WorldWideScience

Sample records for helium gas cooled

  1. Cooling performance of helium-gas/water coolers in HENDEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Takada, Shoji; Hayashi, Haruyoshi; Kobayashi, Toshiaki; Ohta, Yukimaru; Shimomura, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki

    1994-01-01

    The helium engineering demonstration loop (HENDEL) has four helium-gas/water coolers where the cooling water flows in the tubes and helium gas on the shell side. Their cooling performance was studied using the operational data from 1982 to 1991. The heat transfer of helium gas on the shell was obtained for segmental and step-up baffle type coolers. Also, the change with operation time was investigated. The cooling performance was lowered by the graphite powder released from the graphite components for several thousand hours and thereafter recovered because the graphite powder from the components was reduced and the powder in the cooler shell was blown off during the operation. (orig.)

  2. Superconducting cable cooling system by helium gas at two pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    Thermally contacting, oppositely streaming, cryogenic fluid streams in the same enclosure in a closed cycle changes the fluid from a cool high pressure helium gas to a cooler reduced pressure helium gas in an expander so as to be at different temperature ranges and pressures respectively in go and return legs that are in thermal contact with each other and in thermal contact with a longitudinally extending superconducting transmission line enclosed in the same cable enclosure that insulates the line from the ambient at a temperature T 1 . By first circulating the fluid from a refrigerator at one end of the line as a cool gas at a temperature range T 2 to T 3 in the go leg, then circulating the gas through an expander at the other end of the line where the gas becomes a cooler gas at a reduced pressure and at a reduced temperature T 4 and finally by circulating the cooler gas back again to the refrigerator in a return leg at a temperature range T 4 to T 5 , while in thermal contact with the gas in the go leg, and in the same enclosure therewith for compression into a higher pressure gas at T 2 in a closed cycle, where T 2 greater than T 3 and T 5 greater than T 4 , the fluid leaves the enclosure in the go leg as a gas at its coldest point in the go leg, and the temperature distribution is such that the line temperature decreases along its length from the refrigerator due to the cooling from the gas in the return leg

  3. A review of helium gas turbine technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No, Hee Cheon; Kim, Ji Hwan; Kim, Hyeun Min

    2007-01-01

    Current High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) are based on a closed brayton cycle with helium gas as the working fluid. Thermodynamic performance of the axial-flow helium gas turbines is of critical concern as it considerably affects the overall cycle efficiency. Helium gas turbines pose some design challenges compared to steam or air turbomachinery because of the physical properties of helium and the uniqueness of the operating conditions at high pressure with low pressure ratio. This report present a review of the helium Brayton cycle experiences in Germany and in Japan. The design and availability of helium gas turbines for HTGR are also presented in this study. We have developed a new throughflow calculation code to calculate the design-point performance of helium gas turbines. Use of the method has been illustrated by applying it to the GTHTR300 reference

  4. The early history of high-temperature helium gas-cooled nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simnad, M.T.; California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA

    1991-01-01

    The original concepts in the proposals for high-temperature helium gas-cooled power reactors by Farrington Daniels, during the decade 1944-1955, are summarized. The early research on the development of the helium gas-cooled power reactors is reviewed, and the operational experiences with the first generation of HTGRs are discussed. (author)

  5. Study on fundamental features of helium turbomachine for high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jie; Gu Yihua

    2004-01-01

    The High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) coupled with helium turbine cycle is considered as one of the leading candidates for future nuclear power plants. The HTGR helium turbine cycle was analyzed and optimized. Then the focal point of investigation was concentrated on the fundamental thermodynamic and aerodynamic features of helium turbomachine. As a result, a helium turbomachine is different from a general combustion gas turbine in two main design features, that is a helium turbomachine has more blade stages and shorter blade length, which are caused by the helium property and the high pressure of a closed cycle, respectively. (authors)

  6. Unexpected mobility of OH+ and OD+ molecular ions in cooled helium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isawa, R; Yamazoe, J; Tanuma, H; Ohtsuki, K

    2012-01-01

    Mobilities of OH + and OD + ions in cooled helium gas have been measured at gas temperature of 4.3 K. Measured mobilities of both ions as a function of an effective temperature T eff show a minimum around 80 K, and they are approaching to the polarization limits at very low T eff . These findings will be related to the extremely strong anisotropy of the interaction potential between the molecular ion and helium atom.

  7. Preliminary study on helium turbomachine for high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yihua; Wang Jie; Zhang Zuoyi

    2003-01-01

    In the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), gas turbine cycle is a new concept in the field of nuclear power. It combines two technologies of HTGR and gas turbine cycle, which represent the state-of-the-art technologies of nuclear power and fossil fuel generation respectively. This approach is expected to improve safety and economy of nuclear power plant significantly. So it is a potential scheme with competitiveness. The heat-recuperated cycle is the main stream of gas turbine cycle. In this cycle, the work medium is helium, which is very different from the air, so that the design features of the helium turbomachine and combustion gas turbomachine are different. The paper shows the basic design consideration for the heat-recuperated cycle as well as helium turbomachine and highlights its main design features compared with combustion gas turbomachine

  8. Helium heater design for the helium direct cycle component test facility. [for gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, V. R.; Gunn, S. V.; Lee, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes a helium heater to be used to conduct non-nuclear demonstration tests of the complete power conversion loop for a direct-cycle gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant. Requirements for the heater include: heating the helium to a 1500 F temperature, operating at a 1000 psia helium pressure, providing a thermal response capability and helium volume similar to that of the nuclear reactor, and a total heater system helium pressure drop of not more than 15 psi. The unique compact heater system design proposed consists of 18 heater modules; air preheaters, compressors, and compressor drive systems; an integral control system; piping; and auxiliary equipment. The heater modules incorporate the dual-concentric-tube 'Variflux' heat exchanger design which provides a controlled heat flux along the entire length of the tube element. The heater design as proposed will meet all system requirements. The heater uses pressurized combustion (50 psia) to provide intensive heat transfer, and to minimize furnace volume and heat storage mass.

  9. Test results from a helium gas-cooled porous metal heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    North, M.T.; Rosenfeld, J.H.; Youchison, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    A helium-cooled porous metal heat exchanger was built and tested, which successfully absorbed heat fluxes exceeding all previously tested gas-cooled designs. Helium-cooled plasma-facing components are being evaluated for fusion applications. Helium is a favorable coolant for fusion devices because it is not a plasma contaminant, it is not easily activated, and it is easily removed from the device in the event of a leak. The main drawback of gas coolants is their relatively poor thermal transport properties. This limitation can be removed through use of a highly efficient heat exchanger design. A low flow resistance porous metal heat exchanger design was developed, based on the requirements for the Faraday shield for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) device. High heat flux tests were conducted on two representative test articles at the Plasma Materials Test Facility (PMTF) at Sandia National Laboratories. Absorbed heat fluxes as high as 40 MW/m 2 were successfully removed during these tests without failure of the devices. Commercial applications for electronics cooling and other high heat flux applications are being identified

  10. Cooling with Superfluid Helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebrun, P; Tavian, L [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    The technical properties of helium II (‘superfluid’ helium) are presented in view of its applications to the cooling of superconducting devices, particularly in particle accelerators. Cooling schemes are discussed in terms of heat transfer performance and limitations. Large-capacity refrigeration techniques below 2 K are reviewed, with regard to thermodynamic cycles as well as process machinery. Examples drawn from existing or planned projects illustrate the presentation. Keywords: superfluid helium, cryogenics.

  11. Reduction of circulation power for helium-cooled fusion reactor blanket using additive CO{sub 2} gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yeon-Gun [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering, Jeju National University, 102 Jejudaehakno, Jeju-si 690-756, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Il-Woong [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Won [Nuclear Fusion Engineering Development Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeokdaero 989 beon-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Goon-Cherl [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eung-Soo, E-mail: kes7741@snu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Helium (He) cooling requires large circulation power to remove high heat from plasma side and nuclear heating by high energy neutron in fusion reactors due to its low density. Based on the recent findings that the heat transfer capability of the light gas can be enhanced by mixing another heavier gas, this study adds CO{sub 2} to a reference helium coolant and evaluates the cooling performance of the binary mixture for various compositions. To assess the cooling performance, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses on the KO HCML (Korea Helium Cooled Molten Lithium) TBM are conducted. As a result, it is revealed that the binary mixing of helium, which has favorable thermophysical properties but the density, with a heavier noble gas or an unreactive gas significantly reduces the required circulation power by an order of magnitude with meeting the thermal design requirements. This is attributed to the fact that the density can be highly increased with small amount of a heavier gas while other gas properties are kept relatively comparable. The optimal CO{sub 2} mole fraction is estimated to be 0.4 and the circulation power, in this case, can be reduced to 13% of that of pure helium. This implies that the thermal efficiency of a He-cooled blanket system can be fairly enhanced by means of the proposed binary mixing.

  12. Helium cooling of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Baxi, C.; Bourque, R.; Dahms, C.; Inamati, S.; Ryder, R.; Sager, G.; Schleicher, R.

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of worldwide design experience and in coordination with the evolution of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program, the application of helium as a coolant for fusion appears to be at the verge of a transition from conceptual design to engineering development. This paper presents a review of the use of helium as the coolant for fusion reactor blanket and divertor designs. The concept of a high-pressure helium cooling radial plate design was studied for both ITER and PULSAR. These designs can resolve many engineering issues, and can help with reaching the goals of low activation and high performance designs. The combination of helium cooling, advanced low-activation materials, and gas turbine technology may permit high thermal efficiency and reduced costs, resulting in the environmental advantages and competitive economics required to make fusion a 21st century power source. ((orig.))

  13. Helium circulator design concepts for the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Nichols, M.K.; Kaufman, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Two helium circulators are featured in the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) power plant - (1) the main circulator, which facilitates the transfer of reactor thermal energy to the steam generator, and (2) a small shutdown cooling circulator that enables rapid cooling of the reactor system to be realized. The 3170 kW(e) main circulator has an axial flow compressor, the impeller being very similar to the unit in the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) plant. The 164 kW(e) shutdown cooling circulator, the design of which is controlled by depressurized conditions, has a radial flow compressor. Both machines are vertically oriented, have submerged electric motor drives, and embody rotors that are supported on active magnetic bearings. As outlined in this paper, both machines have been conservatively designed based on established practice. The circulators have features and characteristics that have evolved from actual plant operating experience. With a major goal of high reliability, emphasis has been placed on design simplicity, and both machines are readily accessible for inspection, repair, and replacement, if necessary. In this paper, conceptual design aspects of both machines are discussed, together with the significant technology bases. As appropriate for a plant that will see service well into the 21st century, new and emerging technologies have been factored into the design. Examples of this are the inclusion of active magnetic bearings, and an automated circulator condition monitoring system. (author). 18 refs, 20 figs, 13 tabs

  14. Development of gas cooled reactors and experimental setup of high temperature helium loop for in-pile operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miletić, Marija, E-mail: marija_miletic@live.com [Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Fukač, Rostislav, E-mail: fuk@cvrez.cz [Research Centre Rez Ltd., Rez (Czech Republic); Pioro, Igor, E-mail: Igor.Pioro@uoit.ca [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa (Canada); Dragunov, Alexey, E-mail: Alexey.Dragunov@uoit.ca [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Gas as a coolant in Gen-IV reactors, history and development. • Main physical parameters comparison of gas coolants: carbon dioxide, helium, hydrogen with water. • Forced convection in turbulent pipe flow. • Gas cooled fast reactor concept comparisons to very high temperature reactor concept. • High temperature helium loop: concept, development, mechanism, design and constraints. - Abstract: Rapidly increasing energy and electricity demands, global concerns over the climate changes and strong dependence on foreign fossil fuel supplies are powerfully influencing greater use of nuclear power. In order to establish the viability of next-generation reactor concepts to meet tomorrow's needs for clean and reliable energy production the fundamental research and development issues need to be addressed for the Generation-IV nuclear-energy systems. Generation-IV reactor concepts are being developed to use more advanced materials, coolants and higher burn-ups fuels, while keeping a nuclear reactor safe and reliable. One of the six Generation-IV concepts is a very high temperature reactor (VHTR). The VHTR concept uses a graphite-moderated core with a once-through uranium fuel cycle, using high temperature helium as the coolant. Because helium is naturally inert and single-phase, the helium-cooled reactor can operate at much higher temperatures, leading to higher efficiency. Current VHTR concepts will use fuels such as uranium dioxide, uranium carbide, or uranium oxycarbide. Since some of these fuels are new in nuclear industry and due to their unknown properties and behavior within VHTR conditions it is very important to address these issues by investigate their characteristics within conditions close to those in VHTRs. This research can be performed in a research reactor with in-pile helium loop designed and constructed in Research Center Rez Ltd. One of the topics analyzed in this article are also physical characteristic and benefits of gas

  15. The real gas behaviour of helium as a cooling medium for high-temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewing, G.

    1977-01-01

    The article describes the influence of the real gas behaviour on the variables of state for the helium gas and the effects on the design of high-temperature reactor plants. After explaining the basic equations for describing variables and changes of state of the real gas, the real and ideal gas behaviour is analysed. Finally, the influence of the real gas behaviour on the design of high-temperature reactors in one- and two-cycle plants is investigated. (orig.) [de

  16. Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Materials Program. Reducing helium impurity depletion in HTGR materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, D.H.

    1984-08-01

    Moisture depletion in HTGR materials testing rigs has been empirically studied in the GE High Temperature Reactor Materials Testing Laboratory (HTRMTL). Tests have shown that increased helium flow rates and reduction in reactive (oxidizable) surface area are effective means of reducing depletion. Further, a portion of the depletion has been shown to be due to the presence of free C released by the dissociation of CH 4 . This depletion component can be reduced by reducing the helium residence time (increasing the helium flow rate) or by reducing the CH 4 concentration in the test gas. Equipment modifications to reduce depletion have been developed, tested, and in most cases implemented in the HTRMTL to date. These include increasing the Helium Loop No. 1 pumping capacity, conversion of metallic retorts and radiation shields to alumina, isolation of thermocouple probes from the test gas by alumina thermowells, and substitution of non-reactive Mo-TZM for reactive metallic structural components

  17. Cryodeposition of nitrogen gas on a surface cooled by helium II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhuley, R. C.; Bosque, E. S.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2014-01-01

    Catastrophic loss of beam tube vacuum in a superconducting particle accelerator can be simulated by sudden venting of a long high vacuum channel cooled on its outer surface by He II. The rapid rush of atmospheric air in such an event shows an interesting propagation effect, which is much slower than the shock wave that occurs with vacuum loss at ambient conditions. This is due to flash frosting/deposition of air on the cold walls of the channel. Hence to characterize the propagation as well as the associated heat transfer, it is first necessary to understand the deposition process. Here we attempt to model the growth of nitrogen frost layer on a cold plate in order to estimate its thickness with time. The deposition process can be divided into two regimes- free molecular and continuum. It is shown that in free molecular regime, the frost growth can be modeled reasonably well using cryopump theory and general heat transfer relations. The continuum regime is more complex to model, given the higher rate of gas incident on cryosurface causing a large heat load on helium bath and changing cryosurface temperature. Results from the continuum regime are discussed in the context of recent experiments performed in our laboratory

  18. Cryodeposition of nitrogen gas on a surface cooled by helium II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhuley, R. C.; Bosque, E. S.; Van Sciver, S. W. [Cryogenics Group, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, FL 32310 USA and Mechanical Engineering Department, FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    Catastrophic loss of beam tube vacuum in a superconducting particle accelerator can be simulated by sudden venting of a long high vacuum channel cooled on its outer surface by He II. The rapid rush of atmospheric air in such an event shows an interesting propagation effect, which is much slower than the shock wave that occurs with vacuum loss at ambient conditions. This is due to flash frosting/deposition of air on the cold walls of the channel. Hence to characterize the propagation as well as the associated heat transfer, it is first necessary to understand the deposition process. Here we attempt to model the growth of nitrogen frost layer on a cold plate in order to estimate its thickness with time. The deposition process can be divided into two regimes- free molecular and continuum. It is shown that in free molecular regime, the frost growth can be modeled reasonably well using cryopump theory and general heat transfer relations. The continuum regime is more complex to model, given the higher rate of gas incident on cryosurface causing a large heat load on helium bath and changing cryosurface temperature. Results from the continuum regime are discussed in the context of recent experiments performed in our laboratory.

  19. Adsorption purification of helium coolant of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varezhkin, A.V.; Zel'venskij, Ya.D.; Metlik, I.V.; Khrulev, A.A.; Fedoseenkin, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    A series experiments on adsorption purification of helium of CO 2 using national adsorbent under the conditions characteristic of HTGR type reactors cleanup system is performed. The experimnts have been conducted under the dynamic mode with immobile adsorbent layer (CaA zeolite) at gas flow rates from 0,02 to 0,055 m/s in the pressure range from 0,8 to 5 MPa at the temperature of 273 and 293 K. It is shown that the adsorption grows with the decrease of gas rate, i.e. with increase of contact time with adsorbent. The helium pressure, growth noticeably whereas the temperature decrease from 293 to 273 K results in adsorption 2,6 times increase. The conclusion is drawn that it is advisable drying and purification of helium of CO 2 to perform separately using different zeolites: NaA - for water. CaA - for CO 2 . Estimations of purification unit parameters are realized

  20. Low-cycle fatigue of heat-resistant alloys in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, H.; Kondo, T.

    1984-01-01

    Strain controlled low-cycle fatigue tests were conducted on four nickel-base heat-resistant alloys at 900 0 C in simulated high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) environments and high vacuums of about 10 -6 Pa. The observed behaviors of the materials were different and divided into two groups when tests were made in simulated HTGR helium, while all materials behaved similarly in vacuums. The materials that have relatively high ductility and compatibility with impure helium at test temperature showed considerable resistance to the fatigue damage in impure helium. On the other hand, the alloys qualified with their high creep strength were seen to suffer from the adverse effects of impure helium and the trend of intergranular cracking as well. The results were analyzed in terms of their susceptibility to the environmentenhanced fatigue damage by examining the ratios of the performance in impure helium to in vacuum. The materials that showed rather unsatisfactory resistance were considered to be characterized by their limited ductility partly due to their coarse grain structure and susceptibility to intergranular oxidation. Moderate carburization was commonly noted in all materials, particularly at the cracked portions, indicating that carbon intrusion had occurred during the crack growth stage

  1. Gas-cooled fast-breeder reactor. Helium Circulator Test Facility updated design cost estimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-04-01

    Costs which are included in the cost estimate are: Titles I, II, and III Architect-Engineering Services; Titles I, II, and III General Atomic Services; site clearing, grading, and excavation; bulk materials and labor of installation; mechanical and electrical equipment with installation; allowance for contractors' overhead, profit, and insurance; escalation on materials and labor; a contingency; and installation of GAC supplied equipment and materials. The total estimated cost of the facility in As Spent Dollars is $27,700,000. Also included is a cost comparison of the updated design and the previous conceptual design. There would be a considerable penalty for the direct-cooled system over the indirect-cooled system due to the excessive cost of the large diameter helium loop piping to an outdoor heat exchanger. The indirect cooled system which utilizes a helium/Dowtherm G heat exchanger and correspondingly smaller and lower pressure piping to its outdoor air cooler proved to be the more economical of the two systems

  2. Helium-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longton, P.B.; Cowen, H.C.

    1975-01-01

    In helium cooled HTR's there is a by-pass circuit for cleaning purposes in addition to the main cooling circuit. This is to remove such impurities as hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide and water from the coolant. In this system, part of the coolant successively flows first through an oxidation bed of copper oxide and an absorption bed of silica gel, then through activated charcoal or a molecular sieve. The hydrogen and carbon monoxide impurities are absorbed and the dry gas is returned to the main cooling circuit. To lower the hydrogen/water ratio without increasing the hydrogen fraction in the main cooling circuit, some of the hydrogen fraction converted into water is added to the cooling circuit. This is done, inter alia, by bypassing the water produced in the oxidation bed before it enters the absorption bed. The rest of the by-pass circuit, however, also includes an absorption bed with a molecular sieve. This absorbs the oxidized carbon monoxide fraction. In this way, such side effects as the formation of additional methane, carburization of the materials of the by-pass circuit or loss of graphite are avoided. (DG/RF) [de

  3. Adsorption removal of carbon dioxide from the helium coolant of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varezhin, A.V.; Fedoseenkov, A.N.; Khrulev, A.A.; Metlik, I.V.; Zel venskii, Y.D.

    1986-01-01

    This paper conducts experiments on the removal of CO 2 from helium by means of a Soviet-made adsorbent under the conditions characteristic of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor cleaning systems. The adsorption of CO 2 from helium was studied under dynamic conditions with a fixed layer of adsorbent in a flow-through apparatus with an adsorber 16 mm in diameter. The analysis of the helium was carried out by means of a TVT chromatograph. In order to compare the adsorption of CO 2 on CaA zeolite under dynamic conditions from the helium stream under pressure with the equilibrium adsorption on the basis of pure CO 2 , the authors determined the adsorption isotherm at 293 K by the volumetric method over a range of CO 2 equilibrium pressures from 260 to 11,970 Pa. Reducing the adsorption temperature to 273 K leads to a considerable reduction in the energy costs for regeneration, owing to the increase in adsorption and the decrease in the number of regeneration cycles; the amount of the heating gas used is reduced to less than half

  4. Dynamic simulation for scram of high temperature gas-cooled reactor with indirect helium turbine cycle system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenlong; Xie Heng

    2011-01-01

    A dynamic analysis code for this system was developed after the mathematical modeling and programming of important equipment of 10 MW High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Helium Turbine Power Generation (HTR-10GT), such as reactor core, heat exchanger and turbine-compressor system. A scram accident caused by a 0.1 $ reactivity injection at 5 second was simulated. The results show that the design emergency shutdown plan for this system is safe and reasonable and that the design of bypass valve has a large safety margin. (authors)

  5. Preliminary study on application of Pd composite membrane in helium purification system of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jianhua; Yang Xiaoyong; Wang Jie; Yu Suyuan

    2008-01-01

    Helium purification system (HPS) is the main part of the helium auxiliary system of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR), also in fusion reactors. Some exploratory work was carried out on the application of Pd composite membrane in the separation of He and H 2 . A typical single stripper permeator with recycle (SSP) system was designed, based on the design parameters of a small scale He purification test system CIGNE in CADARACHE, CEA, France, and finite element analysis method was used to solve the model. The total length of membrane module is fixed to 0.5 m. The results show that the concentration of H 2 is found to reduce from 1 000 μL/L in feed gas to 5 μL/L in the product He (the upper limitation of HPS in HTGR). And the molar ratio of product He to feed gas is 96.18% with the optimized ratio of sweep gas to retentive gas 0. 3970. It's an exponential distribution of H 2 concentration along the membrane module. The results were also compared with the other two popular designs, two stripper in series permeator (TSSP) and continuous membrane column (CMC). (authors)

  6. Evaluation, Comparison and Optimization of the Compact Recuperator for the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Helium Turbine System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Haoran; Yang Xiaoyong; Wang Jie; Ye Ping; Yu Xiaoli; Zhao Gang

    2014-01-01

    Helium turbine system is a promising method to covert the nuclear power generated by the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) into electricity with inherent safety, compact configuration and relative high efficiency. And the recuperator is one of the key components for the HTGR helium turbine system. It is used to recover the exhaust heat out of turbine and pass it to the helium from high pressure compressor, and hence increase the cycle’s efficiency dramatically. On the other hand, the pressure drop within the recuperator will reduce the cycle efficiency, especially on low pressure side of recuperator. It is necessary to optimize the design of recuperator to achieve better performance of HTGR helium turbine system. However, this optimization has to be performed with the restriction of the size of the pressure vessel which contains the power conversion unit. This paper firstly presents an analysis to investigate the effects of flow channel geometry, recuperator’s power and size on heat transfer and pressure drop. Then the relationship between the recuperator design and system performance is established with an analytical model, followed by the evaluations of the current recuperator designs of GT-MHR, GTHTR300 and PBMR, in which several effective technical measures to optimize the recuperator are compared. Finally it is found that the most important factors for optimizing recuperator design, i.e. the cross section dimensions and tortuosity of flow channel, which can also be extended to compact intermediate heat exchangers. It turns out that a proper optimization can increase the cycle’s efficiency by 1~2 percentage, which could also raise the economy and competitiveness of future commercial HTGR plants. (author)

  7. Mechanical characterization of metallic materials for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors in air and in helium environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainfort, G.; Cappelaere, M.; Gregoire, J.; Sannier, J.

    1984-01-01

    In the French R and D program for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs), three metallic alloys were studied: steel Chromesco-3 with 2.25% chromium, alloy 800H, and Hastelloy-X. The Chromesco-3 and alloy 800H creep behavior is the same in air and in HTGR atmosphere (helium). The tensile tests of Hastelloy-X specimens reveal that aging has embrittlement and hardening effects up to 700 0 C, but the creep tests at 800 0 C show opposite effects. This particular behavior could be due to induced precipitation by aging and the depletion of hardening elements from the matrix. Tests show a low influence of cobalt content on mechanical properties of Hastelloy-X

  8. Critical Current and Stability of MgB$_2$ Twisted-Pair DC Cable Assembly Cooled by Helium Gas

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069632; Ballarino, Amalia; Yang, Yifeng; Young, Edward Andrew; Bailey, Wendell; Beduz, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Long length superconducting cables/bus-bars cooled by cryogenic gases such as helium operating over a wider temperature range are a challenging but exciting technical development prospects, with applications ranging from super-grid transmission to future accelerator systems. With limited existing knowledge and previous experiences, the cryogenic stability and quench protection of such cables are crucial research areas because the heat transfer is reduced and temperature gradient increased compared to liquid cryogen cooled cables. V-I measurements on gas-cooled cables over a significant length are an essential step towards a fully cryogenic stabilized cable with adequate quench protection. Prototype twisted-pair cables using high-temperature superconductor and MgB2 tapes have been under development at CERN within the FP7 EuCARD project. Experimental studies have been carried out on a 5-m-long multiple MgB$_2$ cable assembly at different temperatures between 20 and 30 K. The subcables of the assembly showed sim...

  9. Corrosion of high temperature alloys in the primary circuit helium of high temperature gas cooled reactors. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    The reactive impurities H 2 O, CO, H 2 and CH 4 which are present in the primary coolant helium of high temperature gas-cooled reactors can cause scale formation, internal oxidation and carburization or decarburization of the high temperature structural alloys. In Part 1 of this contribution a theoretical model was presented, which allows the explanation and prediction of the observed corrosion effects. The model is based on a classical stability diagram for chromium, modified to account for deviations from equilibrium conditions caused by kinetic factors. In this paper it is shown how a stability diagram for a commercial alloy can be constructed and how this can be used to correlate the corrosion results with the main experimental parameters, temperature, gas and alloy composition. Using the theoretical model and the presented experimental results, conditions are derived under which a protective chromia based surface scale will be formed which prevents a rapid transfer of carbon between alloy and gas atmosphere. It is shown that this protective surface oxide can only be formed if the carbon monoxide pressure in the gas exceeds a critical value. Psub(CO), which depends on temperature and alloy composition. Additions of methane only have a limited effect provided that the methane/water ratio is not near to, or greater than, a critical value of around 100/1. The influence of minor alloying additions of strong oxide forming elements, commonly present in high temperature alloys, on the protective properties of the chromia surface scales and the kinetics of carbon transfer is illustrated. (orig.) [de

  10. Experimental study on cryogenic adsorption of methane by activated carbon for helium coolant purification of High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hua; Wu, Zong-Xin; Jia, Hai-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The cryogenic CH 4 adsorption on activated carbon was studied for design of HTGR. • The breakthrough curves at different conditions were analyzed by the MTZ model. • The CH 4 adsorption isotherm was fitted well by the Toth model and the D-R model. • The work provides valuable reference data for helium coolant purification of HTGR. - Abstract: The cryogenic adsorption behavior of methane on activated carbon was investigated for helium coolant purification of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor by using dynamic column breakthrough method. With helium as carrier gas, experiments were performed at −196 °C and low methane partial pressure range of 0–120 Pa. The breakthrough curves at different superficial velocities and different feed concentrations were measured and analyzed by the mass-transfer zone model. The methane single-component adsorption isotherm was obtained and fitted well by the Toth model and the Dubinin-Radushkevich model. The adsorption heat of methane on activated carbon was estimated. The cryogenic adsorption process of methane on activated carbon has been verified to be effective for helium coolant purification of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor.

  11. An efficient continuous flow helium cooling unit for Moessbauer experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbert, I.R.; Campbell, S.J.

    1976-01-01

    A Moessbauer continuous flow cooling unit for use with liquid helium over the temperature range 4.2 to 300K is described. The cooling unit can be used for either absorber or source studies in the horizontal plane and it is positioned directly on top of a helium storage vessel. The helium transfer line forms an integral part of the cooling unit and feeds directly into the storage vessel so that helium losses are kept to the minimum. The helium consumption is 0.12 l h -1 at 4.2 K decreasing to 0.055 l h -1 at 40 K. The unit is top loading and the exchange gas cooled samples can be changed easily and quickly. (author)

  12. Study on restriction method for end-wall boundary layer thickness in axial helium gas compressor for gas turbine high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shoji; Takizuka, Takakazu; Yan, Xing; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance test was carried out using a 1/3 scale, 4-stage model of the helium gas compressor to investigate an effect of end-wall over-camber to prevent decrease of axial velocity in the end-wall boundary layer. The model compressor consists of a rotor, 500 mm in diameter, which is driven by an electric motor at a rotational speed of 10800 rpm. The rotor blade span of the first stage is 34 mm. The test was carried out under the condition that the helium gas pressure of 0.88 MPa, temperature of 30degC, and mass flow rate of 12.47 kg/s at the inlet. A 3-dimensional aerodynamic code, which was verified using the test data, showed that axial velocity was lowered by using a blade which increased the inlet blade angle around the end-wall region of the casing side in comparison with that using the original design blade, because the inlet flow angle mismatched with the inlet blade angle of the rotor blade, as opposed to the prediction by a conventional air compressor design method. The overall adiabatic efficiency of the full scale 20-stage helium gas compressor was predicted 89.7% from the Reynolds number dependency of the test data by using the original design blade. (author)

  13. Buffer-gas cooling of antiprotonic helium to 1.5 to 1.7 K, and antiproton-to–electron mass ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki; Sótér, Anna; Barna, Daniel; Dax, Andreas; Hayano, Ryugo; Kobayashi, Takumi; Murakami, Yohei; Todoroki, Koichi; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Horváth, Dezső; Venturelli, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Charge, parity, and time reversal (CPT) symmetry implies that a particle and its antiparticle have the same mass. The antiproton-to-electron mass ratio Embedded Image can be precisely determined from the single-photon transition frequencies of antiprotonic helium. We measured 13 such frequencies with laser spectroscopy to a fractional precision of 2.5 × 10−9 to 16 × 10−9. About 2 × 109 antiprotonic helium atoms were cooled to temperatures between 1.5 and 1.7 kelvin by using buffer-gas cooling in cryogenic low-pressure helium gas; the narrow thermal distribution led to the observation of sharp spectral lines of small thermal Doppler width. The deviation between the experimental frequencies and the results of three-body quantum electrodynamics calculations was reduced by a factor of 1.4 to 10 compared with previous single-photon experiments. From this, Embedded Image was determined as 1836.1526734(15), which agrees with a recent proton-to-electron experimental value within 8 × 10−10.

  14. Evaluation of US demo helium-cooled blanket options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; McQuillan, B.W.; Schleicher, R.W.

    1995-10-01

    A He-V-Li blanket design was developed as a candidate for the U.S. fusion demonstration power plant. This paper presents an 18 MPa helium-cooled, lithium breeder, V-alloy design that can be coupled to the Brayton cycle with a gross efficiency of 46%. The critical issue of designing to high gas pressure and the compatibility between helium impurities and V-alloy are addressed

  15. Gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulten, R.; Trauger, D.B.

    1976-01-01

    Experience to date with operation of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors has been quite favorable. Despite problems in completion of construction and startup, three high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) units have operated well. The Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (AGR) in the United Kingdom has had an excellent operating history, and initial operation of commercial AGRs shows them to be satisfactory. The latter reactors provide direct experience in scale-up from the Windscale experiment to fullscale commercial units. The Colorado Fort St. Vrain 330-MWe prototype helium-cooled HTGR is now in the approach-to-power phase while the 300-MWe Pebble Bed THTR prototype in the Federal Republic of Germany is scheduled for completion of construction by late 1978. THTR will be the first nuclear power plant which uses a dry cooling tower. Fuel reprocessing and refabrication have been developed in the laboratory and are now entering a pilot-plant scale development. Several commercial HTGR power station orders were placed in the U.S. prior to 1975 with similar plans for stations in the FRG. However, the combined effects of inflation, reduced electric power demand, regulatory uncertainties, and pricing problems led to cancellation of the 12 reactors which were in various stages of planning, design, and licensing

  16. Status of helium-cooled nuclear power systems. [Development potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melese-d' Hospital, G.; Simnad, M

    1977-09-01

    Helium-cooled nuclear power systems offer a great potential for electricity generation when their long-term economic, environmental, conservation and energy self-sufficiency features are examined. The high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) has the unique capability of providing high-temperature steam for electric power and process heat uses and/or high-temperature heat for endothermic chemical reactions. A variation of the standard steam cycle HTGR is one in which the helium coolant flows directly from the core to one or more closed cycle gas turbines. The effective use of nuclear fuel resources for electric power and nuclear process heat will be greatly enhanced by the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) currently being developed. A GCFR using thorium in the radial blanket could generate sufficient U-233 to supply the fuel for three HTGRs, or enough plutonium from a depleted uranium blanket to fuel a breeder economy expanding at about 10% per year. The feasibility of utilizing helium to cool a fusion reactor is also discussed. The status of helium-cooled nuclear energy systems is summarized as a basis for assessing their prospects. 50 references.

  17. The evolution of US helium-cooled blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Schultz, K.R.; Cheng, E.T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews and compares four helium-cooled fusion reactor blanket designs. These designs represent generic configurations of using helium to cool fusion reactor blankets that were studied over the past 20 years in the United States of America (US). These configurations are the pressurized module design, the pressurized tube design, the solid particulate and gas mixture design, and the nested shell design. Among these four designs, the nested shell design, which was invented for the ARIES study, is the simplest in configuration and has the least number of critical issues. Both metallic and ceramic-composite structural materials can be used for this design. It is believed that the nested shell design can be the most suitable blanket configuration for helium-cooled fusion power and experimental reactors. (orig.)

  18. Pressure transients analysis of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor with direct helium turbine cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, M.; Dupont, J. F.; Jacquemoud, P.; Mylonas, R. [Eidgenoessisches Inst. fuer Reaktorforschung, Wuerenlingen (Switzerland)

    1981-01-15

    The direct coupling of a gas cooled reactor with a closed gas turbine cycle leads to a specific dynamic plant behaviour, which may be summarized as follows: a) any operational transient involving a variation of the core mass flow rate causes a variation of the pressure ratio of the turbomachines and leads unavoidably to pressure and temperature transients in the gas turbine cycle; and b) very severe pressure equalization transients initiated by unlikely events such as the deblading of one or more turbomachines must be taken into account. This behaviour is described and illustrated through results gained from computer analyses performed at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research (EIR) in Wurenlingen within the scope of the Swiss-German HHT project.

  19. Radiolytic reactions in the coolant of helium cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingey, G.L.; Morgan, W.C.

    1975-01-01

    The success of helium cooled reactors is dependent upon the ability to prevent significant reaction between the coolant and the other components in the reactor primary circuit. Since the thermal reaction of graphite with oxidizing gases is rapid at temperatures of interest, the thermal reactions are limited primarily by the concentration of impurity gases in the helium coolant. On the other hand, the rates of radiolytic reactions in helium are shown to be independent of reactive gas concentration until that concentration reaches a very low level. Calculated steady-state concentrations of reactive species in the reactor coolant and core burnoff rates are presented for current U. S. designed, helium cooled reactors. Since precise base data are not currently available for radiolytic rates of some reactions and thermal reaction rate data are often variable, the accuracy of the predicted gas composition is being compared with the actual gas compositions measured during startup tests of the Fort Saint Vrain high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The current status of these confirmatory tests is discussed. 12 references

  20. Variable electricity and steam from salt, helium and sodium cooled base-load reactors with gas turbines and heat storage - 15115

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.; McDaniel, P.; Zohuri, B.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in utility natural-gas-fired air-Brayton combed cycle technology is creating the option of coupling salt-, helium-, and sodium-cooled nuclear reactors to Nuclear air-Brayton Combined Cycle (NACC) power systems. NACC may enable a zero-carbon electricity grid and improve nuclear power economics by enabling variable electricity output with base-load nuclear reactor operations. Variable electricity output enables selling more electricity at times of high prices that increases plant revenue. Peak power is achieved using stored heat or auxiliary fuel (natural gas, bio-fuels, hydrogen). A typical NACC cycle includes air compression, heating compressed air using nuclear heat and a heat exchanger, sending air through a turbine to produce electricity, reheating compressed air, sending air through a second turbine, and exhausting to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). In the HRSG, warm air produces steam that is used to produce added electricity. For peak power production, auxiliary heat (natural gas, stored heat) is added before the air enters the second turbine to raise air temperatures and power output. Like all combined cycle plants, water cooling requirements are dramatically reduced relative to other power cycles because much of the heat rejection is in the form of hot air. (authors)

  1. Gas turbine modular helium reactor in cogeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon de los Santos, G.

    2009-10-01

    This work carries out the thermal evaluation from the conversion of nuclear energy to electric power and process heat, through to implement an outline gas turbine modular helium reactor in cogeneration. Modeling and simulating with software Thermo flex of Thermo flow the performance parameters, based on a nuclear power plant constituted by an helium cooled reactor and helium gas turbine with three compression stages, two of inter cooling and one regeneration stage; more four heat recovery process, generating two pressure levels of overheat vapor, a pressure level of saturated vapor and one of hot water, with energetic characteristics to be able to give supply to a very wide gamma of industrial processes. Obtaining a relationship heat electricity of 0.52 and efficiency of net cogeneration of 54.28%, 70.2 MW net electric, 36.6 MW net thermal with 35% of condensed return to 30 C; for a supplied power by reactor of 196.7 MW; and with conditions in advanced gas turbine of 850 C and 7.06 Mpa, assembly in a shaft, inter cooling and heat recovery in cogeneration. (Author)

  2. An exergoeconomic investigation of waste heat recovery from the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) employing an ammonia–water power/cooling cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zare, V.; Mahmoudi, S.M.S.; Yari, M.

    2013-01-01

    A detailed exergoeconomic analysis is performed for a combined cycle in which the waste heat from the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) is recovered by an ammonia–water power/cooling cogeneration system. Parametric investigations are conducted to evaluate the effects of decision variables on the performances of the GT-MHR and combined cycles. The performances of these cycles are then optimized from the viewpoints of first law, second law and exergoeconomics. It is found that, combining the GT-MHR with ammonia–water cycle not only enhances the first and second law efficiencies of the GT-MHR, but also it improves the cycle performance from the exergoeconomic perspective. The results show that, when the optimization is based on the exergoeconomics, the unit cost of products is reduced by 5.4% in combining the two mentioned cycles. This is achieved with a just about 1% increase in total investment cost rate since the helium mass flow in the combined cycle is lower than that in the GT-MHR alone. - Highlights: • Application of exergetic cost theory to the combined GT-MHR/ammonia–water cycle. • Enhanced exergoeconomic performance for the combined cycle compared to the GT-MHR. • Comparable investment costs for the combined cycle and the GT-MHR alone

  3. Research on dynamics and experiments about auxiliary bearings for the helium circulator of the 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yulan; Yang, Guojun; Liu, Xingnan; Shi, Zhengang; Zhao, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The research in this paper is based on the AMB helium circulator of HTR-10. • The dynamic rotor performance is analyzed by processing experimental data. • The mechanical bearing without lubrication can be applied in the HTR-10 system. - Abstract: The 10 MW high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-10) was constructed by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University. The auxiliary bearing is utilized in this system to meet particular requirements for the reactor. The main role of the auxiliary bearing is to constrain rotor displacements and also to support the rotor when the rotor drops down, which is caused by the active magnetic bearing (AMB) failure. The auxiliary bearing needs to endure huge impact, rapid angular acceleration and thermal shock. On the one hand, complex geometrical constructions and forces applied on the system bring difficulties and restrictions to establish an appropriate model to reveal the actual dynamic process. On the other hand, large volumes of data obtained from experiments show velocities and displacements of the rotor during the rotor drop process and then can indicate the actual dynamic interactions to a great extent. The research in this paper is based on the test rig of the AMB helium circulator of HTR-10. This paper aims to analyze the dynamic performance and contact forces of the rotor by processing experimental data. A measurement to estimate forces developed due to impacts of the rotor and the auxiliary bearings is presented. It is of great significance and provides certain foundation to elaborate the rotor drop process for the AMB helium circulator of HTR-10.

  4. Creep and fatigue properties of Incoloy 800H in a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) helium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, J.G.Y.; Soo, P.; Epel, L.

    1978-01-01

    A mechanical test program to assess the effects of a simulated HTGR helium environment on the fatigue and creep properties of Incoloy 800H and other primary-circuit metals is described. The emphasis and the objectives of this work are directed toward obtaining information to assess the integrity and safety of an HTGR throughout its service life. The helium test environment selected for study contained 40 μ atm H 2 O, 200 μ atm H 2 , 40 μ atm CO, 10 μ atm CO 2 , and 20 μ atm CH 4 . It is believed that this ''wet'' environment simulates that which could exist in a steam-cycle HTGR containing some leaking steam-generator tubes. A recirculating helium loop operating at about 4 psi in which impurities can be maintained at a constant level, has been constructed to supply the desired environment for fatigue and creep testing

  5. Evaluation of helium cooling for fusion divertors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxi, C.B.

    1993-09-01

    The divertors of future fusion reactors will have a power throughput of several hundred MW. The peak heat flux on the diverter surface is estimated to be 5 to 15 MW/m 2 at an average heat flux of 2 MW/m 2 . The divertors have a requirement of both minimum temperature (100 degrees C) and maximum temperature. The minimum temperature is dictated by the requirement to reduce the absorption of plasma, and the maximum temperature is determined by the thermo-mechanical properties of the plasma facing materials. Coolants that have been considered for fusion reactors are water, liquid metals and helium. Helium cooling has been shown to be very attractive from safety and other considerations. Helium is chemically and neutronically inert and is suitable for power conversion. The challenges associated with helium cooling are: (1) Manifold sizes; (2) Pumping power; and (3) Leak prevention. In this paper the first two of the above design issues are addressed. A variety of heat transfer enhancement techniques are considered to demonstrate that the manifold sizes and the pumping power can be reduced to acceptable levels. A helium-cooled diverter module was designed and fabricated by GA for steady-state heat flux of 10 MW/m 2 . This module was recently tested at Sandia National Laboratories. At an inlet pressure of 4 MPa, the module was tested at a steady-state heat flux of 10 MW/m 2 . The pumping power required was less than 1% of the power removed. These results verified the design prediction

  6. Design of multi-input multi-output controller for magnetic bearing which suspends helium gas-turbine generator rotor for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shoji; Funatake, Yoshio; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    A design of a MIMO controller, which links magnetic forces of multiple magnetic bearings by feedback of multiple measurement values of vibration of a rotor, was proposed for the radial magnetic bearings for the generator rotor of helium gas turbine with a power output of 300 MWe. The generator rotor is a flexible rotor, which passes over the forth critical speed. A controller transfer function was derived at the forth critical speed, in which the bending vibration mode is similar to the one which is excited by unbalance mass to reduce a modeling error. A 1404-dimensional un-symmetric coefficient matrix of equation of state for the rotating rotor affected by Jayro effect was reduced by a modal decomposition using Schur decomposition to reduce a reduction error. The numerical results showed that unbalance response of rotor was 53 and 80 μm p-p , respectively, well below the allowable limits both at the rated and critical speeds. (author)

  7. Preliminary Overview of a Helium Cooling System for the Secondary Helium Loop in VHTR-based SI Hydrogen Production Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Youngjoon; Cho, Mintaek; Kim, Dahee; Lee, Taehoon; Lee, Kiyoung; Kim, Yongwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Nuclear hydrogen production facilities consist of a very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (VHTR) system, intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) system, and a sulfur-iodine (SI) thermochemical process. This study focuses on the coupling system between the IHX system and SI thermochemical process. To prevent the propagation of the thermal disturbance owing to the abnormal operation of the SI process components from the IHX system to the VHTR system, a helium cooling system for the secondary helium of the IHX is required. In this paper, the helium cooling system has been studied. The temperature fluctuation of the secondary helium owing to the abnormal operation of the SI process was then calculated based on the proposed coupling system model. Finally, the preliminary conceptual design of the helium cooling system with a steam generator and forced-draft air-cooled heat exchanger to mitigate the thermal disturbance has been carried out. A conceptual flow diagram of a helium cooling system between the IHX and SI thermochemical processes in VHTR-based SI hydrogen production facilities has been proposed. A helium cooling system for the secondary helium of the IHX in this flow diagram prevents the propagation of the thermal disturbance from the IHX system to the VHTR system, owing to the abnormal operation of the SI process components. As a result of a dynamic simulation to anticipate the fluctuations of the secondary helium temperature owing to the abnormal operation of the SI process components with a hydrogen production rate of 60 mol·H{sub 2}/s, it is recommended that the maximum helium cooling capacity to recover the normal operation temperature of 450 .deg. C is 31,933.4 kJ/s. To satisfy this helium cooling capacity, a U-type steam generator, which has a heat transfer area of 12 m{sup 2}, and a forced-draft air-cooled condenser, which has a heat transfer area of 12,388.67 m{sup 2}, are required for the secondary helium cooling system.

  8. Radiation Protection Practices during the Helium Circulator Maintenance of the 10 MW High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor-Test Module (HTR-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengxiang Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current radiation protection methodology offers abundant experiences on light-water reactors, but very few studies on high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR. To fill this gap, a comprehensive investigation was performed to the radiation protection practices in the helium circulator maintenance of the Chinese 10 MW HTR test module (HTR-10 in this paper. The investigation reveals the unique behaviour of HTR-10’s radiation sources in the maintenance as well as its radionuclide species and presents the radiation protection methods that were tailored to these features. Owing to these practices, the radioactivity level was kept low throughout the maintenance and only low-level radioactive waste was generated. The quantitative analysis further demonstrates that the decontamination efficiency was over 89% for surface contamination and over 34% for γ dose rate and the occupational exposure was much lower than both the limits of regulatory and the exposure levels in comparable literature. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the reported radiation protection practices, which directly provides hands-on experience for the future HTR-PM reactor and adds to the completeness of the radiation protection methodology.

  9. Study on the conversion of H2 and CO from the helium carrier gas of high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Cuiping; Zheng Zhenhong; Shi Fuen

    1995-01-01

    The conversions of hydrogen and carbon monoxide into water vapor and carbon dioxide on CuO-ZnO-Al 2 O 3 catalyst are studied. The effects of different temperature, system atmospheric pressure, impurity gas concentration, flow and dew point on properties of cupric oxide bed are investigated. The conversion characteristics curves of H 2 and CO are given. Experimental data of conversion capacity, action period and conversion efficiency of CuO-ZnO-Al 2 O 3 are obtained and the optimal parameters are determined. The results show that the concentration of H 2 and CO of the effluent gas after purification can reach below 2 x 10 -6 , respectively. So it can meet the demands of high temperature gas-cooled reactor and also provide optimal design parameters and reliable data for conversion of H 2 and CO on CuO-ZnO-Al 2 O 3 catalyst

  10. Thermodynamic properties of helium in the range from 20 to 15000C and 1 to 100 bar. Reactor core design of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kipke, H.E.; Stoehr, A.; Banerjea, A.; Hammeke, K.; Huepping, N.

    1978-12-01

    The following report presents in tabular form the safety standard of the nuclear safety standard commission (KTA) on reactor core design of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Part 1: Calculation of thermodynamic properties of helium The basis of the present work is the data and formulae given by H. Petersen for the calculation of density, specific heat, thermal conductivity and dynamic viscosity of helium together with the formula for their standard deviations in the range of temperature and pressure stated above. The relations for specific enthalpy and specific entropy have been derived from density and specific heat, whereby specific heat is assumed constant over the given range of temperature and pressure. The latter section of this report contains tables of thermodynamic properties of helium calculated from the equations stated earlier in this paper. (orig.) [de

  11. The study of capability natural uranium as fuel cycle input for long life gas cooled fast reactors with helium as coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ariani, Menik, E-mail: menikariani@gmail.com; Satya, Octavianus Cakra; Monado, Fiber [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sriwijaya University, jl Palembang-Prabumulih km 32 Indralaya OganIlir, South of Sumatera (Indonesia); Su’ud, Zaki [Nuclear and Biophysics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, jlGanesha 10, Bandung (Indonesia); Sekimoto, Hiroshi [CRINES, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-11N1-17 Ookayama, Meguro-Ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-03-11

    The objective of the present research is to assess the feasibility design of small long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with helium as coolant. GCFR included in the Generation-IV reactor systems are being developed to provide sustainable energy resources that meet future energy demand in a reliable, safe, and proliferation-resistant manner. This reactor can be operated without enrichment and reprocessing forever, once it starts. To obtain the capability of consuming natural uranium as fuel cycle input modified CANDLE burn-up scheme was adopted in this system with different core design. This study has compared the core with three designs of core reactors with the same thermal power 600 MWth. The fuel composition each design was arranged by divided core into several parts of equal volume axially i.e. 6, 8 and 10 parts related to material burn-up history. The fresh natural uranium is initially put in region 1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region 2 and the region 1 is filled by fresh natural uranium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all regions, i.e. shifted the core of the region (i) into region (i+1) region after the end of 10 years burn-up cycle. The calculation results shows that for the burn-up strategy on “Region-8” and “Region-10” core designs, after the reactors start-up the operation furthermore they only needs natural uranium supply to the next life operation until one period of refueling (10 years).

  12. Forced two phase helium cooling of large superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Burns, W.A.; Taylor, J.D.

    1979-08-01

    A major problem shared by all large superconducting magnets is the cryogenic cooling system. Most large magnets are cooled by some variation of the helium bath. Helium bath cooling becomes more and more troublesome as the size of the magnet grows and as geometric constraints come into play. An alternative approach to cooling large magnet systems is the forced flow, two phase helium system. The advantages of two phase cooling in many magnet systems are shown. The design of a two phase helium system, with its control dewar, is presented. The paper discusses pressure drop of a two phase system, stability of a two phase system and the method of cool down of a two phase system. The results of experimental measurements at LBL are discussed. Included are the results of cool down and operation of superconducting solenoids

  13. Gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakilian, M.

    1977-05-01

    The present study is the second part of a general survey of Gas Cooled Reactors (GCRs). In this part, the course of development, overall performance and present development status of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTCRs) and advances of HTGR systems are reviewed. (author)

  14. Consideration of heat transfer performance of helium-gas/water coolers in HENDEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki

    1986-10-01

    The helium engineering loop (HENDEL) has four helium-gas/water coolers, where the cooling water flows in the tubes and the helium gas flows on the shell side. Their cooling performance depends on mainly the heat transfer of helium gas on the shell side. This report describes the operational data of the coolers and the consideration of the heat transfer performance which is important for the design of coolers. It becomes clear that Donohue's equation is close to the operational data and conservative for the segmental baffle type cooler and preduction by Fishenden-Saunders or Zukauskas' equation is conservation for the step-up baffle type cooler. (author)

  15. Helium-Cooled Refractory Alloys First Wall and Blanket Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Nygren, R.E.; Baxi, C.B.; Fogarty, P.; Ghoniem, N.; Khater, H.; McCarthy, K.; Merrill, B.; Nelson, B.; Reis, E.E.; Sharafat, S.; Schleicher, R.; Sze, D.K.; Ulrickson, M.; Willms, S.; Youssef, M.; Zinkel, S.

    1999-01-01

    Under the APEX program the He-cooled system design task is to evaluate and recommend high power density refractory alloy first wall and blanket designs and to recommend and initiate tests to address critical issues. We completed the preliminary design of a helium-cooled, W-5Re alloy, lithium breeder design and the results are reported in this paper. Many areas of the design were assessed, including material selection, helium impurity control, and mechanical, nuclear and thermal hydraulics design, and waste disposal, tritium and safety design. System study results show that at a closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT) gross thermal efficiency of 57.5%, a superconducting coil tokamak reactor, with an aspect ratio of 4, and an output power of 2 GWe, can be projected to have a cost of electricity at 54.6 mill/kWh. Critical issues were identified and we plan to continue the design on some of the critical issues during the next phase of the APEX design study

  16. Effect of wall thickness and helium cooling channels on duct magnetohydrodynamic flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Qingyun; Feng, Jingchao; Chen, Hongli

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • MHD flows in ducts of different wall thickness compared with wall uniform. • Study of velocity, pressure distribution in ducts MHD flows with single pass of helium cooling channels. • Comparison of three types of dual helium cooling channels and acquisition of an option for minimum pressure drop. • A single short duct MHD flow in blanket without FCI has been simulated for pressure gradient analysis. - Abstract: The concept of dual coolant liquid metal (LM) blanket has been proposed in different countries to demonstrate the technical feasibility of DEMO reactor. In the system, helium gas and PbLi eutectic, separated by structure grid, are used to cool main structure materials and to be self-cooled, respectively. The non-uniform wall thickness of structure materials gives rise to wall non-homogeneous conductance ratio. It will lead to electric current distribution changes, resulting in significant changes in the velocity distribution and pressure drop of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows. In order to investigate the effect of helium channels on MHD flows, different methods of numerical simulations cases are carried out including the cases of different wall thicknesses, single pass of helium cooling channels, and three types of dual helium cooling channels. The results showed that helium tubes are able to affect the velocity distribution in the boundary layer by forming wave sharp which transfers from Hartmann boundary layer to the core area. In addition, the potential profile and pressure drop in the cases have been compared to these in the case of walls without cooling channel, and the pressure gradient of a simplified single short duct MHD flow in blanket shows small waver along the central axis in the helium channel position.

  17. Effect of wall thickness and helium cooling channels on duct magnetohydrodynamic flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Qingyun; Feng, Jingchao; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • MHD flows in ducts of different wall thickness compared with wall uniform. • Study of velocity, pressure distribution in ducts MHD flows with single pass of helium cooling channels. • Comparison of three types of dual helium cooling channels and acquisition of an option for minimum pressure drop. • A single short duct MHD flow in blanket without FCI has been simulated for pressure gradient analysis. - Abstract: The concept of dual coolant liquid metal (LM) blanket has been proposed in different countries to demonstrate the technical feasibility of DEMO reactor. In the system, helium gas and PbLi eutectic, separated by structure grid, are used to cool main structure materials and to be self-cooled, respectively. The non-uniform wall thickness of structure materials gives rise to wall non-homogeneous conductance ratio. It will lead to electric current distribution changes, resulting in significant changes in the velocity distribution and pressure drop of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows. In order to investigate the effect of helium channels on MHD flows, different methods of numerical simulations cases are carried out including the cases of different wall thicknesses, single pass of helium cooling channels, and three types of dual helium cooling channels. The results showed that helium tubes are able to affect the velocity distribution in the boundary layer by forming wave sharp which transfers from Hartmann boundary layer to the core area. In addition, the potential profile and pressure drop in the cases have been compared to these in the case of walls without cooling channel, and the pressure gradient of a simplified single short duct MHD flow in blanket shows small waver along the central axis in the helium channel position.

  18. Cooling of nuclear power stations with high temperature reactors and helium turbine cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, S.; Hewing, G.

    1977-01-01

    On nuclear power stations with high temperature reactors and helium turbine cycles (HTR-single circuits) the residual heat from the energy conversion process in the primary and intermediate coolers is removed from cycled gas, helium. Water, which is circulated for safety reasons through a closed circuit, is used for cooling. The primary and intermediate coolers as well as other cooling equipment of the power plant are installed within the reactor building. The heat from the helium turbine cycle is removed to the environment most effectively by natural draught cooling towers. In this way a net plant efficiency of about 40% is attainable. The low quantities of residual heat thereby produced and the high (in comparison with power stations with steam turbine cycles) cooling agent pressure and cooling water reheat pressure in the circulating coolers enable an economically favourable design of the overall 'cold end' to be expected. In the so-called unit range it is possible to make do with one or two cooling towers. Known techniques and existing operating experience can be used for these dry cooling towers. After-heat removal reactor shutdown is effected by a separate, redundant cooling system with forced air dry coolers. The heat from the cooling process at such locations in the power station is removed to the environment either by a forced air dry cooling installation or by a wet cooling system. (orig.) [de

  19. LOFA analyses for the water and helium cooled SEAFP reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sponton, L.; Sjoeberg, A.; Nordlinder, S.

    2001-01-01

    This study was performed in the frame of the European long-term fusion safety programme 1999 (SEAFP99). Loss of flow accidents (LOFA) have been studied for two cases, first for a helium cooled reactor with advanced dual-coolant (DUAL) blanket at 100% nominal power. The second case applies to a water-cooled reactor at 20% nominal power. Both transients were simulated with the code MELCOR 1.8.4. The results for the helium cooled reactor show that with a natural circulation flow of helium after the pump stops, the first wall temperature will stay below the temperature for excepted failure of the construction material. For the water cooled reactor, the results show that the pressurizer set point for its liquid volumetric inventory is reached before the plasma facing components attain a critical temperature. The pressurizer set point will induce a plasma shutdown

  20. The cryogenic helium cooling system for the Tokamak physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felker, B.; Slack, D.S.; Wendland, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) will use supercritical helium to cool all the magnets and supply helium to the Vacuum cryopumping subsystem. The heat loads will come from the standard steady state conduction and thermal radiation sources and from the pulsed loads of the nuclear and eddy currents caused by the Central Solenoid Coils and the plasma positioning coils. The operations of the TPX will begin with pulses of up to 1000 seconds in duration every 75 minutes. The helium system utilizes a pulse load leveling scheme to buffer out the effects of the pulse load and maintain a constant cryogenic plant operation. The pulse load leveling scheme utilizes the thermal mass of liquid and gaseous helium stored in a remote dewar to absorb the pulses of the tokamak loads. The mass of the stored helium will buffer out the temperature pulses allowing 5 K helium to be delivered to the magnets throughout the length of the pulse. The temperature of the dewar will remain below 5 K with all the energy of the pulse absorbed. This paper will present the details of the heat load sources, of the pulse load leveling scheme operations, a partial helium schematic, dewar temperature as a function of time, the heat load sources as a function of time and the helium temperature as a function of length along the various components that will be cooled

  1. Gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Masayuki.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable direct cooling of reactor cores thereby improving the cooling efficiency upon accidents. Constitution: A plurality sets of heat exchange pipe groups are disposed around the reactor core, which are connected by way of communication pipes with a feedwater recycling device comprising gas/liquid separation device, recycling pump, feedwater pump and emergency water tank. Upon occurrence of loss of primary coolants accidents, the heat exchange pipe groups directly absorb the heat from the reactor core through radiation and convection. Although the water in the heat exchange pipe groups are boiled to evaporate if the forcive circulation is interrupted by the loss of electric power source, water in the emergency tank is supplied due to the head to the heat exchange pipe groups to continue the cooling. Furthermore, since the heat exchange pipe groups surround the entire circumference of the reactor core, cooling is carried out uniformly without resulting deformation or stresses due to the thermal imbalance. (Sekiya, K.)

  2. Liquid helium cooling of the MFTF superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanSant, J.H.; Zbasnik, J.P.

    1986-09-01

    During acceptance testing of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), we measured these tests: liquid helium heat loads and flow rates in selected magnets. We used the data from these tests to estimate helium vapor quality in the magnets so that we could determine if adequate conductor cooling conditions had occurred. We compared the measured quality and flow with estimates from a theoretical model developed for the MFTF magnets. The comparison is reasonably good, considering influences that can greatly affect these values. This paper describes the methods employed in making the measurements and developing the theoretical estimates. It also describes the helium system that maintained the magnets at required operating conditions

  3. Cooling by mixing of helium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, O.P.; Olsen, M.; Rasmussen, F.B.

    1975-01-01

    The principles of the helium dilution refrigerator are outlined. The lowest temperature attained with a continuously operated dilution refrigerator was about 10 mK, and 5 mK for a limited period when the supply of concentrated 3 He to the mixing chamber was interrupted. (R.S.)

  4. On the helium gas leak test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Akira; Ozaki, Susumu

    1975-01-01

    The helium gas leak test (Helium mass spectrometer testing) has a leak detection capacity of the highest level in practical leak tests and is going to be widely applied to high pressure vessels, atomic and vacuum equipments that require high tightness. To establish a standard test procedure several series of experiments were conducted and the results were investigated. The conclusions are summarized as follows: (1) The hood method is quantitatively the most reliable method. The leak rate obtained by tests using 100% helium concentration should be the basis of the other method of test. (2) The integrating method, bell jar method, and vacuum spray method can be considered quantitative when particular conditions are satisfied. (3) The sniffer method is not to be considered quantitive. (4) The leak rate of the hood, integrating, and bell jar methods is approximately proportional to the square of the helium partial pressure. (auth.)

