WorldWideScience

Sample records for helium bubble formation

  1. Helium bubble formation and retention in Cu-Nb nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, A.Y.; McPhie, M.G.; Capolungo, L.; Martinez, E; Cherkaoui, M.

    2013-01-01

    A spatially dependent rate theory model for helium migration, clustering, and trapping on interfaces between Cu and Nb layers is introduced to predict the evolution of the concentrations of He clusters of various sizes during implantation and early annealing. Migration and binding energies of point defects and small clusters in bulk Cu and Nb are found using conjugate gradient minimization and the nudged elastic band method. The model is implemented in a three-dimensional framework and used to predict the relationship between helium bubble formation and the nano-composite microstructure, including interfacial free volume, grain size, and layer thickness. Interstitial and vacancy-like migration of helium is considered. The effects of changing layer thickness and interfacial misfit dislocation density on the threshold for helium bubble nucleation are found to match experiments. Accelerated helium release due to interfaces and grain boundaries is shown to occur only when diffusion rates on interfaces and grain boundaries are greatly increased relative to the bulk material.

  2. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz

  3. Helium accumulation and bubble formation in FeCoNiCr alloy under high fluence He+ implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Da; Tong, Y.; Li, H.; Wang, J.; Zhao, Y. L.; Hu, Alice; Kai, J. J.

    2018-04-01

    Face-centered cubic (FCC) high-entropy alloys (HEA), as emerging alloys with equal-molar or near equal-molar constituents, show a promising radiation damage resistance under heavy ion bombardment, making them potential for structural material application in next-generation nuclear reactors, but the accumulation of light helium ions, a product of nuclear fission reaction, has not been studied. The present work experimentally studied the helium accumulation and bubble formation at implantation temperatures of 523 K, 573 K and 673 K in a homogenized FCC FeCoNiCr HEA, a HEA showing excellent radiation damage resistance under heavy ion irradiation. The size and population density of helium bubbles in FeCoNiCr samples were quantitatively analyzed through transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the helium content existing in bubbles were estimated from a high-pressure Equation of State (EOS). We found that the helium diffusion in such condition was dominated by the self-interstitial/He replacement mechanism, and the corresponding activation energy in FeCoNiCr is comparable with the vacancy migration energy in Ni and austenitic stainless steel but only 14.3%, 31.4% and 51.4% of the accumulated helium precipitated into helium bubbles at 523 K, 573 K and 673 K, respectively, smaller than the pure Ni case. Importantly, the small bubble size suggested that FeCoNiCr HEA has a high resistance of helium bubble formation compared with Ni and steels.

  4. GISAXS modelling of helium-induced nano-bubble formation in tungsten and comparison with TEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Matt; Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Bernard, Elodie; Kirby, Nigel; Kluth, Patrick; Riley, Daniel; Corr, Cormac

    2016-01-01

    Grazing-incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) is a powerful non-destructive technique for the measurement of nano-bubble formation in tungsten under helium plasma exposure. Here, we present a comparative study between transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and GISAXS measurements of nano-bubble formation in tungsten exposed to helium plasma in the Large Helical Device (LHD) fusion experiment. Both techniques are in excellent agreement, suggesting that nano-bubbles range from spheroidal to ellipsoidal, displaying exponential diameter distributions with mean diameters μ=0.68 ± 0.04 nm and μ=0.6 ± 0.1 nm measured by TEM and GISAXS respectively. Depth distributions were also computed, with calculated exponential depth distributions with mean depths of 8.4 ± 0.5 nm and 9.1 ± 0.4 nm for TEM and GISAXS. In GISAXS modelling, spheroidal particles were fitted with an aspect ratio ε=0.7 ± 0.1. The GISAXS model used is described in detail. - Highlights: • GISAXS and TEM were used to measure nano-bubble formation in W exposed to He plasma in the large helical device. • Nano-bubbles had an exponential diameter distributions with averages 0.6 ± 0.1 nm and 0.68 ± 0.04 nm measured by GISAXS and TEM. • Nano-bubbles had an exponential depth distributions with average depths of 9.1 ± 0.4 nm and 8.4 ± 0.5 nm for GISAXS and TEM. • The GISAXS model used to analyse diffraction patterns is explained in detail.

  5. GISAXS modelling of helium-induced nano-bubble formation in tungsten and comparison with TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Matt, E-mail: matt.a.thompson@anu.edu.au [Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Mills Road, Acton, ACT 2601 (Australia); Sakamoto, Ryuichi [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Bernard, Elodie [Aix-Marseille University, Marseille 13288 (France); Kirby, Nigel [SAXS/WAXS Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Rd, Clayton, VIC, 3168 (Australia); Kluth, Patrick [Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Mills Road, Acton, ACT 2601 (Australia); Riley, Daniel [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW, 2232 (Australia); Corr, Cormac [Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Mills Road, Acton, ACT 2601 (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Grazing-incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) is a powerful non-destructive technique for the measurement of nano-bubble formation in tungsten under helium plasma exposure. Here, we present a comparative study between transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and GISAXS measurements of nano-bubble formation in tungsten exposed to helium plasma in the Large Helical Device (LHD) fusion experiment. Both techniques are in excellent agreement, suggesting that nano-bubbles range from spheroidal to ellipsoidal, displaying exponential diameter distributions with mean diameters μ=0.68 ± 0.04 nm and μ=0.6 ± 0.1 nm measured by TEM and GISAXS respectively. Depth distributions were also computed, with calculated exponential depth distributions with mean depths of 8.4 ± 0.5 nm and 9.1 ± 0.4 nm for TEM and GISAXS. In GISAXS modelling, spheroidal particles were fitted with an aspect ratio ε=0.7 ± 0.1. The GISAXS model used is described in detail. - Highlights: • GISAXS and TEM were used to measure nano-bubble formation in W exposed to He plasma in the large helical device. • Nano-bubbles had an exponential diameter distributions with averages 0.6 ± 0.1 nm and 0.68 ± 0.04 nm measured by GISAXS and TEM. • Nano-bubbles had an exponential depth distributions with average depths of 9.1 ± 0.4 nm and 8.4 ± 0.5 nm for GISAXS and TEM. • The GISAXS model used to analyse diffraction patterns is explained in detail.

  6. Growth rate effects on the formation of dislocation loops around deep helium bubbles in Tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval, Luis; Perez, Danny; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Voter, Arthur Ford

    2016-01-01

    Here, the growth process of spherical helium bubbles located 6 nm below a (100) surface is studied using molecular dynamics and parallel replica dynamics simulations, over growth rates from 10"6 to 10"1"2 helium atoms per second. Slower growth rates lead to a release of pressure and lower helium content as compared with fast growth cases. In addition, at slower growth rates, helium bubbles are not decorated by multiple dislocation loops, as these tend to merge or emit given sufficient time. At faster rates, dislocation loops nucleate faster than they can emit, leading to a more complicated dislocation structure around the bubble.

  7. GISAXS modelling of helium-induced nano-bubble formation in tungsten and comparison with TEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Matt; Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Bernard, Elodie; Kirby, Nigel; Kluth, Patrick; Riley, Daniel; Corr, Cormac

    2016-05-01

    Grazing-incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) is a powerful non-destructive technique for the measurement of nano-bubble formation in tungsten under helium plasma exposure. Here, we present a comparative study between transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and GISAXS measurements of nano-bubble formation in tungsten exposed to helium plasma in the Large Helical Device (LHD) fusion experiment. Both techniques are in excellent agreement, suggesting that nano-bubbles range from spheroidal to ellipsoidal, displaying exponential diameter distributions with mean diameters μ=0.68 ± 0.04 nm and μ=0.6 ± 0.1 nm measured by TEM and GISAXS respectively. Depth distributions were also computed, with calculated exponential depth distributions with mean depths of 8.4 ± 0.5 nm and 9.1 ± 0.4 nm for TEM and GISAXS. In GISAXS modelling, spheroidal particles were fitted with an aspect ratio ε=0.7 ± 0.1. The GISAXS model used is described in detail.

  8. The influence of low-energy helium plasma on bubble formation in micro-engineered tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Edward; Nadvornick, Warren; Doerner, Russ; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2018-04-01

    Four different types of micro-engineered tungsten surfaces were exposed to low energy helium plasma, with a planar surface as control. These samples include two surfaces covered with uniform W-coated rhenium micro-pillars; one with cylindrical pillars 1 μm in diameter and 25 μm in height, and one with dendritic conical pillars 4-10 μm in diameter and 20 μm in height. Additionally, two samples with reticulated open-cell foam geometry, one at 45 pores per inch (PPI), and the other at 80 PPI were fabricated with Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). The samples were exposed to helium plasma at 30-100 eV ion energy, 823-1123 K temperature, and 5 × 1025 - 2 × 1026 m-2 ion fluence. It is shown that the formation of nanometer-scale tendrils (fuzz) on micro-engineered W surfaces is greatly reduced as compared to planar surfaces. This is attributed to more significant ion backscattering and the increased effective surface area that intercept incident ions in micro-engineered W. A 20% decrease in the average ion incident angle on pillar type surfaces leads to ∼30% decrease in bubble size, down to 30 nm in diameter. W fuzz was found to be absent from pillar sides due to high ion backscattering rates from pillar sides. In foam samples, 28% higher PPI is observed to have 24.7%-36.7% taller fuzz, and 17.0%-25.0% larger subsurface bubbles. These are found to be an order of magnitude smaller than those found in planar surfaces of similar environment. The helium bubble density was found to increase with ion energy in pillars, roughly from 8.2% to 48.4%, and to increase with increasing PPI, from 36.4% to 116.2%, and with bubble concentrations up to 9.1 × 1021 m-3. Geometric shadowing effects in or near surface ligaments are observed in all foam samples, with near absence of helium bubbles or fuzz in deeper layers of the foam.

  9. Positronium formation in helium bubbles in 600 MeV proton-irradiated aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K. O.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Singh, Bachu Narain

    1985-01-01

    Aluminium samples containing helium bubbles produced by 600 MeV proton irradiation at 430°C were investigated by positron annihilation; both lifetime and angular correlation measurements were made. The angular correlation curves contain an unusually narrow component. This component is associated...

  10. Microstructure of HIPed and SPSed 9Cr-ODS steel and its effect on helium bubble formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Chenyang; Lu, Zheng; Xie, Rui; Liu, Chunming; Wang, Lumin

    2016-01-01

    Two 9Cr-ODS steels with the same nominal composition were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP, named COS-1) and spark plasma sintering (SPS, named COS-2). Helium ions were implanted into COS-1, COS-2 and non-ODS Eurofer 97 steels up at 673 K. Microstructures before and after helium ion implantations were carefully characterized. The results show a bimodal grain size distribution in COS-2 and a more uniform grain size distribution in COS-1. Nanoscale clusters of GP-zone type Y–Ti–O and Y_2Ti_2O_7 pyrochlore as well as large spinel Mn(Ti)Cr_2O_4 particles are all observed in the two ODS steels. The Y–Ti-enriched nano-oxides in COS-1 exhibit higher number density and smaller size than in COS-2. The Y–Ti-enriched nano-oxides in fine grains of COS-2 show higher number density and smaller size than that in coarse grains of COS-2. Nano-oxides effectively trap helium atoms and lead to the formation of high density and ultra-fine helium bubbles. - Highlights: • The microstructure changes of two ODS steels before and after helium ion implantation have been elucidated. • The mechanism of the microstructures of ODS steels under varied thermal mechanical processing paths have been explored. • The dependence of the size, density and distribution of helium bubbles on the specific microstructure features are explored.

  11. Bubbles formation in helium ion irradiated Cu/W multilayer nanocomposites: Effects on structure and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callisti, M., E-mail: M.Callisti@soton.ac.uk [National Centre for Advanced Tribology at Southampton, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Karlik, M. [Department of Materials, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Trojanova 13, 120 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Polcar, T. [National Centre for Advanced Tribology at Southampton, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Department of Control Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technická 2, 16627 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2016-05-15

    This study investigates the effects of He bubbles on structural and mechanical properties of sputter-deposited Cu/W multilayers. A multilayer with a periodicity of 10 nm was deposited and subjected to helium ion irradiation with two different fluences. He bubbles formed mostly in Cu layers and their distribution was affected by He concentration and radiation damage. According to SRIM calculations, in low He concentration regions bubbles formed mostly along interfaces, while more homogeneously distributed bubbles were found in Cu layers and along columnar grain boundaries in higher He concentration regions. We suggest that the capability of interfaces to annihilate point defects is weakened by the He bubbles shielding effect. Nanoindentation tests revealed a hardness decrease amounting to ∼0.5 and ∼1 GPa for low and high fluences, respectively. The observed softening effect is attributed to He storage-induced changes in residual stresses and columnar grain boundary/interfacial sliding facilitated by He bubbles. - Highlights: • Cu/W nanocomposites were subjected to He{sup +} irradiation with different fluences. • He bubbles formed more homogeneously in higher He concentration regions. • Decrease in mechanical properties was observed for higher He concentrations. • He bubbles formation facilitated interfacial and grain boundary sliding.

  12. Microstructure of HIPed and SPSed 9Cr-ODS steel and its effect on helium bubble formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chenyang [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Material Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819, Liaoning (China); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States); Lu, Zheng, E-mail: luz@atm.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Material Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819, Liaoning (China); Xie, Rui; Liu, Chunming [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Material Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819, Liaoning (China); Wang, Lumin, E-mail: lmwang@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Two 9Cr-ODS steels with the same nominal composition were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP, named COS-1) and spark plasma sintering (SPS, named COS-2). Helium ions were implanted into COS-1, COS-2 and non-ODS Eurofer 97 steels up at 673 K. Microstructures before and after helium ion implantations were carefully characterized. The results show a bimodal grain size distribution in COS-2 and a more uniform grain size distribution in COS-1. Nanoscale clusters of GP-zone type Y–Ti–O and Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} pyrochlore as well as large spinel Mn(Ti)Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles are all observed in the two ODS steels. The Y–Ti-enriched nano-oxides in COS-1 exhibit higher number density and smaller size than in COS-2. The Y–Ti-enriched nano-oxides in fine grains of COS-2 show higher number density and smaller size than that in coarse grains of COS-2. Nano-oxides effectively trap helium atoms and lead to the formation of high density and ultra-fine helium bubbles. - Highlights: • The microstructure changes of two ODS steels before and after helium ion implantation have been elucidated. • The mechanism of the microstructures of ODS steels under varied thermal mechanical processing paths have been explored. • The dependence of the size, density and distribution of helium bubbles on the specific microstructure features are explored.

  13. Tungsten surface evolution by helium bubble nucleation, growth and rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefta, Faiza; Wirth, Brian D.; Hammond, Karl D.; Juslin, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations reveal sub-surface mechanisms likely involved in the initial formation of nanometre-sized ‘fuzz’ in tungsten exposed to low-energy helium plasmas. Helium clusters grow to over-pressurized bubbles as a result of repeated cycles of helium absorption and Frenkel pair formation. The self-interstitials either reach the surface as isolated adatoms or trap at the bubble periphery before organizing into prismatic 〈1 1 1〉 dislocation loops. Surface roughening occurs as single adatoms migrate to the surface, prismatic loops glide to the surface to form adatom islands, and ultimately as over-pressurized gas bubbles burst. (paper)

  14. Growth process of helium bubbles in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Haruki; Sakairi, Hideo; Yagi, Eiichi; Karasawa, Takashi; Hashiguti, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    The growth process of helium bubbles in α-particle bombarded pure aluminum during isothermal anneal ranging 200 to 645 0 C and 1 to 100 hr was observed by a transmission electron microscope and the possible growth mechanisms are discussed. The effects of helium concentration and cold work were investigated. The helium bubbles are detectable only at the anneal above 550 0 C in both annealed and cold worked samples. The cold work does not cause any extra coarsening trend of bubbles. The observed types of bubble distribution in the grain interior are divided into two categories, irrespective of helium concentration and cold work; (1) the fine and uniform bubble distribution, in which case the average size is limited to about 200 A or less in diameter even at the anneal just below the melting point, and (2) the coarsened and non-uniform bubble distribution ranging 500 to 4000 A in diameter. The intermediate size bubbles are scarcely found in any cases. In the above fine bubble distribution, the increase of helium concentration by a factor of two increases the density by the same factor of two, but does not change the mean size of bubbles. Corresponding to the above two characteristic bubble distributions, it is concluded that two different mechanisms are operative in this experiment; (1) the growth of bubbles by the Brownian motion, in which the growth rate of bubbles is decreased to almost zero by bubble faceting and this results in the bubble size constancy during the prolonged annealing, and (2) the growth of bubbles by the grain boundary sweep-out mechanism, by which the abrupt coarsening of bubbles is caused. The lack of existence of the intermediate size bubbles is explained in this way. (auth.)

  15. Helium bubbles aggravated defects production in self-irradiated copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, FengChao; Zhu, YinBo; Wu, Qiang; Li, XinZhu; Wang, Pei; Wu, HengAn

    2017-12-01

    Under the environment of high radiation, materials used in fission and fusion reactors will internally accumulate numerous lattice defects and bubbles. With extensive studies focused on bubble resolution under irradiation, the mutually effects between helium bubbles and displacement cascades in irradiated materials remain unaddressed. Therefore, the defects production and microstructure evolution under self-irradiation events in vicinity of helium bubbles are investigated by preforming large scale molecular dynamics simulations in single-crystal copper. When subjected to displacement cascades, distinguished bubble resolution categories dependent on bubble size are observed. With the existence of bubbles, radiation damage is aggravated with the increasing bubble size, represented as the promotion of point defects and dislocations. The atomic mechanisms of heterogeneous dislocation structures are attributed to different helium-vacancy cluster modes, transforming from the resolved gas trapped with vacancies to the biased absorption of vacancies by the over-pressured bubble. In both cases, helium impedes the recombination of point defects, leading to the accelerated formation of interstitial loops. The results and insight obtained here might contribute to understand the underlying mechanism of transmutant solute on the long-term evolution of irradiated materials.

  16. A description of stress driven bubble growth of helium implanted tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharafat, Shahram; Takahashi, Akiyuki; Nagasawa, Koji; Ghoniem, Nasr

    2009-01-01

    Low energy (<100 keV) helium implantation of tungsten has been shown to result in the formation of unusual surface morphologies over a large temperature range (700-2100 deg. C). Simulation of these macroscopic phenomena requires a multiscale approach to modeling helium transport in both space and time. We present here a multiscale helium transport model by coupling spatially-resolved kinetic rate theory (KRT) with kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation to model helium bubble nucleation and growth. The KRT-based HEROS Code establishes defect concentrations as well as stable helium bubble nuclei as a function of implantation parameters and position from the implanted surface and the KMC-based Mc-HEROS Code models the growth of helium bubbles due to migration and coalescence. Temperature- and stress-gradients can act as driving forces, resulting in biased bubble migration. The Mc-HEROS Code was modified to simulate the impact of stress gradients on bubble migration and coalescence. In this work, we report on bubble growth and gas release of helium implanted tungsten W/O stress gradients. First, surface pore densities and size distributions are compared with available experimental results for stress-free helium implantation conditions. Next, the impact of stress gradients on helium bubble evolution is simulated. The influence of stress fields on bubble and surface pore evolution are compared with stress-free simulations. It is shown that near surface stress gradients accelerate helium bubbles towards the free surface, but do not increasing average bubble diameters significantly.

  17. Nucleation path of helium bubbles in metals during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Kazunori

    2008-01-01

    Thermodynamical formalization is made for description of the nucleation and growth of helium bubbles in metals during irradiation. The proposed formalization is available or evaluating both microstructural changes in fusion first wall materials where helium is produced by (n, α) nuclear transmutation reactions, and those in fusion divertor materials where helium particles with low energy are directly implanted. Calculated nucleation barrier is significantly reduced by the presence of helium, showing that a helium bubble with an appropriate number of helium atoms depending on bubble size can nucleate without any large nucleation barriers, even at a condition where an empty void has very large nucleation barrier without helium. With the proposed thermodynamical formalization, the nucleation and growth process of helium bubbles in iron during irradiation is simulated by the kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC) technique. It shows the nucleation path of a helium bubble on the (N He , N V ) space as functions of temperatures and the concentration of helium in the matrix, where N He and N V are the number of helium atoms and vacancies in the helium bubble, respectively. Bubble growth rates depend on the nucleation path and suggest that two different mechanisms operate for bubble growth: one is controlled by vacancy diffusion and the other is controlled by interstitial helium diffusion. (author)

  18. Helium bubbles in bcc Fe and their interactions with irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gai, Xiao, E-mail: X.Gai@lboro.ac.uk; Lazauskas, Tomas; Smith, Roger; Kenny, Steven D.

    2015-07-15

    The properties of helium bubbles in a body-centred cubic (bcc) Fe lattice have been examined. The atomic configurations and formation energies of different He–vacancy complexes were determined. The 0 K results show that the most energetically favourable He to Fe vacancy ratio increases from about 1:1 for approximately 5 vacancies up to about 4:1 for 36 vacancies. The formation mechanisms for small He clusters have also been considered. Isolated interstitials and small clusters can diffuse quickly through the lattice. MD simulations of randomly placed interstitial He atoms at 500 K showed clustering over the time scale of nanoseconds with He clusters containing up to 4 atoms being mobile over this time scale. He clusters containing 4 or 5 atoms were shown to eject an Fe dumbbell interstitial which could then detach from the He cluster and diffuse with the remaining He–vacancy complex being effectively immobile. Collision cascades initiated near larger bubbles showed that Fe vacancies produced by the cascades readily become part of the He–vacancy complexes. Energy barriers for He to join an existing bubble as a function of the He–vacancy ratio are also calculated. These can be larger than the diffusion barrier in the pristine lattice, but are lower when the bubbles contain excess vacancies, thus indicating that bubble growth may be kinetically constrained.

  19. Modeling Space-Time Dependent Helium Bubble Evolution in Tungsten Armor under IFE Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiyang Hu; Shahram Sharafat; Nasr Ghoniem

    2006-01-01

    The High Average Power Laser (HAPL) program is a coordinated effort to develop Laser Inertial Fusion Energy. The implosion of the D-T target produces a spectrum of neutrons, X-rays, and charged particles, which arrive at the first wall (FW) at different times within about 2.5 μs at a frequency of 5 to 10 Hz. Helium is one of several high-energy charged particle constituents impinging on the candidate tungsten armored low activation ferritic steel First Wall. The spread of the implanted debris and burn helium energies results in a unique space-time dependent implantation profile that spans about 10 μm in tungsten. Co-implantation of X-rays and other ions results in spatially dependent damage profiles and rapid space-time dependent temperature spikes and gradients. The rate of helium transport and helium bubble formation will vary significantly throughout the implanted region. Furthermore, helium will also be transported via the migration of helium bubbles and non-equilibrium helium-vacancy clusters. The HEROS code was developed at UCLA to model the spatial and time-dependent helium bubble nucleation, growth, coalescence, and migration under transient damage rates and transient temperature gradients. The HEROS code is based on kinetic rate theory, which includes clustering of helium and vacancies, helium mobility, helium-vacancy cluster stability, cavity nucleation and growth and other microstructural features such as interstitial loop evolution, grain boundaries, and precipitates. The HEROS code is based on space-time discretization of reaction-diffusion type equations to account for migration of mobile species between neighboring bins as single atoms, clusters, or bubbles. HAPL chamber FW implantation conditions are used to model helium bubble evolution in the implanted tungsten. Helium recycling rate predictions are compared with experimental results of helium ion implantation experiments. (author)

  20. Helium solubility and bubble growth in metals under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laakmann, J.

    1985-07-01

    Helium solubility and bubble growth in metals under high pressure polycrystals and single crystals of gold were heated in helium at temperatures between 475 K and 1250 K in a pressure regime of 200 to 2700 bar to measure the solubility of helium in gold. After quenching to room temperature the helium content, measured by mass spectrometry, showed the following properties: 1) A linear dependence of the He solubility on pressure. 2) Thinning of the specimen reduces the helium content by a factor 10 to 100 but does not change the linear pressure dependence. 3) The thermal release of He from thinned polycrystals and single crystals occurs mainly in a single peak at 500 K. 4) The He concentration of the thinned single crystals was lower by a factor of 10 to 50 than that of the thinned polycrystals. 5) The He solubility in single crystals can be described by an enthalpy of solution Hsub(s)sup(f) = 0.85 +- 0.7 eV and a non-configurational entropy of Ssub(s)sup(f) between 0 k and 1 k (k: Boltzmann-constant). In order to measure the pressure dependence of helium bubble growth in nickel polycrystal Ni-foils were α-implanted to a helium content of 130 appm. The evaluation of the size distribution of the helium bubbles after heat treatments shows 1) The helium content of the observable bubbles - assumed to be in equilibrium - equals the amount of helium implanted into the specimen. 2) The activation energy for the growth of helium bubbles is 1.25 +- 0.3 eV. The comparison of specimen which had been heated at low pressures up to 10 bar with others heated at 2500-2700 bar does not show an unequivocal pressure dependence for helium bubble growth. (orig./IHOE) [de

  1. Blistering and bubble formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, J.

    1976-01-01

    Blister formation in metals has been observed during bombardment with inert-gas ions in the energy range between 1 and 2000 keV at doses of about 10 17 to 10 19 cm -2 . The changes in surface topography and the erosion yields were mainly studied in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Additionally the release of the implanted gas during blister formation was observed. Recently measurements on single crystals were performed determining simultaneously the implantation profile, the total amount of trapped ions, the depth distribution of the induced lattice damage and the thickness of the covers of the blisters. In several stages of the formation process of blisters the implanted layer was observed in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) showing the formation of gas bubbles. Using the results of all these measurements in this review an attempt is made to develop a model of blister formation combining the effects of hydrostatic pressure in the gas bubbles and lateral stress due to volume swelling. (author)

  2. Exploding and Imaging of Electron Bubbles in Liquid Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Neha; Vadakkumbatt, Vaisakh; Maris, Humphrey J.; Ghosh, Ambarish

    2017-06-01

    An electron bubble in liquid helium-4 under the saturated vapor pressure becomes unstable and explodes if the pressure becomes more negative than -1.9 bars. In this paper, we use focused ultrasound to explode electron bubbles. We then image at 30,000 frames per second the growth and subsequent collapse of the bubbles. We find that bubbles can grow to as large as 1 mm in diameter within 2 ms after the cavitation event. We examine the relation between the maximum size of the bubble and the lifetime and find good agreement with the experimental results.

  3. Effect of microstructure on helium bubble growth in irradiated nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattler, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    Thin nickel films were irradiated with 80 keV helium ions at varying doses and varying temperatures in order to obtain a variety of final microstructures. The growth of bubbles was examined during in-situ irradiations at 950 0 C where migration and coalescence events were observed for bubbles as large as 60 nm. Further direct observations of bubble growth were made during annealing of the irradiated specimens. For sample with no visible bubbles before annealing, the heating to 0.51 T/sub M/ produced bubbles that increased in diameter with annealing time to the power n. For bubbles in the grain interior, n ∼ 1, and on the grain boundaries, n ∼ 0.6. Since no migration and coalescence or ripening theories predict this behavior, a theory described by transient diffusion to spherical sinks was developed to discuss the behavior. This theory predicts that n = 1 for bubbles growing in the grain interior and n = 0.5 for bubbles on the grain boundary. In other annealing of irradiated samples containing large bubble populations, the growth of large bubbles and shrinking of small bubbles was observed at a temperature equal to 0.54 T/sub M/. The theory of Ostwald ripening properly described this type of bubble growth. Mass spectrometer measurements of He content in the irradiated specimens showed a greater He retention in the Ni films that contained a significant bubble population than those with no visible bubbles

  4. Synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen for bubble swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel under sequential helium and hydrogen irradiation at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wenhui [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chen, Jihong; Luo, Fengfeng; Li, Tiecheng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Ren, Yaoyao [Center for Electron Microscopy, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Suo, Jinping; Yang, Feng [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • Helium/hydrogen synergistic effect can increase irradiation swelling of RAFM steel. • Hydrogen can be trapped to the outer surface of helium bubbles. • Too large a helium bubble can become movable. • Point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations at high temperature. • The peak swelling temperature for RAFM steel is 450 °C. - Abstract: In order to investigate the synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen on swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel, specimens were separately irradiated by single He{sup +} beam and sequential He{sup +} and H{sup +} beams at different temperatures from 250 to 650 °C. Transmission electron microscope observation showed that implantation of hydrogen into the specimens pre-irradiated by helium can result in obvious enhancement of bubble size and swelling rate which can be regarded as a consequence of hydrogen being trapped by helium bubbles. But when temperature increased, Ostwald ripening mechanism would become dominant, besides, too large a bubble could become mobile and swallow many tiny bubbles on their way moving, reducing bubble number density. And these effects were most remarkable at 450 °C which was the peak bubble swelling temperature for RAMF steel. When temperature was high enough, say above 450, point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations or surface. As a consequence, helium could no longer effectively diffuse and clustering in materials and bubble formation was suppressed. When temperature was above 500, helium bubbles would become unstable and decompose or migrate out of surface. Finally no bubble was observed at 650 °C.

  5. Synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen for bubble swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel under sequential helium and hydrogen irradiation at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Wenhui; Guo, Liping; Chen, Jihong; Luo, Fengfeng; Li, Tiecheng; Ren, Yaoyao; Suo, Jinping; Yang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Helium/hydrogen synergistic effect can increase irradiation swelling of RAFM steel. • Hydrogen can be trapped to the outer surface of helium bubbles. • Too large a helium bubble can become movable. • Point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations at high temperature. • The peak swelling temperature for RAFM steel is 450 °C. - Abstract: In order to investigate the synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen on swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel, specimens were separately irradiated by single He + beam and sequential He + and H + beams at different temperatures from 250 to 650 °C. Transmission electron microscope observation showed that implantation of hydrogen into the specimens pre-irradiated by helium can result in obvious enhancement of bubble size and swelling rate which can be regarded as a consequence of hydrogen being trapped by helium bubbles. But when temperature increased, Ostwald ripening mechanism would become dominant, besides, too large a bubble could become mobile and swallow many tiny bubbles on their way moving, reducing bubble number density. And these effects were most remarkable at 450 °C which was the peak bubble swelling temperature for RAMF steel. When temperature was high enough, say above 450, point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations or surface. As a consequence, helium could no longer effectively diffuse and clustering in materials and bubble formation was suppressed. When temperature was above 500, helium bubbles would become unstable and decompose or migrate out of surface. Finally no bubble was observed at 650 °C

  6. Fission of Multielectron Bubbles in Liquid Helium Under Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadakkumbatt, V.; Ghosh, A.

    2017-06-01

    Multielectron bubbles (MEBs) are cavities in liquid helium which contain a layer of electrons trapped within few nanometres from their inner surfaces. These bubbles are promising candidates to probe a system of interacting electrons in curved geometries, but have been subjected to limited experimental investigation. Here, we report on the observation of fission of MEBs under strong electric fields, which arises due to fast rearrangement of electrons inside the bubbles, leading to their deformation and eventually instability. We measured the electrons to be distributed unequally between the daughter bubbles which could be used to control the charge density inside MEBs.

  7. High-density equation of state for helium and its application to bubbles in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfer, W.G.

    1980-06-01

    Helium, produced by transmutations or injected, causes bubble formation in solids at elevated temperatures. For small bubbles, the gas pressure required to balance the surface tension reaches values which far exceed those obtainable in experiments to measure the equation of state for helium gas. Therefore, empirical gas laws cannot be considered applicable to the fluid-like densities existing in small bubbles. In order to remedy this situation, an equation of state for helium was developed from the theory of the liquid state. At very low densities, this theoretically derived equation of state agrees with experimental results. For high densities, however, gas pressures are predicted which are significantly higher than those derived from the ideal gas law, but also significantly lower than pressures obtained with the van der Waals law. When applied to equilibrium bubbles in solids, it is found that the high-density equation of state leads to less bubble swelling than the van der Waals law, but more than the ideal gas law. Furthermore, the number of helium atoms in equilibrium bubbles is nearly independent of temperature

  8. Atomistic simulation of helium bubble nucleation in palladium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Liang [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Hu, Wangyu [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)], E-mail: wangyuhu2001cn@yahoo.com.cn; Xiao Shifang [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)], E-mail: sfxiao@yahoo.com.cn; Yang Jianyu [Department of Maths and Physics, Hunan Institute of Engineering, Xiangtan 411104 (China); Deng Huiqiu [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2009-09-15

    A palladium crystal has been constructed with 11808 atoms. 55 helium atoms occupied the octahedral position of palladium crystal are introduced and retained in a spherical region. Molecular dynamic simulations are performed in a constant temperature and constant volume ensemble (NVT) with temperature controlled by Nose-Hoover thermostat. The interactions between palladium atoms are described with modified analytic embedded atom method (MAEAM), the interactions between palladium atom and helium atom are in the form of Morse potential, and the interactions between helium atoms are in the form of L-J potential function. With the analysis of the radial distribution function (RDF) and microstructure, it reveals that some of helium atoms form a series of clusters with different size, and the nucleation core is random at low temperature, and which is the embryo of helium bubble. Increasing temperature can accelerate the process of bubble nucleation, and the clusters will aggregate and coalesce into a bigger one in which there are no palladium atoms, and it is considered as a helium bubble.

  9. Diffusion of helium and nucleation-growth of helium-bubbles in metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chonghong; Chen Keqin; Wang Yinshu

    2001-01-01

    Studies of diffusion and aggregation behaviour of helium in metallic materials are very important to solve the problem of helium embrittlement in structural materials used in the environment of nuclear power. Experimental studies on helium diffusion and aggregation in austenitic stainless steels in a wide temperature range have been performed in authors' research group and the main results obtained are briefly summarized. The mechanism of nucleation-growth of helium-bubbles has been discussed and some problems to be solved are also given

  10. A description of bubble growth and gas release of helium implanted tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharafat, S.; Hu, Q.; Ghoniem, N.; Tkahashi, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Bubble growth and gas release during annealing of helium implanted tungsten is described using a Kinetic Monte Carlo approach. The implanted spatial profiles of stable bubble nuclei are first determined using the Kinetic Rate Theory based helium evolution code, HEROS. The effects of implantation energy, temperature, and bias forces, such as temperature- and stress gradients on bubble migration and coalescence are investigated to explain experimental gas release measurements. This comprehensive helium bubble evolution and release model, demonstrates the impact of near surface (< 1 um) versus deep helium implantation on bubble evolution. Near surface implanted helium bubbles readily attain large equilibrium sizes, while matrix bubbles remain small with high helium pressures. Using the computer simulation, the various stages of helium bubble nucleation, growth, coalescence, and migration are demonstrated and compared with available experimental results. (authors)

  11. Lower Length Scale Characterization and Validation of Formation and Stability of Helium Bubbles in Nano-structured Ferritic Alloys under Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Huijuan [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Yun, Di [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoelzer, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC)

    2018-01-30

    In order to extend the operating license of current light water reactors (LWRs) in the United States and other countries to as many as 80 years or longer, it is demanding to identify potential materials for many of the internal structural components and fasteners. We proposed that 14YWT iron alloy can be adopted in such applications with its excellent material properties, such as high-temperature strength, low creep rate, and high irradiation resistance. Application with 14YWT would improve the void/helium swelling characteristics of the LWR fuels, extend the burn-up limits with the tolerant temperature up to 800oC and reduce the hydrogen production. One key feature of 14YWT material property enhancement is the ultrafine high density of 2-4nm Y-Ti-O enriched nanoclusters (NCs) within the 14YWT iron matrix. The NCs can effectively pin the ultra-fine grain boundaries and dislocations, which significantly enhance mechanical properties of the alloy. Moreover, these nanoclusters remain stable with no coarsening after a large dose of ion irradiation. After ion irradiation, the helium bubbles are observed extremely uniform in size (1nm) and quite homogeneously distributed within the 14YWT matrix, which indicates that the microstructure of 14YWT remains remarkably tolerance to radiation damage. However, there is a lack of understanding of 14YWT both theoretically and experimentally in order to understand the mechanism behind the material property enhancement and to further develop and design a new generation of advanced structural material for current LWR applications and future fusion applications.

  12. Bubble formation in irradiated Li2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verrall, R.A.; Rose, D.H.; Miller, J.M.; Hastings, I.J.; MacDonald, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    Lithium oxide, irradiated to a burnup of 1 at% (total lithium) at temperatures between 400 and 850deg C with on-line tritium recovery and measurement, has been examined out-reactor. Residual tritium content ranged from 2.4 to 16 mCi/g, but, conservatively, averaged less than 10 mCi/g or 1 wppm. Scanning electron microscopy showed bubble formation in the ceramic which is thought to be due to helium formed from the in-reactor 6 Li(n, α) 3 H reaction. (orig.)

  13. Effects of sequential helium and hydrogen ion irradiation on the nucleation and evolution of bubbles in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Zhenyu; Zheng, Zhongcheng [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430072 (China); Luo, Fengfeng [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430072 (China); Institute of Applied Physics, Jiangxi Academy of Science, Nanchang, 330029 (China); Hu, Wenhui [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430072 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, 230031 (China); Zhang, Weiping [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430072 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430072 (China); Ren, Yaoyao [Center for Electron Microscopy, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430072 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The effect of H{sup +} irradiation on formation and evolution of helium bubbles is explored. • The growth of hydrogen bubbles under He{sup +} irradiation is observed. • Mechanism of synergistic effect between He and H is discussed. - Abstract: Irradiations of He{sup +} and H{sup +} have been performed to investigate the effect of H{sup +} irradiation on existing helium bubbles and the effect of pre-irradiation of H{sup +} on the formation of helium bubbles in tungsten. The specimens were irradiated at 800 °C with either 10kev-H{sup +}, 20kev-He{sup +}, or sequentially irradiated with both H{sup +} and He{sup +}. After H{sup +} irradiation, the growth of existing helium bubbles was observed. It was also found that pre- or post- irradiation of H{sup +} enhanced the nucleation of helium bubbles. The growth of hydrogen bubbles was also observed after post irradiation of He{sup +}. The possible mechanism is discussed.

  14. Molecular dynamics and density functional simulations of tungsten nanostructure formation by helium plasma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, A.M.; Takayama, A.; Oda, Y.

    2014-10-01

    For the purposes of long-term use of tungsten diverter walls, it is necessary to suppress the surface deterioration due to the helium ash which induces the formations of helium bubbles and tungsten fuzzy nanostructures. In the present paper, the formation mechanisms of helium bubbles and tungsten fuzzy nanostructures were explained by the four-step process which is composed of the penetration process, the diffusion and agglomeration process, the helium bubble growth process and the tungsten fuzzy nanostructure formation process. The first to third step processes of the four-step process were investigated by using binary collision approximation, density functional theory and molecular dynamics, respectively. Furthermore, newly developed molecular dynamics and Monte-Carlo hybrid simulation has successfully reproduced the early formation process of tungsten fuzzy nanostructure. From these simulations, we here suggest the following key mechanisms of the formations of helium bubbles and tungsten fuzzy nanostructures: (1) By comparison between helium, neon, argon and hydrogen, the noble gas atoms can agglomerate limitlessly not only at a vacancy but also at an interstitial site. In particular, at the low incident energy, only helium atoms bring about the nucleation for helium bubble. (2) In the helium bubble growth process, the strain of the tungsten material around a helium atom is released as a dislocation loop, which is regarded as the loop punching phenomenon. (3) In the tungsten nanostructure formation process, the bursting of a helium bubble forms cavity and convexity in the surface. The helium bubbles tend to be grown and to burst at the cavity region, and then the difference of height between the cavity and convexity on the surface are enhanced. Consequently, the tungsten fuzzy nanostructure is formed. (author)

  15. Measuring helium bubble diameter distributions in tungsten with grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M.; Kluth, P.; Doerner, R. P.; Kirby, N.; Riley, D.; Corr, C. S.

    2016-02-01

    Grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering was performed on tungsten samples exposed to helium plasma in the MAGPIE and Pisces-A linear plasma devices to measure the size distributions of resulting helium nano-bubbles. Nano-bubbles were fitted assuming spheroidal particles and an exponential diameter distribution. These particles had mean diameters between 0.36 and 0.62 nm. Pisces-A exposed samples showed more complex patterns, which may suggest the formation of faceted nano-bubbles or nano-scale surface structures.

  16. Large scale particle image velocimetry with helium filled soap bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosbach, Johannes; Kuehn, Matthias; Wagner, Claus [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology, Goettingen (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    The application of particle image velocimetry (PIV) to measurement of flows on large scales is a challenging necessity especially for the investigation of convective air flows. Combining helium filled soap bubbles as tracer particles with high power quality switched solid state lasers as light sources allows conducting PIV on scales of the order of several square meters. The technique was applied to mixed convection in a full scale double aisle aircraft cabin mock-up for validation of computational fluid dynamics simulations. (orig.)

  17. Large scale particle image velocimetry with helium filled soap bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosbach, Johannes; Kühn, Matthias; Wagner, Claus

    2009-03-01

    The application of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to measurement of flows on large scales is a challenging necessity especially for the investigation of convective air flows. Combining helium filled soap bubbles as tracer particles with high power quality switched solid state lasers as light sources allows conducting PIV on scales of the order of several square meters. The technique was applied to mixed convection in a full scale double aisle aircraft cabin mock-up for validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations.

  18. Shock formation within sonoluminescence bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuong, V.Q.; Szeri, A.J.; Young, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    A strong case has been made by several authors that sharp, spherically symmetric shocks converging on the center of a spherical bubble driven by a strong acoustic field give rise to rapid compression and heating that produces the brief flash of light known as sonoluminescence. The formation of such shocks is considered. It is found that, although at the main collapse the bubble wall does indeed launch an inwardly-traveling compression wave, and although the subsequent reflection of the wave at the bubble center produces a very rapid temperature peak, the wave is prevented from steepening into a sharp shock by an adverse gradient in the sound speed caused by heat transfer. It is shown that the mathematical characteristics of the flow can be prevented from accumulating into a shock front by this adverse sound speed gradient. A range of results is presented for a variety of bubble ambient radii and sound field amplitudes suggested by experiments. The time scale of the peak temperature in the bubble is set by the dynamics of the compression wave: this is typically in the range 100 - 300 ps (FWHM) in concert with recent measurements of the sonoluminescence pulse width. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  19. Engineering self-organising helium bubble lattices in tungsten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R W; Greaves, G; Hinks, J A; Donnelly, S E

    2017-08-10

    The self-organisation of void and gas bubbles in solids into superlattices is an intriguing nanoscale phenomenon. Despite the discovery of these lattices 45 years ago, the atomistics behind the ordering mechanisms responsible for the formation of these nanostructures are yet to be fully elucidated. Here we report on the direct observation via transmission electron microscopy of the formation of bubble lattices under He ion bombardment. By careful control of the irradiation conditions, it has been possible to engineer the bubble size and spacing of the superlattice leading to important conclusions about the significance of vacancy supply in determining the physical characteristics of the system. Furthermore, no bubble lattice alignment was observed in the directions pointing to a key driving mechanism for the formation of these ordered nanostructures being the two-dimensional diffusion of self-interstitial atoms.

  20. Effect of titanium impurities on helium bubble growth in nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarendra, G.; Viswanathan, B.; Rajaraman, R.; Srinivasan, S.; Gopinathan, K.P.

    1992-01-01

    Positron lifetime measurements in He-implanted Ni and Ni-Ti alloys containing dilute concentrations of Ti, during isochronal annealing, are reported. In the initial annealing stage of Ni-Ti alloys, only a single lifetime ranging from 160 to 180 ps is observed, in contrast with the two lifetimes seen in pure Ni. This indicates saturation positron trapping at helium-bound Ti-vacancy complexes, formed in high concentrations. Lattice statics calculations of the He binding energy at various defect complexes in Ni-containing Ti give credence to the above interpretation. Above 800K, two lifetimes are resolved in Ni-Ti alloys, where the longer lifetime τ 2 increases with a sharp reduction in its intensity. This is indicative of He bubble growth. The bubble radius r B and bubble concentration C B are obtained from an analysis of positron lifetime parameters. These results indicate that, for a given annealing temperature, r B is smaller by a factor of two and C B higher by nearly an order of magnitude in Ni-Ti than the corresponding values in pure Ni. This is explained as due to significant retardation of bubble growth on the addition of Ti to Ni, where the Ti impurities cause an impediment to bubble migration and coalescence. (author)

  1. Stable Trapping of Multielectron Helium Bubbles in a Paul Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, E. M.; Vadakkumbatt, V.; Pal, A.; Ghosh, A.

    2017-06-01

    In a recent experiment, we have used a linear Paul trap to store and study multielectron bubbles (MEBs) in liquid helium. MEBs have a charge-to-mass ratio (between 10^{-4} and 10^{-2} C/kg) which is several orders of magnitude smaller than ions (between 10^6 and 10^8 C/kg) studied in traditional ion traps. In addition, MEBs experience significant drag force while moving through the liquid. As a result, the experimental parameters for stable trapping of MEBs, such as magnitude and frequency of the applied electric fields, are very different from those used in typical ion trap experiments. The purpose of this paper is to model the motion of MEBs inside a linear Paul trap in liquid helium, determine the range of working parameters of the trap, and compare the results with experiments.

  2. Low temperature calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy of helium bubbles in Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syskakis, E.

    1985-08-01

    Helium has been introduced into 100 μm thick pure Cu specimens by implantation of α-particles at T = 300 K. Post-implantation annealing of the specimens at high temperatures caused helium to precipitate into bubbles. We have measured the low-temperature heat capacity of helium confined in bubbles of average radius of less than 100 A. The size of the bubbles was obtained by transmission electron microscope investigations. We have observed that helium liquifies at low temperatures and undergoes the transition to the superfluid state in bubbles of average radius larger than 35 A. The confining geometry of bubbles is new and possesses unique features for investigations of confined helium. It provides the possibility to study properties of extremely small, spherical, completely isolated Bose ''particles'' consisting of 10 4 helium atoms each. Furthermore, as we show, it can be known with better accuracy than formerly investigated confining geometries. (orig./BHO)

  3. Formation of soap bubbles by gas jet

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, M. L.; Li, M.; Chen, Z. Y.; Han, J. F.; Liu, D.

    2017-01-01

    Soap bubbles can be easily generated by varies methods, while their formation process is complicated and still worth study. A model about the bubble formation process was proposed in Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 077801 recently, and it was reported that the bubbles were formed when the gas blowing velocity was above one threshold. However, after repeating these experiments, we found the bubbles could be generated in two velocities ranges which corresponded to laminar and turbulent gas jet respective...

  4. Hybrid simulation research on formation mechanism of tungsten nanostructure induced by helium plasma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Atsushi M., E-mail: ito.atsushi@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Takayama, Arimichi; Oda, Yasuhiro [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Tamura, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Ryo; Hattori, Tatsunori; Ogata, Shuji [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Ohno, Noriyasu; Kajita, Shin [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yajima, Miyuki [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Noiri, Yasuyuki [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yoshimoto, Yoshihide [University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Saito, Seiki [Kushiro National College of Technology, Kushiro, Hokkaido 084-0916 (Japan); Takamura, Shuichi [Aichi Institute of Technology, 1247 Yachigusa, Yakusa-cho, Toyota 470-0392 (Japan); Murashima, Takahiro [Tohoku University, 6-3, Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Aoba-Ward, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Miyamoto, Mitsutaka [Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane 690-8504 (Japan); Nakamura, Hiroaki [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The generation of tungsten fuzzy nanostructure by exposure to helium plasma is one of the important problems for the use of tungsten material as divertor plates in nuclear fusion reactors. In the present paper, the formation mechanisms of the helium bubble and the tungsten fuzzy nanostructure were investigated by using several simulation methods. We proposed the four-step process which is composed of penetration step, diffusion and agglomeration step, helium bubble growth step, and fuzzy nanostructure formation step. As the fourth step, the formation of the tungsten fuzzy nanostructure was successfully reproduced by newly developed hybrid simulation combining between molecular dynamics and Monte-Carlo method. The formation mechanism of tungsten fuzzy nanostructure observed by the hybrid simulation is that concavity and convexity of the surface are enhanced by the bursting of helium bubbles in the region around the concavity.

  5. Formation of soap bubbles by gas jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Maolei; Li, Min; Chen, Zhiyuan; Han, Jifeng; Liu, Dong

    2017-12-01

    Soap bubbles can be easily generated by various methods, while their formation process is complicated and still worth studying. A model about the bubble formation process was proposed in the study by Salkin et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 077801 (2016)] recently, and it was reported that the bubbles were formed when the gas blowing velocity was above one threshold. However, after a detailed study of these experiments, we found that the bubbles could be generated in two velocity ranges which corresponded to the laminar and turbulent gas jet, respectively, and the predicted threshold was only effective for turbulent gas flow. The study revealed that the bubble formation was greatly influenced by the aerodynamics of the gas jet blowing to the film, and these results will help to further understand the formation mechanism of the soap bubble as well as the interaction between the gas jet and the thin liquid film.

  6. Radiation damage in gallium-stabilized δ-plutonium with helium bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, FengChao [CAS Key Laboratory of Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Wang, Pei [Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Liu, XiaoYi [CAS Key Laboratory of Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Wu, HengAn, E-mail: wuha@ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China)

    2017-02-15

    To understand the role of helium on self-irradiation effects in δ-plutonium, microstructure evolutions due to α-decay events near pre-existing helium bubbles in gallium-stabilized δ-plutonium are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Bubble promoting effect plays a dominating role in point defects production, resulting in increasing number of point defects. When lightweight helium atoms act as media, energy transfer discrepancy and altered spatial morphology of point defects induced by mass effect are revealed. The evolution of stacking faults surrounding the disordered core is studied and their binding effect on the propagation of point defects are presented. The cascade-induced bubble coalescence, resolution and re-nucleation driven by internal pressure are obtained in the investigation on helium behaviors. The intrinsic tendency in our simulated self-irradiation with helium bubbles is significant for understanding the underlying mechanism of aging in plutonium and its alloys.

  7. Modeling of helium bubble nucleation and growth in neutron irradiated boron doped RAFM steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dethloff, Christian; Gaganidze, Ermile; Svetukhin, Vyacheslav V.; Aktaa, Jarir

    2012-01-01

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are promising candidates for structural materials in future fusion technology. In addition to other irradiation defects, the transmuted helium is believed to strongly influence material hardening and embrittlement behavior. A phenomenological model based on kinetic rate equations is developed to describe homogeneous nucleation and growth of helium bubbles in neutron irradiated RAFM steels. The model is adapted to different 10 B doped EUROFER97 based heats, which already had been studied in past irradiation experiments. Simulations yield bubble size distributions, whereby effects of helium generation rate, surface energy, helium sinks and helium density are investigated. Peak bubble diameters under different conditions are compared to preliminary microstructural results on irradiated specimens. Helium induced hardening was calculated by applying the Dispersed Barrier Hardening model to simulated cluster size distributions. Quantitative microstructural investigations of unirradiated and irradiated specimens will be used to support and verify the model.

  8. Modeling of helium bubble nucleation and growth in neutron irradiated boron doped RAFM steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dethloff, Christian, E-mail: christian.dethloff@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Gaganidze, Ermile [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Svetukhin, Vyacheslav V. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy Str. 42, 432970 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Aktaa, Jarir [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are promising candidates for structural materials in future fusion technology. In addition to other irradiation defects, the transmuted helium is believed to strongly influence material hardening and embrittlement behavior. A phenomenological model based on kinetic rate equations is developed to describe homogeneous nucleation and growth of helium bubbles in neutron irradiated RAFM steels. The model is adapted to different {sup 10}B doped EUROFER97 based heats, which already had been studied in past irradiation experiments. Simulations yield bubble size distributions, whereby effects of helium generation rate, surface energy, helium sinks and helium density are investigated. Peak bubble diameters under different conditions are compared to preliminary microstructural results on irradiated specimens. Helium induced hardening was calculated by applying the Dispersed Barrier Hardening model to simulated cluster size distributions. Quantitative microstructural investigations of unirradiated and irradiated specimens will be used to support and verify the model.

  9. Solubility of helium in mercury for bubbling technology of the spallation neutron mercury target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, S.; Naoe, T.; Futakawa, M.

    2010-01-01

    The pitting damage of mercury target container that originates in the pressure wave excited by the proton beam incidence becomes a large problem to reach the high-power neutron source in JSNS and SNS. The lifetime of mercury container is decreased remarkably by the pitting damage. As one of solutions, the pressure wave is mitigated by injecting the helium micro bubbles in mercury. In order to inject the helium micro bubbles into mercury, it is important to understand the characteristic of micro bubbles in mercury. The solubility of mercury-helium system is a key factor to decide bubbling conditions, because the disappearance behavior, i.e. the lifetime of micro bubbles, depends on the solubility. In addition, the bubble generation method is affected by it. Moreover, the experimental data related to the solubility of helium in mercury hardly exist. In this work, the solubility was obtained experimentally by measuring precisely the pressure drop of the gas that is facing to mercury surface. The pressure drop was attributed to the helium dissolution into mercury. Based on the measured solubility, the lifetime of micro bubbles and the method of the bubble generation is estimated using the solubility data.

  10. An interbubble fracture mechanism of blister formation on helium-irradiated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes a new model of surface blister formation in which a blister is nucleated by the interbubble fracture of highly overpressurized helium bubbles. As in other gas-driven models, the internal release of helium then provides the driving force for blister lid deformation. The high pressures required for the suggested mode of fracture are a result of the difficulty, experienced by the bubbles in acquiring vacancies. By considering the bubble growth mechanisms, the critical conditions for interbubble fracture are shown to depend on the helium dose and energy, the bubble size, and their depth in the irradiated material. These parameters and other aspects of blister formation are discussed on the basis of the proposed model. One important result concerns the position of the fracture plane; because of the usual displacement of damage and helium peaks relative to depth, this plane can lie well beyond the helium peak. Thus, the disagreement inherent in previous gas models between helium range and measured blister lid thickness values can be resolved without recourse to lateral stress arguments. (Auth.)

  11. Effects of displacement damage and helium production rates on the nucleation and growth of helium bubbles - Positron annihilation spectroscopy aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krsjak, Vladimir; Degmova, Jarmila; Sojak, Stanislav; Slugen, Vladimir

    2018-02-01

    Fe-12 wt% Cr model alloy samples were implanted by 250 keV He2+ ions to three different fluencies (3 × 1017, 9 × 1017 and 1.5 × 1018 cm-2) at T steel samples [1] irradiated in the frame of a two-years irradiation program of the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source. Bi-modal defect distribution represented by two defect components in positron lifetime spectrum reveals two distinct helium bubbles growth mechanisms. While at the lower helium production rate of the spallation environment, the bubbles grow primarily by migration and coalescence, at the high production rates of helium in the implanted samples, the results indicate this growth is driven by Ostwald ripening mechanism. A competitive growth process via emission of interstitial atoms (clusters) is discussed in terms of low-temperature He implantations.

  12. Observations of a fcc helium gas-bubble superlattice in copper, nickel, and stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.B.; Mazey, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy is used to investigate the spatial arrangement of the small gas bubbles produced in several fcc metals by 30 keV helium ion irradiation to high dose at 300 K. In what is a new result for this important class of metals it is found that the helium gas bubbles lie on a superlattice having an fcc structure with principal axes aligned with those of the metal matrix. The bubble lattice constant asub(i), is measured for a helium fluence just below the critical dose for radiation blistering of the metal surface (approximately 4 x 10 17 He/cm 2 ). Implantation rates are typically approximately 10 14 He ions cm -2 sec -1 . The values of asub(i) obtained for copper, nickel and stainless steel are (7.6 +- 0.3)nm, (6.6 +- 0.5)nm and (6.4 +- 0.5)nm respectively. Above the critical dose the bubble lattice is seen to survive in some blister caps as well as in the region between blisters. Bubble alignment is also observed in the case of hydrogen bubbles produced in copper by low energy proton irradiation to high fluence at 300 K. The presentation of this data was accompanied by a cine film illustrating the behaviour of the gas bubble lattice in copper during post-irradiation annealing in the electron microscope. A summary of the film is given in the appendix. (author)

  13. Helium 3 precipitation in AISI 316L stainless steel induced by radioactive decay of tritium: Microstructural study of helium bubble precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brass, A.M.; Chene, J.

    1994-01-01

    The development of the thermonuclear technology has given rise to a renewed interest in the study of the behavior of helium in metals. A great amount of work is still required for the understanding of the role of helium on the mechanical properties of structural materials for fusion technology, especially austenitic stainless steels. This article deals with the study of the influence of thermomechanical heat treatments, aging conditions (temperature and time), and helium concentration of helium bubble precipitation in a 316L austenitic steel. Helium was generated by the radioactive decay of tritium (tritium trick). Helium bubbles impede the grain growth in 316L steel aged at 1,373 K and also the recrystallization reaction at this temperature if cold working is performed prior to aging. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations indicated a weak helium precipitation at 1,073 and 1,223 K, presumably due to the presence of trapping sites for tritium, and no bubble growth after aging up to 100 hours. Precipitation sites are mainly dislocations in the matrix at 1,073 K and grain boundaries and individual dislocations in the matrix at 1,223 K. The large bubble size (50 nm) observed at 1,373 K, even for short aging times (0.083), can partly be attributed to bubble dragging by dislocations toward the grain boundaries. Cold deformation prior to aging leads to a larger bubble size due to growth enhancement during recrystallization. Decreasing the helium content leads to a smaller helium bubble size and density. Tritium trapping at helium bubbles may favor helium 3 accumulation on defects such as grain boundaries, as observed by tritium autoradiography

  14. A three-dimensional meso-scale modeling for helium bubble growth in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzudo, T.; Kaburaki, H.; Wakai, E.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional meso-scale computer model using a Monte-Carlo simulation method has been proposed to simulate the helium bubble growth in metals. The primary merit of this model is that it enables the visual comparison between the microstructure observed by the TEM imaging and those by calculations. The modeling is so simple that one can control easily the calculation by tuning parameters. The simulation results are confirmed by the ideal gas law and the capillary relation. helium bubble growth, meso-scale modeling, Monte-Carlo simulation, the ideal gas law and the capillary relation. (authors)

  15. The observation of helium gas bubble lattices in copper, nickel and stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.B.; Mazey, D.J.

    1978-10-01

    Transmission electron microscopy is used to investigate the spatial arrangement of the small gas bubbles produced in several fcc metals by 30 keV helium ion irradiation to high dose at 300K. In what is a new result for this important class of metals it is found that the helium gas bubbles lie on a superlattice having an fcc structure with principal axes aligned with those of the metal matrix. The bubble lattice constant, asub(l), is measured for a helium fluence just below the critical dose for radiation blistering of the metal surface. Implantation rates are typically approximately 10 14 He ions cm -2 sec -1 . The values of asub(l) obtained for copper, nickel and stainless steel are given. Above the critical dose the bubble lattice is seen to survive in some blister caps as well as in the region between blisters. Bubble alignment is also observed in the case of hydrogen bubbles produced in copper by low energy proton irradiation to high fluence at 300K. (author)

  16. Electron microscopy observations of helium bubble-void transition effects in nimonic PE16 alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazey, D.J.; Nelson, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    High-nickel alloys based on the Nimonic PE16 composition have been injected at temperatures of 525 0 C and 625 0 C with 1000 ppm helium to produce a high gas-bubble concentration and subsequently irradiated with 36 MeV nickel ions. Extensive heterogeneous nucleation of bubbles is observed on faulted interstitial loops and dislocations. Evidence is found in standard PE16 alloy for bimodal bubble plus void distributions which persist during nickel-ion irradiation to 30 and 60 dpa at 625 0 C and result in a low void volume swelling of approximately 1%. The observations can be correlated with the critical bubble/void transition radius which is calculated from theory to be approximately 4.4 nm. Pre-injection of helium into a 'matrix' PE16 (low Si, Ti and Al) alloy produced an initial bubble population whose average size was above the calculated transition radius such that all bubbles eventually grew as voids during subsequent nickel-ion irradiation up to 60 dpa at 625 0 C where the void volume swelling reached approximately 12%. The observations are discussed briefly and related to theoretical predictions of the bubble/void transition radius. (author)

  17. Nanostructure formation on refractory metal surfaces irradiated by helium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, Shuichi; Kajita, Shin; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2013-01-01

    Helium defects on plasma-facing refractory metals like tungsten have been studied in fusion sciences from the view point of the effects on metal surface properties, concentrating on the bubble formation. However, the surface morphology over the lower surface temperature range was found recently to be changed drastically, something like cotton down or arborescence, sometimes called as “fuzz”. The formation process, although still open problem, would be discussed in terms of viscoelastic model with the effect of surface tension, taking account of its thermal properties and nano-bubbles inside the thin fibers. Some physical surface characteristics like electron emission, radiation emissivity and sputtering are quite influenced by its forest-like structure. Unipolar arcing has been newly studied by using such a surface structure which makes its initiation controllable. In the present report, other examples of nanostructure formation in a variety of particle incident conditions have been introduced as well as the possibility of its industrial applications to enhance interdisciplinary interests. (author)

  18. A mechanical analysis of metallic tritide aging by helium bubble growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montheillet, F. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines (SMS), CNRS UMR 5146 (PECM), 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne Cedex 2 (France)], E-mail: montheil@emse.fr; Delaplanche, D.; Fabre, A.; Munier, E.; Thiebaut, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique de Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2008-10-25

    A simple mechanical model is proposed for the aging of a metallic tritide. The material is assumed to be elastic-power law viscoplastic. Part of the helium atoms generated by tritium decay form spherical bubbles that weaken the elastic moduli of the overall material. By contrast, others can be stored in solid solution in the matrix and are likely to increase the moduli. Two variants of the model are compared, assuming either instantaneous or finite rate diffusion of helium. They predict globally similar evolutions of the gas pressure inside the bubbles, the geometrical parameters (bubble radius, overall swelling), as well as the matrix and overall elastic moduli. The results are in good agreement with atomistic calculations of the pressure evolution. Furthermore, recent experimental measurements of the Young modulus changes during aging are better reproduced when He diffusion rate is finite, thus supporting the second variant of the model.

