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Sample records for helicobacter pylori-negative healthy

  1. Lymphoid follicles in children with Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis

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    Broide, Efrat; Richter, Vered; Mendlovic, Sonia; Shalem, Tzippora; Eindor-Abarbanel, Adi; Moss, Steven F; Shirin, Haim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis has been declining, whereas H. pylori-negative gastritis has become more common. We evaluated chronic gastritis in children with regard to H. pylori status and celiac disease (CD). Patients and methods Demographic, clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of children who underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy were reviewed retrospectively. Gastric biopsies from the antrum and corpus of the stomach were graded using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori presence was defined by hematoxylin and eosin, Giemsa, or immunohistochemical staining and urease testing. Results A total of 184 children (61.9% female) met the study criteria with a mean age of 10 years. A total of 122 (66.3%) patients had chronic gastritis; 74 (60.7%) were H. pylori-negative. Children with H. pylori-negative gastritis were younger (p=0.003), were less likely to present with abdominal pain (p=0.02), and were mostly of non-Arabic origin (p=0.011). Nodular gastritis was found to be less prevalent in H. pylori-negative gastritis (6.8%) compared with H. pylori-positive gastritis (35.4%, pgastritis and lymphoid follicles were associated most commonly with H. pylori. Although less typical, lymphoid follicles were demonstrated in 51.3% of H. pylori-negative patients. The presence or absence of CD was not associated with histologic findings in H. pylori-negative gastritis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that lymphoid follicles are a feature of H. pylori-negative gastritis in children independent of their CD status. PMID:28860835

  2. Helicobacter pylori-Negative Gastritis: Prevalence and Risk Factors

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    Nordenstedt, Helena; Graham, David Y.; Kramer, Jennifer R.; Rugge, Massimo; Verstovsek, Gordana; Fitzgerald, Stephanie; Alsarraj, Abeer; Shaib, Yasser; Velez, Maria E.; Abraham, Neena; Anand, Bhupinderjit; Cole, Rhonda; El-Serag, Hashem B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Recent studies using histology alone in select patients have suggested that Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis may be common. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori among individuals with histologic gastritis. METHODS Subjects between 40 and 80 years underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy at a VA Medical Center. Gastric biopsies were mapped from seven prespecified sites (two antrum, four corpus, and one cardia) and graded by two gastrointestinal pathologists, using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori-negative required four criteria: negative triple staining at all seven gastric sites, negative H. pylori culture, negative IgG H. pylori serology, and no previous treatment for H. pylori. Data regarding tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use were obtained by questionnaire. RESULTS Of the 491 individuals enrolled, 40.7% (200) had gastritis of at least grade 2 in at least one biopsy site or grade 1 in at least two sites. Forty-one (20.5%) had H. pylori-negative gastritis; most (30 or 73.2%) had chronic gastritis, five (12.2%) had active gastritis, and six (14.6%) had both. H. pylori-negative gastritis was approximately equally distributed in the antrum, corpus, and both antrum and corpus. Past and current PPI use was more frequent in H. pylori-negative vs. H. pylori-positive gastritis (68.2% and 53.8%; P = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS We used multiple methods to define non-H. pylori gastritis and found it in 21% of patients with histologic gastritis. While PPI use is a potential risk factor, the cause or implications of this entity are not known. PMID:23147524

  3. Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis: prevalence and risk factors.

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    Nordenstedt, Helena; Graham, David Y; Kramer, Jennifer R; Rugge, Massimo; Verstovsek, Gordana; Fitzgerald, Stephanie; Alsarraj, Abeer; Shaib, Yasser; Velez, Maria E; Abraham, Neena; Anand, Bhupinderjit; Cole, Rhonda; El-Serag, Hashem B

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies using histology alone in select patients have suggested that Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis may be common. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori among individuals with histologic gastritis. Subjects between 40 and 80 years underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy at a VA Medical Center. Gastric biopsies were mapped from seven prespecified sites (two antrum, four corpus, and one cardia) and graded by two gastrointestinal pathologists, using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori-negative required four criteria: negative triple staining at all seven gastric sites, negative H. pylori culture, negative IgG H. pylori serology, and no previous treatment for H. pylori. Data regarding tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use were obtained by questionnaire. Of the 491 individuals enrolled, 40.7% (200) had gastritis of at least grade 2 in at least one biopsy site or grade 1 in at least two sites. Forty-one (20.5%) had H. pylori-negative gastritis; most (30 or 73.2%) had chronic gastritis, five (12.2%) had active gastritis, and six (14.6%) had both. H. pylori-negative gastritis was approximately equally distributed in the antrum, corpus, and both antrum and corpus. Past and current PPI use was more frequent in H. pylori-negative vs. H. pylori-positive gastritis (68.2% and 53.8%; P=0.06). We used multiple methods to define non-H. pylori gastritis and found it in 21% of patients with histologic gastritis. While PPI use is a potential risk factor, the cause or implications of this entity are not known.

  4. Relationship between headache and mucosal mast cells in pediatric Helicobacter pylori-negative functional dyspepsia.

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    Yeom, Jung Sook; Choi, Myung Bum; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Park, Ji Sook; Lim, Jae-Young; Park, Chan-Hoo; Woo, Hyang-Ok; Youn, Hee-Shang; Ko, Gyung-Hyuck; Baik, Seung-Chul; Lee, Woo-Kon; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho

    2013-04-01

    Although many patients with functional dyspepsia experience headache concurrently with dyspeptic symptoms, studies suggesting mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are limited. Herein, we explore the relationship between gastrointestinal inflammatory cells and presence of headache associated with dyspeptic symptoms in children with HELICOBACTER PYLORI -negative functional dyspepsia. Fifty-six patients with H. PYLORI -negative functional dyspepsia underwent upper endoscopy with biopsy to investigate recurrent epigastric pain or discomfort. Patients were divided into two groups according to self-reported presence of headache associated with dyspeptic symptoms. Inflammatory cells including mast cells, and enteroendocrine cells in the gastroduodenal mucosa were evaluated. Associations between headache presence and cellular changes in the gastroduodenal mucosa were examined. Headache was not associated with the grade of lymphocytes, neutrophil infiltration, or enteroendocrine cell density in the gastroduedenal mucosa. However, headache was significantly associated with high mast cell density in the body (27.81 ± 8.71 vs. 20.30 ± 8.16, P  headache associated with dyspeptic symptoms is strongly related to mucosal mast cell density in pediatric patients with H. PYLORI -negative functional dyspepsia. Thus, our results may help clinicians understand and treat headache during dyspeptic symptoms in such pediatric patients.

  5. Clinical characteristics of Helicobacter pylori-negative drug-negative peptic ulcer bleeding.

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    Chung, Woo Chul; Jeon, Eun Jung; Kim, Dae Bum; Sung, Hea Jung; Kim, Yeon-Ji; Lim, Eun Sun; Kim, Min-Ah; Oh, Jung Hwan

    2015-07-28

    To investigate the clinical characteristics and outcomes of idiopathic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-negative and drug-negative] peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). A consecutive series of patients who experienced PUB between 2006 and 2012 was retrospectively analyzed. A total of 232 patients were enrolled in this study. The patients were divided into four groups according to the etiologies of PUB: idiopathic, H. pylori-associated, drug-induced and combined (H. pylori-associated and drug-induced) types. We compared the clinical characteristics and outcomes between the groups. When the silver stain or rapid urease tests were H. pylori-negative, we obtained an additional biopsy specimen by endoscopic re-examination and performed an H. pylori antibody test 6-8 wk after the initial endoscopic examination. For a diagnosis of idiopathic PUB, a negative result of an H. pylori antibody test was confirmed. In all cases, re-bleeding was confirmed by endoscopic examination. For the risk assessment, the Blatchford and the Rockall scores were calculated for all patients. For PUB, the frequency of H. pylori infection was 59.5% (138/232), whereas the frequency of idiopathic cases was 8.6% (20/232). When idiopathic PUB was compared to H. pylori-associated PUB, the idiopathic PUB group showed a higher rate of re-bleeding after initial hemostasis during the hospital stay (30% vs 7.4%, P = 0.02). When idiopathic PUB was compared to drug-induced PUB, the patients in the idiopathic PUB group showed a higher rate of re-bleeding after initial hemostasis upon admission (30% vs 2.7%, P < 0.01). When drug-induced PUB was compared to H. pylori-associated PUB, the patients in the drug-induced PUB were older (68.49 ± 14.76 years vs 47.83 ± 15.15 years, P < 0.01) and showed a higher proportion of gastric ulcer (77% vs 49%, P < 0.01). However, the Blatchford and the Rockall scores were not significantly different between the two groups. Among the patients who experienced drug-induced PUB, no

  6. Helicobacter pylori-negative, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug: Negative idiopathic ulcers in Asia

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    Iijima, Katsunori; Kanno, Takeshi; Koike, Tomoyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in the stomach, the bacteria infection and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) use had been considered to be the 2 main causes of peptic ulcers. However, there have been recent reports of an increase in the proportion of peptic ulcers without these known risk factors; these are termed idiopathic peptic ulcers. Such trend was firstly indicated in 1990s from some reports in North America. In Asia, numerous studies reported that idiopathic ulcers accounted for a small percentage of all ulcers in the 1990s, but in the 2000s, multiple studies reported that the proportion of idiopathic ulcers had reached 10%-30%, indicating that the incidence of idiopathic ulcers in Asia has also been rising in recent years. While a decline in H. pylori infection rates of general population in Asia is seen as the main reason for the increased incidence of idiopathic ulcers, it is also possible that the absolute number of idiopathic ulcer cases has increased. Advanced age, serious systemic complication, and psychological stress are considered to be the potential risk factors for idiopathic ulcers. Management of idiopathic ulcers is challenging, at present, because there is no effective preventative measure against recurrence in contrast with cases of H. pylori-positive ulcers and NSAIDs-induced ulcers. As it is expected that H. pylori infection rates in Asia will decline further in the future, measures to treat idiopathic ulcers will also likely become more important. PMID:24574744

  7. Helicobacter-pylori Negative Gastritis in Children—A New Clinical Enigma

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    Yoram Elitsur

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The decrease in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hp infection in children in the world gave rise to a new pathological finding termed as Hp-negative gastritis. Unfortunately, the term “Hp-negative gastritis” has not been identified as a pathological process and has the status of a “second cousin”; in most publications it was never mentioned as a subject to be dealt with, but was “left over” data that was never the topic of the manuscripts’ discussions. Only recently has the topic captured the attention of the pathologists who described this phenomenon in adults, yet the pathological and/or clinical spectrum or significance of this phenomenon has not been adequately investigated. In the current manuscript we describe Hp-negative gastritis in children, summarize its clinical prevalence and touch upon the possible etiology, pathology, and/or therapeutic implication. Overall, this review has concluded that Hp-negative gastritis is a pathological phenomenon in children that needs further investigation, and to date, as the title suggests, is a new clinical enigma that needs to be considered.

  8. Comparison between Resectable Helicobacter pylori-Negative and -Positive Gastric Cancers.

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    Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Nayoung; Yoon, Hyuk; Choi, Yoon Jin; Lee, Ju Yup; Kwon, Yong Hwan; Yoon, Kichul; Jo, Hyun Jin; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Hyung Ho; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-03-01

    Controversy exists regarding the characteristics of Helicobacter pylori infection-negative gastric cancer (HPIN-GC). The aim of this study was to evaluate clinicopathologic features of HPIN-GC compared to H. pylori infection-positive gastric cancer (HPIP-GC) using a comprehensive analysis that included genetic and environmental factors. H. pylori infection status of 705 resectable gastric cancer patients was determined by the rapid urease test, testing for anti-H. pylori antibodies, histologic analysis and culture of gastric cancer tissue samples, and history of H. pylori eradication. HPIN-GC was defined as gastric cancer that was negative for H. pylori infection based on all five methods and that had no evidence of atrophy in histology or serology. The prevalence of HPIN-GC was 4% (28/705). No significant differences with respect to age, sex, smoking, drinking, family history of gastric cancer or obesity were observed between the two groups. HPIN-GC tumors were marginally more likely to involve the cardia (14.3% for HPIN-GC vs 5.3% for HPIP-GC, p=0.068). The Lauren classification, histology, and TNM stage did not differ according to H. pylori infection status. Microsatellite instability was not different between the two groups, but p53 overexpression in HPIN-GC was marginally higher than in HPIP-GC (56.0% for HPIN-GC vs 37.0% for HPIP-GC, p=0.055). The prevalence of HPIN-GC was extremely low, and its clinicopathologic characteristics were similar to HPIP-GC.

  9. Helicobacter pylori Eradication Therapy Is Effective as the Initial Treatment for Patients with H. pylori-Negative and Disseminated Gastric Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma.

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    Gong, Eun Jeong; Ahn, Ji Yong; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Park, Hyungchul; Ko, Young Bo; Na, Hee Kyong; Jung, Kee Wook; Kim, Do Hoon; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Choi, Kee Don; Song, Ho June; Lee, Gin Hyug; Kim, Jin-Ho

    2016-09-15

    We investigated the effectiveness of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy for gastric mucosaassociated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma regardless of the H. pylori infection status or disease stage. From November 1995 to September 2014, 345 subjects who were diagnosed with gastric MALT lymphoma and had received eradication therapy as their first-line treatment were eligible for inclusion in this study. A retrospective review was performed using the medical records. Of the 345 patients, H. pylori infection was detected in 317 patients (91.9%). The complete remission (CR) rate after eradication therapy was 82.3%, which was higher in H. pylori -positive patients than in H. pylori-negative patients (84.5% vs 57.1%, p=0.001). CR rates after eradication did not present significant differences between stages, and the CR rate was 83.3% for stage IE1 and 74.4% for stage IE2 or above (p=0.167). The overall CR rate was 87.2% after additional treatment, and neither H. pylori infection status nor stage showed differences according to the treatment response. Eradication therapy led to CR in 57.1% of H. pylori-negative patients and in 74.4% of patients with stage IE2 or above. Eradication therapy is worthwhile as an initial treatment for gastric MALT lymphoma regardless of the H. pylori infection status and stage.

  10. Gastric polyps diagnosed by double-contrast upper gastrointestinal barium X-ray radiography mostly arise from the Helicobacter pylori-negative stomach with low risk of gastric cancer in Japan.

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    Takeuchi, Chihiro; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Shimamoto, Takeshi; Takahashi, Yu; Mitsushima, Toru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2017-03-01

    Double-contrast upper gastrointestinal barium X-ray radiography (UGI-XR) is a method broadly used for gastric cancer screening in Japan. Gastric polyp is one of the most frequent findings detected by UGI-XR, but how to handle it remains controversial. Gastric polyps of the 17,264 generally healthy subjects in Japan who underwent UGI-XR or upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGI-ES) in 2010 were analyzed. Of the 6,433 UGI-XR examinees (3,405 men and 3,028 women, 47.4 ± 9.0 years old), gastric polyps were detected in 464 men (13.6 %) and 733 women (24.2 %) and were predominantly developed on the non-atrophic gastric mucosa (p gastric polyps has significant association with lower value of serum anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG titer, female gender, lighter smoking habit, older age, and normal range of body mass index (≥18.5 and gastric cancer occurred in 7 subjects (0.11 %), but none of them had gastric polyps at the beginning of the follow-up period. Of the 2,722 subjects with gastric polyps among the 10,831 UGI-ES examinees in the same period, 2,446 (89.9 %) had fundic, 267 (9.8 %) had hyperplastic, and 9 (0.3 %) had adenomatous/cancerous polyps. Gastric polyps diagnosed by UGI-XR predominantly arise on the Helicobacter pylori-negative gastric mucosa with a low risk of gastric cancer in Japan. In the prospective observation, none of the UGI-XR examinees with gastric polyps developed gastric cancer for at least 3 years subsequently.

  11. Antral atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and preneoplastic markers in Mexican children with Helicobacter pylori-positive and Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis.

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    Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Luévano-González, Arturo; Aragón-Flores, Mariana; Zhu, Hongtu; Yuan, Ying; Xiang, Qun; Yan, Benjamin; Stoll, Kathryn Anne; Cross, Janet V; Iczkowski, Kenneth A; Mackinnon, Alexander Craig

    2014-06-01

    Chronic inflammation and infection are major risk factors for gastric carcinogenesis in adults. As chronic gastritis is common in Mexican children, diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori and other causes of gastritis are critical for the identification of children who would benefit from closer surveillance. Antral biopsies from 82 Mexican children (mean age, 8.3 ± 4.8 years) with chronic gastritis (36 H pylori+, 46 H pylori-) were examined for gastritis activity, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia (IM), and immunohistochemical expression of gastric carcinogenesis biomarkers caudal type homeobox 2 (CDX2), ephrin type-B receptor 4 (EphB4), matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3), macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), p53, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. Atrophy was diagnosed in 7 (9%) of 82, and IM, in 5 (6%) of 82 by routine histology, whereas 6 additional children (7%) (3 H pylori+) exhibited aberrant CDX2 expression without IM. Significant positive correlations were seen between EphB4, MMP3, and MIF (Pgastritis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [H. pylori-negative gastric cancer].

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    Kato, Mototsugu; Ono, Shouko; Shimizu, Yuichi; Sakamoto, Naoya; Mabe, Katsuhiro

    2015-07-01

    Broad category of H. pylori-negative gastric cancer includes true gastric cancer without history of H. pylori infection, gastric cancer after successful eradication of H. pylori, and H. pylori-negative gastric cancer with history of H. pylori infection. The frequency of gastric cancer without history of H. pylori infection was less than 1% in Japan. Although preventive effect for gastric cancer of H. pylori eradication can be expected, risk of gastric cancer incidence continues after eradication of H. pylori. The frequency of gastric cancer after successful eradication has been increasing, since eradication treatment was widely spread in Japan. The features of H. pylori-negative gastric cancer were reported to be different from conventional H. pylori-positive gastric cancer. Endoscopic screening of gastric cancer requires to understand the characteristics of gastric cancer based on status of H. pylori infection.

  13. Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis and dyspepsia. The influence on migrating motor complexes

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    Qvist, N; Rasmussen, L; Axelsson, C K

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with dyspepsia were included. In 19 patients with a median age of 48 (range, 20-72) years endoscopy and histologic examination of biopsy specimens from the antrum and corpus of the stomach showed Helicobacter pylori-positive gastritis as the only pathologic finding. In six...... patients with a median age of 42 (range, 32-56) years H. pylori-negative gastritis was found. After an overnight fast the patients underwent an ambulatory duodenal motility study for 6-8 h. Twenty-five young healthy men served as the control group. In patients with H. pylori-positive gastritis the duration...... (22-89 min) in the control group. The duration of phase III and the whole MMC cycle was similar in the two groups. However, in the patients with H. pylori-negative gastritis the values of the duration of the different phases of the MMC were similar to those of the patients with H. pylori...

  14. Two Cases of Helicobacter pylori-Negative Gastric Outlet Obstruction in Children

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    Raza A. Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO in children is most commonly caused by idiopathic hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. Prior to proton pump inhibitors and H2 blockers, peptic ulcer disease (PUD secondary to H. pylori was a cause of GOO. Both patients presented with a history of weight loss, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Their diagnosis of PUD and GOO was made by EGD and UGI. H. pylori testing was negative for both on multiple occasions but still received H. pylori eradication therapy. Patient 1 after failing pharmaceutical management underwent surgery for definitive treatment. Patient 2 underwent six therapeutic pyloric dilations before undergoing surgery as definitive treatment. These cases suggest that GOO secondary to PUD occurs in the absence of H. pylori infection and surgical management can provide definitive therapy.

  15. Demographic, Endoscopic and Histopathologic Features Among Stool H. pylori Positive and Stool H. pylori Negative Patients With Dyspepsia.

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    Emara, Mohamed Hassan; Salama, Rasha Ibrahim; Salem, Amira Amin

    2017-10-01

    Dyspepsia is a common presentation for many patients in gastroenterology clinics. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is endemic in many countries around the world and its relation to dyspepsia has long been questioned. This study aimed at comparing demographic, endoscopic and histologic features among dyspeptic patients with and without stool H. pylori antigen positivity. One hundred and fifty-one consecutive patients with dyspepsia were divided into group I (n = 80) and group II (n = 71) according to positive or negative H. pylori stool antigen testing, respectively. All patients were subjected to history taking, clinical examination, laboratory investigations, abdominal ultrasonography, H. pylori stool antigen detection, and upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy with four gastric mucosal biopsies for histopathologic examination. Stool H. pylori antigen negative group included more smokers and consumed much more fast and spicy food than the positive group. The most common endoscopic findings of both groups were gastritis, reflux esophagitis, gastric erosions, peptic ulcer, mucosal nodularity and hiatus hernia and were encountered in 100%, 74.2%, 23.2%, 15.2%, 13.9%, and 13.2% respectively with non-significant difference between both groups except for gastric erosions that were significantly higher in stool H. pylori negative group (P H. pylori bacilli were histologically detected in 83.7% and 47.9% of patients in group I and group II, respectively (P < 0.001). All patients with dyspepsia in this study had endoscopic evidence of gastritis. Most of these patients had histologic evidence of gastric mucosal inflammation. Consequently, it may be advisable to perform endoscopy on these patients and obtain gastric mucosal biopsies.

  16. Decrease of serum level of gastrin in healthy Japanese adults by the change of Helicobacter pylori infection.

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    Shimoyama, Tadashi; Chinda, Daisuke; Matsuzaka, Masashi; Takahashi, Ippei; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Fukuda, Shinsaku

    2014-12-01

    In Japan, the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is decreasing and the number of patients who receive eradication therapy is increasing. Although the serum level of gastrin is affected by H. pylori infection, the normal level has been unchanged for more than 20 years. The aim of this study was to study whether the present normal range for the serum gastrin level is appropriate for Japanese at present or in the near future. We studied 810 adults (40-80 years old) who participated in a health survey in 2012. We measured H. pylori stool antigen, titer of serum antibody to H. pylori, and serum level of gastrin. The patient's H. pylori status was defined as positive or negative when the results of both stool antigen and serology were concordant. Subjects who were taking proton-pump inhibitor and had a previous history of gastric surgery were excluded. Mean serum level of gastrin was 66.2±49.6 pg/mL in 281 H. pylori-negative subjects and 69.7±42.2 pg/mL in 115 patients who had H. pylori eradicated at least 2 years ago. The level of gastrin was 134.4±145.6 pg/mL in 224 patients with H. pylori infection and the level was significantly higher when compared with those in uninfected subjects and eradicated patients (Pgastrin should be established using current Japanese populations. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. The influence of Helicobacter pylori on oesophageal acid exposure in GERD during acid suppressive therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, FTM; Kuipers, EJ; Ganesh, S; Sluiter, WJ; Klinkenberg-Knol, EC; Lamers, CBHW; Kleibeuker, JH

    Background: Helicobacter pylori exaggerates the effect of acid suppressive drugs on intragastric pH. It is unknown whether this is relevant for the treatment of GERD. Aim: To compare oesophageal acid exposure and symptoms in H. pylori-negative and H. pylori-positive GERD patients during low and

  18. Is the sensitivity to gastric acid inhibition Helicobacter pylori status-dependent?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smout, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies using 24-h intragastric pH monitoring suggest that treatment with a proton-pump inhibitor is less effective in Helicobacter pylori-negative than in H. pylori-positive subjects. AIM: To survey and discuss the available information on the interaction between H. pylori status

  19. Prevalência de helicobactérias e alterações na mucosa gástrica de cães saudáveis Prevalence of helicobacters and alterations in gastric mucosa of healthy dogs

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    F.Q. Moutinho

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence, distribution and density of gastric helicobacter colonization were determined in 50 healthy dogs, characterizing the macroscopic and microcospic aspects of their mucosa. Helicobacter prevalence was 96%, with greater distribution in the gastric fundus and body. Although the presence of macroscopic alterations was high (58%, it was characterized as mild due to the predominance of less severe ones (65.5%. High prevalence of mostly monoclear cell infriltate (64.7% was noted. Association between the presence of helicobacter and macro and microscopic alterations was not observed.

  20. Helicobacter pylori associated with breastfeeding, nutritional status and recurrent abdominal pain in healthy Nigerian children.

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    Senbanjo, Idowu O; Oshikoya, Kazeem A; Njokanma, Olisamedua F

    2014-04-15

    There is limited knowledge about the associations of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections in developing countries. This study aimed to determine the current prevalence and associations of H. pylori infection with breastfeeding practices, nutritional status, and recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in a group of apparently healthy children and adolescents in Lagos, Nigeria. This was a prospective hospital-based study conducted at the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital that involved 118 children who came to the hospital for routine pediatric care. Seroprevalence status of the children was determined by measuring immunoglobulin G antibodies against H. pylori using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Seventy-five (63.6%) children were seropositive for H. pylori. The prevalence of H. pylori infection increased significantly from 40.4% in children less than five years of age to 85.1% at six to ten years of age (χ(2) = 20.9, p nutrition. The prevalence of H. pylori infection is high, particularly among children from low socioeconomic backgrounds in Lagos, Nigeria. It is associated with RAP. The effect of this infection on children's health requires further studies.

  1. Upregulation of miR-222 in both Helicobacter pylori- infected and noninfected gastric cancer patients.

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    Noormohammad, Mina; Sadeghi, Samira; Tabatabaeian, Hossein; Ghaedi, Kamran; Talebi, Ardeshir; Azadeh, Mansoureh; Khatami, Mehri; Heidari, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-12-01

    Despite of promising improvements in treatment of gastric cancer, the mortality rate of this malignancy remains high. Chronic infection by Helicobacter pylori, interfering with intracellular signalling pathways, is the main risk factor for gastric cancer. Some evidence suggests that microRNAs (miRNA), the small noncoding RNA molecules, can play role as oncogenes or tumour suppressors in the cells. MiR-222 is one of the remarkable miRNAs undergoing upregulation in gastric cancer. However, the association between miR-222 upregulation and H. pylori infection in gastric cancer tissues remains unclear. The aim of this study was to analyse the expression level of miR-222 in gastric cancer tissues, evaluating the relationship between miR-222 expression level and H. pylori infection and also finding novel miR-222 targets based on in silico investigations. MiR-222 expression level in 200 patients including 112 H. pylori positive and 88 H. pylori negative was relatively measured using RT-qPCR and compared with 88 healthy samples. In silico enrichment analysis of miR-222 targets was performed by DAVID database to evaluate the possible role(s) of miR-222 in gastric tumourigenesis. We observed upregulated level of miR-222 in gastric cancer tissues compared with normal samples (Ppylori-positive and H. pylori-negative cases was observed. Our in silico analyses showed the possible role of p53, p27, PTEN and Elongin B in gastric cancer tumourigenesis. MiR-222 functions as an onco-miRNA and its overexpression can be involved in pathogenesis of gastric cancer, independent of H. pylori infection.

  2. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection.

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    Tangerman, A; Winkel, E G; de Laat, L; van Oijen, A H; de Boer, W A

    2012-03-01

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to detect halitosis. In this study a possible relation between H. pylori and halitosis was evaluated, using an objective method (gas chromatography, GC) to detect the VSCs, responsible for the halitosis. The levels of the VSCs hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), methyl mercaptan (MM) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were measured in mouth breath and in stomach air of 11 H. pylori positive patients and of 38 H. pylori negative patients, all with gastric pathology. Halitosis was also established by organoleptic scoring (OLS) of mouth-breath. The levels of H(2)S, MM and DMS in the mouth-breath and stomach air of the H. pylori positive patients did not differ significantly from those of the H. pylori negative patients. OLS of the mouth-breath resulted in 9 patients with halitosis, 1 out of the H. pylori positive group and 8 out of the H. pylori negative group, which is not statistically different. The concentrations of the VSCs in stomach air were in nearly all cases below the thresholds of objectionability of the various VSCs, indicating that halitosis does not originate in the stomach. The patients with gastric pathology were also compared with control patients without gastric pathology and with normal volunteers. No significant differences in VSCs in mouth breath were observed between these groups. Thus, in this study no association between halitosis and H. pylori infection was found. Halitosis, as established by GC and OLS, nearly always originates within the oral cavity and seldom or never within the stomach.

  3. Risk Factors for and Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection among Healthy Inhabitants in Northern Jakarta, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yasuyuki; Syam, Ari Fahrial; Darnindro, Nikko; Puspita Hapsari, Florentina Carolin

    2016-01-01

    Indonesia is a developing country, in most of which the infection rates of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) have been reported to be high. However, the prevalence of H. pylori infection in Indonesia has been unexpectedly reported to be low. The purpose of our study was to con rm whether the prevalence of H. pylori infection is low among healthy inhabitants in Northern Jakarta by 13C-urea breath test (UBT), and to examine the association of their lifestyle/environmental factors with H. pylori infection and to identify potential routes of transmission. We recruited a total of 196 subjects from a low-income community in Northern Jakarta, Indonesia. Of them, 193 subjects who completed a questionnaire about their lifestyle/environment and had UBT were included in this study. Odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for sex and age with 95% con dence intervals (CIs) were calculated using logistic regression model. The overall H. pylori infection rate was 15.0%. There was difference in H. pylori infection rates among Buginese (40.0%), Betawi (9.1%), Sundanese (3.7%), and Batak (9.1%). After multivariate analysis, the ORs of intake of soybean milk, cucumber more than one time a week, infrequent hand washing before meals, and alcohol consumption were 0.10 (95%CI: 0.01-0.97), 6.61 (95%CI: 1.87-23.3), 4.10 (95%CI: 1.15-14.6), and 61.9 for former drinkers (95%CI: 1.67-2300.8), respectively. Buginese (OR=7.84; 95%CI: 1.82- 33.8) and Batak ethnic groups (OR=20.1; 95%CI: 1.90-213.2) were infected more frequently, compared with Javanese. The H. pylori infection rate in this study was low, as reported previously. After we scrutinized the factors, Buginese and Batak ethnic groups eat food using ngers more frequently than Javanese, Betawi, and Sundanese. In addition, infrequent hand wash practice before meal increased the risk. Our study indicated that person-person transmission was possible in this low prevalence area. The low infection rates of H. pylori among those of Javanese, Betawi, and

  4. Helicobacter pylori and nonmalignant diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alakkari, Alaa

    2012-02-01

    Research published over the past year has documented the continued decline of Helicobacter pylori-related peptic ulcer disease and increased recognition of non-H. pylori, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ulcer disease--idiopathic ulcers. Despite reduced prevalence of uncomplicated PUD, rates of ulcer complications and associated mortality remain stubbornly high. The role of H. pylori in functional dyspepsia is unclear, with some authors considering H. pylori-associated nonulcer dyspepsia a distinct organic entity. There is increasing acceptance of an inverse relationship between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), but little understanding of how GERD might be more common\\/severe in H. pylori-negative subjects. Research has focused on factors such as different H. pylori phenotypes, weight gain after H. pylori eradication, and effects on hormones such as ghrelin that control appetite.

  5. Gastric bicarbonate secretion and release of prostaglandin E2 are increased in duodenal ulcer patients, but not in Helicobacter pylori positive healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A, Mertz-Nielsen; Hillingsø, Jens; Frøkiær, Hanne

    1996-01-01

    Background: Duodenal ulcer (DU) patients have impaired proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion at rest and in response to luminal acid with higher acid-stimulated mucosal release of prostaglandin (PG) E(2) than healthy subjects. Our purpose was to determine whether this abnormality...... was present also in the stomach of DU patients. Methods: Simultaneous determinations of gastric and duodenal bicarbonate secretion and luminal release of PGE(2) were performed in 16 healthy volunteers (5 Helicobacter pylori-positive) and 8 inactive DU patients (all H. pylori-positivr). Results: In healthy...

  6. Gastric bicarbonate secretion and release of prostaglandin E2 are increased in duodenal ulcer patients but not in Helicobacter pylori-positive healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertz-Nielsen, A; Hillingsø, Jens; Frøkiaer, H

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Duodenal ulcer (DU) patients have impaired proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion at rest and in response to luminal acid with higher acid-stimulated mucosal release of prostaglandin (PG) E2 than healthy subjects. Our purpose was to determine whether this abnormality...... was present also in the stomach of DU patients. METHODS: Simultaneous determinations of gastric and duodenal bicarbonate secretion and luminal release of PGE2 were performed in 16 healthy volunteers (5 Helicobacter pylori-positive) and 8 inactive DU patients (all H. pylori-positive). RESULTS: In healthy...

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric carcinogenesis in rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Toyoda, Takeshi; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Tatematsu, Masae

    2013-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is an important factor for gastric carcinogenesis in human. In carcinogen-treated Mongolian gerbils, H. pylori infection enhances stomach carcinogenesis, while infection alone induced severe hyperplasia called heterotopic proliferative glands. A high-salt diet or early acquisition of the bacteria exacerbates inflammation and carcinogenesis. Oxygen radical scavengers or anti-inflammatory chemicals as well as eradication of H. pylori are effective to prevent carcinogenesis. H. pylori-associated inflammation induces intestinal metaplasia and intestinalization of stomach cancers independently. It is necessary to control cancer development not only in H. pylori-positive cases but also in H. pylori-negative metaplastic gastritis.

  8. Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori does not provoke major systemic inflammation in healthy adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenner, H; Berg, Gabriele; Fröhlich, M

    1999-01-01

    with H. pylori was unrelated to C-reactive protein and the leukocyte count, regardless of CagA status. There was an inverse relation between H. pylori infection and serum albumin. The adjusted OR (95% CI) of an albumin level in the bottom versus the top third were 2.2 (1.5-3.1) and 2.0 (1......It has been suggested that chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), in particular infection with virulent strains producing the cytotoxin-associated protein CagA, may increase the risk of coronary heart disease by generation of a persistent low-grade inflammatory stimulus. We...... assessed the relation between serological markers of H. pylori infection and various markers of systemic inflammation in a population-based sample of 1834 men and women aged 18-88. A total of 39.3% of the sample had a positive IgG response, and among these a slight majority was CagA positive. Infection...

  9. No inverse relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and adult asthma with peptic ulcer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shen-Shong; Hu, Hsiao-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Inverse correlation between childhood-onset asthma and human gastric Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection exists. To investigate whether adult asthma patients with peptic ulcer disease demonstrated lower rates of H. pylori infection. Asthma patients were identified from records of inpatient treatments or from 3 or more ambulatory care claims using the International Classifications of Diseases, Revision 9, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) diagnosis code: 493. To be defined as a non-asthma patient, a person cannot have the code ICD-9-CM: 490-494, and 496 in inpatient records or in the ambulatory care claims. The sample included 2,894 H. pylori-positive patients with peptic ulcers and 522 H. pylori-negative patients with peptic ulcers. A logistic regression model was used to calculate the odds ratio and a 95% confidence interval. Asthma patients with peptic ulcers included 74 H. pylori-positive and 21 H. pylori-negative. Non-asthma patients with peptic ulcers comprised 2,820 H. pylori-positive and 501 H. pylori-negative. Based on logistic regression analysis, adult asthma patients with peptic ulcers (OR = 0.71, P = 0.187) demonstrated similar H. pylori infection rates, compared to adult non-asthma patients with peptic ulcers. Our data show no inverse relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and adult asthma with peptic ulcers.

  10. Effects of Helicobacter pylori infection and its eradication on lipid profiles and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Su Youn; Ryu, Kum Hei; Park, Bum Joon; Park, Sohee

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to examine the relationship of current Helicobacter pylori infection with lipid profile and cardiovascular disease and its eradication effect. Healthy subjects, who underwent routine checkup between October 2003 and December 2007, were followed up until June 2009. Helicobacter pylori and lipid profiles were measured both baseline and follow-up. Multiple logistic regression models for odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to estimate the effects of H. pylori infection and its eradication, on lipids and cardiovascular disease. Current infection with H. pylori with 50.5% (6759/13383) at baseline increased low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and decreased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) than H. pylori-negative group. Successful eradication of H. pylori decreased the risk of high LDL compared with the persistent infection (OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.59-96), which was comparable to that of the persistent negative group (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.70-0.97), and decreased the risk of low HDL (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.49-0.96). Current infection of H. pylori increased the risk of cardiovascular disease (OR 3.27, 95% CI 1.31-8.14) at baseline, but its eradication failed to decrease the risk at a 2-year follow-up. However, persistent negative infection decreased the risk (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.35-0.94) comparing to persistent positive infection at follow-up. Current infection with H. pylori had a positive association with high LDL, low HDL, and cardiovascular disease. Successful H. pylori eradication decreased the risk of high LDL and low HDL, but did not reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Helicobacter Pylori Infection among Healthy Inhabitants in Northern Jakarta, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yasuyuki; Syam, Ari Fahrial; Darnindro, Nikko; Hapsari, Florentina Carolin Puspita

    2016-10-01

    Background: The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in Indonesia has been reported to be exceedingly low. The purpose of our study was to confirm whether this is the case in Northern Jakarta using a sensitive 13C-urea breath test (UBT), and to examine any associations with lifestyle/environment factors and potential routes of transmission. Methods: We recruited a total of 196 subjects from a low-income community in Northern Jakarta, Indonesia, data from 193 who completed a questionnaire about their lifestyle/environment and had UBT being included as the final. Odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for sex and age with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a logistic regression model. Results: The overall H. pylori infection rate was 15.0% (95%CI, 10.3-20.9), with variation among Javanese (9.1%, total=77), Buginese (40.0%, 35), Betawi (9.1%, 33), Sundanese (3.7%, 27), and Batak (40.0%, 5). On multivariate analysis, the ORs for intake of soybean milk, cucumber more than once a week, infrequent hand washing practice before meals, and alcohol consumption were 0.10 (95%CI: 0.01-0.97), 6.61 (95%CI: 1.87-23.3), 4.10 (95%CI: 1.15-14.6), and 61.9 (95%CI: 1.67-2300.8), respectively. Rates for Buginese (OR=7.84; 95%CI: 1.82-33.8) and Batak (OR=20.1; 95%CI: 1.90-213.2) were significantly higher than for Javanese. Conclusions: The H. pylori infection rate in this study was relatively low, in line with previous studies. Regarding ethnicity factors, Buginese and Batak reported eating food using fingers more frequently than Javanese, Betawi, and Sundanese. Our study indicated that person-person transmission is possible in this low prevalence area. The low infection rates for H. pylori among Javanese, Betawi, and Sundanese ethnics could be partly due to their sanitary practices. Creative Commons Attribution License

  12. Association of mast cells with helicobacter pylori infection in the antral mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SR KC

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate consisting of neutrophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes and plasma cells. Helicobacter pylori lead to mast cell degranulation and release of active chemical compounds in in-vitro conditions. The objective of this study was to find out the association of mast cell density and Helicobacter pylori in the antral mucosa of the stomach. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 endoscopic biopsies were included in the study. In addition to routine Hematoxylin and Eosin stained slides, Giemsa stain was done in each case for the evaluation of Helicobacter pylori and mast cell density in the gastric mucosa. Results: Out of 150 gastric biopsies with histopathological diagnosis of chronic gastritis, 36 cases (24% were positive for Helicobacter pylori. In the antral mucosa, mast cell density was significantly higher in the Helicobacter pylori-positive group than in the Helicobacter pylori-negative group (P<0.01. Conclusion: Mast cells may play a role in the development of Helicobacter pylori gastritis. Keywords: Gastritis; Mast Cell; Helicobacter pylori DOI: 10.3126/jpn.v1i1.4448 Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2011 Vol.1, 34-36

  13. A Comparison in Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in the Gingival Crevicular Fluid from Subjects with Periodontitis and Healthy Individuals using Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Salehi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. The high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori among the microorganisms isolated from the oral environment brings up the question of whether oral cavity acts as a reservoir for this bacterium. The aim of the present study was to determine and compare the prevalence of H. pylori in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF of patients with chronic periodontitis (CP as an infectious disease and healthy subjects using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Materials and methods. Periodontal examination was performed for all participants. Two sterilized paper points were inserted to the maximum depth of the periodontal pockets of selected teeth. The presence of H. pylori was determined by PCR. In the CP group, the severity of disease was defined as moderate or severe. Further, the frequency of Helicobacter pylori in GCF of each category, and the association between the presence of Helicobacter pylori in GCF and periodontitis were determined. Results. There was no statistically significant association between CP and the presence of H. pylori in the GCF (P = 0.62, there was no significant correlation between the presence of H. pylori in the GCF and gender of the subjects (P = 0.28 in CP group and P = 0.25 in control group, and there was no significant correlation between the presence of H. pylori in the GCF and severity of periodontitis (P = 0.20. Conclusion. Oral cavity acts as a reservoir for H. pylori; however, the results do not show that H. pylori is involved in periodontal disease

  14. An Appropriate Cutoff Value for Determining the Colonization of Helicobacter pylori by the Pyrosequencing Method: Comparison with Conventional Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaeyeon; Kim, Nayoung; Jo, Hyun Jin; Park, Ji Hyun; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Seok, Yeong-Jae; Kim, Yeon-Ran; Kim, Joo Sung; Kim, Jung Mogg; Kim, Jung Min; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2015-10-01

    Sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene has improved the characterization of microbial communities. It enabled the detection of low abundance gastric Helicobacter pylori sequences even in subjects that were found to be H. pylori negative with conventional methods. The objective of this study was to obtain a cutoff value for H. pylori colonization in gastric mucosa samples by pyrosequencing method. Gastric mucosal biopsies were taken from 63 subjects whose H. pylori status was determined by a combination of serology, rapid urease test, culture, and histology. Microbial DNA from mucosal samples was amplified by PCR using universal bacterial primers. 16S rDNA amplicons were pyrosequenced. ROC curve analysis was performed to determine the cutoff value for H. pylori colonization by pyrosequencing. In addition, temporal changes in the stomach microbiota were observed in eight initially H. pylori-positive and eight H. pylori-negative subjects at a single time point 1-8 years later. Of the 63 subjects, the presence of H. pylori sequences was detected in all (28/28) conventionally H. pylori-positive samples and in 60% (21/35) of H. pylori-negative samples. The average percent of H. pylori reads in each sample was 0.67 ± 1.09% in the H. pylori-negative group. Cutoff value for clinically positive H. pylori status was approximately 1.22% based on ROC curve analysis (AUC = 0.957; p Helicobacter pylori was successfully eradicated in five of seven treated H. pylori-positive subjects (71.4%), and the percentage of H. pylori reads in these five subjects dropped from 1.3-95.18% to 0-0.16% after eradication. These results suggest that the cutoff value of H. pylori sequence percentage for H. pylori colonization by pyrosequencing could be set at approximately 1%. It might be helpful to analyze gastric microbiota related to H. pylori sequence status. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Effects of Helicobacter pylori Infection on the Expressions and Functional Activities of Human Duodenal Mucosal Bicarbonate Transport Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guorong; Jin, Hai; Deng, Shili; Xu, Jingyu; Liu, Xuemei; Xie, Rui; Tuo, Biguang

    2016-12-01

    The mechanisms for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced duodenal ulcerogenesis are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of H. pylori infection on the expressions and functional activities of human duodenal mucosal bicarbonate transport proteins and hope to further clarify the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated duodenal ulcer. The experiments were performed in the patients with H. pylori-associated duodenal ulcers, H. pylori-associated chronic gastritis, and H. pylori-negative healthy subjects. Duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion was measured by Ussing Chamber technology. The expressions of duodenal mucosal bicarbonate transport proteins, CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) and SLC26A6 (solute-linked carrier 26 gene A6), in the patients with H. pylori-associated duodenal ulcers were markedly lower than those in healthy controls. Basal and both forskolin- and prostaglandin E2 -stimulated duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretions in the patients with H. pylori-associated duodenal ulcers were also lower than those in healthy controls. After anti-H. pylori treatment for H. pylori-associated duodenal ulcers, duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion and CFTR and SLC26A6 expressions in H. pylori-eradicated patients recovered to levels comparable to healthy controls, but those were found to be not significantly altered in non-H. pylori-eradicated patients. The further results showed that decreases in the H. pylori-induced CFTR and SLC26A6 expression were related to the severity and virulent factors of H. pylori infection. H. pylori infection impairs the expressions and functional activities of duodenal mucosal bicarbonate transport proteins, CFTR and SLC26A6, which contributes to the development of duodenal ulcer. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. HELICOBACTER PYLORI PREVALENCE IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE: results from a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan LASA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Some previously published studies have suggested an inverse relationship between celiac disease and Helicobacter pylori, raising the possibility of the protective role Helicobacter pylori could have against celiac disease development. Nevertheless, this association is inconclusive. Objectives To determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in celiac subjects. Methods Between January 2013 and June 2014, patients over 18 years old undergoing upper endoscopy who required both gastric and duodenal biopsies were included for analysis. Enrolled subjects were divided in two groups: those with a diagnosis of celiac disease and those without a celiac disease diagnosis. Helicobacter pylori infection prevalence was compared between groups. Among celiac patients, endoscopic markers of villous atrophy as well as histological damage severity were compared between those with and without Helicobacter pylori infection. Results Overall, 312 patients were enrolled. Seventy two of them had a diagnosis of celiac disease. Helicobacter pylori infection prevalence among celiac disease patients was 12.5%, compared to 30% in non-celiac patients [OR=0.33 (0.15-0.71]. There was not a significant difference in terms of the severity of villous atrophy in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection compared to those without it. There was a slight increase in the prevalence of endoscopic markers in those Helicobacter pylori-negative celiac subjects. Conclusion Helicobacter pylori infection seems to be less frequent in celiac patients; among those celiac subjects with concomitant Helicobacter pylori infection, histological damage degree and presence of endoscopic markers suggesting villous atrophy seem to be similar to those without Helicobacter pylori infection.

  17. MiR-27a rs895819 is involved in increased atrophic gastritis risk, improved gastric cancer prognosis and negative interaction with Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian; Chen, Tie-Jun; He, Cai-Yun; Sun, Li-Ping; Liu, Jing-Wei; Yuan, Yuan

    2017-02-02

    MiR-27a rs895819 is a loop-stem structure single nucleotide polymorphism affecting mature miR-27a function. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis about the association of rs895819 with gastric cancer risk and prognosis, atrophic gastritis risk, as well as the interactions with environmental factors. A total of 939 gastric cancer patients, 1,067 atrophic gastritis patients and 1,166 healthy controls were screened by direct sequencing and MALDI-TOF-MS. The association of rs895819 with clinical pathological parameters and prognostic survival in 357 gastric cancer patients was also been analyzed. The rs895819 variant genotype increased the risk for atrophic gastritis (1.58-fold) and gastric cancer (1.24-fold). While in stratified analysis, the risk effect was demonstrated more significantly in the female, age >60y, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) negative and non-drinker subgroups. Rs895819 and H. pylori showed an interaction effect for atrophic gastritis risk. In the survival analysis, the rs895819 AG heterozygosis was associated with better survival than the AA wild-type in the TNM stage I-II subgroup. In vitro study by overexpressing miR-27a, cells carrying polymorphic-type G allele expressed lower miR-27a than wild-type A allele. In conclusion, miR-27a rs895819 is implicated as a biomarker for gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis risk, and interacts with H. pylori in gastric carcinogenesis.

  18. Helicobacter pylori and non-malignant upper gastrointestinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasapolli, Riccardo; Malfertheiner, Peter; Kandulski, Arne

    2016-09-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) has been further decreased over the last decades along with decreasing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori-associated PUD. A delayed H. pylori eradication has been associated with an increased risk of rehospitalization for complicated recurrent peptic ulcer and reemphasized the importance of eradication especially in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). PUB associated with NSAID/aspirin intake and H. pylori revealed an additive interaction in gastric pathophysiology which favors the "test-and-treat" strategy for H. pylori in patients with specific risk factors. The H. pylori-negative and NSAID-negative "idiopathic PUD" have been increasingly observed and associated with slower healing tendency, higher risk of recurrence, and greater mortality. Helicobacter pylori-associated dyspepsia has been further investigated and finally defined by the Kyoto consensus. Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy is advised as first option in this group of patients. Only in the case of symptom persistence or recurrence after eradication therapy, dyspeptic patients should be classified as functional dyspepsia (FD). There were few new data in 2015 on the role of H. pylori infection in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and in particular Barrett's esophagus. A lower prevalence of gastric atrophy with less acid output in patients with erosive esophagitis confirmed previous findings. In patients with erosive esophagitis, no difference was observed in healing rates neither between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative patients nor between patients that underwent eradication therapy compared to patients without eradication. These findings are in line with the current consensus guidelines concluding that H. pylori eradication has no effects on symptoms and does not aggravate preexisting GERD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Gastric bicarbonate secretion and release of prostaglandin E2 are increased in duodenal ulcer patients but not in Helicobacter pylori-positive healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertz-Nielsen, A; Hillingsø, Jens; Frøkiaer, H

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Duodenal ulcer (DU) patients have impaired proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion at rest and in response to luminal acid with higher acid-stimulated mucosal release of prostaglandin (PG) E2 than healthy subjects. Our purpose was to determine whether this abnormality was pres...... for the abnormally high gastric secretion of bicarbonate in inactive DU patients. The defective duodenal secretion of bicarbonate observed in these patients may be a consequence of previous ulceration rather than the mere presence of H. pylori infection.......BACKGROUND: Duodenal ulcer (DU) patients have impaired proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion at rest and in response to luminal acid with higher acid-stimulated mucosal release of prostaglandin (PG) E2 than healthy subjects. Our purpose was to determine whether this abnormality...... was present also in the stomach of DU patients. METHODS: Simultaneous determinations of gastric and duodenal bicarbonate secretion and luminal release of PGE2 were performed in 16 healthy volunteers (5 Helicobacter pylori-positive) and 8 inactive DU patients (all H. pylori-positive). RESULTS: In healthy...

  20. Pharmacodynamics and kinetics of omeprazole MUPS 20 mg and pantoprazole 40 mg during repeated oral administration in Helicobacter pylori-negative subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geus, W. P.; Mathôt, R. A.; Mulder, P. G.; Lamers, C. B.

    2000-01-01

    Omeprazole has become available in a tablet formulation, a Multiple Unit Pellet System (MUPS) containing a large number of small individually enteric-coated micropellets. To compare the acid-inhibitory effect of omeprazole MUPS 20 mg with pantoprazole 40 mg and to describe the pharmacokinetics of

  1. The improvement of treatment efficacy of gastropathy associated with the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in Helicobacter pylori-negative patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonenko Antonina V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the more common side effects of osteoarthritis treatment are NSAID-gastropathy and NSAID-enteropathy. NSAIDs can cause direct injury to colon tissue and also impair synthesis of prostaglandins, reduce mucosal integrity, increase permeability and promote an influx of bacteria and toxins. Alterations in gastrointestinal permeability are considered as an initial step in the development of lesions of the gastric mucosa such as erosions and ulcers. The mechanisms underlying the ability of NSAIDs to cause ulceration in the stomach and proximal duodenum are well understood and this injury can be largely be prevented through suppression of gastric acid secretion. However, our work showed that 28-day administration of the anti-secretory preparation pantoprazole (20 mg 2 times per day resulted in a statistically significant increase of dysbiosis. Monitoring of patients with osteoarthritis who used NSAIDs for more than three months showed that, in comparison to the situation before the beginning of treatment, changes in colonic microbiota were present. Multiprobiotic “Symbiter® acidophilic concentrated” introduced simultaneously with pantoprazole during 20 days prevented formation of dysbiotic changes and led to the quicker healing of gastric mucous healing, in comparison with patients who used only pantoprazole alone. Moreover, it brought about total healing of the gastric mucosa within 4 weeks from the beginning of treatment.

  2. Pharmacodynamics and kinetics of omeprazole MUPS 20 mg and pantoprazole 40 mg during repeated oral administration in Helicobacter pylori-negative subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.P. Geus; R.A. Mathot (Ron); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul); C.B.H.W. Lamers (C. B H W)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Omeprazole has become available in a tablet formulation, a Multiple Unit Pellet System (MUPS) containing a large number of small individually enteric-coated micropellets. Aim: To compare the acid-inhibitory effect of omeprazole MUPS 20 mg with pantoprazole 40 mg and to

  3. Inverse Association Between Helicobacter pylori Gastritis and Microscopic Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenberg, Amnon; Genta, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is known to be inversely associated with Helicobacter pylori infection of the upper gastrointestinal tract. We hypothesized that a similar inverse association also applied to microscopic colitis. The associations between microscopic colitis and presence of H. pylori-positive chronic active gastritis (CAG), H. pylori-negative CAG, intestinal metaplasia, or gastric atrophy were expressed as odds ratios with their 95% confidence intervals. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to adjust these associations for sex, age, percentage residents per ZIP code with white, black, Hispanic, or Asian ethnicity, percentage with college education, average housing values, annual income, and population size of individual ZIP codes. H. pylori-positive CAG was less common among patients with than without microscopic colitis (odds ratio = 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-0.70). Intestinal metaplasia also occurred less frequently among patients with than without microscopic colitis (0.75, 0.65-0.86). These inverse associations remained unaffected by adjustments for parameters of ethnicity and socioeconomic status. In contradistinction with H. pylori-positive CAG, H. pylori-negative CAG was more common in patients with than without microscopic colitis (1.54, 1.17-1.97). H. pylori infection and microscopic colitis are inversely associated. This observation is consistent with similar inverse associations found between H. pylori and inflammatory bowel disease. These relationships may provide clues about the yet unknown etiology of microscopic colitis.

  4. MicroRNA-155-enhanced autophagy in human gastric epithelial cell in response to Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kai; Zhu, Chaohui; Yao, Yi; Wang, Xin; Song, Jiugang; Zhai, Junshan

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs acting as posttranscriptional gene expression regulators in many physiological and pathological conditions. MiR-155 is one kind of miRNAs that plays an important role in causing various diseases. However, the precise molecular mechanism of the ectopic expression of miR-155 in Helicobacter pylori infection remains poorly understood. Autophagy has recently been identified as an effective way to control the intracellular bacterium survival. In the present study, we demonstrate a novel role of miR-155 in regulating the autophagy-mediated anti-H. pylori response. Totally 86 H. pylori-positive patients together with 10 H. pylori-negative, healthy control subjects were included in the study. Correlation between immunohistochemical grades and miR-155 expression were determined. Molecular mechanism of miR-155 on regulation of autophagy and elimination of intracellular H. pylori were determined using the GES-1 cell model. We found that overexpression of miR-155 by transfecting miR-155 mimics could significantly decrease the survival of intracellular H. pylori, and this process was through induction of autophagy. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between miR-155 and immunohistochemical grades in H. pylori-positive patients, and miR-155 expression were decreased in the intestinal metaplasia group. The results have indicated that the miR-155 expression level plays a key role in immunity response against H. pylori and this might provide potential targets for the future treatment of H. pylori-related diseases.

  5. HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria which inhabits the human stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract. This encyclopedic entry summarizes the potential role of this organism as a waterborne pathogen. Information is provided on the physiology and morphology of this bacter...

  6. Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention When to Call the Doctor Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) bacteria are a common cause of digestive illnesses, ... of adults are likely to have had an H. pylori infection — usually without any symptoms. Signs and Symptoms ...