  5. Supercritical Helium Cooling of the LHC Beam Screens

    CERN Document Server

    Hatchadourian, E; Tavian, L

    1998-01-01

    The cold mass of the LHC superconducting magnets, operating in pressurised superfluid helium at 1.9 K, must be shielded from the dynamic heat loads induced by the circulating particle beams, by means of beam screens maintained at higher temperature. The beam screens are cooled between 5 and 20 K by forced flow of weakly supercritical helium, a solution which avoids two-phase flow in the long, narr ow cooling channels, but still presents a potential risk of thermohydraulic instabilities. This problem has been studied by theoretical modelling and experiments performed on a full-scale dedicated te st loop.

  6. Helium turbomachinery operating experience from gas turbine power plants and test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Colin F.

    2012-01-01

    The closed-cycle gas turbine, pioneered and deployed in Europe, is not well known in the USA. Since nuclear power plant studies currently being conducted in several countries involve the coupling of a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a helium closed-cycle gas turbine power conversion system, the experience gained from operated helium turbomachinery is the focus of this paper. A study done as early as 1945 foresaw the use of a helium closed-cycle gas turbine coupled with a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor, and some two decades later this was investigated but not implemented because of lack of technology readiness. However, the first practical use of helium as a gas turbine working fluid was recognized for cryogenic processes, and the first two small fossil-fired helium gas turbines to operate were in the USA for air liquefaction and nitrogen production facilities. In the 1970's a larger helium gas turbine plant and helium test facilities were built and operated in Germany to establish technology bases for a projected future high efficiency large nuclear gas turbine power plant concept. This review paper covers the experience gained, and the lessons learned from the operation of helium gas turbine plants and related test facilities, and puts these into perspective since over three decades have passed since they were deployed. An understanding of the many unexpected events encountered, and how the problems, some of them serious, were resolved is important to avoid them being replicated in future helium turbomachines. The valuable lessons learned in the past, in many cases the hard way, particularly from the operation in Germany of the Oberhausen II 50 MWe helium gas turbine plant, and the technical know-how gained from the formidable HHV helium turbine test facility, are viewed as being germane in the context of current helium turbomachine design work being done for future high efficiency nuclear gas turbine plant concepts. - Highlights:

  7. A new helium gas recovery and purification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamotot, T.; Suzuki, H.; Ishii, J.; Hamana, I.; Hayashi, S.; Mizutani, S.; Sanjo, S.

    1974-01-01

    A helium gas recovery and purification system, based on the principle of gas permeation through a membrane, is described. The system can be used for the purification of helium gas containing air as a contaminant. The apparatus, operating at ambient temperature does not need constant attention, the recovery ratio of helium gas is satisfactory and running costs are low. Gases other than helium can be processed with the apparatus. (U.K.)

  8. The Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor: A Promising Option for Near Term Deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBar, Malcolm P.

    2002-01-01

    The Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) is an advanced nuclear power system that offers unparalleled safety, high thermal efficiency, environmental advantages, and competitive electricity generation costs. The GT-MHR module couples a gas-cooled modular helium reactor (MHR) with a high efficiency modular Brayton cycle gas turbine (GT) energy conversion system. The reactor and power conversion systems are located in a below grade concrete silo that provides protection against sabotage. The GT-MHR safety is achieved through a combination of inherent safety characteristics and design selections that take maximum advantage of the gas-cooled reactor coated particle fuel, helium coolant and graphite moderator. The GT-MHR is projected to be economically competitive with alternative electricity generation technologies due to the high operating temperature of the gas-cooled reactor, high thermal efficiency of the Brayton cycle power conversion system, high fuel burnup (>100,000 MWd/MT), and low operation and maintenance requirements. (author)

  9. Elevated temperature and high pressure large helium gas loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakasai, Minoru; Midoriyama, Shigeru; Miyata, Toyohiko; Nakase, Tsuyoshi; Izaki, Makoto

    1979-01-01

    The development of high temperature gas-cooled reactors especially aiming at the multi-purpose utilization of nuclear heat energy is carried out actively in Japan and West Germany. In Japan, the experimental HTGR of 50 MWt and 1000 deg C outlet temperature is being developed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and others since 1969, and the development of direct iron-making technology utilizing high temperature reducing gas was started in 1973 as the large project of Ministry of Internalional Trade and Industry. Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Has taken part in these development projects, and has developed many softwares for nuclear heat design, system design and safety design of nuclear reactor system and heat utilization system. In hardwares also, efforts have been exerted to develop the technologies of design and manufacture of high temperature machinery and equipments. The high temperature, high pressure, large helium gas loop is under construction in the technical research institute of the company, and it is expected to be completed in December, 1979. The tests planned are that of proving the dynamic performances of the loop and its machinery and equipments and the verification of analysis codes. The loop is composed of the main circulation system, the objects of testing, the helium gas purifying system, the helium supplying and evacuating system, instruments and others. (Kako, I.)

  10. A MEASUREMENT OF THE ADIABATIC COOLING INDEX FOR INTERSTELLAR HELIUM PICKUP IONS IN THE INNER HELIOSPHERE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saul, Lukas; Wurz, Peter; Kallenbach, Reinald

    2009-01-01

    Interstellar neutral gas enters the inner heliosphere where it is ionized and becomes the pickup ion population of the solar wind. It is often assumed that this population will subsequently cool adiabatically, like an expanding ideal gas due, to the divergent flow of the solar wind. Here, we report the first independent measure of the effective adiabatic cooling index in the inner heliosphere from SOHO CELIAS measurements of singly charged helium taken during times of perpendicular interplanetary magnetic field. We use a simple adiabatic transport model of interstellar pickup helium ions, valid for the upwind region of the inner heliosphere. The time averaged velocity spectrum of helium pickup ions measured by CELIAS/CTOF is fit to this model with a single free parameter which indicates an effective cooling rate with a power-law index of γ = 1.35 ± 0.2. While this average is consistent with the 'ideal-gas' assumption of γ = 1.5, the analysis indicates that such an assumption will not apply in general, and that due to observational constraints further measurements are necessary to constrain the cooling process. Implications are discussed for understanding the transport processes in the inner heliosphere and improving this measurement technique.

  11. Cryogenic filter method produces super-pure helium and helium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.

    1964-01-01

    Helium is purified when cooled in a low pressure environment until it becomes superfluid. The liquid helium is then filtered through iron oxide particles. Heating, cooling and filtering processes continue until the purified liquid helium is heated to a gas.

  12. Ceramic BOT type blanket with poloidal helium cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardella, A.; Daenenr, W.; Iseli, M.; Ferrari, M.; Gallina, M.; Rado, V.; Simbolotti, G.; Violante, V.

    1989-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the work done and results achieved over the past two years on the ceramic breeder BOT blanket with poloidal helium cooling. A conclusive remark on the brick/plate option described previously is followed by short descriptions of the low and high performance pebble bed options elaborated as alternatives for both NET and DEMO. The results show, togethre with those about the poloidal cooling of the First Wall, good prospects for this blanket type provided that the questions connected wiht an extensive use of beryllium find a satisfactor answer. (author). 5 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  13. Gas Mixtures for Welding with Micro-Jet Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węgrzyn T.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Welding with micro-jet cooling after was tested only for MIG and MAG processes. For micro-jet gases was tested only argon, helium and nitrogen. A paper presents a piece of information about gas mixtures for micro-jet cooling after in welding. There are put down information about gas mixtures that could be chosen both for MAG welding and for micro-jet process. There were given main information about influence of various micro-jet gas mixtures on metallographic structure of steel welds. Mechanical properties of weld was presented in terms of various gas mixtures selection for micro-jet cooling.

  14. Thermal and flow design of helium-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melese, G.; Katz, R.

    1984-01-01

    This book continues the American Nuclear Society's series of monographs on nuclear science and technology. Chapters of the book include information on the first-generation gas-cooled reactors; HTGR reactor developments; reactor core heat transfer; mechanical problems related to the primary coolant circuit; HTGR design bases; core thermal design; gas turbines; process heat HTGR reactors; GCFR reactor thermal hydraulics; and gas cooling of fusion reactors

  15. Helium gas turbine conceptual design by genetic/gradient optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Long; Yu, Suyuan

    2003-01-01

    Helium gas turbine is the key component of the power conversion system for direct cycle High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR), of which an optimal design is essential for high efficiency. Gas turbine design currently is a multidisciplinary process in which the relationships between constraints, objective functions and variables are very noisy. Due to the ever-increasing complexity of the process, it has becomes very hard for the engineering designer to foresee the consequences of changing certain parts. With classic design procedures which depend on adaptation to baseline design, this problem is usually averted by choosing a large number of design variables based on the engineer's judgment or experience in advance, then reaching a solution through iterative computation and modification. This, in fact, leads to a reduction of the degree of freedom of the design problem, and therefore to a suboptimal design. Furthermore, helium is very different in thermal properties from normal gases; it is uncertain whether the operation experiences of a normal gas turbine could be used in the conceptual design of a helium gas turbine. Therefore, it is difficult to produce an optimal design with the general method of adaptation to baseline. Since their appearance in the 1970s, Genetic algorithms (GAs) have been broadly used in many research fields due to their robustness. GAs have also been used recently in the design and optimization of turbo-machines. Researchers at the General Electronic Company (GE) developed an optimization software called Engineous, and used GAs in the basic design and optimization of turbines. The ITOP study group from Xi'an Transportation University also did some work on optimization of transonic turbine blades. However, since GAs do not have a rigorous theory base, many problems in utilities have arisen, such as premature convergence and uncertainty; the GA doesn't know how to locate the optimal design, and doesn't even know if the optimal solution

  16. Effect of carburizing helium environment on creep behavior of Ni-base heat-resistant alloys for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Yuji; Ogawa, Yutaka; Nakajima, Hajime

    1988-01-01

    Creep tests were conducted on Ni-base heat-resistant alloys Hastelloy XR and XR-II, i.e. versions of Hastelloy X modified for nuclear applications, at 950degC using four types of helium environment with different impurity compositions, and mainly the effect of carburization was examined. For all the materials tested, the values of creep rupture time obtained under the carburizing conditions were similar to or longer than those in the commonly used, standard test environment (JAERI Type B helium). The difference among the results was interpreted by the counterbalancing effects of the strengthening due to carburization and possible weakening caused under very low oxidizing potential. In the corrosion monitoring specimens pronounced carbon pick-up was observed in the environment with high carbon activity and very low oxidizing potential. Based on the results obtained in the present and the previous works, it is suggested that a moderate control of the impurity chemistry is important rather than simple purification of the coolant in protecting the material from the environment-enhanced degradation. Either condition with high or low extremes in the oxidizing and carburizing potentials may cause enhanced degradation and thus are desirable to be avoided at the elevated temperatures. (author)

  17. Thermal Performance of a Dual-Channel, Helium-Cooled, Tungsten Heat Exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; North, Mart T.

    2000-01-01

    Helium-cooled, refractory heat exchangers are now under consideration for first wall and divertor applications. These refractory devices take advantage of high temperature operation with large delta-Ts to effectively handle high heat fluxes. The high temperature helium can then be used in a gas turbine for high-efficiency power conversion. Over the last five years, heat removal with helium was shown to increase dramatically by using porous metal to provide a very large effective surface area for heat transfer in a small volume. Last year, the thermal performance of a bare-copper, dual-channel, helium-cooled, porous metal divertor mock-up was evaluated on the 30 kW Electron Beam Test System at Sandia National Laboratories. The module survived a maximum absorbed heat flux of 34.6 MW/m 2 and reached a maximum surface temperature of 593 C for uniform power loading of 3 kW absorbed on a 2-cm 2 area. An impressive 10 kW of power was absorbed on an area of 24 cm 2 . Recently, a similar dual-module, helium-cooled heat exchanger made almost entirely of tungsten was designed and fabricated by Thermacore, Inc. and tested at Sandia. A complete flow test of each channel was performed to determine the actual pressure drop characteristics. Each channel was equipped with delta-P transducers and platinum RTDs for independent calorimetry. One mass flow meter monitored the total flow to the heat exchanger, while a second monitored flow in only one of the channels. The thermal response of each tungsten module was obtained for heat fluxes in excess of 5 MW/m 2 using 50 C helium at 4 MPa. Fatigue cycles were also performed to assess the fracture toughness of the tungsten modules. A description of the module design and new results on flow instabilities are also presented

  18. Gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) program review committee (PRC). Report No. 13 to members of Helium Breeder Associates (HBA), May 1979 -February 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The responsiveness of the GCFR program structure to changes in design, schedule, and safety issues caused by the decisions to adopt the three-loop over the two-loop primary cooling loop design, to use upflow cooling, and to enhance the natural convection cooling of the plant in a shutdown mode was excellent. The PRC now feels that the criteria for design of a demonstration plant will be manageable and safe. Because of effort to resolve past issues, the PRC has not requested a cost breakdown at this time. It is felt that the HBA effort is properly directed in lieu of the current political malaise regarding future energy supplies and the breeder program in particular. The GCFR is responsive to change and could provide a commercial GCFR before the year 2000

  19. Wide-range vortex shedding flowmeter for high-temperature helium gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, S.P.; Herndon, P.G.; Ennis, R.M. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The existing design of a commercially available vortex shedding flowmeter (VSFM) was modified and optimized to produce three 4-in. and one 6-in. high-performance VSFMs for measuring helium flow in a gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) test loop. The project was undertaken because of the significant economic and performance advantages to be realized by using a single flowmeter capable of covering the 166:1 flow range (at 350/sup 0/C and 45:1 pressure range) of the tests. A detailed calibration in air and helium at the Colorado Engineering Experiment Station showed an accuracy of +-1% of reading for a 100:1 helium flow range and +-1.75% of reading for a 288:1 flow range in both helium and air. At an extended gas temperature of 450/sup 0/C, water cooling was necessary for reliable flowmeter operation.

  20. Phenomenological studies and modelling of the gaseous impurities oxidation and adsorption mechanisms in helium: application for the purification system optimization in gas cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legros, F.

    2008-01-01

    In GEN IV studies on future fission nuclear reactors, two concepts using helium as a coolant have been selected: GFR and VHTR. Among radioactive impurities and dusts, helium can contain H 2 , CO, CH 4 , CO 2 , H 2 O, O 2 , as well as nitrogenous species. To optimize the reactor functioning and lifespan, it is necessary to control the coolant chemical composition using a dedicated purification system. A pilot designed at the CEA allows studying this purification system. Its design includes three unit operations: H 2 and CO oxidation on CuO, then two adsorption steps. This study aims at providing a detailed analysis of the first and second purification steps, which have both been widely studied experimentally at laboratory scale. A first modelling based on a macroscopic approach was developed to represent the behaviour of the reactor and has shown that the CuO fixed bed conversion is dependent on the chemistry (mass transfer is not an issue) and is complete. The results of the structural analysis of the solids allow considering the CuO as particles made of 200 nm diameter grains. Hence, a new model at grain scale is proposed. It is highlighted that the kinetic constants from these two models are related with a scale factor which depends on geometry. A competition between carbon monoxide and hydrogen oxidation has been shown. Activation energies are around 30 kJ.mol-1. Simulation of the simultaneous oxidations leads to consider CO preferential adsorption. A similar methodology has been applied for CO 2 and H 2 O adsorption. The experimental isotherms showed a Langmuir type adsorption. Using this model, experimental and theoretical results agree. (author) [fr

  1. Use of separating nozzles or ultra-centrifuges for obtaining helium from gas mixtures containing helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimann, T.

    1987-01-01

    To obtain helium from gas mixtures containing helium, particularly from natural gas, it is proposed to match the dimensions of the separation devices for a ratio of the molecular weights to be separated of 4:1 of more, which ensures a higher separation factor and therefore a smaller number of separation stages to be connected in series. The process should make reasonably priced separation of helium possible. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Gas turbine modular helium reactor in cogeneration; Turbina de gas reactor modular con helio en cogeneracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon de los Santos, G. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Division de Ingenieria Electrica, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)], e-mail: tesgleon@gmail.com

    2009-10-15

    This work carries out the thermal evaluation from the conversion of nuclear energy to electric power and process heat, through to implement an outline gas turbine modular helium reactor in cogeneration. Modeling and simulating with software Thermo flex of Thermo flow the performance parameters, based on a nuclear power plant constituted by an helium cooled reactor and helium gas turbine with three compression stages, two of inter cooling and one regeneration stage; more four heat recovery process, generating two pressure levels of overheat vapor, a pressure level of saturated vapor and one of hot water, with energetic characteristics to be able to give supply to a very wide gamma of industrial processes. Obtaining a relationship heat electricity of 0.52 and efficiency of net cogeneration of 54.28%, 70.2 MW net electric, 36.6 MW net thermal with 35% of condensed return to 30 C; for a supplied power by reactor of 196.7 MW; and with conditions in advanced gas turbine of 850 C and 7.06 Mpa, assembly in a shaft, inter cooling and heat recovery in cogeneration. (Author)

  3. Gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The invention aims at simplying gas-cooled nuclear reactors. For the cooling gas, the reactor is provided with a main circulation system comprising one or several energy conversion main groups such as gas turbines, and an auxiliary circulation system comprising at least one steam-generating boiler heated by the gas after its passage through the reactor core and adapted to feed a steam turbine with motive steam. The invention can be applied to reactors the main groups of which are direct-cycle gas turbines [fr

  4. Technology of steam generators for gas-cooled reactors. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The activity of the IAEA in the field of the technology of gas-cooled reactors was formalized by formation of an International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (IWGCR). The gas cooled reactor program considered by the IWGCR includes carbon-dioxide-cooled thermal reactors, helium cooled thermal high temperature reactors for power generation and for process heat applications and gas-cooled fast breeder reactors. This report covers the papers dealing with operating experience, steam generators for next generation of gas-cooled reactors, material development and corrosion problems, and thermohydraulics

  5. Technology of steam generators for gas-cooled reactors. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-07-01

    The activity of the IAEA in the field of the technology of gas-cooled reactors was formalized by formation of an International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (IWGCR). The gas cooled reactor program considered by the IWGCR includes carbon-dioxide-cooled thermal reactors, helium cooled thermal high temperature reactors for power generation and for process heat applications and gas-cooled fast breeder reactors. This report covers the papers dealing with operating experience, steam generators for next generation of gas-cooled reactors, material development and corrosion problems, and thermohydraulics.

  6. [Fluid dynamics of supercritical helium within internally cooled cabled superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Sciver, S.W.

    1995-01-01

    The Applied Superconductivity Center of the University of Wisconsin-Madison proposes to conduct research on low temperature helium fluid dynamics as it applies to the cooling of internally cooled cabled superconductors (ICCS). Such conductors are used in fusion reactor designs including most of the coils in ITER. The proposed work is primarily experimental involving measurements of transient and steady state pressure drop in a variety of conductor configurations. Both model and prototype conductors for actual magnet designs will be investigated. The primary goal will be to measure and model the friction factor for these complex geometries. In addition, an effort will be made to study transient processes such as heat transfer and fluid expulsion associated with quench conditions

  7. Gas cooled leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shutt, R.P.; Rehak, M.L.; Hornik, K.E.

    1993-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to cover as completely as possible and in sufficient detail the topics relevant to lead design. The first part identifies the problems associated with lead design, states the mathematical formulation, and shows the results of numerical and analytical solutions. The second part presents the results of a parametric study whose object is to determine the best choice for cooling method, material, and geometry. These findings axe applied in a third part to the design of high-current leads whose end temperatures are determined from the surrounding equipment. It is found that cooling method or improved heat transfer are not critical once good heat exchange is established. The range 5 5 but extends over a large of values. Mass flow needed to prevent thermal runaway varies linearly with current above a given threshold. Below that value, the mass flow is constant with current. Transient analysis shows no evidence of hysteresis. If cooling is interrupted, the mass flow needed to restore the lead to its initially cooled state grows exponentially with the time that the lead was left without cooling

  8. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  9. Evaluation of the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    Recent advances in gas-turbine and heat exchanger technology have enhanced the potential for a Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) incorporating a direct gas turbine (Brayton) cycle for power conversion. The resulting Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) power plant combines the high temperature capabilities of the MHR with the efficiency and reliability of modern gas turbines. While the passive safety features of the steam cycle MHR (SC-MHR) are retained, generation efficiencies are projected to be in the range of 48% and steam power conversion systems, with their attendant complexities, are eliminated. Power costs are projected to be reduced by about 20%, relative to the SC-MHR or coal. This report documents the second, and final, phase of a two-part evaluation that concluded with a unanimous recommendation that the direct cycle (DC) variant of the GT-MHR be established as the commercial objective of the US Gas-Cooled Reactor Program. This recommendation has been endorsed by industrial and utility participants and accepted by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Phase II effort, documented herein, concluded that the DC GT-MHR offers substantial technical and economic advantages over both the IDC and SC systems. Both the DC and IDC were found to offer safety advantages, relative to the SC, due to elimination of the potential for water ingress during power operations. This is the dominant consequence event for the SC. The IDC was judged to require somewhat less development than the direct cycle, while the SC, which has the greatest technology base, incurs the least development cost and risk. While the technical and licensing requirements for the DC were more demanding, they were judged to be incremental and feasible. Moreover, the DC offers significant performance and cost improvements over the other two concepts. Overall, the latter were found to justify the additional development needs.

  10. Evaluation of the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    Recent advances in gas-turbine and heat exchanger technology have enhanced the potential for a Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) incorporating a direct gas turbine (Brayton) cycle for power conversion. The resulting Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) power plant combines the high temperature capabilities of the MHR with the efficiency and reliability of modern gas turbines. While the passive safety features of the steam cycle MHR (SC-MHR) are retained, generation efficiencies are projected to be in the range of 48% and steam power conversion systems, with their attendant complexities, are eliminated. Power costs are projected to be reduced by about 20%, relative to the SC-MHR or coal. This report documents the second, and final, phase of a two-part evaluation that concluded with a unanimous recommendation that the direct cycle (DC) variant of the GT-MHR be established as the commercial objective of the US Gas-Cooled Reactor Program. This recommendation has been endorsed by industrial and utility participants and accepted by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Phase II effort, documented herein, concluded that the DC GT-MHR offers substantial technical and economic advantages over both the IDC and SC systems. Both the DC and IDC were found to offer safety advantages, relative to the SC, due to elimination of the potential for water ingress during power operations. This is the dominant consequence event for the SC. The IDC was judged to require somewhat less development than the direct cycle, while the SC, which has the greatest technology base, incurs the least development cost and risk. While the technical and licensing requirements for the DC were more demanding, they were judged to be incremental and feasible. Moreover, the DC offers significant performance and cost improvements over the other two concepts. Overall, the latter were found to justify the additional development needs

  11. Gas Mixtures for Welding with Micro-Jet Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Węgrzyn T.

    2015-01-01

    Welding with micro-jet cooling after was tested only for MIG and MAG processes. For micro-jet gases was tested only argon, helium and nitrogen. A paper presents a piece of information about gas mixtures for micro-jet cooling after in welding. There are put down information about gas mixtures that could be chosen both for MAG welding and for micro-jet process. There were given main information about influence of various micro-jet gas mixtures on metallographic structure of steel welds. Mechani...

  12. Conceptual design and analysis of the helium cooled solid breeder blanket for CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn; Li, Min; Lv, Zhongliang; Zhou, Guangming; Liu, Qianwen; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Xiaoliang; Zheng, Jie; Ye, Minyou

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A helium cooled solid blanket was proposed as a candidate blanket concept for CFETR. • Material selection, basic structure and gas flow scheme of the blanket were introduced. • A series of performance analyses for the blanket were summarized. - Abstract: To bridge the gap between ITER and DEMO and to realize the fusion energy in China, a fusion device Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) was proposed and is being designed mainly to demonstrate 50–200 MW fusion power, 30–50% duty time factor, tritium self-sustained. Because of the high demand of tritium production and the realistic engineering consideration, the design of tritium breeding blanket for CFETR is a challenging work and getting special attention. As a blanket candidate, a helium cooled solid breeder blanket has been designed with the emphasis on conservative design and realistic blanket technology. This paper introduces the basic blanket scheme, including the material selection, structural design, cooling scheme and purge gas flow path. In addition, some results of neutronics, thermal-hydraulic and stress analysis are presented.

  13. Gas cooled HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweiger, F.

    1985-01-01

    In the He-cooled, graphite-moderated HTR with spherical fuel elements, the steam generator is fixed outside the pressure vessel. The heat exchangers are above the reactor level. The hot gases stream from the reactor bottom over the heat exchanger, through an annular space around the heat exchanger and through feed lines in the side reflector of the reactor back to its top part. This way, in case of shutdown there is a supplementary natural draught that helps the inner natural circulation (chimney draught effect). (orig./PW)

  14. Cryogenic recovery analysis of forced flow supercritical helium cooled superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.Y.

    1977-08-01

    A coupled heat conduction and fluid flow method of solution was presented for cryogenic stability analysis of cabled composite superconductors of large scale magnetic coils. The coils are cooled by forced flow supercritical helium in parallel flow channels. The coolant flow reduction in one of the channels during the spontaneous recovery transient, after the conductor undergoes a transition from superconducting to resistive, necessitates a parallel channel analysis. A way to simulate the parallel channel analysis is described to calculate the initial channel inlet flow rate required for recovery after a given amount of heat is deposited. The recovery capability of a NbTi plus copper composite superconductor design is analyzed and the results presented. If the hydraulics of the coolant flow is neglected in the recovery analysis, the recovery capability of the superconductor will be over-predicted

  15. Coupling a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle to a Helium-Cooled Reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middleton, Bobby [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pasch, James Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kruizenga, Alan Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Walker, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the thermodynamics of a supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) recompression closed Brayton cycle (RCBC) coupled to a Helium-cooled nuclear reactor. The baseline reactor design for the study is the AREVA High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). Using the AREVA HTGR nominal operating parameters, an initial thermodynamic study was performed using Sandia's deterministic RCBC analysis program. Utilizing the output of the RCBC thermodynamic analysis, preliminary values of reactor power and of Helium flow rate through the reactor were calculated in Sandia's HelCO2 code. Some research regarding materials requirements was then conducted to determine aspects of corrosion related to both Helium and to sCO2 , as well as some mechanical considerations for pressures and temperatures that will be seen by the piping and other components. This analysis resulted in a list of materials-related research items that need to be conducted in the future. A short assessment of dry heat rejection advantages of sCO2> Brayton cycles was also included. This assessment lists some items that should be investigated in the future to better understand how sCO2 Brayton cycles and nuclear can maximally contribute to optimizing the water efficiency of carbon free power generation

  16. Gas cooled traction drive inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides a modular circuit card configuration for distributing heat among a plurality of circuit cards. Each circuit card includes a housing adapted to dissipate heat in response to gas flow over the housing. In one aspect, a gas-cooled inverter includes a plurality of inverter circuit cards, and a plurality of circuit card housings, each of which encloses one of the plurality of inverter cards.

  17. Cooling of superconducting electric generators by liquid helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, W.; Ogata, H.

    1987-01-01

    Superconducting generators have a great potential in future electric supply systems in increasing the efficiency of generators and in enhancing the stability of power network systems. Recognition of possible advantages over gas-cooled and water-cooled generators has led research institutes and manufacturers in several countries to wage substantial research and development efforts. The authors show the electric power capacities of the test generators already built, under construction, or in the planning stage. Since earlier attempts, steady improvements in the design of generators have been made, and experience of generator operation has been accumulated

  18. The Design of High Reliability Magnetic Bearing Systems for Helium Cooled Reactor Machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swann, M.; Davies, N.; Jayawant, R.; Leung, R.; Shultz, R.; Gao, R.; Guo, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The requirements for magnetic bearing equipped machinery used in high temperature, helium cooled, graphite moderated reactor applications present a set of design considerations that are unlike most other applications of magnetic bearing technology in large industrial rotating equipment, for example as used in the oil and gas or other power generation applications. In particular, the bearings are typically immersed directly in the process gas in order to take advantage of the design simplicity that comes about from the elimination of ancillary lubrication and cooling systems for bearings and seals. Such duty means that the bearings will usually see high temperatures and pressures in service and will also typically be subject to graphite particulate and attendant radioactive contamination over time. In addition, unlike most industrial applications, seismic loading events become of paramount importance for the magnetic bearings system, both for actuators and controls. The auxiliary bearing design requirements, in particular, become especially demanding when one considers that the whole mechanical structure of the magnetic bearing system is located inside an inaccessible pressure vessel that should be rarely, if ever, disassembled over the service life of the power plant. Lastly, many machinery designs for gas cooled nuclear power plants utilize vertical orientation. This circumstance presents its own unique requirements for the machinery dynamics and bearing loads. Based on the authors’ experience with machine design and supply on several helium cooled reactor projects including Ft. St. Vrain (US), GT-MHR (Russia), PBMR (South Africa), GTHTR (Japan), and most recently HTR-PM (China), this paper addresses many of the design considerations for such machinery and how the application of magnetic bearings directly affects machinery reliability and availability, operability, and maintainability. Remote inspection and diagnostics are a key focus of this paper. (author)

  19. Improving fuel cycle design and safety characteristics of a gas cooled fast reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooijen, W.F.G.

    2006-01-01

    This research concerns the fuel cycle and safety aspects of a Gas Cooled Fast Reactor, one of the so-called "Generation IV" nuclear reactor designs. The Generation IV Gas Cooled Fast Reactor uses helium as coolant at high temperature. The goal of the GCFR is to obtain a "closed nuclear fuel cycle",

  20. A robust helium-cooled shield/blanket design for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Bourque, R.F.; Baxi, C.B.

    1993-11-01

    General Atomics Fusion and Reactor Groups have completed a helium-cooled, conceptual shield/blanket design for ITER. The configuration selected is a pressurized tubes design embedded in radially oriented plates. This plate can be made from ferritic steel or from V-alloy. Helium leakage to the plasma chamber is eliminated by conservative, redundant design and proper quality control and inspection programs. High helium pressure at 18 MPa is used to reduce pressure drop and enhance heat transfer. This high gas pressure is believed practical when confined in small diameter tubes. Ample industrial experience exists for safe high gas pressure operations. Inboard shield design is highlighted in this study since the allowable void fraction is more limited. Lithium is used as the thermal contacting medium and for tritium breeding, its safety concerns are minimized by a modular, low inventory design that requires no circulation of the liquid metal for the purpose of heat removal. This design is robust, conservative, reliable, and meets all design goals and requirements. It can also be built with present-day technology

  1. Optimal thermal-hydraulic performance for helium-cooled divertors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izenson, M.G.; Martin, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Normal flow heat exchanger (NFHX) technology offers the potential for cooling divertor panels with reduced pressure drops (<0.5% Δp/p), reduced pumping power (<0.75% pumping/thermal power), and smaller duct sizes than conventional helium heat exchangers. Furthermore, the NFHX can easily be fabricated in the large sizes required for divertors in large tokamaks. Recent experimental and computational results from a program to develop NFHX technology for divertor coolings using porous metal heat transfer media are described. We have tested the thermal and flow characteristics of porous metals and identified the optimal heat transfer material for the divertor heat exchanger. Methods have been developed to create highly conductive thermal bonds between the porous material and a solid substrate. Computational fluid dynamics calculations of flow and heat transfer in the porous metal layer have shown the capability of high thermal effectiveness. An 18-kW NFHX, designed to meet specifications for the international Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor divertor, has been fabricated and tested for thermal and flow performance. Preliminary results confirm design and fabrication methods. 11 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  2. Organ protection by the noble gas helium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, K.F.

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this thesis were to investigate whether helium induces preconditioning in humans, and to elucidate the mechanisms behind this possible protection. First, we collected data regarding organ protective effects of noble gases in general, and of helium in particular (chapters 1-3). In chapter

  3. Gas Cooled Fast Reactors: Recent advances and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poette, C.; Guedeney, P.; Stainsby, R.; Mikityuk, K.; Knol, S.

    2013-01-01

    Gas Cooled Fast Reactors: Conclusion - GFR: an attractive longer term option allowing to combine Fast spectrum & Helium coolant benefits; • Innovative SiC fuel cladding solutions were found; • A first design confirming the encouraging potential of the reactor system Design improvements are nevertheless recommended and interesting tracks have been identified (core & system design, DHR system); • The GFR requires large R&D needs to confirm its potential (fuel & core materials, specific Helium technology); • ALLEGRO prototype studies are the first step and are drawing the R&D priorities

  4. Development of monitoring system using acoustic emission for detection of helium gas leakage for primary cooling system and flow-induced vibration for heat transfer tube of heat exchangers for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Yukio; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Furusawa, Takayuki; Shinozaki, Masayuki; Satoh, Yoshiyuki; Yanagibashi, Minoru

    1998-10-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) uses helium gas for its primary coolant, whose leakage inside reactor containment vessel is considered in design of the HTTR. It is necessary to detect leakage of helium gas at an early stage so that total amount of the leakage should be as small as possible. On the other hand, heat transfer tubes of heat exchangers of the HTTR are designed not to vibrate at normal operation, but the flow-induced vibration is to be monitored to provide against an emergency. Thus monitoring system of acoustic emission for detection of primary coolant leakage and vibration of heat transfer tubes was developed and applied to the HTTR. Before the application to the HTTR, leakage detection test was performed using 1/4 scaled model of outer tube of primary concentric hot gas duct. Result of the test covers detectable minimum leakage rate and effect of difference in gas, pressure, shape of leakage path and distance from the leaking point. Detectable minimum leakage rate was about 5 Ncc/sec. The monitoring system is promising in leakage detection, though countermeasure to noise is to be needed after the HTTR starts operating. (author)

  5. Options for a high heat flux enabled helium cooled first wall for DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbeiter, Frederik, E-mail: f.arbe@kit.edu; Chen, Yuming; Ghidersa, Bradut-Eugen; Klein, Christine; Neuberger, Heiko; Ruck, Sebastian; Schlindwein, Georg; Schwab, Florian; Weth, Axel von der

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Design challenges for helium cooled first wall reviewed and otimization approaches explored. • Application of enhanced heat transfer surfaces to the First Wall cooling channels. • Demonstrated a design point for 1 MW/m{sup 2} with temperatures <550 °C and acceptable stresses. • Feasibility of several manufacturing processes for ribbed surfaces is shown. - Abstract: Helium is considered as coolant in the plasma facing first wall of several blanket concepts for DEMO fusion reactors, due to the favorable properties of flexible temperature range, chemical inertness, no activation, comparatively low effort to remove tritium from the gas and no chemical corrosion. Existing blanket designs have shown the ability to use helium cooled first walls with heat flux densities of 0.5 MW/m{sup 2}. Average steady state heat loads coming from the plasma for current EU DEMO concepts are expected in the range of 0.3 MW/m{sup 2}. The definition of peak values is still ongoing and depends on the chosen first wall shape, magnetic configuration and assumptions on the fraction of radiated power and power fall off lengths in the scrape off layer of the plasma. Peak steady state values could reach and excess 1 MW/m{sup 2}. Higher short-term transient loads are expected. Design optimization approaches including heat transfer enhancement, local heat transfer tuning and shape optimization of the channel cross section are discussed. Design points to enable a helium cooled first wall capable to sustain heat flux densities of 1 MW/m{sup 2} at an average shell temperature lower than 500 °C are developed based on experimentally validated heat transfer coefficients of structured channel surfaces. The required pumping power is in the range of 3–5% of the collected thermal power. The FEM stress analyses show code-acceptable stress intensities. Several manufacturing methods enabling the application of the suggested heat transfer enhanced first wall channels are explored. An

  6. Manufacturing aspects in the design of the breeder unit for Helium Cooled Pebble Bed blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, J.; Ihli, T.; Filsinger, D.; Polixa, C.

    2007-01-01

    The breeding blanket programme has been in the focus of European fusion research for more than a decade. Recently, it has been driven by the EU Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS), investigating the potential of fusion energy in a future economic environment. On the way to the first commercial nuclear fusion reactor (DEMO) new studies for reactor in-vessel components have been initiated. One central focus is the design and manufacturing of the blankets that have to ensure the breeding process to maintain the fuel cycle and are also responsible for the extraction of the main part of the reactor heat for power generation. Two kinds are established: One is the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) and the other the Helium Cooled Liquid Lead (HCLL) blanket. Both designs employ three different cooling plate assemblies. The outer, cooled U-shaped shell, namely the First Wall (FW), with two caps builds the blanket box. The structural strength of the blanket box is realized by integrating Stiffening Grids (SG) that separate the equally spaced Breeder Unit (BU) and allow the box, in case of faulted conditions, to withstand an internal pressure of 8 MPa. The cooled SG constitute the side walls of the BU and are also cooled. The BU consists of a dedicated Cooling Plate (CP) assembly. In present studies about the fabrication of Cooling Plates two kinds of diffusion welding processes are focused on. One is based on a Hot Isostatic Gas Process (HIP). The second is a uni-axial Diffusion Welding Process (DWP). In both cases the bond between the two halves of the cooling plate structure is reached by controlled pressure and heat cycles. Approaching larger, realistic scaled components the uncertainty of ensuring uniform process parameters across the bonding zone increases the risk of defect sources and, therefore, makes it difficult to guarantee the required bonding penetration. This study presents an alternative manufacturing strategy. The premises for this strategy are the reduction of

  7. R + D work on gas-cooled breeder development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Dorner, S.; Jacobs, G.; Meyer, L.; Rehme, K.; Schumacher, G.; Wilhelm, D.

    1978-01-01

    The development work for the gas-cooled breeder in the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center may be assigned to two different groups: a) Investigations on fuel elements. b) Studies concerning the safety of gas-cooled fast breeder reactors. To the first group there belongs the work related to the: - heat transfer between fuel elements and coolant gas, - influence of increased content of water vapor in helium or the fuel rods. The second group concerns: - establishing a computer code for transient calculations in the primary and secondary circuit of a gas-cooled fast breeder reactor, - steam reactivity coefficients, - the core destruction phase of hypothetical accidents, - the core-catcher using borax. (orig./RW) [de

  8. Manufacturing and joining technologies for helium cooled divertors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aktaa, J.; Basuki, W.W.; Weber, T.; Norajitra, P.; Krauss, W.; Konys, J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The manufacturing and joining technologies developed at KIT for helium cooled divertors are reviewed and critically discussed. • Various technologies have been pursued and further developed aiming divertor components with very high quality and sufficient reliability. • Very promising routes have been found for which however still R and D works are necessary. • Technologies developed are also useful for other divertor and even blanket concepts, particularly those with tungsten armor. - Abstract: In the helium cooled (HC) divertor, developed at KIT for a fusion power plant, tungsten has been selected as armor as well as structural material due to its crucial properties: high melting point, very low sputtering yield, good thermal conductivity, high temperature strength, low thermal expansion and low activation. Thereby the armor tungsten is attached to the structural tungsten by thermally conductive joint. Due to the brittleness of tungsten at low temperatures its use as structural material is limited to the high temperature part of the component and a structural joint to the reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel EUROFER97 is foreseen. Hence, to realize the selected hybrid material concept reliable tungsten–steel and tungsten–tungsten joints have been developed and will be reported in this paper. In addition, the modular design of the HC divertor requires tungsten armor tiles and tungsten structural thimbles to be manufactured in high numbers with very high quality. Due to the high strength and low temperature brittleness of tungsten special manufacturing techniques need to be developed for the production of parts with no cavities inside and/or surface flaws. The main achievement in developing the respective manufacturing technologies will be presented and discussed. To achieve the objectives mentioned above various manufacturing and joining technologies are pursued. Their later applicability depends on the level of development

  9. Helium gas purity monitor based on low frequency acoustic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasthurirengan, S.; Jacob, S.; Karunanithi, R.; Karthikeyan, A.

    1996-05-01

    Monitoring gas purity is an important aspect of gas recovery stations where air is usually one of the major impurities. Purity monitors of Katherometric type are commercially available for this purpose. Alternatively, we discuss here a helium gas purity monitor based on acoustic resonance of a cavity at audio frequencies. It measures the purity by monitoring the resonant frequency of a cylindrical cavity filled with the gas under test and excited by conventional telephone transducers fixed at the ends. The use of the latter simplifies the design considerably. The paper discusses the details of the resonant cavity and the electronic circuit along with temperature compensation. The unit has been calibrated with helium gas of known purities. The unit has a response time of the order of 10 minutes and measures the gas purity to an accuracy of 0.02%. The unit has been installed in our helium recovery system and is found to perform satisfactorily.

  10. Prospects of power conversion technology of direct-cycle helium gas turbine for MHTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yong; Zhang Zuoyi

    1999-01-01

    The modular high temperature gas cooled reactor (MHTGR) is a modern passively safe reactor. The reactor and helium gas turbine may be combined for high efficiency's power conversion, because MHTGR has high outlet temperature up to 950 degree C. Two different schemes are planed separately by USA and South Africa. the helium gas turbine methodologies adopted by them are mainly based on the developed heavy duty industrial and aviation gas turbine technology. The author introduces the differences of two technologies and some design issues in the design and manufacture. Moreover, the author conclude that directly coupling a closed Brayton cycle gas turbine concept to the passively safe MHTGR is the developing direction of MHTGR due to its efficiency which is much higher than that of using steam turbine

  11. High temperature helium-cooled fast reactor (HTHFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, R.A.; Blaylock, Dwayne; Burgett, Eric; Mostafa Ghiaasiaan, S.; Hertel, Nolan

    2006-01-01

    Scoping calculations have been performed for a very high temperature (1000 o C) helium-cooled fast reactor involving two distinct options: (1) using graphite foam into which UC (12% enrichment) is embedded into a matrix comprising UC and graphite foam molded into hexagonal building blocks and encapsulated with a SiC shell covering all surfaces, and (2) using UC only (also 12% enrichment) molded into the same shape and size as the foam-UC matrix in option 1. Both options use the same basic hexagonal fuel matrix blocks to form the core and reflector. The reflector contains natural uranium only. Both options use 50 μm SiC as a containment shell for fission product retention within each hexagonal block. The calculations show that the option using foam (option 1) would produce a reactor that can operate continuously for at least 25 years without ever adding or removing any fuel from the reactor. The calculations show further that the UC only option (option 2) can operate continually for 50 years without ever adding or removing fuel from the reactor. Doppler and loss of coolant reactivity coefficients were calculated. The Doppler coefficient is negative and much larger than the loss of coolant coefficient, which was very small and positive. Additional progress on and development of the two concepts are continuing

  12. Considerations on techniques for improving tritium confinement in helium-cooled ceramic breeder blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuetterer, M.A.; Raepsaet, X.; Proust, E.; Leger, D.

    1994-01-01

    Tritium control issues such as the development of permeation barriers and the choice of the coolant and purge-gas chemistry are of crucial importance for solid breeder blankets. In order to quantify these problems for the helium-cooled ceramic breeder-inside-tube (BIT) blanket concept, the tritium leakage into the coolant was evaluated and the consequent tritium losses into the steam circuit were determined. The results indicate that under certain specified conditions the total tritium release from the coolant can be limited to approximately 10 Ci/d, but only on the assumption that experimental data for tritium permeation barriers can be attained under realistic operating conditions. An experimental study on the impact of the gas chemistry on tritium losses is proposed. (author) 8 refs.; 2 figs

  13. Liquid helium-cooled MOSFET preamplifier for use with astronomical bolometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    A liquid helium-cooled p-channel enhancement mode MOSFET, the 3N167, is found to have sufficiently low noise for use as a preamplifier with helium-cooled bolometers that are used in infrared astronomy. Its characteristics at 300, 77, and 4.2 K are presented. It is also shown to have useful application with certain photoconductive and photovoltaic infrared detectors.

  14. Noble gas, binary mixtures for commercial gas-cooled reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M. S.; Tournier, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Commercial gas cooled reactors employ helium as a coolant and working fluid for the Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) turbo-machines. Helium has the highest thermal conductivity and lowest dynamic viscosity of all noble gases. This paper compares the relative performance of pure helium to binary mixtures of helium and other noble gases of higher molecular weights. The comparison is for the same molecular flow rate, and same operating temperatures and geometry. Results show that although helium is a good working fluid because of its high heat transfer coefficient and significantly lower pumping requirement, a binary gas mixture of He-Xe with M = 15 gm/mole has a heat transfer coefficient that is ∼7% higher than that of helium and requires only 25% of the number stages of the turbo-machines. The binary mixture, however, requires 3.5 times the pumping requirement with helium. The second best working fluid is He-Kr binary mixture with M = 10 gm/mole. It has 4% higher heat transfer coefficient than He and requires 30% of the number of stages in the turbo-machines, but requires twice the pumping power

  15. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of work performed from January 1, 1977 through March 31, 1977 on the Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program are presented. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Process Heat and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (impure Helium), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes progress to date on alloy selection for VHTR Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) applications and for DCHT applications. The present status on the simulated reactor helium loop design and on designs for the testing and analysis facilities and equipment is discussed

  16. Solutions for Liquid Nitrogen Pre-Cooling in Helium Refrigeration Cycles

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, U

    2000-01-01

    Pre-cooling of helium by means of liquid nitrogen is the oldest and one of the most common process features used in helium liquefiers and refrigerators. Its two principle tasks are to allow or increase the rate of pure liquefaction, and to permit the initial cool-down of large masses to about 80 K. Several arrangements for the pre-cooling process are possible depending on the desired application. Each arrangement has its proper advantages and drawbacks. The aim of this paper is to review the possible process solutions for liquid nitrogen pre-cooling and their particularities.

  17. CARR-CNS with crescent-shape moderator cell and sub-cooling helium jacket around cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Qingfeng; Feng, Quanke; Kawai, Takeshi; Cheng, Liang; Shen, Feng; Yuan, Luzheng

    2005-01-01

    The new type of the moderator cell was developed for the Cold Neutron Source (CNS) of the China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) which is now constructing at the China Institute of Atomic Energy in Beijing. A crescent-shape moderator cell covered by the sub-cooling helium jacket is adopted. A crescent-shape would help to increase the volume of the moderator cell for corresponding it to the 4 cold neutron guide tubes, even if liquid hydrogen not liquid deuterium were used as a cold moderator. The sub-cooling helium jacket covering the moderator cell removes the nuclear heating of the outer shell wall of the cell. It contributes to reduce the void fraction of liquid hydrogen in the inner shell. Such a type of a moderator cell is suitable for the CNS with higher nuclear heating. The cold helium gas flows down firstly into the sub-cooling helium jacket and then flows up to the condenser. Therefore, the theory of the self-regulation for the thermo-siphon type of the CNS is also applicable

  18. Strength analysis of CARR-CNS with crescent-shape moderator cell and helium sub-cooling jacket covering cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qingfeng; Feng Quanke; Kawai Takeshi; Shen Feng; Yuan Luzheng; Cheng Liang

    2005-01-01

    The new type of the moderator cell was developed for the cold neutron source (CNS) of the China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) which is now being constructed at the China Institute of Atomic Energy in Beijing. A crescent-shape moderator cell covered by the helium sub-cooling jacket is adopted. The structure of the moderator cell is optimized by the stress FEM analysis. A crescent-shape would help to increase the volume of the moderator cell for fitting it to the four cold neutron guide tubes, even if liquid hydrogen, not liquid deuterium, was used as a cold moderator. The helium sub-cooling jacket covering the moderator cell removes the nuclear heating of the outer shell wall of the cell. It contributes to reduce the void fraction of liquid hydrogen in the outer shell of the moderator cell. Such a type of a moderator cell is suitable for the CNS with higher nuclear heating. The cold helium gas flows down first into the helium sub-cooling jacket and then flows up to the condenser. The theory of the self-regulation suitable to the thermo-siphon type of the CNS is also applicable and validated

  19. CARR-CNS with crescent-shape moderator cell and sub-cooling helium jacket surrounding cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Qingfeng; Feng, Quanke; Kawai, Takeshi; Shen, Feng; Yuan, Luzheng

    2005-01-01

    The new type of the moderator cell was developed for the Cold Neutron Source (CNS) of the China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) which is now constructing at the China Institute of Atomic Energy in Beijing. A crescent-shape moderator cell covered by the sub-cooling helium jacket is adopted. A crescent-shape would help to increase the volume of the moderator cell for corresponding it to the 4 cold neutron guide tubes, even if liquid hydrogen not liquid deuterium were used as a cold moderator. The sub-cooling helium jacket covering the moderator cell removes the nuclear heating of the outer shell wall of the cell. It contributes to reduce the void fraction of liquid hydrogen in the inner shell. Such a type of a moderator cell is suitable for the CNS with higher nuclear heating. The cold helium gas flows down firstly into the sub-cooling helium jacket and then flows up to the condenser. Therefore, the theory of the self-regulation for the thermo-siphon type of the CNS is also applicable

  20. High-temperature gas-cooled reactors and process heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) are fueled with ceramic-coated microspheres of uranium and thorium oxides/carbides embedded in graphite blocks which are cooled with helium. Promising areas of HTGR application are in cogeneration, energy transport using Heat Transfer Salt, recovery of oils from oil shale, steam reforming of methane for chemical production, coal gasification, and in energy transfer using chemical heat jpipes in the long term. Further, HTGRs could be used as the energy source for hydrogen production through thermochemical water splitting in the long term. The potential market for Process Heat HTGRs is 100-200 large units by about the year 2020

  1. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... mixture during pulmonary function testing. The device may use techniques such as thermal conductivity, gas... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...

  2. Pressurized helium II-cooled magnet test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, R.P.; Lambertson, G.R.; Gilbert, W.S.; Meuser, R.B.; Caspi, S.; Schafer, R.V.

    1980-06-01

    A facility for testing superconducting magnets in a pressurized bath of helium II has been constructed and operated. The cryostat accepts magnets up to 0.32 m diameter and 1.32 m length with current to 3000 A. In initial tests, the volume of helium II surrounding the superconducting magnet was 90 liters. Minimum temperature reached was 1.7 K at which point the pumping system was throttled to maintain steady temperature. Helium II reservoir temperatures were easily controlled as long as the temperature upstream of the JT valve remained above T lambda; at lower temperatures control became difficult. Positive control of the temperature difference between the liquid and cold sink by means of an internal heat source appears necessary to avoid this problem. The epoxy-sealed vessel closures, with which we have had considerable experience with normal helium vacuum, also worked well in the helium II/vacuum environment

  3. CEA programme on gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Fiorini, G.L.; Chapelot, Ph.; Gauthier, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    partly builds on the past experience of the CEA on gas cooled reactors (UNGG, HTR) and on the current effort to revive and update High Temperature Reactor technologies to support the development of modular helium cooled reactors (∼300 MWe) by Framatome-ANP and international partners. In this context, the CEA decided to focus prospective R and D work on the development of a consistent set of gas cooled nuclear systems ranging from medium term reactor projects for electricity generation and other applications (robust and secure export model, process heat, hydrogen production at very high temperature, plutonium burning) to a longer term vision of sustainable nuclear systems using fast neutrons with a closed and integrated fuel cycle. This range of gas cooled nuclear systems covers a wide variety of high temperature applications as well as a broad range of fuel cycles, including synergistic fuel cycles with light water reactors (i.e. burning plutonium and possibly also minor actinides from PWR spent fuels). A specific research and development programme is being currently implemented to support the development of this consistent set of gas cooled systems. The major emphasis is put on fuel particles re-fabrication and possible adaptations to fast neutrons, on high temperature materials, high temperature systems technology, and compact spent fuel processing and re-fabrication processes. This programme anticipates the construction of large experimental facilities in the next decade, such as an He integral test loop (2007), a technology testing reactor and a lab scaled integrated fuel cycle (2012). A substantial effort is also invested in the validation of computational tools and procedures for feasibility and performance studies. Strong connections with fundamental research (nuclear physics, materials science, nuclear chemistry) are essential to improve the modelling capability and to achieve effective breakthroughs for the development of high temperature and high irradiation

  4. Impingement jet cooling in gas turbines

    CERN Document Server

    Amano, R S

    2014-01-01

    Due to the requirement for enhanced cooling technologies on modern gas turbine engines, advanced research and development has had to take place in field of thermal engineering. Impingement jet cooling is one of the most effective in terms of cooling, manufacturability and cost. This is the first to book to focus on impingement cooling alone.

  5. Performance of cold compressors in a cooling system of an R and D superconducting coil cooled with subcooled helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, S.; Imagawa, S.; Yanagi, N.; Takahata, K.; Maekawa, R.; Mito, T.

    2006-01-01

    The helical coils of large helical device (LHD) have been operated in saturated helium at 4.4 K and plasma experiments have been carried out at magnetic fields lower than 3 T for 8 years. Now, it is considered that the cooling system of helical coils will be improved to enhance magnetic fields in 2006. In the improvement, the helical coils will be cooled with subcooled helium and the operating temperature of helical coils will be lowered to achieve the designed field of 3 T and enhance cryogenic stabilities. Two cold compressors will be used in the cooling system of helical coils to generate subcooled helium. In the present study, the performance of cold compressors has been investigated, using a cooling system of R and D coil, to apply cold compressors to the cooling system of helical coils. Actual surge lines of cold compressors were observed and the stable operation area was obtained. Automatic operations were also performed within the area. In the automatic operations, the suitable pressure of a saturated helium bath, calculated from the rotation speed of the 1st cold compressor, was regulated by bypass valve. From these results, stable operations will be expected in the cooling system of helical coils

  6. Is cold better ? - exploring the feasibility of liquid-helium-cooled optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assoufid, L.; Mills, D.; Macrander, A.; Tajiri, G.

    1999-01-01

    Both simulations and recent experiments conducted at the Advanced Photon Source showed that the performance of liquid-nitrogen-cooled single-silicon crystal monochromators can degrade in a very rapid nonlinear fashion as the power and for power density is increased. As a further step towards improving the performance of silicon optics, we propose cooling with liquid helium, which dramatically improves the thermal properties of silicon beyond that of liquid nitrogen and brings the performance of single silicon-crystal-based synchrotrons radiation optics up to the ultimate limit. The benefits of liquid helium cooling as well as some of the associated technical challenges will be discussed, and results of thermal and structural finite elements simulations comparing the performance of silicon monochromators cooled with liquid nitrogen and helium will be given

  7. High temperature friction and seizure in gas cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousseran, P.; Febvre, A.; Martin, R.; Roche, R.

    1978-01-01

    One of the most delicate problems encountered in the gas cooled nuclear reactors is the friction without lubrication in a dry and hot (800 0 C /1472 0 F) helium atmosphere even at very small velocity. The research and development programs are described together with special tribometers that operate at mode than 1000 0 C (1832 0 F) in dry helium. The most interesting test conditions and results are given for gas nitrited steels and for strongly alloyed Ni-Cr steels coated with chromium carbide by plasma sprayed. The effects of parameters live velocity, travelled distance, contact pressure, roughness, temperature and prolonged stops under charge are described together with the effects of negative phenomena like attachment and chattering [fr

  8. Design and analysis of breeding blanket with helium cooled solid breeder for ITER-TBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Tao; Feng Kaiming; Chen Zhi; Wang Xiaoyu

    2007-01-01

    Test blanket module (TBM) is one of important components in ITER. Some of related blanket technologies of future fusion, such as tritium self-sufficiency, the exaction of high-grade heat, design criteria and safety requirements and environmental impacts, will be demonstrated in ITER-TBM. In ITER device, the three equatorial ports have allocated for TBM testing. China had proposed to develop independently the ITER-TBM with helium cooled solid breeder in 12th meeting of test blanket workgroup (TBWG-12). In this work, the preliminary design and analysis for Chinese HCSB TBM will be carried out. The TBM must be contains the function of the first wall, breeding blanket, shield and structure. Finally, in the period of preliminary investigation, HCSB TBM design adopt modularization concept which is helium as coolant and tritium purge gas, ferritic/martensitic steel as structural material, Lithium orthosilicate (Li 4 SiO 4 ) as tritium breeder, beryllium pebble as neutron multiplier. TBM is allocated in standard vertical frame port. HCSB TBM consist of first wall, backplate, breeding sub-modules, caps, grid and support plate, and breeding sub-modules is arranged by layout of 2 x 6 in blanket box. In this paper, main components of HCSB TBM will be described in detail, also performance analysis of main components have been completed. (authors)

  9. RF DEMO ceramic helium cooled blanket, coolant and energy transformation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, V.; Leshukov, A.; Poliksha, V.; Popov, A.; Strebkov, Yu.; Borisov, A.; Shatalov, G.; Demidov, V.; Kapyshev, V.

    2004-01-01

    RF DEMO-S reactor is a prototype of commercial fusion reactors for further generation. A blanket is the main element unit of the reactor design. The segment structure is the basis of the ceramic blanket. The segments mounting/dismounting operations are carried out through the vacuum vessel vertical port. The inboard/outboard blanket segment is the modules welded design, which are welded by back plate. The module contains the back plate, the first wall, lateral walls and breeding zone. The 9CrMoVNb steel is used as structural material. The module internal space formed by the first wall, lateral walls and back plate is used for breeding zone arrangement. The breeding zone design based upon the poloidal BIT (Breeder Inside Tube) concept. The beryllium is used as multiplier material and the lithium orthosilicate is used as breeder material. The helium at 0.1 MPa is used as purge gas. The cooling is provided by helium at 10 MPa. The coolant supply/return to the blanket modules are carrying out on the two independent circuits. The performed investigations of possible transformation schemes of DEMO-S blanket heat power into the electricity allowed to make a conclusion about the preferable using of traditional steam-turbine facility in the secondary circuit. (author)

  10. Helium release rates and ODH calculations from RHIC magnet cooling line failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liaw, C.J.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2011-03-28

    A catastrophic failure of the magnet cooling lines, similar to the LHC superconducting bus failure incident, could discharge cold helium into the RHIC tunnel and cause an Oxygen Deficiency Hazard (ODH) problem. A SINDA/FLUINT{reg_sign} model, which simulated the 4.5K/4 atm helium flowing through the magnet cooling system distribution lines, then through a line break into the insulating vacuum volumes and discharging via the reliefs into the RHIC tunnel, had been developed. Arc flash energy deposition and heat load from the ambient temperature cryostat surfaces are included in the simulations. Three typical areas: the sextant arc, the Triplet/DX/D0 magnets, and the injection area, had been analyzed. Results, including helium discharge rates, helium inventory loss, and the resulting oxygen concentration in the RHIC tunnel area, are reported. Good agreement had been achieved when comparing the simulation results, a RHIC sector depressurization test measurement, and some simple analytical calculations.

  11. Application of Hastelloy X in gas-cooled reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkman, C.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Corwin, W.R.; Strizak, J.P.; Lystrup, A.; DiStefano, J.R.

    1976-10-01

    Hastelloy X, an Ni--Cr--Fe--Mo alloy, may be an important structural alloy for components of gas-cooled reactor systems. Expected applications of this alloy in the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) are discussed, and the development of interim mechanical properties and supporting data are reported. Properties of concern include tensile, creep, creep-rupture, fatigue, creep-fatigue interaction, subcritical crack growth, thermal stability, and the influence of helium environments with controlled amounts of impurities on these properties. In order to develop these properties in helium environments that are expected to be prototypic of HTGR operating conditions, it was necessary to construct special environmental test systems. Details of construction and operating parameters are described. Interim results from tests designed to determine the above properties are presented. To date a fairly extensive amount of information has been generated on this material at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and elsewhere concerning behavior in air, which is reviewed. However, only limited data are available from tests conducted in helium. Comparisons of the fatigue and subcritical growth behavior in air between Hastelloy X and a number of other structural alloys are given

  12. Core catcher cooling for a gas-cooled fast breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Dorner, S.; Schretzmann, K.

    1976-01-01

    Water, molten salts, and liquid metals are under discussion as coolants for the core catcher of a gas-cooled fast breeder. The authors state that there is still no technically mature method of cooling a core melt. However, the investigations carried out so far suggest that there is a solution to this problem. (RW/AK) [de

  13. Preliminary design of the cooling system for a gas-cooled, high-fluence fast pulsed reactor (HFFPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteith, H.C.

    1978-10-01

    The High-Fluence Fast Pulsed Reactor (HFFPR) is a research reactor concept currently being evaluated as a source for weapon effects experimentation and advanced reactor safety experiments. One of the designs under consideration is a gas-cooled design for testing large-scale weapon hardware or large bundles of full-length, fast reactor fuel pins. This report describes a conceptual cooling system design for such a reactor. The primary coolant would be helium and the secondary coolant would be water. The size of the helium-to-water heat exchanger and the water-to-water heat exchanger will be on the order of 0.9 metre (3 feet) in diameter and 3 metres (10 feet) in length. Analysis indicates that the entire cooling system will easily fit into the existing Sandia Engineering Reactor Facility (SERF) building. The alloy Incoloy 800H appears to be the best candidate for the tube material in the helium-to-water heat exchanger. Type 316 stainless steel has been recommended for the shell of this heat exchanger. Estimates place the cost of the helium-to-water heat exchanger at approximately $100,000, the water-to-water heat exchanger at approximately $25,000, and the helium pump at approximately $450,000. The overall cost of the cooling system will approach $2 million

  14. Population inversion in a recombining hydrogen plasma interacting with a helium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Toshiatsu; Furukane, Utaro.