  19. A mechanical analysis of metallic tritide aging by helium bubble growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montheillet, F.; Delaplanche, D.; Fabre, A.; Munier, E.; Thiebaut, S.

    2008-01-01

    A simple mechanical model is proposed for the aging of a metallic tritide. The material is assumed to be elastic-power law viscoplastic. Part of the helium atoms generated by tritium decay form spherical bubbles that weaken the elastic moduli of the overall material. By contrast, others can be stored in solid solution in the matrix and are likely to increase the moduli. Two variants of the model are compared, assuming either instantaneous or finite rate diffusion of helium. They predict globally similar evolutions of the gas pressure inside the bubbles, the geometrical parameters (bubble radius, overall swelling), as well as the matrix and overall elastic moduli. The results are in good agreement with atomistic calculations of the pressure evolution. Furthermore, recent experimental measurements of the Young modulus changes during aging are better reproduced when He diffusion rate is finite, thus supporting the second variant of the model

  20. Gas bubble and damage microstructure in helium implanted nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminsky, M.; Das, S.K.; Fenske, G.

    1978-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to study the depth distribution of bubbles (or voids) and dislocation damage in nickel irradiated at 500 0 C with 20- and 500-keV 4 He + ions to total doses ranging from 2.9 x 10 15 to 5 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 . The size, number density, and volume fraction of bubbles (or voids) were measured from micrographs taken from samples sectioned parallel to the surface normal. The results for 500-keV irradiation show that the peaks in the depth distribution of number density and of volume fraction (i.e., swelling) of bubbles (or voids) are approx. 20% deeper than the calculated projected range distribution. However, for 20-keV irradiation the peak in the swellig occurs at a depth which is about a factor of two larger than the peak in the distributions of projected range and the energy deposited into damage as calculated according to Brice. The peak positions are nearly independent of the total doses used in these studies. The implications of these results for the blistering mechanisms are discussed

  1. Irradiation damage in boron carbide: point defects, clusters and helium bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoto, T.; Zuppiroli, L.

    1986-06-01

    Boron carbide is a refractory hard and light material of interest in nuclear technology (fission and also fusion). Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine the properties of radiation induced damage. Firstly, the production of point defects and their clustering was studied in samples irradiated by 1 MeV electron in a high voltage electron microscope at selected temperatures from 12 K to 1000 K. Secondly, conventional transmission electron microscopy was used to understand the production of helium bubbles in neutron irradiated boron carbide and their role in the generation of microcracks. Finally, the interaction between point defects and bubbles was also examined

  2. Modeling of helium bubble nucleation and growth in austenitic stainless steels using an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Backer, A.; Adjanor, G.; Domain, C.; Lescoat, M.L.; Jublot-Leclerc, S.; Fortuna, F.; Gentils, A.; Ortiz, C.J.; Souidi, A.; Becquart, C.S.

    2015-01-01

    Implantation of 10 keV helium in 316L steel thin foils was performed in JANNuS-Orsay facility and modeled using a multiscale approach. Density Functional Theory (DFT) atomistic calculations [1] were used to obtain the properties of He and He-vacancy clusters, and the Binary Collision Approximation based code MARLOWE was applied to determine the damage and He-ion depth profiles as in [2,3]. The processes involved in the homogeneous He bubble nucleation and growth were defined and implemented in the Object Kinetic Monte Carlo code LAKIMOCA [4]. In particular as the He to dpa ratio was high, self-trapping of He clusters and the trap mutation of He-vacancy clusters had to be taken into account. With this multiscale approach, the formation of bubbles was modeled up to nanometer-scale size, where bubbles can be observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy. Their densities and sizes were studied as functions of fluence (up to 5 × 10 19 He/m 2 ) at two temperatures (473 and 723 K) and for different sample thicknesses (25–250 nm). It appears that the damage is not only due to the collision cascades but is also strongly controlled by the He accumulation in pressurized bubbles. Comparison with experimental data is discussed and sensible agreement is achieved

  3. Modeling of helium bubble nucleation and growth in austenitic stainless steels using an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Backer, A., E-mail: andree.debacker@ccfe.ac.uk [UMET, UMR 8207, Université Lille 1, Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); CCFE, Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Adjanor, G.; Domain, C.; Lescoat, M.L. [EDF R& D, MMC Centre des Renardières, Moret-sur-Loing (France); Jublot-Leclerc, S.; Fortuna, F.; Gentils, A. [CSNSM, Univ Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Ortiz, C.J. [CIEMAT, Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión por Confinamiento Magnético, Madrid (Spain); Souidi, A. [Université Dr. Tahar Moulay de Saida, Saida (Algeria); Becquart, C.S. [UMET, UMR 8207, Université Lille 1, Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2015-06-01

    Implantation of 10 keV helium in 316L steel thin foils was performed in JANNuS-Orsay facility and modeled using a multiscale approach. Density Functional Theory (DFT) atomistic calculations [1] were used to obtain the properties of He and He-vacancy clusters, and the Binary Collision Approximation based code MARLOWE was applied to determine the damage and He-ion depth profiles as in [2,3]. The processes involved in the homogeneous He bubble nucleation and growth were defined and implemented in the Object Kinetic Monte Carlo code LAKIMOCA [4]. In particular as the He to dpa ratio was high, self-trapping of He clusters and the trap mutation of He-vacancy clusters had to be taken into account. With this multiscale approach, the formation of bubbles was modeled up to nanometer-scale size, where bubbles can be observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy. Their densities and sizes were studied as functions of fluence (up to 5 × 10{sup 19} He/m{sup 2}) at two temperatures (473 and 723 K) and for different sample thicknesses (25–250 nm). It appears that the damage is not only due to the collision cascades but is also strongly controlled by the He accumulation in pressurized bubbles. Comparison with experimental data is discussed and sensible agreement is achieved.

  4. Effect of helium bubbles at grain boundaries on the fracture characteristics of high-density 238PuO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisson, R.D.; McDonell, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    Helium bubbles that formed at grain boundaries in high density (greater than 92 percent of theoretical) 238 PuO 2 shards did not affect the room temperature fracture behavior as observed by scanning electron microscopy. Fracture was predominantly by brittle transgranular cleavage with only infrequent intergranular failure observed. Pores (approximately 5 μm dia) that formed within the grains during the sintering process, rather than helium bubbles, initiated fractures. Helium bubbles were observed occasionally on the fracture surfaces of 20-month-old shards that had been heated to 1600 0 C for 8 h and subsequently crushed at room temperature. The average radius of these bubbles was approximately 1 μm. These bubbles were not interconnected, but were sometimes aligned in stringers

  5. Bubble Formation in Basalt-like Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Keding, Ralf; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    and their diameter. The variation in melting temperature has little influence on the overall bubble volume. However, the size distribution of the bubbles varies with the melting temperature. When the melt is slowly cooled, the bubble volume increases, implying decreased solubility of the gaseous species. Mass...... spectroscopy analysis of gases liberated during heating of the glass reveals that small bubbles contain predominantly CH4, CO and CO2, whereas large bubbles bear N2, SO2 and H2S. The methodology utilised in this work can, besides mapping the bubbles in a glass, be applied to shed light on the sources of bubble...

  6. A stochastic differential equations approach for the description of helium bubble size distributions in irradiated metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seif, Dariush; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2014-12-01

    A rate theory model based on the theory of nonlinear stochastic differential equations (SDEs) is developed to estimate the time-dependent size distribution of helium bubbles in metals under irradiation. Using approaches derived from Itô's calculus, rate equations for the first five moments of the size distribution in helium-vacancy space are derived, accounting for the stochastic nature of the atomic processes involved. In the first iteration of the model, the distribution is represented as a bivariate Gaussian distribution. The spread of the distribution about the mean is obtained by white-noise terms in the second-order moments, driven by fluctuations in the general absorption and emission of point defects by bubbles, and fluctuations stemming from collision cascades. This statistical model for the reconstruction of the distribution by its moments is coupled to a previously developed reduced-set, mean-field, rate theory model. As an illustrative case study, the model is applied to a tungsten plasma facing component under irradiation. Our findings highlight the important role of stochastic atomic fluctuations on the evolution of helium-vacancy cluster size distributions. It is found that when the average bubble size is small (at low dpa levels), the relative spread of the distribution is large and average bubble pressures may be very large. As bubbles begin to grow in size, average bubble pressures decrease, and stochastic fluctuations have a lessened effect. The distribution becomes tighter as it evolves in time, corresponding to a more uniform bubble population. The model is formulated in a general way, capable of including point defect drift due to internal temperature and/or stress gradients. These arise during pulsed irradiation, and also during steady irradiation as a result of externally applied or internally generated non-homogeneous stress fields. Discussion is given into how the model can be extended to include full spatial resolution and how the

  7. Dynamics of bubble formation in highly viscous liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancholi, Ketan; Stride, Eleanor; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2008-04-15

    There has recently been considerable interest in the development of devices for the preparation of monodisperse microbubble suspensions for use as ultrasound contrast agents and drug delivery vehicles. These applications require not only a high degree of bubble uniformity but also a maximum bubble size of 8 mum, and this provides a strong motivation for developing an improved understanding of the process of bubble formation in a given device. The aim of this work was to investigate bubble formation in a T-junction device and determine the influence of the different processing parameters upon bubble size, in particular, liquid viscosity. Images of air bubble formation in a specially designed T-junction were recorded using a high-speed camera for different ratios of liquid to gas flow rate (Ql/Qg) and different liquid viscosities (microl). It was found that theoretical predictions of the flow profile in the focal region based on analysis of axisymmetric Stokes flow were accurate to within 6% when compared with the experimental data, indicating that this provided a suitable means of describing the bubble formation process. Both the theoretical and experimental results showed that Ql/Qg and mul had a significant influence upon bubble formation and eventual size, with higher flow rates and higher viscosities producing smaller bubbles. There were, however, found to be limiting values of Ql/Qg and mul beyond which no further reduction in bubble size was achieved.

  8. Effect of helium on void formation in nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brimhall, J.L.; Simonen, E.P.

    1977-01-01

    This study examines the influence of helium on void formation in self-ion irradiated nickel. Helium was injected either simultaneously with, or prior to, the self-ion bombardment. The void microstructure was characterized as a function of helium deposition rate and the total heavy-ion dose. In particular, at 575 0 C and 5 X 10 -3 displacements per atom per second the void density is found to be proportional to the helium deposition rate. The dose dependence of swelling is initially dominated by helium driven nucleation. The void density rapidly saturates after which swelling continues with increasing dose only from void growth. It is concluded that helium promotes void nucleation in nickel with either helium implantation technique, pre-injection or simultaneous injection. Qualitative differences, however, are recognized. (Auth.)

  9. Crystal orientation effects on helium ion depth distributions and adatom formation processes in plasma-facing tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    We present atomistic simulations that show the effect of surface orientation on helium depth distributions and surface feature formation as a result of low-energy helium plasma exposure. We find a pronounced effect of surface orientation on the initial depth of implanted helium ions, as well as a difference in reflection and helium retention across different surface orientations. Our results indicate that single helium interstitials are sufficient to induce the formation of adatom/substitutional helium pairs under certain highly corrugated tungsten surfaces, such as (1 1 1)-orientations, leading to the formation of a relatively concentrated layer of immobile helium immediately below the surface. The energies involved for helium-induced adatom formation on (1 1 1) and (2 1 1) surfaces are exoergic for even a single adatom very close to the surface, while (0 0 1) and (0 1 1) surfaces require two or even three helium atoms in a cluster before a substitutional helium cluster and adatom will form with reasonable probability. This phenomenon results in much higher initial helium retention during helium plasma exposure to (1 1 1) and (2 1 1) tungsten surfaces than is observed for (0 0 1) or (0 1 1) surfaces and is much higher than can be attributed to differences in the initial depth distributions alone. The layer thus formed may serve as nucleation sites for further bubble formation and growth or as a source of material embrittlement or fatigue, which may have implications for the formation of tungsten “fuzz” in plasma-facing divertors for magnetic-confinement nuclear fusion reactors and/or the lifetime of such divertors.

  10. Thermal desorption of deuterium from Be, and Be with helium bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorov, A.V.; Van Veen, A.; Busker, G.J. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Interfaculty Reactor Inst.

    1998-01-01

    Deuterium desorption measurements carried out on a single-crystalline beryllium sample are presented. Deuterium ions were implanted at room temperature at the energy of 0.7 and 1.2 keV up to doses ranging from 10{sup 19} to 3.6 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -2}. In order to eliminate the influence of the beryllium-oxide surface layer, before the implantation the surface of the sample was cleaned by argon sputtering. After the implantation the sample was annealed up to 1200 K at a constant rate of 10 K/s. Deuterium released from the sample was monitored by a calibrated quadrupole mass-spectrometer. The desorption spectra revealed two different contributions. One is a well defined and very narrow peak centered around 450 K. This peak is observed only at high implantation doses > 7.8 x 10{sup 20} m{sup -2}, which is close to the deuterium saturation limit of 0.3 D/Be and is related to deuterium release from blisters or interconnected bubbles. The activation energy of 1.1 eV and the threshold implantation dose are consistent with the values reported in literature. The second contribution in the release spectra is found in the temperature range from 600 to 900 K and is present throughout the whole range of the implantation doses. The activation energies corresponding to this release lie in the range between 1.8 and 2.5 eV and are ascribed to the release from deuterium-vacancy type of defects. In a number of experiments the deuterium implantation was preceded by helium implantation followed by partial annealing to create helium bubbles. The resulting deuterium desorption spectra indicate that deuterium detrapping from helium bubbles is characterized by an activation energy of 2.7 eV. (author)

  11. Helium-filled soap bubbles tracing fidelity in wall-bounded turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faleiros, David Engler; Tuinstra, Marthijn; Sciacchitano, Andrea; Scarano, Fulvio

    2018-03-01

    The use of helium-filled soap bubbles (HFSB) as flow tracers for particle image velocimetry (PIV) and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) to measure the properties of turbulent boundary layers is investigated in the velocity range from 30 to 50 m/s. The experiments correspond to momentum thickness-based Reynolds numbers of 3300 and 5100. A single bubble generator delivers nearly neutrally buoyant HFSB to seed the air flow developing over the flat plate. The HFSB motion analysis is performed by PTV using single-frame multi-exposure recordings. The measurements yield the local velocity and turbulence statistics. Planar two-component-PIV measurements with micron-sized droplets (DEHS) conducted under the same conditions provide reference data for the quantities of interest. In addition, the behavior of air-filled soap bubbles is studied where the effect of non-neutral buoyancy is more pronounced. The mean velocity profiles as well as the turbulent stresses obtained with HFSB are in good agreement with the flow statistics obtained with DEHS particles. The study illustrates that HFSB tracers can be used to determine the mean velocity and the turbulent fluctuations of turbulent boundary layers above a distance of approximately two bubble diameters from the wall. This work broadens the current range of application of HFSB from external aerodynamics of large-scale-PIV experiments towards wall-bounded turbulence.

  12. A Molecular dynamics study of helium bubble stability during high-energy displacement cascades in alpha-iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu, Jin; Yang, Li; Zu, Xiaotao; Gao, Fei

    2007-01-01

    The interactions of high-energy displacement cascades with helium bubbles in a-Fe are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Initial bubbles with the volumes of 212 and 636 (angstrom)3 are considered, and the helium-to-vacancy (He/V) ratio in the bubbles varies from 0.5 to 3. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) energy, Ep, is up to 40 keV. The results show that the change of nm-sized He bubbles due to displacement cascade does not depend much on the bubble size, but rather on the He/V ratio and the recoil energy. For the initial He/V ratio less than 1, the size of the bubbles decreases with increasing PKA energy, but the He/V ratio increases. However, for the initial He/V ratio of 3, the size of the bubbles increases, and the He/V ratio decreases with PKA energy. For the initial He/V ratio of 1, the ratio of the small bubble decreases slightly, but the ratio of the large bubble remains unchanged for lower PKA energy, and increases slightly for higher PKA energy. The reasons for these observed phenomena have been explained

  13. Gas bubble network formation in irradiated beryllium pebbles monitored by X-Ray micro-tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolier, E; Ferrero, C. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Zimer 203, Gebaeude 451, Abteilung HVT-TL (Germany); Moslang, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, FZK, Karlsruhe (Germany); Pieritz, R.A. [CNRS, Lab. de Glaciologie et Geophysique de l' Environnement, 38 - Saint Martin d' Heres (France)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The efficient and safe operation of helium cooled ceramic breeder blankets requires among others an efficient tritium release during operation at blanket relevant temperatures. In the past out-of-pile thermal desorption studies on low temperature neutron irradiated beryllium have shown that tritium and helium release peaks occur together. This phenomenon can be interpreted in terms of growth and coalescence of helium bubbles and tritium that either is trapped inside the helium bubbles in form of T{sub 2} molecules or in their strain field. With increasing temperature the bubble density and size at grain interfaces increase together with the probability of interconnected porosities and channel formation to the outer surface, leading to simultaneous helium and tritium release peaks in TDS. For a reliable prediction of gas release up to end-of-life conditions at blanket relevant temperatures, knowledge of the dynamics of bubble growth and coalescence as well as the 3D distribution of bubble network formation is indispensable. Such data could also be used to experimentally validate any future model predictions of tritium and helium release rates. A high resolution computer aided micro-tomography (CMT) setup has been developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility which allowed reconstructing 3-D images of beryllium pebbles without damaging them. By postprocessing the data a 3D rendering of inner surfaces and of interconnected channel networks can be obtained, thus allowing the identification of open porosities in neutron irradiated and tempered beryllium pebbles. In our case Beryllium pebbles of 2 mm diameter had been neutron irradiated in the 'Beryllium' experiment at 770 K with 1.24 x 10{sup 25} nxm{sup -2} resulting in 480 appm He and 12 appm Tritium. After annealing at 1500 K CMT was performed on the pebbles with 4.9 and 1.4 {mu}m voxel resolution, respectively, followed by morphological and topological post

  14. Jet formation in shock-heavy gas bubble interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Gang Zhai; Ting Si; Li-Yong Zou; Xi-Sheng Luo

    2013-01-01

    The influences of the acoustic impedance and shock strength on the jet formation in shock-heavy gas bubble interaction are numerically studied in this work.The process of a shock interacting with a krypton or a SF6 bubble is studied by the numerical method VAS2D.As a validation,the experiments of a SF6 bubble accelerated by a planar shock were performed.The results indicate that,due to the mismatch of acoustic impedance,the way of jet formation in heavy gas bubble with different species is diversified under the same initial condition.With respect to the same bubble,the manner of jet formation is also distinctly different under different shock strengths.The disparities of the acoustic impedance result in different effects of shock focusing in the bubble,and different behaviors of shock wave inside and outside the bubble.The analyses of the wave pattern and the pressure variation indicate that the jet formation is closely associated with the pressure perturbation.Moreover,the analysis of the vorticity deposition,and comparisons of circulation and baroclinic torque show that the baroclinic vorticity also contributes to the jet formation.It is concluded that the pressure perturbation and baroclinic vorticity deposition are the two dominant factors for the jet formation in shock-heavy gas bubble interaction.

  15. On the empirical determination of positron trapping coefficient at nano-scale helium bubbles in steels irradiated in spallation target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krsjak, Vladimir; Kuriplach, Jan; Vieh, Christiane; Peng, Lei; Dai, Yong

    2018-06-01

    In the present work, the specific positron trapping rate of small helium bubbles was empirically derived from positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of Fe9Cr martensitic steels. Both techniques are well known to be sensitive to nanometer-sized helium-filled cavities induced during irradiation in a mixed proton-neutron spectrum of spallation target. Complementary TEM and PALS studies show that positrons are being trapped to these defects at a rate of 1.2 ± 0.8 × 10-14 m3s-1. This suggests that helium bubbles in ferritic/martensitic steels are attractive traps for positrons comparable to mono-vacancies and quantitative analysis of the bubbles by PALS technique is plausible.

  16. Interaction of the Helium, Hydrogen, Air, Argon, and Nitrogen Bubbles with Graphite Surface in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartali, Ruben; Otyepka, Michal; Pykal, Martin; Lazar, Petr; Micheli, Victor; Gottardi, Gloria; Laidani, Nadhira

    2017-05-24

    The interaction of the confined gas with solid surface immersed in water is a common theme of many important fields such as self-cleaning surface, gas storage, and sensing. For that reason, we investigated the gas-graphite interaction in the water medium. The graphite surface was prepared by mechanical exfoliation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The surface chemistry and morphology were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, profilometry, and atomic force microscopy. The surface energy of HOPG was estimated by contact angle measurements using the Owens-Wendt method. The interaction of gases (Ar, He, H 2 , N 2 , and air) with graphite was studied by a captive bubble method, in which the gas bubble was in contact with the exfoliated graphite surface in water media. The experimental data were corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations. The surface energy of HOPG equaled to 52.8 mJ/m 2 and more of 95% of the surface energy was attributed to dispersion interactions. The results on gas-surface interaction indicated that HOPG surface had gasphilic behavior for helium and hydrogen, while gasphobic behavior for argon and nitrogen. The results showed that the variation of the gas contact angle was related to the balance between the gas-surface and gas-gas interaction potentials. For helium and hydrogen the gas-surface interaction was particularly high compared to gas-gas interaction and this promoted the favorable interaction with graphite surface.

  17. A stochastic differential equations approach for the description of helium bubble size distributions in irradiated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seif, Dariush; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2014-01-01

    A rate theory model based on the theory of nonlinear stochastic differential equations (SDEs) is developed to estimate the time-dependent size distribution of helium bubbles in metals under irradiation. Using approaches derived from Itô’s calculus, rate equations for the first five moments of the size distribution in helium–vacancy space are derived, accounting for the stochastic nature of the atomic processes involved. In the first iteration of the model, the distribution is represented as a bivariate Gaussian distribution. The spread of the distribution about the mean is obtained by white-noise terms in the second-order moments, driven by fluctuations in the general absorption and emission of point defects by bubbles, and fluctuations stemming from collision cascades. This statistical model for the reconstruction of the distribution by its moments is coupled to a previously developed reduced-set, mean-field, rate theory model. As an illustrative case study, the model is applied to a tungsten plasma facing component under irradiation. Our findings highlight the important role of stochastic atomic fluctuations on the evolution of helium–vacancy cluster size distributions. It is found that when the average bubble size is small (at low dpa levels), the relative spread of the distribution is large and average bubble pressures may be very large. As bubbles begin to grow in size, average bubble pressures decrease, and stochastic fluctuations have a lessened effect. The distribution becomes tighter as it evolves in time, corresponding to a more uniform bubble population. The model is formulated in a general way, capable of including point defect drift due to internal temperature and/or stress gradients. These arise during pulsed irradiation, and also during steady irradiation as a result of externally applied or internally generated non-homogeneous stress fields. Discussion is given into how the model can be extended to include full spatial resolution and how the

  18. A stochastic differential equations approach for the description of helium bubble size distributions in irradiated metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seif, Dariush, E-mail: dariush.seif@iwm-extern.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institut für Werkstoffmechanik, Freiburg 79108 (Germany); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 (United States); Ghoniem, Nasr M. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    A rate theory model based on the theory of nonlinear stochastic differential equations (SDEs) is developed to estimate the time-dependent size distribution of helium bubbles in metals under irradiation. Using approaches derived from Itô’s calculus, rate equations for the first five moments of the size distribution in helium–vacancy space are derived, accounting for the stochastic nature of the atomic processes involved. In the first iteration of the model, the distribution is represented as a bivariate Gaussian distribution. The spread of the distribution about the mean is obtained by white-noise terms in the second-order moments, driven by fluctuations in the general absorption and emission of point defects by bubbles, and fluctuations stemming from collision cascades. This statistical model for the reconstruction of the distribution by its moments is coupled to a previously developed reduced-set, mean-field, rate theory model. As an illustrative case study, the model is applied to a tungsten plasma facing component under irradiation. Our findings highlight the important role of stochastic atomic fluctuations on the evolution of helium–vacancy cluster size distributions. It is found that when the average bubble size is small (at low dpa levels), the relative spread of the distribution is large and average bubble pressures may be very large. As bubbles begin to grow in size, average bubble pressures decrease, and stochastic fluctuations have a lessened effect. The distribution becomes tighter as it evolves in time, corresponding to a more uniform bubble population. The model is formulated in a general way, capable of including point defect drift due to internal temperature and/or stress gradients. These arise during pulsed irradiation, and also during steady irradiation as a result of externally applied or internally generated non-homogeneous stress fields. Discussion is given into how the model can be extended to include full spatial resolution and how the

  19. Interaction of displacement cascade with helium bubbles in α-iron: Computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu, J.; Yang, L.; Gao, F.; Heinisch, H.L.; Kurtz, R.J.; Zu, X.T.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) method has been performed to study the interaction of displacement cascade with He bubbles with two sets of potentials. The results show that the stability of He bubbles depends much on the initial He-vacancy (He/V) ratio and the recoil energy. For an initial He/V ratio of 3, the cascade leads to the increase in the number of vacancies in the He bubble and the decrease in the He/V ratio. For an initial He/V ratio of 0.5, the interaction of a cascade with the He/V bubble results in the decrease in the number of vacancies and the increase in the He/V ratio. For an initial He/V ratio of 1, the stability of the bubbles slightly depends on the primary knock-on atom (PKA) energy. Furthermore, a large number of self-interstitial atom clusters are formed after cascade collision for the He/V ratio of 3, while large vacancy clusters are observed for the He/V ratio of 0.5. However, some differences of defect production and clustering between the two sets of potentials are observed, which may be associated the formation energies of He-V clusters, the binding energies of vacancies and He atoms to the clusters and the probability of subcascade formation

  20. Formation and evolution of bubbly screens in confined oscillating bubbly liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyaev, Sergey; Straube, Arthur V.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of dilute monodisperse bubbly liquid confined by two plane solid walls and subject to small-amplitude high-frequency oscillations normal to the walls. The initial state corresponds to the uniform distribution of bubbles and motionless liquid. The period of external driving is assumed much smaller than typical relaxation times for a single bubble but larger than the period of volume eigenoscillations. The time-averaged description accounting for the two-way coupling between the liquid and the bubbles is applied. We show that the model predicts accumulation of bubbles in thin sheets parallel to the walls. These singular structures, which are formally characterized by infinitely thin width and infinitely high concentration, are referred to as bubbly screens. The formation of a bubbly screen is described analytically in terms of a self-similar solution, which is in agreement with numerical simulations. We study the evolution of bubbly screens and detect a one-dimensional stationary state, which is shown to be unconditionally unstable.

  1. Helium bubble nucleation and growth in α-Fe: insights from first–principles simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, W; Zhang, X; Lu, G; Geng, W T

    2014-01-01

    We have carried out a first-principles study on the nucleation and early-stage growth of He bubbles in Fe. The energetics, atomic and electronic structure of He-vacancy complexes, involving both a monovacancy and a nine-vacancy cluster, are examined. Based on the energetics, we then perform thermodynamics analysis to gain deeper insights into He bubble nucleation and growth. We have determined the energy cost for the nucleation of He bubbles and found that up to eight He atoms can be trapped at a single vacancy. In order to capture more He atoms, the vacancy has to emit Frenkel pairs to release the substantial stress building on the surrounding Fe lattice. Compared to the monovacancy, the nine-vacancy cluster has a lower energy cost for He bubble nucleation and growth. He atoms at the vacancy repel the surrounding electronic charge and redistribute it on the neighboring Fe atoms. The thermodynamic analysis reveals that He chemical potential provides a driving force for He bubble nucleation and growth. There are two critical He chemical potentials that are of particular importance: one of them marks the transition from single He occupation to multiple He occupation at a monovacancy while the other sets off He-induced superabundant vacancy formation. (paper)

  2. On the use of helium-filled soap bubbles for large-scale tomographic PIV in wind tunnel experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scarano, F.; Ghaemi, S.; Alp Caridi, G.C.; Bosbach, J.; Dierksheide, U.; Sciacchitano, A.

    2015-01-01

    The flow-tracing fidelity of sub-millimetre diameter helium-filled soap bubbles (HFSB) for low-speed aerodynamics is studied. The main interest of using HFSB in relation to micron-size droplets is the large amount of scattered light, enabling larger-scale three-dimensional experiments by tomographic

  3. Calculations of Helium Bubble Evolution in the PISCES Experiments with Cluster Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondel, Sophie; Younkin, Timothy; Wirth, Brian; Lasa, Ane; Green, David; Canik, John; Drobny, Jon; Curreli, Davide

    2017-10-01

    Plasma surface interactions in fusion tokamak reactors involve an inherently multiscale, highly non-equilibrium set of phenomena, for which current models are inadequate to predict the divertor response to and feedback on the plasma. In this presentation, we describe the latest code developments of Xolotl, a spatially-dependent reaction diffusion cluster dynamics code to simulate the divertor surface response to fusion-relevant plasma exposure. Xolotl is part of a code-coupling effort to model both plasma and material simultaneously; the first benchmark for this effort is the series of PISCES linear device experiments. We will discuss the processes leading to surface morphology changes, which further affect erosion, as well as how Xolotl has been updated in order to communicate with other codes. Furthermore, we will show results of the sub-surface evolution of helium bubbles in tungsten as well as the material surface displacement under these conditions.

  4. Simulation on three dimensional bubble formation using MARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunugi, Tomoaki

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical simulation on three-dimensional bubble formation by means of the MARS (Multi-interfaces Advection and Reconstruction Solver) developed by the author. The comparison between two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulation on an agglomeration of two bubbles is discussed. Moreover, some simulation results regarding a phase change phenomena such as a boiling and condensation in a two dimensional enclosure with heated and cooled walls are presented. (author)

  5. Meniscus Dynamics in Bubble Formation. Part II: Model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, Marek; Bunganič, Radovan; Drahoš, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 10 (2009), s. 1357-1365 ISSN 0263-8762 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/07/1110; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200720801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : bubble formation * periodic bubbling * meniscus oscillations Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.223, year: 2009

  6. Formation of Nitrogen Bubbles During Solidification of Duplex Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Kaiju; Wang, Bo; Xue, Fei; Liu, Shanshan; Huang, Junkai; Zhang, Jieyu

    2018-04-01

    The nucleation and growth of nitrogen bubbles for duplex stainless steels are of great significance for the formation mechanism of bubbles during solidification. In the current study, numerical method and theoretical analysis of formula derivation were used to study the formation of nitrogen bubbles during solidification. The critical sizes of the bubble for homogeneous nucleation and heterogeneous nucleation at the solid-liquid interface during solidification were derived theoretically by the classical nucleation theory. The results show that the calculated values for the solubility of nitrogen in duplex stainless steel are in good agreement with the experimental values which are quoted by references: for example, when the temperature T = 1823 K and the nitrogen partial pressure P_{{N2 }} = 40P^{Θ} , the calculated value (0.8042 wt pct) for the solubility of Fe-12Cr alloy nitrogen in molten steel is close to the experimental value (0.780 wt pct). Moreover, the critical radii for homogeneous nucleation and heterogeneous nucleation are identical during solidification. On the one hand, with the increasing temperature or the melt depth, the critical nucleation radius of bubbles at the solid-liquid interface increases, but the bubble growth rate decreases. On the other hand, with the decreasing initial content of nitrogen or the cooling rate, the critical nucleation radius of bubbles at the solid-liquid interface increases, but the bubble growth rate decreases. Furthermore, when the melt depth is greater than the critical depth, which is determined by the technological conditions, the change in the Gibbs free energy for the nucleation is not conducive enough to form new bubbles.

  7. Bubble formation in Zr alloys under heavy ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagano, L. Jr.; Motta, A.T. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Birtcher, R.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Materials Science Div.

    1995-12-01

    Kr ions were used in the HVEM/Tandem facility at ANL to irradiate several Zr alloys, including Zircaloy-2 and -4, at 300-800 C to doses up to 2{times}10{sup 16}ion.cm{sup -2}. Both in-situ irradiation of thin foils as well as irradiation of bulk samples with an ion implanter were used in this study. For the thin foil irradiations, a distribution of small bubbles in the range of 30-100 {angstrom} was found at all temperatures with the exception of the Cr-rich Valloy where 130 {angstrom} bubbles were found. Irradiation of bulk samples at 700-800 C produced large faceted bubbles up to 300 {angstrom} after irradiation to 2{times}10{sup 16}ion.cm{sup -2}. Results are examined in context of existing models for bubble formation and growth in other metals.

  8. Compressive flow behavior of Cu thin films and Cu/Nb multilayers containing nanometer-scale helium bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, N.; Mara, N.A.; Wang, Y.Q.; Nastasi, M.; Misra, A.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Firstly micro-pillar compression technique has been used to measure the implanted metal films. → The magnitude of radiation hardening decreased with decreasing layer thickness. → When thickness decreases to 2.5 nm, no hardening and no loss in deformability after implantation. -- Focused-ion-beam machined compression specimens were used to investigate the effect of nanometer-scale helium bubbles on the strength and deformability of sputter-deposited Cu and Cu/Nb multilayers with different layer thickness. The flow strength of Cu films increased by more than a factor of 2 due to helium bubbles but in multilayers, the magnitude of radiation hardening decreased with decreasing layer thickness. When the layer thickness decreases to 2.5 nm, insignificant hardening and no measurable loss in deformability is observed after implantation.

  9. A physiological model of the interaction between tissue bubbles and the formation of blood-borne bubbles under decompression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappell, M A; Payne, S J

    2006-01-01

    Under decompression, bubbles can form in the human body, and these can be found both within the body tissues and the bloodstream. Mathematical models for the growth of both types of bubbles have previously been presented, but they have not been coupled together. This work thus explores the interaction between the growth of tissue and blood-borne bubbles under decompression, specifically looking at the extent to which they compete for the common resource of inert gas held in solution in the tissues. The influence of tissue bubbles is found to be significant for densities as low as 10 ml -1 for tissues which are poorly perfused. However, the effects of formation of bubbles in the blood are not found until the density of bubble production sites reaches 10 6 ml -1 . From comparison of the model predictions with experimental evidence for bubbles produced in animals and man under decompression, it is concluded that the density of tissue bubbles is likely to have a significant effect on the number of bubbles produced in the blood. However, the density of nucleation sites in the blood is unlikely to be sufficiently high in humans for the formation of bubbles in the blood to have a significant impact on the growth of the bubbles in the tissue

  10. Interactions between bubble formation and heating surface in nucleate boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luke, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The heat transfer and bubble formation is investigated in pool boiling of propane. Size distributions of active nucleation sites on single horizontal copper and steel tubes with different diameter and surface finishes have been calculated from heat transfer measurements over wide ranges of heat flux and selected pressure. The model assumptions of Luke and Gorenflo for the heat transfer near growing and departing bubbles, which were applied in the calculations, have been slightly modified and the calculated results have been compared to experimental investigations by high speed video techniques. The calculated number of active sites shows a good coincidence for the tube with smaller diameter, while the results for the tube with larger diameter describe the same relative increase of the active sites. The comparison of the cumulative size distribution of the active and potential nucleation sites demonstrates the same slope of the curve and that the critical radius of a stable bubble nuclei is smaller than the average cavity size. (author)

  11. Interactions between bubble formation and heating surface in nucleate boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luke, Andrea [Leibniz University, Hannover (Denmark). Inst. of Thermodynamics], e-mail: ift@ift.uni-hannover.de

    2009-07-01

    The heat transfer and bubble formation is investigated in pool boiling of propane. Size distributions of active nucleation sites on single horizontal copper and steel tubes with different diameter and surface finishes have been calculated from heat transfer measurements over wide ranges of heat flux and selected pressure. The model assumptions of Luke and Gorenflo for the heat transfer near growing and departing bubbles, which were applied in the calculations, have been slightly modified and the calculated results have been compared to experimental investigations by high speed video techniques. The calculated number of active sites shows a good coincidence for the tube with smaller diameter, while the results for the tube with larger diameter describe the same relative increase of the active sites. The comparison of the cumulative size distribution of the active and potential nucleation sites demonstrates the same slope of the curve and that the critical radius of a stable bubble nuclei is smaller than the average cavity size. (author)

  12. Bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dholakia, Nikhilesh; Turcan, Romeo V.

    2013-01-01

    A goal of our ongoing research stream is to develop a multidisciplinary metatheory of bubbles. In this viewpoint paper we put forward a typology of bubbles by comparing four types of assets – entertainment, commodities, financial securities (stocks), and housing properties – where bubbles could...... and do form occasionally. Cutting across and comparing such varied asset types provides some rich insights into the nature of bubbles – and offers an inductive way to arrive at the typology of bubbles....

  13. Detail analysis of tritium permeation in the metal liquid channels of the regenerating sheaths of a fusion reactor in presence of helium bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banet, L.; Mas de les Valls, E.; Sedano, L. A.

    2012-01-01

    Inside the channels of liquid metal of the fusion reactor regenerative wrappers, the possible existence of nucleated helium bubbles is not remote. Helium is formed joined the tritium in the escaped neutrons of plasma with lithium. The accumulation of helium in the contact surfaces, between the structure and ML, lead a reduction of heat transfer, at the same time a reduction in the permeation of tritium. The coexistence of three phases in touch: metal liquid, helium and structural material, makes the transport of heat and tritium in a complex phenomenon. To enrich tritium transport studies conducted in the past, there is now a detail analysis of the helium bubble environment adhered to the channel ML wall of a regenerative wrap. For the study we used a CFD tool development on free code OpenFOAM.

  14. Behavior of helium gas atoms and bubbles in low activation 9Cr martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Shiraishi, Haruki; Matsui, Hideki; Abe, Katsunori

    1994-09-01

    The behavior of helium-gas release from helium-implanted 9Cr martensitic steels (500 appm implanted at 873 K) during tensile testing at 873 K was studied. Modified 9Cr-1Mo, low-activation 9Cr-2W and 9Cr-0.5V were investigated. Cold-worked AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel was also investigated as a reference which was susceptible helium embrittlement at high temperature. A helium release peak was observed at the moment of rupture in all the specimens. The total quantity of helium released from these 9Cr steels was in the same range but smaller than that of 316CW steel. Helium gas in the 9Cr steels should be considered to remain in the matrix at their lath-packets even if deformed at 873 K. This is the reason why the martensitic steels have high resistance to helium embrittlement.

  15. Behavior of helium gas atoms and bubbles in low activation 9Cr martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Shiraishi, Haruki; Matsui, Hideki; Abe, Katsunori

    1994-01-01

    The behavior of helium-gas release from helium-implanted 9Cr martensitic steels (500 appm implanted at 873 K) during tensile testing at 873 K was studied. Modified 9Cr-1Mo, low-activation 9Cr-2W and 9Cr-0.5V were investigated. Cold-worked AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel was also investigated as a reference which was susceptible helium embrittlement at high temperature. A helium release peak was observed at the moment of rupture in all the specimens. The total quantity of helium released from these 9Cr steels was in the same range but smaller than that of 316CW steel. Helium gas in the 9Cr steels should be considered to remain in the matrix at their lath-packets even if deformed at 873 K. This is the reason why the martensitic steels have high resistance to helium embrittlement. ((orig.))

  16. Meniscus Dynamics in Bubble Formation. Part I: Experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, Marek; Bunganič, Radovan; Drahoš, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 10 (2009), s. 1349-1356 ISSN 0263-8762 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/07/1110; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200720801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : bubble formation * perforated plate * meniscus oscillations Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.223, year: 2009

  17. Bubble formation upon crystallization of high nitrogen iron base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svyazhin, A.G.; Sivka, E.; Skuza, Z.

    2000-01-01

    A study is made into the conditions of nitrogen bubble formation during crystallization of unalloyed iron, alloys of Fe-O, Fe-O-S systems, steels 1Kh13, 0Kh18N9 and a two-phase Fe-11%Cr-1%Mo-0.2%V steel. It is revealed that the amount of bubbles in a high nitrogen steel casting increases with a degree of nitrogen supersaturation and decreases with a cooling rate growth and with a rise of surfactant concentration in the metal. In sound castings a nitrogen content can be increased due to a cooling rate growth, nitrogen dilution with inert gas, an increase of nitrogen pressure during crystallization as well as due to the introduction of such surfactants as sulphur, selenium, tellurium, tin [ru

  18. Formation of gas bubbles in gas superheated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkelstein, Y.

    1984-05-01

    The phenomenon of bubbles formation in supersaturated solutions of gases in water is a transport process, the final result of which is a separation of phases. In spite of its widespread appearance in industry and in nature, no model exists that can explain it and predict the degree of supersaturation which a gas-water solution can tolerate before bubbles are formed. The objective of this study was to fill this gap, and indeed, an extensive experimental work was carried out, a model was established and simple but accurate means were developed for predicting the tolerable degree of supersaturation of gas-water solutions. The model is also capable of predicting quite accurately the activation phenomenon in water. Superheating and supercooling phenomena were also examined in the light of the new model. (author)

  19. Development and implementation of a model of permeation of tritium in the presence of bubbles of helium to tritigenic wraps of liquid metal wraps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batet, L.; Mas de les Valls, E.; Sedano, L. A.

    2013-01-01

    In the channels of liquid metal (ML) regenerating sheaths of a fusion reactor, the possibility of bubbles of helium is not remote. Bubbles adhering to the wall of the ML channels would affect heat transfer and the permeation of tritium. Detailed analysis has been conducted (fine mesh), using OpenFOAM, from the environment of a bubble attached to the wall and has developed a model for permeation of tritium through a partially covered with bubbles of helium surface of contact Ml-solid. The model developed has implemented as wall function in OpenFOAM, has validated and has been applied to a case study, using a relatively thick mesh. The developed model substantially reduces the need for computing on the detailed calculation power.

  20. Depth distribution of bubbles in 4He+-ion irradiated nickel and the mechanism of blister formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.; Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.; Miley, G.H.

    1978-01-01

    While the radiation blistering phenomenon has been widely studied, the mechanism of blister formation is still not well understood. The present studies on depth distribution of helium bubbles in nickel were carried out in order to obtain a better understanding of the radiation blistering process. Particularly, the aim was to understand the experimental observation that the blister skin thickness for many metals irradiated with He + ions of energies lower than 20-keV is a factor of two or more larger than the calculated projected range. (Auth.)

  1. Effects of gravity level on bubble formation and rise in low-viscosity liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suñol, Francesc; González-Cinca, Ricard

    2015-05-01

    We present an experimental analysis of the effects of gravity level on the formation and rise dynamics of bubbles. Experiments were carried out with millimeter-diameter bubbles in the hypergravity environment provided by the large-diameter centrifuge of the European Space Agency. Bubble detachment from a nozzle is determined by buoyancy and surface tension forces regardless of the gravity level. Immediately after detachment, bubble trajectory is deviated by the Coriolis force. Subsequent bubble rise is dominated by inertial forces and follows a zig-zag trajectory with amplitude and frequency dependent on the gravity level. Vorticity production is enhanced as gravity increases, which destabilizes the flow and therefore the bubble path.

  2. Meniscus Dynamics in Bubble Formation: A Parametric Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stanovský, Petr; Růžička, Marek; Martins, A.; Teixeira, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 14 (2011), s. 3258-3267 ISSN 0009-2509. [International Conference on Gas–Liquid and Gas–Liquid–Solid Reactor Engineering /10./. Braga, 26.06.2011-29.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/07/1110; GA AV ČR KJB200720901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : bubble formation * transparent perforated plate * meniscus oscillations Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.431, year: 2011

  3. EXPERIMENTAL BUBBLE FORMATION IN A LARGE SCALE SYSTEM FOR NEWTONIAN AND NONNEWTONIAN FLUIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, R; Michael Restivo, M

    2008-06-26

    The complexities of bubble formation in liquids increase as the system size increases, and a photographic study is presented here to provide some insight into the dynamics of bubble formation for large systems. Air was injected at the bottom of a 28 feet tall by 30 inch diameter column. Different fluids were subjected to different air flow rates at different fluid depths. The fluids were water and non-Newtonian, Bingham plastic fluids, which have yield stresses requiring an applied force to initiate movement, or shearing, of the fluid. Tests showed that bubble formation was significantly different in the two types of fluids. In water, a field of bubbles was formed, which consisted of numerous, distributed, 1/4 to 3/8 inch diameter bubbles. In the Bingham fluid, large bubbles of 6 to 12 inches in diameter were formed, which depended on the air flow rate. This paper provides comprehensive photographic results related to bubble formation in these fluids.

  4. Regimes of Micro-bubble Formation Using Gas Injection into Ladle Shroud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sheng; Cao, Xiangkun; Zou, Zongshu

    2018-06-01

    Gas injection into a ladle shroud is a practical approach to produce micro-bubbles in tundishes, to promote inclusion removal from liquid steel. A semi-empirical model was established to characterize the bubble formation considering the effect of shearing action combined with the non-fully bubble break-up by turbulence. The model shows a good accuracy in predicting the size of bubbles formed in complex flow within the ladle shroud.

  5. The role of grain size in He bubble formation: Implications for swelling resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Atwani, O.; Nathaniel, J. E.; Leff, A. C.; Muntifering, B. R.; Baldwin, J. K.; Hattar, K.; Taheri, M. L.

    2017-02-01

    Nanocrystalline metals are postulated as radiation resistant materials due to their high defect and particle (e.g. Helium) sink density. Here, the performance of nanocrystalline iron films is investigated in-situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) using He irradiation at 700 K. Automated crystal orientation mapping is used in concert with in-situ TEM to explore the role of grain orientation and grain boundary character on bubble density trends. Bubble density as a function of three key grain size regimes is demonstrated. While the overall trend revealed an increase in bubble density up to a saturation value, grains with areas ranging from 3000 to 7500 nm2 show a scattered distribution. An extrapolated swelling resistance based on bubble size and areal density indicated that grains with sizes less than 2000 nm2 possess the greatest apparent resistance. Moreover, denuded zones are found to be independent of grain size, grain orientation, and grain boundary misorientation angle.

  6. THE MILKY WAY PROJECT: A STATISTICAL STUDY OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION ASSOCIATED WITH INFRARED BUBBLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendrew, S.; Robitaille, T. P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Simpson, R.; Lintott, C. J. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Bressert, E. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Povich, M. S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Sherman, R. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Schawinski, K. [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Wolf-Chase, G., E-mail: kendrew@mpia.de [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium, 1300 S. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States)

    2012-08-10

    The Milky Way Project citizen science initiative recently increased the number of known infrared bubbles in the inner Galactic plane by an order of magnitude compared to previous studies. We present a detailed statistical analysis of this data set with the Red MSX Source (RMS) catalog of massive young stellar sources to investigate the association of these bubbles with massive star formation. We particularly address the question of massive triggered star formation near infrared bubbles. We find a strong positional correlation of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) and H II regions with Milky Way Project bubbles at separations of <2 bubble radii. As bubble sizes increase, a statistically significant overdensity of massive young sources emerges in the region of the bubble rims, possibly indicating the occurrence of triggered star formation. Based on numbers of bubble-associated RMS sources, we find that 67% {+-} 3% of MYSOs and (ultra-)compact H II regions appear to be associated with a bubble. We estimate that approximately 22% {+-} 2% of massive young stars may have formed as a result of feedback from expanding H II regions. Using MYSO-bubble correlations, we serendipitously recovered the location of the recently discovered massive cluster Mercer 81, suggesting the potential of such analyses for discovery of heavily extincted distant clusters.

  7. THE MILKY WAY PROJECT: A STATISTICAL STUDY OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION ASSOCIATED WITH INFRARED BUBBLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendrew, S.; Robitaille, T. P.; Simpson, R.; Lintott, C. J.; Bressert, E.; Povich, M. S.; Sherman, R.; Schawinski, K.; Wolf-Chase, G.

    2012-01-01

    The Milky Way Project citizen science initiative recently increased the number of known infrared bubbles in the inner Galactic plane by an order of magnitude compared to previous studies. We present a detailed statistical analysis of this data set with the Red MSX Source (RMS) catalog of massive young stellar sources to investigate the association of these bubbles with massive star formation. We particularly address the question of massive triggered star formation near infrared bubbles. We find a strong positional correlation of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) and H II regions with Milky Way Project bubbles at separations of <2 bubble radii. As bubble sizes increase, a statistically significant overdensity of massive young sources emerges in the region of the bubble rims, possibly indicating the occurrence of triggered star formation. Based on numbers of bubble-associated RMS sources, we find that 67% ± 3% of MYSOs and (ultra-)compact H II regions appear to be associated with a bubble. We estimate that approximately 22% ± 2% of massive young stars may have formed as a result of feedback from expanding H II regions. Using MYSO-bubble correlations, we serendipitously recovered the location of the recently discovered massive cluster Mercer 81, suggesting the potential of such analyses for discovery of heavily extincted distant clusters.

  8. MD simulations of onset of tungsten fuzz formation under helium irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasa, A.; Henriksson, K.O.E.; Nordlund, K.

    2013-01-01

    When helium (He) escapes a fusion reactor plasma, a tungsten (W)-based divertor may, under some conditions, form a fuzz-like nano-morphology. This is a highly undesired phenomenon for the divertor, and is not well understood. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of high fluence He and also C-seeded He (He+C) irradiation on W, focusing on the effect of the high fluence, the temperature and the impurities on the onset of the structure formation. We concluded that MD reproduces the experimentally found square root of time dependence of the surface growth. The He atomic density decreases when increasing the number of He atoms in the cell. A higher temperature causes a larger bubble growth and desorption activity, specially for the pure He irradiation cases. It also it leads to W recrystallization for the He+C irradiation cases. Carbon acts as a local He trap for small clusters or single atoms and causes a larger loss of crystallinity of the W surface

  9. Formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattice in UMo metal fuels: Phase-field modeling investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Shenyang, E-mail: shenyang.hu@pnnl.gov; Burkes, Douglas E.; Lavender, Curt A.; Senor, David J.; Setyawan, Wahyu; Xu, Zhijie

    2016-10-15

    Nano-gas bubble superlattices are often observed in irradiated UMo nuclear fuels. However, the formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattices is not well understood. A number of physical processes may affect the gas bubble nucleation and growth; hence, the morphology of gas bubble microstructures including size and spatial distributions. In this work, a phase-field model integrating a first-passage Monte Carlo method to investigate the formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattices was developed. Six physical processes are taken into account in the model: 1) heterogeneous generation of gas atoms, vacancies, and interstitials informed from atomistic simulations; 2) one-dimensional (1-D) migration of interstitials; 3) irradiation-induced dissolution of gas atoms; 4) recombination between vacancies and interstitials; 5) elastic interaction; and 6) heterogeneous nucleation of gas bubbles. We found that the elastic interaction doesn’t cause the gas bubble alignment, and fast 1-D migration of interstitials along 〈110〉 directions in the body-centered cubic U matrix causes the gas bubble alignment along 〈110〉 directions. It implies that 1-D interstitial migration along [110] direction should be the primary mechanism of a fcc gas bubble superlattice which is observed in bcc UMo alloys. Simulations also show that fission rates, saturated gas concentration, and elastic interaction all affect the morphology of gas bubble microstructures.

  10. Theoretical study on bubble formation and flow condensation in downflow channel with horizontal gas injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kang; Li, Yanzhong; Wang, Jiaojiao; Ma, Yuan; Wang, Lei; Xie, Fushou

    2018-05-01

    Bubble formation and condensation in liquid pipes occur widely in industrial systems such as cryogenic propellant feeding system. In this paper, an integrated theoretical model is established to give a comprehensive description of the bubble formation, motion and condensation process. The model is validated by numerical simulations and bubble condensation experiments from references, and good agreements are achieved. The bubble departure diameter at the orifice and the flow condensation length in the liquid channel are predicted by the model, and effects of various influencing parameters on bubble behaviors are analyzed. Prediction results indicate that the orifice diameter, the gas feeding rate, and the liquid velocity are the primary influence factors on the bubble departure diameter. The interfacial heat transfer as well as the bubble departure diameter has a direct impact on the bubble flow condensation length, which increases by 2.5 times over a system pressure range of 0.1 0.4 MPa, and decreases by 85% over a liquid subcooling range of 5 30 K. This work could be beneficial to the prediction of bubble formation and flow condensation processes and the design of cryogenic transfer pipes.

  11. Helium Bubbles Cavitation Phenomena in Pb-15.7Li and Potential Impact on Tritium Transport Behaviour in HCLL Breeding Channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedano, L. A.

    2007-01-01

    COMPU task is devoted to develop a Process Flow Diagram (PFD) modelling tool for DEMO tritium cycle for HCLL and HCPB blanket lines for DEMO. At the actual stage of definition of HCLL blanket design line this global objective requires to progress specifically on the physical reliability of tritium transport assessments at blanket design level. A rough reliability assessment with the identify cation of physical phenomena determining permeation rates into the coolant was tentatively advanced in COMPU Task Deliverable 1. In HCLL design, the tritium diffusion in the alloy under the flow conditions and radiation effects in Pb15.7Li can be theoretically justifies ed as the rate limiting processes for tritium transfer into the coolant. This Deliverable 2 focuses on the analysis of a specific radiation effect: the potential role of helium bubbles in Pb15.7Li, the discussion of its implications on tritium assessment for HCLL design and consequently the analysis of its quantitative impact (as cycle input) on HCLL PFD tritium cycle design. Thus, the contents of this report investigate: (1) the rationality of the consideration on HCLL design of helium bubble cavitation phenomena in irradiated Pb15.7Li channels on the base of fundamental analysis (He solution states in Pb15.7Li) from empirical clues provided by Pb15.7Li irradiation tests, (2) a preliminary rough He-bubble cavitation design assessment and bases for a more precise FEM calculation for helium bubble cavitation phenomena in HCLL blanket channels, (3) the analysis of direct experimental data and numerical developments needed for a precise cavitation assessment and (4) a proposal of the lay-out and general specifications of an integral proof-of-principle Cavitation Experiment (Cevitex) of Helium in Pb15.7Li. (Author) 40 refs

  12. Helium Bubbles Cavitation Phenomena in Pb-15.7Li and Potential Impact on Tritium Transport Behaviour in HCLL Breeding Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedano, L. A.

    2007-09-27

    COMPU task is devoted to develop a Process Flow Diagram (PFD) modelling tool for DEMO tritium cycle for HCLL and HCPB blanket lines for DEMO. At the actual stage of definition of HCLL blanket design line this global objective requires to progress specifically on the physical reliability of tritium transport assessments at blanket design level. A rough reliability assessment with the identify cation of physical phenomena determining permeation rates into the coolant was tentatively advanced in COMPU Task Deliverable 1. In HCLL design, the tritium diffusion in the alloy under the flow conditions and radiation effects in Pb15.7Li can be theoretically justifies ed as the rate limiting processes for tritium transfer into the coolant. This Deliverable 2 focuses on the analysis of a specific radiation effect: the potential role of helium bubbles in Pb15.7Li, the discussion of its implications on tritium assessment for HCLL design and consequently the analysis of its quantitative impact (as cycle input) on HCLL PFD tritium cycle design. Thus, the contents of this report investigate: (1) the rationality of the consideration on HCLL design of helium bubble cavitation phenomena in irradiated Pb15.7Li channels on the base of fundamental analysis (He solution states in Pb15.7Li) from empirical clues provided by Pb15.7Li irradiation tests, (2) a preliminary rough He-bubble cavitation design assessment and bases for a more precise FEM calculation for helium bubble cavitation phenomena in HCLL blanket channels, (3) the analysis of direct experimental data and numerical developments needed for a precise cavitation assessment and (4) a proposal of the lay-out and general specifications of an integral proof-of-principle Cavitation Experiment (Cevitex) of Helium in Pb15.7Li. (Author) 40 refs.

  13. Electron driven water formation from oxyhydrogen clusters in superfluid helium nanodroplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renzler, Michael; Kranabetter, Lorenz; Barwa, Erik; Scheier, Paul; Illenberger, Eugen

    2015-01-01

    Helium nanodroplets provide an enviroment that allow studies of chemical reactions at ultracold temperatures. We use these droplets as a matrix to study the formation of water upon electron bombardment of oxyhydrogen clusters (paper)

  14. Formation of the lunar helium corona and atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Helium is one of the dominant gases of the lunar atmosphere. Its presence is easily identified in data from the mass spectrometer at the Apollo 17 landing site. The major part of these data was obtained in lunar nighttime, where helium concentration reaches the maximum of its diurnal cyclic variation. The large night to day concentration ratio agrees with the basic theory of exospheric lateral transport reported by Hodges and Johnson (1968). A reasonable fraction of atmospheric helium atoms has a velocity in excess of the gravitational escape velocity. The result is a short average lifetime and a tenuous helium atmosphere. A description is presented of an investigation which shows that the atmosphere of the moon has two distinct components including low energy atoms, which are gravitationally bound in trajectories that intersect the lunar surface, and higher energy atoms, which are trapped in satellite orbits. The total helium abundance in the lunar corona is shown to be about 1.3 times 10 to the 30th power atoms.

  15. Correlation between Gas Bubble Formation and Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Kinetics at Nanoelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qianjin; Luo, Long

    2018-04-17

    We report the correlation between H 2 gas bubble formation potential and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) activity for Au and Pt nanodisk electrodes (NEs). Microkinetic models were formulated to obtain the HER kinetic information for individual Au and Pt NEs. We found that the rate-determining steps for the HER at Au and Pt NEs were the Volmer step and the Heyrovsky step, respectively. More interestingly, the standard rate constant ( k 0 ) of the rate-determining step was found to vary over 2 orders of magnitude for the same type of NEs. The observed variations indicate the HER activity heterogeneity at the nanoscale. Furthermore, we discovered a linear relationship between bubble formation potential ( E bubble ) and log( k 0 ) with a slope of 125 mV/decade for both Au and Pt NEs. As log ( k 0 ) increases, E bubble shifts linearly to more positive potentials, meaning NEs with higher HER activities form H 2 bubbles at less negative potentials. Our theoretical model suggests that such linear relationship is caused by the similar critical bubble formation condition for Au and Pt NEs with varied sizes. Our results have potential implications for using gas bubble formation to evaluate the HER activity distribution of nanoparticles in an ensemble.