  7. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis in newly diagnosed children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roka, Kleoniki; Roubani, Aikaterini; Stefanaki, Kalliopi; Panayotou, Ioanna; Roma, Eleftheria; Chouliaras, Giorgos

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are less likely to be infected with Helicobacter pylori compared with non-IBD patients. We aimed to study the prevalence of H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative gastritis in newly diagnosed children with IBD in comparison to those with non-IBD in Greece. All children who underwent first esophagogastroduodenal endoscopy between 2002 and 2011 were retrospectively included. Four groups were studied: patients with Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), IBD unclassified (IBDU), and non-IBD individuals (non-IBD). Helicobacter pylori infection was defined by positive culture or by positive histology and CLO test. Those children with negative or not available culture and only one positive test (histology or CLO) were further evaluated by urea breath test, and the positives were also included in the infected group. We studied 159 patients with IBD (66 CD, 34 UC, and 59 IBDU) and 1209 patients in non-IBD individuals. Helicobacter pylori gastritis was less frequent in the IBD group (3.8% vs 13.2% in the control group, p pylori-negative gastritis were 3.3 times more likely to belong in the IBD group compared with H. pylori-positive patients (p = .006). Occurrence of H. pylori gastritis is less frequent in children with IBD compared with controls. Our study confirms an inverse association between H. pylori and IBD. Future studies are needed to distinguish between a true protective role of H. pylori and a confounding effect due to previous antibiotic use in children with IBD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Oxyntic gastric atrophy in Helicobacter pylori gastritis is distinct from autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venerito, Marino; Varbanova, Mariya; Röhl, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Reinhold, Dirk; Frauenschläger, Katrin; Jechorek, Doerthe; Weigt, Jochen; Link, Alexander; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-08-01

    To assess characteristics of oxyntic gastric atrophy (OGA) in autoimmune gastritis (AIG) compared with OGA as a consequence of Helicobacter pylori infection. Patients undergoing oesophagogastroduodenoscopy from July 2011 to October 2014 were prospectively included (N=452). Gastric biopsies were obtained for histology and H. pylori testing. Serum gastrin-17 (G17), pepsinogen (PG) I, PGII and antibodies against H. pylori and cytotoxin-associated gene A protein were determined in all patients. Antibodies against parietal cells and intrinsic factor were determined in patients with advanced (moderate to severe) OGA. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were calculated for serum biomarkers and compared with histology. Overall, 34 patients (8.9%) had advanced OGA by histology (22 women, age 61±15 years). Current or past H. pylori infection and AIG were present in 14/34 and 22/34 patients, respectively. H. pylori-negative AIG patients (N=18) were more likely to have another autoimmune disease (OR 6.3; 95% CI 1.3 to 29.8), severe corpus atrophy (OR 10.1; 95% CI 1.9 to 54.1) and corpus intestinal metaplasia (OR 26.9; 95% CI 5.3 to 136.5) compared with H. pylori-positive patients with advanced OGA. Antrum atrophy was present in 39% of H. pylori-negative AIG patients. The diagnostic performance of G17, PG I and PGI/II was excellent for AIG patients (AUC=0.83, 0.95 and 0.97, respectively), but limited for H. pylori-positive patients with advanced OGA (AUC=0.62, 0.75 and 0.67, respectively). H. pylori-negative AIG has a distinct clinical, morphological and serological phenotype compared with advanced OGA in H. pylori gastritis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on outcomes in resected gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Jennifer M; Ozbek, Umut; Harpaz, Noam; Holcombe, Randall F; Ang, Celina

    2017-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection is a known risk factor for gastric cancer (GC) and has been linked with gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Studies examining the relationship between H. pylori infection, GC characteristics and prognosis are limited and have yielded conflicting results. We report on the clinicopathologic characteristics and oncologic outcomes of gastric and GEJ cancer patients with and without a history of H. pylori treated at our institution. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients over the age of 18 years who underwent curative resection for GEJ and GC at Mount Sinai Hospital between 2007 and 2012 who had histopathologic documentation of the presence or absence of H pylori infection. Demographic, clinical, pathologic, treatment characteristics and outcomes including recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were compared. Ninety-five patients were identified. The majority of patients were male (61%), white (36%) or Asian (34%), with median age at diagnosis 64. Tumors were stage I (51%), stage II (23%), stage III (25%), and stage IV (1%). H pylori infection status was documented at the time of cancer diagnosis in 89 (94%) patients, and following cancer diagnosis and treatment in 6 (6%) patients. Younger age at diagnosis, Asian race and Lauren histologic classification were associated with H Pylori infection. H pylori positive patients exhibited higher 5-year OS and 5-year RFS compared to H pylori negative patients, though the difference was not statistically significant in either univariate or multivariate analyses. In this retrospective series of predominantly early stage GC and GEJ cancers, H. pylori positive patients were significantly younger at cancer diagnosis and were more frequently Asian compared to H. pylori negative patients. Other demographic and histologic classifications except for Lauren histologic classification were similar between the two groups. H pylori positive patients appeared

  10. Gastroduodenal mucosal prostaglandin generation in patients with Helicobacter pylori before and after treatment with bismuth subsalicylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avunduk, C; Suliman, M; Gang, D; Polakowski, N; Eastwood, G L

    1991-04-01

    To determine whether Helicobacter pylori has an effect on gastroduodenal mucosal prostaglandin generation, mucosal biopsies were obtained from the gastric body, antrum, and duodenal bulb of 30 patients who were undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for clinical indications. One biopsy from the gastric body and one from the antrum were tested for urease activity (urea broth) and one biopsy from each area including the duodenum was processed for histology. Two other biopsies form each area were incubated and the accumulation of prostaglandin E2 and 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha in the incubation medium was measured by radioimmunoassay. Twelve of the 17 H. pylori-positive patients and seven of the 13 H. pylori-negative patients agreed to take bismuth subsalicylate (Pepto-Bismol) two tablets four times a day for four weeks. One week after treatment, these patients again underwent endoscopy and the above studies. This study indicates that: (1) mucosal PGE2 generation may be increased in the duodenum, gastric body, and antrum in H. pylori-positive patients compared to H. pylori-negative patients, and (2) treatment with bismuth subsalicylate for four weeks results in reduction of mucosal PGE2 in the duodenum, gastric body, and antrum of H. pylori-positive patients and fails to eradicate H. pylori or reduce gastric inflammation.

  11. A short-term eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori acute gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, H; Miyake, K; Kashiwagi, S; Sugiyama, T; Asaka, M

    2000-12-01

    Acute gastritis, caused by an initial infection of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), may resolve spontaneously, but the infection sometimes becomes chronic. We examined the efficacy of a short-term H. pylori eradication therapy on acute gastritis. Among the 15 patients with hemorrhagic acute gastritis who were randomly allocated to group A (eradication therapy) or group B (Lansoprazole, LPZ), 10 of them started to receive treatment within 1 day after the disease onset. The other five patients began the eradication therapy 4-6 days after disease onset (group C). Eradication therapy consisted of a daily oral administration of each of 30 mg lansoprazole (LPZ), once a day; 400 mg clarithromycin, twice a day; 1000 mg amoxicillin, twice a day; and 300 mg rebamipide, three times a day, for one week. If the endoscopy was normal, medication was stopped for the following 4 weeks before gastric endoscopy was performed again in order to assess H. pylori eradication. All group A patients were cured after the 1-week treatment and therefore, they became H. pylori negative. Group B and C patients had erosions or ulcers after the 1-week treatment and so received an additional 3-week administration of LPZ. Four weeks later, their gastritis was cured and except for one group B patient, they became H. pylori-negative. In patients with acute gastritis, caused by an initial H. pylori infection, eradication therapy was efficacious in achieving early healing. This therapy should be started as soon as possible after disease onset.

  12. Enterohepatic Helicobacter other than Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Mateos Muñoz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Helicobacter genus includes Gram negative bacteria which were originally considered to belong to the Campylobacter genus. They have been classified in a separate genus since 1989 because they have different biochemical characteristics, with more than 24 species having been identified and more still being studied. H. pylori is the best known. It has an important etiopathogenic role in peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Enterohepatic Helicobacter s (EHH other than H. pylori colonize the bowel, biliary tree and liver of animals and human beings with pathogenic potential. The difficulties existing to correctly isolate these microorganisms limit the description of their true prevalence and of the diseases they cause. Many studies have tried to discover the different clinical implications of EHH. Diseases like chronic liver disease, autoimmune hepatitis, hepatocarcinoma, autoimmune hepatobiliary disease, biliary lithiasis, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, Meckel's diverticulum, acute appendicitis and inflammatory bowel disease have been related with different EHH species with different results, although their prevalence is greater than in healthy subjects. However, these data are currently not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions. Finally, the best known role of EHH in bowel disease is production of acute and chronic diarrhea pictures initially referred to as Campylobacter. H. pullorum has been identified in patients with acute gastroenteritis. The correct identification of EHH as producers of infectious gastroenteritis is found in its antibiotic susceptibility. It is generally macrolide-susceptible and quinolone-resistant.

  13. Suppression of gastric acid with intravenous esomeprazole and omeprazole: results of 3 studies in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhss, K; Wilder-Smith, C; Kilhamn, J; Fjellman, M; Lind, T

    2007-06-01

    To identify the optimal pharmacodynamic dosing regimen for esomeprazole administered intravenously (i.v.) and to compare acid suppression with various esomeprazole i.v. and omeprazole i.v. dosing regimens. A total of 90 healthy Helicobacter pylori-negative subjects participated in three randomized, crossover studies of esomeprazole i.v. Comparative acid output study: an open-label study that compared single 40 mg i.v. doses (administered over 30 min) of esomeprazole and omeprazole. Dose-ranging study: an open-label study that compared acid control with five different doses of esomeprazole i.v., administered over 24 h. Comparative pH study: a double-blind study that compared esomeprazole i.v. and omeprazole at doses of 80 mg (over 30 min) + 8 mg/h (for 23.5 h). In the comparative acid output study, estimated mean pentagastrin-stimulated acid output was reduced from 33.9 mmol/h at baseline to 5.4 mmol/h at 4 - 5.5 h with esomeprazole vs. 9.5 mmol/h with omeprazole (p 6 (12.6 h) than the lower doses (11.0 and 10.7 h for 40 + 8 mg/h and 80 + 4 mg/h, respectively) and significantly more time with pH > 4 (21.5 vs. 19.7 and 19.2 h, respectively; p 4 was similar between esomeprazole (21.4 h) and omeprazole (21.1 h). Esomeprazole was superior to omeprazole in reducing stimulated acid secretion. Control of intragastric pH was similar for esomeprazole and omeprazole at a dose of 80 + 8 mg/h. An esomeprazole i.v. dosage regimen of 80 + 8 mg/h appeared to be optimal for acid suppression in healthy subjects under study.

  14. Epithelial cell kinetics of the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Susanne; Holm, I.L.; Holck, P.P.

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen in major gastroduodenal diseases, including inflammation with ulceration and gastric malignancies. Alterations in H. pylori associated cell turnover in gastric epithelial cells are examined in relation to inflammatory activity, bacteria load...... and cytokines which may improve knowledge concerning the outcome of gastric diseases caused by H. pylori. Antral biopsies from 42 dyspeptic patients including 27 H. pylori-positive and 15 H. pylori-negative patients were tested for apoptotic activity by the TUNEL assay, and immuno-histochemically for p53...... and the proliferative marker Ki-67. H. pylori infection, bacteria load and inflammatory activity were associated with increased cell turnover as judged by enhanced activities of TUNEL, p53 and Ki-67. Only p53 was significantly correlated to IFN-gamma, IL-8 and IL-10. The H. pylori-positive state was furthermore...

  15. Helicobacter pylori infection and its correlation to extraesophageal and esophageal reflux in contact granuloma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylitalo, Riitta

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and its correlation to extraesophageal and esophageal reflux, 18 consecutive contact granuloma patients were examined by laryngoscopy, 24-hour double probe pH monitoring and [13C]-urea breath test. Sixteen of the 18 patients (89%) were H. pylori-negative, while 2 patients (11%) showed positive test results. Extraesophageal reflux was detected in 14 patients; one of them was H. pylori-positive. In the ten patients with abnormal distal esophageal reflux, one was H. pylori-positive. The present results do not confirm increased prevalence for H. pylori infection in contact granuloma patients and the occurrence of H. pylori infection was not correlated to the amount of pharyngeal or esophageal acid exposure.

  16. Relationship of vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms in Helicobacter pylori gastric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins DJ

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dinelma de Jesus Martins,1 Gyselly CB Matos,1 Rosane SP Loiola,2 Vivian D’Annibale,3 Tereza Corvelo1 1Immunogenetics Laboratory, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Pará, 2Central Laboratory Pará State, Executive Office of Health Pará State, 3Epidemiological Surveillance Unit, João de Barros Barreto University Hospital, Belém, Pará, Brazil Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate the association between the human VDR gene and Helicobacter pylori infection. Patients and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 208 adult patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Gastric biopsy specimens were obtained from each patient for molecular DNA and histological examination. Patients were genotyped for VDR gene polymorphisms using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Results: The allelic and genotypic distribution analyses of the FokI, ApaI and TaqI polymorphisms of the VDR gene did not show distribution differences between H. pylori-positive and -negative groups. The genotype distribution observed for polymorphism BsmI deviated significantly from what was expected in a Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium test in the H. pylori-positive group (X2=29.048, p<0.001. The distribution of BsmI genotypes differed significantly between the H. pylori-negative and H. pylori-positive groups (p=0.0034, where the frequency of the bb genotype increased among H. pylori-positive individuals compared with those without infection (63.25% versus 50.55%, respectively. Conversely, the H. pylori-negative group showed a Bb frequency that was 20.27% higher than in the infected group. Conclusion: We identified a possible association between the BsmI polymorphism and infection by H. pylori. However, further research is required to clarify this relationship. Keywords: vitamin D, VDR, polymorphism, Helicobacter pylori virulence factors, infectious disease, VDR SNPs, admixed population

  17. Helicobacter spp. other than Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Cinthia G; Mitchell, Hazel M

    2010-09-01

    Over the last 12 months, new insights into the association of non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacters with a range of human diseases in children and adults, including hepatobiliary disease, Crohn's disease, sepsis, and gastric disease were published. Studies investigating the presence of non-H. pylori Helicobacters in domestic animals reinforce previous findings that cats and dogs harbor gastric Helicobacter species and thus may be an important source of these organisms in humans. The confounding effect of enterohepatic Helicobacters on the outcome of biomedical research was investigated in several studies and led to recommendations that animals should be screened prior to performing experiments. A number of important and novel investigations regarding pathogenic mechanisms and immune responses to enterohepatic Helicobacters were conducted. Genomic advances in non-H. pylori Helicobacters included description of the complete genome of Helicobacter canadensis, delineation of two Helicobacter bilis genomospecies, and identification of a novel cis-regulatory RNA. New insights concerning growth conditions, biochemical characterization, and the effect of certain dietary compounds on Helicobacter spp. have also been reported. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    1992-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) are Gram-negative spiral bacteria which occur in the human stomach. The bacteria were cultured in vitro for the first time in 1983. It is suspected that the bacteria may cause chronic gastritis of type B and may also be a contributory cause of chronic ulceration and cancer...... of the stomach. The bacteria are accompanied by characteristic inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. The significance for gastritis, chronic ulceration, non-ulcer dyspepsia and carcinoma of the stomach is discussed. HP occurs in a great proportion of the population of the world and the frequency increases...

  19. Validation of {sup 14} C-urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattar, Rejane; Silva, Fernando Marcuz; Alexandrino, Ana Maria; Laudanna, Antonio Atilio [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Gastroenterologia]. E-mail: shiroineko@uol.com.br

    1999-02-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the {sup 14} C-urea breath test for use in diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. Thirty H. pylori positive patients, based on histologic test and thirty H. pylori negative patients by histology and anti-H pylori IgG entered the study. Fasting patients drank 5 uCi of {sup 14} C-urea in 20 ml of water. Breath samples were collected at O, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 min. The difference of cpm values between the two groups was significant at all the time intervals, besides time 0 (p < 0.0001). At 20 min, the test gave 100% sensitivity and specificity with a cut-off value of 562 cpm. Females were higher expirers than males (p=0.005). {sup 14} C-urea breath test is highly accurate for Helicobacter pylori diagnosis. It is fast, simple and should be the non-invasive test used after treating Helicobacter pylori infection. (author)

  20. Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric mucosal atrophy in Bhutan, a country with a high prevalence of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Seiji; Mahachai, Varocha; Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Ratanachu-ek, Thawee; Tshering, Lotay; Uchida, Tomohisa; Matsunari, Osamu; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2013-10-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world. Recently, serum Helicobacter pylori antibodies and pepsinogen (PG) have been used for gastric cancer screening. The incidence of gastric cancer in Bhutan is reported to be quite high compared with that in neighbouring countries. In this study, 381 subjects from three areas of Bhutan were assessed for gastric mucosal atrophy and serological parameters. Anti-H. pylori IgG, PG I, PG II and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) antibodies were measured using ELISA. Subjects were classified into four groups according to H. pylori and PG seropositivity: Group A (H. pylori-negative/PG-negative), Group B (H. pylori-positive/PG-negative), Group C (H. pylori-positive/PG-positive) and Group D (H. pylori-negative/PG-positive). The prevalence of H. pylori in the 381 subjects was 71.1% (271/381), with high infection rates found in rural areas. The PG I/II ratio was significantly inversely correlated with the atrophy score in the antrum and the corpus (PBhutan can be attributed to the high prevalence of H. pylori infection and gastric mucosal atrophy.

  1. Misidentifying helicobacters: the Helicobacter cinaedi example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandamme, P.; Harrington, C.S.; Jalava, K.

    2000-01-01

    of Helicobacter cinaedi and that Helicobacter sp. strain Mainz belongs to the same species. H. cinaedi occurs in various animal reservoirs, including hamsters, dogs, cats, rats, and foxes. Appropriate growth conditions and identification strategies will be required to establish the genuine significance...

  2. The association of metabolic syndrome and Chlamydia pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori, cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex virus type 1: The Persian Gulf Healthy Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pazoki Raha

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome together with insulin resistance and their consequences are basic factors in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Chronic infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1, cytomegalovirus (CMV, and Chlamydia pneumoniae are associated with the development of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. The infectious aspects of metabolic syndrome have not been investigated. Methods In a cross-sectional, population-based study, we used National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP-Adult Treatment Panel (ATP-III criteria in 1791 subjects, aged 25 years and over, selected by cluster random sampling in three Iranian ports in the northern Persian Gulf. Sera were analyzed for IgG antibodies to Chlamydia pneumoniae, HSV-1, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and CMV using ELISA. Results In multiple logistic regression analysis, of the infectious agents, CMV [OR = 1.81 (1.05–3.10; p = 0.03], H. pylori [OR = 1.50 (1.12–2.00; p = 0.007] and Chlamydia pneumoniae [OR = 1.69 (1.27–2.25; p Conclusion The metabolic syndrome, which occurs very frequently in the general population, has a significant association with prior infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori, cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus type 1. Hypothesis about participation of infection in pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome should be investigated.

  3. Disappearance of Helicobacter without Antibiotics in 12 Patients with Gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh James Freeman

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection of Helicobacter pylori in endoscopic gastric biopsies has been associated with a variety of diseases, including ulcers and gastritis. Although the natural history of H pylori in the gastric mucosa is unknown, antibiotic regimens have been used for eradication. Gastric biopsies from 6050 endoscopic procedures done by a single gastroenterologist from 1981 to 1994 were evaluated. Of these, 2860 from April 1, 1991 to September 30, 1994 had silver-stained biopsies to facilitate H pylori detection, and at least two upper endoscopic procedures were done with gastric biopsies in 188 patients. Twelve of the 188 patients with an initially positive H pylori gastric biopsy became H pylori-negative without antibiotic treatment for H pylori or other infection; 10 received omeprazole and two received no drug treatment. In two of the 12 patients recurrent H pylori in the gastric mucosa was also documented. These findings indicate that H pylori may disappear and reappear in the gastric mucosa with no specific antibiotic eradication regimen, although omeprazole may eradicate H pylori in vivo in some patients. The natural history of H pylori in gastric biopsies is poorly understood. Improved understanding, especially regarding the pathogenesis of upper gastrointestinal ulcerative and inflammatory disease processes, is essential before recommendations for specific antibiotic eradication regimens can be made.

  4. Gastric mucosal status in populations with a low prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Nusi, Iswan Abbas; Akil, Fardah; Syam, Ari Fahrial; Wibawa, I Dewa Nyoman; Rezkitha, Yudith Annisa Ayu; Maimunah, Ummi; Subsomwong, Phawinee; Parewangi, Muhammad Luthfi; Mariadi, I Ketut; Adi, Pangestu; Uchida, Tomohisa; Purbayu, Herry; Sugihartono, Titong; Waskito, Langgeng Agung; Hidayati, Hanik Badriyah; Lusida, Maria Inge; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    In Indonesia, endoscopy services are limited and studies about gastric mucosal status by using pepsinogens (PGs) are rare. We measured PG levels, and calculated the best cutoff and predictive values for discriminating gastric mucosal status among ethnic groups in Indonesia. We collected gastric biopsy specimens and sera from 233 patients with dyspepsia living in three Indonesian islands. When ≥5.5 U/mL was used as the best cutoff value of Helicobacter pylori antibody titer, 8.6% (20 of 233) were positive for H. pylori infection. PG I and II levels were higher among smokers, and PG I was higher in alcohol drinkers than in their counterparts. PG II level was significantly higher, whereas PG I/II ratios were lower in H. pylori-positive than in H. pylori-negative patients. PG I/II ratios showed a significant inverse correlation with the inflammation and atrophy scores of the antrum. The best cutoff values of PG I/II were 4.05 and 3.55 for discriminating chronic and atrophic gastritis, respectively. PG I, PG II, and PG I/II ratios were significantly lower in subjects from Bangli than in those from Makassar and Surabaya, and concordant with the ABC group distribution; however, group D (H. pylori negative/PG positive) was the lowest in subjects from Bangli. In conclusion, validation of indirect methods is necessary before their application. We confirmed that serum PG level is a useful biomarker determining chronic gastritis, but a modest sensitivity for atrophic gastritis in Indonesia. The ABC method should be used with caution in areas with a low prevalence of H. pylori.

  5. OLGA and OLGIM stage distribution according to age and Helicobacter pylori status in the Korean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ji Hyung; Choi, Il Ju; Kook, Myeong-Cherl; Lee, Jong Yeul; Cho, Soo-Jeong; Nam, Su Youn; Kim, Chan Gyoo

    2014-04-01

    The Operative Link for Gastritis Assessment (OLGA) and the Operative Link on Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia Assessment (OLGIM) staging systems have been suggested to provide risk assessment for gastric cancer. This study aimed to evaluate the distribution of OLGA and OLGIM staging by age and Helicobacter pylori status. We studied 632 subjects who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy for gastric cancer screening. Helicobacter pylori status and histologic changes were assessed using the updated Sydney system. Stage III and IV OLGA or OLGIM stages were considered as high-risk stages. The rate of H. pylori infection was 59.0% (373/632). Overall, the proportion of high OLGA and OLGIM stages was significantly increased with older age (p pylori infection (OR = 8.46) were independent risk factors for high-risk OLGA stages. These risk factors were the same for high-risk OLGIM stages. In the H. pylori-positive subgroup, the proportion of high-risk OLGA stages was low (6.9%) before the age of 40, but increased to 23.0%, 29.1%, and 41.1% for those in their 40s, 50s, and 60s, respectively (p pylori-negative group, with a respective prevalence of 10.3% and 3.4% even among those in their 60s. Because high-risk OLGA and OLGIM stages are uncommon under the age of 40, H. pylori treatment before that age may reduce the need for endoscopic surveillance for gastric cancer. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Extragastric manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection--other Helicobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solnick, Jay V; Franceschi, Francesco; Roccarina, D; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2006-10-01

    Recent studies have indicated a strong link between Helicobacter pylori and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and iron deficiency anemia. Interesting results have also been obtained for ischemic heart disease, though most putative associations between H. pylori infection and extragastric disease remain speculative. With regard to other Helicobacter species, Helicobacter felis has been shown to play a role in gastric carcinogenesis in mouse models. An increased susceptibility to cholesterol gallstone formation has been described in animals fed a lithogenic diet and infected with Helicobacter bilis, or co-infected with Helicobacter hepaticus and Helicobacter rodentium. Finally, enterohepatic Helicobacter species have also been exploited to better understand inflammatory bowel disease.

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection and pediatric asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Karimi; Koroush Fakhimi Derakhshan; Farid Imanzadeh; Mohamad Rezaei; Zahra Cavoshzadeh; Saeid Maham

    2013-01-01

    Objective Childhood infectious diseases are one of the most known environmental pathogenic causes of childhood asthma. The high prevalence of both Helicobacter pylori infection and asthma in our country prompted us to assess anyprobable association between them in childhood. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited 196 children aged 6 to 12 years old comprising 98 asthmatic (case group) and 98 healthy (control group) individuals. Urea breath test was performed for all of the children and ...

  8. HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusri Dianne Jurnalis

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakFaktor risiko infeksi Helicobacter pylori adalah tinggal di negara berkembang, kondisi sosial ekonomi yang rendah, jumlah anggota keluarga yang banyak, etnik dan genetik. Tatalaksana dan diagnosis Helicobacter pylori belum memuaskan karena adanya resistensi antibiotik pada pasien Helicobacter pylori. Kami melaporkan seorang pasien perempuan usia 8 tahun 6 bulan yang terinfeksi Helicobacter pylori. Diagnosis ditegakkan berdasarkan anamnesis, pemeriksaan fisik, dan hasil laboratorium. Pasien diduga terinfeksi Helicobacter pylori karena mengalami nyeri perut berulang. Dari laboratorium didapatkan serologi IgG Helicobacter pylori positif. Pada hasil endoskopi biopsi ditemukan kuman Helicobacter pylori. Pasien mendapat therapi eradikasi lini pertama untuk infeksi Helicobacter pylori yaitu amoksisilin, klaritromisin dan omeprazol selama dua minggu. Setelah dua minggu pengobatan keluhan pasien tidak ada.Kata kunci: Helicobacter pylori, anak, nyeri perut berulangAbstractRisk factors for acquiring Helicobacter pylori infection include residency of developing country, poor socioeconomic conditions, crowded family, and possibly an ethnic or genetic as predispositions. The diagnosis and management Helicobacter pylori has not been satisfied yet, however, there is problem of increasing resistancy antibiotic due to Helicobacter pylori. Objective: We report a 8 year and 6 month old girl who suffered from Helicobacter pylori. The diagnosis was based on history, clinical finding, and laboratory work-up. Suspicion on the presence of Helicobacter pylori was started when the girl had recurrent abdominal pain. Serology IgG Helicobacter pylori was positive and we had done endoscopic examination and biopsy. Therapy this patient was first line eradication Helicobacter pylori which give amoxicillin, clarithromycin and omeprazole for two weeks. There are no sympthoms after two weeks therapyKey word: Helicobacter pylori, children, recurrent abdominal pain

  9. The assessment of carotid intima media thickness and serum Paraoxonase-1 activity in Helicobacter pylori positive subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbas Halide S

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of inflammation in the pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis has been increasingly discussed. Although the seroepidemiological studies have suggested a relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection and atherosclerosis; the issue is still controversial. It is well known that abnormal lipid profil is related to atherosclerosis and the measurement of carotid-intima media thickness (CIMT is one of the surrogate marker of atherosclerosis. The serum concentration of high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C has been known to have an inverse correlation with the development of atherosclerosis. Paraoxonase-1 (PON1 is a major anti-atherosclerotic component of HDL-C. PON1 activity is related to lipid peroxidation and prospective cardiovascular risk. The aim of this study was to investigate CIMT and serum PON1 activities along with lipid parameters in H. pylori positive and negative subjects. Methods Thirty H. pylori positive subjects and thirty-one negative subjects were enrolled. H. pylori infection was diagnosed by the presence of positivity of stool H. pylori antigen test or Carbon 14 labeled urea breath test. Serum PON1 activity was measured spectrophotometrically. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors were investigated and laboratory analysis included measurement of serum triglycerides (TG, total cholesterol (TC, high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C. We assessed CIMT by high-resolution ultrasound of both common carotid arteries. Results We found that the mean and maximum values of right and overall CIMT in H. pylori positive subjects were significantly thicker than those of H. pylori negative subjects. There was no significant differences in serum HDL-C, LDL-C, TC levels and TC/HDL-C ratios between two groups. Serum TG levels of H. pylori positive subjects were significantly higher than those of H. pylori negative subjects (p = 0.014. We found that PON1

  10. Helicobacter pylori Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Related Images View Sources Also Known As H. pylori antibody test, stool antigen, breath tests Urea breath test CLO test Rapid urease test (RUT) for H. pylori Formal Name Helicobacter pylori This article was last ...

  11. Helicobacter pylori and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Substances Chronic Inflammation Common Cancer Myths and Misconceptions Diet Hormones Immunosuppression Infectious Agents Obesity Radiation Sunlight Tobacco Genetics NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Helicobacter pylori and Cancer On This Page What is ...

  12. Histological and endoscopic features of the stomachs of patients with Chagas disease in the era of Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Machado Fonseca

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Most studies that have evaluated the stomachs of patients with Chagas disease were performed before the discovery of Helicobacter pylori and used no control groups. This study compared the gastric features of chagasic and non-chagasic patients and assessed whether gastritis could be associated with Chagas disease. Methods Gastric biopsy samples were taken from patients who underwent endoscopy for histological analysis according to the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori infection was assessed by histology, 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR, serology and the 13C-urea breath test. Patients were considered H. pylori-negative when all of these diagnostic tests were negative. Clinical and socio-demographic data were obtained by reviewing medical records and using a questionnaire. Results The prevalence of H. pylori infection (70.3% versus 71.7% and chronic gastritis (92.2% versus 85% was similar in the chagasic and non-chagasic groups, respectively; such as peptic ulcer, atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. Gastritis was associated with H. pylori infection independent of Chagas disease in a log-binomial regression model. However, the chagasic H. pylori-negative patients showed a significantly higher grade of mononuclear (in the corpus and polymorphonuclear (PMN (in the antrum cell infiltration. Additionally, the patients with the digestive form of Chagas disease showed a significantly lower prevalence of corpus atrophy than those with other clinical forms. Conclusions The prevalence of H. pylori infection and of gastric histological and endoscopic features was similar among the chagasic and non-chagasic patients. Additionally, this is the first controlled study to demonstrate that H. pylori is the major cause of gastritis in patients with Chagas disease.

  13. Immunomodulation of Helicobacter Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Ken Croitoru

    1999-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori leads to a chronic infection in humans that is associated with gastric inflammation and a vigorous immune response. Despite the humoral and cellular responses that can be detected in both human and animal models of helicobacter infection, the immune response fails to eliminate the organism. Eradication failure may be due to the niche in which H pylori confines itself, well away from direct contact with elements of the immune system. Alternatively, the general tendency of t...

  14. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in dyspeptic patients in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Shokrzadeh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Although Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection has been known to be associated with several upper gastrointestinal disorders such as peptic ulcer and gastric cancer, the relationship between H. pylori infection and dyspeptic symptoms remains controversial. Furthermore, it is still not clear which factors are associated with H. pylori infection in the Iranian population. We investigated the prevalence of H. pylori infection in dyspeptic patients and factors associated with H. pylori infection in the Iranian population. In this cross-sectional study, 303 patients with dyspeptic symptoms underwent endoscopy. Clinical data and a questionnaire about gastrointestinal symptoms were collected from each patient. H. pylori status was evaluated by histological examination. Among the 303 patients, 263 (86.8% were found to be positive for H. pylori. The prevalence of H. pylori infection decreased significantly with age. There was no difference in the prevalence of H. pylori infection between the patients with and those without a family history of gastroduodenal diseases. Among 250 patients with abdominal pain, 219 (87.6% were infected with H. pylori. Among 211 patients with epigastric abdominal pain, 185 (87.7% were infected with H. pylori. It was observed that belching was significantly associated with H. pylori infection (P = 0.03. Dyspepsia triggered by the consumption of tea was higher in H. pylori-positive patients than in H. pylori-negative patients (P = 0.03. The prevalence of H. pylori infection in dyspeptic patients was quite high in Iran. Belching and dyspepsia triggered by tea consumption was related with H. pylori infection.

  15. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and its relation with body mass index in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chengfu; Yan, Ming; Sun, Yan; Joo, Jungsoo; Wan, Xingyong; Yu, Chaohui; Wang, Qunyan; Shen, Chao; Chen, Peng; Li, Youming; Coleman, William G

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is highly prevalent worldwide. The association between obesity and H. pylori infection is controversial in the literature. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori infection and its relation with body mass index (BMI) in a Chinese population. A cross-sectional study was performed among adults who underwent health checkups at the First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University in 2013. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was examined by (13)C urea breath tests, and the association between prevalence of H. pylori infection and BMI was analyzed. Of the 8820 participants enrolled, 3859 (43.8%) were positive for H. pylori infection. H. pylori-positive participants had a more unfavorable metabolic profile than H. pylori-negative participants. Overweight/obese participants showed a higher prevalence of H. pylori infection than that of lean participants, and a positive linear correlation between BMI and prevalence of H. pylori infection was observed. Both unadjusted and adjusted analysis revealed that BMI was significantly associated with risk factors of H. pylori infection. Our results showed that BMI was significantly and positively associated with H. pylori infection, and a high BMI was associated with an increased risk of the infection. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with reduced prevalence of colonic diverticular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Lars Erik; Jepsen, Peter; Tøttrup, Anders; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik

    2017-08-01

    Colonic diverticular disease is a common disorder with increasing incidence in Western societies. The intestinal microbiome may be among etiological factors. Helicobacter pylori may protect against some intestinal diseases, and incidence of H. pylori is decreasing in Western societies. Thus, we aimed to determine whether H. pylori is associated to decreased prevalence of registered colonic diverticular disease. In a historical cohort study, patients were enrolled from primary health care centers after urea breath test for H. pylori and then followed for a median of 6 years. The patient's diagnostic codes and country of birth were acquired from nationwide Danish administrative registries. We used logistic regression to compare prevalence and Cox regression to compare incidence of diverticular disease between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative patients, adjusting for confounding variables. Patients infected with H. pylori had lower prevalence of colonic diverticular disease (0.87% vs 1.14%, OR=0.62, 95% CI: 0.50-0.78). This phenomenon was observed whether we studied all registered diagnoses or only cases registered as primary diagnoses at discharge. After urea breath test, we observed no statistical difference in incidence rates of diverticular disease. H. pylori is associated with reduced prevalence of colonic diverticular disease. The inverse association was absent after the urea breath test. Thus, we speculate that H. pylori may provide protection from colonic diverticular disease. Alternatively, H. pylori is a marker for other factors affecting disease development. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Long-Term Recurrence Rates of Peptic Ulcers without Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jae Hyun; Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Kim, Byung-Wook; Jee, Sam Ryong; Chung, Woo Chul; Shim, Ki-Nam; Baik, Gwang Ho; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Jin Il

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The purpose of this study is to investigate the recurrence rate of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) over a long follow-up period with PUD patients without Helicobacter pylori. Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients diagnosed with PUD on endoscopy and divided them into two groups: a H. pylori-negative group (HP-negative group), and a group of patients with untreated H. pylori (HP noneradicated group). We compared the recurrence rates of PUD in these two groups and analyzed the factors that affected ulcer recurrence. Results Total of nine hospitals in Korea participated, and a total of 1,761 patients were retrospectively reviewed. The HP-negative group included 553 patients, and the HP noneradicated group included 372 patients. The 5-year cumulative probabilities of PUD recurrence were 36.4% in the HP-negative group and 43.8% in the HP noneradicated group (p=0.113). The factors that were found to affect recurrence in the HP-negative group were elder, male, and comorbid chronic kidney disease. Conclusions The 5-year cumulative probability of PUD recurrence without H. pylori infection after a long-term follow-up was 36.4% and the factors that affected recurrence were elder, male, and comorbid chronic kidney disease. PMID:27114412

  18. Helicobacter pylori and Its Virulence Factors' Effect on Serum Oxidative DNA Damages in Adults With Dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshmat Shahi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter Pylori infection is a common gastrointestinal infection that can cause pathological effects, increase oxidative stress and induce an inflammatory response in gastric mucosa. Inflammatory aspects may prompt the production of radical oxygen substance (ROS which may damage cells and release 8-hydroxydyoxyguanosine (8-OHdG to serum. In this study, we evaluate the prevalence of H. pylori virulence factors and the association between serum level of 8-OHdG, H. pylori infection, and its various virulence factors. The presence of H. pylori and prevalence of cagA, babA and oipA genes in samples were determined by rapid urease test (RUT, histopathological exam (HE and polymerase chain reaction (PCR and oxidative DNA damage situation were assessed by using serum level of 8-OHdG. There was not any direct relation between H. pylori negative and H. pylori oipA+specimens by 8-OHdG serum level (P>0.05. In all clinical observations, the presence of cagA and oipA genes was common. There was a statistical relationship between the presence of cagA, babA factors, and high serum level of 8-OHdG (P<0.05. The presence of cagA and babA virulence factors may be associated with increased serum 8-OHdG in dyspeptic patients and may induce the damage to gastric cells.

  19. Helicobacter pylori and Its Virulence Factors' Effect on Serum Oxidative DNA Damages in Adults With Dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Heshmat; Bahreiny, Rasoul; Reiisi, Somayeh

    2016-11-01

    Helicobacter Pylori infection is a common gastrointestinal infection that can cause pathological effects, increase oxidative stress and induce an inflammatory response in gastric mucosa. Inflammatory aspects may prompt the production of radical oxygen substance (ROS) which may damage cells and release 8-hydroxydyoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) to serum. In this study, we evaluate the prevalence of H. pylori virulence factors and the association between serum level of 8-OHdG, H. pylori infection, and its various virulence factors. The presence of H. pylori and prevalence of cagA, babA and oipA genes in samples were determined by rapid urease test (RUT), histopathological exam (HE) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and oxidative DNA damage situation were assessed by using serum level of 8-OHdG. There was not any direct relation between H. pylori negative and H. pylori oipA+specimens by 8-OHdG serum level (P>0.05). In all clinical observations, the presence of cagA and oipA genes was common. There was a statistical relationship between the presence of cagA, babA factors, and high serum level of 8-OHdG (P<0.05). The presence of cagA and babA virulence factors may be associated with increased serum 8-OHdG in dyspeptic patients and may induce the damage to gastric cells.

  20. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and atrophic gastritis in patients with dyspeptic symptoms in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Thein; Shiota, Seiji; Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Ni, New; Aye, Than Than; Matsuda, Miyuki; Tran, Trang Thi Huyen; Uchida, Tomohisa; Mahachai, Varocha; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-14

    To survey the detailed analyses for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and gastric mucosal status in Myanmar. A total of 252 volunteers with dyspeptic symptoms (155 female and 97 male; mean age of 43.6 ± 14.2 years) was participated in Yangon and Mandalay. The status of H. pylori infection was determined based on 5 different tests including rapid urease test, culture, histology, immunohistochemistry and serology. Histological scores were evaluated according to the update Sydney system and the Operative Link for Gastritis Assessment system. Pepsinogen (PG) I and PG II were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The overall prevalence of H. pylori infection was 48.0%. There was no relationship between age and infection rate. Even in young group (less than 29 years old), the H. pylori infection rate was relatively high (41.9%). The prevalence of H. pylori infection was significantly higher in Yangon than that of Mandalay. H. pylori infection was significantly associated with the presence of gastric mucosal atrophy. All 7 subjects with peptic ulcer were infected with H. pylori. Although H. pylori-positive subjects showed stronger gastritis than H. pylori-negative subjects, most cases had mild gastritis. We revealed the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with dyspeptic symptoms in Myanmar. The H. pylori infection was a risk factor for peptic ulcer and stronger gastritis.

  1. Production of IL-12 in gastritis relates to infection with Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauditz, J; Ortner, M; Bierbaum, M; Niedobitek, G; Lochs, H; Schreiber, S

    1999-01-01

    Increased production of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8, has been demonstrated in Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric mucosal inflammation. IL-12, a newly characterized cytokine, is thought to be a key mediator in host responses to bacterial infections. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in cytokine patterns between H. pylori-positive and -negative gastritis and normal mucosa. Secretion of IL-12, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 was measured in 176 patients with chronic gastritis in whole biopsy cultures. Gastritis was graded for chronic inflammation or acute inflammatory activity, respectively, according to the Sydney system. Biopsies with similar scores were matched for analysis from H. pylori-infected and non-infected patients. Secretion of IL-12 was significantly increased in H. pylori-associated gastritis in comparison with H. pylori-negative gastritis (P gastritis by impairing clearance of the pathogen. PMID:10444264

  2. Role of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of infantile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ramakantb

    between infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) and Helicobacter pylori infection. Materials and. Methods: In a case-control study, 20 infants with confirmed IHPS (Group 1) and 30 age-matched healthy infants (Group 2) were enrolled for the assessment of H. pylori infection. Serological testing of anti-H. pylori antibody ...

  3. Serum TNF-α, IL-8, VEGF Levels in Helicobacter pylori Infection and Their Association with Degree of Gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gontar A Siregar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to investigate the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-8, VEGF in Helicobacter pylori infection, and their association with the degrees of gastritis histopathology. Methods: a cross-sectional study was done on 80 consecutive gastritis patients admitted to endoscopy units at Adam Malik General Hospital and Permata Bunda Hospital, Medan, Indonesia from July-December 2014. The Rapid Urease test was used for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. The severity of chronic inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia were assessed. Serum samples were obtained to determine circulating TNF-α, IL-8, and VEGF. Univariate and bivariate analysis (chi square, fisher’s exact, and mann-whitney test were done using SPSS version-22. Results: there were 41.25% of 80 patients infected with Helicobacter pylori. Serum TNF-α and VEGF levels in the infected group were significantly higher compared to H. pylori negative, but there were no significant differences between serum levels of IL-8 in H. pylori positive and negative. There were significant associations between serum level of TNF-α and IL-8 with degree of chronic inflammation, and also between serum level of IL-8 and degree of neutrophil infiltration. There were significant associations between serum level of VEGF and degree of atrophy, and also between serum level of VEGF and degree of intestinal metaplasia. Conclusion: High levels of TNF-α were associated with severe degree of chronic inflammation, high levels of IL-8 associated with severe degree of chronic inflammation and neutrophil infiltration, and high levels of VEGF associated with severe degree of premalignant gastric lesion. Key words: cytokine, neoangiogenesis, Helicobacter pylori, atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia.

  4. Extragastric Helicobacter species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, Stephen L.W.; Hynes, S.; Wadstrom, T.

    2002-01-01

    The genus Helicobacter has expanded at a rapid pace and no fewer than 31 species have been named since the proposal of the genus in 1989. Of these 31 species, 22 are principally associated with extragastric niches and there is increasing interest in the role of these taxa in diseases of humans...... and animals. Substantial evidence attests to certain species playing a role in the pathogenesis of enteric, hepatic and biliary disorders and some taxa demonstrate zoonotic potential. The importance of extragastric Helicobacters is likely to be an important topic for research in the near future. Here...

  5. Isolation and identification of Helicobacter spp, from canine and feline gastric mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalava, K.; On, Stephen L.W.; VanDamme, P.A.R.

    1998-01-01

    It is known that virtually all healthy adult dogs and cats harbor spiral helicobacters in their gastric mucosa, Three species, Helicobacter felis, Helicobacter bizzozeronii, and Helicobacter salomonis have been isolated in vitro from the gastric mucosa of these animals. The aims of this study were...... conventional phenotypic tests, whole-cell protein profiling, and ultrastructural analysis in identifying the different species isolated from canine and feline gastric mucose. We cultured 95 and 22 gastric mucosal biopsies from dogs and cats, respectively. Twenty-one H. bizzozeronii strains, 8 H. felis strains......, 8 H. salomonis strains, 3 mixed cultures, 2 "Flexispira rappini"-like organisms, and 3 as get uncharacterized strains were isolated from the dogs, and 3 H. felis strains were isolated from the cats. The methods used here yielded Helicobacter isolation rates of 51% from dogs and 13.6% from cats...

  6. Molecular alterations in early gastric carcinomas. No apparent correlation with Helicobacter pylori status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, P.; Craanen, M. E.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Dekker, W.; Kuipers, E. J.; Meuwissen, S. G.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1999-01-01

    Data on the differences in molecular profile between H pylori-positive and H pylori-negative early gastric carcinomas, if any, are almost nonexistent. We therefore investigated whether molecular differences can be observed between H pylori-positive and H pylori-negative early gastric carcinomas.

  7. Immunomodulation of Helicobacter Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Croitoru

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori leads to a chronic infection in humans that is associated with gastric inflammation and a vigorous immune response. Despite the humoral and cellular responses that can be detected in both human and animal models of helicobacter infection, the immune response fails to eliminate the organism. Eradication failure may be due to the niche in which H pylori confines itself, well away from direct contact with elements of the immune system. Alternatively, the general tendency of the intestinal immune response to down- regulate reactivity to noninvasive luminal bacteria also may contribute to the failure to eliminate helicobacter infection. Results of vaccine studies in mouse models indicate that modulating the helper T cell response from a T helper cell type 1 to a T helper cell type 2 response likely is required for the prevention and elimination of helicobacter infection. Understanding the mechanisms by which the immune response controls bacterial infections will allow for the design of novel strategies of immune modulation and the development of vaccines for both the treatment and prevention of H pylori.

  8. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a type of bacteria that causes infection in the stomach. It is found in about two-thirds ... breath or stool to see if it contains H. pylori. The best treatment is a combination of antibiotics ...

  9. Infecciones por helicobacter pylori Helicobacter pylori infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliam Alvarez Gil

    1994-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Se revisan los conocimientos sobre el papel de Helicobacter pylori en varias enfermedades gastroduodenales como la gastritis crónica (GC, úlcera gástrica (UG, úlcera duodenal (UD y dispepsia no ulcerosa (DNU. La revisión abarca aspectos históricos, microbiológicos, clínicos, epidemiológicos, diagnósticos de laboratorio, terapéuticos y de patogénesis.

    The current knowledge of the role of Helicobacter Pylori in several gastroduodenal  diseases is reviewed. It includes chronic gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers and nonulcerous dyspepsia. The following aspects are treated in this paper: history, microbiology. Clinical presentation, epidemiology, laboratory diagnosis, therapy and pathogenesis.

  10. What Do We Do about Helicobacter pylori?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CJ Hawkey

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Heliobacter pylori and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs cause ulcers by different mechanisms. Under some circumstances, patients infected with H pylori may be less prone to NSAID-associated ulcers than those who are H pylori-negative. Eradication trials have yielded differing results. However, those who have studied patients who have a past history of ulcer disease and are already established on NSAIDs have shown no benefit from H pylori eradication.

  11. Helicobacter pylori: Novel Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Eric Drouin

    1999-01-01

    The ideal therapy for Helicobacter pylori would cure the infection without resulting in the development of antibiotic resistance. Current therapies have variable cure rates; the reasons for treatment failure include bacterial resistance and poor compliance. Some antibiotics, such as furazolidone, may be affordable agents to treat this infection worldwide. New proton pump inhibitors, such as rabeprazole, can potentiate antibiotics. Nutriceuticals and probiotics demonstrate interesting in vitro...

  12. PREVALENCE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    OpenAIRE

    Vandana; Vidya

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: This study was done at Christian Medical College an d Hospital, Ludhiana for the period of 5 years from January 2006 to December 2010 in the Department of Microbiology. A total of 306 endoscopic gastric biopsy specimens were collected from the suspected cases of the peptic ulcer and were subjected to rapid urease test for Helicobacter pylori. This test has high sensitivity and cent percent specificity. The prevalen ce was determined to be 09.48...

  13. Effect of eradication of Helicobacter pylori in children with chronic immune thrombocytopenia: a prospective, controlled, multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Giovanna; Miraglia, Vito; Branciforte, Francesca; Matarese, Sofia Maria Rosaria; Zecca, Marco; Bisogno, Gianni; Parodi, Emilia; Amendola, Giovanni; Giordano, Paola; Jankovic, Momcilo; Corti, Annalisa; Nardi, Margherita; Farruggia, Piero; Battisti, Laura; Baronci, Carlo; Palazzi, Giovanni; Tucci, Fabio; Ceppi, Stefania; Nobili, Bruno; Ramenghi, Ugo; De Mattia, Domenico; Notarangelo, Lucia

    2011-02-01

    The eradication of Helicobacter pylori has been associated with remission of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in approximately half of eradicated patients. Data on children are limited to small case series. Children from 16 centers in Italy, who were less than 18 years of age and diagnosed with chronic ITP (cITP), were screened for H. pylori infection. Positive patients underwent standard triple therapy with amoxicillin, clarithromycin, and omeprazole. The eradication response was defined as follows: complete response, platelet (PLT) count ≥ 150 × 10(9) /L; partial response, PLT count of at least 50 × 10(9) /L; no response, PLT count <50 × 10(9) /L. Of 244 screened patients, 50 (20%) had H. pylori infection, 37 of which received eradication therapy and completed follow-up. Eradication was successful in 33/37 patients (89%). PLT recovery was demonstrated in 13/33 patients after eradication (39%), whereas spontaneous remission was observed in 17/166 (10%) H. pylori-negative patients (P < 0.005). Responders more often required second line eradication (9/13), whereas a second cycle was required in 3/20 non-responders (P < 0.005). Among the large cohort of patients, those who underwent successful H. pylori eradication showed a significantly higher PLT response. Therefore, it may be appropriate to look for H. pylori and eventually eradicate it in children with cITP. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Halitosis and helicobacter pylori infection: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Wenhuan; Li, Juan; Xu, Liming; Zhu, Jianhong; Hu, Kewei; Sui, Zhenyu; Wang, Jianzong; Xu, Lingling; Wang, Shaofeng; Yin, Guojian

    2016-09-01

    Halitosis is used to describe any disagreeable odor of expired air regardless of its origin. Numerous trials published have investigated the relation between Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection and halitosis, and even some regimes of H pylori eradication have been prescribed to those patients with halitosis in the clinic. We conducted a meta-analysis to define the correlation between H pylori infection and halitosis. To evaluate whether there is a real correlation between H pylori infection and halitosis, and whether H pylori eradication therapy will help relieve halitosis. We searched several electronic databases (The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science, and Wanfangdata) up to December 2015. Studies published in English and Chinese were considered in this review. After a final set of studies was identified, the list of references reported in the included reports was reviewed to identify additional studies. Screening of titles and abstracts, data extraction and quality assessment was undertaken independently and in duplicate. All analyses were done using Review Manager 5.2 software. A total of 115 articles were identified, 21 of which met the inclusion criteria and presented data that could be used in the analysis. The results showed that the OR of H pylori infection in the stomach between halitosis-positive patients and halitosis-negative patients was 4.03 (95% CI: 1.41-11.50; P = 0.009). The OR of halitosis between H pylori-positive patients and H pylori-negative patients was 2.85 (95% CI: 1.40-5.83; P = 0.004); The RR of halitosis after successful H pylori eradication in those H pylori-infected halitosis-positive patients was 0.17 (95% CI: 0.08-0.39; P halitosis before successful H pylori eradication therapy was 4.78 (95% CI: 1.45-15.80; P = 0.01), compared with after successful H pylori eradication therapy. There is clear evidence that H pylori infection correlates with halitosis. H pylori infection might be important in the

  15. Helicobacter pylori--a risk factor for the developement of the central serous chorioretinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiuk-Hojło, Marta; Michałowska, Magdalena; Turno-Krecicka, Anna

    2009-01-01

    To prove the influence oftte Helicobcter pylor for the development of the central serous chororetinopathy. We examined 55 patients with central serous chorioretinopathy confirmed by fluorescein angiogram and 55 controls. Each patient provided venous blood sample for IgG antibodies to Helicobacter pylori by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique (ELISA) and a stool specimen for Helicobacter pylori antigens. 44% in CSC patients were positive results of stool examine and only 29% in group comtrol. In 67% of the patients we proved the presence of the antibodies IgG--anty Helicobacter pylori and in 47% controls. The difference was statistically significant. Helicobacter pylori infection is statistically more frequently among the patients with CSC diagnosis than in healthy population.

  16. Helicobacter pylori: Novel Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Drouin

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The ideal therapy for Helicobacter pylori would cure the infection without resulting in the development of antibiotic resistance. Current therapies have variable cure rates; the reasons for treatment failure include bacterial resistance and poor compliance. Some antibiotics, such as furazolidone, may be affordable agents to treat this infection worldwide. New proton pump inhibitors, such as rabeprazole, can potentiate antibiotics. Nutriceuticals and probiotics demonstrate interesting in vitro activity against H pylori. Children rarely have symptoms to this infection and, therefore, are a suitable group in which to assess different nonaggressive therapies.

  17. Management of Helicobacter pylori infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin; Kusters, Johannes G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infection with Helicobacter pylori is associated with severe digestive diseases including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. Successful eradication of this common gastric pathogen in individual patients is known to prevent the occurrence of peptic ulcer disease

  18. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms in Bushehr, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Falahi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori is a spiral Gram negative bacterium that has been found to be related to various gastroduodenal diseases. The prevalence of H. pylori infection may vary greatly in different regions. In order to establish a suitable policy for disease control and prevention, it is necessary to perform epidemiologic studies in different geographical regions. This investigation aims to determine the prevalence of H. pylori infection by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and to study of some related factors among patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms in Bushehr, Iran. Materials and Methods: Gastric biopsy samples were collected from 310 patients referred for endoscopy due to different upper gastrointestinal symptoms. FISH was used to detect H. pylori in the specimens. Logistic regression with calculation of odds ratio was used for statistical analysis. Results: The prevalence of H. pylori infection was 43.5%. There was a significant difference between the mean age of H. pylori positive (46.59±17.14 and H. pylori negative (42.35±17.3 patients (P= 0.033. There was significant association between H. pylori infection and age of 40 years or more (OR=1.63 P=0.036, employment (OR=1.91 P=0.047, smoking (OR= 2.16 P = 0.008, keeping domestic animals (OR=1.74 P=0.043, drinking tap water (OR=1.75 P= 0.025, and blood group O (OR=3.21 P=0.0001. Conclusion: The prevalence of H. pylori infection is considerable in Bushehr. The present study shows that several factors are significantly associated with H. pylori infection in Bushehr, of which some factors are modifiable. It is probable that modification of these factors can lead to decrease the prevalence of H. pylori infection in community

  19. Evaluation of the Correlation Between Childhood Asthma and Helicobacter pylori in Kashan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamechian, Tahere; Movahedian, Amir Hossein; Ebrahimi Eskandari, Ghasem; Heidarzadeh Arani, Marzieh; Mohammadi, Abouzar

    2015-06-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory air-way disease with increasing prevalence rate during the recent years. There are studies about the relationship between asthma and infectious diseases, including the association between asthma and Helicobacter pylori. According to the latest studies, there is an epidemiological correlation between asthma prevalence and prevalence of H. pylori. The aim of this research was to study the correlation between H. pylori and asthma by biopsy in five to eighteen year-old children who had undergone endoscopy at Shahid Beheshti Hospital. Three hundred children (5 to 18 years old) undergoing endoscopy owing to gastro-intestinal problems at Shahid Beheshti Hospital were observed for childhood asthma using the Gina 2010 questionnaire which included 24 questions with "yes" and "no" answers to identify asthmatic patients with five positive answers. Next, the patients were referred to an allergy and asthma specialist for clinical examinations, spirometry and post bronchodilator test (Post BD). Among 138 H. pylori positive patients, eight cases (5.8 %) were asthmatic while of the 162 H. pylori negative patients 28 (17.3%) were asthmatic. This difference was statistically significant (P Value = 0.002). The correlation between H. pylori and asthma was studied after controlling the confounding variables including, gender, age and family history. The results obtained for the above-mentioned variables were significant (P Values of 0.004, 0.005 and 0.002, and Odd-Ratio Mantel Haenszel (ORMH) of 3.38, 3.24 and 4.06, respectively). Our findings showed that there is an inverse correlation between H. pylori and asthma. Performing more studies with larger sample sizes is necessary to confirm these results.