    1984-08-01

    A numerical investigation has shown that the population inversion between the levels with the principal quantum number i=2 and 3 takes place in a recombining hydrogen plasma which is interacting with a cool and dense helium gas on the basis of a collisional- radiative (CR) model. Overpopulation density Δn 32 , which is defined as the difference between the population densities per unit statistical weight of the upper and lower excited levels 3 and 2, is found to be much higher than a threshold level for the laser oscillation in the quasi-steady state when the hydrogen plasma with nsub(e) = 10 13 --10 14 cm -3 interacts with the helium gas with pressure of --50 Torr. (author)

  15. Numerical modeling and validation of helium jet impingement cooling of high heat flux divertor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koncar, Bostjan; Simonovski, Igor; Norajitra, Prachai

    2009-01-01

    Numerical analyses of jet impingement cooling presented in this paper were performed as a part of helium-cooled divertor studies for post-ITER generation of fusion reactors. The cooling ability of divertor cooled by multiple helium jets was analysed. Thermal-hydraulic characteristics and temperature distributions in the solid structures were predicted for the reference geometry of one cooling finger. To assess numerical errors, different meshes (hexagonal, tetra, tetra-prism) and discretisation schemes were used. The temperatures in the solid structures decrease with finer mesh and higher order discretisation and converge towards finite values. Numerical simulations were validated against high heat flux experiments, performed at Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg. The predicted design parameters show reasonable agreement with measured data. The calculated maximum thimble temperature was below the tile-thimble brazing temperature, indicating good heat removal capability of reference divertor design. (author)

  16. Utilization of multi-purpose high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawada, Osamu; Onuki, Yoshiaki; Wasaoka, Takeshi.

    1974-01-01

    Concerning the utilization of multi-purpose high temperature gas-cooled reactors, the electric power generation with gas turbines is described: features of HTR-He gas turbine power plants; the state of development of He gas turbines; and combined cycle with gas turbines and steam turbines. The features of gas turbines concern heat dissipation into the environment and the mode of load operation. Outstanding work in the development of He gas turbines is that in Hochtemperatur Helium-Turbine Project in West Germany. The power generation with combined gas turbines and steam turbines appears to be superior to that with gas turbines alone. (Mori, K.)

  17. Natural gas cooling: Part of the solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews and compares the efficiencies and performance of a number of gas cooling systems with a comparable electric cooling system. The results show that gas cooling systems compare favorably with the electric equivalents, offering a new dimension to air conditioning and refrigeration systems. The paper goes on to compare the air quality benefits of natural gas to coal or oil-burning fuel systems which are used to generate the electricity for the electric cooling systems. Finally, the paper discusses the regulatory bias that the author feels exists towards the use of natural gas and the need for modification in the existing regulations to provide a 'level-playing field' for the gas cooling industry

  18. Heating up the gas cooling market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, G.

    2001-01-01

    Gas cooling is an exciting technology with a potentially bright future. It comprises the production of cooling (and heating) in buildings and industry, by substituting environmentally-friendlier natural gas or LPG over predominantly coal-fired electricity in air conditioning equipment. There are currently four established technologies using gas to provide cooling energy or conditioned air. These are: absorption, both direct gas-fired and utilising hot water or steam; gas engine driven vapour compression (GED); cogeneration, with absorption cooling driven by recovered heat; and desiccant systems. The emergence of gas cooling technologies has been, and remains, one of evolution rather than revolution. However, further development of the technology has had a revolutionary effect on the performance, reliability and consumer acceptability of gas cooling products. Developments from world-renowned manufacturers such as York, Hitachi, Robur and Thermax have produced a range of absorption equipment variously offering: the use of 100 percent environmentally-friendly refrigerants, with zero global warming potential; the ideal utilisation of waste heat from cogeneration systems; a reduction in electrical distribution and stand-by generation capacity; long product life expectancy; far less noise and vibration; performance efficiency maintained down to about 20 percent of load capacity; and highly automated and low-cost maintenance. It is expected that hybrid systems, that is a mixture of gas and electric cooling technologies, will dominate the future market, reflecting the uncertainty in the electricity market and the prospects of stable future gas prices

  19. Emergency cooling system for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, R.K.; Burylo, P.S.

    1975-01-01

    The site of the gas-cooled reactor with direct-circuit gas turbine is preferably the sea coast. An emergency cooling system with safety valve and emergency feed-water addition is designed which affects at least a part of the reactor core coolant after leaving the core. The emergency cooling system includes a water emergency cooling circuit with heat exchanger for the core coolant. The safety valve releases water or steam from the emergency coolant circuit when a certain temperature is exceeded; this is, however, replaced by the emergency feed-water. If the gas turbine exhibits a high and low pressure turbine stage, which are flowed through by coolant one behind another, a part of the coolant can be removed in front of each part turbine by two valves and be added to the haet exchanger. (RW/LH) [de

  20. Fuel Development For Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. K. Meyer

    2006-06-01

    The Generation IV Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) concept is proposed to combine the advantages of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (such as efficient direct conversion with a gas turbine and the potential for application of high-temperature process heat), with the sustainability advantages that are possible with a fast-spectrum reactor. The latter include the ability to fission all transuranics and the potential for breeding. The GFR is part of a consistent set of gas-cooled reactors that includes a medium-term Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)-like concept, or concepts based on the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR), and specialized concepts such as the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), as well as actinide burning concepts [ ]. To achieve the necessary high power density and the ability to retain fission gas at high temperature, the primary fuel concept proposed for testing in the United States is a dispersion coated fuel particles in a ceramic matrix. Alternative fuel concepts considered in the U.S. and internationally include coated particle beds, ceramic clad fuel pins, and novel ceramic ‘honeycomb’ structures. Both mixed carbide and mixed nitride-based solid solutions are considered as fuel phases.

  1. A helium-cooled blanket design of the low aspect ratio reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.; Baxi, C.B.; Reis, E.E.; Cerbone, R.; Cheng, E.T.

    1998-03-01

    An aggressive low aspect ratio scoping fusion reactor design indicated that a 2 GW(e) reactor can have a major radius as small as 2.9 m resulting in a device with competitive cost of electricity at 49 mill/kWh. One of the technology requirements of this design is a high performance high power density first wall and blanket system. A 15 MPa helium-cooled, V-alloy and stagnant LiPb breeder first wall and blanket design was utilized. Due to the low solubility of tritium in LiPb, there is the concern of tritium migration and the formation of V-hydride. To address these issues, a lithium breeder system with high solubility of tritium has been evaluated. Due to the reduction of blanket energy multiplication to 1.2, to maintain a plant Q of > 4, the major radius of the reactor has to be increased to 3.05 m. The inlet helium coolant temperature is raised to 436 C in order to meet the minimum V-alloy temperature limit everywhere in the first wall and blanket system. To enhance the first wall heat transfer, a swirl tape coolant channel design is used. The corresponding increase in friction factor is also taken into consideration. To reduce the coolant system pressure drop, the helium pressure is increased from 15 to 18 MPa. Thermal structural analysis is performed for a simple tube design. With an inside tube diameter of 1 cm and a wall thickness of 1.5 mm, the lithium breeder can remove an average heat flux and neutron wall loading of 2 and 8 MW/m(2), respectively. This reference design can meet all the temperature and material structural design limits, as well as the coolant velocity limits. Maintaining an outlet coolant temperature of 650 C, one can expect a gross closed cycle gas turbine thermal efficiency of 45%. This study further supports the use of helium coolant for high power density reactor design. When used with the low aspect ratio reactor concept a competitive fusion reactor can be projected at 51.9 mill/kWh

  2. Gas-cooled reactor power systems for space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    Efficiency and mass characteristics for four gas-cooled reactor power system configurations in the 2- to 20-MWe power range are modeled. The configurations use direct and indirect Brayton cycles with and without regeneration in the power conversion loop. The prismatic ceramic core of the reactor consists of several thousand pencil-shaped tubes made from a homogeneous mixture of moderator and fuel. The heat rejection system is found to be the major contributor to system mass, particularly at high power levels. A direct, regenerated Brayton cycle with helium working fluid permits high efficiency and low specific mass for a 10-MWe system

  3. Maintenance free gas bearing helium blower for nuclear plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyneaux, A., Dr; Harris, M., Prof; Sharkh, S., Prof; Hill, S.; de Graaff, T.

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes the design, testing and operation of novel helium blowers used to recirculate the helium blanketing gas in the nuclear reactor used as a neutron source at the Institut Laue Langevan, Grenoble, France. The laser sintered shrouded centrifugal wheel operates at speeds up to 45000 rpm supported on helium lubricated hydrodynamic spiral groove bearings, and is driven by a sensorless permanent magnet motor. The entire machine is designed to keep the helium gas (polluted by a small amount of D2O) out of contact with any iron or copper materials which would contribute to the corrosion of parts of the circuit. It is designed to have zero maintenance during a lifetime of 40,000 hours of continuous operation. This paper will describe the spiral groove journal and thrust bearings. Design and manufacture of the 1 kW motor and centrifugal wheel will be explained including their CFD and FEA analyses. Measurements of rotor displacement will be presented showing the behaviour under factory testing as well as details of the measured centrifugal wheel and motor performances. Two machines are incorporated into the circuit to provide redundancy and the first blower has been in continuous operation since Jan 2015. The blower was designed, manufactured, assembled and tested in the UK using predominantly UK suppliers.

  4. 43 CFR 16.1 - Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas. 16.1 Section 16.1 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior CONSERVATION OF HELIUM § 16.1 Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas. (a) Pursuant to his authority and...

  5. Safety analysis on tokamak helium cooling slab fuel fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Renjie; Jian Hongbing

    1992-01-01

    The thermal analyses for steady state, depressurization and total loss of flow in the tokamak helium cooling slab fuel element fusion-fission hybrid reactor are presented. The design parameters, computed results of HYBRID program and safety evaluation for conception design are given. After all, it gives some recommendations for developing the design

  6. High-power frequency-stabilized laser for laser cooling of metastable helium at 389 nm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelemeij, J.C.J.; Hogervorst, W.; Vassen, W.

    2005-01-01

    A high-power, frequency-stabilized laser for cooling of metastable helium atoms using the 2 S13 →3 P23 transition at 389 nm has been developed. The 389 nm light is generated by frequency doubling of a titanium:sapphire laser in an external enhancement cavity containing a lithium-triborate nonlinear

  7. Effects of cyclic mean pressure of helium gas on performance of integral crank driven stirling cryocooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Yong Ju; Ko, Jun Seok; Kim, Hyo Bong; Park, Seong Je [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    An integral crank driven Stirling cryocooler is solidly based on concepts of direct IR detector mounting on the cryocooler's cold finger, and the integral construction of the cryocooler and Dewar envelope. Performance factors of the cryocooler depend on operating conditions of the cryocooler such as a cyclic mean pressure of the working fluid, a rotational speed of driving mechanism, a thermal environment, a targeted operation temperature and etc.. At given charging condition of helium gas, the cyclic mean pressure of helium gas in the cryocooler changes with temperatures of the cold end and the environment. In this study, effects of the cyclic mean pressure of helium gas on performances of the Stirling cryocooler were investigated by numerical analyses using the Sage software. The simulation model takes into account thermodynamic losses due to an inefficiency of regenerator, a pressure drop, a shuttle heat transfer and solid conductions. Simulations are performed for the performance variation according to the cyclic mean pressure induced by the temperature of the cold end and the environment. This paper presents P-V works in the compression and expansion space, cooling capacity, contribution of losses in the expansion space.

  8. Effects of cyclic mean pressure of helium gas on performance of integral crank driven stirling cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Yong Ju; Ko, Jun Seok; Kim, Hyo Bong; Park, Seong Je

    2016-01-01

    An integral crank driven Stirling cryocooler is solidly based on concepts of direct IR detector mounting on the cryocooler's cold finger, and the integral construction of the cryocooler and Dewar envelope. Performance factors of the cryocooler depend on operating conditions of the cryocooler such as a cyclic mean pressure of the working fluid, a rotational speed of driving mechanism, a thermal environment, a targeted operation temperature and etc.. At given charging condition of helium gas, the cyclic mean pressure of helium gas in the cryocooler changes with temperatures of the cold end and the environment. In this study, effects of the cyclic mean pressure of helium gas on performances of the Stirling cryocooler were investigated by numerical analyses using the Sage software. The simulation model takes into account thermodynamic losses due to an inefficiency of regenerator, a pressure drop, a shuttle heat transfer and solid conductions. Simulations are performed for the performance variation according to the cyclic mean pressure induced by the temperature of the cold end and the environment. This paper presents P-V works in the compression and expansion space, cooling capacity, contribution of losses in the expansion space

  9. Thermal optimization of the helium-cooled power leads for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demko, J.A.; Schiesser, W.E.; Carcagno, R.; McAshan, M.; McConeghy, R.

    1992-01-01

    The optimum thermal design of the power leads for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) will minimize the amount of Carnot work (which is a combination of refrigeration and liquefaction work) required. This optimization can be accomplished by the judicious selection of lead length and diameter. Even though an optimum set of dimensions is found, the final design must satisfy other physical constraints such as maximum allowable heat leak and helium vapor mass flow rate. A set of corresponding lengths and diameters has been determined that meets these requirements for the helium vapor-cooled, spiral-fin power lead design of the SSC. Early efforts by McFee and Mallon investigated optimizing power leads for cryogenic applications with no convection cooling. Later designs utilized the boiled-off helium vapor to cool the lead. One notable design for currents up to several thousand amps is presented by Efferson based on a series of recommendations discussed by Deiness. Buyanov presents many theoretical models and design formulae but does not demonstrate an approach to thermally optimizing the design of a vapor-cooled lead. In this study, a detailed numerical thermal model of a power lead design for the SSC has been developed. It was adapted from the dynamic model developed by Schiesser. This model was used to determine the optimum dimensions that minimize the Carnot refrigeration and liquefaction work due to the leads. Since the SSC leads will be cooled by supercritical helium, the flow of vapor is regulated by a control valve. These leads include a superconducting portion at the cold end. All of the material properties in the model are functions of temperature, and for the helium are functions of pressure and temperature. No pressure drop calculations were performed as part of this analysis. The diameter that minimizes the Carnot work was determined for four different lengths at a design current of 6600 amps

  10. Thermal optimization of the helium-cooled power leads for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demko, J.A.; Schiesser, W.E.; Carcagno, R.; McAshan, M.; McConeghy, R.

    1992-03-01

    The optimum thermal design of the power leads for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) will minimize the amount of Carnot work (which is a combination of refrigeration and liquefaction work) required. This optimization can be accomplished by the judicious selection of lead length and diameter. Even though an optimum set of dimensions is found, the final design must satisfy other physical constraints such as maximum allowable heat leak and helium vapor mass flow rate. A set of corresponding lengths and diameters has been determined that meets these requirements for the helium vapor-cooled, spiral-fin power lead design of the SSC. Early efforts by McFee and Mallon investigated optimizing power leads for cryogenic applications with no convection cooling. Later designs utilized the boiled-off helium vapor to cool the lead. One notable design for currents up to several thousand amps is presented by Efferson based on a series of recommendations discussed by Deiness. Buyanov presents many theoretical models and design formulate but does not demonstrate an approach to thermally optimizing the design of a vapor-cooled lead. A method for optimizing superconducting magnet current leads is described by Maehata et al. The approach assumes that the helium boil-off caused by heat conduction along with power lead into the low-temperature helium is used to cool the lead. The optimum solution is found when the heat flow at the cold end is minimized.. In this study, a detailed numerical thermal model of a power lead design for the SSC has been developed. It was adapted from the dynamic model developed by Schiesser. This model was used to determine the optimum dimensions that minimize the Carnot refrigeration and liquefaction work due to the leads

  11. Initial assessment of environmental effects on SiC/SiC composites in helium-cooled nuclear systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL

    2013-09-01

    This report summarized the information available in the literature on the chemical reactivity of SiC/SiC composites and of their components in contact with the helium coolant used in HTGR, VHTR and GFR designs. In normal operation conditions, ultra-high purity helium will have chemically controlled impurities (water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, hydrogen) that will create a slightly oxidizing gas environment. Little is known from direct experiments on the reactivity of third generation (nuclear grade) SiC/SiC composites in contact with low concentrations of water or oxygen in inert gas, at high temperature. However, there is ample information about the oxidation in dry and moist air of SiC/SiC composites at high temperatures. This information is reviewed first in the next chapters. The emphasis is places on the improvement in material oxidation, thermal, and mechanical properties during three stages of development of SiC fibers and at least two stages of development of the fiber/matrix interphase. The chemical stability of SiC/SiC composites in contact with oxygen or steam at temperatures that may develop in off-normal reactor conditions supports the conclusion that most advanced composites (also known as nuclear grade SiC/SiC composites) have the chemical resistance that would allow them maintain mechanical properties at temperatures up to 1200 1300 oC in the extreme conditions of an air or water ingress accident scenario. Further research is needed to assess the long-term stability of advanced SiC/SiC composites in inert gas (helium) in presence of very low concentrations (traces) of water and oxygen at the temperatures of normal operation of helium-cooled reactors. Another aspect that needs to be investigated is the effect of fast neutron irradiation on the oxidation stability of advanced SiC/SiC composites in normal operation conditions.

  12. Processing of coke oven gas. Primary gas cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, H [Otto (C.) und Co. G.m.b.H., Bochum (Germany, F.R.)

    1976-11-01

    The primary cooler is an indispensable part of all byproduct processing plants. Its purpose is to cool the raw gas from the coke oven battery and to remove the accompanying water vapor. The greater part of the cooling capacity is utilized for the condensation of water vapor and only a small capacity is needed for the gas cooling. Impurities in the gas, like naphthalene, tar and solid particles, necessitate a special design in view of the inclination to dirt accumulation. Standard types of direct and indirect primary gas coolers are described, with a discussion of their advantages and disadvantages.

  13. Medium-size high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peinado, C.O.; Koutz, S.L.

    1980-08-01

    This report summarizes high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) experience for the 40-MW(e) Peach Bottom Nuclear Generating Station of Philadelphia Electric Company and the 330-MW(e) Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station of the Public Service Company of Colorado. Both reactors are graphite moderated and helium cooled, operating at approx. 760 0 C (1400 0 F) and using the uranium/thorium fuel cycle. The plants have demonstrated the inherent safety characteristics, the low activation of components, and the high efficiency associated with the HTGR concept. This experience has been translated into the conceptual design of a medium-sized 1170-MW(t) HTGR for generation of 450 MW of electric power. The concept incorporates inherent HTGR safety characteristics [a multiply redundant prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), a graphite core, and an inert single-phase coolant] and engineered safety features

  14. Particle exhaust of helium plasmas with actively cooled outboard pump limiter on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, T.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Loarer, T.; Chatelier, M.; Guilhem, D.; Lutz, T.; Nygren, R.E.; Mahdavi, M.A.

    1995-08-01

    The superconducting tokamak Tore Supra was designed for long-pulse (30-s) high input power operation. Here observations on the particle-handling characteristics of the actively cooled modular outboard pump limiter (OPL) are presented for helium discharges. The important experimental result was that a modest pumping speed (1 m 3 /s) of the OPL turbomolecular pump (TMP) provided background helium exhaust. This result came about due to a well-conditioned vessel wall with helium discharges that caused no wall outgasing. The particle accountability in these helium discharges was excellent, and the well-conditioned wall did not play a significant role in the particle balance. The helium density control, 25% density drop with OPL exhaust efficiency of ∼1%, was possible with TMP although this may not be the case with reactive gases such as deuterium. The observed quadratic increase of the OPL neutral pressure with helium density was consistent with an improvement of the particle control with increasing plasma density

  15. Conceptual design of two helium cooled fusion blankets (ceramic and liquid breeder) for INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Dorner, S.; Taczanowski, S.

    1983-08-01

    Neutronic and heat transfer calculations have been performed for two helium cooled blankets for the INTOR design. The neutronic calculations show that the local tritium breeding ratios, both for the ceramic blanket (Li 2 SiO 3 ) and for the liquid blanket (Li 17 Pb 83 ) solutions, are 1.34 for natural tritium and about 1.45 using 30% Li 6 enrichment. The heat transfer calculations show that it is possible to cool the divertor section of the torus (heat flux = 1.7 MW/m 2 ) with helium with an inlet pressure of 52 bar and an inlet temperature of 40 0 C. The temperature of the back face of the divertor can be kept at 130 0 C. With helium with the same inlet conditions it is possible to cool the first wall as well (heat flux = 0.136 MW/m 2 ) and keep the back-face of this wall at a temperature of 120 0 C. For the ceramic blanket we use helium with 52 bar inlet pressure and 400 0 C inlet temperature to ensure sufficiently high temperatures in the breeder material. The maximum temperature in the pressure tubes containing the blanket is 450 0 C, while the maximum breeder particle temperature is 476 0 C. (orig./RW) [de

  16. Study on Off-Design Steady State Performances of Helium Gas Turbo-compressor for HTGR-GT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qisen Ren; Xiaoyong Yang; Zhiyong Huang; Jie Wang

    2006-01-01

    The high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) coupled with direct gas turbine cycle is a promising concept in the future of nuclear power development. Both helium gas turbine and compressor are key components in the cycle. Under normal conditions, the mode of power adjustment is to control total helium mass in the primary loop using gas storage vessels. Meanwhile, thermal power of reactor core is regulated. This article analyzes off-design performances of helium gas turbine and compressors for high temperature gas-cooled reactor with gas turbine cycle (HTGR-GT) at steady state level of electric power adjustment. Moreover, performances of the cycle were simply discussed. Results show that the expansion ratio of turbine decreases as electric power reduces but the compression ratios of compressors increase, efficiencies of both turbine and compressors decrease to some extent. Thermal power does not vary consistently with electric power, the difference between these two powers increases as electric power reduces. As a result of much thermal energy dissipated in the temperature modulator set at core inlet, thermal efficiency of the cycle has a widely reduction under partial load conditions. (authors)

  17. A High Reliability Gas-driven Helium Cryogenic Centrifugal Compressor

    CERN Document Server

    Bonneton, M; Gistau-Baguer, Guy M; Turcat, F; Viennot, P

    1998-01-01

    A helium cryogenic compressor was developed and tested in real conditions in 1996. The achieved objective was to compress 0.018 kg/s Helium at 4 K @ 1000 Pa (10 mbar) up to 3000 Pa (30 mbar). This project was an opportunity to develop and test an interesting new concept in view of future needs. The main features of this new specific technology are described. Particular attention is paid to the gas bearing supported rotor and to the pneumatic driver. Trade off between existing technologies and the present work are presented with special stress on the bearing system and the driver. The advantages are discussed, essentially focused on life time and high reliability without maintenance as well as non pollution characteristic. Practical operational modes are also described together with the experimental performances of the compressor. The article concludes with a brief outlook of future work.

  18. Status on DEMO Helium Cooled Lithium Lead breeding blanket thermo-mechanical analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, J., E-mail: julien.aubert@cea.fr [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Aiello, G.; Jaboulay, J.-C. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Kiss, B. [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest (Hungary); Morin, A. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • CEA with the support of Wigner-RCP and IPP-CR, is in charge of the design of the HCLL blanket for DEMO. The DEMO HCLL breeding blanket design capitalizes on the experience acquired on the HCLL Test Blanket Module designed for ITER. Design improvements are being implemented to adapt the design to DEMO specifications and performance objectives. • Thermal and mechanical analyses have been carried out in order to justify the design of the HCLL breeding blanket showing promising results for tie rods modules’ attachments system and relatively good behavior of the box in case of LOCA when comparing to RCC-MRx criteria. • CFD thermal analyses on generic breeding unit have enabled the consolidation of the results obtained with previous FEM design analyses. - Abstract: The EUROfusion Consortium develops a design of a fusion power demonstrator (DEMO) in the framework of the European “Horizon 2020” innovation and research program. One of the key components in the fusion reactor is the breeding blanket surrounding the plasma, ensuring tritium self-sufficiency, heat removal for conversion into electricity, and neutron shielding. The Helium Cooled Lithium Lead (HCLL) blanket is one of the concepts which is investigated for DEMO. It is made of a Eurofer structure and uses the eutectic liquid lithium–lead as tritium breeder and neutron multiplier, and helium gas as coolant. Within the EUROfusion organization, CEA with the support of Wigner-RCP and IPP-CR, is in charge of the design of the HCLL blanket for DEMO. This paper presents the status of the thermal and mechanical analyses carried out on the HCLL breeding blanket in order to justify the design. CFD thermal analyses on generic breeding unit including stiffening plates and cooling plates have been performed with ANSYS in order to consolidate results obtained with previous FEM design analyses. Moreover in order to expand the justification of the HCLL Breeding blanket design, the most loaded area of

  19. HTGR [High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor] ingress analysis using MINET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Tuyle, G.J.; Yang, J.W.; Kroeger, P.G.; Mallen, A.N.; Aronson, A.L.

    1989-04-01

    Modeling of water/steam ingress into the primary (helium) cooling circuit of a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is described. This modeling was implemented in the MINET Code, which is a program for analyzing transients in intricate fluid flow and heat transfer networks. Results from the simulation of a water ingress event postulated for the Modular HTGR are discussed. 27 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs

  20. A preliminary definition of the parameters of an experimental natural - uranium, graphite - moderated, helium - cooled power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltazar, O.

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary study of the technical characteristic of an experiment at 32 MWe power with a natural uconium, graphite-moderated, helium cooled reactor is described. The national participation and the use of reactor as an instrument for the technological development of future high temperature gas cooled reactor is considered in the choice of the reactor type. Considerations about nuclear power plants components based in extensive bibliography about similar english GCR reactor is presented. The main thermal, neutronic an static characteristic and in core management of the nuclear fuel is stablished. A simplified scheme of the secondary system and its thermodynamic performance is determined. A scheme of parameters calculation of the reactor type is defined based in the present capacity of calculation developed by Coordenadoria de Engenharia Nuclear and Centro de Processamento de Dados, IEA, Brazil [pt

  1. Hot gas path component cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Bunker, Ronald Scott; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2014-02-18

    A cooling system for a hot gas path component is disclosed. The cooling system may include a component layer and a cover layer. The component layer may include a first inner surface and a second outer surface. The second outer surface may define a plurality of channels. The component layer may further define a plurality of passages extending generally between the first inner surface and the second outer surface. Each of the plurality of channels may be fluidly connected to at least one of the plurality of passages. The cover layer may be situated adjacent the second outer surface of the component layer. The plurality of passages may be configured to flow a cooling medium to the plurality of channels and provide impingement cooling to the cover layer. The plurality of channels may be configured to flow cooling medium therethrough, cooling the cover layer.

  2. The Cold Mass Support System and the Helium Cooling System for the MICE Focusing Solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Stephanie Q.; Green, Michael A.; Lau, Wing W.; Senanayake, Rohan S.; Witte, Holger

    2006-01-01

    The heart of the absorber focus coil (AFC) module for the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) is the two-coil superconducting solenoid that surrounds the muon absorber. The superconducting magnet focuses the muons that are cooled using ionization cooling, in order to improve the efficiency of cooling. The coils of the magnet may either be run in the solenoid mode (both coils operate at the same polarity) or the gradient (the coils operate at opposite polarity). The AFC magnet cold mass support system is designed to carry a longitudinal force up to 700 kN. The AFC module will be cooled using three pulse tube coolers that produce 1.5 W of cooling at 4.2 K. One of the coolers will be used to cool the liquid (hydrogen or helium) absorber used for ionization cooling. The other two coolers will cool the superconducting solenoid. This report will describe the MICE AFC magnet. The cold mass supports will be discussed. The reasons for using a pulsed tube cooler to cool this superconducting magnet will also be discussed

  3. Adsorption of helium gas near Tλ at low pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachalin, G.V.; Kryukov, A.P.; Nesterov, S.B.

    1998-01-01

    Cryosorption of helium isotopes ( 4 He and 3 He) on thin argon cryo layers is studied experimentally in the temperature range 4.2-2 K at low pressures. It is shown that the sorption iso stere 4 He is anomalous at temperatures close to be temperature of the phase transition in the bulk of 4 He, T λ . An abrupt pressure change is observed for a 4 He film thickness approximately equal to two monolayers. The experiments on cryosorption of 3 He gas on an argon layer with a 3 He film thickness of approximately one monolayer display monotonous changes in the pressure within the whole temperature range

  4. Study of Transient Heat Transport Mechanisms in Superfluid Helium Cooled Rutherford-Cables

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2100615

    The Large Hadron Collider leverages superconducting magnets to focus the particle beam or keep it in its circular track. These superconducting magnets are composed of NbTi-cables with a special insulation that allows superfluid helium to enter and cool the superconducting cable. Loss mechanisms, e.g. continuous random loss of particles escaping the collimation system heating up the magnets. Hence, a local temperature increase can occur and lead to a quench of the magnets when the superconductor warms up above the critical temperature. A detailed knowledge about the temperature increases in the superconducting cable (Rutherford type) ensures a secure operation of the LHC. A sample of the Rutherford cable has been instrumented with temperature sensors. Experiments with this sample have been performed within this study to investigate the cooling performance of the helium in the cable due to heat deposition. The experiment uses a superconducting coil, placed in a cryostat, to couple with the magnetic field loss m...

  5. Supercritical helium cooled, cabled, superconducting hollow conductors for large high field magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoenig, M.O.; Iwasa, Y.; Montgomery, D.B.; Bejan, A.

    1976-01-01

    Within the last two years a new concept of cabled superconducting hollow conductors has been developed which are able to recover from transient instabilities by virtue of on-going, single-phase helium cooling. It has been possible to correlate small scale experimental results with an iterative computer program. The latter has been recently upgraded to include axial as well as radial heat transfer and predict more closely the chances of recovery. Nearly 1 g/s of supercritical helium has been circulated in a closed loop using a high speed centrifugal fan and up to 10 g/s using a reciprocating single pulse bellows pump. The loop is now being adapted to a 3 m length of a tightly wound 5000 A cabled hollow conductor equipped with pulse coils designed to fit inside a water cooled Bitter magnet. The combination will allow for a steady background field of 7.5 t with a 2 t superimposed pulse. (author)

  6. Design of a power conversion system for an indirect cycle, helium cooled pebble bed reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.; Ballinger, R.G.; Stahle, P.W.; Demetri, E.; Koronowski, M.

    2002-01-01

    A design is presented for the turbomachinery for an indirect cycle, closed, helium cooled modular pebble bed reactor system. The design makes use of current technology and will operate with an overall efficiency of 45%. The design uses an intermediate heat exchanger which isolated the reactor cycle from the turbomachinery. This design excludes radioactive fission products from the turbomachinery. This minimizes the probability of an air ingress accident and greatly simplifies maintenance. (author)

  7. Design and safety analysis of the helium cooled solid breeder blanket for CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuai; Zhou, Guangming; Lv, Zhongliang; Jin, Cheng; Chen, Hongli [University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui (China). School of Nuclear Science and Technology

    2016-05-15

    This paper reports the design and safety analysis results of the helium cooled solid breeder blanket of the Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR). Materials selection and basic structure of the blanket have been presented. Performance analysis including neutronics analysis and thermo-mechanical analysis has shown good results. And the safety analysis of the blanket under Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions has been described. Results showed the current design can deal well with the selected accident scenarios.

  8. Parametric studies on different gas turbine cycles for a high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jie; Gu Yihua

    2005-01-01

    The high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) coupled with turbine cycle is considered as one of the leading candidates for future nuclear power plants. In this paper, the various types of HTGR gas turbine cycles are concluded as three typical cycles of direct cycle, closed indirect cycle and open indirect cycle. Furthermore they are theoretically converted to three Brayton cycles of helium, nitrogen and air. Those three types of Brayton cycles are thermodynamically analyzed and optimized. The results show that the variety of gas affects the cycle pressure ratio more significantly than other cycle parameters, however, the optimized cycle efficiencies of the three Brayton cycles are almost the same. In addition, the turbomachines which are required for the three optimized Brayton cycles are aerodynamically analyzed and compared and their fundamental characteristics are obtained. Helium turbocompressor has lower stage pressure ratio and more stage number than those for nitrogen and air machines, while helium and nitrogen turbocompressors have shorter blade length than that for air machine

  9. IAEA high temperature gas cooled reactor activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    IAEA activities on high temperature gas cooled reactors are conducted with the review and support of Member States, primarily through the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors (IWGGCR). This paper summarises the results of the IAEA gas cooled reactor project activities in recent years along with ongoing current activities through a review of Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs), meetings and other international efforts. A series of three recently completed CRPs have addressed the key areas of reactor physics for LEU fuel, retention of fission products, and removal of post shutdown decay heat through passive heat transport mechanisms. These activities along with other completed and ongoing supporting CRPs and meetings are summarised with reference to detailed documentation of the results. (author)

  10. Concept Design for a High Temperature Helium Brayton Cycle with Interstage Heating and Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vernon, Milton E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pickard, Paul S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The primary metric for the viability of these next generation nuclear power plants will be the cost of generated electricity. One important component in achieving these objectives is the development of power conversion technologies that maximize the electrical power output of these advanced reactors for a given thermal power. More efficient power conversion systems can directly reduce the cost of nuclear generated electricity and therefore advanced power conversion cycle research is an important area of investigation for the Generation IV Program. Brayton cycles using inert or other gas working fluids, have the potential to take advantage of the higher outlet temperature range of Generation IV systems and allow substantial increases in nuclear power conversion efficiency, and potentially reductions in power conversion system capital costs compared to the steam Rankine cycle used in current light water reactors. For the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), Helium Brayton cycles which can operate in the 900 to 950 C range have been the focus of power conversion research. Previous Generation IV studies examined several options for He Brayton cycles that could increase efficiency with acceptable capital cost implications. At these high outlet temperatures, Interstage Heating and Cooling (IHC) was shown to provide significant efficiency improvement (a few to 12%) but required increased system complexity and therefore had potential for increased costs. These scoping studies identified the potential for increased efficiency, but a more detailed analysis of the turbomachinery and heat exchanger sizes and costs was needed to determine whether this approach could be cost effective. The purpose of this study is to examine the turbomachinery and heat exchanger implications of interstage heating and cooling configurations. In general, this analysis illustrates that these engineering considerations introduce new constraints to the design of IHC systems that may require

  11. Ship exhaust gas plume cooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schleijpen, H.M.A.; Neele, P.P.

    2004-01-01

    The exhaust gas plume is an important and sometimes dominating contributor to the infrared signature of ships. Suppression of the infrared ship signatures has been studied by TNO for the Royal Netherlands Navy over considerable time. This study deals with the suppression effects, which can be

  12. Transient heat transfer for forced convection flow of helium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qiusheng; Fukuda, Katsuya; Sasaki, Kenji; Yamamoto, Manabu

    1999-01-01

    Transient heat transfer coefficients for forced convection flow of helium gas over a horizontal cylinder were measured using a forced convection test loop. The platinum heater with a diameter of 1.0 mm was heated by electric current with an exponential increase of Q 0 exp(t/τ). It was clarified that the heat transfer coefficient approaches the steady-state one for the period τ over 1 s, and it becomes higher for the period of τ shorter than 1 s. The transient heat transfer shows less dependent on the gas flowing velocity when the period becomes very shorter. Semi-empirical correlations for steady-state and transient heat transfer were developed based on the experimental data. (author)

  13. French activities on gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastien, D.

    1996-01-01

    The gas cooled reactor programme in France originally consisted of eight Natural Uranium Graphite Gas Cooled Reactors (UNGG). These eight units, which are now permanently shutdown, represented a combined net electrical power of 2,375 MW and a total operational history of 163 years. Studies related to these reactors concern monitoring and dismantling of decommissioned facilities, including the development of methods for dismantling. France has been monitoring the development of HTRs throughout the world since 1979, when it halted its own HTR R and D programme. France actively participates in three CRPs set up by the IAEA. (author). 1 tab

  14. Development of a wide range vortex shedding flowmeter for high temperature helium gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, S.P.; Ennis, R.M. Jr.; Herndon, P.G.

    1981-07-01

    A flowmeter was required to measure recirculating helium gas flow over a wide range of conditions in a gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) core flow simulator, the ORNL Core Flow Test Loop (CFTL). The flow measurement requirements of the CFTL exceeded the proven performance of any single conventional flowmeter. Therefore, a special purpose vortex shedding flowmeter (VSFM) was developed. A single flowmeter capable of meeting all the CFTL requirements would provide significant economic and performance advantages in the operation of the loop. The development, conceptual design, and final design of a modified VSFM are described. The results of extensive flow calibration of the flowmeter at the Colorado Engineering Experiment Station (CEES) are presented. The report closes with recommendations for application of the VSFM to the CFTL and for future development work.

  15. Parametric study of sodium aerosols in the cover-gas space of sodium-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheth, A.

    1975-03-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to describe the behavior of sodium aerosols in the cover-gas space of a sodium-cooled reactor. A review of the literature was first made to examine methods of aerosol generation, mathematical expressions representing aerosol behavior, and pertinent experimental investigations of sodium aerosols. In the development of the model, some terms were derived from basic principles and other terms were estimated from available correlations. The model was simulated on a computer, and important parameters were studied to determine their effects on the overall behavior of sodium aerosols. The parameters studied were sodium pool temperature, source and initial size of particles, film thickness at the sodium pool/cover gas interface, wall plating parameters, cover-gas flow rate, and type of cover gas (argon and helium). The model satisfactorily describes the behavior of sodium aerosol in argon, but not in helium. Possible reasons are given for the failure of the model with helium, and further experimental work is recommended. The mathematical model, with appropriate modifications to describe the behavior of sodium aerosols in helium, would be very useful in designing traps to remove aerosols from the cover gas of sodium-cooled reactors. (U.S.)

  16. Design and optimization of a multistage turbine for helium cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braembussche, R.A. van den; Brouckaert, J.F.; Paniagua, G.; Briottet, L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the aerodynamic design and explores the performance limits of a 600 MWt multistage helium turbine for a high temperature nuclear reactor closed cycle gas turbine. The design aims for maximum performance while limiting the number of stages for reasons of rotor dynamics and weight. A first part discusses the arguments that allow a preliminary selection of the overall dimensions by means of performance prediction correlations and simplified stress considerations. The rotational speed being fixed at 3000 rpm, the only degrees of freedom for the design are: the impeller diameter, number of stages and stage loading. The optimum load distribution of the different stages, the main flow parameters and the blade overall dimensions are defined by means of a 2D through-flow analysis method. The resulting absolute and relative flow angles and span-wise velocity variation are the input for a first detailed design by an inverse method. The latter defines the different 2D blade sections corresponding to prescribed optimum velocity distributions. The final 3D blade definition is made by means of a computer based 3D-DESIGN system developed at the von Karman Institute. This method combines a 3D Navier-Stokes (NS) solver, Database, Artificial Neural Network and Genetic Algorithm into a two level optimization technique for compressor and turbine stages. The use of 3D Navier-Stokes solvers allows full accounting of the secondary flow losses and optimization of the compound leaning of the stator vanes. The performance of the individual stages is used to define the multistage operating curves. The last part of the paper describes an evaluation of the cooling requirements of the first turbine rotor

  17. Behavior of helium gas atoms and bubbles in low activation 9Cr martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Shiraishi, Haruki; Matsui, Hideki; Abe, Katsunori

    1994-09-01

    The behavior of helium-gas release from helium-implanted 9Cr martensitic steels (500 appm implanted at 873 K) during tensile testing at 873 K was studied. Modified 9Cr-1Mo, low-activation 9Cr-2W and 9Cr-0.5V were investigated. Cold-worked AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel was also investigated as a reference which was susceptible helium embrittlement at high temperature. A helium release peak was observed at the moment of rupture in all the specimens. The total quantity of helium released from these 9Cr steels was in the same range but smaller than that of 316CW steel. Helium gas in the 9Cr steels should be considered to remain in the matrix at their lath-packets even if deformed at 873 K. This is the reason why the martensitic steels have high resistance to helium embrittlement.

  18. A description of bubble growth and gas release of helium implanted tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharafat, S.; Hu, Q.; Ghoniem, N.; Tkahashi, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Bubble growth and gas release during annealing of helium implanted tungsten is described using a Kinetic Monte Carlo approach. The implanted spatial profiles of stable bubble nuclei are first determined using the Kinetic Rate Theory based helium evolution code, HEROS. The effects of implantation energy, temperature, and bias forces, such as temperature- and stress gradients on bubble migration and coalescence are investigated to explain experimental gas release measurements. This comprehensive helium bubble evolution and release model, demonstrates the impact of near surface (< 1 um) versus deep helium implantation on bubble evolution. Near surface implanted helium bubbles readily attain large equilibrium sizes, while matrix bubbles remain small with high helium pressures. Using the computer simulation, the various stages of helium bubble nucleation, growth, coalescence, and migration are demonstrated and compared with available experimental results. (authors)

  19. Behavior of helium gas atoms and bubbles in low activation 9Cr martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Shiraishi, Haruki; Matsui, Hideki; Abe, Katsunori

    1994-01-01

    The behavior of helium-gas release from helium-implanted 9Cr martensitic steels (500 appm implanted at 873 K) during tensile testing at 873 K was studied. Modified 9Cr-1Mo, low-activation 9Cr-2W and 9Cr-0.5V were investigated. Cold-worked AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel was also investigated as a reference which was susceptible helium embrittlement at high temperature. A helium release peak was observed at the moment of rupture in all the specimens. The total quantity of helium released from these 9Cr steels was in the same range but smaller than that of 316CW steel. Helium gas in the 9Cr steels should be considered to remain in the matrix at their lath-packets even if deformed at 873 K. This is the reason why the martensitic steels have high resistance to helium embrittlement. ((orig.))

  20. Estimation of gas turbine blades cooling efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moskalenko, A.B.; Kozhevnikov, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper outlines the results of the evaluation of the most thermally stressed gas turbine elements, first stage power turbine blades, cooling efficiency. The calculations were implemented using a numerical simulation based on the Finite Element Method. The volume average temperature of the blade

  1. Advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeomans, R. M. [South of Scotland Electricity Board, Hunterston Power Station, West Kilbride, Ayshire, UK

    1981-01-15

    The paper describes the advanced gas-cooled reactor system, Hunterston ''B'' power station, which is a development of the earlier natural uranium Magnox type reactor. Data of construction, capital cost, operating performance, reactor safety and also the list of future developments are given.

  2. Gas-cooled reactor technology: a bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raleigh, H.D.

    1981-09-01

    Included are 3358 citations on gas-cooled reactor technology contained in the DOE Energy Data Base for the period January 1978 through June 1981. The citations include reports, journal articles, books, conference papers, patents, and monographs. Corporate, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number Indexes are provided

  3. Development of high temperature gas cooled reactor in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Wentao [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland). Dept. of Nuclear Energy and Safety; Schorer, Michael [Swiss Nuclear Forum, Olten (Switzerland)

    2018-02-15

    High temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) is one of the six Generation IV reactor types put forward by Generation IV International Forum (GIF) in 2002. This type of reactor has high outlet temperature. It uses Helium as coolant and graphite as moderator. Pebble fuel and ceramic reactor core are adopted. Inherit safety, good economy, high generating efficiency are the advantages of HTGR. According to the comprehensive evaluation from the international nuclear community, HTGR has already been given the priority to the research and development for commercial use. A demonstration project of the High Temperature Reactor-Pebble-�bed Modules (HTR-PM) in Shidao Bay nuclear power plant in China is under construction. In this paper, the development history of HTGR in China and the current situation of HTR-PM will be introduced. The experiences from China may be taken as a reference by the international nuclear community.

  4. Gas cooled fast breeder reactors using mixed carbide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kypreos, S.

    1976-09-01

    The fast reactors being developed at the present time use mixed oxide fuel, stainless-steel cladding and liquid sodium as coolant (LMFBR). Theoretical and experimental designing work has also been done in the field of gas-cooled fast breeder reactors. The more advanced carbide fuel offers greater potential for developing fuel systems with doubling times in the range of ten years. The thermohydraulic and physics performance of a GCFR utilising this fuel is assessed. One question to be answered is whether helium is an efficient coolant to be coupled with the carbide fuel while preserving its superior neutronic performance. Also, an assessment of the fuel cycle cost in comparison to oxide fuel is presented. (Auth.)

  5. Design, fabrication, and testing of a helium-cooled module for the ITER divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxi, C.B.; Smith, J.P.; Youchison, D.

    1994-08-01

    The International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER) will have a single-null divertor with total power flow of 200 MW and a peak heat flux of about 5 MW/m 2 . The reference coolant for the divertor is water. However, helium is a viable alternative and offers advantages from safety considerations, such as excellent radiation stability and chemical inertness. In order to prove the feasibility of helium cooling at ITER relevant heat flux conditions, General Atomics designed, fabricated, and tested a helium-cooled divertor module. The module was made from dispersion strengthened copper, with a heat flux surface 25 mm wide and 80 mm long, designed for twice the ITER divertor heat flux. Different techniques were examined to enhance the heat transfer, which in turn reduced the flow and pumping power required to cool the module. It was concluded that an extended surface was the most practical solution. An optimization study was performed to find the best extended surface parameters. The optimum extended surface geometry consisted of fins: 10 mm high, 0.4 mm thick with a 1 mm pitch. It was estimated to require a pumping power of 150 W to remove 20 kW of power. This is more than an order of magnitude reduction in pumping power requirement, compared to smooth surface. The module was fabricated by electric discharge machining (EDM) process. The testing was carried out at SNLA during August 1993. The testing confirmed the design calculations. The peak heat flux during the test was 10 MW/m 2 applied over a surface area of 20 cm 2 . The pumping power calculated from flow rate and pressure drop measurement was about 160 W, which was less than 1% of the power removed. It is planned to test the module to higher temperature limits and higher heat fluxes during coming months. As a result of this effort we conclude that helium cooling of the ITER divertor is feasible without requiring a very large helium pressure or a large pumping power

  6. A charge regulating system for turbo-generator gas-cooled high-temperature reactor power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braytenbah, A.S.; Jaegtnes, K.O.

    1975-01-01

    The invention relates to a regulating system for gas-cooled high-temperature reactors power stations (helium coolant), equipped with several steam-boilers, each of which deriving heat from a corresponding cooling-gas flow circulating in the reactor, so as to feed superheated steam into a main common steam-manifold and re-superheated steam into a re-superheated hot common manifold [fr

  7. Flow-induced and acoustically induced vibration experience in operating gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halvers, L.J.

    1977-03-01

    An overview has been presented of flow-induced and acoustically induced vibration failures that occurred in the past in gas-cooled graphite-moderated reactors, and the importance of this experience for the Gas-Cooled Fast-Breeder Reactor (GCFR) project has been assessed. Until now only failures in CO 2 -cooled reactors have been found. No problems with helium-cooled reactors have been encountered so far. It is shown that most of the failures occurred because flow-induced and acoustically induced dynamic loads were underestimated, while at the same time not enough was known about the influence of environmental parameters on material behavior. All problems encountered were solved. The comparison of the influence of the gas properties on acoustically induced and flow-induced vibration phenomena shows that the interaction between reactor design and the thermodynamic properties of the primary coolant precludes a general preference for either carbon dioxide or helium. The acoustic characteristics of CO 2 and He systems are different, but the difference in dynamic loadings due to the use of one rather than the other remains difficult to predict. A slight preference for helium seems, however, to be justified

  8. Thermal performance test of hot gas ducts of helium engineering demonstration loop (HENDEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishida, Makoto; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Ioka, Ikuo; Umenishi, Koji; Kondo, Yasuo; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Shimomura, Hiroaki

    1984-01-01

    A hot gas duct provided with internal thermal insulation is supposed to be used for an experimental very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) which has been developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). This type of hot gas duct has not been used so far in industrial facilities, and only a couple of tests on such a large-scale model of hot gas duct have been conducted. The present test was to investigate the thermal performance of the hot gas ducts which are installed as parts of a helium engineering demonstration loop (HENDEL) of JAERI. Uniform temperature and heat flux distributions at the surface of the duct were observed, the experimental correlation being obtained for the effective thermal conductivity of the internal thermal insulation layer. The measured temperature distribution of the pressure tube was in good agreement with the calculation by a TRUMP heat transfer computer code. The temperature distribution of the inner tube of VHTR hot gas duct was evaluated, and no hot spot was detected. These results would be very valuable for the design and development of VHTR. (author)

  9. Light induced cooling of a heated solid immersed in liquid helium I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lezak, D.; Brodie, L.C.; Semura, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter investigates the marked enhancement in the transient heat transfer from the heater-thermometer to the liquid helium immediately following the application of a flash of visible light. This ''light effect'' is associated with increased bubble activity, and it is possible that the light induces a rapid nucleation of bubbles in the superheated liquid at or near the heater surface. A summary of the light effect is presented and some potential uses to which this effect could be applied are suggested. Quantification of the light effect and properties of the light effect are discussed. It is determined that the light effect is an additional cooling due to a light induced enhancement of boiling in superheated liquid helium I. The effect could be applied in practical cryogenic engineering and for the acquisition of fundamental knowledge of boiling heat transfer and nucleation in cryogenic liquids

  10. Overview of gas cooled reactors' applications with CATHARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genevieve Geffraye; Fabrice Bentivoglio; Anne Messie; Alain Ruby; Manuel Saez; Nicolas Tauveron; Ola Widlund

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: For about four years, CEA has launched feasibility studies of future nuclear advanced systems in a consistent series of Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR) ranging from thermal reactors, as the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) for the mid term, to fast reactors (GFR) for the long term. Thermal hydraulic performances are a key issue for the core design, the evaluation of the thermal stresses on the structures and the decay heat removal systems. This analysis requires a 1D code able to simulate the whole reactor, including the core, the vessel, the piping and the components (turbine, compressors, heat exchangers). CATHARE is the reference code developed and extensively validated in collaboration between CEA, EDF, IRSN and FRAMATOME-ANP for the French Pressurized Water Reactors. CATHARE has the capabilities to model a Gas Cooled Reactor using standard 0D and 1D modules with some adaptations to treat the specificities of the GCR designs. In this paper, the different adaptations are presented and discussed. The direct coupling of a Gas Cooled Reactor with a closed gas-turbine cycle leads to a specific dynamic plant behaviour and a specific turbomachinery module has been developed. The thermal reactors' core consists of hexagonal graphite blocks with an annular-fueled region surrounded by reflectors and a special attention is paid on the thermal modeling of such a core leading to a quasi-2D thermal description. First designs of the VHTR are proposed and are based on an indirect cycle concept with a primary circuit, cooled by helium, and containing the core and a circulator. The core power is transmitted to the secondary circuit via an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). The secondary circuit contains a turbine and a compressor coupled on a single shaft. It uses a mixture of helium and nitrogen, in order to benefit from both the favourable thermal properties of helium for the heat exchanger, and from existing experience of turbomachines using

  11. Neutronic of heterogenous gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maturana, Roberto Hernan

    2008-01-01

    At present, one of the main technical features of the advanced gas cooled reactor under development is its fuel element concept, which implies a neutronic homogeneous design, thus requiring higher enrichment compared with present commercial nuclear power plants.In this work a neutronic heterogeneous gas cooled reactor design is analyzed by studying the neutronic design of the Advanced Gas cooled Reactor (AGR), a low enrichment, gas cooled and graphite moderated nuclear power plant.A search of merit figures (some neutronic parameter, characteristic dimension, or a mixture of both) which are important and have been optimized during the reactor design stage is been done, to aim to comprise how a gas heterogeneous reactor is been design, given that semi-infinity arrangement criteria of rods in LWRs and clusters in HWRs can t be applied for a solid moderator and a gas refrigerator.The WIMS code for neutronic cell calculations is been utilized to model the AGR fuel cell and to calculate neutronic parameters such as the multiplication factor and the pick factor, as function of the fuel burnup.Also calculation is been done for various nucleus characteristic dimensions values (fuel pin radius, fuel channel pitch) and neutronic parameters (such as fuel enrichment), around the design established parameters values.A fuel cycle cost analysis is carried out according to the reactor in study, and the enrichment effect over it is been studied.Finally, a thermal stability analysis is been done, in subcritical condition and at power level, to study this reactor characteristic reactivity coefficients.Present results shows (considering the approximation used) a first set of neutronic design figures of merit consistent with the AGR design. [es

  12. Conceptual design of helium gas turbine for MHTGR-GT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, E.; Tsutsumi, M.; Ogata, K.; Nomura, S.

    1996-01-01

    Conceptual designs of the direct-cycle helium gas turbine for a practical unit (450 MWt) and an experimental unit (1200kWt) of MHTGR were conducted and the results as shown below were obtained. The power conversion vessel for this practical unit can further be downsized to an outside diameter of 7.4m and a height of 22m as compared with the conventional design examples. Comparison of the conceptual designs of helium gas turbines using single-shaft type employing the axial-flow compressor and twin-shaft type employing the centrifugal compressor shows that the former provides advantages in terms of structure and control designs whereas the latter offers a higher efficiency. In order to determine which of them should be selected, a further study to investigate various aspects of safety features and startup characteristics will be needed. Either of the two types can provide a cycle efficiency of 46 to 48%. The third mode natural frequencies of the twin-shart type's low-pressure rotational shaft and the single shaft type are below the designed rotational speed, but their vibrational controls are made available using the magnetic bearing system. Elevation of the natural frequency for the twin-shaft type would be possible by altering the arrangements of its shafting configuration. As compared with the earlier conceptual designs, the overall systems configuration can be made simpler and more compact; five stages of turbines for the single-shaft type and seven stages of turbines for the twin-shaft type employing one shaft for the low-pressure compressor and the power turbine and; 26 stages of compressors for the axial-flow type with the single shaft system and five stages of compressors for the centrifugal type with the twin-shaft system. 9 refs, 12 figs, 4 tabs

  13. An evaluation of reactor cooling and coupled hydrogen production processes using the modular helium reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvego, E.A.; Reza, S.M.M.; Richards, M.; Shenoy, A.

    2006-01-01

    The high-temperature characteristics of the modular helium reactor (MHR) make it a strong candidate for producing hydrogen using either thermochemical or high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) processes. Using heat from the MHR to drive a sulfur-iodine (SI) thermochemical hydrogen production process has been the subject of a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored Nuclear Engineering Research Initiative (NERI) project led by General Atomics, with participation from the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and Texas A and M University. While the focus of much of the initial work was on the SI thermochemical production of hydrogen, recent activities included development of a preconceptual design for an integral HTE hydrogen production plant driven by the process heat and electricity produced by a 600 MW MHR. This paper describes ATHENA analyses performed to evaluate alternative primary system cooling configurations for the MHR to minimize peak reactor vessel and core temperatures while achieving core helium outlet temperatures in the range of 900-1000 deg. C that are needed for the efficient production of hydrogen using either the SI or HTE process. The cooling schemes investigated are intended to ensure peak fuel temperatures do not exceed specified limits under normal or transient upset conditions, and that reactor vessel temperatures do not exceed American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code limits for steady-state or transient conditions using standard light water reactor vessel materials. Preconceptual designs for SI and HTE hydrogen production plants driven by one or more 600 MW MHRs at helium outlet temperatures in the range of 900-1000 deg. C are described and compared. An initial SAPHIRE model to evaluate the reliability, maintainability, and availability of the SI hydrogen production plant is also described. Finally, a preliminary flowsheet for a conceptual design of an HTE hydrogen production plant coupled to a 600 MW modular helium reactor is presented and

  14. Construction and performance tests of a secondary hydrogen gas cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanokawa, K.; Hishida, M.

    1980-01-01

    With the aim of a multi-purpose use of nuclear energy, such as direct steel-making, an experimental multi-purpose high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is now being developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). In order to simulate a heat exchanging system between the primary helium gas loop and the secondary reducing gas system of the VHTR, a hydrogen gas loop as a secondary cooling system of the existing helium gas loop was completed in 1977, and was successfully operated for over 2000 hours. The objectives of constructing the H 2 secondary loop were: (1) To get basic knowledge for designing, constructing and operating a high-temperature and high-pressure gas facility; (2) To perform the following tests: (a) hydrogen permeation at the He/H 2 heat exchanger (the surfaces of the heat exchanger tubes are coated by calorizing to reduce hydrogen permeation), (b) thermal performance tests of the He/H 2 heat exchanger and the H 2 /H 2 regenerative heat exchanger, (c) performance test of internal insulation, and (d) performance tests of the components such as a H 2 gas heater and gas purifiers. These tests were carried out at He gas temperature of approximately 1000 0 C, H 2 gas temperature of approximately 900 0 C and gas pressures of approximately 40 kg/cm 2 G, which are almost the same as the operating conditions of the VHTR

  15. A heat exchanger between forced flow helium gas at 14 to 18 K and liquid hydrogen at 20 K circulated by natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.

    2003-01-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) has three 350-mm long liquid hydrogen absorbers to reduce the momentum of 200 MeV muons in all directions. The muons are then re-accelerated in the longitudinal direction by 200 MHz RF cavities. The result is cooled muons with a reduced emittance. The energy from the muons is taken up by the liquid hydrogen in the absorber. The hydrogen in the MICE absorbers is cooled by natural convection to the walls of the absorber that are in turn cooled by helium gas that enters at 14 K. This report describes the MICE liquid hydrogen absorber and the heat exchanger between the liquid hydrogen and the helium gas that flows through passages in the absorber wall

  16. Modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    The high financial risk involved in building large nuclear power reactors has been a major factor in halting investment in new plant and in bringing further technical development to a standstill. Increased public concern about the safety of nuclear plant, particularly after Chernobyl, has contributed to this stagnation. Financial and technical risk could be reduced considerably by going to small modular units, which would make it possible to build up power station capacity in small steps. Such modular plant, based on the helium-cooled high temperature reactor (HTR), offers remarkable advantages in terms of inherent safety characteristics, partly because of the relatively small size of the individual modules but more on account of the enormous thermal capacity and high temperature margins of the graphitic reactor assemblies. Assessments indicate that, in the USA, the cost of power from the modular systems would be less than that from conventional single reactor plant, up to about 600 MW(e), and only marginally greater above that level, a margin that should be offset by the shorter time required in bringing the modular units on line to earn revenue. The modular HTR would be particularly appropriate in the UK, because of the considerable British industrial background in gas-cooled reactors, and could be a suitable replacement for Magnox. The modular reactor would be particularly suited to combined heat and power schemes and would offer great potential for the eventual development of gas turbine power conversion and the production of high-temperature process heat. (author)

  17. Helium production technology based on natural gas combustion and beneficial use of thermal energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakoryakov Vladimir E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Helium is widely used in all industries, including power plant engineering. In recent years, helium is used in plants operating by the Brayton cycle, for example, in the nuclear industry. Using helium-xenon mixture in nuclear reactors has a number of advantages, and this area is rapidly developing. The hydrodynamics and mass transfer processes in single tubes with various cross-sections as well as in inter-channel space of heating tube bundle were studied at the Institute of Thermophysics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Currently, there is a strongest shortage in helium production. The main helium production method consists in the liquefaction of the natural gas and subsequent separation of helium from remaining gas with its further purification using membranes.

  18. Low-temperature dynamic nuclear polarization with helium-cooled samples and nitrogen-driven magic-angle spinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Kent; Tycko, Robert

    2016-03-01

    We describe novel instrumentation for low-temperature solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS), focusing on aspects of this instrumentation that have not been described in detail in previous publications. We characterize the performance of an extended interaction oscillator (EIO) microwave source, operating near 264 GHz with 1.5 W output power, which we use in conjunction with a quasi-optical microwave polarizing system and a MAS NMR probe that employs liquid helium for sample cooling and nitrogen gas for sample spinning. Enhancement factors for cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals in the 100-200 range are demonstrated with DNP at 25K. The dependences of signal amplitudes on sample temperature, as well as microwave power, polarization, and frequency, are presented. We show that sample temperatures below 30K can be achieved with helium consumption rates below 1.3 l/h. To illustrate potential applications of this instrumentation in structural studies of biochemical systems, we compare results from low-temperature DNP experiments on a calmodulin-binding peptide in its free and bound states. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. High temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosegood, S.B.; Lockett, G.E.

    1975-01-01

    For high-temperature gas cooled reactors it is considered advantageous to design the core so that the moderator blocks can be removed and replaced by some means of standpipes normally situated in the top of the reactor vessel. An arrangement is here described to facilitate these operations. The blocks have end faces shaped as irregular hexagons with three long sides of equal length and three short sides also of equal length, one short side being located between each pair of adjacent long sides, and the long sides being inclined towards one another at 60 0 . The block defines a number of coolant channels located parallel to its sides. Application of the arrangement to a high temperature gas-cooled reactor with refuelling standpipes is described. The standpipes are located in the top of the reactor vessel above the tops of the columns and are disposed coaxially above the hexagonal channels, with diameters that allow the passage of the blocks. (U.K.)

  20. Cooling process in separation devices of krypton gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, S; Sugimoto, K

    1975-06-11

    To prevent entry of impurities into purified gases and to detect leaks of heat exchanger in a separation and recovering device of krypton gas by means of liquefaction and distillation, an intermediate refrigerant having the same or slightly higher boiling point than that of gas to be cooled is used between the gas to be cooled (process gas) and refrigerant (nitrogen), and the pressure of the gas to be cooled is controlled to have a pressure higher than the intermediate refrigerant to cool the gas to be cooled.

  1. Computer simulation of multiple stability regions in an internally cooled superconducting conductor and of helium replenishment in a bath-cooled conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Shindler, J.