  16. Hydrogen bubble formation and evolution in tungsten under different hydrogen irradiation conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wenhui; Luo, Fengfeng; Shen, Zhenyu [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zheng, Zhongcheng; Wen, Yongming [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Ren, Yaoyao [Center for Electron Microscopy, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Direct and clear observation of hydrogen bubbles evolution by TEM is provided. • The role of temperature playing in bubble formation and evolution is fully explored. • Vacancy trapping mechanism is verified in this experiment. - Abstract: In order to see how hydrogen is behaving in tungsten and to understand the way bubbles form and grow up, specimens were irradiated by hydrogen ions from room temperature to 800 °C to fluence of 2.25 × 10{sup 21} m{sup −2}. Experimental results show that higher temperature helped bubble acquire higher internal pressure, causing interstitial loop punching to happen. In this process bubbles’ size grew and dislocation loops were formed but dislocation loops migrated away at and above 350 °C. And bubble number density reached peak value at 600 °C but then dropped dramatically at 800 °C. Because continuously increasing temperature would cause small bubbles dissolution or leaking out. Besides, high temperature also prevented tiny bubbles growing to be visible under TEM observation by their reaching equilibrium pressure before reaching threshold pressure for loop punching. In the other set of experiments, specimens were irradiated by low hydrogen fluence of 1 × 10{sup 20} m{sup −2} at 600 °C, in which case few hydrogen bubbles appeared. With further increasing irradiation fluence, bubble number density quickly increased. Small bubbles tended to coalesce to become larger visible bubbles. And they continued to grow through loop punching until their internal pressure cannot support their size expansion any more.

  17. Resistivity studies of interstitial helium mobility in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.G.; Birnbaum, H.K.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The mobility of interstitial helium in Nb and Nb-O alloys was studied in the temperature range of 10-383 K using resistivity measurements. The helium was introduced by radioactive decay of solute tritium (approximately 1 at%). At T < 100 K the resistivity increased due to conversion of tritium trapped at oxygen interstititals to helium. The formation of helium caused a very significant resistance increase at room temperature and above. The results suggest that helium is mobile at temperatures above 295 K and that the precipitation of large helium bubbles occurs along grain boundaries. The mobile helium species may either be single interstitials or small helium clusters. The activation enthalpy for the diffusion of the mobile helium species was estimated to be about 55 kJ/mol (0.66 eV). (Auth.)

  18. Diffusion and agglomeration of helium in stainless steel in the temperature range from RT to 600 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, C.H.; Chen, K.Q.; Zhu, Z.Y.

    2000-01-01

    Diffusion of helium and formation of helium bubbles in stainless steel in conditions of atomic displacement in the temperature range from RT to 600 deg. C are studied theoretically using standard rate equations. The dissociative mechanism via self-interstitial/He replacement is assumed to control helium diffusion and bubble formation. The numerical analysis shows that the temperature dependence of the effective diffusion coefficient of helium, the number density and the mean radius of bubbles has two distinctly different regimes with the transition occurring around 300 deg. C. The effective diffusion coefficient of helium, the number density and the mean radius of bubbles show weak temperature dependence in the low temperature regime, while they change abruptly with temperature in the high temperature regime. The results are qualitatively in agreement with the results of our experimental study on helium diffusion and bubble formation in helium-implanted 316L stainless steel. However, the discrepancy in the absolute values of number density and mean radius of bubbles between theoretical and experimental studies indicates that helium diffusion and bubble formation may be controlled by some athermal mechanisms in the low temperature regime

  19. Current bubble formation by nonlinear coupling of resistive tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Kazuhiro; Hatori, Tadatsugu; Amano, Tsuneo.

    1990-02-01

    The current bubble means a helical duct with low current density invading the inner high current region of current carrying toroidal plasmas. It is a non-turbulent analogue of the MHD clump. The numerical simulations show that it appears right after the absorption of a small magnetic island into the chaotic layer in the separatrix region of a large magnetic island. (author)

  20. Numerical study to invistigate the effect of inlet gas velocity and Reynolds number on bubble formation in a viscous liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Tariqul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bubble formation dynamics has great value in mineral recovery and the oil industry. In this paper, a single bubble formation process through an orifice in a rectangle domain is modelled to study the bubble formation characteristics using the volume of fluid (VOF with the continuum surface force (CSF method. The effect of gas inlet velocities, Ug ~ 0.1 - 0.3 m/s on bubble formation stages (i.e., expansion, elongation and pinch off, bubble contact angle, dynamics and static pressure, bubble departure diameter etc. was investigated through an orifice diameter of 1 mm. The method was also used to study the effect of Reynolds number, Reμ ~ 1.32 - 120 on bubble formation when all other parameters were kept constant. It is found that a high inlet gas velocity accelerated the reducing of the bubble contact angle from an obtuse angle to an acute angle and the faster development of hemispherical shape of the bubble. It is also found that an increasing of Reynolds number caused speeding up of the bubble pinch-off and formed a smaller bubble neck height due to stronger vortex ring around the bubble neck.

  1. Formation of excited states in high-Z helium-like systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsche, S.; Fricke, B.; Brinzanescu, O.

    1999-12-01

    High-Z helium-like ions represent the simplest multi-electron systems for studying the interplay between electron-electron correlations, relativistic as well as quantum electrodynamical effects in strong fields. In contrast to the adjacent lithium-like ions, however, almost no experimental information is available about the excited states in the high-Z domain of the helium sequence. Here, we present a theoretical analysis of the X-ray production and decay dynamics of the excited states in helium-like uranium. Emphasize has been paid particularly to the formation of the 3 P 0 and 3 P 2 levels by using electron capture into hydrogen-like U 91+ . Both states are of interest for precise measurements on high-Z helium-like ions in the future. (orig.)

  2. The role of grain size in He bubble formation: Implications for swelling resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Atwani, O., E-mail: oelatwan25@gmail.com [Drexel University, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nathaniel, J.E.; Leff, A.C. [Drexel University, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Muntifering, B.R. [Department of Radiation Solid Interactions, Sandia National Laboratories, NM (United States); Baldwin, J.K. [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hattar, K. [Department of Radiation Solid Interactions, Sandia National Laboratories, NM (United States); Taheri, M.L. [Drexel University, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Nanocrystalline metals are postulated as radiation resistant materials due to their high defect and particle (e.g. Helium) sink density. Here, the performance of nanocrystalline iron films is investigated in-situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) using He irradiation at 700 K. Automated crystal orientation mapping is used in concert with in-situ TEM to explore the role of grain orientation and grain boundary character on bubble density trends. Bubble density as a function of three key grain size regimes is demonstrated. While the overall trend revealed an increase in bubble density up to a saturation value, grains with areas ranging from 3000 to 7500 nm{sup 2} show a scattered distribution. An extrapolated swelling resistance based on bubble size and areal density indicated that grains with sizes less than 2000 nm{sup 2} possess the greatest apparent resistance. Moreover, denuded zones are found to be independent of grain size, grain orientation, and grain boundary misorientation angle.

  3. The formation of microvoids in MgO by helium ion implantation and thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veen, A. van; Schut, H.; Fedorov, A.V.; Labohm, F.; Neeft, E.A.C.; Konings, R.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    The formation of microvoids in metal oxides by helium implantation and thermal annealing is observed under similar conditions as has been shown earlier for silicon. Cleaved MgO (1 0 0) single crystals were implanted with 30 keV 3 He ions with doses varying from 10 15 to 10 16 cm -2 and subsequently thermally annealed from RT to 1500 K. Monitoring of the defect depth profile and the retained amount of helium was performed by positron beam analysis and neutron depth profiling, respectively. For a dose larger than 2x10 15 cm -2 annealing of the defects was observed in two stages: at 1000 K helium filled monovacancies dissociated, and other defects still retaining the helium were formed, and at 1300 K all helium left the sample while an increase of positron-valence-electron annihilations was observed, indicating an increase of the volume available in the defects. The voids of nm size were located at shallower depth than the implanted helium. At lower dose no voids were left after high temperature annealing. Voids can also be created, and even more effectively, by hydrogen or deuterium implantation. The voids are stable to temperatures of 1500 K. The use of the nanovoids as a precursor state for nanoprecipitates of metals or other species is discussed

  4. The formation of microvoids in MgO by helium ion implantation and thermal annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veen, A.; Schut, H.; Fedorov, A. V.; Labohm, F.; Neeft, E. A. C.; Konings, R. J. M.

    1999-01-01

    The formation of microvoids in metal oxides by helium implantation and thermal annealing is observed under similar conditions as has been shown earlier for silicon. Cleaved MgO (1 0 0) single crystals were implanted with 30 keV 3He ions with doses varying from 10 15 to 10 16 cm -2 and subsequently thermally annealed from RT to 1500 K. Monitoring of the defect depth profile and the retained amount of helium was performed by positron beam analysis and neutron depth profiling, respectively. For a dose larger than 2 × 10 15 cm -2 annealing of the defects was observed in two stages: at 1000 K helium filled monovacancies dissociated, and other defects still retaining the helium were formed, and at 1300 K all helium left the sample while an increase of positron-valence-electron annihilations was observed, indicating an increase of the volume available in the defects. The voids of nm size were located at shallower depth than the implanted helium. At lower dose no voids were left after high temperature annealing. Voids can also be created, and even more effectively, by hydrogen or deuterium implantation. The voids are stable to temperatures of 1500 K. The use of the nanovoids as a precursor state for nanoprecipitates of metals or other species is discussed.

  5. The formation of microvoids in MgO by helium ion implantation and thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veen, A. van E-mail: avveen@iri.tudelft.nl; Schut, H.; Fedorov, A.V.; Labohm, F.; Neeft, E.A.C.; Konings, R.J.M

    1999-01-02

    The formation of microvoids in metal oxides by helium implantation and thermal annealing is observed under similar conditions as has been shown earlier for silicon. Cleaved MgO (1 0 0) single crystals were implanted with 30 keV {sup 3}He ions with doses varying from 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} and subsequently thermally annealed from RT to 1500 K. Monitoring of the defect depth profile and the retained amount of helium was performed by positron beam analysis and neutron depth profiling, respectively. For a dose larger than 2x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} annealing of the defects was observed in two stages: at 1000 K helium filled monovacancies dissociated, and other defects still retaining the helium were formed, and at 1300 K all helium left the sample while an increase of positron-valence-electron annihilations was observed, indicating an increase of the volume available in the defects. The voids of nm size were located at shallower depth than the implanted helium. At lower dose no voids were left after high temperature annealing. Voids can also be created, and even more effectively, by hydrogen or deuterium implantation. The voids are stable to temperatures of 1500 K. The use of the nanovoids as a precursor state for nanoprecipitates of metals or other species is discussed.

  6. The formation of soap bubbles created by blowing on soap films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salkin, Louis; Schmit, Alexandre; Panizza, Pascal; Courbin, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Using either circular bubble wands or long-lasting vertically falling soap films having an adjustable steady state thickness, we study the formation of soap bubbles created when air is blown through a nozzle onto a soap film. We vary nozzle radius, film size, space between the film and nozzle, and gas density, and we measure the gas velocity threshold above which bubbles are generated. The response is sensitive to confinement, that is, the ratio between film and jet sizes, and dissipation in the turbulent gas jet which is a function of the distance from the nozzle to the film. We observe four different regimes that we rationalize by comparing the dynamic pressure of a jet on the film and the Laplace pressure needed to create the curved surface of a bubble.

  7. Track formation in a liquid hydrogen ultrasonic bubble chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, R C A; Jarman, P D

    1973-01-01

    Track sensitivity to minimum ionising particles has been demonstrated in liquid hydrogen using only an intense ultrasonic field. Carefully designed transducer systems are shown to be capable of producing pressure amplitudes >2.8 atm in a standing wave system in liquid hydrogen. The growth of bubbles to visible size (0.1 mm) in less than 0.2 ms, and their collapse in less than 15 ms, indicates that rapid cycling rates of 50-100 pulses per second may be feasible with this technique. (11 refs).

  8. Liquid phase stabilization versus bubble formation at a nanoscale curved interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffbauer, Jarrod; Luo, Tengfei

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the nature of vapor bubble formation near a nanoscale-curved convex liquid-solid interface using two models: an equilibrium Gibbs model for homogenous nucleation, and a nonequilibrium dynamic van der Waals-diffuse-interface model for phase change in an initially cool liquid. Vapor bubble formation is shown to occur for sufficiently large radius of curvature and is suppressed for smaller radii. Solid-fluid interactions are accounted for and it is shown that liquid-vapor interfacial energy, and hence Laplace pressure, has limited influence over bubble formation. The dominant factor is the energetic cost of creating the solid-vapor interface from the existing solid-liquid interface, as demonstrated via both equilibrium and nonequilibrium arguments.

  9. Numeric implementation of a nucleation, growth and transport model for helium bubbles in lead-lithium HCLL breeding blanket channels: Theory and code development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batet, L., E-mail: lluis.batet@upc.edu [Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Energy and Radiation Studies Research Group (GREENER), Technology for Fusion T4F, Barcelona (Spain); UPC, Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (DFEN), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fradera, J. [Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Energy and Radiation Studies Research Group (GREENER), Technology for Fusion T4F, Barcelona (Spain); UPC, Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (DFEN), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Valls, E. Mas de les [Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Energy and Radiation Studies Research Group (GREENER), Technology for Fusion T4F, Barcelona (Spain); UPC, Department of Heat Engines (DMMT), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Sedano, L.A. [EURATOM-CIEMAT Association, Fusion Technology Division, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-06-15

    Large helium (He) production rates in liquid metal breeding blankets of a DT fusion reactor might have a significant influence in the system design. Low He solubility together with high local concentrations may create the conditions for He cavitation, which would have an impact in the components performance. The paper states that such a possibility is not remote in a helium cooled lithium-lead breeding blanket design. A model based on the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT) has been developed and implemented in order to have a specific tool able to simulate HCLL systems and identify the key parameters and sensitivities. The nucleation and growth model has been implemented in the open source CFD code OpenFOAM so that transport of dissolved atomic He and nucleated He bubbles can be simulated. At the current level of development it is assumed that void fraction is small enough not to affect either the hydrodynamics or the properties of the liquid metal; thus, bubbles can be represented by means of a passive scalar. He growth and transport has been implemented using the mean radius approach in order to save computational time. Limitations and capabilities of the model are shown by means of zero-dimensional simulation and sensitivity analysis under HCLL breeding unit conditions.

  10. Effect of rhenium addition on tungsten fuzz formation in helium plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, A.; De Temmerman, G.; Morgan, T. W.; M. B. Ward,

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the addition of rhenium to tungsten on the formation of a nanostructure referred to as ‘fuzz’ when exposed to helium plasmas at fusion relevant ion fluxes was investigated in the Magnum and Pilot PSI devices at the FOM Institute DIFFER. The effect rhenium had on fuzz growth was seen to

  11. Gas fluxing of aluminum: a bubble probe for optimization of bubbles/bubble distribution and minimization of splashing/droplet formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James W. Evans; Auitumn Fjeld

    2006-01-01

    totaling 1.549 million lbs. for only thirteen of the twenty three primary smelters then in operation in the US. The research work described in the body of this report (the doctoral dissertation of Dr. Autumn M. Fjeld) had as its objective the improvement of gas fluxing technology to reduce emissions while still maintaining fluxing unit metal throughput. A second objective was a better understanding of the splashing and droplet emission that occurs during fluxing at high gas throughput rates. In the extreme such droplets can form undesired accretions on the walls and gas exit lines of the fluxing unit. Consequently, the productivity of a fluxing unit is sometimes limited by the need to avoid such spraying of droplets produced as gas bubbles break at the metal surface. The approach used was a combination of experimental work in laboratories at UC Berkeley and at the Alcoa Technical Center. The experimental work was mostly on a bubble probe that could be used to determine the extent of dispersion of gas bubbles in the fluxing unit (a parameter affecting the utilization of the injected chlorine). Additionally a high speed digital movie camera was used to study droplet formation due to gas bubbles bursting at the surface of a low melting point alloy. The experimental work was supported by mathematical modeling. In particular, two FLUENT? base mathematical models were developed to compute the metal flow and distribution of the gas within a fluxing unit. Results from these models were then used in a third model to compute emissions and the progress of impurity removal as a function of parameters such as rotor speed. The project was successful in demonstrating that the bubble probe could detect bubbles in a gas fluxing unit at the Alcoa technical Center outside Pittsburgh, PA. This unit is a commercial sized one and the probe, with its associated electronics, was subjected to the hostile molten aluminum, electrical noise etc. Despite this the probes were, on several occasions

  12. Ultraviolet spectra of Mg in liquid helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriwaki, Y.; Morita, N.

    1999-01-01

    Emission and absorption spectra of Mg atoms implanted in liquid helium have been observed in the ultraviolet region. We have presented a model of exciplex formation of Mg-He 10 and found that this model is more suitable for understanding the dynamics in the 3s3p 1 P→3s 21 S transition than the bubble model. (orig.)

  13. The influence of microstructure on blistering and bubble formation by He ion irradiation in Al alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria, S.R.; Tolley, A.; Sánchez, E.A.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of microstructure and composition on the effects of ion irradiation in Al alloys was studied combining Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. For this purpose, irradiation experiments with 20 keV He + ions at room temperature were carried out in Al, an Al–4Cu (wt%) supersaturated solid solution, and an Al-5.6Cu-0.5Si-0.5Ge (wt.%) alloy with a very high density of precipitates, and the results were compared. In Al and Al–4Cu, He bubbles were found with an average size in between 1 nm and 2 nm that was independent of fluence. The critical fluence for bubble formation was higher in Al–4Cu than in Al. He bubbles were also observed below the critical fluence after post irradiation annealing in Al–4Cu. The incoherent interfaces between the equilibrium θ phase and the Al matrix were found to be favorable sites for the formation of He bubbles. Instead, no bubbles were observed in the precipitate rich Al-5.6Cu-0.5Si-0.5Ge alloy. In all alloys, blistering was observed, leading to surface erosion by exfoliation. The blistering effects were more severe in the Al-5.6Cu-0.5Si-0.5Ge alloy, and they were enhanced by increasing the fluence rate. - Highlights: • In Al and Al–4Cu, He bubbles were formed, but no bubbles were observed in Al-5.6Cu-0.5Si-0.5Ge. • Bubble formation was enhanced at incoherent matrix/precipitate interfaces in Al–4Cu. • The bubble size was insensitive to displacement rate in pure Al. • In Al and Al-5.6Cu-0.5Si-0.5Ge blistering was observed, which was more severe in the alloy. • Blistering effects were enhanced by increasing the displacement rate in Al and Al–4Cu.

  14. Helium ion damage in an amorphous Fe-Ni-Mo-B alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swijgenhoven, H. van; Stals, L.M.; Knuyt, G.

    1983-01-01

    Data are presented on helium gas bubble and helium blister formation for Metglas 2826MB during 5 keV He + -implantation in the temperature range 200K-600K and dose range 5.10 20 -10 22 He + /m 2 . It is concluded that amorphous alloys are less radiation resistant as has been thought earlier. (author)

  15. The formation of a Spitzer bubble RCW 79 triggered by a cloud-cloud collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohama, Akio; Kohno, Mikito; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Torii, Kazufumi; Nishimura, Atsushi; Hattori, Yusuke; Hayakawa, Takahiro; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Sano, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Tachihara, Kengo; Fukui, Yasuo

    2018-05-01

    Understanding the mechanism of O-star formation is one of the most important current issues in astrophysics. Also an issue of keen interest is how O stars affect their surroundings and trigger secondary star formation. An H II region RCW 79 is one of the typical Spitzer bubbles alongside RCW 120. New observations of CO J = 1-0 emission with Mopra and NANTEN2 revealed that molecular clouds are associated with RCW 79 in four velocity components over a velocity range of 20 km s-1. We hypothesize that two of the clouds collided with each other and the collision triggered the formation of 12 O stars inside the bubble and the formation of 54 low-mass young stellar objects along the bubble wall. The collision is supported by observational signatures of bridges connecting different velocity components in the colliding clouds. The whole collision process happened over a timescale of ˜3 Myr. RCW 79 has a larger size by a factor of 30 in the projected area than RCW 120 with a single O star, and the large size favored formation of the 12 O stars due to the greater accumulated gas in the collisional shock compression.

  16. Formation of helium induced nanostructure 'fuzz' on various tungsten grades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, M.J.; Doerner, R.P.

    2010-01-01

    The response of a variety of W material grades to nanostructure 'fuzz' formation is explored. W targets are exposed to He or D 2 -0.2He plasmas in PISCES-B at 900-1320 K to below sputter threshold He + ions of energy 25-60 eV for up to 2.2 x 10 4 s. SEM and XPS reveal nanoscopic reorganization of the W surface to a layer of 'fuzz' of porosity ∼90% as determined by a 'fuzz' removal/weight loss method. The variability of 'fuzz' growth is examined at 1120 K for 1 h durations: SR, SC and doped W grades - La 2 O 3 (1% wt.), Re (5% and 10% wt.), and TiC (1.5% wt.) developed 2-3 μm thick 'fuzz' layers, while a VPS grade developed a layer 4 μm thick. An RC grade revealed additional 'fuzz' at deep (>100 μm) grain boundaries. However, heat treatment up to 1900 K produced reintegration of 'fuzz' with the bulk and He release at ∼1000 K and ∼1400-1800 K due to depopulation from vacancy complexes.

  17. Electrical insulation characteristics of liquid helium under high speed rotating field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, I.; Fuchino, S.; Okano, M.; Tamada, N.

    1996-01-01

    Electrical breakdown behavior of liquid helium was investigated under high speed rotating field. In the development of superconducting turbine generator it is essential to get the knowledge of electrical insulation characteristics of liquid helium under high speed rotating field. When the current of the field magnet of a superconducting generator is changed, changing magnetic field generates heat in the conductor and it causes bubbles in the liquid helium around the conductor. The behavior of the bubbles is affected largely by the buoyancy which is generated by the centrifugal force. Electrical breakdown behavior of the liquid helium is strongly dependent on the gas bubbles in the liquid. Electrical breakdown voltage between electrodes was measured in a rotating cryostat with and without heater input for bubble formation. Decrease of the breakdown voltage by the heater power was smaller in the rotating field than that in the non rotating field

  18. Nucleation, growth and transport modelling of helium bubbles under nuclear irradiation in lead–lithium with the self-consistent nucleation theory and surface tension corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradera, J.; Cuesta-López, S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The work presented in this manuscript provides a reliable computational tool to quantify the He complex phenomena in a HCLL. • A model based on the self-consistent nucleation theory (SCT) is exposed. It includes radiation induced nucleation modelling and surface tension corrections. • Results informed reinforce the necessity of conducting experiments to determine nucleation conditions and bubble transport parameters in LM breeders. • Our findings and model provide a good qualitative insight into the helium nucleation phenomenon in LM systems for fusion technology and can be used to identify key system parameters. -- Abstract: Helium (He) nucleation in liquid metal breeding blankets of a DT fusion reactor may have a significant impact regarding system design, safety and operation. Large He production rates are expected due to tritium (T) fuel self-sufficiency requirement, as both, He and T, are produced at the same rate. Low He solubility, local high concentrations, radiation damage and fluid discontinuities, among other phenomena, may yield the necessary conditions for He nucleation. Hence, He nucleation may have a significant impact on T inventory and may lower the T breeding ratio. A model based on the self-consistent nucleation theory (SCT) with a surface tension curvature correction model has been implemented in OpenFOAM ® CFD code. A modification through a single parameter of the necessary nucleation condition is proposed in order to take into account all the nucleation triggering phenomena, specially radiation induced nucleation. Moreover, the kinetic growth model has been adapted so as to allow for the transition from a critical cluster to a macroscopic bubble with a diffusion growth process. Limitations and capabilities of the models are shown by means of zero-dimensional simulations and sensitivity analyses to key parameters under HCLL breeding unit conditions. Results provide a good qualitative insight into the helium nucleation

  19. Nucleation, growth and transport modelling of helium bubbles under nuclear irradiation in lead–lithium with the self-consistent nucleation theory and surface tension corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fradera, J., E-mail: jfradera@ubu.es; Cuesta-López, S., E-mail: scuesta@ubu.es

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The work presented in this manuscript provides a reliable computational tool to quantify the He complex phenomena in a HCLL. • A model based on the self-consistent nucleation theory (SCT) is exposed. It includes radiation induced nucleation modelling and surface tension corrections. • Results informed reinforce the necessity of conducting experiments to determine nucleation conditions and bubble transport parameters in LM breeders. • Our findings and model provide a good qualitative insight into the helium nucleation phenomenon in LM systems for fusion technology and can be used to identify key system parameters. -- Abstract: Helium (He) nucleation in liquid metal breeding blankets of a DT fusion reactor may have a significant impact regarding system design, safety and operation. Large He production rates are expected due to tritium (T) fuel self-sufficiency requirement, as both, He and T, are produced at the same rate. Low He solubility, local high concentrations, radiation damage and fluid discontinuities, among other phenomena, may yield the necessary conditions for He nucleation. Hence, He nucleation may have a significant impact on T inventory and may lower the T breeding ratio. A model based on the self-consistent nucleation theory (SCT) with a surface tension curvature correction model has been implemented in OpenFOAM{sup ®} CFD code. A modification through a single parameter of the necessary nucleation condition is proposed in order to take into account all the nucleation triggering phenomena, specially radiation induced nucleation. Moreover, the kinetic growth model has been adapted so as to allow for the transition from a critical cluster to a macroscopic bubble with a diffusion growth process. Limitations and capabilities of the models are shown by means of zero-dimensional simulations and sensitivity analyses to key parameters under HCLL breeding unit conditions. Results provide a good qualitative insight into the helium

  20. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of bubble formation in a microfluidic T-junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya-Bower, Luz; Lee, Taehun

    2011-06-28

    A lattice Boltzmann equation method based on the Cahn-Hilliard diffuse interface theory is developed to investigate the bubble formation process in a microchannel with T-junction mixing geometry. The bubble formation process has different regimes, namely, squeezing, dripping and jetting regimes, which correspond to the primary forces acting on the system. Transition from regime to regime is generally dictated by the capillary number Ca, volumetric flow ratio Q and viscosity ratio λ. A systematic analysis is performed to evaluate these effects. The computations are performed in the range of 10(-4)

  1. Thermal release behavior of helium from copper irradiated by He+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, T.; Tokura, S.; Yamanaka, S.; Miyake, M.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal release behavior of helium from copper irradiated by 20 keV He + ions with a dose of 2x10 15 to 3x10 17 ions/cm 2 has been studied. The shape of the thermal release curves and thew number of helium release peaks strongly depend on the irradiation dose. Results from SEM surface observastion after post-irradiation heating suggested that helium release caused various surface damages such as blistering, flaking, and hole formation. Helium release resulting in small holes was analyzed and helium bubble growth mechanisms are discussed. (orig.)

  2. Low energy helium ion irradiation induced nanostructure formation on tungsten surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ajlony, A.; Tripathi, J.K.; Hassanein, A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the low energy helium ion irradiation induced surface morphology changes on tungsten (W) surfaces under extreme conditions. Surface morphology changes on W surfaces were monitored as a function of helium ion energy (140–300 eV), fluence (2.3 × 10 24 –1.6 × 10 25 ions m −2 ), and flux (2.0 × 10 20 –5.5 × 10 20 ion m −2 s −1 ). All the experiments were performed at 900° C. Our study shows significant effect of all the three ion irradiation parameters (ion flux, fluence, and energy) on the surface morphology. However, the effect of ion flux is more pronounced. Variation of helium ion fluence allows to capture the very early stages of fuzz growth. The observed fuzz growth and morphology changes were understood in the realm of various possible phenomena. The study has relevance and important impact in the current and future nuclear fusion applications. - Highlights: •Reporting formation of W nanostructure (fuzz) due to low energy He ion beam irradiation. •Observing the very early stages for the W-Fuzz formation. •Tracking the surface morphological evolution during the He irradiation. •Discussing in depth our observation and drawing a possible scenario that explain this phenomenon. •Studying various ions irradiation parameters such as flux, fluence, and ions energy.

  3. Low energy helium ion irradiation induced nanostructure formation on tungsten surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ajlony, A., E-mail: montaserajlony@yahoo.com; Tripathi, J.K.; Hassanein, A.

    2017-05-15

    We report on the low energy helium ion irradiation induced surface morphology changes on tungsten (W) surfaces under extreme conditions. Surface morphology changes on W surfaces were monitored as a function of helium ion energy (140–300 eV), fluence (2.3 × 10{sup 24}–1.6 × 10{sup 25} ions m{sup −2}), and flux (2.0 × 10{sup 20}–5.5 × 10{sup 20} ion m{sup −2} s{sup −1}). All the experiments were performed at 900° C. Our study shows significant effect of all the three ion irradiation parameters (ion flux, fluence, and energy) on the surface morphology. However, the effect of ion flux is more pronounced. Variation of helium ion fluence allows to capture the very early stages of fuzz growth. The observed fuzz growth and morphology changes were understood in the realm of various possible phenomena. The study has relevance and important impact in the current and future nuclear fusion applications. - Highlights: •Reporting formation of W nanostructure (fuzz) due to low energy He ion beam irradiation. •Observing the very early stages for the W-Fuzz formation. •Tracking the surface morphological evolution during the He irradiation. •Discussing in depth our observation and drawing a possible scenario that explain this phenomenon. •Studying various ions irradiation parameters such as flux, fluence, and ions energy.

  4. On the mechanism of formation of the Efimov states in the helium 4He trimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolganova, E.A.; Motovilov, A.K.

    1998-01-01

    A mechanism of disappearance and formation of the Efimov levels of the helium 4 He 3 trimer is studied when the force of interatomic interaction is changed. It is shown that these levels arise from virtual levels which are in turn formed from (quasi)resonances settled on the real axis. The resonances including virtual levels are calculated by the method based on the solution of the boundary value problem, at complex energies, for the Faddeev differential equations describing the scattering processes (2 + 1 → 2 + 1; 1 + 1 + 1). All the calculations are performed with the known interatomic Aziz He-He-potential HFD-B. A very strong repulsive component of this potential at short distances between helium atoms is approximated by a hard core. A special attention is paid to the substantiation of the method used for computing resonances and to the investigation of its applicability range

  5. Radiation-induced grain subdivision and bubble formation in U3Si2 at LWR temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Tiankai; Gong, Bowen; He, Lingfeng; Harp, Jason; Tonks, Michael; Lian, Jie

    2018-01-01

    U3Si2, an advanced fuel form proposed for light water reactors (LWRs), has excellent thermal conductivity and a high fissile element density. However, limited understanding of the radiation performance and fission gas behavior of U3Si2 is available at LWR conditions. This study explores the irradiation behavior of U3Si2 by 300 keV Xe+ ion beam bombardment combining with in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation. The crystal structure of U3Si2 is stable against radiation-induced amorphization at 350 °C even up to a very high dose of 64 displacements per atom (dpa). Grain subdivision of U3Si2 occurs at a relatively low dose of 0.8 dpa and continues to above 48 dpa, leading to the formation of high-density nanoparticles. Nano-sized Xe gas bubbles prevail at a dose of 24 dpa, and Xe bubble coalescence was identified with the increase of irradiation dose. The volumetric swelling resulting from Xe gas bubble formation and coalescence was estimated with respect to radiation dose, and a 2.2% volumetric swelling was observed for U3Si2 irradiated at 64 dpa. Due to extremely high susceptibility to oxidation, the nano-sized U3Si2 grains upon radiation-induced grain subdivision were oxidized to nanocrystalline UO2 in a high vacuum chamber for TEM observation, eventually leading to the formation of UO2 nanocrystallites stable up to 80 dpa.

  6. Effect of phosphorus and boron additions on helium bubble microstructure in titanium-modified austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jitsukawa, Shiro; Hojou, Kiichi; Hishinuma, Akimichi

    1992-01-01

    Ti-modified austenitic stainless steels (0.06C-0.5Si-15Cr-15Ni-2Mo-0.2Ti) plus P and/or B additions up to 0.06 wt% and 60 wtppm respectively, were irradiated with 10keV He + ions at a dose rate of 1.8 x 10 18 He + /m 2 s at 923K. Irradiation was performed on foil specimens in a transmission electron microscope equipped with an ion-accelerator up to a fluence of 1 x 10 21 He + /m 2 . Small (5 nm >) bubbles were formed in the depth region ranging between 5 and 15 nm from the foil surface of the specimen irradiated up to a fluence of 9 x 10 18 He + /m 2 . These bubbles grew continuously during the following irradiation. They were often observed to grow by coalescence. Bubble growth by coalescence was suppressed by Ti-modification. Both P and B additions enhanced the suppression effect of Ti-modification. (author)

  7. Generalized Rate Theory for Void and Bubble Swelling and its Application to Delta-Plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, P. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wall, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wolfer, W. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-04

    A rate theory for void and bubble swelling is derived that allows both vacancies and self-interstitial atoms to be generated by thermal activation at all sinks. In addition, they can also be produced by displacement damage from external and internal radiation. This generalized rate theory (GRT) is applied to swelling of gallium-stabilized δ-plutonium in which α-decay causes the displacement damage. Since the helium atoms produced also become trapped in vacancies, a distinction is made between empty and occupied vacancies. The growth of helium bubbles observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in weapons-grade and in material enriched with Pu238 is analyzed, using different values for the formation energy of self-interstitial atoms (SIA) and two different sets of relaxation volumes for the vacancy and for the SIA. One set allows preferential capture of SIA at dislocations, while the other set gives equal preference to both vacancy and SIA. It is found that the helium bubble diameters observed are in better agreement with GRT predictions if no preferential capture occurs at dislocations. Therefore, helium bubbles in δ-plutonium will not evolve into voids. The helium density within the bubbles remains sufficiently high to cause thermal emission of SIA. Based on a helium density between two to three helium atoms per vacant site, the sum of formation and migration energies must be around 2.0 eV for SIA in δ-plutonium.

  8. Helium behaviour in aluminium under hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokurskij, Yu.N.; Tebus, V.N.; Zudilin, V.A.; Tumanova, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    Effect of hydrostatic compression on equilibrium helium bubbles in low aluminium-lithium alloy irradiated in reactor at 570 K is investigated. Measurements of hydrostatic density and electron-microscopic investigations have shown, that application of up to 2 GPa pressure reduces equilibrium size of helium bubbles and reduces helium swelling. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the process are considered with application of 'rigid sphere' equation which describes helium state in bubbles

  9. Beneficial effect of enriched air nitrox on bubble formation during scuba diving. An open-water study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brebeck, Anne-Kathrin; Deussen, Andreas; Range, Ursula; Balestra, Costantino; Cleveland, Sinclair; Schipke, Jochen D

    2018-03-01

    Bubble formation during scuba diving might induce decompression sickness. This prospective randomised and double-blind study included 108 advanced recreational divers (38 females). Fifty-four pairs of divers, 1 breathing air and the other breathing nitrox28 undertook a standardised dive (24 ± 1 msw; 62 ± 5min) in the Red Sea. Venous gas bubbles were counted (Doppler) 30-air) vs. 11% (air28®) (n.s.) were bubble-free after a dive. Independent of sampling time and breathing gas, there were more bubbles in the jugular than in the femoral vein. More bubbles were counted in the air-group than in the air28-group (pooled vein: early: 1845 vs. 948; P = 0.047, late: 1817 vs. 953; P = 0.088). The number of bubbles was sex-dependent. Lastly, 29% of female air divers but only 14% of male divers were bubble-free (P = 0.058). Air28® helps to reduce venous gas emboli in recreational divers. The bubble number depended on the breathing gas, sampling site and sex. Thus, both exact reporting the dive and in particular standardising sampling characteristics seem mandatory to compare results from different studies to further investigate the hitherto incoherent relation between inert gas bubbles and DCS.

  10. Radiation effects on transport and bubble formation in silicate glasses. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifunac, A.D.

    1998-01-01

    'To study the fundamental chemistry of radiation damage in silicate/borosilicate glasses and simulated high-level nuclear waste (HLW) forms. Special emphasis is on delineating molecular processes crucial for understanding the aggregation of defects and formation of oxygen bubbles. The knowledge obtained will provide the needed scientific basis for extrapolating long-term behavior of stored radiative waste glass forms. This report summarizes the first 6 months of a 3-year project. The following issues have been addressed: (i) the production of radiolytic oxygen, (ii) the chemistry of hydrogenous species, and (iii) the effect of glass composition and microstructure on the formation and accumulation of metastable point defects.'

  11. On the shear strength of tungsten nano-structures with embedded helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, R.D.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.

    2013-01-01

    Modification of plastic properties of tungsten nano-structures under shear stress load due to embedded helium atoms is studied using molecular dynamics modelling. The modelling demonstrates that the yield strength of tungsten nano-structures reduces significantly with increasing embedded helium concentration. At high helium concentrations (>10 at%), the yield strength decreases to values characteristic to the pressure in helium nano-bubbles, which are formed in tungsten under such conditions and thought to be responsible for the formation of nano-fuzz on tungsten surfaces irradiated with helium plasma. It is also shown that tungsten plastic flow strongly facilitates coagulation of helium clusters to larger bubbles. The temperature dependencies of the yield strength are obtained. (letter)

  12. In situ transmission electron microscope observation of the formation of fuzzy structures on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, M; Watanabe, T; Nagashima, H; Nishijima, D; Doerner, R P; Krasheninnikov, S I; Sagara, A; Yoshida, N

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the formation processes of tungsten nano-structures, so called fuzz, in situ transmission electron microscope observations during helium ion irradiation and high temperature annealing have been performed. The irradiation with 3 keV He + from room temperature to 1273 K is found to cause high-density helium bubbles in tungsten with no significant change in the surface structure. At higher temperatures, surface morphology changes were observed even without helium irradiation due probably to surface diffusion of tungsten atoms driven by surface tension. It is clearly shown that this morphology change is enhanced with helium irradiation, i.e. the formation of helium bubbles. (paper)

  13. Dynamics of C2 formation in laser-produced carbon plasma in helium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Polek, M.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the role of helium ambient gas on the dynamics of C 2 species formation in laser-produced carbon plasma. The plasma was produced by focusing 1064 nm pulses from an Nd:YAG laser onto a carbon target. The emission from the C 2 species was studied using optical emission spectroscopy, and spectrally resolved and integrated fast imaging. Our results indicate that the formation of C 2 in the plasma plume is strongly affected by the pressure of the He gas. In vacuum, the C 2 emission zone was located near the target and C 2 intensity oscillations were observed both in axial and radial directions with increasing the He pressure. The oscillations in C 2 intensity at higher pressures in the expanding plume could be caused by various formation zones of carbon dimers.

  14. On the blister formation in copper alloys due to the helium ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, D.; Eliezer, D.

    1997-01-01

    Structural materials in fusion reactors will be exposed to alpha radiation and helium implantation over a broad range of energies. A new approach to the blister-formation phenomenon is discussed by means of the mathematical solution on a uniformly loaded circular plate with clamped edges (circular diaphragm). In the present investigation, it was found that blister formation depends on the mechanical properties of the alloys and the near-surface concentration of the implanted gas, which itself is contingent on the crystallographic orientation by means of the stopping power of the implanted atoms. The reported model is based on the fact that at certain depths from the surface, the pressure in the cavities approaches the yield stress of the metal and blistering starts. The thickness of this thin film depends on the mechanical properties of the specific metal. Once a blister cavity is formed, the deformation of the thin film to form a blister cap depends on the buildup of pressure in the cavity contingent on the implanted dose. For the present model, it is sufficient to say that the thickness of the blister's cap cannot be correlated with the projected range of the implantation, as assumed by other authors. The implanted helium concentration needed to build up enough gas pressure to create a blister at a depth which is close to the projected range is higher by 50 times than the gas helium concentration in the cavity. Experimental results, such as the fact that the blisters have burst at the edge of the circular skin, where the maximum stresses are developed, and the fact that at high implantation energy (large projected range), the bursting of the blisters occurs by multilayer caps, support the present model

  15. Bubble formation in shear-thinning fluids: Laser image measurement and a novel correlation for detached volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Wenyuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A laser image system has been established to quantify the characteristics of growing bubbles in quiescent shear-thinning fluids. Bubble formation mechanism was investigated by comparing the evolutions of bubble instantaneous shape, volume and surface area in two shear-thinning liquids with those in Newtonian liquid. The effects of solution mass concentration, gas chamber volume and orifice diameter on bubble detachment volume are discussed. By dimensional analysis, a single bubble volume detached within a moderate gas flowrate range was developed as a function of Reynolds number ,Re, Weber number, We, and gas chamber number, Vc, based on the orifice diameter. The results reveal that the generated bubble presents a slim shape due to the shear-thinning effect of the fluid. Bubble detachment volume increases with the solution mass concentration, gas chamber volume and orifice diameter. The results predicted by the present correlation agree better with the experimental data than the previous ones within the range of this paper.

  16. Understanding molecular motor walking along a microtubule: a themosensitive asymmetric Brownian motor driven by bubble formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Noriyoshi; Yasuoka, Kenji; Koishi, Takahiro; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2013-06-12

    The "asymmetric Brownian ratchet model", a variation of Feynman's ratchet and pawl system, is invoked to understand the kinesin walking behavior along a microtubule. The model system, consisting of a motor and a rail, can exhibit two distinct binding states, namely, the random Brownian state and the asymmetric potential state. When the system is transformed back and forth between the two states, the motor can be driven to "walk" in one direction. Previously, we suggested a fundamental mechanism, that is, bubble formation in a nanosized channel surrounded by hydrophobic atoms, to explain the transition between the two states. In this study, we propose a more realistic and viable switching method in our computer simulation of molecular motor walking. Specifically, we propose a thermosensitive polymer model with which the transition between the two states can be controlled by temperature pulses. Based on this new motor system, the stepping size and stepping time of the motor can be recorded. Remarkably, the "walking" behavior observed in the newly proposed model resembles that of the realistic motor protein. The bubble formation based motor not only can be highly efficient but also offers new insights into the physical mechanism of realistic biomolecule motors.

  17. The helium line formation in late-type stars: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batalha, C.C.; De La Reza, R.

    1989-01-01

    The formation of helium lines and continua in an atmospheric model representing the medium quiet sun has been investigated considering principally the influence of: (i) changes in the temperature gradient at Transition Region (TR); (ii) the coronal radiation and (iii) the overlapping of He II Lyα at 304 A and the continuum radiation of He I at λ≤504 A. By diminishing the thermal gradient in the Transition Region a large part of the helium observations are reproduced. This is the case for the He II resonance λ304 line which is collisionally controlled and is formed at 1.0 x 10 5 K, and the He I resonance line at 584 A which is also collisionally controlled but is formed at deeper layers with a mean temperature of 2.5 x 10 4 K. The He II continuum at 228 A as well as the Lβ line at 256 A can be adjusted to observations if a characteristic solar coronal flux is incident on the optimized Transition Region. (author)

  18. Comparative study of He bubble formation in nanostructured reduced activation steel and its coarsen-grained counterpart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. B.; Zhang, J. H.; Ji, Y. Z.; Xia, L. D.; Liu, H. P.; Yun, D.; He, C. H.; Zhang, C.; Yang, Z. G.

    2018-03-01

    High temperature (550 °C) He ions irradiation was performed on nanostructured (NS) and coarsen-grained (CG) reduced activation steel to investigate the effects of GBs/interfaces on the formation of bubbles during irradiation. Experimental results showed that He bubbles were preferentially trapped at dislocations and/or grain boundaries (GBs) for both of the samples. Void denuded zones (VDZs) were observed in the CG samples, while VDZs near GBs were unobvious in NS sample. However, both the average bubble size and the bubble density in peak damage region of the CG sample were significantly larger than that observed in the NS sample, which indicated that GBs play an important role during the irradiation, and the NS steel had better irradiation resistance than its CG counterpart.

  19. Effect of rhenium addition on tungsten fuzz formation in helium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Aneeqa, E-mail: aneeqa.khan-3@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); De Temmerman, Gregory [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046 - 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Morgan, Thomas W. [FOM Institute DIFFER – Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Ward, Michael B. [Institute for Materials Research, School of Chemical Process Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    The effect of the addition of rhenium to tungsten on the formation of a nanostructure referred to as ‘fuzz’ when exposed to helium plasmas at fusion relevant ion fluxes was investigated in the Magnum and Pilot PSI devices at the FOM Institute DIFFER. The effect rhenium had on fuzz growth was seen to be dependent on time, temperature and flux. Initial fuzz growth was seen to be highly dependent on grain orientation, with rhenium having little effect. Once the fuzz was fully developed, the effect of grain orientation disappeared and the rhenium had an inhibiting effect on growth. This could be beneficial for inhibiting fuzz growth in a future fusion reactor, where transmutation of tungsten to rhenium is expected. It also appears that erosion or annealing of the fuzz is limiting growth of fuzz at higher temperatures in the range of ∼1340 °C.

  20. Effect of rhenium addition on tungsten fuzz formation in helium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Aneeqa; De Temmerman, Gregory; Morgan, Thomas W.; Ward, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the addition of rhenium to tungsten on the formation of a nanostructure referred to as ‘fuzz’ when exposed to helium plasmas at fusion relevant ion fluxes was investigated in the Magnum and Pilot PSI devices at the FOM Institute DIFFER. The effect rhenium had on fuzz growth was seen to be dependent on time, temperature and flux. Initial fuzz growth was seen to be highly dependent on grain orientation, with rhenium having little effect. Once the fuzz was fully developed, the effect of grain orientation disappeared and the rhenium had an inhibiting effect on growth. This could be beneficial for inhibiting fuzz growth in a future fusion reactor, where transmutation of tungsten to rhenium is expected. It also appears that erosion or annealing of the fuzz is limiting growth of fuzz at higher temperatures in the range of ∼1340 °C.

  1. Helium release from radioisotope heat sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, D.E.; Early, J.W.; Starzynski, J.S.; Land, C.C.

    1984-05-01

    Diffusion of helium in /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuel was characterized as a function of the heating rate and the fuel microstructure. The samples were thermally ramped in an induction furnace and the helium release rates measured with an automated mass spectrometer. The diffusion constants and activation energies were obtained from the data using a simple diffusion model. The release rates of helium were correlated with the fuel microstructure by metallographic examination of fuel samples. The release mechanism consists of four regimes, which are dependent upon the temperature. Initially, the release is controlled by movement of point defects combined with trapping along grain boundaries. This regime is followed by a process dominated by formation and growth of helium bubbles along grain boundaries. The third regime involves volume diffusion controlled by movement of oxygen vacancies. Finally, the release at the highest temperatures follows the diffusion rate of intragranular bubbles. The tendency for helium to be trapped within the grain boundaries diminishes with small grain sizes, slow thermal pulses, and older fuel.

  2. Helium release from radioisotope heat sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, D.E.; Early, J.W.; Starzynski, J.S.; Land, C.C.

    1984-05-01

    Diffusion of helium in 238 PuO 2 fuel was characterized as a function of the heating rate and the fuel microstructure. The samples were thermally ramped in an induction furnace and the helium release rates measured with an automated mass spectrometer. The diffusion constants and activation energies were obtained from the data using a simple diffusion model. The release rates of helium were correlated with the fuel microstructure by metallographic examination of fuel samples. The release mechanism consists of four regimes, which are dependent upon the temperature. Initially, the release is controlled by movement of point defects combined with trapping along grain boundaries. This regime is followed by a process dominated by formation and growth of helium bubbles along grain boundaries. The third regime involves volume diffusion controlled by movement of oxygen vacancies. Finally, the release at the highest temperatures follows the diffusion rate of intragranular bubbles. The tendency for helium to be trapped within the grain boundaries diminishes with small grain sizes, slow thermal pulses, and older fuel

  3. Triggered massive star formation associated with the bubble Hii region Sh2-39 (N5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duronea, N. U.; Cappa, C. E.; Bronfman, L.; Borissova, J.; Gromadzki, M.; Kuhn, M. A.

    2017-09-01

    Aims: We perform a multiwavelength analysis of the bubble Hii region Sh2-39 (N5) and its environs with the aim of studying the physical properties of Galactic IR bubbles and exploring their impact in triggering massive star formation. Methods: To analyze the molecular gas, we used CO(3-2) and HCO+(4-3) line data obtained with the on-the-fly technique from the ASTE telescope. To study the distribution and physical characteristics of the dust, we made use of archival data from ATLASGAL, Herschel, and MSX, while the ionized gas was studied making use of an NVSS image. We used public WISE, Spitzer, and MSX point source catalogs to search for infrared candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in the region. To investigate the stellar cluster [BDS2003]6 we used IR spectroscopic data obtained with the ARCoIRIS spectrograph, mounted on Blanco 4 m Telescope at CTIO, and new available IR Ks band observations from the VVVeXtended ESO Public Survey (VVVX). Results: The new ASTE observations allowed the molecular gas component in the velocity range from 30 km s-1 to 46 km s-1, associated with Sh2-39, to be studied in detail. The morphology of the molecular gas suggests that the ionized gas is expanding against its parental cloud. We identified four molecular clumps, which were likely formed by the expansion of the ionization front, and determined some of their physical and dynamical properties. Clumps with HCO+ and 870 μm counterparts show evidence of gravitational collapse. We identified several candidate YSOs across the molecular component. Their spatial distribution and the fragmentation time derived for the collected layers of the molecular gas suggest that massive star formation might have been triggered by the expansion of the nebula via the collect and collapse mechanism. The spectroscopical distance obtained for the stellar cluster [BDS2003]6, placed over one of the collapsing clumps in the border of the Hii region, reveals that this cluster is physically associated with

  4. Satellite formation during bubble transition through an interface between immiscible liquids

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Erqiang; Al-Otaibi, S. A.; Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2014-01-01

    the intermediate film between the bubble and the interface has drained sufficiently, the bubble makes contact with the interface, forming a triple-line and producing strong capillary waves which travel around the bubble and can pinch off a satellite on the opposite

  5. Detail analysis of tritium permeation in the metal liquid channels of the regenerating sheaths of a fusion reactor in presence of helium bubbles; Analisis de detalle de la permeacion de tritio en los caneles de metal liquido de las envolturas regeneradoras de un reactor de fusion en presencia de burbujas de helio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banet, L.; Mas de les Valls, E.; Sedano, L. A.

    2012-07-01

    Inside the channels of liquid metal of the fusion reactor regenerative wrappers, the possible existence of nucleated helium bubbles is not remote. Helium is formed joined the tritium in the escaped neutrons of plasma with lithium. The accumulation of helium in the contact surfaces, between the structure and ML, lead a reduction of heat transfer, at the same time a reduction in the permeation of tritium. The coexistence of three phases in touch: metal liquid, helium and structural material, makes the transport of heat and tritium in a complex phenomenon. To enrich tritium transport studies conducted in the past, there is now a detail analysis of the helium bubble environment adhered to the channel ML wall of a regenerative wrap. For the study we used a CFD tool development on free code OpenFOAM.

  6. Impact and effects of simultaneous MeV-ion irradiation and helium plasma exposure to the formation of tungsten nano-tendrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Graham; Kesler, Leigh Ann; Whyte, Dennis

    2013-10-01

    The extrusion of nano-tendrils from high temperature (>1000 K) tungsten (W) targets exposed to helium (He) plasma ions remains a concern for future fusion reactors. Previous work on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak has demonstrated it is possible to form these structures in a tokamak environment. However, one area where Alcator C-Mod and a fusion reactor differ is total neutron flux at the wall and the displacement damage these neutrons produce in the plasma-facing materials. This dsiplacement damage may affect the size and number He bubbles precipitating in the W target, which is a key factor in the formation and growth of the nano-tendrils. The DIONISOS experiment directly measures the impact of the displacement damage by simultaneously bombarding high temperature W targets with MeV-range ions (to simulate the displacement damage caused by neutron flux) and high flux of He plasma ions. Different combinations of irradiating ion species and W target temperatures are used to vary the different processes and rates that are involved such as He trapping rate, vacancy production and annealing rates, and nano-tendril growth rate. The nano-tendril growth is characterized by SEM imaging and focused ion beam (FIB) cross-sectioning and compared to nano-tendril formation without the presence of the irradiating ion beam. This work is supported by US DOE award DE-SC00-02060.

  7. Experimental Results for Direct Electron Irradiation of a Uranyl Sulfate Solution: Bubble Formation and Thermal Hydraulics Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chemerisov, Sergey [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gromov, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Makarashvili, Vakhtang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heltemes, Thad [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sun, Zaijing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wardle, Kent E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bailey, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Stepinski, Dominique [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jerden, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-30

    In support of the development of accelerator-driven production of fission product Mo-99 as proposed by SHINE Medical Technologies, a 35 MeV electron linac was used to irradiate depleted-uranium (DU) uranyl sulfate dissolved in pH 1 sulfuric acid at average power densities of 6 kW, 12 kW, and 15 kW. During these irradiations, gas bubbles were generated in the solution due to the radiolytic decomposition of water molecules in the solution. Multiple video cameras were used to record the behavior of bubble generation and transport in the solution. Seven six-channel thermocouples were used to record temperature gradients in the solution from self-heating. Measurements of hydrogen and oxygen concentrations in a helium sweep gas were recorded by a gas chromatograph to estimate production rates during irradiation. These data are being used to validate a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the experiment that includes multiphase flow and a custom bubble injection model for the solution region.

  8. Experimental Results for Direct Electron Irradiation of a Uranyl Sulfate Solution: Bubble Formation and Thermal Hydraulics Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemerisov, Sergey; Gromov, R.; Makarashvili, Vakhtang; Heltemes, Thad; Sun, Zaijing; Wardle, Kent E.; Bailey, James; Stepinski, Dominique; Jerden, James; Vandegrift, George F.

    2015-01-01

    In support of the development of accelerator-driven production of fission product Mo-99 as proposed by SHINE Medical Technologies, a 35 MeV electron linac was used to irradiate depleted-uranium (DU) uranyl sulfate dissolved in pH 1 sulfuric acid at average power densities of 6 kW, 12 kW, and 15 kW. During these irradiations, gas bubbles were generated in the solution due to the radiolytic decomposition of water molecules in the solution. Multiple video cameras were used to record the behavior of bubble generation and transport in the solution. Seven six-channel thermocouples were used to record temperature gradients in the solution from self-heating. Measurements of hydrogen and oxygen concentrations in a helium sweep gas were recorded by a gas chromatograph to estimate production rates during irradiation. These data are being used to validate a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the experiment that includes multiphase flow and a custom bubble injection model for the solution region.

  9. Bubble formation occurs in insulin pumps in response to changes in ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure but not as a result of vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Prudence E; King, Bruce R; Goss, Peter W; Chockalingam, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Bubble formation in insulin pump giving sets is a common problem. We studied change in temperature, change in atmospheric pressure, and vibration as potential mechanisms of bubble formation. 5 Animas 2020 pumps with 2 mL cartridges and Inset II infusion systems, 5 Medtronic Paradigm pumps with 1.8 mL cartridge and Quickset and 3 Roche Accu-chek pumps with 3.15 mL cartridges were used. Temperature study: insulin pumps were exposed to a temperature change from 4°C to 37°C. Pressure study: insulin pumps were taken to an altitude of 300 m. Vibration study: insulin pumps were vigorously shaken. All were observed for bubble formation. Bubble formation was observed with changes in temperature and atmospheric pressure. Bubble formation did not occur with vibration. Changes in insulin temperature and atmospheric pressure are common and may result in bubble formation. Vibration may distribute bubbles but does not cause bubble formation.

  10. In-situ observation of damage evolution in TiC crystals during helium ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojou, K.; Otsu, H.; Furuno, S.; Izui, K.; Tsukamoto, T.

    1994-01-01

    In-situ observations were performed on bubble formation and growth in TiC during 20 keV helium ion irradiation over the wide range of irradiation temperatures from 12 to 1523 K. No amorphization occurred over this temperature range. The bubble densities and sizes were almost independent of irradiation temperatures from 12 to 1273 K. Remarkable growth and coalescence occurred during irradiation at high temperature above 1423 K and during annealing above 1373 K after irradiation. ((orig.))

  11. Electron irradiation effect on bubble formation and growth in a sodium borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X.; Birtcher, R. C.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the authors studied simultaneous and intermittent electron irradiation effects on bubble growth in a simple sodium borosilicate glass during Xe ion implantation at 200 C. Simultaneous electron irradiation increases the average bubble size in the glass. This enhanced diffusion is also shown by the migration of Xe from bubbles into the matrix when the sample is irradiated by an electron beam after the Xe implantation

  12. Formation of droplets and bubbles in a microfluidic T-junction-scaling and mechanism of break-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garstecki, Piotr; Fuerstman, Michael J; Stone, Howard A; Whitesides, George M

    2006-03-01

    This article describes the process of formation of droplets and bubbles in microfluidic T-junction geometries. At low capillary numbers break-up is not dominated by shear stresses: experimental results support the assertion that the dominant contribution to the dynamics of break-up arises from the pressure drop across the emerging droplet or bubble. This pressure drop results from the high resistance to flow of the continuous (carrier) fluid in the thin films that separate the droplet from the walls of the microchannel when the droplet fills almost the entire cross-section of the channel. A simple scaling relation, based on this assertion, predicts the size of droplets and bubbles produced in the T-junctions over a range of rates of flow of the two immiscible phases, the viscosity of the continuous phase, the interfacial tension, and the geometrical dimensions of the device.

  13. Blister/hole formation on tungsten surface due to low-energy and high-flux deuterium/helium plasma exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, D.; Iwakiri, H.; Yoshida, N.; Ye, M.Y.; Ohno, N.; Takamura, S.

    2005-01-01

    Deuterium/helium plasma exposures on tungsten surface bring serious damages such as blister and hole. Blistering occurs by cleaving along layered structure intrinsic to the press-roll manufacturing process. Mechanical polishing and helium pre-exposure on mirror-finished powder metallurgy tungsten drastically suppress blister formation. Small cracks made by a polishing would become paths to the surface for diffusing deuterium atoms in the substrate, resulting in no gas accumulation and no blister formation on the surface. Helium pre-exposure would make a helium-enriched layer near the surface, which becomes a kind of diffusion barrier for incident deuterium atoms. Blister formation and deuterium retention are suppressed on the surface with helium-enriched layer. (author)

  14. Starting mechanisms and dynamics of bubble formation induced by a Ho:Yttrium aluminum garnet laser in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenz, Martin; Könz, Flurin; Pratisto, Hans; Weber, Heinz P.; Silenok, Alexander S.; Konov, Vitaly I.

    1998-12-01

    The starting mechanisms and dynamics of laser-induced bubble formation at a submerged fiber tip in distilled water were experimentally investigated using pressure measurements and fast flash videography. A fiber guided Ho:YAG laser operating in the free running (τ=200 μs) and Q-switched (τ=45 ns) mode at a wavelength of λ=2.12 μm was used as a light source. It is shown that the beam profile at the distal fiber tip (multimode fiber d=300 μm) exhibits hot spots that result in an inhomogeneous temperature distribution in the heated water volume. Depending on the laser irradiance, three different bubble formation processes are distinguished: bubble formation by heating, by rarefraction (cavitation), and by a combination of these two processes. For laser irradiances of less than 0.5 MW/ cm2 bubble formation takes place at temperatures near the critical point of water (T=280 °C). A rapid decrease in the threshold temperature for bubble formation was found for laser irradiances between 0.5 and 1 MW/cm 2. At laser irradiances higher than 3 MW/cm2, microbubbles with radii of up to 20 μm were formed at the front of the laser pulse even though the average water temperature was far below 100 °C. The water temperature distribution during the laser pulse was determined by numerical simulation. Simultaneous pressure measurements revealed that each subablative laser spike induces a bipolar pressure transient. The onset of the bubble expansion was found to be correlated with a characteristic pressure increase that can be used for on-line monitoring of the ablation process. The distortion of the temporal profile of the pressure wave is shown to be an effect of diffraction. The reduction of pressure by the negative part of the bipolar pressure transients leads to a lowering of the evaporation pressure and therefore to the initiation of bubbles by cavitation. With increasing irradiance this mechanism becomes more efficient.

  15. Cross section for calculating the helium formation rate in construction materials irradiated by nucleons at energies to 800 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konobeev, A.Yu.; Korovin, Yu.A.