  20. Helicobacter pylori in children with asthmatic conditions at school age, and their mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hollander, W J; Sonnenschein-van der Voort, A M M; Holster, I L; de Jongste, J C; Jaddoe, V W; Hofman, A; Perez-Perez, G I; Moll, H A; Blaser, M J; Duijts, L; Kuipers, E J

    2016-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori prevalence in Western countries has been declining simultaneously with increases in childhood asthma and allergic diseases; prior studies have linked these phenomena. To examine the association between H. pylori colonisation in children and risk of asthma and related conditions at school age. We secondly examined additional effects of maternal H. pylori status by pairing with children's status. This study was embedded in a multi-ethnic population-based cohort in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. We measured anti-H. pylori and anti-CagA antibodies in serum of children obtained at age 6 years, and of their mothers obtained during midpregnancy. Asthma or related conditions were reported for children at age 6 years. We used multivariate logistic regression analyses among 3797 subjects. In children, the H. pylori positivity rate was 8.7%, and 29.2% of these were CagA-positive. A child's colonisation with a CagA-negative-H. pylori strain was associated with an increased risk of asthma (Odds ratio 2.11; 95% CI 1.23-3.60), but this differed for European (3.64; 1.97-6.73) and non-European (0.52; 0.14-1.89) children. When taking into account maternal H. pylori status, only H. pylori-positive children with an H. pylori-negative mother had increased risk of asthma (2.42; 1.11-5.27), accounting for 3.4% of the asthma risk. Colonisation of a European child with a CagA-negative-H. pylori strain at age 6 was associated with an increased prevalence of asthma, but there was no association for non-European children. The underlying mechanisms for the observed risk differences require further research. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Helicobacter pylori but not gastrin is associated with the development of colonic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selgrad, Michael; Bornschein, Jan; Kandulski, Arne; Hille, Carla; Weigt, Jochen; Roessner, Albert; Wex, Thomas; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) constitutes a risk for the development of colonic neoplasia. Hypergastrinemia can be induced by H. pylori infection, and gastrin can act as putative promoter of colorectal carcinogenesis. Aim of our study was to assess whether H. pylori infection and/or increased serum gastrin levels are associated with the occurrence of colonic neoplasms. For this, we reviewed prospectively collected data of 377 patients with a minimum age of 50 years who underwent colonoscopy. H. pylori and CagA status were determined by serology. Serum gastrin levels were measured in fasting state by commercially available assay. In H. pylori infected patients (n = 138; 36.6%), the overall prevalence of colonic neoplasms was more frequent compared to H. pylori negative patients (n = 239; 63.4%) (OR = 2.73, 95% CI: 1.76-4.24). H. pylori infection occurred more frequently in patients with hyperplastic polyps (OR = 2.66, 95% CI: 1.23-5.74) and adenomas presenting with low grade intraepithelial neoplasia (IEN) (OR = 1.85, 95% CI: 1.14-2.99). Attributable risk for adenomas with high grade IEN and colorectal adenocarcinoma (n = 14) was not assessed due to the low number of cases. The expression of CagA was also associated with an increased risk for colonic neoplasms (OR = 2.25, 95% CI: 1.29-3.94). Hypergastrinemia did not increase the risk for any colonic neoplasms and there was no difference in basal serum gastrin levels between H. pylori positive and negative patients. In conclusion, H. pylori infection, including CagA expression is associated with an increased risk for the development of colonic neoplasm. © 2014 UICC.

  2. Helicobacter pylori-positive functional dyspepsia in elderly patients: comparison of two treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, F; Branciforte, G; Brogna, A; Bentivegna, C; Luca, S; Terranova, R; Michalos, A; Dawson, B K; Chodash, H B

    1999-05-01

    The association of Helicobacter pylori and functional dyspepsia is not well defined. The role of H. pylori on dyspeptic symptoms is still controversial. The aim of this study is to confirm the efficacy of H. pylori eradication by two different commonly used treatment regimens, as well as to examine the improvement of the dyspeptic symptoms by eradicating H. pylori. H. pylori functional dyspepsia is prevalent in people over 60 years old. In this age group we treated 126 patients with bismuth plus metronidazole and amoxicillin (group A, 67 patients) versus omeprazole plus amoxicillin (group B, 59 patients). Results were statistically analyzed utilizing the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, McNemer test and chi-square test; P < 0.05 was considered significant. Two months after the end of therapy we observed an eradication rate of 66.1% in group A vs 64.3% in group B. All treated patients showed improvement in symptomatology. Although there was no significant difference between patients in whom H. pylori was or was not eradicated within the respective groups, when examining all H. pylori-positive patients versus H. pylori-negative posttreatment patients, there was a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in all four symptoms of functional dyspepsia measured. In conclusion, we suggest that patients treated with H. pylori-eradicating therapeutic regimens have an improvement in functional dyspepsia symptoms. We shall prefer the dual therapy as compared to the triple therapy. We believe that eradicating treatment to eradicate H. pylori in the elderly patients with H. pylori-related functional dyspepsia will reduce health care costs by reducing the number of subsequent visits.

  3. Helicobacter pylori in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sýkora, Josef; Rowland, Marion

    2011-09-01

    This article reviewed the important publications on Helicobacter pylori research with children between April 2010 and March 2011. The most interesting studies in the last year lend further weight to the evidence for vertical transmission of H. pylori. The discovery of a potential role for jhp0562, the gene which encodes for the cell envelope protein glycosyltransferase, in the progression to peptic ulcer disease is also very interesting as it may provide a novel way to distinguish children at risk of peptic ulcer disease from those who are not, and so determine those who requires treatment to eradicate H. pylori. The rise in non-H. pylori-associated ulcers and erosions continues to be reported with no apparent risk factors for these ulcers identified to date. High levels of treatment failure continue to be reported, and there remains an urgent need for more effective treatment regimes for children. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters detected in the stomach of humans comprise several naturally occurring Helicobacter species in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baele, Margo; Pasmans, Frank; Flahou, Bram; Chiers, Koen; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2009-04-01

    Besides the well-known gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori, other Helicobacter species with a spiral morphology have been detected in a minority of human patients who have undergone gastroscopy. The very fastidious nature of these non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters (NHPH) makes their in vitro isolation difficult. These organisms have been designated 'Helicobacter heilmannii'. However, sequencing of several genes detected in NHPH-infected tissues has shown that the 'H. heilmannii' group comprises at least five different Helicobacter species, all of them known to colonize the stomach of animals. Recent investigations have indicated that Helicobacter suis is the most prevalent NHPH species in human. This species has only recently been isolated in vitro from porcine stomach mucosa. Other NHPH that colonize the human stomach are Helicobacter felis, Helicobacter bizzozeronii, Helicobacter salomonis and 'Candidatus Helicobacter heilmannii'. In numerous case reports of human gastric NHPH infections, no substantial information is available about the species status of the infecting strain, making it difficult to link the species with certain pathologies. This review aims to clarify the complex nomenclature of NHPH species associated with human gastric disease and their possible animal origin. It is proposed to use the term 'gastric NHPH' to designate gastric spirals that are morphologically different from H. pylori when no identification is available at the species level. Species designations should be reserved for those situations in which the species is defined.

  5. RAD51 G135C genetic polymorphism and their potential role in gastric cancer induced by Helicobacter pylori infection in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, T T H; Nagashima, H; Uchida, T; Mahachai, V; Vilaichone, R-K; Tshering, L; Binh, T T; Yamaoka, Y

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate the role of the RAD51 G135C genetic polymorphism on the risk of gastric cancer induced by Helicobacter pylori infection, we determined allele frequency and genotype distribution of this polymorphism in Bhutan--a population documented with high prevalence of gastric cancer and extremely high prevalence of H. pylori infection. The status of RAD51 G135C was examined by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of PCR amplified fragments and sequencing. Histological scores were evaluated according to the updated Sydney system. G135C carriers showed significantly higher scores for intestinal metaplasia in the antrum than G135G carriers [mean (median) 0·33 (0) vs. 0·08 (0), P = 0·008]. Higher scores for intestinal metaplasia of G135C carriers compared to those of G135G carriers were also observed in H. pylori-positive patients [0·3 (0) vs. 0·1 (0), P = 0·002] and H. pylori-positive patients with gastritis [0·4 (0) vs. 0·1 (0), P = 0·002] but were not found in H. pylori-negative patients. Our findings revealed that a combination of H. pylori infection and RAD51 G135C genotype of the host showed an increasing score for intestinal metaplasia. Therefore, RAD51 G135C might be the important predictor for gastric cancer of H. pylori-infected patients.

  6. Helicobacter pylori eradication may influence timing of endoscopic surveillance for gastric cancer in patients with gastric precancerous lesions: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, Maria Pina; Cipolli, Alice; Ruggiu, Matteo Walter; Manca, Alessandra; Bassotti, Gabrio; Pes, Giovanni Mario

    2018-01-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia related to Helicobacter pylori infection, are major risk factors for gastric adenocarcinoma. Eradication of H pylori and endoscopy surveillance of precancerous lesions may reduce the risk and/or lead to early detection of gastric cancer improving survival. In this study, the progression of precancerous lesions after H pylori treatment was evaluated.Patients with incomplete or complete intestinal metaplasia and/or gastric atrophy at the index endoscopy, were examined for the extension/histological worsening of precancerous lesions at the endoscopy surveillance for gastric cancer. Progression of lesions was evaluated according to H pylori status, age, and sex. Cox proportional hazard regression model and Kaplan-Meier curves were used to evaluate the strength of predictors for lesions progression.Among 105 patients (61 women) H pylori negative patients showed a milder worsening of gastric lesions between index and surveillance endoscopy compared with patients positive for the infection (log-rank test: P Cox regression model showed persistence of H pylori infection (hazard ratio = 4.436; P 65 years and sex were not significant predictors.According to literature our results demonstrate that H pylori eradication is the major factor able to delay gastric precancerous lesions progression. Time interval for endoscopic surveillance in patients negative for H pylori infection and with gastric precancerous lesions may be extended.

  7. Prediction of Helicobacter pylori status by conventional endoscopy, narrow-band imaging magnifying endoscopy in stomach after endoscopic resection of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Kazuyoshi; Saka, Akiko; Nozawa, Yujiro; Nakamura, Atsuo

    2014-04-01

    To reduce the incidence of metachronous gastric carcinoma after endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer, Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy has been endorsed. It is not unusual for such patients to be H. pylori negative after eradication or for other reasons. If it were possible to predict H. pylori status using endoscopy alone, it would be very useful in clinical practice. To clarify the accuracy of endoscopic judgment of H. pylori status, we evaluated it in the stomach after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) of gastric cancer. Fifty-six patients treated by ESD were enrolled. The diagnostic criteria for H. pylori status by conventional endoscopy and narrow-band imaging (NBI)-magnifying endoscopy were decided, and H. pylori status was judged by two endoscopists. Based on the H. pylori stool antigen test as a diagnostic gold standard, conventional endoscopy and NBI-magnifying endoscopy were compared for their sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV). Interobserver agreement was assessed in terms of κ value. Interobserver agreement was moderate (0.56) for conventional endoscopy and substantial (0.77) for NBI-magnifying endoscopy. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 0.79, 0.52, 0.70, and 0.63 for conventional endoscopy and 0.91, 0.83, 0.88, and 0.86 for NBI-magnifying endoscopy, respectively. Prediction of H. pylori status using NBI-magnifying endoscopy is practical, and interobserver agreement is substantial. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Helicobacter bilis and Helicobacter trogontum: infectious causes of abortion in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, John; Haydon, Taryrn G; Rawdon, Thomas G; McFadden, Andrew M J; Ha, Hye-Jeong; Shen, Zeli; Feng, Yan; Pang, Jassia; Swennes, Alton G; Paster, Bruce J; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Fox, James G; Spence, Richard P

    2016-05-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the association of Helicobacter spp. that had flexispira morphology with ovine abortion, and to understand the importance of these organisms as a cause of ovine abortion in New Zealand. A retrospective diagnostic survey was carried out on laboratory submissions from ovine abortion outbreaks. A comparison was made of the proportion of laboratory submissions where Helicobacter spp. were detected from flocks that had no other agent identified (group A) with a group that had a known cause of abortion identified (group B). This latter group was considered to be a negative control, given the premise that Helicobacter spp. were not causing abortions and that Helicobacter spp. should be present at a lower rate in the group. Where no diagnosis had been made, aborted material was positive for Helicobacter spp. with flexispira morphology in 8 submissions (20%, 8/40) from 5 of the 31 survey farms (16%, 5/31). Helicobacter spp. were not detected in any of the 18 submissions from the 17 control farms (group B). Helicobacter spp. were confirmed by 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing of 3 of the Helicobacter spp. isolated by culture from the livers of aborted sheep fetuses, and 7 of the 8 where samples were positive in a Helicobacter PCR assay. The Helicobacter spp. were identified as Helicobacter trogontum (Flexispira taxon 5 genotype) and Helicobacter bilis (Flexispira taxon 8 genotype). The findings support Helicobacter spp. being a probable causative agent of ovine abortions in New Zealand. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. Effect of Helicobacter pylori Infection on Symptoms of Gastroenteritis Due to Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Alicia Hsin-Ming; Haggerty, Thomas Dean; de Martel, Catherine; Leung, Cynthia Wai-Mun; Parsonnet, Julie

    Helicobacter pylori can cause hypochlorhydria in some hosts and predispose to diarrheal infections. We tested the hypothesis that chronic H. pylori infection increases the risk of diarrheal illness due to an acid-sensitive organism: enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). After testing healthy

  10. Detection of Helicobacter pylori by Real-Time PCR for 16s rRNA in Stools of NonInfected Healthy Children, Using ELISA Antigen Stool Test as the Gold Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sergio; Mamani, Nora; Lucero, Yalda; Torres, Juan Pablo; Farfán, Mauricio; Lagomarcino, Anne J; Orellana, Andrea; O'Ryan, Miguel

    2016-12-01

    We previously detected Helicobacter pylori infection by stool antigen ELISA assay in 33-41% of asymptomatic Chilean children between 2-3 years of age, of which 11-20% had a transient infection and 21-22% a persistent infection. A total of 88% of ELISA-positive samples were also rtPCR positive, while 37/133 (33%) of ELISA-negative stool samples were rtPCR positive. The significance of a ELISA-negative/rtPCR-positive sample requires clarification. We aimed to determine whether rtPCR is able to detect persistent infections not detected by ELISA. We selected 36 children with an ELISA-negative/rtPCR-positive stool sample, of which 25 were never H. pylori infected according to ELISA, and 11 had a transient infection with an ELISA-positive sample before or after the discordant sample. At least two additional consecutive ELISA-negative samples per child were tested in duplicate by rtPCR for the 16s rRNA gene. A total of 14 of 78 (17.9%) rtPCR reactions were positive, but only 4/78 (5.1%) were positive in both duplicates, representing a total of 3/36 (8.3%) children with an additional rtPCR-positive sample, only one of whom was persistently negative by ELISA. One child with a transient infection had two positive rtPCR reactions despite negative ELISA samples. In H. pylori noninfected or transiently infected children, as determined by stool ELISA, additional ELISA-negative/rtPCR-positive stool samples were found in 8.3% of children, but a possible persistent infection was only identified in 2.7% of children. Thus, the characterization of infection dynamics in children is not being misrepresented by application of stool ELISA. Furthermore, rtPCR does not significantly improve dynamic characterization. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effectiveness of Helicobacter pylori eradication in the prevention of primary gastric cancer in healthy asymptomatic people: A systematic review and meta-analysis comparing risk ratio with risk difference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Seta

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is strongly associated with gastric cancer occurrence. However, it is unclear whether eradication therapy reduces the risk of gastric cancer occurrence. We evaluated whether H. pylori eradication reduces the risk of primary gastric cancer by using both risk ratio (RR and risk difference (RD.Searches of PubMed, EMBASE, Google scholar, the Cochrane Library, and the Japan Medical Abstracts Society as well as those registered in databases of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, metaRegister of Controlled Trials, ClinicalTrials.gov, controlled-trials.com, UMIN-CTR, JMACCT-CTR, and JAPIC-CTI between January 1965 and March 2017, supplemented with manual screening. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs in which eradication therapy were implemented for the interventional group but not for the control group, and assessed the subsequent occurrence of primary gastric cancer as the main outcome. Two authors independently reviewed articles and extracted data. Integrated results for all data were presented as RR and RD.Seven studies met inclusion criteria. The reductions in risk of primary gastric cancer occurrence in terms of overall RR and RD were 0.67 (95% CI: 0.48 to 0.95 and -0.00 ([95% CI: -0.01 to 0.00]; number needed to treat: 125.5 [95% CI: 70.0 to 800.9], respectively.The effectiveness of H. pylori eradication therapy in suppressing the occurrence of primary gastric cancer was significant and comparable to that of previous studies in terms of the estimated RR. However, the estimated RD was slight and not statistically significant.

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection and pediatric asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Abdullah; Fakhimi-Derakhshan, Koroush; Imanzadeh, Farid; Rezaei, Mohamad; Cavoshzadeh, Zahra; Maham, Saeid

    2013-06-01

    Childhood infectious diseases are one of the most known environmental pathogenic causes of childhood asthma. The high prevalence of both Helicobacter pylori infection and asthma in our country prompted us to assess anyprobable association between them in childhood. This cross-sectional study recruited 196 children aged 6 to 12 years old comprising 98 asthmatic (case group) and 98 healthy (control group) individuals. Urea breath test was performed for all of the children and H. pylori infection was compared between the two groups according to the urea breath test results. Urea breath test was positive in 18 asthmatic (18.36) and 23 (23.36) healthy subjects but was not significantly different between the case and controls (p = 0.380). Further analysis in the asthmatic group revealed association of H. pylori infection withage (p asthma (p = 0.010). However, no significant correlation was found between sex, severity of asthma, controled asthma or abnormal pulmonary function tests with H. pylori infection (p= 0.804, 0.512, 0.854 and 0.292, respectively). Given the results of the study, H. pylori infection was not significantly different between asthmatic and healthy children. In asthmatic patients, there was no significant association between H. pylori infection and sex, severity of disease, control status of disease and normal or abnormal pulmonary function tests. H. Pylori infection had a significant association with increasing age and duration of asthma.

  13. relation between helicobacter pylori, inflammatory

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Sept. 2008 Vol 11(3):270-274. RELATION BETWEEN HELICOBACTER PYLORI, INFLAMMATORY. (NEUTROPHIL) ACTIVITY, CHRONIC GASTRITIS, GASTRIC ATROPHY AND. INTESTINAL METAPLASIA. *M. N Tanko, *A. N Manasseh,*G.O Echejoh, *B. M. Mandong , **A. O Malu , **E. N Okeke, **N. Ladep , **E. I. Agaba.

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    A high prevalence and early colonization of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood was described again this year in developing countries in contrast to developed ones. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy including gastric biopsies remains the diagnostic gold standard method for this infection. A...

  15. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.; Winkel, E. G.; de Laat, L.; van Oijen, A. H.; de Boer, W. A.

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to

  16. Helicobacter pylori and Peptic Ulcers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-17

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. David Swerdlow discusses the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcer disease and trends in hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease in the United States between 1998 and 2005.  Created: 8/17/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 8/17/2010.

  17. Nickel Homeostasis in Helicobacter Species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Stoof (Jeroen)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractGastric Helicobacter species are adapted to colonize the acidic environment of the stomach. Colonization with H pylori is life long if untreated, and can lead to gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and eventually to gastric cancer. Although H pylori is sensitive to many antibiotics in vitro,

  18. Alopecia areata is not associated with Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Hafez Hisham

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alopecia areata (AA is an immune-mediated form of hair loss that occurs in all ethnic groups, ages, and both sexes. Helicobacter pylori has been associated with many extra-digestive dermatological conditions. The causal relation between alopecia areata and Helicobacter pylori is discussed in this study. Materials and Methods: We have screened for the presence of H. pylori in patients with AA, in order to determine any potential role in its patho-physiology. We have prospectively studied 31 patients with alopecia areata and 24 healthy volunteers of similar gender, for the presence of H. pylori stool antigen (HpSAg. Results: Optical density values for H. pylori infection was positive in 18 of the 31 patients evaluated (58.1%, while in 13 patients, the values did not support H. pylori infection (41.9%. In the control group, 10 of the 24 (41.7% had positive results. Within the group of alopecia areata, there was no significant difference between HpSAg positive and negative patients. Conclusions: The results have shown that a relation between Helicobacter pylori and alopecia areata is not supported. We advise that H. pylori detection need not to be included in the laboratory work up of alopecia areata.

  19. Biopatologia do Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladeira Marcelo Sady Plácido

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A infecção pelo Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori induz inflamação persistente na mucosa gástrica com diferentes lesões orgânicas em humanos, tais como gastrite crônica, úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. Os fatores determinantes desses diferentes resultados incluem a intensidade e a distribuição da inflamação induzida pelo H. pylori na mucosa gástrica. Evidências recentes demonstram que cepas do H. pylori apresentam diversidade genotípica, cujos produtos acionam o processo inflamatório por meio de mediadores e citocinas, que podem levar a diferentes graus de resposta inflamatória do hospedeiro, resultando em diferentes destinos patológicos. Cepas H. pylori com a ilha de patogenicidade cag induzem resposta inflamatória mais grave, através da ativação da transcrição de genes, aumentando o risco para desenvolvimento de úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. O estresse oxidativo e nitrosativo induzido pela inflamação desempenha importante papel na carcinogênese gástrica como mediador da formação ou ativação de cancerígenos, danos no DNA, bem como de alterações da proliferação celular e da apoptose.

  20. Associations among Gastric Juice pH, Atrophic Gastritis, Intestinal Metaplasia andHelicobacter pyloriInfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jihee; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Jongchan; Hwang, Young-Jae; Kim, Hyoung Woo; Chung, Jung Wha; Kim, Jin-Wook; Lee, Dong Ho

    2018-03-15

    Gastric juice plays a crucial role in the physiology of the stomach. The aim of this study is to evaluate associations among the pH of gastric juice, atrophic gastritis (AG), intestinal metaplasia (IM), pepsinogen, and Helicobacter pylori infection. Gastric biopsies and juice were collected from 46 subjects who underwent endoscopies at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital between November 2011 and March 2013. H. pylori , AG and IM were evaluated, and pepsinogen I or II, I/II ratio, and interleukin (IL)-1β levels were measured. The mean pH of gastric juice was higher in the H. pylori -positive group (n=17) than that in the H. pylori -negative group (n=29) (4.54 vs 2.46, p=0.002). When patients were divided into pH <3 (n=28) and pH ≥3 (n=18) groups, H. pylori was lower in the pH <3 group (21.4%) than in the pH ≥3 group (61.1%) (p=0.007). The pH ≥3 group demonstrated AG and IM more frequently than the pH <3 group in the body (p=0.047 and p=0.051, respectively) but not in the antrum. There were no differences in pepsinogen I or II, I/II ratio, and IL-1β levels between the two groups. There is a relationship between chronic H. pylori infection and gastric juice pH ≥3, which may originate from AG and IM in the body.

  1. Dietary and anthropometric indicators of nutritional status in relation to Helicobacter pylori infection in a paediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjetic, Mariana A; Mantero, Paula; Cueto Rua, Eduardo; Balcarce, Norma; Zerbetto de Palma, Gerardo; Catalano, Mariana; Zubillaga, Marcela B; Boccio, José R; Goldman, Cinthia G

    2015-04-14

    It has been postulated that Helicobacter pylori infection could affect growth and appetite, consequently influencing body weight. Therefore, the association between H. pylori infection and the dietary and anthropometric indicators of nutritional status of a paediatric population were investigated. A total of 525 children (aged 4-16 years) who were referred to the gastroenterology unit of the Sor Maria Ludovica Children's Hospital from Buenos Aires, Argentina, were enrolled and completed an epidemiological questionnaire. H. pylori infection was diagnosed using the ¹³C-urea breath test (¹³C-UBT). Height and weight were assessed for calculation of anthropometric indicators. Energy and macronutrient intakes were estimated by 24 h dietary recall. Data analysis was performed using a χ² test, a Student's t test, a Mann-Whitney U test and linear and logistic regressions. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was 25·1 % (with a mean age of 10·1 (SD 3·1) years). A tendency towards lower energy, carbohydrate, protein and fat intakes was observed in infected patients; however, it was not associated with H. pylori infection in any of the evaluated age groups (4-8, 9-13 and 14-16 years). Underweight, stunting, overweight and obesity were also not associated with the infection. Although height-for-age and BMI-for-age Z scores tended to be lower in infected patients, the differences between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative children were not statistically significant. In conclusion, H. pylori infection was not associated with dietary intake or with anthropometric indicators in the present population of children with gastrointestinal symptoms; however, an increased sample size would be needed to confirm the observed tendency towards lower dietary intake and lower anthropometric indicators of nutritional status in H. pylori-infected children.

  2. Helicobacter pylori Is Associated with miR-133a Expression through Promoter Methylation in Gastric Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joo Hyun; Kim, Sang Gyun; Choi, Ji Min; Yang, Hyo-Joon; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2018-01-15

    To investigate whether Helicobacter pylori eradication can reverse epigenetic silencing of microRNAs (miRNAs) which are associated with H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis. We examined expression and promoter methylation of miR-34b/c, miR-133a, let-7a, and let-7i in gastric cancer cell line, before/after demethylation. Among them, epigenetically controlled miRNAs were identified. Their expression and promoter methylation was examined in human tissues of H. pylori-positive gastric cancer (T), H. pylori-positive gastritis (H), and H. pylori-negative controls (C). We also compared changes of miRNA expression and promoter methylation in H. pylori-positive patients who were endoscopically treated for early gastric cancer, between baseline and 1 year later according to eradication status. In gastric cancer cell line, miR-34b/c and miR-133a showed epigenetic silencing. In human tissues, miR-34b/c and miR-133a showed serial increase of promoter methylation in order of C, H, and T (all, p<0.01), and the miR-133a expression showed serial decrease (C vs H, p=0.02; H vs T, p=0.01; C vs T, p<0.01) while miR-34b and miR-34c expressions did not. H. pylori eradication induced decrease of methylation (p<0.01) and increase of miR-133a expression (p=0.03), compared with noneradication group. This result suggests H. pylori eradication could reverse methylation-silencing of miR-133a which is involved in H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis.

  3. A novel line immunoassay based on recombinant virulence factors enables highly specific and sensitive serologic diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formichella, Luca; Romberg, Laura; Bolz, Christian; Vieth, Michael; Geppert, Michael; Göttner, Gereon; Nölting, Christina; Walter, Dirk; Schepp, Wolfgang; Schneider, Arne; Ulm, Kurt; Wolf, Petra; Busch, Dirk H; Soutschek, Erwin; Gerhard, Markus

    2013-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes half of the world's population, and infection can lead to ulcers, gastric cancer, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Serology is the only test applicable for large-scale, population-based screening, but current tests are hampered by a lack of sensitivity and/or specificity. Also, no serologic test allows the differentiation of type I and type II strains, which is important for predicting the clinical outcome. H. pylori virulence factors have been associated with disease, but direct assessment of virulence factors requires invasive methods to obtain gastric biopsy specimens. Our work aimed at the development of a highly sensitive and specific, noninvasive serologic test to detect immune responses to important H. pylori virulence factors. This line immunoassay system (recomLine) is based on recombinant proteins. For this assay, six highly immunogenic virulence factors (CagA, VacA, GroEL, gGT, HcpC, and UreA) were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and immobilized to nitrocellulose membranes to detect serological immune responses in patient's sera. For the validation of the line assay, a cohort of 500 patients was screened, of which 290 (58.0%) were H. pylori negative and 210 (42.0%) were positive by histology. The assay showed sensitivity and specificity of 97.6% and 96.2%, respectively, compared to histology. In direct comparison to lysate blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the recomLine assay had increased discriminatory power. For the assessment of individual risk for gastrointestinal disease, the test must be validated in a larger and defined patient cohort. Taking the data together, the recomLine assay provides a valuable tool for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection.

  4. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with metabolic parameters and dietary habits among medical undergraduate students in southeastern of Iran

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    Omid Eslami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To date, there is still inconclusive evidence on the extra-gastric manifestations of Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori infection. This study aimed to determine whether there is an association between H.pylori infection with metabolic syndrome and dietary habits among medical undergraduate students in south-eastern of Iran, Zahedan. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was done among 363 undergraduate students in Zahedan University of Medical Sciences during spring 2014. All subjects completed a questionnaire including demographic factors and dietary habits. Serum H. pylori-specific IgG antibodies, total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C, and fasting blood sugar (FBS levels were measured after an overnight fast. Results: The seroprevalence of H. pylori infection was 45.7%. H. pylori-positive subjects had lower mean levels of TC and TG and higher levels of HDL-C compared to H. pylori-negative subjects. In addition, lower levels of LDL-C (P = 0.044 and FBS (P = 0.05 were observed among subjects with positive H pylori infection. Only rare consumption of raw vegetables (odds ratio [OR] =3.74, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.37–5.24 as well as higher levels of FBS (OR = 1.031, 95% CI = 1.001–1.99 were significantly associated with higher odds of H. pylori infection in both the univariate and multiple logistic regression analysis. Conclusion: In a small population of young students in southeastern of Iran, H. pylori infection was associated with low consumption of raw vegetables and higher serum blood glucose.

  5. Acid-suppressive effects of generic omeprazole: Comparison of three brands of generic omeprazole with original omeprazole

    OpenAIRE

    Shimatani, Tomohiko; Inoue, M.; Kuroiwa, T.; Xu, J.; Mieno, H.; Tazuma, S.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Generic omeprazole contains the same active ingredient as original omeprazole and require verification of the bioequivalence with original omeprazole. However, very few clinical studies have been reported. Aims: A prospective, randomised, open-label, crossover study to compare acid-suppressive effect of generic omeprazole with that of original omeprazole. Subjects: Seven healthy Helicobacter pylori-negative subjects of CYP2C19 extensive metaboliser. Methods: Intragastric pH was me...

  6. Paediatric Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ayse Esra; Bilici, Meki; Tonbul, Alparslan; Karabel, Musemma; Dogan, Guzide; Tas, Tugba

    2012-01-01

    To compare the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection by stool antigen test in children with and without halitosis. Comparative study. Department of Paediatrics, Fatih University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, between December 2008 and June 2009. Fifty-three patients aged between 3-15 years who presented to paediatrics outpatient clinic with halitosis and 55 healthy children aged between 4-15 years without halitosis were included in the study. Halitosis was confirmed with organoleptic test. Stool antigen test was performed in both groups. Intergroup proportions were compared using chisquare and Fisher exact tests with significance at p halitosis and 12 of 55 healthy controls (21.8%). The rate of positive H. pylori stool antigen test results were similar between two groups (p > 0.05). Twoweeks eradication treatment was administered to 11 patients with H. pylori infection and halitosis. After treatment, the symptoms of 8 patients with halitosis (72.7%) completely resolved and persisted in 3 patients (27.3%). Seven of the 11 patients who were administered eradication treatment also had abdominal pain along with halitosis. Both symptoms completely resolved in all those patients after treatment. Although no statistically significant difference existed between the rate of H. pylori infections among those with and without halitosis. Eradication treatment was found beneficial in the treatment of children with halitosis and positive H. pylori stool antigen test.

  7. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavities of patients with leukoplakia and oral lichen planus

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    Magdalena Kazanowska-Dygdała

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections in men. This gastrointestinal pathogen is closely related to gastritis, peptic ulcers, and the increased risk of gastric cancer. Numerous studies have indicated oral cavities as possible Helicobacter pylori reservoirs. Helicobacter pylori has been detected both in supragingival and subgingival plaques, and also in saliva. In addition, the relationship between lesions of oral mucosa and the presence of H. pylori has been evaluated and described in some studies. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of Helicobacter pylori DNA in the oral cavity of patients with oral leukoplakia and oral lichen planus. Material and Methods The study included 54 patients with oral leukoplakia, 72 with oral lichen planus lesions, and 40 healthy controls. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavity samples was analyzed using a single-step Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR method. All patients underwent a periodontal examination and the following clinical parameters were collected: pocket depth, bleeding, and plaque indexes. The periodontal status was assessed using the Offenbacher classification. Results In most patients, pathological lesions were in typical sites on the buccal mucosa (leukoplakia in 88%, and oral lichen planus in 93% of patients. The DNA of the Helicobacter pylori was present in 20% of patients with leukoplakia and 23% of patients with lichen planus. We did not find the DNA of H. pylori in healthy controls. The periodontal status described by periodontal indices was worse in the investigated group than in the control group. Conclusion These findings suggest that the H. pylori presence in oral cavities may be related with leukoplakia and lichen planus oral lesions.

  8. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavities of patients with leukoplakia and oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanowska-Dygdała, Magdalena; Duś, Irena; Radwan-Oczko, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections in men. This gastrointestinal pathogen is closely related to gastritis, peptic ulcers, and the increased risk of gastric cancer. Numerous studies have indicated oral cavities as possible Helicobacter pylori reservoirs. Helicobacter pylori has been detected both in supragingival and subgingival plaques, and also in saliva. In addition, the relationship between lesions of oral mucosa and the presence of H. pylori has been evaluated and described in some studies. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of Helicobacter pylori DNA in the oral cavity of patients with oral leukoplakia and oral lichen planus. The study included 54 patients with oral leukoplakia, 72 with oral lichen planus lesions, and 40 healthy controls. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavity samples was analyzed using a single-step Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method. All patients underwent a periodontal examination and the following clinical parameters were collected: pocket depth, bleeding, and plaque indexes. The periodontal status was assessed using the Offenbacher classification. In most patients, pathological lesions were in typical sites on the buccal mucosa (leukoplakia in 88%, and oral lichen planus in 93% of patients). The DNA of the Helicobacter pylori was present in 20% of patients with leukoplakia and 23% of patients with lichen planus. We did not find the DNA of H. pylori in healthy controls. The periodontal status described by periodontal indices was worse in the investigated group than in the control group. These findings suggest that the H. pylori presence in oral cavities may be related with leukoplakia and lichen planus oral lesions.

  9. Gastric and enterohepatic helicobacters other than Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, Armelle; Péré-Védrenne, Christelle; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Flahou, Bram

    2014-09-01

    During the past year, research on non-Helicobacter pylori species has intensified. H. valdiviensis was isolated from wild birds, and putative novel species have been isolated from Bengal tigers and Australian marsupials. Various genomes have been sequenced: H. bilis, H. canis, H. macacae, H. fennelliae, H. cetorum, and H. suis. Several studies highlighted the virulence of non-H. pylori species including H. cinaedi in humans and hyperlipidemic mice or H. macacae in geriatric rhesus monkeys with intestinal adenocarcinoma. Not surprisingly, increased attention has been paid to the position of Helicobacter species in the microbiota of children and animal species (mice, chickens, penguins, and migrating birds). A large number of experimental studies have been performed in animal models of Helicobacter induced typhlocolitis, showing that the gastrointestinal microbial community is involved in modulation of host pathways leading to chronic inflammation. Animal models of H. suis, H. heilmannii, and H. felis infection have been used to study the development of severe inflammation-related pathologies, including gastric MALT lymphoma and adenocarcinoma. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection in Japan

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    Shiota, Seiji; Murakawi, Kazunari; Suzuki, Rumiko; Fujioka, Toshio; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is gradually decreasing in Japan. On the main island of Japan, nearly all H. pylori isolates possess cagA and vacA with strong virulence. However, less virulent H. pylori strains are frequently found in Okinawa where cases of gastric cancer are the lowest in Japan. Eradication therapy for peptic ulcer, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and early gastric cancer after endoscopic resection has been approved by the Japanese national health insurance system. However, the Japanese Society for Helicobacter Research recently stated that all ‘H. pylori infection’ was considered as the indication for eradication irrespective of the background diseases. To eliminate H. pylori in Japan, the Japanese health insurance system should approve the eradication of all H. pylori infections. PMID:23265147

  11. Inflammation, immunity, and vaccines for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Elios, Mario M; Andersen, Leif P

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects almost half of the population worldwide and represents the major cause of gastroduodenal diseases, such as duodenal and gastric ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma, autoimmune gastritis, and B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Helicobacter pylori induces...

  12. Detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with obstructive airway diseases with sero techniques using highly specific IgG antibodies for Helicobacter pylori antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Subhash Pawar; Sanditi Ram Reddy; Lakshmi Kiran Chelluri; Chelluri Eswara Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the authenticity of three techniques viz., ELISA, western blot and indirect immune fluorescence assay (IIFA) to establish the connection between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and two obstructive airway diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) and asthma. Methods: Serum samples were collected from 48 patients, 27 with COPD, 21 with asthma diseases and control sera were obtained from 42 healthy volunteer blood donors. Serum samples were ...

  13. [Helicobacter pylori and Arteriosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Teruaki

    2011-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-related diseases are known to include gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, gastric MALT lymphoma, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, iron-deficient anemia, urticaria, reflux esophagitis, and some lifestyle-related diseases. It is indicated that homocysteine involved with arteriosclerosis induces lifestyle-related diseases. Homocysteine is decomposed to methionine and cysteine (useful substances) in the liver, through the involvement of vitamin B₁₂ (VB₁₂) and folic acid. However, deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid induces an increase in unmetabolized homocysteine stimulating active oxygen and promoting arteriosclerosis. VB₁₂ and folic acid are activated by the intrinsic factors of gastric parietal cells and gastric acid. The question of whether homocysteine, as a trigger of arteriosclerosis, was influenced by H. pylori infection was investigated. H. pylori infection induces atrophy of the gastric mucosa, and the function of parietal cells decreases with the atrophy to inactivate its intrinsic factor. The inactivation of the intrinsic factor causes a deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid to increase homocysteine's chances of triggering arteriosclerosis. The significance and usefulness of H. pylori eradication therapy was evaluated for its ability to prevent arteriosclerosis that induces lifestyle-related diseases. Persons with positive and negative results of H. pylori infection were divided into a group of those aged 65 years or more (early and late elderly) and a group of those under 65 years of age, and assessed for gastric juice. For twenty-five persons from each group who underwent gastrointestinal endoscopy, the degree of atrophy of the gastric mucosa was observed. Blood homocysteine was measured as a novel index of arteriosclerosis, as well as VB₁₂ and folic acid that affect the metabolism of homocysteine, and then activated by gastric acid and intrinsic factors. Their

  14. Helicobacter spp. other than H. pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Mirko; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa

    2012-09-01

    Significant advances have been made over the last 12 months in the understanding of the biology of non-H. pylori Helicobacter species (NHPH). Several studies have investigated the association between NHPH and human disease, including Crohn's disease, lithiasis, liver disease, coronary disease, gastritis, and pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcers. Novel Helicobacter taxa were identified in new vertebrate hosts, and new methodologies in the fields of identification of Helicobacter spp. and evaluation of antibiotic resistance were described. The genome of the first human-derived gastric NHPH strain (Helicobacter bizzozeronii CIII-1) was sequenced, and several studies elucidated functions of different genes in NHPH. A number of important investigations regarding pathogenesis and immunopathobiology of NHPH infections have been published including the description of a new urease in Helicobacter mustelae. Finally, the effects of the gut microbiota and probiotics on NHPH infections were investigated. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. BH3-only protein Bim is associated with the degree of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis and is localized to the mitochondria of inflammatory cells in the gastric mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akazawa, Yuko; Matsuda, Katsuya; Isomoto, Hajime; Matsushima, Kayoko; Kido, Yoko; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Yamaghchi, Naoyuki; Ohnita, Ken; Takeshima, Fuminao; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Tsugawa, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Moss, Joel; Nakao, Kazuhiko; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    BH3-only protein, Bim, is a pro-apoptotic protein that mediates mitochondria-dependent cell death. However, the role of Bim in Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis remains unclear. This study aimed to assess the cellular localization of Bim and its possible role in H. pylori-induced gastritis. The study was conducted on biopsy specimens obtained from 80 patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (H. pylori-negative: n=30, positive: n=50). Association between Bim mRNA expression and severity of gastritis was evaluated and the localization of Bim was examined by immunofluorescence. Bim mRNA expression was positively correlated with the degree of gastritis, as defined by the Sydney system. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed increased Bim expression in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa compared with uninfected mucosa in both humans and mice. Bim localized in myeloperoxidase- and CD138-positive cells of H. pylori-infected lamina propria and submucosa of the gastric tract, indicating that this protein is predominantly expressed in neutrophils and plasma cells. In contrast, Bim did not localize in CD20-, CD3-, or CD68-positive cells. Bim was expressed in the mitochondria, where it was partially co-localized with activated Bax and cleaved-PARP. In conclusion, Bim is expressed in neutrophils and plasma cells in H. pylori-associated gastritis, where it may participate in the termination of inflammatory response by causing mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in specific leucocytes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Helicobacter pylori infection on common lethal factors for hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis

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    LI Yuling

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo study the relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection and common lethal factors for hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis (HBC. MethodsA total of 235 patients with HBC who were admitted to our hospitals from October 2008 to October 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. The infection rate of H. pylori in those patients was calculated. In the 155 patients with esophagogastric varices and 97 patients with portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG, the infection rate of H. pylori was compared between those with different degrees of esophagogastric varices or PHG. In the 32 patients whose blood ammonia was determined, the level of blood ammonia was compared between H. pylori-positive and -negative groups. Between-group comparison of continuous data was performed by t test and analysis of variance, and between-group comparison of categorical data was performed by χ2 test. ResultsThe infection rate of H. pylori in the 235 patients with HBC was 80.85% (190/235. In the 155 patients with esophagogastric varices, who had tortuous serpentine uplift or bead-like changes of esophageal varices and tumor-like changes (with or without gastric erosion of gastric varices visible under endoscopy, there was significant difference in infection rate of H. pylori between patients with mild, moderate, and severe varices (50.55% (46/91 vs 43.59% (17/39 vs 76% (19/25, χ2=6.913, P<0.05. In the 97 patients with PHG, who had snake skin-like changes, cherry red spots, scarlet rash, and erosion bleeding of gastric mucosa visible under endoscopy, there was significant difference in infection rate of H. pylori between patients with mild and severe PHG (43.33% (26/60 vs 67.57% (25/37, χ2=5.391, P<005.In patients whose blood ammonia was determined, patients in H. pylori-positive group had a significantly higher average concentration of blood ammonia than those in H. pylori-negative group (62.76±13.43 vs 47.20±12.51 μmol/L, t= 3.39, P<0

  17. Effect of maternal Helicobacter Pylori infection on birth weight in an urban community in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanyama, Ronald; Kagawa, Mike N; Opio, Kenneth C; Baingana, Rhona K

    2016-07-13

    Helicobacter pylori, a widespread infection particularly in developing countries has been associated with many adverse effects during pregnancy including hyperemesis gravidarum, neural tube defects in newborns, intrauterine fetal growth restriction and miscarriage. We sought to document the effects of H. pylori infection on birth weight in a low-income setting in Kampala, Uganda. This was a prospective cohort study conducted in Kampala between May 2012 and May 2013. The participants were H. pylori positive and H. pylori negative HIV negative primigravidae and secundigravidae. Recruitment was at ≤18 gestation weeks and follow up assessments were carried out at 26 and 36 gestation weeks and soon after delivery. H. pylori infection was determined using H. pylori stool antigen test. Maternal weight and height were measured, and body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain were calculated. Only term and live babies were considered. Low birth weight (LBW) was defined as a birth weight of <2500 gram. A total of 221 participants were enrolled with mean ± standard deviation (SD) age of 20.9 ± 2.7 years. The mean ± SD gestation age at delivery was 39.4 ± 1.0 weeks. Primigravidae were 61.5 % (n = 188) and 52.9 % (n = 117) of the participants were positive for H. pylori infection. Low pre-pregnancy BMI (<18.5 kg/m(2)) was recorded in 14.6 % (n = 28) while 38 % (n = 73) had a height <156 cm at recruitment. Of the infants born to the participants, 13.6 % (n = 26) had low birth weight (<2500 gram). Independent predictors for LBW were the mother being positive for H. pylori infection (odds ratio, OR, 3.6, 95 % CI 1.1 - 11.5; P = 0.031) maternal height at recruitment <156 cm (OR 3.4, 95 % CI 1.4-8.2; P = 0.008) and maternal weight gain rates <0.3 kg/week during the 2(nd) and 3(rd) trimesters (OR 3.8, 95 % CI 1.0-14.1; P = 0.044). H. pylori infection is associated with LBW among primigravidae and

  18. Helicobacter pylori DNA in recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victória, Júnia Maria Netto; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Silva, Jeane de Fátima Correia; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2003-04-01

    Considering not only the fact that recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) and stomach ulcers are immunologically mediated ulcers associated with Helicobacter pylori, but also the recent evidence that anaemia can be associated with both diseases, and the discovery of H. pylori in the oral mucosa led us to hypothesize that this bacteria may be related to RAS pathogenesis. Thirty-six consecutive subjects affected by minor and major forms of RAS and 48 healthy volunteers were included in the present study. The nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to detect the presence of H. pylori in the oral lesion, the normal contralateral mucosa of patients affected by RAS and the oral mucosa of control subjects. The chi2- and Fisher's tests were used for statistical analysis. No association between RAS lesions and H. pylori was observed. However, 14 out of 36 (38.9%) of the patients with RAS were found to show the presence of H. pylori DNA in the lesion and/or contralateral mucosa. Sixteen out of 48 (33.3%) of the patients without RAS (control subjects) were positive (P > 0.05). The present study does not give support to the assumption that H. pylori could be involved in RAS development.

  19. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in hyperemesis

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    hosein Khedmat

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vomiting is one of the most common problems during pregnancy periods which happens in 50% of the pregnant women. Hyperemesis gravidarum is a rare status that 1 out of 500 pregnant women suffer from it. Although the reason of HG is unknown, but several studies indicate a relationship between HG and helicobacter pylori . So the aim of this study was to assess the relation between H.pylori infection and hyperemesis gravidarum and to compare it with healthy ones. Materials and Methods : In this case control study 100 pregnant women with HG and 100 pregnant controls , at the same gestational weeks , referred to the city clinics were studied. Then H.pylori serum immunoglobulin IgG concentration was determined in the case and control groups by ELIZA method and serologic tests and analyzed using SPSS software. Findings: Results showed that the prevalence of H.pylori infection was significantly higher in patients with HG (79.8% than in controls (46.8% with a P<0.001 . There were no significant differences in maternal age , gestational age and social economic status between case and control groups . Conclusion : Results of this study indicate that H. pylori can play an important role for etiology of hyperemesis gravidarum.

  20. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pullorum infections in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceelen, Liesbeth M; Decostere, Annemie; Chiers, Koen; Ducatelle, Richard; Maes, Dominiek; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2007-05-10

    Four groups of 23 one-day-old broiler chickens were each inoculated by gavage with a different Helicobacter pullorum strain isolated from humans or poultry. As a control, a fifth group of eight animals was inoculated with phosphate-buffered saline. Faecal samples were collected weekly and tested for the presence of H. pullorum DNA using PCR. At 1, 8, 15, 22 and 42 days postinoculation, birds were euthanized and samples from the liver and intestinal tract were histologically, immunohistochemically and bacteriologically examined. The samples were also tested for the presence of H. pullorum DNA by PCR. All animals remained clinically healthy throughout the experiment although mild lesions in the caeca were present in animals inoculated with H. pullorum. In all H. pullorum-inoculated groups, DNA of this bacterium was detected in faecal samples until 42 days postinoculation. The main site of colonization was the caecum. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that the bacterium was closely associated with the caecal epithelial cells. It was concluded that H. pullorum may colonize the caecum of broilers and is excreted in their faeces until slaughter age. This implies that chicken meat might constitute a source of infection for human beings.

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    in gastric manifestations is the subject of conflicting reports. Extra-digestive manifestations are also reported in the course of this infection. The treatment of H. pylori infection is influenced by resistance of the bacteria to the antibiotics used. We suggest that eradication of H. pylori should take......A high prevalence and early colonization of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood was described again this year in developing countries in contrast to developed ones. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy including gastric biopsies remains the diagnostic gold standard method for this infection...

  2. [Helicobacter pylori infection in children without dyspepsia in Curundu and Parque Lefevre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halphen, G M; Lindsay Estupiñán, J; Márquez, L E; Pon Chow, R L; Méndez, J R; Brandáriz, C; Oduber, L; Chanis, R

    1998-01-01

    A study of seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori determined by ELISA IgG, was conducted in 83 consecutive healthy children. The majority of the children (55%) had the bacterium. Seropositivity was demonstrated in 55% of the age group 0-5 years old, in 47% of 6-10, and in 67%, of the group 11 to 15. Of the children without sanitary inside their homes 86% were seropositive, versus 47% of the children with sanitary in their homes.

  3. INCIDENCE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI IN DENTAL PLAQUE OF SAUDI GASTRITIS PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Refai, Abdel-Nasser M.; Fathalla, Sami E.; Nagamani, Rambhala; Al-Momen, Sami

    2002-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) was identified in dental plaque, raising the possibility of future gastritis and peptic ulceration. Objective: This trial was to study the association between presence of H. pylori in dental plaque and in the stomachs of patients with gastritis; the effect of oral hygiene and periodontal condition on the stomach. Patients and Methods: Seventy-five Saudi adult dyspeptic patients, together with 60 healthy persons as control. Two samples of dental plaq...

  4. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma, Eleftheria; Miele, Erasmo

    2015-09-01

    This review includes the main pediatric studies published from April 2014 to March 2015. The host response of Treg cells with increases in FOXP3 and TGF-β1 combined with a reduction in IFN-γ by Teff cells may contribute to Helicobacter pylori susceptibility in children. Genotypic variability in H. pylori strains influences the clinical manifestation of the infection. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with variables indicative of a crowded environment and poor living conditions, while breast-feeding has a protective effect. Intrafamilial infection, especially from mother to children and from sibling to sibling, is the dominant transmission route. Studies showed conflicting results regarding the association between H. pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia. One study suggests that H. pylori eradication plays a role in the management of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in H. pylori-infected children and adolescents. The prevalence of H. pylori was higher in chronic urticaria patients than in controls and, following H. pylori eradication, urticarial symptoms disappeared. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and allergic disease was reported. Antibiotic resistance and insufficient compliance to treatment limit the efficacy of eradication therapy. Sequential therapy had no advantage over standard triple therapy. In countries where H. pylori infection is prevalent, studies focusing on virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility may provide anticipation of the prognosis and may be helpful to reduce morbidity and mortality. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection Among Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ‑9 years and in the 10‑19 years age group respectively.[6] There are many other etiological. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection Among. Patients Undergoing Upper Gastrointestinal. Endoscopy in a Medical College Hospital in Kerala,.

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection and skin disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kutlubay, Zekayi; Zara, Tuba; Engin, Burhan; Serdaroğlu, Server; Tüzün, Yalçin; Yilmaz, Erkan; Eren, Bülent

    2014-01-01

    ..., Behçet's disease, alopecia areata, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, and Sweet's syndrome. However, more systematic studies are required to clarify the proposed association between Helicobacter pylori and skin diseases...

  7. Assessment of p21, p53 expression, and Ki-67 proliferative activities in the gastric mucosa of children with Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saf, Coskun; Gulcan, Enver Mahir; Ozkan, Ferda; Cobanoglu Saf, Seyhan Perihan; Vitrinel, Ayca

    2015-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori that is generally acquired in childhood and infects the gastric mucosa is considered to be responsible for many pathobiological changes that are linked to the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. Although the majority of studies on the subject have been carried out in adults, there are a limited number of studies on children that reflect the early period of infection and may be of greater significance. We aimed to determine the role of H. pylori infection and/or gastritis in several histopathological changes, p53, p21, and cell proliferation-associated Ki-67 antigen expression in the gastric mucosa. We studied 60 patients with a mean age of 7.5 ± 4.5 years at referral. On the basis of endoscopic appearance and the evaluation of the gastric antral specimens, the patients were divided into three groups: patients without gastritis, patients with H. pylori-positive gastritis, and patients with H. pylori-negative gastritis. To determine the expression of p53, Ki-67, and p21 in gastric biopsy specimens, immunohistochemical stains were performed. The incidence of neutrophil activity, which was one of our histopathologic parameters, was significantly higher in the H. pylori-positive gastritis group than the other two groups. The presence of lymphoid aggregate was more frequent in H. pylori ± gastritis groups than the nongastritis group. p53 expression was found to be significantly higher in the H. pylori-positive gastritis group than the nongastritis group. Ki-67 and p21 expressions were significantly more frequent in the H. pylori-positive gastritis group than the other two groups. When we evaluated the density of H. pylori, as the density of bacteria increases, we found that the expressions of p53, p21, and Ki-67 increased significantly. Expression of the studied precancerous markers in significant amounts indicates the importance of childhood H. pylori infection in the constitution of gastric cancer in adulthood.

  8. Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genotype diversity and interferon gamma expression in patients with chronic gastritis and patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Carrillo, D N; Atrisco-Morales, J; Hernández-Pando, R; Reyes-Navarrete, S; Betancourt-Linares, R; Cruz-del Carmen, I; Illades Aguiar, B; Román-Román, A; Fernández-Tilapa, G

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main risk factor for the development of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcer, and gastric cancer. In H. pylori-infected individuals, the clinical result is dependent on various factors, among which are bacterial components, the immune response, and environmental influence. To compare IFN-γ expression with the H. pylori vacA and cagA genotypes in patients with chronic gastritis and patients with gastric cancer. Ninety-five patients diagnosed with chronic gastritis and 20 with gastric cancer were included in the study. Three gastric biopsies were taken; one was used for the molecular detection and genotyping of H. pylori; another was fixed in absolute alcohol and histologic sections were made for determining IFN-γ expression through immunohistochemistry. No differences were found in the cells that expressed IFN-γ between the patients with chronic gastritis (median percentage of positive cells: 82.6% in patients without H. pylori and 82% in infected persons) and those with gastric cancer (70.5% in H. pylori-negative patients and 78.5% in infected persons). IFN-γ expression was 69% in chronic gastritis patients infected with H. pylori vacAs2m2/cagA⁻ it was 86.5% in patients infected with H. pylori vacAs1m2/cagA⁻, 86.5% in vacAs1m1/cagA⁻, and 82% in vacAs1m1/cagA⁺. Similar data were found in the patients with gastric cancer. IFN-γ expression varied depending on the H. pylori vacA and cagA genotype, but not in accordance with the presence of chronic gastritis or gastric cancer.

  9. Fruit and vegetable consumption, Helicobacter pylori antibodies, and gastric cancer risk: A pooled analysis of prospective studies in China, Japan, and Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianyi; Cai, Hui; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Zheng, Wei; Cho, Eo Rin; Jee, Sun Ha; Michel, Angelika; Pawlita, Michael; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; You, Wei-Cheng; Epplein, Meira

    2017-02-01

    Epidemiological findings on the association between fruit and vegetable consumption and gastric cancer risk remain inconsistent. The present analysis included 810 prospectively ascertained non-cardia gastric cancer cases and 1,160 matched controls from the Helicobacter pylori Biomarker Cohort Consortium, which collected blood samples, demographic, lifestyle, and dietary data at baseline. Conditional logistic regression adjusting for total energy intake, smoking, and H. pylori status, was applied to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for gastric cancer risk across cohort- and sex-specific quartiles of fruit and vegetable intake. Increasing fruit intake was associated with decreasing risk of non-cardia gastric cancer (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.52-0.95, p trend = 0.02). Compared to low-fruit consumers infected with CagA-positive H. pylori, high-fruit consumers without evidence of H. pylori antibodies had the lowest odds for gastric cancer incidence (OR = 0.12, 95% CI: 0.06-0.25), whereby the inverse association with high-fruit consumption was attenuated among individuals infected with CagA-positive H. pylori (OR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.66-1.03). To note, the small number of H. pylori negative individuals does influence this finding. We observed a weaker, nondose-response suggestion of an inverse association of vegetable intake with non-cardia gastric cancer risk. High fruit intake may play a role in decreasing risk of non-cardia gastric cancer in Asia. © 2016 UICC.

  10. Seropositivity to Helicobacter pylori and CagA protein in schoolchildren of different ages living in urban and rural areas in southern Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobjova, T; Grünberg, H; Oona, M; Maaroos, H I; Nilsson, I; Wadström, T; Covacci, A; Uibo, R

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate Helicobacter pylori and CagA seropositivity in a non-selected group of schoolchildren in southern Estonia, with reference to previous studies where high seroprevalence to H. pylori (87%) and anti-CagA positivity (63%) in an adult population from the same region were found. A total of 421 schoolchildren selected haphazardly from a random population (n = 1018, ages 9, 12 or 15 years) and living in urban or rural areas. H. pylori status was determined by evaluation of IgG antibodies against cell surface proteins of H. pylori, strain CCUG 17874, using standard ELISA. Anti-CagA IgGs were determined by ELISA using a recombinant fragment of CagA (CCUG 17874) as solid-phase antigen. Absorbance values > 0.3 (405 nm) were taken as a CagA-positive result based on a study of 25 sera from H. pylori-negative children. Of the 421 subjects, 235 (56%) were H. pylori-ELISA positive, and 109 out of the 235 (46%) were anti-CagA positive. Neither H. pylori nor CagA positivity were significantly different in girls and boys, or in children aged 9, 12 or 15 years. The H. pylori prevalence rate (118/181, 65%) as well as CagA positivity (64/181, 35%) in rural areas were higher compared with those in towns (117/240, 49% and 54/240, 22%, respectively; P = 0.001 and P = 0.005). Of schoolchildren living in southern Estonia, 56% were seropositive to H. pylori. Half of them had anti-CagA antibodies. Schoolchildren living in rural areas were infected significantly more often with CagA-seropositive strains compared with those living in towns.