    1984-09-01

    For upcoming fusion experiments and future fusion reactors, superconducting magnetic have been chosen or considered which employ cooling by pool-boiling HeI, by HeII, and by internally flowing HeI. The choice of conductor and cooling method should be determined in part by the response of the magnet to sudden localized heat pulses of various magnitudes. The paper describes the successful computer simulation of multiple stability in internally cooled conductors, as observed experimentally, using the computer code SSICC. It also describes the modeling of helium replenishment in the cooling channels of a bath-cooled conductor, using the computer code TASS

  2. The modular high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, D.E.; Lipps, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    Due to relatively high operating temperatures, the gas-cooled reactor has the potential to serve a wide variety of energy applications. This paper discusses the energy applications which can be served by the modular HTGR, the magnitude of the potential markets, and the HTGR product cost incentives relative to fossil fuel competition. Advantages of the HTGR modular systems are presented along with a description of the design features and performance characteristics of the current reference HTGR modular systems

  3. Gas-cooled breeder reactor safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chermanne, J.; Burgsmueller, P. [Societe Belge pour l' Industrie Nucleaire, Brussels

    1981-01-15

    The European Association for the Gas-cooled Breeder Reactor (G B R A), set-up in 1969 prepared between 1972 and 1974 a 1200 MWe Gas-cooled Breeder Reactor (G B R) commercial reference design G B R 4. It was then found necessary that a sound and neutral appraisal of the G B R licenseability be carried out. The Commission of the European Communities (C E C) accepted to sponsor this exercise. At the beginning of 1974, the C E C convened a group of experts to examine on a Community level, the safety documents prepared by the G B R A. A working party was set-up for that purpose. The experts examined a ''Preliminary Safety Working Document'' on which written questions and comments were presented. A ''Supplement'' containing the answers to all the questions plus a detailed fault tree and reliability analysis was then prepared. After a final study of this document and a last series of discussions with G B R A representatives, the experts concluded that on the basis of the evidence presented to the Working Party, no fundamental reasons were identified which would prevent a Gas-cooled Breeder Reactor of the kind proposed by the G B R A achieving a satisfactory safety status. Further work carried out on ultimate accident have confirmed this conclusion. One can therefore claim that the overall safety risk associated with G B R s compares favourably with that of any other reactor system.

  4. Heat transfer in a compact heat exchanger containing rectangular channels and using helium gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Development of a National Aerospace Plane (NASP), which will fly at hypersonic speeds, require novel cooling techniques to manage the anticipated high heat fluxes on various components. A compact heat exchanger was constructed consisting of 12 parallel, rectangular channels in a flat piece of commercially pure nickel. The channel specimen was radiatively heated on the top side at heat fluxes of up to 77 W/sq cm, insulated on the back side, and cooled with helium gas flowing in the channels at 3.5 to 7.0 MPa and Reynolds numbers of 1400 to 28,000. The measured friction factor was lower than that of the accepted correlation for fully developed turbulent flow, although the uncertainty was high due to uncertainty in the channel height and a high ratio of dynamic pressure to pressure drop. The measured Nusselt number, when modified to account for differences in fluid properties between the wall and the cooling fluid, agreed with past correlations for fully developed turbulent flow in channels. Flow nonuniformity from channel-to-channel was as high as 12 pct above and 19 pct below the mean flow.

  5. Operating experience with gas-bearing circulators in a high-pressure helium loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, J.P.; Gat, U.; Young, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    A high-pressure engineering test loop has been designed and constructed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for circulating helium through a test chamber at temperatures to 1,000 deg. C. The purpose of this loop is to determine the thermal and structural performance of proposed components for the primary loops of gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Three gas-bearing circulators, mounted in series, provide a maximum volumetric flow of 0.47 m 3 /s and a maximum head of 78 kJ/kg at operating pressures from 0.1 to 10.7 MPa. Control of gaseous impurities in the circulating gas was the significant operating requirement that dictated the choice of a circulator that is lubricated by the circulating gas. The motor for each circulator is contained within the pressure boundary, and it is cooled by circulating the gas in the motor cavity over water-cooled coils. Each motor is rated at 200 kW at a speed of 23,500 rpm. The circulators have been operated in the loop for more than 5,000 h. The flow of the gas in the loop is controlled by varying the speed of the circulators through the use of individual 250-kVA, solid state power supplies that can be continuously varied in frequency from 50 to 400 Hz. To prevent excessive wear on the gas bearings during startup, the circulator motor accelerates the rotor to 3,000 rpm in less than one second. During operation, no problems associated with the gas bearings, per se, were encountered; however, related problems pointed to design considerations that should be included in future applications of circulators of this type. The primary test that has been conducted in this loop required sustained operation for several weeks without interruption. After a number of unscheduled interruptions, the operating goals were attained. During part of this period, the loop was operated with only two circulators installed in the pressure vessels with a guard installed in the third vessel to protect the closure flange from the gas temperatures. Unattended

  6. Parametric Investigation of Brayton Cycle for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh

    2004-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is investigating a Brayton cycle efficiency improvement on a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as part of Generation-IV nuclear engineering research initiative. In this project, we are investigating helium Brayton cycles for the secondary side of an indirect energy conversion system. Ultimately we will investigate the improvement of the Brayton cycle using other fluids, such as supercritical carbon dioxide. Prior to the cycle improvement study, we established a number of baseline cases for the helium indirect Brayton cycle. These cases look at both single-shaft and multiple-shaft turbomachinery. The baseline cases are based on a 250 MW thermal pebble bed HTGR. The results from this study are applicable to other reactor concepts such as a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR), fast gas-cooled reactor (FGR), supercritical water reactor (SWR), and others. In this study, we are using the HYSYS computer code for optimization of the helium Brayton cycle. Besides the HYSYS process optimization, we performed parametric study to see the effect of important parameters on the cycle efficiency. For these parametric calculations, we use a cycle efficiency model that was developed based on the Visual Basic computer language. As a part of this study we are currently investigated single-shaft vs. multiple shaft arrangement for cycle efficiency and comparison, which will be published in the next paper. The ultimate goal of this study is to use supercritical carbon dioxide for the HTGR power conversion loop in order to improve the cycle efficiency to values great than that of the helium Brayton cycle. This paper includes preliminary calculations of the steady state overall Brayton cycle efficiency based on the pebble bed reactor reference design (helium used as the working fluid) and compares those results with an initial calculation of a CO2 Brayton cycle

  7. Preliminary Analysis on Decay Heat Removal Capability of Helium Cooled Solid Breeder Test Blanket Module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Mu Young; Cho, Seung Yon; Kim, Duck Hoi; Lee, Eun Seok; Kim, Hyung Seok; Suh, Jae Seung; Yun, Sung Hwan; Cho, Nam Zin

    2007-01-01

    One of the main ITER goals is to test and validate design concepts of tritium breeding blankets relevant to DEMO or fusion power plants. Korea Helium-Cooled Solid Breeder (HCSB) Test Blanket Module (TBM) has been developed with overall objectives of achieving this goal. The TBM employs high pressure helium to cool down the First Wall (FW), Side Wall (SW) and Breeding Zone (BZ). Therefore, safety consideration is a part of the design process. Each ITER Party performing the TBM program is requested to reach a similar level of confidence in the TBM safety analysis. To meet ITER's request, Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) studies have been performed on the TBM to identify the Postulated Initial Event (PIE). Although FMEA on the KO TBM has not been completed, in-vessel, in-box and ex-vessel Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) are considered as enveloping cases of PIE in general. In this paper, accidental analyses for the three selected LOCA were performed to investigate the decay heat removal capability of the TBM. To simulate transient thermo-hydraulic behavior of the TBM for the selected scenarios, RELAP5/MOD3.2 code was used

  8. Updated conceptual design of helium cooling ceramic blanket for HCCB-DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Suhao [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China); Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Cao, Qixiang; Wu, Xinghua; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Guoshu [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Feng, Kaiming, E-mail: fengkm@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • An updated design of Helium Cooled Ceramic breeder Blanket (HCCB) for HCCB-DEMO is proposed in this paper. • The Breeder Unit is transformed to TBM-like sub-modules, with double “banana” shape tritium breeder. Each sub-module is inserted in space formed by Stiffen Grids (SGs). • The performance analysis is performed based on the R&D development of material, fabrication technology and safety assessment in CN ITER TBM program. • Hot spots will be located at the FW bend side. - Abstract: The basic definition of the HCCB-DEMO plant and preliminary blanket designed by Southwestern Institution of Physics was proposed in 2009. The DEMO fusion power is 2550 MW and electric power is 800 MW. Based on development of R&D in breeding blanket, a conceptual design of helium cooled blanket with ceramic breeder in HCCB-DEMO was presented. The main design features of the HCCB-DEMO blanket were: (1) CLF-1 structure materials, Be multiplier and Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} breeder; (2) neutronic wall load is 2.3 MW/m{sup 2} and surface heat flux is 0.43 MW/m{sup 2} (2) TBR ≈ 1.15; (3) geometry of breeding units is ITER TBM-like segmentation; (4)Pressure of helium is 8 MPa and inlet/outlet temperature is 300/500 °C. On the basis of these design, some important analytical results are presented in aspects of (i) neutronic behavior of the blanket; (ii) design of 3D structure and thermal-hydraulic lay-out for breeding blanket module; (iii) structural-mechanical behavior of the blanket under pressurization. All of these assessments proved current stucture fulfill the design requirements.

  9. High-heat-flux testing of helium-cooled heat exchangers for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youchison, D.L.; Izenson, M.G.; Baxi, C.B.; Rosenfeld, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    High-heat-flux experiments on three types of helium-cooled divertor mock-ups were performed on the 30-kW electron beam test system and its associated helium flow loop at Sandia National Laboratories. A dispersion-strengthened copper alloy (DSCu) was used in the manufacture of all the mock-ups. The first heat exchanger provides for enhanced heat transfer at relatively low flow rates and much reduced pumping requirements. The Creare sample was tested to a maximum absorbed heat flux of 5.8 MW/m 2 . The second used low pressure drops and high mass flow rates to achieve good heat removal. The GA specimen was tested to a maximum absorbed heat flux of 9 MW/m 2 while maintaining a surface temperature below 400 degree C. A second experiment resulted in a maximum absorbed heat flux of 34 MW/m 2 and surface temperatures near 533 degree C. The third specimen was a DSCu, axial flow, helium-cooled divertor mock-up filled with a porous metal wick which effectively increases the available heat transfer area. Low mass flow and high pressure drop operation at 4.0 MPa were characteristic of this divertor module. It survived a maximum absorbed heat flux of 16 MW/m 2 and reached a surface temperature of 740 degree C. Thermacore also manufactured a follow-on, dual channel porous metal-type heat exchanger, which survived a maximum absorbed heat flux of 14 MW/m 2 and reached a maximum surface temperature of 690 degree C. 11refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Study on thermodynamic cycle of high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Xinhe; Yang Xiaoyong; Wang Jie

    2017-01-01

    The development trend of the (very) High temperature gas-cooled reactor is to gradually increase the reactor outlet temperature. The different power conversion units are required at the different reactor outlet temperature. In this paper, for the helium turbine direct cycle and the combined cycle of the power conversion unit of the High temperature gas-cooled reactor, the mathematic models are established, and three cycle plans are designed. The helium turbine direct cycle is a Brayton cycle with recuperator, precooler and intercooler. In the combined cycle plan 1, the topping cycle is a simple Brayton cycle without recuperator, precooler and intercooler, and the bottoming cycle is based on the steam parameters (540deg, 6 MPa) recommended by Siemens. In the combined cycle plan 2, the topping cycle also is a simple Brayton cycle, and the bottoming cycle which is a Rankine cycle with reheating cycle is based on the steam parameters of conventional subcritical thermal power generation (540degC, 18 MPa). The optimization results showed that the cycle efficiency of the combined cycle plan 2 is the highest, the second is the helium turbine direct cycle, and the combined cycle plan 2 is the lowest. When the reactor outlet temperature is 900degC and the pressure ratio is 2.02, the cycle efficiency of the combined cycle plan 2 can reach 49.7%. The helium turbine direct cycle has a reactor inlet temperature above 500degC due to the regenerating cycle, so it requires a cooling circuit for the internal wall of the reactor pressure vessel. When the reactor outlet temperature increases, the increase of the pressure ratio required by the helium turbine direct cycle increases may bring some difficulties to the design and manufacture of the magnetic bearings. For the combined cycle, the reactor inlet temperature can be controlled below than 370degC, so the reactor pressure vessel can use SA533 steel without cooling the internal wall of the reactor pressure vessel. The pressure

  11. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) Decay Heat Removal Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. D. Weaver; L-Y. Cheng; H. Ludewig; J. Jo

    2005-01-01

    Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with an outlet temperature of 850 C at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in participating in research related to the development of the GFR. These are Euratom (European Commission), France, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Of these, Euratom (including the United Kingdom), France, and Japan have active research activities with respect to the GFR. The research includes GFR design and safety, and fuels/in-core materials/fuel cycle projects. This report is a compilation of work performed on decay heat removal systems for a 2400 MWt GFR during this fiscal year (FY05)

  12. Material development for gas-cooled high temperature reactors for the production of nuclear process heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.

    1977-04-01

    In the framework of the material development for gas-cooled high temperature reactors, considerable investigations of the materials for the reactor core and the primary cicuit are being conducted. Concerning the core components, the current state-of-the-art and the objectives of the development work on the spherical fuel elements, coated particles and structural graphite are discussed. As an example of the structural graphite, the non-replaceable reflector of the process heat reactor is discussed. The primary circuit will be constructed mainly from metallic materials, although some ceramics are also being considered. Components of interest are hot gas ducts, liners, methane reformer tubes and helium-helium intermediate heat exchangers. The gaseous impurities present in the helium coolant may cause oxidation and carburization of the nickel-base and iron-base alloys envisaged for use in these components, with a possible associated adverse effect on the mechanical properties such as creep and fatigue. Test capacity has therefore been installed to investigate materials behaviour in simulated reactor helium under both constant and alternating stress conditions. The first results on the creep behaviour of several alloys in impure helium are presented and discussed. (orig./GSC) [de

  13. Validation of CATHARE for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrice Bentivoglio; Ola Widlund; Manuel Saez

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Extensively validated and qualified for light-water reactor safety studies, the thermo-hydraulics code CATHARE has been adapted to deal also with gas-cooled reactor applications. In order to validate the code for these novel applications, CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) has initiated an ambitious long-term experimental program. The foreseen experimental facilities range from small-scale loops for physical correlations, to component technology and system demonstration loops. In the short-term perspective, CATHARE is being validated against existing experimental data, in particular from the German power plant Oberhausen II and the South African Pebble-Bed Micro Model (PBMM). Oberhausen II, operated by the German utility EVO, is a 50 MW(e) direct-cycle Helium turbine plant. The power source is a gas burner rather than a nuclear reactor core, but the power conversion system resembles those of the GFR (Gas-cooled Fast Reactor) and other high-temperature reactor concepts. Oberhausen II was operated for more than 100 000 hours between 1974 and 1988. Design specifications, drawings and experimental data have been obtained through the European HTR project, offering a unique opportunity to validate CATHARE on a large-scale Brayton cycle. Available measurements of temperatures, pressures and mass flows throughout the circuit have allowed a very comprehensive thermohydraulic description of the plant, in steady-state conditions as well as during transients. The Pebble-Bed Micro Model (PBMM) is a small-scale model conceived to demonstrate the operability and control strategies of the South African PBMR concept. The model uses Nitrogen instead of Helium, and an electrical heater with a maximum rating of 420 kW. As the full-scale PBMR, the PBMM loop features three turbines and two compressors on the primary circuit, located on three separate shafts. The generator, however, is modelled by a third compressor on a separate circuit, with a

  14. Corrosion behaviour of high temperature alloys in the cooling gas of high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.

    1989-01-01

    The reactive impurities in the primary cooling helium of advanced high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR) can cause oxidation, carburization or decarburization of the heat exchanging metallic components. By studies of the fundamental aspects of the corrosion mechanisms it became possible to define operating conditions under which the metallic construction materials show, from the viewpoint of technical application, acceptable corrosion behaviour. By extensive test programmes with exposure times of up to 30,000 hours, a data base has been obtained which allows a reliable extrapolation of the corrosion effects up to the envisaged service lives of the heat exchanging components. (author). 6 refs, 7 figs

  15. Helium pressures in RHIC vacuum cryostats and relief valve requirements from magnet cooling line failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liaw, C.J.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2011-03-28

    A catastrophic failure of the RHIC magnet cooling lines, similar to the LHC superconducting bus failure incident, would pressurize the insulating vacuum in the magnet and transfer line cryostats. Insufficient relief valves on the cryostats could cause a structural failure. A SINDA/FLUINT{reg_sign} model, which simulated the 4.5K/4 atm helium flowing through the magnet cooling system distribution lines, then through a line break into the vacuum cryostat and discharging via the reliefs into the RHIC tunnel, had been developed to calculate the helium pressure inside the cryostat. Arc flash energy deposition and heat load from the ambient temperature cryostat surfaces were included in the simulations. Three typical areas: the sextant arc, the Triplet/DX/D0 magnets, and the injection area, had been analyzed. Existing relief valve sizes were reviewed to make sure that the maximum stresses, caused by the calculated maximum pressures inside the cryostats, did not exceed the allowable stresses, based on the ASME Code B31.3 and ANSYS results. The conclusions are as follows: (1) The S/F simulation results show that the highest internal pressure in the cryostats, due to the magnet line failure, is {approx}37 psig (255115 Pa); (2) Based on the simulation, the temperature on the cryostat chamber, INJ Q8-Q9, could drop to 228 K, which is lower than the material minimum design temperature allowed by the Code; (3) Based on the ASME Code and ANSYS results, the reliefs on all the cryostats inside the RHIC tunnel are adequate to protect the vacuum chambers when the magnet cooling lines fail; and (4) In addition to the pressure loading, the thermal deformations, due to the temperature decrease on the cryostat chambers, could also cause a high stress on the chamber, if not properly supported.

  16. Helium pressures in RHIC vacuum cryostats and relief valve requirements from magnet cooling line failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, C.J.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2011-01-01

    A catastrophic failure of the RHIC magnet cooling lines, similar to the LHC superconducting bus failure incident, would pressurize the insulating vacuum in the magnet and transfer line cryostats. Insufficient relief valves on the cryostats could cause a structural failure. A SINDA/FLUINT(reg s ign) model, which simulated the 4.5K/4 atm helium flowing through the magnet cooling system distribution lines, then through a line break into the vacuum cryostat and discharging via the reliefs into the RHIC tunnel, had been developed to calculate the helium pressure inside the cryostat. Arc flash energy deposition and heat load from the ambient temperature cryostat surfaces were included in the simulations. Three typical areas: the sextant arc, the Triplet/DX/D0 magnets, and the injection area, had been analyzed. Existing relief valve sizes were reviewed to make sure that the maximum stresses, caused by the calculated maximum pressures inside the cryostats, did not exceed the allowable stresses, based on the ASME Code B31.3 and ANSYS results. The conclusions are as follows: (1) The S/F simulation results show that the highest internal pressure in the cryostats, due to the magnet line failure, is ∼37 psig (255115 Pa); (2) Based on the simulation, the temperature on the cryostat chamber, INJ Q8-Q9, could drop to 228 K, which is lower than the material minimum design temperature allowed by the Code; (3) Based on the ASME Code and ANSYS results, the reliefs on all the cryostats inside the RHIC tunnel are adequate to protect the vacuum chambers when the magnet cooling lines fail; and (4) In addition to the pressure loading, the thermal deformations, due to the temperature decrease on the cryostat chambers, could also cause a high stress on the chamber, if not properly supported.

  17. Design codes for gas cooled reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plants have been under development for about 30 years and experimental and prototype plants have been operated. The main line of development has been electricity generation based on the steam cycle. In addition the potential for high primary coolant temperature has resulted in research and development programmes for advanced applications including the direct cycle gas turbine and process heat applications. In order to compare results of the design techniques of various countries for high temperature reactor components, the IAEA established a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Design Codes for Gas-Cooled Reactor Components. The Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, Switzerland and the USSR participated in this Co-ordinated Research Programme. Within the frame of this CRP a benchmark problem was established for the design of the hot steam header of the steam generator of an HTGR for electricity generation. This report presents the results of that effort. The publication also contains 5 reports presented by the participants. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these reports. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. System code assessment with thermal-hydraulic experiment to develop helium cooled breeding blanket for nuclear fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yum, S. B.; Park, I. W.; Park, G. C.; Lee, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    By considering the requirements for a DEMO-relevant blanket concept, Korea (KO) has proposed a He Cooled Molten Lithium (HCML) Test Blanket Module (TBM) for testing in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). A performance analysis for the thermal-hydraulics and a safety analysis for an accident caused by a loss of coolant for the KO TBM have been carried out using a commercial CFD code, ANSYS-CFX, and a system code, GAMMA (GAs Multicomponent Mixture Analysis), which was developed by the Gas Cooled Reactor in Korea. To verify the codes, a preliminary study was performed by Lee using a single TBM First Wall (FW) mock-up made from the same material as tho KO TBM, ferritic martensitic steel, using a 6 MPa nitrogen gas loop. The test was performed at pressures of 11, 19, and 29 bar, and under various ranges of flow rate from 0.63 to 2.44kg/min with a constant wall temperature condition. In the present study, a thermal-hydraulic test was performed with the newly constructed helium supplying system, In which the design pressure and temperature were 9 MPa and 500 .deg. C, respectively. In the experiment, the same mock-up was used, and the test was performed under the conditions of 8 MPa pressure, 0.2 kg/s flow rate, which are almost same conditions of the KO TBM FW. One-side of the mock-up was heated with a constant heat flux of 0.5 MW/m 2 using a graphite heating system, KoHLT-2 (Korea Heat Load Test Facility-2). The wall temperatures were measured using installed thermocouples, and they show a strong parity with the code results simulated under the same test conditions

  19. Gas propagation following a sudden loss of vacuum in a pipe cooled by He I and He II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garceau, N.; Guo, W.; Dodamead, T.

    2017-12-01

    Many cryogenic systems around the world are concerned with the sudden catastrophic loss of vacuum for cost, preventative damage, safety or other reasons. The experiments in this paper were designed to simulate the sudden vacuum break in the beam-line pipe of a liquid helium cooled superconducting particle accelerator. This paper expands previous research conducted at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and evaluates the differences between normal helium (He I) and superfluid helium (He II). For the experiments, a straight pipe and was evacuated and immersed in liquid helium at 4.2 K and below 2.17 K. Vacuum loss was simulated by opening a solenoid valve on a buffer tank filled nitrogen gas. Gas front arrival was observed by a temperature rise of the tube. Preliminary results suggested that the speed of the gas front through the experiment decreased exponentially along the tube for both normal liquid helium and super-fluid helium. The system was modified to a helical pipe system to increase propagation length. Testing and analysis on these two systems revealed there was minor difference between He I and He II despite the difference between the two distinct helium phases heat transfer mechanisms: convection vs thermal counterflow. Furthermore, the results indicated that the temperature of the tube wall above the LHe bath also plays a significant role in the initial front propagation. More systematic measurements are planned in with the helical tube system to further verify the results.

  20. Gas-cooled fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    1982-07-01

    Almost all the R D works of gas-cooled fast breeder reactor in the world were terminated at the end of the year 1980. In order to show that the R D termination was not due to technical difficulties of the reactor itself, the present paper describes the reactor plant concept, reactor performances, safety, economics and fuel cycle characteristics of the reactor, and also describes the reactor technologies developed so far, technological problems remained to be solved and planned development schedules of the reactor. (author)

  1. Construction and performance testing of a secondary cooling system with hydrogen gas (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishida, M.; Nekoya, S.; Takizuka, T.; Emori, K.; Ogawa, M.; Ouchi, M.; Okamoto, Y.; Sanokawa, K.; Nakano, T.; Hagiwara, T.

    1979-08-01

    An experimental multi-purpose High-Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (VHTR) which is supposed to be used for a direct steel-making is now being developed in JAeRI. In order to simulate the heat exchanging system between the primary helium gas and the secondary reducing gas system of VHTR, a hydrogen gas loop was constructed as a secondary cooling system of the helium gas loop. The maximum temperature and the maximum pressure of the hydrogen gas are 900 degrees C and 42 kg/cm 2 x G respectively. The construction of the hydrogen gas loop was completed in January, 1977, and was successfully operated for 1.000 h. Various performance tests, such as the hydrogen permeation test of a He/H2 heat exchanger and the thermal performance test of heat exchangers, were made. Especially, it was proved that hydrogen permeation rate through the heat exchanger was reduced to 1/30 to approximately 1/50 by a method of calorized coating, and the coating was stable during 1.000 h's operation. It was also stable against the temperature changes. This report describes the outline of the facility and performance of the components. (orig.) [de

  2. The world trends of high temperature gas-cooled reactors and the mode of utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Jun-ichi

    1974-01-01

    After a long period of research and development, high temperature gas-cooled reactors are going to enter the practical stage. The combination of a HTGR with a closed cycle helium gas turbine is advantageous in thermal efficiency, reduction of environmental impact and economy. In recent years, the direct utilization of nuclear heat energy in industries has been attracting interest. The multi-purpose utilization of high temperature gas-cooled reactors is thus now the world trend. Reviewing the world developments in this field, the following matters are described: (1) development of HTGRs in the U.K., West Germany, France and the United States; (2) development of He gas turbine, etc. in West Germany; and (3) multi-purpose utilization of HTGRs in West Germany and Japan. (Mori, K.)

  3. Graphites and composites irradiations for gas cooled reactor core structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Laan, J.G.; Vreeling, J.A.; Buckthorpe, D.E.; Reed, J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Material investigations are undertaken as part of the European Commission 6. Framework Programme for helium-cooled fission reactors under development like HTR, VHTR, GCFR. The work comprises a range of activities, from (pre-)qualification to screening of newly designed materials. The High Flux Reactor at Petten is the main test bed for the irradiation test programmes of the HTRM/M1, RAPHAEL and ExtreMat Integrated Projects. These projects are supported by the European Commission 5. and 6. Framework Programmes. To a large extent they form the European contribution to the Generation-IV International Forum. NRG is also performing a Materials Test Reactor project to support British Energy in preparing extended operation of their Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGR). Irradiations of commercial and developmental graphite grades for HTR core structures are undertaken in the range of 650 to 950 deg C, with a view to get data on physical and mechanical properties that enable engineering design. Various C- and SiC-based composite materials are considered for support structures or specific components like control rods. Irradiation test matrices are chosen to cover commercial materials, and to provide insight on the behaviour of various fibre and matrix types, and the effects of architecture and manufacturing process. The programme is connected with modelling activities to support data trending, and improve understanding of the material behaviour and micro-structural evolution. The irradiation programme involves products from a large variety of industrial and research partners, and there is strong interaction with other high technology areas with extreme environments like space, electronics and fusion. The project on AGR core structures graphite focuses on the effects of high dose neutron irradiation and simultaneous radiolytic oxidation in a range of 350 to 450 deg C. It is aimed to provide data on graphite properties into the parameter space

  4. Helium-cooled pebble bed test blanket module alternative design and fabrication routes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lux, M.

    2007-01-01

    According to first results of the recently started European DEMO study, a new blanket integration philosophy was developed applying so-called multi-module segments. These consist of a number of blanket modules flexibly mounted onto a common vertical manifold structure that can be used for replacing all modules in one segment at one time through vertical remote-handling ports. This principle gives new freedom in the design choices applied to the blanket modules itself. Based on the alternative design options considered for DEMO also the ITER test blanket module was newly analyzed. As a result of these activities it was decided to keep the major principles of the reference design like stiffening grid, breeder unit concept and perpendicular arrangement of pebble beds related to the First Wall because of the very positive results of thermo-mechanical and neutronics studies. The present paper gives an overview on possible further design optimization and alternative fabrication routes. One of the most significant improvements in terms of the hydraulic performance of the Helium cooled reactor can be reached with a new First Wall concept. That concept is based on an internal heat transfer enhancement technique and allows drastically reducing the flow velocity in the FW cooling channels. Small ribs perpendicular to the flow direction (transverse-rib roughness) are arranged on the inner surface of the First Wall cooling channels at the plasma side. In the breeder units cooling plates which are mostly parallel but bent into U-shape at the plasma-side are considered. In this design all flow channels are parallel and straight with the flow entering on one side of the parallel plate sections and exiting on the other side. The ceramic pebble beds are embedded between two pairs of such type of cooling plates. Different modifications could possibly be combined, whereby the most relevant discussed in this paper are (i) rib-cooled First Wall channels, (ii) U-bent cooling plates for

  5. Stability of test environments for performance evaluation of materials for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgemon, G.L.; Wilson, D.F.; Bell, G.E.C.

    1993-01-01

    Stability of the primary helium-based coolant test gas for use in performance ests of materials for the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) was determined. Results of tests of the initial gas chemistry from General Atomics (GA) at elevated temperatures, and the associated results predicted by the SOLGASMIX trademark modelling package are presented. Results indicated that for this gas composition and at flow rates obtainable in the test loop, 466 ± 24C is the highest temperature that can be maintained without significantly altering the specified gas chemistry. Four additional gas chemistries were modelled using SOLGASMIX trademark

  6. Study of Temperature Wave Propagation in Superfluid Helium Focusing on Radio-Frequency Cavity Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Koettig, T; Avellino, S; Junginger, T; Bremer, J

    2015-01-01

    Oscillating Superleak Transducers (OSTs) can be used to localize quenches of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. Local hot spots at the cavity surface initiate temperature waves in the surrounding superfluid helium that acts as cooling fluid at typical temperatures in the range of 1.6 K to 2 K. The temperature wave is characterised by the properties of superfluid helium such as the second sound velocity. For high heat load densities second sound velocities greater than the standard literature values are observed. This fast propagation has been verified in dedicated small scale experiments. Resistors were used to simulate the quench spots under controlled conditions. The three dimensional propagation of second sound is linked to OST signals. The aim of this study is to improve the understanding of the OST signal especially the incident angle dependency. The characterised OSTs are used as a tool for quench localisation on a real size cavity. Their sensitivity as well as the time resolution was proven to b...

  7. Study on plant concept for gas cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moribe, Takeshi; Kubo, Shigenobu; Saigusa, Toshiie; Konomura, Mamoru

    2003-05-01

    In 'Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle System', technological options including various coolant (sodium, heavy metal, gas, water, etc.), fuel type (MOX, metal, nitride) and output power are considered and classified, and commercialized FBR that have economical cost equal to LWR are pursued. In conceptual study on gas cooled FBR in FY 2002, to identify the prospect of the technical materialization of the helium cooled FBR using coated particle fuel which is an attractive concept extracted in the year of FY2001, the preliminary conceptual design of the core and entire plant was performed. This report summarizes the results of the plant design study in FY2002. The results of study is as follows. 1) For the passive core shutdown equipment, the curie point magnet type self-actuated device was selected and the device concept was set up. 2) For the reactor block, the concept of the core supporting structure, insulators and liners was set up. For the material of the heat resistant structure, SiC was selected as a candidate. 3) For the seismic design of the plant, it was identified that a design concept with three-dimensional base isolation could be feasible taking the severe seismic condition into account. 4) For the core catcher, an estimation of possible event sequences under severe core damage condition was made. A core catcher concept which may suit the estimation was proposed. 5) The construction cost was roughly estimated based on the amount of materials and its dependency on the plant output power was evaluated. The value for a small sized plant exceeds the target construction cost about 20%. (author)

  8. Activation analysis and waste management of China ITER helium cooled solid breeder test blanket module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, J.R., E-mail: hanjingru@163.co [North China Electric Power University, School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Zhu-Xin-Zhuang, De-Wai, Beijing 102206 (China); Chen, Y.X.; Han, R. [North China Electric Power University, School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Zhu-Xin-Zhuang, De-Wai, Beijing 102206 (China); Feng, K.M. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O.Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Forrest, R.A. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    Activation characteristics have been assessed for the ITER China helium cooled solid breeder (CH-HCSB) 3 x 6 test blanket module (TBM). Taking a representative irradiation scenario, the activation calculations were performed by FISPACT code. Neutron fluxes distributions in the TBM were provided by a preceding MCNP calculation. These fluxes were passed to FISPACT for the activation calculation. The main activation parameters of the HCSB-TBM were calculated and discussed, such as activity, afterheat and contact dose rate. Meanwhile, the dominant radioactivity nuclides and reaction channel pathways have been identified. According to the Safety and Environmental Assessment of Fusion Power (SEAFP) waste management strategy, the activated materials can be re-used following the remote handling recycling options. The results will provide useful indications for further optimization design and waste management of the TBM.

  9. Numerical benchmark for the deep-burn modular helium-cooled reactor (DB-MHR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taiwo, T. A.; Kim, T. K.; Buiron, L.; Varaine, F.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical benchmark problems for the deep-burn concept based on the prismatic modular helium-cooled reactor design (a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR)) are specified for joint analysis by U.S. national laboratories and industry and the French CEA. The results obtained with deterministic and Monte Carlo codes have been inter-compared and used to confirm the underlying feature of the DB-MHR concept (high transuranics consumption). The results are also used to evaluate the impact of differences in code methodologies and nuclear data files on the code predictions for DB-MHR core physics parameters. The code packages of the participating organizations (ANL and CEA) are found to give very similar results. (authors)

  10. Thermal-hydraulic investigations on the CEA-ENEA DEMO relevant helium cooled poloidal blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Orco, G.; Polazzi, G.; Vallette, F.; Proust, E.; Eid, M.

    1994-01-01

    The CEA-ENEA design of an Helium Cooled Solid Breeder Blanket (HCSBB) for the DEMO reactor, with a breeder in tube (BIT) poloidal arrangement, is based on the use of lithium ceramic pellets, the ENEA γ-LiAlO 2 or the CEA Li 2 ZrO 3 . Due to the geometry of the DEMO reactor plasma chamber, these breeder bundles are adapted to the Vacuum Vessel with a strong poloidal curvature. This curvature influences the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of the coolant flowing inside the bundle. The paper presents the CEA-ENEA first results of the experimental and theoretical programme, aiming at optimizing the breeder module thermal hydraulic design. (author) 6 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  11. Cryogenic thermometer calibration system using a helium cooling loop and a temperature controller [for LHC magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Chanzy, E; Thermeau, J P; Bühler, S; Joly, C; Casas-Cubillos, J; Balle, C

    1998-01-01

    The IPN-Orsay and CERN are designing in close collaboration a fully automated cryogenic thermometer calibration facility which will calibrate in 3 years 10,000 cryogenic thermometers required for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) operation. A reduced-scale model of the calibration facility has been developed, which enables the calibration of ten thermometers by comparison with two rhodium-iron standard thermometers in the 1.8 K to 300 K temperature range under vacuum conditions. The particular design, based on a helium cooling loop and an electrical temperature controller, gives good dynamic performances. This paper describes the experimental set-up and the data acquisition system. Results of experimental runs are also presented along with the estimated global accuracy for the calibration. (3 refs).

  12. Scram device for gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Atsushi; Takahashi, Suehiro.

    1989-01-01

    A scram device for gas-cooled reactors has a hopper disposed below a stand pipe standing upright passing through a reactor container and electromagnets disposed therein. It further comprises neutron absorbing steel balls maintained between the electromagnets and the hopper upon energization of the electromagnets. Upon emergency reactor shutdown, energization for the electromagnets is interrupted to drop the neutron absorption stainless steel balls into the reactor core. It is an object of the present invention to keep the mechanical strength of the electromagnets in a high temperature gas atmosphere and not to reduce the insulation performance. That is, coils for the electromagnets are constituted with a small oxide-insulated metal sheath cable (MI cable). As the feature of the MI cable, it can maintain the mechanical strength even when exposed to high temperature gas coolant and the insulation performance thereof does not reduce by virture of its gas sealing property. Accordingly, a scram device of stable reliability can be obtained. (K.M.)

  13. Fuel arrangement for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a fuel arrangement for a high temperature gas cooled reactor including fuel assemblies with separate directly cooled fissile and fertile fuel elements removably inserted in an elongated moderator block also having a passageway for control elements

  14. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  15. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-01-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: (1) Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements; (2) Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout; (3) Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required; (4) Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems; (5) Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs; and (6) Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs

  16. The distribution of helium isotopes of natural gas and tectonic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Mingliang; Tao Mingxin

    1993-01-01

    Based on the 3 He/ 4 He data of the main oil-gas bearing basins in continental China, a systematic study has been made for the first time on the relations between the space distribution of the helium isotopes of natural gas and the tectonic environment. The average value R-bar of 3 He/ 4 He in eastern China bordering on the Pacific Ocean is 2.08 x 10 -6 >Ra, and that is dualistic mixed helium containing mantle source helium. The R-bar of central and western China is 4.96 x 10 -8 , and that is mainly crust source radioactive helium. The R-bar of Huabei and Zhongyuan oil-gas fields is 8.00 x 10 -7 , and that is a kind of transitional helium intercepted between the eastern region and the central western region of China. On the whole, the 3 He/ 4 He values decrease gradually with the distance from the subduction zone of the Western Pacific Ocean. The results show that the space distributions of the helium isotopes is controlled by the tectonic environment, that is the environment of tensile rift, especially in the neighborhood of deep megafractures advantageous to the rise of mantle source helium, so then and there the 3 He/ 4 He value is the highest; In the most stable craton basins, the value is the lowest and the helium is a typical crust source radioactive one. Between the active area (rift) and stable area, there is the transitional helium and its value is 10 -7 , as is the case in Huabei-Zhongyuan oil-gas field

  17. Thermohydraulics design and thermomechanics analysis of two European breeder blanket concepts for DEMO. Pt. 1 and Pt. 2. Pt. 1: BOT helium cooled solid breeding blanket. Pt. 2: Dual coolant self-cooled liquid metal blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norajitra, P.

    1995-06-01

    Two different breeding blanket concepts are being elaborated at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe within the framework of the DEMO breeding blanket development, the concept of a helium cooled solid breeding blanket and the concept of a self-cooled liquid metal blanket. The breeder material used in the first concept is Li 4 SiO 4 as a pebble bed arranged separate from the beryllium pebble bed, which serves as multiplier. The breeder material zone is cooled by several toroidally-radially configurated helium cooling plates which, at the same time, act as reinforcements of the blanket structures. In the liquid metal blanket concept lead-lithium is used both as the breeder material and the coolant. It flows at low velocity in poloidal direction downwards and back in the blanket front zone. In both concepts the First Wall is cooled by helium gas. This report deals with the thermohydraulics design and thermomechanics analysis of the two blanket concepts. The performance data derived from the Monte-Carlo computations serve as a basis for the design calculations. The coolant inlet and outlet temperatures are chosen with the design criteria and the economics aspects taken into account. Uniform temperature distribution in the blanket structures can be achieved by suitable branching and routing of the coolant flows which contributes to reducing decisively the thermal stress. The computations were made using the ABAQUS computer code. The results obtained of the stresses have been evaluated using the ASME code. It can be demonstrated that all maximum values of temperature and stress are below the admissible limit. (orig.) [de

  18. Determination of low levels of krypton in helium by gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.L.; Mukherji, A.K.

    1980-01-01

    Krypton-helium mixture was used as an adsorbate for surface area measurement--. The surface area measurements depend on the accuracy with which the krypton concentration is known. Generally gas tanks supplied by Union Carbide provide a nominal value of 0.1% krypton in helium. The surface area measurements require, however, that the krypton concentraion be known to +- 0.001% or better. A standard plot of krypton volume in microliters vs the area under the curve as measured by a planimeter using the helium detector and Molecular Sieve 5A column was obtained. Results with a thermal conductivity detector using Molecular Sieve 5A and Carbon Molecular Sieve are also given. Low levels of krypton in helium can be measured with precision using either a helium or a thermal conductivity detector with Molecular Sieve 5A or Carbon Molecular Sieve columns. 2 figures, 1 table

  19. General characteristics and technical subjects on helium closed cycle gas turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomura, Hiroaki

    1996-06-01

    Making the subjects clarified on nuclear-heated gas turbine that will apply the inherent features of HTGR, the present paper discusses the difference of the helium closed cycle gas turbine, which is a candidate of nuclear gas turbine, with the open cycle gas turbine and indicates inherent problems of closed cycle gas turbine, its effects onto thermal efficiency and turbine output and difficulties due to the pressure ratio and specific speed from use of helium. The paper also discusses effects of the external pressure losses onto the efficiencies of compressor and turbine that are major components of the gas turbine. According to the discussions above, the paper concludes indicating the key idea on heat exchangers for the closed cycle gas turbine and design basis to solve the problems and finally offers new gas turbine conception using nitrogen or air that is changeable into open cycle gas turbine. (author)

  20. Feasibility of high-helium natural gas exploration in the Presinian strata, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helium in China highly depends on import at present, so the most practical way to change the situation is searching for medium-to-large natural gas fields with high helium content. Therefore, the hydrocarbon accumulation mechanism and the helium origin of the Weiyuan high-helium natural gas reservoir have been analyzed to find out the feasibility of finding natural gas field with high helium content in the Presinian strata of the Sichuan Basin. Based on twelve outcrop sections and drilling data of four wells encountering the Presinian strata, the petrological features, sedimentary facies and source rocks of Presinian strata were systematically analyzed, which shows that the sedimentary formation developed in the Presinian is the Nanhua system, and the stratigraphic sequence revealed by outcrop section in the eastern margin includes the Nantuo, Datangpo, Gucheng and Liantuo Fms, and it is inferred that the same stratigraphic sequence may occur inside the basin. The Nantuo, Gucheng and Liantuo Fms are mainly glacial deposits of glutenite interbedded with mudstone; the Datangpo Fm is interglacial deposits of sandstone and shale, the lower part shale, rich in organic matter, is fairly good source rock. Further study showed that the Nantuo coarse-grained clastic reservoir, Datangpo source rock and the intruded granite “helium source rock” make up a good high-helium gas system. Controlled by the early rift, the thick Presinian sedimentary rocks occur primarily inside the rift. The distribution of sedimentary rocks and granite in the basin was predicted by use of the seismic data, which shows that the feasibility of finding high-helium gas reservoirs in Ziyang area of the Sichuan Basin is great.

  1. Program for aerodynamic performance tests of helium gas compressor model of the gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shoji; Takizuka, Takakazu; Kunimoto, Kazuhiko; Yan, Xing; Itaka, Hidehiko; Mori, Eiji

    2003-01-01

    Research and development program for helium gas compressor aerodynamics was planned for the power conversion system of the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor (GTHTR300). The axial compressor with polytropic efficiency of 90% and surge margin more than 30% was designed with 3-dimensional aerodynamic design. Performance and surge margin of the helium gas compressor tends to be lower due to the higher boss ratio which makes the tip clearance wide relative to the blade height, as well as due to a larger number of stages. The compressor was designed on the basis of methods and data for the aerodynamic design of industrial open-cycle gas-turbine. To validate the design of the helium gas compressor of the GTHTR300, aerodynamic performance tests were planned, and a 1/3-scale, 4-stage compressor model was designed. In the tests, the performance data of the helium gas compressor model will be acquired by using helium gas as a working fluid. The maximum design pressure at the model inlet is 0.88 MPa, which allows the Reynolds number to be sufficiently high. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  2. Experimental study of the critical density of heat flux in open channels cooled with helium - II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pron'ko, V.G.; Gorokhov, V.V.; Saverin, V.N.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental values of the critical density of a heat flux qsub(cr) in uniformly heated open channels cooled with helium-2 are reported for the first time. The experimental test bench and experimental element are described. Experimental data are obtained in cylindrical channels of 12Kh18N1OT steel with inner diameter d=0.8, 1.8; 2.8 mm and ratio l/d=20.8, 44, 85. The channel orientation has varied from vertical to horizontal position, the immersion depth - from 100, to 600 mm. It has been found that the heat transfer crisis propagation over the whole length of the channel with He-2 occurs practically instantaneously. The qsub(cr) value depends essentially on the bath liquid temperature, angle of inclivnation and relative length (l/d) of the channel with qsub(cr) approximately (l/d)sup(-1.5) being independent of the depth of channel immersion. The obtained values of critical density of a heat flux in channels are papproximately by an order less than those found for a great bulk of He-2. The results presented may be used for designing various types of devices cooled with He-2 and development of heat exchange theory in it [ru

  3. Skin blood flow from gas transport: helium xenon and laser Doppler compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neufeld, G.R.; Galante, S.R.; Whang, J.M.; DeVries, D.; Baumgardner, J.E.; Graves, D.J.; Quinn, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    A study was designed to compare three independent measures of cutaneous blood flow in normal healthy volunteers: xenon-133 washout, helium flux, and laser velocimetry. All measurements were confined to the volar aspect of the forearm. In a large group of subjects we found that helium flux through intact skin changes nonlinearly with the controlled local skin temperature whereas helium flux through stripped skin, which is directly proportional to skin blood flow, changes linearly with cutaneous temperature over the range 33 degrees to 42 degrees. In a second group of six volunteers we compared helium flux through stripped skin to xenon-133 washout (intact skin) at a skin temperature of 33 degrees, and we found an essentially linear relationship between helium flux and xenon measured blood flow. In a third group of subjects we compared helium flux blood flow (stripped skin) to laser doppler velocimetric (LDV) measurements (intact skin) at adjacent skin sites and found a nonlinear increase in the LDV skin blood flow compared to that determined by helium over the same temperature range. A possible explanation for the nonlinear increases of helium flux through intact skin and of LDV output with increasing local skin temperature is that they reflect more than a change in blood flow. They may also reflect physical changes in the stratum corneum, which alters its diffusional resistance to gas flux and its optical characteristics

  4. Skin blood flow from gas transport: helium xenon and laser Doppler compared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neufeld, G.R.; Galante, S.R.; Whang, J.M.; DeVries, D.; Baumgardner, J.E.; Graves, D.J.; Quinn, J.A.

    1988-03-01

    A study was designed to compare three independent measures of cutaneous blood flow in normal healthy volunteers: xenon-133 washout, helium flux, and laser velocimetry. All measurements were confined to the volar aspect of the forearm. In a large group of subjects we found that helium flux through intact skin changes nonlinearly with the controlled local skin temperature whereas helium flux through stripped skin, which is directly proportional to skin blood flow, changes linearly with cutaneous temperature over the range 33 degrees to 42 degrees. In a second group of six volunteers we compared helium flux through stripped skin to xenon-133 washout (intact skin) at a skin temperature of 33 degrees, and we found an essentially linear relationship between helium flux and xenon measured blood flow. In a third group of subjects we compared helium flux blood flow (stripped skin) to laser doppler velocimetric (LDV) measurements (intact skin) at adjacent skin sites and found a nonlinear increase in the LDV skin blood flow compared to that determined by helium over the same temperature range. A possible explanation for the nonlinear increases of helium flux through intact skin and of LDV output with increasing local skin temperature is that they reflect more than a change in blood flow. They may also reflect physical changes in the stratum corneum, which alters its diffusional resistance to gas flux and its optical characteristics.

  5. Assessment of gas cooled fast reactor with indirect supercritical CO2 cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hejzlar, P.; Driscoll, M. J.; Dostal, V.; Dumaz, P.; Poullennec, G.; Alpy, N.

    2006-01-01

    Various indirect power cycle options for a helium cooled Gas cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) with particular focus on a supercritical CO 2 (SCO 2 ) indirect cycle are investigated as an alternative to a helium cooled direct cycle GFR. The Balance Of Plant (BOP) options include helium-nitrogen Brayton cycle, supercritical water Rankine cycle, and SCO 2 recompression Brayton power cycle in three versions: (1) basic design with turbine inlet temperature of 550 .deg. C, (2) advanced design with turbine inlet temperature of 650 .deg. C and (3) advanced design with the same turbine inlet temperature and reduced compressor inlet temperature. The indirect SCO 2 recompression cycle is found attractive since in addition to easier BOP maintenance it allows significant reduction of core outlet temperature, making design of the primary system easier while achieving very attractive efficiencies comparable to or slightly lower than, the efficiency of the reference GFR direct cycle design. In addition, the indirect cycle arrangement allows significant reduction of the GFR 'proximate-containment' and the BOP for the SCO 2 cycle is very compact. Both these factors will lead to reduced capital cost

  6. Status of national gas cooled reactor programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    This report has been compiled as a central source of summary-level information on the present status of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) programmes in the world and on future plans for the continued development and deployment of HTGRs. Most of the information concerns the programmes in the United States, Germany, Japan and the Soviet Union, countries that have had large programmes related to HTGR technology for several years. Summary-level information is also provided in the report on HTGR-related activities in several other countries who either have an increasing interest in the technology and/or who are performing some development efforts related to HTGR technology. The report contains a summary-level update on the MAGNOX and AGR programmes. This is the twelfth issue of the document, the first of which was issued in March, 1979. The report has been prepared in the IAEA Nuclear Power Technology Development Section. Figs and tabs

  7. Use of thorium for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimarães, Cláudio Q., E-mail: claudio_guimaraes@usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Física; Stefani, Giovanni L. de, E-mail: giovanni.stefani@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, Thiago A. dos, E-mail: thiago.santos@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo André, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The HTGR ( High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) is a 4{sup th} generation nuclear reactor and is fuelled by a mixture of graphite and fuel-bearing microspheres. There are two competitive designs of this reactor type: The German “pebble bed” mode, which is a system that uses spherical fuel elements, containing a graphite-and-fuel mixture coated in a graphite shell; and the American version, whose fuel is loaded into precisely located graphite hexagonal prisms that interlock to create the core of the vessel. In both variants, the coolant consists of helium pressurised. The HTGR system operates most efficiently with the thorium fuel cycle, however, so relatively little development has been carried out in this country on that cycle for HTGRs. In the Nuclear Engineering Centre of IPEN (Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares), a study group is being formed linked to thorium reactors, whose proposal is to investigate reactors using thorium for {sup 233}U production and rejects burning. The present work intends to show the use of thorium in HTGRs, their advantages and disadvantages and its feasibility. (author)

  8. Heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly du Bois, B.; Bernard, J.L.; Naudet, R.; Roche, R.

    1964-01-01

    France has based its main effort for the production of nuclear energy on natural Uranium Graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactors, and has a long term programme for fast reactors, but this country is also engaged in the development of heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors which appear to present the best middle term prospects. The economy of these reactors, as in the case of Graphite, arises from the use of natural or very slightly enriched Uranium; heavy water can take the best advantages of this fuel cycle and moreover offers considerable development potential because of better reactor performances. A prototype plant EL 4 (70 MW) is under construction and is described in detail in another paper. The present one deals with the programme devoted to the development of this reactor type in France. Reasons for selecting this reactor type are given in the first part: advantages and difficulties are underlined. After reviewing the main technological problems and the Research and Development carried out, results already obtained and points still to be confirmed are reported. The construction of EL 4 is an important step of this programme: it will be a significant demonstration of reactor performances and will afford many experimentation opportunities. Now the design of large power reactors is to be considered. Extension and improvements of the mechanical structures used for EL 4 are under study, as well as alternative concepts. The paper gives some data for a large reactor in the present state of technology, as a result from optimization studies. Technical improvements, especially in the field of materials could lead to even more interesting performances. Some prospects are mentioned for the long run. Investment costs and fuel cycles are discussed in the last part. (authors) [fr

  9. Seismic behaviour of gas cooled reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-08-01

    On invitation of the French Government the Specialists' Meeting on the Seismic Behaviour of Gas-Cooled Reactor Components was held at Gif-sur-Yvette, 14-16 November 1989. This was the second Specialists' Meeting on the general subject of gas-cooled reactor seismic design. There were 27 participants from France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Israel, Japan, Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, the United States, the CEC and IAEA took the opportunity to present and discuss a total of 16 papers reflecting the state of the art of gained experiences in the field of their seismic qualification approach, seismic analysis methods and of the capabilities of various facilities used to qualify components and verify analytical methods. Since the first meeting, the sophistication and expanded capabilities of both the seismic analytical methods and the test facilities are apparent. The two main methods for seismic analysis, the impedance method and the finite element method, have been computer-programmed in several countries with the capability of each of the codes dependent on the computer capability. The correlations between calculation and tests are dependent on input assumptions such as boundary conditions, soil parameters and various interactions between the soil, the buildings and the contained equipment. The ability to adjust these parameters and match experimental results with calculations was displayed in several of the papers. The expanded capability of some of the new test facilities was graphically displayed by the description of the SAMSON vibration test facility at Juelich, FRG, capable of dynamically testing specimens weighing up to 25 tonnes, and the TAMARIS facility at the CEA laboratories in Gif-sur-Yvette where the largest table is capable of testing specimens weighing up to 100 tonnes. The proceedings of this meeting contain all 16 presented papers. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. Gas cooled fast reactor research in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stainsby, Richard; Peers, Karen; Mitchell, Colin; Poette, Christian; Mikityuk, Konstantin; Somers, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Research on the gas-cooled fast reactor system is directed towards fulfilling the ambitious long term goals of Generation IV (Gen IV), i.e., to develop a safe, sustainable, reliable, proliferation-resistant and economic nuclear energy system. In common with other fast reactors, gas-cooled fast reactors (GFRs) have exceptional potential as sustainable energy sources, for both the utilisation of fissile material and minimisation of nuclear waste through transmutation of minor actinides. The primary goal of GFR research is to develop the system primarily to be a reliable and economic electricity generator, with good safety and sustainability characteristics. However, for the longer term, GFR retains the potential for hydrogen production and other process heat applications facilitated through a high core outlet temperature which, in this case, is not limited by the characteristics of the coolant. In this respect, GFR can inherit the non-electricity applications of the thermal HTRs in a sustainable manner in a future in which natural uranium becomes scarce. GFR research within Europe is performed directly by those states who have signed the 'System Arrangement' document within the Generation IV International Forum (the GIF), specifically France and Switzerland and Euratom. Importantly, Euratom provides a route by which researchers in other European states, and other non-European affiliates, can contribute to the work of the GIF, even when these states are not signatories to the GFR System Arrangement in their own right. This paper is written from the perspective of Euratom's involvement in research on the GFR system, starting with the 5th Framework Programme (FP5) GCFR project in 2000, through the FP6 project between 2005 and 2009 and looking ahead to the proposed activities within the current 7th Framework Programme (FP7). The evolution of the GFR concept from the 1960s onwards is discussed briefly, followed by the current perceived role, objectives and progress with

  11. Metaphysics methods development for high temperature gas cooled reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seker, V.; Downar, T. J.

    2007-01-01

    Gas cooled reactors have been characterized as one of the most promising nuclear reactor concepts in the Generation-IV technology road map. Considerable research has been performed on the design and safety analysis of these reactors. However, the calculational tools being used to perform these analyses are not state-of-the-art and are not capable of performing detailed three-dimensional analyses. This paper presents the results of an effort to develop an improved thermal-hydraulic solver for the pebble bed type high temperature gas cooled reactors. The solution method is based on the porous medium approach and the momentum equation including the modified Ergun's resistance model for pebble bed is solved in three-dimensional geometry. The heat transfer in the pebble bed is modeled considering the local thermal non-equilibrium between the solid and gas, which results in two separate energy equations for each medium. The effective thermal conductivity of the pebble-bed can be calculated both from Zehner-Schluender and Robold correlations. Both the fluid flow and the heat transfer are modeled in three dimensional cylindrical coordinates and can be solved in steady-state and time dependent. The spatial discretization is performed using the finite volume method and the theta-method is used in the temporal discretization. A preliminary verification was performed by comparing the results with the experiments conducted at the SANA test facility. This facility is located at the Institute for Safety Research and Reactor Technology (ISR), Julich, Germany. Various experimental cases are modeled and good agreement in the gas and solid temperatures is observed. An on-going effort is to model the control rod ejection scenarios as described in the OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR-400 benchmark problem. In order to perform these analyses PARCS reactor simulator code will be coupled with the new thermal-hydraulic solver. Furthermore, some of the other anticipated accident scenarios in the benchmark

  12. Status of and prospects for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The IAEA International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (IWGGCR) (see Annex I), which was established in 1978, recommended to the Agency that a report be prepared in order to provide an up-to-date summary of gas-cooled reactor technology. The present Technical Report is based mainly on submissions of Member Countries of the IWGGCR and consists of four main sections. Beside some general information about the gas-cooled reactor line, section 1 contains a description of the incentives for the development and deployment of gas-cooled reactors in various Agency Member States. These include both electricity generation and process steam and process heat production for various branches of industry. The historical development of gas-cooled reactors is reviewed in section 2. In this section information is provided on how, when and why gas-cooled reactors have been developed in various Agency Member States and, in addition, a detailed description of the different gas-cooled reactor lines is presented. Section 3 contains information about the technical status of gas-cooled reactors and their applications. Gas-cooled reactors that are under design or construction or in operation are listed and shortly described, together with an outlook for future reactor designs. In this section the various applications for gas-cooled reactors are described in detail. These include both electricity generation and process steam and process heat production. The last section (section 4) is entitled ''Special features of gas-cooled reactors'' and contains information about the technical performance, fuel utilization, safety characteristics and environmental impact, such as radiation exposure and heat rejection

  13. Fundamental conceptual design of the experimental multi-purpose high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimokawa, Junichi; Yasuno, Takehiko; Yasukawa, Shigeru; Mitake, Susumu; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki

    1975-06-01

    The fundamental conceptual design of the experimental multi-purpose very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (experimental VHTR of thermal output 50 MW with reactor outlet-gas temperature 1,000 0 C) has been carried out to provide the operation modes of the system consisting of the reactor and the heat-utilization system, including characteristics and performance of the components and safety of the plant system. For the heat-utilization system of the plant, heat distribution, temperature condition, cooling system constitution, and the containment facility are specified. For the operation of plant, testing capability of the reactor and controlability of the system are taken into consideration. Detail design is made of the fuel element, reactor core, reactivity control and pressure vessel, and also the heat exchanger, steam reformer, steam generator, helium circulator, helium-gas turbine, and helium-gas purification, fuel handling, and engineered safety systems. Emphasis is placed on providing the increase of the reactor outlet-gas temperature. Fuel element design is directed to the prismatic graphite blocks of hexagonal cross-section accommodating the hollow or tubular fuel pins sheathed in graphite sleeve. The reactor core is composed of 73 fuel columns in 7 stages, concerning the reference design MK-II. Orificing is made in the upper portion of core; one orifice for every 7 fuel columns. Average core power density is 2.5 watts/cm 3 . Fuel temperature is kept below 1,300 0 C in rated power. The main components, i.e. pressure vessel, reformer, gas turbine and intermediate heat exchanger are designed in detail; the IHX is of a double-shell and helically-wound tube coils, the reformer is of a byonet tube type, and the turbine-compressor unit is of an axial flow type (turbine in 6 stages and compressor in 16 stages). (auth.)

  14. Numerical analysis of performance of steam reformer of methane reforming hydrogen production system connected with high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Huaqiang; Jiang Shengyao; Zhang Youjie

    2007-01-01

    Methane conversion rate and hydrogen output are important performance indexes of the steam reformer. The paper presents numerical analysis of performance of the reformer connected with high-temperature gas-cooled reactor HTR-10. Setting helium inlet flow rate fixed, performance of the reformer was examined with different helium inlet temperature, pressure, different process gas temperature, pressure, flow rate, and different steam to carbon ratio. As the range concerned, helium inlet temperature has remarkable influence on the performance, and helium inlet temperature, process gas temperature and pressure have little influence on the performance, and improving process gas flow rate, methane conversion rate decreases and hydrogen output increases, however improving steam to carbon ratio has reverse influence on the performance. (authors)

  15. Effects of hydrogen mixture into helium gas on deuterium removal from lithium titanate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Akihito, E-mail: tsuchiya@frontier.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Plasma Physics and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Hino, Tomoaki; Yamauchi, Yuji; Nobuta, Yuji [Laboratory of Plasma Physics and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Akiba, Masato; Enoeda, Mikio [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1, Mukoyama, Naka 311-0193 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    Lithium titanate (Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) pebbles were irradiated with deuterium ions with energy of 1.7 keV and then exposed to helium or helium–hydrogen mixed gas at various temperatures, in order to evaluate the effects of gas exposure on deuterium removal from the pebbles. The amounts of residual deuterium in the pebbles were measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy. The mixing of hydrogen gas into helium gas enhanced the removal amount of deuterium. In other words, the amount of residual deuterium after the helium–hydrogen mixed gas exposure at lower temperature was lower than that after the helium gas exposure. In addition, we also evaluated the pebbles exposed to the helium gas with different hydrogen mixture ratio from 0% to 1%, at 573 K. Although the amount of residual deuterium in the pebbles after the exposure decreased with increasing the hydrogen mixture ratio, the implanted deuterium partly remained after the exposure. These results suggest that the tritium inventory may occur at low temperature region in the blanket during the operation.