    1992-01-01

    Recently, effects related to the formation of helium in irradiated construction materials have been studied extensively. Data on the nuclear cross sections for producing helium in these materials form the initial information necessary for such investigations. If the spectrum of the incoming particles is known, the value of the helium production cross section makes it possible to calculate the helium generation rate. In recent years, plans and simulating experiments on radiating materials with high-energy particles made it necessary to determine the helium production cross sections in constructionmaterials, which are irradiated by protons and neutrons with energies to 800 MeV. Helium-formation cross sections have been calculated at these energies. However, a correct description of the experimental data for various construction materials does not yet exist. For example, the calculated helium-formation cross sections turned out to overestimate the experimental data, and to underestimate the experimental data. The objective here is to calculate the helium-formation cross sections for various construction materials, which are irradiated by protons and neutrons to energies from 20 to 800 MeV, and to analyze the probable causes of deviations between experimental and earlier calculated cross sections

  16. Chaotic bubbling and nonstagnant foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufaile, Alberto; Sartorelli, José Carlos; Jeandet, Philippe; Liger-Belair, Gerard

    2007-06-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the agglomeration of bubbles obtained from a nozzle working in different bubbling regimes. This experiment consists of a continuous production of bubbles from a nozzle at the bottom of a liquid column, and these bubbles create a two-dimensional (2D) foam (or a bubble raft) at the top of this column. The bubbles can assemble in various dynamically stable arrangement, forming different kinds of foams in a liquid mixture of water and glycerol, with the effect that the bubble formation regimes influence the foam obtained from this agglomeration of bubbles. The average number of bubbles in the foam is related to the bubble formation frequency and the bubble mean lifetime. The periodic bubbling can generate regular or irregular foam, while a chaotic bubbling only generates irregular foam.

  17. Experimental investigation of bubble formation during capillary filling of SiO2 nanoslits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamdrup, Lasse Højlund; Persson, Karl Fredrik; Bruus, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    in the filling speed. In nanoslits with heights below 100 nm, pinned bubbles are continuously formed at the advancing liquid meniscus. This observed increase in bubble density, which increases the fluidic resistance, quantitatively coincides with an observed reduction of the filling speed during filling...

  18. Development and implementation of a model of permeation of tritium in the presence of bubbles of helium to tritigenic wraps of liquid metal wraps; Desarrollo e implementacion de un modelo de permeacion de tritio en presencia de burbujas de helio para envolturas tritigenicas de metal liquido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batet, L.; Mas de les Valls, E.; Sedano, L. A.

    2013-07-01

    In the channels of liquid metal (ML) regenerating sheaths of a fusion reactor, the possibility of bubbles of helium is not remote. Bubbles adhering to the wall of the ML channels would affect heat transfer and the permeation of tritium. Detailed analysis has been conducted (fine mesh), using OpenFOAM, from the environment of a bubble attached to the wall and has developed a model for permeation of tritium through a partially covered with bubbles of helium surface of contact Ml-solid. The model developed has implemented as wall function in OpenFOAM, has validated and has been applied to a case study, using a relatively thick mesh. The developed model substantially reduces the need for computing on the detailed calculation power.

  19. TEM Characterization of Helium Bubbles in T91 and MNHS Steels Implanted with 200 keV He Ions at Different Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ji; Gao Xing; Wang Zhi-Guang; Wei Kong-Fang; Yao Cun-Feng; Cui Ming-Huan; Sun Jian-Rong; Li Bing-Sheng; Pang Li-Long; Zhu Ya-Bin; Luo Peng; Chang Hai-Long; Zhang Hong-Peng; Zhu Hui-Ping; Wang Dong; Du Yang-Yang; Xie Er-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Modified novel high silicon steel (MNHS, a newly developed reduced-activation martensitic alloy) and commercial alloy T91 are implanted with 200 keV He"2"+ ions to a dose of 5 × 10"2"0 ions/m"2 at 300, 450 and 550°C. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to characterize the size and morphology of He bubbles. With the increase of the implantation temperature, TEM observations indicate that bubbles increase in size and the proportion of ‘brick shaped’ cuboid bubbles increases while the proportion of polyhedral bubbles decreases in both the steel samples. For the samples implanted at the same temperature, the average size of He bubbles in MNHS is smaller than that in T91. This might be due to the abundance of boundaries and precipitates in MNHS, which provide additional sites for the trapping of He atoms, thus reduce the susceptibility of MNHS to He embrittlement. (paper)

  20. Effect of Gas- and Liquid-injection Methods on Formation of Bubble and Liquid Slug at Merging Micro T-junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun Kyoung [Kyungnam Univ., Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chi Young [Pukyong Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    In the present experimental study, the effect of gas- and liquid-injected methods on the formation of bubble and liquid slug at the merging micro T-junction of a square microchannel with dimensions 600 μm × 600 μm was investigated. Nitrogen and water were used as test fluids. The superficial velocities of the liquid and gas were in the range of 0.05 - 1 m/s, and 0.1 - 1 m/s, respectively, where the Taylor flow was observed. The bubble length, liquid slug length, bubble velocity, and bubble generation frequency were measured by analyzing the images captured using a high-speed camera. Under similar inlet superficial velocity conditions, in the case of gas injection to the main channel at the merging T-junction (T{sub g}as-liquid), the lengths of the bubble and liquid slug were longer, and the bubble generation frequency was lower than in the case of liquid injection to the main channel at the merging T-junction (T{sub l}iquid-gas). On the other hand, in both cases, the bubble velocity was almost the same. The previous correlation proposed using experimental data for T{sub l}iquid-gas had predicted the present experimental data of bubble length, bubble velocity, liquid slug length, and bubble generation frequency for T{sub g}as-liquid to be ~24%, ~9%, ~39%, ~55%, respectively.

  1. Instability and the formation of bubbles and the plugs in fluidized beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Schulz

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an review paper, particulary concentrate on results not many researches by reason that are explain in the text. We consider stability of disperse, two-phase flow (gas-solid particles or liquid-solid particles linear and non-linear. In particular we discuss the result of Anderson, Sundareson and Jackson (1995 [Anderson K., Sundareson S., Jackson R.: Instabilities and the formation of bubbles in fluidized beds. J. Fluid Mech. 303 (1995, 327-366] that for vertical dispersion flow one- and two-dimensional, they attack problem growing disturbances directly by numerical integration of equations of motion from given initial conditions (using computer Cray C-90. In principle, this would allow authors to explore all aspects of dynamical behaviour of fluidized beds. It is interesting mechanism of periodic plug describing by Anderson et al. and attest by other researchers. Second part of paper is more general, dedicate the problem of linear stability of uniformly fluidized state ("fluidized bed". We make the most important stages of calculations (after to Jackson (2000 [Jackson R.: The Dynamics of Fluidized Particles. Cambridge University Press 2000] and demonstrate that the majority (but not all of fluidized beds with parameters having technical importance is unstable, or stable in narrow interval of wave numbers \\(k\\.

  2. The gas-bubble superlattice and the development of surface structure in He+ and H+ irradiated metals at 300 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.B.; Mazey, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to investigate the spatial arrangement of the small gas bubbles produced at 300 K in several fcc metals including copper and in the hcp metal titanium by 30 keV helium ion irradiation, and in copper by 16 keV proton irradiation. For the fcc metals it is found that the helium gas bubbles lie on a superlattice having a fcc structure with principal axes aligned with those of the metal matrix. The bubble lattice constant, α 1 , measured for a helium fluence just below the critical dose for radiation blistering of the metal surface (approx. equal to 4 x 10 21 He + /m 2 ) is typically approx. equal to 7 nm with bubble diameters typically approx. equal to 2 nm. For titanium, similar bubble ordering is seen is samples irradiated to a level of approx. equal to 1.5 x 10 22 He + /m 2 , with bubble sizes and spacings approximately 50% greater than those for the fcc metals. Pipe-like passages formed by the interconnection of strings of helium gas bubbles are evident in all metals studied. Superlattice formation is also a freature of the hydrogen bubble structure in copper following irradiation to a level of approx. equal to 1.3 x 10 23 H + /m 2 . At an early stage of bubble development small bubbles (approx. equal to 2 nm diameter) arranged on a lattice of spacing α 1 approx. equal to 12 nm are found. The bubble structure evolves further through several well-defined stages before radiation blistering of the surface occurs. Some implications for gas release and for synergistic effects in irradiated surfaces are suggested by these results and by those obtained in other recent experiments. (orig.)

  3. Electron induced formation and stability of molecular and cluster ions in gas phase and superfluid helium nanodroplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleem, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    The present PhD thesis represents a broad range study of electron induced formation and stability of positive and negative ions in gas phase and superfluid helium nanodroplets. The molecules studied are of industrial, environmental, plasma and biological relevance. The knowledge obtained from the study provides new insight for the proper understanding and control on energetics and dynamics of the reactions involved in the formation and fragmentation processes of the studied molecules and clusters. The experiments are accomplished and investigated using mass spectrometric techniques for the formation of molecular and cluster ions using different mass spectrometers available in our laboratory. One part of the work is focused on electron-induced reactions of the molecules in gas phase. Especially focus is laid to electron attachment to the isomers of mononitrotolouene used as an additive to explosives. The fragile nature and high internal energy of these molecules has lead to extensive fragmentation following the ionisation process. Dissociative electron attachment to the three different isomers has shown different resonances and therefore this process can be utilized to explicitly distinguish these isomers. Anion efficiency curves of the isomers have been studied using effusive molecular beam source in combination with a hemispherical electron monochromator as well as a Nier-type ion source attached to a sector field mass spectrometer. The outcome of the experiment is a reliable and effective detection method highly desirable for environmental and security reasons. Secondly, dissociative electron ionization of acetylene and propene is studied and their data is directly related to the plasma modelling for plasma fusion and processing reactors. Temperature effects for dissociative electron attachment to halo-hydrocarbons are also measured using a trochoidal electron monochromator. The second part of the work is concerned with the investigation of electron

  4. Anti-Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufaile, Alberto; Sartorelli, José Carlos

    2003-08-01

    An anti-bubble is a striking kind of bubble in liquid that seemingly does not comply the buoyancy, and after few minutes it disappears suddenly inside the liquid. Different from a simple air bubble that rises directly to the liquid surface, an anti-bubble wanders around in the fluid due to its slightly lesser density than the surrounding liquid. In spite of this odd behavior, an anti-bubble can be understood as the opposite of a conventional soap bubble in air, which is a shell of liquid surrounding air, and an anti-bubble is a shell of air surrounding a drop of the liquid inside the liquid. Two-phase flow has been a subject of interest due to its relevance to process equipment for contacting gases and liquids applied in industry. A chain of bubbles rising in a liquid formed from a nozzle is a two-phase flow, and there are certain conditions in which spherical air shells, called anti-bubbles, are produced. The purpose of this work is mainly to note the existence of anti-bubbling regime as a sequel of a bubbling system. We initially have presented the experimental apparatus. After this we have described the evolution of the bubbling regimes, and emulated the effect of bubbling coalescence with simple maps. Then is shown the inverted dripping as a consequence of the bubble coalescence, and finally the conditions for anti-bubble formation.

  5. Modeling of helium effects in metals: High temperature embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinkaus, H.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of helium on swelling, creep rupture and fatigue properties of fusion reactor materials subjected to (n,α)-reactions and/or direct α-injection, are controlled by bubble formation. The understanding of such effects requires therefore the modeling of (1) diffusional reactions of He atoms with other defects; (2) nucleation and growth of He bubbles; (3) transformation of such bubbles into cavities under continuous He generation and irradiation or creep stress. The present paper is focussed on the modeling of the (coupled) high temperature bubble nucleation and growth processes within and on grain boundaries. Two limiting cases are considered: di-atomic nucleation described by the simplest possible sets of rate equations, and multi-atomic nucleation described by classical nucleation theory. Scaling laws are derived which characterize the dependence of the bubble densities upon time (He-dose), He generation rate and temperature. Comparison with experimental data of AISI 316 SS α-implanted at temperatures around 1000 K indicates bubble nucleation of the multi-atomic type. The nucleation and growth models are applied to creep tests performed during α-implantation suggesting that in these cases gas driven bubble growth is the life time controlling mechanism. The narrow (creep stress/He generation rate) range of this mechanism in a mechanism map constructed from these tests indicates that in many reactor situations the time to rupture is probably controlled by stress driven cavity growth rather than by gas driven bubble growth. (orig.)

  6. Stationary bubble formation and cavity collapse in wedge-shaped hoppers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagisawa, Yui; Then, Hui Zee; Okumura, Ko

    2016-01-01

    The hourglass is one of the apparatuses familiar to everyone, but reveals intriguing behaviors peculiar to granular materials, and many issues are remained to be explored. In this study, we examined the dynamics of falling sand in a special form of hourglass, i.e., a wedge-shaped hopper, when a suspended granular layer is stabilized to a certain degree. As a result, we found remarkably different dynamic regimes of bubbling and cavity. In the bubbling regime, bubbles of nearly equal size are created in the sand at a regular time interval. In the cavity regime, a cavity grows as sand beads fall before a sudden collapse of the cavity. Bubbling found here is quite visible to a level never discussed in the physics literature and the cavity regime is a novel phase, which is neither continuous, intermittent nor completely blocked phase. We elucidate the physical conditions necessary for the bubbling and cavity regimes and develop simple theories for the regimes to successfully explain the observed phenomena by considering the stability of a suspended granular layer and clogging of granular flow at the outlet of the hopper. The bubbling and cavity regimes could be useful for mixing a fluid with granular materials. PMID:27138747

  7. Satellite formation during bubble transition through an interface between immiscible liquids

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Erqiang

    2014-03-12

    When a bubble rises to an interface between two immiscible liquids, it can pass through the interface, if this is energetically favourable, i.e. The bubble preferring the side of the interface with the lower air-liquid surface tension. Once the intermediate film between the bubble and the interface has drained sufficiently, the bubble makes contact with the interface, forming a triple-line and producing strong capillary waves which travel around the bubble and can pinch off a satellite on the opposite side, akin to the dynamics in the coalescence cascade. We identify the critical Ohnesorge numbers where such satellites are produced and characterize their sizes. The total transition time scales with the bubble size and differential surface tension, while the satellite pinch-off time scales with the capillary-inertial time of the pool liquid, which originally surrounds the bubble. We also use high-speed video imaging to study the motion of the neck of the contact. For low viscosity we show that it grows in time with a power-law exponent between 0.44 and 0.50, with a prefactor modified by the net sum of the three interfacial tensions. Increasing the viscosity of the receiving liquid drop drastically slows down the motion of the triple-line, when the Ohnesorge number exceeds ${\\\\sim }$0.08. This differs qualitatively from the coalescence of two miscible drops of different viscosities, where the lower viscosity sets the coalescence speed. We thereby propose a strong resistance from the triple-line. © 2014 Cambridge University Press.

  8. Experimental study of formation and dynamics of cavitation bubbles and acoustic flows in NaCl, KCl water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybkin, K. A.; Bratukhin, Yu. K.; Lyubimova, T. P.; Fatallov, O.; Filippov, L. O.

    2017-07-01

    The acoustic flows and the phenomena associated with them arising under the action of ultrasound of different power on distilled water and aqueous solutions of a mixture of NaCl and KCl salts of various concentrations are studied experimentally. It is found that in the distilled water, under the action of ultrasound, the appearance of inertial and non-inertial cavitation bubbles takes place, then the formation of stable clusters, the distance between which depends on the power of the ultrasound source is observed. Experiments show that an increase in the mass concentration of salts in water leads to the decrease in the average diameter of the arising inertial cavitation bubbles and to the gradual decrease in their number, up to an almost complete disappearance at nearly 13% of the concentration of the salt mixture in the water.

  9. Design and Construction of Experiment for Direct Electron Irradiation of Uranyl Sulfate Solution: Bubble Formation and Thermal Hydraulics Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chemerisov, Sergey [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gromov, Roman [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Makarashvili, Vakho [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heltemes, Thad [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sun, Zaijing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wardle, Kent E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bailey, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Quigley, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Stepinski, Dominique [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Argonne is assisting SHINE Medical Technologies in developing SHINE, a system for producing fission-product 99Mo using a D/T-accelerator to produce fission in a non-critical target solution of aqueous uranyl sulfate. We have developed an experimental setup for studying thermal-hydraulics and bubble formation in the uranyl sulfate solution to simulate conditions expected in the SHINE target solution during irradiation. A direct electron beam from the linac accelerator will be used to irradiate a 20 L solution (sector of the solution vessel). Because the solution will undergo radiolytic decomposition, we will be able to study bubble formation and dynamics and effects of convection and temperature on bubble behavior. These experiments will serve as a verification/ validation tool for the thermal-hydraulic model. Utilization of the direct electron beam for irradiation allows homogeneous heating of a large solution volume and simplifies observation of the bubble dynamics simultaneously with thermal-hydraulic data collection, which will complement data collected during operation of the miniSHINE experiment. Irradiation will be conducted using a 30-40 MeV electron beam from the high-power linac accelerator. The total electron-beam power will be 20 kW, which will yield a power density on the order of 1 kW/L. The solution volume will be cooled on the front and back surfaces and central tube to mimic the geometry of the proposed SHINE solution vessel. Also, multiple thermocouples will be inserted into the solution vessel to map thermal profiles. The experimental design is now complete, and installation and testing are in progress.

  10. Effects of surface orientation on lifetime of near-surface nanoscale He bubble in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Jiechao; Fu, Baoqin; Wu, Zhangwen; Hou, Qing, E-mail: qhou@scu.edu.cn

    2017-02-15

    In multiscale modeling of the morphological evolution of plasma facing materials in nuclear fusion reactors, the knowledge of the timescales of the involved physical processes is important. In the present study, a new method based on molecular dynamics simulations was developed to extract the lifetime of helium bubbles near tungsten surfaces. It was found that the lifetime of a helium bubble can be described by the Arrhenius equation. However, the lifetime of a helium bubble depends on the thickness of tungsten film above the helium bubble in the substrate and the bubble size. The influence of surface orientations on the lifetime of helium bubbles was also observed, and the performance of helium bubbles on the (1 1 1) surface is very different from on the (0 0 1) and (0 1 1) surfaces. The role of the helium bubble lifetime in other simulation techniques, such as in kinetic Monte Carlo methods and rate theory, is discussed.

  11. Bubble Formation in Yield Stress Fluids Using Flow-Focusing and T-Junction Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborie, Benoit; Rouyer, Florence; Angelescu, Dan E; Lorenceau, Elise

    2015-05-22

    We study the production of bubbles inside yield stress fluids (YSFs) in axisymmetric T-junction and flow-focusing devices. Taking advantage of yield stress over capillary stress, we exhibit a robust break-up mechanism reminiscent of the geometrical operating regime in 2D flow-focusing devices for Newtonian fluids. We report that when the gas is pressure driven, the dynamics is unsteady due to hydrodynamic feedback and YSF deposition on the walls of the channels. However, the present study also identifies pathways for potential steady-state production of bubbly YSFs at large scale.

  12. Dynamics of vortex assisted metal condensation in superfluid helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Evgeny; Mammetkuliyev, Muhammet; Eloranta, Jussi

    2013-05-28

    Laser ablation of copper and silver targets immersed in bulk normal and superfluid (4)He was studied through time-resolved shadowgraph photography. In normal fluid, only a sub-millimeter cavitation bubble is created and immediate formation of metal clusters is observed within a few hundred microseconds. The metal clusters remain spatially tightly focused up to 15 ms, and it is proposed that this observation may find applications in particle image velocimetry. In superfluid helium, the cavitation bubble formation process is distinctly different from the normal fluid. Due to the high thermal conductivity and an apparent lag in the breakdown of superfluidity, about 20% of the laser pulse energy was transferred directly into the liquid and a large gas bubble, up to several millimeters depending on laser pulse energy, is created. The internal temperature of the gas bubble is estimated to exceed 9 K and the following bubble cool down period therefore includes two separate phase transitions: gas-normal liquid and normal liquid-superfluid. The last stage of the cool down process was assigned to the superfluid lambda transition where a sudden formation of large metal clusters is observed. This is attributed to high vorticity created in the volume where the gas bubble previously resided. As shown by theoretical bosonic density functional theory calculations, quantized vortices can trap atoms and dimers efficiently, exhibiting static binding energies up to 22 K. This, combined with hydrodynamic Bernoulli attraction, yields total binding energies as high as 35 K. For larger clusters, the static binding energy increases as a function of the volume occupied in the liquid to minimize the surface tension energy. For heliophobic species an energy barrier develops as a function of the cluster size, whereas heliophilics show barrierless entry into vortices. The present theoretical and experimental observations are used to rationalize the previously reported metal nanowire assembly in

  13. Void formation and helium effects in 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels irradiated in HFIR and FFTF at 400/degree/C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Klueh, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Martensitic/ferritic 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels doped with up to 2 wt% Ni have up to 450 appm He after HFIR irradiation to /approximately/38 dpa, but only 5 appm He after 47 dpa in FFTF. No fine He bubbles and few or no larger voids were observable in any of these steels after FFTF irradiation at 407/degree/C. By contrast, many voids were found in the undoped steels (30-90 appm He) irradiated in HFIR at 400/degree/C, while voids plus many more fine He bubbles were found in the Ni-doped steels (400-450 appm He). Irradiation in both reactors at /approximately/400/degree/C produced significant changes in the as-tempered lath/subgrain boundary, dislocation, and precipitation structures that were sensitive to alloy composition, including doping with Ni. However, for each specific alloy the irradiation-produced changes were exactly the same comparing samples irradiated in FFTF and HFIR, particularly the Ni-doped steels. Therefore, the increased void formation appears solely due to the increased helium generation found in HFIR. While the levels of void swelling are relatively low after 37-39 dpa in HFIR (0.1-0.4%), details of the microstructural evolution suggest that void nucleation is still progressing, and swelling could increase with dose. The effect of helium on void swelling remains a valid concern for fusion application that requires higher dose experiments. 15 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs

  14. A study of formation of iron nanoparticles in aluminium matrix with helium pores

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kichanov, S.E.; Kozlenko, D. P.; Belushkin, A.V.; Reutov, V.F.; Samoilenko, S.O.; Jirák, Zdeněk; Savenko, B. N.; Bulavin, L. A.; Zubavichus, Y.V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 351, č. 1 (2012), "012013-1"-"012013-5" ISSN 1742-6588. [International Workshop on SANS-YuMO User Meeting at the Start-up of Scientific Experiments on the IBR-2M Reactor - Devoted to the 75th anniversary of Yu M Ostanevich's Birth /2./. Dubna, 27.05.2011-30.05.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : iron nanoparticles * aluminium matrix * helium pores Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  15. Depth distribution of bubbles in He-ion irradiated nickel and the mechanism of blister formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.; Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.; Miley, G.H.

    1978-01-01

    Studies carried out to understand the experimental observation that the blister skin thickness for many metals irradiated with He + ions of energies lower than 20 keV is a factor of two or more larger than the calculated projected range are reported. Nickel foils were used with 20 and 500 keV helium ions

  16. Formation of a current bubble in a coupling process of resistive tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Kazuhiro; Hatori, Tadatsugu

    1990-01-01

    The current bubble means a helical duct with low current density invading the inner high current region of current carrying toroidal plasmas. The numerical simulations show that it appears right after the absorption of a small magnetic island into the chaotic layer along the separatrix of large magnetic island. (author)

  17. Bubble formation after a 20-m dive: deep-stop vs. shallow-stop decompression profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, Nico A. M.; Corstius, Jan-Jaap Brandt; Germonpré, Peter; Sterk, Wouter

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: It is claimed that performing a "deep stop," a stop at about half of maximal diving depth (MDD), can reduce the amount of detectable precordial bubbles after the dive and may thus diminish the risk of decompression sickness. In order to ascertain whether this reduction is caused by the

  18. Synergistic enhancement of micro-bubble formation in ultrasound irradiated H2O-CH3OH mixtures probed by dynamic light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pai, M.R.; Hassan, P.A.; Bharadwaj, S.R.; Kulshreshtha, S.K.

    2008-01-01

    This report investigates the formation of micro-bubbles in water-methanol mixtures upon ultrasound irradiation and its correlation with the yield of H 2 obtained as a result of sono-chemical splitting of water. The yield of hydrogen produced by sono-chemical reaction is monitored at different compositions of water-methanol mixtures. The evidence for the formation of micro-bubbles upon ultrasound irradiation is obtained by the dynamic light scattering technique. Micro-bubble formation during ultrasound irradiation of water-methanol mixtures, their stability and size distribution, has been quantitatively estimated. The effect of composition of the water-methanol mixture and duration of irradiation on the extent of bubble formation has been inferred from the changes in the light scattering intensity and its time correlation function. Exceptional stability of micro-bubbles without any additives is observed at a certain composition of the water-methanol mixture (4:3, v/v). The extent of micro-bubbles formed in the mixture correlates well with the yield of hydrogen detected. (authors)

  19. Gold nanoshell photomodification under a single-nanosecond laser pulse accompanied by color-shifting and bubble formation phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akchurin, Garif; Khlebtsov, Boris; Akchurin, Georgy; Tuchin, Valery; Zharov, Vladimir; Khlebtsov, Nikolai

    2008-01-01

    Laser-nanoparticle interaction is crucial for biomedical applications of lasers and nanotechnology to the treatment of cancer or pathogenic microorganisms. We report on the first observation of laser-induced coloring of gold nanoshell solution after a one nanosecond pulse and an unprecedentedly low bubble formation (as the main mechanism of cancer cell killing) threshold at a laser fluence of about 4 mJ cm -2 , which is safe for normal tissue. Specifically, silica/gold nanoshell (140/15 nm) suspensions were irradiated with a single 4 ns (1064 nm) or 8 ns (900 nm) laser pulse at fluences ranging from 0.1 mJ cm -2 to 50 J cm -2 . Solution red coloring was observed by the naked eye confirmed by blue-shifting of the absorption spectrum maximum from the initial 900 nm for nanoshells to 530 nm for conventional colloidal gold nanospheres. TEM images revealed significant photomodification of nanoparticles including complete fragmentation of gold shells, changes in silica core structure, formation of small 20-30 nm isolated spherical gold nanoparticles, gold nanoshells with central holes, and large and small spherical gold particles attached to a silica core. The time-resolved monitoring of bubble formation phenomena with the photothermal (PT) thermolens technique demonstrated that after application of a single 8 ns pulse at fluences 5-10 mJ cm -2 and higher the next pulse did not produce any PT response, indicating a dramatic decrease in absorption because of gold shell modification. We also observed a dependence of the bubble expansion time on the laser energy with unusually very fast PT signal rising (∼3.5 ns scale at 0.2 J cm -2 ). Application of the observed phenomena to medical applications is discussed, including a simple visual color test for laser-nanoparticle interaction

  20. Carbon dioxide induced bubble formation in a CH4-CO2-H2O ternary system: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujith, K S; Ramachandran, C N

    2016-02-07

    The extraction of methane from its hydrates using carbon dioxide involves the decomposition of the hydrate resulting in a CH4-CO2-H2O ternary solution. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the evolution of dissolved gas molecules in the ternary system at different concentrations of CO2. Various compositions considered in the present study resemble the solution formed during the decomposition of methane hydrates at the initial stages of the extraction process. We find that the presence of CO2 aids the formation of CH4 bubbles by causing its early nucleation. Elucidation of the composition of the bubble revealed that in ternary solutions with high concentration of CO2, mixed gas bubbles composed of CO2 and CH4 are formed. To understand the role of CO2 in the nucleation of CH4 bubbles, the structure of the bubble formed was analyzed, which revealed that there is an accumulation of CO2 at the interface of the bubble and the surrounding water. The aggregation of CO2 at the bubble-water interface occurs predominantly when the concentration of CO2 is high. Radial distribution function for the CH4-CO2 pair indicates that there is an increasingly favorable direct contact between dissolved CH4 and CO2 molecules in the bubble-water interface. It is also observed that the presence of CO2 at the interface results in the decrease in surface tension. Thus, CO2 leads to greater stability of the bubble-water interface thereby bringing down the critical size of the bubble nuclei. The results suggest that a rise in concentration of CO2 helps in the removal of dissolved CH4 thereby preventing the accumulation of methane in the liquid phase. Thus, the presence of CO2 is predicted to assist the decomposition of methane hydrates in the initial stages of the replacement process.

  1. A theoretical insight into H accumulation and bubble formation by applying isotropic strain on the W-H system under a fusion environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Quan-Fu; Liu, Yue-Lin; Zhang, Ying; Ding, Fang; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2018-04-01

    The solubility and bubble formation of hydrogen (H) in tungsten (W) are crucial factors for the application of W as a plasma-facing component under a fusion environment, but the data and mechanism are presently scattered, indicating some important factors might be neglected. High-energy neutron-irradiated W inevitably causes a local strain, which may change the solubility of H in W. Here, we performed first-principles calculations to predict the H solution behaviors under isotropic strain combined with temperature effect in W and found that the H solubility in interstitial lattice can be promoted/impeded by isotropic tensile/compressive strain over the temperature range 300-1800 K. The calculated H solubility presents good agreement with the experiment. Together, our previous results of anisotropic strain, except for isotropic compression, both isotropic tension and anisotropic tension/compression enhance H solution so as to reveal an important physical implication for H accumulation and bubble formation in W: strain can enhance H solubility, resulting in the preliminary nucleation of H bubble that further causes the local strain of W lattice around H bubble, which in turn improves the H solubility at the strained region that promotes continuous growth of the H bubble via a chain-reaction effect in W. This result can also interpret the H bubble formation even if no radiation damage is produced in W exposed to low-energy H plasma.

  2. Helium generation and diffusion in graphite and some carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, J.B.; Guinan, M.W.; Hosmer, D.W.; Condit, R.H.; Borg, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    The cross section for the generation of helium in neutron irradiated carbon was found to be 654 mb at 14.4 MeV and 744 mb at 14.9 MeV. Extrapolating to 14.1 MeV (the fusion reactor spectrum) gives 615 mb. The diffusion of helium in dense polycrystalline graphite and in pyrographite was measured and found to be D = 7.2 x 10 -7 m 2 s -1 exp (-80 kJ/RT). It is assumed that diffusion is primarily in the basal plane direction in crystals of the graphite. In polycrystalline graphite the path length is a factor of √2 longer than the measured distance due to the random orientation mismatch between successive grains. Isochronal anneals (measured helium release as the specimen is steadily heated) were run and maximum release rates were found at 200 0 C in polycrystalline graphite, 1000 0 C in pyrographite, 1350 0 C in boron carbide, and 1350 0 and 2400 0 C (two peaks) in silicon carbide. It is concluded that in these candidates for curtain materials in fusion reactors the helium releases can probably occur without bubble formation in graphites, may occur in boron carbide, but will probably cause bubble formation in silicon carbide. 7 figures

  3. Behaviour of helium after implantation in molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viaud, C.; Maillard, S.; Carlot, G.; Valot, C.; Gilabert, E.; Sauvage, T.; Peaucelle, C.; Moncoffre, N.

    2009-01-01

    This study deals with the behaviour of helium in a molybdenum liner dedicated to the retention of fission products. More precisely this work contributes to evaluate the release of implanted helium when the gas has precipitated into nanometric bubbles close to the free surface. A simple model dedicated to calculate the helium release in such a condition is presented. The specificity of this model lays on the assumption that the gas is in equilibrium with a simple distribution of growing bubbles. This effort is encouraging since the calculated helium release fits an experimental dataset with a set of parameters in good agreement with the literature

  4. The role of current sheet formation in driven plasmoid reconnection in laser-produced plasma bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezhnin, Kirill; Fox, William; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2017-10-01

    We conduct a multiparametric study of driven magnetic reconnection relevant to recent experiments on colliding magnetized laser produced plasmas using the PIC code PSC. Varying the background plasma density, plasma resistivity, and plasma bubble geometry, the results demonstrate a variety of reconnection behavior and show the coupling between magnetic reconnection and global fluid evolution of the system. We consider both collision of two radially expanding bubbles where reconnection is driven through an X-point, and collision of two parallel fields where reconnection must be initiated by the tearing instability. Under various conditions, we observe transitions between fast, collisionless reconnection to a Sweet-Parker-like slow reconnection to complete stalling of the reconnection. By varying plasma resistivity, we observe the transition between fast and slow reconnection at Lundquist number S 103 . The transition from plasmoid reconnection to a single X-point reconnection also happens around S 103 . We find that the criterion δ /di < 1 is necessary for fast reconnection onset. Finally, at sufficiently high background density, magnetic reconnection can be suppressed, leading to bouncing motion of the magnetized plasma bubbles.

  5. Dark-ages reionization and galaxy formation simulation - XII. Bubbles at dawn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geil, Paul M.; Mutch, Simon J.; Poole, Gregory B.; Duffy, Alan R.; Mesinger, Andrei; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.

    2017-12-01

    The direct detection of regions of ionized hydrogen (H II) has been suggested as a promising probe of cosmic reionization. Observing the redshifted 21-cm signal of hydrogen from the epoch of reionization (EoR) is a key scientific driver behind new-generation, low-frequency radio interferometers. We investigate the feasibility of combining low-frequency observations with the Square Kilometre Array and near infra-red survey data of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope to detect cosmic reionization by imaging H II bubbles surrounding massive galaxies during the cosmic dawn. While individual bubbles will be too small to be detected, we find that by stacking redshifted 21-cm spectra centred on known galaxies, it will be possible to directly detect the EoR at z ∼ 9-12, and to place qualitative constraints on the evolution of the spin temperature of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z ≳ 9. In particular, given a detection of ionized bubbles using this technique, it is possible to determine if the IGM surrounding them is typically in absorption or emission. Determining the globally averaged neutral fraction of the IGM using this method will prove more difficult due to degeneracy with the average size of H II regions.

  6. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  7. The double helium-white dwarf channel for the formation of AM CVn binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian-Fei; Liu, Jin-Zhong; Jeffery, C. Simon; Hall, Philip D.; Bi, Shao-Lan

    2018-01-01

    Most close double helium white dwarfs will merge within a Hubble time due to orbital decay by gravitational wave radiation. However, a significant fraction with low mass ratios will survive for a long time as a consequence of stable mass transfer. Such stable mass transfer between two helium white dwarfs (HeWDs) provides one channel for the production of AM CVn binary stars. In previous calculations of double HeWD progenitors, the accreting HeWD was treated as a point mass. We have computed the evolution of 16 double HeWD models in order to investigate the consequences of treating the evolution of both components in detail. We find that the boundary between binaries having stable and unstable mass transfer is slightly modified by this approach. By comparing with observed periods and mass ratios, we redetermine masses of eight known AM CVn stars by our double HeWDs channel, i.e. HM Cnc, AM CVn, V406 Hya, J0926, J1240, GP Com, Gaia14aae and V396 Hya.We propose that central spikes in the triple-peaked emission spectra of J1240, GP Com and V396 Hya and the surface abundance ratios of N/C/O in GP Com can be explained by the stable double HeWD channel. The mass estimates derived from our calculations are used to discuss the predicted gravitational wave signal in the context of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) project.

  8. Formation of Pyrylium from Aromatic Systems with a Helium:Oxygen Flowing Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow (FAPA) Plasma Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badal, Sunil P.; Ratcliff, Tyree D.; You, Yi; Breneman, Curt M.; Shelley, Jacob T.

    2017-06-01

    The effects of oxygen addition on a helium-based flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization source are explored. Small amounts of oxygen doped into the helium discharge gas resulted in an increase in abundance of protonated water clusters by at least three times. A corresponding increase in protonated analyte signal was also observed for small polar analytes, such as methanol and acetone. Meanwhile, most other reagent ions (e.g., O2 +·, NO+, etc.) significantly decrease in abundance with even 0.1% v/v oxygen in the discharge gas. Interestingly, when analytes that contained aromatic constituents were subjected to a He:O2-FAPA, a unique (M + 3)+ ion resulted, while molecular or protonated molecular ions were rarely detected. Exact-mass measurements revealed that these (M + 3)+ ions correspond to (M - CH + O)+, with the most likely structure being pyrylium. Presence of pyrylium-based ions was further confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry of the (M + 3)+ ion compared with that of a commercially available salt. Lastly, rapid and efficient production of pyrylium in the gas phase was used to convert benzene into pyridine. Though this pyrylium-formation reaction has not been shown before, the reaction is rapid and efficient. Potential reactant species, which could lead to pyrylium formation, were determined from reagent-ion mass spectra. Thermodynamic evaluation of reaction pathways was aided by calculation of the formation enthalpy for pyrylium, which was found to be 689.8 kJ/mol. Based on these results, we propose that this reaction is initiated by ionized ozone (O3 +·), proceeds similarly to ozonolysis, and results in the neutral loss of the stable CHO2 · radical. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Comparison of platelet formation in hydrogen and helium-implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebras, X.; Nguyen, P.; Bourdelle, K.K.; Letertre, F.; Cherkashin, N.; Claverie, A.

    2007-01-01

    A comparative transmission electron microscopy study of the extended defects formed in (0 0 1) Si after hydrogen or helium implantation was performed. Quantitative data on the size and density of the defects with different crystallographic variants have been obtained. Common defects observed after implants with a dose of 1 x 10 16 cm -2 and isothermal anneals at 350 o C in the presence of a stiffener were platelet-like structures lying on {1 0 0} habit planes parallel and perpendicular to the wafer surface. The differences in the defect morphology and in the variant platelet population are correspondingly related to the different chemical reactivity of H and He and the different compressive biaxial stresses generated by the H and He implants

  10. Electron dynamics and plasma jet formation in a helium atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algwari, Q. Th. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Maths and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, University Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Electronic Department, College of Electronics Engineering, Mosul University, Mosul 41002 (Iraq); O' Connell, D. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Maths and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, University Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-19

    The excitation dynamics within the main plasma production region and the plasma jets of a kHz atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet operated in helium was investigated. Within the dielectric tube, the plasma ignites as a streamer-type discharge. Plasma jets are emitted from both the powered and grounded electrode end; their dynamics are compared and contrasted. Ignition of these jets are quite different; the jet emitted from the powered electrode is ignited with a slight time delay to plasma ignition inside the dielectric tube, while breakdown of the jet at the grounded electrode end is from charging of the dielectric and is therefore dependent on plasma production and transport within the dielectric tube. Present streamer theories can explain these dynamics.

  11. Variations of bubble cavitation and temperature elevation during lesion formation by high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Gao, Xiaobin Wilson

    2013-08-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as an effective therapeutic modality in both thermal ablations for solid tumor/cancer and soft-tissue fragmentation. Mechanical and thermal effects, which play an important role in the HIFU treatment simultaneously, are dependent on the operating parameters and may vary with the progress of therapy. Mechanical erosion in the shape of a "squid," a "dumbbell" lesion with both mechanical and thermal lesions, or a "tadpole" lesion with mechanical erosion at the center and thermal necrosis on the boundary in the transparent gel phantom could be produced correspondingly with the pulse duration of 5-30 ms, which is much longer than histotripsy burst but shorter than the time for tissue boiling, and pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 0.2-5 Hz. Meanwhile, variations of bubble cavitation (both inertial and stable cavitation) and temperature elevation in the focal region (i.e., z = -2.5, 0, and 2.5 mm) were measured by passive cavitation detection (PCD) and thermocouples during the therapeutic procedure, respectively. Stable cavitation increased with the pulse duration, PRF, and the number of pulses delivered. However, inertial cavitation was found to increase initially and then decrease with long pulse duration and high PRF. Temperature in the pre-focal region is always higher than those at the focal and post-focal position in all tests. Great variations of PCD signals and temperature elevation are due to the generation and persistence of large bubble, which is resistant to collapse and occurs with the increase of pulse duration and PRF. Similar lesion pattern and variations were also observed in ex vivo porcine kidneys. Hyperechoes in the B-mode ultrasound image were comparable to the shape and size of lesions in the dissected tissue. Thermal lesion volume increased with the increase of pulse duration and PRF, but mechanical erosion reached its maximum volume with the pulse duration of 20 ms and PRF of 1

  12. Jet formation and shock wave emission during collapse of ultrasound-induced cavitation bubbles and their role in the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brujan, E A; Ikeda, T; Matsumoto, Y

    2005-10-21

    The dynamics of inertial cavitation bubbles produced by short pulses of high-intensity focused ultrasound near a rigid boundary are studied to get a better understanding of the role of jet formation and shock wave emission during bubble collapse in the therapeutic applications of ultrasound. The bubble dynamics are investigated by high-speed photography with up to 2 million frames/s and acoustic measurements, as well as by numerical calculations. The significant parameter of this study is the dimensionless stand-off, gamma, which is defined as the distance of the bubble centre at its maximum expansion scaled by the maximum bubble radius. High-speed photography is applied to observe the bubble motion and the velocity of the liquid jet formed during bubble collapse. Hydrophone measurements are used to determine the pressure and the duration of the shock wave emitted during bubble rebound. Calculations yield the variation with time of the bubble wall, the maximum velocity and the kinetic energy of the re-entrant jet. The comparisons between experimental and numerical data are favourable with regard to both shape history and translational motion of the bubble. The acoustic energy constitutes the largest individual amount in the energy balance of bubble collapse. The ratio of the shock wave energy, measured at 10 mm from the emission centre, to the cavitation bubble energy was 1:2.4 at gamma = 1.55 and 1:3.5 at gamma = 1. At this distance, the shock wave pressure ranges from 0.122 MPa, at gamma = 1, to 0.162 MPa, at gamma = 1.55, and the temporal duration at the half maximum level is 87 ns. The maximum jet velocity ranges from 27 m s(-1), at gamma = 1, to 36 m s(-1), at gamma = 1.55. For gamma < 1.2, the re-entrant jet can generate an impact pressure on the nearby boundary larger than 50 MPa. We discuss the implications of the results for the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound.

  13. Jet formation and shock wave emission during collapse of ultrasound-induced cavitation bubbles and their role in the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brujan, E A; Ikeda, T; Matsumoto, Y

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of inertial cavitation bubbles produced by short pulses of high-intensity focused ultrasound near a rigid boundary are studied to get a better understanding of the role of jet formation and shock wave emission during bubble collapse in the therapeutic applications of ultrasound. The bubble dynamics are investigated by high-speed photography with up to 2 million frames/s and acoustic measurements, as well as by numerical calculations. The significant parameter of this study is the dimensionless stand-off, γ, which is defined as the distance of the bubble centre at its maximum expansion scaled by the maximum bubble radius. High-speed photography is applied to observe the bubble motion and the velocity of the liquid jet formed during bubble collapse. Hydrophone measurements are used to determine the pressure and the duration of the shock wave emitted during bubble rebound. Calculations yield the variation with time of the bubble wall, the maximum velocity and the kinetic energy of the re-entrant jet. The comparisons between experimental and numerical data are favourable with regard to both shape history and translational motion of the bubble. The acoustic energy constitutes the largest individual amount in the energy balance of bubble collapse. The ratio of the shock wave energy, measured at 10 mm from the emission centre, to the cavitation bubble energy was 1:2.4 at γ = 1.55 and 1:3.5 at γ = 1. At this distance, the shock wave pressure ranges from 0.122 MPa, at γ = 1, to 0.162 MPa, at γ 1.55, and the temporal duration at the half maximum level is 87 ns. The maximum jet velocity ranges from 27 m s -1 , at γ = 1, to 36 m s -1 , at γ = 1.55. For γ < 1.2, the re-entrant jet can generate an impact pressure on the nearby boundary larger than 50 MPa. We discuss the implications of the results for the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound

  14. Super-resolution by elliptical bubble formation with PtOx and AgInSbTe layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jooho; Hwang, Inoh; Yoon, Duseop; Park, Insik; Shin, Dongho; Kikukawa, Takashi; Shima, Takayuki; Tominaga, Junji

    2003-01-01

    The recording and retrieval of signals below 100 nm mark length were attempted with elliptical bubble-type super-resolution technology with platinum oxide (PtO x ) and ductile AgInSbTe layers, using the same optical system as that of a digital versatile disk (a 635 nm wavelength red laser system). The carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR) of over 47 dB for 100 nm mark length signals (over 43 dB for 80 nm mark length signals) was obtained, which can be considered as a commercially acceptable level of CNR. The recording mechanism of the sample disk was shown through the transmission electron microscopy cross-section image observation to be by rigid elliptical bubble formation at the PtO x layer located between the AgInSbTe layers. The results of this report represent the potential for a much higher-density storage using the red laser system and a subterabyte optical storage using the blue laser system

  15. RESUS: A code for low volatile radio-nuclide release from liquids due to vapor bubble burst induced liquid jet formation and disintegration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, M.K.; Starflinger, J.; Linnemann, Th.; Brockmeier, U.; Unger, H.; Schuetz, W.

    1995-01-01

    In the field of nuclear safety, the release of volatile and low volatile radio-nuclides from liquid surfaces into a gas atmosphere is important for aerosol source term considerations particularly in late severe accident sequences. In case of a hypothetical nuclear reactor accident involving a failure of the primary system, primary coolant and radio-nuclides may be released into the containment to frequently form a liquid pool which may be contaminated by suspended or solved fuel particles and fission products. Under this scope, the release code package REVOLS/RENONS was developed for radio-nuclide release from liquid surfaces. Assuming the absence of gas or vapor bubbles in the liquid, the evaporative release of volatile components, calculated by the REVOLS code, is governed by diffusive and convective transport processes, whereas the release of low volatiles, calculated by the RENONS code, may be governed by mechanical processes which leads to droplet entrainment in case of wavy liquid pool surface conditions into the containment atmosphere by means of convection. For many accident sequences, in which gas is injected into a pool or liquid area elsewhere, predominantly when saturation temperatures can be reached, the release of low volatile species from liquid surfaces due to bubble burst is identified as a decisive release mechanism also. Together with the liquid, the particles which are located at the pool surface or suspended in the pool, are released into the atmosphere. Consequently, the code RESUS.MOD1 (RESUSpension) is presently extended to include the calculation of the release of droplets and suspended radio-nuclide particles due to bubble burst induced liquid jet formation and disintegration above liquid surfaces. Experimental investigations indicate the influence of bubble volume and shape at the pool surface as well as bubble stabilization or destabilization, and furthermore the system pressure and temperatures as well as fluid properties, on droplet

  16. Helium in inert matrix dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veen, A. van; Konings, R.J.M.; Fedorov, A.V.

    2003-01-01

    The behaviour of helium, an important decay product in the transmutation chains of actinides, in dispersion-type inert matrix fuels is discussed. A phenomenological description of its accumulation and release in CERCER and CERMET fuel is given. A summary of recent He-implantation studies with inert matrix metal oxides (ZrO 2 , MgAl 2 O 4 , MgO and Al 2 O 3 ) is presented. A general picture is that for high helium concentrations helium and vacancy defects form helium clusters which convert into over-pressurized bubbles. At elevated temperature helium is released from the bubbles. On some occasions thermal stable nano-cavities or nano-pores remain. On the basis of these results the consequences for helium induced swelling and helium storage in oxide matrices kept at 800-1000 deg. C will be discussed. In addition, results of He-implantation studies for metal matrices (W, Mo, Nb and V alloys) will be presented. Introduction of helium in metals at elevated temperatures leads to clustering of helium to bubbles. When operational temperatures are higher than 0.5 melting temperature, swelling and helium embrittlement might occur

  17. Influence of ultrasound power on acoustic streaming and micro-bubbles formations in a low frequency sono-reactor: mathematical and 3D computational simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadi, Baharak; Raman, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Ibrahim, Shaliza

    2015-05-01

    This paper aims at investigating the influence of ultrasound power amplitude on liquid behaviour in a low-frequency (24 kHz) sono-reactor. Three types of analysis were employed: (i) mechanical analysis of micro-bubbles formation and their activities/characteristics using mathematical modelling. (ii) Numerical analysis of acoustic streaming, fluid flow pattern, volume fraction of micro-bubbles and turbulence using 3D CFD simulation. (iii) Practical analysis of fluid flow pattern and acoustic streaming under ultrasound irradiation using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). In mathematical modelling, a lone micro bubble generated under power ultrasound irradiation was mechanistically analysed. Its characteristics were illustrated as a function of bubble radius, internal temperature and pressure (hot spot conditions) and oscillation (pulsation) velocity. The results showed that ultrasound power significantly affected the conditions of hotspots and bubbles oscillation velocity. From the CFD results, it was observed that the total volume of the micro-bubbles increased by about 4.95% with each 100 W-increase in power amplitude. Furthermore, velocity of acoustic streaming increased from 29 to 119 cm/s as power increased, which was in good agreement with the PIV analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular dynamics study of the role of symmetric tilt grain boundaries on the helium distribution in nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, E.; Pencer, J.

    2018-04-01

    Helium impurities, from either direct implantation or transmutation reactions, have been associated with embrittlement in nickel-based alloys. Helium has very low solubility in nickel, and has been found to aggregate at lattice defects such as vacancies, dislocations, and grain boundaries. The retention and precipitation of helium in nickel-based alloys have deleterious effects on the material mechanical properties. However, the underlying mechanisms that lead to helium effects in the host metal are not fully understood. In the present work, we investigate the role of symmetric tilt grain boundary (STGB) structures on the distribution of helium in nickel using molecular dynamics simulations. We investigate the family of STGBs specific to the 〈 110 〉 tilt axis. The present results indicate that accumulation of helium at the grain boundary may be modulated by details of grain boundary geometry. A plausible correlation between the grain boundary energy and misorientation with the accumulation and mobility of helium is proposed. Small clusters with up to 6 helium atoms show significant interstitial mobility in the nickel bulk, but also become sites for nucleation and grow of more stable helium clusters. High-energy GBs are found mainly populated with small helium clusters. The high mobility of small clusters along the GBs indicates the role of these GBs as fast two-dimensional channels for diffusion. In contrast, the accumulation of helium in large helium clusters at low-energy STGB creates a favorable environment for the formation of large helium bubbles, indicating a potential role for low-energy STGB in promoting helium-induced GB embrittlement.

  19. HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION TOWARD SOUTHERN INFRARED BUBBLE S10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Swagat Ranjan; Tej, Anandmayee; Vig, Sarita [Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Trivandrum 695547 (India); Ghosh, Swarna K.; Ishwara Chandra, C. H., E-mail: swagat.12@iist.ac.in [National Centre For Radio Astrophysics, Pune 411007 (India)

    2016-11-01

    An investigation in radio and infrared wavelengths of two high-mass star-forming regions toward the southern Galactic bubble S10 is presented here. The two regions under study are associated with the broken bubble S10 and Extended Green Object, G345.99-0.02, respectively. Radio continuum emission mapped at 610 and 1280 MHz using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, India, is detected toward both of the regions. These regions are estimated to be ionized by early-B- to late-O-type stars. Spitzer GLIMPSE mid-infrared data is used to identify young stellar objects (YSOs) associated with these regions. A Class-I/II-type source, with an estimated mass of 6.2  M {sub ⊙}, lies ∼7″ from the radio peak. Pixel-wise, modified blackbody fits to the thermal dust emission using Herschel far-infrared data is performed to construct dust temperature and column density maps. Eight clumps are detected in the two regions using the 250 μ m image. The masses and linear diameter of these range between ∼300–1600  M {sub ⊙} and 0.2–1.1 pc, respectively, which qualifies them as high-mass star-forming clumps. Modeling of the spectral energy distribution of these clumps indicates the presence of high luminosity, high accretion rate, massive YSOs possibly in the accelerating accretion phase. Furthermore, based on the radio and MIR morphology, the occurrence of a possible bow wave toward the likely ionizing star is explored.

  20. Test ventilation with smoke, bubbles, and balloons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickering, P.L.; Cucchiara, A.L.; McAtee, J.L.; Gonzales, M.

    1987-01-01

    The behavior of smoke, bubbles, and helium-filled balloons was videotaped to demonstrate the mixing of air in the plutonium chemistry laboratories, a plutonium facility. The air-distribution patterns, as indicated by each method, were compared. Helium-filled balloons proved more useful than bubbles or smoke in the visualization of airflow patterns. The replay of various segments of the videotape proved useful in evaluating the different techniques and in identifying airflow trends responsible for air mixing. 6 refs

  1. Membranous nephropathy (bubbling appearance and spike formation) without immunoglobulin deposition in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Naoto; Mori, Yuki; Yoshino, Masabumi; Suga, Norihiro; Kitagawa, Wataru; Yamada, Harutaka; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Imai, Hirokazu

    2008-12-01

    A 53-year-old Japanese man with systemic lupus erythematosus developed proteinuria and hematuria after a urinary stone episode. A light microscopic study of a kidney biopsy specimen demonstrated a bubbling appearance and spike formation of the basement membrane. Immunofluorescent studies revealed that there were no significant depositions of immunoglobulins, such as IgG (-), IgA (-), IgM (+/-), kappa light chain (+/-), lambda light chain (+/-), or C3 (-) in the glomerular capillary wall, though C1q was present as one-plus positive staining in mesangial areas. Electron microscopic studies showed that the thickness of the basement membrane varied from thin to thick without electron dense deposits, and that the cellular components of the podocyte were irregularly present in the basement membrane. Urinary protein decreased after the usage of prednisolone and mizoribine; however, proteinuria aggravated after an episode of urinary stone during the same treatment.

  2. Hydrogen and helium in metals: positron lifetime experiments. Quarterly report 3. quarter 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajainmaeki, Hannu.

    1987-09-01

    This thesis reviews a new approach to studying the role of hydrogen and helium in defect recovery of metals by the positron lifetime technique. A cryostat has been built at the University of Jyvaeskylae for irradiating and/or implaning solids by high-energy proton or helium beams from the MC-20 cyclotron. The samples can be kept continuously below 20 K and the isochronal annealings and the subsequent positron lifetime measurements are carried ou in the same cryostat after the irradiations. During the implantations below 20 K both impuities (H or He) and Frenkel pairs are produced simultaneously. By measuring positron lifetimes during the annealing detailed information is obtained about radiation damage, impurity-defect interactions, lattice defect annealing, void nucleation and formation of helium bubbles. In this work positron lifetime spectroscopy has been utilized for the first time to study defect recovery below the liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). The annealing stages are investigated in aluminium, nickel and molybdenum in the temperature range 20-700 K. Hydrogen is found to get trapped at vacancies in all the studied metals with binding energies 0.53+-0.04 and 1.6+-0.1 eV, respectively. Trapped hydrogen retards the vacancy migration in Al and Mo, while H-vancancy pairs dissociate in Ni below the free vacancy migration stage. helium gets deeply trapped at vacancies in Al and migrates substitutionally with the activation energy of 1.3+-0.1 eV. Helium-vacancy pairs are observed to nucleate into clusters and form helium bubbles which are stable up to the Al melting temperature. The growth mechanisms for the bubbles are established as thermal vacancy absorption and bubble migration/coalescence

  3. New mechanism for bubble nucleation: Classical transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easther, Richard; Giblin, John T. Jr; Hui Lam; Lim, Eugene A.

    2009-01-01

    Given a scalar field with metastable minima, bubbles nucleate quantum mechanically. When bubbles collide, energy stored in the bubble walls is converted into kinetic energy of the field. This kinetic energy can facilitate the classical nucleation of new bubbles in minima that lie below those of the 'parent' bubbles. This process is efficient and classical, and changes the dynamics and statistics of bubble formation in models with multiple vacua, relative to that derived from quantum tunneling.

  4. Temperature dependence of underdense nanostructure formation in tungsten under helium irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valles, G.; Martin-Bragado, I.; Nordlund, K.; Lasa, A.; Björkas, C.; Safi, E.; Perlado, J.M.; Rivera, A.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, tungsten has been found to form a highly underdense nanostructured morphology (“W fuzz”) when bombarded by an intense flux of He ions, but only in the temperature window 900–2000 K. Using object kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (pseudo-3D simulations) parameterized from first principles, we show that this temperature dependence can be understood based on He and point defect clustering, cluster growth, and detrapping reactions. At low temperatures (<900 K), fuzz does not grow because almost all He is trapped in very small He-vacancy clusters. At high temperatures (>2300 K), all He is detrapped from clusters, preventing the formation of the large clusters that lead to fuzz growth in the intermediate temperature range. - Highlights: •OKMC simulation of temperature window for fuzz formation. •Stable He-V clusters prevent fuzz formation at low temperatures. •Dissociation of He-V clusters prevent fuzz formation at high temperatures. •Fuzz formation rate increases with increasing temperature. •An incubation fluence observed in the simulations, similar to experimental observations.

  5. Temperature dependence of underdense nanostructure formation in tungsten under helium irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valles, G., E-mail: gonzalovallesalberdi@hotmail.com [Instituto de Fusión Nuclear, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, C/ José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006, Madrid (Spain); Martin-Bragado, I. [UCAM, Universidad Católica de Murcia, Campus de los Jerónimos, Guadalupe, 30107, Murcia (Spain); Nordlund, K. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, Helsinki, FI-00014 (Finland); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lasa, A. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, Helsinki, FI-00014 (Finland); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831-6169 (United States); Björkas, C.; Safi, E. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, Helsinki, FI-00014 (Finland); Perlado, J.M.; Rivera, A. [Instituto de Fusión Nuclear, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, C/ José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-07-15

    Recently, tungsten has been found to form a highly underdense nanostructured morphology (“W fuzz”) when bombarded by an intense flux of He ions, but only in the temperature window 900–2000 K. Using object kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (pseudo-3D simulations) parameterized from first principles, we show that this temperature dependence can be understood based on He and point defect clustering, cluster growth, and detrapping reactions. At low temperatures (<900 K), fuzz does not grow because almost all He is trapped in very small He-vacancy clusters. At high temperatures (>2300 K), all He is detrapped from clusters, preventing the formation of the large clusters that lead to fuzz growth in the intermediate temperature range. - Highlights: •OKMC simulation of temperature window for fuzz formation. •Stable He-V clusters prevent fuzz formation at low temperatures. •Dissociation of He-V clusters prevent fuzz formation at high temperatures. •Fuzz formation rate increases with increasing temperature. •An incubation fluence observed in the simulations, similar to experimental observations.

  6. Quantum statistical vibrational entropy and enthalpy of formation of helium-vacancy complex in BCC W

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Haohua [Sino-French Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology, Sun Yat-Sen University, 519082, Zhuhai (China); Woo, C.H., E-mail: chung.woo@polyu.edu.hk [ME Department, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2016-12-15

    High-temperature advance-reactor design and operation require knowledge of in-reactor materials properties far from the thermal ground state. Temperature-dependence due to the effects of lattice vibrations is important to the understanding and formulation of atomic processes involved in irradiation-damage accumulation. In this paper, we concentrate on the formation of He-V complex. The free-energy change in this regard is derived via thermodynamic integration from the phase-space trajectories generated from MD simulations based on the quantum fluctuation-dissipation relation. The change of frequency distribution of vibration modes during the complex formation is properly accounted for, and the corresponding entropy change avoids the classical ln(T) divergence that violates the third law. The vibrational enthalpy and entropy of formation calculated this way have significant effects on the He kinetics during irradiation.

  7. Effect of isobaric breathing gas shifts from air to heliox mixtures on resolution of air bubbles in lipid and aqueous tissues of recompressed rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldegaard, Ole; Kerem, Dikla; Melamed, Y

    2011-01-01

    Deep tissue isobaric counterdiffusion that may cause unwanted bubble formation or transient bubble growth has been referred to in theoretical models and demonstrated by intravascular gas formation in animals, when changing inert breathing gas from nitrogen to helium after hyperbaric air breathing....... We visually followed the in vivo resolution of extravascular air bubbles injected at 101 kPa into nitrogen supersaturated rat tissues: adipose, spinal white matter, skeletal muscle or tail tendon. Bubbles were observed during isobaric breathing-gas shifts from air to normoxic (80:20) heliox mixture...... breathing. No such bubble growth was observed in spinal white matter, skeletal muscle or tendon. In spinal white matter, an immediate breathing gas shift after the hyperbaric air exposure from air to both (80:20) and (50:50) heliox, coincident with recompression to either 285 or 405 kPa, caused consistent...

  8. Helium-induced hardening effect in polycrystalline tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fanhang; Qu, Miao; Yan, Sha; Zhang, Ailin; Peng, Shixiang; Xue, Jianming; Wang, Yugang

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, helium induced hardening effect of tungsten was investigated. 50 keV He2+ ions at fluences vary from 5 × 1015 cm-2 to 5 × 1017 cm-2 were implanted into polycrystalline tungsten at RT to create helium bubble-rich layers near the surface. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the irradiated specimens were studied by TEM and nano-indentor. Helium bubble rich layers are formed in near surface region, and the layers become thicker with the rise of fluences. Helium bubbles in the area of helium concentration peak are found to grow up, while the bubble density is almost unchanged. Obvious hardening effect is induced by helium implantation in tungsten. Micro hardness increases rapidly with the fluence firstly, and more slowly when the fluence is above 5 × 1016 cm-2. The hardening effect of tungsten can be attributed to helium bubbles, which is found to be in agreement with the Bacon-Orowan stress formula. The growing diameter is the major factor rather than helium bubbles density (voids distance) in the process of helium implantation at fluences below 5 × 1017 cm-2.