  11. Eating Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Eating Healthy Eating Healthy Contact Us Resources Eating Healthy Eating healthy is part of living a healthy life. Healthy eating is a responsibility of our communities, schools, clinics, ...

  12. Significance of dormant forms of Helicobacter pylori in ulcerogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich; Reshetnyak, Tatiana Magomedalievna

    2017-01-01

    Nearly half of the global population are carriers of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a Gram-negative bacterium that persists in the healthy human stomach. H. pylori can be a pathogen and causes development of peptic ulcer disease in a certain state of the macroorganism. It is well established that H. pylori infection is the main cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Decontamination of the gastric mucosa with various antibiotics leads to H. pylori elimination and longer remission in this disease. However, the reasons for repeated detection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD after its successful eradication remain unclear. The reason for the redetection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD can be either reinfection or ineffective anti-Helicobacter therapy. The administration of antibacterial drugs can lead not only to the emergence of resistant strains of microorganisms, but also contribute to the conversion of H. pylori into the resting (dormant) state. The dormant forms of H. pylori have been shown to play a potential role in the development of relapses of PUD. The paper discusses morphological H. pylori forms, such as S-shaped, C-shaped, U-shaped, and coccoid ones. The authors proposes the classification of H. pylori according to its morphological forms and viability. PMID:28785141

  13. Helicobacter Infection Decreases Reproductive Performance of IL10-deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp, Julie M; Vanderford, Deborah A; Chichlowski, Maciej; Myles, Matthew H; Hale, Laura P

    2008-01-01

    Infections with a variety of Helicobacter species have been documented in rodent research facilities, with variable effects on rodent health. Helicobacter typhlonius has been reported to cause enteric disease in immunodeficient and IL10−/− mice, whereas H. rodentium has only been reported to cause disease in immunodeficient mice coinfected with other Helicobacter species. The effect of Helicobacter infections on murine reproduction has not been well studied. The reproductive performance of C5...

  14. DRUG RESISTANCE IN HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Silveira VIANNA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Helicobacter pylori has a worldwide distribution and is associated with the pathogenesis of various diseases of the digestive system. Treatment to eradicate this microorganism involves the use of a combination of antimicrobials, such as amoxicillin, metronidazole, clarithromycin, and levofloxacin, combined with proton pump inhibitors. Although the current therapy is effective, a high rate of treatment failure has been observed, mainly because of the acquisition of point mutations, one of the major resistance mechanisms developed by H. pylori. This phenomenon is related to frequent and/or inappropriate use of antibiotics. Conclusion This review reported an overview of the resistance to the main drugs used in the treatment of H. pylori, confirming the hypothesis that antibacterial resistance is a highly local phenomenon and genetic characteristics of a given population can influence which therapy is the most appropriate.

  15. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Elizabeth A; Sachs, George; Scott, David R

    2016-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects about 50 % of the world's population, causing at a minimum chronic gastritis. A subset of infected patients will ultimately develop gastric or duodenal ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma, or MALT (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue) lymphoma. Eradication of H. pylori requires complex regimens that include acid suppression and multiple antibiotics. The efficacy of treatment using what were once considered standard regimens have declined in recent years, mainly due to widespread development of antibiotic resistance. Addition of bismuth to standard triple therapy regimens, use of alternate antibiotics, or development of alternative regimens using known therapies in novel combinations have improved treatment efficacy in specific populations, but overall success of eradication remains less than ideal. Novel regimens under investigation either in vivo or in vitro, involving increased acid suppression ideally with fewer antibiotics or development of non-antibiotic treatment targets, show promise for future therapy.

  16. Diet and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hołubiuk, Łukasz; Imiela, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has accompanied man for thousands of years. In some infected patients, a complex and dynamic pathogen-host reaction triggers pathogenic pathways resulting in development, inter alia, of atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease (both gastric and duodenal), gastric adenocarcinoma, and MALT lymphoma. Large-scale eradication therapy is associated with a rapid increase in antibiotic resistance, gut flora composition disturbances, and increased risk of development, inter alia, of paediatric infectious diarrhoeas, atopic diseases, and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Our diet contains many substances with potent antibacterial activity against H. pylori. Dietary interventions enable a decrease in H. pylori colonisation and result in a decrease in gastritis prevalence, thus potentially lowering the risk of gastric adenocarcinoma development.

  17. Helicobacter pylori infection and atrophic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebule, I A; Longdoh, A N; Paloheimo, I L

    2013-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori-infection associated gastritis is known to be a significant risk factor of gastric cancer. Serum levels of Gastrin-17 and Pepsinogen1which are respectively biomarkers of gastric antral and corpus mucosal activity are well known parameters of atrophic gastritis. To determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori and atrophic gastritis amongst dyspeptic patients and to compare the production of PGI and G-17 in the various atrophic stages. A total of 139 dyspeptic patients aged 46.68±15.50 years [females 106 aged47.23±15.51years, males 33 aged 44.48±14.62] were included during the one year period, March 2008-april 2009 at the district hospital Tombel. The degree of atrophy was determined by the levels of serum pepsinogen1, and gastrin-17 and the presence of Helicobacter pylori antibodies detected by an enzyme immunoassay. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori was 79.82% and that for atrophic gastritis was 6.6%. A decrease in mean serum levels of gastin-17 along with increasing antral atrophy was observed; the mean serum levels of pepsinogen1 were reduced during progression of corpus atrophy. A weak reverse correlation(r =-0.036) was found between Gastrin-17 and Helicobacter pylori antibodies.

  18. Effect of diet and Helicobacter pylori infection to the risk of early gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Ah; Kang, Daehee; Shim, Ki Nam; Choe, Jae Won; Hong, Weon Seon; Choi, Haymie

    2003-05-01

    The association of dietary habits and Helicobacter pylori infection with early gastric cancer is still unclear. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted in Korea. Sixty-nine patients were newly diagnosed as having early gastric cancer at the Division of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, and 199 healthy subjects who visited the Health Promotion Center of the this same hospital for annual health examinations were selected as controls. Helicobacter pylori infection status was assayed by ELISA, and information for dietary habits was obtained by interview using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires. Preference for salty taste was also evaluated using a sensitive test. H. pylori seropositivity was observed in 88% of cases, as compared with 75% of controls (OR = 5.3, 95% confidence interval:1.7-16.5). Adaptive salt concentration was significantly and positively associated with early gastric cancer risk (p diets may enhance the effect of H. pyori infection in gastric carcinogenesis.

  19. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection improves levodopa action, clinical symptoms and quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasriza Hashim

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated a higher prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD compared to controls. H. pylori infection affects levodopa absorption and its eradication significantly improves clinical response to levodopa. Here, we studied the prevalence of H. pylori infection and its eradication effects among our PD patients.A prospective study involving idiopathic PD patients on levodopa therapy. 13C-urea breath test (UBT was used to detect H. pylori. UBT-positive patients were given standard eradication therapy and followed up at 6 and 12 weeks in an open label single arm design. Repeat UBT was performed at 12 weeks. The UPDRS, PD NMQ, PD NMSS and PDQ-39 were administered at baseline and post-eradication (6 and 12 weeks. Levodopa 'onset' time and ON-duration were recorded.Of 82 patients recruited, 27 (32.9% had positive UBT. H. pylori-positive patients had significantly poorer total UPDRS (p = 0.005 and PDQ39 (p<0.0001 scores compared to H. pylori-negative patients. At 12 weeks post-eradication, the mean levodopa onset time shortened by 14 minutes (p = 0.011. The mean ON duration time increased by 56 minutes at week 6 (p = 0.041 and 38 minutes at week 12 (p = 0.035. The total UPDRS scores (p<0.0001, scores for parts II (p = 0.001, III (p<0.0001 and IV (p = 0.009 were significantly better. The total PDQ-39 scores (p = 0.001 and subdomains mobility (p = 0.002, ADL (p = 0.001, emotional well being (p = 0.026 and stigma (p = 0.034 significantly improved. The PD NMSQ did not show significant improvement.H. pylori eradication improved levodopa onset time, ON duration, motor severity and quality of life parameters. Screening and eradication of H. pylori is inexpensive and should be recommended in PD patients, particularly those with erratic response to levodopa.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02112812.

  20. Does low dose13C-urea breath test maintain a satisfactory accuracy in diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Vaz Coelho

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The standard doses of 13C-urea in 13C-urea breath test is 75 mg. OBJECTIVE: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of 13C-urea breath test containing 25 mg of 13C-urea comparing with the standard doses of 75 mg in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. METHODS: Two hundred seventy adult patients (96 males, 174 females, median age 41 years performed the standard 13C-urea breath test (75 mg 13C-urea and repeated the 13C-urea breath test using only 25 mg of 13C-urea within a 2 week interval. The test was performed using an infrared isotope analyzer. Patients were considered positive if delta over baseline was >4.0‰ at the gold standard test. RESULTS: One hundred sixty-one (59.6% patients were H. pylori negative and 109 (40.4% were positive by the gold standard test. Using receiver operating characteristic analysis we established a cut-off value of 3.4% as the best value of 25 mg 13C-urea breath test to discriminate positive and negative patients, considering the H. pylori prevalence (95% CI: 23.9-37.3 at our setting. Therefore, we obtained to 25 mg 13C-urea breath test a diagnostic accuracy of 92.9% (95% CI: 88.1-97.9, sensitivity 83.5% (95% CI: 75.4-89.3, specificity 99.4% (95% CI: 96.6-99.9, positive predictive value 98.3% (95% CI: 92.4-99.4, and negative predictive value 93.0% (95% CI: 88.6-96.1. CONCLUSIONS: Low-dose 13C-urea breath test (25 mg 13C-urea does not reach accuracy sufficient to be recommended in clinical setting where a 30% prevalence of H. pylori infection is observed. Further studies should be done to determine the diagnostic accuracy of low doses of 13C-urea in the urea breath test.

  1. Helicobacter Infection Significantly Alters Pregnancy Success in Laboratory Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, Tara C; Cooper, Caitlin A; Ali, Zil; Truong, Ha; Moore, Julie M

    2017-05-01

    Helicobacter spp. are gram-negative, helically shaped bacteria that cause gastric and enterohepatic infections in mammalian species. Although Helicobacter infection frequently is implicated to interfere with reproductive success, few experimental data support these claims. We therefore retrospectively investigated the effect of Helicobacter infection on murine pregnancy outcome after the identification of endemic Helicobacter infection in an animal research facility. Multiplex conventional PCR analysis was used to characterize Helicobacter infection status in one inbred and 2 transgenic strains of mice in 2 self-contained rooms assigned to the same investigator. Outcomes of timed-mating experiments were compared among Helicobacter spp.-infected and uninfected mice of the same strain; Helicobacter infection was eradicated from the colony through fostering with uninfected dams. Although Helicobacter infection affected fecundity in only one strain of transgenic mouse, the total number of embryos per gravid uterus was significantly reduced in C57BL/6J mice that were infected with a single Helicobacter species, H. typhlonius. Helicobacter infection was also associated with a significant increase in the number of resorbing embryos per uterus and significant decreases in pregnancy-associated weight gain relative to uninfected mice in C57BL6/J mice and one transgenic strain. Helicobacter spp.-infected mice of all tested strains exhibited higher frequency of intrauterine hemorrhaging relative to uninfected mice. These results indicate that naturally-acquired Helicobacter infection not only reduces the productivity of a research animal breeding colony, but also negatively impacts embryo health. Despite these deleterious effects, these data suggest that colonies can be rederived to be Helicobacter-free by Cesarean section and fostering with uninfected dams. This paper provides the first evidence that H. typhlonius infection is sufficient to interfere with reproductive success

  2. Rosacea is associated with Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders; Egeberg, A; Gideonsson, R

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rosacea is a common skin disease characterized by facial erythema, telangiectasia, papules and pustules. Helicobacter pylori infection has been suggested to play a role in the etiopathogenesis of rosacea. OBJECTIVE: To systematically review and meta-analyse the relationship between...... rosacea and infection with Helicobacter pylori. METHODS: A literature search was performed using PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science. Data extraction and analyses were performed on descriptive data. Study quality was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Random-effects models with Der...... in the quantitative meta-analysis, comprising a total of 928 rosacea patients and 1527 controls. The overall association between Helicobacter pylori infection and rosacea was non-significant (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.00-2.84, P = 0.052), but analysis restricted to C-urea breath test showed a significant association (OR 3...

  3. Epidemiological study of gastric Helicobacter spp. in dogs with gastrointestinal disease in Japan and diversity of Helicobacter heilmannii sensu stricto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota-Aizawa, Sanae; Ohno, Koichi; Fukushima, Kenjiro; Kanemoto, Hideyuki; Nakashima, Ko; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Chambers, James K; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Watanabe, Takayasu; Sekizaki, Tsutomu; Mimuro, Hitomi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2017-07-01

    Epidemiological and pathological studies of Helicobacter spp. in canine stomachs in Japan were performed to investigate strain specific pathogenicity. Gastric biopsies from 144 dogs with gastrointestinal diseases were evaluated for the presence of Helicobacter spp. using genus and species specific PCRs for Helicobacter felis, Helicobacter bizzozeronii, Helicobacter heilmannii sensu stricto (s.s.) and Helicobacter pylori. PCR indicated that 50/144 (34.7%) dogs were infected with Helicobacter spp. Of the genus positive samples, 21/50 could not be amplified by any of the species specific PCRs. To investigate Helicobacter at the species level, partial ureAB gene sequences from 48/50 genus positive samples were determined; 47 strains were identified. Thirty-five strains from 45 cases were closely related to H. heilmannii s.s. (89-99% sequence similarity), seven strains from seven cases were closely related to H. bizzozeronii (95-99% sequence similarity), three strains from three cases were closely related to Helicobacter felis (86%, 98% and 99% sequence similarity), one strain from one case was closely related to Helicobacter salomonis (99% sequence similarity) and one strain from one case was closely related to H. pylori (99% sequence similarity). Dogs infected with Helicobacter spp. most similar to H. heilmannii s.s. had a higher frequency of moderate to severe gastritis than dogs negative for Helicobacter spp. (P=0.044). In conclusion, the predominant Helicobacter spp. detected in canine stomachs in our study were most closely related to H. heilmannii s.s. and displayed substantial genetic diversity. Infection with Helicobacter spp. may be associated with more severe gastritis in dogs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Diversity of zoonotic enterohepatic Helicobacter species and detection of a putative novel gastric Helicobacter species in wild and wild-born captive chimpanzees and western lowland gorillas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flahou, B.; Modrý, D.; Pomajbíková, K.; Petrželková, Klára Judita; Smet, A.; Ducatelle, R.; Pasmans, F.; Sá, R. M.; Todd, A.; Hashimoto, C.; Mulama, M.; Kiang, J.; Rossi, M.; Haesebrouck, F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 174, 1-2 (2014), s. 186-194 ISSN 0378-1135 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/0927 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Enterohepatic Helicobacter species * Gastric Helicobacter species * Helicobacter cinaedi * Candidatus Helicobacter homininae * Chimpanzee * Gorilla Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.511, year: 2014

  5. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leja, Mārcis; Axon, Anthony; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    This review of recent publications related to the epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori highlights the origin of the infection, its changing prevalence, transmission, and outcome. A number of studies have addressed the ancestor roots of the bacteria, and the first genomewide analysis of bacterial strains suggests that its coexistence with humans is more ancient than previously thought. As opposed to the generally declining prevalence of H. pylori (including China and Japan), in Sweden, the prevalence of atrophic gastritis in the young population has risen. The prevalence of the infection remains high in the indigenous populations of the Arctic regions, and reinfection rates are high. A high prevalence is permanently found in the Siberian regions of Russia as well. Several studies, some of which used multiplex serology, addressed prevalence of and risks associated with various H. pylori serotypes, thereby enabling more precise risk assessment. Transmission of H. pylori was discussed, specifically fecal-oral transmission and the use of well-water and other unpurified water. Finally, the long-term course of H. pylori infection was considered, with an estimated 89% of noncardia gastric cancer cases being attributable to the infection. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Helicobacter, Hygiene, Atopy, and Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Nusi, Iswan A; Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    The hygiene hypothesis links environmental and microbial exposures in early life to the prevalence of atopy, allergy, and asthma. Helicobacter pylori infection is typically acquired in childhood and acquisition of the infection is associated with poor household hygiene. Some population surveys have shown an inverse association between H. pylori infection and atopy, allergy, and asthma leading to the suggestion that H. pylori infection may be protective against disease; others consider it simply a biomarker for poor household hygiene. We review the relevant surveys, cohort studies, meta-analyses, and studies testing the protective hypothesis. Overall, the results of surveys and cohort studies are inconsistent, whereas meta-analyses show a significant but weak inverse correlation. In contrast, studies directly testing the protection hypothesis in relation to asthma in populations with poor hygiene and low H. pylori prevalence failed to confirm a protective effect. H. pylori is a major cause of human disease including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric malignancies. H. pylori infections most likely serve as a biomarker for poor hygienic conditions in childhood. We conclude that while synergistic interactions between environmental factors in childhood are important determinants of the pathogenesis of atopy, allergy, and asthma; H. pylori is inversely related to good hygiene and thus it's presence serves as a biomarker rather than for a specific prevention role for H. pylori or H. pylori antigens.

  7. Helicobacter pylori and Nonmalignant Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potamitis, Georgios S; Axon, Anthony T R

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is responsible for most peptic ulcers, plays a role in functional dyspepsia and is thought by some to influence the course of gastroesophageal reflux disease. This article addresses recent studies that have been published in connection with these diseases. H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer is declining in prevalence but the incidence of perforation and bleeding remains high especially in the elderly. All H. pylori associated peptic ulcers should be treated by eradication of the infection. Dyspepsia is a common disorder that affects up to 25% of the population. About 8% of cases that are infected with H. pylori will respond to treatment of the infection. The association between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease continues to be debated, a number of studies have shown that there is a negative association between H. pylori infection and Gastroesophageal reflux disease but treatment of H. pylori has not been shown to induce reflux or to affect the response to medication. Gastric atrophy is known to extend when acid suppression is used in infected patients implying that H. pylori treatment should be used in infected patients who are to undergo long-term Proton Pump Inhibitor therapy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusebi, Leonardo H; Zagari, Rocco M; Bazzoli, Franco

    2014-09-01

    Medline and PubMed databases were searched on epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori for the period of April 2013-March 2014. Several studies have shown that the prevalence of H. pylori is still high in most countries. In north European and North American populations, about one-third of adults are still infected, whereas in south and east Europe, South America, and Asia, the prevalence of H. pylori is often higher than 50%. H. pylori remains highly prevalent in immigrants coming from countries with high prevalence of H. pylori. However, the lower prevalence of infection in the younger generations suggests a further decline of H. pylori prevalence in the coming decades. Low socioeconomic conditions in childhood are confirmed to be the most important risk factors for H. pylori infection. Although the way the infection is transmitted is still unclear, interpersonal transmission appears to be the main route. Finally, H. pylori recurrence after successful eradication can still occur, but seems to be an infrequent event. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Helicobacter pylori and nonmalignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hollander, Wouter J; Sostres, Carlos; Kuipers, Ernst J; Lanas, Angel

    2013-09-01

    Declining Helicobacter pylori prevalence rates have resulted in a decrease of peptic ulcer bleeding incidence. Moreover, eradication reduces peptic ulcer recurrence rate. Newer studies confirm that H. pylori eradication lowers the risk of recurrent peptic ulcer bleeding. Guidelines therefore advocate a test-and-treat strategy for patients with a history of ulcer bleeding and NSAIDs and/or aspirin use. There is mounting evidence that H. pylori status has no effect on symptoms and treatment efficacy in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Some studies observed an improvement of GERD complaints after H. pylori eradication, which underlines that H. pylori treatment is not contra-indicated in GERD patients. The exact role of H. pylori in functional dyspepsia (FD) remains controversial. However, there is growing consensus that H. pylori-positive FD should be assessed as a separate entity. In these patients, eradication can be beneficial and appropriate. Finally, several studies suggest that H. pylori infection may also be associated with beneficial effects for the host. Epidemiologic studies showed an inverse relation between H. pylori infection and asthma and allergy, although data are conflicting and need to be expanded. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Helicobacter, Hygiene, Atopy, and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Miftahussurur

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The hygiene hypothesis links environmental and microbial exposures in early life to the prevalence of atopy, allergy, and asthma. Helicobacter pylori infection is typically acquired in childhood and acquisition of the infection is associated with poor household hygiene. Some population surveys have shown an inverse association between H. pylori infection and atopy, allergy, and asthma leading to the suggestion that H. pylori infection may be protective against disease; others consider it simply a biomarker for poor household hygiene. We review the relevant surveys, cohort studies, meta-analyses, and studies testing the protective hypothesis. Overall, the results of surveys and cohort studies are inconsistent, whereas meta-analyses show a significant but weak inverse correlation. In contrast, studies directly testing the protection hypothesis in relation to asthma in populations with poor hygiene and low H. pylori prevalence failed to confirm a protective effect. H. pylori is a major cause of human disease including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric malignancies. H. pylori infections most likely serve as a biomarker for poor hygienic conditions in childhood. We conclude that while synergistic interactions between environmental factors in childhood are important determinants of the pathogenesis of atopy, allergy, and asthma; H. pylori is inversely related to good hygiene and thus it's presence serves as a biomarker rather than for a specific prevention role for H. pylori or H. pylori antigens.

  11. Management of Helicobacter pylori infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin; Kusters, Johannes G

    2016-08-12

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori is associated with severe digestive diseases including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. Successful eradication of this common gastric pathogen in individual patients is known to prevent the occurrence of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. With half of the world's population being infected with H, pylori and only few antibiotics result in an effective eradication, a successful antibiotic driven worldwide eradication program seems unlikely. In addition, H. pylori eradication is not always beneficial as it has been described that eradication can be associated with an increased frequency of other disorders such as pediatric asthma, inflammatory bowel diseases and Barrett's Esophagus. We have to accept that eradication of this infection is a two-edged sword that is both useful and harmful and we should therefore focus our H. pylori eradication policy toward selectively identify and destroy only the virulent strains. In order to still be able to effectively treat H. pylori infections in the future we need an alternative diagnostic/treatment algorithm. This would involve a shift towards more precise and enhanced disease predicting diagnosis that tries to identify patients with chance of developing severe diseases such as gastric cancer, rather than the current regime that is geared towards find and destroy all H. pylori.

  12. Helicobacter pylori and nonmalignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ierardi, Enzo; Goni, Elisabetta; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Di Mario, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding and recurrence rate are strongly linked to Helicobacter pylori infection even if nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) play a relevant role in this setting. Further studies confirm that H. pylori eradication lowers the risk of recurrent peptic ulcer bleeding. Therefore, a test-and-treat strategy appears to be mandatory for patients with a history of ulcer bleeding and NSAIDs and/or aspirin use. Concerning gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), evidence clearly shows that H. pylori status has no effect on symptoms and treatment. Therefore, H. pylori treatment is not contraindicated in patients with GERD. The exact role of H. pylori in functional dyspepsia (FD) remains controversial. Novel possible mechanisms by which H. pylori may elicit dyspeptic symptoms include alterations of gastric motility, as well as endocrine and acid-secretory abnormalities. Hunger sensations, acid secretion, and gastrointestinal motility are regulated by ghrelin, particularly produced by the gastric enteroendocrine cell compartment. The improvement of symptoms correlates with enhanced plasma ghrelin levels. Apart from the need for more trials on this topic, these findings may give insight into the underlying pathophysiology of FD symptoms. Recent reports suggest that the presence of bacterial DNA in the oral cavity may be relevant to its transmission. A potential protective role of H. pylori on inflammatory bowel diseases needs to be better elucidated. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Dietary Amelioration of Helicobacter Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Jed W.; Stephenson, Katherine K.; Wallace, Alison J.

    2015-01-01

    We review herein the basis for using dietary components to treat and/or prevent Helicobacter pylori infection, with emphasis on: (a) work reported in the last decade, (b) dietary components for which there is mechanism-based plausibility, and (c) components for which clinical results on H. pylori amelioration are available. There is evidence that a diet-based treatment may reduce the levels and/or the virulence of H. pylori colonization without completely eradicating the organism in treated individuals. This concept was endorsed a decade ago by the participants in a small international consensus conference held in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, and interest in such a diet-based approach has increased dramatically since then. This approach is attractive in terms of cost, treatment, tolerability and cultural acceptability. This review therefore highlights specific foods, food components, and food products, grouped as follows: bee products (e.g. honey and propolis), probiotics, dairy products, vegetables, fruits, oils, essential oils, and herbs, spices and other plants. A discussion of the small number of clinical studies that are available is supplemented by supportive in vitro and animal studies. This very large body of in vitro and pre-clinical evidence must now be followed up with rationally designed, unambiguous human trials. PMID:25799054

  14. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgouras, Dionyssios N.; Trang, Tran Thi Huyen; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Three decades have passed since Warren and Marshall described the successful isolation and culture of Helicobacter pylori, the Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the stomach of half the human population worldwide. Although it is documented that H. pylori infection is implicated in a range of disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract, as well as associated organs, many aspects relating to host colonization, successful persistence and the pathophysiological mechanisms of this bacteria still remain controversial and are constantly being explored. Unceasing efforts to decipher the pathophysiology of H. pylori infection have illuminated the crucially important contribution of multifarious bacterial factors for H. pylori pathogenesis, in particular the cag pathogenicity island (PAI), the effector protein CagA and the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA. In addition, recent studies have provided insight into the importance of the gastrointestinal microbiota on the cumulative pathophysiology associated with H. pylori infections. This review focuses on the key findings of publications related to the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection published during the last year, with an emphasis on factors affecting colonization efficiency, cag PAI, CagA, VacA and gastrointestinal microbiota. PMID:26372819

  15. Dietary amelioration of Helicobacter infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Jed W; Stephenson, Katherine K; Wallace, Alison J

    2015-06-01

    We review herein the basis for using dietary components to treat and/or prevent Helicobacter pylori infection, with emphasis on (a) work reported in the last decade, (b) dietary components for which there is mechanism-based plausibility, and (c) components for which clinical results on H pylori amelioration are available. There is evidence that a diet-based treatment may reduce the levels and/or the virulence of H pylori colonization without completely eradicating the organism in treated individuals. This concept was endorsed a decade ago by the participants in a small international consensus conference held in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, and interest in such a diet-based approach has increased dramatically since then. This approach is attractive in terms of cost, treatment, tolerability, and cultural acceptability. This review, therefore, highlights specific foods, food components, and food products, grouped as follows: bee products (eg, honey and propolis); probiotics; dairy products; vegetables; fruits; oils; essential oils; and herbs, spices, and other plants. A discussion of the small number of clinical studies that are available is supplemented by supportive in vitro and animal studies. This very large body of in vitro and preclinical evidence must now be followed up with rationally designed, unambiguous human trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    This article aims to examine current best practice in the field reference to first-line, second-line, rescue and emerging treatment regimens for Helicobacter pylori eradication. The recommended first-line treatment in published guidelines in Europe and North American is proton pump inhibitor combined with amoxicillin and clarithromycin being the favoured regimen. Rates of eradication with this regimen however are falling alarmingly due to a combination of antibiotic resistance and poor compliance with therapy. Bismuth based quadruple therapies and levofloxacin based regimes have been shown to be effective second line regimens. Third-line options include regimes based on rifabutin or furazolidone, but susceptibility testing is the most rational option here, but is currently not used widely enough. Sequential therapy is promising but needs further study and validation outside of Italy. Although the success of first line treatments is falling, if compliance is good and a clear treatment paradigm adhered to, almost universal eradication rates can still be achieved. If compliance is not achievable, the problem of antibiotic resistance will continue to beset any combination of drugs used for H. pylori eradication.

  17. Healthy Places for Healthy People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Describes the Healthy Places for Healthy People technical assistance program that helps communities create walkable, healthy, economically vibrant places by engaging with local health care facility partners

  18. Molecular assessment of clarithromycin resistant Helicobacter pylori ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular assessment of clarithromycin resistant Helicobacter pylori strains using rapid and accurate PCR-RFLP method in gastric specimens in Iran. ... Thirty nine (39) (23/78%) clarithromycin-resistant strains were detected which were identified as 15 (9.15%) A2143G, 15 (9.15%) A2142G and 9 (5.49%) mix strains.

  19. Helicobacter pylori and upper digestive diseases - diagnosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Helicobacter pylori, which has been designated by the WHO as type I carcinogen, has a global prevalence of over 50%. The aim of this study was to determine the association between this bacterium and upper gastrointestinal problems in an endoscopy unit in Ouagadougou, using a molecular diagnostic method.

  20. Alcohol consumption and Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenner, H; Berg, Gabriele; Lappus, N

    1999-01-01

    Alcohol has strong antimicrobial activity and stimulates gastric acid secretion. Alcohol consumption may therefore compromise the living conditions of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. We assessed the relation of alcohol consumption with H. pylori infection among 1,785 participants ages 18...

  1. Helicobacter Pylori : Serological Testing and Treatment in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Helicobacter pylori has been strongly associated with dyspepsia and eradication of H. pylori after a non-invasive testing is an integral part of most management guidelines. This study evaluated the benefit of serological testing and treatment of H. pylori in Nigerian patients presenting with uninvestigated dyspepsia.

  2. Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori in human immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study assessed the seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori antibodies among Iranian patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. It also examines whether anti H. pylori seroprevalence was associated with the severity of the HIV infection or the antiretroviral treatment. Material and Methods: ...

  3. HELICOBACTER PYLORI SEROLOGY AND EVALUATION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been strongly associated with various gastroduodenal diseases worldwide with only a few studies emanating from developing countries. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of serum Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and underlying gastroduodenal pathology in Nigerian ...

  4. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by Chloramination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were studied to determine their resistance to chloramination. H. pylori is an organism listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Contaminant Control List (CCL). H. pylori was exposed to 2ppm of pre-formed monoc...

  5. Inflammation, immunity, and vaccines for Helicobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aebischer, Toni; Meyer, Thomas F; Andersen, Leif P

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori represents the major etiologic agent of gastritis, gastric, and duodenal ulcer disease and can cause gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue B-cell lymphoma. It is clear that the consequences of infection reflect diverse outcomes of the interaction of bacteria...

  6. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection Among Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S Adlekha, T Chadha, P Krishnan, B Sumangala. Abstract. Background: Helicobacter pylori related gastritis is a major health ailment in developing nations. There is ... Aim: To study the prevalence of H. pylori gastritis in patients undergoing endoscopy and its association with the development of gastrointestinal diseases.

  7. Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity in Children With Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Yousefichaijan; Mosayebi; Sharafkhah; Kahbazi; Heydarbagi; Rafiei

    2016-01-01

    Background Some studies have reported an association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization and the occurrence of asthma or other allergies. However, data are inconsistent, and few studies have been performed in children. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate H. pylori seropositivity in children with and without asthma. Patients and Methods This cross-sect...

  8. Relation Between Helicobacter Pylori, Inflammatory (neutrophil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: To determine the relation of Helicobacter pylori infection with chronic inflammation, atrophy, activity level and intestinal metaplasia. Patients and Methods: A cross-sectional study of 100 consecutive patients with dyspepsia. These patients were fasted for 12 hours and gastroscopic biopsy specimens were ...

  9. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Helicobacter pylori: Prevalence and antibiotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increasing evidence links infection of the gastric mucosa by. Helicobacter pylori with the subsequent development of gastric pathologies. The incidence of H. pylori infection in Kenya is staggeringly high. An investigation into the prevalence of H. pylori in patients with dyspepsia and asymptomatic controls from the same ...

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection and atrophic gastritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Discussion. Helicobacter pylori-infection -infection causes acute gastritis in most infected individuals. In a certain number of patients with persistent infection, chronic active gastritis develops, leading finally to glandular atrophy, a risk factor for gastric adenoma and cancer7 . Correa 19928 postulated the paradigm of gastric.

  11. Magnitude of Helicobacter pylori among Dyspeptic patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection is predominantly acquired in childhood from family members. The infection can cause dypepepsia, chronic and acute gastritis and gastric cancer. Dyspepsia is the most common illness in the Ethiopian population visiting outpatient department of health facilities, and it has ...

  12. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection Among Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori related gastritis is a major health ailment in developing nations. There is high morbidity and mortality ranging from chronic gastritis to gastric malignancies. Prevalence of H. pylori infection varies markedly from country to country and in a country, region to region. Aim: To study the prevalence ...

  13. Pathogenesis of helicobacter pylori infection involves interaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori is the most ubiquitous bacterial infection worldwide infecting at least 50% of the world's population. Scientific evidence abound on the age long cohabitation of H. pylori and humans. However, following infection, development of disease depends upon three main factors namely: the virulence of the ...

  14. Helicobacter pylori and early gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craanen, M. E.; Blok, P.; Dekker, W.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1994-01-01

    The relation between Helicobacter pylori, intestinal metaplasia, and early gastric cancer was studied by examining gastrectomy specimens from 31 intestinal type and 22 diffuse type carcinomas. A total of 298 patients with antral gastritis were used as controls. Atrophic changes and intestinal

  15. Helicobacter-negative gastritis: a distinct entity unrelated to Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genta, R M; Sonnenberg, A

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter-negative gastritis is diagnosed when no organisms are detected in a gastric mucosa with typical features of Helicobacter gastritis (Hp-gastritis). If Helicobacter-negative gastritis consisted mostly of 'missed' Helicobacter infections, its prevalence should represent a constant percentage of these infections in a population, and their clinico-epidemiological features would overlap. To compare the epidemiologic patterns of Hp-positive and Hp-negative gastritis. From a pathology database, we extracted demographic, clinical and histopathological data from patients with gastric biopsies (1.2008-12.2013). We allocated patients to high (≥12%) and low (≤6%) H. pylori prevalence regions defined by ZIP code-based data. The prevalence of H. pylori-positive and -negative gastritis by sex, age and state were expressed as a per cent of the total study population stratified accordingly. Of 895 323 patients, 10.6% had Hp-gastritis and 1.5% Helicobacter-negative gastritis. Hp-gastritis, but not Helicobacter-negative gastritis, was more common in males than females (OR 1.17, 95% CI: 1.16-1.19). While Hp-gastritis was more prevalent in high than in low-prevalence areas (OR 3.65, 95% CI: 3.57-3.74), Helicobacter-negative gastritis was only minimally affected by the underlying H. pylori prevalence (1.7% vs. 1.5%). The age-specific prevalence of Hp-gastritis peaked in the 4th to 5th decades; Helicobacter-negative gastritis exhibited a low and relatively flat pattern. The geographic distribution of H. pylori-positive and -negative gastritis showed no significant correlation. Intestinal metaplasia was found in 13.0% of patients with Hp-gastritis and in 6.1% of those with Helicobacter-negative gastritis (OR 0.43, 95% CI: 0.40-0.47). These data suggest that Helicobacter-negative gastritis is, in the vast majority of cases, a nosologically and epidemiologically distinct entity that deserves further investigation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The Association of Helicobacter pylori Infection with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Alsadat Salami

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD are multifactorial conditions that result from genetic predisposition in combination with environmental risk factors. Helicobacter pylori infection as an environmental risk factor has been proposed to imitate the antigenic components of the thyroid cell membrane and may play a leading role in the onset of the autoimmune diseases, such as Hashimoto thyroiditis. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between Helicobacter pylori (HP infection and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT. The participants in this case-control study included 43 patients affected by Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and 40 healthy individuals without history of autoimmune disease as the control group. Anti HP IgG and anti-TPO antibodies were determined using ELISA method. Results were considered positive when the IgG anti-HP value was higher than 30 IU/ml and the anti-TPO autoantibody value was higher than 75 IU/ml. The mean TSH level was 18.3±16.8 IU/ml for patients and 2.8±1.2 IU/ml for the control group (P<0.001. 46.5% of the patient group and 10.8% of the control group were infected with HP. The association between HP and Hashimoto's thyroiditis was statistically significant (Odds Ratio=7.2, 95%, Confidence Interval: 2.0- 28.8, P<0.001. The findings show that, there is an association between HP and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. To establish a definite correlation between them, more detailed studies with a more specialized examination and precise consideration regarding species of HP, genetic polymorphism of the host and investigation of environmental factors are needed.

  17. Review of successful treatment for Helicobacter species in laboratory mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerton, Angela; Warden, Paul

    2006-04-01

    Three variations of the amoxycillin-based triple therapy (amoxycillin, metronidazole and bismuth) were administered in the diet, by oral gavage or in the diet in conjunction with cross-fostering on to Helicobacter-free foster mothers to mice naturally infected with H. hepaticus and/or H. bilis. The presence of Helicobacter species was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of faecal pellets. Helicobacter infection was eliminated in 50% of strains of mice treated by oral gavage; 57% of strains of mice treated by medicated diet alone and 100% of strains of mice treated with the medicated diet in conjunction with cross-fostering on to Helicobacter-free foster mothers. Eight strains of mice were successfully treated for Helicobacter infection over a two-year period. The mouse colony has been maintained Helicobacter free, as determined by PCR analysis and has remained off treatment from December 2002 to March 2005.

  18. Helicobacter pylori in gastroduodenal perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat B Dogra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:peptic ulcers were earlier believed to be caused by dietary factors, gastric acid, and stress. However, in 1983, Warren and Marshall identified the correlation between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and peptic ulcers. It is now well established that most of the peptic ulcers occur as a result of H. pylori infection. But the co-relation between perforated peptic ulcer and H. pylori infection is not yet fully established. Aims and objectives : to study the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated peptic ulcer. Materials and methods: this was a prospective study carried out in all cases of perforated peptic ulcer reporting in surgical wards of a medical college during 2008-2010. A total of 50 cases, presenting as acute perforation of duodenum and stomach during this period, formed the study group. After resuscitation, all the cases were subjected to emergency exploratory laparotomy. The exact site of perforation was identified, biopsy was taken from the ulcer margin from 2-3 sites and the tissue was sent for H. pylori culture and histopathological examination. Simple closure of perforation, omentoplasty, thorough peritoneal lavage and drainage was carried out. Results: out of the 50 cases of perforated peptic ulcer, 38 happened to be males, and only 12 were females. The age of the patients ranged from 20 to 70 years. All the patients underwent only emergency laparotomy. As many as 46 cases (92% turned out to be positive for H. pylori and only four cases (8% were negative for this infection. Postoperatively, patients who were found to be positive for H. pylori were put on anti-H. pylori treatment. Conclusion: there was a high prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated gastroduodenal ulcers.

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalach, Nicolas; Bontems, Patrick; Raymond, Josette

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection in children differs from that in adults, from the point of view of epidemiology, host response, clinical features, related diseases, and diagnosis, as well as treatment strategies. The prevalence of H. pylori infection, in both children and adults, is decreasing in the Western World as well as in some developing countries, which contrasts with the increase in childhood asthma and allergic diseases. Recurrent abdominal pain is not specific during H. pylori infection in children. The role of H. pylori infection and failure to thrive, children's growth, type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and celiac disease remains controversial. The main initial diagnosis is based on upper digestive endoscopy with biopsy-based methods. Nodular gastritis may be a pathognomonic endoscopic finding of childhood H. pylori infection. The infection eradication control is based on validated noninvasive tests. The main cause of treatment failure of H. pylori infection is its clarithromycin resistance. We recommend standard antibiotic susceptibility testing of H. pylori in pediatric patients prior to the initiation of eradication therapy. H. pylori treatment in children should be based on an evaluation of the rate of eradication in the local population, a systematic use of a treatment adapted to the susceptibility profile and a treatment compliance greater than 90%. The last meta-analysis in children did not show an advantage for sequential therapy when compared to a 14-day triple therapy. Finally, the high rate of antibiotic resistance responsible for therapy failure in recent years justifies the necessity of a novel vaccine to prevent H. pylori infection in children. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Novel Insights into Fur Regulation in Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-10

    Schumann, E. M. Schneider, and K. Triantafilou. 2005. Lipopolysaccharides from Helicobacter pylori can act as antagonists for Toll -like receptor 4. Cell...lymphocyte receptor for the Helicobacter pylori vacuolating cytotoxin. Cell Host Microbe 3:20-9. 142. Sharma, C. M., S. Hoffmann, F. Darfeuille, J...into Fur Regulation in Helicobacter pylori Name of Candidate: Jeremy Gilbreath Doctor of Philosophy Degree January 10, 2013 DISSERTATION AND

  1. Combination of Helicobacter pylori infection and the interleukin 8 -251 T > A polymorphism, but not the mannose-binding lectin 2 codon 54 G > A polymorphism, might be a risk factor of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Young Woon; Oh, Chi Hyuk; Kim, Jung-Wook; Lee, Jae Won; Park, Mi Ju; Shim, Jae-Jun; Lee, Chang Kyun; Jang, Jae-Young; Dong, Seok Ho; Kim, Hyo Jong; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Byung-Ho

    2017-05-30

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) acts in the innate immune response to Helicobacter pylori. Interleukin 8 (IL-8) is a potent cytokine produced by gastric epithelial cells in response to H. pylori. We aimed to investigate whether polymorphisms in MBL2 and IL-8 influence susceptibility to H. pylori infection, and the associations of these polymorphisms with the risk of gastroduodenal diseases in a Korean population. We consecutively enrolled 176 H. pylori-negative control subjects, 221 subjects with H. pylori-positive non-atrophic gastritis, 52 mild atrophic gastritis (AG), 61 severe AG, 175 duodenal ulcer, and 283 gastric cancer (GC). Allele-specific PCR-RFLP was conducted for polymorphisms in MBL2 exon 1 (codon 52, 54, and 57) and IL-8 -251 T > A. IL-8 levels in gastric mucosal tissues and serum MBL levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. MBL2 exon 1 polymorphic variants were found only in codon 54, and the allele frequencies did not differ significantly between the control and disease groups. Although serum MBL levels in codon 54 A/A mutants were markedly low, it did not influence susceptibility to H. pylori infection or the risk of gastroduodenal diseases. IL-8 levels were significantly different between T/T wild type, T/A heterozygote, and A/A mutant genotypes. IL-8 -251 A allele carriers (A/A + T/A) showed increased IL-8 levels, and were significantly associated with the risk of severe AG and GC. We suggest that a combination of H. pylori infection and the IL-8 -251 T > A polymorphism might increase the risk of severe AG and GC in a Korean population.

  2. Relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hashemi, Seyyed Hamid; Nadi, Ebrahim; Hajilooi, Mehrdad; Seif-Rabiei, Mohammad-Ali; Roustaei, Uldoz

    2011-01-01

    There is some evidence indicating the role of Helicobacter pylori infection in pathogenesis of extragastrointestinal diseases including skin, vascular, and autoimmune disorders, as well as some respiratory diseases...

  3. Nobeli auhinna tõi Helicobacter pylori / Juhan Kaldre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaldre, Juhan

    2005-01-01

    Nobeli meditsiiniauhind määrati sel aastal Austraalia teadlastele Robin Warrenile ja Barry Marshallile, kes avastasid, et gastriit ning peptiline haavand tekib Helicobacter pylori infektsiooni tulemusena

  4. Cholesterol-α-glucosyltransferase gene is present in most Helicobacter species including gastric non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters obtained from Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakubo, Masatomo; Horiuchi, Kazuki; Matsumoto, Takehisa; Nakayama, Jun; Akamatsu, Taiji; Katsuyama, Tsutomu; Ota, Hiroyoshi; Sagara, Junji

    2018-02-01

    Non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters (NHPHs) besides H. pylori infect human stomachs and cause chronic gastritis and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Cholesteryl-α-glucosides have been identified as unique glycolipids present in H. pylori and some Helicobacter species. Cholesterol-α-glucosyltransferase (αCgT), a key enzyme for the biosynthesis of cholesteryl-α-glucosides, plays crucial roles in the pathogenicity of H. pylori. Therefore, it is important to examine αCgTs of NHPHs. Six gastric NHPHs were isolated from Japanese patients and maintained in mouse stomachs. The αCgT genes were amplified by PCR and inverse PCR. We retrieved the αCgT genes of other Helicobacter species by BLAST searches in GenBank. αCgT genes were present in most Helicobacter species and in all Japanese isolates examined. However, we could find no candidate gene for αCgT in the whole genome of Helicobacter cinaedi and several enterohepatic species. Phylogenic analysis demonstrated that the αCgT genes of all Japanese isolates show high similarities to that of a zoonotic group of gastric NHPHs including Helicobacter suis, Helicobacter heilmannii, and Helicobacter ailurogastricus. Of 6 Japanese isolates, the αCgT genes of 4 isolates were identical to that of H. suis, and that of another 2 isolates were similar to that of H. heilmannii and H. ailurogastricus. All gastric NHPHs examined showed presence of αCgT genes, indicating that αCgT may be beneficial for these helicobacters to infect human and possibly animal stomachs. Our study indicated that NHPHs could be classified into 2 groups, NHPHs with αCgT genes and NHPHs without αCgT genes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Helicobacter pylori-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisbert, Javier P

    2016-09-01

    This article describes the main conclusions drawn from the presentations on Helicobacter pylori infection in Digestive Diseases Week, 2016. Despite the undeniable widespread reduction in the prevalence of this infection, infection rates continue to be high in developing countries. The prevalence of clarithromycin, metronidazole and quinolone resistance is markedly high in most countries and continues to rise. The management of H. pylori infection in patients with peptic ulcers still leaves much to be desired. Although H. pylori eradication reduces the incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma, it does not completely avoid its appearance. The new rapid stool antigen tests show promising results. The efficacy of standard triple therapy is clearly inadequate and continues to decline, and cannot therefore be recommended. Vonoprazan, when associated with 2 antibiotics, is more effective than traditional proton pump inhibitors, especially in clarithromycin-resistant patients. Non-bismuth quadruple (concomitant) therapy achieves eradication rates of around 90% and has a good safety profile. Concomitant therapy is more effective and simpler than sequential therapy. Although some probiotics can increase the efficacy and tolerability of triple therapy, the utility of its association with quadruple concomitant therapy has not been established. If a first treatment with clarithromycin fails, both bismuth-containing quadruple therapy and levofloxacin-containing triple therapy achieve good-but still suboptimal-results. The combination of bismuth and levofloxacin in the same regimen increases the efficacy of rescue therapy. The management of H. pylori infection by European gastroenterologists is widely heterogeneous and the eradication rates achieved by them are generally unacceptable. In Spain, the highest first-line eradication rate is obtained with quadruple concomitant therapy in 14-day regimens and with double doses of proton pump inhibitors; in second-line therapy, the use of

  6. Helicobacter pylori and Gastrointestinal Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venerito, Marino; Vasapolli, Riccardo; Rokkas, Theodoros; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the principal trigger of gastric carcinogenesis and gastric cancer (GC) and remains the third leading cause of cancer-related death in both sexes worldwide. In a big Japanese study, the risk of developing GC in patients with peptic ulcer disease who received H. pylori eradication therapy and annual endoscopic surveillance for a mean of 9.9 years was significantly lower after successful eradication therapy compared to the group with persistent infection (0.21%/year and 0.45%/year, respectively, p = .049). According to a recent meta-analysis, H. pylori eradication is insufficient in GC risk reduction in subjects with advanced precancerous conditions (i.e., intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia). A microsimulation model suggested screening smokers over the age of 50 in the U.S. for serum pepsinogens. This would allow to detect advanced gastric atrophy with endoscopic follow-up of subjects testing positive as a cost-effective strategy to reduce GC mortality. In a Taiwanese study, the anti-H. pylori IgG-based test-and-treat program had lower incremental cost-effectiveness ratios than that with (13)C-urea breath test in both sexes to prevent GC whereas expected years of life lost for GC were higher and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of test-and-treat programs were more cost-effective in young adults (30-69 years old) than in elders (>70 years old). With respect to gastrointestinal malignancies other than GC, a meta-analysis confirmed the inverse association between H. pylori infection and esophageal adenocarcinoma. In a Finnish study, H. pylori seropositivity was associated with an increased risk of biliary tract cancers (multivariate adjusted OR 2.63; 95% CI: 1.08-6.37), another meta-analysis showed a slightly increased rate of pancreatic cancer in patients with CagA-negative strains (OR: 1.30; 95% CI: 1.02-1.65), whereas current data suggest that the association between H. pylori and colorectal neoplasms may be population

  7. Avaliação do método imunoenzimático (ELISA para diagnóstico da infecção por Helicobacter pylori em crianças e adolescentes Evaluation of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurea Portorreal

    2002-07-01

    was to evaluate the ELISA method for the infection diagnosis for Helicobacter pylori in children and adolescents using the Cobas Core II kit (Roche. Helicobacter pylori was positive when the rapid urease test and the histology were both positive or when the culture was positive and Helicobacter pylori negative when all the tests were negative. PATIENTS/METHODS: Eleven hundred patients were studied, their age ranged from 3 months and 16 years, (mean = 8y 7m ± 4.0; median = 9y 5m. Helicobacter pylori infection was diagnosed in 47.7% (53/111. RESULT: Sensitivity was 83.0% and 86.0%; specificity was 70.6% and 71.0%, using the cutoff of 7 U/mL and 5 U/mL, respectively. When only the positive culture was used as gold standard and the cutoff of 5 U/mL, the sensitivity was 93.3%. In patients older than 10 years, the sensibility was 90.6% and 96.8%; specificity was 71.0% and 61.9%, with the cutoff of 7 U/mL and 5 U/mL, respectively. CONCLUSION: ELISA method had good sensitivity in children older than 10 years, using the cutoff 5 U/mL, but the specificity was low.

  8. Healthy pets, healthy people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S K; Feinstein, L H; Heidmann, P

    1999-08-01

    Zoonoses, diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans, can pose serious health risks to immunocompromised people. Although pets can carry zoonoses, owning and caring for animals can benefit human health. Information exists about preventing transmission of zoonoses, but not all physicians and veterinarians provide adequate and accurate information to immunocompromised pet owners. This disease prevention/health promotion project provides physicians and veterinarians with information, created specifically to share with patients and clients, about the health risks and benefits of pet ownership. Further, "Healthy Pets, Healthy People" encourages communication between veterinarians, physicians, clients, and patients and can serve as a model program for a nation-wide effort to aid health professionals in making recommendations about pet ownership for immunocompromised people.

  9. Detección de Helicobacter pylori en tejido aórtico humano mediante la amplificación del gen del 16S rDNA Detection of Helicobacter pylori in human aortic tissue through amplification of the 16S rDNA gen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María F Escobar

    2005-04-01

    atherosclerotic lesion, and another from an apparently healthy region, was examined in each patient. No Helicobacter pylori nucleic acids were detected in any of the analyzed specimens. The results of the study suggest low or null association between Helicobacter pylori and coronary disease in our environment.

  10. Healthy Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changes to your lifestyle. By taking steps toward healthy living, you can help reduce your risk of ... Get the screening tests you need Maintain a healthy weight Eat a variety of healthy foods, and ...

  11. Two Decades of Helicobacter pylori: A Review of the Fourth Western Pacific Helicobacter Congress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo A Fallone

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available From March 3 to 6, 2002, Helicobacter enthusiasts gathered in Perth, Australia for the Fourth Western Pacific Helicobacter Congress to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the modern discovery of this organism by Barry Marshall and Robin Warren. The meeting included state-of-the-art lectures highlighting the breakthroughs that have occurred since the discovery of this bacterium. As well, advances from the forefront of current Helicobacter pylori research were presented, particularly in the realm of genomics and molecular biology. A symposium about vaccines and trends for future H pylori research completed this congress. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the highlights from this conference, emphasizing new advances.

  12. Recent "omics" advances in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthenet, Elvire; Sheppard, Sam; Vale, Filipa F

    2016-09-01

    The development of high-throughput whole genome sequencing (WGS) technologies is changing the face of microbiology, facilitating the comparison of large numbers of genomes from different lineages of a same organism. Our aim was to review the main advances on Helicobacter pylori "omics" and to understand how this is improving our knowledge of the biology, diversity and pathogenesis of H. pylori. Since the first H. pylori isolate was sequenced in 1997, 510 genomes have been deposited in the NCBI archive, providing a basis for improved understanding of the epidemiology and evolution of this important pathogen. This review focuses on works published between April 2015 and March 2016. Helicobacter "omics" is already making an impact and is a growing research field. Ultimately these advances will be translated into a routine clinical laboratory setting in order to improve public health. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A fluid model for Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigh, Shang-Yik; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Swimming microorganisms and self-propelled nanomotors are often found in confined environments. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori survives in the acidic environment of the human stomach and is able to penetrate gel-like mucus layers and cause infections by locally changing the rheological properties of the mucus from gel-like to solution-like. In this talk we propose an analytical model for the locomotion of Helicobacter pylori as a confined spherical squirmer which generates its own confinement. We solve analytically the flow field around the swimmer, and derive the swimming speed and energetics. The role of the boundary condition in the outer wall is discussed. An extension of our model is also proposed for other biological and chemical swimmers. Newton Trust.

  14. Role of probiotics in Helicobacter pylori infections

    OpenAIRE

    Cazzato, Immacolata Alessia; Candelli, Marcello; Nista, Enrico Celestino; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the main causal agent of several gastrointestinal disturbances (e.g. chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric cancer). Treatments based on a combination of antibiotics and proton pump inhibitors are currently used to eradicate the gastric infection. Despite the high eradication rate reached by standard therapies (_/80%), because of the high incidence of H. pylori-related diseases worldwide new options to improve the eradication rate are needed. Probiotics are defined as...

  15. Effectiveness of Citrus Fruits on Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Mandalari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma. Due to the increased side effects of the treatment regimens and the development of antimicrobial resistance, a number of natural compounds have been tested as potential alternatives. In this review, we will examine the current knowledge on the effect of Citrus fruits and their derivatives against H. pylori, highlighting the remaining outstanding questions on the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  16. Acid-Adaptive Genes of Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Yi; Marcus, Elizabeth A.; Matrubutham, Uday; Gleeson, Martin A.; Scott, David R.; Sachs, George

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the only neutralophile that has been able to colonize the human stomach by using a variety of acid-adaptive mechanisms. One of the adaptive mechanisms is increased buffering due to expression of an acid-activated inner membrane urea channel, UreI, and a neutral pH-optimum intrabacterial urease. To delineate other possible adaptive mechanisms, changes in gene expression in response to acid exposure were examined using genomic microarrays of H. pylori exposed to different...

  17. Helicobacter pylori virulence factors in gastric carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Sicheng; Moss, Steven F.

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the most important risk factor in the development of non-cardia gastric adenocarcinoma; host genetic variability and dietary co-factors also modulate risk. Because most H. pylori infections do not cause cancer, H. pylori heterogeneity has been investigated to identify possible virulence factors. The strongest candidates are genes within the cag (cytotoxin associated antigen) pathogenicity island, including the gene encoding the CagA protein, as well as polymor...

  18. Helicobacter Pylori associated global gastric cancer burden

    OpenAIRE

    Mbulaiteye, Sam M; Hisada, Michie; El-Omar, Emad M.

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is ubiquitous, infecting close to one-half of the world's population, but its prevalence is declining in developed countries. Chronic H. pylori infection is etiologically linked to gastric adenocarcinoma, especially non-cardia type (63% of all stomach cancer or ∼5.5% of the global cancer burden: ∼25% of cancers associated with infectious etiology), and to gastric mucosal associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, which accounts for up to 8% of all non-Hodgkin ly...

  19. Acute symptomatic gastritis due to Helicobacter heilmannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamoudi, Waleed K; Alpert, Lesley; Szilagyi, Andrew

    2006-10-01

    Helicobacter heilmannii is a Gram-negative spiral-shaped organism predominantly associated with zoonotic infection. Human pathology has also been described, but acute symptoms with complete resolution have been infrequently reported. We present a 50-year-old man in whom H. heilmannii gastritis presented as an acute febrile illness and was successfully treated with antibiotics and proton pump inhibitor. Epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of similar cases are reviewed.

  20. Can Helicobacter pylori infection influence human reproduction?

    OpenAIRE

    Moretti, Elena; Figura, Natale; Collodel, Giulia; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection could be associated with extra-digestive diseases. Here, we report the evidences concerning the decrease in reproductive potential occurring in individuals infected by H. pylori, especially by strains expressing CagA. This infection is more prevalent in individuals with fertility disorders. Infected women have anti-H. pylori antibodies in cervical mucus and follicular fluid that may decrease sperm motility and cross react immunologically with spermato...