  16. Direct implementation of an axial-flow helium gas turbine tool in a system analysis tool for HTGRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hwan; No, Hee Cheon; Kim, Hyeun Min; Lim, Hong Sik

    2008-01-01

    This study concerns the development of dynamic models for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) through direct implementation of a gas turbine analysis code with a transient analysis code. We have developed a streamline curvature analysis code based on the Newton-Raphson numerical application (SANA) to analyze the off-design performance of helium gas turbines under conditions of normal operation. The SANA code performs a detailed two-dimensional analysis by means of throughflow calculation with allowances for losses in axial-flow multistage compressors and turbines. To evaluate the performance in the steady-state and load transient of HTGRs, we developed GAMMA-T by implementing SANA in the transient system code, GAMMA, which is a multidimensional, multicomponent analysis tool for HTGRs. The reactor, heat exchangers, and connecting pipes were designed with a one-dimensional thermal-hydraulic model that uses the GAMMA code. We assessed GAMMA-T by comparing its results with the steady-state results of the GTHTR300 of JAEA. We concluded that the results are in good agreement, including the results of the vessel cooling bypass flow and the turbine cooling flow

  17. Presentation summary: Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Numerous prototypes and demonstration plants have been constructed and operated beginning with the Dragon plant in the early 1960s. The MHTGR was the U.S. developed modular plant and underwent pre application review by NRC. The GT-MHR represents a further refinement on this concept with the steam cycle being replaced by a closed loop gas turbine (Brayton) cycle. Modular gas reactors and the GT-MHR represent a fundamental shift in reactor design and safety philosophy. The reactor system is contained in a 3 vessel, side-by-side arrangement. The reactor and a shutdown cooling system are in one vessel, and the gas turbine based power conversion system, including the generator, in a second parallel vessel. A more detailed look at the system shows the compact arrangement of gas turbine, compressors, recuperator, heat exchanges, and generator. Fueled blocks are stacked in three concentric rings with inert graphite blocks making up the inner and outer reflectors. Operating control rods are located outside the active core while startup control rods and channels for reserve shutdown pellets are located near the core center. Ceramic coated fuel is the key to the GT-MHR's safety and economics. A kernel of Uranium oxycarbide (or UO 2 ) is placed in a porous carbon buffer and then encapsulated in multiple layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. These micro pressure vessels withstand internal pressures of up to 2,000 psi and temperatures of nearly 2,000 C providing extremely resilient containment of fission products under both normal operating and accident conditions. The fuel particles are blended in carbon pitch, forming fuel rods, and then loaded into holes within large graphite fuel elements. Fuel elements are stacked to form the core. Fuel particle testing in has repeatedly demonstrated the high temperature resilience of coated particle fuel to temperature approaching 2,000 C. As an conservative design goal, GT-MHR has been sized to keep maximum fuel temperatures

  18. Evaluating the income and employment impacts of gas cooling technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Laitner, S.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential employment and income benefits of the emerging market for gas cooling products. The emphasis here is on exports because that is the major opportunity for the U.S. heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) industry. But domestic markets are also important and considered here because without a significant domestic market, it is unlikely that the plant investments, jobs, and income associated with gas cooling exports would be retained within the United States. The prospects for significant gas cooling exports appear promising for a variety of reasons. There is an expanding need for cooling in the developing world, natural gas is widely available, electric infrastructures are over-stressed in many areas, and the cost of building new gas infrastructure is modest compared to the cost of new electric infrastructure. Global gas cooling competition is currently limited, with Japanese and U.S. companies, and their foreign business partners, the only product sources. U.S. manufacturers of HVAC products are well positioned to compete globally, and are already one of the faster growing goods-exporting sectors of the U.S. economy. Net HVAC exports grew by over 800 percent from 1987 to 1992 and currently exceed $2.6 billion annually (ARI 1994). Net gas cooling job and income creation are estimated using an economic input-output model to compare a reference case to a gas cooling scenario. The reference case reflects current policies, practices, and trends with respect to conventional electric cooling technologies. The gas cooling scenario examines the impact of accelerated use of natural gas cooling technologies here and abroad.

  19. Overview of environmental control aspects for the gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolan, A.M.

    1981-05-01

    Environmental control aspects relating to release of radionuclides have been analyzed for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR). Information on environmental control systems was obtained for the most recent GCFR designs, and was used to evaluate the adequacy of these systems. The GCFR has been designed by the General Atomic Company as an alternative to other fast breeder reactor designs, such as the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR). The GCFR design includes mixed oxide fuel and helium coolant. The environmental impact of expected radionuclide releases from normal operation of the GCFR was evaluated using estimated collective dose equivalent commitments resulting from 1 year of plant operation. The results were compared to equivalent estimates for the Light Water Reactor (LWR) and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). A discussion of uncertainties in system performances, tritium production rates, and radiation quality factors for tritium is included

  20. Properties of super alloys for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izaki, Takashi; Nakai, Yasuo; Shimizu, Shigeki; Murakami, Takashi

    1975-01-01

    The existing data on the properties at high temperature in helium gas of iron base super alloys. Incoloy-800, -802 and -807, nickel base super alloys, Hastelloy-X, Inconel-600, -617 and -625, and a casting alloy HK-40 were collectively evaluated from the viewpoint of the selection of material for HTGRs. These properties include corrosion resistance, strength and toughness, weldability, tube making, formability, radioactivation, etc. Creep strength was specially studied, taking into consideration the data on the creep characteristics in the actual helium gas atmosphere. The necessity of further long run creep data is suggested. Hastelloy-X has completely stable corrosion resistance at high temperature in helium gas. Incoloy 800 and 807 and Inconel 617 are not preferable in view of corrosion resistance. The creep strength of Inconel 617 extraporated to 1,000 deg C for 100,000 hours in air was the greatest rupture strength of 0.6 kg/mm 2 in all above alloys. However, its strength in helium gas began to fall during a relatively short time, so that its creep strength must be re-evaluated in the use for long time. The radioactivation and separation of oxide film in primary construction materials came into question, Inconel 617 and Incoloy 807 showed high induced radioactivity intensity. Generally speaking, in case of nickel base alloys such as Hastelloy-X, oxide film is difficult to break away. (Iwakiri, K.)

  1. Post-examination of helium-cooled tungsten components exposed to DEMO specific cyclic thermal loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritz, G.; Hirai, T.; Linke, J.; Norajitra, P.; Giniyatulin, R.; Singheiser, L.

    2009-01-01

    A concept of helium-cooled tungsten finger module was developed for the European DEMO divertor. The concept was realized and tested under DEMO specific cyclic thermal loads up to 10 MW/m 2 . The modules were examined carefully before and after loading by metallography and microstructural analyses. While before loading mainly discrete and shallow cracks were found on the tungsten surface due to the manufacturing process, dense crack networks were observed at the loaded surfaces due to the thermal stress. In addition, cracks occurred in the structural, heat sink part and propagated along the grains orientation of the deformed tungsten material. Facilitated by cracking, the molten brazing metal between the tungsten plasma facing material and the W-La 2 O 3 heat sink, that could not withstand the operational temperatures, infiltrated the tungsten components and, due to capillary forces, even reached the plasma facing surface through the cracks. The formed cavity in the brazed layer reduced the heat conduction and the modules were further damaged due to overheating during the applied heat loads. Based on this detailed characterization and possible improvements of the design and of the manufacturing routes are discussed.

  2. Brookhaven program to develop a helium-cooled power transmission system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, E.B.

    1975-01-01

    The particular system under design consists of flexible cables installed in a cryogenic enclosure at room temperature and cooled to the range 6 to 9 0 K by supercritical helium, contraction of the cable is accommodated by proper choice of helix angles of the components of the cable. The superconductor is Nb 3 Sn and at the present time the dielectric insulation is still the subject of intensive development. Two good choices appear to be forms of polyethylene and polycarbonate. Sample cables incorporating various dielectrics have been manufactured commercially in lengths of 1500 ft and tested in laboratory cryostats in shorter sections of about 70 ft. A test facility is under construction to evaluate cables and cryogenic components for this type of service, the first refrigerator uses a 350 H.P. screw compressor and three turbo-expander stages. It is hoped to achieve reliability of a very high order. The first three-phase tests will be conducted at 69 kV, although it appears that 230 to 345 kV is the most likely voltage range for future applications. (auth)

  3. Conceptual design of the blanket mechanical attachment for the helium-cooled lithium-lead reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, G.; Branas, B.; Lucas, J.; Doncel, J.; Medrano, M.; Garcia, A.; Giancarli, L.; Ibarra, A.; Li Puma, A.; Maisonnier, D.; Sardain, P.

    2008-01-01

    The conceptual design of a new type of fusion reactor based on the helium-cooled lithium-lead (HCLL) blanket has been performed within the European Power Plant Conceptual Studies. As part of this activity, a new attachment system suitable for the HCLL blanket modules had to be developed. This attachment is composed of two parts. The first one is the connection between module and the first part of a shield, called high temperature shield, which operates at a temperature around 500 deg. C, close to that of the blanket module. This connection must be made at the lateral walls, in order to avoid openings through the first wall and breeding zone thus avoiding complex design and fabrication issues of the module. The second connection is the one between the high temperature shield and a second shield called low temperature shield, which has a temperature during reactor operation around 150 deg. C. The design of this connection is complex because it must allow the large differential thermal expansion (up to 30 mm) between the two components. Design proposals for both connections are presented, together with the results of finite element mechanical analyses which demonstrate the feasibility to support the blanket and shield modules during normal and accidental operation conditions

  4. Electromagnetic analysis on Korean Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) TBM during plasma major disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youngmin; Ku, Duck Young; Ahn, Mu-Young; Cho, Seungyon; Park, Yi-Hyun; Lee, Dong Won

    2015-01-01

    Korean Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) Test Blanket Module (TBM) will be installed at the #18 equatorial port of the Vaccum Vessel in order to test the feasibility of the breeding blanket performance for forthcoming fusion power plant in the ITER TBM Program. Since ITER tokamak contains Vaccum Vessel and set of electromagnetic coils, the TBM as well as other components is greatly influenced by magnetic field generated by these coils. By the electromagnetic (EM) fast transient events such as major disruption (MD), vertical displacement event (VDE) or magnet fast discharge (MFD) occurred in tokamak system, the eddy current can be induced eventually in the conducting components. As a result, the magnetic field and induced eddy current produce extremely huge EM load (force and moment) on the TBM. Therefore, EM load calculation is one of the most important analyses for optimized design of TBM. In this study, a 20-degree sector model for tokamak system including central solenoid (CS) coil, poloidal field (PF) coil, toroidal field (TF) coil, vaccum vessel, shield blankets and TBM set (TBM, TBM key, TBM shield, TBM frame) is prepared for analysis by ANSYS-EMAG tool. Concerning the installation location of the TBM, a major disruption scenario is particularly applied for fast transient analysis. The final goal of this study is to evaluate the EM load on HCCR TBM during plasma major disruption.

  5. Electromagnetic analysis on Korean Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) TBM during plasma major disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youngmin, E-mail: ymlee@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ku, Duck Young; Ahn, Mu-Young; Cho, Seungyon; Park, Yi-Hyun [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Korean Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) Test Blanket Module (TBM) will be installed at the #18 equatorial port of the Vaccum Vessel in order to test the feasibility of the breeding blanket performance for forthcoming fusion power plant in the ITER TBM Program. Since ITER tokamak contains Vaccum Vessel and set of electromagnetic coils, the TBM as well as other components is greatly influenced by magnetic field generated by these coils. By the electromagnetic (EM) fast transient events such as major disruption (MD), vertical displacement event (VDE) or magnet fast discharge (MFD) occurred in tokamak system, the eddy current can be induced eventually in the conducting components. As a result, the magnetic field and induced eddy current produce extremely huge EM load (force and moment) on the TBM. Therefore, EM load calculation is one of the most important analyses for optimized design of TBM. In this study, a 20-degree sector model for tokamak system including central solenoid (CS) coil, poloidal field (PF) coil, toroidal field (TF) coil, vaccum vessel, shield blankets and TBM set (TBM, TBM key, TBM shield, TBM frame) is prepared for analysis by ANSYS-EMAG tool. Concerning the installation location of the TBM, a major disruption scenario is particularly applied for fast transient analysis. The final goal of this study is to evaluate the EM load on HCCR TBM during plasma major disruption.

  6. Pumped helium system for cooling positron and electron traps to 1.2 K

    CERN Document Server

    Wrubel, J; Kolthammer, W S; Larochelle, P; McConnell, R; Richerme, P; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Sefzick, T; Zielinski, M; Borbely, J S; George, M C; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Mullers, A; Walz, J; Speck, A

    2011-01-01

    Extremely precise tests of fundamental particle symmetries should be possible via laser spectroscopy of trapped antihydrogen ((H) over bar) atoms. (H) over bar atoms that can be trapped must have an energy in temperature units that is below 0.5 K-the energy depth of the deepest magnetic traps that can currently be constructed with high currents and superconducting technology. The number of atoms in a Boltzmann distribution with energies lower than this trap depth depends sharply upon the temperature of the thermal distribution. For example, ten times more atoms with energies low enough to be trapped are in a thermal distribution at a temperature of 1.2 K than for a temperature of 4.2 K. To date, (H) over bar atoms have only been produced within traps whose electrode temperature is 4.2 K or higher. A lower temperature apparatus is desirable if usable numbers of atoms that can be trapped are to eventually be produced. This report is about the pumped helium apparatus that cooled the trap electrodes of an (H) ove...

  7. Non-linear Model Predictive Control for cooling strings of superconducting magnets using superfluid helium

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)673023; Blanco Viñuela, Enrique

    In each of eight arcs of the 27 km circumference Large Hadron Collider (LHC), 2.5 km long strings of super-conducting magnets are cooled with superfluid Helium II at 1.9 K. The temperature stabilisation is a challenging control problem due to complex non-linear dynamics of the magnets temperature and presence of multiple operational constraints. Strong nonlinearities and variable dead-times of the dynamics originate at strongly heat-flux dependent effective heat conductivity of superfluid that varies three orders of magnitude over the range of possible operational conditions. In order to improve the temperature stabilisation, a proof of concept on-line economic output-feedback Non-linear Model Predictive Controller (NMPC) is presented in this thesis. The controller is based on a novel complex first-principles distributed parameters numerical model of the temperature dynamics over a 214 m long sub-sector of the LHC that is characterized by very low computational cost of simulation needed in real-time optimizat...

  8. Activation analysis of Chinese ITER helium cooled solid breeder test blanket module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Jingru; Chen Yixue; Ma Xubo; Wang Shouhai; Forrest, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    Based on the Chinese ITER helium cooled solid breeder(CH-HCSB) test blanket module (TBM) of the 3 x 6 sub-modules options, the activation characteristics of the TBM were calculated. Three-dimensional neutronic calculations were performed using the Monte-Carlo code MCNP and the nuclear data library FENDL/2. Furthermore, the activation calculations of HCSB-TBM were carried out with the European activation system EASY-2007. At shutdown the total activity is 1.29 x 10 16 Bq, and the total afterheat is 2.46 kW. They are both dominated by the Eurofer steel. The activity and afterheat are both in the safe range of TBM design, and will not have a great impact on the environment. Meanwhile,on basis of the calculated contact dose rate, the activated materials can be re-used following the remote handling recycling options. The activation results demonstrate that the current HCSB-TBM design can satisfy the ITER safety design requirements from the activation point of view. (authors)

  9. Cryogenic system with GM cryocooler for krypton, xenon separation from hydrogen-helium purge gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, X. X.; Zhang, D. X.; Qian, Y.; Liu, W. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 201800 (China); Zhang, M. M.; Xu, D. [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China)

    2014-01-29

    In the thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR), fission products such as krypton, xenon and tritium will be produced continuously in the process of nuclear fission reaction. A cryogenic system with a two stage GM cryocooler was designed to separate Kr, Xe, and H{sub 2} from helium purge gas. The temperatures of two stage heat exchanger condensation tanks were maintained at about 38 K and 4.5 K, respectively. The main fluid parameters of heat transfer were confirmed, and the structural heat exchanger equipment and cold box were designed. Designed concentrations after cryogenic separation of Kr, Xe and H{sub 2} in helium recycle gas are less than 1 ppb.

  10. Radiation and gas conduction heat transport across a helium dewer multilayer insulation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, M.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    This report describes a method for calculating mixed heat transfer through the multilayer insulation used to insulated a 4K liquid helium cryostat. The method described permits one to estimate the insulation potential for a multilayer insulation system from first principles. The heat transfer regimes included are: radiation, conduction by free molecule gas conduction, and conduction through continuum gas conduction. Heat transfer in the transition region between the two gas conduction regimes is also included.

  11. A methodology for accident analysis of fusion breeder blankets and its application to helium-cooled lead–lithium blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayotov, Dobromir; Poitevin, Yves; Grief, Andrew; Trow, Martin; Dillistone, Michael

    2016-01-01

    'Fusion for Energy' (F4E) is designing, developing, and implementing the European Helium-Cooled Lead-Lithium (HCLL) and Helium-Cooled Pebble-Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Systems (TBSs) for ITER (Nuclear Facility INB-174). Safety demonstration is an essential element for the integration of these TBSs into ITER and accident analysis is one of its critical components. A systematic approach to accident analysis has been developed under the F4E contract on TBS safety analyses. F4E technical requirements, together with Amec Foster Wheeler and INL efforts, have resulted in a comprehensive methodology for fusion breeding blanket accident analysis that addresses the specificity of the breeding blanket designs, materials, and phenomena while remaining consistent with the approach already applied to ITER accident analyses. Furthermore, the methodology phases are illustrated in the paper by its application to the EU HCLL TBS using both MELCOR and RELAP5 codes.

  12. Development status and operational features of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkleblack, R.K.

    1976-04-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the maturity of HTR-technology and to look out for possible technical problems, concerning introduction of large HTR power plants into the market. Further state and problems of introducing and closing the thorium fuel cycle is presented and judged. Finally, the state of development of advanced HTR-concepts for electricity production, the direct cycle HTR with helium turbine, and the gas-cooled fast breeder is discussed. In preparing the study, both HTR concepts with spherical and block-type fuel elements have been considered

  13. Advanced gas cooled reactors - Designing for safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, Barry A.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor Power Stations recently completed at Heysham in Lancashire, England, and Torness in East Lothian, Scotland represent the current stage of development of the commercial AGR. Each power station has two reactor turbo-generator units designed for a total station output of 2x660 MW(e) gross although powers in excess of this have been achieved and it is currently intended to uprate this as far as possible. The design of both stations has been based on the successful operating AGRs at Hinkley Point and Hunterston which have now been in-service for almost 15 years, although minor changes were made to meet new safety requirements and to make improvements suggested by operating experience. The construction of these new AGRs has been to programme and within budget. Full commercial load for the first reactor at Torness was achieved in August 1988 with the other three reactors following over the subsequent 15 months. This paper summarises the safety principles and guidelines for the design of the reactors and discusses how some of the main features of the safety case meet these safety requirements. The paper also summarises the design problems which arose during the construction period and explains how these problems were solved with the minimum delay to programme

  14. Advanced gas cooled reactors - Designing for safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keen, Barry A [Engineering Development Unit, NNC Limited, Booths Hall, Knutsford, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor Power Stations recently completed at Heysham in Lancashire, England, and Torness in East Lothian, Scotland represent the current stage of development of the commercial AGR. Each power station has two reactor turbo-generator units designed for a total station output of 2x660 MW(e) gross although powers in excess of this have been achieved and it is currently intended to uprate this as far as possible. The design of both stations has been based on the successful operating AGRs at Hinkley Point and Hunterston which have now been in-service for almost 15 years, although minor changes were made to meet new safety requirements and to make improvements suggested by operating experience. The construction of these new AGRs has been to programme and within budget. Full commercial load for the first reactor at Torness was achieved in August 1988 with the other three reactors following over the subsequent 15 months. This paper summarises the safety principles and guidelines for the design of the reactors and discusses how some of the main features of the safety case meet these safety requirements. The paper also summarises the design problems which arose during the construction period and explains how these problems were solved with the minimum delay to programme.

  15. Real-Gas Correction Factors for Hypersonic Flow Parameters in Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Wayne D.

    1960-01-01

    The real-gas hypersonic flow parameters for helium have been calculated for stagnation temperatures from 0 F to 600 F and stagnation pressures up to 6,000 pounds per square inch absolute. The results of these calculations are presented in the form of simple correction factors which must be applied to the tabulated ideal-gas parameters. It has been shown that the deviations from the ideal-gas law which exist at high pressures may cause a corresponding significant error in the hypersonic flow parameters when calculated as an ideal gas. For example the ratio of the free-stream static to stagnation pressure as calculated from the thermodynamic properties of helium for a stagnation temperature of 80 F and pressure of 4,000 pounds per square inch absolute was found to be approximately 13 percent greater than that determined from the ideal-gas tabulation with a specific heat ratio of 5/3.

  16. Optimization design of turbo-expander gas bearing for a 500W helium refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S. S.; Fu, B.; Y Zhang, Q.

    2017-12-01

    Turbo-expander is the core machinery of the helium refrigerator. Bearing as the supporting element is the core technology to impact the design of turbo-expander. The perfect design and performance study for the gas bearing are essential to ensure the stability of turbo-expander. In this paper, numerical simulation is used to analyze the performance of gas bearing for a 500W helium refrigerator turbine, and the optimization design of the gas bearing has been completed. And the results of the gas bearing optimization have a guiding role in the processing technology. Finally, the turbine experiments verify that the gas bearing has good performance, and ensure the stable operation of the turbine.

  17. 75 FR 75995 - Request for Comments on Helium-3 Use in the Oil and Natural Gas Well Logging Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... manufacture neutron detectors used by the well logging industry or wireline or Logging-While-Drilling tools... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Request for Comments on Helium-3 Use in the Oil and Natural Gas Well Logging... of Helium-3 by the oil and gas well logging industry. DATES: Written comments and information are...

  18. Behavior of W-based materials in hot helium gas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Vilémová, Monika; Hadraba, Hynek; Di Gabriele, F.; Kuběna, Ivo; Kolíbalová, E.; Michalička, J.; Čech, J.; Jäger, Aleš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, December (2016), s. 405-410 ISSN 2352-1791. [International Conference of Fusion Reactor Material (ICFRM-17) /17./. Aachen, 11.10.2015-16.10.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12837S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68081723 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : tungsten * helium * fusion materials Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy; JG - Metallurgy (UFM-A); JG - Metallurgy (FZU-D) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nme.2016.03.009

  19. Buffer gas cooling and mixture analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, David S.; Doyle, John M.

    2018-03-06

    An apparatus for spectroscopy of a gas mixture is described. Such an apparatus includes a gas mixing system configured to mix a hot analyte gas that includes at least one analyte species in a gas phase into a cold buffer gas, thereby forming a supersaturated mixture to be provided for spectroscopic analysis.

  20. Hypothetical accident scenario analyses for a 250-MW(t) modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, R.M.; Ball, S.J.; Cleveland, J.C.

    1985-11-01

    This paper describes calculations performed to characterize the inherent safety of a 250-MW(t), 100-MW(e), pebble bed modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) design with vertical in-line arrangement (i.e., upflow core with steam generators directly above the core). A variety of postulated accident sequences involving combinations of loss of forced primary coolant (helium) circulation, loss of primary coolant pressurization, and loss of heat sink were studied and were discussed

  1. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project

  2. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project.

  3. Soil-gas radon/helium surveys in some neotectonic areas of NW Himalayan foothills, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mahajan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The present research is aimed at accessing the relationship between variation in the soil gases radon (222Rn and helium (4He and recently developed fissures and other neotectonic features in Nurpur and Nadha areas of the NW Himalayas, India. Two soil-gas surveys were conducted on/near known faults to reconfirm their position using soil gas technique and to check their present activity. During these surveys, soil-gas samples were collected along traverses crossing the observed structures. The data analysis reveals that the concentrations of radon and helium along the Dehar lineament and the longitudinal profile (Profile D are very high compared to any other thrust/lineament of the Nurpur area. The Nadha area shows high values of radon and helium concentrations along/near the Himalayan Frontal Fault (HFF as compared to the adjoining areas. This indicates the presence of some buried fault/fault zone running parallel to the HFF, not exposed to the surface and not delineated by satellite data but is geochemically active and might be tectonically active too. Hence, soil helium and radon gas patterns have been combined with morphological and geological observations to supply useful constraints for deformation of tectonic environments.

  4. Exergy analysis of a gas-hydrate cool storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Yuehong; Liu, Xiao; Jiang, Minghe

    2014-01-01

    Based on exergy analysis of charging and discharging processes in a gas-hydrate cool storage system, the formulas for exergy efficiency at the sensible heat transfer stage and the phase change stage corresponding to gas-hydrate charging and discharging processes are obtained. Furthermore, the overall exergy efficiency expressions of charging, discharging processes and the thermodynamic cycle of the gas-hydrate cool storage system are obtained. By using the above expressions, the effects of number of transfer units, the inlet temperatures of the cooling medium and the heating medium on exergy efficiencies of the gas-hydrate cool storage system are emphatically analyzed. The research results can be directly used to evaluate the performance of gas-hydrate cool storage systems and design more efficient energy systems by reducing the sources of inefficiency in gas-hydrate cool storage systems. - Highlights: • Formulas for exergy efficiency at four stages are obtained. • Exergy efficiency expressions of two processes and one cycle are obtained. • Three mainly influencing factors on exergy efficiencies are analyzed. • With increasing the inlet temperature of cooling medium, exergy efficiency increases. • With decreasing the inlet temperature of heating medium, exergy efficiency increases

  5. Disruption mitigation with high-pressure helium gas injection on EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D. L.; Shen, B.; Granetz, R. S.; Qian, J. P.; Zhuang, H. D.; Zeng, L.; Duan, Y.; Shi, T.; Wang, H.; Sun, Y.; Xiao, B. J.

    2018-03-01

    High pressure noble gas injection is a promising technique to mitigate the effect of disruptions in tokamaks. In this paper, results of mitigation experiments with low-Z massive gas injection (helium) on the EAST tokamak are reported. A fast valve has been developed and successfully implemented on EAST, with valve response time  ⩽150 μs, capable of injecting up to 7 × 1022 particles, corresponding to 300 times the plasma inventory. Different amounts of helium gas were injected into stable plasmas in the preliminary experiments. It is seen that a small amount of helium gas (N_He≃ N_plasma ) can not terminate a discharge, but can trigger MHD activity. Injection of 40 times the plasma inventory impurity (N_He≃ 40× N_plasma ) can effectively radiate away part of the thermal energy and make the electron density increase rapidly. The mitigation result is that the current quench time and vertical displacement can both be reduced significantly, without resulting in significantly higher loop voltage. This also reduces the risk of runaway electron generation. As the amount of injected impurity gas increases, the gas penetration time decreases slowly and asymptotes to (˜7 ms). In addition, the impurity gas jet has also been injected into VDEs, which are more challenging to mitigate that stable plasmas.

  6. Method of collecting helium cover gas for heavy water moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Keiji; Ueda, Hiroshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the systematic facility cost in a heavy water moderated reactor by contriving the simplification of a helium cover gas collecting intake system. Method: A detachable low pressure metal tank and a neoprene balloon are prepared for a vacuum pump in a permanent vacuum drying facility. When all of the helium cover gas is collected from a heavy water moderated reactor, a large capacity of neoprene balloon capable of temporarily storing it under low pressure is connected to the exhaust of the vacuum pump. On the other hand, while the reactor is operating, a suitable amount of the low pressure tank or neoprene balloon is connected to the exhaust side of the pump, thereby regulating the pressure of the helium cover gas. When refeeding the cover gas, the balloon, with a large capacity for collecting and storing the cover gas is connected to the intake side of the pump. Thus, the pressure regulation, collection of all of the cover gas and refeeding of the cover gas can be conducted without using a high discharge pump and high pressure tank. (Kamimura, M.)

  7. Thermal insulation of the high-temperature helium-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharlamov, A.G.; Grebennik, V.N.

    1979-01-01

    Unlike the well-known thermal insulation methods, development of high-temperature helium reactors (HTGR) raises quite new problems. To understand these problems, it is necessary to consider behaviour of thermal insulation inside the helium circuit of HTGR and requirements imposed on it. Substantiation of these requirements is given in the presented paper

  8. Neutronics - thermal-hydraulics coupling: application to the helium-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaiana, F.

    2009-11-01

    This thesis focuses on the study of interactions between neutron-kinetics and thermal-hydraulics. Neutron-kinetics allow to calculate the power in a nuclear reactor and the temperature evolution of materials where this power is deposited is known thanks to thermal-hydraulics. Moreover, when the temperatures evolve, the densities and cross sections change. These two disciplines are thus coupled. The first part of this work corresponds to the study and development of a method which allows to simulate transients in nuclear reactors and especially with a Monte-Carlo code for neutron-kinetics. An algorithm for the resolution of the neutron transport equation has been established and validated with a benchmark. In thermal-hydraulics, a porous media approach, based on another thesis, is considered. This gives the opportunity to solve the equations on the whole core without unconscionable computation time. Finally, a theoretical study has been performed on the statistical uncertainties which result from the use of a Monte-Carlo code and which spread from the reactivity to the power and from the power to the temperatures. The second part deals with the study of a misplaced control rod withdrawing in a GFR (helium-cooled fast reactor), a fourth generation reactor. Some models allowing to calculate neutron-kinetics and thermal-hydraulics in the core (which contains assemblies built up with fuel plates) were defined. In thermal-hydraulics, a model for the core based on the porous media approach and a fuel plate homogenization model have been set up. A similar homogenization model has been studied for neutron-kinetics. Finally, the control rod withdrawing transient where we can observe the power raising and the stabilisation by thermal feedback has been performed with the Monte-Carlo code Tripoli for neutron-kinetics and the code Trio-U for thermal-hydraulics. (author)

  9. Numerical studies on helium cooled divertor finger mock up with sectorial extended surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimza, Sandeep; Satpathy, Kamalakanta; Khirwadkar, Samir; Velusamy, Karupanna

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Studies on heat transfer enhancement for divertor finger mock-up. • Heat transfer characteristics of jet impingement with extended surfaces have been investigated. • Effect of critical parameters that influence the thermal performance of the finger mock-up by CFD approach. • Effect of extended surface in enhancing heat removal potential with pumping power assessed. • Practicability of the chosen design is verified by structural analysis. - Abstract: Jet impinging technique is an advance divertor concept for the design of future fusion power plants. This technique is extensively used due to its high heat removal capability with reasonable pumping power and for safe operation. In this design, plasma-facing components are fabricated with numerous fingers cooled by helium jets to reduce the thermal stresses. The present study is focused towards finding an optimum performance of one such finger mock-up through systematic computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies. Heat transfer characteristics of jet impingement have been numerically investigated with sectorial extended surfaces (SES). The result shows that addition of SES enhances heat removal potential with minimum pumping power. Detailed parametric studies on critical parameters that influence thermal performance of the finger mock-up have been analyzed. Thermo-mechanical analysis has been carried out through finite element based approach to know the state of stress in the assembly as a result of large temperature gradients. It is seen that the stresses are within the permissible limits for the present design. The whole numerical simulation has been carried out using general-purpose CFD software (ANSYS FLUENT, Release 14.0, User Guide, Ansys, Inc., 2011). Benchmark validation studies have been performed against high-heat flux experiments (B. Končar, P. Norajitra, K. Oblak, Appl. Therm. Eng., 30, 697–705, 2010) and a good agreement is noticed between the present simulation and the reported

  10. Preliminary electromagnetic analysis of Helium Cooled Solid Blanket for CFETR by MAXWELL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Cheng; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A FEM model of the blanket and magnetic system was built. • Electromagnetic forces and moments of the typical blanket for ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic materials were computed and analyzed. • Maxwell forces and Lorentz forces were computed and compared. • Eddy current in the blanket was analyzed under MD condition. - Abstract: A Helium Cooled Solid Blanket (HCSB) for CFETR (Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor) was designed by USTC. The structural and thermal-hydraulic analysis has been carried out, while electromagnetic analysis was not carefully researched. In this paper, a FEM (finite element method) model of the HCSB was developed and electromagnetic forces as well as moments was computed by a FEM software called MAXWELL integrated in ANSYS Workbench. In the geometrical model, flow channels and small connecting parts were neglected because of the extreme complication and the reasonable conservative assumption by neglecting these circumstantial details. As for electromagnetic (EM) analysis, Lorentz forces due to eddy currents caused by main disruption and Maxwell forces due to the magnetization of RAFM steel (i.e. EUROFER97) were computed. Since the unavailability of the details of the plasma in CFETR, when disruptions happen, the condition where a linear current quench of main disruption occurs was assumed. The maximum magnitude of the electromagnetic forces was 356.45 kN and the maximum value of the coupled electromagnetic moments was 1899.40 N m around the radial direction. It is feasible to couple electromagnetic analysis, structural analysis and thermal-hydraulic analysis in the future since MAXWELL has good channels to exchange data between different analytic parts.

  11. Electromagnetic analysis of the Korean helium cooled ceramic reflector test blanket module set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youngmin; Ku, Duck Young; Lee, Dong Won; Ahn, Mu-Young; Park, Yi-Hyun; Cho, Seungyon

    2016-01-01

    Korean helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) test blanket module set (TBM-set) will be installed at equatorial port #18 of Vacuum Vessel in ITER in order to test the breeding blanket performance for forthcoming fusion power plant. Since ITER tokamak has a set of electromagnetic coils (Central Solenoid, Poloidal Field and Toroidal Field coil set) around Vacuum Vessel, the HCCR TBM-set, the TBM and associated shield, is greatly influenced by magnetic field generated by these coils. In the case of fast transient electromagnetic events such as major disruption, vertical displacement event or magnet fast discharge, magnetic field and induced eddy current results in huge electromagnetic load, known as Lorentz load, on the HCCR TBM-set. In addition, the TBM-set experiences electromagnetic load due to magnetization of the structural material not only during the fast transient events but also during normal operation since the HCCR TBM adopts Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel as a structural material. This is known as Maxwell load which includes Lorentz load as well as load due to magnetization of structure material. This paper presents electromagnetic analysis results for the HCCR TBM-set. For analysis, a 20° sector finite model was constructed considering ITER configuration such as Vacuum Vessel, ITER shield blankets, Central Solenoid, Poloidal Field, Toroidal Field coil set as well as the HCCR TBM-set. Three major disruptions (operational event, likely event and highly unlikely event) were selected for analysis based on the load specifications. ANSYS-EMAG was used as a calculation tool. The results of EM analysis will be used as input data for the structural analysis.

  12. Electromagnetic analysis of the Korean helium cooled ceramic reflector test blanket module set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youngmin, E-mail: ymlee@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ku, Duck Young [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Mu-Young; Park, Yi-Hyun; Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Korean helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) test blanket module set (TBM-set) will be installed at equatorial port #18 of Vacuum Vessel in ITER in order to test the breeding blanket performance for forthcoming fusion power plant. Since ITER tokamak has a set of electromagnetic coils (Central Solenoid, Poloidal Field and Toroidal Field coil set) around Vacuum Vessel, the HCCR TBM-set, the TBM and associated shield, is greatly influenced by magnetic field generated by these coils. In the case of fast transient electromagnetic events such as major disruption, vertical displacement event or magnet fast discharge, magnetic field and induced eddy current results in huge electromagnetic load, known as Lorentz load, on the HCCR TBM-set. In addition, the TBM-set experiences electromagnetic load due to magnetization of the structural material not only during the fast transient events but also during normal operation since the HCCR TBM adopts Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel as a structural material. This is known as Maxwell load which includes Lorentz load as well as load due to magnetization of structure material. This paper presents electromagnetic analysis results for the HCCR TBM-set. For analysis, a 20° sector finite model was constructed considering ITER configuration such as Vacuum Vessel, ITER shield blankets, Central Solenoid, Poloidal Field, Toroidal Field coil set as well as the HCCR TBM-set. Three major disruptions (operational event, likely event and highly unlikely event) were selected for analysis based on the load specifications. ANSYS-EMAG was used as a calculation tool. The results of EM analysis will be used as input data for the structural analysis.

  13. Improvement of Cooling Technology through Atmosphere Gas Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renard, Michel; Dosogne, Edgaar; Crutzen, Jean Pierre; Raick, Jean Mare [DREVER INTERNATIONAL S.A., Liege (Belgium); Ji, Ma Jia; Jun, Lv; Zhi, Ma Bing [SHOUGANG Cold Rolling Mill Headquarter, Beijin (China)

    2009-12-15

    The production of advanced high strength steels requires the improvement of cooling technology. The use of high cooling rates allows relatively low levels of expensive alloying additions to ensure sufficient hardenability. In classical annealing and hot-dip galvanizing lines a mixing station is used to provide atmosphere gas containing 3-5% hydrogen and 97-95% nitrogen in the various sections of the furnace, including the rapid cooling section. Heat exchange enhancement in this cooling section can be insured by the increased hydrogen concentration. Driver international developed a patented improvement of cooling technology based on the following features: pure hydrogen gas is injected only in the rapid cooling section whereas the different sections of the furnace are supplied with pure nitrogen gas: the control of flows through atmosphere gas management allows to get high hydrogen concentration in cooling section and low hydrogen content in the other furnace zones. This cooling technology development insures higher cooling rates without additional expensive hydrogen gas consumption and without the use of complex sealing equipment between zones. In addition reduction in electrical energy consumption is obtained. This atmosphere control development can be combined with geometrical design improvements in order to get optimised cooling technology providing high cooling rates as well as reduced strip vibration amplitudes. Extensive validation of theoretical research has been conducted on industrial lines. New lines as well as existing lines, with limited modifications, can be equipped with this new development. Up to now this technology has successfully been implemented on 6 existing and 7 new lines in Europe and Asia.

  14. Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) fuel and In-Core Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, K.D.; Sterbentz, J.; Meyer, M.; Lowden, R.; Hoffman, E.; Wei, T.Y.C.

    2004-01-01

    The Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) has been chosen as one of six candidates for development as a Generation IV nuclear reactor based on: its ability to fully utilize fuel resources; minimize or reduce its own (and other systems) actinide inventory; produce high efficiency electricity; and the possibility to utilize high temperature process heat. Current design approaches include a high temperature (2 850 C) helium cooled reactor using a direct Brayton cycle, and a moderate temperature (550 C - 650 C) helium or supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO 2 ) cooled reactor using direct or indirect Brayton cycles. These design choices have thermal efficiencies that approach 45% to 50%, and have turbomachinery sizes that are much more compact compared to steam plants. However, there are challenges associated with the GCFR, which are the focus of current research. This includes safety system design for decay heat removal, development of high temperature/high fluence fuels and materials, and development of fuel cycle strategies. The work presented here focuses on the fuel and preliminary in-core fuel management, where advanced ceramic-ceramic (cercer) dispersion fuels are the main focus, and average burnups to 266 M Wd/kg appear achievable for the reference Si C/(U,TRU)C block/plate fuel. Solid solution (pellet) fuel in composite ceramic clad (Si C/Si C) is also being considered, but remains as a backup due to cladding fabrication challenges, and high centerline temperatures in the fuel. (Author)

  15. The modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor - a new production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nulton, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    One of the reactor concepts being considered for application as a new production reactor (NPR) is a 350-MW(thermal) modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). The proposed MHTGR-NPR is based on the design of the commercial MHTGR and is being developed by a team that includes General Atomics and Combustion Engineering. The proposed design includes four modules combined into a production block that includes a shared containment, a spent-fuel storage facility, and other support facilities. The MHTGR has a helium-cooled, graphite-moderated, graphite-reflected annular core formed from prismatic graphite fuel blocks. The MHTGR fuel consists of highly enriched uranium oxycarbide (UCO) microsphere fuel particles that are coated with successive layers of pyrolytic carbon (PyC) and silicon carbide (SiC). Tritium-producing targets consist of enriched 6 Li aluminate microsphere target particles that are coated with successive layers of PyC and SiC similar to the fuel microspheres. Normal reactivity control is implemented by articulated control rods that can be inserted into channels in the inner and outer reflector blocks. Shutdown heat removal is accomplished by a single shutdown heat exchanger and electric motor-driven circulator located in the bottom of the reactor vessel. Current plans are to stack spent fuel elements in dry, helium-filled, water-cooled wells and store them for ∼1 yr before reprocessing. All phases of MHTGR fuel reprocessing have been demonstrated

  16. The gas turbine modular helium reactor. An international project to develop a safe, efficient, flexible product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberstein, A.J.

    1998-01-01

    As originally scheduled, the Conceptual Design Report of the 600 Mwt Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor has been issued in October 1997 by OKBM in Nizhny Novgorod, a keystone Russian Engineering Institute fully involved in the realization of this International Project. The plutonium burning, graphite moderated helium cooled reactor design results from the work done on the basis of General Atomics original concept combined with the goal of optimizing safety power and efficiency with multi contributions in specific fields from the Russian organizations: MINATOM, OKBM, VNIINM, Lutch, Kurchatov Institute, Seversk Chemical Combinat, Fuji Electric and FRAMATOME. The objective to concentrate the engineering work in Russia has met a full success due principally to the quality and experience of the people, to the international support and to the progressive integration of new techniques of communication, of project management culture and utilization of modern computerized design tools and methods. To day the best international standard of quality is reached in the engineering activity and expected to stay at this level for future developments, when including experimental facilities operation and components manufacturing activities, thanks to the diffusion of the common culture, acquired by the main actors during the conceptual design phase, that will be exported to Russian third parties. At this stage we are planning to start design verification and sensitive components and systems qualification, with the same original actors. The European Commission has already shown some significant interest through the MICHELANGELO Initiative in supporting the HTR concepts assessment and identification of the R and D needs. We are looking forward for further support from the International Community and particularly from European Institutions in the frame of the 5th PCRD to pursue the GT MHR R and D program. Furthermore we are looking for funding the building of a prototype in Russia

  17. Evaluation of tritium production rate in a gas-cooled reactor with continuous tritium recovery system for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, Hideaki, E-mail: mat@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Nakaya, Hiroyuki; Nakao, Yasuyuki [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Shimakawa, Satoshi; Goto, Minoru; Nakagawa, Shigeaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Nishikawa, Masabumi [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • The performance of a gas-cooled reactor as a tritium production system was studied. • A continuous tritium recovery using helium gas was considered. • Gas-cooled reactors with 3 GW output in all can produce ∼6 kg of tritium in a year • Performance of the system was examined for Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and LiAlO{sub 2} compounds. -- Abstract: The performance of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor as a tritium production with continuous tritium recovery system is examined. A gas turbine high-temperature reactor of 300-MWe (600 MW) nominal capacity (GTHTR300) is assumed as the calculation target, and using the continuous-energy Monte Carlo transport code MVP-BURN, burn-up simulations for the three-dimensional entire-core region of the GTHTR300 were performed. A Li loading pattern for the continuous tritium recovery system in the gas-cooled reactor is presented. It is shown that module gas-cooled reactors with a total thermal output power of 3 GW in all can produce ∼6 kg of tritium maximum in a year.

  18. Development of components for the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dee, J.B.; Macken, T.

    1977-01-01

    The gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) component development program is based on an extension of high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) component technology; therefore, the GCFR development program is addressed primarily to components which differ in design and requirements from HTGR components. The principal differences in primary system components are due to the increase in helium coolant pressure level, which benefits system size and efficiency in the GCFR, and differences in the reactor internals and fuel handling systems due to the use of the compact metal-clad core. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the principal component design differences between the GCFR and HTGR and the consequent influences of these differences on GCFR component development programs. Development program plans are discussed and include those for the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), the main helium circulator and its supporting systems, the steam generators, the reactor thermal shielding, and the fuel handling system. Facility requirements to support these development programs are also discussed. Studies to date show that GCFR component development continues to appear to be incremental in nature, and the required tests are adaptations of related HTGR test programs. (Auth.)

  19. European Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) test blanket. ITER design description document. Status 1.12.1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, H.; Boccaccini, L.V.; Dalle Donne, M.; Fischer, U.; Gordeev, S.; Hutter, E.; Kleefeldt, K.; Norajitra, P.; Reimann, G.; Ruatto, P.; Schleisiek, K.; Schnauder, H.

    1997-04-01

    The Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) blanket is based on the use of separate small lithium orthosilicate and beryllium pebble beds placed between radial toroidal cooling plates. The cooling is provided by helium at 8 MPa. The tritium produced in the pebble beds is purged by the flow of helium at 0.1 MPa. The structural material is martensitic steel. It is foreseen, after an extended R and D work, to test in ITER a blanket module based on the HCPB design, which is one of the two European proposals for the ITER Test Blanket Programme. To facilitate the handling operation the Blanket Test Module (BTM) is bolted to a surrounding water cooled frame fixed to the ITER shield blanket back plate. For the design of the test module, three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutronic calculations and thermohydraulic and stress analyses for the operation during the Basic Performance Phase (BPP) and during the Extended Performance Phase (EPP) of ITER have been performed. The behaviour of the test module during LOCA and LOFA has been investigated. Conceptual designs of the required ancillary loops have been performed. The present report is the updated version of the Design Description Document (DDD) for the HCPB Test Module. It has been written in accordance with a scheme given by the ITER Joint Central Team (JCT) and accounts for the comments made by the JCT to the previous version of this report. This work has been performed in the framework of the Nuclear Fusion Project of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhne and it is supported by the European Union within the European Fusion Technology Program. (orig.) [de

  20. Gas turbine bucket with impingement cooled platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Raphael Durand

    2002-01-01

    In a turbine bucket having an airfoil portion and a root portion, with a substantially planar platform at an interface between the airfoil portion and root portion, a platform cooling arrangement including at least one bore in the root portion and at least one impingement cooling tube seated in the bore, the tube extending beyond the bore with an outlet in close proximity to a targeted area on an underside of the platform.

  1. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) FY05 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. D. Weaver; T. Marshall; T. Totemeier; J. Gan; E.E. Feldman; E.A Hoffman; R.F. Kulak; I.U. Therios; C. P. Tzanos; T.Y.C. Wei; L-Y. Cheng; H. Ludewig; J. Jo; R. Nanstad; W. Corwin; V. G. Krishnardula; W. F. Gale; J. W. Fergus; P. Sabharwall; T. Allen

    2005-09-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radio toxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. Nevertheless, the GFR was chosen as one of only six Generation IV systems to be pursued based on its ability to meet the Generation IV goals in sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection. Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with on outlet temperature of 850 C at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in

  2. Investigation of the helium proportion influence on the Prandtl number value of gas mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Burtsev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates an influence of helium fraction (light gases on the Prandtl number value for binary and more complex gas mixtures.It is shown that a low value of the Prandtl number (Pr-number results in decreasing a temperature recovery factor value and, respectively, in reducing a recovery temperature value on the wall (thermoinsulated wall temperature with the compressive gas flow bypassing it. This, in turn, allows us to increase efficiency of gasdynamic energy separation in Leontyev's tube.The paper conducts a numerical research of the influence of binary and more complex gas mixture composition on the Prandtl number value. It is shown that a mixture of two gases with small and large molecular weight allows us to produce a mixture with a lower value of the Prandtl number in comparison with the initial gases. Thus, the value of Prandtl number decreases by 1.5-3.2 times in comparison with values for pure components (the more a difference of molar mass of components, the stronger is a decrease.The technique to determine the Prandtl number value for mixtures of gases in the wide range of temperatures and pressure is developed. Its verification based on experimental data and results of numerical calculations of other authors is executed. It is shown that it allows correct calculation of binary and more complex mixtures of gasesFor the mixtures of inert gases it has been obtained that the minimum value of the Prandtl number is as follows: for helium - xenon mixtures (He-Xe makes 0.2-0.22, for helium - krypton mixtures (He-Kr – 0.3, for helium - argon mixes (He-Ar – 0.41.For helium mixture with carbon dioxide the minimum value of the Prandtl number makes about 0.4, for helium mixture with N2 nitrogen the minimum value of the Prandtl number is equal to 0.48, for helium-methane (CH4 - 0.5 and helium – oxygen (O2 – 0.46.This decrease is caused by the fact that the thermal capacity of mixture changes under the linear law in regard to the

  3. Gas cooled high temperature reactor with a heap of pebble shaped fuel elements and absorber rods which can be driven directly into the heap of pebbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elter, C.; Schmitt, H.; Schoening, J.; Weicht, U.

    1980-01-01

    The absorber rod for the graphite moderated, helium cooled reactor is cylindrical and has a tip in the shape of the frustrum of a cone. It consists of three coaxially arranged sleeve tubes made of steel, the inner and centre sleeve tubes surrounding the absorber part (B4C) so as to be gastight. The inner sleeve tube represents the supporting tube and is cooled by cold gas, as is the annular gap between the centre and outer sleeve tube. (RW) [de

  4. Natural convection in closed vertical cylinders with particular reference to gas cooled reactor standpipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, I.D.

    1975-09-01

    The access to the core for fuel assemblies and control rods of the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor is through the top cap by means of standpipes. The standpipe is essentially a cylindrical, vertical tube with cooled side wall, closed upper end and an orifice at the lower end which is exposed to the hot core fluid. This creates confined natural convection flow in the empty standpipe and this is the subject of this thesis. The investigation is carried out using analytical and experimental methods. For the analytical work, solution of laminar and turbulent flow is attempted using finite-difference computer techniques. The laminar flow performance is evaluated using two different finite-difference procedures, and the results are compared to each other and to existing analytical and experimental results for the open thermosyphon with cool inflow and hot sidewall, i.e. the complementary problem to the present one. For turbulent flow a two equation turbulence model is employed which provides transport equations for the kinetic energy of turbulence and its dissipation rate. The experimental rig is a full scale replica of the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor control rod mechanism standpipe. Carbon dioxide and helium are used as the working fluids for the series of tests. (author)

  5. Numerical Analysis for Heat transfer characteristic of Helium cooling system in Helium cooled ceramic reflector Test Module Blanket (HCCR-TBM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seong Dae; Lee, Dong Won; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae Sung; Kim, Suk Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The main objectives of ITER project can be summarized into three types as follows - Plasma operation for a long time - Large tokamak device technology - Test blanket module (TBM) installation and verification The thermal-hydraulic analysis was performed in the He cooling channel in the BZ region of the HCCR TBM. The maximum temperature in the breeder material is equal to the limit temperature in the present design cooling channel. Nuclear fusion energy has advantage in terms of safety, resource availability, cost and waste management. There is not enough experimental results about the fusion reactor due to the severe experiments restrictions like vacuum environment, plasma production and significant nuclear heating at the same time. Much research and time is required for the commercial fusion reactor. For technical verification against the commercialization of fusion reactor, 7 countries which are EU, USA, Japan, Russia, China, India, and South Korea are building an ITER in the south of France. New designed cooling channels were proposed to improve the cooling performance. The swirl flow accelerates the mixture flow in the channels.

  6. The modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neylan, A.J.; Graf, D.F.; Millunzi, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    GA Technologies Inc. and other U.S. corporations, in a cooperative program with the U.S. Department of Energy, is developing a Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) that will provide highly reliable, economic, nuclear power. The MHTGR system assures maximum safety to the public, the owner/operator, and the environment. The MHTGR is being designed to meet and exceed rigorous requirements established by the user industry for availability, operation and maintenance, plant investment protection, safety and licensing, siting flexibility and economics. The plant will be equally attractive for deployment and operation in the U.S., other major industrialized nations including Korea, Japan, and the Republic of China, as well as the developing nations. The High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is an advanced, third generation nuclear power system which incorporates distinctive technical features, including the use of pressurized helium as a coolant, graphite as the moderator and core structural material, and fuel in the form of ceramic coated uranium particles. The modular HTGR builds upon generic gas-cooled reactor experience and specific HTGR programs and projects. The MHTGR offers unique technological features and the opportunity for the cooperative international development of an advanced energy system that will help assure adaquate world energy resources for the future. Such international joint venturing of energy development can offer significant benefits to participating industries and governments and also provides a long term solution to the complex problems of the international balance of payments

  7. First principles study of inert-gas (helium, neon, and argon) interactions with hydrogen in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Xiang-Shan [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Hou, Jie [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Li, Xiang-Yan [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu, Xuebang, E-mail: xbwu@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu, C.S., E-mail: csliu@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Chen, Jun-Ling; Luo, G.-N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2017-04-15

    We have systematically evaluated binding energies of hydrogen with inert-gas (helium, neon, and argon) defects, including interstitial clusters and vacancy-inert-gas complexes, and their stable configurations using first-principles calculations. Our calculations show that these inert-gas defects have large positive binding energies with hydrogen, 0.4–1.1 eV, 0.7–1.0 eV, and 0.6–0.8 eV for helium, neon, and argon, respectively. This indicates that these inert-gas defects can act as traps for hydrogen in tungsten, and impede or interrupt the diffusion of hydrogen in tungsten, which supports the discussion on the influence of inert-gas on hydrogen retention in recent experimental literature. The interaction between these inert-gas defects and hydrogen can be understood by the attractive interaction due to the distortion of the lattice structure induced by inert-gas defects, the intrinsic repulsive interaction between inert-gas atoms and hydrogen, and the hydrogen-hydrogen repelling in tungsten lattice.

  8. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gary; D'Silva, Arthur P.; Fassel, Velmer A.

    1986-05-06

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  9. Development of gas-cooled fast reactor and its thermo-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hiroshi

    1977-10-01

    Development, thermo-hydraulics and safety of GCFR are reviewed. The Development of Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) utilizes helium technology of HTGR and fuel technology of LMFBR. The breeding ratio of GCFR will be larger than that of LMFBR by about 0.2. Features of GCFR are a fuel with roughened surface to raise the heat transfer and vent system for the pressure equalization in the fuel rod. Helium as coolant of GCFR is chemically stable and stays in the single phase. So, there is no fuel-coolant interaction unlike the case of LMFBR. Since the helium must be pressurized, possibility of a depressurization accident is not negligible. In the United States, a 300MWe demonstration plant program is about to start; the collaboration with European countries is now quite active in this field. Though the development of GCFR started behind that of LMFBR, GCFR is equally promising as a fast breeder reactor. When realized, it will present possibility of a choice between these two. (auth.)

  10. Mechanical Properties of Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor Stainless Steel Cladding After Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degueldre, Claude; Fahy, James; Kolosov, Oleg; Wilbraham, Richard J.; Döbeli, Max; Renevier, Nathalie; Ball, Jonathan; Ritter, Stefan

    2018-05-01

    The production of helium bubbles in advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR) cladding could represent a significant hazard for both the mechanical stability and long-term storage of such materials. However, the high radioactivity of AGR cladding after operation presents a significant barrier to the scientific study of the mechanical properties of helium incorporation, said cladding typically being analyzed in industrial hot cells. An alternative non-active approach is to implant He2+ into unused AGR cladding material via an accelerator. Here, a feasibility study of such a process, using sequential implantations of helium in AGR cladding steel with decreasing energy is carried out to mimic the buildup of He (e.g., 50 appm) that would occur for in-reactor AGR clad in layers of the order of 10 µm in depth, is described. The implanted sample is subsequently analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, nanoindentation, atomic force and ultrasonic force microscopies. As expected, the irradiated zones were affected by implantation damage (steel cladding is retained despite He2+ implantation.

  11. SAFE AND FAST QUENCH RECOVERY OF LARGE SUPERCONDUCTING SOLENOIDS COOLED BY FORCED TWO-PHASE HELIUM FLOW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, L.X.

    1999-01-01

    The cryogenic characteristics in energy extraction of the four fifteen-meter-diameter superconducting solenoids of the g-2 magnet are reported in this paper. The energy extraction tests at full-current and half-current of its operating value were deliberately carried out for the quench analyses and evaluation of the cryogenic system. The temperature profiles of each coil mandrel and pressure profiles in its helium cooling tube during the energy extraction are discussed. The low peak temperature and pressure as well as the short recovery time indicated the desirable characteristics of the cryogenic system

  12. Engineering structure design and fabrication process of small sized China helium-cooled solid breeder test blanket module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zeming; Chen Lu; Hu Gang

    2014-01-01

    Preliminary design and analysis for china helium-cooled solid breeder (CHHC-SB) test blanket module (TBM) have been carried out recently. As partial verification that the original size module was reasonable and the development process was feasible, fabrication work of a small sized module was to be carried out targetedly. In this paper, detailed design and structure analysis of small sized TBM was carried out based on preliminary design work, fabrication process and integrated assembly process was proposed, so a fabrication for the trial engineering of TBM was layed successfully. (authors)

  13. Compatibility of gas turbine materials with steam cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, V.; Tamboli, D.; Patel, Y. [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Gas turbines had been traditionally used for peak load plants and remote locations as they offer advantage of low installation costs and quick start up time. Their use as a base load generator had not been feasible owing to their poor efficiency. However, with the advent of gas turbines based combined cycle plants (CCPs), continued advances in efficiency are being made. Coupled with ultra low NO{sub x} emissions, coal compatibility and higher unit output, gas turbines are now competing with conventional power plants for base load power generation. Currently, the turbines are designed with TIT of 2300{degrees}F and metal temperatures are maintained around 1700{degrees}F by using air cooling. New higher efficiency ATS turbines will have TIT as high as 2700{degrees}F. To withstand this high temperature improved materials, coatings, and advances in cooling system and design are warranted. Development of advanced materials with better capabilities specifically for land base applications are time consuming and may not be available by ATS time frame or may prove costly for the first generation ATS gas turbines. Therefore improvement in the cooling system of hot components, which can take place in a relatively shorter time frame, is important. One way to improve cooling efficiency is to use better cooling agent. Steam as an alternate cooling agent offers attractive advantages because of its higher specific heat (almost twice that of air) and lower viscosity.

  14. Propagation of atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet into ambient air at laminar gas flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinchuk, M; Kurakina, N; Spodobin, V; Stepanova, O

    2017-01-01

    The formation of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) in a gas flow passing through the discharge gap depends on both gas-dynamic properties and electrophysical parameters of the plasma jet generator. The paper presents the results of experimental and numerical study of the propagation of the APPJ in a laminar flow of helium. A dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) generated inside a quartz tube equipped with a coaxial electrode system, which provided gas passing through it, served as a plasma source. The transition of the laminar regime of gas flow into turbulent one was controlled by the photography of a formed plasma jet. The corresponding gas outlet velocity and Reynolds numbers were revealed experimentally and were used to simulate gas dynamics with OpenFOAM software. The data of the numerical simulation suggest that the length of plasma jet at the unvarying electrophysical parameters of DBD strongly depends on the mole fraction of ambient air in a helium flow, which is established along the direction of gas flow. (paper)

  15. Propagation of atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet into ambient air at laminar gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchuk, M.; Stepanova, O.; Kurakina, N.; Spodobin, V.

    2017-05-01

    The formation of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) in a gas flow passing through the discharge gap depends on both gas-dynamic properties and electrophysical parameters of the plasma jet generator. The paper presents the results of experimental and numerical study of the propagation of the APPJ in a laminar flow of helium. A dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) generated inside a quartz tube equipped with a coaxial electrode system, which provided gas passing through it, served as a plasma source. The transition of the laminar regime of gas flow into turbulent one was controlled by the photography of a formed plasma jet. The corresponding gas outlet velocity and Reynolds numbers were revealed experimentally and were used to simulate gas dynamics with OpenFOAM software. The data of the numerical simulation suggest that the length of plasma jet at the unvarying electrophysical parameters of DBD strongly depends on the mole fraction of ambient air in a helium flow, which is established along the direction of gas flow.

  16. Removal of tritium from gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieder, R.

    1976-01-01

    Tritium contained in the coolant gas in the primary circuit of a gas cooled nuclear reactor together with further tritium adsorbed on the graphite used as a moderator for the reactor is removed by introducing hydrogen or a hydrogen-containing compound, for example methane or ammonia, into the coolant gas. The addition of the hydrogen or hydrogen-containing compound to the coolant gas causes the adsorbed tritium to be released into the coolant gas and the tritium is then removed from the coolant gas by passing the mixture of coolant gas and hydrogen or hydrogen-containing compound through a gas purification plant before recirculating the coolant gas through the reactor. 14 claims, 1 drawing figure

  17. High-Temperature Structural Analysis Model of the Process Heat Exchanger for Helium Gas Loop (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kee Nam; Lee, Heong Yeon; Kim, Chan Soo; Hong, Seong Duk; Park, Hong Yoon

    2010-01-01

    PHE (Process Heat Exchanger) is a key component required to transfer heat energy of 950 .deg. C generated in a VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) to the chemical reaction that yields a large quantity of hydrogen. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute established the helium gas loop for the performance test of components, which are used in the VHTR, and they manufactured a PHE prototype to be tested in the loop. In this study, as part of the high temperature structural-integrity evaluation of the PHE prototype, which is scheduled to be tested in the helium gas loop, we carried out high-temperature structural-analysis modeling, thermal analysis, and thermal expansion analysis of the PHE prototype. The results obtained in this study will be used to design the performance test setup for the PHE prototype

  18. Theoretical and experimental studies on transient forced convection heat transfer of helium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qiusheng; Fukuda, Katsuya; Shibahara, Makoto

    2008-01-01

    Forced convection transient heat transfer for helium gas at various periods of exponential increase of heat input to a horizontal cylinder and a plate (ribbon) one was experimentally and theoretically studied. In the experimental studies, the authors measured heat flux, surface temperature, and transient heat transfer coefficients for forced convection flow of helium gas over a horizontal cylinder and a plate (ribbon) one under wide experimental conditions. Empirical correlations for quasi-steady-state heat transfer and transient heat transfer were obtained based on the experimental data. In the theoretical study, transient heat transfer was numerically solved based on a turbulent flow model. The values of numerical solution for surface temperature and heat flux were compared and discussed with authors' experimental data. (author)

  19. Adopted Methodology for Cool-Down of SST-1 Superconducting Magnet System: Operational Experience with the Helium Refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, A. K.; Sarkar, B.; Panchal, P.; Tank, J.; Bhattacharya, R.; Panchal, R.; Tanna, V. L.; Patel, R.; Shukla, P.; Patel, J. C.; Singh, M.; Sonara, D.; Sharma, R.; Duggar, R.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2008-03-01

    The 1.3 kW at 4.5 K helium refrigerator / liquefier (HRL) was commissioned during the year 2003. The HRL was operated with its different modes as per the functional requirements of the experiments. The superconducting magnets system (SCMS) of SST-1 was successfully cooled down to 4.5 K. The actual loads were different from the originally predicted boundary conditions and an adjustment in the thermodynamic balance of the refrigerator was necessary. This led to enhanced capacity, which was achieved without any additional hardware. The required control system for the HRL was tuned to achieve the stable thermodynamic balance, while keeping the turbines' operating parameters at optimized conditions. An extra mass flow rate requirement was met by exploiting the margin available with the compressor station. The methodology adopted to modify the capacity of the HRL, the safety precautions and experience of SCMS cool down to 4.5 K, are discussed.