  9. The role of implanted gas and lateral stress in blister formation mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper the parts played by gas and lateral stress in blister formation on metal surfaces after helium implantation are critically reviewed. Although measurements show the existence of lateral stresses in implanted surfaces, an analysis indicates that these stresses can play little part in blister formation. Conversely, there is a strong case for a gas driven model. One possible mechanism, that involving the interbubble fracture of overpressurised helium bubbles, is outlined and revised to take recent measurements into account. (Auth.)

  10. Science Bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Pedersen, David Budtz

    2013-01-01

    Much like the trade and trait sof bubbles in financial markets,similar bubbles appear on the science market. When economic bubbles burst, the drop in prices causes the crash of unsustainable investments leading to an investor confidence crisis possibly followed by a financial panic. But when...... bubbles appear in science, truth and reliability are the first victims. This paper explores how fashions in research funding and research management may turn science into something like a bubble economy....

  11. Radiolytic bubble formation and level changes in simulated high-level waste salts and sludges -- application to Savannah River Site and Hanford Storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.D.; Crawford, C.L.; Bibler, N.E.

    1993-01-01

    Radiolytically-produced bubbles of trapped gas are observed in simulated high-level waste (HLW) damp salt cake exposed to Co-60 gamma radiation. As the damp salt cake is irradiated, its volume increases due to the formation of trapped gas bubbles. Based on the increase in volume, the rate of trapped gas generation varies between 0.04 and 0.2 molecules/100 eV of energy deposited in the damp salt cake. The maximum volume of trapped gas observed in experiments is in the range 21--26 vol %. After reaching these volumes, the gas bubbles begin to escape. The generated gas includes hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrous oxide. The ratio in which these components are produced depends on the composition of the waste. Nitrous oxide production increases with the amount of sodium nitrite. Gases trapped by this mechanism may account for some of the observed level changes in Savannah River Site and Hanford waste tanks

  12. Experimental observations of effects of inert gas on cavity formation during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, K.

    1980-04-01

    Cavity (void) formation and swelling in non-fissile materials during neutron irradiation and charged particle bombardments are reviewed. Helium is the most important inert gas and is primarily active as a cavity nucleant. It also enhances formation of dislocation structure. Preimplantation of helium overstimulates cavity nucleation and gives a different temperature response of swelling than when helium is coimplanted during the damage process. Helium affects, and is affected by, radiation-induced phase instability. Many of these effects are explainable in terms of cavity nucleation on submicroscopic critical size gas bubbles, and on the influence of the neutral sink strength of such bubbles. Titanium and zirconium resist cavity formation when vacancy loops are present

  13. Experimental observations of effects of inert gas on cavity formation during irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, K.

    1980-04-01

    Cavity (void) formation and swelling in non-fissile materials during neutron irradiation and charged particle bombardments are reviewed. Helium is the most important inert gas and is primarily active as a cavity nucleant. It also enhances formation of dislocation structure. Preimplantation of helium overstimulates cavity nucleation and gives a different temperature response of swelling than when helium is coimplanted during the damage process. Helium affects, and is affected by, radiation-induced phase instability. Many of these effects are explainable in terms of cavity nucleation on submicroscopic critical size gas bubbles, and on the influence of the neutral sink strength of such bubbles. Titanium and zirconium resist cavity formation when vacancy loops are present.

  14. Ionizing feedback from massive stars in massive clusters: fake bubbles and untriggered star formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dale, James E.; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 414, č. 1 (2011), s. 321-328 ISSN 0035-8711 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : stars formation * H II regions Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.900, year: 2011

  15. Defect production and formation of helium-vacancy clusters due to cascades in α-iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, L.; Zu, X.T.; Xiao, H.Y.; Gao, F.; Heinisch, H.L.; Kurtz, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Displacement cascades are simulated by molecular dynamics methods in α-Fe containing different concentrations of substitutional He atoms. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies, E p , from 0.5 to 5 keV are considered at the irradiation temperature of 100 K. The concentration of He in Fe varies from 1 to 5 at%, and the results are compared with the simulations performed in pure α-Fe. We find that the total number of point defects increases with increasing He concentration. The present studies reveal the formation and the configurations of He-vacancy clusters in the cascades of α-Fe. Furthermore, the production efficiency of He-vacancy clusters increases with increasing He concentration and PKA energy. The nucleation mechanisms of He-vacancy clusters in displacement cascades are discussed in detail

  16. Systematic investigation of the barrier discharge operation in helium, nitrogen, and mixtures: discharge development, formation and decay of surface charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschiersch, R.; Bogaczyk, M.; Wagner, H.-E.

    2014-09-01

    As a logical extension to previous investigations of the barrier discharge (BD) in helium and nitrogen, the present work reports on the operation in any mixtures of both pure gases. Using a well-established plane-parallel discharge cell configuration allows to study the influence of the He/N2 mixing ratio on the formation of different discharge modes. Their characterization was made by measuring the discharge emission development together with the formation and decay of surface charges on a bismuth silicon oxide (Bi12SiO20, BSO) crystal. This was realized by the simultaneous application of the spatio-temporally resolved optical emission spectroscopy, and the electro-optic Pockels effect in combination with a CCD high speed camera. The existence diagram for diffuse and filamentary BDs was determined by varying the amplitude and shape of the applied voltage. Over the entire range of the He/N2 ratio, the diffuse mode can be operated at moderate voltage amplitudes whereas filamentation occurs at significant overvoltage and is favoured by a high voltage slew rate. Irrespective of the discharge mode, the overall charge transfer during a discharge breakdown is found to be in excellent agreement with the amount of accumulated surface charges. An exponential decay of the surface charge deposited on the BSO crystal is induced by LED illumination beyond a typical discharge cycle. During the decay process, a broadening of the radial profiles of positive as well as negative surface charge spots originating from previous microdischarges is observed. The investigations contribute to a better understanding of the charge accumulation at a dielectric.

  17. Investigation on the effect of temperature excursion on the helium defects of tungsten surface by using compact plasma device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, S.; Miyamoto, T.; Tomida, Y.; Minagawa, T.; Ohno, N.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of temperature excursion on the helium defects of tungsten surface have been investigated by using compact plasma device AIT-PID (Aichi Institute of Technology - Plasma Irradiation Device). An initial stage of bubble formation has been identified with an order of smaller (sub-micron) bubbles and holes than those in the past in which the micron size is the standard magnitude. The radiation cooling has been detected when a blacking of tungsten surface coming from nanostructure formation is proceeding due to an increase in the emissivity. The temperature increase to the domain (∼1600 K) in bubble/hole formation from that in nanostructure formation has been found to bring a constriction in diameter and a reduction in length of fiber-form nanostructure.

  18. A STRANGE STAR SCENARIO FOR THE FORMATION OF ECCENTRIC MILLISECOND PULSAR/HELIUM WHITE DWARF BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Long; Li, Xiang-Dong [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Dey, Jishnu; Dey, Mira, E-mail: lixd@nju.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Presidency University, 86/1, College Street, Kolkata 700 073 (India)

    2015-07-01

    According to the recycling scenario, millisecond pulsars (MSPs) have evolved from low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Their orbits are expected to be circular due to tidal interactions during binary evolution, as observed in most binary MSPs. There are some peculiar systems that do not fit this picture. Three recent examples are the PSRs J2234+06, J1946+3417, and J1950+2414, all of which are MSPs in eccentric orbits but with mass functions compatible with expected He white dwarf (WD) companions. It has been suggested these MSPs may have formed from delayed accretion-induced collapse of massive WDs, or the eccentricity may be induced by dynamical interaction between the binary and a circumbinary disk. Assuming that the core density of accreting neutron stars (NSs) in LMXBs may reach the density of quark deconfinement, which can lead to phase transition from NSs to strange quark stars, we show that the resultant MSPs are likely to have an eccentric orbit, due to the sudden loss of the gravitational mass of the NS during the transition. The eccentricities can be reproduced with a reasonable estimate of the mass loss. This scenario might also account for the formation of the youngest known X-ray binary Cir X–1, which also possesses a low-field compact star in an eccentric orbit.

  19. Structural and chemical evolution in neutron irradiated and helium-injected ferritic ODS PM2000 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hee Joon [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Edwards, Dan J., E-mail: dan.edwards@pnnl.gov [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Kurtz, Richard J. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Yamamoto, Takuya; Wu, Yuan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Odette, G. Robert [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    An investigation of the influence of helium on damage evolution under neutron irradiation of an 11 at% Al, 19 at% Cr ODS ferritic PM2000 alloy was carried out in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) using a novel in situ helium injection (ISHI) technique. Helium was injected into adjacent TEM discs from thermal neutron {sup 58}Ni(n{sub th},γ) {sup 59}Ni(n{sub th},α) reactions in a thin NiAl layer. The PM2000 undergoes concurrent displacement damage from the high-energy neutrons. The ISHI technique allows direct comparisons of regions with and without high concentrations of helium since only the side coated with the NiAl experiences helium injection. The corresponding microstructural and microchemical evolutions were characterized using both conventional and scanning transmission electron microscopy techniques. The evolutions observed include formation of dislocation loops and associated helium bubbles, precipitation of a variety of phases, amorphization of the Al{sub 2}YO{sub 3} oxides (which also variously contained internal voids), and several manifestations of solute segregation. Notably, high concentrations of helium had a significant effect on many of these diverse phenomena. These results on PM2000 are compared and contrasted to the evolution of so-called nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA).

  20. Computational Studies of Positive and Negative Streamers in Bubbles Suspended in Distilled Water

    KAUST Repository

    Sharma, Ashish; Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2017-01-01

    We perform computational studies of nanosecond streamers generated in helium bubbles immersed in distilled water under high pressure conditions. The model takes into account the presence of water vapor in the gas bubble for an accurate description

  1. Damage studies on tungsten due to helium ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, N.J.; Buzarbaruah, N.; Mohanty, S.R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Used plasma focus helium ion source to study radiation induced damage on tungsten. • Surface analyses confirm formation of micro-crack, bubbles, blisters, pinholes, etc. • XRD patterns confirm development of compressive stress due to thermal load. • Reduction in hardness value is observed in the case of exposed sample. - Abstract: Energetic and high fluence helium ions emitted in a plasma focus device have been used successfully to study the radiation induced damage on tungsten. The reference and irradiated samples were characterized by optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and by hardness testers. The micrographs of the irradiated samples at lower magnification show uniform mesh of cracks of micrometer width. However at higher magnification, various types of crystalline defects such as voids, pinholes, bubbles, blisters and microcracks are distinctly noticed. The prominent peaks in X-ray diffraction spectrum of irradiated samples are seen shifted toward higher Bragg angles, thus indicating accumulation of compressive stress due to the heat load delivered by helium ions. A marginal reduction in hardness of the irradiated sample is also noticed

  2. Sticky bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoniuk, O.; Bos, van der A.; Driessen, T.W.; Es, van B.; Jeurissen, R.J.M.; Michler, D.; Reinten, H.; Schenker, M.; Snoeijer, J.H.; Srivastava, S.; Toschi, F.; Wijshoff, H.M.A.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the physical forces that are required to remove an air bubble immersed in a liquid from a corner. This is relevant for inkjet printing technology, as the presence of air bubbles in the channels of a printhead perturbs the jetting of droplets. A simple strategy to remove the bubble is to

  3. Liquid helium

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, K R

    1959-01-01

    Originally published in 1959 as part of the Cambridge Monographs on Physics series, this book addresses liquid helium from the dual perspectives of statistical mechanics and hydrodynamics. Atkins looks at both Helium Three and Helium Four, as well as the properties of a combination of the two isotopes. This book will be of value to anyone with an interest in the history of science and the study of one of the universe's most fundamental elements.

  4. Nucleation in bubble chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harigel, G.G.

    1988-01-01

    Various sources and mechanisms for bubble formation in superheated liquids are discussed. Bubble chambers can be filled with a great variety of liquids, such as e.g. the cryogenic liquids hydrogen, deuterium, neon, neon/hydrogen mixtures, argon, nitrogen, argon/nitrogen mixtures, or the warm liquids propane and various Freon like Freon-13B1. The superheated state is normally achieved by a rapid movement of an expansion piston or membrane, but can also be produced by standing ultrasonic waves, shock waves, or putting liquids under tension. Bubble formation can be initiated by ionizing particles, by intense (laser) light, or on rough surfaces. The creation of embryonic bubbles is not completely understood, but the macroscopic growth and condensation can be calculated, allowing to estimate the dynamic heat load [fr

  5. Freezing Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingett, Christian; Ahmadi, Farzad; Nath, Saurabh; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    The two-stage freezing process of a liquid droplet on a substrate is well known; however, how bubbles freeze has not yet been studied. We first deposited bubbles on a silicon substrate that was chilled at temperatures ranging from -10 °C to -40 °C, while the air was at room temperature. We observed that the freeze front moved very slowly up the bubble, and in some cases, even came to a complete halt at a critical height. This slow freezing front propagation can be explained by the low thermal conductivity of the thin soap film, and can be observed more clearly when the bubble size or the surface temperature is increased. This delayed freezing allows the frozen portion of the bubble to cool the air within the bubble while the top part is still liquid, which induces a vapor pressure mismatch that either collapses the top or causes the top to pop. In cases where the freeze front reaches the top of the bubble, a portion of the top may melt and slowly refreeze; this can happen more than just once for a single bubble. We also investigated freezing bubbles inside of a freezer where the air was held at -20 °C. In this case, the bubbles freeze quickly and the ice grows radially from nucleation sites instead of perpendicular to the surface, which provides a clear contrast with the conduction limited room temperature bubbles.

  6. STAR-FORMATION ACTIVITY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD OF W–R 1503-160L STAR IN THE MID-INFRARED BUBBLE N46

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Janardhan, P. [Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad—380 009 (India); Baug, T.; Ojha, D. K.; Ninan, J. P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Luna, A. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Luis Enrique Erro #1, Tonantzintla, Puebla, C.P. 72840, México (Mexico); Zinchenko, I., E-mail: lokeshd@prl.res.in [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov Street, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-20

    In order to investigate star-formation (SF) processes in extreme environments, we have carried out a multi-wavelength analysis of the mid-infrared bubble N46, which hosts a WN7 Wolf–Rayet (W–R) star. We have used {sup 13}CO line data to trace an expanding shell surrounding the W–R star containing about five condensations within the molecular cloud associated with the bubble. The W–R star is associated with a powerful stellar wind having a mechanical luminosity of ∼4 × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup 1}. A deviation of the H -band starlight mean polarization angles around the bubble has also been traced, indicating the impact of stellar wind on the surroundings. The Herschel temperature map shows a temperature range of ∼18–24 K toward the five molecular condensations. The photometric analysis reveals that these condensations are associated with the identified clusters of young stellar objects, revealing ongoing SF process. The densest among these five condensations (peak N(H{sub 2}) ∼9.2 × 10{sup 22} cm{sup 2} and A{sub V} ∼ 98 mag) is associated with a 6.7 GHz methanol maser, an infrared dark cloud, and the CO outflow, tracing active massive SF within it. At least five compact radio sources (CRSs) are physically linked with the edges of the bubble, and each of them is consistent with the radio spectral class of a B0V–B0.5V-type star. The ages of the individual infrared counterparts of three CRSs (∼1–2 Myr) and a typical age of WN7 W–R star (∼4 Myr) indicate that the SF activities around the bubble are influenced by the feedback of the W–R star.

  7. STAR-FORMATION ACTIVITY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD OF W–R 1503-160L STAR IN THE MID-INFRARED BUBBLE N46

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Janardhan, P.; Baug, T.; Ojha, D. K.; Ninan, J. P.; Luna, A.; Zinchenko, I.

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate star-formation (SF) processes in extreme environments, we have carried out a multi-wavelength analysis of the mid-infrared bubble N46, which hosts a WN7 Wolf–Rayet (W–R) star. We have used 13 CO line data to trace an expanding shell surrounding the W–R star containing about five condensations within the molecular cloud associated with the bubble. The W–R star is associated with a powerful stellar wind having a mechanical luminosity of ∼4 × 10 37 erg s 1 . A deviation of the H -band starlight mean polarization angles around the bubble has also been traced, indicating the impact of stellar wind on the surroundings. The Herschel temperature map shows a temperature range of ∼18–24 K toward the five molecular condensations. The photometric analysis reveals that these condensations are associated with the identified clusters of young stellar objects, revealing ongoing SF process. The densest among these five condensations (peak N(H 2 ) ∼9.2 × 10 22 cm 2 and A V ∼ 98 mag) is associated with a 6.7 GHz methanol maser, an infrared dark cloud, and the CO outflow, tracing active massive SF within it. At least five compact radio sources (CRSs) are physically linked with the edges of the bubble, and each of them is consistent with the radio spectral class of a B0V–B0.5V-type star. The ages of the individual infrared counterparts of three CRSs (∼1–2 Myr) and a typical age of WN7 W–R star (∼4 Myr) indicate that the SF activities around the bubble are influenced by the feedback of the W–R star.

  8. Helium diffusion in nickel at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipps, V.

    1980-09-01

    Helium has been implanted at certain temperatures between 800 and 1250 0 C into single and polycrystalline Ni-samples with implantation depths between 15 and 90 μm. Simultaneously the helium reemission from the sample is measured by a mass-spectrometer. It has been shown that the time dependence of the observed reemission rate is governed by volume diffusion of the helium. Measuring this time dependence as a function of temperature the helium diffusion constant has been determined. The He-diffusion is interpreted as a interstitial diffusion hindered by thermal vacancies. Depending on the implantation depth more or less of the implanted helium remains in the sample and forms large helium bubbles. (orig./GSCH)

  9. Helium cryogenics

    CERN Document Server

    Van Sciver, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Twenty five years have elapsed since the original publication of Helium Cryogenics. During this time, a considerable amount of research and development involving helium fluids has been carried out culminating in several large-scale projects. Furthermore, the field has matured through these efforts so that there is now a broad engineering base to assist the development of future projects. Helium Cryogenics, 2nd edition brings these advances in helium cryogenics together in an updated form. As in the original edition, the author's approach is to survey the field of cryogenics with emphasis on helium fluids. This approach is more specialized and fundamental than that contained in other cryogenics books, which treat the associated range of cryogenic fluids. As a result, the level of treatment is more advanced and assumes a certain knowledge of fundamental engineering and physics principles, including some quantum mechanics. The goal throughout the work is to bridge the gap between the physics and engineering aspe...

  10. Helium behaviour in nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fares, T.

    2011-01-01

    with helium at high concentrations, doped with curium and irradiated in nuclear reactor showed a homogeneous microstructure free of helium bubbles, pores or cracking. The results of the present work were used to develop a long-term diffusion model of helium in an industrial R7T7 nuclear waste glass. The model considers the thermal history, the fracturing and the alpha activity of the glass. (author) [fr

  11. Microstructure and hardness evolution of nanochannel W films irradiated by helium at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wenjing; Wang, Yongqiang; Tang, Ming; Ren, Feng; Fu, Qiang; Cai, Guangxu; Dong, Lan; Hu, Lulu; Wei, Guo; Jiang, Changzhong

    2018-04-01

    Plasma facing materials (PFMs) face one of the most serious challenges in fusion reactors, including unprecedented harsh environment such as 14.1 MeV neutron and transmutation gas irradiation at high temperature. Tungsten (W) is considered to be one of the most promising PFM, however, virtually insolubility of helium (He) in W causes new material issues such as He bubbles and W "fuzz" microstructure. In our previous studies, we presented a new strategy using nanochannel structure designed in the W film to increase the releasing of He atoms and thus to minimize the He nucleation and "fuzz" formation behavior. In this work, we report the further study on the diffusion of He atoms in the nanochannel W films irradiated at a high temperature of 600 °C. More specifically, the temperature influences on the formation and growth of He bubbles, the lattice swelling, and the mechanical properties of the nanochannel W films were investigated. Compared with the bulk W, the nanochannel W films possessed smaller bubble size and lower bubble areal density, indicating that noticeable amounts of He atoms have been released out along the nanochannels during the high temperature irradiations. Thus, with lower He concentration in the nanochannel W films, the formation of the bubble superlattice is delayed, which suppresses the lattice swelling and reduces hardening. These aspects indicate the nanochannel W films have better radiation resistance even at high temperature irradiations.

  12. Bubble systems

    CERN Document Server

    Avdeev, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents a systematic analysis of bubble system mathematics, using the mechanics of two-phase systems in non-equilibrium as the scope of analysis. The author introduces the thermodynamic foundations of bubble systems, ranging from the fundamental starting points to current research challenges. This book addresses a range of topics, including description methods of multi-phase systems, boundary and initial conditions as well as coupling requirements at the phase boundary. Moreover, it presents a detailed study of the basic problems of bubble dynamics in a liquid mass: growth (dynamically and thermally controlled), collapse, bubble pulsations, bubble rise and breakup. Special emphasis is placed on bubble dynamics in turbulent flows. The analysis results are used to write integral equations governing the rate of vapor generation (condensation) in non-equilibrium flows, thus creating a basis for solving a number of practical problems. This book is the first to present a comprehensive theory of boil...

  13. Development of helium porosity near-by grain boundaries in nickel-carbon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reutov, I.V.; Reutov, V.F.

    1995-01-01

    The peculiarities of development of helium porosity near grain boundaries in nickel with 0.002-0.065 at.% carbon uniformly doped with helium up to 2·10 -2 at.% in the process of post-irradiation isothermal annealing at 800 deg C for 1-50 hours are studied. It is stated that at this annealing temperature intensive nucleation and growth of bubbles are observed in near-boundary region whose width grows both with increase of annealing time and carbon content. The TEM studies have shown that in near-boundary zone itself the process of bubble growth is non-uniform: bubble size increases and their density decreases as the distance from grain boundary is increased. The effect observed is discussed from the point of view of formation of two zones with different level of swelling in a grain (near-by boundary and matrix) and consequently, hydrostatic stress as well conditioning the flux of vacancies and helium-vacancy complexes from matrix to grain boundary. 8 refs., 5 figs

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of the diffusion and coalescence of helium in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Y.L.; Wang, J.; Hou, Q.; Deng, A.H.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed on the diffusion and coalescence of helium in tungsten. A new method for determining the effective capture radii (ECRs) and the dissociation energies of helium-related defects is proposed in this work. It is observed that the ECR of an interstitial helium atom trapping helium interstitials (denoted as He–He n , n = 1–3) decreases with increasing temperature, except for He–He 2 at T n for helium clusters are also investigated. He 2 migrates more quickly than a single He atom does at T 2 changes at higher temperatures. Another counterintuitive observation is that D 5 > D 3 > D 4 at T 5 . The Arrhenius relation describes the diffusion of He n well in the temperature range from 300 K to 550 K, whereas the diffusion is not a standard thermally activated process at higher temperatures. Taken together, these results help elucidate the initial stage of helium bubble formation in tungsten as well as the requirements of long-term evolution methods such as KMC or RT models

  15. Helium release from neutron-irradiated Li{sub 2}O single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaki, Daiju; Tanifuji, Takaaki; Noda, Kenji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Helium release behavior in post-irradiation heating tests was investigated for Li{sub 2}O single crystals which had been irradiated with thermal neutrons in JRR-4 and JRR-2, and fast neutrons in FFTF. It is clarified that the helium release curves from JRR-4 and JRR-2 specimens consists of only one broad peak. From the dependence of the peak temperatures on the neutron fluence and the crystal diameter, and the comparison with the results obtained for sintered pellets, it is considered that the helium generated in the specimen is released through the process of bulk diffusion with trapping by irradiation defects such as some defect clusters. For the helium release from FFTF specimens, two broad peaks were observed in the release curves. It is considered to suggest that two different diffusion paths exist for helium migration in the specimen, that is, bulk diffusion and diffusion through the micro-crack due to the heavy irradiation. In addition, helium bubble formation after irradiation due to the high temperature over 800K is suggested. (J.P.N.)

  16. Self-trapping of helium in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, W.D.; Bisson, C.L.; Baskes, M.I.

    1981-01-01

    Atomistic calculations are presented which demonstrate that helium atoms in a metal lattice are able to cluster with each other, producing vacancies and nearby self-interstitial defects. Even a small number of helium atoms is found to be sufficient to create these large distortions. As few as five interstitial helium can spontaneously produce a lattice vacancy and nearby self-interstitial. An eight-helium-atom cluster gives rise to two such defects, and 16 helium atoms to more than five self-interstitial vacancy pairs. It was noted that the self-interstitials prefer to agglomerate on the same ''side'' of the helium cluster rather than to spread themselves out uniformly. The binding energy of each additional helium atom to these clusters increases with helium concentration and the trap is apparently unsaturable. A rate theory using these atomistic binding energies has been used to calculate the kinetics of helium-bubble nucleation and growth. The results are consistent with measurements of the properties of helium resulting from tritium decay

  17. Explosive helium burning in white dwarf stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khokhlov, A.M. (AN SSSR, Moscow. Astronomicheskij Sovet)

    1984-04-01

    Helium burning kinetics in white dwarfs has been considered at constant temperatures T >= 10/sup 9/ K and densities rho >10/sup 5/ g/cm/sup 3/. It is found, that helium detonation in white dwarfs does not lead to formation of light (A < 56) elements. Thus, helium white dwarf model for supernova 1 is inconsistent with observations.

  18. Bubbles & Squat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbjerre Larsen, Signe

    , a new concept called ‘Bubbles & Squat’, where fitness training is combined with Champagne and a live DJ. One of the invitations for this event describes how “we spice up your friday training with live DJ and lots of refreshing bubbles, to make sure that you are ready for the weekend (...).” Before New...

  19. Unified model of plasma formation, bubble generation and shock wave emission in water for fs to ns laser pulses (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao-Xuan; Freidank, Sebastian; Linz, Norbert; Paltauf, Günther; Zhang, Zhenxi; Vogel, Alfred

    2017-03-01

    We developed modeling tools for optical breakdown events in water that span various phases reaching from breakdown initiation via solvated electron generation, through laser induced-plasma formation and temperature evolution in the focal spot to the later phases of cavitation bubble dynamics and shock wave emission and applied them to a large parameter space of pulse durations, wavelengths, and pulse energies. The rate equation model considers the interplay of linear absorption, photoionization, avalanche ionization and recombination, traces thermalization and temperature evolution during the laser pulse, and portrays the role of thermal ionization that becomes relevant for T > 3000 K. Modeling of free-electron generation includes recent insights on breakdown initiation in water via multiphoton excitation of valence band electrons into a solvated state at Eini = 6.6 eV followed by up-conversion into the conduction band level that is located at 9.5 eV. The ability of tracing the temperature evolution enabled us to link the model of laser-induced plasma formation with a hydrodynamic model of plasma-induced pressure evolution and phase transitions that, in turn, traces bubble generation and dynamics as well as shock wave emission. This way, the amount of nonlinear energy deposition in transparent dielectrics and the resulting material modifications can be assessed as a function of incident laser energy. The unified model of plasma formation and bubble dynamics yields an excellent agreement with experimental results over the entire range of investigated pulse durations (femtosecond to nanosecond), wavelengths (UV to IR) and pulse energies.

  20. Experimental mechanistic investigation of the nanostructuring of tungsten with low energy helium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiflis, P., E-mail: fiflis1@illinois.edu; Connolly, N.; Ruzic, D.N.

    2016-12-15

    Helium ion bombardment of tungsten at temperatures between approximately one third and one half of its melting point has shown growth of nanostructures colloquially referred to as “fuzz”. The nanostructures take the form of thin tendrils of diameter about 30 nm and grow out of the bulk material. Tungsten will and does compose one of the key materials for plasma facing components (PFCs) in fusion reactors. The formation of nanostructured fuzz layers on PFCs would be detrimental to the performance of the reactor, and must therefore be avoided. Previous experiments have shown evidence that tungsten fuzz is initially grown by loop punching of helium bubbles created in the bulk. However, once the tendrils grow to sufficient length, the tendrils should intercept the entire helium flux, halting the production of fuzz. Fuzz continues to grow though. To increase the understanding of the mechanisms of tungsten fuzz formation, and thereby aid the avoidance of its production, a series of tests were performed to examine the validity of several theories regarding later stage tungsten fuzz growth. Tests showed that the fuzz formation was dependent solely on the bombardment of helium ions, and not on electric fields, or adatom diffusion. Experiments employing a tungsten coated molybdenum sample indicate the presence of a strong mixing layer and strongly suggest that tungsten fuzz growth continues to occur from the bottom up even as the tendrils grow in size. Tests also show a similarity between different metals exposed to helium ion fluxes where the ratio of bubble diameter to tendril diameter is constant.

  1. Experimental mechanistic investigation of the nanostructuring of tungsten with low energy helium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiflis, P.; Connolly, N.; Ruzic, D.N.

    2016-01-01

    Helium ion bombardment of tungsten at temperatures between approximately one third and one half of its melting point has shown growth of nanostructures colloquially referred to as “fuzz”. The nanostructures take the form of thin tendrils of diameter about 30 nm and grow out of the bulk material. Tungsten will and does compose one of the key materials for plasma facing components (PFCs) in fusion reactors. The formation of nanostructured fuzz layers on PFCs would be detrimental to the performance of the reactor, and must therefore be avoided. Previous experiments have shown evidence that tungsten fuzz is initially grown by loop punching of helium bubbles created in the bulk. However, once the tendrils grow to sufficient length, the tendrils should intercept the entire helium flux, halting the production of fuzz. Fuzz continues to grow though. To increase the understanding of the mechanisms of tungsten fuzz formation, and thereby aid the avoidance of its production, a series of tests were performed to examine the validity of several theories regarding later stage tungsten fuzz growth. Tests showed that the fuzz formation was dependent solely on the bombardment of helium ions, and not on electric fields, or adatom diffusion. Experiments employing a tungsten coated molybdenum sample indicate the presence of a strong mixing layer and strongly suggest that tungsten fuzz growth continues to occur from the bottom up even as the tendrils grow in size. Tests also show a similarity between different metals exposed to helium ion fluxes where the ratio of bubble diameter to tendril diameter is constant.

  2. Motion of W and He atoms during formation of W fuzz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerner, R. P.; Nishijima, D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Zach, M.

    2018-06-01

    Measurements are conducted to identify the motion of tungsten and helium atoms during the formation of tungsten fuzz. In a first series of experiments the mobility of helium within the growing fuzz was measured by adding 3He to the different stages of plasma exposure under conditions that promoted tungsten fuzz growth. Ion beam analysis was used to quantify the amount of 3He remaining in the samples following the plasma exposure. The results indicate that the retention of helium in bubbles within tungsten is a dynamic process with direct implantation rather than diffusion into the bubbles, best describing the motion of the helium atoms. In the second experiment, an isotopically enriched layer of tungsten (~92.99% 182W) is deposited on the surface of a bulk tungsten sample with the natural abundance of the isotopes. This sample is then exposed to helium plasma at the conditions necessary to support the formation of tungsten ‘fuzz’. Depth profiles of the concentration of each of the tungsten isotopes are obtained using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) before and after the plasma exposure. The depth profiles clearly show mixing of tungsten atoms from the bulk sample toward the surface of the fuzz. This supports a physical picture of the dynamic behavior of helium bubbles which, also, causes an enhanced mixing of tungsten atoms.

  3. Numerical investigations on the link between the 60 Fe anomaly in a deep-sea ferromanganese crust and the formation of the Local Bubble

    OpenAIRE

    Schulreich, Michael Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Some time ago, an enhanced concentration of the radionuclide 60Fe was discovered in a deep-sea ferromanganese crust, isolated in layers dating from about 2.2 Myr ago. Since 60Fe (whose half-life is about 2.6 Myr) is not naturally produced on Earth, such an excess can only be attributed to extraterrestrial sources, particularly one or several nearby supernovae in the recent past. It has been speculated that these supernovae might have been involved in the formation of the Local Bubble, a soft ...

  4. Study of helium behaviour in body-centered cubic structures for new nuclear reactor generations: experimental approach in well characterized materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorondy-Novak, Sofia Maria

    2017-01-01

    The presence of helium produced during the operation of future fast reactors and fusion reactors in core structural materials induces a deterioration of their mechanical properties (hardening, swelling, embrittlement). In order to pursue the development of the metallic structural alloys, it is necessary to comprehend the He interaction with the metal lattice thus the point in common is the study of the metallic components with body-centered cubic structure (bcc) of future alloys, such as iron and/or vanadium. Ion implantation of ions "4He was employed with the aim of simulating the damaging effects associated with the helium accumulation, the point defects' creation (vacancies, self-interstitials) and the He cluster formation in future reactors. Helium evolution in pure iron and pure vanadium has been revealed from the point of view of the trapping sites' nature and well as the helium migration mechanisms and the nucleation/growth of bubbles. These phenomena were studied by coupling different complementary techniques. Despite of the fact that some mechanisms involved seem to be similar for both bcc metals, the comparison between the helium behavior in iron and vanadium shows certain differences. Microstructural defects, including grain boundaries and implanted helium concentration (dose) in both bcc metals will play significant roles on the helium behavior at high temperature. The acquired experimental data coupled with simulation methods contribute to the future development in terms of kinetic and thermodynamic data management of helium behavior in the metal components of the alloys of nuclear interest. (author) [fr

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of the diffusion and coalescence of helium in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Y.L. [Key Lab for Radiation Physics and Technology, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Department of Physics, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Wang, J. [Key Lab for Radiation Physics and Technology, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Hou, Q., E-mail: qhou@scu.edu.cn [Key Lab for Radiation Physics and Technology, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Deng, A.H. [Department of Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2014-03-15

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed on the diffusion and coalescence of helium in tungsten. A new method for determining the effective capture radii (ECRs) and the dissociation energies of helium-related defects is proposed in this work. It is observed that the ECR of an interstitial helium atom trapping helium interstitials (denoted as He–He{sub n}, n = 1–3) decreases with increasing temperature, except for He–He{sub 2} at T < 400 K. The traditional view that the ECR is approximately equal to the lattice constant, which has been widely used in kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) and rate theory (RT) models, is only valid in some cases. However, the ECR between an interstitial helium atom and a substitutional helium atom (denoted as He–HeV) always approximates the third nearest-neighbor tetrahedral positions of the HeV. The diffusion coefficients D{sub n} for helium clusters are also investigated. He{sub 2} migrates more quickly than a single He atom does at T < 400 K, whereas the diffusion path of He{sub 2} changes at higher temperatures. Another counterintuitive observation is that D{sub 5} > D{sub 3} > D{sub 4} at T < 500 K, which can be attributed to the disordered structure of He{sub 5}. The Arrhenius relation describes the diffusion of He{sub n} well in the temperature range from 300 K to 550 K, whereas the diffusion is not a standard thermally activated process at higher temperatures. Taken together, these results help elucidate the initial stage of helium bubble formation in tungsten as well as the requirements of long-term evolution methods such as KMC or RT models.

  6. Dechanneling of particles by gas bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronikier-Polonsky, Danuta.

    1976-01-01

    The dechanneling probability P of a particle hitting a gas bubble in a solid is evaluated theoretically. This probability is found to depend neither on the energy of the particle, nor on the radius of the bubble. A simple expression of P is given in the case of a harmonic channeling potential. Then an experiment is described concerning α particles channeled along (111) planes in aluminium containing helium bubbles. In this particular case, the measured probabilitity (P=0.27+-0.09) is in good agreement with the corresponding theoretical values (0.34 for a harmonic potential and 0.24 for a more realistic potential) [fr

  7. Experimental observation of exploding electron bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classen, J.; Su, C.K.; Hall, S.C.; Pettersen, M.S.; Maris, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    Since free electrons form small voids in liquid helium they are expected to be preferred sites for nucleating macroscopic bubbles when the liquid is exposed to sufficiently large negative pressures. We have performed a series of cavitation experiments using focussed ultrasound where free electrons were introduced into the liquid by a radioactive source. The electron bubbles are found to explode at negative pressures significantly lower than those required for homogeneous nucleation. We present measurements of the thresholds for cavitation at electrons in the temperature range 1 - 4.5 K. Reasonable agreement with a simple model for the stability limit of the electron bubble is obtained. (author)

  8. Study on helium-charged titanium films deposited by DC-magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Liqun; Jin Qinhua; Liu Chaozhuo; Xu Shilin; Zhou Zhuying

    2005-01-01

    Helium trapping in the Ti films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering with a He/Ar mixture was studied. He atoms with a surprisingly high concentration (He/Ti atomic ratio is as high as 56%) incorporate evenly in deposited film. The trapped amount of He can be controlled by the helium partial amount. The introduction of the helium with no extra damage (or very low damage) can be realized by choosing suitable deposition conditions. It was also found that because of the formation of nanophase Ti film a relative high He flux for bubble formation is needed and the amount of the retaining He in sputtering Ti films is much higher than that in the coarse-grain Ti films. The nanophase Ti film can accommodate larger concentration of trapped sites to He, which results in a high density and small size of the He bubbles. With increasing He irradiation flux, the grain size of Ti film decreases and the lattice spacing and width of the X-ray diffraction peak increase due to the He introduction, and the film tends to amorphous phase. (authors)

  9. Helium behaviour in implanted boron carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motte Vianney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When boron carbide is used as a neutron absorber in nuclear power plants, large quantities of helium are produced. To simulate the gas behaviour, helium implantations were carried out in boron carbide. The samples were then annealed up to 1500 °C in order to observe the influence of temperature and duration of annealing. The determination of the helium diffusion coefficient was carried out using the 3He(d,p4He nuclear reaction (NRA method. From the evolution of the width of implanted 3He helium profiles (fluence 1 × 1015/cm2, 3 MeV corresponding to a maximum helium concentration of about 1020/cm3 as a function of annealing temperatures, an Arrhenius diagram was plotted and an apparent diffusion coefficient was deduced (Ea = 0.52 ± 0.11 eV/atom. The dynamic of helium clusters was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM of samples implanted with 1.5 × 1016/cm2, 2.8 to 3 MeV 4He ions, leading to an implanted slab about 1 μm wide with a maximum helium concentration of about 1021/cm3. After annealing at 900 °C and 1100 °C, small (5–20 nm flat oriented bubbles appeared in the grain, then at the grain boundaries. At 1500 °C, due to long-range diffusion, intra-granular bubbles were no longer observed; helium segregates at the grain boundaries, either as bubbles or inducing grain boundaries opening.

  10. Study of stream flow effects on bubble motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sami, S.S.

    1983-01-01

    The formation of air bubbles at constant-pressure by submerged orifices was investigated in both quiescent and moving streams inside a vertical tube. Parameters affecting the bubble rise velocity, such as bubble generating frequency and diameter, were studied and analyzed for bubbles rising in a chain and homogeneous mixture. A special technique for measuring bubble motion parameters has been developed, tested, and employed throughout the experimental investigation. The method is based on a water-air impedance variation. Results obtained in stagnant liquid show that increasing the bubble diameter serves to increase bubble rise velocity, while an opposite trend has been observed for stream liquid where the bubble diameter increase reduces the bubble rise velocity. The increase of bubble generation frequency generally increases the bubble rise velocity. Experimental data covered with bubble radial distribution showed symmetrical profiles of bubble velocity and frequency, and the radial distribution of the velocity profiles sometimes has two maxima and one minimum depending on the liquid velocity. Finally, in stagnant liquid, a normalized correlation has been developed to predict the terminal rise velocity in terms of bubble generating frequency, bubble diameter, single bubble rise velocity, and conduit dimensions. Another correlation is presented for forced bubbly flow, where the bubble rise velocity is expressed as a function of bubble generating frequency, bubble diameter, and water superficial velocity

  11. Bubbling away

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1993-10-15

    Bubble chambers may have almost vanished from the front line of physics research, but the vivid memory of their intricate and sometimes beautiful patterns of particle tracks lives on, and has greatly influenced the computer graphics of track reconstruction in today's big experiments. 'Seeing' an interaction makes it more understandable. Bubble chambers, with their big collaborations of physicists from many widely scattered research institutes, started another ball rolling. The groups formed are even now only surpassed in size by the big collaborations working on today's major detectors at colliding beam machines. From 14-16 July, about 130 physicists gathered at CERN to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the invention of the bubble chamber by Donald Glaser. The meeting, organized by Derek C. Colley from Birmingham, gave a comprehensive overview of bubble chamber contributions to physics, their challenging technology, and the usefulness of bubble chamber photographs in education, both for physics and the public at large. After opening remarks by CERN Director Carlo Rubbia, Donald Glaser began with a brief review of the work which led to his invention - there was much more to it than idly watching beer bubbles rise up the wall of the glass - before turning to his present line of research, biophysics, also very visually oriented.

  12. Bubbling away

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Bubble chambers may have almost vanished from the front line of physics research, but the vivid memory of their intricate and sometimes beautiful patterns of particle tracks lives on, and has greatly influenced the computer graphics of track reconstruction in today's big experiments. 'Seeing' an interaction makes it more understandable. Bubble chambers, with their big collaborations of physicists from many widely scattered research institutes, started another ball rolling. The groups formed are even now only surpassed in size by the big collaborations working on today's major detectors at colliding beam machines. From 14-16 July, about 130 physicists gathered at CERN to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the invention of the bubble chamber by Donald Glaser. The meeting, organized by Derek C. Colley from Birmingham, gave a comprehensive overview of bubble chamber contributions to physics, their challenging technology, and the usefulness of bubble chamber photographs in education, both for physics and the public at large. After opening remarks by CERN Director Carlo Rubbia, Donald Glaser began with a brief review of the work which led to his invention - there was much more to it than idly watching beer bubbles rise up the wall of the glass - before turning to his present line of research, biophysics, also very visually oriented

  13. Helium mobility in advanced nuclear ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Shradha

    2014-01-01

    1100 and 1600 C. The values of the corresponding thermal activation energy are in the range 1 - 2.5 eV; - surface blistering only occurs for ZrC 0.92 ; - whatever the helium implantation dose, helium bubbles are formed near the ion end of range. Nevertheless, for as implanted samples, the bubble size remains less than the lateral resolution of TEM (≤ 1 nm); - when the annealing temperature increases, the average bubble size increases due to vacancy absorption while the density does not seem to vary. The activation energy corresponding to this mechanism has been evaluated around 0.40 eV; - after a high temperature thermal annealing (T ≥ 1500 C), the internal pressure of helium bubbles tends to reach the equilibrium value given by the classical law P = 2 γ/r with γ the surface energy and r the bubble radius; - near grain boundaries, the average helium bubble size tends to be larger and their density lower than within the grains; - when the helium implantation fluence decreases from 5 * 10 16 to 2.3 * 10 15 ions/cm 2 , helium release is quasi negligible for TiN 0.96 even after a 1600 C annealing treatment. Moreover, helium was shown to diffuse on a larger range. (author) [fr

  14. Technique to eliminate helium induced weld cracking in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin-An Wang; Chin, B.A.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments have shown that Type 316 stainless steel is susceptible to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) cracking upon cooling when welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) process under lateral constraint. The cracking has been hypothesized to be caused by stress-assisted helium bubble growth and rupture at grain boundaries. This study utilized an experimental welding setup which enabled different compressive stresses to be applied to the plates during welding. Autogenous GTA welds were produced in Type 316 stainless steel doped with 256 appm helium. The application of a compressive stress, 55 Mpa, during welding suppressed the previously observed catastrophic cracking. Detailed examinations conducted after welding showed a dramatic change in helium bubble morphology. Grain boundary bubble growth along directions parallel to the weld was suppressed. Results suggest that stress-modified welding techniques may be used to suppress or eliminate helium-induced cracking during joining of irradiated materials

  15. Cluster Dynamics Modeling with Bubble Nucleation, Growth and Coalescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Almeida, Valmor F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Blondel, Sophie [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bernholdt, David E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The topic of this communication pertains to defect formation in irradiated solids such as plasma-facing tungsten submitted to helium implantation in fusion reactor com- ponents, and nuclear fuel (metal and oxides) submitted to volatile ssion product generation in nuclear reactors. The purpose of this progress report is to describe ef- forts towards addressing the prediction of long-time evolution of defects via continuum cluster dynamics simulation. The di culties are twofold. First, realistic, long-time dynamics in reactor conditions leads to a non-dilute di usion regime which is not accommodated by the prevailing dilute, stressless cluster dynamics theory. Second, long-time dynamics calls for a large set of species (ideally an in nite set) to capture all possible emerging defects, and this represents a computational bottleneck. Extensions beyond the dilute limit is a signi cant undertaking since no model has been advanced to extend cluster dynamics to non-dilute, deformable conditions. Here our proposed approach to model the non-dilute limit is to monitor the appearance of a spatially localized void volume fraction in the solid matrix with a bell shape pro le and insert an explicit geometrical bubble onto the support of the bell function. The newly cre- ated internal moving boundary provides the means to account for the interfacial ux of mobile species into the bubble, and the growth of bubbles allows for coalescence phenomena which captures highly non-dilute interactions. We present a preliminary interfacial kinematic model with associated interfacial di usion transport to follow the evolution of the bubble in any number of spatial dimensions and any number of bubbles, which can be further extended to include a deformation theory. Finally we comment on a computational front-tracking method to be used in conjunction with conventional cluster dynamics simulations in the non-dilute model proposed.

  16. Molecular gas in the H II-region complex RCW 166: Possible evidence for an early phase of cloud-cloud collision prior to the bubble formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohama, Akio; Kohno, Mikito; Fujita, Shinji; Tsutsumi, Daichi; Hattori, Yusuke; Torii, Kazufumi; Nishimura, Atsushi; Sano, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Tachihara, Kengo; Fukui, Yasuo

    2018-05-01

    Young H II regions are an important site for the study of O star formation based on distributions of ionized and molecular gas. We reveal that two molecular clouds at ˜48 km s-1 and ˜53 km s-1 are associated with the H II regions G018.149-00.283 in RCW 166 by using the JCMT CO High-Resolution Survey (COHRS) of the 12CO(J = 3-2) emission. G018.149-00.283 comprises a bright ring at 8 μm and an extended H II region inside the ring. The ˜48 km s-1 cloud delineates the ring, and the ˜53 km s-1 cloud is located within the ring, indicating a complementary distribution between the two molecular components. We propose a hypothesis that high-mass stars within G018.149-00.283 were formed by triggering during cloud-cloud collision at a projected velocity separation of ˜5 km s-1. We argue that G018.149-00.283 is in an early evolutionary stage, ˜0.1 Myr after the collision according to the scheme detailed by Habe and Ohta (1992, PASJ, 44, 203), which will be followed by a bubble formation stage like RCW 120. We also suggest that nearby H II regions N21 and N22 are candidates for bubbles possibly formed by cloud-cloud collision. Inoue and Fukui (2013, ApJ, 774, L31) showed that the interface gas becomes highly turbulent and realizes a high-mass accretion rate of 10-3-10-4 M⊙ yr-1 by magnetohydrodynamical numerical simulations, which offers an explanation of the O-star formation. The fairly high frequency of cloud-cloud collision in RCW 166 is probably due to the high cloud density in this part of the Scutum arm.

  17. Nuttier bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astefanesei, Dumitru; Mann, Robert B.; Stelea, Cristian

    2006-01-01

    We construct new explicit solutions of general relativity from double analytic continuations of Taub-NUT spacetimes. This generalizes previous studies of 4-dimensional nutty bubbles. One 5-dimensional locally asymptotically AdS solution in particular has a special conformal boundary structure of AdS 3 x S 1 . We compute its boundary stress tensor and relate it to the properties of the dual field theory. Interestingly enough, we also find consistent 6-dimensional bubble solutions that have only one timelike direction. The existence of such spacetimes with non-trivial topology is closely related to the existence of the Taub-NUT(-AdS) solutions with more than one NUT charge. Finally, we begin an investigation of generating new solutions from Taub-NUT spacetimes and nuttier bubbles. Using the so-called Hopf duality, we provide new explicit time-dependent backgrounds in six dimensions

  18. A review of recent theoretical developments in the understanding of the migration of helium in metals and its interaction with lattice defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    Recent theoretical calculations of the properties of rare gases, and in particular helium, in the common f.c.c. and b.c.c. metals, are reviewed from the viewpoint of the investigator concerned with the behaviour of rare gas in such radiation damage processes as surface blistering and void swelling. Particular attention is paid to mechanisms by which helium may migrate in a damaged metal lattice during irradiation and to the properties of small gas and vacancy clusters which may represent bubble or void nuclei. Initially the proposed rapid migration of interstitial helium is discussed together with the substitutional de-trapping mechanism, whereby thermally activated helium jumps from a substitutional to an interstitial position. This enables a mechanism of substitutional helium diffusion to be proposed which may proceed at temperatures below those of self-diffusion. The formation, binding, migration and dissociation energies of gas-vacancy clusters have been reviewed. The relevance of the predicted trend towards the optimum stability of clusters composed of equal numbers of gas atoms and vacancies is discussed. The limited data available concerned with the binding of a helium atom to a pure dislocation line is presented together with comments on the possible nature of the interaction of helium with the dislocation jog. (author)

  19. Kinetics and dynamics of nanosecond streamer discharge in atmospheric-pressure gas bubble suspended in distilled water under saturated vapor pressure conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Sharma, Ashish; Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L; Cha, Min

    2016-01-01

    We perform computational studies of nanosecond streamer discharges generated in helium bubbles immersed in distilled water under atmospheric pressure conditions. The model takes into account the presence of water vapor in the gas bubble

  20. Study of the rise of gas bubbles in a viscous liquid. Stability and speed. Bibliographical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahan, Gilbert

    1969-01-01

    This short thesis reports a bibliographical study on the movement of gas bubbles in viscous liquids. The author addresses the formation of gas bubbles in liquids of different viscosity (devices used for the formation of bubbles in viscous liquids, formation of bubbles at a hole), and the behaviour of bubbles rising in viscous liquids and more particularly the speed and shape of these bubbles [fr

  1. How well do we know the beta-decay of 16N and oxygen formation in helium burning?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, Moshe

    1998-01-01

    We review the status of the 12 C(α, γ) 16 O reaction rate, of importance for stellar processes in a progenitor star prior to a supernova collapse. Several attempts to constrain the p-wave S-factor of the 12 C(α, γ) 16 O reaction at Helium burning temperatures (200 MK) using the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission of 16 N have been made, and it is claimed that this S-factor is known, as quoted by the TRIUMF collaboration. In contrast, reanalyses (by GM Hale) of all thus far available data (including the 16 N data) does not rule out a small S-factor solution. Furthermore, we improved our previous Yale-UConn study of the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission of 16 N by improving our statistical sample (by more than a factor of 5), improving the energy resolution of the experiment (by 20%), and in understanding our line shape, deduced from measured quantities. Our newly measured spectrum of the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission of 16 N is not consistent with the TRIUMF (1994) data, but is consistent with the Seattle (1995) data, as well as the earlier (unaltered) data of Mainz (1971). The implication of these discrepancies for the extracted astrophysical p-wave S-factor is briefly discussed. (author)

  2. On helium cluster dynamics in tungsten plasma facing components of fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasheninnikov, S.I.; Faney, T.; Wirth, B.D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the dynamics of helium clustering behaviour within either a nanometer-sized tendril of fuzz, or a half-space domain, as predicted by a reaction–diffusion model. This analysis has identified a dimensionless parameter, P Δ , which is a balance of the reaction and diffusion actions of insoluble He in a metal matrix and which governs the self-trapping effects of He into growing bubbles within a tendril. The impact of He self-trapping, as well as trapping caused by pre-existing traps in the form of lattice defects or clusters of impurities, within a half-space domain results in the formation of a densely packed layer of nanometer-sized bubbles with high number density. This prediction is consistent with available experimental observations in which a dense zone of helium bubbles is observed in tungsten, which are compared to estimates of the layer characteristics. Direct numerical simulation of the reaction–diffusion cluster dynamics supports the analysis presented here. (paper)

  3. High-temperature helium embrittlement (T>=0,45Tsub(M)) of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batfalsky, P.

    1984-06-01

    High temperature helium embrittlement, swelling and irradiation creep are the main technical problem of fusion reactor materials. The expected helium production will be very high. The helium produced by (n,α)-processes precipitates into helium bubbles because its solubility in solid metals is very low. Under continuous helium production at high temperature and stress the helium bubbles grow and lead to intergranular early failure. Solution annealed foil specimens of austenitic stainless steel AISI 316 were implanted with α-particles: 1. during creep tests at 1023 K (''in-beam'' test) 2. before the creep tests at high temperature (1023 K). The creep tests have been performed within large ranges of test parameter, e.g. applied stress, temperature, helium implantation rate and helium concentration. After the creep tests the microstructure was investigated using scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. All the helium implanted specimens showed high temperature helium embrittlement, i.e. reduction of rupture time tsub(R) and ductility epsilonsub(R) and evidence of intergranular brittle fracture. The ''in-beam'' creep tests showed greater reduction of rupture time tsub(R) and ductility than the preimplanted creep tests. The comparison of this experimentally obtained data with various theoretical models of high temperature helium embrittlement showed that within the investigated parameter ranges the mechanism controlling the life time of the samples is probably the gas driven stable growth of the helium bubbles within the grain boundaries. (orig.)

  4. Leverage bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wanfeng; Woodard, Ryan; Sornette, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Leverage is strongly related to liquidity in a market and lack of liquidity is considered a cause and/or consequence of the recent financial crisis. A repurchase agreement is a financial instrument where a security is sold simultaneously with an agreement to buy it back at a later date. Repurchase agreement (repo) market size is a very important element in calculating the overall leverage in a financial market. Therefore, studying the behavior of repo market size can help to understand a process that can contribute to the birth of a financial crisis. We hypothesize that herding behavior among large investors led to massive over-leveraging through the use of repos, resulting in a bubble (built up over the previous years) and subsequent crash in this market in early 2008. We use the Johansen-Ledoit-Sornette (JLS) model of rational expectation bubbles and behavioral finance to study the dynamics of the repo market that led to the crash. The JLS model qualifies a bubble by the presence of characteristic patterns in the price dynamics, called log-periodic power law (LPPL) behavior. We show that there was significant LPPL behavior in the market before that crash and that the predicted range of times predicted by the model for the end of the bubble is consistent with the observations.

  5. Experimental study of vapor bubble dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquini, Maria-Elena

    2015-01-01

    The object of this thesis is an experimental study of vapor bubble dynamics in sub-cooled nucleate boiling. The test section is locally heated by focusing a laser beam: heat fluxes from 1 e4 to 1.5 e6 W/m 2 and water temperature between 100 and 88 C have been considered. Three boiling regimes have been observed. Under saturated conditions and with low heat fluxes a developed nucleate boiling regime has been observed. Under higher sub-cooling and still with low heat fluxes an equilibrium regime has been observed in which the liquid flowrate evaporating at the bubble base is compensated by the vapor condensing flowrate at bubble top. A third regime have been observed at high heat fluxes for all water conditions: it is characterized by the formation of a large dry spot on the heated surface that keeps the nucleation site dry after bubble detachment. The condensation phase starts after bubble detachment. Bubble equivalent radius at detachment varies between 1 and 2.5 mm. Bubble properties have been measured and non-dimensional groups have been used to characterize bubble dynamics. Capillary waves have been observed on the bubble surface thanks to high-speed images acquisition. Two main phenomena have been proposed to explain capillary waves effects on bubble condensation: increasing of the phases interface area and decreasing of vapor bubble translation velocity, because of the increased drag force on the deformed bubble. (author) [fr

  6. Laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, M

    2005-01-01

    When antiprotons (i.e. the antimatter counterpart of protons) are stopped in helium gas, 97% of them annihilate within picoseconds by reacting with the helium nuclei; a 3% fraction, however, survive with an anomalously long lifetime of several microseconds. This longevity is due to the formation of antiprotonic helium, which is a three-body Rydberg atom composed of an antiproton, electron, and helium nucleus. The ASACUSA experimental collaboration has recently synthesized large numbers of these atoms using CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility, and measured the atom's transition frequencies to 60 parts per billion by laser spectroscopy. By comparing the experimental results with recent three-body QED calculations and the known antiproton cyclotron frequency, we were able to show that the antiproton mass and charge are the same as the corresponding proton values to a precision of 10 parts per billion. Ongoing and future series of experiments will further improve the experimental precision by using chirp-compe...

  7. Helium crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipson, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    Hexagonal close-packed helium crystals in equilibrium with superfluid have been found to be one of the few systems in which an anisotropic solid comes into true thermodynamic equilibrium with its melt. The discovery of roughening transitions at the liquid-solid interface have shown this system to be ideal for the study of the statistical mechanics of interface structures. We describe the effect of roughening on the shape and growth of macroscopic crystals from both the theoretical and experimental points of view. (author)

  8. Formation times of RbHe exciplexes on the surface of superfluid versus normal fluid helium nanodroplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droppelmann, G.; Buenermann, O.; Stienkemeier, F.; Schulz, C.P.

    2004-01-01

    Nanodroplets of either superfluid He 4 or normal fluid He 3 are doped with Rb atoms that are bound to the surface of the droplets. The formation of RbHe exciplexes upon 5P 3/2 excitation is monitored in real time by femtosecond pump-probe techniques. We find formation times of 8.5 and 11.6 ps for Rb He 4 and Rb He 3 , respectively. A comparison to calculations based on a tunneling model introduced for these systems by Reho et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 113, 9694 (2000)] shows that the proposed mechanism cannot account for our findings. Apparently, a different relaxation dynamics of the superfluid opposed to the normal fluid surface is responsible for the observed formation times

  9. Film boiling heat transfer in liquid helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inai, Nobuhiko

    1979-01-01

    The experimental data on the film boiling heat transfer in liquid helium are required for investigating the stability of superconducting wires. On the other hand, liquid helium has the extremely different physical properties as compared with the liquids at normal temperature such as water. In this study, the experiments on pool boiling were carried out, using the horizontal top surface of a 20 mm diameter copper cylinder in liquid helium. For observing individual bubbles, the experiments on film boiling from a horizontal platinum wire were performed separately in liquid nitrogen and liquid helium, and photographs of floating-away bubbles were taken. The author pointed out the considerable upward shift of the boiling curve near the least heat flux point in film boiling from the one given by the Berenson's equation which has been said to agree comparatively well with the data on the film boiling of the liquids at normal temperature, and the reason was investigated. Consequently, a model for film boiling heat transfer was presented. Also one equation expressing the film boiling at low heat flux for low temperature liquids was proposed. It represents well the tendency to shift from Berenson's equation of the experimental data on film boiling at the least heat flux point for liquid helium, liquid nitrogen and water having extremely different physical properties. Some discussions are added at the end of the paper. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  10. Bubble nuclei in relativistic mean field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, A.; Aberg, S.; Patra, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Bubble nuclei are characterized by a depletion of their central density, i.e. the formation of the proton or neutron void and subsequently forming proton or neutron bubble nuclei. Possibility of the formation of bubble nuclei has been explored through different nuclear models and in different mass regions. Advancements in experimental nuclear physics has led our experimental access to many new shapes and structures, which were inaccessible hitherto. In the present paper, the possibility of observing nuclear bubble in oxygen isotopes, particularly for 22 O has been studied

  11. Impurity bubbles in a BEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Eddy; Blinova, Alina; Boshier, Malcolm

    2013-05-01

    Polarons (particles that interact with the self-consistent deformation of the host medium that contains them) self-localize when strongly coupled. Dilute Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) doped with neutral distinguishable atoms (impurities) and armed with a Feshbach-tuned impurity-boson interaction provide a unique laboratory to study self-localized polarons. In nature, self-localized polarons come in two flavors that exhibit qualitatively different behavior: In lattice systems, the deformation is slight and the particle is accompanied by a cloud of collective excitations as in the case of the Landau-Pekar polarons of electrons in a dielectric lattice. In natural fluids and gases, the strongly coupled particle radically alters the medium, e.g. by expelling the host medium as in the case of the electron bubbles in superfluid helium. We show that BEC-impurities can self-localize in a bubble, as well as in a Landau-Pekar polaron state. The BEC-impurity system is fully characterized by only two dimensionless coupling constants. In the corresponding phase diagram the bubble and Landau-Pekar polaron limits correspond to large islands separated by a cross-over region. The same BEC-impurity species can be adiabatically Feshbach steered from the Landau-Pekar to the bubble regime. This work was funded by the Los Alamos LDRD program.