  1. RESEARCH Helicobacter pylori eradication: A randomised ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gut.2006.102269]. 13. Laine L, Estrada R, Trujillo M, Fukanaga K, Neil G. Randomized comparison of differing periods of twice-a-day triple therapy for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 1996;10(6):1029-33. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2036.1996.111282000.x]. 14.

  2. Investigation of association of Helicobacter pylori and simple nasal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To investigate a possible contribution of Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) in the etiopathogenesis of simple nasal polyps. Study Design: Prospective clinical trial. Methods: Twenty five patients with simple nasal polyps underwent nasal polypectomy were studied. Helicobacter pylori DNA was investigated for ...

  3. Bacteriologisch en serologisch onderzoek van Helicobacter species bij laboratoriummuizen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Root R; Admiraal J; Koedam MA; Thuis HCW; Veenema JL; LIS; LPI

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter soorten zijn spiraalvormige Gramnegatieve bacterien die voorkomen in het maagdarmkanaal van mens en dier. Helicobacter hepaticus koloniseert bij muizen o.a. het ileum en het cecum en is bij meerdere muizenstammen geassocieerd met chronische actieve hepatitis en bij de A/J stam met

  4. Helicobacter pylori infection and precancerous lesions of the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haziri, Adem; Juniku-Shkololli, Argjira; Gashi, Zaim; Berisha, Drita; Haziri, Avni

    2010-01-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, hereditary non-polyposos colon cancer, gastric dysplasia, gastric adenoma, Barrett esophagitis and familiar adenomatous polyposis are confirmed precancerous lesions of the stomach. Most of these conditions are correlated with long-term infections with Helicobacter pylori. Patients which were included in our study underwent gastro endoscopy with multiple biopsies from antrum and corpus ventricle, also urease test and histopathological examination, using special coloring for Helicobacter pylori. 802 patients entered this study, of which 369 female and 483 male. Among female patients 56.4% resulted Helicobacter pylori positive, whereas among male patients this was at a rate of 62.6%. The most affected age was 40-49 years, in which group Helicobacter pylori infection was 64.2%. In each precancerous lesion positivity of Helicobacter pylori infection was very high.-in patients with intestinal metaplasia: 71.7%, with gastric dysplasia: 71.4%, with gastric ulcer: 68.4%, with atrophic gastritis: 66.0% and with Barrett esophagitis: 55.0%. The main purpose of this study was to determine the percentage of Helicobacter pylori infection among patients with precancerous lesions, which resulted to be very high. The highest percentage of infection resulted in patients with intestinal metaplasia (71.7%). Precancerous lesions of stomach are associated with high percentage of Helicobacter pylori infection. This confirms once more the importance of Helicobacter pylori eradication in early stages and patient's surveillance.

  5. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with peptic ulcer disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori infection has been identified as an important risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and is probably the most important cause of relapse in those previously treated for peptic ulcer disease. The aim of this study was to determine the association of Helicobacter pylori infection as ...

  6. the effect of some nigerian local herbs on helicobacter pylori

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four Nigerian medicinal plants commonly used in the treatment of bacterial infections were tested for antimicrobial activity against twenty local strains of Helicobacter pylori recovered from patients with gastro-duodenal ulcers and gastritis. In vitro agar diffusion assay revealed anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of ethanolic ...

  7. A Biotin Biosynthesis Gene Restricted to Helicobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hongkai; Zhu, Lei; Jia, Jia; Cronan, John E.

    2016-01-01

    In most bacteria the last step in synthesis of the pimelate moiety of biotin is cleavage of the ester bond of pimeloyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) methyl ester. The paradigm cleavage enzyme is Escherichia coli BioH which together with the BioC methyltransferase allows synthesis of the pimelate moiety by a modified fatty acid biosynthetic pathway. Analyses of the extant bacterial genomes showed that bioH is absent from many bioC-containing bacteria and is replaced by other genes. Helicobacter pylori lacks a gene encoding a homologue of the known pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester cleavage enzymes suggesting that it encodes a novel enzyme that cleaves this intermediate. We isolated the H. pylori gene encoding this enzyme, bioV, by complementation of an E. coli bioH deletion strain. Purified BioV cleaved the physiological substrate, pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester to pimeloyl-ACP by use of a catalytic triad, each member of which was essential for activity. The role of BioV in biotin biosynthesis was demonstrated using a reconstituted in vitro desthiobiotin synthesis system. BioV homologues seem the sole pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester esterase present in the Helicobacter species and their occurrence only in H. pylori and close relatives provide a target for development of drugs to specifically treat Helicobacter infections. PMID:26868423

  8. Helicobacter marmotae and novel Helicobacter and Campylobacter species isolated from the livers and intestines of prairie dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisele, Maike; Shen, Zeli; Parry, Nicola; Mobley, Melissa; Taylor, Nancy S.; Buckley, Ellen; Abedin, Mohammad Z.; Dewhirst, Floyd E.

    2011-01-01

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) are used to study the aetiology and prevention of gallstones because of the similarities of prairie dog and human bile gallstone composition. Epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested a connection between infection with Helicobacter species and cholesterol cholelithiasis, cholecystis and gallbladder cancer. Ten of the 34 prairie dogs in this study had positive Helicobacter species identified by PCR using Helicobacter genus-specific primers. Ten of 34 prairie dogs had positive Campylobacter species identified in the intestine by PCR with Campylobacter genus-specific primers. Six Helicobacter sp. isolates and three Campylobacter sp. isolates were identified taxonomically by 16S rRNA gene analysis. The prairie dog helicobacters fell into three clusters adjacent to Helicobacter marmotae. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, three strains in two adjacent clusters were included in the species H. marmotae. Three strains were only 97.1 % similar to the sequence of H. marmotae and can be considered a novel species with the provisional designation Helicobacter sp. Prairie Dog 3. The prairie dog campylobacters formed a single novel cluster and represent a novel Campylobacter sp. with the provisional designation Campylobacter sp. Prairie Dog. They branched with Campylobacter cuniculorum at 96.3 % similarity and had the greatest sequence similarity to Campylobacter helveticus at 97.1 % similarity. Whether H. marmotae or the novel Helicobacter sp. and Campylobacter sp. identified in prairie dogs play a role in cholesterol gallstones or hepatobiliary disease requires further studies. PMID:21546560

  9. Enterohepatic helicobacter in ulcerative colitis: potential pathogenic entities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Thomson

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Changes in bacterial populations termed "dysbiosis" are thought central to ulcerative colitis (UC pathogenesis. In particular, the possibility that novel Helicobacter organisms play a role in human UC has been debated but not comprehensively investigated. The aim of this study was to develop a molecular approach to investigate the presence of Helicobacter organisms in adults with and without UC.A dual molecular approach to detect Helicobacter was developed. Oligonucleotide probes against the genus Helicobacter were designed and optimised alongside a validation of published H. pylori probes. A comprehensive evaluation of Helicobacter genus and H. pylori PCR primers was also undertaken. The combined approach was then assessed in a range of gastrointestinal samples prior to assessment of a UC cohort. Archival colonic samples were available from 106 individuals for FISH analysis (57 with UC and 49 non-IBD controls. A further 118 individuals were collected prospectively for dual FISH and PCR analysis (86 UC and 32 non-IBD controls. An additional 27 non-IBD controls were available for PCR analysis. All Helicobacter PCR-positive samples were sequenced. The association between Helicobacter and each study group was statistically analysed using the Pearson Chi Squared 2 tailed test. Helicobacter genus PCR positivity was significantly higher in UC than controls (32 of 77 versus 11 of 59, p = 0.004. Sequence analysis indicated enterohepatic Helicobacter species prevalence was significantly higher in the UC group compared to the control group (30 of 77 versus 2 of 59, p<0.0001. PCR and FISH results were concordant in 74 (67.9% of subjects. The majority of discordant results were attributable to a higher positivity rate with FISH than PCR.Helicobacter organisms warrant consideration as potential pathogenic entities in UC. Isolation of these organisms from colonic tissue is needed to enable interrogation of pathogenicity against established criteria.

  10. The Helicobacter pylori L-form: formation and isolation in the human bile cultures in vitro and in the gallbladders of patients with biliary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan N; Ding, Wen J; Pan, Yao Z; Tang, Ke L; Wang, Tao; She, Xiao L; Wang, He

    2015-04-01

    The Helicobacter pylori is considered the important causative agent causing biliary diseases, but the H. pylori can be isolated from very few gallbladder specimens with diseases. We studied the formation of H. pylori L-forms in bile in vitro and isolated the H. pylori L-forms from gallbladder of patients with biliary diseases. We inoculated the H. pylori into the human bile to induce the L-form in vitro. The gallbladder specimens were collected from patients with biliary diseases to isolate the bacterial L-forms by the nonhigh osmotic isolation technique, and the H. pylori L-forms in the L-form isolates were identified by the gene assay for the H. pylori-specific genes 16S rRNA and UreA. The H. Pylori cannot be isolated from the bile-induced cultures, but the H. pylori L-form can be isolated from the H. pylori-negative bile-induced cultures. The L-form isolates of bile-induced cultures showed a positive reaction of the H. pylori-specific genes by PCR, and the coincidence ratio of the nucleotide sequences between the L-forms and the H. pylori is 99%. The isolation rate of bacteria L-form is 93.2% in the gallbladder specimens with bacteria-negative isolation culture by the nonhigh osmotic isolation technique, and the positive rate of the H. pylori-specific genes in the L-form isolates is 7.1% in the bacterial L-form-positive isolation cultures by the PCR. H. pylori can be rapidly induced into the L-form in the human bile; the L-form, as the latent bacteria, can live in the host gallbladder for a long times, and they made the host became a latent carrier of the H. pylori L-form. The H. pylori L-form can be isolated by the nonhigh osmotic isolation technique, and the variant can be identified by the gene assay for the H. pylori-specific genes 16S rRNA and reA. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. MicroRNA-3178 ameliorates inflammation and gastric carcinogenesis promoted by Helicobacter pylori new toxin, Tip-α, by targeting TRAF3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Meijuan; Wang, Fang; Jiang, Aiqin; Xia, Anliang; Kong, Siya; Gong, Chun; Zhu, Mingxia; Zhou, Xin; Zhu, Jun; Zhu, Wei; Cheng, Wenfang

    2017-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the main cause of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Tip-α is a newly identified carcinogenic factor present in H. pylori. TRAF3 can activate NF-κB by both canonical and noncanonical signaling pathways. In this study, we found that the expression of TRAF3 and NF-κB was upregulated, while microRNA-3178 (miR-3178) was decreased in H. pylori-positive gastric tissues but not in H. pylori-negative tissues. GES-1 cells were incubated with 12.5 μg/mL recombinant Tip-α (rTip-α) in RPMI1640 for 2 hours. After another 24 hours, the supernatant medium was designed as inflammatory-conditioned medium (ICM) and that from the untreated control cells was designed as untreated control medium. The release of proinflammatory cytokines from GES-1 cells and proliferation of gastric cancer cells was determined by ELISA and CCK-8 kits. Cells were transfected with the mimic, inhibitor, negative control of miR-3178, or TRAF3 siRNA control siRNA. The medium was then replaced with RPMI1640, 12.5 μg/mL rTip-α, and collected, and the total cellular RNA and protein were extracted for the following detection. MiR-3178 mimic prevented the increasement of TRAF3 and hence decreased activation of NF-κB signals, whereas miR-3178 inhibitor could not, in GES-1 cells with Tip-α treatment. The condition medium from miR-3178 mimic transfected GES-1 cells could inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of inflammation-related gastric cancer cells SGC7901 and MGC803 by decreasing the production of inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6, which were secreted by GES-1 cells. Taken all together, Tip-α might activate NF-κB to promote inflammation and carcinogenesis by inhibiting miR-3178 expression, which directly targeting TRAF3, during H. pylori infection in gastric mucosal epithelial cells. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Randomized controlled trial comparing gastric cancer screening by gastrointestinal X-ray with serology for Helicobacter pylori and pepsinogens followed by gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoda, Takuji; Ishikawa, Hideki; Ohnishi, Hirohide; Sugano, Kentaro; Kusano, Chika; Yokoi, Chizu; Matsuyama, Yutaka; Moriyasu, Fuminori

    2015-07-01

    Based on the results of several case-control and cohort studies gastrointestinal X-ray (GI X-ray) has been recommended for use in the nationwide screening program for gastric cancer.. Although this was the only effective screening program when almost all of the Japanese population were Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) positive, there has been concern whether an alternative effective screening system should be established for the future H. pylori-negative generation. We therefore conducted the first randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing GI X-ray and gastrointestinal endoscopy (GIE) scheduled according to results of serological testing (ST); this was done to determine the potential for an alternative screening method. Subjects who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were residents between the ages of 30 and 74 and who were able to receive gastric cancer screening in the Yurihonjo area. Participants were assigned to the GI X-ray group or the GIE-ST group by computer randomization. Subjects in each group were further subdivided into 4 categories according to their different risks for gastric cancer. The feasibility of stratified randomization was serologically assessed and detection rates of gastric cancer at entry by the different screening methods were also compared. Of the 2,962 subjects invited, 1,206 individuals (41 percent) were included in the first stage of this stratified RCT, and 604 and 602 individuals were assigned to the GI X-ray group and the GIE-ST group, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in sex, age, height, body weight, smoking, alcohol intake and family history of cancer between the 2 groups. During ST the GI X-ray group showed a distribution that was not statistically different from that of the GIE-ST group. Although 3 cases of gastric cancer were detected in the GIE-ST group, there was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups. One complication found was barium aspiration during the examination in

  13. Lack of association between gastric cancer and hopQ alleles in Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazemi Elham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori use a number of mechanisms to survive in the stomach lumen. The presence of these bacteria in the stomach can lead to gastritis and reduction in stomach acid production. Acute inflammation can directly damage to the peripheral cells that are responsible for the secretion of acid. The risk of developing gastric carcinoma is associated to heterogeneity of Helicobacter pylori virulence factors (such as cagA. The HopQ is one of the outer membrane proteins involved in bacterial adherence to gastric mucosa and has been suggested to also play a role in the virulence of H. pylori. This gene has been shown in two types. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the association between different H. pylori virulence hopQ alleles (types I and II and patients with gastroduodenal disorders. For this purpose 58 stomach biopsies the of patients with gastric cancer and 100 saliva samples from healthy individuals were collected. Then genomic DNA was purified and PCR for was done for desired genes via specific primers. The H. pylori infections were diagnosed by PCR for GlmM gene. Then frequencies of hopQI+, hopQII+ and hopQI+ hopQII+ genotypes were determined in H. pylori infected cases. Statistical analysis showed that there were not significant differences between healthy and diseased ones for genotypes hopQI+, hopQII+ and hopQI+ hopQII+.

  14. No Helicobacter pylori, no Helicobacter pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.

    1995-01-01

    Virtually all duodenal ulcers (DUs) and the vast majority of gastric ulcers (GUs) are the consequence of Helicobacter pylori-associated inflammation. In DUs, the inflammation is maximal in the antrum and is associated with gastric metaplasia in the bulb. Gastrin homeostasis is disturbed by H. pylori

  15. Role of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of hyperemesis gravidarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Ghada M; Nashaat, Ehab H

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the role of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in the pathogenesis of hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) and the value of adding a non teratogenic regimen for its treatment in intractable cases. Eighty hyperemesis gravidarum cases were recruited from Ain Shams University out patient clinics. A complete history was taken including history of medical disorders and chronic medications intake as non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. After general and local examination, ultrasound was done for all cases to exclude obstetric causes of hyperemesis. Eighty normal pregnant women acted as control. Serum test for H. pylori IgG antibody titre was done for all patients and controls. Seventy-one cases among the 80 HG cases and twenty-four out of the 80 controls were H. pylori positive. Eight HG cases developed severe intractable vomiting. Three of them developed attacks of hematemesis. Gastroscopy done for the eight cases revealed antral gastritis and duodenitis. Gastric and duodenal erosions were found in two cases. The eight patients received a non teratogenic regimen for treatment. Attacks of vomiting decreased and pregnancy continued till delivery of healthy newborns. Screening for H. pylori should be added to the investigations of hyperemesis gravidarum cases. Non teratogenic treatment can be considered in intractable cases.

  16. Assessment of PCR-DGGE for the identification of diverse Helicobacter species, and application to faecal samples from zoo animals to determine Helicobacter prevalence.

    OpenAIRE

    Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Bennedsen, Mads; On, Stephen L. W.; Ouis, Ibn-Sina; Vandamme, Peter; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Ljungh, Åsa; Wadström, Torkel

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter species are fastidious bacterial pathogens that are difficult to culture by standard methods. A PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) technique for detection and identification of different Helicobacter species was developed and evaluated. The method involves PCR detection of Helicobacter DNA by genus-specific primers that target 16S rDNA and subsequent differentiation of Helicobacter PCR products by use of DGGE. Strains are identified by comparing mobilities of ...

  17. Frequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Tay

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate thefrequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopyeastern Anatolia.Materials and methods: The patients whose endoscopicantral biopsies were taken for any reason in our endoscopyunit in February-June 2010 period were includedand retrospectively investigated. The frequency of Helicobacterpylori was determined as separating the patientsaccording to general, sex and the age groups. Antral biopsieswere stained with hematoxylin-eosin and modified giemsamethod and examined under light microscope andreported as (+ mild, (++ moderate, (+++ severe positiveaccording to their intensities.Results: Biopsy specimens of 1298 patients were includedinto the study. The mean age was 47.5 ± 17.5 years(range 14-88 and 607 of these patients (47% were male.Histopathological evaluation revealed that, 918 of the patientswere (71% positive and 379 (29% were negativefor Helicobacter pylori. Approximately 60% of our patientshad mild, 29% had moderate and 11% had severe positivityfor Helicobacter pylori. No significant difference wasfound in the frequency of Helicobacter pylori betweenwomen and men. The frequencies of Helicobacter pyloriwere 73.2%, 71.5%, 68.6% and 70.4%, respectively, inthe age groups of 14-30 years, 31-45 years, 46-60 yearsand 61-88 years.Conclusion: The frequency of Helicobacter pylori was71% in Eastern Anatolia Region. No statistically significantdifference was found between genders and agegroups in term of the frequency of Helicobacter pylori.

  18. Helicobacter infection decreases reproductive performance of IL10-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Julie M; Vanderford, Deborah A; Chichlowski, Maciej; Myles, Matthew H; Hale, Laura P

    2008-10-01

    Infections with a variety of Helicobacter species have been documented in rodent research facilities, with variable effects on rodent health. Helicobacter typhlonius has been reported to cause enteric disease in immunodeficient and IL10(-/-) mice, whereas H. rodentium has only been reported to cause disease in immunodeficient mice coinfected with other Helicobacter species. The effect of Helicobacter infections on murine reproduction has not been well studied. The reproductive performance of C57BL/6 IL10(-/-) female mice intentionally infected with H. typhlonius, H. rodentium, or both was compared with that of age-matched uninfected controls or similarly infected mice that received antihelicobacter therapy. The presence of Helicobacter organisms in stool and relevant tissues was detected by PCR assays. Helicobacter infection of IL10(-/-) female mice markedly decreased pregnancy rates and pup survival. The number of pups surviving to weaning was greatest in noninfected mice and decreased for H. rodentium > H. typhlonius > H. rodentium and H. typhlonius coinfected mice. Helicobacter organisms were detected by semiquantitative real-time PCR in the reproductive organs of a subset of infected mice. Treatment of infected mice with a 4-drug regimen consisting of amoxicillin, clarithromycin, metronidazole, and omeprazole increased pregnancy rates, and pup survival and dam fecundity improved. We conclude that infection with H. typhlonius, H. rodentium, or both decreased the reproductive performance of IL10(-/-) mice. In addition, antihelicobacter therapy improved fecundity and enhanced pup survival.

  19. The prevalence and related symptomatology of Helicobacter pylori in children with recurrent abdominal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Andersen, L P; Pærregaard, Anders

    1998-01-01

    in 46/66 by culture and histology. The presence of H. pylori was significantly associated with active or inactive chronic gastritis. The presence of H. pylori was associated with both parents being born in a country with a high prevalence and a low social class. Helicobacter pylori-positive children had......The aim of the study was to assess and compare the IgG seroprevalence of H. pylori in children with recurrent abdominal pain with healthy children and to investigate the related symptoms. IgG antibodies against low-molecular weight H. pylori antigens were assessed in 438 children with recurrent...... of the abdominal pain, presence of pyrosis, nocturnal pain, relation of pain to meals and bowel irregularities. The seroprevalence was 21% (95% CI: 17-25%) in the children with recurrent abdominal pain and 10% (95% CI: 5-18%) in the healthy controls (p = 0.30). In seropositive children with RAP H. pylori was found...

  20. Healthy Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weight Gain Losing Weight Getting Started Improving Your Eating Habits Keeping It Off Healthy Eating for a Healthy ... or "program". It's about lifestyle changes in daily eating and exercise habits. Success Stories They did it. So can you! ...

  1. Healthy Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... recreational water activities like swimming, also helps promote healthy living. Often, water’s vital role is most apparent during an emergency or disaster. We launched the Healthy Water website to provide answers to your water- ...

  2. [Role of Helicobacter species in hepatobiliary diseases]3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M.E.; Lauritsen, L.E.; Andersen, Leif Percival

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter species have been found in extragastric tissues of humans and mice, and it has been shown that hepatic infection with H. hepaticus causes chronic hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in mice. 18 studies of humans with hepatobiliary diseases have been reviewed. In studies...... of patients with HCC the results imply a pathogen role of Helicobacter species. The same trend was not found in studies of humans with other hepatobiliary diseases. There is no evidence of the possible involvement of Helicobacter species in the development of diseases in the hepatobiliary system...

  3. Helicobacter canis colonization in sheep: a Zoonotic link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swennes, Alton G; Turk, Michelle L; Trowel, Elise M; Cullin, Cassandra; Shen, Zeli; Pang, Jassia; Petersson, Katherine H; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Fox, James G

    2014-02-01

    Helicobacter canis has been associated with hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal disease in dogs, cats, and humans. Infection has not been documented in other species. Sheep feces subjected to microaerobic culture. Isolates were characterized by genus-specific PCR, restriction fragment length polymorphism, biochemical profiling, and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Helicobacter canis was isolated from sheep feces and confirmed by the above methods. These isolates are distinct from other sheep-origin enterohepatic Helicobacter species previously isolated. This study identifies sheep as H. canis reservoirs potentially important in zoonotic or foodborne transmission. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Immune Homeostasis of Human Gastric Mucosa in Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, I V; Yamamoto, T; Vershinina, S S; Reva, G V

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of electron microscopic, microbiological, immunohistochemical, and molecular genetic studies of gastric biopsy specimens taken for diagnostic purposes according by clinical indications during examination of patients with gastrointestinal pathology. Immune homeostasis of the gastric mucosa against the background of infection with various pathogen strains of Helicobacter pylori was studied in patients of different age groups with peptic ulcer, gastritis, metaplasia, and cancer. Some peculiarities of Helicobacter pylori contamination in the gastric mucosa were demonstrated. Immune homeostasis of the gastric mucosa in different pathologies was analyzed depending on the Helicobacter pylori genotype.

  5. Helicobacter pylori y dispepsia, un problema de salud comunitario

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel González-Carbajal Pascual; Ludmila Concepción Izaguirre

    2002-01-01

    Mientras la relación causal entre el Helicobacter pylori y la gastritis crónica, así como la importante conexión entre esta infección, la úlcera gastroduodenal y el cáncer gástrico han sido bien establecidas, la asociación entre la infección por Helicobacter pylori y la dispepsia "no ulcerosa" es un problema que dista mucho de estar esclarecido. Hay autores que no dudan en utilizar tratamiento de erradicación en la dispepsia "no ulcerosa" con Helicobacter pylori, pero existen enfoques alterna...

  6. Assessment of PCR-DGGE for the identification of diverse Helicobacter species, and application to faecal samples from zoo animals to determine Helicobacter prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Soud, Waleed Abu; Bennedsen, Mads; On, Stephen L W; Ouis, Ibn-Sina; Vandamme, Peter; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Ljungh, Asa; Wadström, Torkel

    2003-09-01

    Helicobacter species are fastidious bacterial pathogens that are difficult to culture by standard methods. A PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) technique for detection and identification of different Helicobacter species was developed and evaluated. The method involves PCR detection of Helicobacter DNA by genus-specific primers that target 16S rDNA and subsequent differentiation of Helicobacter PCR products by use of DGGE. Strains are identified by comparing mobilities of unknown samples to those determined for reference strains; sequence analysis can also be performed on purified amplicons. Sixteen DGGE profiles were derived from 44 type and reference strains of 20 Helicobacter species, indicating the potential of this approach for resolving infection of a single host by multiple Helicobacter species. Some more highly related species were not differentiated whereas in highly heterogeneous species, sequence divergence was observed and more than one PCR-DGGE profile was obtained. Application of the PCR-DGGE method to DNA extracted from faeces of zoo animals revealed the presence of Helicobacter DNA in 13 of 16 samples; a correlation was seen between the mobility of PCR products in DGGE analysis and DNA sequencing. In combination, this indicated that zoo animals are colonized by a wide range of different Helicobacter species; seven animals appeared to be colonized by multiple Helicobacter species. By this approach, presumptive identifications were made of Helicobacter bilis and Helicobacter hepaticus in a Nile crocodile, Helicobacter cinaedi in a baboon and a red panda, and Helicobacter felis in a wolf and a Taiwan beauty snake. All of these PCR products ( approximately 400 bp) showed 100 % sequence similarity to 16S rDNA sequences of the mentioned species. These results demonstrate the potential of PCR-DGGE-based analysis for identification of Helicobacter species in complex ecosystems, such as the gastrointestinal tract, and could contribute to

  7. Isolation and characterization of a novel Helicobacter species, Helicobacter jaachi sp. nov., from common marmosets (Callithrix jaachus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zeli; Feng, Yan; Sheh, Alexander; Everitt, Jeffrey; Bertram, Frederick; Paster, Bruce J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose-bred common marmosets from domestic sources housed in a US research facility, and used in multiple drug discovery programmes, were noted to have a high incidence of spontaneous inflammatory bowel disease and sporadic cholecystitis and cholangiohepatitis. Inflammatory infiltrates increased in incidence and severity with age. Because Helicobacter spp. have been linked to gastrointestinal diseases, samples from the gastrointestinal tracts of 39 marmosets were screened for Helicobacter spp. by culture and PCR. Helicobacter spp. were frequently detected in marmosets; 28.2 % of the marmosets were positive for a proposed novel species, Helicobacter jaachi sp. nov., by culture, and 48.7 % were positive by Helicobacter genus-specific PCR. Seventeen strains of Helicobacter sp. from 11 marmosets were cultured from various gastrointestinal sites. Older animals (age 6–11 years) had a higher helicobacter prevalence rate (57.1 %) compared with younger animals (age 3–5 years), which had a 27.2 % prevalence rate. Cells of H. jaachi sp. nov. were catalase, urease and oxidase positive and had fusiform morphology, with periplasmic fibres and multiple bipolar, sheathed flagella. All isolates had similar 16S and 23S rRNA sequences, which clustered as representatives of a novel Helicobacter species closely related to ‘Helicobacter sanguini’ (97 %), a species isolated from cotton-top tamarins and ‘Helicobacter callitrichis’ (96 %) isolated previously from the faeces of common marmosets. The whole genome sequence of one of the liver isolates, H. jaachi sp. nov. MIT 09-6949T, had a 1.9 Mb genome length with a 41 mol% DNA G+C content. The type strain of Helicobacter jaachi sp. nov., MIT 09-6949T, has been deposited in the BCCM/LMG Bacteria Collection as LMG 28613T. These findings add to the increasing number of animal species with gastrointestinal disease in which novel enterohepatic Helicobacter spp. have been isolated. PMID:26297446

  8. Assessment of PCR-DGGE for the identification of diverse Helicobacter species, and application to faecal samples from zoo animals to determine Helicobacter prevalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu Al-Soud, W.; Bennedsen, M.; On, Stephen L.W.

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter species are fastidious bacterial pathogens that are difficult to culture by standard methods. A PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) technique for detection and identification of different Helicobacter species was developed and evaluated. The method involves PCR...... bilis and Helicobacter hepaticus in a Nile crocodile, Helicobacter cinaedi in a baboon and a red panda, and Helicobacter felis in a wolf and a Taiwan beauty snake. All of these PCR products (similar to400 bp) showed 100 % sequence similarity to 16S rDNA sequences of the mentioned species. These results...

  9. Helicobacter pylori Infection, Gastric Cancer and Gastropanel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loor Alexandra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer (GC is one of the most widespread types of cancer worldwide. Helicobacter pylori infection has been clearly correlated with gastric carcinogenesis. At present and in the near future, the most important challenge is and will be the significant reduction of mortality due to GC. That goal can be achieved through the identification of higher-risk patients, such as those with atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia. In this review we intend to discuss the importance of diagnosing H. pylori infection and chronic atrophic gastritis in preventing gastric cancer, using a new non-invasive test called GastroPanel. This test is a classification algorithm including four biochemical parameters pepsinogen I and II (PGI and PGII, gastrin-17 (G17, and anti-Helicobacter pylori antibodies (Ig G anti-Hp measured in fasting sera, which allows to classify patients as having atrophic or non-atrophic gastritis and to find whether gastritis is associated or not with H. pylori infection. GastroPanel is not a “cancer test”, but it can and should be used in the screening and diagnosis of subjects with a high cancer risk; still, a careful diagnostic made by superior digestive endoscopy is compulsory to find possible precancerous or cancerous lesions at an early and curable stage.

  10. 3rd BRAZILIAN CONSENSUS ON Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Coelho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  11. Rosacea and Helicobacter pylori: links and risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazaridou E

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Lazaridou,1 Chrysovalantis Korfitis,2 Christina Kemanetzi,1 Elena Sotiriou,1 Zoe Apalla,1 Efstratios Vakirlis,1 Christina Fotiadou,1 Aimilios Lallas,1 Demetrios Ioannides1 1First Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Aristotle University Medical School, Thessaloniki, Greece; 2Department of Dermatology, 401 General Army Hospital, Athens, Greece Abstract: Rosacea is a chronic skin disease characterized by facial erythema and telangiectasia. Despite the fact that many hypotheses have been proposed, its etiology remains unknown. In the present review, the possible link and clinical significance of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of rosacea are being sought. A PubMed and Google Scholar search was performed using the terms “rosacea”, “H.pylori”, “gastrointestinal disorders and H.pylori”, “microorganisms and rosacea”, “pathogenesis and treatment of rosacea”, and “risk factors of rosacea”, and selected publications were studied and referenced in text. Although a possible pathogenetic link between H. pylori and rosacea is advocated by many authors, evidence is still interpreted differently by others. We conclude that further studies are needed in order to fully elucidate the pathogenesis of rosacea. Keywords: eradication, Helicobacter pylori, pathogenesis, rosacea

  12. Helicobacter pylori, HIV and Gastric Hypochlorhydria in the Malawian Population

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Geraghty, Joe; Thumbs, Alexander; Kankwatira, Anstead; Andrews, Tim; Moore, Andrew; Malamba, Rose; Mtunthama, Neema; Hellberg, Kai; Kalongolera, Lughano; O'Toole, Paul; Varro, Andrea; Pritchard, D Mark; Gordon, Melita

    2015-01-01

    HIV and Helicobacter pylori are common chronic infections in sub-Saharan Africa. Both conditions can predispose to gastric hypochlorhydria that may be a risk factor for enteric infections and reduced drug absorption...

  13. Epidemiological study on feline gastric Helicobacter spp. in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota-Aizawa, Sanae; Ohno, Koichi; Kanemoto, Hideyuki; Nakashima, Ko; Fukushima, Kenjiro; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Chambers, James K; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Mimuro, Hitomi; Watanabe, Takayasu; Sekizaki, Tsutomu; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2017-05-18

    Epidemiological and pathological studies on Helicobacter spp. in feline stomachs in Japan were conducted using genus- and species-specific (H. felis, H. bizzozeronii, H. heilmannii sensu stricto [s.s.] and H. pylori) polymerase chain reactions (PCRs), ureAB gene sequencing and histopathology. PCR results showed that 28 of 56 cats were infected with Helicobacter spp., and H. heilmannii s.s. was the most prevalent species by both PCR (28/28) and ureAB gene sequencing (26/28). Some of the sequences showed high similarities with those from human patients with gastric diseases (99%). There were no significant differences between Helicobacter spp.-positive and -negative cats in the severity of chronic gastritis (P=0.69). This is the first extensive epidemiological study on feline gastric Helicobacter spp. in Japan.

  14. Gastric Helicobacter Spp. Infection in Captive Neotropical Brazilian Feline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiz de Camargo, Pedro; Akemi Uenaka, Simone; Bette Motta, Maitê; Harumi Adania, Cristina; Yamasaki, Letícia; Alfieri, Amauri A.; Bracarense, Ana Paula F. R. L.

    2011-01-01

    Ten captive neotropical Brazilian feline were submitted to gastroscopic examination and samples of gastric mucosa from fundus, corpus and pyloric antrum were evaluated for the presence of Helicobacter species. Warthin-Starry (WS) staining and PCR assay with species-specific primers and enzymatic cleavage were applied for bacterial detection and identification. Histological lesions were evaluated by haematoxylin and eosin staining. All animals showed normal gross aspect of gastric mucosa. Helicobacter heilmannii was confirmed in 100% of the samples by WS and PCR assay. Mild lymphocytic infiltrate in the lamina propria was observed in eight animals, mainly in the fundus region. Small lymphoid follicles were seen in three animals. No significant association between Helicobacter infection and histological findings was verified. These observations suggest that gastric Helicobacter spp. could be a commensal or a eventual pathogen to captive neotropical feline, and that procedures, way life, and stress level on the shelter apparently had no negative repercussion over the integrity of the stomach. PMID:24031634

  15. Helicobacter pylori infection and fasting plasma glucose concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Peach, H; Barnett, N.

    2001-01-01

    Background—Helicobacter pylori infection raises basal and meal stimulated serum gastrin concentrations and lowers iron stores, which may in turn reduce fasting plasma glucose concentrations in the population.

  16. Evolution of the Selenoproteome in Helicobacter pylori and Epsilonproteobacteria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cravedi, Pietro; Mori, Giulia; Fischer, Frédéric; Percudani, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    By competing for the acquisition of essential nutrients, Helicobacter pylori has the unique ability to persist in the human stomach, also causing nutritional insufficiencies in the host. Although the H...

  17. Is Helicobacter Pylori a Possible Etiopathogenic Factor in Chronic Tonsillitis?

    OpenAIRE

    Elmas Ozgun

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Helicobacter pylori is the major gastric pathogen which has an important role in the etiopathogenesis of chronic gastritis. We investigated the presence of Helicobacter pylori as an extragastric reservoir in the tonsillectomy specimens to display if it is an etiologic factor in the development of chronic tonsilitis. Material and Method: In the current study, 100 cases with chronic tonsilitis were examined in bilateral tonsillectomy specimens. The colonization of the microorganism have be...

  18. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastrointestinal symptoms on Chilean pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Ferrer Poveda

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the aim of this research was to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection on Chilean pregnant women and its relationship with the appearance and severity of hyperemesis and dyspepsia. Methods: quantitative study of prevalence in a transversal cut with variable analysis. The sample was taken from 274 Chilean pregnant women from the Bío Bío province through vein puncture between June and December, 2005. Pregnant women were informed of this study, interviewed and signed an informed consent. The samples were processed using ImmunoComb II Helicobacter pylori IgG kit. Statistical analysis was performed by means of the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Program. Results: out of the total number of pregnant women, 68.6% showed infection by Helicobacter pylori. 79.6% of the total sample had symptoms of dyspepsia, and 72.5% of this group presented Helicobacter pylori infection. 12.4% showed pregnancy hyperemesis; among them, 79.4% were infected with Helicobacter pylori. 73.4% of the pregnant women that showed gastric discomfort during the first three months had Helicobacter pylori infection. 53.7% of them continued with gastric discomfort after the first three months; of those, 95.8% were infected. Helicobacter pylori infection was present only in 1.5% of pregnant women without gastric discomfort. Conclusion: both, gastric discomfort of pregnant women and the continuity of severe symptoms of dyspepsia and hyperemesis after the first three months of gestation are significantly correlated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  19. Metal-responsive gene regulation and metal transport in Helicobacter species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Belzer (Clara); J. Stoof (Jeroen); A.H.M. van Vliet (Arnoud)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractHelicobacter species are among the most successful colonizers of the mammalian gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary tract. Colonization is usually lifelong, indicating that Helicobacter species have evolved intricate mechanisms of dealing with stresses encountered during colonization of

  20. Helicobacter species and common gut bacterial DNA in gallbladder with cholecystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagin, Peren H; Stenram, Unne; Wadström, Torkel; Ljungh, Åsa

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the association between Helicobacter spp. and some common gut bacteria in patients with cholecystitis. METHODS: A nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), specific to 16S rRNA of Helicobacter spp. was performed on paraffin-embedded gallbladder samples of 100 cholecystitis and 102 control cases. The samples were also analyzed for some common gut bacteria by PCR. Positive samples were sequenced for species identification. RESULTS: Helicobacter DNA was found in seven out of 100 cases of acute and chronic cholecystitis. Sequence analysis displayed Helicobacter pullorum (H. pullorum) in six cases and Helicobacter pylori in one; H. pullorum was only found in cases with metaplasia. Control samples were negative for Helicobacter spp. and some common gut bacteria. There was a significant difference (P = 0.007) between cholecystitis and control samples for Helicobacter DNA. CONCLUSION: A possible relationship was detected between Helicobacter DNA and cholecystitis. Further serological and immunohistochemical studies are needed to support these data. PMID:20939110

  1. Inverse correlation between Helicobacter pylori colonization and obesity in a cohort of inner city children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Hanh D; Goli, Sridhar; Gill, Rupinder; Anderson, Virginia; Stefanov, Dimitre G; Xu, Jiliu; Kulsum-Mecci, Nazia; Schwarz, Steven M; Rabinowitz, Simon S

    2015-02-01

    Recently, publications in adults and children have documented a potential role of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in decreasing the likelihood of obesity. The present study compares the prevalence of H. pylori colonization between obese (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 95th percentile) and healthy weight (BMI ≥ 5th to Helicobacter pylori colonization was determined by histopathologic identification of the organism. Multiple logistic regression was employed to measure the association between BMI and H. pylori colonization, controlling for baseline age, gender, and presenting symptoms. Among 340 patients (51.5% female, mean age of 10.5 ± 4.7 years), 98 (29%) were obese and 173 (51%) were healthy weight. The H. pylori colonization rate of the entire cohort was 18.5% (95% CI = 14.7-23.0%). Among obese children, 10% had H. pylori colonization compared to 21% of the healthy weight children (RR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.1-4.0). Conversely, 39% of noncolonized children, but only 21% of the infected children, were obese (RR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.1-3.3). Multivariate analysis revealed that being colonized with H. pylori is associated with a 50% reduction in the odds of being obese (adjusted OR = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.2-1.0). Our findings in a North American cohort are in agreement with studies from Asia and Europe suggesting that H. pylori infection decreases the prevalence of obesity in children. Further work to characterize the extent and nature of this relationship is warranted. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. FREKUENSI POSITIVITAS ANTIBODI TERHADAP HELICOBACTER PYLORI PADA KELOMPOK DONOR DARAH DI SURAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Suparyatmo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The patho-physiology of the gastritis achieved a significant progress in 1983, when it was proven that Helicobacter pylori colonized in the gastric mucosa. Several studies confirmed the relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and the type B gastritis. Further study reported the evidence of H. pylori colonization in the gastric anthrum of almost all duodenal ulcer patients. Since this micro-organism infected almost all subjects through out all ages, epidemiological data was therefore very important to determine the strategy to control the disease. This study aims to obtain the prevalence of the positivity of the antibody against. H. pylori (anti-Hp among the volunteer blood donors in Surakarta. The passive haemagglutination (PHA method (Biomedik-Mataram was carried out to test the anti-Hp among 511 healthy subjects. The results obtained were 1984 (36% showed anti-Hp positive. There is no significant difference between male and female groups in this study (p>0.05. The results of this study can be used as a preliminary study for further research to complete the epidemiological data of the H. pylori infectivity in Surakarta.

  3. Reflux esophagitis triggered after Helicobacter pylori eradication: a noteworthy demerit of eradication therapy among the Japanese?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsunori eIijima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the February 2013 Revision of Insured Medical Treatment, bacterial eradication for all Helicobacter pylori-positive individuals in Japan was covered under the insurance scheme. However, reflux esophagitis is believed to occur in approximately 10% of Japanese patients who undergo eradication therapy. Hence, the risk of reflux esophagitis among such cases should be carefully considered, particularly in the treatment for H. pylori-positive patients who are otherwise healthy. The eradication of Helicobacter pylori in cases of H. pylori-positive gastritis markedly suppresses gastric inflammation, and inhibits gastric mucosal atrophy and its progression to intestinal metaplasia. In a long-term follow-up study (10-20 years, eradication treatment was found to reduce the risk of subsequent gastric cancer. However, the fact that eradication-induced reflux esophagitis could increase the long-term risk of Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma should also be considered in the Japanese population. Appropriate treatment with proton pump inhibitors should be taken into consideration for patients undergoing eradication therapy in clinical practice.

  4. Are Helicobacter Pylori and Other Helicobacter Species Infection Associated with Human Biliary Lithiasis? A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Di Zhou; Yong Zhang; Wei Gong; Sayid Omar Mohamed; Henry Ogbomo; Xuefeng Wang; Yingbin Liu; Zhiwei Quan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since the isolation of Helicobacter species in biliary system, a hypothetical question was raised about the role of these agents in the development of cholelithiasis. This meta-analysis is to explore the association between the Helicobacter infection and biliary lithiasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A systematic literature search was performed to identify all eligible articles. Meta-analysis which was carried out using odds ratio and random effect model, 95% confidence interv...

  5. [THE INTERDEPENDENCE BETWEEN SMOKING, ALCOHOL, TOOTH PATHOLOGY AND PREVALENCE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI AMONG ETHNIC GROUPS IN KYRGYZSTAN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhumabaev, M N; Dzhumanova, R G; Sabirov, I S

    2015-01-01

    The main aim was to study the ethnic and social characteristics of the prevalence of certain risk factors among Kyrgyz ethnic population infected with Helicobacter pylori without clinical signs of the disease of upper gastrointestinal tract. The study involved 116 healthy individuals (57 and 49 Kyrgyz, Russian) who were tested on H. pylori infection, taking into account risk factors such as smoking, alcohol consumption, low or serious teeth damage. The identified H.pylori infection was independent from ethnic affiliation. Significant relation between absence or high damage of the teeth and H. pylori contamination was revealed in surveyed Kyrgyz group.

  6. Helicobacter pylori and Hepatitis C virus coinfection in Egyptian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Masry Samir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a leading cause of end-stage liver disease worldwide. It has been shown that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori plays an important role in chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancies, and its eradication has been advocated. The association between H. pylori infection and liver cirrhosis in patients with hepatitis C virus has been documented in different parts of the world; nevertheless, no conclusive data is available in Egypt. Materials and Methods: In the present study, the status of H. pylori infection was sought in 90 patients with chronic HCV infection and in 66 HCV-free healthy controls. Results: The study showed that the H. pylori positivity was increased significantly (P = 0.03 in the HCV-infected patients when compared to that in healthy controls, where H. pylori infection was found in 50 (55.6% out of 90 of the HCV-infected patients versus 26 (39.4% out of 66 of the healthy controls. In HCV-infected patients, the prevalence of H. pylori infection was increased significantly (P = 0.04 from chronic active hepatitis to cirrhosis. H. pylori infection was present in 6/18 (33.3%, 10/21 (47.6%, 16/27 (59.3%, 18/24 (75.0% patients with chronic active hepatitis, Child-Pugh score A, Child-Pugh score B and Child-Pugh score C, respectively. More importantly, the prevalence of H. pylori infection in HCV-infected patients was increased very significantly (P = 0.003 with increasing Meld (model for end-stage liver disease score. The prevalence of H. pylori was documented in 9/28 (32.1% patients with Meld score ≤10 and in 41/62 (66.1% patients with Meld score> 10. Conclusion: It may be stated that our results collectively reflect a remarkable increase in H. pylori prevalence with advancing hepatic lesions, and the eradication treatment may prove beneficial in those patients with chronic hepatitis C.

  7. Helicobacter-negative gastritis: polymerase chain reaction for Helicobacter DNA is a valuable tool to elucidate the diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, S; Zsikla, V; Frank, A; Willi, N; Cathomas, G

    2016-04-01

    Helicobacter-negative gastritis has been increasingly reported. Molecular techniques as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) may detect bacterial DNA in histologically negative gastritis. To evaluate of Helicobacter PCR in gastric biopsies for the daily diagnostics of Helicobacter-negative gastritis. Over a 5-year period, routine biopsies with chronic gastritis reminiscent of Helicobacter infection, but negative by histology, were tested by using a H. pylori specific PCR. Subsequently, PCR-negative samples were re-evaluated using PCR for other Helicobacter species. Of the 9184 gastric biopsies, 339 (3.7%) with histological-negative gastritis and adequate material were forwarded to PCR analysis for H. pylori and 146 (43.1%) revealed a positive result. In 193 H. pylori DNA-negative biopsies, re-analysis using PCR primers for other Helicobacter species, revealed further 23 (11.9%) positive biopsies, including 4 (2.1%) biopsies with H. heilmannii sensu lato. PCR-positive biopsies showed a higher overall inflammatory score, more lymphoid follicles/aggregates and neutrophils (P gastritis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Healthy Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the Flu Vaccine? Eating Disorders Arrhythmias Healthy Eating KidsHealth > For Parents > Healthy Eating Print A A A What's in this article? ... best strategies to improve nutrition and encourage smart eating habits: Have regular family meals . Serve a variety ...

  9. Healthy Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... there are many healthy ways to cope with stress. A diabetes educator will help you find healthy ways to ... you figure out a plan for coping with stress, here: English Version Spanish Version In This Section Living with Diabetes How a Diabetes Educator Can Help You Been ...

  10. [Analysis of the infection status of saliva Helicobacter pylori in Lanzhou].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; Che, Tuanjie; Ju, Jun; Yang, Sen; He, Xiangyi; Zhang, Ying

    2014-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of saliva Helicobacter pylori in Lanzhou and investigate Helicobacter pylori-related diseases. Helicobacter pylori was detected through bacterial culture, Gram stain microscopy, and urease test from saliva samples collected from 941 residents of Lanzhou. The infection rate and growth of Helicobacter pylori among the residents were analyzed in terms of different oral health conditions, oral disease, gender, urban and rural status, and age. The rate of Helicobacter pylori-positive saliva in Lanzhou was 42.72%. The status of Helicobacter pylori infection showed significant difference among subjects with different oral hygiene and oral diseases. The rate of Helicobacter pylori-positive saliva among females was 47.89%, which was greater compared with the rate among males (38.45%, P = 0.004, chi2 = 8.492). The rate of Helicobacter pylori-positive saliva in the town was 33.99%, which was less than the rate for the villages (50.93%, P = 0.000, chi2 = 27.551). The rate of Helicobacter pylori-positive saliva among residents aged 10 to 59 showed a flat trend with no significant differences. However, the rate of Helicobacter pylori-positive saliva among residents over 60 years old showed a significant increase. No significant difference was found in the growth of saliva Helicobacter pylori (P = 0.086). The rate of Helicobacter pylori-positive saliva is related to the subjects' oral hygiene, oral disease, gender, age, and living conditions.

  11. Helicobacter pylori y dispepsia, un problema de salud comunitario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel González-Carbajal Pascual

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Mientras la relación causal entre el Helicobacter pylori y la gastritis crónica, así como la importante conexión entre esta infección, la úlcera gastroduodenal y el cáncer gástrico han sido bien establecidas, la asociación entre la infección por Helicobacter pylori y la dispepsia "no ulcerosa" es un problema que dista mucho de estar esclarecido. Hay autores que no dudan en utilizar tratamiento de erradicación en la dispepsia "no ulcerosa" con Helicobacter pylori, pero existen enfoques alternativos a este problema. La realización de tratamiento de erradicación en los pacientes con dispepsia "no ulcerosa" pudiera beneficiar o no a los enfermos y a la comunidad, pero seguramente no puede dejar de beneficiar a las transnacionales productoras de medicamentos que cosechan cuantiosas ganancias con la comercialización de los bloqueadores de la bomba de protones y los antibióticos que se incluyen en cualquier esquema de terapia erradicadora de la infección por Helicobacter pylori. El alivio de los síntomas dispépticos como consecuencia del tratamiento de erradicación del Helicobacter pylori no ha sido comprobado. El problema de realizar tratamiento de erradicación de la infección a los pacientes con dispepsia "no ulcerosa" continúa siendo un dilema y, por tanto, no debe indicarse sistemáticamente.Although the causative relationship between Helicobacter pylori and chronic gastritis as well as the important connection of this infection with gastric-duodenal ulcer and gastric cancer are well established, the association of Helicobacter pylori infection and non-ulcer dispepsia is a problem that is still unclear. Some authors do not hesitate in using Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment in cases of non-ulcer dispepsia but there are other alternative approaches to this problem. The eradication treatment in patients with non-ulcer dispepsia may or may not benefit patients and the community, but will benefit for sure the big drug

  12. A comparison of Helicobacter pylori and non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter spp. Binding to canine gastric mucosa with defined gastric glycophenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Irina; Freitas, Daniela P; Magalhães, Ana; Faria, Fátima; Lopes, Célia; Faustino, Augusto M; Smet, Annemieke; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Reis, Celso A; Gärtner, Fátima

    2014-08-01

    The gastric mucosa of dogs is often colonized by non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters (NHPH), while H. pylori is the predominant gastric Helicobacter species in humans. The colonization of the human gastric mucosa by H. pylori is highly dependent on the recognition of host glycan receptors. Our goal was to define the canine gastric mucosa glycophenotype and to evaluate the capacity of different gastric Helicobacter species to adhere to the canine gastric mucosa. The glycosylation profile in body and antral compartments of the canine gastric mucosa, with focus on the expression of histo-blood group antigens was evaluated. The in vitro binding capacity of FITC-labeled H. pylori and NHPH to the canine gastric mucosa was assessed in cases representative of the canine glycosylation pattern. The canine gastric mucosa lacks expression of type 1 Lewis antigens and presents a broad expression of type 2 structures and A antigen, both in the surface and glandular epithelium. Regarding the canine antral mucosa, H. heilmannii s.s. presented the highest adhesion score whereas in the body region the SabA-positive H. pylori strain was the strain that adhered more. The canine gastric mucosa showed a glycosylation profile different from the human gastric mucosa suggesting that alternative glycan receptors may be involved in Helicobacter spp. binding. Helicobacter pylori and NHPH strains differ in their ability to adhere to canine gastric mucosa. Among the NHPH, H. heilmannii s.s. presented the highest adhesion capacity in agreement with its reported colonization of the canine stomach. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Epidemiology and Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentis, Andreas; Lehours, Philippe; Mégraud, Francis

    2015-09-01

    During the period reviewed, prevalence studies were essentially performed in less economically advanced countries and a high prevalence was found. The traditional risk factors for Helicobacter pylori positivity were mostly found. Transmission studied by molecular typing showed a familial transmission. The eventual role of water transmission was explored in several studies with controversial results. Concerning diagnosis, most of the invasive and noninvasive methods used for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection are long standing with efficient performance. The most interesting recent improvements in H. pylori diagnosis include advances in endoscopy, developments in molecular methods, and the introduction of omics-based techniques. Interpretation of old or newer method should take into account the pretest probability and the prevalence of H. pylori in the population under investigation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Rosacea and Helicobacter pylori: links and risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaridou, Elizabeth; Korfitis, Chrysovalantis; Kemanetzi, Christina; Sotiriou, Elena; Apalla, Zoe; Vakirlis, Efstratios; Fotiadou, Christina; Lallas, Aimilios; Ioannides, Demetrios

    2017-01-01

    Rosacea is a chronic skin disease characterized by facial erythema and telangiectasia. Despite the fact that many hypotheses have been proposed, its etiology remains unknown. In the present review, the possible link and clinical significance of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of rosacea are being sought. A PubMed and Google Scholar search was performed using the terms “rosacea”, “H.pylori”, “gastrointestinal disorders and H.pylori”, “microorganisms and rosacea”, “pathogenesis and treatment of rosacea”, and “risk factors of rosacea”, and selected publications were studied and referenced in text. Although a possible pathogenetic link between H. pylori and rosacea is advocated by many authors, evidence is still interpreted differently by others. We conclude that further studies are needed in order to fully elucidate the pathogenesis of rosacea. PMID:28848358

  15. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection 2011.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    This article reviews the literature published pertaining to Helicobacter pylori eradication over the last year. The general perception among clinicians and academics engaged in research on H. pylori has been that eradication rates for first-line therapies are falling, although some data published this year have cast doubt on this. The studies published this year have therefore focussed on developing alternative strategies for the first-line eradication of H. pylori. In this regard, clear evidence now exists that both levofloxacin and bismuth are viable options for first-line therapy. The sequential and "concomitant" regimes have also been studied in new settings and may have a role in future algorithms also. In addition, data have emerged that the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii may be a useful adjunct to antibiotic therapy. Other studies promote individualized therapies based on host polymorphisms, age, and other such demographic factors.

  16. Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms of Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S Hoffman

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori is most frequently associated with gastritis and peptic ulcer disease. Antimicrobial intervention, together with proton pump inhibitors, has become the standard therapy for treating this disease. Resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole, two of the most commonly used antimicrobials for treatment of H pylori infections, is often associated with treatment failures and relapse of infection. Clarithromycin resistance arises through mutations leading to base changes in 23S ribosomal RNA subunits, while resistance to metronidazole is due to mutations in the rdxA gene, which encodes a novel nitroreductase that is responsible for reductive activation of the drug. Products of metronidazole activation are mutagenic and can be demonstrated to increase both the mutation frequency and the frequency at which antibiotic resistance arises in H pylori.

  17. Novel anti-Helicobacter pylori therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Sukhbir K

    2014-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a ubiquitous gastropathogen infecting more than half of the world population. It is associated with dyspepsia, gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcers, mucus-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric carcinoma. Current recommended therapy does not eradicate infection in all treated cases and at least 20% post-treatment patients continue to suffer. Salvage therapy helps some of these nonresponders, but resistance to available antibiotics is mounting. Hence, its treatment still remains a daunting task for the practicing physician. Novel medications with improved efficacy and tolerability and with less chances of resistance are required. The present review attempts to discuss the newer patents in this field, which demonstrate a promising future role in the management of H. pylori infection and its consequent problems.

  18. Effects of curcumin on Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetvicka, Vaclav; Vetvickova, Jana; Fernandez-Botran, Rafael

    2016-12-01

    Curcumin is a well-established natural molecule with significant biological and pharmaceutical effects. Its effects on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection have been repeatedly confirmed both in animal and human models. This study directly compared five different samples to evaluate if the effects are general or if they differ among samples. Using a mouse model, we studied the effects of curcumin on lipid peroxide (LPO) level, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and urease activity, number of colonized bacteria, levels of anti-H. pylori antibodies, biofilm formation, IFN-γ, IL-4, gastrin and somatostatin levels in serum, and minimum inhibitory concentration. In addition, we evaluated the effects on biofilm production and antibacterial antibody response. In all tests, one sample (Sabinsa) was consistently the most active. All curcumin samples showed some anti-H. pylori effects, but only some of the tested samples had significant activity.

  19. Effects of Community Screening for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bomme, Maria; Hansen, Jane Møller; Wildner-Christensen, Mette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Helicobacter pylori (Hp) eradication improves the prognosis of peptic ulcer disease (PUD), dyspepsia, and possibly gastric cancer. Hp screening tests are accurate and eradication therapy is effective. Hp population screening seems attractive. The aim of this study was to evaluate...... the long-term effect of Hp population screening and eradication on dyspepsia prevalence and the incidence of PUD, and as secondary outcomes to assess the effect on health-care consumption and quality of life. METHODS: At baseline in 1998-1999 20,011 individuals aged 40-65 years were randomized to Hp...... screening and eradication or a control group with no screening. Both groups received a questionnaire on dyspepsia and quality of life. Register data were obtained for all randomized individuals. RESULTS: Baseline questionnaire response rate was 63%. Of the 5,749 screened, 1,007 (17.5%) individuals were Hp...