  20. Pulse Shape Analysis and Discrimination for Silicon-Photomultipliers in Helium-4 Gas Scintillation Neutron Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Cathleen; Zhu, Ting; Rolison, Lucas; Kiff, Scott; Jordan, Kelly; Enqvist, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    Using natural helium (helium-4), the Arktis 180-bar pressurized gas scintillator is capable of detecting and distinguishing fast neutrons and gammas. The detector has a unique design of three optically separated segments in which 12 silicon-photomultiplier (SiPM) pairs are positioned equilaterally across the detector to allow for them to be fully immersed in the helium-4 gas volume; consequently, no additional optical interfaces are necessary. The SiPM signals were amplified, shaped, and readout by an analog board; a 250 MHz, 14-bit digitizer was used to examine the output pulses from each SiPMpair channel. The SiPM over-voltage had to be adjusted in order to reduce pulse clipping and negative overshoot, which was observed for events with high scintillation production. Pulse shaped discrimination (PSD) was conducted by evaluating three different parameters: time over threshold (TOT), pulse amplitude, and pulse integral. In order to differentiate high and low energy events, a 30ns gate window was implemented to group pulses from two SiPM channels or more for the calculation of TOT. It was demonstrated that pulses from a single SiPM channel within the 30ns window corresponded to low-energy gamma events while groups of pulses from two-channels or more were most likely neutron events. Due to gamma pulses having lower pulse amplitude, the percentage of measured gamma also depends on the threshold value in TOT calculations. Similarly, the threshold values were varied for the optimal PSD methods of using pulse amplitude and pulse area parameters. Helium-4 detectors equipped with SiPMs are excellent for in-the-field radiation measurement of nuclear spent fuel casks. With optimized PSD methods, the goal of developing a fuel cask content monitoring and inspection system based on these helium-4 detectors will be achieved.

  1. Neutronics study on hybrid reactor cooled by helium, water and molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zaixin; Feng Kaiming; Zhang Guoshu; Zheng Guoyao; Zhao Fengchao

    2009-01-01

    There is no serious magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) problem when helium,water or molten salt of Flibe flows in high magnetic field. Thus helium, water and Flibe were proposed as candidate of coolant for fusion-fission hybrid reactor based on magnetic confinement. The effect on neutronics of hybrid reactor due to coolant was investigated. The analyses of neutron spectra and fuel breeding of blanket with different coolants were performed. Variations of tritium breeding ratio (TBR), blanket energy multiplication (M) and keff with operating time were also studied. MCNP code was used for neutron transport simulation. It is shown that spectra change greatly with different coolants. The blanket with helium exhibits very hard spectrum and good tritium breeding ability. And fission reactions are mainly from fast neutron. The blanket with water has soft spectrum and high energy multiplication factor. However, it needs to improve TBR. The blanket with Flibe has hard spectrum and less energy release. (authors)

  2. Study of heat transfer in superconducting cable electrical insulation of accelerator magnet cooled by superfluid helium; Etude des transferts de chaleur dans les isolations electriques de cables supraconducteurs d'aimant d'accelerateur refroidi par helium superfluide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudouy, B

    1996-10-04

    Heat transfer studies of electrical cable insulation in superconducting winding are of major importance for stability studies in superconducting magnets. This work presents an experimental heat transfer study in superconducting cables of Large Hadron Collider dipoles cooled by superfluid helium and submitted to volume heat dissipation due to beam losses. For NbTi magnets cooled by superfluid helium the most severe heat barrier comes from the electrical insulation of the cables. Heat behaviour of a winding is approached through an experimental model in which insulation characteristics can be modified. Different tests on insulation patterns show that heat transfer is influenced by superfluid helium contained in insulation even for small volume of helium (2 % of cable volume). Electrical insulation can be considered as a composite material made of a solid matrix with a helium channels network which cannot be modelled easily. This network is characterised by another experimental apparatus which allows to study transverse and steady-state heat transfer through an elementary insulation pattern. Measurements in Landau regime ({delta}T{approx}10{sup -5} to 10{sup -3} K) and in Gorter-Mellink regime ({delta}T>10{sup -3} K) and using assumptions that helium thermal paths and conduction in the insulation are decoupled allow to determine an equivalent channel area (10{sup -6} m{sup 2}) and an equivalent channel diameter (25 {mu}). (author)

  3. Study of heat transfer in superconducting cable electrical insulation of accelerator magnet cooled by superfluid helium; Etude des transferts de chaleur dans les isolations electriques de cables supraconducteurs d'aimant d'accelerateur refroidi par helium superfluide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudouy, B

    1996-10-04

    Heat transfer studies of electrical cable insulation in superconducting winding are of major importance for stability studies in superconducting magnets. This work presents an experimental heat transfer study in superconducting cables of Large Hadron Collider dipoles cooled by superfluid helium and submitted to volume heat dissipation due to beam losses. For NbTi magnets cooled by superfluid helium the most severe heat barrier comes from the electrical insulation of the cables. Heat behaviour of a winding is approached through an experimental model in which insulation characteristics can be modified. Different tests on insulation patterns show that heat transfer is influenced by superfluid helium contained in insulation even for small volume of helium (2 % of cable volume). Electrical insulation can be considered as a composite material made of a solid matrix with a helium channels network which cannot be modelled easily. This network is characterised by another experimental apparatus which allows to study transverse and steady-state heat transfer through an elementary insulation pattern. Measurements in Landau regime ({delta}T{approx}10{sup -5} to 10{sup -3} K) and in Gorter-Mellink regime ({delta}T>10{sup -3} K) and using assumptions that helium thermal paths and conduction in the insulation are decoupled allow to determine an equivalent channel area (10{sup -6} m{sup 2}) and an equivalent channel diameter (25 {mu}). (author)

  4. A helium gas scintillator active target for photoreaction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Jebali, Ramsey; Annand, John R.M.; Buchanan, Emma; Gardner, Simon; Hamilton, David J.; Livingston, Kenneth; McGeorge, John C.; MacGregor, Ian J.D.; MacRae, Roderick; Reiter, Andreas J.H.; Rosner, Guenther; Sokhan, Daria; Strandberg, Bruno [University of Glasgow, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Adler, Jan-Olof; Fissum, Kevin; Schroeder, Bent [University of Lund, Department of Physics, Lund (Sweden); Akkurt, Iskender [Sueleyman Demirel University, Fen-Edebiyat Faculty, Isparta (Turkey); Brudvik, Jason; Hansen, Kurt; Isaksson, Lennart; Lundin, Magnus [MAX IV Laboratory, PO Box 118, Lund (Sweden); Middleton, Duncan G. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Kepler Centre for Astro and Particle Physics, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Sjoegren, Johan [University of Glasgow, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); MAX IV Laboratory, PO Box 118, Lund (Sweden)

    2015-10-15

    A multi-cell He gas scintillator active target, designed for the measurement of photoreaction cross sections, is described. The target has four main chambers, giving an overall thickness of 0.103 g/cm{sup 3} at an operating pressure of 2 MPa. Scintillations are read out by photomultiplier tubes and the addition of small amounts of N{sub 2} to the He, to shift the scintillation emission from UV to visible, is discussed. First results of measurements at the MAX IV Laboratory tagged-photon facility show that the target has a timing resolution of around 1 ns and can cope well with a high-flux photon beam. The determination of reaction cross sections from target yields relies on a Monte Carlo simulation, which considers scintillation light transport, photodisintegration processes in {sup 4}He, background photon interactions in target windows and interactions of the reaction-product particles in the gas and target container. The predictions of this simulation are compared to the measured target response. (orig.)

  5. An efficient cooling loop for connecting cryocooler to a helium reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, C.E.; Abbott, C.S.R.; Leitner, D.; Leitner, M.; Lyneis, C.M.

    2003-01-01

    The magnet system of the VENUS ECR Ion Source at LBNL has two 1.5-watt cryocoolers suspended in the cryostat vacuum. Helium vapor from the liquid reservoir is admitted to a finned condenser bolted to the cryocooler 2nd stage and returns as liquid via gravity. Small-diameter flexible tubes allow the cryocoolers to be located remotely from the reservoir. With 3.1 watts load, the helium reservoir is maintained at 4.35 K, 0.05K above the cryocooler temperature. Design, analysis, and performance are presented

  6. Safety aspects of the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silady, F.A.; Millunzi, A.C.

    1989-08-01

    The Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is an advanced reactor concept under development through a cooperative program involving the US Government, the nuclear industry and the utilities. The design utilizes the basic high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) features of ceramic fuel, helium coolant, and a graphite moderator. The qualitative top-level safety requirement is that the plant's operation not disturb the normal day-to-day activities of the public. The MHTGR safety response to events challenging the functions relied on to retain radionuclides within the coated fuel particles has been evaluated. A broad range of challenges to core heat removal have been examined which include a loss of helium pressure and a simultaneous loss of forced cooling of the core. The challenges to control of heat generation have considered not only the failure to insert the reactivity control systems, but the withdrawal of control rods. Finally, challenges to control chemical attack of the ceramic coated fuel have been considered, including catastrophic failure of the steam generator allowing water ingress or of the pressure vessels allowing air ingress. The plant's response to these extreme challenges is not dependent on operator action and the events considered encompass conceivable operator errors. In the same vein, reliance on radionuclide retention within the full particle and on passive features to perform a few key functions to maintain the fuel within acceptable conditions also reduced susceptibility to external events, site-specific events, and to acts of sabotage and terrorism. 4 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  7. Observations of a fcc helium gas-bubble superlattice in copper, nickel, and stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.B.; Mazey, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy is used to investigate the spatial arrangement of the small gas bubbles produced in several fcc metals by 30 keV helium ion irradiation to high dose at 300 K. In what is a new result for this important class of metals it is found that the helium gas bubbles lie on a superlattice having an fcc structure with principal axes aligned with those of the metal matrix. The bubble lattice constant asub(i), is measured for a helium fluence just below the critical dose for radiation blistering of the metal surface (approximately 4 x 10 17 He/cm 2 ). Implantation rates are typically approximately 10 14 He ions cm -2 sec -1 . The values of asub(i) obtained for copper, nickel and stainless steel are (7.6 +- 0.3)nm, (6.6 +- 0.5)nm and (6.4 +- 0.5)nm respectively. Above the critical dose the bubble lattice is seen to survive in some blister caps as well as in the region between blisters. Bubble alignment is also observed in the case of hydrogen bubbles produced in copper by low energy proton irradiation to high fluence at 300 K. The presentation of this data was accompanied by a cine film illustrating the behaviour of the gas bubble lattice in copper during post-irradiation annealing in the electron microscope. A summary of the film is given in the appendix. (author)

  8. Deep Burn: Development of Transuranic Fuel for High-Temperature Helium-Cooled Reactors- Monthly Highlights September 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Besmann, Theodore M.; Collins, Emory D.; Bell, Gary L.

    2010-01-01

    The DB Program monthly highlights report for August 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/184, was distributed to program participants by email on September 17. This report discusses: (1) Core and Fuel Analysis - (a) Core Design Optimization in the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) Prismatic Design (Logos), (b) Core Design Optimization in the HTR Pebble Bed Design (INL), (c) Microfuel analysis for the DB HTR (INL, GA, Logos); (2) Spent Fuel Management - (a) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) repository behavior (UNLV), (b) Repository performance of TRISO fuel (UCB); (3) Fuel Cycle Integration of the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) - Synergy with other reactor fuel cycles (GA, Logos); (4) TRU (transuranic elements) HTR Fuel Qualification - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (5) HTR Spent Fuel Recycle - (a) TRU Kernel Development (ORNL), (b) Coating Development (ORNL), (c) Characterization Development and Support, (d) ZrC Properties and Handbook; and (6) HTR Fuel Recycle - (a) Graphite Recycle (ORNL), (b) Aqueous Reprocessing, (c) Pyrochemical Reprocessing METROX (metal recovery from oxide fuel) Process Development (ANL).

  9. Methodology for accident analyses of fusion breeder blankets and its application to helium-cooled pebble bed blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayotov, Dobromir; Grief, Andrew; Merrill, Brad J.; Humrickhouse, Paul; Trow, Martin; Dillistone, Michael; Murgatroyd, Julian T.; Owen, Simon; Poitevin, Yves; Peers, Karen; Lyons, Alex; Heaton, Adam; Scott, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Test Blanket Systems (TBS) DEMO breeding blankets (BB) safety demonstration. • Comprehensive methodology for fusion breeding blanket accident analysis that addresses the specificity of the breeding blanket designs, materials, and phenomena. • Development of accident analysis specifications (AAS) via the use of phenomena identification and ranking tables (PIRT). • PIRT application to identify required physical models for BB accidents analysis, code assessment and selection. • Development of MELCOR and RELAP5 codes TBS models. • Qualification of the models via comparison with finite element calculations, code-tocode comparisons, and sensitivity studies. - Abstract: ‘Fusion for Energy’ (F4E) is designing, developing, and implementing the European Helium-Cooled Lead-Lithium (HCLL) and Helium-Cooled Pebble-Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Systems (TBSs) for ITER (Nuclear Facility INB-174). Safety demonstration is an essential element for the integration of these TBSs into ITER and accident analysis is one of its critical components. A systematic approach to accident analysis has been developed under the F4E contract on TBS safety analyses. F4E technical requirements, together with Amec Foster Wheeler and INL efforts, have resulted in a comprehensive methodology for fusion breeding blanket accident analysis that addresses the specificity of the breeding blanket designs, materials, and phenomena while remaining consistent with the approach already applied to ITER accident analyses. The methodology phases are illustrated in the paper by its application to the EU HCPB TBS using both MELCOR and RELAP5 codes.

  10. Methodology for accident analyses of fusion breeder blankets and its application to helium-cooled pebble bed blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panayotov, Dobromir, E-mail: dobromir.panayotov@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Josep Pla, 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Barcelona E-08019 (Spain); Grief, Andrew [Amec Foster Wheeler, Booths Park, Chelford Road, Knutsford WA16 8QZ, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Merrill, Brad J.; Humrickhouse, Paul [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Trow, Martin; Dillistone, Michael; Murgatroyd, Julian T.; Owen, Simon [Amec Foster Wheeler, Booths Park, Chelford Road, Knutsford WA16 8QZ, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Poitevin, Yves [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Josep Pla, 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Barcelona E-08019 (Spain); Peers, Karen; Lyons, Alex; Heaton, Adam; Scott, Richard [Amec Foster Wheeler, Booths Park, Chelford Road, Knutsford WA16 8QZ, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Test Blanket Systems (TBS) DEMO breeding blankets (BB) safety demonstration. • Comprehensive methodology for fusion breeding blanket accident analysis that addresses the specificity of the breeding blanket designs, materials, and phenomena. • Development of accident analysis specifications (AAS) via the use of phenomena identification and ranking tables (PIRT). • PIRT application to identify required physical models for BB accidents analysis, code assessment and selection. • Development of MELCOR and RELAP5 codes TBS models. • Qualification of the models via comparison with finite element calculations, code-tocode comparisons, and sensitivity studies. - Abstract: ‘Fusion for Energy’ (F4E) is designing, developing, and implementing the European Helium-Cooled Lead-Lithium (HCLL) and Helium-Cooled Pebble-Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Systems (TBSs) for ITER (Nuclear Facility INB-174). Safety demonstration is an essential element for the integration of these TBSs into ITER and accident analysis is one of its critical components. A systematic approach to accident analysis has been developed under the F4E contract on TBS safety analyses. F4E technical requirements, together with Amec Foster Wheeler and INL efforts, have resulted in a comprehensive methodology for fusion breeding blanket accident analysis that addresses the specificity of the breeding blanket designs, materials, and phenomena while remaining consistent with the approach already applied to ITER accident analyses. The methodology phases are illustrated in the paper by its application to the EU HCPB TBS using both MELCOR and RELAP5 codes.

  11. IAEA high temperature gas-cooled reactor activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The IAEA activities on high temperature gas-cooled reactors are conducted with the review and support of the Member states, primarily through the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (IWG-GCR). This paper summarises the results of the IAEA gas-cooled reactor project activities in recent years along with ongoing current activities through a review of Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs), meetings and other international efforts. A series of three recently completed CRPs have addressed the key areas of reactor physics for LEU fuel, retention of fission products and removal of post shutdown decay heat through passive heat transport mechanisms. These activities along with other completed and ongoing supporting CRPs and meetings are summarised with reference to detailed documentation of the results. (authors)

  12. Interotex-innovative gas equipment for heating and cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winnington, T.L. [Interotex Ltd. (United Kingdom); Moore, N. [British Gas plc (United Kingdom); Valle, F.; Sanz, J. I. [Gas Natural SDG S.A. (Spain); Chavarri, J.M. [Fagor Electrodomesticos S. Coop. (Spain); Uselton, R. [Lennox Industries Inc. (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Conventionally, cooling technology for the residential market is provided by electrically driven vapour re-compression systems. But lately, due to the Montreal Protocol - restricting the utilisation of ozone depleting substances - and to the high peak demand in electricity, created by electrical air conditioning systems, there is a commercial opportunity for gas fired air conditioning appliances. This paper describes the development programme for a radical new absorption technology, from the theoretical studies, through the experimental programme, to the building, commissioning and installation of demonstration machines. It also includes an analysis of the world-wide residential cooling market and the opportunities available to manufacturers and gas utilities to introduce new gas heating and cooling technology, capable of competing effectively with electrical systems. (au)

  13. Design requirements, operation and maintenance of gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    At the invitation of the Government of the USA the Technical Committee Meeting on Design Requirements, Operation and Maintenance of Gas-Cooled Reactors, was held in San Diego on September 21-23, 1988, in tandem with the GCRA Conference. Both meetings attracted a large contingent of foreign participants. Approximately 100 delegates from 18 different countries participated in the Technical Committee meeting. The meeting was divided into three sessions: Gas-cooled reactor user requirement (8 papers); Gas-cooled reactor improvements to facilitate operation and maintenance (10 papers) and Safety, environmental impacts and waste disposal (5 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 23 papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Potential applications of helium-cooled high-temperature reactors to process heat use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambill, W.R.; Kasten, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTRs) permit nuclear energy to be applied to a number of processes presently utilizing fossil fuels. Promising applications of HTRs involve cogeneration, thermal energy transport using molten salt systems, steam reforming of methane for production of chemicals, coal and oil shale liquefaction or gasification, and - in the longer term - energy transport using a chemical heat pipe. Further, HTRs might be used in the more distant future as the energy source for thermochemical hydrogen production from water. Preliminary results of ongoing studies indicate that the potential market for Process Heat HTRs by the year 2020 is about 150 to 250 GW(t) for process heat/cogeneration application, plus approximately 150 to 300 GW(t) for application to fossil conversion processes. HTR cogeneration plants appear attractive in the near term for new industrial plants using large amounts of process heat, possibly for present industrial plants in conjunction with molten-salt energy distribution systems, and also for some fossil conversion processes. HTR reformer systems will take longer to develop, but are applicable to chemicals production, a larger number of fossil conversion processes, and to chemical heat pipes

  15. Monte Carlo Analysis of the Battery-Type High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzki, Marcin; Darnowski, Piotr; Niewiński, Grzegorz

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents a neutronic analysis of the battery-type 20 MWth high-temperature gas cooled reactor. The developed reactor model is based on the publicly available data being an `early design' variant of the U-battery. The investigated core is a battery type small modular reactor, graphite moderated, uranium fueled, prismatic, helium cooled high-temperature gas cooled reactor with graphite reflector. The two core alternative designs were investigated. The first has a central reflector and 30×4 prismatic fuel blocks and the second has no central reflector and 37×4 blocks. The SERPENT Monte Carlo reactor physics computer code, with ENDF and JEFF nuclear data libraries, was applied. Several nuclear design static criticality calculations were performed and compared with available reference results. The analysis covered the single assembly models and full core simulations for two geometry models: homogenous and heterogenous (explicit). A sensitivity analysis of the reflector graphite density was performed. An acceptable agreement between calculations and reference design was obtained. All calculations were performed for the fresh core state.

  16. Monte Carlo Analysis of the Battery-Type High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grodzki Marcin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a neutronic analysis of the battery-type 20 MWth high-temperature gas cooled reactor. The developed reactor model is based on the publicly available data being an ‘early design’ variant of the U-battery. The investigated core is a battery type small modular reactor, graphite moderated, uranium fueled, prismatic, helium cooled high-temperature gas cooled reactor with graphite reflector. The two core alternative designs were investigated. The first has a central reflector and 30×4 prismatic fuel blocks and the second has no central reflector and 37×4 blocks. The SERPENT Monte Carlo reactor physics computer code, with ENDF and JEFF nuclear data libraries, was applied. Several nuclear design static criticality calculations were performed and compared with available reference results. The analysis covered the single assembly models and full core simulations for two geometry models: homogenous and heterogenous (explicit. A sensitivity analysis of the reflector graphite density was performed. An acceptable agreement between calculations and reference design was obtained. All calculations were performed for the fresh core state.

  17. Emergency cooling method and system for gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumpf, H.

    1982-01-01

    For emergency cooling of gas-cooled fast breeder reactors (GSB), which have a core consisting of a fission zone and a breeding zone, water is sprayed out of nozzles on to the core from above in the case of an incident. The water which is not treated with boron is taken out of a reservoir in the form of a storage tank in such a maximum quantity that the cooling water gathering in the space below the core rises at most up to the lower edge of the fission zone. (orig./GL) [de

  18. Coated particle fuel for high temperature gas cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, Karl; Nabielek, Heinz [Research Center Julich (FZJ), Julich (Germany); Kendall, James M. [Global Virtual L1c, Prescott (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Roy Huddle, having invented the coated particle in Harwell 1957, stated in the early 1970s that we know now everything about particles and coatings and should be going over to deal with other problems. This was on the occasion of the Dragon fuel performance information meeting London 1973: How wrong a genius be{exclamation_point} It took until 1978 that really good particles were made in Germany, then during the Japanese HTTR production in the 1990s and finally the Chinese 2000-2001 campaign for HTR-10. Here, we present a review of history and present status. Today, good fuel is measured by different standards from the seventies: where 9 x 10{sup -4} initial free heavy metal fraction was typical for early AVR carbide fuel and 3 x 10{sup -4} initial free heavy metal fraction was acceptable for oxide fuel in THTR, we insist on values more than an order of magnitude below this value today. Half a percent of particle failure at the end-of-irradiation, another ancient standard, is not even acceptable today, even for the most severe accidents. While legislation and licensing has not changed, one of the reasons we insist on these improvements is the preference for passive systems rather than active controls of earlier times. After renewed HTGR interest, we are reporting about the start of new or reactivated coated particle work in several parts of the world, considering the aspects of designs/traditional and new materials, manufacturing technologies/ quality control/ quality assurance, irradiation and accident performance, modeling and performance predictions, and fuel cycle aspects and spent fuel treatment. In very general terms, the coated particle should be strong, reliable, retentive, and affordable. These properties have to be quantified and will be eventually optimized for a specific application system. Results obtained so far indicate that the same particle can be used for steam cycle applications with 700-750 .deg. C helium coolant gas exit, for gas turbine

  19. Coated particle fuel for high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, Karl; Nabielek, Heinz; Kendall, James M.

    2007-01-01

    Roy Huddle, having invented the coated particle in Harwell 1957, stated in the early 1970s that we know now everything about particles and coatings and should be going over to deal with other problems. This was on the occasion of the Dragon fuel performance information meeting London 1973: How wrong a genius be! It took until 1978 that really good particles were made in Germany, then during the Japanese HTTR production in the 1990s and finally the Chinese 2000-2001 campaign for HTR-10. Here, we present a review of history and present status. Today, good fuel is measured by different standards from the seventies: where 9 x 10 -4 initial free heavy metal fraction was typical for early AVR carbide fuel and 3 x 10 -4 initial free heavy metal fraction was acceptable for oxide fuel in THTR, we insist on values more than an order of magnitude below this value today. Half a percent of particle failure at the end-of-irradiation, another ancient standard, is not even acceptable today, even for the most severe accidents. While legislation and licensing has not changed, one of the reasons we insist on these improvements is the preference for passive systems rather than active controls of earlier times. After renewed HTGR interest, we are reporting about the start of new or reactivated coated particle work in several parts of the world, considering the aspects of designs/traditional and new materials, manufacturing technologies/ quality control/ quality assurance, irradiation and accident performance, modeling and performance predictions, and fuel cycle aspects and spent fuel treatment. In very general terms, the coated particle should be strong, reliable, retentive, and affordable. These properties have to be quantified and will be eventually optimized for a specific application system. Results obtained so far indicate that the same particle can be used for steam cycle applications with 700-750 .deg. C helium coolant gas exit, for gas turbine applications at 850-900 .deg. C

  20. Operating experience of gas bearing helium circulators in HTGR development facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomura, H.; Kawaji, S.; Fujisaki, K.; Ihizuka, T.

    1988-01-01

    The large scale helium gas test facility (HENDEL) has been constructed and operated since March 1982 at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute to develop HTGR components. The five electric driven gas circulators with dynamic gas bearings are used to circulate the helium gas of 4MPa and 400 deg. C in loops for their compactness, gas tightness, easy maintenance and free from gas contamination. All of these circulators are variable speed types of 3,000 to 12,000 rpm and have the same gas bearings and electric motors. The four machines among them are equipped with centrifugal impeller and one other machine has regenerative type, and the weight of both type rotors are nearly the same. After the troubles and repairing, both type of circulators were tested and the vibration characteristics were measured as preventing maintenance. From the test and measurements of the circulators, it was presumed that the first trouble on regenerative type was caused from excess unbalance force by falling off of a small pin from the rotating part and the second severe trouble on it was caused by the whipping in gas bearing. The static load on tilting pads indicated close relations to occurrence of the whirling through the measurements. It is recognized that fine balancing of the rotors and delicate clearance adjustment of the bearings are very important for the rotor stability and that the mechanism should be designed and machined so precise as to be adjustable. As the gas bearing would be damaged in an instantaneously short time, the monitoring technique for it should be so fast and predictive as to prevent serious damage. Through the tests, the vibration spectrum monitoring method seems to be predictive and useful for early detection of the shaft instability. It will be concluded that the gas bearing machine is an excellent system in its design philosophy, however, it also needs highly precise machining and delicate maintenance technique. 4 refs, 10 figs, 1 tab

  1. Polarizability of Helium, Neon, and Argon: New Perspectives for Gas Metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiser, Christof; Fellmuth, Bernd

    2018-03-01

    With dielectric-constant gas thermometry, the molar polarizability of helium, neon, and argon has been determined with relative standard uncertainties of about 2 parts per million. A series of isotherms measured with the three noble gases and two different experimental setups led to this unprecedented level of uncertainty. These data are crucial for scientists in the field of gas metrology, working on pressure and temperature standards. Furthermore, with the new benchmark values for neon and argon, theoretical calculations, today about 3 orders of magnitude larger in uncertainty, can be checked and improved.

  2. Thermodynamic analysis and economical evaluation of two 310-80 K pre-cooling stage configurations for helium refrigeration and liquefaction cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z. G.; Zhuang, M.; Jiang, Q. F.; Y Zhang, Q.; Feng, H. S.

    2017-12-01

    In 310-80 K pre-cooling stage, the temperature of the HP helium stream reduces to about 80 K where nearly 73% of the enthalpy drop from room temperature to 4.5 K occurs. Apart from the most common liquid nitrogen pre-cooling, another 310-80 K pre-cooling configuration with turbine is employed in some helium cryoplants. In this paper, thermodynamic and economical performance of these two kinds of 310-80 K pre-cooling stage configurations has been studied at different operating conditions taking discharge pressure, isentropic efficiency of turbines and liquefaction rate as independent parameters. The exergy efficiency, total UA of heat exchangers and operating cost of two configurations are computed. This work will provide a reference for choosing 310-80 K pre-cooling stage configuration during design.

  3. Heat removal in gas-cooled fuel rod clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehme, K.

    1975-01-01

    For a thermo- and fluid-dynamic analysis of fuel rod cluster subchannels for gas-cooled breeder reactors, the following values must be verified: a) friction coefficient as flow parameter; b) Stanton number as heat transfer parameter; c) influence of spacers on friction coefficient and Stanton number; d) heat and mass exchange between subchannels with different temperatures. These parameters are established by combining results of single experiments and of integral experiments. Mention is made of further studies to be performed in order to determine the heat removal from gas-cooled fast breeder fuel elements. (HR) [de

  4. Gas-cooled reactors for advanced terrestrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesavan, K.; Lance, J.R.; Jones, A.R.; Spurrier, F.R.; Peoples, J.A.; Porter, C.A.; Bresnahan, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Conceptual design of a power plant on an inert gas cooled nuclear coupled to an open, air Brayton power conversion cycle is presented. The power system, called the Westinghouse GCR/ATA (Gas-Cooled Reactors for Advanced Terrestrial Applications), is designed to meet modern military needs, and offers the advantages of secure, reliable and safe electrical power. The GCR/ATA concept is adaptable over a range of 1 to 10 MWe power output. Design descriptions of a compact, air-transportable forward base unit for 1 to 3 MWe output and a fixed-base, permanent installation for 3 to 10 MWe output are presented

  5. Gas-cooled fast reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rickard, C.L.; Simon, R.H.; Buttemer, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    Initial conceptual design work on the GCFR began in the USA in the early 1960s and since the later 1960s has proceeded with considerable international cooperation. A 300 MWe GCFR demonstration plant employing three main cooling loops is currently being developed at General Atomic. A major preapplication licensing review of this demonstration plant was initiated in 1971 leading in 1974 to publication of a Safety Evaluation Report by the USAEC Directorate of Licensing. The preapplication review is continuing by addressing areas of concern identified in this report such that a major part of the work necessary to support the actual licensing of a GCFR demonstration plant has been established. The safety performance of the GCFR demonstration plant is based upon its inherent safety characteristics among which are the single phase and chemically inert coolant which is not activated and has a low reactivity worth, the negative core power and temperature reactivity coefficients and the small and negative steam reactivity worth. Recent studies of larger core designs indicate that as the reactor size increases central fuel, clad and coolant reactivity worths decrease and the Doppler coefficient becomes more negative. These inherent safety characteristics are complemented by safety design features such as enclosing the entire primary coolant system within a prestressed concrete pressure vessel (PCRV), providing two independent and diverse shutdown systems and residual heat removal (RHR) systems, limiting the worth of control rods to less than $1, employing pressure-equalized fuel rods, a core supported rigidly at its upper end and otherwise unrestrained and coolant downflow within the core to enhance debris removal should local melting occur. The structurally redundant PCRV design allows the potential depressurization leak area to be controlled and, since the PCRV is located within a containment building, coolant is present even after a depressurization accident and each RHR

  6. Residual gas analysis of a cryostat vacuum chamber during the cool down of SST - 1 superconducting magnet field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semwal, P.; Joshi, K.S.; Thankey, P.L.; Pathan, F.S.; Raval, D.C.; Patel, R.J.; Pathak, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    One of the most important feature of Steady state Superconducting Tokamak -1 (SST-l) is the Nb-Ti superconducting magnet field coils. The coils will be kept in a high vacuum chamber (Cryostat) and liquid Helium will be flown through it to cool it down to its critical temperature of 4.5K. The coil along with its hydraulics has four types of joints (1) Stainless Steel (S.S.) to Copper (Cu) weld joints (2) S. S. to S. S. weld joints (3) Cu to Cu brazed joints and (4) G-10 to S. S. joints with Sti-cast as the binding material. The joints were leak tested with a Helium mass spectrometer leak detector in vacuum as well as in sniffer mode. However during the cool-down of the coil, these joints may develop leaks. This would deteriorate the vacuum inside the cryostat and coil cool-down would subsequently become more difficult. To study the effect of cooling on the vacuum condition of the Cryostat, a dummy Cryostat chamber was fabricated and a toroidal Field (TF) magnet was kept inside this chamber and cooled down to 4.5 K.A residual gas analyzer (RGA) was connected to the Cryostat chamber to study the behaviour of major gases inside this chamber with temperature. An analysis of the RGA data acquired during the coo-down has been presented in this chamber. (author)

  7. Artificial dissipation models applied to Euler equations for analysis of supersonic flow of helium gas around a geometric configurations ramp and diffusor type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Jussiê S., E-mail: jussie.soares@ifpi.edu.br [Instituto Federal do Piauí (IFPI), Valença, PI (Brazil); Maciel, Edisson Sávio de Góes, E-mail: edissonsavio@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica (ITA), São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Lira, Carlos A.B.O., E-mail: cabol@ufpe.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Sousa, Pedro A.S.; Neto, Raimundo N.C., E-mail: augusto.96pedro@gmail.com, E-mail: r.correia17@hotmail.com [Instituto Federal do Piauí (IFPI), Teresina, PI (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors - VHTGRs are studied by several research groups for the development of advanced reactors that can meet the world's growing energy demand. The analysis of the flow of helium coolant around the various geometries at the core of these reactors through computational fluid dynamics techniques is an essential tool in the development of conceptual designs of nuclear power plants that provide added security. This analysis suggests a close analogy with aeronautical cases widely studied using computational numerical techniques to solve systems of governing equations for the flow involved. The present work consists in using the DISSIPA2D{sub E}ULER code, to solve the Euler equations in a conservative form, in two-dimensional space employing a finite difference formulation for spatial discretization using the Euler method for explicit marching in time. The physical problem of supersonic flow along a ramp and diffusor configurations is considered. For this, the Jameson and Mavriplis algorithm and the artificial dissipation model linear of Pulliam was implemented. A spatially variable time step is employed aiming to accelerate the convergence to the steady state solution. The main purpose of this work is obtain computational tools for flow analysis through the study the cited dissipation model and describe their characteristics in relation to the overall quality of the solution, as well as obtain preliminary results for the development of computational tools of dynamic analysis of helium gas flow in gas-cooled reactors. (author)

  8. Artificial dissipation models applied to Euler equations for analysis of supersonic flow of helium gas around a geometric configurations ramp and diffusor type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Jussiê S.; Maciel, Edisson Sávio de Góes; Lira, Carlos A.B.O.; Sousa, Pedro A.S.; Neto, Raimundo N.C.

    2017-01-01

    Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors - VHTGRs are studied by several research groups for the development of advanced reactors that can meet the world's growing energy demand. The analysis of the flow of helium coolant around the various geometries at the core of these reactors through computational fluid dynamics techniques is an essential tool in the development of conceptual designs of nuclear power plants that provide added security. This analysis suggests a close analogy with aeronautical cases widely studied using computational numerical techniques to solve systems of governing equations for the flow involved. The present work consists in using the DISSIPA2D E ULER code, to solve the Euler equations in a conservative form, in two-dimensional space employing a finite difference formulation for spatial discretization using the Euler method for explicit marching in time. The physical problem of supersonic flow along a ramp and diffusor configurations is considered. For this, the Jameson and Mavriplis algorithm and the artificial dissipation model linear of Pulliam was implemented. A spatially variable time step is employed aiming to accelerate the convergence to the steady state solution. The main purpose of this work is obtain computational tools for flow analysis through the study the cited dissipation model and describe their characteristics in relation to the overall quality of the solution, as well as obtain preliminary results for the development of computational tools of dynamic analysis of helium gas flow in gas-cooled reactors. (author)

  9. Cooling of gas turbines IX : cooling effects from use of ceramic coatings on water-cooled turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W Byron; Livingood, John N B

    1948-01-01

    The hottest part of a turbine blade is likely to be the trailing portion. When the blades are cooled and when water is used as the coolant, the cooling passages are placed as close as possible to the trailing edge in order to cool this portion. In some cases, however, the trailing portion of the blade is so narrow, for aerodynamic reasons, that water passages cannot be located very near the trailing edge. Because ceramic coatings offer the possibility of protection for the trailing part of such narrow blades, a theoretical study has been made of the cooling effect of a ceramic coating on: (1) the blade-metal temperature when the gas temperature is unchanged, and (2) the gas temperature when the metal temperature is unchanged. Comparison is also made between the changes in the blade or gas temperatures produced by ceramic coatings and the changes produced by moving the cooling passages nearer the trailing edge. This comparison was made to provide a standard for evaluating the gains obtainable with ceramic coatings as compared to those obtainable by constructing the turbine blade in such a manner that water passages could be located very near the trailing edge.

  10. First Study of Helium Gas Purification System as Primary Coolant of Co-Generation Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piping Supriatna

    2009-01-01

    The technological progress of NPP Generation-I on 1950’s, Generation-II, Generation-III recently on going, and Generation-IV which will be implemented on next year 2025, concept of nuclear power technology implementation not only for generate electrical energy, but also for other application which called cogeneration reactor. Commonly the type of this reactor is High Temperature Reactor (HTR), which have other capabilities like Hydrogen production, desalination, Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR), etc. The cogeneration reactor (HTR) produce thermal output higher than commonly Nuclear Power Plant, and need special Heat Exchanger with helium gas as coolant. In order to preserve heat transfer with high efficiency, constant purity of the gas must be maintained as well as possible, especially contamination from its impurities. In this report has been done study for design concept of HTR primary coolant gas purification system, including methodology by sampling He gas from Primary Coolant and purification by using Physical Helium Splitting Membrane. The examination has been designed in physical simulator by using heater as reactor core. The result of study show that the of Primary Coolant Gas Purification System is enable to be implemented on cogeneration reactor. (author)

  11. The observation of helium gas bubble lattices in copper, nickel and stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.B.; Mazey, D.J.

    1978-10-01

    Transmission electron microscopy is used to investigate the spatial arrangement of the small gas bubbles produced in several fcc metals by 30 keV helium ion irradiation to high dose at 300K. In what is a new result for this important class of metals it is found that the helium gas bubbles lie on a superlattice having an fcc structure with principal axes aligned with those of the metal matrix. The bubble lattice constant, asub(l), is measured for a helium fluence just below the critical dose for radiation blistering of the metal surface. Implantation rates are typically approximately 10 14 He ions cm -2 sec -1 . The values of asub(l) obtained for copper, nickel and stainless steel are given. Above the critical dose the bubble lattice is seen to survive in some blister caps as well as in the region between blisters. Bubble alignment is also observed in the case of hydrogen bubbles produced in copper by low energy proton irradiation to high fluence at 300K. (author)

  12. The effect on the transmission loss of a double wall panel of using helium gas in the gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwal, M. S.; Crocker, M. J.

    The possibility of increasing the sound-power transmission loss of a double panel by using helium gas in the gap is investigated. The transmission loss of a panel is defined as ten times the common logarithm of the ratio of the sound power incident on the panel to the sound power transmitted to the space on the other side of the panel. The work is associated with extensive research being done to develop new techniques for predicting the interior noise levels on board high-speed advanced turboprop aircraft and reducing the noise levels with a minimum weight penalty. Helium gas was chosen for its inert properties and its low impedance compared with air. With helium in the gap, the impedance mismatch experienced by the sound wave will be greater than that with air in the gap. It is seen that helium gas in the gap increases the transmission loss of the double panel over a wide range of frequencies.

  13. Evaluation of materials for heat exchanging components in advanced helium-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, F.

    1984-01-01

    The qualification of metallic materials for advanced HTR applications is based on creep behaviour, fatigue properties, structural stability and corrosion resistance. A brief state of the art is provided for the materials for heat exchanging components. The experimental results are treated with respect to the importance for the design, the characteristic of time-depend materials behaviour are evaluated. Of specific interest are the possible effects of helium on the mechanical properties. Helium, which serves as primary coolant, contains traces of reactive impurities such as hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide and water vapor. The evaluation of the HTR materials program serves as basis for structural design rules of components with operation temperatures above 800 deg C. The materials mechanical topics are discussed. Alloy improvement and the progress in development of new alloys are reviewed. (author)

  14. R and D programme on generation IV nuclear energy systems: the high temperatures gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Fiorini, G.L.; Billot, P.; Anzieu, P.; Brossard, P.

    2005-01-01

    The Generation IV Technology Roadmap selected, among others, a sequenced development of advanced high temperature gas cooled reactors as one of the main focus for R and D on future nuclear energy systems. The selection of this research objective originates both from the significance of high temperature and fast neutrons for nuclear energy to meet the needs for a sustainable development for the medium-long term (2020/2030 and beyond), and from the significant common R and D pathway that supports both medium term industrial projects and more advanced versions of gas cooled reactors. The first step of the 'Gas Technology Path' aims to support the development of a modular HTR to meet specific international market needs around 2020. The second step is a Very High Temperature Reactor - VHTR (>950 C) - to efficiently produce hydrogen through thermo-chemical or electro-chemical water splitting or to generate electricity with an efficiency above 50%, among other applications of high temperature nuclear heat. The third step of the Path is a Gas Fast Reactor - GFR - that features a fast-spectrum helium-cooled reactor and closed fuel cycle, with a direct or indirect thermodynamic cycle for electricity production and full recycle of actinides. Hydrogen production is also considered for the GFR. The paper succinctly presents the R and D program currently under definition and partially launched within the Generation IV International Forum on this consistent set of advanced gas cooled nuclear systems. (orig.)

  15. International working group on gas-cooled reactors. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-15

    The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for exchange of information on safety and licensing aspects for gas-cooled reactors in order to provide comprehensive review of the present status and of directions for future applications and development. Contributions were made concerning the operating experience of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) HTGR Power Plant in the United States of America, the experimental power station Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) in the Federal Republic of Germany, and the CO/sub 2/-cooled reactors in the United Kingdom such as Hunterson B and Hinkley Point B. The experience gained at each of these reactors has proved the high safety potential of Gas-cooled Reactor Power Plants.

  16. Periodic reviews of structural integrity of gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, P.J.; Stokoe, T.Y.; Thomas, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear Electric operates 12 gas-cooled reactor power stations which have been in service for between 5 and 30 years. Periodically, comprehensive reviews of the safety cases are carried out for each station. The approach followed in these reviews in respect of structural integrity is outlined with the use of illustrative examples. (author)

  17. Gas-cooled reactor safety and accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    The Specialists' Meeting on Gas-Cooled Reactor Safety and Accident Analysis was convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency in Oak Ridge on the invitation of the Department of Energy in Washington, USA. The meeting was hosted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an opportunity to compare and discuss results of safety and accident analysis of gas-cooled reactors under development, construction or in operation, to review their lay-out, design, and their operational performance, and to identify areas in which additional research and development are needed. The meeting emphasized the high safety margins of gas-cooled reactors and gave particular attention to the inherent safety features of small reactor units. The meeting was subdivided into four technical sessions: Safety and Related Experience with Operating Gas-Cooled Reactors (4 papers); Risk and Safety Analysis (11 papers); Accident Analysis (9 papers); Miscellaneous Related Topics (5 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  18. French gas cooled reactor experience with moisture ingress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastien, D.; Brie, M.

    1995-01-01

    During the history of operation of six gas cooled reactors in France, some experience has been gained with accidental water ingress into the primary system. This occurred as a result of leaks in steam generators. This paper describes the cause of the leaks, and the resulting consequences. (author). 2 refs, 8 figs

  19. Gas cooled fast reactor research and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markoczy, G.; Hudina, M.; Richmond, R.; Wydler, P.; Stratton, R.W.; Burgsmueller, P.

    1980-03-01

    The research and development work in the field of core thermal-hydraulics, steam generator research and development, experimental and analytical physics and carbide fuel development carried out 1979 for the Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research is described. (Auth.)

  20. Detection of fuel element failures at the gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremsak, P.; Ranzel, S.; Ogrin, R.; Pisanski, C.

    1964-01-01

    This paper describes the system for measuring the concentration of released Kr and Xe in the cooling gas. The system developed in the Jozef Stefan Institute is efficient and suitable for application The method is based on electrostatic collection of daughter elements from radioactive decay of Xe and Kr

  1. IAEA activities in gas-cooled reactor technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleveland, J.; Kupitz, J.

    1992-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has the charter to ''foster the exchange of scientific and technical information'', and ''encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful uses throughout the world''. This paper describes the Agency's activities in Gas-cooled Reactor (GCR) technology development

  2. Artificial dissipation models applied to Navier-Stokes equations for analysis of supersonic flow of helium gas around a geometric configuration ramp type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Jussie Soares da; Maciel, Edisson Savio de G.; Lira, Carlos A.B. de O.

    2015-01-01

    Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors - VHTGRs are studied by several research groups for the development of advanced reactors that can meet the world's growing energy demand. The analysis of the flow of helium coolant around the various geometries at the core of these reactors through computational fluid dynamics techniques is an essential tool in the development of conceptual designs of nuclear power plants that provide added safety. This analysis suggests a close analogy with aeronautical cases widely studied using computational numerical techniques to solve systems of governing equations for the flow involved. The present work consists in solving the Navier-Stokes equations in a conservative form, in two-dimensional space employing a finite difference formulation for spatial discretization using the Euler method for explicit marching in time. The physical problem of supersonic laminar flow of helium gas along a ramp configuration is considered. For this, the Jameson and Mavriplis algorithm and the artificial dissipations models linear and nonlinear of Pulliam was implemented. A spatially variable time step is employed aiming to accelerate the convergence to the steady state solution. The main purpose of this work is to study the cited dissipation models and describe their characteristics in relation to the overall quality of the solution, aiming preliminary results for the development of computational tools of dynamic analysis of helium flow for the VHTGR core. (author)

  3. Review of ORNL-TSF shielding experiments for the gas-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, L.S.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Muckenthaler, F.J.; Slater, C.O.

    1982-01-01

    During the period between 1975 and 1980 a series of experiments was performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility in support of the shield design for a 300-MW(e) Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Demonstration Plant. This report reviews the experiments and calculations, which included studies of: (1) neutron streaming in the helium coolant passageways in the GCFR core; (2) the effectiveness of the shield designed to protect the reactor grid plate from radiation damage; (3) the adequacy of the radial shield in protecting the PCRV (prestressed concrete reactor vessel) from radiation damage; (4) neutron streaming between abutting sections of the radial shield; and (5) the effectiveness of the exit shield in reducing the neutron fluxes in the upper plenum region of the reactor

  4. Average equilibrium charge state of 278113 ions moving in a helium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaji, D.; Morita, K.; Morimoto, K.

    2005-01-01

    Difficulty to identify a new heavy element comes from the small production cross section. For example, the production cross section was about 0.5 pb in the case of searching for the 112th element produced by the cold fusion reaction of 208 Pb( 70 Zn,n) 277 ll2. In order to identify heavier elements than element 112, the experimental apparatus with a sensitivity of sub-pico barn level is essentially needed. A gas-filled recoil separator, in general, has a large collection efficiency compared with other recoil separators as seen from the operation principle of a gas-filled recoil separator. One of the most important parameters for a gas-filled recoil separator is the average equilibrium charge state q ave of ions moving in a used gas. This is because the recoil ion can not be properly transported to the focal plane of the separator, if the q ave of an element of interest in a gas is unknown. We have systematically measured equilibrium charge state distributions of heavy ions ( 169 Tm, 208 Pb, 193,209 Bi, 196 Po, 200 At, 203,204 Fr, 212 Ac, 234 Bk, 245 Fm, 254 No, 255 Lr, and 265 Hs) moving in a helium gas by using the gas-filled recoil separator GARIS at RIKEN. Ana then, the empirical formula on q ave of heavy ions in a helium gas was derived as a function of the velocity and the atomic number of an ion on the basis of the Tomas-Fermi model of the atom. The formula was found to be applicable to search for transactinide nuclides of 271 Ds, 272 Rg, and 277 112 produced by cold fusion reactions. Using the formula on q ave , we searched for a new isotope of element 113 produced by the cold fusion reaction of 209 Bi( 70 Zn,n) 278 113. As a result, a decay chain due to an evaporation residue of 278 113 was observed. Recently, we have successfully observed the 2nd decay chain due to an evaporation residue of 278 113. In this report, we will present experimental results in detail, and will also discuss the average equilibrium charge sate of 278 113 in a helium gas by

  5. Fuel assembly for gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yellowlees, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    A fuel assembly is described for gas-cooled nuclear reactor which consists of a wrapper tube within which are positioned a number of spaced apart beds in a stack, with each bed containing spherical coated particles of fuel; each of the beds has a perforated top and bottom plate; gaseous coolant passes successively through each of the beds; through each of the beds also passes a bypass tube; part of the gas travels through the bed and part passes through the bypass tube; the gas coolant which passes through both the bed and the bypass tube mixes in the space on the outlet side of the bed before entering the next bed

  6. Long-term prospects for the gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, W.P.S.

    1982-01-01

    Towards the second half of a fifty-year time span the market for gas-cooled reactors as sources of high temperature process heat and as highly fuel efficient electricity producers should be reasonably bright, given a fair degree of technological maturity and consequent realisation of inherent economic advantages. Declining fossil resources and increasing prices, initially in oil and gas later in open-cast coal, provide the economic impetus towards substitution of nuclear for coal heat, not only in the generally accepted processes of coal conversion and steel-making but also for oil shale pyrolysis and electrothermal aluminium smelting. Around 2010, if not sooner, the need for uranium conservation should allow the market penetration of breeders and thorium-cycle reactors for which gas cooling has a potential techno-economic edge. (author)

  7. Long-term prospects for the gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, W.P.S.

    1983-01-01

    Towards the second half of a 50-year time span the market for gas-cooled reactors as sources of high-temperature process heat and as highly fuel-efficient electricity producers should be reasonably bright, given a fair degree of technological maturity and consequent realization of inherent economic advantages. Declining fossil resources and increasing prices, initially in oil and gas, later in open-cast coal, provide the economic impetus towards substitution of nuclear for coal heat, not only in the generally accepted processes of coal conversion and steel making but also for oil shale pyrolysis and electrothermal aluminium smelting. Around 2010, if not sooner, the need for uranium conservation should allow the market penetration of breeders and thorium-cycle reactors for which gas cooling has a potential techno-economic edge. (author)

  8. Gas erosion of impeller housing in the operation of a high-temperature, high-pressure helium circulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, J.P.; Heestand, R.L.; Young, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    Three gas-bearing circulators are installed in series in a high-pressure, high-temperature loop to provide helium flow up to 0.47 m 3 /s at a total head of 78 kJ/kg. The design pressure is 10.7 MPa, and temperatures of 1000 deg. C can be obtained in the test section. The inlet temperature to the circulators is limited to 450 deg. C. The 200-kW motor for each circulator is enclosed in the pressure boundary, and the motor is cooled by circulating the gas within the cavity over a water-cooled coil. The full operating speed is 23,500 rpm. A full-flow filter, absolute for particulate above 10 μm, is installed upstream of the circulator to protect the gas bearing surfaces. The minimum clearances between these surfaces during operation are in the range of 15 to 30 μm. During a routine examination of the circulator, deep V-shaped grooves were found in the stationary surface of this cavity. At the same time, a very fine, dark particulate was observed in crevices of the housing. At first it was assumed that the grooves were formed by particulate erosion; however, examination of the grooves and discussions with persons experienced with large circulator operation changed this opinion. Erosion caused by particulate is characteristically rounded on the bottom and has a greater width to depth aspect than the V-shaped grooves, which were observed. Analysis of the particulate indicated that it was essentially the material of the housing that had undergone reactions with impurities in the circulating gas. It was subsequently concluded that the impeller housing had not been heat treated in a sufficiently oxidizing atmosphere after machining to form an adherent oxide coating. This suboxide coating was eroded by the shear forces in the gas. The exposed layer of metal was then further oxidized by the impurities in the gas, and these layers of oxide were successively eroded to produce the grooves. This erosion problem was eliminated by machining a ring of the same material, heat

  9. A novel approach to process carbonate samples for radiocarbon measurements with helium carrier gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wacker, L., E-mail: wacker@phys.ethz.ch [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Fueloep, R.-H. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne, 50674 Cologne (Germany); Hajdas, I. [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Molnar, M. [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Institute of Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Rethemeyer, J. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne, 50674 Cologne (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Most laboratories prepare carbonates samples for radiocarbon analysis by acid decomposition in evacuated glass tubes and subsequent reduction of the evolved CO{sub 2} to graphite in self-made reduction manifolds. This process is time consuming and labor intensive. In this work, we have tested a new approach for the preparation of carbonate samples, where any high-vacuum system is avoided and helium is used as a carrier gas. The liberation of CO{sub 2} from carbonates with phosphoric acid is performed in a similar way as it is often done in stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry where CO{sub 2} is released with acid in septum sealed tube under helium atmosphere. The formed CO{sub 2} is later flushed in a helium flow by means of a double-walled needle mounted from the tubes to the zeolite trap of the automated graphitization equipment (AGE). It essentially replaces the elemental analyzer normally used for the combustion of organic samples. The process can be fully automated from sampling the released CO{sub 2} in the septum-sealed tubes with a commercially available auto-sampler to the graphitization with the automated graphitization. The new method yields in low sample blanks of about 50000 years. Results of processed reference materials (IAEA-C2, FIRI-C) are in agreement with their consensus values.

  10. Design of a spherical fuel element for a gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Rooijen, W.F.G.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Van Dam, H.; Van der Hagen, T.H.J.J.

    2004-01-01

    A study is undertaken to develop a fuel cycle for a gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR). The design goals are: highly efficient use of (depleted) uranium, application of Pu recycled from LWR discharge as fissile material, high temperature output and simplicity of design. The design focuses on spherical TRISO-like fuel elements, a homogeneous core at start-up, providing for easy fuel fabrication, and self-breeding capability with a flat k eff with burn-up. Nitride fuel ( 15 N > 99%) has been selected because of its favourable thermal conductivity, high heavy metal density and compatibility with PUREX reprocessing. Two core concepts have been studied: one with coated particles embedded inside fuel pebbles, and one with coated particles cooled directly by helium. The result is that a flat k eff can be achieved for a long period of time, using coated particles cooled directly, with a homogeneous core at, start-up, with a closed fuel cycle and a simple refuelling and reprocessing scheme. (author)

  11. Performance comparison of liquid metal and gas cooled ATW system point designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.S.; Taiwo, T.A.; Hill, R.N.; Khalil, H.S.; Wade, D.C.

    2001-01-01

    As part of the Advanced Accelerator Application (AAA) program in the U.S., preliminary design studies have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to define and compare candidate Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) systems. The studies at ANL have focused primarily on the transmutation blanket component of the overall system. Lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE), sodium, and gas cooled systems are among the blanket technology options currently under consideration. This paper summarizes the results from neutronics trade studies performed at ANL. Core designs have been developed for LBE and sodium cooled 840 MWt fast spectrum accelerator driven systems employing re-cycle. Additionally, neutronics analyses have been performed for a helium-cooled 600 MWt hybrid thermal and fast spectrum system proposed by General Atomics (GA), which is operated in the critical mode for three cycles and in a subcritical accelerator driven mode for a subsequent single cycle. For these three point designs, isotopic inventories, consumption rates, and annual burnup rates are compared. The mass flows and the ultimate loss of transuranic (TRU) isotopes to the waste stream per unit of heat generated during transmutation are also compared on a consistent basis. (author)

  12. System analysis for HTTR-GT/H2 plant. Safety analysis of HTTR for coupling helium gas turbine and H2 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Yan, Xing L.; Ohashi, Hirofumi

    2017-08-01

    High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is expected to extend the use of nuclear heat to a wider spectrum of industrial applications because of the high temperature heat supply capability and inherently safe characteristics. Japan Atomic Energy Agency initiated a nuclear cogeneration demonstration project with helium gas turbine power generation and thermochemical hydrogen production utilizing the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), the first HTGR in Japan. This study carries out safety evaluation for the HTTR gas turbine hydrogen cogeneration test plant (HTTR-GT/H 2 plant). The evaluation was conducted for the events newly identified corresponding to the coupling of helium gas turbine and hydrogen production plant to the HTTR. The results showed that loss of load event does not have impact on temperature of fuel and reactor coolant pressure boundary. In addition, reactor coolant pressure does not exceed the evaluation criteria. Furthermore, it was shown that reactor operation can be maintained against temperature transients induced by abnormal events in hydrogen production plant. (author)

  13. Multiple scattering effects in fast neutron polarization experiments using high-pressure helium-xenon gas scintillators as analyzers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tornow, W.; Mertens, G.

    1977-01-01

    In order to study multiple scattering effects both in the gas and particularly in the solid materials of high-pressure gas scintillators, two asymmetry experiments have been performed by scattering of 15.6 MeV polarized neutrons from helium contained in stainless steel vessels of different wall thicknesses. A monte Carlo computer code taking into account the polarization dependence of the differential scattering cross sections has been written to simulate the experiments and to calculate corrections for multiple scattering on helium, xenon and the gas containment materials. Besides the asymmetries for the various scattering processes involved, the code yields time-of-flight spectra of the scattered neutrons and pulse height spectra of the helium recoil nuclei in the gas scintillator. The agreement between experimental results and Monte Carlo calculations is satisfactory. (Auth.)

  14. Gas-Cooled Reactors: the importance of their development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1978-01-01

    Gas-Cooled Reactors are considered to have a significant future impact on the application of fission energy. The specific types are the steam-cycle High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor, the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor, the gas-turbine HTGR, and the Very High-Temperature Process Heat Reactor. The importance of developing the above systems is discussed relative to alternative fission power systems involving Light Water Reactors, Heavy Water Reactors, Spectral Shift Controlled Reactors, and Liquid-Metal-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactors. A primary advantage of developing GCRs as a class lies in the technology and cost interrelations, permitting cost-effective development of systems having diverse applications. Further, HTGR-type systems have highly proliferation-resistant characteristics and very attractive safety features. Finally, such systems and GCFRs are mutally complementary. Overall, GCRs provide interrelated systems that serve different purposes and needs; their development can proceed in stages that provide early benefits while contributing to future needs. It is concluded that the long-term importance of the various GCRs is as follows: HTGR, providing a technology for economic GCFRs and HTGR-GTs, while providing a proliferation-resistant reactor system having early economic and fuel utilization benefits; GCFR, providing relatively low cost fissile fuel and reducing overall separative work needs at capital costs lower than those for LMFBRs; HTGR-GT (in combination with a bottoming cycle), providing a very high thermal efficiency system having low capital costs and improved fuel utilization and technology pertinent to VHTRs; HTGR-GT, providing a power system well suited for dry cooling conditions for low-temperature process heat needs; and VHTR, providing a high-temperature heat source for hydrogen production processes

  15. Thermophysical properties of krypton-helium gas mixtures from ab initio pair potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Benjamin; Bich, Eckard

    2017-06-07

    A new potential energy curve for the krypton-helium atom pair was developed using supermolecular ab initio computations for 34 interatomic distances. Values for the interaction energies at the complete basis set limit were obtained from calculations with the coupled-cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations and correlation consistent basis sets up to sextuple-zeta quality augmented with mid-bond functions. Higher-order coupled-cluster excitations up to the full quadruple level were accounted for in a scheme of successive correction terms. Core-core and core-valence correlation effects were included. Relativistic corrections were considered not only at the scalar relativistic level but also using full four-component Dirac-Coulomb and Dirac-Coulomb-Gaunt calculations. The fitted analytical pair potential function is characterized by a well depth of 31.42 K with an estimated standard uncertainty of 0.08 K. Statistical thermodynamics was applied to compute the krypton-helium cross second virial coefficients. The results show a very good agreement with the best experimental data. Kinetic theory calculations based on classical and quantum-mechanical approaches for the underlying collision dynamics were utilized to compute the transport properties of krypton-helium mixtures in the dilute-gas limit for a large temperature range. The results were analyzed with respect to the orders of approximation of kinetic theory and compared with experimental data. Especially the data for the binary diffusion coefficient confirm the predictive quality of the new potential. Furthermore, inconsistencies between two empirical pair potential functions for the krypton-helium system from the literature could be resolved.

  16. Absorber rod driving into a gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elter, C.; Schmitt, H.; Schoening, J.

    1987-01-01

    The absorber rod consists of a hollow cylinder which has a layer of absorber material applied on its inside circumferential surface. The absorber rod is held via a guide sleeve, which is supported centrally in a hole in the side reflector. The guidance within the sleeve is provided by flanges on the hollow cylinder. The movement of the hollow cylinder is carried out hydraulically or pneumatically. A flow of cooling gas is used for cooling, which is passed through the inner central areas of the hollow cylinder and the guide sleeve. (DG) [de

  17. Scaling analysis of the coupled heat transfer process in the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.C.

    1986-08-01

    The differential equations representing the coupled heat transfer from the solid nuclear core components to the helium in the coolant channels are scaled in terms of representative quantities. This scaling process identifies the relative importance of the various terms of the coupled differential equations. The relative importance of these terms is then used to simplify the numerical solution of the coupled heat transfer for two bounding cases of full-power operation and depressurization from full-system operating pressure for the Fort St. Vrain High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. This analysis rigorously justifies the simplified system of equations used in the nuclear safety analysis effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  18. Dynamics and inherent safety features of small modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, R.M.; Ball, S.J.; Cleveland, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations were made at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to characterize the dynamics and inherent safety features of various modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) designs. This work was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's HTGR Safety Research program. The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Gas Cooled Reactor Associates (GCRA) have sponsored studies of several modular HTGR concepts, each having it own unique advantageous economic and inherent safety features. The DOE design team has recently choses a 350-MW(t) annular core with prismatic, graphite matrix fuel for its reference plant. The various safety features of this plant and of the pebble-bed core designs similar to those currently being developed and operated in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) are described. A varity of postulated accident sequences involving combinations of loss of forced circulation of the helium primary coolant, loss of primary coolant pressurization, and loss of normal and backup heat sinks were studied and are discussed. Results demonstrate that each concept can withstand an uncontrolled heatup accident without reaching excessive peak fuel temperatures. Comparisons of calculated and measured response for a loss of forced circulation test on the FRG reactor, AVR, are also presented. 10 refs

  19. Gas cooled fast reactor 2400 MWTh, status on the conceptual design studies and preliminary safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malo, J.Y.; Alpy, N.; Bentivoglio, F.