  12. Heat transfer property of refrigerant-oil mixture in a flooded evaporator: The role of bubble formation and oil retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Sung-Gyu; Jeong, Young-Man; Lee, Jae-Keun; Kim, Soo Hyung; Lee, Soowon; Park, Nae-Hyun; Na, Byung-Chul; Hwang, Yoon-Jae; Kim, Byung-Soon; Hwang, Joon-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effect of oil retention on the heat transfer performance of a shell-and-tube-type evaporator which had 26 inner tubes and was filled with the refrigerant R-134a. The refrigerant was boiled on the surface of the inner tubes in the evaporator, while chilled water circulated through these tubes. An experimental apparatus was designed to measure both the pressure and temperature profiles at the inlet and outlet of the flooded evaporator. Four windows were installed for observing the operation of the flooded evaporator. A series of experiments were carried out under the following conditions: the refrigerant saturation temperature, 5 .deg. C; refrigerant inlet quality, 0.1; heat fluxes from water to the refrigerant, 5-7 kW/m"2.. The concentration of the oil retained in the refrigerant was then varied up to approximately 10% to observe the effect on the heat transfer performance of the flooded evaporator. Increasing the oil content (i.e., increasing the concentration up to a maximum of approximately 10%) in the refrigerant R134a did not lead to any appreciable reduction in the overall heat transfer coefficient of a flooded evaporator with multiple-inner-tubes. When the oil concentration in the refrigerant was approximately 10%, the heat transfer degradation in the case of the flooded evaporator with multiple-inner-tubes was approximately 11%, which was found to be much smaller than the heat transfer degradation in the case of a flooded evaporator with a single-tube (26-49%). This observation suggested that the oil retained in the refrigerant did not significantly deteriorate the heat transfer performance of the flooded evaporator, presumably because the presence of tube bundles promoted forced convection by agitating bubbles

  13. SO3 Formation and the Effect of Fly Ash in a Bubbling Fluidised Bed under Oxy-Fuel Combustion Conditions.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sarbassov, Y.; Duan, L.; Jeremiáš, Michal; Manovic, V.; Anthony, E.J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 167, DEC 1 (2017), s. 314-321 ISSN 0378-3820 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : SO3 formation * oxy-fuel combustion * fluidised bed Subject RIV: JE - Non-nuclear Energetics, Energy Consumption ; Use OBOR OECD: Energy and fuels Impact factor: 3.752, year: 2016

  14. SO3 Formation and the Effect of Fly Ash in a Bubbling Fluidised Bed under Oxy-Fuel Combustion Conditions.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sarbassov, Y.; Duan, L.; Jeremiáš, Michal; Manovic, V.; Anthony, E.J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 167, DEC 1 (2017), s. 314-321 ISSN 0378-3820 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : SO3 formation * oxy- fuel combustion * fluidised bed Subject RIV: JE - Non-nuclear Energetics, Energy Consumption ; Use OBOR OECD: Energy and fuel s Impact factor: 3.752, year: 2016

  15. Helium-induced weld cracking in austenitic and martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, H.T.; Chin, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    Helium was uniformly implanted into type 316 stainless steel and Sandvik HT-9 (12Cr-1MoVW) to levels of 0.18 to 256 and 0.3 to 1 a.p.p.m., respectively, using the ''tritium trick'' technique. Autogenous bead-on-plate, full penetration, welds were then produced under fully constrained conditions using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. The control and hydrogen-charged plates of both alloys were sound and free of any weld defects. For the 316 stainless steel, catastrophic intergranular fracture occurred in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of welds with helium levels ≥ 2.5 a.p.p.m. In addition to the HAZ cracking, brittle fracture along the centreline of the fusion zone was also observed for the welds containing greater than 100 a.p.p.m. He. For HT-9, intergranular cracking occurred in the HAZ along prior-austenite grain boundaries of welds containing 1 a.p.p.m. He. Electron microscopy observations showed that the cracking in the HAZ originated from the growth and coalescence of grain-boundary helium bubbles and that the fusion-zone cracking resulted from the growth of helium bubbles at dendrite boundaries. The bubble growth kinetics in the HAZ is dominated by stress-induced diffusion of vacancies into bubbles. Results of this study indicate that the use of conventional GTAW techniques to repair irradiation-degraded materials containing even small amounts of helium may be difficult. (author)

  16. Studies of helium distribution in metal tritides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, R.C. Jr.; Attalla, A.

    1976-01-01

    The distribution of helium ( 3 He) in LiT, TiT 2 , and UT 3 , which are regarded as representative metal tritides, was investigated using pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Analyses of the NMR lineshapes and nuclear relaxation times indicate the 3 He atoms are trapped in microscopic gas bubbles for each tritide. The effects of concentration and temperature on the 3 He distributions were investigated as well

  17. Bubble bath soap poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002762.htm Bubble bath soap poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bubble bath soap poisoning occurs when someone swallows bubble bath soap. ...

  18. Statistical model and first-principles simulation on concentration of HenV cluster and He bubble formation in α-Fe and W

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yue-Lin; Yu, Yang; Dai, Zhen-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the stabilities of He and He n -vacancy (He n V) clusters in α-Fe and W. Vacancy formation energies are 2.08 eV in α-Fe and 3.11 eV in W, respectively. Single He in both α-Fe and W prefers to occupy the tetrahedral interstitial site. We recalculated the He solution energy considering the effect of zero-point energy (ZPE). The ZPEs of He in α-Fe and W at the tetrahedral (octahedral) interstitial site are 0.072 eV (0.031 eV) and 0.078 eV (0.034 eV), respectively. The trapping energies of single He at vacancy in α-Fe and W are −2.39 eV and −4.55 eV, respectively. By sequentially adding He into vacancy, a monovacancy trap up to 10 He atoms distributing in the vacancy vicinity. Based on the above results combined with statistical model, we evaluate the concentrations of all relevant He n V clusters as a function of He chemical potential. The critical He n V concentration is found to be ∼10 −40 (atomic) at the critical temperature T = 600 K in α-Fe and T = 1600 K in W, respectively. Beyond the critical He n V concentrations, considerable He n V aggregate to form He n V m clusters. By further growing of He n V m , the He n V m clusters grow bigger resulting in the larger He bubble formation

  19. Statistical model and first-principles simulation on concentration of HenV cluster and He bubble formation in α-Fe and W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue-Lin; Yu, Yang; Dai, Zhen-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the stabilities of He and Hen-vacancy (HenV) clusters in α-Fe and W. Vacancy formation energies are 2.08 eV in α-Fe and 3.11 eV in W, respectively. Single He in both α-Fe and W prefers to occupy the tetrahedral interstitial site. We recalculated the He solution energy considering the effect of zero-point energy (ZPE). The ZPEs of He in α-Fe and W at the tetrahedral (octahedral) interstitial site are 0.072 eV (0.031 eV) and 0.078 eV (0.034 eV), respectively. The trapping energies of single He at vacancy in α-Fe and W are -2.39 eV and -4.55 eV, respectively. By sequentially adding He into vacancy, a monovacancy trap up to 10 He atoms distributing in the vacancy vicinity. Based on the above results combined with statistical model, we evaluate the concentrations of all relevant HenV clusters as a function of He chemical potential. The critical HenV concentration is found to be ∼10-40 (atomic) at the critical temperature T = 600 K in α-Fe and T = 1600 K in W, respectively. Beyond the critical HenV concentrations, considerable HenV aggregate to form HenVm clusters. By further growing of HenVm, the HenVm clusters grow bigger resulting in the larger He bubble formation.

  20. Statistical model and first-principles simulation on concentration of He{sub n}V cluster and He bubble formation in α-Fe and W

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yue-Lin, E-mail: liuyuelin@ss.buaa.edu.cn; Yu, Yang; Dai, Zhen-Hong

    2015-01-15

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the stabilities of He and He{sub n}-vacancy (He{sub n}V) clusters in α-Fe and W. Vacancy formation energies are 2.08 eV in α-Fe and 3.11 eV in W, respectively. Single He in both α-Fe and W prefers to occupy the tetrahedral interstitial site. We recalculated the He solution energy considering the effect of zero-point energy (ZPE). The ZPEs of He in α-Fe and W at the tetrahedral (octahedral) interstitial site are 0.072 eV (0.031 eV) and 0.078 eV (0.034 eV), respectively. The trapping energies of single He at vacancy in α-Fe and W are −2.39 eV and −4.55 eV, respectively. By sequentially adding He into vacancy, a monovacancy trap up to 10 He atoms distributing in the vacancy vicinity. Based on the above results combined with statistical model, we evaluate the concentrations of all relevant He{sub n}V clusters as a function of He chemical potential. The critical He{sub n}V concentration is found to be ∼10{sup −40} (atomic) at the critical temperature T = 600 K in α-Fe and T = 1600 K in W, respectively. Beyond the critical He{sub n}V concentrations, considerable He{sub n}V aggregate to form He{sub n}V{sub m} clusters. By further growing of He{sub n}V{sub m}, the He{sub n}V{sub m} clusters grow bigger resulting in the larger He bubble formation.

  1. Interferometric measurement of film thickness during bubble blowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Mandracchia, B.; Ferraro, V.; Tammaro, D.; Di Maio, E.; Maffettone, P. L.; Ferraro, P.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we propose digital holography in transmission configuration as an effective method to measure the time-dependent thickness of polymeric films during bubble blowing. We designed a complete set of experiments to measure bubble thickness, including the evaluation of the refractive index of the polymer solution. We report the measurement of thickness distribution along the film during the bubble formation process until the bubble`s rupture. Based on those data, the variation range and variation trend of bubble film thickness are clearly measured during the process of expansion to fracture is indicated.

  2. Rational equity bubbles

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Ge

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the existence of a bubble in the pricing of an asset that pays positive dividends. I show that rational bubbles can exist in a growing economy. The existence of bubbles depends on the relative magnitudes of risk aversion to consumption and to wealth. Furthermore, I examine how an exogenous shock in technology might trigger bubbles.

  3. Field investigation with regard to the impermeability of clay formations. Helium-4 soil gas surveys in sedimentary basins as a tentative study of secondary permeability in clayey sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardi, S.; Benvegnu, F.; Brondi, A.; Polizzano, C.

    1993-01-01

    This report deals with a tentative study for the detection of the secondary permeability in clayey formations conducted in several sedimentary basins in Central Italy, by means of geochemical methods. The main purposes are: to try a geochemical method, based on the distribution of deep origin gases in soil gas ( 4 He and 222 Rn), to detect buried fault systems and to study the permeability of clay as a potential migration pathway for nuclides of radioactive waste deposits; to verify the effectiveness of this method for the selection of suitable sites for radwaste disposal. This research programme consists in a collaboration between ENEA and the University of Rome within the communitarian programme for the disposal of high level and long-live radwaste. Investigations concerned sedimentary basins filled by sand-clay formations 1000-2000 meters thick and characterized by different tectonic: Era and Chiani-Paglia Valleys (Tuscany and North Latium), structural trenches due to extensive tectonics along the tyrrhenian edge, and Vasto region, a basin in the 'Adriatic foretrench', characterized by compressive tectonics. The investigated areas are near or directly correspond to geothermal fields or to hydrocarbon reservoirs supplying gases which may migrate upward along fractures. Almost 4000 soil gas samples were collected in the three surveyed areas; the sampling density was of about 1.5 points / km 2 , normally used in the regional scale surveys. The obtained results show that the observed helium anomalies are distributed or elongated according to the main tectonic features of the substratum (fault systems, fractures, deep structures); the magnitude of anomalies seems to correlate with the nature of the deep gas reservoir (i.e. oil in Vasto), geothermal reservoir in the Paglia valley. These observations seem to confirm that the presence of deep origin gases in soils is controlled by tectonics. Clay thickness does not significantly control the uprising of deep gases: in

  4. Fama on Bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom

    2016-01-01

    While Eugene Fama has repeatedly expressed his discontent with the notion of an “irrational bubble,” he has never publicly expressed his opinion on “rational bubbles.” On empirical grounds Fama rejects bubbles by referring to the lack of reliable evidence that price declines are predictable....... However, this argument cannot be used to rule out rational bubbles because such bubbles do not necessarily imply return predictability, and return predictability of the kind documented by Fama does not rule out rational bubbles. On data samples that include the 1990s, there is evidence of an explosive...... component in stock market valuation ratios, consistent with a rational bubble....

  5. Evaluation of defect formation in helium irradiated Y2O3 doped W-Ti alloys by positron annihilation and nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Asta; Anwand, Wolfgang; Chen, Chun-Liang; Böttger, Roman

    2017-10-01

    Helium implanted tungsten-titanium ODS alloys are investigated using positron annihilation spectroscopy and nanoindentation. Titanium reduces the brittleness of the tungsten alloy, which is manufactured by mechanical alloying. The addition of Y2O3 nanoparticles increases the mechanical properties at elevated temperature and enhances irradiation resistance. Helium ion implantation was applied to simulate irradiation effects on these materials. The irradiation was performed using a 500 kV He ion implanter at fluences around 5 × 1015 cm-2 for a series of samples both at room temperature and at 600 °C. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the pristine and irradiated W-Ti-ODS alloy are compared with respect to the titanium and Y2O3 content. Radiation damage is studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy analyzing the lifetime and the Doppler broadening. Three types of helium-vacancy defects were detected after helium irradiation in the W-Ti-ODS alloy: small defects with high helium-to-vacancy ratio (low S parameter) for room temperature irradiation, larger open volume defects with low helium-to-vacancy ratio (high S parameter) at the surface and He-vacancy complexes pinned at nanoparticles deeper in the material for implantation at 600 °C. Defect induced hardness was studied by nanoindentation. A drastic hardness increase is observed after He ion irradiation both for room temperature and elevated irradiation temperature of 600 °C. The Ti alloyed tungsten-ODS is more affected by the hardness increase after irradiation compared to the pure W-ODS alloy.

  6. Ageing of palladium tritide: mechanical characterization, helium state and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segard, M.

    2010-01-01

    Palladium is commonly used for the storage of tritium (the hydrogen radioactive isotope), since it forms a low-equilibrium-pressure and reversible tritide. Tritium decay into helium-3 is responsible for the ageing of the tritide, leading to the apparition of helium-3 bubbles for instance. Both experimental and theoretical aspects of this phenomenon are studied here.Previous works on ageing modelling led to two main models, dealing with:- Helium-3 bubbles nucleation (using a cellular automaton), - Bubbles growth (using continuum mechanics).These models were quite efficient, but their use was limited by the lack of input data and fitting experimental parameters.To get through these limitations, this work has consisted in studying the most relevant experimental data to improve the modelling of the palladium tritide ageing.The first part of this work was focused on the assessment of the mechanical properties of the palladium tritide (yield strength, ultimate strength, mechanical behaviour). They were deduced from the in situ tensile tests performed on palladium hydride and deuteride. In the second part, ageing characterization was undertaken, mainly focusing on: - Bubbles observations in palladium tritide using transmission electron microscopy, - Internal bubble pressure measurements using nuclear magnetic resonance, - Macroscopic swelling measurements using pycno-metry.The present work has led to significant progress in ageing understanding and has brought very valuable improvements to the modelling of such a phenomenon. (author) [fr

  7. Bubble Formation within Filaments of Melt-Processed Bi2212 wires and its strongly negative effect on the Critical Current Density

    CERN Document Server

    Kametani, F; Jiang, J; Scheuerlein, C; Malagoli, A; Di Michiel, M; Huang, Y; Miao, H; Parrell, J A; Hellstrom, E E; Larbalestier, D C

    2011-01-01

    Most studies of Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox (Bi2212) show that the critical current density Jc is limited by the connectivity of the filaments, but what determines the connectivity is still elusive. Here we report on the role played by filament porosity in limiting Jc. By a microstructural investigation of wires quenched from the melt state, we find that porosity in the unreacted wire agglomerates into bubbles that segment the Bi2212 melt within the filaments into discrete sections. These bubbles do not disappear during subsequent processing because they are only partially filled by Bi2212 grains as the Bi2212 forms on cooling. Correlating the microstructure of quenched wires to their final, fully processed Jc values shows an inverse relation between Jc and bubble density. Bubbles are variable between conductors and perhaps from sample to sample, but they occur frequently and almost completely fill the filament diameter, so they exert a strongly variable but always negative effect on Jc. Bubbles reduce the continuous Bi221...

  8. Bubble Dynamics in Laser Lithotripsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadzadeh, Milad; Mercado, Julian Martinez; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Laser lithotripsy is a medical procedure for fragmentation of urinary stones with a fiber guided laser pulse of several hundred microseconds long. Using high-speed photography, we present an in-vitro study of bubble dynamics and stone motion induced by Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy. The experiments reveal that detectable stone motion starts only after the bubble collapse, which we relate with the collapse-induced liquid flow. Additionally, we model the bubble formation and dynamics using a set of 2D Rayleigh-Plesset equations with the measured laser pulse profile as an input. The aim is to reduce stone motion through modification of the temporal laser pulse profile, which affects the collapse scenario and consequently the remnant liquid motion. (paper)

  9. Liquid helium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Y.; Kitami, T.; Torikoshi, M.

    1984-12-01

    A liquid helium target system has been built and used for the experiment on the reaction 4 He(γ, p). The target system has worked satisfactorily; the consumption rate of liquid helium is 360 ml/h and the cryogenic system retains liquid helium for about ten hours. The structure, operation and performance of the target system are reported. (author)

  10. Influence of displacement damage on deuterium and helium retention in austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloys considered for ADS service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyevodin, V.N.; Karpov, S.A.; Kopanets, I.E.; Ruzhytskyi, V.V. [National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology” Kharkov, 1, Akademicheskaya St., Kharkov, 61108 (Ukraine); Tolstolutskaya, G.D., E-mail: g.d.t@kipt.kharkov.ua [National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology” Kharkov, 1, Akademicheskaya St., Kharkov, 61108 (Ukraine); Garner, F.A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The behavior of ion-implanted hydrogen (deuterium) and helium in austenitic 18Cr10NiTi stainless steel, EI-852 ferritic steel and ferritic/martensitic steel EP-450 and their interaction with displacement damage were investigated. Energetic argon irradiation was used to produce displacement damage and bubble formation to simulate nuclear power environments. The influence of damage morphology and the features of radiation-induced defects on deuterium and helium trapping in structural alloys was studied using ion implantation, the nuclear reaction D({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He, thermal desorption spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. It was found in the case of helium irradiation that various kinds of helium-radiation defect complexes are formed in the implanted layer that lead to a more complicated spectra of thermal desorption. Additional small changes in the helium spectra after irradiation with argon ions to a dose of ≤25 dpa show that the binding energy of helium with these traps is weakly dependent on the displacement damage. It was established that retention of deuterium in ferritic and ferritic-martensitic alloys is three times less than in austenitic steel at damage of ∼1 dpa. The retention of deuterium in steels is strongly enhanced by presence of radiation damages created by argon ion irradiation, with a shift in the hydrogen release temperature interval of 200 K to higher temperature. At elevated temperatures of irradiation the efficiency of deuterium trapping is reduced by two orders of magnitude.

  11. Helium implanted Eurofer97 characterized by positron beam Doppler broadening and Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, I., E-mail: i.carvalho@m2i.nl [Materials Innovation Institute (M2i), Delft (Netherlands); Schut, H. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft (Netherlands); Fedorov, A.; Luzginova, N. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands); Desgardin, P. [CEMHTI-CNRS, 3A Rue de la Férolerie, 45071 Orléans Cedex (France); Sietsma, J. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering, Delft (Netherlands)

    2013-11-15

    Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steels are being extensively studied because of their foreseen application in fusion and Generation IV fission reactors. To produce irradiation induced defects, Eurofer97 samples were implanted with helium at energies of 500 keV and 2 MeV and doses of 1 × 10{sup 15}–10{sup 16} He/cm{sup 2}, creating atomic displacements in the range 0.07–0.08 dpa. The implantation induced defects were characterized by positron beam Doppler Broadening (DB) and Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS). Results show that up to ∼600 K peaks that can be attributed to He desorption from overpressured He{sub n}V{sub m} (n > m) clusters and vacancy assisted mechanism in the case of helium in the substitutional position. The temperature range 600–1200 K is related to the formation of larger clusters He{sub n}V{sub m} (n < m). The dissociation of the HeV and the phase transition attributed to a sharp peak in the TDS spectra at 1200 K. Above this temperature, the release of helium from bubbles is observed.

  12. Numerical simulation of single bubble dynamics under acoustic travelling waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaojian; Huang, Biao; Li, Yikai; Chang, Qing; Qiu, Sicong; Su, Zheng; Fu, Xiaoying; Wang, Guoyu

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to apply CLSVOF method to investigate the single bubble dynamics in acoustic travelling waves. The Naiver-Stokes equation considering the acoustic radiation force is proposed and validated to capture the bubble behaviors. And the CLSVOF method, which can capture the continuous geometric properties and satisfies mass conservation, is applied in present work. Firstly, the regime map, depending on the dimensionless acoustic pressure amplitude and acoustic wave number, is constructed to present different bubble behaviors. Then, the time evolution of the bubble oscillation is investigated and analyzed. Finally, the effect of the direction and the damping coefficient of acoustic wave propagation on the bubble behavior are also considered. The numerical results show that the bubble presents distinct oscillation types in acoustic travelling waves, namely, volume oscillation, shape oscillation, and splitting oscillation. For the splitting oscillation, the formation of jet, splitting of bubble, and the rebound of sub-bubbles may lead to substantial increase in pressure fluctuations on the boundary. For the shape oscillation, the nodes and antinodes of the acoustic pressure wave contribute to the formation of the "cross shape" of the bubble. It should be noted that the direction of the bubble translation and bubble jet are always towards the direction of wave propagation. In addition, the damping coefficient causes bubble in shape oscillation to be of asymmetry in shape and inequality in size, and delays the splitting process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Nonequilibrium statistical theory of bubble nucleation and growth under neutron and proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, J.; Sommer, W.F.; Bradbury, J.N.

    1986-01-01

    Microstructural evolution in metals under particle irradiation is described by a non-equilibrium statistics method. This method gives a set of equations for the evolution of bubbles and an approximate solution for a distribution function of bubble size as a function of fluence and temperature. The distribution function gives the number of bubbles of radius r at time t, N(r,t)dr, as a function of size, r/r 0 (r 0 is the radius of a bubble nucleus). It is found that N(r,t)dr increases with fluence. Also, the peak value of N(r,t)dt shifts to higher r/r 0 with increasing fluence. Nucleation depends mainly on helium concentration and defect cluster concentration while bubble growth is controlled mainly by the vacancy concentration and a fluctuation coefficient. If suitable material parameters are chosen, a reasonable distribution function for bubble size is obtained. The helium diffusion coefficient is found to be less than that for vacancies by five orders of magnitude. The fraction of helium remaining in matrix is less than 10 -2 ; the majority of the helium is associated with the bubbles

  14. Gas diffusion and temperature dependence of bubble nucleation during irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foreman, A. J. E.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    1986-01-01

    The continuous production of gases at relatively high rates under fusion irradiation conditions may enhance the nucleation of cavities. This can cause dimensional changes and could induce embrittlement arising from gas accumulation on grain boundaries. Computer calculations have been made...... of the diatomic nucleation of helium bubbles, assuming helium to diffuse substitutionally, with radiation-enhanced diffusion at lower temperatures. The calculated temperature dependence of the bubble density shows excellent agreement with that observed in 600 MeV proton irradiations, including a reduction...... in activation energy below Tm/2. The coalescence of diatomic nuclei due to Brownian motion markedly improves the agreement and also provides a well-defined terminal density. Bubble nucleation by this mechanism is sufficiently fast to inhibit any appreciable initial loss of gas to grain boundaries during...

  15. Computational Studies of Positive and Negative Streamers in Bubbles Suspended in Distilled Water

    KAUST Repository

    Sharma, Ashish

    2017-01-05

    We perform computational studies of nanosecond streamers generated in helium bubbles immersed in distilled water under high pressure conditions. The model takes into account the presence of water vapor in the gas bubble for an accurate description of the chemical kinetics of the discharge. We apply positive and negative trigger voltages much higher than the breakdown voltage and study the dynamic characteristics of the resulting discharge. We observe that, for high positive trigger voltages, the streamer moves along the surface of the gas bubble during the initial stages of the discharge. We also find a considerable difference in the evolution of the streamer discharge for positive and negative trigger voltages with more uniform volumetric distribution of species in the streamer channel for negative trigger voltages due to formation of multiple streamers. We also observe that the presence of water vapor does not influence the breakdown voltage of the discharge but greatly affects the composition of dominant species in the trail of the streamer channel.

  16. Numerical studies on the link between radioisotopic signatures on Earth and the formation of the Local Bubble. I. 60Fe transport to the solar system by turbulent mixing of ejecta from nearby supernovae into a locally homogeneous interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulreich, M. M.; Breitschwerdt, D.; Feige, J.; Dettbarn, C.

    2017-08-01

    Context. The discovery of radionuclides like 60Fe with half-lives of million years in deep-sea crusts and sediments offers the unique possibility to date and locate nearby supernovae. Aims: We want to quantitatively establish that the 60Fe enhancement is the result of several supernovae which are also responsible for the formation of the Local Bubble, our Galactic habitat. Methods: We performed three-dimensional hydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement simulations (with resolutions down to subparsec scale) of the Local Bubble and the neighbouring Loop I superbubble in different homogeneous, self-gravitating environments. For setting up the Local and Loop I superbubble, we took into account the time sequence and locations of the generating core-collapse supernova explosions, which were derived from the mass spectrum of the perished members of certain stellar moving groups. The release of 60Fe and its subsequent turbulent mixing process inside the superbubble cavities was followed via passive scalars, where the yields of the decaying radioisotope were adjusted according to recent stellar evolution calculations. Results: The models are able to reproduce both the timing and the intensity of the 60Fe excess observed with rather high precision, provided that the external density does not exceed 0.3 cm-3 on average. Thus the two best-fit models presented here were obtained with background media mimicking the classical warm ionised and warm neutral medium. We also found that 60Fe (which is condensed onto dust grains) can be delivered to Earth via two physical mechanisms: either through individual fast-paced supernova blast waves, which cross the Earth's orbit sometimes even twice as a result of reflection from the Local Bubble's outer shell, or, alternatively, through the supershell of the Local Bubble itself, injecting the 60Fe content of all previous supernovae at once, but over a longer time range.

  17. Modeling of bubble dynamics in relation to medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendt, P.A.; London, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Strauss, M. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)]|[Israel Atomic Energy Commission, Beersheba (Israel). Nuclear Research Center-Negev] [and others

    1997-03-12

    In various pulsed-laser medical applications, strong stress transients can be generated in advance of vapor bubble formation. To better understand the evolution of stress transients and subsequent formation of vapor bubbles, two-dimensional simulations are presented in channel or cylindrical geometry with the LATIS (LAser TISsue) computer code. Differences with one-dimensional modeling are explored, and simulated experimental conditions for vapor bubble generation are presented and compared with data. 22 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Modeling of bubble dynamics in relation to medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendt, P.A.; London, R.A.; Strauss, M.; Israel Atomic Energy Commission, Beersheba

    1997-01-01

    In various pulsed-laser medical applications, strong stress transients can be generated in advance of vapor bubble formation. To better understand the evolution of stress transients and subsequent formation of vapor bubbles, two-dimensional simulations are presented in channel or cylindrical geometry with the LATIS (LAser TISsue) computer code. Differences with one-dimensional modeling are explored, and simulated experimental conditions for vapor bubble generation are presented and compared with data. 22 refs., 8 figs

  19. Fama on bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom

    Eugene Fama has repeatedly expressed his discontent with the notion of an irrational bubble. However, he has never publicly expressed his opinion on rational bubbles. This is peculiar since such bubbles build naturally from the rational efficient markets paradigm that Fama strongly adheres to...

  20. Observation of high-temperature bubbles in an ECR plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaka, K.; Yoshimura, S.; Tanaka, M. Y.

    2018-05-01

    Creation and annihilation of high-temperature bubbles have been observed in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma. The electron temperature in the bubble core is three times higher than that in the ambient region, and the size perpendicular to the magnetic field is much smaller than the plasma diameter. Formation of a bubble accompanies large negative spikes in the floating potential of a Langmuir probe, and the spatiotemporal behavior of the bubble has been visualized with a high-impedance wire grid detector. It is found that the bubble is in a prolate spheroidal shape with the axis along the magnetic field and occurs randomly in time and independently in space.

  1. Decay of bubble of disoriented chiral condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gani, V.A.; Kudryavtsev, A.E.; Belova, T.I.

    1999-01-01

    The space-time structure for the process of decay of a bubble of hypothetical phase -disoriented chiral condensate (DCC) i discussed. The evolution of the initial classical field configuration corresponding to the bubble of DCC is studied, both numerically and analytically. The decay of this initial configuration depends crucially on self-interaction of the pionic fields. It is shown that in some cases this self-interaction leads to the formation of sort of breather solution, formed from pionic fields situated in the center of the initial bubble of DCC. This breather looks like a long-lived source of pionic fields [ru

  2. Tritium and helium-3 in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasser, R.

    1989-01-01

    The book surveys recent results on the behaviour of tritium and its decay product helium-3 metals. In contrast to many earlier books which discuss the properties of the stable hydrogen isotopes without mentioning tritium, this book reviews mainly the results on tritium in metals. Due to the difficulties in preparing metal tritide samples, very important quantities such as diffusivity, superconductivity, solubility, etc. have only been determined very recently. The book not only presents the measured tritium data, but also the isotopic dependency of the different physical properties by comparing H, D and T results. A chapter is devoted to helium-3 in metals. Aspects such as helium release, generation of helium bubbles, swelling, and change of the lattice parameter upon aging are discussed. The book provides the reader with up-to-date information and deep insight into the behaviour of H, D, T and He-3 in metals. Further important topics such a tritium production, its risks, handling and discharge to the environment are also addressed

  3. Combined effects of radiation damage and He accumulation on bubble nucleation in Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Caitlin A., E-mail: ctayl105@vols.utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Patel, Maulik K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Aguiar, Jeffery A. [Fuel Performance and Design Department, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Material Science Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80220 (United States); Zhang, Yanwen [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Crespillo, Miguel L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Wen, Juan [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Xue, Haizhou [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Wang, Yongqiang [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Weber, William J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Pyrochlores have long been considered as host phases for long-term immobilization of radioactive waste nuclides that would undergo α-decay for hundreds of thousands of years. This work utilizes ion-beam irradiations to examine the combined effects of radiation damage and He accumulation on bubble formation in Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} over relevant waste-form timescales. Helium bubbles are not observed in pre-damaged Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} implanted with 2 × 10{sup 16} He/cm{sup 2}, even after post-implantation irradiations with 7 MeV Au{sup 3+} at 300, 500, and 700 K. However, He bubbles with average diameters of 1.5 nm and 2.1 nm are observed in pre-damaged (amorphous) Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} and pristine Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}, respectively, after implantation of 2 × 10{sup 17} He/cm{sup 2}. The critical He concentration for bubble nucleation in Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} is estimated to be 6 at.% He. - Highlights: • He bubbles not formed in amorphous Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} implanted with 2 × 10{sup 16} He/cm{sup 2}, even after additional irradiation at 300 to 700 K. • He bubbles, 1.5 and 2.1 nm diameter, respectively, observed in amorphous and pristine Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} implanted to 2 × 10{sup 17} He/cm{sup 2}. • The critical He dose for bubble nucleation is estimated to be 6 at.% He.

  4. Generalized Rate Theory for Void and Bubble Swelling and its Application to Plutonium Metal Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, P. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wolfer, W. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-16

    In the classical rate theory for void swelling, vacancies and self-interstitials are produced by radiation in equal numbers, and in addition, thermal vacancies are also generated at the sinks, primarily at edge dislocations, at voids, and at grain boundaries. In contrast, due to the high formation energy of self-interstitials for normal metals and alloys, their thermal generation is negligible, as pointed out by Bullough and Perrin. However, recent DFT calculations of the formation energy of self-interstitial atoms in bcc metals have revealed that the sum of formation and migration energies for self-interstitials atoms (SIA) is of the same order of magnitude as for vacancies. The ratio of the activation energies for thermal generation of SIA and vacancies is presented. For fcc metals, this ratio is around three, but for bcc metals it is around 1.5. Reviewing theoretical predictions of point defect properties in δ-Pu, this ratio could possibly be less than one. As a result, thermal generation of SIA in bcc metals and in plutonium must be taken into considerations when modeling the growth of voids and of helium bubbles, and the classical rate theory (CRT) for void and bubble swelling must be extended to a generalized rate theory (GRT).

  5. Letter: Entrapment and interaction of an air bubble with an oscillating cavitation bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Y. S.; Karri, Badarinath; Sahu, Kirti Chandra

    2018-04-01

    The mechanism of the formation of an air bubble due to an oscillating cavitation bubble in its vicinity is reported from an experimental study using high-speed imaging. The cavitation bubble is created close to the free surface of water using a low-voltage spark circuit comprising two copper electrodes in contact with each other. Before the bubble is created, a third copper wire is positioned in contact with the free surface of water close to the two crossing electrodes. Due to the surface tension at the triple point (wire-water-air) interface, a small dip is observed in the free surface at the point where the wire is immersed. When the cavitation bubble is created, the bubble pushes at the dip while expanding and pulls at it while collapsing. The collapse phase leads to the entrapment of an air bubble at the wire immersion point. During this phase, the air bubble undergoes a "catapult" effect, i.e., it expands to a maximum size and then collapses with a microjet at the free surface. To the best of our knowledge, this mechanism has not been reported so far. A parametric study is also conducted to understand the effects of wire orientation and bubble distance from the free surface.

  6. Cooling with Superfluid Helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebrun, P; Tavian, L [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    The technical properties of helium II (‘superfluid’ helium) are presented in view of its applications to the cooling of superconducting devices, particularly in particle accelerators. Cooling schemes are discussed in terms of heat transfer performance and limitations. Large-capacity refrigeration techniques below 2 K are reviewed, with regard to thermodynamic cycles as well as process machinery. Examples drawn from existing or planned projects illustrate the presentation. Keywords: superfluid helium, cryogenics.

  7. Mechanical properties and microstructure of austenitic steels loaded with helium using tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacovy, Paulette; Brun, Gilbert; Delaplace, Jean; Devaux, Joel; Fidelle, J.P.

    1982-06-01

    Following a review of the principle of the method using the radioactive decay of tritium to helium 3 to introduce helium into thick metallic test specimens, the results of preliminary tests performed on austenitic steels are presented. 304L and 316 steel specimens were loaded with helium, treated at 760 0 C to precipitate the helium in bubbles, and then strained by tensile stress at 800 0 C. In the material most loaded with helium (304 steel containing 230 ppm at. helium), a significant increase in distributed and total elongation at 800 0 C was observed. In the least loaded material (steel 316 containing 13 ppm at. helium), only total elongation decreased. Neither the yield stress nor the breaking load was altered by the presence of helium. Observations made by electron microscopy in the most loaded material revealed the presence, after heat treatment at 760 0 C, of very small bubbles of helium and also imperfect dislocation loops. The cause of these fault loops is discussed [fr

  8. The ring vortex metamorphosis as a basis for cavitation bubble implosion, the Schwenk method for drop formation and the water jet cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, P.E.M.

    1980-01-01

    It is possible, even to understand better the implosion of cavitation bubles by means of the progress of the recent years with reference to the transition of the laminar into the turbulent state of flow, especially for the case of ring vortices. The present report proves that the implosion of the cavitation bubbles takes place within implosion of the cavitation bubbles takes place within a gaseous/liquid ring vortex that transits from laminar flow state into the turbulent. The material erosion by a cavitation bubble takes place, when the metamorphosis of the ring vortex takes place immediately at a wall resp. in the vicinity of a wall, when the ring vortices of the cavitation move towards the wall and hereby erode it. Furthermore it is presented that this beam phenomenon, observed in cavitation also takes place during other events e.g. the drop transformation at the impact of a drop on a liquid layer or a solid material. This way it is possible to make a contribution to the explantations of phenomena, that take place during cuttering of solid materials by high pressure drop jets cutters. (orig.)

  9. Using a dynamic point-source percolation model to simulate bubble growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Zeigler, David A.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate modeling of nucleation, growth and clustering of helium bubbles within metal tritide alloys is of high scientific and technological importance. Of interest is the ability to predict both the distribution of these bubbles and the manner in which these bubbles interact at a critical concentration of helium-to-metal atoms to produce an accelerated release of helium gas. One technique that has been used in the past to model these materials, and again revisited in this research, is percolation theory. Previous efforts have used classical percolation theory to qualitatively and quantitatively model the behavior of interstitial helium atoms in a metal tritide lattice; however, higher fidelity models are needed to predict the distribution of helium bubbles and include features that capture the underlying physical mechanisms present in these materials. In this work, we enhance classical percolation theory by developing the dynamic point-source percolation model. This model alters the traditionally binary character of site occupation probabilities by enabling them to vary depending on proximity to existing occupied sites, i.e. nucleated bubbles. This revised model produces characteristics for one and two dimensional systems that are extremely comparable with measurements from three dimensional physical samples. Future directions for continued development of the dynamic model are also outlined

  10. Structure and micro-mechanical properties of helium-implanted layer on Ti by plasma-based ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xinxin; Li Jinlong; Sun Mingren

    2008-01-01

    The present paper concentrates on structure and micro-mechanical properties of the helium-implanted layer on titanium treated by plasma-based ion implantation with a pulsed voltage of -30 kV and doses of 3, 6, 9 and 12 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 , respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy are employed to characterize the structure of the implanted layer. The hardnesses at different depths of the layer were measured by nano-indentation. We found that helium ion implantation into titanium leads to the formation of bubbles with a diameter from a few to more than 10 nm and the bubble size increases with the increase of dose. The primary existing form of Ti is amorphous in the implanted layer. Helium implantation also enhances the ingress of O, C and N and stimulates the formations of TiO 2 , Ti 2 O 3 , TiO, TiC and TiN in the near surface layer. And the amount of the ingressed oxygen is obviously higher than those of nitrogen and carbon due to its higher activity. At the near surface layer, the hardnesses of all implanted samples increases remarkably comparing with untreated one and the maximum hardness has an increase by a factor of up to 3.7. For the samples implanted with higher doses of 6, 9 and 12 x 10 17 He/cm 2 , the local displacement bursts are clearly found in the load-displacement curves. For the samples implanted with a lower dose of 3 x 10 17 He/cm 2 , there is no obvious displacement burst found. Furthermore, the burst width increases with the increase of the dose

  11. A possible mechanism for electron-bombardment-induced loop punching in helium-implanted materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, S.E.

    1983-01-01

    The recently proposed mechanism for the punching of dislocation loops by overpressurized helium bubbles in molybdenum is studied quantitatively. According to this mechanism, under the electron beam of the transmission microscope, He atoms are excited or ionized and the resulting excited species (excited He atoms and free electrons) are responsible for the pressure rise in the gas beyond the threshold for loop punching. In the model, the pressure increase is attributed to a reduction of the effective volume accessible to the gas due to the formation of a cavity around each excited species. The radius of this cavity is evaluated and, also, the excited fraction required to reach the threshold is discussed in terms of excitation life times. (author)

  12. Mechanical properties of tungsten following rhenium ion and helium plasma exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Corr

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of Tungsten (W samples irradiated with 2 MeV Rhenium (Re ions and helium (He plasma were investigated using nanoindentation. It was found that there was an increase in hardness for all samples following separate irradiation with both Re ion and He plasma. A slight increase in hardness was obtained for combined exposures. A comparable increase in hardness was observed for a pure He plasma with a sample temperature of 473 K and 1273 K. Optical interferometry was employed to compare surface modification of the samples. Grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering confirmed He nano-bubble formation of approximately 1 nm diameter in the higher temperature sample, which was not observed with samples at the lower temperatures.

  13. The consequences of helium production on microstructural development in isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    A series of alloys have been made adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation by a two step nuclear reaction in a mixed spectrum reactor. The alloys use a base composition of Fe-12Cr with an addition of 1.5% nickel, either in the form of 60 Ni which produces no helium, 59 Ni which produces helium at a rate of about 10 appm He/dpa, or natural nickel ( Nat Ni) which provides an intermediate level of helium due to delayed development of 59 Ni. Specimens were irradiated in the HFIR at Oak Ridge, TN to ∼7 dpa at 300 and 400 degrees C. Microstructural examinations indicated that nickel additions promote precipitation in all alloys, but the effect appears to be much stronger at 400 degrees C than at 300 degrees C. There is sufficient dose by 7 dpa (and with 2 appm He) to initiate void swelling in ferritic/martensitic alloys. Little difference was found between response from 59 Ni and Nat Ni. Also, helium bubble development for high helium generation conditions appeared to be very different at 300 and 400 degrees C. At 300 degrees C, it appeared that high densities of bubbles formed whereas at 400 degrees C, bubbles could not be identified, possibly because of the complexity of the microstructure, but more likely because helium accumulated at precipitate interfaces

  14. The consequences of helium production on microstructural development in isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    A series of alloys have been made adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation by a two step nuclear reaction in a mixed spectrum reactor. The alloys use a base composition of Fe-12Cr with an addition of 1.5% nickel, either in the form of {sup 60}Ni which produces no helium, {sup 59}Ni which produces helium at a rate of about 10 appm He/dpa, or natural nickel ({sup Nat}Ni) which provides an intermediate level of helium due to delayed development of {sup 59}Ni. Specimens were irradiated in the HFIR at Oak Ridge, TN to {approx}7 dpa at 300 and 400{degrees}C. Microstructural examinations indicated that nickel additions promote precipitation in all alloys, but the effect appears to be much stronger at 400{degrees}C than at 300{degrees}C. There is sufficient dose by 7 dpa (and with 2 appm He) to initiate void swelling in ferritic/martensitic alloys. Little difference was found between response from {sup 59}Ni and {sup Nat}Ni. Also, helium bubble development for high helium generation conditions appeared to be very different at 300 and 400{degrees}C. At 300{degrees}C, it appeared that high densities of bubbles formed whereas at 400{degrees}C, bubbles could not be identified, possibly because of the complexity of the microstructure, but more likely because helium accumulated at precipitate interfaces.

  15. Helium sequestration at nanoparticle-matrix interfaces in helium + heavy ion irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parish, C.M., E-mail: parishcm@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Unocic, K.A.; Tan, L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Kondo, S. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto, 611-0011 (Japan); Snead, L.L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hoelzer, D.T.; Katoh, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2017-01-15

    We irradiated four ferritic alloys with energetic Fe and He ions: one castable nanostructured alloy (CNA) containing Ti-W-Ta-carbides, and three nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). The NFAs were: 9Cr containing Y-Ti-O nanoclusters, and two Fe-12Cr-5Al NFAs containing Y-Zr-O or Y-Hf-O clusters. All four were subjected to simultaneous dual-beam Fe + He ion implantation (650 °C, ∼50 dpa, ∼15 appm He/dpa), simulating fusion-reactor conditions. Examination using scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) revealed high-number-density helium bubbles of ∼8 nm, ∼10{sup 21} m{sup −3} (CNA), and of ∼3 nm, 10{sup 23} m{sup −3} (NFAs). STEM combined with multivariate statistical analysis data mining suggests that the precipitate-matrix interfaces in all alloys survived ∼50 dpa at 650 °C and serve as effective helium trapping sites. All alloys appear viable structural material candidates for fusion or advanced fission energy systems. Among these developmental alloys the NFAs appear to sequester the helium into smaller bubbles and away from the grain boundaries more effectively than the early-generation CNA.

  16. Helium the disappearing element

    CERN Document Server

    Sears, Wheeler M

    2015-01-01

    The subject of the book is helium, the element, and its use in myriad applications including MRI machines, particle accelerators, space telescopes, and of course balloons and blimps. It was at the birth of our Universe, or the Big Bang, where the majority of cosmic helium was created; and stellar helium production continues. Although helium is the second most abundant element in the Universe, it is actually quite rare here on Earth and only exists because of radioactive elements deep within the Earth. This book includes a detailed history of the discovery of helium, of the commercial industry built around it, how the helium we actually encounter is produced within the Earth, and the state of the helium industry today. The gas that most people associate with birthday party balloons is running out. “Who cares?” you might ask. Well, without helium, MRI machines could not function, rockets could not go into space, particle accelerators such as those used by CERN could not operate, fiber optic cables would not...

  17. Helium dilution refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    A new system of continuous heat exchange for a helium dilution refrigerator is proposed. The 3 He effluent tube is concurrent with the affluent mixed helium tube in a vertical downward direction. Heat exchange efficiency is enhanced by placing in series a number of elements with an enlarged surface area

  18. Helium localisation in tritides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flament, J.L.; Lozes, G.

    1982-06-01

    Study of titanium and LaNi 5 type alloys tritides lattice parameters evolution revealed that helium created by tritium decay remains in interstitial sites up to a limit material dependant concentration. Beyond this one exceeding helium precipites in voids [fr

  19. Bubbles in piezo-acoustic inkjet printing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohse, D.; Jeurissen, R.J.M.; de Jong, J.; Versluis, M.; Wijshoff, H.M.A.; van den Berg, M.; Reinten, H.

    2008-01-01

    Ink-jet printing is considered as the hitherto most successful application of microfluidics. A notorious problem in piezo-acoustic ink-jet systems is the formation of air bubbles during operation. They seriously disturb the acoustics and can cause the droplet formation to stop. We could show by a

  20. Experimental visualization coalesced interaction of sliding bubble near wall in vertical narrow rectangular channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jianjun; Chen Bingde; Wang Xiaojun

    2011-01-01

    The characteristic of the coalesced sliding bubble was visually observed by wide side and narrow side of the narrow rectangular channel using high speed digital camera. The results show that the coalesced time among the sliding bubbles is quick, and the new formation of coalesced bubble is not lift-off, and it continues to slide along the heated surface in low heat flux for the isolated bubble region. The influence region is about 2 times projected area of the sliding bubble when the sliding bubbles begin to interact. The sliding bubble velocities increase duo to the interaction among the bubbles, which contributes to enhance heat transfer of this region. Finally, the effect of coalesced interaction of growing bubble in the nucleation sites on bubble lift-off was discussed and analysed. (authors)

  1. Sonoluminescence and bubble fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Arakeri, Vijay H

    2003-01-01

    Sonoluminescence (SL), the phenomenon of light emission from nonlinear motion of a gas bubble, involves an extreme degree of energy focusing. The conditions within the bubble during the last stages of the nearly catastrophic implosion are thought to parallel the efforts aimed at developing inertial confinement fusion. A limited review on the topic of SL and its possible connection to bubble nuclear fusion is presented here. The emphasis is on looking for a link between the various forms o...

  2. Atomistic simulations of thermodynamic properties of Xe gas bubbles in U10Mo fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Shenyang, E-mail: shenyang.hu@pnnl.gov; Setyawan, Wahyu; Joshi, Vineet V.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2017-07-15

    Xe gas bubble superlattice formation is observed in irradiated uranium–10 wt% molybdenum (U10Mo) fuels. However, the thermodynamic properties of the bubbles (the relationship among bubble size, equilibrium Xe concentration, and bubble pressure) and the mechanisms of bubble superlattice formation are not well known. In this work, the molecular dynamics (MD) method is used to study these properties and mechanisms. The results provide important inputs for quantitative mesoscale models of gas bubble evolution and fuel performance. In the MD simulations, the embedded-atom method (EAM) potential of U10Mo-Xe [1] is employed. Initial gas bubbles with a low Xe concentration (underpressured) are generated in a body-centered cubic (bcc) U10Mo single crystal. Then Xe atoms are sequentially added into the bubbles one by one, and the evolution of pressure and dislocation emission around the bubbles is analyzed. The relationship between pressure, equilibrium Xe concentration, and radius of the bubbles is established. It was found that an overpressured gas bubble emits partial dislocations with a Burgers vector along the <111> direction and a slip plane of (11-2). Meanwhile, dislocation loop punch out was not observed. The overpressured bubble also induces an anisotropic stress field. A tensile stress was found along <110> directions around the bubble, favoring the nucleation and formation of a face-centered cubic bubble superlattice in bcc U10Mo fuels.

  3. Atomistic simulations of thermodynamic properties of Xe gas bubbles in U10Mo fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shenyang; Setyawan, Wahyu; Joshi, Vineet V.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2017-07-01

    Xe gas bubble superlattice formation is observed in irradiated uranium-10 wt% molybdenum (U10Mo) fuels. However, the thermodynamic properties of the bubbles (the relationship among bubble size, equilibrium Xe concentration, and bubble pressure) and the mechanisms of bubble superlattice formation are not well known. In this work, the molecular dynamics (MD) method is used to study these properties and mechanisms. The results provide important inputs for quantitative mesoscale models of gas bubble evolution and fuel performance. In the MD simulations, the embedded-atom method (EAM) potential of U10Mo-Xe [1] is employed. Initial gas bubbles with a low Xe concentration (underpressured) are generated in a body-centered cubic (bcc) U10Mo single crystal. Then Xe atoms are sequentially added into the bubbles one by one, and the evolution of pressure and dislocation emission around the bubbles is analyzed. The relationship between pressure, equilibrium Xe concentration, and radius of the bubbles is established. It was found that an overpressured gas bubble emits partial dislocations with a Burgers vector along the direction and a slip plane of (11-2). Meanwhile, dislocation loop punch out was not observed. The overpressured bubble also induces an anisotropic stress field. A tensile stress was found along directions around the bubble, favoring the nucleation and formation of a face-centered cubic bubble superlattice in bcc U10Mo fuels.

  4. Bubbling in vibrated granular films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamankhan, Piroz

    2011-02-01

    With the help of experiments, computer simulations, and a theoretical investigation, a general model is developed of the flow dynamics of dense granular media immersed in air in an intermediate regime where both collisional and frictional interactions may affect the flow behavior. The model is tested using the example of a system in which bubbles and solid structures are produced in granular films shaken vertically. Both experiments and large-scale, three-dimensional simulations of this system are performed. The experimental results are compared with the results of the simulation to verify the validity of the model. The data indicate evidence of formation of bubbles when peak acceleration relative to gravity exceeds a critical value Γ(b). The air-grain interfaces of bubblelike structures are found to exhibit fractal structure with dimension D=1.7±0.05.

  5. TEM investigation of the microstructural evolution in nickel during MeV helium implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadalla, A.A.; Jaeger, W.; Ehrhart, P.

    1986-01-01

    In a recent TEM investigation of high energy He-implanted copper the low average helium density could be understood by the observation of the coexistence of two types of vacancy agglomerates i.e. relaxed vacancy agglomerates in the form of stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) and small bubbles. In order to arrive at a more systematic understanding of the evolution of the microstructure during high energy helium implantation we extended these TEM investigations to nickel. Of particular interest was also the minimum implantation dose necessary to precipitate bubbles that are large enough to be visible in the TEM. (orig./RK)

  6. Recent progress in the modelling of helium and tritium behaviour in irradiated beryllium pebbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabaglino, E.; Ronchi, C.; Cardella, A.

    2003-01-01

    One of the key issues of the European Helium Cooled Pebble Bed blanket is the behaviour under irradiation of beryllium pebbles, which have the function of neutron multiplier. An intense production of helium occurs in-pile, as well as a non negligible generation of tritium. Helium bubbles induce swelling and a high tritium inventory is a safety issue. Extensive studies for a better understanding, characterisation and modelling of the behaviour of helium and tritium in irradiated beryllium pebbles are being carried out, with the final aim to enable a reliable prediction of gas release and swelling in the full range of operating and accidental conditions of a Fusion Power Reactor. The general strategy consists in integrating studies on macroscopic phenomena (gas release) with the characterisation of corresponding microscopic diffusion phenomena (bubble kinetics) and the assessment of some fundamental diffusion parameter for the models (gas atomic diffusion coefficients). The present work gives a summary of the latest achievements in this context. By an inverse analysis of experimental out-of-pile gas release from weakly irradiated pebbles, coupled to the study of the characteristics of bubble population, it has been possible to assess the thermal diffusion coefficients of helium and tritium in and to improve and validate the classical model of gas precipitation into bubbles inside the grain. The improvement of the description of gas atomic diffusion and precipitation is the first step to enable a more reliable prediction of gas release

  7. A method to calculate equilibrium concentrations of gas and defects in the vicinity of an over-pressured bubble in UO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noirot, L., E-mail: laurence.noirot@cea.fr

    2014-04-01

    We present a method devised to calculate the equilibrium concentration of point defects and gas atoms in the vicinity of a bubble in UO{sub 2}. First, we neglect the mechanical energy stored in the solid around an over-pressured bubble and then we explain how to take it into account. We apply the method to helium in interstitial positions in UO{sub 2}, and compare our theoretical value of Henry’s constant with experiments and a molecular dynamics computation. Then, we apply the method to xenon in a Schottky defect and use it to assess the realism of two scenarios elaborated to explain the “paradox of annealing experiments”, i.e. “why a large proportion of gas is released from grains in annealing experiments on irradiated fuel, even though there are thousands of intragranular bubbles to trap the gas?” These two scenarios (thermal resolution or blockage of trapping due to the stress field around the bubbles) were both found to be unrealistic, at least with the formation energies available from ab initio calculations, and with the assumption made to calculate the Z3 term of the partition function. This term is related to the vibration frequencies of xenon atoms in Schottky defects and lattice atoms close to defects.

  8. A liquid helium saver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avenel, O.; Der Nigohossian, G.; Roubeau, P.

    1976-01-01

    A cryostat equipped with a 'liquid helium saver' is described. A mass flow rate M of helium gas at high pressure is injected in a counter-flow heat exchanger extending from room to liquid helium temperature. After isenthalpic expansion through a calibrated flow impedance this helium gas returns via the low pressure side of the heat exchanger. The helium boil-off of the cryostat represents a mass flow rate m, which provides additional precooling of the incoming helium gas. Two operating regimes appear possible giving nearly the same efficiency: (1) high pressure (20 to 25 atm) and minimum flow (M . L/W approximately = 1.5) which would be used in an open circuit with helium taken from a high pressure cylinder; and (2) low pressure (approximately = 3 atm), high flow (M . L/W > 10) which would be used in a closed circuit with a rubber diaphragm pumping-compressing unit; both provide a minimum theoretical boil-off factor of about 8%. Experimental results are reported. (U.K.)

  9. Prospects for bubble fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigmatulin, R.I. [Tyumen Institute of Mechanics of Multiphase Systems (TIMMS), Marx (Russian Federation); Lahey, R.T. Jr. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    In this paper a new method for the realization of fusion energy is presented. This method is based on the superhigh compression of a gas bubble (deuterium or deuterium/thritium) in heavy water or another liquid. The superhigh compression of a gas bubble in a liquid is achieved through forced non-linear, non-periodic resonance oscillations using moderate amplitudes of forcing pressure. The key feature of this new method is a coordination of the forced liquid pressure change with the change of bubble volume. The corresponding regime of the bubble oscillation has been called {open_quotes}basketball dribbling (BD) regime{close_quotes}. The analytical solution describing this process for spherically symmetric bubble oscillations, neglecting dissipation and compressibility of the liquid, has been obtained. This solution shown no limitation on the supercompression of the bubble and the corresponding maximum temperature. The various dissipation mechanisms, including viscous, conductive and radiation heat losses have been considered. It is shown that in spite of these losses it is possible to achieve very high gas bubble temperatures. This because the time duration of the gas bubble supercompression becomes very short when increasing the intensity of compression, thus limiting the energy losses. Significantly, the calculated maximum gas temperatures have shown that nuclear fusion may be possible. First estimations of the affect of liquid compressibility have been made to determine possible limitations on gas bubble compression. The next step will be to investigate the role of interfacial instability and breaking down of the bubble, shock wave phenomena around and in the bubble and mutual diffusion of the gas and the liquid.

  10. Vapor bubble growth in highly superheated liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    Dynamics of the bubble growth in the volume of the uniformally superheated liquid is considered. It is supposed that its growth is hampered by heat transfer. An asymptotic expression for the bubble growth rate at high superheatings when heat hold by liquid is comparable with heat of steam formation, is found by the automodel solution of the heat transfer equation. Writing the radius square in the form of a functional applicable for the calculation of steam formation at the pressure change in superheated liquid is suggested for eveluation calculations [ru

  11. Soap Bubbles and Crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 6. Soap Bubbles and Crystals. Jean E Taylor. General Article Volume 11 Issue 6 June 2006 pp 26-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/011/06/0026-0030. Keywords. Soap bubble ...

  12. Turbulence, bubbles and drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Roeland

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, several questions related to drop impact and Taylor-Couette turbulence are answered. The deformation of a drop just before impact can cause a bubble to be entrapped. For many applications, such as inkjet printing, it is crucial to control the size of this entrapped bubble. To study

  13. Single bubble sonoluminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenner, Michael P.; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Lohse, Detlef

    2002-01-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence occurs when an acoustically trapped and periodically driven gas bubble collapses so strongly that the energy focusing at collapse leads to light emission. Detailed experiments have demonstrated the unique properties of this system: the spectrum of the emitted light

  14. Flow visualization using bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, J.P.

    1974-01-01

    Soap bubbles were used for visualizing flows. The tests effected allowed some characteristics of flows around models in blow tunnels to be precised at mean velocities V 0 5 . The velocity of a bubble is measured by chronophotography, the bulk envelope of the trajectories is also registered [fr

  15. HCDA bubble experiment, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Kaoru; Mashiko, Hiroyuki; Oka, Yoshiaki; An, Shigehiro; Isozaki, Tadashi.

    1981-06-01

    An experiment simulating the behavior of the very large steam bubbles generated at the time of an accident of core collapse was carried out with a warm water tank, and the applicability of the theory of very small bubble disappearance known at present was examined. The bubbles generated in HCDA (hypothetical core disruptive accident) are expected to be very large, containing sodium, fuel, FP gas and so on, and play important role in the mechanism of emitting radioactive substances in the safety analysis of LMFBRs. In this experiment, the degree of subcool of the warm water pool, the initial radii of steam bubbles and the blowoff pressure of steam were taken as the parameters. The radius of the steam bubbles generated in the experiment was about 6.5 cm, and the state of disappearance was different above and below the degree of unsaturation of 10 deg C. Comparing the disappearance curve obtained by the experiment with the theory of disappearance of small bubbles, the experimental values were between inertia-controlled disappearance and heat transfer-controlled disappearance, and this result was able to be explained generally with the model taking the pressure change within steam bubbles into account. The rise of bubbles was also observed. (Kako, I.)

  16. Bubbles in graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Settnes, Mikkel; Power, Stephen; Lin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Strain-induced deformations in graphene are predicted to give rise to large pseudomagnetic fields. We examine theoretically the case of gas-inflated bubbles to determine whether signatures of such fields are present in the local density of states. Sharp-edged bubbles are found to induce Friedel...

  17. Helium-induced weld degradation of HT-9 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chin-An; Chin, B.A.; Lin, Hua T.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    Helium-bearing Sandvik HT-9 ferritic steel was tested for weldability to simulate the welding of structural components of a fusion reactor after irradiation. Helium was introduced into HT-9 steel to 0.3 and 1 atomic parts per million (appm) by tritium doping and decay. Autogenous single pass full penetration welds were produced using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process under laterally constrained conditions. Macroscopic examination showed no sign of any weld defect in HT-9 steel containing 0.3 appm helium. However, intergranular micro cracks were observed in the HAZ of HT-9 steel containing 1 appm helium. The microcracking was attributed to helium bubble growth at grain boundaries under the influence of high stresses and temperatures that were present during welding. Mechanical test results showed that both yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) decreased with increasing temperature, while the total elongation increased with increasing temperature for all control and helium-bearing HT-9 steels

  18. Helium-Charged La-Ni-Al Thin Films Deposited by Magnetron Sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Liqun; Chen Deming; Xu Shilin; Liu Chaozhu; Hao Wanli; Zhou Zhuyin

    2005-01-01

    An advanced implantation of low energy helium-4 atoms during the La-Ni-Al film growth by adopting magnetron sputtering with Ar/He mixture gases is discussed. Both proton backscattering spectroscopy (PBS) and elastic recoil detection (ERD) analyses were adopted to measure helium concentration of the films and distribution in the near-surface region. Helium atoms with a high concentration incorporate evenly in deposited film. The introduction of the helium with no extra irradiation damage is expected by choosing suitable deposition conditions. It was found that amorphous and crystalline LaNi 5 -type structures can be achieved when sputtered with pure Ar and Ar/He mixture gases at room temperature, respectively. Thermal desorption experiments proposes that a part of hydrogen atoms are bound to trapped helium at crystal and releases together with helium. Only a small fraction of helium is released from the helium-vacancy clusters in lower temperature range and most of helium is released from small size helium bubbles in the high temperature range

  19. Interfacial Bubble Deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Brian; Shabane, Parvis; Cypull, Olivia; Cheng, Shengfeng; Feitosa, Klebert

    Soap bubbles floating at an air-water experience deformations as a result of surface tension and hydrostatic forces. In this experiment, we investigate the nature of such deformations by taking cross-sectional images of bubbles of different volumes. The results show that as their volume increases, bubbles transition from spherical to hemispherical shape. The deformation of the interface also changes with bubble volume with the capillary rise converging to the capillary length as volume increases. The profile of the top and bottom of the bubble and the capillary rise are completely determined by the volume and pressure differences. James Madison University Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4VA Consortium, Research Corporation for Advancement of Science.