  20. Helicobacter pylori, Cancer, and the Gastric Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroblewski, Lydia E; Peek, Richard M

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this disease. Although the stomach was once thought to be a sterile environment, it is now known to house many bacterial species leading to a complex interplay between H. pylori and other residents of the gastric microbiota. In addition to the role of H. pylori virulence factors, host genetic polymorphisms, and diet, it is now becoming clear that components of the gastrointestinal microbiota may also influence H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss emerging data regarding the gastric microbiota in humans and animal models and alterations that occur to the composition of the gastric microbiota in the presence of H. pylori infection that may augment the risk of developing gastric cancer.

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eriksen, Jens Ravn

    2011-01-01

    National Danish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection have been approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology. All patients with peptic ulcer disease, gastric cancer, and MALT lymphoma should be tested for Hp. We also recommend testing in first...... degree relatives to patients with gastric cancer, in NSAID-naive patients, who need long-term NSAID therapy, and in patients presenting with dyspepsia and no alarm symptoms. Non-endoscoped patients can be tested with a urea-breath test or a faecal antigen test. Endoscoped patients can be tested...... with a rapid urease test. Proton pump inhibitor therapy should be stopped at least 1 week prior to Hp testing. All infected patients should be offered Hp eradication therapy. First-line treatment is 7-day triple therapy with a proton pump inhibitor and clarithromycine in combination with metronidazole...

  2. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Anthony; Gisbert, Javier P; McNamara, Deirdre; O'Morain, Colm

    2011-09-01

    This article reviews the literature published pertaining to Helicobacter pylori eradication over the last year. The general perception among clinicians and academics engaged in research on H. pylori has been that eradication rates for first-line therapies are falling, although some data published this year have cast doubt on this. The studies published this year have therefore focussed on developing alternative strategies for the first-line eradication of H. pylori. In this regard, clear evidence now exists that both levofloxacin and bismuth are viable options for first-line therapy. The sequential and "concomitant" regimes have also been studied in new settings and may have a role in future algorithms also. In addition, data have emerged that the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii may be a useful adjunct to antibiotic therapy. Other studies promote individualized therapies based on host polymorphisms, age, and other such demographic factors. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Carolina-Cavaliéri; Gomez, Ricardo-Santiago; Zina, Lívia-Guimarães; Amaral, Fabrício-Rezende

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a recurrent painful ulcerative disorder that commonly affects the oral mucosa. Local and systemic factors such as trauma, food sensitivity, nutritional deficiencies, systemic conditions, immunological disorders and genetic polymorphisms are associated with the development of the disease. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram-negative, microaerophile bacteria, that colonizes the gastric mucosa and it was previously suggested to be involved in RAS development. In the present paper we reviewed all previous studies that investigated the association between RAS and H. pylori. A search in Pubmed (MEDLINE) databases was made of articles published up until July 2015 using the following keywords: Helicobacter Pylori or H. pylori and RAS or Recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Fifteen experimental studies that addressed the relationship between infection with H. pylori and the presence of RAS and three reviews, including a systematic review and a meta-analysis were included in this review. The studies reviewed used different methods to assess this relationship, including PCR, nested PCR, culture, ELISA and urea breath test. A large variation in the number of patients included in each study, as well as inclusion criteria and laboratorial methods was observed. H. pylori can be detected in the oral mucosa or ulcerated lesion of some patients with RAS. The quality of the all studies included in this review was assessed using levels of evidence based on the University of Oxford's Center for Evidence Based Medicine Criteria. Although the eradication of the infection may affect the clinical course of the oral lesions by undetermined mechanisms, RAS ulcers are not associated with the presence of the bacteria in the oral cavity and there is no evidence that H. pylori infection drives RAS development.

  4. Healthy Ageing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. C.P. van der Schans

    2015-01-01

    Presentatie gehouden bij de bijeenkomst voor het Regionaal Genootschap Fysiotherapie Het Noorden op 10 februari te Marum, over het belang van fysieke activiteit voor healthy ageing en de rol van de fysiotherapeut hierin

  5. Relationship of Halitosis with Gastric Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    HajiFattahi, Farnaz; Hesari, Maryam; Zojaji, Homayoun; Sarlati, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori may be one of the main causes of halitosis. This study was performed to evaluate the relationship of Helicobacter pylori infection with halitosis. Materials and Methods: This case control study was performed on 44 dyspeptic patients with a mean age of 34.29±13.71 years (range 17 to 76 years). The case group included 22 patients with halitosis and no signs of diabetes mellitus, renal or liver failure, upper respiratory tract infection, malignancies, deep carious teeth, severe periodontitis, coated tongue, dry mouth or poor oral hygiene. Control group included 22 patients without halitosis and the same age, sex, systemic and oral conditions as the case group. Halitosis was evaluated using organoleptic test (OLT) and Helicobacter pylori infection was evaluated by Rapid Urease Test (RUT) during endoscopy. The data were statistically analyzed using chi square, Mann Whitney and t-tests. Results: Helicobacter pylori infection was detected in 20 (91%) out of 22 halitosis patients, and 7 control subjects (32%) (P<0.001). Conclusion: Helicobacter pylori gastric infection can be a cause of bad breath. Dentists should pay more attention to this infection and refer these patients to internists to prevent further gastrointestinal (GI) complications and probable malignancies. PMID:26622273

  6. Association between Helicobacter spp. infections and hepatobiliary malignancies: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-López, Fany Karina; Güitrón-Cantú, Alfredo; Torres, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hepatobiliary cancers are highly lethal cancers that comprise a spectrum of invasive carcinomas originating in the liver hepatocellular carcinoma, the bile ducts intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, the gallbladder and the ampulla of Vater (collectively known as biliary tract cancers). These tumors account for approximately 13% of all annual cancer-related deaths worldwide and for 10%-20% of deaths from hepatobiliary malignancies. Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a devastating disease that displays a poor survival rate for which few therapeutic options are available. Population genetics, geographical and environmental factors, cholelithiasis, obesity, parity, and endemic infection with liver flukes have been identified as risk factors that influence the development of biliary tract tumors. Other important factors affecting the carcinogenesis of these tumors include chronic inflammation, obstruction of the bile ducts, and impaired bile flow. It has been suggested that CCA is caused by infection with Helicobacter species, such as Helicobacter bilis and Helicobacter hepaticus, in a manner that is similar to the reported role of Helicobacter pylori in distal gastric cancer. Due to the difficulty in culturing these Helicobacter species, molecular methods, such as polymerase chain reaction and sequencing, or immunologic assays have become the methods of choice for diagnosis. However, clinical studies of benign or malignant biliary tract diseases revealed remarkable variability in the methods and the findings, and the use of uniform and validated techniques is needed. PMID:25663761

  7. [Helicobacter pylori infection in children with celiac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimpu, Silvia; Bozomitu, Laura; Cârdei, E; Oltean, Carmen; Burlacu, M; Anton, Dana; Trandafir, Laura; Mihăilă, Doina; Moraru, D

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate symptomatology, endoscopic and histopathologic changes of Helicobacter pylori infection and gastritis lesions without Helicobacter pylori infection on children diagnosed with celiac disease. 15 children under gluten-free diet were selected and, because of the recurrence of the dyspeptic syndrome, an upper digestive endoscopy associated with histopathologic exam was performed. Considering the histopathologic result we made two groups: first group (8 children with celiac disease and Helicobacter pylori infection) and second group (7 children with celiac disease without Helicobacter pylori infection, but associated with gastritis lesions). The main symptom was diffuse abdominal pain in both groups. The endoscopic antrum aspects were congestive with striped aspect (first group--12.5%, second group--42.9%) and congestive with nodulation (first group--25%, second group--14.3%). The histopathologic diagnosis were: moderate active chronic pangastritis (first group--25%, second group--14.3%) moderate active chronic gastritis (first group--25%,second group--14.3%), lymphocytic gastritis (first group--12.5%, second group--14.3%). The histopathologic exam remains the gold standard for celiac disease, gastritis lesions and Helicobacter pylori infection.

  8. [THE ROLE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI IN NORMOMICROBIOCENOSIS AND DYSBACTERIOSIS OF MUCOSAL MICROFLORA OF OESOPHAGOGASTRODUODENAL ZONE IN THE CASES OF PEPTIC ULCER, CHRONIC GASTRITIS AND OESOPHAGITIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernin, V V; Chervinets, V M; Bazlov, S N

    2016-01-01

    Determine the qualitative and quantitative composition of the mucosal microflora of oesophagogastroduodenal zone to determine the location of Helicobocter pylori and its place in normomicrobiocenosis and dysbacteriosis in cases of peptic ulcer, chronic gastritis and oesophagitis. Clinical and microbiological studies were conducted in 30 healthy individuals-volunteers, 130 patients with peptic ulcer, 36--chronic gastritis and 24--chronic esophagitis. Helicobacter pylori in 33% of cases included in normomicrobiocenosis of mucosal microflora oesophagogastroduodenal zone, which consists of 12 genera of microorganisms and carries out all protection functions. The recurrence of peptic ulcer disease, exacerbation of chronic active gastritis and oesophagitis are accompanied by a dysbacteriosis of mucosal microflora with overgrowth of typical and atypical microorganisms for normal biotope with reduced occurrenceof Helicobocter pylori. Helicobacter pylori in the biocenosis of mucosal microflora of oesophagogastroduodenal zone is not an infection, has no independent significance in the development of peptic ulcer, chronic gastritis and esophagitis, does not require eradication.

  9. Detection of Helicobacter spp. in the saliva of dogs with gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, M; Spużak, J; Kubiak, K; Glińska-Suchocka, K; Biernat, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the species and determine the prevalence of gastric Helicobacter in the saliva of dogs with gastritis. The study was carried out on 30 dogs of different breeds, genders and ages, which were diagnosed with gastritis. The nested-PCR method was used to detect Helicobacter spp. in saliva. Helicobacter bacteria were found in the saliva samples of 23 (76.6%) dogs. Helicobacter heilmannii was the most commonly detected species of gastric Helicobacter spp. in canine saliva, and was found in 22 (73.3%) cases. The results indicate that gastric Helicobacter spp. occurs relatively frequently in dogs with gastritis. Moreover, the saliva of dogs with gastritis may be a source of Helicobacter spp. infection for humans and other animals. However, further studies are needed to confirm this finding as the PCR method does not distinguish active from inactive infections.

  10. CONVENTIONAL VIDEOENDOSCOPY CAN IDENTIFY HELICOBACTER PYLORI GASTRITIS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Alexandre; Skare, Thelma Larocca; Prestes, Manoel Alberto; Costa, Maiza da Silva; Petisco, Roberta Dombroski; Ramos, Gabriela Piovezani

    2016-01-01

    Studies with latest technologies such as endoscopy with magnification and chromoendoscopy showed that various endoscopic aspects are clearly related to infection by Helicobacter pylori (HP). The description of different patterns of erythema in gastric body under magnification of images revived interest in identifying these patterns by standard endoscopy. To validate the morphologic features of gastric mucosa related to H. pylori infection gastritis allowing predictability of their diagnosis as well as proper targeting biopsies. Prospective study of 339 consecutive patients with the standard videoendoscope image analysis were obtained, recorded and stored in a program database. These images were studied with respect to the presence or absence of H. pylori, diagnosed by rapid urease test and/or by histological analysis. Were studied: a) normal mucosa appearance; b) mucosal nodularity; c) diffuse nonspecific erythema or redness (with or without edema of folds and exudate) of antrum and body; d) mosaic pattern with focal area of hyperemia; e) erythema in streaks or bands (red streak); f) elevated (raised) erosion; g) flat erosions; h) fundic gland polyps. The main exclusion criteria were the use of drugs, HP pre-treatment and other entities that could affect results. Applying the exclusion criteria, were included 170 of the 339 patients, of which 52 (30.58%) were positive for HP and 118 negative. On the positive findings, the most associated with infection were: nodularity in the antrum (26.92%); presence of raised erosion (15.38%) and mosaic mucosa in the body (21.15%). On the negative group the normal appearance of the mucosa was 66.94%; erythema in streaks or bands in 9.32%; flat erosions 11.86%; and fundic gland polyps 11.86%. Endoscopic findings are useful in the predictability of the result and in directing biopsies. The most representative form of HP related gastritis was the nodularity of the antral mucosa. The raised erosion and mucosa in mosaic in the body

  11. Prevalence of Coinfection with Gastric Non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter (NHPH) Species in Helicobacter pylori-infected Patients Suffering from Gastric Disease in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; He, Lihua; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Gong, Yanan; Flahou, Bram; Cao, Qizhi; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-08-01

    The Helicobacter heilmannii sensu lato (H. heilmannii s.l.) group consists of long, spiral-shaped bacteria naturally colonizing the stomach of animals. Moreover, bacteria belonging to this group have been observed in 0.2-6% of human gastric biopsy specimens, and associations have been made with the development of chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration, and gastric MALT lymphoma in humans. To gain insight into the prevalence of H. heilmannii s.l. infections in patients suffering from gastric disease in China, H. heilmannii s.l. species-specific PCRs were performed on DNA extracts from rapid urease test (RUT)-positive gastric biopsies from 1517 patients followed by nucleotide sequencing. At the same time, Helicobacter pylori cultivation and specific PCR was performed to assess H. pylori infection in these patients. In total, H. heilmannii s.l. infection was detected in 11.87% (178/1499) of H. pylori-positive patients. The prevalence of H. suis, H. felis, H. bizzozeronii, H. heilmannii sensu stricto (s.s.), and H. salomonis in the patients was 6.94%, 2.20%, 0.13%, 0.07%, and 2.54%, respectively. Results revealed that all patients with H. heilmannii s.l. infection were co-infected with H. pylori, and some patients were co-infected with more than two different Helicobacter species. Helicobacter heilmannii s.l. infections are fairly common in Chinese patients. This should be kept in mind when diagnosing the cause of gastric pathologies in patients. Helicobacter suis was shown to be by far the most prevalent H. heilmannii s.l.species. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Case report: Helicobacter suis infection in a pig veterinarian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, Myrthe; Flahou, Bram; Meyns, Tom; Smet, Annemieke; Arts, Joris; De Cooman, Lien; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2013-10-01

    This study describes a non-Helicobacter (H.) pylori Helicobacter (NHPH) infection in a pig veterinarian. The patient suffered from reflux esophagitis and general dyspeptic symptoms and was referred to the hospital for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Histologic examination of corpus and antrum biopsies revealed a chronic gastritis. Large spiral-shaped non-H. pylori helicobacters could be visualized and were identified as H. suis by PCR. The patient was treated with a triple therapy, consisting of amoxicillin, clarithromycin, and pantoprazole for 10 days. Successful eradication was confirmed after a follow-up gastrointestinal endoscopy and PCR 10 weeks after treatment. A mild chronic gastritis was, however, still observed at this point in time. This case report associates porcine H. suis strains with gastric disease in humans, thus emphasizing the zoonotic importance of H. suis bacteria from pigs. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Healthy Places

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-04-10

    Every person has a stake in environmental public health. As the environment deteriorates, so does the physical and mental health of the people within it. Healthy places are those designed and built to improve the quality of life for all people who live, work, worship, learn, and play within their borders -- where every person is free to make choices amid a variety of healthy, available, accessible, and affordable options. The CDC recognizes significant health issues and places that are vital in developing the Healthy Places program and provides examples in this report.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  14. Helicobacter heilmannii-associated Gastritis: Clinicopathologic Findings and Comparison with Helicobacter pylori-associated Gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Ji Eun; Chang, Sun Hee; Kim, Hanseong; Chi, Je G.; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Yang, Jeon Ho; Lee, June Sung; Moon, Young-Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Mee

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the clinicopathologic features of Helicobacter heilmannii-associated gastritis and to compare H. heilmannii-associated gastritis with H. pylori-associated gastritis. We reviewed 5,985 consecutive gastric biopsy specimens. All cases of chronic gastritis with Helicobacter infection were evaluated with the Updated Sydney System, and the grades of all gastritis variables were compared between H. heilmannii-associated gastritis and H. pylori-associated gastritis groups. There were 10 cases of H. heilmannii-associated gastritis (0.17%) and 3,285 cases of H. pylori-associated gastritis (54.9%). The organisms were superficially located within the mucous layer without adhesion to epithelial cells. Interestingly, in one case many intracytoplasmic H. heilmannii organisms were observed in parietal cells with cell damage. A case of low-grade mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma concomitant with H. heilmannii infection was detected. Compared to H. pylori-associated gastritis, H. heilmannii-associated gastritis showed less severe neutrophilic activity (pgastritis devoid of erosion or ulcer (p=0.0309). In conclusion, we present the detailed clinicopathologic findings of H. heilmannii-associated gastritis compared to H. pylori-associated gastritis. H. heilmannii-associated gastritis is uncommon and milder than H. pylori-associated gastritis, however it may be noteworthy with respect to the development of MALT lymphoma. PMID:17297253

  15. Helicobacter Pylori Infection in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Ming Liou

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The elderly often seek medical attention because of gastroduodenal diseases. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is associated with several gastroduodenal diseases and its prevalence increases with age worldwide. It is estimated that 10–15% of infected patients will have peptic ulcer disease and 1% of patients will have gastric cancer or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Notably, the most severe clinical outcomes, i.e., gastric cancer and complicated peptic ulcer diseases, usually occur in elderly patients. Thus the test-and-treatment strategy is not recommended for elderly patients with uninvestigated dyspepsia. However, biopsy specimens for the rapid urease test and histology should be taken from both the antrum and corpus to increase the detection rate in elderly patients, especially in those with atrophic gastritis. The urea breath test may increase the detection rate if the rapid urease test or histology are negative in elderly patients with atrophic gastritis. Standard triple therapy and sequential therapy can achieve satisfactory eradication rates for H. pylori in elderly patients. Elderly patients with peptic ulcers may have a similar benefit from treatment of H. pylori infection as non-elderly patients. Eradication of H. pylori infection may also lead to improvement in histologic grading of gastritis, but the risk of gastric cancer cannot be completely reduced, especially in patients with existing premalignant lesions.

  16. Rare Helicobacter pylori Virulence Genotypes in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunari, Osamu; Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Shiota, Seiji; Suzuki, Rumiko; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Uchida, Tomohisa; Ratanachu-ek, Thawee; Tshering, Lotay; Mahachai, Varocha; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2016-03-02

    Both the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and the incidence of gastric cancer are high in Bhutan. The high incidence of atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer suggest the phylogeographic origin of an infection with a more virulent strain of H. pylori. More than 90% of Bhutanese strains possessed the highly virulent East Asian-type CagA and all strains had the most virulent type of vacA (s1 type). More than half also had multiple repeats in East Asian-type CagA, which are rare in other countries and are reported characteristictly found in assciation with atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer consistent with Bhutanese strains having multiple H. pylori virulence factors associated with an increase in gastric cancer risk. Phylogeographic analyses showed that most Bhutanese strains belonged to the East Asian population type with some strains (17.5%) sharing East Asian and Amerindian components. Only 9.5% belonged to the European type consistant with H. pylori in Bhutan representing an intermediate evolutionary stage between H. pylori from European and East Asian countries.

  17. Exploring alternative treatments for Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Guadalupe; Escobedo-Hinojosa, Wendy Itzel; de la Cruz-Herrera, Carlos Felipe; Romero, Irma

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a successful pathogen that can persist in the stomach of an infected person for their entire life. It provokes chronic gastric inflammation that leads to the development of serious gastric diseases such as peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and Mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. It is known that these ailments can be avoided if the infection by the bacteria can be prevented or eradicated. Currently, numerous antibiotic-based therapies are available. However, these therapies have several inherent problems, including the appearance of resistance to the antibiotics used and associated adverse effects, the risk of re-infection and the high cost of antibiotic therapy. The delay in developing a vaccine to prevent or eradicate the infection has furthered research into new therapeutic approaches. This review summarises the most relevant recent studies on vaccine development and new treatments using natural resources such as plants, probiotics and nutraceuticals. In addition, novel alternatives based on microorganisms, peptides, polysaccharides, and intragastric violet light irradiation are presented. Alternative therapies have not been effective in eradicating the bacteria but have been shown to maintain low bacterial levels. Nevertheless, some of them are useful in preventing the adverse effects of antibiotics, modulating the immune response, gastroprotection, and the general promotion of health. Therefore, those agents can be used as adjuvants of allopathic anti-H. pylori eradication therapy. PMID:24587621

  18. Hematologic manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano-Maya, Germán

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most common infection in humans, with a marked disparity between developed and developing countries. Although H. pylori infections are asymptomatic in most infected individuals, they are intimately related to malignant gastric conditions such as gastric cancer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and to benign diseases such as gastritis and duodenal and gastric peptic ulcers. Since it was learned that bacteria could colonize the gastric mucosa, there have been reports in the medical literature of over 50 extragastric manifestations involving a variety medical areas of specialization. These areas include cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, gynecology and obstetrics, hematology, pneumology, odontology, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology and pediatrics, and they encompass conditions with a range of clear evidence between the H. pylori infection and development of the disease. This literature review covers extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection in the hematology field. It focuses on conditions that are included in international consensus and management guides for H. pylori infection, specifically iron deficiency, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency, immune thrombocytopenia, and MALT lymphoma. In addition, there is discussion of other conditions that are not included in international consensus and management guides on H. pylori, including auto-immune neutropenia, antiphospholipid syndrome, plasma cell dyscrasias, and other hematologic diseases. PMID:25278680

  19. Lipopolysaccharide Structure and Biosynthesis in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Liao, Tingting; Debowski, Aleksandra W; Tang, Hong; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Stubbs, Keith A; Marshall, Barry J; Benghezal, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    This review covers the current knowledge and gaps in Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure and biosynthesis. H. pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium which colonizes the luminal surface of the human gastric epithelium. Both a constitutive alteration of the lipid A preventing TLR4 elicitation and host mimicry of the Lewis antigen decorated O-antigen of H. pylori LPS promote immune escape and chronic infection. To date, the complete structure of H. pylori LPS is not available, and the proposed model is a linear arrangement composed of the inner core defined as the hexa-saccharide (Kdo-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-DD-Hep-Gal-Glc), the outer core composed of a conserved trisaccharide (-GlcNAc-Fuc-DD-Hep-) linked to the third heptose of the inner core, the glucan, the heptan and a variable O-antigen, generally consisting of a poly-LacNAc decorated with Lewis antigens. Although the glycosyltransferases (GTs) responsible for the biosynthesis of the H. pylori O-antigen chains have been identified and characterized, there are many gaps in regard to the biosynthesis of the core LPS. These limitations warrant additional mutagenesis and structural studies to obtain the complete LPS structure and corresponding biosynthetic pathway of this important gastric bacterium. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Molecular mimicry in Helicobacter pylori infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Gonciarz, Weronika

    2017-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonize gastric mucosa in humans and increase the risk of serious diseases such as gastric and duodenal ulcers, stomach cancers and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. The role of H. pylori infection in the pathogenesis of several extragastric diseases has been suggested including immune thrombocytopenic purpura, iron deficiency anemia, vitamin D deficiency, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and dermatological disorders. Also neurological diseases and even lung cancer have attracted researchers concern. The relation between H. pylori infection and a growth retardation in children has also been suggested. Many mechanisms of molecular mimicry between H. pylori and the host have been proposed as a pathogen strategy to manipulate the immune system of the host in order to remain unrecognized and avoid eradication. A lot of effort has been put into the demonstration of homologous sequences between H. pylori and host compounds. However, knowledge about how often autoantibodies or autoreactive T lymphocytes induced during H. pylori infections cause pathological disorders is insufficient. This review provides data on H. pylori antigenic mimicry and possible deleterious effects due to the induction of immune response to the components common to these bacteria and the host. PMID:28652651

  1. Occurrence of Helicobacter pullorum in turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoni, Renato Giulio; Piva, Silvia; Rossi, Mirko; Pasquali, Frédérique; Lucchi, Alex; De Cesare, Alessandra; Manfreda, Gerardo

    2011-05-05

    In order to investigate the occurrence of Helicobacter pullorum in turkeys, caecum contents collected at the slaughterhouse from 55 animals intensively reared in 11 farms were sampled. Gram-negative curved rod bacteria were isolated by a modified Steele and McDermott filter technique and further identified as H. pullorum by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Eleven and 31 isolates, randomly selected from each positive farm, underwent phenotypic (biochemical and antibiotic susceptibility tests) and genotypic characterization (PFGE and AFLP analysis), respectively. Forty-two out of 55 animals (76.4%) and all the 11 farms sampled were positive for H. pullorum. Isolates showed similar biochemical characteristics and whole cell protein profiles but showed a high degree of genetic heterogeneity. Ten out of 11 isolates were resistant to one or more antibiotics with erythromycin, ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid resistance being the most frequently detected. This is the first description of H. pullorum in turkeys. H. pullorum is a frequent intestinal colonizer in turkeys; therefore, attention should be given to clarify the food-borne risk linked to carcass contamination. Antibiotic resistance is a concern since high values of resistance rates were observed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Helicobacter pylori infection - recent developments in diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ana Isabel; Vale, Filipa F; Oleastro, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    Considering the recommended indications for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy and the broad spectrum of available diagnostic methods, a reliable diagnosis is mandatory both before and after eradication therapy. Only highly accurate tests should be used in clinical practice, and the sensitivity and specificity of an adequate test should exceed 90%. The choice of tests should take into account clinical circumstances, the likelihood ratio of positive and negative tests, the cost-effectiveness of the testing strategy and the availability of the tests. This review concerns some of the most recent developments in diagnostic methods of H. pylori infection, namely the contribution of novel endoscopic evaluation methodologies for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection, such as magnifying endoscopy techniques and chromoendoscopy. In addition, the diagnostic contribution of histology and the urea breath test was explored recently in specific clinical settings and patient groups. Recent studies recommend enhancing the number of biopsy fragments for the rapid urease test. Bacterial culture from the gastric biopsy is the gold standard technique, and is recommended for antibiotic susceptibility test. Serology is used for initial screening and the stool antigen test is particularly used when the urea breath test is not available, while molecular methods have gained attention mostly for detecting antibiotic resistance. PMID:25071324

  3. Helicobacter pylori: From Infection to Cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 380 abstracts, presentations and posters of recent advances were highlighted at the European and International Helicobacter pylori meeting held July 7 to 9, 1995 in Edinburgh, Scotland. New advances abound, with major interest focusing on the simple, safe, inexpensive new `gold standard’ for H pylori eradication therapy: a single week of tid omeprazole 20 mg, metronidazole 400 mg and clarithromycin 250 mg, or omeprazole 20 mg, amoxicillin 1000 mg and clarithromycin 500 mg. To avoid false negative results, two biopsies must be taken from the antrum and two from the gastric body at least four weeks after completion of eradication therapy, and ideally should be supplemented with at least one further H pylori test such as a biopsy for urease activity or culture, or a urea breath test. While most patients with a gastric or duodenal ulcer (DU who do not consume nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are infected with H pylori, the association is much less apparent in those with a DU who present with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. H pylori eradication for nonulcer dyspepsia is not widely recommended, and the patient with a DU given effective H pylori eradication who presents with dyspepsia likely has erosive esophagitis rather than recurrent DU or H pylori. Gastroenterologists are at increased risk of H pylori infection, particularly older gastroenterologists who are very busy endoscopists.

  4. Helicobacter pylori: prospettive per un vaccino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Del Giudice

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori causes one of the most widespread infections worldwide: it affects more than 50% of the human population, and is responsible for serious gastric pathologies such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, atrophic gastritis and, in some individuals, gastric cancer. Current treatments with antibiotics are efficacious, but encounters several drawbacks at the level of compliance, side effects, antibiotic resistance, etc.The availability of vaccines could contribute in reducing the burden of H. pylori associated diseases. Several bacterial antigens have been identified as virulence factors and proposed as potential vaccine candidates. Some of these antigens have been tested in experimental animal models of challenge with H. pylori. The experiments in animals have shown that prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination against H. pylori is indeed feasible. Several open questions still remain concerning the understanding of the host-microbe relationship and the quality of the immune response which should be induced in order to confer protective immunity in man.The answers to these questions will be crucial in helping the preparation of appropriate vaccine formulations able to efficaciously protect humans both prophylactically and therapeutically. A few clinical trials have been carried out so far with still limited results. Other trials in humans are in progress and are planned for the next few years.The final hope is that these new vaccines will show the expected efficacy against H. pylori and will permit the elimination of this pathogen which has cohabited with humans for more than 100,000 years.

  5. The Immune Response to Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Gubina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune response to Helicobacter pylori involves different mechanisms that are both protective and damaging to the host. The innate and the adaptive immune responses lead to inflammatory as well as anti-inflammatory responses, allowing for persistence of many infections. Thus, developing new therapeutics and effective vaccines against H. pylori has proven to be arduous. Despite many immunisation experiments, using various routes of immunisation with classical as well as recombinant H. pylori vaccines (urease, CagA, HP-NAP, HspA, DNA, chimeric molecules, live vectors, microspheres, no effective vaccine is currently available for humans. New directions for successful vaccine construction should follow a profound knowledge of immunopathological events during natural H. pylori infection and factors leading to resolution of infection: mandatory is a new knowledge about the interplay of the innate response to H. pylori, mucosal inflammation, H. pylori virulence factors inducing immune responses, regulation of the adaptive responses to H. pylori as well as construction of novel vaccine platforms for achieving a broad immune response, leading to a sterilizing immunity.

  6. Is Helicobacter pylori always a "bad guy"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojsak, Iva; Kolacek, Sanja

    2014-01-01

    Various clinical presentations have been ascribed to Helicobacter (H.) pylori. Most importantly, H. pylori is considered the leading cause of gastric cancer worldwide and because of that, in adult population, it is listed as a number one carcinogen. However, children are less prone to develop H. pylori related serious diseases such as peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and cases of malignancy are only sporadically reported. On the other hand, there is an increasing level of evidence suggesting that H. pylori in children could also have a beneficial effect. Recently, several data confirmed previously described inverse relationship of H. pylori infection and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Furthermore, it has been hypothesized that an increased prevalence of allergic diseases could be, at least partially, explained by the decreased incidence of H. pylori infection. H. pylori can, to some degree, influence immunological response. It has an ability to promote high proinflammatory cytokine expression in the gastric mucosa shifting immunity towards Th1 response, which could be a plausible explanation for the down-regulated clinical expression of allergies (including asthma) in patients with H. pylori gastritis. Based on these findings the aim of this review is to present "pros and cons" for H. pylori eradication in children.

  7. Gastric angiogenesis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Pousa

    Full Text Available The formation of new blood vessels seen in conditions commonly associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, including gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma, prompts consideration of a potential relationship between mucosal colonization by this organism and the angiogenic process. H. pylori directly or indirectly damages endothelial cells, which induces a number of changes in the microvasculature of the gastric mucosa. In H. pylori-associated conditions, that is, in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma, there is an increased concentration of angiogenic factors, and subsequently a formation of new blood vessels. However, this early angiogenesis -which is activated to repair the gastric mucosa- is subsequently inhibited in patients with peptic ulcer, and ulcer healing is thus delayed. This may be due to the antiproliferative action of this organism on endothelial cells. While the angiogenic process becomes inhibited in infected patients with peptic ulcer, it remains seemingly active in those with gastritis or gastric cancer. This fact is in support of the notion suggested by various studies that peptic ulcer and gastric cancer are mutually excluding conditions. In the case of gastric cancer, neoangiogenesis would enhance nutrient and oxygen supply to cancer cells, and thus tumor growth and metastatic spread.

  8. Investigation of Helicobacter pylori in Laryngeal Papillomatosis

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    Khadije Moridi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (HP is a motile, gram negative, catalase and oxidase positive bacteria that produce strong urease. H. pylori has been recognized as an etiologic agent of gastritis, gastric ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric MALT lamphoma. H. pylori infections have been correlated with many throat and larynx disease. More recently it is introduced as group 1 carcinogen. The existence of H. pylori within bouccal cavity and dental plaque has been reported. The nasal cavity can be colonized easily with H. pylori. Objectives: The aim of this Study is to report the result of an investigation of H. pylori genome within the larynx popilomatosis biopsy samples. Materials and Methods: 41 biopsy samples were provided from papillomatosis cases during therapeutic surgery. The biopsy samples were preserved at -80°C until use. The DNA extractions were achieved by the phenole- chloroform method. The cagA of H. pylori were amplified by specific primer sets. Results: H. pylori DNA were detected from 3 out of 41 (0.7% papilloma samples. Conclusions: This result is in agree with another reports about correlation between laryngeal papilomatosis and H. pylori infections

  9. Living Conditions and Helicobacter pylori in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odete Amaral

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Infection by the bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is transmissible and is considered a public health issue which affects people of all ages. The objective of this study was to identify factors (lifestyles, dietary factors, and hygiene conditions related to the prevalence of H. pylori infection. Methods. We carried out an observational cross-sectional study with a community sample of adults from the municipalities of Viseu and Sátão, Portugal. The final sample resulted in 166 adults. The data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire with questions regarding sociodemographic aspects and lifestyles. H. pylori infection was identified using the 13C-urea breath test. Results. No association was found between the prevalence of H. pylori infection and the use of tobacco, alcohol, or coffee or dietary factors. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was higher in adults who reported higher consumption of fried food and lower consumption of vegetables and fruit. H. pylori infection was significant for the variables of lower frequency of handwashing before going to the bathroom (p=0.02 and well water consumption (p=0.05. Conclusion. A significant association was found for H. pylori infection with the lower frequency of handwashing before going to the bathroom and the consumption of well water.

  10. Metalloregulation of Helicobacter pylori physiology and pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Angeline Gaddy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative spiral-shaped bacterium that colonizes over half of the world’s population. Chronic H. pylori infection is associated with increased risk for numerous disease outcomes including gastritis, dysplasia, neoplasia, B-cell lymphoma of mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma, and invasive adenocarcinoma. The complex interactions that occur between pathogen and host are dynamic and exquisitely regulated, and the relationship between the H. pylori and its human host are no exception. To successfully colonize, and subsequently persist, within the human stomach H. pylori must temporally regulate numerous genes to ensure localization to the gastric lumen and coordinated expression of virulence factors to subvert the host’s innate and adaptive immune response. H. pylori achieves this precise gene regulation by sensing subtle environmental changes including host-mediated alterations in nutrient availability and responding with dramatic global changes in gene expression. Recent studies revealed that the presence or absence of numerous metal ions encountered in the lumen of the stomach, or within host tissues, including nickel, iron, copper and zinc, can influence regulatory networks to alter gene expression in H. pylori. These expression changes modulate the deployment of bacterial virulence factors that can ultimately influence disease outcome. In this review we will discuss the environmental stimuli that are detected by H. pylori as well as the trans regulatory elements, specifically the transcription regulators and transcription factors, that allow for these significant transcriptional shifts.

  11. Helicobacter Pylori and Gastric Cancer: Clinical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Qiang Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is considered as the main etiological factor for gastric cancer, the strategy of screening and treating the oncogenic bacterium is still controversial. The objective was to evaluate the status and progress of the cognition about the relationship between H. pylori infection and gastric cancer from a clinical aspect. Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from the PubMed articles published in English from 1984 to 2015. Study Selection: Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic. Results: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The main etiological factor for gastric cancer is H. pylori infection. About 74.7-89.0% gastric cancer was related to H. pylori infection. Up to date, some regional gastric cancer prevention programs including the detection and treatment of H. pylori infection are under way. Current data obtained from the randomized controlled trials suggest that population-based H. pylori screening and treatment is feasible and cost-effective in preventing gastric cancer; however, a population-based H. pylori eradication campaign would potentially lead to bacterial resistance to the corresponding antibiotics, as well as a negative impact on the normal flora. Conclusions: The important questions of feasibility, program costs, appropriate target groups for intervention, and the potential harm of mass therapy with antibiotics must first be answered before implementing any large-scale program.

  12. Rescue Therapy for Helicobacter pylori Infection 2012

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    Javier P. Gisbert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is the main cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. After 30 years of experience in H. pylori treatment, however, the ideal regimen to treat this infection has still to be found. Nowadays, apart from having to know well first-line eradication regimens, we must also be prepared to face treatment failures. In designing a treatment strategy, we should not only focus on the results of primary therapy alone but also on the final—overall—eradication rate. The choice of a “rescue” treatment depends on which treatment is used initially. If a first-line clarithromycin-based regimen was used, a second-line metronidazole-based treatment (quadruple therapy may be used afterwards, and then a levofloxacin-based combination would be a third-line “rescue” option. Alternatively, it has recently been suggested that levofloxacin-based “rescue” therapy constitutes an encouraging 2nd-line strategy, representing an alternative to quadruple therapy in patients with previous PPI-clarithromycin-amoxicillin failure, with the advantage of efficacy, simplicity and safety. In this case, quadruple regimen may be reserved as a 3rd-line “rescue” option. Even after two consecutive failures, several studies have demonstrated that H. pylori eradication can finally be achieved in almost all patients if several “rescue” therapies are consecutively given.

  13. Changing epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Manami

    2017-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) is known as the most important cause of gastric cancer. The prevalence of H. pylori infection varies widely by geographic area, age, and socioeconomic status. In Japan, H. pylori infection has been highly correlated with the incidence rate of gastric cancer, and a reduction in H. pylori infection is therefore crucial for decreasing the incidence of gastric cancer, especially at the population level. Infection occurs during childhood, commonly before 5 years of age. In Japan, where gastric cancer has ranked as the most common cancer by incidence and mortality for the last several decades, the prevalence of H. pylori infection has dramatically declined by birth cohort effect, mainly due to improvements in the general hygiene environment in childhood. Older generations born before around 1950 show a high prevalence of around 80-90 %, decreasing with age to reach around 10 % or less in those born around the 1990s, and less than 2 % for children born after the year 2000. This change will have generational effects on gastric cancer prevention strategies, both primary and secondary. The risk-stratified approach to gastric cancer prevention should be considered in Japan and other countries which have similarly experienced rapid economic development.

  14. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection 2010.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    It is accepted that the success of Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment using standard triple therapy is declining. Resistance, particularly to clarithromycin, has been shown in numerous countries to be rising to a level where the use of standard triple therapy in its current form may no longer be justified. The two major factors influencing resistance are prior exposure to the antibiotic and compliance with therapy. Regimes based on bismuth and levofloxacin, which had previously been mainly second-line options, are now emerging as superior first-line options. Trials of sequential and concomitant therapies are also showing the usefulness of these treatments in different populations. Options for third and subsequent line therapies include furazolidone and rifabutin-based regimes. Susceptibility testing should be performed to maintain accurate data on resistance levels, and has also clinical utility in difficult to eradicate cases. None of these, however, will be successful unless compliance is improved upon. If compliance is assured and eradication confirmation pursued, it has been repeatedly illustrated that near full eradication is achievable.

  15. Can Helicobacter pylori infection influence human reproduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Elena; Figura, Natale; Collodel, Giulia; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection could be associated with extra-digestive diseases. Here, we report the evidences concerning the decrease in reproductive potential occurring in individuals infected by H. pylori, especially by strains expressing CagA. This infection is more prevalent in individuals with fertility disorders. Infected women have anti-H. pylori antibodies in cervical mucus and follicular fluid that may decrease sperm motility and cross react immunologically with spermatozoa, conceivably hampering the oocyte/sperm fusion. Infection by CagA positive organisms enhances the risk of preeclampsia, which is a main cause of foetus death. These findings are supported by the results of experimental infections of pregnant mice, which may cause reabsorption of a high number of foetuses and alter the balance between Th1 and Th2 cell response. Infected men have decreased sperm motility, viability and numbers of normally shaped sperm and augmented systemic levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, which may damage spermatozoa. In countries where parasitic infestation is endemic, detrimental effects of infection upon spermatozoa may not occur, because the immune response to parasites could determine a switch from a predominant Th1 type to Th2 type lymphocytes, with production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, the evidences gathered until now should be taken into consideration for future studies aiming to explore the possible role of H. pylori infection on human reproduction.

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection and dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardo, P G; Tugnait, A; Hassan, F; Lynch, D A; West, A P; Mapstone, N P; Quirke, P; Chalmers, D M; Kowolik, M J; Axon, A T

    1995-01-01

    Sixty two patients (mean age 45.6 years) were assessed for oral hygiene and periodontal disease by dental examination before endoscopy. Information about oral care, smoking, and dentures was obtained and samples of dental plaque collected. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in plaque as sought by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and gastric antral biopsy specimens were taken for histological examination. Although H pylori was detected in the antral specimens of 34 patients (54%) all of the cultures of dental plaque were negative, and PCR was only positive from the dentures of one patient. Smokers had poor oral hygiene, visited their dentist less often, and brushed their teeth less frequently. There was no correlation of H pylori gastritis with either dental hygiene or periodontal disease. These results suggest that dental plaque or dentures are not an important reservoir for H pylori and are probably not a significant factor in transmission of the organism. The conflicting results in published works may be caused by differences in sample collection, culture techniques, or oral contamination from gastric juice as a result of gastro-oesophageal reflux at the time of endoscopy. PMID:7672679

  17. Treatment of Helicobacter Pylori in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Famouri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Childrenwith Helicobacter infection need treatment. The aim of treatment is elimination of H.Pylori. Most patients with this infection are asymptomatic and without peptic disease. Treatment and management of these patients are controversy. Conventional Treatment: The best treatment for H. pylori eradication regimens should have cure rates of at least 80%, be without major side effects, and induce minimal bacterial resistance. Antibiotics alone have not achieved this. Luminal acidity influences both the effectiveness of some antimicrobial agents and the survival of the bacteri; thus antibiotics have been combined with acid suppression such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs, bismuth, or H2 antagonists. The “classic” regimen is treatment twice daily for 7 days with a PPI and clarithromycin plus either amoxicillin or metronidazole Bismuth has been used in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease and 1 part o quadruple therapy for H.Pylori but compliance of children for it is low.   Sequential Therapy  Sequential therapyinvolves dual therapy with a PPI and amoxicillin for 5 days followed sequentially by clarithromycin, Tinidazole and omeperazole for 5 days or other triple therapy for 7 days. This treatment has had 97% efficacy.   Adjunctive Therapies A number of studies have showed the potential benefits of probiotic therapy in H. pylori treatment regimens.Consumption of these drugs accompanied with other medications increase H.Pylori eradication.    

  18. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori Infection 2013.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2013-09-01

    This review summarizes important studies regarding Helicobacter pylori therapy published from April 2012 up to March 2013. To begin with, the updated European Consensus Guidelines were published last year, highlighting the role of bismuth and nonbismuth quadruple regimen as first-line treatments. Cure rates for standard triple therapy remain acceptable in quite a few settings nowadays, and some reports on innovative triple therapies look promising. One study evaluating bismuth quadruple therapy as first-line therapy was reported. Regarding nonbismuth quadruple regimens, there is a trend of superiority emerging for the "concomitant" therapy over the "sequential" regimen. "Hybrid" therapy, a combination of sequential and concomitant therapy, has also shown advantage over sequential therapy. Levofloxacin-based therapies appear to be useful and versatile in second- and third-line therapies, with interesting results for newer generation quinolones, which may partially overcome antibiotic resistance. Some promising works have been reported for bismuth-based rescue therapy, using individualized therapies upon antimicrobial information, as well as for rifabutin fourth-line therapy. Probiotics appear to have an effect in terms of reducing side effects and improving compliance, but data on improvement of eradication rates remain controversial.

  19. Helicobacter pylori Genotypes May Determine Gastric Histopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Cristina; Figueiredo, Céu; Carneiro, Fátima; Taveira Gomes, António; Barreira, Raul; Figueira, Paulo; Salgado, Céu; Belo, Luis; Peixoto, António; Bravo, Juan C.; Bravo, Luis E.; Realpe, Jose L.; Plaisier, Anton P.; Quint, Wim G. V.; Ruiz, Bernardo; Correa, Pelayo; van Doorn, Leen-Jan

    2001-01-01

    The outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection has been associated with specific virulence-associated bacterial genotypes. The present study aimed to investigate the gastric histopathology in Portuguese and Colombian patients infected with H. pylori and to assess its relationship with bacterial virulence-associated vacA, cagA, and iceA genotypes. A total of 370 patients from Portugal (n = 192) and Colombia (n = 178) were studied. Corpus and antrum biopsy specimens were collected from each individual. Histopathological features were recorded and graded according to the updated Sydney system. H. pylori vacA, cagA, and iceA genes were directly genotyped in the gastric biopsy specimens by polymerase chain reaction and reverse hybridization. Despite the significant differences between the Portuguese and Colombian patient groups, highly similar results were observed with respect to the relation between H. pylori genotypes and histopathology. H. pylori vacA s1, vacA m1, cagA+ genotypes were significantly associated with a higher H. pylori density, higher degrees of lymphocytic and neutrophilic infiltrates, atrophy, the type of intestinal metaplasia, and presence of epithelial damage. The iceA1 genotype was only associated with epithelial damage in Portuguese patients. These findings show that distinct H. pylori genotypes are strongly associated with histopathological findings in the stomach, confirming their relevance for the development of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology. PMID:11159201

  20. Phylogenomics of ColombianHelicobacter pyloriisolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Escobar, Andrés Julián; Trujillo, Esperanza; Acevedo, Orlando; Bravo, María Mercedes

    2017-01-01

    During the Spanish colonisation of South America, African slaves and Europeans arrived in the continent with their corresponding load of pathogens, including Helicobacter pylori . Colombian strains have been clustered with the hpEurope population and with the hspWestAfrica subpopulation in multilocus sequence typing (MLST) studies. However, ancestry studies have revealed the presence of population components specific to H. pylori in Colombia. The aim of this study was to perform a thorough phylogenomic analysis to describe the evolution of the Colombian urban H. pylori isolates. A total of 115 genomes of H. pylori were sequenced with Illumina technology from H. pylori isolates obtained in Colombia in a region of high risk for gastric cancer. The genomes were assembled, annotated and underwent phylogenomic analysis with 36 reference strains. Additionally, population differentiation analyses were performed for two bacterial genes. The phylogenetic tree revealed clustering of the Colombian strains with hspWestAfrica and hpEurope, along with three clades formed exclusively by Colombian strains, suggesting the presence of independent evolutionary lines for Colombia. Additionally, the nucleotide diversity of horB and vacA genes from Colombian isolates was lower than in the reference strains and showed a significant genetic differentiation supporting the hypothesis of independent clades with recent evolution. The presence of specific lineages suggest the existence of an hspColombia subtype that emerged from a small and relatively isolated ancestral population that accompanied crossbreeding of human population in Colombia.

  1. Hematologic manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano-Maya, Germán

    2014-09-28

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most common infection in humans, with a marked disparity between developed and developing countries. Although H. pylori infections are asymptomatic in most infected individuals, they are intimately related to malignant gastric conditions such as gastric cancer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and to benign diseases such as gastritis and duodenal and gastric peptic ulcers. Since it was learned that bacteria could colonize the gastric mucosa, there have been reports in the medical literature of over 50 extragastric manifestations involving a variety medical areas of specialization. These areas include cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, gynecology and obstetrics, hematology, pneumology, odontology, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology and pediatrics, and they encompass conditions with a range of clear evidence between the H. pylori infection and development of the disease. This literature review covers extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection in the hematology field. It focuses on conditions that are included in international consensus and management guides for H. pylori infection, specifically iron deficiency, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency, immune thrombocytopenia, and MALT lymphoma. In addition, there is discussion of other conditions that are not included in international consensus and management guides on H. pylori, including auto-immune neutropenia, antiphospholipid syndrome, plasma cell dyscrasias, and other hematologic diseases.

  2. Helicobacter pylori vacuolating toxin A and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rassow Joachim

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract VacA, the vacuolating cytotoxin A of Helicobacter pylori, induces apoptosis in epithelial cells of the gastic mucosa and in leukocytes. VacA is released by the bacteria as a protein of 88 kDa. At the outer surface of host cells, it binds to the sphingomyelin of lipid rafts. At least partially, binding to the cells is facilitated by different receptor proteins. VacA is internalized by a clathrin-independent mechanism and initially accumulates in GPI-anchored proteins-enriched early endosomal compartments. Together with early endosomes, VacA is distributed inside the cells. Most of the VacA is eventually contained in the membranes of vacuoles. VacA assembles in hexameric oligomers forming an anion channel of low conductivity with a preference for chloride ions. In parallel, a significant fraction of VacA can be transferred from endosomes to mitochondria in a process involving direct endosome-mitochondria juxtaposition. Inside the mitochondria, VacA accumulates in the mitochondrial inner membrane, probably forming similar chloride channels as observed in the vacuoles. Import into mitochondria is mediated by the hydrophobic N-terminus of VacA. Apoptosis is triggered by loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential, recruitment of Bax and Bak, and release of cytochrome c.

  3. Identification of cholelithogenic enterohepatic helicobacter species and their role in murine cholesterol gallstone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Kirk J; Ihrig, Melanie M; Rogers, Arlin B; Ng, Vivian; Bouchard, Guylaine; Leonard, Monika R; Carey, Martin C; Fox, James G

    2005-04-01

    Helicobacter spp are common inhabitants of the hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal tracts of humans and animals and cause a variety of well-described diseases. Recent epidemiologic results suggest a possible association between enterohepatic Helicobacter spp and cholesterol cholelithiasis, chronic cholecystitis, and gallbladder cancer. To test this, we prospectively investigated the effects of Helicobacter spp infection in cholesterol gallstone pathogenesis in the highly susceptible C57L/J mouse model. Helicobacter spp-free adult male C57L mice were infected with several different enterohepatic Helicobacter spp or left uninfected and fed either a lithogenic diet or standard mouse chow for 8 and 18 weeks. At the conclusion of the study, bile was examined microscopically and diagnostic culture and polymerase chain reaction were performed. Mice infected with Helicobacter bilis or coinfected with Helicobacter hepaticus and Helicobacter rodentium and fed a lithogenic diet developed cholesterol gallstones at 80% prevalence by 8 weeks compared with approximately 10% in uninfected controls. Monoinfections with H hepaticus , Helicobacter cinaedi , and H rodentium gave a cholesterol gallstone prevalence of 40%, 30%, and 20%, respectively; the latter 2 groups did not differ significantly from uninfected animals. Neither infected nor uninfected mice fed a chow diet developed cholesterol gallstones. These findings, along with prior epidemiologic studies, suggest that Helicobacter spp play a major role in the pathophysiology of cholesterol gallstone formation in mice and perhaps humans.

  4. Early effects of oral administration of esomeprazole and omeprazole on the intragastric pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Hiroshi; Inamori, Masahiko; Okuno, Kotone; Sekino, Yusuke; Sakai, Eiji; Okubo, Hidenori; Higurashi, Takuma; Endo, Hiroki; Hosono, Kunihiro; Yoneda, Masato; Koide, Tomoko; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Goto, Ayumu; Kubota, Kensuke; Saito, Satoru; Maeda, Shin; Nakajima, Atsushi; Gotoh, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the inhibitory effects on gastric acid secretion of a single oral dose of a proton pump inhibitor, esomeprazole 20 mg and omeprazole 20 mg. A total of 14 Helicobacter pylori-negative male subjects participated in this study. Intragastric pH was monitored continuously for 6 hours after a single oral dose of omeprazole 20 mg and a single oral dose of esomeprazole 20 mg. Each administration was separated by a 7-day washout period. During the 6-hour study period, the average pH after administration of esomeprazole was higher than that after the administration of omeprazole. Also during the 6-hour study period, each of pH > 2, 3, 3.5, 4, and 5 was maintained for a longer duration after administration of esomeprazole 20 mg than after administration of omeprazole 20 mg (median: 75.4% vs. 53.8%, p = 0.0138; 52.1% vs. 33.4%, p = 0.0188; 45.8% vs. 28.2%, p = 0.0262; 42.5% vs. 20.7%, p = 0.0414; 35.8% vs. 11.6%, p = 0.0262; respectively). In Helicobacter pylori-negative healthy male subjects, single oral administration of esomeprazole 20 mg increased the intragastric pH more rapidly than single oral administration of omeprazole 20 mg.

  5. Infection with Helicobacter pylori is associated with protection against tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Perry

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori, a lifelong and typically asymptomatic infection of the stomach, profoundly alters gastric immune responses, and may benefit the host in protection against other pathogens. We explored the hypothesis that H. pylori contributes to the control of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.We first examined M. tuberculosis-specific IFN-gamma and H. pylori antibody responses in 339 healthy Northern Californians undergoing routine tuberculin skin testing. Of 97 subjects (29% meeting criteria for latent tuberculosis (TB infection (LTBI, 45 (46% were H. pylori seropositive. Subjects with LTBI who were H. pylori-seropositive had 1.5-fold higher TB antigen-induced IFN-gamma responses (p = 0.04, ANOVA, and a more Th-1 like cytokine profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, compared to those who were H. pylori seronegative. To explore an association between H. pylori infection and clinical outcome of TB exposure, we evaluated H. pylori seroprevalence in baseline samples from two high risk TB case-contact cohorts, and from cynomolgus macaques experimentally challenged with M. tuberculosis. Compared to 513 household contacts who did not progress to active disease during a median 24 months follow-up, 120 prevalent TB cases were significantly less likely to be H. pylori infected (AOR: 0.55, 95% CI 0.0.36-0.83, p = 0.005, though seroprevalence was not significantly different from non-progressors in 37 incident TB cases (AOR: 1.35 [95% CI 0.63-2.9] p = 0.44. Cynomolgus macaques with natural H. pylori infection were significantly less likely to progress to TB 6 to 8 months after M. tuberculosis challenge (RR: 0.31 [95% CI 0.12-0.80], p = 0.04.H. pylori infection may induce bystander effects that modify the risk of active TB in humans and non-human primates. That immunity to TB may be enhanced by exposure to other microbial agents may have important implications for vaccine development and disease control.

  6. A cultured strain of "Helicobacter heilmannii," a human gastric pathogen, identified as H-bizzozeronii: Evidence for zoonotic potential of Helicobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalava, K.; On, Stephen L.W.; Harrington, Clare S.

    2001-01-01

    We compared the characteristics of a cultured human "Helicobacter heilmannii" isolate with those of other helicobacters found in animals. Phenotypic, protein profile, 16S rDNA sequence, and DNA-DNA hybridization analyses identified the human strain as H. bizzozeronii, a species frequently found i...... in dogs. Thus, H. bizzozeronii may have zoonotic potential....

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection and typhoid fever in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollaard, A.M.; Verspaget, H.W.; Ali, S.; Visser, L.G.; Veenendaal, R.A.; Asten, H.A.G.H. van; Widjaja, S.; Surjadi, C.; Dissel, J.T. van

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the association between typhoid fever and Helicobacter pylori infection, as the latter microorganism may influence gastric acid secretion and consequently increase susceptibility to Salmonella typhi infection. Anti-H. pylori IgG and IgA antibody titres (ELISA) and gastrin concentration

  8. Helicobacter urease: Niche construction at the single molecule level

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-09-04

    Sep 4, 2009 ... The urease of the human pathogen, Helicobacter pylori, is essential for pathogenesis. The ammonia produced by the enzyme neutralizes stomach acid; thereby modifying its environment. The dodecameric enzyme complex has high affinity for its substrate, urea. We compared urease sequences and ...

  9. Anti- Helicobacter pylori Effects Of The Methanol Extracts Of Allium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bulb is of considerable importance in African cooking and in salads . Various species have been reported to have anti-diabetic, hypocholesterolaemic, fibrinolytic, anti-ulcer and diuretic potentials. Crude methanol extracts of Allium ascalonicum bulb was screened against three strains of Helicobacter pylori (UCH 97001, ...