    2009-01-01

    The Gas cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is considered by the French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique as a promising concept, combining the benefits of fast spectrum and high temperature, using Helium as coolant. A status on the GFR preliminary viability was made at the end of 2007, ending the pre-conceptual design phase. A consistent overall systems arrangement was proposed and a preliminary safety analysis based on operating transient calculations and a simplified PSA had established a global confidence in the feasibility and safety of this baseline concept. Its potential for attractive performances had been pointed out. Compare to the more mature Sodium Fast Reactor technology, no demonstrator has ever been built and the feasibility demonstration will required a longer lead time. The next main project milestone is related to the GFR viability, scheduled in 2012. The current studies consist in revisiting the reactor reference design options as selected at the end of 2007. Most of them are being consolidated by going more in depth in the analysis. Some possible alternatives are assessed. The paper will give a status on the last studies performed on the core design and corresponding neutronics and cycle performance, the Decay Heat Removal strategy and preliminary safety analysis, systems design and balance of plant... This paper is complementary to the Icapp'09 papers 9062 dealing with the Gas cooled Fast Reactor Demonstrator ALLEGRO and 9378 related to GFR transients analysis. (author)

  20. Performance analysis of a large-scale helium Brayton cryo-refrigerator with static gas bearing turboexpander

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Qiang; Wu, Jihao; Li, Qing; Lu, Wenhai; Xiong, Lianyou; Liu, Liqiang; Xu, Xiangdong; Sun, Lijia; Sun, Yu; Xie, Xiujuan; Wang, Bingming; Qiu, Yinan; Zhang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A 2 kW at 20.0 K helium Brayton cryo-refrigerator is built in China. • A series of tests have been systematically conducted to investigate the performance of the cryo-refrigerator. • Maximum heat conductance proportion (90.7%) appears in the heat exchangers of cold box rather than those of heat reservoirs. • A model of helium Brayton cryo-refrigerator/cycle is presented according to finite-time thermodynamics. - Abstract: Large-scale helium cryo-refrigerator is widely used in superconducting systems, nuclear fusion engineering, and scientific researches, etc., however, its energy efficiency is quite low. First, a 2 kW at 20.0 K helium Brayton cryo-refrigerator is built, and a series of tests have been systematically conducted to investigate the performance of the cryo-refrigerator. It is found that maximum heat conductance proportion (90.7%) appears in the heat exchangers of cold box rather than those of heat reservoirs, which is the main characteristic of the helium Brayton cryo-refrigerator/cycle different from the air Brayton refrigerator/cycle. Other three characteristics also lie in the configuration of refrigerant helium bypass, internal purifier and non-linearity of specific heat of helium. Second, a model of helium Brayton cryo-refrigerator/cycle is presented according to finite-time thermodynamics. The assumption named internal purification temperature depth (PTD) is introduced, and the heat capacity rate of whole cycle is divided into three different regions in accordance with the PTD: room temperature region, upper internal purification temperature region and lower one. Analytical expressions of cooling capacity and COP are obtained, and we found that the expressions are piecewise functions. Further, comparison between the model and the experimental results for cooling capacity of the helium cryo-refrigerator shows that error is less than 7.6%. The PTD not only helps to achieve the analytical formulae and indicates the working

  1. A solution for the helium problem. Cryogen-free cooling systems for low temperatures; Eine Loesung fuer das Heliumproblem. Kryogenfreie Kuehlsysteme fuer tiefe Temperaturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Good, Jeremy [Cryogenic Limited, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    Pulse tube or Gifford-McMahon coolers are related to Stirling engines. Extremely low temperatures - 1 K can be reached with these devices. As a cryogen-free system the devices need only small amounts of helium as working gas. This fact reduces the gaseous and liquid helium consumption of research labs considerably and allows new applications. The cost-efficiency of this alternative technique is important for research facilities that use superconducting magnets.

  2. Experimental investigation of temperature rise in bone drilling with cooling: A comparison between modes of without cooling, internal gas cooling, and external liquid cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakouri, Ehsan; Haghighi Hassanalideh, Hossein; Gholampour, Seifollah

    2018-01-01

    Bone fracture occurs due to accident, aging, and disease. For the treatment of bone fractures, it is essential that the bones are kept fixed in the right place. In complex fractures, internal fixation or external methods are used to fix the fracture position. In order to immobilize the fracture position and connect the holder equipment to it, bone drilling is required. During the drilling of the bone, the required forces to chip formation could cause an increase in the temperature. If the resulting temperature increases to 47 °C, it causes thermal necrosis of the bone. Thermal necrosis decreases bone strength in the hole and, subsequently, due to incomplete immobilization of bone, fracture repair is not performed correctly. In this study, attempts have been made to compare local temperature increases in different processes of bone drilling. This comparison has been done between drilling without cooling, drilling with gas cooling, and liquid cooling on bovine femur. Drilling tests with gas coolant using direct injection of CO 2 and N 2 gases were carried out by internal coolant drill bit. The results showed that with the use of gas coolant, the elevation of temperature has limited to 6 °C and the thermal necrosis is prevented. Maximum temperature rise reached in drilling without cooling was 56 °C, using gas and liquid coolant, a maximum temperature elevation of 43 °C and 42 °C have been obtained, respectively. This resulted in decreased possibility of thermal necrosis of bone in drilling with gas and liquid cooling. However, the results showed that the values obtained with the drilling method with direct gas cooling are independent of the rotational speed of drill.

  3. A technique to simulate a tube break in a high-pressure gas/cooling water heat exchanger - HTR2008-58161

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antwerpen, H. J. V.; Mulder, E. J.

    2008-01-01

    The gas cycles of most High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTR's) reject heat to water at some stage. In the helium/water heat exchangers of HTR's with direct Brayton cycles, the helium is usually at a much higher pressure than the water. If the pressure boundary between the helium and the water fails inside the heat exchanger. the effect on the rest of the water system has to be established in order to do a proper system design. This can be done most efficiently by using a system simulation code, however, very few system simulation codes has the capability to do gas/liquid interface tracking as required for this problem. This study describes a calculation method with which a gas/liquid heat exchanger tube rupture can be calculated in a simulation code without interface tracking. The course of events after tube rupture is described and appropriate calculation models derived. A mathematical model for a pressure relief valve (PRV) was also created. The calculation models were implemented in the system simulation software Flownex and used to study a tube rupture on a 5000 kPa helium/water heat exchanger. The assembled calculation network solved stable and within reasonable time. The simulation provided insight into the course of events following the tube break. It was shown that the acceleration of water out of the helium cooler, by choked-flow helium, caused the main pressure pulses during the event. The maximum pressure in the water loop occurs on the opposite side of the helium cooler due to constructive interference of the initial pressure wave with itself. It was also shown that by changing only pipe lengths, the system could become prone to severe oscillations after a tube rupture event. (authors)

  4. Ambient air cooling arrangement having a pre-swirler for gas turbine engine blade cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Tham, Kok-Mun; Schroeder, Eric; Meeroff, Jamie; Miller, Jr., Samuel R; Marra, John J

    2015-01-06

    A gas turbine engine including: an ambient-air cooling circuit (10) having a cooling channel (26) disposed in a turbine blade (22) and in fluid communication with a source (12) of ambient air: and an pre-swirler (18), the pre-swirler having: an inner shroud (38); an outer shroud (56); and a plurality of guide vanes (42), each spanning from the inner shroud to the outer shroud. Circumferentially adjacent guide vanes (46, 48) define respective nozzles (44) there between. Forces created by a rotation of the turbine blade motivate ambient air through the cooling circuit. The pre-swirler is configured to impart swirl to ambient air drawn through the nozzles and to direct the swirled ambient air toward a base of the turbine blade. The end walls (50, 54) of the pre-swirler may be contoured.

  5. Peculiarities of void fraction measurement applied to physical installation channels cooled by forced helium flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilov, V.V.; Filippov, Yu.P.; Mamedov, I.S.

    1989-01-01

    The methods of optimizing the transducers designed for measurements of the void fraction of two-phase flows in the channels of round and annular cross section are presented. On the basis of the analysis performed concrete solution of relatively high technical characteristics are proposed. Rated and actual characteristics of signal ranges and measurement errors are given for both sensors. Influence of the mass velocity on the void fraction of adiabatic two-phase flows is theoretically analyzed. Effects of friction and of liquid-into-vapour entrainment are shown. Calculation results are compared with the obtained experimental data for helium. Special attention is given to the specific features of the processes in channels with different cross section. 17 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  6. Power Conversion Study for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh; Richard Moore; Robert Barner

    2005-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is investigating a Brayton cycle efficiency improvement on a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as part of Generation-IV nuclear engineering research initiative. There are some technical issues to be resolved before the selection of the final design of the high temperature gas cooled reactor, called as a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is supposed to be built at the INEEL by year 2017. The technical issues are the selection of the working fluid, direct vs. indirect cycle, power cycle type, the optimized design in terms of a number of intercoolers, and others. In this paper, we investigated a number of working fluids for the power conversion loop, direct versus indirect cycle, the effect of intercoolers, and other thermal hydraulics issues. However, in this paper, we present part of the results we have obtained. HYSYS computer code was used along with a computer model developed using Visual Basic computer language

  7. Optimal design of gas adsorption refrigerators for cryogenic cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, C. K.

    1983-01-01

    The design of gas adsorption refrigerators used for cryogenic cooling in the temperature range of 4K to 120K was examined. The functional relationships among the power requirement for the refrigerator, the system mass, the cycle time and the operating conditions were derived. It was found that the precool temperature, the temperature dependent heat capacities and thermal conductivities, and pressure and temperature variations in the compressors have important impacts on the cooling performance. Optimal designs based on a minimum power criterion were performed for four different gas adsorption refrigerators and a multistage system. It is concluded that the estimates of the power required and the system mass are within manageable limits in various spacecraft environments.

  8. Gas turbine cooling modeling - Thermodynamic analysis and cycle simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordal, Kristin

    1999-02-01

    Considering that blade and vane cooling are a vital point in the studies of modern gas turbines, there are many ways to include cooling in gas turbine models. Thermodynamic methods for doing this are reviewed in this report, and, based on some of these methods, a number of model requirements are set up and a Cooled Gas Turbine Model (CGTM) for design-point calculations of cooled gas turbines is established. Thereafter, it is shown that it is possible to simulate existing gas turbines with the CGTM. Knowledge of at least one temperature in the hot part of the turbine (TET, TRIT or possibly TIT) is found to be vital for a complete heat balance over the turbine. The losses, which are caused by the mixing of coolant and main flow, are in the CGTM considered through a polytropic efficiency reduction factor S. Through the study of S, it can be demonstrated that there is more to gain from coolant reduction in a small and/or old turbine with poor aerodynamics, than there is to gain in a large, modern turbine, where the losses due to interaction between coolant and main flow are, relatively speaking, small. It is demonstrated, at the design point (TET=1360 deg C, {pi}=20) for the simple-cycle gas turbine, that heat exchanging between coolant and fuel proves to have a large positive impact on cycle efficiency, with an increase of 0.9 percentage points if all of the coolant passes through the heat exchanger. The corresponding improvement for humidified coolant is 0.8 percentage points. A design-point study for the HAT cycle shows that if all of the coolant is extracted after the humidification tower, there is a decrease in coolant requirements of 7.16 percentage points, from 19.58% to 12.52% of the compressed air, and an increase in thermal efficiency of 0.46 percentage points, from 53.46% to 53.92%. Furthermore, it is demonstrated with a TET-parameter variation, that the cooling of a simple-cycle gas turbine with humid air can have a positive effect on thermal efficiency

  9. Fuel performance and fission product behaviour in gas cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Validation of Predictive Methods for Fuel and Fission Product Behaviour was organized within the frame of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors. This International Working Group serves as a forum for exchange of information on national programmes, provides advice to the IAEA on international co-operative activities in advanced technologies of gas cooled reactors (GCRs), and supports the conduct of these activities. The objectives of this CRP were to review and document the status of the experimental data base and of the predictive methods for GCR fuel performance and fission product behaviour; and to verify and validate methodologies for the prediction of fuel performance and fission product transport. Refs, figs, tabs.

  10. Fuel performance and fission product behaviour in gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Validation of Predictive Methods for Fuel and Fission Product Behaviour was organized within the frame of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors. This International Working Group serves as a forum for exchange of information on national programmes, provides advice to the IAEA on international co-operative activities in advanced technologies of gas cooled reactors (GCRs), and supports the conduct of these activities. The objectives of this CRP were to review and document the status of the experimental data base and of the predictive methods for GCR fuel performance and fission product behaviour; and to verify and validate methodologies for the prediction of fuel performance and fission product transport

  11. Advanced In-Core Fuel Cycles for the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto

    2006-04-15

    Amid generation IV of nuclear power plants, the Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor, designed by General Atomics, is the only core with an energy conversion efficiency of 50%; the safety aspects, coupled to construction and operation costs lower than ordinary Light Water Reactors, renders the Gas Turbine - Modular Helium reactor rather unequaled. In the present studies we investigated the possibility to operate the GT-MHR with two types of fuels: LWRs waste and thorium; since thorium is made of only fertile {sup 232}Th, we tried to mix it with pure {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu; ex post facto, only uranium isotopes allow the reactor operation, that induced us to examine the possibility to use a mixture of uranium, enriched 20% in {sup 235}U, and thorium. We performed all calculations by the MCNP and MCB codes, which allowed to model the reactor in a very detailed three-dimensional geometry and to describe the nuclides transmutation in a continuous energy approach; finally, we completed our studies by verifying the influence of the major nuclear data libraries, JEFF, JENDL and ENDF/B, on the obtained results.

  12. Hot corrosion behavior of Ni-Cr-W-C alloys in impure helium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmura, Taizo; Sahira, Kensho; Sakonooka, Akihiko; Yonezawa, Noboru

    1976-01-01

    Influence of the minor alloy constituents such as Al, Mn and Si on the hot corrosion behavior of Ni-20Cr-20W-0.07C alloy was studied in 99.995% helium gas at 1000 0 C, comparing with that behavior of commercial Ni-base superalloys (Hastelloy X and Inconel 617). The low oxidizing potential in the impure helium gas usually causes selective oxidation of these elements and the growth of oxide whiskers on the surface of specimen at elevated temperature. The intergranular attack was caused by selective oxidation of Al, Si and Mn. The spalling of oxide film was restrained by addition of Mn and Si, providing tough spinel type oxide film on the surface and 'Keyes' on the oxide-matrix interface respectively. The amount and the morphology of the oxide whiskers depended on Si and Mn content. More than 0.29% of Si content without Mn always caused the growth of rather thinner whiskers with smooth surface, and the whiskers analyzed by electron diffraction patterns and EPMA to be Cr 2 O 3 containing Si. Mn addition changed the whiskers to thicker ones of spinel type oxide (MnCr 2 O 1 ) with rough surface. On the basis of these results, the optimum content of Al, Mn and Si to minimize the growth of whiskers, the intergranular attack and the spalling of oxide film was discussed. (auth.)

  13. An advanced conceptual Tokamak fusion power reactor utilizing closed cycle helium gas turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    UWMAK-III is a conceptual Tokamak reactor designed to study the potential and the problems associated with an advanced version of Tokamaks as power reactors. Design choices have been made which represent reasonable extrapolations of present technology. The major features are the noncircular plasma cross section, the use of TZM, a molybdenum based alloy, as the primary structural material, and the incorporation of a closed-cycle helium gas turbine power conversion system. A conceptual design of the turbomachinery is given together with a preliminary heat exchanger analysis that results in relatively compact designs for the generator, precooler, and intercooler. This paper contains a general description of the UWMAK-III system and a discussion of those aspects of the reactor, such as the burn cycle, the blanket design and the heat transfer analysis, which are required to form the basis for discussing the power conversion system. The authors concentrate on the power conversion system and include a parametric performance analysis, an interface and trade-off study and a description of the reference conceptual design of the closed-cycle helium gas turbine power conversion system. (Auth.)

  14. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Laboratory; Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Laboratory; Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Laboratory; Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Laboratory; Kinsey, James Carl [Idaho National Laboratory; Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Laboratory; Kumar, Akansha [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-04-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200 MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technological readiness level, licensing approach and costs.

  15. Multidisciplinary design optimization of film-cooled gas turbine blades

    OpenAIRE

    Shashishekara S. Talya; J. N. Rajadas; A. Chattopadhyay

    1999-01-01

    Design optimization of a gas turbine blade geometry for effective film cooling toreduce the blade temperature has been done using a multiobjective optimization formulation. Three optimization formulations have been used. In the first, the average blade temperature is chosen as the objective function to be minimized. An upper bound constraint has been imposed on the maximum blade temperature. In the second, the maximum blade temperature is chosen as the objective function to be minimized with ...

  16. The status of graphite development for gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The meeting was convened by the IAEA on the recommendation of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors. It was attended by 61 participants from 6 countries. The meeting covered the following subjects: overview of national programs; design criteria, fracture mechanisms and component test; materials development and properties; non-destructive examination, inspection and surveillance. The participants presented 33 papers on behalf of their countries. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs, tabs, photos and diagrams

  17. Incoloy 800 stands up to radiation and corrosion in high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Incoloy 800 has been selected for heat exchangers in helium cooled nuclear reactor prototypes for exposure to 350 to 800 0 C helium and high temperature high purity water and steam. 304H stainless steel used in heat exchangers in original design cracked in the superheater area, bellows and tubing after static pressure tests but before exposure to steam. Residual stress, chlorides, and oxygen were deduced to have caused the failures

  18. Composite beryllium-ceramics breeder pin elements for a gas cooled solid blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Chevreau, G.; Gervaise, F.; Proust, E.

    1986-06-01

    Helium coolant have main advantages compared to water for solid blankets. But limitations exist too and the development of attractive helium cooled blankets based on breeder pin assemblies has been essentially made possible by the derivation from recent CEA neutronic studies of an optimized composite beryllium/ceramics breeder arrangement. Description of the proposed toroidal blanket layout for Net is made together with the analysis of its main performance. Merits of the considered composite Be/ceramics breeder elements are discussed

  19. Experimental investigations of flow distribution in coolant system of Helium-Cooled-Pebble-Bed Test Blanket Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilić, M.; Schlindwein, G., E-mail: georg.schlindwein@kit.edu; Meyder, R.; Kuhn, T.; Albrecht, O.; Zinn, K.

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Experimental investigations of flow distribution in HCPB TBM are presented. • Flow rates in channels close to the first wall are lower than nominal ones. • Flow distribution in central chambers of manifold 2 is close to the nominal one. • Flow distribution in the whole manifold 3 agrees well with the nominal one. - Abstract: This paper deals with investigations of flow distribution in the coolant system of the Helium-Cooled-Pebble-Bed Test Blanket Module (HCPB TBM) for ITER. The investigations have been performed by manufacturing and testing of an experimental facility named GRICAMAN. The facility involves the upper poloidal half of HCPB TBM bounded at outlets of the first wall channels, at outlet of by-pass pipe and at outlets of cooling channels in breeding units. In this way, the focus is placed on the flow distribution in two mid manifolds of the 4-manifold system: (i) manifold 2 to which outlets of the first wall channels and inlet of by-pass pipe are attached and (ii) manifold 3 which supplies channels in breeding units with helium coolant. These two manifolds are connected with cooling channels in vertical/horizontal grids and caps. The experimental facility has been built keeping the internal structure of manifold 2 and manifold 3 exactly as designed in HCPB TBM. The cooling channels in stiffening grids, caps and breeding units are substituted by so-called equivalent channels which provide the same hydraulic resistance and inlet/outlet conditions, but have significantly simpler geometry than the real channels. Using the conditions of flow similarity, the air pressurized at 0.3 MPa and at ambient temperature has been used as working fluid instead of HCPB TBM helium coolant at 8 MPa and an average temperature of 370 °C. The flow distribution has been determined by flow rate measurements at each of 28 equivalent channels, while the pressure distribution has been obtained measuring differential pressure at more than 250 positions. The

  20. The Formation and Physical Origin of Highly Ionized Cooling Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordoloi, Rongmon [MIT-Kavli Center for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA, 02139 (United States); Wagner, Alexander Y. [University of Tsukuba, Center for Computational Sciences, Tennodai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Heckman, Timothy M.; Norman, Colin A., E-mail: bordoloi@mit.edu, E-mail: bordoloi@mit.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, John Hopkins University, 21218, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-10-20

    We present a simple model that explains the origin of warm, diffuse gas seen primarily as highly ionized absorption-line systems in the spectra of background sources. We predict the observed column densities of several highly ionized transitions such as O vi, O vii, Ne viii, N v, and Mg x, and we present a unified comparison of the model predictions with absorption lines seen in the Milky Way disk, Milky Way halo, starburst galaxies, the circumgalactic medium, and the intergalactic medium at low and high redshifts. We show that diffuse gas seen in such diverse environments can be simultaneously explained by a simple model of radiatively cooling gas. We show that most such absorption-line systems are consistent with being collisionally ionized, and we estimate the maximum-likelihood temperature of the gas in each observation. This model satisfactorily explains why O vi is regularly observed around star-forming low- z L* galaxies, and why N v is rarely seen around the same galaxies. We further present some consequences of this model in quantifying the dynamics of the cooling gas around galaxies and predict the shock velocities associated with such flows. A unique strength of this model is that while it has only one free (but physically well-constrained) parameter, it nevertheless successfully reproduces the available data on O vi absorbers in the interstellar, circumgalactic, intragroup, and intergalactic media, as well as the available data on other absorption lines from highly ionized species.

  1. Gas Breakdown of Radio Frequency Glow Discharges in Helium at near Atmospheric Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xinkun; Xu Jinzhou; Cui Tongfei; Guo Ying; Zhang Jing; Shi Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    A one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model was developed for radio frequency glow discharge in helium at near atmospheric pressure, and was employed to study the gas breakdown characteristics in terms of breakdown voltage. The effective secondary electron emission coefficient and the effective electric field for ions were demonstrated to be important for determining the breakdown voltage of radio frequency glow discharge at near atmospheric pressure. The constant of A was estimated to be 64±4 cm −1 Torr −1 , which was proportional to the first Townsend coefficient and could be employed to evaluate the gas breakdown voltage. The reduction in the breakdown voltage of radio frequency glow discharge with excitation frequency was studied and attributed to the electron trapping effect in the discharge gap

  2. Behaviour of gas cooled reactor fuel under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    The Specialists Meeting on Behaviour of Gas Cooled Reactor Fuel under Accident Conditions was convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency on the recommendation of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an international forum for the review of the development status and for the discussion on the behaviour of gas cooled reactor fuel under accident conditions and to identify areas in which additional research and development are still needed and where international co-operation would be beneficial for all involved parties. The meeting was attended by 45 participants from France, Germany, Japan, Switzerland, the Union of Soviet Socialists Republics, the United Kingdom, the United States of America, CEC and the IAEA. The meeting was subdivided into five technical sessions: Summary of Current Research and Development Programmes for Fuel; Fuel Manufacture and Quality Control; Safety Requirements; Modelling of Fission Product Release - Part I and Part II; Irradiation Testing/Operational Experience with Fuel Elements; Behaviour at Depressurization, Core Heat-up, Power Transients; Water/Steam Ingress - Part I and Part II. 22 papers were presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. At the end of the meeting a round table discussion was held on Directions for Future R and D Work and International Co-operation. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. Risk Based Inspection of Gas-Cooling Heat Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Priyanta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available On October 2013, Pertamina Hulu Energi Offshore North West Java (PHE – ONWJ platform personnel found 93 leaking tubes locations in the finfan coolers/ gas-cooling heat exchanger. After analysis had been performed, the crack in the tube strongly indicate that stress corrosion cracking was occurred by chloride. Chloride stress corrosion cracking (CLSCC is the cracking occurred by the combined influence of tensile stress and a corrosive environment. CLSCC is the one of the most common reasons why austenitic stainless steel pipework or tube and vessels deteriorate in the chemical processing, petrochemical industries and maritime industries. In this thesis purpose to determine the appropriate inspection planning for two main items (tubes and header box in the gas-cooling heat exchanger using risk based inspection (RBI method. The result, inspection of the tubes must be performed on July 6, 2024 and for the header box inspection must be performed on July 6, 2025. In the end, RBI method can be applicated to gas-cooling heat exchanger. Because, risk on the tubes can be reduced from 4.537 m2/year to 0.453 m2/year. And inspection planning for header box can be reduced from 4.528 m2/year to 0.563 m2/year.

  4. Gas-cooled reactor thermal-hydraulics using CAST3M and CRONOS2 codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studer, E.; Coulon, N.; Stietel, A.; Damian, F.; Golfier, H.; Raepsaet, X.

    2003-01-01

    The CEA R and D program on advanced Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR) relies on different concepts: modular High Temperature Reactor (HTR), its evolution dedicated to hydrogen production (Very High Temperature Reactor) and Gas Cooled Fast Reactors (GCFR). Some key safety questions are related to decay heat removal during potential accident. This is strongly connected to passive natural convection (including gas injection of Helium, CO 2 , Nitrogen or Argon) or forced convection using active safety systems (gas blowers, heat exchangers). To support this effort, thermal-hydraulics computer codes will be necessary tools to design, enhance the performance and ensure a high safety level of the different reactors. Accurate and efficient modeling of heat transfer by conduction, convection or thermal radiation as well as energy storage are necessary requirements to obtain a high level of confidence in the thermal-hydraulic simulations. To achieve that goal a thorough validation process has to ve conducted. CEA's CAST3M code dedicated to GCR thermal-hydraulics has been validated against different test cases: academic interaction between natural convection and thermal radiation, small scale in-house THERCE experiments and large scale High Temperature Test Reactor benchmarks such as HTTR-VC benchmark. Coupling with neutronics is also an important modeling aspect for the determination of neutronic parameters such as neutronic coefficient (Doppler, moderator,...), critical position of control rods...CEA's CAST3M and CRONOS2 computer codes allow this coupling and a first example of coupled thermal-hydraulics/neutronics calculations has been performed. Comparison with experimental data will be the next step with High Temperature Test Reactor experimental results at nominal power

  5. Numerical examination of temperature control in helium-cooled high flux test module of IFMIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebara, Shinji; Yokomine, Takehiko; Shimizu, Akihiko

    2007-01-01

    For long term irradiation of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), test specimens are needed to retain constant temperature to avoid change of its irradiation characteristics. The constant temperatures control is one of the most challenging issues for the IFMIF test facilities. We have proposed a new concept of test module which is capable of precisely measuring temperature, keeping uniform temperature with enhanced cooling performance. In the system according to the new design, cooling performances and temperature distributions of specimens were examined numerically under diverse conditions. Some transient behaviors corresponding to the prescribed temperature control mode were perseveringly simulated. It was confirmed that the thermal characteristics of the new design satisfied the severe requirement of IFMIF

  6. Testing and analyses of a high temperature duct for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, W.E.; Roberge, A.; Felten, P.; Bastien, R.

    1979-01-01

    A 0.6 scale model of a steam cycle gas-cooled reactor high temperature duct was tested in a closed loop helium facility. The object of the test series was to determine: 1) the thermal effects of gas permeation within the thermal barrier, 2) the plastic deformation of the metallic components, and 3) the thermal performance of the fibrous insulation. A series of tests was performed with thermal cyclings from 100 0 C to 760 0 C at 50 atmospheres until the system thermal performance had stabilized hence enabling predictions for the reactor life. Additional tests were made to assess permeation by deliberately simulating sealing weld failures thereby allowing gas flow by-pass within the primary thermal barrier. After 100 cycles the entire primary structure was found to have performed without structural failure. Due to high pressures exerted by the insulation on the cover plates and a design oversight, the thin seal sheets were unable to expand in an anticipated manner. Local buckling resulted. Pre and post test metallurgical analyses were conducted on the Hastelloy-X structures and reference specimens. The results gave evidence of aging in the form of noticeable changes in room temperature tensile and reduction in area parameters. The Hastelloy-X welds exhibited greater changes in properties due to thermal aging. The antifriction coating (Cr 3 C 2 ) performed well without spallation or excessive wear. (orig.)

  7. Development of a nuclear steam generator system for gas-cooled reactors for application in oil sands extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.; Hart, R.; Lazic, L.

    2009-01-01

    Canada has vast energy reserves in the Oil Sands regions of Alberta and Saskatchewan. Present extraction technologies, such as strip mining, where oil deposits are close to the surface, and Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) technologies for deeper deposits consume significant amounts of energy to produce the bitumen and upgraded synthetic crude oil. Studies have been performed to assess the feasibility of using nuclear reactors as primary energy sources to produce, in particular the steam required for the SAGD deeper deposit extraction process. Presently available reactors fall short of meeting the requirements, in two areas: the steam produced in a 'standard' reactor is too low in pressure and temperature for the SAGD process. Requirements can be for steam as high as 12MPa pressure with superheat; and, 'standard' reactors are too large in total output. Ideally, reactors of output in the range of 400 to 500 MWth, in modules are better suited to Oil Sands applications. The above two requirements can be met using gas-cooled reactors. Generally, newer generation gas-cooled reactors have been designed for power generation, using Brayton Cycle gas turbines run directly from the heated reactor coolant (helium). Where secondary steam is required, heat recovery steam generators have been used. In this paper, a steam generating system is described which uses the high temperature helium from the reactor directly for steam generation purposes, with sufficient quantities of steam produced to allow for SAGD steam injection, power generation using a steam turbine-generator, and with potential secondary energy supply for other purposes such as hydrogen production for upgrading, and environmental remediation processes. It is assumed that the reactors will be in one central location, run by a utility type organization, providing process steam and electricity to surrounding Oil Sands projects, so steam produced is at very high pressure (12 MPa), with superheat, in order to

  8. [Feasibility investigation of hydrogen instead of helium as carrier gas in the determination of five organophosphorus pesticides by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenxue; Zhou, Shixue

    2015-01-01

    Helium is almost the only choosable carrier gas used in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A mixed standard solution of five organophosphorus pesticides was analyzed by using GC-MS, and hydrogen or helium as carrier gas, so as to study the feasibility of hydrogen instead of helium as carrier gas for the determination of organophosphorus pesticides. Combining a mass spectrum database built by ourselves, the results were deconvolved and identified by Automated Mass Spectral Deconvolution & Identification System (AMDIS32), a software belonging to the workstation of the instrument. Then, the statistical software, IBM SPSS Statistics 19.0 was used for the clustering analysis of the data. The results indicated that when hydrogen was used as carrier gas, the peaks of the pesticides detected were slightly earlier than those when helium used as carrier gas, but the resolutions of the chromatographic peaks were lower, and the fraction good indices (Frac. Good) were lower, too. When hydrogen was used as carrier gas, the signals of the pesticides were unstable, the measuring accuracies of the pesticides were reduced too, and even more, some compounds were undetectable. Therefore, considering the measuring accuracy, the signal stability, and the safety, etc., hydrogen should be cautiously used as carrier gas in the determination of organophosphorus pesticides by GC-MS.

  9. There is no explosion risk associated with superfluid Helium in the LHC cooling system

    CERN Document Server

    Fairbairn, Malcolm

    2008-01-01

    We evaluate speculation about the possibility of a dangerous release of energy within the liquid Helium of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) cryogenic system due to the occurrence of a "Bose-Nova". Bose-Novae are radial bursts of rapidly moving atoms which can occur when a Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) undergoes a collapse due the interatomic potential being deliberately made attractive using a magnetic field close to the Feshbach resonance. Liquid 4He has a monatomic structure with s-wave electrons, zero nuclear spin, no hyperfine splitting, and as a consequence no Feshbach resonance which would allow one to change its normally repulsive interactions to be attractive. Because of this, a Bose-Nova style collapse of 4He is impossible. Additional speculations concerning cold fusion during these events are easily dismissed using the usual arguments about the Coulomb barrier at low temperatures, and are not needed to explain the Bose-Einstein condensate Bose-Nova phenomenon. We conclude that that there is no physi...

  10. Diffusion-controlled regime of surface-wave-produced plasmas in helium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berndt, J; Makasheva, K; Schlueter, H; Shivarova, A

    2002-01-01

    The study presents a numerical fluid-plasma model of diffusion-controlled surface-wave-sustained discharges in helium gas. The self-consistent behaviour of the discharge based on the interrelation between plasma density and Θ, the power absorbed on average by one electron, is described. The nonlinear process of step ionization in the charged particle balance equation is the main factor, which ensures the self-consistency. However, it is shown that in helium discharges, the ionization frequencies enter the dependence of Θ on the plasma density also through the ambipolar-diffusion coefficient. Results at two different values of the gas pressure and of the wave frequency are discussed. The lower value of the gas pressure is chosen according to the condition to have a pure diffusion-controlled regime without interference with a transition to the free-fall regime. The boundary condition for the ion flux at the wall sheath is used for determination of the value of μ, the quantity denoting the degree of the radial plasma-density inhomogeneity which, together with the electron-neutral elastic collision frequency, influences the wave propagation characteristics. The two values of the wave frequency chosen provide descriptions of high-frequency and microwave discharges. The model results in the self-consistent structure of the discharge: interrelated variations along the discharge length of wavenumber, space damping rate, Θ, plasma density and electron temperature. The power necessary for sustaining discharges of a given length is also calculated. Comparisons with argon discharges are shown

  11. Testing and analyses of a high temperature thermal barrier for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, W.E.; Betts, W.S.; Felten, P.

    1979-01-01

    A full size, multi-panel section of a thermal barrier system was fabricated from a nickel-base superalloy and a combination of fibrous blanket insulation materials for specific application in a steam cycle gas-cooled nuclear reactor. The 2.4 m square array was representative of the sidewall of the lower core outlet plenum and included coverplates, attachments, seals, and a simulated water-cooled liner. Testing was conducted in a reactor grade, helium-filled chamber at 816 0 C for 100 hours, which established a normal (baseline) condition; 982 0 C for 10 hours, which satisfied an emergency condition; 1093 0 C for 1 hour, which simulated a faulted condition; and 1260 0 C, which was a non-design condition test to demonstrate the temperature overshoot capability of the system. Post-test examination indicated: (1) an acceptable performance by the anti-friction chromium carbide (Cr 3 C 2 ) coating; (2) no significant galling between non-coated surfaces; (3) no distortion of attachment fixtures; (4) predictable coverplate deflection during the design conditions testing (normal, emergency, and faulted); and (5) considerable plastic deformation resulting from the near-incipient melting temperature. (orig.)

  12. Interim Status Report on the Design of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, K. D.

    2005-01-01

    Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with on outlet temperature of 850 C at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in participating in research related to the development of the GFR. These are Euratom (European Commission), France, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Of these, Euratom (including the United Kingdom), France, and Japan have active research activities with respect to the GFR. The research includes GFR design and safety, and fuels/in-core materials/fuel cycle projects. This report outlines the current design status of the GFR, and includes work done in the areas mentioned above

  13. Current design efforts for the gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, K.D.

    2005-01-01

    Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFC I) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GCFR: a helium-cooled, direct Brayton cycle power conversion system that will operate with an outlet temperature of 850 C at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in participating in research related to the development of the GCFR. These are EURATOM (European Commission), France, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Of these, EURATOM (including the United Kingdom), France, Japan, and Switzerland have active research activities with respect to the GCFR. The research includes GCFR design and safety, and fuels/in-core materials/fuel cycle projects. This paper outlines the current design status of the GCFR, and includes work done in the areas mentioned above. (Author)

  14. Design and performance study of the helium-cooled T-tube divertor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihli, T.; Raffray, A.R.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Shin, S.

    2007-01-01

    The ARIES-CS study has been launched with the goal of developing through physics and engineering optimization an attractive power plant concept based on a compact stellarator configuration. The study included an effort to characterize the divertor location and corresponding heat load distribution, and to develop a He-cooled divertor concept that could accommodate a heat flux of at least 10 MW/m 2 , and that would integrate well with the other power core components. This paper describes the design study of this divertor concept, which, although developed for a compact stellarator, is well suited for a tokamak configuration also

  15. Development of THYDE-HTGR: computer code for transient thermal-hydraulics of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Masashi; Hada, Kazuhiko

    1990-04-01

    The THYDE-HTGR code has been developed for transient thermal-hydraulic analyses of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors, based on the THYDE-W code. THYDE-W is a code developed at JAERI for the simulation of Light Water Reactor plant dynamics during various types of transients including loss-of-coolant accidents. THYDE-HTGR solves the conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy for compressible gas, or single-phase or two-phase flow. The major code modification from THYDE-W is to treat helium loops as well as water loops. In parallel to this, modification has been made for the neutron kinetics to be applicable to helium-cooled graphite-moderated reactors, for the heat transfer models to be applicable to various types of heat exchangers, and so forth. In order to assess the validity of the modifications, analyses of some of the experiments conducted at the High Temperature Test Loop of ERANS have been performed. In this report, the models applied in THYDE-HTGR are described focusing on the present modifications and the results from the assessment calculations are presented. (author)

  16. Heat transfer problems in gas-cooled solid blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    In all fusion reactors using the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle, a large fraction approximately 80 percent of the fusion energy will be released as approximately 14 MeV neutrons which must be slowed down in a relatively thick blanket surrounding the plasma, thereby, converting their kinetic energy to high temperature heat which can be continuously removed by a coolant stream and converted in part to electricity in a conventional power turbine. Because of the primary goal of achieving minimum radioactivity, to date Brookhaven blanket concepts have been restricted to the use of some form of solid lithium, with inert gas-cooling and in some design cases, water-cooling of the shell structure. Aluminum and graphite have been identified as very promising structural materials for fusion blankets, and conceptual designs based on these materials have been made. Depending on the thermal loading on the ''first'' wall which surrounds the plasma as well as blanket design, heat transfer problems may be noticeably different in gas-cooled solid blankets. Approaches to solution of heat removal problems as well as explanation of: (a) the after-heat problems in blankets; (b) tritium breeding in solids; and (c) materials selection for radiation shields relative to the minimum activity blanket efforts at Brookhaven are discussed

  17. Verification of Thermal Models of Internally Cooled Gas Turbine Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Shevchenko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation of temperature field of cooled turbine blades is a required element of gas turbine engine design process. The verification is usually performed on the basis of results of test of full-size blade prototype on a gas-dynamic test bench. A method of calorimetric measurement in a molten metal thermostat for verification of a thermal model of cooled blade is proposed in this paper. The method allows obtaining local values of heat flux in each point of blade surface within a single experiment. The error of determination of local heat transfer coefficients using this method does not exceed 8% for blades with radial channels. An important feature of the method is that the heat load remains unchanged during the experiment and the blade outer surface temperature equals zinc melting point. The verification of thermal-hydraulic model of high-pressure turbine blade with cooling allowing asymmetrical heat removal from pressure and suction sides was carried out using the developed method. An analysis of heat transfer coefficients confirmed the high level of heat transfer in the leading edge, whose value is comparable with jet impingement heat transfer. The maximum of the heat transfer coefficients is shifted from the critical point of the leading edge to the pressure side.

  18. Review of RSG-GAS secondary cooling pump performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsahala, Y.B.

    1999-01-01

    The control system of RSG-GAS secondary pump is the study for the operation existence of RSG-GAS secondary pump. The research is about characteristic of the secondary pump and its control system. The measuring of characteristic parameter of secondary cooling pump was being done while the pump running. The pump was loading with capacity 1950 m3/hr. with ambient temperature 28.5 oC. The fault effect of public grid (PLN) such as the fluctuation of both voltage and frequency likes voltage drops (dip). Supply block out that effect of the electric motor performances directly will be analyzed. How far those faults will effect the overall performance of secondary cooling system. Analyzing. Will be done according to the control system was installed. Has be done to find the direct effects of the motor performances against the motor rotation fluctuation which run from 1450 rpm to 1475 rpm. The using of start-delta starting method with delay time about 6 seconds, is enough or not to reduce the inrush starting current also analyzed in this paper. From the research can be obtained that in the steady state condition , the electric motor runs with both power and current are still under tolerances permitted. According to the analyzed data above, it will be consider that the control system of secondary pump would be modified or not. Therefore the analyzed data can show the characteristic curve of the secondary cooling system performance

  19. A novel nuclear combined power and cooling system integrating high temperature gas-cooled reactor with ammonia–water cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Chending; Zhao, Fuqiang; Zhang, Na

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a novel nuclear ammonia–water power and cooling cogeneration system. • The high temperature reactor is inherently safe, with exhaust heat fully recovered. • The thermal performances are improved compared with nuclear combined cycle. • The base case attains an energy efficiency of 69.9% and exergy efficiency of 72.5%. • Energy conservation and emission reduction are achieved in this cogeneration way. - Abstract: A nuclear ammonia–water power and refrigeration cogeneration system (NAPR) has been proposed and analyzed in this paper. It consists of a closed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) topping Brayton cycle and a modified ammonia water power/refrigeration combined bottoming cycle (APR). The HTGR is an inherently safe reactor, and thus could be stable, flexible and suitable for various energy supply situation, and its exhaust heat is fully recovered by the mixture of ammonia and water in the bottoming cycle. To reduce exergy losses and enhance outputs, the ammonia concentrations of the bottoming cycle working fluid are optimized in both power and refrigeration processes. With the HTGR of 200 MW thermal capacity and 900 °C/70 bar reactor-core-outlet helium, the system achieves 88.8 MW net electrical output and 9.27 MW refrigeration capacity, and also attains an energy efficiency of 69.9% and exergy efficiency of 72.5%, which are higher by 5.3%-points and 2.6%-points as compared with the nuclear combined cycle (NCC, like a conventional gas/steam power-only combined cycle while the topping cycle is a closed HTGR Brayton cycle) with the same nuclear energy input. Compared with conventional separate power and refrigeration generation systems, the fossil fuel saving (based on CH 4 ) and CO 2 emission reduction of base-case NAPR could reach ∼9.66 × 10 4 t/y and ∼26.6 × 10 4 t/y, respectively. The system integration accomplishes the safe and high-efficiency utilization of nuclear energy by power and refrigeration

  20. Single-jet gas cooling of in-beam foils or specimens: Prediction of the convective heat-transfer coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn, Gideon; Vermeulen, Christiaan

    2018-05-01

    An experiment was designed to study the effect of the jet direction on convective heat-transfer coefficients in single-jet gas cooling of a small heated surface, such as typically induced by an accelerated ion beam on a thin foil or specimen. The hot spot was provided using a small electrically heated plate. Heat-transfer calculations were performed using simple empirical methods based on dimensional analysis as well as by means of an advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The results provide an explanation for the observed turbulent cooling of a double-foil, Havar beam window with fast-flowing helium, located on a target station for radionuclide production with a 66 MeV proton beam at a cyclotron facility.

  1. Static and transient characteristics of the shaft seal system for helium gas circulator (Part 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morohoshi, S.; Saki, K.; Nemoto, M.; Taniguchi, S.; Sugimoto, A.; Kojima, M.

    1982-01-01

    A development program of the shaft seal system for the helium circulator supported by water lubricated bearings is presented. A seal system simulating tester and a computer program which can simulate the transient characteristics of a buffer gas seal system were newly introduced, and an investigation was performed experimentally and analytically of the characteristics of water and gas seals and of the buffer gas seal system including the control system. Main results are as follows: (1) Water seals were especially investigated in detail, and it was found that turbulence in water flow through seal clearance and deformation of seal components affected the leakage characteristics of water seals. They should be considered not only to make safety design but also to get optimum design of the seal system. (2) The calculation method for transient response of the buffer gas seal system including the control system was developed. This digital simulating method can well simulate transients encountered in the tester, and it would make a powerful tool for developing a safe seal system under steady state operation conditions and at depressurization accidents in a reactor

  2. Testing and analyses of a high temperature duct for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, W.E.; Roberge, A.; Felten, P.; Bastien, D.

    1979-01-01

    A 0.6 scale model of a steam cycle gas-cooled reactor high temperature duct was tested in a closed loop helium facility. The object of the test series was to determine: 1) the thermal effects of gas permeation within the thermal barrier, 2) the plastic deformation of the metallic components, and 3) the thermal performance of the fibrous insulation. A series of tests was performed with thermal cyclings from 100 0 C to 760 0 C at 50 atmospheres until the system thermal performance had stabilized hence enabling predictions for the reactor life. Additional tests were made to assess permeation by deliberately simulating sealing weld failures thereby allowing gas flow by-pass within the primary thermal barrier. After 100 cycles the entire primary structure was found to have performed without structural failure. Due to high pressures exerted by the insulation on the cover plates and a design oversight, the thin seal sheets were unable to expand in an anticipated manner. Local buckling resulted. The insulation retained an acceptable degree of resiliency. However, some fiber damage was observed within both the high and low temperature insulation blankets. A thermal analysis was conducted to correlate the hot duct heat transfer results with those obtained from the analytical techniques used for the HTGR design using a computer thermal model representative of the duct and test setup. The thermal performance of the insulation, the temperature gradient through the structural components, the heating load to the cooling system and the permeation flow effect on heat transfer were verified. Exellent correlation between the experimental data and the analytical techniques were obtained

  3. Contributions to the neutronic analysis of a gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-del-Campo, Cecilia; Reyes-Ramirez, Ricardo; Francois, Juan-Luis; Reinking-Cejudo, Arturo G.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Differences on reactivity with MCNPX and TRIPOLI-4 are negligible. → Fuel lattice and core criticality calculations were done. → A higher Doppler coefficient than coolant density coefficient. → Zirconium carbide is a better reflector than silicon carbide. → Adequate active height, radial size and reflector thickness were obtained. - Abstract: In this work the Monte Carlo codes MCNPX and TRIPOLI-4 were used to perform the criticality calculations of the fuel assembly and the core configuration of a gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) concept, currently in development. The objective is to make contributions to the neutronic analysis of a gas-cooled fast reactor. In this study the fuel assembly is based on a hexagonal lattice of fuel-pins. The materials used are uranium and plutonium carbide as fuel, silicon carbide as cladding, and helium gas as coolant. Criticality calculations were done for a fuel assembly where the axial reflector thickness was varied in order to find the optimal thickness. In order to determine the best material to be used as a reflector, in the reactor core with neutrons of high energy spectrum, criticality calculations were done for three reflector materials: zirconium carbide, silicon carbide and natural uranium. It was found that the zirconium carbide provides the best neutron reflection. Criticality calculations using different active heights were done to determine the optimal height, and the reflector thickness was adjusted. Core criticality calculations were performed with different radius sizes to determine the active radial dimension of the core. A negative temperature coefficient of reactivity was verified for the fuel. The effect on reactivity produced by changes in the coolant density was also evaluated. We present the main neutronic characteristics of a preliminary fuel and core designs for the GFR concept. ENDF-VI cross-sections libraries were used in both the MCNPX and TRIPOLI-4 codes, and we verified that the

  4. Process for measuring the helium residual gas pressure and circuit for carrying out the process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, C.; Cesnak, L.

    1983-01-01

    In cryotechnic devices, the quality of the thermal insulation can be monitored by checking the pressure of the residual gas. A process is proposed in which a thin super-conducting wire or a superconducting layer acting as vacuum sensor has a heating pulse reaching the critical current applied to it, which produces a local normal conduction zone. The vacuum sensor has a measuring current of constant amount applied to it, which causes a voltage drop on its resistance during the time in which the normal conduction zone exists, the cooling time. The pressure of the residual gas is a function of the integral of the voltage drop and is measured by integrating the voltage during the cooling time. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Flow characteristics of helium gas going through a 90°elbow for flow measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Beibei; Wang Shiming; Yang Xingtuan; Jiang Shengyao

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulation is performed to investigate the pressure distribution of He-gas under high pressure and high temperature for 10MW High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR-10). Experimental measurements of wall pressure through a self-built test system are carried out to validate the credibility of the computational approach. We present a study for complex flow structure of He-gas using the case of an structurally 90°elbow that is reconstructed from the steam generator of HTGR-10. Pressure measurement of inner wall and outer wall is used to compare with the numerical results. Distribution of wall pressure of He-gas flowing through 90° elbow based on the numerical and experimental approaches show good agreement. Wall pressure distribution of eight cross sections of the elbow is given in detail to represent the entire region of elbow. (author)

  6. Experimental study of the density of the helium-nitrogen gas system at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milyutin, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    At the Department of TOT, an experimental setup was created to measure the density of a binary gas system from 100 to 300 K and pressures up to 16 MPa and with any mixture compositions. Experimental density for the helium-nitrogen system were determined by the piezometer of constant volume method. The amount of substance in the piezometer was measured by volumetric method. In this setup, the mixture of He - N2 was prepared in a special mixer for a series of p-v-T experiments, the concentration was determined by calculation using the equations of state of pure components. In the experiment, mixtures were prepared with molar concentrations, lying close to the range: 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8.

  7. Emission profiles of K-He exciplexes in cold helium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allard, N F

    2012-01-01

    Emission spectra of exciplexes composed of a light alkali atom in the first excited state and 4 He atoms have been observed in cryogenic gas in the spectral range from the atomic D lines to 6300 cm −1 . A unified semi-classical theory of line broadening has been used to determine the total profile from the center to the far wings of emission profiles of potassium perturbed by helium at low temperatures and high He density. The agreement of the theoretical peak positions of K*He n exciplexes compared to the experimental determinations is fairly good. Such comparisons provide a critical test of the calculated molecular potentials and the relevance of the theoretical approach which has been used.

  8. Transient heat transfer for helium gas flowing over a horizontal cylinder with exponentially increasing heat input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qiusheng; Fukuda, Katsuya

    2003-01-01

    The transient heat transfer coefficients for forced convection flow of helium gas over a horizontal cylinder were measured under wide experimental conditions. The platinum cylinder with a diameter of 1.0 mm was used as test heater and heated by electric current with an exponentially increasing heat input of Q 0 exp(t/τ). The gas flow velocities ranged from 5 to 35 m/s, the gas temperatures ranged from 25 to 80degC, and the periods of heat generation rate, τ, ranged from 40 ms to 20 s. The surface superheat and heat flux increase exponentially as the heat generation rate increases with the exponential function. It was clarified that the heat transfer coefficient approaches the quasi-steady-state one for the period τ longer than about 1 s, and it becomes higher for the period shorter than around 1 s. The transient heat transfer shows less dependence on the gas flowing velocity when the period becomes very shorter. The gas temperature in this study shows little influence on the heat transfer coefficient. Semi-empirical correlation for quasi-steady-state heat transfer was obtained based on the experimental data. The ratios of transient Nusselt number Nu tr to quasi-steady-state Nusselt number Nu st at various periods, flow velocities, and gas temperatures were obtained. The heat transfer shifts to the quasi-steady-state heat transfer for longer periods and shifts to the transient heat transfer for shorter periods at the same flow velocity. It also approaches the quasi-steady-state one for higher flow velocity at the same period. Empirical correlation for transient heat transfer was also obtained based on the experimental data. (author)

  9. Two phase cooling for superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, P.H.; Gibson, G.A.; Green, M.A.; Ross, R.R.; Smits, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    Comments on the use of two phase helium in a closed circuit tubular cooling system and some results obtained with the TPC superconducting magnet are given. Theoretical arguments and experimental evidence are given against a previously suggested method to determine helium two phase flow regimes. Two methods to reduce pressure in the magnet cooling tubes during quenches are discussed; 1) lowering the density of helium in the magnet cooling tubes and 2) proper location of pressure relief valves. Some techniques used to protect the refrigerator from too much cold return gas are also mentioned

  10. Two phase cooling for superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, P.H.; Gibson, G.A.; Green, M.A.; Ross, R.R.; Smits, R.G.; Taylor, J.D.; Watt, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Comments on the use of two phase helium in a closed circuit tubular cooling system and some results obtained with the TPC superconducting magnet are given. Theoretical arguments and experimental evidence are given against a previously suggested method to determine helium two phase flow regimes. Two methods to reduce pressure in the magnet cooling tubes during quenches are discussed; (1) lowering the density of helium in the magnet cooling tubes and (2) proper location of pressure relief valves. Some techniques used to protect the refrigerator from too much cold return gas are also mentioned. 10 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  11. Gas-cooled reactor application for a university campus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colak, Ue.; Kadiroghlu, O.K.; Soekmen, C.N.; Schmitt, H.

    1991-01-01

    Large urban areas with unfavourable topographic and meteorological conditions suffer severe air pollution during the winter months. Use of low grade lignites, imported higher quality coal or imported fuel oil are the sources of air pollution in the form of sulphur dioxide, fly ash and soot. Large housing complexes or old and historical locations within the city are in need of pollution free centralized district heating systems. Natural gas imported from the Soviet Union is a solution for this problem. Lack of gas distribution network for high pressure gas within the city is the main bottle-neck for the heating systems utilizing natural gas. Concern of the safety of flammable high pressure gas circulating within the city is another drawback for the natural gas heating systems. Nuclear district heating is an environmentally viable option worth looking into it. Localized urban nuclear heating is an interesting solution for large urban areas with old and historical character. The results of a feasibility study on the HGR application for the Hacettepe University presented here, summarizes the concept of gas-cooled heating reactors specially designed for urban centers. The inherently safe characteristics of the pebble bed heating reactor makes localized urban nuclear heating a viable alternative to other heat sources. An economical analysis of various heat sources with equal power levels is done for the Beytepe campus of Hacettepe University in Ankara. Under special boundary conditions, the price for heat generation can be much lower for nuclear heating with GHR 20 than for hard coal or fuel oil. It is also possible that if the price escalation rate for natural gas exceeds 3%, then nuclear heating with GHR can be more competitive. It is concluded that the nuclear heating of Beytepe campus with a GHR 20 is feasible and economical. (author) 3 figs., 5 refs

  12. Thermodynamic analysis of turbine blade cooling on the performance of gas turbine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarabchi, K.; Shokri, M.

    2002-01-01

    Turbine inlet temperature strongly affects gas turbine performance. Today blade cooling technologies facilitate the use of higher inlet temperatures. Of course blade cooling causes some thermodynamic penalties that destroys to some extent the positive effect of higher inlet temperatures. This research aims to model and evaluate the performance of gas turbine cycle with air cooled turbine. In this study internal and transpiration cooling methods has been investigated and the penalties as the result of gas flow friction, cooling air throttling, mixing of cooling air flow with hot gas flow, and irreversible heat transfer have been considered. In addition, it is attempted to consider any factor influencing actual conditions of system in the analysis. It is concluded that penalties due to blade cooling decrease as permissible temperature of the blade surface increases. Also it is observed that transpiration method leads to better performance of gas turbine comparing to internal cooling method

  13. Gas-cooled reactor coolant circulator and blower technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    In the previous 17 meetings held within the framework of the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors, a wide variety of topics and components have been addressed, but the San Diego meeting represented the first time that a group of specialists had been convened to discuss circulator and blower related technology. A total of 20 specialists from 6 countries attended the meeting in which 15 technical papers were presented in 5 sessions: circulator operating experience I and II (6 papers); circulator design considerations I and II (6 papers); bearing technology (3 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Refueling system for the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawke, B.C.

    1980-05-01

    Criteria specifically related to the handling of Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) fuel are briefly reviewed, and the most significant requirements with which the refueling system must comply are discussed. Each component of the refueling system is identified, and a functional description of the fuel handling machine is presented. An illustrated operating sequence describing the various functions involved in a typical refueling cycle is presented. The design status of components and subsystems selected for conceptual development is reviewed, and anticipated refueling time frames are given

  15. The UK gas-cooled reactor programme - Progress report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askew, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper summarises key developments during 1988 on the 26 Magnox reactors and 14 AGRs now operating in the UK. Details are given of long-term safety reviews of the Berkeley and Bradwell Magnox stations which resulted in a decision by CEGB to cease generation at Berkeley but to continue operation at Bradwell. The summary of operating experience with the AGRs concentrates on the completion of construction and successful commissioning of the second generation AGRs at Heysham 2 and Torness. An appended article by John Wilson, Deputy Director of the UKAEA's gas-cooled reactor R and D programme, gives details of the aims and achievements of the programme during 1988. (author)

  16. Graphite development for gas-cooled reactors in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.

    1991-01-01

    This document discusses Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) graphite activities in the USA which currently include the following research and development tasks: coke examination; effects of irradiation; variability of physical properties (mechanical, thermal-physical, and fracture); fatigue behavior, oxidation behavior; NDE techniques; structural design criteria; and carbon-carbon composite control rod clad materials. These tasks support nuclear grade graphite manufacturing technology including nondestructive examination of billets and components. Moreover, data shall be furnished to support design and licensing of graphite components for the MHTGR

  17. Beam cooling using a gas-filled RFQ ion guide

    CERN Document Server

    Henry, S; De Saint-Simon, M; Jacotin, M; Képinski, J F; Lunney, M D

    1999-01-01

    A radiofrequency quadrupole mass filter is being developed for use as a high-transmission beam cooler by operating it in buffer gas at high pressure. Such a device will increase the sensitivity of on-line experiments that make use of weakly produced radioactive ion beams. We present simulations and some preliminary measurements for a device designed to cool the beam for the MISTRAL RF mass spectrometer on- line at ISOLDE. The work is carried out partly within the frame of the European Community research network: EXOTRAPS. (9 refs).

  18. Analysis of pressure drop accidents in high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameoka, Toshiyuki

    1980-01-01

    Research and development are carried out on various problems in order to realize a multi-purpose, high temperature gas-cooled experimental reactor by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and others. In the experimental reactor in consideration at present, it is planned to flow helium at 1000 deg C and 40 atm. For the purpose, high temperature heat insulation structures are designed and developed, which insulate heat on the internal surfaces of pressure vessels and pipings. Consideration must be given to these internal heat insulation structures about the various characteristics in the working environmental temperature and pressure conditions, the measures for preventing the by-pass flow due to the formation of gaps and the abnormal leak of heat through the natural convection in the heat insulators and others. In this paper, the experimental results on the rapid pressure reduction characteristics of ceramic fiber heat insulation structures are reported. The ceramic fiber heat insulation structures have the features such as the application to uneven surfaces and penetration parts, the prevention of by-pass flow, and very low permeability. The problem is the restoring force after the high temperature compression. The experiment on rapid pressure reduction due to the accidental release of gas and the results are reported. (Kako, I.)

  19. Sensisivity and Uncertainty analysis for the Tritium Breeding Ratio of a DEMO Fusion reactor with a Helium cooled pebble bed blanket

    OpenAIRE

    Nunnenmann, Elena; Fischer, Ulrich; Stieglitz, Robert

    2016-01-01

    An uncertainty analysis was performed for the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) of a fusion power plant of the European DEMO type using the MCSEN patch to the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The breeding blanket was of the type Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB), currently under development in the European Power Plant Physics and Technology (PPPT) programme for a fusion power demonstration reactor (DEMO). A suitable 3D model of the DEMO reactor with HCPB blanket modules, as routinely used for blanket design c...

  20. CALIOP: a multichannel design code for gas-cooled fast reactors. Code description and user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, W.I.

    1980-10-01

    CALIOP is a design code for fluid-cooled reactors composed of parallel fuel tubes in hexagonal or cylindrical ducts. It may be used with gaseous or liquid coolants. It has been used chiefly for design of a helium-cooled fast breeder reactor and has built-in cross section information to permit calculations of fuel loading, breeding ratio, and doubling time. Optional cross-section input allows the code to be used with moderated cores and with other fuels

  1. Vented fuel experiment for gas-cooled fast reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longest, A.W.; Gat, U.; Conlin, J.A.; Campana, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    A pressure-equalized and vented fuel rod is being irradiated in an instrumented capsule designated GB-10 to approximately 100MWd/kg-heavy metal. The fuel is a sol-gel-derived 88 at.% uranium (approximately 9% 235 U) and 12 at.% plutonium oxide, and the cladding is 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel. The capsule is being irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and has exceeded a burnup of 70MWd/kg. The fuel has been operated at linear power rates of 39 and 44kW/m, and peak outer cladding temperature of 565 and 630 0 C respectively. A similar fuel rod in a previous capsule (GB-9) was subjected to 48kW/m (685 0 C). Helium gas sweeps through any portion of the three regions of the fuel rod, namely: fuel, blanket, and charcoal trap. The charcoal trap is operated at about 300 0 C. An on-line Ge(Li) detector is used to analyse release rates of several gamma-emitting noble gas isotopes. Analyses are performed primarily on sweep gas flowing through the entire fuel rod, and for sweeps over the top of the charcoal trap. Sweep gas samples are analyzed for stable noble gas isotopes. Results in the form of ratios of release rate over birth rate (R/B) and venting rate over birth rate (V/B) are derived. R/B rates range from 10 -4 % to 30% while V/B ranges from 10 -6 % to 30%. Flow conductance in the capsule was monitored by recording the flow rate and pressure drop across the fuel rod and inlet sweep line. The flow conductance has been falling with increasing burnup, currently restricting the flow to about 20ml (s.t.p.)/min at a pressure difference of about 1.5MPa. Venting rates of the gaseous fission products as a function of gas pressure in the range 6.9 to 1.4MPa have also been measured. Planned future experiments include the monitoring of tritium release, venting and cladding permeation rates, and its molecular form. First measurements have been made. A simulated leak experiment will determine the mixture of fission gases as a function of flow rate and the most

  2. Cooling of interstellar formaldehyde by collision with helium: an accurate quantum mechanical calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrison, B.J.