  20. Tritium Decay Helium-3 Effects in Tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Merrill, B. J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-06-01

    retention in helium-3 bubble. This paper reports the initial experimental observation of tritium-decay helium-3 in tungsten exposed to deuterium/tritium plasma along with electron microscope analysis and also discusses a Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) analysis of tritium-decay helium-3 effects on tritium retention in tungsten for DEMO and future fusion reactor. [1] Y. Hatano, et.al., Nucl. Fusion 53 (2013) 073006 [2] M. Shimada, et.al., Nucl. Fusion 55 (2015) 013008 [3] M. Sawan, Fus. Sci. Technol. 66 (2014) 272 [4] T. Otsuka, Fus. Sci. Technol. 60 (2011) 1539 This work was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under the DOE Idaho Field Office contract number DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  1. Radiation-pressure-driven dust waves inside bursting interstellar bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ochsendorf, B.B.; Verdolini, S.; Cox, N.L.J.; Berné, O.; Kaper, L.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Massive stars drive the evolution of the interstellar medium through their radiative and mechanical energy input. After their birth, they form "bubbles" of hot gas surrounded by a dense shell. Traditionally, the formation of bubbles is explained through the input of a powerful stellar wind, even

  2. Vacancy effects on the formation of helium and krypton cavities in 3-C-SiC irradiated and annealed at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zang, Hang; Liu, Wenbo; Li, Tao; He, Chaohui; Yun, Di; Jiang, Weilin; Devaraj, Arun; Edwards, Danny J.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Zhiguang

    2017-02-27

    Polycrystalline 3C-SiC was sequentially irradiated at 400 and 750°C with 120 keV He2+ and 4 MeV Kr15+ ions to 1017 and 41016 cm-2, respectively. The Kr15+ ions penetrated the entire depth of the He2+ ion implantation region. Three areas of He2+, Kr15+ and He2+ + Kr15+ ion implanted 3C-SiC were created through masked overlapping irradiations. The sample was subsequently annealed at 1600°C in vacuum and characterized using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Compared to the He2+ ion only implanted 3C-SiC, helium cavities in the He2+ and Kr15+ co-implanted 3C-SiC had a smaller size but higher density. At 25 dpa, presence of He in the co-implanted 3C-SiC significantly promoted cavity growth; much smaller voids were formed in the Kr15+ ion only irradiated 3C-SiC at the same dose. In addition, local Kr migration and trapping at cavities occurred, but long-range Kr diffusion in 3C-SiC was not observed up to 1600°C.

  3. The influence of bubbles on the perception carbonation bite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Wise

    Full Text Available Although many people naively assume that the bite of carbonation is due to tactile stimulation of the oral cavity by bubbles, it has become increasingly clear that carbonation bite comes mainly from formation of carbonic acid in the oral mucosa. In Experiment 1, we asked whether bubbles were in fact required to perceive carbonation bite. Subjects rated oral pungency from several concentrations of carbonated water both at normal atmospheric pressure (at which bubbles could form and at 2.0 atmospheres pressure (at which bubbles did not form. Ratings of carbonation bite under the two pressure conditions were essentially identical, indicating that bubbles are not required for pungency. In Experiment 2, we created controlled streams of air bubbles around the tongue in mildly pungent CO2 solutions to determine how tactile stimulation from bubbles affects carbonation bite. Since innocuous sensations like light touch and cooling often suppress pain, we predicted that bubbles might reduce rated bite. Contrary to prediction, air bubbles flowing around the tongue significantly enhanced rated bite, without inducing perceived bite in blank (un-carbonated solutions. Accordingly, though bubbles are clearly not required for carbonation bite, they may well modulate perceived bite. More generally, the results show that innocuous tactile stimulation can enhance chemogenic pain. Possible physiological mechanisms are discussed.

  4. Effects of mixing methods on phase distribution in vertical bubble flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monji, Hideaki; Matsui, Goichi; Sugiyama, Takayuki.

    1992-01-01

    The mechanism of the phase distribution formation in a bubble flow is one of the most important problems in the control of two-phase flow systems. The effect of mixing methods on the phase distribution was experimentally investigated by using upward nitrogen gas-water bubble flow under the condition of fixed flow rates. The experimental results show that the diameter of the gas injection hole influences the phase distribution through the bubble size. The location of the injection hole and the direction of injection do not influence the phase distribution of fully developed bubble flow. The transitive equivalent bubble size from the coring bubble flow to the sliding bubble flow corresponds to the bubble shape transition. The analytical results show that the phase distribution may be predictable if the phase profile is judged from the bubble size. (author)

  5. Theory calculation of combination of 'embryo' bubble growing-up visible bubble in bubble chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Zipiao; Sheng Xiangdong; Dai Changjiang

    2004-01-01

    By aid of island combination theory of 'embryo' bubble, it is resolved well the question which 'embryo' bubble grows up a visible bubble in the bubble chamber. Through theory calculation it is shown that radius of the big' embryo' bubble combinated not only relates with work matter such as surface tension coefficient, saturation vapour pressure and boiling point of liquid, but also does absorbing quantity of heat and the numbers of 'embryo' bubbles combination. It is explained reasonably that the radius of bubbles in bubble chamber is different for the same energies of neutrons and proton. The track of neutron in bubble chamber is long and thin, and the track of proton in bubble chamber is wide and short. It is also explained reasonably that the bubble radius of the incident particles with more charges which there are the same energies will be wider than that of the incident particles with less charges in the track. (author)

  6. Bubbles and breaking waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, S. A.

    1980-01-01

    The physical processes which control the transfer of gases between the atmosphere and oceans or lakes are poorly understood. Clouds of micro-bubbles have been detected below the surface of Loch Ness when the wind is strong enough to cause the waves to break. The rate of transfer of gas into solution from these bubbles is estimated to be significant if repeated on a global scale. We present here further evidence that the bubbles are caused by breaking waves, and discuss the relationship between the mean frequency of wave breaking at a fixed point and the average distance between breaking waves, as might be estimated from an aerial photograph.

  7. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Brent J.; Coomes, Edmund P.

    1988-12-06

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  8. ERDA, RBS, TEM and SEM characterization of microstructural evolution in helium-implanted Hastelloy N alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Jie [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); School of Physical Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Bao, Liangman [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Huang, Hefei, E-mail: huanghefei@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Li, Yan, E-mail: liyan@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Lei, Qiantao [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Deng, Qi [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Liu, Zhe; Yang, Guo [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); School of Physical Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Shi, Liqun [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Hastelloy N alloy was implanted with 30 keV, 5 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} helium ions at room temperature, and subsequent annealed at 600 °C for 1 h and further annealed at 850 °C for 5 h in vacuum. Using elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the depth profiles of helium concentration and helium bubbles in helium-implanted Hastelloy N alloy were investigated, respectively. The diffusion of helium and molybdenum elements to surface occurred during the vacuum annealing at 850 °C (5 h). It was also observed that bubbles in molybdenum-enriched region were much larger in size than those in deeper region. In addition, it is worth noting that plenty of nano-holes can be observed on the surface of helium-implanted sample after high temperature annealing by scanning electron microscope (SEM). This observation provides the evidence for the occurrence of helium release, which can be also inferred from the results of ERDA and TEM analysis.

  9. Impact of helium implantation and ion-induced damage on reflectivity of molybdenum mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Carrasco, A., E-mail: alvarogc@kth.se [Department of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 31, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Petersson, P.; Hallén, A. [Department of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 31, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Grzonka, J. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, 133 Wolczynska Str., 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Gilbert, M.R. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Fortuna-Zalesna, E. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Rubel, M. [Department of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 31, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-09-01

    Molybdenum mirrors were irradiated with Mo and He ions to simulate the effect of neutron irradiation on diagnostic first mirrors in next-generation fusion devices. Up to 30 dpa were produced under molybdenum irradiation leading to a slight decrease of reflectivity in the near infrared range. After 3 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} of helium irradiation, reflectivity decreased by up to 20%. Combined irradiation by helium and molybdenum led to similar effects on reflectivity as irradiation with helium alone. Ion beam analysis showed that only 7% of the implanted helium was retained in the first 40 nm layer of the mirror. The structure of the near-surface layer after irradiation was studied with scanning transmission electron microscopy and the extent and size distribution of helium bubbles was documented. The consequences of ion-induced damage on the performance of diagnostic components are discussed.

  10. Competitive Deprotonation and Superoxide [O₂⁻•)] Radical-Anion Adduct Formation Reactions of Carboxamides under Negative-Ion Atmospheric-Pressure Helium-Plasma Ionization (HePI) Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Isra; Pinto, Spencer; Weisbecker, Carl; Attygalle, Athula B

    2016-03-01

    Carboxamides bearing an N-H functionality are known to undergo deprotonation under negative-ion-generating mass spectrometric conditions. Herein, we report that N-H bearing carboxamides with acidities lower than that of the hydroperoxyl radical (HO-O(•)) preferentially form superoxide radical-anion (O2(-•)) adducts, rather than deprotonate, when they are exposed to the glow discharge of a helium-plasma ionization source. For example, the spectra of N-alkylacetamides show peaks for superoxide radical-anion (O2(-•)) adducts. Conversely, more acidic amides, such as N-alkyltrifluoroacetamides, preferentially undergo deprotonation under similar experimental conditions. Upon collisional activation, the O2(-•) adducts of N-alkylacetamides either lose the neutral amide or the hydroperoxyl radical (HO-O(•)) to generate the superoxide radical-anion (m/z 32) or the deprotonated amide [m/z (M - H)(-)], respectively. For somewhat acidic carboxamides, the association between the two entities is weak. Thus, upon mildest collisional activation, the adduct dissociates to eject the superoxide anion. Superoxide-adduct formation results are useful for structure determination purposes because carboxamides devoid of a N-H functionality undergo neither deprotonation nor adduct formation under HePI conditions.

  11. Bubble Collision in Curved Spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Dong-il; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; Yeom, Dong-han

    2014-01-01

    We study vacuum bubble collisions in curved spacetime, in which vacuum bubbles were nucleated in the initial metastable vacuum state by quantum tunneling. The bubbles materialize randomly at different times and then start to grow. It is known that the percolation by true vacuum bubbles is not possible due to the exponential expansion of the space among the bubbles. In this paper, we consider two bubbles of the same size with a preferred axis and assume that two bubbles form very near each other to collide. The two bubbles have the same field value. When the bubbles collide, the collided region oscillates back-and-forth and then the collided region eventually decays and disappears. We discuss radiation and gravitational wave resulting from the collision of two bubbles

  12. Gas bubble coalescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganeev, G.Z.; Turkebaev, T.Eh.; Kadyrov, Kh.G.

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of gaseous pores coalescence in area of the straggling of helium atoms is given. The considered coalescence is based on both the Brownian movement and the migration within the stress gradient. (author)

  13. Chemistry in Soap Bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Albert W. M.; Wong, A.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, H. Y.; Zhou, Ning-Huai

    2002-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment in which common chemical gases are trapped inside soap bubbles. Examines the physical and chemical properties of the gases such as relative density and combustion. (Author/MM)

  14. Bubble chamber: antiproton annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    These images show real particle tracks from the annihilation of an antiproton in the 80 cm Saclay liquid hydrogen bubble chamber. A negative kaon and a neutral kaon are produced in this process, as well as a positive pion. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  15. Microstructural evolution adjacent to grain boundaries under cascade damage conditions and helium production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinkaus, H.; Singh, B.N.; Victoria, M.

    1996-01-01

    the cascade damage is accompanied by a high helium production rate. It is shown that, in this case, the width of the peak zone is controlled by the (mostly invisible) bubble structure rather than by the (visible) void structure. The reduced swelling relative to that under neutron irradiation is attributed...

  16. Magnetic-bubble devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairholme, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    Magnetic bubbles were first described only ten years ago when research workers were discussing orthoferrites containing μm diameter bubbles. However, problems of material fabrication limit crystals to a few mm across which severely curtailed device development. Since then materials have changed and rare-earth-iron garnet films can be grown up 3 inches in diameter with bubble diameters down to sizes below 1 μm. The first commercial products have device capacities in the range 64 000 to 100 000 bits with bubble diameters between 4 and 6 μm. Chip capacities of 1 Mbit are presently under development in the laboratory, as are new techniques to use submicrometre bubbles. The operation and fabrication of a bubble device is described using the serial loop devices currently being manufactured at Plessey as models. Chip organization is one important variable which directly affects the access time. A range of access times and capacities is available which offers a wide range of market opportunities, ranging from consumer products to fixed head disc replacements. some of the application areas are described. (author)

  17. Bubble transport in bifurcations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Joseph; Qamar, Adnan

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment, we examine the transport of bubbles entrained in liquid. In gas embolotherapy, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that originate from acoustic vaporization of vascular droplets. In the case of non-functionalized droplets with the objective of vessel occlusion, the bubbles are transported by flow through vessel bifurcations, where they may split prior to eventually reach vessels small enough that they become lodged. This splitting behavior affects the distribution of bubbles and the efficacy of flow occlusion and the treatment. In these studies, we investigated bubble transport in bifurcations using computational and theoretical modeling. The model reproduces the variety of experimentally observed splitting behaviors. Splitting homogeneity and maximum shear stress along the vessel walls is predicted over a variety of physical parameters. Maximum shear stresses were found to decrease with increasing Reynolds number. The initial bubble length was found to affect the splitting behavior in the presence of gravitational asymmetry. This work was supported by NIH Grant R01EB006476.

  18. Does an electron form a bubble in liquid neon?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storchak, V.G.; Brewer, J.H.; Morris, G.D.

    1997-01-01

    Muon spin relaxation measurements in liquid neon in electric fields up to 35 kV/cm reveal the existence of a delocalized electron state which is responsible for delayed muonium atom formation. Other fraction of radiolysis electrons created in the positive muon's ionization track is believed to be localized inside bubbles and therefore possesses low mobility. Bubble formation in liquid neon is discussed in detail

  19. Pinch-off Scaling Law of Soap Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, John; Ryu, Sangjin

    2014-11-01

    Three common interfacial phenomena that occur daily are liquid drops in gas, gas bubbles in liquid and thin-film bubbles. One aspect that has been studied for these phenomena is the formation or pinch-off of the drop/bubble from the liquid/gas threads. In contrast to the formation of liquid drops in gas and gas bubbles in liquid, thin-film bubble pinch-off has not been well documented. Having thin-film interfaces may alter the pinch-off process due to the limiting factor of the film thickness. We observed the pinch-off of one common thin-film bubble, soap bubbles, in order to characterize its pinch-off behavior. We achieved this by constructing an experimental model replicating the process of a human producing soap bubbles. Using high-speed videography and image processing, we determined that the minimal neck radius scaled with the time left till pinch-off, and that the scaling law exponent was 2/3, similar to that of liquid drops in gas.

  20. Dripping Faucet and Bubbling Faucet: An Analogy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, Marek

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 10 (2009), s. 1366-1370 ISSN 0263-8762 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/07/1110; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200720801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : bubble formation * drop formation * oscillations Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.223, year: 2009

  1. Dynamics of bubble-bubble interaction in sheared low-viscosity magma imaged by X-ray computed micro-tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helo, C.; Flaws, A.; Hess, K.-U.; Franz, A.; Clague, D. A.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2012-04-01

    X-ray computed tomography of vesicles in basaltic pyroclastic glass fragments has been used to investigate the syn-eruptive shear environment and resulting bubble-bubble interaction during mild pyroclastic eruptions in a mid-ocean ridge environment. We have imaged vesicles present in two different types of pyroclastic fragments produced by mildly explosive activity on Axial Seamount, limu o Pele, that is, thin glass films often described as bubble walls, and tube scoria fragments. Rapid quenching of the glass has prevented extensive bubble relaxation preserving the syn-eruptive geometry of the bubbles in these fragments. Isolated, ellipsoid-shaped vesicles in low-vesicular limu o Pele indicate deformation in a simple shear environment. Under these shear conditions higher vesiculated parts of the erupting magma show strong bubble-bubble interactions partially leading to coalscence and formation of tubular vesicles. These tubular vesicles can reach significant lengths, exceeding the dimensions of the small glass fragments (2 mm). Their unreformed radius can be more then one order of magnitude larger than that of the isolated vesicles in the limu o Pele fragments. We can distinguish two principle modes of interaction based on the relative orientation of the bubbles. Interaction along the sidewalls of two bubbles, and tip-to-tip interaction. At interdistances of less than a few tens of micrometre, interaction of the sidewalls results in deformation of the bubbles to more irregular shapes, with depressions caused by close, small bubbles or in some cases bubbles being partially mantled around tubular bubbles. This often leads to a more close packing of bubbles. At distances of less than a few microns, the melt films between the bubbles destabilize leading to coalescence. This mechanism appears to involve a bulging of the larger bubble into the smaller, followed by melt film rapture and coalescence. The complete digestion of one bubble by the other is the slow rate

  2. Rational speculative bubbles: A critical view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radonjić Ognjen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the theory of rational bubbles, the bubble is present whenever asset prices progressively diverge from their fundamental value, which occurs because agents expect that asset prices will continue to grow exponentially (self-fulfilling prophecies far in the future and consistently, which promises the realization of ever larger capital gains. In our opinion, the basic shortcoming of this theory refers to the assumption that all market agents are perfectly informed and rational and, accordingly, form homogeneous expectations. The model does not explain decision-making processes or expectation formation, nor does it detect potential psychological and institutional factors that might significantly influence decision making processes and market participants’ reactions to news. Since assumptions of the model critically determine its validity, we conclude that comprehensiveness of the rational bubble model is, to put it mildly, limited.

  3. Effects of low energy helium plasma irradiation on potassium doped tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Xiaoyan [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Key Subject Laboratory of National Defense for Radioactive Waste and Environmental Security, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang (China); Huang, Bo [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Liu, Dongping; Fan, Hongyu [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian (China); Liu, Ning [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Tang, Jun, E-mail: tangjun@scu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2017-04-15

    Effects of helium plasma irradiation on spark plasma sintering (SPS) W-K, pure W and traditionally sintered commercial W-K have been studied, concerning the density, grain size and potassium content as the influence factors. Pinholes are formed under 120 eV He ions at 600 °C and 1 × 10{sup 23} m{sup −2} fluence on the surface of all samples. It is found that SPS-sintered W-K shows the best irradiation resistance among the present samples, and SPS-sintered pure W exhibits higher irradiation tolerance than commercial W-K. Different He-plasma tolerance was observed among the SPS-sintered W-K samples due to varied potassium content and grain size. In addition, the microstructure evolution under helium irradiation, the growth-migration of helium bubbles and their interactions of potassium bubbles have also been discussed.

  4. Multiphysics model of thermomechanical and helium-induced damage of tungsten during plasma heat transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, Tamer, E-mail: tcrosby@ucla.edu; Ghoniem, Nasr M., E-mail: ghoniem@ucla.edu

    2013-11-15

    A combination of transient heating and bombardment by helium and hydrogen atoms has been experimentally proven to lead to severe surface and sub-surface damage. We developed a computational model to determine the relationship between the thermomechanical loading conditions and the onset of damage and failure of tungsten surfaces. The model is based on a thermoelasticity fracture damage approach that was developed using the phase field method. The model simulates the distribution of helium bubbles inside the grains and on grain boundaries using space-dependent rate theory. In addition, the model is coupled with a transient heat conduction analysis for temperature distributions inside the material. The results show the effects of helium bubbles on reducing tungsten surface energy. Further, a temperature gradient in the material equals to 10 K/μm, resulted in deep cracks propagating from the tungsten surface.

  5. Drop impact entrapment of bubble rings

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, M.-J.

    2013-04-29

    We use ultra-high-speed video imaging to look at the initial contact of a drop impacting on a liquid layer. We observe experimentally the vortex street and the bubble-ring entrapments predicted numerically, for high impact velocities, by Thoraval et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 108, 2012, article 264506). These dynamics mainly occur within 50 -s after the first contact, requiring imaging at 1 million f.p.s. For a water drop impacting on a thin layer of water, the entrapment of isolated bubbles starts through azimuthal instability, which forms at low impact velocities, in the neck connecting the drop and pool. For Reynolds number Re above -12 000, up to 10 partial bubble rings have been observed at the base of the ejecta, starting when the contact is -20% of the drop size. More regular bubble rings are observed for a pool of ethanol or methanol. The video imaging shows rotation around some of these air cylinders, which can temporarily delay their breakup into micro-bubbles. The different refractive index in the pool liquid reveals the destabilization of the vortices and the formation of streamwise vortices and intricate vortex tangles. Fine-scale axisymmetry is thereby destroyed. We show also that the shape of the drop has a strong influence on these dynamics. 2013 Cambridge University Press.

  6. The adsorption of helium atoms on coronene cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurzthaler, Thomas; Rasul, Bilal; Kuhn, Martin; Scheier, Paul, E-mail: Paul.Scheier@uibk.ac.at, E-mail: andrew.ellis@le.ac.uk [Institut für Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Universität Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Lindinger, Albrecht [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Ellis, Andrew M., E-mail: Paul.Scheier@uibk.ac.at, E-mail: andrew.ellis@le.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-14

    We report the first experimental study of the attachment of multiple foreign atoms to a cationic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). The chosen PAH was coronene, C{sub 24}H{sub 12}, which was added to liquid helium nanodroplets and then subjected to electron bombardment. Using mass spectrometry, coronene cations decorated with helium atoms were clearly seen and the spectrum shows peaks with anomalously high intensities (“magic number” peaks), which represent ion-helium complexes with added stability. The data suggest the formation of a rigid helium layer consisting of 38 helium atoms that completely cover both faces of the coronene ion. Additional magic numbers can be seen for the further addition of 3 and 6 helium atoms, which are thought to attach to the edge of the coronene. The observation of magic numbers for the addition of 38 and 44 helium atoms is in good agreement with a recent path integral Monte Carlo prediction for helium atoms on neutral coronene. An understanding of how atoms and molecules attach to PAH ions is important for a number of reasons including the potential role such complexes might play in the chemistry of the interstellar medium.

  7. Helium refrigerator for 'SULTAN'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arpagaus, M.; Erlach, H.; Quack, H.

    1984-01-01

    The authors describe the helium refrigerator designed for the SULTAN test facility. SULTAN (Supraleiter-Testanlage) is intended to serve for the developments and testing of high field superconducting magnets. These magnets are needed mainly for future applications in nuclear fusion. (Auth.)

  8. Cosmological helium production simplified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, J.; Brown, L.S.; Feinberg, G.

    1988-01-01

    We present a simplified model of helium synthesis in the early universe. The purpose of the model is to explain clearly the physical ideas relevant to the cosmological helium synthesis, in a manner that does not overlay these ideas with complex computer calculations. The model closely follows the standard calculation, except that it neglects the small effect of Fermi-Dirac statistics for the leptons. We also neglect the temperature difference between photons and neutrinos during the period in which neutrons and protons interconvert. These approximations allow us to express the neutron-proton conversion rates in a closed form, which agrees to 10% accuracy or better with the exact rates. Using these analytic expressions for the rates, we reduce the calculation of the neutron-proton ratio as a function of temperature to a simple numerical integral. We also estimate the effect of neutron decay on the helium abundance. Our result for this quantity agrees well with precise computer calculations. We use our semi-analytic formulas to determine how the predicted helium abundance varies with such parameters as the neutron life-time, the baryon to photon ratio, the number of neutrino species, and a possible electron-neutrino chemical potential. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  9. Bubble behavior and breakdown characteristics in LHe under simulating quench condition of S.C. magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z.; Yoshizuka, H.; Takano, K.; Hara, M. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1996-09-20

    In large superconducting magneto, liquid helium is usually used both as coolant and electrical insulator. An abnormal high voltage and thermal bubbles often appear simultaneously during the quenching period. Such an incident is thought serious from a point of view of electrical insulation. In this work, thermal bubble behavior affected by the electrostatic forces in liquid helium and electrical breakdown mechanism of liquid helium are studied under the simulating quench condition of S.C magnet. The results show that (1) the electrostatic forces produced by nonuniform electric field are useful for reducing the effect of thermal bubbles on electrical breakdown in almost all cases, although the bubble aggregation occurs in the region where the gradient force is counterbalancing with the buoyancy and (2) the fins on the surface of superconducting wires are helpful to prevent the bubbles from being released into strong field region if the groove between fins is formed along the field decreasing direction on the wire surface. 11 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Colliding with a crunching bubble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freivogel, Ben; Freivogel, Ben; Horowitz, Gary T.; Shenker, Stephen

    2007-03-26

    In the context of eternal inflation we discuss the fate of Lambda = 0 bubbles when they collide with Lambda< 0 crunching bubbles. When the Lambda = 0 bubble is supersymmetric, it is not completely destroyed by collisions. If the domain wall separating the bubbles has higher tension than the BPS bound, it is expelled from the Lambda = 0 bubble and does not alter its long time behavior. If the domain wall saturates the BPS bound, then it stays inside the Lambda = 0 bubble and removes a finite fraction of future infinity. In this case, the crunch singularity is hidden behind the horizon of a stable hyperbolic black hole.

  11. Hydrogen extraction from liquid lithium-lead alloy by bubbling with rotational jet nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Bo; Yang Tongzai; Guan Rui; Weng Kuiping

    2010-01-01

    The technology of tritium extraction from lithium-lead alloy has been simulated, hydrogen extraction from lithium-lead alloy by bubbling with rotational jet nozzle being used to simulate tritium in the study based on the introduction of fluid dynamics to establish algebraic model. The results show that the higher than lithium-lead melting temperature, the higher cumulative hydrogen extraction efficiency, and gas holdup of bubble column is little affected by the impeller diameter. Gas holdup when using small aperture is slightly higher when using large aperture only at a high helium flow rate, but the smaller the aperture, the greater the bubble surface area, and a marked increase in intensity of flow circulation for liquid lithium-lead with the increase of helium flow rate, hydrogen extraction rate increases too. Moreover, influence of the jet rotational velocity on hydrogen extraction is limited. (authors)

  12. Dynamics of bubble generated by low energy pulsed electric discharge in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinchuk, M E; Kolikov, V A; Rutberg, Ph G; Leks, A G; Dolinovskaya, R V; Snetov, V N; Stogov, A Yu

    2012-01-01

    Results of investigations of bubble formation and dynamics for discharge in water are presented. Experiments were carried out in discharge chamber with axisymmetric electrode system “wire to wire”. Interelectrode gap was varied from 1 to 10 mm. Energy in a pulse was <1 J. Velocity of bubble expantion and collapse is about several hundreds meter per second at early stage of discharge. Bubble pulsation period is 0.5 – 1 ms. Increasing of energy released in the discharge gap will increase bubble pulsation period. Little bubble was formed by reducing energy input into discharge. But the main stage of discharge always followed by bubble formation. Specific erosion is measured for different energy in pulse and matched up with bubble collapse.

  13. FP plate-out and compound formation analysis in hot helium coolant of 600 MWt GTHTR300 system by FP concentration difference diffusion and aerosol-condensation mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Shintaro

    2004-01-01

    To estimate FP deposition rate on the typical turbomachinary, including gas turbine of GTHTR300 and exposure dose limit at its maintenance, FP plate-out analysis was been carried out using FP compound formation theory and FP concentration controlled diffusion mechanism. As the results, following conclusions were derived; (1) It is found that the analysis data computed by the VICTORIA code with assumption of the correct thickness of reactive zone exhibits very good correlation with the experimental data obtained by simulated FP plate-out experiment. (2) 137 Cs, 110m Ag and 137 Cs (131+133) I compound are major fission products deposited on the surface of turbomachinery. (3) Deposition rates of major FPs on the surface of gas turbine blade and disk are (131+133) I> 137 Cs> 110m Ag. (4) Total dose rate and allowable work time at turbine of GTHTR300 are given as 19.2 mSv/h and 2.6 h by VICTORIA code analysis and these values are conservative than that given by simple code analysis. (author)

  14. Characterization of nano-bubbles as an oxygen carrier for in-situ bioremediation of organic pollutants in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIM, E.; Jung, J.; Kang, S.; Choi, Y.

    2016-12-01

    In-situ bioremediation using bubbles as an oxygen carrier has shown its applicability for aerobic biodegradation of organic pollutants in the subsurface. By recent progresses, generation of nano-sized bubbles is possible, which have enhanced oxygen transfer efficiencies due to their high interfacial area and stability. We are developing an in-situ bioremediation technique using nano-bubbles as an oxygen carrier. In this study, nano-bubbles were characterized for their size and oxygen supply capacity. Nano-bubbles were generated with pure oxygen and pure helium gas. The stable nano-bubbles suspended in water were sonicated to induce the bubbles to coalesce, making them to rise and be released out of the water. By removing the bubbles, the water volume was decreased by 0.006%. The gas released from the bubble suspension was collected to measure the amount of gas in the nano-bubbles. For sparingly soluble helium gas 17.9 mL/L was released from the bubble suspension, while for oxygen 46.2 mL/L was collected. For the oxygen nano-bubble suspension, it is likely that the release of dissolved oxygen (DO) contributed to the collected gas volume. After removing the oxygen nano-bubbles, 36.0 mg/L of DO was still present in water. Altogether, the oxygen nano-bubble suspension was estimated to have 66.2 mg/L of oxygen in a dissolved form and 25.6 mg/L as nano-bubbles. A high DO level in the water was possible because of their large Laplace pressure difference across the fluid interface. Applying Young-Laplace equation and ideal gas law, the bubble diameter was estimated to be approximately 10 nm, having an internal pressure of 323 atm. Considering the saturation DO of 8.26 mg/L for water in equilibrium with the atmosphere, the total oxygen content of 91.8 mg/L in the nano-bubble suspension suggests its great potential as an oxygen carrier. Studies are underway to verify the enhanced aerobic biodegradation of organic pollutants in soils by injecting nano-bubble suspensions.

  15. Guest investigator program study: Physics of equatorial plasma bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, Roland T.

    1994-01-01

    Plasma bubbles are large-scale (10 to 100 km) depletions in plasma density found in the night-time equatorial ionosphere. Their formation has been found to entail the upward transport of plasma over hundreds of kilometers in altitude, suggesting that bubbles play significant roles in the physics of many of the diverse and unique features found in the low-latitude ionosphere. In the simplest scenario, plasma bubbles appear first as perturbations in the bottomside F layer, which is linearly unstable to the gravitationally driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Once initiated, bubbles develop upward through the peak of the F layer into its topside (sometimes to altitudes in excess of 1000 km), a behavior predicted by the nonlinear form of the same instability. While good general agreement has been found between theory and observations, little is known about the detailed physics associated with plasma bubbles. Our research activity centered around two topics: the shape of plasma bubbles and associated electric fields, and the day-to-day variability in the occurrence of plasma bubbles. The first topic was pursued because of a divergence in view regarding the nonlinear physics associated with plasma bubble development. While the development of perturbations in isodensity contours in the bottomside F layer into plasma bubbles is well accepted, some believed bubbles to be cylinder-like closed regions of depleted plasma density that floated upward leaving a turbulent wake behind them (e.g., Woodman and LaHoz, 1976; Ott, 1978; Kelley and Ott, 1978). Our results, summarized in a paper submitted to the Journal of Geophysical Research, consisted of incoherent scatter radar measurements that showed unambiguously that the depleted region is wedgelike and not cylinderlike, and a case study and modeling of SM-D electric field instrument (EFI) measurements that showed that the absence of electric-field perturbations outside the plasma-depleted region is a distinct signature of wedge

  16. Atmospheric helium and geomagnetic field reversals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, W. R.; Kern, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of the earth's helium budget is examined in the light of recent work on the interaction of the solar wind with nonmagnetic planets. It is proposed that the dominant mode of helium (He4) loss is ion pumping by the solar wind during geomagnetic field reversals, when the earth's magnetic field is very small. The interaction of the solar wind with the earth's upper atmosphere during such a period is found to involve the formation of a bow shock. The penetration altitude of the shock-heated solar plasma is calculated to be about 700 km, and ionization rates above this level are estimated for a cascade ionization (electron avalanche) process to average 10 to the 9th power ions/sq cm/sec. The calculated ionization rates and the capacity of the solar wind to remove ionized helium (He4) from the upper atmosphere during geomagnetic dipole reversals are sufficient to yield a secular equilibrium over geologic time scales. The upward transport of helium from the lower atmosphere under these conditions is found to be adequate to sustain the proposed loss rate.

  17. {sup 3}He bubble evolution in ErT{sub 2}: A survey of experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, C.S., E-mail: cssnow@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Browning, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Bond, G.M. [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Rodriguez, M.A.; Knapp, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    For the past several years we have been carrying out a long term experimental study of {sup 3}He in ErT{sub 2} (erbium di-tritide). This study has attempted to answer questions regarding the evolution of helium bubbles in ErT{sub 2-x}He{sub x}. ErT{sub 2} samples have been studied periodically over four years using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and Nano-Indentation (NI). In ErT{sub 2-x}He{sub x}, helium bubbles are plate-like and grow along {1 1 1} planes. The bubbles grow in three distinct phases. First, they nucleate and grow as “Griffith-cracks” until an age of ∼0.15 He:M. Second, around 0.15 He:M the diameter stops increasing and instead the bubbles grow in thickness by punching dislocation dipoles. Third, the bubbles grow in size until ∼0.3 He:M at which point the bubbles begin to link.

  18. Fractality and growth of He bubbles in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajita, Shin; Ito, Atsushi M.; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2017-08-01

    Pinholes are formed on surfaces of metals by the exposure to helium plasmas, and they are regarded as the initial process of the growth of fuzzy nanostructures. In this study, number density of the pinholes is investigated in detail from the scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs of tungsten and tantalum exposed to the helium plasmas. A power law relation was identified between the number density and the size of pinholes. From the slope and the region where the power law was satisfied, the fractal dimension D and smin, which characterize the SEM images, are deduced. Parametric dependences and material dependence of D and smin are revealed. To explain the fractality, simple Monte-Carlo simulations including random walks of He atoms and absorption on bubble was introduced. It is shown that the initial position of the random walk is one of the key factors to deduce the fractality. The results indicated that new nucleations of bubbles are necessary to reproduce the number-density distribution of bubbles.

  19. High temperature tensile properties of 316 stainless steel implanted with helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Yamamoto, Norikazu; Shiraishi, Haruki

    1993-01-01

    Helium embrittlement is one of the problems in structural materials for fusion reactors. Recently, martensitic steels have been developed which have a good resistance to high-temperature helium embrittlement, but the mechanism has not yet been clarified. In this paper, tensile behaviors of helium implanted austenitic stainless steels, which are sensitive to the helium embrittlement, were studied and compared with those of martensitic steels under the same experimental conditions, and the effect of microstructure on helium embrittlement was discussed. Helium was implanted by 300 appm at 573-623 K to miniature tensile speciments of 316 austenitic steels using a cyclotron accelerator. Solution annealed (316SA) and 20% cold worked (316CW) specimens were used. Post-implantation tensile tests were carried out at 573, 873 and 973 K. Yield stress at 573 K increased with the helium implantation in 316SA and 316CW, but the yield stress changes of 316SA at 873 and 973 K were different from that of 316CW. Black-dots were observed in the as-implanted specimen and bubbles were observed in the speciments tensile-tested at 873 and 973 K. Intergranular fracture was observed at only 973 K in both of the 316SA and 316CW specimens. Therefore, cold work did not suppress the high-temperature helium embrittlement under this experimental condition. The difference in the influence of helium on type 316 steel and 9Cr martensitic steels were discussed. Test temperature change of reduction in are showed clearly that helium embrittlement did not occur in 9Cr martensitic steels but occurred in 316 austenitic steels. Fine microstructures of 9Cr martensitic steels should suppress helium embrittlement at high temperatures. (author)

  20. Effects of helium on ductile brittle transition behavior of reduced activation ferritic steels after high concentration he implantation at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, A.; Ejiri, M.; Nogami, S.; Ishiga, M.; Abe, K. [Tohoku Univ., Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engr, Sendai (Japan); Kasada, R.; Kimura, A. [Kyoto Univ., Institute of Advanced Energy (Japan); Jitsukawa, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Influence of Helium (He) on fracture behavior of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels including Oxide Dispersion Strengthening (ODS) steels and F82H were examined. To study the He effects on fracture behavior of these steels after He bubble formation conditions, higher concentration of He implantation at around 550 C were performed and examined the relationship between microstructure evolution and fracture behavior of the steels. The 1.5CVN mini size Charpy specimens were used to evaluate impact test behavior. Reduced activation ferritic ODS steels, 9Cr-ODS and 12Cr-ODS steels were examine. F82H was also examined as reference material. Helium implantation was performed by a cyclotron of Tohoku University with a beam of 50 MeV {alpha}-particles at temperature around 550 C. A tandem-type energy degrader system was used to implant He into the specimen from the irradiated surface to the range of 50 MeV {alpha}-particles, that was about 380 {mu}m in iron. Implanted He concentration were about 1000 appm. Charpy impact test was performed using a instrumented impact test apparatus in Oarai branch of IMR, Tohoku University. Analyses of absorbed energy change and fracture surface were carried out. Vickers hardness test was also carried out on He implanted area of the 1.5CVN specimen to estimate irradiation hardening. Microstructural observation was performed by TEM. In the case of F82H, DBTT increased by the 1000 appm He implantation condition was about 80 C and grain boundary fracture surface was only observed in the He implanted area of all the ruptured specimens in brittle manner. On the other hand, DBTT shift and fracture mode change of He implanted 9Cr-ODS steel was not observed after He implantation. Microstructural observation showed that He bubble formation on the lath boundaries and grain boundaries were significant in F82H, but the bubble segregation on grain boundary in ODS steel was not apparent. The bubble formation

  1. Neutral helium beam probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Rezwanul

    1999-10-01

    This article discusses the development of a code where diagnostic neutral helium beam can be used as a probe. The code solves numerically the evolution of the population densities of helium atoms at their several different energy levels as the beam propagates through the plasma. The collisional radiative model has been utilized in this numerical calculation. The spatial dependence of the metastable states of neutral helium atom, as obtained in this numerical analysis, offers a possible diagnostic tool for tokamak plasma. The spatial evolution for several hypothetical plasma conditions was tested. Simulation routines were also run with the plasma parameters (density and temperature profiles) similar to a shot in the Princeton beta experiment modified (PBX-M) tokamak and a shot in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor tokamak. A comparison between the simulation result and the experimentally obtained data (for each of these two shots) is presented. A good correlation in such comparisons for a number of such shots can establish the accurateness and usefulness of this probe. The result can possibly be extended for other plasma machines and for various plasma conditions in those machines.

  2. Antiprotonic helium atomcules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauge Sébastien

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available About 3% of antiprotons ( stopped in helium are long-lived with microsecond lifetimes, against picoseconds in all other materials. This unusual longevity has been ascribed to the trapping of on metastable bound states in He+ helium atom-molecules thus named atomcules. Apart from their unique dual structure investigated by laser spectroscopy – a near-circular quasi-classical Rydberg atom with l ~ n – 1 ~ 37 or a special diatomic molecule with a negatively charged nucleus in high rotational state with J = l – the chemical physics aspects of their interaction with other atoms or molecules constitute an interesting topic for molecular physics. While atomcules may resist to million collisions in helium, molecular contaminants such as H2 are likely to destroy them in a single one, down to very low temperatures. In the Born-Oppenheimer framework, we interpret the molecular interaction obtained by ab initio quantum chemical calculations in terms of classical reactive channels, with activation barriers accounting for the experiments carried out in He and H2. From classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations, we show that the thermalization stage strongly quenches initial populations, thus reduced to a recovered 3 % trapping fraction. This work illustrates the pertinence of chemical physics concepts to the study of exotic processes involving antimatter. New insights into the physico-chemistry of cold interstellar radicals are anticipated.

  3. Helium isotope data from the Goldfield epithermal system, Nevada: Evidence for volatile input from a primitive mantle source during ore formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstra, A. H.; Manning, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    crust. This exceptional volatile plumbing system may be an important ingredient in the formation of large, high sulfidation gold deposits. The ascent of mantle-sourced volatiles may be related to the coeval transition from transpression to transtension within the western North American plate caused by microplate capture along the San Andreas transform.

  4. Bubble fusion: Preliminary estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The collapse of a gas-filled bubble in disequilibrium (i.e., internal pressure much-lt external pressure) can occur with a significant focusing of energy onto the entrapped gas in the form of pressure-volume work and/or acoustical shocks; the resulting heating can be sufficient to cause ionization and the emission of atomic radiations. The suggestion that extreme conditions necessary for thermonuclear fusion to occur may be possible has been examined parametrically in terms of the ratio of initial bubble pressure relative to that required for equilibrium. In this sense, the disequilibrium bubble is viewed as a three-dimensional ''sling shot'' that is ''loaded'' to an extent allowed by the maximum level of disequilibrium that can stably be achieved. Values of this disequilibrium ratio in the range 10 -5 --10 -6 are predicted by an idealized bubble-dynamics model as necessary to achieve conditions where nuclear fusion of deuterium-tritium might be observed. Harmonic and aharmonic pressurizations/decompressions are examined as means to achieve the required levels of disequilibrium required to create fusion conditions. A number of phenomena not included in the analysis reported herein could enhance or reduce the small levels of nuclear fusions predicted

  5. Critical scattering by bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler-Ferrari, N.; Nussenzveig, H.M.

    1986-11-01

    We apply the complex angular momentum theory to the problem of the critical scattering of light by spherical cavities in the high frequency limit (permittivity greater than the external media) (e.g, air bubble in water) (M.W.O.) [pt

  6. Heavy liquid bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    The CERN Heavy liquid bubble chamber being installed in the north experimental hall at the PS. On the left, the 1180 litre body; in the centre the magnet, which can produce a field of 26 800 gauss; on the right the expansion mechanism.

  7. MISSING: BUBBLE CHAMBER LENS

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Would the person who borrowed the large bubble chamber lens from the Microcosm workshops on the ISR please return it. This is a much used piece from our object archives. If anybody has any information about the whereabouts of this object, please contact Emma.Sanders@cern.ch Thank you

  8. BEBC bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1972-01-01

    Looking up into the interior of BEBC bubble chamber from the expansion cylinder. At the top of the chamber two fish-eye lenses are installed and three other fish-eye ports are blanked off. In the centre is a heat exchanger.

  9. Helium induced degradation in the weldability of an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, H.T.; Goods, S.H.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Chinl, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Autogenous gas tungsten arc welding was performed on He-doped type 316 stainless steel. Helium was uniformly implanted in the material using the ''tritium trick'' to levels of 27 and 105 appm. Severe intergranular cracking occurred in both fusion and heat-affected zones. Microstructural observations of fusion zone indicated that the pore size, degree of porosity, and tendency to form cracks increased with increasing helium concentration. Scanning electron microscopy showed that cracking in He-doped materials was due to the precipitation of helium bubbles on grain boundaries and dentrite interfaces. Results of the present study demonstrate that the use of conventional welding techniques to repair materials degraded by exposure to radiation may be difficult if the irradiation results in the generation of even rather small amounts of helium. 23 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Bubble dynamics and bubble-induced turbulence of a single-bubble chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohyoung; Park, Hyungmin

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the bubble dynamics and liquid-phase turbulence induced by a chain of bubbles injected from a single nozzle have been experimentally investigated. Using a high-speed two-phase particle image velociemtry, measurements on the bubbles and liquid-phase velocity field are conducted in a transparent tank filled with water, while varying the bubble release frequency from 0.1 to 35 Hz. The tested bubble size ranges between 2.0-3.2 mm, and the corresponding bubble Reynolds number is 590-1100, indicating that it belongs to the regime of path instability. As the release frequency increases, it is found that the global shape of bubble dispersion can be classified into two regimes: from asymmetric (regular) to axisymmetric (irregular). In particular, at higher frequency, the wake vortices of leading bubbles cause an irregular behaviour of the following bubble. For the liquid phase, it is found that a specific trend on the bubble-induced turbulence appears in a strong relation to the above bubble dynamics. Considering this, we try to provide a theoretical model to estimate the liquid-phase turbulence induced by a chain of bubbles. Supported by a Grant funded by Samsung Electronics, Korea.

  11. Bubble properties of heterogeneous bubbly flow in a square bubble column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, Wei; Deen, Niels G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The present work focuses on the measurements of bubble properties in heterogeneous bubbly flows in a square bubble column. A four-point optical fibre probe was used for this purpose. The accuracy and intrusive effect of the optical probe was investigated first. The results show that the optical

  12. Characteristics of bubble plumes, bubble-plume bubbles and waves from wind-steepened wave breaking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leifer, I.; Caulliez, G.; Leeuw, G. de

    2007-01-01

    Observations of breaking waves, associated bubble plumes and bubble-plume size distributions were used to explore the coupled evolution of wave-breaking, wave properties and bubble-plume characteristics. Experiments were made in a large, freshwater, wind-wave channel with mechanical wind-steepened

  13. Bubbles generated from wind-steepened breaking waves: 1. Bubble plume bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leifer, I.; Leeuw, G. de

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of bubble plumes from paddle-amplified, wind stress breaking waves were made in a large wind-wave channel during the LUMINY experiment in fresh (but not clean) water. Bubble plumes exhibited considerable variability with respect to dynamics, bubble size distribution, and physical

  14. Bubble Departure from Metal-Graphite Composite Surfaces and Its Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, David F.; Sankovic, John M.; Motil, Brian J.; Yang, W-J.; Zhang, Nengli

    2010-01-01

    The formation and growth processes of a bubble in the vicinity of graphite micro-fiber tips on metal-graphite composite boiling surfaces and their effects on boiling behavior are investigated. It is discovered that a large number of micro bubbles are formed first at the micro scratches and cavities on the metal matrix in pool boiling. By virtue of the non-wetting property of graphite, once the growing micro bubbles touch the graphite tips, the micro bubbles are sucked by the tips and merged into larger micro bubbles sitting on the end of the tips. The micro bubbles grow rapidly and coalesce to form macro bubbles, each spanning several tips. The necking process of a detaching macro bubble is analyzed. It is revealed that a liquid jet is produced by sudden break-off of the bubble throat. The composite surfaces not only have higher temperatures in micro- and macrolayers but also make higher frequency of the bubble departure, which increase the average heat fluxes in both the bubble growth stage and in the bubble departure period. Based on these analyses, the enhancement mechanism of pool boiling heat transfer on composite surfaces is clearly revealed.

  15. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF BUOYANT BUBBLES IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, S. M.; De Young, D. S.; Jones, T. W.

    2009-01-01

    We report results of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the dynamics of buoyant bubbles in magnetized galaxy cluster media. The simulations are three-dimensional extensions of two-dimensional calculations reported by Jones and De Young. Initially, spherical bubbles and briefly inflated spherical bubbles all with radii a few times smaller than the intracluster medium (ICM) scale height were followed as they rose through several ICM scale heights. Such bubbles quickly evolve into a toroidal form that, in the absence of magnetic influences, is stable against fragmentation in our simulations. This ring formation results from (commonly used) initial conditions that cause ICM material below the bubbles to drive upwards through the bubble, creating a vortex ring; that is, hydrostatic bubbles develop into 'smoke rings', if they are initially not very much smaller or very much larger than the ICM scale height. Even modest ICM magnetic fields with β = P gas /P mag ∼ 3 can influence the dynamics of the bubbles, provided the fields are not tangled on scales comparable to or smaller than the size of the bubbles. Quasi-uniform, horizontal fields with initial β ∼ 10 2 bifurcated our bubbles before they rose more than about a scale height of the ICM, and substantially weaker fields produced clear distortions. These behaviors resulted from stretching and amplification of ICM fields trapped in irregularities along the top surface of the young bubbles. On the other hand, tangled magnetic fields with similar, modest strengths are generally less easily amplified by the bubble motions and are thus less influential in bubble evolution. Inclusion of a comparably strong, tangled magnetic field inside the initial bubbles had little effect on our bubble evolution, since those fields were quickly diminished through expansion of the bubble and reconnection of the initial field.

  16. Surface electrons of helium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studart, N.; Hipolito, O.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of some properties of two-dimensional electrons on a liquid helium film adsorbed on a solid substrate are reviewed. We describe the spectrum of electron bound states on bulk helium as well on helium films. The correlational properties, such as the structure factor and correlation energy, are determined as functions of the film thickness for different types of substrates in the framework of a Generalized Random-Phase Approximation. The collective excitations of this system are also described. The results for electrons on the surface of thin films and bulk helium are easily obtained. we examine the electron interaction with the excitations of the liquid helium surface resulting in a new polaron state, which was observed very recently. The ground state energy and the effective mass of this polaron are determined by using the path-integral formalism and unitary-transformation method. Recent speculations about the phase diagram of electrons on the helium film are also discussed. (Author) [pt

  17. Bubble Dynamics and Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This volume of the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library is concerned with the interplay between bubble dynamics and shock waves. It is divided into four parts containing twelve chapters written by eminent scientists. Topics discussed include shock wave emission by laser generated bubbles (W Lauterborn, A Vogel), pulsating bubbles near boundaries (DM Leppinen, QX Wang, JR Blake), interaction of shock waves with bubble clouds (CD Ohl, SW Ohl), shock propagation in polydispersed bubbly liquids by model equations (K Ando, T Colonius, CE Brennen. T Yano, T Kanagawa,  M Watanabe, S Fujikawa) and by DNS (G Tryggvason, S Dabiri), shocks in cavitating flows (NA Adams, SJ Schmidt, CF Delale, GH Schnerr, S Pasinlioglu) together with applications involving encapsulated bubble dynamics in imaging (AA Doinikov, A Novell, JM Escoffre, A Bouakaz),  shock wave lithotripsy (P Zhong), sterilization of ships’ ballast water (A Abe, H Mimura) and bubbly flow model of volcano eruptions ((VK Kedrinskii, K Takayama...

  18. Effects of Bubble-Mediated Processes on Nitrous Oxide Dynamics in Denitrifying Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, P. M.; Falk, L. M.; Reid, M. C.

    2017-12-01

    To mitigate groundwater and surface water impacts of reactive nitrogen (N), agricultural and stormwater management practices can employ denitrifying bioreactors (DNBs) as low-cost solutions for enhancing N removal. Due to the variable nature of hydrologic events, DNBs experience dynamic flows which can impact physical and biological processes within the reactors and affect performance. A particular concern is incomplete denitrification, which can release the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere. This study aims to provide insight into the effects of varying hydrologic conditions upon the operation of DNBs by disentangling abiotic and biotic controls on denitrification and N2O dynamics within a laboratory-scale bioreactor. We hypothesize that under transient hydrologic flows, rising water levels lead to air entrapment and bubble formation within the DNB porous media. Mass transfer of oxygen (O2) between trapped gas and liquid phases creates aerobic microenvironments that can inhibit N2O reductase (NosZ) enzymes and lead to N2O accumulation. These bubbles also retard N2O transport and make N2O unavailable for biological reduction, further enhancing atmospheric fluxes when water levels fall. The laboratory-scale DNB permits measurements of longitudinal and vertical profiles of dissolved constituents as well as trace gas concentrations in the reactor headspace. We describe a set of experiments quantifying denitrification pathway biokinetics under steady-state and transient hydrologic conditions and evaluate the role of bubble-mediated processes in enhancing N2O accumulation and fluxes. We use sulfur hexafluoride and helium as dissolved gas tracers to examine the impact of bubble entrapment upon retarded gas transport and enhanced trace gas fluxes. A planar optode sensor within the bioreactor provides near-continuous 2-D profiles of dissolved O2 within the bioreactor and allows for identification of aerobic microenvironments. We use qPCR to

  19. 'In-beam' simulation of high temperature helium embrittlement of DIN 1.4970 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, H.; Batfalsky, P.

    1982-01-01

    This work describes a facility for high temperature creep rupture tests during homogeneous helium implantation. This 'in-beam' creep testing facility is used to simulate helium embrittlement effects which will be very important for first wall materials of future fusion reactors operated at high temperatures. First results for DIN 1.4970 austenitic stainless steel clearly demonstrate differences between samples 'in-beam' tested at 1073 K and those creep tested at the same temperature after room temperature helium implantation. The specimens ruptured 'in-beam' have much shorter lifetimes and lower ductility than the specimens tested after room temperature implantation. There are also differences in the microstructures, concerning helium bubble sizes and densities in matrix and grain boundaries. These microstructural differences may be a key for the understanding of the more severe helium embrittlement effects 'in-beam' as compared to creep tests performed after room temperature implantation. (orig.)

  20. Canada's helium output rising fast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1966-12-01

    About 12 months from now, International Helium Limited will be almost ready to start up Canada's second helium extraction plant at Mankota, in Saskatchewan's Wood Mountain area about 100 miles southwest of Moose Jaw. Another 80 miles north is Saskatchewan's (and Canada's) first helium plant, operated by Canadian Helium and sitting on a gas deposit at Wilhelm, 9 miles north of Swift Current. It contains almost 2% helium, some COD2U, and the rest nitrogen. One year in production was apparently enough to convince Canadian Helium that the export market (it sells most of its helium in W. Europe) can take a lot more than it's getting. Construction began this summer on an addition to the Swift Current plant that will raise its capacity from 12 to 36MMcf per yr when it goes on stream next spring. Six months later, International Helium's 40 MMcf per yr plant to be located about 4 miles from its 2 Wood Mountain wells will double Canada's helium output again.

  1. Orion A helium abundance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsivilev, A.P.; Ershov, A.A.; Smirnov, G.T.; Sorochenko, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The 22.4-GHz (H,He)66-alpha and 36.5-GHz (H,He)56-alpha radio recombination lines have been observed at several Jaffe-Pankonin positions in the central part of the Orion A source. The measured relative abundance of ionized helium increases with distance, averaging 11.6 percent at peripheral points. The observed behavior is interpreted by a blister-type model nebula, which implies that Orion A has a true He abundance of 12 percent, is moving with a radial velocity of 5 km/sec, and is expanding. 18 references

  2. Simulation of liquid helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceperley, D.M.

    1985-07-01

    The author discusses simulation methods for quantum mechanical systems at finite temperatures. Recently it has been shown that static properties of some quantum systems can be obtained by simulation in a straightforward manner using path integrals, albeit with an order of magnitude more computing effort needed than for the corresponding classical systems. Some dynamical information can be gleaned from these simulations as will be discussed below. But this is very limited - there is no quantum version of the molecular dynamics method. The path integral method is illustrated by discussing the application to liquid helium. 12 refs., 8 figs

  3. Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, Shripad; Plawsky, Joel; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Zheng, Ling; Wang, Ying-Xi

    2002-11-01

    Microgravity experiments on the Constrained Vapor Bubble Heat Exchanger, CVB, are being developed for the International Space Station. In particular, we present results of a precursory experimental and theoretical study of the vertical Constrained Vapor Bubble in the Earth's environment. A novel non-isothermal experimental setup was designed and built to study the transport processes in an ethanol/quartz vertical CVB system. Temperature profiles were measured using an in situ PC (personal computer)-based LabView data acquisition system via thermocouples. Film thickness profiles were measured using interferometry. A theoretical model was developed to predict the curvature profile of the stable film in the evaporator. The concept of the total amount of evaporation, which can be obtained directly by integrating the experimental temperature profile, was introduced. Experimentally measured curvature profiles are in good agreement with modeling results. For microgravity conditions, an analytical expression, which reveals an inherent relation between temperature and curvature profiles, was derived.

  4. Study of helium diffusion, implanted at a cyclotron, in face-centered cubic metals: Au, Ag and Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciani, V.

    1985-01-01

    Helium in metals is produced by nuclear reactions of energetic particles. In nuclear technology the interest on helium in metals is import, due to its production by (n, α) reaction. Because helium has extremely low solubility in metals, the precipitation in the form of filled bubbles at elevated temperatures occurs, which have detrimental effects on mechanical properties and may limit the lifetime of structural components. One typical example is the high temperature embrittlement. The nucleation and growth of the bubbles strongly depends on the mobility of the helium. This work presents the study of helium diffusion in Au, Ag and Al at temperatures above room temperature. The helium created by (n, α) reactions has been simulated by homogeneous alpha particles implantation in cyclotron, at room temperature, in specimens of thicknesses between 5 and 50 μm and helium concentration between 10 -3 to 10 ppm. After implantation, the specimens were dropped in a furnace in a UHV-chamber and the diffusion was measured by observing the He-release during linear and isothermal annealings. The occurence of free diffusion was comparing the dependence of release kinetics on helium concentration, sample thickness, time and heating rate to diffusion theory and is clearly separeted from agglomeration process. The diffusion constants of helium in Au, Ag and Al follow an Arrhenius behavior, with: Au:D o =10 -1.0 cm 2 /s ΔH=1.70eV Ag:D 0 =10 -1.2 cm 2 /s ΔH=1.51eV Al:D o =10 +0.5 cm 2 /s ΔH=1.40eV. The results are compared to self-diffusion and to the diffusion of other gases in these metals. Comparison with theoretical estimates favours the vacancy mechanism for helium diffusion in Au, Ag and Al. (author) [pt

  5. Bubble dynamics in drinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broučková Zuzana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study introduces two physical effects known from beverages: the effect of sinking bubbles and the hot chocolate sound effect. The paper presents two simple „kitchen” experiments. The first and second effects are indicated by means of a flow visualization and microphone measurement, respectively. To quantify the second (acoustic effect, sound records are analyzed using time-frequency signal processing, and the obtained power spectra and spectrograms are discussed.

  6. Bubble dynamics in drinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broučková, Zuzana; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Šafařík, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    This study introduces two physical effects known from beverages: the effect of sinking bubbles and the hot chocolate sound effect. The paper presents two simple "kitchen" experiments. The first and second effects are indicated by means of a flow visualization and microphone measurement, respectively. To quantify the second (acoustic) effect, sound records are analyzed using time-frequency signal processing, and the obtained power spectra and spectrograms are discussed.

  7. Influence of Bubble-Bubble interactions on the macroscale circulation patterns in a bubbling gas-solid fluidized bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, J.A.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    The macro-scale circulation patterns in the emulsion phase of a gas-solid fluidized bed in the bubbling regime have been studied with a 3D Discrete Bubble Model. It has been shown that bubble-bubble interactions strongly influence the extent of the solids circulation and the bubble size

  8. High Efficiency Regenerative Helium Compressor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Helium plays several critical rolls in spacecraft propulsion. High pressure helium is commonly used to pressurize propellant fuel tanks. Helium cryocoolers can be...

  9. Intraluminal bubble dynamics induced by lithotripsy shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jie; Bai, Jiaming; Zhou, Yufeng

    2016-12-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been the first option in the treatment of calculi in the upper urinary tract since its introduction. ESWL-induced renal injury is also found after treatment and is assumed to associate with intraluminal bubble dynamics. To further understand the interaction of bubble expansion and collapse with the vessel wall, the finite element method (FEM) was used to simulate intraluminal bubble dynamics and calculate the distribution of stress in the vessel wall and surrounding soft tissue during cavitation. The effects of peak pressure, vessel size, and stiffness of soft tissue were investigated. Significant dilation on the vessel wall occurs after contacting with rapid and large bubble expansion, and then vessel deformation propagates in the axial direction. During bubble collapse, large shear stress is found to be applied to the vessel wall at a clinical lithotripter setting (i.e. 40 MPa peak pressure), which may be the mechanism of ESWL-induced vessel rupture. The decrease of vessel size and viscosity of soft tissue would enhance vessel deformation and, consequently, increase the generated shear stress and normal stresses. Meanwhile, a significantly asymmetric bubble boundary is also found due to faster axial bubble expansion and shrinkage than in radial direction, and deformation of the vessel wall may result in the formation of microjets in the axial direction. Therefore, this numerical work would illustrate the mechanism of ESWL-induced tissue injury in order to develop appropriate counteractive strategies for reduced adverse effects.