  10. Helicobacter pylori in childhood : aspects of prevalence, diagnosis and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourad-Baars, Petronella Elisabeth Cornelia

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation we present the results of our research on Helicobacter pylori infections in childhood, focusing on the prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of the infection. Our studies were conducted in the Netherlands, Europe and Indonesia. We discuss diagnostic tests, therapeutic regimens,

  11. Comparative study of methods of diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objective: Diagnostic tests currently in use for the detection of Helicobacter pylori have been classified into either non-invasive or invasive categories, with each having its merits and demerits, as well as superiority over the other depending on the clinical setting. This study compared the accuracy of the ...

  12. Changing patterns of the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) discovered in 1982, has strongly been associated with multiple clinical disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. This study described the prevalence of H. pylori among large numbers of patients over two different time periods in Accra, Ghana. Methods: It was a retrospective records ...

  13. SURVIVAL OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI IN A NATURAL FRESHWATER ENVIRONMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mode by which Helicobacter pylori, the causative agent of most gastric ulcers, is transmitted remains undetermined. Epidemiological evidence suggests these organisms are waterborne; however, H. pylori has rarely been grown from potential water sources. This may be due to th...

  14. Seroprevalance of Helicobacter pylori amongst anti retroviral naive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and objectives: HIV Infection at any stage alters patients' immunity. The pattern of several diseases including incidence and prevalence has changed due to the HIV pandemic. Infections, infestations and malignancies present more frequently and often in an unusual pattern. Helicobacter pylori is the main cause ...

  15. Clinical correlates of helicobacter pylori infection in children seen at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection is the commonest global chronic human bacterial infection. Data from developed countries show that acquisition occurs in childhood but manifestation of chronic gastroduodenal diseases occur more commonly in adulthood. H. pylori infection has however been associated ...

  16. Influence of Helicobacter pylori infection on the prevalence and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Infection with Helicobacter pylori infection is widespread in our environment. However, whether this fact has any bearing on the prevalence and pattern of symptoms referable to the upper gastrointestinal (GI) system in our population of diabetes mellitus (DM) patients has not been much studied. Aim: We ...

  17. Correlation of Serum Anti- Helicobacter pylori Immunoglobulin A (IGA)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The seroprevalence of anti-H. pylori IgA antibodies has been reported to vary among populations and in relation to strains of Helicobacter pylori bacterium. However, there has been conflicting reports on the association between IgA serological status and the histological variables of chronic gastritis. This study ...

  18. Helicobacter pylori infection and atrophic gastritis | Ebule | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori-infection associated gastritis is known to be a significant risk factor of gastric cancer. Serum levels of Gastrin-17 and Pepsinogen1which are respectively biomarkers of gastric antral and corpus mucosal activity are well known parameters of atrophic gastritis. Objectives: To determine the ...

  19. Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Sugano (Kentaro); J. Tack (Jan); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); D.Y. Graham (David Y.); E. El-Omar; S. Miura (Soichiro); K. Haruma (Ken); M. Asaka (Masahiro); N. Uemura (Naomi); P. Malfertheiner

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective To present results of the Kyoto Global Consensus Meeting, which was convened to develop global consensus on (1) classification of chronic gastritis and duodenitis, (2) clinical distinction of dyspepsia caused by Helicobacter pylori from functional dyspepsia, (3) appropriate

  20. correlation of serum anti-helicobacter pylori immunoglobulin a (iga)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. It is now established that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which is believed to be the commonest bacterial infection of man, is the major causative agent of chronic gastritis.1 This chronic inflammation of gastric mucosa which is histologically characterized by mucosal infiltration by plasma cells has been ...

  1. Pattern of gastritis and Helicobacter pylori colonization of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Helicobacter pylori infection of the stomach causes chronic active gastritis. The pattern of gastritis is related to the disease outcome. This study aimed to determine the predominant gastritis pattern in Nigerian dyspeptic patients with a view to predicting gastroduodenal disease outcomes. Methods: Patients referred ...

  2. Therapeutic options after failed Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hulst, R. W.; Weel, J. F.; van der Ende, A.; ten Kate, F. J.; Dankert, J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Many of the currently used Helicobacter pylori eradication regimens fail to cure 5-20% of the patients. Those patients will remain at risk of developing a potentially fatal complication of peptic ulcer disease. Therefore, a new attempt to cure H. pylori infection after initial failure of

  3. Helicobacter pylori among preschool children and their parents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothenbacher, D; Bode, G; Berg, Gabriele

    1999-01-01

    This study assessed the role of parental infection status in the transmission of Helicobacter pylori infection in a large population-based sample of preschool-aged children. The subjects, who lived in Ulm, Germany, and in two nearby communities, were screened for school fitness between January...

  4. The impact of Helicobacter pylori on atopic disorders in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.L. Holster (Ingrid); A.J. Vila (Anne J.); D. Caudri (Daan); C.M. den Hoed (Caroline); G.I. Perez; M.J. Blaser (Martin J.); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in Western populations has steadily decreased. This has been suggested as one of the factors involved in the recent increase of asthma and allergy. Some studies have reported a negative association between H. pylori and asthma and

  5. Gastric Helicobacter spp. infection in captive neotropical Brazilian feline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Luiz de Camargo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Ten captive neotropical Brazilian feline were submitted to gastroscopic examination and samples of gastric mucosa from fundus, corpus and pyloric antrum were evaluated for the presence of Helicobacter species. Warthin-Starry (WS staining and PCR assay with species-specific primers and enzymatic cleavage were applied for bacterial detection and identification. Histological lesions were evaluated by haematoxylin and eosin staining. All animals showed normal gross aspect of gastric mucosa. Helicobacter heilmannii was confirmed in 100% of the samples by WS and PCR assay. Mild lymphocytic infiltrate in the lamina propria was observed in eight animals, mainly in the fundus region. Small lymphoid follicles were seen in three animals. No significant association between Helicobacter infection and histological findings was verified. These observations suggest that gastric Helicobacter spp. could be a commensal or a eventual pathogen to captive neotropical feline, and that procedures, way life, and stress level on the shelter apparently had no negative repercussion over the integrity of the stomach.

  6. Is Helicobacter Pylori a Possible Etiopathogenic Factor in Chronic Tonsillitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmas Ozgun

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Helicobacter pylori is the major gastric pathogen which has an important role in the etiopathogenesis of chronic gastritis. We investigated the presence of Helicobacter pylori as an extragastric reservoir in the tonsillectomy specimens to display if it is an etiologic factor in the development of chronic tonsilitis. Material and Method: In the current study, 100 cases with chronic tonsilitis were examined in bilateral tonsillectomy specimens. The colonization of the microorganism have been evaluated with hematoxylin-eosin and giemsa stains under the light microscope.Results: Helicobacter pylori has been detected in 33 cases (33% on one side of the bilateral tonsillectomy specimens while it has been seen in 15 cases (15% on both sides which demonstrated positivity in 48 cases (48% in total. No colonization has been observed in the remaining 52 cases (52%. Discussion: Due to the considerable positivity in our study, the histopathologic evaluation of tonsillary Helicobacter pylori colonization may be instrumental in the etiologic association with chronic tonsillitis.

  7. (Nutmeg) on Helicobacter pylori induced gastritis in albino rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) activities of dichloromethane and methanol extracts of Myristica fragrans Houtt. seed (nutmeg) was studied to authenticate traditional use in gastrointestinal disorder. Anti-H. pylori activities using the agar dilution method was investigated in 39 strains of H. pylori comprising 38 clinical ...

  8. Serum bactericidal activity against Helicobacter pylori in patients with hypogammaglobulinaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desar, I. M. E.; van Deuren, M.; Sprong, T.; Jansen, J. B. M. J.; Namavar, F.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C. M.; van der Meer, J. W. M.

    2009-01-01

    The two major primary antibody deficiency disorders are X-linked hypogammaglobulinaemia (XLA) and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). CVID patients have an elevated risk for gastric cancer and extra-nodal marginal zone lymphoma. Both diseases are associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  9. Assessment of Helicobacter pylori eredication in patients on NSAID treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonkeman, Harald Erwin; de Leest, H.T.J.I.; van de Laar, Mart A F J; van Baarlen, J.; Steen, K.S.S.; Lems, W.F.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Kuipers, E.J.; Houben, H.H.M.L.; Janssen, M.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In this post-hoc analysis of a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled trial, we measured the sensitivity and specificity of Helicobacter pylori IgG-antibody titer changes, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stains, immunohistochemical (IHC) stains and culture results in NSAID using

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance in Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Gerrits (Monique)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractAn estimated 4 to 5 million individuals in the Netherlands are actively infected with Helicobacter pylori. Eradication of this bacterium becomes more difficult as the prevalence of antibiotic resistance is increasing worldwide. Most H. pylori infections are now diagnosed by

  11. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with the Lewis and ABO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori infection is a basic risk factor for chronic gastritis, and gastric carcinoma. Based on some studies, the reason is binding of H. pylori to H and Leb antigens in gastric mucosa. However, some other findings have not determined any association between the infection and these antigens.

  12. Helicobacter Pylori and the Prevention of Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence Sullivan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is an important cause of stomach cancer that infects a substantial proportion of the Canadian adult population. H pylori can be detected by noninvasive tests and effectively eradicated by medical treatment. Screening for and treatment of H pylori may represent a significant opportunity for preventive oncology.

  13. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections: Mitigating factors and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-05

    Apr 5, 2010 ... basis of novel low cost, efficient, large-scale and alternative/complementary solutions with minimal side effects to decrease or eradicate ... Key words: Helicobacter pylori, treatment regimen, factors affecting treatment, alternative approaches, .... treatment for H. pylori infection has been fraught with difficulty.

  14. Helicobacter pylori infections and gastric cancer: The West African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori infections and gastric cancer: The West African experience. ... Although most strains of Hp are positive for the virulent factor cagA gene as well as vacA s1, m1 or s1, m2; there is no consistent association with GC. Some studies have attributed the low incidence of GC to low prevalence of strains with ...

  15. Nutrients released by gastric epithelial cells enhance Helicobacter pylori growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amsterdam, Karin; van der Ende, Arie

    2004-01-01

    Background. Helicobacter pylori survives and proliferates in the human gastric mucosa. In this niche, H. pylori adheres to the gastric epithelial cells near the tight junctions. In vitro, H. pylori proliferated well in tissue-culture medium near gastric epithelial cells. However, in the absence of

  16. Empiric treatment based on Helicobacter Pylori serology cannont ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Evidence that chronic gastric Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection is an aetiological factor in dyspepsia, peptic ulcer disease, gastric carcinoma and ... disease; patients with 'alarm' signs (78%), cancer (78%) and peptic ulcers (81%) had similar seropositivity rates to patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia (81%).

  17. Prevalence Of Helicobacter pylori In Gastric Biopsies Of Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection as seen at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH) Benin City Nigeria was 16% which was significant using the students T-test (P<0.05). Eighty one gastric biopsy specimens received in the microbiology laboratory were cultured on chocolate agar. Of the H. pylori ...

  18. Helicobacter pylori : the causative agent of peptic ulcer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review examines Helicobacter pylori as an organism and as the causative agent of peptic ulcers. The review also examined the classification of ulcers, how the bacterium produces the ulcer, some of the virulence factors possessed by the organism, its metabolism and growth requirements. The incidence and ...

  19. Association of specific haplotype of TNFα with Helicobacter pylori ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 87; Issue 3. Association of specific haplotype of TNF with Helicobacter pylori-mediated duodenal ulcer in eastern Indian population. Meenakshi Chakravorty Dipanjana Datta De Abhijit Choudhury Amal Santra Susanta Roychoudhury. Research Note Volume 87 Issue 3 ...

  20. Effect of curcumin on Helicobacter pylori biofilm formation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori is a leading etiologic agent causing peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. The alternative lifestyle as a biofilm facilitates H. pylori to survive in adverse environments. Here, we investigated effect of curcumin on H. pylori biofilm formation both qualitatively by pellicle assay and quantitatively by crystal violet ...

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection in Africa: Pathology and microbiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori is a microaerophilic motile curve rod that inhabits the gastric mucosa of the human stomach. The organism chronically infects billions of people worldwide and is one of the most genetically diverse of bacterial species. Infection with the bacterium which leads to chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration, gastric ...

  2. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in bile of cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.R. Boomkens (Hester); J.G. Kusters (Johannes); G. Hoffmann (Gaby); R.G. Pot (Raymond); B. Spee (B.); C. Penning (Corine); H.F. Egberink (Herman); T.S.G.A.M. van den Ingh (Ted); J. Rothuizen (Jan)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractLymphocytic cholangitis (LC) in cats is a biliary disease of unknown etiology. Helicobacter spp. were recently implicated in human primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Because of the similarities between PSC/PBC with LC, we hypothesized that

  3. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on deep vein thrombosis seen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To investigate the role of homocysteine metabolism due to Helicobacter pylori infection on the development of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients with Behcet's disease (BD). Design: Prospective clinical study. Setting: Teaching hospital. Subject: Fifty-five patients with BD divided into groups, with DVT and ...

  4. effect of helicobacter pylori infection on deep vein thrombosis seen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    Objective: To investigate the role of homocysteine metabolism due to Helicobacter pylori infection on the development of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients with Behcet's disease (BD). Design: Prospective clinical study. Setting: Teaching hospital. Subject: Fifty-five patients with BD divided into groups, with DVT and ...

  5. Helicobacter Pylori –Infected Patients | Eltayeb | Sudan Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The role of Helicobacter pylori on gastric carcinogenesis is still unclear but it is considered to predispose carriers to gastric cancer. Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the extent of DNA damage of normal gastric epithelial cells and H. Pylori positive & negative gastritis ...

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection: past, present and future | Jemilohun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) by Warren and Marshall in 1982 was preceded by nearly a hundred year of inconspicuous publications in regard to spiral bacteria, achlorhydria, gastritis, gastric urease, and antimicrobial therapy for peptic ulcers. The infection has now been implicated in the etiopathogenesis ...

  7. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections: Mitigating factors and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative, microaerophilic spiral or motile rod that infects about half the world's population with a very high prevalence in the developing world. It is an important aetiological factor in the development of gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric atrophy and B cell mucosa associated lymphoid tissue ...

  8. Relationship of Halitosis with Gastric Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz HajiFattahi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori may be one of the main causes of halitosis. This study was performed to evaluate the relationship of Heli- cobacter pylori infection with halitosis.Materials and Methods: This case control study was performed on 44 dyspeptic patients with a mean age of 34.29±13.71 years (range 17 to 76 years. The case group included 22 patients with halitosis and no signs of diabetes mellitus, renal or liver failure, upper respiratory tract infection, malignancies, deep carious teeth, severe  periodontitis,  coated  tongue,  dry  mouth  or poor  oral  hygiene.  Control group included 22 patients without halitosis and the same age, sex, systemic and oral conditions as the case group. Halitosis was evaluated using organoleptic test (OLT and Helicobacter pylori infection was evaluated by Rapid Urease Test (RUT during endoscopy. The data were statistically analyzed using chi square, Mann Whitney and t-tests.Results: Helicobacter pylori infection was detected in 20 (91% out of 22 halitosis patients, and 7 control subjects (32% (P<0.001.Conclusion: Helicobacter pylori gastric infection can be a cause of bad breath. Dentists should pay more attention to this infection and refer these patients to in- ternists to prevent further gastrointestinal (GI complications and probable malig- nancies.

  9. Helicobacter pylori y enfermedad péptica ulcerosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Padrón Pérez

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión dirigida a los médicos de la familia sobre la relación del Helicobacter pylori y la enfermedad péptica ulcerosa. Se incluyen datos epidemiológicos y métodos diagnósticos de la infección. El papel de Helicobacter pylori en la génesis de las recidivas ulcerosas y la significativa disminución de las recurrencias posterior a la erradicación con la terapia antimicrobiana, son aspectos abordados en el presente trabajo. La inmunización como arma de prevención y tratamiento sería un importante logro que se menciona como una futura alternativa para combatir la úlcera asociada a la infecciónA review on the connection of Helicobacter pylori with peptic ulcer disease was made for the family physicians. Epidemiological data and diagnostic methods were included. The role of Helicobacter pylori in the genesis of ulcer relapses and the significant reduction of recurrences after the erradication with antimicrobial therapy are approached in the present paper. Immunization as an instrument of prevention and treatment would be an important achievement that is mentioned as a future alternative to fight ulcer associated with the infection

  10. Bellagio report on healthy agriculture, healthy nutrition, healthy people

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simopoulos, Artemis P; Bourne, Peter G; Faergeman, Ole

    2013-01-01

    The Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People is the result of the meeting held at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Lake Como, Italy, 29 October-2 November 2012...

  11. Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simopoulos, Artemis P; Bourne, Peter G; Faergeman, Ole

    2013-01-01

    The Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People is the result of the meeting held at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Lake Como, Italy, 29 October-2 November 2012...

  12. Helicobacter pylori: From Bench to Bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Chiba

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available With the exponential increase in research in the field of Helicobacter pylori a paradigm shift has occurred. It is now recognized that H pylori is a chronic infection of the stomach causing inflammation. Some patients remain asymptomatic, while others may develop dyspepsia, duodenal or gastric ulcer, gastric cancer or a mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. However, the role of H pylori in contributing to nonulcer dyspepsia or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug gastropathy remains controversial. An effective vaccine against H pylori is years away. Major interest has focused on the questions "who should be investigated and therefore treated" and "what is the latest gold standard for eradication of H pylori"? In Europe, guidelines have been developed to help the practitioner answer these important questions. Canadian guidelines will soon be available. For persons with known peptic ulcer disease there should be unequivocal acceptance that the good clinical practice of eradicating H pylori will result in substantial savings in health care expenses. The original 'classical triple therapy' (bismuth, metronidazole and tetracycline [BMT] has now been surpassed by the combination of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI plus two antibiotics (metronidazole plus clarithromycin; amoxicillin plus clarithromycin; or amoxicillin plus metronidazole, each given twice a day for one week. In Canada, the regimen of omeprazole plus one antibiotic (amoxicillin or clarithromycin was approved recently but gives an eradication rate that is lower than the current target of 90%. According to the European (Mäastricht recommendations, if a single treatment attempt with PPI plus two antibiotics fails, PPI plus BMT is recommended.

  13. Gastric Autoantigenic Proteins in Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Sook; Lee, Su-Jin; Kim, Tae Hyo; Yeom, Jeongsuk; Park, Eun-Sil; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Jun, Jin-Su; Lim, Jae-Young; Park, Chan-Hoo; Woo, Hyang-Ok; Ko, Gyung-Hyuck; Kang, Hyung-Lyun; Baik, Seung-Chul; Lee, Woo-Kon; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study tried to identify novel gastric autoimmune antigens that might be involved in aggravating the atrophic gastritis among patients with Helicobacter pylori infection using two-dimensional immunoblotting analysis. Materials and Methods Proteins from gastric mucosal antrectomy specimens and AGS cells (gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines derived from a Caucasian patient who had received no prior therapy) were 2-dimensionally immunoblotted separately with a pool of 300 sera from H. pylroi-infected patients at Gyeongsang National University Hospital. Results Thirty-eight autoantigenic proteins including alcohol dehydrogenase [NADP+], alpha enolase, gastrokine-1, gastric triacylglycerol lipase, heat shock 70 kDa protein 1, and peroxiredoxin-2 were identified in the gastric mucosal tissue. Fourteen autoantigenic proteins including programmed cell death 6-interacting protein, serum albumin and T-complex protein 1 subunit gamma were identified in the AGS cells. Albumin, alpha-enolase, annexin A3, cytoplasmic actin 1, heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein and leukocyte elastase inhibitor were commonly observed autoantigenic proteins in both gastric mucosal tissue and AGS cells. Alpha-enolase, glutathione S-transferase P, heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein, heat shock 70 kDa protein 1, human mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate synthase (ATP) subunit beta, mitochondrial 60 kDa heat shock protein, peroxiredoxin-2, 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein precursor, tyrosine-protein phosphatase non-receptor type 11 and Tryptophan-Aspartic acid (WD) repeat-containing protein 1 showed 60% or higher amino acid positivity. Conclusion These newly identified gastric autoimmune antigens might be useful in the control and prevention of gastroduodenal disorders, and might be valuable in breaking the vicious circle that exists in gastroduodenal disorders if their pathophysiological roles could be understood in the progress of chronic atrophic gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcers, intestinal

  14. Helicobacter pylori Antibiotic Resistance: Trends Over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond G Lahaie

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to antibiotics can be a major problem in the treatment of bacterial infections. As the use of antibiotics increases, bacterial resistance to these agents is rising and in many cases is responsible for the failure of treatment regimens. Although the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection requires the use of more than one antibiotic to obtain adequate eradication rates, the efficacy of the currently used antibiotic combinations has been shown to be decreased by resistance to one of the antibiotics. The use of antibiotics in regimens for the treatment of H pylori is increasing in many countries, including Canada. This increase is both in the use of these antibiotics alone for the treatment of nongastrointestinal infections and in their use in association with proton pump inhibitors for the treatment of H pylori infection. In several European and Asian countries, where resistance to antibiotics is being monitored, it has been demonstrated that H pylori resistance to metronidazole and to clarithromycin increased throughout the 1990s. Thus far, the data available in Canada do not show increased resistance to either of these antibiotics. As for other antibiotics used in the treatment of H pylori infection, such as tetracycline and amoxicillin, the rate of resistance to these agents is still very low and does not constitute a significant problem. Because the efficacy of the regimens used in the treatment of H pylori infection is compromised by resistance to the antibiotics used, it is important that H pylori resistance rates in Canada and throughout the world continue to be monitored. Only with such reliable data can the most optimal regimens be recommended.

  15. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in Oral Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soussan Irani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Helicobacter pylori is a microaerophilic gram-negative spiral organism. It is recognized as the etiologic factor for peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric lymphoma. Recently, it has been isolated from dental plaque and the dorsum of the tongue. This study was designed to assess the association between H. pylori and oral lesions such as ulcerative/inflammatory lesions, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC and primary lymphoma. Materials and methods. A total of 228 biopsies diagnosed as oral ulcerative/inflammatory lesions, oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC and oral primary lymphoma were selected from the archives of the Pathology Department. Thirty-two samples that were diagnosed as being without any pathological changes were selected as the control group. All the paraffin blocks were cut for hematoxylin and eosin staining to confirm the diagnoses and then the samples were prepared for immunohistochemistry staining. Data were collected and analyzed. Results. Chi-squared test showed significant differences between the frequency of H. pylori positivity in normal tissue and the lesions were examined (P=0.000. In addition, there was a statistically significant difference between the lesions examined (P=0.042. Chi-squared test showed significant differences between H. pylori positivity and different tissue types except inside the muscle layer as follows: in epithelium and in lamina propria (P=0.000, inside the blood vessels (P=0.003, inside the salivary gland duct (P=0.036, and muscle layer (P=0.122. Conclusion. There might be a relation between the presence of H. pylori and oral lesions. Therefore, early detection and eradication of H. pylori in high-risk patients are suggested.

  16. Colitis and Colon Cancer in WASP-Deficient Mice Require Helicobacter Spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Deanna D.; Muthupalani, Suresh; Goettel, Jeremy A.; Eston, Michelle A.; Mobley, Melissa; Taylor, Nancy S.; McCabe, Amanda; Marin, Romela; Snapper, Scott B.; Fox, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASP)-deficient patients and mice are immunodeficient and can develop inflammatory bowel disease. The intestinal microbiome is critical to the development of colitis in most animal models, in which, Helicobacter spp. have been implicated in disease pathogenesis. We sought to determine the role of Helicobacter spp. in colitis development in WASP-deficient (WKO) mice. Methods Feces from WKO mice raised under specific pathogen free conditions were evaluated for the presence of Helicobacter spp., after which, a subset of mice were rederived in Helicobacter spp.-free conditions. Helicobacter spp.-free WKO animals were subsequently infected with Helicobacter bilis. Results Helicobacter spp. were detected in feces from WKO mice. After re-derivation in Helicobacter spp.-free conditions, WKO mice did not develop spontaneous colitis but were susceptible to radiation-induced colitis. Moreover, a T-cell transfer model of colitis dependent on WASP-deficient innate immune cells also required Helicobacter spp. colonization. Helicobacter bilis infection of rederived WKO mice led to typhlitis and colitis. Most notably, several H. bilis-infected animals developed dysplasia with 10% demonstrating colon carcinoma, which was not observed in uninfected controls. Conclusions Spontaneous and T-cell transfer, but not radiation-induced, colitis in WKO mice is dependent on the presence of Helicobacter spp. Furthermore, H. bilis infection is sufficient to induce typhlocolitis and colon cancer in Helicobacter spp.-free WKO mice. This animal model of a human immunodeficiency with chronic colitis and increased risk of colon cancer parallels what is seen in human colitis and implicates specific microbial constituents in promoting immune dysregulation in the intestinal mucosa. PMID:23820270

  17. Bactericidal and Morphological Effects of NE-2001, a Novel Synthetic Agent Directed against Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Guofei; Ni CHENG; Dong, Lei; Muramatsu, Mutsumi; Xiao, Shudong; Wang, Ming-Wei; Zhu, De-Xu

    2005-01-01

    The antibacterial activities of NE-2001 were tested against 24 clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori and compared with those of amoxicillin, clarithromycin, metronidazole, and furazolidone. The MIC50 and MIC90 of this synthetic compound on the isolates were 8 and 16 μg/ml, respectively. This action was highly selective against Helicobacter pylori; there was a >4-fold difference between the concentration of NE-2001 required to inhibit the growth of Helicobacter pylori and that required to i...

  18. Dietary Patterns are Associated with Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Chinese Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Xia; Ge Meng; Qing Zhang; Li Liu; Hongmei Wu; Hongbin Shi; Xue Bao; Qian Su; Yeqing Gu; Liyun Fang; Fei Yu; Huijun Yang; Bin Yu; Shaomei Sun; Xing Wang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that food consumption was associated with Helicobacter pylori infection, but no study has yet investigated the association between Helicobacter pylori infection and dietary patterns. The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations between Helicobacter pylori infection and dietary patterns in Tianjin, China. The final cross-sectional study population comprised 10407 participants. Dietary consumption of participants was assessed via food frequency questionnaire...

  19. Investigating the Effect of Periodontal Treatment on Recurrence of Dyspepsia Caused by Helicobacter Pylori

    OpenAIRE

    A Haerian-Ardakani; H Salman Roghani; M Nourelahi; Y Asadi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Helicobacter Pylori has a major documented role in gastric and duodenal ulcer. It is assumed that dental plaque might be a reservoir for Helicobacter pylori. Thus, the purpose of this study was to find a possible relationship between presence of H. Pylori in dental plaque, gastritis and periodontitis. Methods:Sixty patients with symptoms of gastritis and periodontitis participated in our study in whom the presence of Helicobacter Pylori was confirmed in both stool test and d...

  20. Helicobacter pylori infection prevents allergic asthma in mouse models through the induction of regulatory T cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arnold, Isabelle C; Dehzad, Nina; Reuter, Sebastian; Martin, Helen; Becher, Burkhard; Taube, Christian; Müller, Anne

    2011-01-01

    .... The increase in asthma rates has been linked epidemiologically to the rapid disappearance of Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that persistently colonizes the human stomach, from Western societies...

  1. Seroepidemiology of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Tepehuanos Aged 15 Years and Older in Durango, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the seroepidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection in Tepehuanos (an indigenous ethnic group living in rural Mexico). The prevalence of anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG antibodies was examined in 156 Tepehuanos in Durango State, Mexico, using an enzyme-linked immunoassay. In addition, sociodemographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics of Tepehuanos associated with seropositivity were investigated. In total, 103 (66%) of the 156 participants (mean age 31.03  ±  16.71 years) had Helicobacter pylori IgG antibodies. Fifty-four (52.4%) of the 103 seropositive individuals had Helicobacter pylori IgG antibody levels higher than 100 U/mL. Males and females had comparable seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and Helicobacter pylori IgG antibody levels. The seroprevalence was significantly higher in women with pregnancies than those without this obstetric characteristic. Logistic regression showed that Helicobacter pylori infection was positively associated with low education (OR = 3.37; 95% CI: 1.13-10.00; P = 0.02) and laborer occupation (OR = 2.71; 95% CI: 1.14-6.42; P = 0.02). This is the first report of seroprevalence and contributing factors for Helicobacter pylori infection in Tepehuanos and of the association of Helicobacter pylori infection with laborer occupation. Results warrants further research.

  2. Seroepidemiology of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Tepehuanos Aged 15 Years and Older in Durango, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosme Alvarado-Esquivel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the seroepidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection in Tepehuanos (an indigenous ethnic group living in rural Mexico. The prevalence of anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG antibodies was examined in 156 Tepehuanos in Durango State, Mexico, using an enzyme-linked immunoassay. In addition, sociodemographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics of Tepehuanos associated with seropositivity were investigated. In total, 103 (66% of the 156 participants (mean age years had Helicobacter pylori IgG antibodies. Fifty-four (52.4% of the 103 seropositive individuals had Helicobacter pylori IgG antibody levels higher than 100 U/mL. Males and females had comparable seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and Helicobacter pylori IgG antibody levels. The seroprevalence was significantly higher in women with pregnancies than those without this obstetric characteristic. Logistic regression showed that Helicobacter pylori infection was positively associated with low education (OR = 3.37; 95% CI: 1.13–10.00; and laborer occupation (OR = 2.71; 95% CI: 1.14–6.42; . This is the first report of seroprevalence and contributing factors for Helicobacter pylori infection in Tepehuanos and of the association of Helicobacter pylori infection with laborer occupation. Results warrants further research.

  3. Gastric helicobacters in domestic animals and nonhuman primates and their significance for human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank; Flahou, Bram; Chiers, Koen; Baele, Margo; Meyns, Tom; Decostere, Annemie; Ducatelle, Richard

    2009-04-01

    Helicobacters other than Helicobacter pylori have been associated with gastritis, gastric ulcers, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in humans. These very fastidious microorganisms with a typical large spiral-shaped morphology were provisionally designated "H. heilmannii," but in fact they comprise at least five different Helicobacter species, all of which are known to colonize the gastric mucosa of animals. H. suis, which has been isolated from the stomachs of pigs, is the most prevalent gastric non-H. pylori Helicobacter species in humans. Other gastric non-H. pylori helicobacters colonizing the human stomach are H. felis, H. salomonis, H. bizzozeronii, and the still-uncultivable "Candidatus Helicobacter heilmannii." These microorganisms are often detected in the stomachs of dogs and cats. "Candidatus Helicobacter bovis" is highly prevalent in the abomasums of cattle but has only occasionally been detected in the stomachs of humans. There are clear indications that gastric non-H. pylori Helicobacter infections in humans originate from animals, and it is likely that transmission to humans occurs through direct contact. Little is known about the virulence factors of these microorganisms. The recent successes with in vitro isolation of non-H. pylori helicobacters from domestic animals open new perspectives for studying these microorganisms and their interactions with the host.

  4. Helicobacter pylori infection might be responsible for the interconnection between type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Eshmawy Mervat M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Higher serological prevalence rates of helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection have been reported in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1DM and autoimmune thyroiditis (AT. Patients with T1DM are at increased risk for developing other autoimmune diseases, most commonly AT. It is unknown whether H. pylori infection could explain the high prevalence of thyroid autoantibodies and AT in T1DM. The aim of the current study was to evaluate anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO and anti-thyroglobulin (anti-Tg autoantibodies in correlation with anti-H. pylori IgG and IgA in young patients with T1DM. Methods Anti-H. Pylori IgG, IgA, anti-TPO and anti-Tg antibodies titers were measured in 162 euthyroid patients with T1DM and 80 healthy controls matched for age, sex and socioeconomic status. Results Seroprevalence of H. pylori was significantly higher in patients with T1DM than in healthy controls; 79% vs. 51.2%, p Conclusion our results support the idea of a connection between H. pylori infection and the occurrence of anti-TPO, anti-Tg autoantibodies and AT in young patients with T1DM. So, H. pylori infection could be considered as an environmental trigger for development of AT in T1DM. Young patients with T1DM should be screened for H. pylori infection.

  5. Detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with obstructive airway diseases with sero techniques using highly specific IgG antibodies for Helicobacter pylori antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash Pawar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the authenticity of three techniques viz., ELISA, western blot and indirect immune fluorescence assay (IIFA to establish the connection between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and two obstructive airway diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD and asthma. Methods: Serum samples were collected from 48 patients, 27 with COPD, 21 with asthma diseases and control sera were obtained from 42 healthy volunteer blood donors. Serum samples were analyzed by three sero-based techniques, viz., ELISA, western blot and IIFA. Results: ELISA results revealed no connection between the H. pylori infection and COPD and asthma. Western blot results also did not reveal any relationship between H. pylori and obstructive airway diseases. Antibody pattern also did not support the connection between these two diseases. IIFA tests revealed a positive connectivity and relation between the two diseases. Conclusions: The results of the present investigations reveal an association of H. pylori in COPD and asthma. IIFA is a reliable test and hence it is recommended.

  6. Helicobacter pylori and pregnancy-related disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardaropoli, Simona; Rolfo, Alessandro; Todros, Tullia

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is investigated in gastric diseases even during pregnancy. In particular, this Gram-negative bacterium seems to be associated with hyperemesis gravidarum, a severe form of nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. During the last decade, the relationship among H. pylori and several extra-gastric diseases strongly emerged in literature. The correlation among H. pylori infection and pregnancy-related disorders was mainly focused on iron deficiency anemia, thrombocytopenia, fetal malformations, miscarriage, pre-eclampsia and fetal growth restriction. H. pylori infection may have a role in the pathogenesis of various pregnancy-related disorders through different mechanisms: depletion of micronutrients (iron and vitamin B12) in maternal anemia and fetal neural tube defects; local or systemic induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines release and oxidative stress in gastrointestinal disorders and pre-eclampsia; cross-reaction between specific anti-H. pylori antibodies and antigens localized in placental tissue and endothelial cells (pre-eclampsia, fetal growth restriction, miscarriage). Since H. pylori infection is most likely acquired before pregnancy, it is widely believed that hormonal and immunological changes occurring during pregnancy could activate latent H. pylori with a negative impact not only on maternal health (nutritional deficiency, organ injury, death), but also on the fetus (insufficient growth, malformation, death) and sometime consequences can be observed later in life. Another important issue addressed by investigators was to determine whether it is possible to transmit H. pylori infection from mother to child and whether maternal anti-H. pylori antibodies could prevent infant’s infection. Studies on novel diagnostic and therapeutic methods for H. pylori are no less important, since these are particularly sensitive topics in pregnancy conditions. It could be interesting to study the possible correlation between H

  7. Acid-Adaptive Genes of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yi; Marcus, Elizabeth A.; Matrubutham, Uday; Gleeson, Martin A.; Scott, David R.; Sachs, George

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the only neutralophile that has been able to colonize the human stomach by using a variety of acid-adaptive mechanisms. One of the adaptive mechanisms is increased buffering due to expression of an acid-activated inner membrane urea channel, UreI, and a neutral pH-optimum intrabacterial urease. To delineate other possible adaptive mechanisms, changes in gene expression in response to acid exposure were examined using genomic microarrays of H. pylori exposed to different levels of external pH (7.4, 6.2, 5.5, and 4.5) for 30 min in the absence and presence of 5 mM urea. Gene expression was correlated with intrabacterial pH measured using 2′,7′-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-carboxyfluorescein and compared to that observed with exposure to 42°C for 30 min. Microarrays containing the 1,534 open reading frames of H. pylori strain 26695 were hybridized with cDNAs from control (pH 7.4; labeled with Cy3) and acidic (labeled with Cy5) conditions. The intrabacterial pH was 8.1 at pH 7.4, fell to 5.3 at pH 4.5, and rose to 6.2 with urea. About 200 genes were up-regulated and ∼100 genes were down-regulated at pH 4.5 in the absence of urea, and about half that number changed in the presence of urea. These genes included pH-homeostatic, transcriptional regulatory, motility, cell envelope, and pathogenicity genes. The up-regulation of some pH-homeostatic genes was confirmed by real-time PCR. There was little overlap with the genes induced by temperature stress. These results suggest that H. pylori has evolved multifaceted acid-adaptive mechanisms enabling it to colonize the stomach that may be novel targets for eliminating infection. PMID:14500513

  8. Pathobiology of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H Riddell

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paediatric population, the associations of Helicobacter pylori with gastritis, gastric ulcer, duodenitis and duodenal ulcer, and with duodenal gastric surface metaplasia and disorders of the D cell-G cell axis resulting in hypergastrinemia, are well established and in many ways resemble their counterparts in adults. Eradication of H pylori invariably results in the reversal of these diseases with time. There are also suggestions that gastric surface metaplasia is more extensive in children with H pylori, and may be the site of duodenal H pylori infection and associated duodenal erosions or ulcers. There is no consensus as to whether H pylori in children is more or less severe than in adults. In one paediatric cohort, H pylori was associated with increased intensity of inflammation, while other studies suggest that acute inflammation may be less intense in children overall but that chronic inflammation may be increased in intensity, including lymphoid hyperplasia, which in turn may correlate with endoscopic nodularity. Lymphoid hyperplasia and nodular gastritis appear to be more frequent in children than in adults and usually regress following H pylori eradication. However, in children, other diseases or morphological abnormalities, including some loss of glands (atrophy, occasionally intestinal metaplasia, lymphoproliferative diseases including low grade mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, lymphocytic gastritis and hypertrophic gastritis/Menetrier’s disease, are much less frequently associated with H pylori than in adults. Other associations are rarely seen in children, primarily because the time required for these to develop takes the individual to adulthood; for example, while intestinal metaplasia occurs in the pediatric population, the complications of adenoma/dysplasia and carcinoma are rare. In adults, inflammatory and hyperplastic polyps, atrophic gastritis and pernicious anemia, and in some patients granulomas

  9. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ESOPHAGITIS GRADES AND HELICOBACTER PYLORI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Patrícia Fernanda Saboya; Kubrusly, Luiz Fernandao; Nassif, Paulo Afonso Nunes; Ribeiro, Irma Cláudia Saboya; Bertoldi, Andressa de Souza; Batistão, Venessa Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori infection (HP) is related to the development of gastric lesions and lymphoma; however, it is not known if there is a relation with gastroesophageal reflux disease and reflux esophagitis. To evaluate HP's relationship with esophagitis in patients undergoing upper endoscopy. Observational, retrospective and cross-sectional study, being evaluated 9576 patients undergoing outpatient endoscopic examination during the period between January and December 2015. Were included patients with any esophageal alteration at the examination; greater than 18; of both genders; independent of the complaint or the reason for the examination, illness or drug use. Were excluded those with active bleeding during the examination and in use of anticoagulants. The variables gender, age, esophagitis and result of the urease test, were studied. For statistical analysis was used the Epi Info software 7.1.5.2. Most of the samples consisted of women and the overall average age was 46.54±16.32 years. The presence of infection was balanced for gender: 1204 (12.56%) women and 952 (13.92%) men. Relating degree of esophagitis HP- and HP+ was observed that the type A was the most common (58.79%, n=1460); 604 (24.32%) had grade B; 334 (13.45%) grade C, and 85 (3.42%) grade D. In the relation between the grade of esophagitis with gender, esophagitis A was predominant in women and present in 929 (63.33%), followed by type B, 282 (46.68%), 136 C (40.71%) and D 30 (35.29%). In men 531 (36.36%) showed type A, 322 (53.31%) B, 198 (59.28%) C, and 55 (64.70%) D. Among the groups 40-50 and over 60 years there was a significant difference in whether have or not have HP+. There is no significant difference between HP infection and the different grades of esophagitis. A infecção pelo Helicobacter pylori (HP) é relacionada com o desenvolvimento de lesões e linfoma gástricos; porém, ainda não se sabe ao certo se há relação dele com a doença do refluxo gastroesofágico e esofagite

  10. Presence of Helicobacter pylori in betel chewers and non betel chewers with and without oral cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarasingha Indranee

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Betel chewing has been shown to predispose to periodontal disease and oral cancer. Studies show that people with gum disease are more likely to test positive for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori. It is not known if the lesions produced by betel quid and the resulting, chemical changes predispose to colonization by H. pylori. Further the role of this organism in oral cancer is not known. Our objective was to determine the presence of H. pylori in oral lesions of thirty oral cancer patients and to determine the presence of IgG antibodies to H. pylori in oral cancer patients who are betel chewers and non betel chewers, healthy betel chewers and healthy non-betel chewers and to compare the presence of H. pylori in these four groups. This case control study was conducted at the Cancer Institute Maharagama and the Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Sri Jayewardenepura. Methods One hundred and seventy three subjects, of whom fifty three were patients presenting with oral cancer to the Cancer Institute Maharagama, sixty healthy betel chewers and sixty healthy non-betel chewers from the Religious and Welfare Service Centre Maharagama were tested for H. pylori by serology. Thirty oral biopsies from oral cancer patients were cultured under microaerophilic condition to isolate H. pylori. The statistic used was Chi-square test. Results Of the fifty-three oral cancer patients, forty-four were betel chewers. Among the 53 oral cancer patients examined, ten of forty-four (10/44 = 22.7% patients who are betel chewers and four of nine (4/9 = 44.4% patients who are non-betel chewers were detected positive for IgG antibody against H. pylori. In the healthy group (betel chewers and non betel chewers ten (16.7% of the healthy betel chewers tested positive for H. pylori by serology. None of the healthy non-betel chewers tested positive for H. pylori Fourteen [26.4%] of oral cancer patients tested positive for H

  11. Healthy Cooking Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Nutrition and healthy eating Healthy-cooking techniques capture the flavor and nutrients of food without ... in expensive cookware. You can use basic cooking techniques to prepare food in healthy ways. By using ...

  12. Why do we still have Helicobacter Pylori in our Stomachs

    OpenAIRE

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin; Ierardi, Enzo; Lee, Yeong Yeh

    2015-01-01

    The existence of any infectious agent in a highly acidic human stomach is contentious, but the chance finding of Helicobacter pylori is by no means an accident. Once H. pylori colonises the gastric mucosa, it can persist for a lifetime, and it is intriguing why our immune system is able to tolerate its existence. Some conditions favour the persistence of H. pylori in the stomach, but other conditions oppose the colonisation of this bacterium. Populations with high and extremely low prevalence...

  13. Helicobacter pylori Update: Gastric Cancer, Reliable Therapy, and Possible Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    David Y Graham

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection contributes to development of diverse gastric and extra-gastric diseases. The infection is necessary but not sufficient for development of gastric adenocarcinoma. Its eradication would eliminate a major worldwide cause of cancer death, so there is much interest in identifying how, if, and when this can be accomplished. There are several mechanisms by which H pylori contributes to development of gastric cancer. Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of many cancers associa...

  14. Evidence of mother-child transmission of Helicobacter pylori infection

    OpenAIRE

    Escobar,Mario Luis; Kawakami,Elisabete

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low socioeconomical status is a major risk factor for natural acquisition of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in developing countries. Its transmission route is unknown but studies suggest person-to-person transmission. AIM: To evaluate seropositivity of anti-H. pylori antibodies in family members of infected symptomatic index patients as compared to family members of symptomatic uninfected index patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred and twelve family members of 38 ...

  15. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Ontario: Prevalence and Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Naja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori has been classified by the World Health Organization as a type I carcinogen. Nearly 50% of the world’s population is estimated to be infected with H pylori. Prevalence patterns of the infection are different between developing and developed countries. The present study had two objectives – to estimate the prevalence of H pylori infection in Ontario, and to evaluate the relationship between the infection and various demographic characteristics and selected lifestyle factors.

  16. The effect of Helicobacter pylori on asthma and allergy

    OpenAIRE

    D?Elios, Mario Milco

    2010-01-01

    Amedeo Amedei1, Gaia Codolo2, Gianfranco Del Prete1, Marina de Bernard2, Mario M D’Elios11Policlinico AOU Careggi, Department Internal Medicine, University of Florence, Italy; 2Venetian Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Padua, ItalyAbstract: Current evidence indicates an inverse association between Helicobacter pylori and asthma and allergy. H. pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium which represents the major cause of peptic ulcer and gastric cancer, and preferentially eli...

  17. Helicobacter pylori in humans: Where are we now?

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Arshad Hussain; Shamila Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been associated with colonization of gastro duodenal mucosa of humans from millions of years. The main burden of the disese is in the developing countries, due to overcrowding and poor hygiene. If left untreated it leads to lot of sequlae from minor to sinister diseases over a period of time. The main challenges that remain are prevention of H. pylori-related diseases by effective treatment and screening procedures and development of a vaccine, which can address all th...

  18. Helicobacter pylori-coccoid forms and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Leif Percival; Rasmussen, Lone

    2009-01-01

    be detected by PCR in water supplies. There is no substantial evidence for viable H. pylori persisting in water supplies. Epidemiological studies suggest that environmental water is a risk factor for H. pylori infection when compared with tap water, and formation of H. pylori biofilm cannot be excluded....... Helicobacter pylori does not seem to take part in biofilm formation in the oral cavity even though the bacterium may be detected....

  19. The immunohistochemical demonstration of Helicobacter pylori in rectal ectopia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Corrigan, Mark Anthony

    2009-08-01

    The finding of heterotopic gastric mucosa in the rectum is rare, with less than 40 reported cases in the literature. A condition of unknown etiology, several hypotheses exist including infectious and congenital. We report a case of ectopic gastric tissue in the rectum of a 47-year-old female, and her subsequent clinical course. Furthermore for the first time, we present immunohistologic evidence of the presence of Helicobacter pylori in rectal ectopic gastric tissue.

  20. Comparison of three diagnostic methods to confirm Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opavski Nataša

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Helicobacter pylori induces gastric inflammation in host and such gastritis increases the risk of gastric and duodenal ulceration as well as adenocarcinoma. Because peptic ulcer disease is the major cause of morbidity, accurate diagnosis of H. pylori infection is very important. Unfortunately, there is no gold standard among diagnostic tests for Helicobacter infections. If gastroscopy is performed, histopathology and urease test are the most often used. Still, culturing of this bacterium is essential for drug susceptibility testing and analysis of virulence factors. Objective The aim of this study was to compare three diagnostic procedures - histopathology, urease test and culture, which are used to verify H. pylori infection. Method Three pairs of gastric mucosal biopsy specimens were collected from each of 28 dyspeptic patients undergoing endoscopy. Nineteen patients were not pretreated with antibiotics, while nine had received eradication therapy earlier. One pair of biopsy specimens was used for histopathologic examination, the second for urease test and the third was simultaneously cultured on nonselective and selective solid media. Isolate was identified as H. pylori on the basis of colony morphology, morphological properties and biochemical tests. Results In 14 out of 28 patients, H. pylori infection was confirmed on the basis of results of all diagnostic procedures. The concordance of these three methods was very good, because the results of histopathology, urease test and culture corresponded in 26 from 28 patients. Conclusion The conclusion of our study is that culture, as the method with high degree of concordance with other two procedures and the only that can give information on drug susceptibility of Helicobacter, is recommended for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection along with histopathology and urease test.

  1. Helicobacter pylori associated gastric intestinal metaplasia: Treatment and surveillance

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Kevin Sze-Hang; Wong, Irene Oi-Ling; Leung, Wai K.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the leading causes of cancer related death in the world, particularly in East Asia. According to the Correa’s cancer cascade, non-cardia GC is usually developed through a series of mucosal changes from non-atrophic gastritis to atrophic gastritis (AG), intestinal metaplasia (IM), dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. Atrophic gastritis and IM are therefore generally considered to be pre-neoplastic gastric lesions. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is an important...

  2. Helicobacter pylori and its Association with Gastric and Oesophageal Carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Simán, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common infections in man. The infection is often acquired during childhood and usually results in a chronic life-long inflammation in the gastric mucosa. The aim of our studies was to investigate the association between H. pylori seropositivity and the development of gastric and oesophageal carcinomas. Nested case-control studies were performed in the Malmö Preventive Medicine cohort consisting of 32,906 subjects. Tumour cases were identified by the Swed...

  3. A Novel Reduction Strategy of Clarithromycin Resistance in Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Tadjrobehkar, Omid; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Antibiotic resistance is a major therapeutic problem in patients infected with Helicobacter pylori. H. pylori clarithromycin resistant mutants have been evolved during antibiotic therapy, this is mainly due to 23s rRNA point mutations. Objectives: In the present study, we investigated anti-mutational features of four traditionally Iranian medicinal plants on three local isolated H. pylori strains. Materials and Methods: In this study clarithromycin resistance was used as a mutatio...

  4. "Targeted disruption of the epithelial-barrier by Helicobacter pylori"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wroblewski Lydia E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human gastric epithelium and induces chronic gastritis, which can lead to gastric cancer. Through cell-cell contacts the gastric epithelium forms a barrier to protect underlying tissue from pathogenic bacteria; however, H. pylori have evolved numerous strategies to perturb the integrity of the gastric barrier. In this review, we summarize recent research into the mechanisms through which H. pylori disrupts intercellular junctions and disrupts the gastric epithelial barrier.

  5. Helicobacter pylori Associated Lymphocytic Gastritis in a Child

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Min Jeong; Eom, Dae Woon; Park, Kieyoung

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocytic gastritis (LG) is a rare subtype of chronic gastritis. It is defined as dense proliferation of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) more than 25 lymphocytes per 100 epithelial cells. The known major causes of LG are celiac disease and Helicobacter pylori infection. H. pylori associated LG (HpLG) has more enhanced cytotoxic and apoptotic tendencies than chronic H. pylori gastritis. A 12-year-old girl with postprandial epigastric pain was diagnosed HpLG on endoscopic biopsy. After the...

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection generates genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Figueiredo, C.; Seruca, R.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric cancer has led to numerous studies that investigate the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer shows genetic instability both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, besides impairment of important DNA repair...... of the host, such as oxidative damage, methylation, chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability, and mutations. Interestingly, H. pylori infection generates genetic instability in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Based on the reviewed literature we conclude that H. pylori infection promotes gastric...

  7. "Helicobacter Pylori" Infection in Five Inpatient Units for People with Intellectual Disability and Psychiatric Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David; Vemuri, Murali; Gunatilake, Deepthi; Tewari, Sidhartha

    2008-01-01

    Background: A high prevalence of "Helicobacter pylori" infection has been reported among people with intellectual disability, especially those residing in hospital and similar settings. Surveys of inpatients have found unusually high rates of gastrointestinal malignancy, to which "H. pylori" infection predisposes. Methods: "Helicobacter pylori"…

  8. Treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection and risk of Parkinson's disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H H; Qiu, J; Friis, S

    2012-01-01

    It has been speculated that gastrointestinal infection with Helicobacter pylori (HP) contributes to the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). We used nationwide Danish registers to investigate this hypothesis.......It has been speculated that gastrointestinal infection with Helicobacter pylori (HP) contributes to the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). We used nationwide Danish registers to investigate this hypothesis....

  9. Citric acid inhibits growth of Helicobacter pylori in vitro: a new strategy for eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazgornik, Jan; Mittermayer, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    About 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori. The association of peptic ulcer disease with Helicobacter pylori is well documented. Therefore eradication is obligatory. However, the high costs of multidrug therapy, the resistance of Helicobacter pylori to antibiotics as well as the sometimes present drug intolerance are limiting factors. The inhibitory effect of 3% hydrogen peroxide, 8.4% sodium bicarbonate, 2% ascorbic acid, citric acid in combination with sodium citrate, 7% and 14% citric acid solutions, respectively, on nine Helicobacter pylori strains were tested in vitro. Citric acid showed a potent inhibitory activity on growth of Helicobacter pylori strains in vitro. This was observed not only when citric acid was applied alone but also if citric acid was given together with low concentration of sodium citrate. Two percent ascorbic acid inhibited three, sodium bicarbonate two and hydrogen peroxide one of the nine tested Helicobacter pylori strains, respectively. Citric acid is a cheap substance present in many fruits and produced by food industry, and it demonstrated powerful inhibitory effect on the growth of Helicobacter pylori strains. On the basis of our findings citric acid should be further evaluated for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

  10. Functional dyspepsia and dyspepsia associated with Helicobacter pylori infection: Do they have different clinical characteristics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Rodríguez-García

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: The patients with dyspepsia infected with Helicobacter pylori had similar clinical characteristics to the non-infected patients and could not be differentiated a priori. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with functional dyspepsia was 58% and increased with age.

  11. Validation of a rapid stool antigen test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection Validação de teste rápido de antígeno fecal para diagnóstico de infecção por Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Matie Kinoshita da Silva

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to validate the rapid lateral flow Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test (One step H. pylori antigen test, ACON laboratories, San Diego, USA; Prime diagnostics, São Paulo, using 13C-Urea Breath Test as the gold standard for H. pylori infection diagnosis. A total of 98 consecutive patients, asymptomatic or dyspeptic, entered the study. Sixty-nine were women, with a mean age of 45.76 ± 14.59 years (14 to 79 years. In the H. pylori-positive group, the rapid stool antigen test detected H. pylori antigen in 44 of the 50 positive patients (sensitivity 88%; 95% CI: 75.7-95.5%, and six false-negative; and in the H. pylori-negative group 42 presented negative results (specificity 87.5%; 95% CI: 74.7-95.3%, and six false-positive, showing a substantial agreement (Kappa Index = 0.75; p O objetivo desse trabalho foi avaliar o teste rápido de antígeno de H. pylori nas fezes (One step H. pylori antigen test, ACON laboratories, San Diego, USA; Prime diagnostics, São Paulo, usando teste respiratório com uréia marcada com 13C (TRU-13C, como padrão ouro. Noventa e oito pacientes assintomáticos ou com dispepsia participaram do estudo. Sessenta e nove eram mulheres; a média de idade dos pacientes foi de 45.76 ± 14.59 (14 a 79 anos. No grupo H. pylori positivo, o teste rápido detectou antígenos de H. pylori nas fezes em 44 dos 50 pacientes positivos (sensibilidade de 88%; 95% IC: 75.7-95.5%, com seis falso-negativos; e no grupo H. pylori negativo, 42 apresentaram resultados negativos (especificidade de 87,5%; 95% IC: 74.7-95.3%, com seis falso-positivos, mostrando concordância substancial (índice Kappa = 0.75; p < 0.0001; 95% IC: 0.6-0.9. Quarenta e quatro dos 50 que tiveram teste de antígeno fecal positivo eram H. pylori positivos, sendo o VPP do teste 88% (95% IC: 75.7-95.5%, e 42 pacientes com teste de antígeno fecal negativo eram H. pylori negativos, com VPN de 87,5% (95% IC: 74.7-95.3%. Concluímos que o teste de ant

  12. Infecção pelo helicobacter pylori e sua correlação com os sintomas dispépticos e evolução da gravidez Helicobacter pylori infection and its correlation with gastrointestinal symptoms and outcome of pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sansom Henrique Bromberg

    2006-10-01

    gestation. H.Pylori ser um Immunoglobulin IgG antibody concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA. Age, obesity, parity, outcome of pregnancy and dyspeptic symptoms were registered in the patients' medical records. Chi-square and Student's t-test were used for statistical analysis of the data. RESULTS: Prevalence of H.pylori infection in the population studied was 65.7% (96 of 146. H pylori infection was not associated with parity, preterm delivery, obesity or with dyspeptic symptoms. Women positive for H.pylori IgG were older (30, 45 ± 6.87 vs 27, 96 ± 7.44, p= 0,045565* than H. pylori negative patients. CONCLUSION: In this study there was no association of H pylori infection with dyspeptic symptoms in pregnancy .nor was its presence associated with obesity, parity and outcome of pregnancy.