    1975-08-01

    In order to test a collisional pumping model as a mechanism for cooling the 6 cm and 2 cm doublets of interstellar formaldehyde, a quantum mechanical scattering calculation is performed. To obtain the intermolecular interaction between H 2 CO( 1 A 1 ) and He( 1 S) two calculations are performed, a Hartree-Fock (HF) potential surface and a configuration interaction (CI) surface. A basis set of better than ''triple zeta plus polarization'' quality is used to compute the HF portion of the potential energy surface. This portion is highly anisotropic and has a slight attraction arising from induction effects at intermolecular separations around 9 a.u. The HF surface is modified through a series of CI calculations. Correlation is found to have little effect in the strongly anisotropic repulsive region of the interaction potential but dominates the well and long-range regions. The maximum well depth is attained for in-plane approaches of He and lies in the range 35-40 0 K for arbitrary theta at center of mass separation of 7.5 a.u. The entire surface is fit to a spherical harmonic expansion to facilitate scattering applications. (auth)

  3. Commercial sector gas cooling technology frontier and market share analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pine, G.D.; Mac Donald, J.M.; McLain, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a method, developed for the Gas Research Institute of the United States, that can assist planning for commercial sector natural gas cooling systems R and D. These systems are higher in first cost than conventional electric chillers. Yet, engine-driven chiller designs exist which are currently competitive in U.S. markets typified by high electricity or demand charges. Section II describes a scenario analysis approach used to develop and test the method. Section III defines the technology frontier, a conceptual tool for identifying new designs with sales potential. Section IV describes a discrete choice method for predicting market shares of technologies with sales potential. Section V shows how the method predicts operating parameter, cost, and/or performance goals for technologies without current sales potential (or for enhancing a frontier technology's sales potential). Section VI concludes with an illustrative example for the Chicago office building retrofit market

  4. Gas cooled fast reactor background, facilities, industries and programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.

    1980-05-01

    This report was prepared at the request of the OECD-NEA Coordinating Group on Gas Cooled Fast Reactor Development and it represents a contribution (Vol.II) to the jointly sponsored Vol.I (GCFR Status Report). After a chapter on background with a brief description of the early studies and the activities in the various countries involved in the collaborative programme (Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom and United States), the report describes the facilities available in those countries and at the Gas Breeder Reactor Association and the industrial capabilities relevant to the GCFR. Finally the programmes are described briefly with programme charts, conclusions and recommendations are given. (orig.) [de

  5. Gas-cooled reactors: the importance of their development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1979-06-01

    The nearest term GCR is the steam-cycle HTGR, which can be used for both power and process steam production. Use of SC-HTGRs permits timely introduction of thorium fuel cycles and of high-thermal-efficiency reactors, decreasing the need for mined U 3 O 8 before arrival of symbiotic fueling of fast-thermal reactor systems. The gas-turbine HTGR offers prospects of lower capital costs than other nuclear reactors, but it appears to require longer and more costly development than the SC-HTGR. Accelerated development of the GT-HTGR is needed to gain the advantages of timely introduction. The Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) offers the possibility of fast breeder reactors with lower capital costs and with higher breeding ratios from oxide fuels. The VHTR provides high-temperature heat for hydrogen production

  6. Commercial helium reserves, continental rifting and volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballentine, C. J.; Barry, P. H.; Hillegonds, D.; Fontijn, K.; Bluett, J.; Abraham-James, T.; Danabalan, D.; Gluyas, J.; Brennwald, M. S.; Pluess, B.; Seneshens, D.; Sherwood Lollar, B.

    2017-12-01

    Helium has many industrial applications, but notably provides the unique cooling medium for superconducting magnets in medical MRI scanners and high energy beam lines. In 2013 the global supply chainfailed to meet demand causing significant concern - the `Liquid Helium Crisis' [1]. The 2017 closure of Quatar borders, a major helium supplier, is likely to further disrupt helium supply, and accentuates the urgent need to diversify supply. Helium is found in very few natural gas reservoirs that have focused 4He produced by the dispersed decay (a-particle) of U and Th in the crust. We show here, using the example of the Rukwa section of the Tanzanian East African Rift, how continental rifting and local volcanism provides the combination of processes required to generate helium reserves. The ancient continental crust provides the source of 4He. Rifting and associated magmatism provides the tectonic and thermal mechanism to mobilise deep fluid circulation, focusing flow to the near surface along major basement faults. Helium-rich springs in the Tanzanian Great Rift Valley were first identified in the 1950's[2]. The isotopic compositions and major element chemistry of the gases from springs and seeps are consistent with their release from the crystalline basement during rifting [3]. Within the Rukwa Rift Valley, helium seeps occur in the vicinity of trapping structures that have the potential to store significant reserves of helium [3]. Soil gas surveys over 6 prospective trapping structures (1m depth, n=1486) show helium anomalies in 5 out of the 6 at levels similar to those observed over a known helium-rich gas reservoir at 1200m depth (7% He - Harley Dome, Utah). Detailed macroseep gas compositions collected over two days (n=17) at one site allows us to distinguish shallow gas contributions and shows the deep gas to contain between 8-10% helium, significantly increasing resource estimates based on uncorrected values (1.8-4.2%)[2,3]. The remainder of the deep gas is

  7. Multidisciplinary design optimization of film-cooled gas turbine blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talya Shashishekara S.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Design optimization of a gas turbine blade geometry for effective film cooling toreduce the blade temperature has been done using a multiobjective optimization formulation. Three optimization formulations have been used. In the first, the average blade temperature is chosen as the objective function to be minimized. An upper bound constraint has been imposed on the maximum blade temperature. In the second, the maximum blade temperature is chosen as the objective function to be minimized with an upper bound constraint on the average blade temperature. In the third formulation, the blade average and maximum temperatures are chosen as objective functions. Shape optimization is performed using geometric parameters associated with film cooling and blade external shape. A quasi-three-dimensional Navier–Stokes solver for turbomachinery flows is used to solve for the flow field external to the blade with appropriate modifications to incorporate the effect of film cooling. The heat transfer analysis for temperature distribution within the blade is performed by solving the heat diffusion equation using the finite element method. The multiobjective Kreisselmeier–Steinhauser function approach has been used in conjunction with an approximate analysis technique for optimization. The results obtained using both formulations are compared with reference geometry. All three formulations yield significant reductions in blade temperature with the multiobjective formulation yielding largest reduction in blade temperature.

  8. A study on nuclear heat load tolerable for NET/TF coils cooled by internal flow of helium II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, A.

    1988-02-01

    NbTi cables cooled by internal flow of superfluid helium are considered an option for the design of NET/TF coils with about 11 T peak fields. Starting from an available winding cross section of 0.61x0.61 m 2 for a 8 MA turns coil made of a 16 kA conductor it is shown that sufficient hydraulic cross section can be provided within such cables to remove the expected thermal load resulting from nuclear heating with exponential decay from inboard to outboard side of the winding. The concept is a pancake type coil with 1.8 K helium fed-in the high field region of each pancake. The temperature distribution within such coils is calculated, and the local safety margin is determined from temperature and field. The calculation takes account of nuclear and a.c. heating, and of thermal conductance between the individual layers and the coil casing. It is shown that operation with 1.8 K inlet and about 3 K outlet temperature is possible. The electrical insulation with about 0.5 mm thickness proves to provide sufficient thermal insulation. No additional thermal shield is required between the coil casing and the winding package. Two different types of conductors are being considered: a) POLO type cable with quadratic cross section and a central circular coolant duct, and b) an LCT type cable with two conductors wound in hand. Both concepts with about 500 m length of the cooland channels are shown to meet the requirements resulting from a peak nuclear heat load of 0.3 mW/cm 3 in the inboard turns. The hydraulic diameters are sufficient to operate each coils with self-sustained fountain effect pumps. Even appreciably higher heat loads with up to 3 mW/cm 3 of nuclear heating can be tolerated for the POLO type cable when the hydraulic diameter is enlarged to its maximum of 17 mm. (orig.) [de

  9. Evaluation of the RSG-GAS cooling tower performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suroso

    2003-01-01

    Utilization of RSG-GAS reactor should be operated as efficiently as possible, so that reactor operation planning using one line primary coolant can be anticipated. To analyze the performance of the RSG-GAS cooling tower with one line primary coolant doing by using same data from 10 MW thermal reactor operation. The result were then compare to those achieved using CATHENA code. The results indicated that, for design condition the ratio of water flowrate to air is (L/G) 1.52 and number transfer unit (NTU) is 0.348. For operation condition, the average of L/G and NTU are respectively 1.37 and 0,348. Moreover the results achieved by the code showed that L/G and NTU are respectively 1.35 and 0,302. The performance of cooling tower achieved operation condition and the code results are respectively 91% and 72%. This means that the calculated results are lower than measurement results

  10. Design of helium-gas supplying facility of out-of-pile demonstration test for HTTR heat utilization system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hino, Ryutaro; Fujisaki, Katsuo; Kobayashi, Toshiaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment] [and others

    1996-09-01

    One of the objectives of the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is to demonstrate effectiveness of high-temperature heat utilization. Prior to connect a heat utilization system to the HTTR, a series of out-of-pile demonstration test is indispensable to improve components` performance, to demonstrate operation, control and safety technologies and to verify analysis codes for design and safety evaluation. After critical review and discussion on the out-of-pile demonstration test, a test facility have been designed. In this report, a helium-gas supplying facility simulated the HTTR system was described in detail, which supplies High-temperature helium-gas of 900degC to a steam reforming facility mocking-up the HTTR heat utilization system. Components of the Helium Engineering Demonstration Loop (HENDEL) were selected to reuse in the helium-gas supplying facility in order to decrease construction cost. Structures and specifications of new components such as a high-temperature heater and a preheater were decided after evaluation of thermal and hydraulic performance and strength. (author)

  11. A gas-cooled reactor surface power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, R.J.; Wright, S.A.; Lenard, R.X.; Harms, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1%Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  12. A gas-cooled reactor surface power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wright, Steven A.; Lenard, Roger X.; Harms, Gary A.

    1999-01-01

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1%Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars

  13. A Gas-Cooled Reactor Surface Power System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, G.A.; Lenard, R.X.; Lipinski, R.J.; Wright, S.A.

    1998-11-09

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life- cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitide clad in Nb 1 %Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-I 00 program The fiel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fbel and stabilizing the geometty against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality cannot occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars.

  14. Investigation of light gas effects on passive containment cooling system in ALWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paladino, D.; Auban, O.; Huggenberger, M.; Andreani, M.

    2003-01-01

    The large-scale thermal-hydraulic PANDA facility has been used for the last years for investigating passive decay-heat removal systems and related containment phenomena relevant for current and next generation of light water reactors. Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) systems operate by transferring heat from the containment to a water pool located outside the containment by steam condensation, and serve to mitigate long-term pressure build-up in the event of steam discharge from the primary circuit. As part of the 5 th Euratom framework program project TEMPEST, a new series of tests was performed in the PANDA facility to experimentally investigate the distribution of non-condensable gases inside the containment and their effect on the performance of PCCS of the European Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR). The influence of light gas(hydrogen) on the PCCs performance is of special interest. Hydrogen release caused by the metalwater reaction in case of severe accident was simulated in PANDA by injecting helium into the lines feeding the break flow from the reactor pressure vessel to the Drywells. The paper combines the presentation of experimental results for a number of PANDA tests and the analysis performed using the GOTHIC code. As GOTHIC has 3-D modeling capabilities, gas distribution effects could be studied. The comparison of GOTHIC calculations (two pre-test and one post-test with the same model) with selected TEMPEST tests showed that the code is capable to predict well gas stratification in the drywell, while the system pressure increase due to the release of light gas is slightly overestimated. The analysis aiming to clarify the discordance between the GOTHIC simulation and the experimental results is included in this paper

  15. Survey on Cooled-Vessel Designs in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min-Hwan; Lee, Won-Jae

    2006-01-01

    The core outlet temperature of the coolant in the high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) has been increased to improve the overall efficiency of their electricity generation by using the Brayton cycle or their nuclear hydrogen production by using thermo-chemical processes. The increase of the outlet temperature accompanies an increase of the coolant inlet temperature. A high coolant inlet temperature results in an increase of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) operation temperature. The conventional steels, proven vessel material in light water reactors, cannot be used as materials for the RPV in the elevated temperatures which necessitate its design to account for the creep effects. Some ferritic or martensitic steels like 2 1/4Cr-1Mo and 9Cr-1Mo-V are very well established creep resistant materials for a temperature range of 400 to 550 C. Although these materials have been used in a chemical plant, there is limited experience with using these materials in nuclear reactors. Even though the 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel was used to manufacture the RPV for HTR-10 of Japan Atomic Energy Agency(JAEA), a large RPV has not been manufactured by using this material or 9Cr-1Mo-V steel. Due to not only its difficulties in manufacturing but also its high cost, the JAEA determined that they would exclude these materials from the GTHTR design. For the above reasons, KAERI has been considering a cooled-vessel design as an option for the RPV design of a NHDD plant (Nuclear Hydrogen Development and Demonstration). In this study, we surveyed several HTGRs, which adopt the cooled-vessel concept for their RPV design, and discussed their design characteristics. The survey results in design considerations for the NHDD cooled-vessel design

  16. Assessing the feasibility of a high-temperature, helium-cooled vacuum vessel and first wall for the Vulcan tokamak conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, H.S.; Hartwig, Z.S.; Olynyk, G.M.; Payne, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    The Vulcan conceptual design (R = 1.2 m, a = 0.3 m, B 0 = 7 T), a compact, steady-state tokamak for plasma–material interaction (PMI) science, must incorporate a vacuum vessel capable of operating at 1000 K in order to replicate the temperature-dependent physical chemistry that will govern PMI in a reactor. In addition, the Vulcan divertor must be capable of handling steady-state heat fluxes up to 10 MW m −2 so that integrated materials testing can be performed under reactor-relevant conditions. A conceptual design scoping study has been performed to assess the challenges involved in achieving such a configuration. The Vulcan vacuum system comprises an inner, primary vacuum vessel that is thermally and mechanically isolated from the outer, secondary vacuum vessel by a 10 cm vacuum gap. The thermal isolation minimizes heat conduction between the high-temperature helium-cooled primary vessel and the water-cooled secondary vessel. The mechanical isolation allows for thermal expansion and enables vertical removal of the primary vessel for maintenance or replacement. Access to the primary vessel for diagnostics, lower hybrid waveguides, and helium coolant is achieved through ∼1 m long intra-vessel pipes to minimize temperature gradients and is shown to be commensurate with the available port space in Vulcan. The isolated primary vacuum vessel is shown to be mechanically feasible and robust to plasma disruptions with analytic calculations and finite element analyses. Heat removal in the first wall and divertor, coupled with the ability to perform in situ maintenance and replacement of divertor components for scientific purposes, is achieved by combining existing helium-cooled techniques with innovative mechanical attachments of plasma facing components, either in plate-type helium-cooled modules or independently bolted, helium-jet impingement-cooled tiles. The vacuum vessel and first wall design enables a wide range of potential PFC materials and configurations to

  17. Helium Isotopes and Noble Gas Abundances of Cave Dripping Water in Three Caves in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A. T.; Shen, C. C.; Tan, M.; Li, T.; Uemura, R.; Asami, R.

    2015-12-01

    Paleo-temperature recorded in nature archives is a critical parameter to understand climate change in the past. With advantages of unique inert chemical characteristics and sensitive solubilities with temperature, dissolved noble gases in speleothem inclusion water were recently proposed to retrieve terrestrial temperature history. In order to accurately apply this newly-developed speleothem noble gas temperature (NGT) as a reliable proxy, a fundamental issue about behaviors of noble gases in the karst should be first clarified. In this study, we measured noble gas contents in air and dripping water to evaluate any ratio deviation between noble gases. Cave dripping water samples was collected from three selected caves, Shihua Cave in northern China, Furong Cave in southwestern, and Gyukusen Cave in an island located in the western Pacific. For these caves are characterized by a thorough mixing and long-term storage of waters in a karst aquifer by the absence of seasonal oxygen isotope shifts. Ratios of dripping water noble gases are statistically insignificant from air data. Helium isotopic ratios in the dripping water samples match air value. The results indicate that elemental and isotopic signatures of noble gases from air can be frankly preserved in the epikarst and support the fidelity of NGT techniques.

  18. Preliminary safety evaluation of the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, T.D.; Lommers, L.J.; Tangirala, V.E.

    1994-04-01

    A qualitative comparison between the safety characteristics of the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) and those of the steam cycle shows that the two designs achieve equivalent levels of overall safety performance. This comparison is obtained by applying the scaling laws to detailed steam-cycle computations as well as the conclusions obtained from preliminary GT-MHR model simulations. The gas turbine design is predicted to be superior for some event categories, while the steam cycle design is better for others. From a safety perspective, the GT-MHR has a modest advantage for pressurized conduction cooldown events. Recent computational simulations of 102 column, 550 MW(t) GT-MHR during a depressurized conduction cooldown show that peak fuel temperatures are within the limits. The GT-MHR has a significantly lower risk due to water ingress events under operating conditions. Two additional scenarios, namely loss of load event and turbine deblading event that are specific to the GT-MHR design are discussed. Preliminary evaluation of the GT-MHR's safety characteristics indicate that the GT-MHR can be expected to satisfy or exceed its safety requirements

  19. Powering of an HTS dipole insert-magnet operated standalone in helium gas between 5 and 85 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nugteren, J.; Kirby, G.; Bajas, H.; Bajko, M.; Ballarino, A.; Bottura, L.; Chiuchiolo, A.; Contat, P.-A.; Dhallé, M.; Durante, M.; Fazilleau, P.; Fontalva, A.; Gao, P.; Goldacker, W.; ten Kate, H.; Kario, A.; Lahtinen, V.; Lorin, C.; Markelov, A.; Mazet, J.; Molodyk, A.; Murtomäki, J.; Long, N.; Perez, J.; Petrone, C.; Pincot, F.; de Rijk, G.; Rossi, L.; Russenschuck, S.; Ruuskanen, J.; Schmitz, K.; Stenvall, A.; Usoskin, A.; Willering, G.; Yang, Y.

    2018-06-01

    This paper describes the standalone magnet cold testing of the high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnet Feather-M2.1-2. This magnet was constructed within the European funded FP7-EUCARD2 collaboration to test a Roebel type HTS cable, and is one of the first high temperature superconducting dipole magnets in the world. The magnet was operated in forced flow helium gas with temperatures ranging between 5 and 85 K. During the tests a magnetic dipole field of 3.1 T was reached inside the aperture at a current of 6.5 kA and a temperature of 5.7 K. These values are in agreement with the self-field critical current of the used SuperOx cable assembled with Sunam tapes (low-performance batch), thereby confirming that no degradation occurred during winding, impregnation, assembly and cool-down of the magnet. The magnet was quenched many tens of times by ramping over the critical current and no degradation nor training was evident. During the tests the voltage over the coil was monitored in the microvolt range. An inductive cancellation wire was used to remove the inductive component, thereby significantly reducing noise levels. Close to the quench current, drift was detected both in temperature and voltage over the coil. This drifting happens in a time scale of minutes and is a clear indication that the magnet has reached its limit. All quenches happened approximately at the same average electric field and thus none of the quenches occurred unexpectedly.

  20. Combining a gas turbine modular helium reactor and an accelerator and for near total destruction of weapons grade plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, A.M.; Lane, R.K.; Sherman, R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Fissioning surplus weapons-grade plutonium (WG-Pu) in a reactor is an effective means of rendering this stockpile non-weapons useable. In addition the enormous energy content of the plutonium is released by the fission process and can be captured to produce valuable electric power. While no fission option has been identified that can accomplish the destruction of more than about 70% of the WG-Pu without repeated reprocessing and recycling, which presents additional opportunities for diversion, the gas turbine modular helium-cooled reactor (GT-MHR), using an annular graphite core and graphite inner and outer reflectors combines the maximum plutonium destruction and highest electrical production efficiency and economics in an inherently safe system. Accelerator driven sub-critical assemblies have also been proposed for WG-Pu destruction. These systems offer almost complete WG-Pu destruction, but achieve this goal by using circulating aqueous or molten salt solutions of the fuel, with potential safety implications. By combining the GT-MHR with an accelerator-driven sub-critical MHR assembly, the best features of both systems can be merged to achieve the near total destruction of WG-Pu in an inherently safe, diversion-proof system in which the discharged fuel elements are suitable for long term high level waste storage without the need for further processing. More than 90% total plutonium destruction, and more than 99.9% Pu-239 destruction, could be achieved. The modular concept minimizes the size of each unit so that both the GT-MHR and the accelerator would be straightforward extensions of current technology.

  1. The gas turbine-modular helium reactor (GT-MHR), high efficiency, cost competitive, nuclear energy for the next century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zgliczynski, J.B.; Silady, F.A.; Neylan, A.J.

    1994-04-01

    The Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) is the result of coupling the evolution of a small passively safe reactor with key technology developments in the US during the last decade: large industrial gas turbines, large active magnetic bearings, and compact, highly effective plate-fin heat exchangers. The GT-MHR is the only reactor concept which provides a step increase in economic performance combined with increased safety. This is accomplished through its unique utilization of the Brayton cycle to produce electricity directly with the high temperature helium primary coolant from the reactor directly driving the gas turbine electrical generator. This cannot be accomplished with another reactor concept. It retains the high levels of passive safety and the standardized modular design of the steam cycle MHTGR, while showing promise for a significant reduction in power generating costs by increasing plant net efficiency to a remarkable 47%

  2. High-Temperature Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 617 in Helium Environment of Very High Temperature Gas Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gyeong-Geun; Jung, Sujin; Kim, Daejong; Jeong, Yong-Whan; Kim, Dong-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Alloy 617 is a Ni-base superalloy and a candidate material for the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) of a very high temperature gas reactor (VHTR) which is one of the next generation nuclear reactors under development. The high operating temperature of VHTR enables various applications such as mass production of hydrogen with high energy efficiency. Alloy 617 has good creep resistance and phase stability at high temperatures in an air environment. However, it was reported that the mechanical properties decreased at a high temperature in an impure helium environment. In this study, high-temperature corrosion tests were carried out at 850°C-950°C in a helium environment containing the impurity gases H_2, CO, and CH_4, in order to examine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 617. Until 250 h, Alloy 617 specimens showed a parabolic oxidation behavior at all temperatures. The activation energy for oxidation in helium environment was 154 kJ/mol. The SEM and EDS results elucidated a Cr-rich surface oxide layer, Al-rich internal oxides and depletion of grain boundary carbides. The thickness and depths of degraded layers also showed a parabolic relationship with time. A normal grain growth was observed in the Cr-rich surface oxide layer. When corrosion tests were conducted in a pure helium environment, the oxidation was suppressed drastically. It was elucidated that minor impurity gases in the helium would have detrimental effects on the high temperature corrosion behavior of Alloy 617 for the VHTR application.

  3. A combined gas cooled nuclear reactor and fuel cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, David J.

    Rising oil costs, global warming, national security concerns, economic concerns and escalating energy demands are forcing the engineering communities to explore methods to address these concerns. It is the intention of this thesis to offer a proposal for a novel design of a combined cycle, an advanced nuclear helium reactor/solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) plant that will help to mitigate some of the above concerns. Moreover, the adoption of this proposal may help to reinvigorate the Nuclear Power industry while providing a practical method to foster the development of a hydrogen economy. Specifically, this thesis concentrates on the importance of the U.S. Nuclear Navy adopting this novel design for its nuclear electric vessels of the future with discussion on efficiency and thermodynamic performance characteristics related to the combined cycle. Thus, the goals and objectives are to develop an innovative combined cycle that provides a solution to the stated concerns and show that it provides superior performance. In order to show performance, it is necessary to develop a rigorous thermodynamic model and computer program to analyze the SOFC in relation with the overall cycle. A large increase in efficiency over the conventional pressurized water reactor cycle is realized. Both sides of the cycle achieve higher efficiencies at partial loads which is extremely important as most naval vessels operate at partial loads as well as the fact that traditional gas turbines operating alone have poor performance at reduced speeds. Furthermore, each side of the cycle provides important benefits to the other side. The high temperature exhaust from the overall exothermic reaction of the fuel cell provides heat for the reheater allowing for an overall increase in power on the nuclear side of the cycle. Likewise, the high temperature helium exiting the nuclear reactor provides a controllable method to stabilize the fuel cell at an optimal temperature band even during transients helping

  4. Nitrogen versus helium: effects of the choice of the atomizing gas on the structures of Fe50Ni30Si10B10 and Fe32Ni36Ta7Si8B17 powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambon, A.

    2004-01-01

    Gas atomization can produce, besides a possible significant degree of undercooling, high cooling rates, whose extent depends on the size of the droplets, on their velocity with respect to the surrounding medium, on the thermo-physical properties of both the alloy and the gas, and of course on the operating conditions such as melt overheating and gas-to-metal flow ratio. In this respect it is well-known that the atomizing gas can play a significant role in determining both the powder size distribution and the kind and mix of phases which result from the solidification and cooling processes. The microstructures and solidification morphologies of powders obtained from nitrogen and helium sonic gas atomization of two iron-nickel base glass forming alloys, Fe 50 Ni 30 Si 10 B 10 and Fe 32 Ni 36 Ta 7 Si 8 B 17 , were investigated by means of light microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The Fe 32 Ni 36 Ta 7 Si 8 B 17 alloy exhibits a higher proneness to the development of amorphous phase than the Fe 50 Ni 30 Si 10 B 10 alloy, while the effect of the higher speed attainable by the stream of helium with respect to that of nitrogen, affords not only to obtain a larger amount of particles in the finer size ranges, but also to affect the relative amounts of phases within the different size fractions

  5. The calculating methods of the release of airborne radionuclides to environment during the normal operation of a module high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yuanzhong

    1993-01-01

    The calculations of the release of radionuclides to environment are the basis of environmental impact assessment during the normal operation of a module high temperature gas-cooled reactor of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, China. According to the features of the reactor it is pointed out that only five sources of the airborne radioactive materials released to environment are important. They are: (1) the activation of the air in the reactor cavity; (2) the escape from the primary coolant systems; (3) the release of radioactively contaminated helium from storage tanks; (4) the release of radioactively contaminated helium from the gas evacuation system of fuel load and unload system; (5) the leakage of the vapour from water-steam loop. In accordance with five release sources the calculating methods of radionuclides released to environment are worked out respectively and the respective calculating formulas are derived for the normal operation of the reactor

  6. Supercritical CO2 Brayton power cycles for DEMO fusion reactor based on Helium Cooled Lithium Lead blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares, José Ignacio; Herranz, Luis Enrique; Fernández, Iván; Cantizano, Alexis; Moratilla, Beatriz Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Fusion energy is one of the most promising solutions to the world energy supply. This paper presents an exploratory analysis of the suitability of supercritical CO 2 Brayton power cycles (S-CO 2 ) for low-temperature divertor fusion reactors cooled by helium (as defined by EFDA). Integration of three thermal sources (i.e., blanket, divertor and vacuum vessel) has been studied through proposing and analyzing a number of alternative layouts, achieving an improvement on power production higher than 5% over the baseline case, which entails to a gross efficiency (before self-consumptions) higher than 42%. In spite of this achievement, the assessment of power consumption for the circulating heat transfer fluids results in a penalty of 20% in the electricity production. Once the most suitable layout has been selected an optimization process has been conducted to adjust the key parameters to balance performance and size, achieving an electrical efficiency (electricity without taking into account auxiliary consumptions due to operation of the fusion reactor) higher than 33% and a reduction in overall size of heat exchangers of 1/3. Some relevant conclusions can be drawn from the present work: the potential of S-CO 2 cycles as suitable converters of thermal energy to power in fusion reactors; the significance of a suitable integration of thermal sources to maximize power output; the high penalty of pumping power; and the convenience of identifying the key components of the layout as a way to optimize the whole cycle performance. - Highlights: • Supercritical CO 2 Brayton cycles have been proposed for BoP of HCLL fusion reactor. • Low temperature sources have been successfully integrated with high temperature ones. • Optimization of thermal sources integration improves 5% the electricity production. • Assessment of pumping power with sources and sink loops results on 20% of gross power. • Matching of key parameters has conducted to 1/3 of reduction in heat

  7. Assessment of tritiated activities in the radwaste generated from ITER Chinese helium cooled ceramic breeding test blanket module system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chang An, E-mail: chenchangan@caep.cn; Liu, Lingbo; Wang, Bo; Xiang, Xin; Yao, Yong; Song, Jiangfeng

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Approaches were developed for calculation/evaluation of tritium activities in the materials and components of a TBM system, with tritium permeation being considered for the first time. • Almost all tritiated materials and components were considered in CNHCCB TBM system including the TBM set, connection pipes, and the ancillary tritium handling systems. • Tritium activity data in HCCB TBM system were updated. Some of which in directly tritium contacted components are to be 2 or 4 magnitudes higher than the original neutron transmutation calculations. • The radwaste amount from both operation and decommission of HCCB TBM system was evaluated. - Abstract: Chinese Helium Cooled Ceramic Breeding Test blanket Module (CNHCCB TBM) will be tested in the ITER machine for the feasibility of in pile tritium production for a future magnetic confinement fusion reactor. The tritium inventories/retentions in the material/components were evaluated and updated mainly based on the tritium diffusion/permeation theory and the analysis of some reported data. Tritiated activities rank from less than 10 Bq g{sup −1} to 10{sup 9} Bq g{sup −1} for the different materials or components, which are generally higher than those from the previous neutron transmutation calculation. The amounts of tritiated radwaste were also estimated according to the operation, decommission, maintenance and replacement strategies, which vary from several tens of kilograms to tons in the different operation phases. The data can be used both for the tritium radiological safety evaluation and radwaste management of CNHCCB TBM set and its ancillary systems.

  8. DEPOSITION OF FISSION PRODUCTS FROM HELIUM GAS FLOWING AT HIGH VELOCITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abriss, A.; Ewing, R. A.; Sunderman, D. N.

    1963-11-15

    From American Nuclear Society Meeting, New York, Nov. 1963. Out-of- pile experiments simulating gas cooled reactor flow and temperature conditions were made to correlate by both empirical and theoretical considerations such parameters as Reynolds numbers, velocity, surface conditions, materials of construction, geometry, particulate matter, and fission product diffusion coefficients. It was concluded that all regions of flow disturbance are areas of buildup of activity. No selectivity in deposition among the elements studied, with the exception of I, Te, and Cs, was found. Relative abundances to each other of less volatile isotopes remained constant throughout any particular experiment. Data are tabulated. (P.C.H.)

  9. The development of advanced gas cooled reactor iodine adsorber systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meddings, P.

    1986-01-01

    Advanced Gas Cooled Reactors (AGRs) are provided with plants to process the carbon dioxide coolant prior to its discharge to atmosphere. Included in these are beds of granular activated charcoal, contained within a suitable pressure vessel, through which the high pressure carbon dioxide is passed for the purpose of retaining iodine and iodine-containing compounds. Carry-over carbon dust from the adsorption beds was identified during active in-situ commissioning testing, radio-iodine being transported with the particulate material due to gross disturbance of the adsorber carbon bed and displacement of the vessel internals. The methods used to identify the causes of the problems and find solutions are described. A development programme for the Heysham-2 and Torness reactors iodine adsorber units was set up to identify a method of de-dusting granular charcoal and develop it for full-scale use, of assess the effect under conditions of high gas density of approach velocity on charcoal fines production and to establish the pressure drop characteristics of a packed granular bed and to develop an effective design of inlet gas diffuser manifold to ensure an acceptable velocity distribution. This has involved the construction of a small scale high pressure carbon dioxide rig and development of an air flow model. This work is described. (UK)

  10. Neutron-induced helium implantation in GCFR cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, H.; Poeppel, R.B.; Sevy, R.H.

    1980-10-01

    The neutron-induced implantation of helium atoms on the exterior surfaces of the cladding of a prototypic gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) has been investigated analytically. A flux of recoil helium particles as high as 4.2 x 10 10 He/cm 2 .s at the cladding surface has been calculated at the peak power location in the core of a 300-MWe GCFR. The calculated profile of the helium implantation rates indicates that although some helium is implanted as deep as 20 μm, more than 99% of helium particles are implanted in the first 2-μm-deep layer below the cladding surface. Therefore, the implanted helium particles should mainly affect surface properties of the GCFR cladding

  11. Numerical evaluation of flow through a prismatic very high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros Filho, Jose A.; Santos, Andre A.C.; Navarro, Moyses A.; Ribeiro, Felipe Lopes

    2011-01-01

    The High-temperature Gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is a Next Generation Nuclear System that has a good chance to be used as energy generation source in the near future owing to its potential capacity to supply hydrogen without greenhouse gas emission for the future humanity. Recently, improvements in the HTGR design led to the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concept in which the outlet temperature of the coolant gas reaches to 1000 deg C increasing the efficiency of the hydrogen and electricity generation. Among the core concepts emerging in the VHTR development stands out the prismatic block which uses coated fuel microspheres named TRISO pressed into cylinders and assembled in hexagonal graphite blocks staked to form columns. The graphite blocks contain flow channels around the fuel cylinders for the helium coolant. In this study an analysis is performed using the CFD code CFX 13.0 on a prismatic fuel assembly in order to investigate its thermo-fluid dynamic performance. The simulations were made in a 1/12 fuel element model of the GT-MHR design which was developed by General Atomics. A numerical mesh verification process based on the Grid Convergence Index (GCI) was performed using five progressively refined meshes to assess the numerical uncertainty of the simulation and determine adequate mesh parameters. An analysis was also performed to evaluate different methods to define the inlet and outlet boundary conditions. In this study simulations of models with and without inlet and outlet plena were compared, showing that the presence of the plena offers a more realistic flow distribution. (author)

  12. Measurement of sulphur-35 in the coolant gas of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandalls, F.J.

    1978-03-01

    Sulphur is an important element in some food chains and the release of radioactive sulphur to the environment must be closely controlled if the chemical form is such that it is available or potentially available for entering food chains. The presence of sulphur-35 in the coolant gas of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor warranted a study to assess the quantity and chemical form of the radioactive sulphur in order to estimate the magnitude of the potential environmental hazard which might arise from the release of coolant gas from Civil Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors. A combination of gas chromatographic and radiochemical analyses revealed carbonyl sulphide to be the only sulphur-35 compound present in the coolant gas of the Windscale Reactor. The concentration of carbonyl sulphide was found to lie in the range 40 to 100 x 10 -9 parts by volume and the sulphur-35 specific activity was about 20 mCi per gramme. The analytical techniques are described in detail. The sulphur-35 appears to be derived from the sulphur and chlorine impurities in the graphite. A method for the preparation of carbonyl sulphide labelled with sulphur-35 is described. (author)

  13. Auxiliary bearing design considerations for gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penfield, S.R. Jr.; Rodwell, E.

    2001-01-01

    The need to avoid contamination of the primary system, along with other perceived advantages, has led to the selection of electromagnetic bearings (EMBs) in most ongoing commercial-scale gas cooled reactor (GCR) designs. However, one implication of magnetic bearings is the requirement to provide backup support to mitigate the effects of failures or overload conditions. The demands on these auxiliary or 'catcher' bearings have been substantially escalated by the recent development of direct Brayton cycle GCR concepts. Conversely, there has been only limited directed research in the area of auxiliary bearings, particularly for vertically oriented turbomachines. This paper explores the current state-of-the-art for auxiliary bearings and the implications for current GCR designs. (author)

  14. Acoustical environment of gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blevins, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Methods for acoustical analysis of gas-cooled nuclear reactors in terms of the sources of sound, the propagation of sound about the coolant circuit and the response of reactor structures to sound, are described. Sources of sound that are considered are circulators, jets, vortex shedding and separated flow. Circulators are generally the dominant source of sound. At low frequency the sound propagates one dimensionally through the ducts and cavities of the reactor. At high frequency the sound excites closely spaced two- and three-dimensional acoustic modes, and the resultant sound field can be described only statistically. The sound excites plate and shell structures within the coolant circuit. Secondary steam piping can also be excited by pumps and valves. Formulations are presented for the resultant vibration. Vibration-induced damage is also reviewed. (author)

  15. Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor (WAGR) decommissioning project overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattinson, A.

    2003-01-01

    The current BNFL reactor decommissioning projects are presented. The projects concern power reactor sites at Berkely, Trawsfynydd, Hunterstone, Bradwell, Hinkley Point; UKAEA Windscale Pile 1; Research reactors within UK Scottish Universities at East Kilbride and ICI (both complete); WAGR. The BNFL environmental role include contract management; effective dismantling strategy development; implementation and operation; sentencing, encapsulation and transportation of waste. In addition for the own sites it includes strategy development; baseline decommissioning planning; site management and regulator interface. The project objectives for the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (WAGR) are 1) Safe and efficient decommissioning; 2) Building of good relationships with customer; 3) Completion of reactor decommissioning in 2005. The completed WAGR decommissioning campaigns are: Operational Waste; Hot Box; Loop Tubes; Neutron Shield; Graphite Core and Restrain System; Thermal Shield. The current campaign is Lower Structures and the remaining are: Pressure vessel and Insulation; Thermal Columns and Outer Vault Membrane. An overview of each campaign is presented

  16. Advances in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Fuel Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-12-01

    This publication reports on the results of a coordinated research project on advances in high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel technology and describes the findings of research activities on coated particle developments. These comprise two specific benchmark exercises with the application of HTGR fuel performance and fission product release codes, which helped compare the quality and validity of the computer models against experimental data. The project participants also examined techniques for fuel characterization and advanced quality assessment/quality control. The key exercise included a round-robin experimental study on the measurements of fuel kernel and particle coating properties of recent Korean, South African and US coated particle productions applying the respective qualification measures of each participating Member State. The summary report documents the results and conclusions achieved by the project and underlines the added value to contemporary knowledge on HTGR fuel.

  17. Advances in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Fuel Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    This publication reports on the results of a coordinated research project on advances in high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel technology and describes the findings of research activities on coated particle developments. These comprise two specific benchmark exercises with the application of HTGR fuel performance and fission product release codes, which helped compare the quality and validity of the computer models against experimental data. The project participants also examined techniques for fuel characterization and advanced quality assessment/quality control. The key exercise included a round-robin experimental study on the measurements of fuel kernel and particle coating properties of recent Korean, South African and US coated particle productions applying the respective qualification measures of each participating Member State. The summary report documents the results and conclusions achieved by the project and underlines the added value to contemporary knowledge on HTGR fuel.

  18. Safety analysis of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazu, Akira; Morimoto, Toshio

    1975-01-01

    In recent years, in order to satisfy the social requirements of environment and safety and also to cope with the current energy stringency, the installation of safe nuclear power plants is indispensable. Herein, safety analysis and evaluation to confirm quantitatively the safety design of a nuclear power plant become more and more important. The safety analysis and its methods for a high temperature gas-cooled reactor are described, with emphasis placed on the practices by Fuji Electric Manufacturing Co. Fundamental rule of securing plant safety ; safety analysis in normal operation regarding plant dynamic characteristics and radioactivity evaluation ; and safety analysis at the time of accidents regarding plant response to the accidents and radioactivity evaluation are explained. (Mori, K.)

  19. Description of the magnox type of gas cooled reactor (MAGNOX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, S.E.; Nonboel, E.

    1999-05-01

    The present report comprises a technical description of the MAGNOX type of reactor as it has been build in Great Britain. The Magnox reactor is gas cooled (CO 2 ) with graphite moderators. The fuels is natural uranium in metallic form, canned with a magnesium alloy called 'Magnox'. The Calder Hall Magnox plant on the Lothian coastline of Scotland, 60 km east of Edinburgh, has been chosen as the reference plant and is described in some detail. Data on the other stations are given in tables with a summary of design data. Special design features are also shortly described. Where specific data for Calder Hall Magnox has not been available, corresponding data from other Magnox plants has been used. The information presented is based on the open literature. The report is written as a part of the NKS/RAK-2 sub-project 3: 'Reactors in Nordic Surroundings', which comprises a description of nuclear power plants neighbouring the Nordic countries. (au)

  20. A He-gas Cooled, Stationary Granular Target

    CERN Document Server

    Pugnat, P

    2003-01-01

    In the CERN approach to the design of a neutrino factory, the repetition frequency of the proton beam is high enough to consider stationary solid targets as a viable solution for multi-MW beams. The target consists of high density tantalum spheres of 2 mm diameter which can efficiently be cooled by passing a high mass flow He-gas stream through the voids between the Ta-granules. Very small thermal shocks and stresses will arise in this fine grained structure due to the relatively long burst of 3.3 ms from the SPL-proton linac. In a quadruple target system where each target receives only one quarter of the total beam power of 4 MW, conservative temperature levels and adequate lifetimes of the target are estimated in its very high radiation environment. A conceptual design of the integration of the target into the magnetic horn-pion-collector is presented.

  1. Development of failure detection system for gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feirreira, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    This work presents several kinds of Failure Detection Systems for Fuel Elements, stressing their functional principles and major applications. A comparative study indicates that the method of electrostatic precipitation of the fission gases Kr and Xe is the most efficient for fuel failure detection in gas-cooled reactors. A detailed study of the physical phenomena involved in electrostatic precipitation led to the derivation of an equation for the measured counting rate. The emission of fission products from the fuel and the ion recombination inside the chamber are evaluated. A computer program, developed to simulate the complete operation of the system, relates the counting rate to the concentration of Kr and Xe isotopes. The project of a mock-up is then presented. Finally, the program calculations are compared to experimental data, available from the literature, yielding a close agreement. (author)

  2. Gas-cooled reactor commercialization study. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This report of the gas-cooled reactor commercialization study completes the technical and cost evaluation portions of this study contract. A final report in December will update the status of the incentive analyses and the issues of commercialization. This study was designed to bring together potential industry participants (utilities and suppliers) to evaluate the commercial potential of the HTGR-SC and to build channels of communication among the participating organizations at the same time that technical, economic and institutional issues were being evaluated. RAMCO, Inc., in suggesting and using this study approach, believes its application extends to any commercialization problem involving multi-party involvement in high capital, intensive, high risk energy technologies

  3. Real time thermal hydraulic model for high temperature gas-cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Zhe; Sun Jun; Ma Yuanle; Zhang Ruipeng

    2013-01-01

    A real-time thermal hydraulic model of the reactor core was described and integrated into the simulation system for the high temperature gas-cooled pebble bed reactor nuclear power plant, which was developed in the vPower platform, a new simulation environment for nuclear and fossil power plants. In the thermal hydraulic model, the helium flow paths were established by the flow network tools in order to obtain the flow rates and pressure distributions. Meanwhile, the heat structures, representing all the solid heat transfer elements in the pebble bed, graphite reflectors and carbon bricks, were connected by the heat transfer network in order to solve the temperature distributions in the reactor core. The flow network and heat transfer network were coupled and calculated in real time. Two steady states (100% and 50% full power) and two transients (inlet temperature step and flow step) were tested that the quantitative comparisons of the steady results with design data and qualitative analysis of the transients showed the good applicability of the present thermal hydraulic model. (authors)

  4. Sliding wear studies of sprayed chromium carbide-nichrome coatings for gas-cooled reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.C.; Lai, G.Y.

    1978-09-01

    Chromium carbide-nichrome coatings being considered for wear protection of some critical components in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR's) were investigated. The coatings were deposited either by the detonation gun or the plasma-arc process. Sliding wear tests were conducted on specimens in a button-on-plate arrangement with sliding velocities of 7.1 x 10 -3 and 7.9 mm/s at 816 0 C in a helium environment simulates HTGR primary coolant chemistry. The coatings containing 75 or 80 wt % chromium carbide exhibited excellent wear resistance. As the chromium carbide content decreased from either 80 or 75 to 55 wt %, with a concurrent decrease in coating hardness, wear-resistance deteriorated. The friction and wear behavior of the soft coating was similar to that of the bare metal--showing severe galling and significant amounts of wear debris. The friction characteristics of the hard coating exhibited a strong velocity dependence with high friction coefficients in low sliding velocity tests ad vice versa. Both the soft coating and bare metal showed no dependence on sliding velocity. The wear behavior observed in this study is of adhesive type, and the wear damage is believed to be controlled primarily by the delamination process

  5. Severe water ingress accident analysis for a Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zuoyi; Scherer, Winfried

    1997-01-01

    This paper analyzes the severe water ingress accidents in the SIEMENS 200MW Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR-Module) under the assumption of no active safety protection systems in order to find the safety margin of the current HTR-Module design. A water, steam and helium multi-phase cavity model is originally developed and implemented in the DSNP simulation system. The developed DSNP system is used to simulate the primary circuit of HTR-Module power plant. The comparisons of the models with the TINTE calculations validate the current simulation. After analyzing the effects of blower separation on water droplets, the wall heat storage, etc., it is found that the maximum H 2 O density increase rate in the reactor core is smaller than 0.3 kg/(m 3 s). The liquid water vaporization in the steam generator and H 2 O transport from the steam generator to the reactor core reduces the impulse of the H 2 O in the reactor core. The nuclear reactivity increase caused by the water ingress leads to a fast power excursion, which, however, is inherently counterbalanced by negative feedback effects. Concerning the integrity of the fuel elements, the safety relevant temperature limit of 1600degC was not reached in any case. (author)

  6. The gas-cooled high temperature reactor: perspectives, problems and programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckurts, K.H.; Engelmann, P.; Erb, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    For nearly 20 years, extensive research and development programs on Helium-cooled high-temperature reactors (HTR) have been carried out in several countries of the world, in particular in Germany and in the United States. This reactor system offers major potential advantages as a source of electricity or of nuclear process heat: it shows high nuclear fuel conversion efficiency, permitting a better utilization of uranium and in particular of thorium resources; it offers a high degree of inherent nuclear safety and thus a good potential for adoption to very strict safety standards; it permits high-efficiency electricity generation using either the indirect steam or the direct Helium cycle; dry air cooling can be employed without major economic penalties; it permits direct use of the nuclear heat for the production of gaseous or liquid secondary fuels from coal and other fossil fuels or - on a more extended time scale - by thermochemical water splitting. As a result of the longstanding efforts, satisfactory solutions have been found for many of the basic problems of this new reactor system, particularly in the field of high-temperature fuels and materials technology. Three small experimental plants - Peach Bottom in USA, Dragon in England, and AVR in Germany - have been operated successfully over extended periods of time. The AVR is still in operation; since 1974 it has performed satisfactorily with an average gas outlet temperature of 950 0 C. Prototype steam-cycle plants of 300 MW(e) are underway at Fort St. Vrain, USA (full-power operation scheduled for 1977), and at Schmehausen, Germany (scheduled for 1979). Major delays have occured in the construction and commissioning of these plants; they are due to various reasons and do not reveal specific problems of the HTR. Commercial market introduction of the steam-cycle electricity generating system has been attempted, but the first approach has not been successfull. Major effects by both government and industry are

  7. Improvement of the decay heat removal characteristics of the generation IV gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epiney, A. S.

    2010-09-01

    powered either by the power grid or by batteries for at least 24 hours. The specific contributions of the present research aimed at achieving enhanced passivity of the DHR system for the GFR are design and analysis related to (1) the injection of heavy gas into the primary circuit after a LOCA, to enable natural convection cooling at an intermediate-pressure level, and (2) an autonomous Brayton loop to evacuate decay heat at low primary pressure in case of a loss of the guard containment pressure. Both these developments reduce the dependence on blower power availability considerably. First, the thermal-hydraulic codes used in the study – TRACE and CATHARE – are validated for gas cooling. The validation includes benchmark comparisons between the codes, serving to identify the sensitivity of the results to the different modeling assumptions. The parameters found to be the most sensitive in this analysis, such as heat transfer and friction models, are then validated via a detailed re-analysis of earlier PSI (EIR, at the time) gas-loop experiments conducted in the 1970s. Conclusions and recommendations on the models to be used for transient analysis are derived. In general, it has been shown that the agreement, between experiments and the correlations for heat transfer and friction used in TRACE and CATHARE, is quite satisfactory. The thus validated codes are then used in the two detailed, DHR improvement studies carried out. The first improvement of the reference DHR strategy is the heavy gas injection. Assuming a DHR blower failure after a LOCA, the helium pressure in the guard containment is not high enough to evacuate the decay heat by natural convection. To improve the natural convection, the effects of injecting different heavy gases (N 2 , CO 2 , Ar and a N 2 /He mixture) into the primary circuit were analyzed, in order to address the possibility of dealing with DHR-blower failure while accepting an intermediate back-up pressure in the guard containment

  8. ETDR, The European Union's Experimental Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poette, Christian; Brun-Magaud, Valerie; Morin, Franck; Dor, Isabelle; Pignatel, Jean-Francois; Bertrand, Frederic; Stainsby, Richard; Pelloni, Sandro; Every, Denis; Da Cruz, Dirceu

    2008-01-01

    In the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) development plan, the Experimental Technology Demonstration Reactor (ETDR) is the first necessary step towards the electricity generating prototype GFR. It is a low power (∼50 MWth) Helium cooled fast reactor. The pre-conceptual design of the ETDR is shared between European partners through the GCFR Specifically Targeted Research Project (STREP) within the European Commission's 6. R and D Framework Program. After recalling the place of ETDR in the GFR development plan, the main reactor objectives, the role of the European partners in the different design and safety tasks, the paper will give an overview of the current design with recent progresses in various areas like: - Sub-assembly technology for the starting core (pin bundle with MOX fuel and stainless steel cladding). - The design of experimental advanced ceramic GFR fuel sub-assemblies included in several locations of the starting core. - Starting Core reactivity management studies model including experimental GFR sub-assemblies. - Neutron and radiation shielding calculations using a specific MCNP model. The model allows evaluation of the neutron doses for the vessel and internals and radiation doses for maintenance operations. - System design and safety considerations, with a reactor architecture largely influenced by the Decay Heat Removal strategy (DHR) for de-pressurized accidents. The design of the reactor raises a number of issues in terms of fuel, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics codes qualification as well as critical components (blowers, IHX, thermal barriers) qualification. An overview of the R and D development on codes and technology qualification program is presented. Finally, the status of international collaborations and their perspectives for the ETDR are mentioned. (authors)

  9. Determination of an instability temperature for alloys in the cooling gas of a high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimmer, H.; Grman, D.; Krompholz, K.; Zimmermann, U.; Ullrich, G.

    1985-05-01

    High temperature alloys designed to be used for components in the primary circuit of a helium cooled high temperature nuclear reactor show massive CO production above a certain temperature, called the instability temperature T/sub i/, which increases with increasing partial pressure of CO in the cooling gas. At p/sub CO/ = 15 microbar, T/sub i/ lies between 900 and 950 degrees C for the four alloys under investigation: T/sub i/ is lowest for the iron base alloy Incoloy 800 H and increases for the nickel base alloys in the order Inconel 617, HDA 230 and Nimonic 86. Measurements of T/sub i/ made at 3 different laboratories were compared and shown to agree for p/sub CO/ 25 microbar, compatible with CO production by a reaction of Cr2O3 with carbides. Some measurements of T/sub i/ on HDA 230 and Nimonic 86 were performed in the course of simulated reactor disturbances. They showed that the oxide layer looses its protective properties above T/sub i/. A highlight of the examinations was the detection of eta-carbides (M6C) with unusual properties. M6C is the only type of carbide occuring in HDA 230. An eta-carbide with a lattice constant of 1088.8 pm had developed at the surface of Nimonic 86 during pre-oxidation before the disturbance simulation. Its composition is estimated at Ni3SiMo2C. Eta-carbides containing Si and especially eta-carbides with lattice constants as low as 1088.8 pm have been described only rarely until now. (author)

  10. Targets Involved in Cardioprotection by the Non-Anesthetic Noble Gas Helium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, Nina C.; Smit, Kirsten F.; Hollmann, Markus W.; Preckel, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Research data from the past decade indicate that noble gases like xenon and helium exert profound cardioprotection when applied before, during or after organ ischemia. Of all noble gases, especially helium, has gained interest in the past years because it does not have an anesthetic "side effect"

  11. Assessment and status report High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor gas-turbine technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Purpose of this report is to present a brief summary assessment of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor - Gas Turbine (HTGR-GT) technology. The focal point for the study was a potential 2000 MW(t)/800 MW(e) HTGR-GT commercial plant. Principal findings of the study were that: the HTGR-GT is feasible, but with significantly greater development risk than the HTGR-SC (Steam Cycle). At the level of performance corresponding to the reference design, no incremental economic incentive can be identified for the HTGR-GT to offset the increased development costs and risk relative to the HTGR-SC. The relative economics of the HTGR-GT and HTGR-SC are not significantly impacted by dry cooling considerations. While reduced cycel complexity may ultimately result in a reliability advantage for the HTGR-GT, the value of that potential advantage was not quantified

  12. Study on a method for loading a Li compound to produce tritium using high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakaya, Hiroyuki, E-mail: nakaya@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 8190395 (Japan); Matsuura, Hideaki [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 8190395 (Japan); Katayama, Kazunari [Department of Advanced Energy Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga 8168580 (Japan); Goto, Minoru; Nakagawa, Shigeaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Tritium production by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor was studied. • The loading method considering tritium outflow suppression was estimated. • A reactor with 600 MWt produced 400–600 g of tritium for 180 days. • A possibility that tritium outflow can be sufficiently suppressed was shown. - Abstract: Tritium production using high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and its outflow from the region loading Li compound into the helium coolant are estimated when considering the suppression of tritium outflow. A Li rod containing a cylindrical Li compound placed in an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} cladding tube is assumed as a method for loading Li compound. A gas turbine high-temperature reactor of 300 MW electrical nominal capacity (GTHTR300) with 600 MW thermal output power is considered and modeled using the continuous-energy Monte Carlo transport code MVP-BURN, where burn-up simulations are carried out. Tritium outflow is estimated from equilibrium solution for the tritium diffusion equation in the cladding tube. A GTHTR300 can produce 400–600 g of tritium over a 180-day operation using the chosen method of loading the Li compound while minimizing tritium outflow from the cladding tube. Optimizing tritium production while suppressing tritium outflow is discussed.

  13. Studies of Helium Based Gas Mixtures Using a Small Cell Drift Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heise, Jaret; British Columbia U.

    2006-01-01

    An international collaboration is currently working on the construction and design of an asymmetric B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center that will be ready to collect data in 1999. The main physics motivation for such a facility is to test the description and mechanism of CP violation in the Standard Model of particle physics and provide insight into the question of why more matter than antimatter is observed in the universe today. In particular, this experiment will measure CP violation in the decay of B mesons. In the early stages of this effort, the Canadian contingent proposed to build the central tracking chamber for the BABAR detector. Presently, a prototype drift chamber is in operation and studies are being performed to test some of the unique features of drift chamber design dictated by the conditions of the experiment. Using cosmic muons, it is possible to study tracking and pattern recognition in the prototype chamber, and therefore calculate the efficiency and spatial resolution of the prototype chamber cells. These performance features will be used to test whether or not the helium-based gas mixtures proposed for the BABAR drift chamber are a viable alternative to the more traditional argon-based gases

  14. An X-ray beam position monitor based on the photoluminescence of helium gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revesz, Peter; White, Jeffrey A.

    2005-03-01

    A new method for white beam position monitoring for both bend magnet and wiggler synchrotron X-ray radiation has been developed. This method utilizes visible light luminescence generated as a result of ionization by the intense X-ray flux. In video beam position monitors (VBPMs), the luminescence of helium gas at atmospheric pressure is observed through a view port using a CCD camera next to the beam line. The beam position, profile, integrated intensity and FWHM are calculated from the distribution of luminescence intensity in each captured image by custom software. Misalignment of upstream apertures changes the image profile making VBPMs helpful for initial alignment of upstream beam line components. VBPMs can thus provide more information about the X-ray beam than most beam position monitors (BPMs). A beam position calibration procedure, employing a tilted plane-parallel glass plate placed in front of the camera lens, has also been developed. The accuracy of the VBPM system was measured during a bench-top experiment to be better than 1 μm. The He-luminescence-based VBPM system has been operative on three CHESS beam lines (F hard-bend and wiggler, A-line wiggler and G-line wiggler) for about a year. The beam positions are converted to analog voltages and used as feedback signals for beam stabilization. In our paper we discuss details of VBPM construction and describe further results of its performance.

  15. Low pressure cooling seal system for a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J

    2014-04-01

    A low pressure cooling system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids at low pressure, such as at ambient pressure, through at least one cooling fluid supply channel and into a cooling fluid mixing chamber positioned immediately downstream from a row of turbine blades extending radially outward from a rotor assembly to prevent ingestion of hot gases into internal aspects of the rotor assembly. The low pressure cooling system may also include at least one bleed channel that may extend through the rotor assembly and exhaust cooling fluids into the cooling fluid mixing chamber to seal a gap between rotational turbine blades and a downstream, stationary turbine component. Use of ambient pressure cooling fluids by the low pressure cooling system results in tremendous efficiencies by eliminating the need for pressurized cooling fluids for sealing this gap.

  16. Thermodynamic assessment of impact of inlet air cooling techniques on gas turbine and combined cycle performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohapatra, Alok Ku; Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    The article is focused on the comparison of impact of two different methods of inlet air cooling (vapor compression and vapor absorption cooling) integrated to a cooled gas turbine based combined cycle plant. Air-film cooling has been adopted as the cooling technique for gas turbine blades. A parametric study of the effect of compressor pressure ratio, compressor inlet temperature (T i , C ), turbine inlet temperature (T i , T ), ambient relative humidity and ambient temperature on performance parameters of plant has been carried out. Optimum T i , T corresponding to maximum plant efficiency of combined cycle increases by 100 °C due to the integration of inlet air cooling. It has been observed that vapor compression cooling improves the efficiency of gas turbine cycle by 4.88% and work output by 14.77%. In case of vapor absorption cooling an improvement of 17.2% in gas cycle work output and 9.47% in gas cycle efficiency has been observed. For combined cycle configuration, however, vapor compression cooling should be preferred over absorption cooling in terms of higher plant performance. The optimum value of compressor inlet temperature has been observed to be 20 °C for the chosen set of conditions for both the inlet air cooling schemes. - Highlights: • Inlet air cooling improves performance of cooled gas turbine based combined cycle. • Vapor compression inlet air cooling is superior to vapor absorption inlet cooling. • For every turbine inlet temperature, there exists an optimum pressure ratio. • The optimum compressor inlet temperature is found to be 293 K

  17. Helium leak and chemical impurities control technology in HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochio, Daisuke; Shimizu, Atsushi; Hamamoto, Shimpei; Sakaba, Nariaki

    2014-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has designed and developed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) hydrogen cogeneration system named gas turbine high-temperature reactor (GTHTR300C) as a commercial HTGR. Helium gas is used as the primary coolant in HTGR. Helium gas is easy to leak, and the primary helium leakage should be controlled tightly from the viewpoint of preventing the release of radioactive materials to the environment. Moreover from the viewpoint of preventing the oxidization of graphite and metallic material, the helium coolant chemistry should be controlled tightly. The primary helium leakage and the helium coolant chemistry during the operation is the major factor in the HTGR for commercialization of HTGR system. This paper shows the design concept and the obtained operational experience on the primary helium leakage control and primary helium impurity control in the high-temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) of JAEA. Moreover, the future plan to obtain operational experience of these controls for commercialization of HTGR system is shown. (author)

  18. Gas expulsion vs gas retention in young stellar clusters II: effects of cooling and mass segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silich, Sergiy; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2018-05-01

    Gas expulsion or gas retention is a central issue in most of the models for multiple stellar populations and light element anti-correlations in globular clusters. The success of the residual matter expulsion or its retention within young stellar clusters has also a fundamental importance in order to understand how star formation proceeds in present-day and ancient star-forming galaxies and if proto-globular clusters with multiple stellar populations are formed in the present epoch. It is usually suggested that either the residual gas is rapidly ejected from star-forming clouds by stellar winds and supernova explosions, or that the enrichment of the residual gas and the formation of the second stellar generation occur so rapidly, that the negative stellar feedback is not significant. Here we continue our study of the early development of star clusters in the extreme environments and discuss the restrictions that strong radiative cooling and stellar mass segregation provide on the gas expulsion from dense star-forming clouds. A large range of physical initial conditions in star-forming clouds which include the star-forming cloud mass, compactness, gas metallicity, star formation efficiency and effects of massive stars segregation are discussed. It is shown that in sufficiently massive and compact clusters hot shocked winds around individual massive stars may cool before merging with their neighbors. This dramatically reduces the negative stellar feedback, prevents the development of the global star cluster wind and expulsion of the residual and the processed matter into the ambient interstellar medium. The critical lines which separate the gas expulsion and the gas retention regimes are obtained.

  19. The influence of liquid-gas velocity ratio on the noise of the cooling tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Liu, Xuanzuo; Chen, Chi; Zhao, Zhouli; Song, Jinchun

    2018-05-01

    The noise from the cooling tower has a great influence on psychological performance of human beings. The cooling tower noise mainly consists of fan noise, falling water noise and mechanical noise. This thesis used DES turbulence model with FH-W model to simulate the flow and sound pressure field in cooling tower based on CFD software FLUENT and analyzed the influence of different kinds noise, which affected by diverse factors, on the cooling tower noise. It can be concluded that the addition of cooling water can reduce the turbulence and vortex noise of the rotor fluid field in the cooling tower at some extent, but increase the impact noise of the liquid-gas two phase. In general, the cooling tower noise decreases with the velocity ratio of liquid to gas increasing, and reaches the lowest when the velocity ratio of liquid to gas is close to l.