  10. First-principles calculations of helium and neon desorption from cavities in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddin, A Charaf; Pizzagalli, L

    2012-01-01

    Combining density functional theory, the nudged elastic band technique, and the ultradense fluid model, we investigated the desorption process of He and Ne in silicon. Our results show that the internal surfaces of gas-filled bubbles are not a limiting factor during desorption experiments, since the surface reconstruction opens diffusion paths easier than in the bulk. We show that the vibrational contribution to the energy of helium in the bulk has to be considered in order to determine realistic pressures in the bubbles, when comparing experiments and simulations. At the maximum of desorption, an average pressure of 1-2 GPa is computed. (paper)

  11. A helium regenerative compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, W.L.; Nutt, W.E.; Sixsmith, H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and performance of a regenerative compressor that was developed primarily for use in cryogenic helium systems. The objectives for the development were to achieve acceptable efficiency in the machine using conventional motor and bearing technology while reducing the complexity of the system required to control contamination from the lubricants. A single stage compressor was built and tested. The compressor incorporates aerodynamically shaped blades on a 218 mm (8.6 inches) diameter impeller to achieve high efficiency. A gas-buffered non-contact shaft seal is used to oppose the diffusion of lubricant from the motor bearings into the cryogenic circuit. Since it is a rotating machine, the flow is continuous and steady, and the machine is very quiet. During performance testing with helium, the single stage machine has demonstrated a pressure ratio of 1.5 at a flow rate of 12 g/s with measured isothermal efficiencies in excess of 30%. This performance compares favorably with efficiencies generally achieved in oil flooded screw compressors

  12. Characterization of Bubble Size Distributions within a Bubble Column

    OpenAIRE

    Shahrouz Mohagheghian; Brian R. Elbing

    2018-01-01

    The current study experimentally examines bubble size distribution (BSD) within a bubble column and the associated characteristic length scales. Air was injected into a column of water via a single injection tube. The column diameter (63–102 mm), injection tube diameter (0.8–1.6 mm) and superficial gas velocity (1.4–55 mm/s) were varied. Large samples (up to 54,000 bubbles) of bubble sizes measured via 2D imaging were used to produce probability density functions (PDFs). The PDFs were used to...

  13. Experimental Analysis of a Bubble Wake Influenced by a Vortex Street

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Rüttinger

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bubble column reactors are ubiquitous in engineering processes. They are used in waste water treatment, as well as in the chemical, pharmaceutical, biological and food industry. Mass transfer and mixing, as well as biochemical or chemical reactions in such reactors are determined by the hydrodynamics of the bubbly flow. The hydrodynamics of bubbly flows is dominated by bubble wake interactions. Despite the fact that bubble wakes have been investigated intensively in the past, there is still a lack of knowledge about how mass transfer from bubbles is influenced by bubble wake interactions in detail. The scientific scope of this work is to answer the question how bubble wakes are influenced by external flow structures like a vortex street behind a cylinder. For this purpose, the flow field in the vicinity of a single bubble is investigated systematically with high spatial and temporal resolution. High-speed Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV measurements are conducted monitoring the flow structure in the equatorial plane of the single bubble. It is shown that the root mean square (RMS velocity profiles downstream the bubble are influenced significantly by the interaction of vortices. In the presence of a vortex street, the deceleration of the fluid behind the bubble is compensated earlier than in the absence of a vortex street. This happens due to momentum transfer by cross-mixing. Both effects indicate that the interaction of vortices enhances the cross-mixing close to the bubble. Time series of instantaneous velocity fields show the formation of an inner shear layer and coupled vortices. In conclusion, this study shows in detail how the bubble wake is influenced by a vortex street and gives deep insights into possible effects on mixing and mass transfer in bubbly flows.

  14. Helium production in reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippincott, E.P.; McElroy, W.N.; Farrar, H. IV.

    1975-02-01

    Comparisons of integral helium production measurements with predictions based on ENDF/B Version IV cross sections have been made. It is concluded that an ENDF/B helium production cross section file should be established in order to ensure a complete and consistent cross section evaluation to meet accuracies required for LMFBR, CTR, and LWR applications. (U.S.)

  15. Pressure and tension waves from bubble collapse near a solid boundary: A numerical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Christiane; Koch, Max; Lauterborn, Werner; Mettin, Robert

    2017-12-01

    The acoustic waves being generated during the motion of a bubble in water near a solid boundary are calculated numerically. The open source package OpenFOAM is used for solving the Navier-Stokes equation and extended to include nonlinear acoustic wave effects via the Tait equation for water. A bubble model with a small amount of gas is chosen, the gas obeying an adiabatic law. A bubble starting from a small size with high internal pressure near a flat, solid boundary is studied. The sequence of events from bubble growth via axial microjet formation, jet impact, annular nanojet formation, torus-bubble collapse, and bubble rebound to second collapse is described. The different pressure and tension waves with their propagation properties are demonstrated.

  16. The thermodynamic and kinetic interactions of He interstitial clusters with bubbles in W

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Danny, E-mail: danny-perez@lanl.gov; Sandoval, Luis; Voter, Arthur F. [Theoretical Division T-1, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Uberuaga, Blas P. [Materials Science and Technology MST-8, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-05-28

    Due to its enviable properties, tungsten is a leading candidate plasma facing material in nuclear fusion reactors. However, like many other metals, tungsten is known to be affected by the high doses of helium atoms incoming from the plasma. Indeed, the implanted interstitial helium atoms cluster together and, upon reaching a critical cluster size, convert into substitutional nanoscale He bubbles. These bubbles then grow by absorbing further interstitial clusters from the matrix. This process can lead to deleterious changes in microstructure, degradation of mechanical properties, and contamination of the plasma. In order to better understand the growth process, we use traditional and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interactions between interstitial He clusters and pre-existing bubbles. These interactions are characterized in terms of thermodynamics and kinetics. We show that the proximity of the bubble leads to an enhancement of the trap mutation rate and, consequently, to the nucleation of satellite bubbles in the neighborhood of existing ones. We also uncover a number of mechanisms that can lead to the subsequent annihilation of such satellite nanobubbles.

  17. Jets from pulsed-ultrasound-induced cavitation bubbles near a rigid boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brujan, Emil-Alexandru

    2017-06-01

    The dynamics of cavitation bubbles, generated from short (microsecond) pulses of ultrasound and situated near a rigid boundary, are investigated numerically. The temporal development of the bubble shape, bubble migration, formation of the liquid jet during bubble collapse, and the kinetic energy of the jet are investigated as a function of the distance between bubble and boundary. During collapse, the bubble migrates towards the boundary and the liquid jet reaches a maximum velocity between 80 m s-1 and 120 m s-1, depending on the distance between bubble and boundary. The conversion of bubble energy to kinetic energy of the jet ranges from 16% to 23%. When the bubble is situated in close proximity to the boundary, the liquid jet impacts the boundary with its maximum velocity, resulting in an impact pressure of the order of tens of MPa. The rapid expansion of the bubble, the impact of the liquid jet onto the nearby boundary material, and the high pressure developed inside the bubble at its minimum volume can all contribute to the boundary material damage. The high pressure developed during the impact of the liquid jet onto the biological material and the shearing forces acting on the material surface as a consequence of the radial flow of the jet outward from the impact site are the main damage mechanisms of rigid biological materials. The results are discussed with respect to cavitation damage of rigid biological materials, such as disintegration of renal stones and calcified tissue and collateral effects in pulsed ultrasound surgery.

  18. Rational Asset Pricing Bubbles Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Werner

    2012-01-01

    Price bubble arises when the price of an asset exceeds the asset's fundamental value, that is, the present value of future dividend payments. The important result of Santos and Woodford (1997) says that price bubbles cannot exist in equilibrium in the standard dynamic asset pricing model with rational agents as long as assets are in strictly positive supply and the present value of total future resources is finite. This paper explores the possibility of asset price bubbles when either one of ...

  19. Structure and dynamics of molecular complex He2*(a3Σu+) in condensed phases of helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kafanov, S.G.; Parshin, A.Ya.; Tadoshchenko, I.A.

    2000-01-01

    The absorption spectra of the helium triplet metastable molecules in the a 3 Σ u + states in the liquid 4 He and 3 He by various pressures and in the 3 He dense gas are studied. The analysis of the spectrum, corresponding to the a 3 Σ u + → c 3 Σ g + transition, proves the conclusion on the availability of a microscopic bubble, surrounding the molecule in the liquid helium. Simple approximation of the wave function of the molecule valent electron is proposed and the bubble parameters under various experimental conditions are determined. The coefficient conditions are determined. The coefficient of the molecular recombination in the liquid 3 He and 4 He by different pressures and in the 3 He cold gas is experimentally determined. The obtained results agree well with the mutual recombination theory. It is shown, that molecular polarization in the helium condensed phases under the magnetic field effect does not lead to their mutual recombination [ru

  20. Helium influence on the microstructure and swelling of 9%Cr ferritic steel after neutron irradiation to 16.3 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimenkov, M.; Möslang, A.; Materna-Morris, E.

    2014-01-01

    Specially fabricated samples of the European reference 9Cr-WTaV steel EUROFER 97 alloyed with 0.081 mass% natural B and 0.081 and 0.114 mass% pure isotope 10 B were neutron-irradiated with about 16.3 dpa at temperatures in the range from 523 K to 723 K to study the influence of helium produced by 10 B(n,α) 7 Li transmutation reaction on microstructure, swelling and hardness. The spatial and size distributions of helium bubbles or cavities after irradiation at different temperatures were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Vickers microhardness HV0.1 tests were performed on the as received specimens and specimens after irradiation. The influence of irradiation temperature and helium concentration on the size and density of the bubbles or cavities was analyzed and correlations with the hardness, tensile properties, and the fracture surface were discussed

  1. Electron beam-induced radiation damage: the bubbling response in amorphous dried sodium phosphate buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massover, William H

    2010-06-01

    Irradiation of an amorphous layer of dried sodium phosphate buffer (pH = 7.0) by transmission electron microscopy (100-120 kV) causes rapid formation of numerous small spherical bubbles [10-100 A (= 1-10 nm)] containing an unknown gas. Bubbling is detected even with the first low-dose exposure. In a thin layer (ca. 100-150 A), bubbling typically goes through nucleation, growth, possible fusion, and end-state, after which further changes are not apparent; co-irradiated adjacent areas having a slightly smaller thickness never develop bubbles. In moderately thicker regions (ca. over 200 A), there is no end-state. Instead, a complex sequence of microstructural changes is elicited during continued intermittent high-dose irradiation: nucleation, growth, early simple fusions, a second round of extensive multiple fusions, general reduction of matrix thickness (producing flattening and expansion of larger bubbles, occasional bubble fission, and formation of very large irregularly-shaped bubbles by a third round of compound fusion events), and slow shrinkage of all bubbles. The ongoing lighter appearance of bubble lumens, maintenance of their rounded shape, and extensive changes in size and form indicate that gas content continues throughout their surprisingly long lifetime; the thin dense boundary layer surrounding all bubbles is proposed to be the main mechanism for their long lifetime.

  2. Collapse of a cavitation bubble near a free surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chahine, G.

    1976-01-01

    The interaction between a collapsing bubble and a free surface is investigated theoretically and experimentally using high speed photography. A limiting value for the distance from the free surface to the center of the bubble reported to its radius is found. Under this limit the free surface is not disturbed during the collapse, in the first approximation. Only in this case, the method of images can be used and the free surface be replaced by an image-source, symmetrical with respect to the free surface to the sink representing the bubble. Above this limit, observations show a singular perturbation in the free surface with the formation of a thin spike directed to the air. In all cases the bubble is repelled from the free surface and the re-entering jet, formed during collapse, is oriented away from it [fr

  3. A preliminary investigation of the diffusion of helium in zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.J.; Faulkner, D.

    1976-10-01

    The out-diffusion of helium, introduced into polycrystalline zirconium at room temperature by ion-implantation at 100 keV to a peak concentration of 1ppm, was found to occur in two principal regions. Two evolution rate maxima, obtained during post-implantation target annealing at 2.6 0 K s -1 , were observed in close proximity at 330 0 C (0.28 Tsub(m)) and 450 0 C (0.34 Tsub(m)) comprising the principal stage, with a subordinate stage occurring at 600 0 C (0.4 Tsub(m)). These data were compared with similar maxima observed in nickel at 600 0 C (0.5 Tsub(m)) and 850 0 C (0.65 Tsub(m)). The results imply a high helium diffusivity over the 0.5 mm experimental range in comparison with nickel, and an exceptionally high diffusivity taking into account the melting temperature of zirconium. On the basis of a diffusion model proposed earlier for nickel, activation energies of 1.37 and 1.66 eV have been assigned to the principal maxima at 330 0 C and 450 0 C, and a value of 2.41 eV to the maximum at 600 0 C. The long range diffusivity of helium manifested by its thermal evolution from uniformly filled 120 mm thick foils was found to be much lower than that measured for short range migration. An empirical activation energy of approximately 3 eV was estimated for this process, thought to be a result of bubble migration. The release of helium from zirconium has been explained by comparison with nickel data. The proposed substitutional de-trapping mechanism has been invoked to account for the principal evolution rate maxima at 330 0 C. Helium release observed at 600 0 C has been explained by the annealing of radiation damage, so allowing gas trapped therein to be evolved. (author)

  4. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics.

  5. CS EMISSION NEAR MIR-BUBBLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, C.; Devine, Kathryn; Quintanar, N.; Candelaria, T.

    2016-01-01

    We survey 44 young stellar objects located near the edges of mid-IR-identified bubbles in CS (1–0) using the Green Bank Telescope. We detect emission in 18 sources, indicating young protostars that are good candidates for being triggered by the expansion of the bubble. We calculate CS column densities and abundances. Three sources show evidence of infall through non-Gaussian line-shapes. Two of these sources are associated with dark clouds and are promising candidates for further exploration of potential triggered star formation. We obtained on-the-fly maps in CS (1–0) of three sources, showing evidence of significant interactions between the sources and the surrounding environment

  6. CS EMISSION NEAR MIR-BUBBLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, C. [Manchester University, Department of Physics, 604 E. College Ave., North Manchester, IN 46962 (United States); Devine, Kathryn [College of Idaho, Department of Physics, 2112 Cleveland Blvd, Caldwell, ID 83605 (United States); Quintanar, N. [Texas A and M University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, 401 Joe Routt Blvd, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Candelaria, T., E-mail: cwatson@manchester.edu, E-mail: KDevine@collegeofidaho.edu, E-mail: nrquintanar@tamu.edu, E-mail: tcandela@nmt.edu [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Department of Physics, 801 Leroy Place, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    We survey 44 young stellar objects located near the edges of mid-IR-identified bubbles in CS (1–0) using the Green Bank Telescope. We detect emission in 18 sources, indicating young protostars that are good candidates for being triggered by the expansion of the bubble. We calculate CS column densities and abundances. Three sources show evidence of infall through non-Gaussian line-shapes. Two of these sources are associated with dark clouds and are promising candidates for further exploration of potential triggered star formation. We obtained on-the-fly maps in CS (1–0) of three sources, showing evidence of significant interactions between the sources and the surrounding environment.

  7. Bubbles, Bubbles, Tremors & Trouble: The Bayou Corne Sinkhole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    In May 2012, thermogenic methane bubbles were first observed in Bayou Corne in Assumption Parish, Louisiana. As of July 2013, ninety one bubbling sites have been identified. Gas was also found in the top of the Mississippi River Alluvial Aquifer (MRAA) about 125 ft below the surface. Vent wells drilled into the MRAA have flared more 16 million SCF of gas. Trace amounts of hydrogen sulfide also have been detected. Bayou Corne flows above the Napoleonville salt dome which has been an active area for oil and gas exploration since the 1920s. The dome is also a site of dissolution salt mining which has produced large caverns with diameters of up to 300 ft and heights of 2000 ft. Some caverns are used for storage of natural gas. Microseismic activity was confirmed by an Earthscope seismic station in White Castle, LA in July 2012. An array of microseismic stations set up in the area recorded more than 60 microseismic events in late July and early August, 2012. These microseismic events were located on the western side of the dome. Estimated focal depths are just above the top of salt. In August 2012, a sinkhole developed overnight just to the northwest of a plugged and abandoned brine filled cavern (see figure below). The sinkhole continues to grow in area to more than 20 acres and has consumed a pipeline right of way. The sinkhole is more than 750 ft deep at its center. Microseismic activity was reduced for several months following the formation of the sinkhole. Microseismic events have reoccurred episodically since then with periods of frequent events preceding slumping of material into the sinkhole or a 'burp' where fluid levels in the sinkhole drop and then rebound followed by a decrease in microseismic activity. Some gas and/or oil may appear at the surface of the sinkhole following a 'burp'. Very long period events also have been observed which are believed to be related to subsurface fluid movement. A relief well drilled into the abandoned brine cavern found that

  8. Light induced cooling of a heated solid immersed in liquid helium I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lezak, D.; Brodie, L.C.; Semura, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter investigates the marked enhancement in the transient heat transfer from the heater-thermometer to the liquid helium immediately following the application of a flash of visible light. This ''light effect'' is associated with increased bubble activity, and it is possible that the light induces a rapid nucleation of bubbles in the superheated liquid at or near the heater surface. A summary of the light effect is presented and some potential uses to which this effect could be applied are suggested. Quantification of the light effect and properties of the light effect are discussed. It is determined that the light effect is an additional cooling due to a light induced enhancement of boiling in superheated liquid helium I. The effect could be applied in practical cryogenic engineering and for the acquisition of fundamental knowledge of boiling heat transfer and nucleation in cryogenic liquids

  9. Photoionization of helium dimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havermeier, Tilo

    2010-01-01

    The helium dimer is one of the most weakly bound systems in the universe. This makes it an interesting quantum mechanical object for investigation. These Van der Waals Clusters can be produced in an expansion of a cryogenic gas jet through a small nozzle into vacuum. In the present experiment we examine the interaction of He dimers with synchrotron radiation at an energy range from 64 to 78 eV. We observed different pathways leading to single ionization of both He atoms of the dimer compound. This two close standing ions begin now to dissociate in cause of their coulomb potential. All charged fragments were detected in coincidence with a COLTRIMS system. Especially Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD) and the two step process (TS1) were clearly identified. Furthermore a distribution of the internuclear distance was obtained from the measured Kinetic Energy Release (KER). (orig.)

  10. Exotic helium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portier, M.

    2007-12-01

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 P 0 ) molecule, or a 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 S 1 ) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 ± 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 S 1 ) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime τ = (1.4 ± 0.3) μs is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  11. Bubble Coalescence: Effect of Bubble Approach Velocity and Liquid Viscosity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Orvalho, Sandra; Růžička, Marek; Olivieri, G.; Marzocchella, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 134, SEP 29 (2015), s. 205-216 ISSN 0009-2509 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13018 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : bubble coalescence * bubble approach velocity * liquid viscosity Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.750, year: 2015

  12. Bubble Size Distribution in a Vibrating Bubble Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohagheghian, Shahrouz; Wilson, Trevor; Valenzuela, Bret; Hinds, Tyler; Moseni, Kevin; Elbing, Brian

    2016-11-01

    While vibrating bubble columns have increased the mass transfer between phases, a universal scaling law remains elusive. Attempts to predict mass transfer rates in large industrial scale applications by extrapolating laboratory scale models have failed. In a stationary bubble column, mass transfer is a function of phase interfacial area (PIA), while PIA is determined based on the bubble size distribution (BSD). On the other hand, BSD is influenced by the injection characteristics and liquid phase dynamics and properties. Vibration modifies the BSD by impacting the gas and gas-liquid dynamics. This work uses a vibrating cylindrical bubble column to investigate the effect of gas injection and vibration characteristics on the BSD. The bubble column has a 10 cm diameter and was filled with water to a depth of 90 cm above the tip of the orifice tube injector. BSD was measured using high-speed imaging to determine the projected area of individual bubbles, which the nominal bubble diameter was then calculated assuming spherical bubbles. The BSD dependence on the distance from the injector, injector design (1.6 and 0.8 mm ID), air flow rates (0.5 to 5 lit/min), and vibration conditions (stationary and vibration conditions varying amplitude and frequency) will be presented. In addition to mean data, higher order statistics will also be provided.

  13. Helium-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longton, P.B.; Cowen, H.C.

    1975-01-01

    In helium cooled HTR's there is a by-pass circuit for cleaning purposes in addition to the main cooling circuit. This is to remove such impurities as hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide and water from the coolant. In this system, part of the coolant successively flows first through an oxidation bed of copper oxide and an absorption bed of silica gel, then through activated charcoal or a molecular sieve. The hydrogen and carbon monoxide impurities are absorbed and the dry gas is returned to the main cooling circuit. To lower the hydrogen/water ratio without increasing the hydrogen fraction in the main cooling circuit, some of the hydrogen fraction converted into water is added to the cooling circuit. This is done, inter alia, by bypassing the water produced in the oxidation bed before it enters the absorption bed. The rest of the by-pass circuit, however, also includes an absorption bed with a molecular sieve. This absorbs the oxidized carbon monoxide fraction. In this way, such side effects as the formation of additional methane, carburization of the materials of the by-pass circuit or loss of graphite are avoided. (DG/RF) [de

  14. Understanding the bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.

    that are identified to exist between the Internet and housing market bubbles: uncertainty and sentiments. The iteration between uncertainty and sentiments leads to the emergence of the third commonality: residue. The residue is the difference between the actors’ overall sentiment about exaggerated future prospects...... all boils down to the role pricing plays vis-à-vis the emergence of a new venture and its perceived value. Being in the midst of the global economic crisis provides us with a unique opportunity to refine the proposed model, especially by understanding its temporal and contextual boundaries....

  15. Hydrodynamics of circulating and bubbling fluidized beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gidaspow, D.P.; Tsuo, Y.P.; Ding, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that a review of modeling of the hydrodynamics of fluidization of bubbling beds showed that inviscid two-fluid models were able to predict a great deal of the behavior of bubbling beds because the dominant mechanism of energy dissipation is the drag between the particles and the fluid. The formation, the growth and the bursting of bubbles were predicted. Predicted wall-to-bed heat transfer coefficients and velocity profiles of jets agreed with measurements. Time average porosity distributions agreed with measurements done using gamma-ray densitometers without the use of any adjustable parameters. However, inviscid models could not correctly predict rates of erosion around tubes immersed into fluidized beds. To correctly model such behavior, granular stresses involving solids viscosity were added into the computer model. This viscosity arises due to random collision of particles. Several models fro this viscosity were investigated and the results compared to measurements of solids distributions in two-dimensional beds and to particle velocities reported in the literature. While in the case of bubbling beds the solids viscosity plays the role of a correction, modeling of a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) without a viscosity is not possible. Recent experimental data obtained at IIT and at IGT show that in CFB the solids viscous dissipation is responsible for as much as half of the pressure drop. From such measurement, solids viscosities were computed. These were used in the two fluid hydrodynamic model, to predict radial solids distributions and solids velocities which matched the experimental distributions. Most important, the model predicted cluster formation and transient internal circulation which is responsible for the favorable characteristics of CFBs, such as good wall-to-bed heat transfer. Video tape movies of computations compared favorably with high speed movies of the experiments

  16. Oxidation characteristics of the electron beam surface-treated Alloy 617 in high temperature helium environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ho Jung; Sah, Injin; Kim, Donghoon; Kim, Hyunmyung; Jang, Changheui

    2015-01-01

    The oxidation characteristics of the electron beam surface-treated Alloy 617, which has an Al-rich surface layer, were evaluated in high temperature helium environments. Isothermal oxidation tests were performed in helium (99.999% purity) and VHTR-helium (helium of prototypical VHTR chemistry containing impurities like CO, CO 2 , CH 4 , and H 2 ) environments at 900 °C for up to 1000 h. The surface-treated Alloy 617 showed an initial transient oxidation stage followed by the steady-state oxidation in all test environments. In addition, the steady-state oxidation kinetics of the surface-treated Alloy 617 was 2-order of magnitude lower than that of the as-received Alloy 617 in both helium environments as well as in air. The improvement in oxidation resistance was primarily due to the formation of the protective Al 2 O 3 layer on the surface. The weight gain was larger in the order of air, helium, and VHTR-helium, while the parabolic rate constants (k p ) at steady-state were similar for all test environments. In both helium environments, the oxide structure consisted of the outer transition Al 2 O 3 with a small amount of Cr 2 O 3 and inner columnar structured Al 2 O 3 without an internal oxide. In the VHTR-helium environment, where the impurities were added to helium, the initial transient oxidation increased but the steady state kinetics was not affected

  17. Mechanical compression tests of beryllium pebbles after neutron irradiation up to 3000 appm helium production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakin, V., E-mail: vladimir.chakin@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institite for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, R.; Moeslang, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institite for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, c/Josep Pla, no. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Compression tests of highly neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles have been performed. • Irradiation hardening of beryllium pebbles decreases the steady-state strain-rates. • The steady-state strain-rates of irradiated beryllium pebbles exceed their swelling rates. - Abstract: Results: of mechanical compression tests of irradiated and non-irradiated beryllium pebbles with diameters of 1 and 2 mm are presented. The neutron irradiation was performed in the HFR in Petten, The Netherlands at 686–968 K up to 1890–2950 appm helium production. The irradiation at 686 and 753 K cause irradiation hardening due to the gas bubble formation in beryllium. The irradiation-induced hardening leads to decrease of steady-state strain-rates of irradiated beryllium pebbles compared to non-irradiated ones. In contrary, after irradiation at higher temperatures of 861 and 968 K, the steady-state strain-rates of the pebbles increase because annealing of irradiation defects and softening of the material take place. It was shown that the steady-state strain-rates of irradiated beryllium pebbles always exceed their swelling rates.

  18. Trapping of hydrogen and helium at an {110}<111> edge dislocation in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Hongxian, E-mail: hongxianxie@163.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300132 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Materials Laminating Fabrication and Interface Control Technology, Tianjin 300132 (China); Xu, Ke [School of Physics & Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Lu, Guang-Hong, E-mail: LGH@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics & Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Yu, Tao [Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China); Yin, Fuxing [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Materials Laminating Fabrication and Interface Control Technology, Tianjin 300132 (China); Research Institute for Energy Equipment Materials, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300132 (China)

    2017-02-15

    We have performed an atomistic simulation to investigate energetics and dynamic behaviour of hydrogen (H) and helium (He) at an {110}<111> edge dislocation in tungsten (W). The edge dislocation is shown to attract H/He at the tensile stress region according to the negative interaction energy of H/He at the tensile stress region, which implies that the dislocation is energetically beneficial to accommodate both H and He. Dynamically both H and He are easy to diffuse into the dislocation core, indicating the ‘down-hill’ diffusion due to the presence of the dislocation serving as a trapping center for both H and He. Further, He exhibits much lower interaction energy and much faster diffusion into the dislocation core region as compared with H owing to the close shell electronic structure of He. The results suggest the edge dislocation as a trapping center facilitates the H/He accumulation, contributing to the understanding the role of the dislocation on the H/He accumulation and bubble formation in W.

  19. Visualization of airflow growing soap bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Rahbi, Hamood; Bock, Matthew; Ryu, Sangjin

    2016-11-01

    Visualizing airflow inside growing soap bubbles can answer questions regarding the fluid dynamics of soap bubble blowing, which is a model system for flows with a gas-liquid-gas interface. Also, understanding the soap bubble blowing process is practical because it can contribute to controlling industrial processes similar to soap bubble blowing. In this study, we visualized airflow which grows soap bubbles using the smoke wire technique to understand how airflow blows soap bubbles. The soap bubble blower setup was built to mimic the human blowing process of soap bubbles, which consists of a blower, a nozzle and a bubble ring. The smoke wire was placed between the nozzle and the bubble ring, and smoke-visualized airflow was captured using a high speed camera. Our visualization shows how air jet flows into the growing soap bubble on the ring and how the airflow interacts with the soap film of growing bubble.

  20. Bubble levitation and translation under single-bubble sonoluminescence conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matula, Thomas J

    2003-08-01

    Bubble levitation in an acoustic standing wave is re-examined for conditions relevant to single-bubble sonoluminescence. Unlike a previous examination [Matula et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 1522-1527 (1997)], the stable parameter space [Pa,R0] is accounted for in this realization. Forces such as the added mass force and drag are included, and the results are compared with a simple force balance that equates the Bjerknes force to the buoyancy force. Under normal sonoluminescence conditions, the comparison is quite favorable. A more complete accounting of the forces shows that a stably levitated bubble does undergo periodic translational motion. The asymmetries associated with translational motion are hypothesized to generate instabilities in the spherical shape of the bubble. A reduction in gravity results in reduced translational motion. It is hypothesized that such conditions may lead to increased light output from sonoluminescing bubbles.

  1. Electronic properties of physisorbed helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossler, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    This thesis deals with electronic excitations of helium physisorbed on metal substrates. It is studied to what extent the electronic properties change compared to the gas phase due to the increased helium density and the proximity of the metal. Furthermore, the influence of different substrate materials is investigated systematically. To this end, up to two helium layers were adsorbed onto Ru (001), Pt (111), Cu (111), and Ag (111) surfaces in a custom-made cryostat. These samples were studied spectroscopically using synchrotron radiation and a time-of-flight detector. The experimental results were then analyzed in comparison with extensive theoretical model calculations.

  2. Electronic properties of physisorbed helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossler, Sarah

    2011-09-22

    This thesis deals with electronic excitations of helium physisorbed on metal substrates. It is studied to what extent the electronic properties change compared to the gas phase due to the increased helium density and the proximity of the metal. Furthermore, the influence of different substrate materials is investigated systematically. To this end, up to two helium layers were adsorbed onto Ru (001), Pt (111), Cu (111), and Ag (111) surfaces in a custom-made cryostat. These samples were studied spectroscopically using synchrotron radiation and a time-of-flight detector. The experimental results were then analyzed in comparison with extensive theoretical model calculations.

  3. The microjetting behavior from single laser-induced bubbles generated above a solid boundary with a through hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Jack E.; Oweis, Ghanem F.

    2013-01-01

    An inertial bubble collapsing near a solid boundary generates a fast impulsive microjet directed toward the boundary. The jet impacts the solid boundary at a high velocity, and this effect has been taken advantage of in industrial cleaning such as when tiny bubbles are driven ultrasonically to cavitate around machined parts to produce jets that are believed to induce the cleaning effect. In this experimental investigation, we are interested in the jetting from single cavities near a boundary. By introducing a through hole in the boundary beneath a laser-induced bubble, it is hypothesized that the forming jet, upon bubble implosion, will proceed to penetrate through the hole to the other side and that it may be utilized in useful applications such as precise surgeries. It was found that the growth of the bubble induced a fast flow through the hole and lead to the formation of secondary hydrodynamic cavitation. The experiments also showed the formation of a counter jet directed away from the hole and into the bubble. During the growth phase of the bubble, and near the point of maximum expansion, the bubble wall bulged out toward the hole in a `bulb' like formation, which sometimes resulted in the pinching-off of a secondary small bubble. This was ensued by the inward recoiling of the primary bubble wall near the pinch-off spot, which developed into a counter jet seen to move away from the hole and inward into the bubble.

  4. Sonoluminescing Air Bubbles Rectify Argon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohse, Detlef; Brenner, Michael P.; Dupont, Todd F.; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Johnston, Blaine

    1997-01-01

    The dynamics of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) strongly depends on the percentage of inert gas within the bubble. We propose a theory for this dependence, based on a combination of principles from sonochemistry and hydrodynamic stability. The nitrogen and oxygen dissociation and subsequent

  5. Bubble coalescence in breathing DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novotný, Tomas; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Ambjörnsson, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the coalescence of two DNA bubbles initially located at weak segments and separated by a more stable barrier region in a designed construct of double-stranded DNA. The characteristic time for bubble coalescence and the corresponding distribution are derived, as well as the distribu...... vicious walkers in opposite potentials....

  6. A prediction for bubbling geometries

    OpenAIRE

    Okuda, Takuya

    2007-01-01

    We study the supersymmetric circular Wilson loops in N=4 Yang-Mills theory. Their vacuum expectation values are computed in the parameter region that admits smooth bubbling geometry duals. The results are a prediction for the supergravity action evaluated on the bubbling geometries for Wilson loops.

  7. Preparation of bubble damage detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu Caiqing; Guo Shilun; Wang Yulan; Hao Xiuhong; Chen Changmao; Su Jingling

    1997-01-01

    Bubble damage detectors have been prepared by using polyacrylamide as detector solid and freon as detector liquid. Tests show that the prepared detectors are sensitive to fast neutrons and have proportionality between bubble number and neutron fluence within a certain range of neutron fluence. Therefore, it can be used as a fast neutron detector and a dosimeter

  8. The little holographic bubble chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herve, A.

    1983-01-01

    The lifetime study of the charmed particles has readvanced the idea to use holography for the little fast-cycle bubble chambers. A pilot experiment has been realised in 1982 with a little bubble chamber filled up with freon-115. 40000 holograms have been recorded [fr

  9. Bubble chamber: colour enhanced tracks

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    This artistically-enhanced image of real particle tracks was produced in the Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC). Liquid hydrogen is used to create bubbles along the paths of the particles as a piston expands the medium. A magnetic field is produced in the detector causing the particles to travel in spirals, allowing charge and momentum to be measured.

  10. Turbulence modulation induced by interaction between a bubble swarm and decaying turbulence in oscillating-grid turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaizumi, Ryota; Morikawa, Koichi; Higuchi, Masamori; Saito, Takayuki

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the interaction between a bubble swarm and homogeneous isotropic turbulence was experimentally investigated. The objective is to clarify the turbulence modulation induced by interaction between the bubble swarm and the homogeneous isotropic turbulence without mean flow. In order to generate simultaneously ideally homogeneous isotropic turbulence and a sufficiently controlled bubble swarm, we employed both oscillating grid and bubble generators equipped with audio speakers. First, the homogeneous isotropic turbulence was formed by operating the oscillating grid cylindrical acrylic pipe (height: 600 mm, inner diameter: 149 mm) filled with ion-exchanged and degassed water. Second, we stopped the oscillating-grid in arbitrary time after the homogeneous isotropic turbulence was achieved. A few moments later, the controlled bubble swarm (number of bubbles: 3, average equivalent diameter of bubble: 3 mm, bubble Reynolds number: 859, Weber number: 3.48) was launched into the decaying turbulence described above, using the bubble generators. The bubble formation, bubble size and bubble-launch timing are controlled arbitrarily and precisely by this device. In this study, we conducted the following experiments: 1) measurement of the motion of bubbles in rest water and oscillating grid turbulence via high-speed visualization, 2) measurement of the liquid phase motion around the bubbles in rest water via PIV system with LIF method, 3) measurement of the liquid phase motion around the bubbles in oscillating-grid turbulence via PIV system with LIF method. In the vitalization of the liquid-phase motion of both experiments, two high speed video cameras were employed in order to simultaneously film large- and small-scale interrogation areas. The liquid-phase ambient turbulence hastened the change of the bubble motion from zigzag mode to spiral mode. The interaction between the bubble swarm and liquid-phase turbulence increased decay-rate of the turbulence. (author)

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of bubble nucleation in dark matter detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzel, Philipp; Diemand, Jürg; Angélil, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Bubble chambers and droplet detectors used in dosimetry and dark matter particle search experiments use a superheated metastable liquid in which nuclear recoils trigger bubble nucleation. This process is described by the classical heat spike model of F. Seitz [Phys. Fluids (1958-1988) 1, 2 (1958)PFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1724333], which uses classical nucleation theory to estimate the amount and the localization of the deposited energy required for bubble formation. Here we report on direct molecular dynamics simulations of heat-spike-induced bubble formation. They allow us to test the nanoscale process described in the classical heat spike model. 40 simulations were performed, each containing about 20 million atoms, which interact by a truncated force-shifted Lennard-Jones potential. We find that the energy per length unit needed for bubble nucleation agrees quite well with theoretical predictions, but the allowed spike length and the required total energy are about twice as large as predicted. This could be explained by the rapid energy diffusion measured in the simulation: contrary to the assumption in the classical model, we observe significantly faster heat diffusion than the bubble formation time scale. Finally we examine α-particle tracks, which are much longer than those of neutrons and potential dark matter particles. Empirically, α events were recently found to result in louder acoustic signals than neutron events. This distinction is crucial for the background rejection in dark matter searches. We show that a large number of individual bubbles can form along an α track, which explains the observed larger acoustic amplitudes.

  12. Sinking bubbles in stout beers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W. T.; Kaar, S.; O'Brien, S. B. G.

    2018-04-01

    A surprising phenomenon witnessed by many is the sinking bubbles seen in a settling pint of stout beer. Bubbles are less dense than the surrounding fluid so how does this happen? Previous work has shown that the explanation lies in a circulation of fluid promoted by the tilted sides of the glass. However, this work has relied heavily on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Here, we show that the phenomenon of sinking bubbles can be predicted using a simple analytic model. To make the model analytically tractable, we work in the limit of small bubbles and consider a simplified geometry. The model confirms both the existence of sinking bubbles and the previously proposed mechanism.

  13. Tritium and helium behavior in irradiated beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billone, M.C.; Lin, C.C.; Baldwin, D.L.

    1990-11-01

    Large quantities of Be (> 100 metric tons) are planned for use in the ITER blanket design to enhance tritium breeding and to act as a thermal barrier between coolant and breeder. Tritium retention/release and He-induced swelling are important issues in blanket design. The data base on tritium and helium behavior in Be is reviewed. New data on tritium retention/release and He bubble growth are presented for Be irradiated to 5 x 10 22 n(E > 1 MeV)/cm 2 at ∼75 degree C and postirradiation-annealed for 700 hours at 500 degree C. A model (diffusion/desorption) is proposed and tested against the data base to determine tritium diffusivity and the desorption rate constant. Similarly a model for He-induced swelling is developed and tested against the data base. The dependence of tritium retention and release on He content and impurities (e.g. BeO) is also explored. 11 refs., 6 figs

  14. Profiteering from the Dot-com Bubble, Sub-Prime Crisis and Asian Financial Crisis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. McAleer (Michael); J. Suen (John); W.-K. Wong (Wing-Keung)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis paper explores the characteristics associated with the formation of bubbles that occurred in the Hong Kong stock market in 1997 and 2007, as well as the 2000 dot-com bubble of Nasdaq. It examines the profitability of Technical Analysis (TA) strategies generating buy and sell signals

  15. Super-exponential bubbles in lab experiments: evidence for anchoring over-optimistic expectations on price

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hüsler, A.; Sornette, D.; Hommes, C.H.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze a controlled price formation experiment in the laboratory that shows evidence for bubbles. We calibrate two models that demonstrate with high statistical significance that these laboratory bubbles have a tendency to grow faster than exponential due to positive feedback. We show that the

  16. Operating Manual of Helium Refrigerator (Rev. 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, K.M.; Son, S.H.; Kim, K.S.; Lee, S.K.; Kim, M.S. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2002-07-01

    A helium refrigerator was installed as a supplier of 20K cold helium to the cryogenic distillation system of WTRF pilot plant. The operating procedures of the helium refrigerator, helium compressor and auxiliary apparatus are described for the safety and efficient operation in this manual. The function of the helium refrigerator is to remove the impurities from the compressed helium of about 250psig, to cool down the helium from ambient temperature to 20K through the heat exchanger and expansion engine and to transfer the cold helium to the cryogenic distillation system. For the smoothly operation of helium refrigerator, the preparation, the start-up, the cool-down and the shut-down of the helium refrigerator are described in this operating manual. (author). 3 refs., 14 tabs.

  17. Helium cooling of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Baxi, C.; Bourque, R.; Dahms, C.; Inamati, S.; Ryder, R.; Sager, G.; Schleicher, R.

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of worldwide design experience and in coordination with the evolution of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program, the application of helium as a coolant for fusion appears to be at the verge of a transition from conceptual design to engineering development. This paper presents a review of the use of helium as the coolant for fusion reactor blanket and divertor designs. The concept of a high-pressure helium cooling radial plate design was studied for both ITER and PULSAR. These designs can resolve many engineering issues, and can help with reaching the goals of low activation and high performance designs. The combination of helium cooling, advanced low-activation materials, and gas turbine technology may permit high thermal efficiency and reduced costs, resulting in the environmental advantages and competitive economics required to make fusion a 21st century power source. ((orig.))

  18. High Accuracy Vector Helium Magnetometer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed HAVHM instrument is a laser-pumped helium magnetometer with both triaxial vector and omnidirectional scalar measurement capabilities in a single...

  19. Advancement and application of bubble detector technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckner, M.A.; Casson, W.H.; Sims, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    A new technology is vying for position in the dosimetry community. This relatively young technology is building upon the foundation of the bubble chamber, conceptualized by Glaser in 1952. Although the attitudes surrounding this technology are somewhat mixed, applications of this technology hold great promise for the future of neutron dosimetry. The Dosimetry Applications Research facility of Oak Ridge National Laboratory is looking into some innovative applications of this technology. The authors are investigating options for overcoming its limiting features in hopes of achieving an unprecedented level of proficiency in neutron detection. Among these are the developing and testing of a Combination Area Neutron Spectrometer, CANS, assessing the plausibility of extremity applications, the assembly of an alternative reader for research, investigation of temperature-related effects and how to correct for them and considerations on the coming of age of neutron dosimetry via real time detection of bubble formation in Bubble Technology Industries Inc. detectors. The authors attempt to answer the questions: (1) What areas hold the greatest promise for application of this emerging technology?; (2) What obstacles must be overcome before full-blown application becomes a reality?; and (3) What might the future hold?

  20. Bubbles of nothing and supersymmetric compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J. [IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011, Bilbao (Spain); Department of Theoretical Physics, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU,48080 Bilbao (Spain); Shlaer, Benjamin [Department of Physics, University of Auckland,Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy,Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Sousa, Kepa [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU,48080 Bilbao (Spain); Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM-CSIC, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid,Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Urrestilla, Jon [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU,48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2016-10-03

    We investigate the non-perturbative stability of supersymmetric compactifications with respect to decay via a bubble of nothing. We show examples where this kind of instability is not prohibited by the spin structure, i.e., periodicity of fermions about the extra dimension. However, such “topologically unobstructed” cases do exhibit an extra-dimensional analog of the well-known Coleman-De Luccia suppression mechanism, which prohibits the decay of supersymmetric vacua. We demonstrate this explicitly in a four dimensional Abelian-Higgs toy model coupled to supergravity. The compactification of this model to M{sub 3}×S{sub 1} presents the possibility of vacua with different windings for the scalar field. Away from the supersymmetric limit, these states decay by the formation of a bubble of nothing, dressed with an Abelian-Higgs vortex. We show how, as one approaches the supersymmetric limit, the circumference of the topologically unobstructed bubble becomes infinite, thereby preventing the realization of this decay. This demonstrates the dynamical origin of the decay suppression, as opposed to the more familiar argument based on the spin structure. We conjecture that this is a generic mechanism that enforces stability of any topologically unobstructed supersymmetric compactification.

  1. Bose-Einstein condensation in helium white dwarf stars. I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosquera, M.E. [Faculty of Astronomy and Geophysics, University of La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s.n., La Plata (Argentina); Department of Physics, University of La Plata, c.c. 67 1900, La Plata (Argentina); Civitarese, O., E-mail: osvaldo.civitarese@fisica.unlp.edu.a [Department of Physics, University of La Plata, c.c. 67 1900, La Plata (Argentina); Benvenuto, O.G.; De Vito, M.A. [Faculty of Astronomy and Geophysics, University of La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s.n., La Plata (Argentina); Instituto de Astrofisica La Plata, CCT (Argentina)

    2010-01-18

    The formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate in the interior of helium white dwarfs stars is discussed. Following the proposal made by Gabadadze and Rosen, we have explored the consequences of such a mechanism by calculating the cooling time of the stars. We have found that it is shorter than the value predicted by the standard model.

  2. Depth-dependence recovery of helium-implanted 18 carats gold-silver alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thome, T.; Grynszpan, R.I. [DCE-CTA-LOT, Arcueil (France); Lab. de Chimie Metallurgique des Terres Rares, Thiais (France); Fradin, J. [DCE-CTA-LOT, Arcueil (France); SINUMEF, Ecole Nationale Superieure d' Arts et Metiers, Paris (France); Anwand, W.; Brauer, G. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (FZR), Dresden (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Helium diffusion in Au{sub 60}Ag{sub 40} is investigated using a variable energy positron beam. The positron diffusion length of the annealed material (66 {+-} 1 nm) is reduced after implantation of 2.2 x 10{sup 14} He ions/cm{sup 2} at 300 keV. During isochronal annealing up to 600 K, the recovery rate of the Doppler broadening lineshape parameter S strongly depends on the distance to the helium implantation peak, indicating an increase of the defect stabilization by He atoms. In contrast, for subsequent annealing, and irrespective of the depth, a maximum in S occurs at 670 K (around 0.5 T{sub m}) resulting from competing processes of growth and breaking up of helium bubbles. (orig.)

  3. A study of the effect of helium concentration and displacement damage on the microstructure of helium ion irradiated tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R. W.; Greaves, G.; Hinks, J. A.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2017-11-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with in-situ He ion irradiation has been used to examine the damage microstructure of W when varying the helium concentration to displacement damage ratio, irradiation temperature and total dose. Irradiations employed 15, 60 or 85 keV He ions, at temperatures between 500 and 1000 °C up to doses of ∼3.0 DPA. Once nucleated and grown to an observable size in the TEM, bubble diameter as a function of irradiation dose did not measurably increase at irradiation temperatures of 500 °C between 1.0 and 3.0 DPA; this is attributed to the low mobility of vacancies and He/vacancy complexes at these temperatures. Bubble diameter increased slightly for irradiation temperatures of 750 °C and rapidly increased when irradiated at 1000 °C. Dislocation loops were observed at irradiation temperatures of 500 and 750 °C and no loops were observed at 1000 °C. Burgers vectors of the dislocations were determined to be b = ±½ type only and both vacancy and interstitial loops were observed. The proportion of interstitial loops increased with He-appm/DPA ratio and this is attributed to the concomitant increase in bubble areal density, which reduces the vacancy flux for both the growth of vacancy-type loops and the annihilation of interstitial clusters.

  4. Micro-bubble morphologies following drop impacts onto a pool surface

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T; Thoraval, M.-J.; Takehara, K.; Etoh, T.G.

    2012-01-01

    When a drop impacts at low velocity onto a pool surface, a hemispheric air layer cushions and can delay direct contact. Herein we use ultra-high-speed video to study the rupture of this layer, to explain the resulting variety of observed distribution of bubbles. The size and distribution of micro-bubbles is determined by the number and location of the primary punctures. Isolated holes lead to the formation of bubble necklaces when the edges of two growing holes meet, whereas bubble nets are produced by regular shedding of micro-bubbles from a sawtooth edge instability. For the most viscous liquids the air film contracts more rapidly than the capillary-viscous velocity through repeated spontaneous ruptures of the edge. From the speed of hole opening and the total volume of micro-bubbles we conclude that the air sheet ruptures when its thickness approaches ?100.

  5. Acoustic levitation of soap bubbles in air: Beyond the half-wavelength limit of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Duyang; Lin, Kejun; Li, Lin; Chen, Zhen; Li, Xiaoguang; Geng, Xingguo

    2017-03-01

    We report on the behavior of levitated soap bubbles in a single-axis acoustic field. For a single bubble, its surface in the polar regions is under compression, but in the equatorial region, it is under suction. Levitation becomes unstable when the height of the bubble approaches half the wavelength of the sound wave because horizontal fluctuations lead to a negative recovery force and a negative levitation force. Vertically stacked double bubbles notably can be stable under levitation if their total vertical length is ˜5λ/6, significantly beyond λ/2 in consequence of the formation of a toroidal high-pressure region around the waist of the two bubbles. Our results provide a deeper insight into the stability of acoustic levitation and the coupling between bubbles and sound field.

  6. Micro-bubble morphologies following drop impacts onto a pool surface

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2012-10-01

    When a drop impacts at low velocity onto a pool surface, a hemispheric air layer cushions and can delay direct contact. Herein we use ultra-high-speed video to study the rupture of this layer, to explain the resulting variety of observed distribution of bubbles. The size and distribution of micro-bubbles is determined by the number and location of the primary punctures. Isolated holes lead to the formation of bubble necklaces when the edges of two growing holes meet, whereas bubble nets are produced by regular shedding of micro-bubbles from a sawtooth edge instability. For the most viscous liquids the air film contracts more rapidly than the capillary-viscous velocity through repeated spontaneous ruptures of the edge. From the speed of hole opening and the total volume of micro-bubbles we conclude that the air sheet ruptures when its thickness approaches ?100.

  7. Contribution to the study of helium two-phase vertical flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augyrond, L.

    1998-04-01

    This work aims at a better understanding of the dynamics of helium two-phase flow in a vertical duct. The case of bubble flow is particularly investigated. The most descriptive parameter of two-phase flow is the void fraction. A sensor to measure this parameter was specially designed and calibrated, it is made of a radioactive source and a semiconductor detector. Sensors based on light attenuation were used to study the behaviour of this two-phase flow. The experimental set-up is described. The different flow types were photographed and video filmed. This visualization has allowed to measure the diameter of bubbles and to study their movements in the fluid. Bubble flow then churn and annular flows were observed but slug flow seems not to exist with helium. A modelling based on a Zuber model matches better the experimental results than a Levy type model. The detailed analysis of the signals given by the optical sensors has allowed to highlight a bubble appearance frequency directly linked to the flowrate. (A.C.)

  8. Recombination of positive helium ions in gaseous helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyu, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Wigner-Keck Monte Carlo trajectory method and the resonance complex theory are employed to calculate the rate coefficient k for H e + ions recombining in gaseous helium in the temperature range 80 2 + is obtained from a Morse potential and a long range ion-induced dipole interaction term. The three body He 3 + interaction is represented by an approximate expression which, for practical purpose, depends on the same parameters that determine the two body interaction. Russell had employed the Wigner-Keck Monte Carlo trajectory method to the same reaction. Unlike his calculation, in which the final quasibound states are treated as continuous, we apply the JWKB approximation to quantize those quasibound states. Both the values of k, calculated from two different quasibound state treatments, are found to be very close and give good agreement with experimental results obtained by Biondi, although they are still 10% to 20% lower than the experimental results. The resonance complex theory, developed by Roberts et al, is then employed to investigated de-excitation from the highest quasibound state, which can be populated by inward tunneling through the rotational (centrifugal) barrier. It is found that this strongly supports a suggestion proposed by Russell. He had suggested that the remaining difference between the Wigner-Keck method and experiment might be largely due to the formation of highly excited quasibound states. The statistical errors of the rate constants, which is the sun of results obtained from both methods, are kept less then 5% by running 2500 trajectories in the first method and 500 in the second

  9. Cryogenic filter method produces super-pure helium and helium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.

    1964-01-01

    Helium is purified when cooled in a low pressure environment until it becomes superfluid. The liquid helium is then filtered through iron oxide particles. Heating, cooling and filtering processes continue until the purified liquid helium is heated to a gas.

  10. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device. Three fine mesh screen samples (325 x 2300, 450 x 2750, 510 x 3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen using cold and warm noncondensible (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0 to 90 K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate a degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over noncondensible pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  11. Sonochemistry and the acoustic bubble

    CERN Document Server

    Grieser, Franz; Enomoto, Naoya; Harada, Hisashi; Okitsu, Kenji; Yasui, Kyuichi

    2015-01-01

    Sonochemistry and the Acoustic Bubble provides an introduction to the way ultrasound acts on bubbles in a liquid to cause bubbles to collapse violently, leading to localized 'hot spots' in the liquid with temperatures of 5000° celcius and under pressures of several hundred atmospheres. These extreme conditions produce events such as the emission of light, sonoluminescence, with a lifetime of less than a nanosecond, and free radicals that can initiate a host of varied chemical reactions (sonochemistry) in the liquid, all at room temperature. The physics and chemistry behind the p

  12. Desorption of tritium and helium from high dose neutron irradiated beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriyanov, I. B.; Nikolaev, G. N.; Vlasov, V. V.; Kovalev, A. M.; Chakin, V. P.

    2007-08-01

    The effect of high dose neutron irradiation on tritium and helium desorption in beryllium is described. Beryllium samples were irradiated in the SM and BOR-60 reactors to a neutron fluences ( E > 0.1 MeV) of (5-16) × 10 22 cm -2 at 70-100 °C and 380-420 °C. A mass-spectrometry technique was used in out of pile tritium release experiments during stepped annealing in the 250-1300 °C temperature range. The total amount of helium accumulated in irradiated beryllium samples varied from 6000 to 7200 appm. The first signs of tritium and helium release were detected at temperature of 312-445 °C and 500-740 °C, respectively. It is shown that most tritium (˜82%) from sample irradiated at 70-100 °C releases in temperature range of 312-700 °C before the beginning of helium release (740 °C). In the case of beryllium sample irradiated at 380-420 °C, tritium release starts at a higher temperature ( Ts > Tann = 445 °C) and most of the tritium (˜99.8%) is released concurrently with helium which could be considered as evidence of co-existence of partial amounts of tritium and helium in common bubbles. Both the Be samples differ little in the upper temperatures of gas release: 745 and 775 °C for tritium; 1140 and 1160 °C for helium. Swelling of beryllium starts to play a key role in accelerating tritium release at Tann > 600 °C and in helium release - at Tann > 750 °C.

  13. Effect of bubble interface parameters on predicted of bubble departure diameter in a narrow channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jianjun; Xie Tianzhou; Zhou Wenbin; Chen Bingde; Huang Yanping

    2014-01-01

    The predicted model on the bubble departure diameter in a narrow channel is built by analysis of forces acting on the bubble, and effects of bubble interface parameters such as the bubble inclination angle, upstream contact angle, downstream contact angle and bubble contact diameter on predicted bubble departure diameters in a narrow channel are analysed by comparing with the visual experimental data. Based on the above results, the bubble interface parameters as the input parameters used to obtain the bubble departure diameter in a narrow channel are assured, and the bubble departure diameters in a narrow channel are predicted by solving the force equation. The predicted bubble departure diameters are verified by the 58 bubble departure diameters obtained from the vertical and inclined visual experiment, and the predicted results agree with the experimental results. The different forces acting on the bubble are obtained and the effect of thermal parameters in this experiment on bubble departure diameters is analysed. (authors)

  14. New evidence on the first financial bubble

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frehen, R.G.P.; Goetzmann, W.; Rouwenhorst, K.G.

    2013-01-01

    The Mississippi Bubble, South Sea Bubble and the Dutch Windhandel of 1720 together represent the world's first global financial bubble. We hand-collect cross-sectional price data and investor account data from 1720 to test theories about market bubbles. Our tests suggest that innovation was a key

  15. Design and calculation of tritium extraction from liquid LiPb by bubble columns for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Bo

    2009-04-01

    A mathematical model describing the complex fluid-dynamics of a bubble extractor from liquid LiPb loop for ITER is presented. A parametric analysis of the extraction efficiency of a bubble column as a function of the process parameters is carried out and the design of a bubble extractor system is proposed. On this base, a mathematical model is built by taking into consideration the kinetics of deuterium desorption from liquid LiPb alloy. The calculation data of deuterium release-behavior from liquid LiPb under different operating conditions of temperature and deuterium partial pressures and helium gas flow-rates in the liquid LiPb alloy are obtained. These results have shown that the overall re- lease process is governed by the diffusion of deuterium atoms in the LiPb and by the heterogeneous reaction at the gas-eutectic interface of the deuterium atoms recombination under the probable working temperature range. (authors)

  16. Air bubbles and hemolysis of blood samples during transport by pneumatic tube systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Garrett R; Bruns, David E

    2017-10-01

    Transport of blood samples through pneumatic tube systems (PTSs) generates air bubbles in transported blood samples and, with increasing duration of transport, the appearance of hemolysis. We investigated the role of air-bubble formation in PTS-induced hemolysis. Air was introduced into blood samples for 0, 1, 3 or 5min to form air bubbles. Hemolysis in the blood was assessed by (H)-index, lactate dehydrogenase (LD) and potassium in plasma. In an effort to prevent PTS-induced hemolysis, blood sample tubes were completely filled, to prevent air bubble formation, and compared with partially filled samples after PTS transport. We also compared hemolysis in anticoagulated vs clotted blood subjected to PTS transport. As with transport through PTSs, the duration of air bubble formation in blood by a gentle stream of air predicted the extent of hemolysis as measured by H-index (pair space in a blood sample prevented bubble formation and fully protected the blood from PTS-induced hemolysis (ptransport and was partially protected from hemolysis vs anticoagulated blood as indicated by lower LD (ptransport. Prevention of air bubble formation in blood samples during PTS transport protects samples from hemolysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of Bubble Size Distributions within a Bubble Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrouz Mohagheghian

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The current study experimentally examines bubble size distribution (BSD within a bubble column and the associated characteristic length scales. Air was injected into a column of water via a single injection tube. The column diameter (63–102 mm, injection tube diameter (0.8–1.6 mm and superficial gas velocity (1.4–55 mm/s were varied. Large samples (up to 54,000 bubbles of bubble sizes measured via 2D imaging were used to produce probability density functions (PDFs. The PDFs were used to identify an alternative length scale termed the most frequent bubble size (dmf and defined as the peak in the PDF. This length scale as well as the traditional Sauter mean diameter were used to assess the sensitivity of the BSD to gas injection rate, injector tube diameter, injection tube angle and column diameter. The dmf was relatively insensitive to most variation, which indicates these bubbles are produced by the turbulent wakes. In addition, the current work examines higher order statistics (standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis and notes that there is evidence in support of using these statistics to quantify the influence of specific parameters on the flow-field as well as a potential indicator of regime transitions.

  18. Annealing dislocation loops in OKh16N15M3T steel implanted by helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utkelbaev, B.D.; Reutov, V.F.; Zhdan, G.T.

    1993-01-01

    With the use of electron microscopy a study was made into the influence of preliminary thermomechanical treatment on the process of dislocation loop development in austenitic stainless steel type OKh16N15M3T with helium on annealing. Preliminary treatment was shown to prevent dislocation loop formation to a greater or lesser extent. Preliminary 'cold' working and thermal ageing of the material are the most effective ways to suppress radiation defect formation when annealing helium implanted steel

  19. Excitation of helium resonance lines in solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, J.G.; Gebbie, K.B.; November, L.J.; Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics, Boulder, CO; National Solar Observatory, Sunspot, NM)

    1985-01-01

    Helium resonance line intensities are calculated for a set of six flare models corresponding to two rates of heating and three widely varying incident fluxes of soft X-rays. The differing ionization and excitation equilibria produced by these models, the processes which dominate the various cases, and the predicted helium line spectra are examined. The line intensities and their ratios are compared with values derived from Skylab NRL spectroheliograms for a class M flare, thus determining which of these models most nearly represents the density vs temperature structure and soft X-ray flux in the flaring solar transition region, and the temperature and dominant mechanaism of formation of the helium line spectrum during a flare. 26 references

  20. Microstreaming from Sessile Semicylindrical Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Guo, Lin; Wang, Cheng

    2014-03-01

    Powerful steady streaming flows result from the ultrasonic driving of microbubbles, in particular when these bubbles have semicylindrical cross section and are positioned in contact with a microfluidic channel wall. We have used this streaming in experiment to develop novel methods for trapping and sorting of microparticles by size, as well as for micromixing. Theoretically, we arrive at an analytical description of the streaming flow field through an asymptotic computation that, for the first time, reconciles the boundary layers around the bubble and along the substrate wall, and also takes into account the oscillation modes of the bubble. This approach gives insight into changes in the streaming pattern with bubble size and driving frequency, including a reversal of the flow direction at high frequencies with potentially useful applications. Present address: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Missouri S &T.