  13. Helicobacter Pylori: Vías de transmisión

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Alonso Bayona Rojas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available La importancia de Helicobacter pylori como agente etiológico en diversas patologías se asocia con una alta tasa de morbimortalidad y genera un fuerte impacto en nuestra sociedad y en los sistemas de salud. En ese sentido, la presente revisión de literatura pretende analizar y comprender la ruta de transmisión de este patógeno con el objeto de prevenir su propagación. El conocimiento de la epidemiología y el modo de transmisión permite prevenir la propagación e identificar poblaciones de alto riesgo, especialmente en áreas que tienen altas tasas de linfoma gástrico, cáncer gástrico y úlcera gástrica. Helicobacter Pylori: Transmission RoutesAbstractThe importance of Helicobacter pylori as an etiological agent in several pathologies is associated with a high rate of morbi mortality, which generates a strong impact in our society and in the health systems. The present literature review sought to analize and understand the route of transmission of this pathogen to prevent its spread. Knowledge of the epidemiology and mode of transmission of this pathogen is important to prevent its spread and be useful in identifying high-risk populations, especially in areas with high rates of gastric lymphoma, gastric cancer, and gastric ulcer

  14. [Current value of quinolones in Helicobacter pylori therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasz, S; Miehlke, S; Berning, M; Morgner, A; Labenz, J

    2011-08-01

    Eradication rates in first-line Helicobacter pylori therapy have been declining over the last decades, mainly due to increasing resistance against the recommended antibiotics clarithromycin and metronidazole. Thus, there is a need to evaluate novel regimens and substances to offer effective alternative treatment strategies. New generation quinolones, like levofloxacin and moxifloxacin, exhibit a broad-spectrum activity against various Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains and are mostly well tolerated. Based on a large number of studies, quinolones have been introduced in second-line and rescue treatment and are recommended for these indications in current guidelines. Various studies have investigated alternative strategies for first-line treatment including quinolone-based regimens. In the context of increasing resistance rates of Helicobacter pylori against quinolones some risks and benefits have to be considered when using quinolones as a first-line strategy. Besides numerous studies investigating levofloxacin and moxifloxacin there are some promising results for the new substance sitafloxacin, which might overcome primary resistance of Helicobacter pylori against conventional quinolones. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Iron deficiency anemia in an athlete associated with Campylobacter pylori-negative chronic gastritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mack, D.; Sherman, P. (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    1989-08-01

    A 14-year-old athletic boy with a 1-year history of decreased exercise tolerance presented with unexplained iron deficiency anemia. Panendoscopy, colonoscopy, and barium contrast studies of the gastrointestinal tract were normal. However, persistent uptake of radionuclide using a {sup 99m}technetium-sucralfate scan suggested inflammation localized to the stomach. Mucosal biopsies demonstrated acute and chronic gastritis that was not associated with the presence of Campylobacter pylori.

  16. Antimicrobial Nanotherapeutics Against Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamphiwatana, Soracha

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection with its vast prevalence is responsible for various gastric diseases including gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric malignancy. While effective, current treatment regimens are challenged by a fast-declining eradication rate due to the increasing emergence of H. pylori strains resistant to existing antibiotics. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibacterial strategies against H. pylori. The first area of this research, we developed a liposomal nanoformulation of linolenic acid (LipoLLA) and evaluated its bactericidal activity against resistant strains of H. pylori. We found that LipoLLA was effective in killing both spiral and dormant forms of the bacteria via disrupting bacterial membranes. LipoLLA eradicated all strains of the bacteria regardless of their antibiotic resistance status. Furthermore, the bacteria did not develop drug resistance toward LipoLLA. Our findings suggest that LipoLLA is a promising antibacterial nanotherapeutic to treat antibiotic-resistant H. pylori infection. The next step, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic potential of LipoLLA for the treatment of H. pylori infection. In vivo tests further confirmed that LipoLLA was able to kill H. pylori and reduce bacterial load in the mouse stomach. LipoLLA treatment was also shown to reduce the levels of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, which were otherwise elevated due to the H. pylori infection. Finally, toxicity test demonstrated excellent biocompatibility of LipoLLA to normal mouse stomach. Collectively, results from this work indicate that LipoLLA is a promising, new, effective, and safe therapeutic agent for the treatment of H. pylori infection. The second area is stimuli-responsive liposomes development. By adsorbing small chitosan-modified gold nanoparticles (AuChi) onto the outer surface of liposomes, we show that at gastric pH the liposomes have

  17. Are Helicobacter pylori and other Helicobacter species infection associated with human biliary lithiasis? A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Di; Zhang, Yong; Gong, Wei; Mohamed, Sayid Omar; Ogbomo, Henry; Wang, Xuefeng; Liu, Yingbin; Quan, Zhiwei

    2011-01-01

    Since the isolation of Helicobacter species in biliary system, a hypothetical question was raised about the role of these agents in the development of cholelithiasis. This meta-analysis is to explore the association between the Helicobacter infection and biliary lithiasis. A systematic literature search was performed to identify all eligible articles. Meta-analysis which was carried out using odds ratio and random effect model, 95% confidence intervals for odds ratio was calculated. Quantitative assessment of heterogeneity was explored by chi-square test with significance set at P value 0.10 and was measured using I(2) statistic. Eighteen studies published between 1998 and 2011 were finally eligible for meta-analysis. H. pylori, H. bilis, H. hepaticus, H. pullorum and H. ganmani were studied. With heterogeneity (I(2) = 69.5%, Plithiasis group. Higher prevalence of H. pylori in cholelithiasis patients were reported by studies from East Asia, South Asia and South America. Evidences supporting the higher presence of H. pylori in cholelithiasis patients could be found by PCR for detecting 16s rRNA in bile, 26 kDa protein gene in biliary tissue and immunohistochemistry. Using multiple detection tests could increase the detection rate of H. pylori. Our meta-analysis suggests a trend of higher presence of H. pylori in cholelithiasis patients than control group and this trend was significant in the regions with higher prevalence of this agent. Evidences supporting the association between Helicobacter and cholelithiasis could be found by using different tests but the gold standard for the identification of these bacteria in biliary system has yet to be established. Considering obvious heterogeneity, a large multi-center study will facilitate us to further clarify the association between the Helicobacter infection and cholelithiasis.

  18. Helicobacter spp. infection in dogs is not associated with changes in epithelial proliferation or E-cadherin expression in gastric mucosaInfecção por Helicobacter spp. em cães não está associada com alterações na proliferação epitelial ou na expressão de E-caderina na mucosa gástrica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Bracarense

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection causes gastritis and can induce gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma in humans. The aim of this study was to determine in dogs whether there is an association between Helicobacter spp. infection in gastric mucosa, histological lesions, including epithelial cell proliferation and cell adhesion. Gastric biopsies of 12 dogs with gastric disturbances and 25 healthy dogs were evaluated. Warthin-Starry staining (WS and PCR assay were performed to confirm the presence of helicobacteria. The Helicobacter species were determined by PCR assay with speciesspecific primers for H. heilmannii, H. bizzozeronii or H. salomonis, H. felis and H. pylori. Mucosal lesions were evaluated by haematoxylin and eosin (HE and epithelial proliferation was determined by AgNOR and PCNA methods. Cell adhesion was evaluated by the expression of E-cadherin by epithelial cells. Helicobacter spp. was confirmed in 75.7% (28/37 and 73.0% (27/37 of the samples by WS and PCR, respectively. H. bizzozeronii was the species most frequently detected (37%; co-infection was observed in six (22% dogs. Histological changes in the lamina propria included mild chronic gastritis, fibrosis, glandular degeneration, and presence of lymphoid aggregates. There was a significant association between H. heilmannii infection and the presence of lymphoid follicles (p Infecção por Helicobacter pylori provoca gastrite e pode induzir adenocarcinoma gástrico e linfoma tipo MALT em seres humanos. O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar se existe associação entre infecção por Helicobacter spp. na mucosa gástrica de cães e lesões histológicas, incluindo proliferação epitelial e adesão celular. Foram avaliadas biópsias de 12 cães com distúrbios gástricos e de 25 cães saudáveis. A coloração de Warthin-Starry (WS e o método de PCR foram utilizados para confirmar a presença de helicobactérias. As espécies de Helicobacter foram determinadas por PCR com

  19. Protective effect of yoghurt consumption on Helicobacter pylori seropositivity in a Mexican population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornelas, India J; Galvan-Potrillo, Marcia; López-Carrillo, Lizbeth

    2007-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the relationship between fermented and unfermented dairy product consumption and Helicobacter pylori seropositivity in a Mexican population. Dietary interviews were conducted as part of a population-based case-control study in 2005. Serum was obtained for each participant to determine H. pylori seropositivity status. Adjusted odds ratios were estimated from multivariate logistic regression models. Mexico City, Mexico. A random sample of 464 healthy adult residents. The overall seroprevalence of H. pylori in the study sample was 75.4%. In fully adjusted models, compared with those who did not consume yoghurt, there was a protective effect of eating up to one serving per week of yoghurt and more than one serving per week of yoghurt (odds ratio (OR) = 0.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.35-0.94 and OR = 0.45, 95% CI 0.24-0.86, respectively), with a P for trend of 0.01. There were no effects for the consumption of unfermented dairy products (milk and cheese). This study suggests that yoghurt consumption may have a protective effect against H. pylori seropositivity. Additional studies are needed to determine whether consumption of yoghurt or other fermented dairy products can prevent or eradicate H. pylori infection.

  20. Association between Helicobacter pylori infection and the presence of anti-sperm antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrina K. Dimitrova-Dikanarova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association between serum anti-Helicobacter pylori antibodies and anti-sperm antibodies (ASA in patients with gastroduodenal diseases caused by H. pylori, infertile patients positive for ASA and healthy fertile blood donors as controls. Serum ASA were studied by sperm agglutination tests, sperm immobilization test and ELISA against sperm antigens (ELISAsp. Serum IgG anti-H. pylori antibodies were detected by ELISA (ELISAHp. The tests revealed significantly higher incidence of ASA in patients with gastroduodenal diseases compared to the controls (P < 0.0001. The median levels of both types of antibodies were significantly higher in infertile patients than in patients with upper gastroduodenal diseases in all tests applied (sperm agglutination and immobilization tests P < 0.0001; ELISAsp P = 0.006; ELISAHp, P = 0.0008. Significant linear correlation was found between anti-H. pylori antibodies and ASA detected by sperm immobilization test (r = 0.613, P = 0.05 in the group of patients with gastroduodenal disease, as well as a weak linear correlation was established between anti-H. pylori antibodies and ASA in ELISAsp (r = 0.275, P = 0.0051 in the same group. These results suggest that H. pylori infection may play a role in the induction of ASA.

  1. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in bovine, buffalo, camel, ovine, and caprine milk in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Ebrahim; Kheirabadi, Elahe Kazemi

    2012-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection in humans is one of the most common infections worldwide. However, the origin and transmission of this bacterium has not been clearly explained. One of the suggested theories is transmission via raw milk from animals to human beings. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence rate of H. pylori in bulk milk samples from dairy bovine, buffalo, camel, ovine, and caprine herds in Iran. In the present study, 447 bulk milk samples from 230 dairy bovine, buffalo, camel, ovine, and caprine herds were collected in four provinces and tested for H. pylori by cultural method and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of the ureC (glmM) gene. The animals whose milk samples collected for this study were clinically healthy. Using the cultural method, three of 447 milk samples (0.67%), including two sheep (2.2%) and one buffalo (1.6%) milk samples, were found to be contaminated with H. pylori. H. pylori ureC gene was detected in 56 (12.5%) of milk samples, including 19 cow (14.1%), 11 sheep (12.2%), nine goat (8.7%), two camel (3.6%), and 15 buffalo (23.4%) milk samples. Using PCR method, there were significant differences (pmilk samples collected from different species. The present study is the first report of the isolation of H. pylori from raw sheep and buffalo milk in Iran and the first demonstration of H. pylori DNA in camel and buffalo milk.

  2. The relationship between recurrent aphthous stomatitis, and periodontal disease and Helicobacter Pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülseren, D; Karaduman, A; Kutsal, D; Nohutcu, R M

    2016-11-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common oral mucosal disease with unknown etiology. This cross-sectional study aimed to test the hypothesis that Helicobacter pylori and periodontal disease might play an etiological role in RAS. Dental plaque samples obtained from 38 patients with RAS and 43 healthy individuals via periodontal examinations were examined for H. pylori colonization. H. pylori was identified using the rapid urease test (RUT). The periodontal status of the patients and controls was based on the following periodontal parameters: periodontal pocket depth (PPD), the plaque index (PI), the gingival index (GI), and clinical attachment loss (CAL). RUT results were positive in 34 (89.5 %) of the 38 patients and 24 (55.8 %) of the 43 controls (P = 0.002). There were not any significant differences in mean PPD, PI, GI, or CAL between the patient and control groups (P > 0.05). Mean PPD, PI, GI, and CAL were higher in the RUT-positive RAS patients than in the RUT-negative patients (P > 0.05, for all). The present findings show that H. pylori might have played an etiological role in RAS and might have caused periodontal disease, but RAS was not associated with any of the periodontal parameters examined in this study. The present study indicates that H. pylori plays a role in the development of RAS, but periodontal diseases have no effect on it. Eradicating H. pylori might be useful to prevent RAS.

  3. Healthy Family 2009: Assuring Healthy Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Healthy Family 2009 Assuring Healthy Aging Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... please turn Javascript on. 7 Smart Steps to Aging Well 1. Control Blood Pressure You can have ...

  4. Healthy Family 2009: Practicing Healthy Adult Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Healthy Family 2009 Practicing Healthy Adult Living Past Issues / Winter ... diabetes, or if heart disease runs in your family, begin checking cholesterol at age 20. Colorectal Cancer : ...

  5. Effect of dietary anti-Helicobacter pylori-urease immunoglobulin Y on Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H; Nomura, S; Masaoka, T; Goshima, H; Kamata, N; Kodama, Y; Ishii, H; Kitajima, M; Nomoto, K; Hibi, T

    2004-07-01

    Recently, chicken egg yolk was recognized as an inexpensive antibody source, and the therapeutic usefulness of egg yolk immunoglobulin Y (IgY) in oral passive immunization has been investigated. Although multiple antibiotic treatments eradicate most Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections, therapy fails in 10-15% of cases due to the development of drug resistance. Consequently, it is important that new, more broadly based therapies for the treatment of H. pylori infection should be identified. The present study evaluated the effect, on H. pylori infection, of IgY prepared from egg yolk of hens immunized with H. pylori urease (anti-HpU IgY). Seventeen asymptomatic volunteers diagnosed as H. pylori-positive by the 13C-urea breath test (UBT) were orally administered anti-HpU IgY for 4 weeks. Four weeks later, UBT values were significantly decreased although no case showed H. pylori eradication. An H. pylori-positive 53-year-old female gastritis patient administered anti-HpU IgY plus lansoprazole for 8 weeks showed a decrease in serum pepsinogen (PG) I and UBT values as well as an increase in the PG I/II ratio. In conclusion, anti-HpU IgY may mitigate H. pylori-associated gastritis and partially attenuate gastric urease activity. Furthermore, anti-HpU IgY combined with antacids appears to ameliorate gastric inflammation. These encouraging results may represent a novel approach to the management of H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal disease.

  6. Review: Impact of Helicobacter pylori on Alzheimer's disease: What do we know so far?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulberis, Michael; Kotronis, Georgios; Thomann, Robert; Polyzos, Stergios A; Boziki, Marina; Gialamprinou, Dimitra; Deretzi, Georgia; Katsinelos, Panagiotis; Kountouras, Jannis

    2018-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori has changed radically gastroenterologic world, offering a new concept in patients' management. Over time, more medical data gave rise to diverse distant, extragastric manifestations and interactions of the "new" discovered bacterium. Special interest appeared within the field of neurodegenerative diseases and particularly Alzheimer's disease, as the latter and Helicobacter pylori infection are associated with a large public health burden and Alzheimer's disease ranks as the leading cause of disability. However, the relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and Alzheimer's disease remains uncertain. We performed a narrative review regarding a possible connection between Helicobacter pylori and Alzheimer's disease. All accessible relevant (pre)clinical studies written in English were included. Both affected pathologies were briefly analyzed, and relevant studies are discussed, trying to focus on the possible pathogenetic role of this bacterium in Alzheimer's disease. Data stemming from both epidemiologic studies and animal experiments seem to be rather encouraging, tending to confirm the hypothesis that Helicobacter pylori infection might influence the course of Alzheimer's disease pleiotropically. Possible main mechanisms may include the bacterium's access to the brain via the oral-nasal-olfactory pathway or by circulating monocytes (infected with Helicobacter pylori due to defective autophagy) through disrupted blood-brain barrier, thereby possibly triggering neurodegeneration. Current data suggest that Helicobacter pylori infection might influence the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. However, further large-scale randomized controlled trials are mandatory to clarify a possible favorable effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology, before the recommendation of short-term and cost-effective therapeutic regimens against Helicobacter pylori-related Alzheimer's disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons

  7. Functional dyspepsia and dyspepsia associated with Helicobacter pylori infection: Do they have different clinical characteristics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-García, J L; Carmona-Sánchez, R

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes motor, secretory, and inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders and therefore the term "functional" has been questioned when referring to dyspepsia associated with this bacterium. Patients with dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori infection could have clinical characteristics that differentiate them a priori from those with true functional dyspepsia. To determine whether there are clinical differences between patients with functional dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori-associated dyspepsia that enable their a priori identification and to know the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with functional dyspepsia. A total of 578 patients with dyspepsia with no significant lesions detectable through endoscopy were divided into 2 groups according to the presence of Helicobacter pylori. The clinical characteristics, medical history, comorbidities, and use of health resources were compared between the two groups. A sub-analysis pairing the groups by age and sex in a 1:1 ratio was carried out to reduce bias. A total of 336 patients infected with Helicobacter pylori were compared with 242 non-infected patients. The prevalence of infection in the patients with dyspeptic symptoms and no endoscopically detectable lesions was 58%. The initial analysis showed that the cases with dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori infection were more frequently associated with overweight, obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome, but the paired analysis nullified all these differences. The patients with dyspepsia infected with Helicobacter pylori had similar clinical characteristics to the non-infected patients and could not be differentiated a priori. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with functional dyspepsia was 58% and increased with age. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. Healthy Vision Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NEI for Kids > Healthy Vision Tips All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series ... Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Healthy Vision Tips Healthy vision starts with you! Use these ...

  9. Eating Healthy Ethnic Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents/Families ( We Can! ) Health Professional Resources Tipsheet: Eating Healthy Ethnic Food Trying different ethnic cuisines to ... Aim for a Healthy Weight Pocket Guide to Eating Healthy on the Go features tips on ordering ...

  10. Healthy Lifestyle: Children's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Children's health You want your child to eat healthy foods, but do you know which nutrients are ... 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/childrens-health/in-depth/nutrition-for-kids/art- ...

  11. Healthy food trends -- kale

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    Healthy food trends - borecole; Healthy snacks - kale; Weight loss - kale; Healthy diet - kale; Wellness - kale ... drugs), you may need to limit vitamin K foods. Vitamin K can affect how these medicines work. ...

  12. Keeping Your Voice Healthy

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    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Keeping Your Voice Healthy Keeping Your Voice Healthy Patient Health Information News ... voice-related. Key Steps for Keeping Your Voice Healthy Drink plenty of water. Moisture is good for ...

  13. The Suppressive Effects of Geniposide and Genipin on Helicobacter pylori Infections In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiung-Hung; Wu, Jin-Bin; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lai, Yen-Ju; Su, Chiu-Hsian; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Hsu, Yuan-Man

    2017-12-01

    Geniposide and genipin have been found in Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, a traditional Chinese medicine that exhibits multiple biological functions. However, no report showing the effects of geniposide and genipin on gastric protection in Helicobacter pylori infections in vitro and in vivo has been done. In this study, we clarified how geniposide and genipin suppress H. pylori-mediated inflammation in gastric AGS cells and C57BL/6 mice. Our results demonstrated that genipin shows a strong ability to inhibit H. pylori growth and is able to reduce vacA and cagA gene expression of H. pylori in infected AGS cells. Genipin also attenuates the abilities of adhesion and invasion of H. pylori to AGS cells. An attenuation of interleukin (IL)-8 and IFN-γ production caused by genipin was observed to inhibit cell inflammatory responses. In the in vivo experiments, geniposide and genipin both showed suppressive effects on the vacA gene expression in mice after H. pylori infection. The serum levels of IFN-γ, IL-1β, immunoglobulin A, and Immunoglobulin M were decreased by geniposide and genipin in infected mice. The inflammatory maker COX2 was downregulated in H. pylori-infected mice after exposure to geniposide and genipin. Together, geniposide and genipin effectively exert a healthy promotion to reduce H. pylori infections in vivo by interfering with the growth and virulence of H. pylori as well as attenuating the gastric inflammation caused by an H. pylori infection. Geniposide and genipin have a healthy promotion to eradicate H. pylori infections by interfering with the growth and virulence of H. pylori and to attenuate the gastric inflammation caused by an H. pylori infection. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection and serum ferritin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Gabriele; Bode, G; Blettner, M

    2001-01-01

    were H. pylori positive, of whom 57.6% had an infection with a CagA-positive H. pylori strain. Age- and sex-adjusted geometric mean of ferritin was 54.5 microg/dl among H. pylori-infected compared with 63.8 microg/dl among uninfected persons. A multiple linear regression model with log......, a marker of the body iron stores. In this analysis, we paid particular attention to the role of dietary iron intake and CagA, an established virulence factor of the agent. METHODS: The analysis is based on a cross-sectional national health and nutrition survey among healthy people in Germany conducted......-transformed serum ferritin concentration as dependent variable and H. pylori infection and several potential confounding factors as independent variable was fitted. In this model, H. pylori infection was associated with a 17.0% decrease of the serum ferritin concentration (95% CI = 9.8-23.6). The association...

  15. Animal Model Reveals Potential Waterborne Transmission of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehnke, Kevin F; Eaton, Kathryn A; Valdivieso, Manuel; Baker, Laurence H; Xi, Chuanwu

    2015-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has been consistently associated with lack of access to clean water and proper sanitation, but no studies have demonstrated that the transmission of H. pylori can occur from drinking contaminated water. In this study, we used a laboratory mouse model to test whether waterborne H. pylori could cause gastric infection. Groups of immunocompetent C57/BL6 Helicobacter-free mice were exposed to static concentrations (1.29 × 10(5), 10(6), 10(7), 10(8), and 10(9) CFU/L) of H. pylori in their drinking water for 4 weeks. One group of Helicobacter-free mice was exposed to uncontaminated water as a negative control. H. pylori morphology changes in water were examined using microscopy Live/Dead staining. Following exposure, H. pylori infection and inflammation status in the stomach were evaluated using quantitative culture, PCR, the rapid urease test, and histology. None of the mice in the negative control or 10(5) groups were infected. One of 20 cages (one of 40 mice) of the 10(6) group, three of 19 cages (four of 38 mice) of the 10(7) CFU/L group, 19 of 20 cages (33 of 40 mice) of the 10(8) group, and 20 of 20 cages (39 of 40 mice) of the 10(9) CFU/L group were infected. Infected mice had significantly higher gastric inflammation than uninfected mice (27.86% higher inflammation, p pylori in water is infectious in mice, suggesting that humans drinking contaminated water may be at risk of contracting H. pylori infection. Much work needs to be performed to better understand the risk of infection from drinking H. pylori-contaminated water. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Medicinal plants in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, Maliheh; Shams-Ardakani, Mohammadreza; Foroumadi, Alireza

    2015-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a small, spiral, Gram-negative bacillus that plays a role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases ranging from asymptomatic gastritis to gastric cancer. Schedule compliance, antibiotic drug resistance, and side-effects of triple or quadruple therapy have led to research for novel candidates from plants. The purpose of this paper is to review the most potent medicinal plants of recently published literature with anti-H. pylori activity. For centuries, herbals have been used by traditional healers around the world to treat various gastrointestinal tract disorders such as dyspepsia, gastritis, and peptic ulcer disease. The mechanism of action by which these botanicals exert their therapeutic properties has not been completely and clearly elucidated. Anti-H. pylori properties may be one of the possible mechanisms by which gastroprotective herbs treat gastrointestinal tract disorders. Electronic databases such as PubMed, Google scholar, EBSCO, and local databases were explored for medicinal plants with anti-H. pylori properties between 1984 and 2013 using key words "medicinal plants" and "Helicobacter pylori" or "anti-Helicobacter pylori". A total of 43 medicinal plant species belonging to 27 families including Amaryllidaceae, Anacardiaceae, Apiaceae, Apocynaceae, Asclepiadoideae, Asteraceae, Bignoniaceae, Clusiaceae, Chancapiedra, Combretaceae, Cyperaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, Geraniaceae, Lamiaceae, Lauraceae, Lythraceae, Menispermaceae, Myristicaceae, Myrtaceae, Oleaceae, Papaveraceae, Plumbaginaceae, Poaceae, Ranunculaceae, Rosaceae, and Theaceae were studied as herbs with potent anti-H. pylori effects. Traditional folk medicinal use of some of these plants to treat gastric infections is substantiated by the antibacterial activity of their extracts against H. pylori.

  17. Helicobacter cinaedi induced typhlocolitis in Rag-2-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zeli; Feng, Yan; Rickman, Barry; Fox, James G

    2015-04-01

    Helicobacter cinaedi, an enterohepatic helicobacter species (EHS), is an important human pathogen and is associated with a wide range of diseases, especially in immunocompromised patients. It has been convincingly demonstrated that innate immune response to certain pathogenic enteric bacteria is sufficient to initiate colitis and colon carcinogenesis in recombinase-activating gene (Rag)-2-deficient mice model. To better understand the mechanisms of human IBD and its association with development of colon cancer, we investigated whether H. cinaedi could induce pathological changes noted with murine enterohepatic helicobacter infections in the Rag2(-/-) mouse model. Sixty 129SvEv Rag2(-/-) mice mouse were experimentally or sham infected orally with H. cinaedi strain CCUG 18818. Gastrointestinal pathology and immune responses in infected and control mice were analyzed at 3, 6 and 9 months postinfection (MPI). H. cinaedi colonized the cecum, colon, and stomach in infected mice. H. cinaedi induced typhlocolitis in Rag2(-/-) mice by 3 MPI and intestinal lesions became more severe by 9 MPI. H. cinaedi was also associated with the elevation of proinflammatory cytokines, interferon-γ, tumor-necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-10; iNOS mRNA levels were also upregulated in the cecum of infected mice. However, changes in IL-4, IL-6, Cox-2, and c-myc mRNA expressions were not detected. Our results indicated that the Rag2(-/-) mouse model will be useful to continue investigating the pathogenicity of H. cinaedi, and to study the association of host immune responses in IBD caused by EHS. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection with common dietary habits in Khuzestan province in patients with dyspepsia referred to Imam Khomeini Hospital, Ahwaz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Mard

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Helicobacter pylori (HP infection is one of the main risk factors for stomach illness. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and common dietary habits in patients with dyspepsia. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on individuals referred for gastrointestinal endoscopy (N: 374 using a one-year food frequency questionnaire and a 24 hour dietary recall for three days. Tissue samples from the antrum, body and fundus were derived and kept in glass containers including formalin buffer for further pathologic examinations. All data were analyzed using SPSS version 13.0. Independent-Sample t test was used to compare the means. P value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The study population was comprised of 214 healthy subjects (57% and 160 patients (43%. The average daily intake of sausages (p = 0.001, burgers (p = 0.002 was higher in patients compared to the healthy group significantly. The average daily intake of fish (p = 0.001 and weekly intake of tomato (p = 0.001, onions (p = 0.002 and citrus (p = 0.001 was lower among patients in comparison to healthy subjects significantly. Conclusion: The high consumption of fruits and vegetables and low intake of red meat were of dietary habits among healthy individuals. Although, high consumption of processed meat was of dietary habits among patients infected with H. pylori. Therefore, a proper diet can be recommended as a public health policy to the general public.

  19. The Effects of Two Novel Copper-Based Formulations on Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Holton

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of two novel copper-based inorganic formulations for their activity against 60 isolates of Helicobacter pylori (Hp. The two copper-based formulations were tested against three NCTC Helicobacter pylori isolates and 57 clinical strains isolated from the UK and Italy in time-kill assays. Both copper-based formulations were bio-cidal against all Helicobacter pylori strains tested reducing the viable count by 4–5 log within 2 h. These two copper-based anti-microbial agents deserve further study in relation to the treatment of H. pylori-related gastric disease.

  20. The Effects of Two Novel Copper-Based Formulations on Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    John Holton; Dino Vaira; Giovanna Lo Re; Cristina Zaccaro; Saracino, Ilaria M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effects of two novel copper-based inorganic formulations for their activity against 60 isolates of Helicobacter pylori (Hp). The two copper-based formulations were tested against three NCTC Helicobacter pylori isolates and 57 clinical strains isolated from the UK and Italy in time-kill assays. Both copper-based formulations were bio-cidal against all Helicobacter pylori strains tested reducing the viable count by 4–5 log within 2 h. These two copper-based anti-microbial ag...

  1. The Multiple Carbohydrate Binding Specificities of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teneberg, Susann

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Adhesion of microbes to the target tissue is an important determinant for successful initiation, establishment and maintenance of infection, and a variety of different candidate carbohydrate receptors for H. pylori have been identified. Here the different the binding specifities, and their potential role in adhesion to human gastric epithelium are described. Finally, recent findings on the roles of sialic acid binding SabA adhesin in interactions with human neutrophils and erythrocytes are discussed.

  2. Is There a Role for Probiotics in Helicobacter pylori Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, Maria P; Goni, Elisabetta; Di Mario, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    The role of probiotics in Helicobacter pylori therapy remains unclear. Lactobacilli can be shown to inhibit H pylori in vitro. Some strains of Lactobacilli may exert specific antimicrobial effects. There is no strong evidence of a benefit on eradication rate when probiotics are added to a regimen. Despite promising results obtained using compounds of L reuteri and S boulardii, high-quality trials are needed to define the role of probiotics as adjuvant therapy. Variables that remain to be studied with L reuteri, currently the most promising strain, include dosage, frequency of administration, administration in relation to meals, and duration of therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to the Gastric Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marguerite Clyne

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion to the intestinal epithelium is a critical initial step in the pathogenesis of many enteric diseases. Helicobacter pylori is a duodenal pathogen that adheres to the gastric epithelium and causes gastritis and peptic ulceration. The mechanism by which H pylori causes disease has not yet been elucidated but adherence to the gastric mucosa is thought to be an important virulence determinant of the organism. What is known about adherence of H pylori to the gastric mucosa is summarized. Topics discussed are the mechanism of H pylori adherence; in vitro and in vivo models of H pylori infection; and adherence and potential adhesins and receptors for H pylori.

  4. [Helicobacter pylori infection: what else besides gastric problems?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheptulin, A A

    2014-01-01

    The role of Helicobacter pylori infection (HPI) in the development of chronic gastritis, ulcer disease, MALT-lymphoma, stomach cancer, and other diseases is considered. HPI is directly or indirectluy associated with colon adenoma and colorectal cancer, hepatic disorders, coronary heart disease, idiopathic iron deficiency anemia and thrombocytopenia. The role of HPI in the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease remains to be elucidated. HPI is negatively related to bronchial asthma and chronic inflammatory intestinal diseases. Pathophysiological and clinical aspects of HPI and the aforementioned pathologies await further investigations.

  5. Gastroretentive dosage forms: overview and special case of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardonnet, P L; Faivre, V; Pugh, W J; Piffaretti, J C; Falson, F

    2006-03-10

    The challenge to develop efficient gastroretentive dosage forms began about 20 years ago, following the discovery of Helicobacter pylori by Warren and Marshall. In order to understand the real difficulty of increasing the gastric residence time of a dosage form, we have first summarized the important physiologic parameters, which act upon the gastric residence time. Afterwards, we have reviewed the different drug delivery systems designed until now, i.e. high-density, intragastric floating, expandable, superporous hydrogel, mucoadhesive and magnetic systems. Finally, we have focused on gastroretentive dosage forms especially designed against H. pylori, including specific targeting systems against this bacterium.

  6. Determinants of Disease Outcome following Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola L Jones

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is primarily acquired during childhood, causes chronic, active gastritis and peptic ulcer disease, and is associated with the development of gastric malignancies. However, only a small number of infected individuals ever develop the more severe sequelae of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancers. Therefore, the identification of bacterial and host factors that play a role in determining the outcomes and pathophysiology of infection is a major focus of current research. Recent advances in the understanding of disease pathogenesis are critically considered, with particular reference to the paediatric population.

  7. Characterization in Helicobacter pylori of a Nickel Transporter Essential for Colonization That Was Acquired during Evolution by Gastric Helicobacter Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlin, Evelyne; Mancuso, Francesco; Michel, Valérie; Richaud, Pierre; Veyrier, Frédéric J.; De Reuse, Hilde; Vinella, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Metal acquisition is crucial for all cells and for the virulence of many bacterial pathogens. In particular, nickel is a virulence determinant for the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori as it is the cofactor of two enzymes essential for in vivo colonization, urease and a [NiFe] hydrogenase. To import nickel despite its scarcity in the human body, H. pylori requires efficient uptake mechanisms that are only partially defined. Indeed, alternative ways of nickel entry were predicted to exist in addition to the well-described NixA permease. Using a genetic screen, we identified an ABC transporter, that we designated NiuBDE, as a novel H. pylori nickel transport system. Unmarked mutants carrying deletions of nixA, niuD and/or niuB, were constructed and used to measure (i) tolerance to toxic nickel exposure, (ii) intracellular nickel content by ICP-OES, (iii) transport of radioactive nickel and (iv) expression of a reporter gene controlled by nickel concentration. We demonstrated that NiuBDE and NixA function separately and are the sole nickel transporters in H. pylori. NiuBDE, but not NixA, also transports cobalt and bismuth, a metal currently used in H. pylori eradication therapy. Both NiuBDE and NixA participate in nickel-dependent urease activation at pH 5 and survival under acidic conditions mimicking those encountered in the stomach. However, only NiuBDE is able to carry out this activity at neutral pH and is essential for colonization of the mouse stomach. Phylogenomic analyses indicated that both nixA and niuBDE genes have been acquired via horizontal gene transfer by the last common ancestor of the gastric Helicobacter species. Our work highlights the importance of this evolutionary event for the emergence of Helicobacter gastric species that are adapted to the hostile environment of the stomach where the capacity of Helicobacter to import nickel and thereby activate urease needs to be optimized. PMID:27923069

  8. Are Helicobacter pylori and other Helicobacter species infection associated with human biliary lithiasis? A meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Since the isolation of Helicobacter species in biliary system, a hypothetical question was raised about the role of these agents in the development of cholelithiasis. This meta-analysis is to explore the association between the Helicobacter infection and biliary lithiasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A systematic literature search was performed to identify all eligible articles. Meta-analysis which was carried out using odds ratio and random effect model, 95% confidence intervals for odds ratio was calculated. Quantitative assessment of heterogeneity was explored by chi-square test with significance set at P value 0.10 and was measured using I(2 statistic. Eighteen studies published between 1998 and 2011 were finally eligible for meta-analysis. H. pylori, H. bilis, H. hepaticus, H. pullorum and H. ganmani were studied. With heterogeneity (I(2 = 69.5%, P<0.0001, significantly higher pooled infection rates of H. pylori (OR: 2.59, 35.82% versus 26.75%, P = 0.01 and H. hepaticus (OR: 3.13, 31.30% versus 12.12%, P = 0.02 were observed in lithiasis group. Higher prevalence of H. pylori in cholelithiasis patients were reported by studies from East Asia, South Asia and South America. Evidences supporting the higher presence of H. pylori in cholelithiasis patients could be found by PCR for detecting 16s rRNA in bile, 26 kDa protein gene in biliary tissue and immunohistochemistry. Using multiple detection tests could increase the detection rate of H. pylori. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCES: Our meta-analysis suggests a trend of higher presence of H. pylori in cholelithiasis patients than control group and this trend was significant in the regions with higher prevalence of this agent. Evidences supporting the association between Helicobacter and cholelithiasis could be found by using different tests but the gold standard for the identification of these bacteria in biliary system has yet to be established. Considering obvious

  9. Canadian Helicobacter pylori Consensus Conference Update: Infections in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RH Hunt

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The first Canadian Helicobacter pylori Consensus Conference took place in April 1997. The initial recommendations of the conference were published in early 1998. An update meeting was held in June 1998, and the present paper updates and complements the earlier recommendations. Key changes included the following: the recommendation for testing and treating H pylori infection in patients with known peptic ulcer disease was extended to testing and treating patients with ulcer-like dyspepsia; it was decided that the urea breath test (not serology should be used for routine diagnosis of H pylori infection unless endoscopy is indicated for another reason; and recommended therapies were a twice daily, seven-day regimen of a proton pump inhibitor (omeprazole 20 mg, lansoprazole 30 mg, pantoprazole 40 mg or ranitidine bismuth citrate 400 mg, plus clarithromycin 500 mg and amoxicillin 1000 mg, or plus clarithromycin 500 or 250 mg and metronidazole 500 mg. The need was reiterated to have funding for readily accessible, accurate testing for H pylori infection with the urea breath test. It was strongly recommended that regional centres be established to monitor the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant H pylori infections. The initial consensus document referred to pediatric issues that were not addressed in this update but were the subject of a subsequent Canadian Helicobacter Study Group meeting, and will be published later in 1999.

  10. ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI AMONG CHILDREN AND THERAPY SELECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye.A. Kornienko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The reason for the low therapy efficiency of many gastrobduodenal diseases is the increasing resistance to the antibiotics helicobacter pylori (Н. pylori, which is conditioned by the mutations of its various genes. The most practical importance is attributed to the 23s RRNA mutations, underlying resistance to claritromicin. According to the international consensus maastrichtb3, the scheme of treatment with the inhibitor of the proton pump, claritromicin and metronidasol is recommended as the 1st line therapy. The present work assesses the resistance of Н. pylori to claritromicin aided by pcrbdiagnostics of the 23s RRNA mutation of rna in the biopsy material of the mucous coat of stomach and standard treatment scheme efficiency if compared with the onebantibiotic scheme – amoxicillin, bismuth and inhibitor of the proton pump. 68 children with Н. pylori bassociated diseases have been examined. The frequency of resistance of Н. pylori to claritromicin made up 28%. The standard 10bday long scheme of treatment was efficient among 14% of the patients, the 7bday long schemes with amoxicillin, bismuth and omeprazole were efficient among 40% of the patients, the 10bday long schemes with amoxicillin, bismuth and omeprazole were efficient among 75% of the patients; with omeprazole replaced by esomeprazole the efficiency was observed among 83% of the patients along with the good treatment tolerance.Key words: helicobacter pylori, antibiotic resistance, eradication.

  11. Helicobacter pylori seropositivity in patients with hyperemesis gravidarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaban, Mona M; Kandil, Hisham O; Elshafei, Arwa H

    2014-02-01

    Nausea and vomiting during pregnancy are the most common conditions affecting pregnancy, occurring in about 80% of all pregnancies and always disappearing on the 16th to 18th weeks of gestation. This may be mild and it does not affect the general condition of the patient (the condition is called emesis gravidarum), or it may be severe enough to affect the patient physically and psychologically, causing intractable vomiting, electrolyte imbalance, weight loss >5%, impairment of liver and kidney functions and dehydration. Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common bacterium affecting humans. It is a gram-negative helix-shaped microaerophilic bacterium transmitted by the oro-oral or feco-oral route. It is more prevalent in developing countries and affects young children. Acute infection manifests as acute gastritis and stomach pain, whereas chronic infection causes chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer, 2% of which may develop into stomach cancer. The authors tried to investigate the association between H pylori infection and hyperemesis gravidarum. Fifty patients with hyperemesis gravidarum and 50 patients with normal pregnancy were included in the study. H pylori infection was determined using a 1-step H pylori test device (serum/plasma), which is a qualitative membrane-based immunoassay. Regarding maternal age, gestational age and socioeconomic status, there is no statistical difference between both groups. There is a marked statistical difference between both groups in terms of Helicobacter pylori seropositivity and frequency of vomiting. There is a powerful correlation between H pylori and hyperemesis gravidarum.

  12. Evaluation of Salivary Antibodies to Detect Infection with Helicobacter pylori

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    Mark B Loeb

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is an important cause of peptic ulcer disease and chronic gastritis. Infection with this bacterium stimulates the production of immunoglobulin (Ig G antibody. Salivary IgG antibody tests to detect H pylori infection offer a convenient and noninvasive method of diagnosis. To evaluate an IgG salivary antibody kit, saliva was collected from 157 out-patients with dyspepsia referred for endoscopy to a tertiary centre. A salivary IgG ELISA antibody assay was performed using the Helisal Helicobacter pylori (IgG assay kit, and at least four gastric biopsies were obtained. H pylori infection was confirmed by demonstration of the organism on Warthin-Starry silver stain (sensitivity 85%, specificity 55%. The prevalence of infection with H pylori was 30%. When the analysis was redone, excluding those treated with eradication therapy, the results were similar (sensitivity 86%, specificity 58%. The positive predictive value of the assay was 45% and the negative predictive value was 90%. Despite the ease of sampling, the assay used has limited diagnostic utility, lacking the predictive value to indicate which patients referred with dyspeptic symptoms to a tertiary care setting are infected with H pylori.

  13. Drug delivery strategies for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, B R

    2005-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common pathogenic bacterial infections, colonising an estimated half of all humans. It is associated with the development of serious gastroduodenal disease - including peptic ulcers, gastric lymphoma and acute chronic gastritis. Current recommended regimes are not wholly effective and patient compliance, side-effects and bacterial resistance can be problematic. Drug delivery to the site of residence in the gastric mucosa may improve efficacy of the current and emerging treatments. Gastric retentive delivery systems potentially allow increased penetration of the mucus layer and therefore increased drug concentration at the site of action. Proposed gastric retentive systems for the enhancement of local drug delivery include floating systems, expandable or swellable systems and bioadhesive systems. Generally, problems with these formulations are lack of specificity, limited to mucus turnover or failure to persist in the stomach. Gastric mucoadhesive systems are hailed as a promising technology to address this issue, penetrating the mucus layer and prolonging activity at the mucus-epithelial interface. This review appraises gastroretentive delivery strategies specifically with regard to their application as a delivery system to target Helicobacter. As drug-resistant strains emerge, the development of a vaccine to eradicate and prevent reinfection is an attractive proposition. Proposed prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines have been delivered using a number of mucosal routes using viral and non-viral vectors. The delivery form, inclusion of adjuvants, and delivery regime will influence the immune response generated.

  14. The effect of Helicobacter pylori on asthma and allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedeo Amedei

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Amedeo Amedei1, Gaia Codolo2, Gianfranco Del Prete1, Marina de Bernard2, Mario M D’Elios11Policlinico AOU Careggi, Department Internal Medicine, University of Florence, Italy; 2Venetian Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Padua, ItalyAbstract: Current evidence indicates an inverse association between Helicobacter pylori and asthma and allergy. H. pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium which represents the major cause of peptic ulcer and gastric cancer, and preferentially elicits a T helper (Th-1 response. Many H. pylori factors, such as the neutrophil-activating factor of H. pylori (HP-NAP, are able to drive Th-1 polarization and to display a powerful inhibition of allergic Th-2 response. This article proposes an overview of the actual knowledge about the effects of H. pylori on asthma and allergy. Special attention has been drawn to HP-NAP as a potential novel strategy for the prevention and treatment of asthma and atopy.Keywords: Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating factor, protein, Th-1/Th-2, Treg, asthma

  15. Dietary Factors in Relation to Helicobacter pylori Infection

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    Seyyed Ali Mard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Helicobacter pylori (HP and diet are both risk factors for gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the Helicobacter pylori infection and dietary habits common in Khuzestan province. Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2011–2013 on 374 patients. Participants were interviewed using a food frequency questionnaire and tissue sample of the antrum was sent for pathology lab. The histopathological major variables were graded on a scale of 3 (mild, moderate, and severe and data analyzed using nonparametric tests. Results. In this study, of 160 patients (43% that were determined, 8.1 percent had severe contamination. Among dietary patterns, relationship between energy intake and carbohydrate with H. pylori was significant. A direct association was found between mean daily intakes of sausage (P=0.001 and burgers (P<0.05 with HP infection. Low intake of fresh vegetables and fruits was the most significant risk factors (P<0.05. Conclusion. There is a possibility that some dietary factors such as consumption of fast foods and low intake of fresh vegetables may increase the chance of HP and severity of this infection.

  16. Helicobacter pylori - a seasoned pathogen by any other name

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    Ahmed Niyaz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Helicobacter pylori is a well known inhabitant of human stomach which is linked to peptic ulcer disease and gastric adenocarcinoma. It was recently shown in several studies that H. pylori can be harnessed as a surrogate marker of human migration and that its population structure and stratification patterns exactly juxtapose to those of Homo sapiens. This is enough a testimony to convey that H. pylori may have coevolved with their host. Several protective effects of H. pylori colonization have been considered as evidence of a presumed symbiotic relationship. Contrary to this assumption is the presence of a strong virulence apparatus within H. pylori; why a co-evolved parasite would try inflicting its host with serious infection and even causing cancer? The answer is perhaps embedded in the evolutionary history of both the bacterium and the host. We discuss a hypothetical scenario wherein H. pylori may have acquired virulence genes from donors within its environment that varied with change in human history and ecology. The H. pylori genomes sequenced to date portray fairly high abundance of such laterally acquired genes which have no assigned functions but could be linked to inflammatory responses or other pathogenic attributes. Therefore, the powerful virulence properties and survival strategies of Helicobacter make it a seasoned pathogen; thus the efforts to portray it as a commensal or a (harmless 'bacterial parasite' need rethinking.

  17. Host Determinants of Expression of the Helicobacter pylori BabA Adhesin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mary E Kable; Lori M Hansen; Cathy M Styer; Samuel L Deck; Olena Rakhimova; Anna Shevtsova; Kathryn A Eaton; Miriam E Martin; Pär Gideonsson; Thomas Borén; Jay V Solnick

    2017-01-01

    Expression of the Helicobacter pylori blood group antigen binding adhesin A (BabA) is more common in strains isolated from patients with peptic ulcer disease or gastric cancer, rather than asymptomatic colonization...

  18. The relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and hyperemesis gravidarum in pregnant woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Ghasempour Shirazi

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: There is no relationship between helicobacter pylori and hyperemesis gravidarum in pregnant woman. Considering the high prevalence of H. pylori infection in our country, there is a need for studies with more samples and more diagnostic methods.

  19. Serodiagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Andersen, L P

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to the established role of Helicobacter pylori gastritis in gastritis and duodenal ulcer in general, conflicting results have been reported in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The seroprevalence during early HIV...

  20. Epithelial cell kinetics of the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Susanne; Holm, I.L.; Holck, P.P.

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen in major gastroduodenal diseases, including inflammation with ulceration and gastric malignancies. Alterations in H. pylori associated cell turnover in gastric epithelial cells are examined in relation to inflammatory activity, bacteria load and cytoki...

  1. Oxidative and nitrosative stress defences of Helicobacter and Campylobacter species that counteract mammalian immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Annika; Stintzi, Alain; Saraiva, Lígia M

    2016-11-01

    Helicobacter and Campylobacter species are Gram-negative microaerophilic host-associated heterotrophic bacteria that invade the digestive tract of humans and animals. Campylobacter jejuni is the major worldwide cause of foodborne gastroenteritis in humans, while Helicobacter pylori is ubiquitous in over half of the world's population causing gastric and duodenal ulcers. The colonisation of the gastrointestinal system by Helicobacter and Campylobacter relies on numerous cellular defences to sense the host environment and respond to adverse conditions, including those imposed by the host immunity. An important antimicrobial tool of the mammalian innate immune system is the generation of harmful oxidative and nitrosative stresses to which pathogens are exposed during phagocytosis. This review summarises the regulators, detoxifying enzymes and subversion mechanisms of Helicobacter and Campylobacter that ultimately promote the successful infection of humans.

  2. Environmental Exposures Are Important Risk Factors for Infection Toxoplasma gondii and Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: An estimated 70% of Americans suffer chronic infections. Helicobacter pylori and Toxoplasma gondii affect an estimated 35% and 15% of Americans, respectively. Despite their heavy burden, environmental transmission of these infections is not well understood. Object...

  3. Helicobacter ganmani sp nov., a urease-negative anaerobe isolated from the intestines of laboratory mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, B.R.; O'Rourke, J.L.; Vandamme, P.

    2001-01-01

    Spiral bacteria were isolated from the intestines of laboratory mice during a study examining the presence of Helicobacter species and other spiral organisms naturally infecting mice maintained at four different animal facilities in Sydney, Australia. One group of 17 isolates, cultured from mice...... from three of the four facilities, were found to be helicobacters but did not fall within any of the 18 currently recognized species. These isolates were unusual in that they only grew anaerobically at 37 degreesC and were incapable of growth under microaerobic conditions. Like Helicobacter rodentium...... and found to be identical to one another. H. rodentium was the most closely related species in terms of 16S rDNA sequence similarity (98.2%). Numerical analysis of whole-cell proteins by SDS-PAGE for nine isolates was carried out with a comparison to all known Helicobacter species, including newly...

  4. Pre-endoscopic screening for Helicobacter pylori and celiac disease in young anemic women

    OpenAIRE

    Vannella, Lucy; Gianni, Debora; Lahner, Edith; Amato, Antonio; Grossi, Enzo; Fave, Gianfranco Delle; Annibale, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the usefulness of pre-endoscopic serological screening for Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection and celiac disease in women aged < 50 years affected by iron-deficiency anemia (IDA).

  5. 16S rRNA mutation-mediated tetracycline resistance in Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Gerrits (Monique); M.R. de Zoete; N.L.A. Arents (Niek); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); J.G. Kusters (Johannes)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractMost Helicobacter pylori strains are susceptible to tetracycline, an antibiotic commonly used for the eradication of H. pylori. However, an increase in incidence of tetracycline resistance in H. pylori has recently been reported. Here the mechanism of tetracycline

  6. Divergence between the Highly Virulent Zoonotic Pathogen Helicobacter heilmannii and Its Closest Relative, the Low-Virulence “Helicobacter ailurogastricus” sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, Myrthe; Lindén, Sara; Rossi, Mirko; Skoog, Emma; Padra, Médea; Peters, Fanny; Perkins, Tim; Vandamme, Peter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; D'Herde, Katharina; Van den Broeck, Wim; Flahou, Bram; Deforce, Dieter; Ducatelle, Richard; Marshall, Barry; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter heilmannii naturally colonizes the stomachs of dogs and cats and has been associated with gastric disorders in humans. Nine feline Helicobacter strains, classified as H. heilmannii based on ureAB and 16S rRNA gene sequences, were divided into a highly virulent and a low-virulence group. The genomes of these strains were sequenced to investigate their phylogenetic relationships, to define their gene content and diversity, and to determine if the differences in pathogenicity were associated with the presence or absence of potential virulence genes. The capacities of these helicobacters to bind to the gastric mucosa were investigated as well. Our analyses revealed that the low-virulence strains do not belong to the species H. heilmannii but to a novel, closely related species for which we propose the name Helicobacter ailurogastricus. Several homologs of H. pylori virulence factors, such as IceA1, HrgA, and jhp0562-like glycosyltransferase, are present in H. heilmannii but absent in H. ailurogastricus. Both species contain a VacA-like autotransporter, for which the passenger domain is remarkably larger in H. ailurogastricus than in H. heilmannii. In addition, H. ailurogastricus shows clear differences in binding to the gastric mucosa compared to H. heilmannii. These findings highlight the low-virulence character of this novel Helicobacter species. PMID:26527212

  7. Early effect of oral administration of omeprazole with mosapride as compared with those of omeprazole alone on the intragastric pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iida Hiroshi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ideal medication for acid-related diseases should have a rapid onset of action to promote hemostasis and cause efficient resolution of symptoms. The aim of our study was to comparatively investigate the inhibitory effect on gastric acid secretion of a single oral administration of omeprazole plus mosapride with that of omeprazole alone. Methods Ten Helicobacter pylori-negative male subjects participated in this randomized, two-way crossover study. Intragastric pH was monitored continuously for 6 hours after a single oral administration of omeprazole 20 mg or that of omeprazole 20 mg plus mosapride 5 mg (the omeprazole being administered one hour after the mosapride. Each administration was separated by a 7-days washout period. Results The average pH during the 6-hour period after administration of omeprazole 20 mg plus mosapride 5 mg was higher than that after administration of omeprazole 20 mg alone (median: 3.22 versus 4.21, respectively; p = 0.0247. Conclusions In H. pylori -negative healthy male subjects, an oral dose of omeprazole 20 mg plus mosapride 5 mg increased the intragastric pH more rapidly than omeprazole 20 mg alone.

  8. Early effects of oral administration of lafutidine with mosapride compared with lafutidine alone on intragastric pH values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koide Tomoko

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ideal medication for treatment of acid related diseases should have a rapid onset of action to promote hemostasis and resolution of symptoms. The aim of our study was to investigate the inhibitory effects on gastric acid secretion after a single oral administrations of lafutidine, is a newly synthesized H2-receptor antagonist, with mosapride 5 mg or lafutidine alone. Methods Ten Helicobacter pylori negative male subjects participated in this randomized, two-way crossover study. Intragastric pH was monitored continuously for 4 hours after a single oral administration of lafutidine 10 mg or lafutidine 10 mg with mosapride 5 mg (the lafutidine being administrated one hour after the mosapride. Each administration was separated by a 7-day washout period. Results The average pH during the 4-hour period after administration of lafutidine 10 mg with mosapride 5 mg was higher than after lafutidine 10 mg alone (median: 5.25 versus 4.58, respectively; p = 0.0318. During the 3–4 hour study period, lafutidine 10 mg with mosapride 5 mg provided a higher pH, compared to lafutidine 10 mg alone (median: 7.28 versus 6.42; p = 0.0208. Conclusion In H. pylori negative healthy male subjects, an oral dose of lafutidine 10 mg with mosapride 5 mg more rapidly increased intragastric pH than lafutidine 10 mg alone.

  9. Gastric Helicobacter infection induces iron deficiency in the INS-GAS mouse.

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    Melanie J Thomson

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence from clinical and population studies for a role of H. pylori infection in the aetiology of iron deficiency. Rodent models of Helicobacter infection are helpful for investigating any causal links and mechanisms of iron deficiency in the host. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of gastric Helicobacter infection on iron deficiency and host iron metabolism/transport gene expression in hypergastrinemic INS-GAS mice. INS-GAS mice were infected with Helicobacter felis for 3, 6 and 9 months. At post mortem, blood was taken for assessment of iron status and gastric mucosa for pathology, immunohistology and analysis of gene expression. Chronic Helicobacter infection of INS- GAS mice resulted in decreased serum iron, transferrin saturation and hypoferritinemia and increased Total iron binding capacity (TIBC. Decreased serum iron concentrations were associated with a concomitant reduction in the number of parietal cells, strengthening the association between hypochlorhydria and gastric Helicobacter-induced iron deficiency. Infection with H. felis for nine months was associated with decreased gastric expression of iron metabolism regulators hepcidin, Bmp4 and Bmp6 but increased expression of Ferroportin 1, the iron efflux protein, iron absorption genes such as Divalent metal transporter 1, Transferrin receptor 1 and also Lcn2 a siderophore-binding protein. The INS-GAS mouse is therefore a useful model for studying Helicobacter-induced iron deficiency. Furthermore, the marked changes in expression of gastric iron transporters following Helicobacter infection may be relevant to the more rapid development of carcinogenesis in the Helicobacter infected INS-GAS model.

  10. Features of Immune Response to Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Children with Bronchial Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Kalichevska

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The course of bronchial asthma in children is often accompanied by gastrointestinal (GI diseases associated with H.pylori infection. The presence of H.pylori leads to the activation and maintenance of inflammatory process with release of cytokines and mediators of inflammation and subsequent systemic effects. Objective: to study the peculiarities of interferon gamma (IFN-γ and interleukin (IL-4, -5 and -13 production as markers of allergic inflammation severity in children with bronchial asthma infected with H.pylori. Materials and methods. There were examined 120 children with bronchial asthma aged 6 to 18 years. Identification of H.pylori was carried out with the help of brea­thing Helic-test (LLC AMA, Russia. Serum concentrations of IFN-γ and IL‑4, -5 and -13 were determined by enzyme-linked immunoassay (Diaclone test-kits, France before and 7 days after the end of treatment for GI pathology. Statistical processing was performed using the methods of variation statistics implemented in the software package Statistica 6.1. Results. 78 children with bronchial asthma were diagnosed with GI disease, including 37 cases associated with H.pylori infection. To study the influence of H.pylori on the course of bronchial asthma, children were divided into 3 groups: I group — 37 children with bronchial asthma and GI pathology, infected with H.pylori, II — 41 H.pylori-negative children with bronchial asthma and GI pathology, III — 42 H.pylori-negative children with bronchial asthma without GI disorders. Duration of bronchial asthma in group I was 7.80 ± 0.17 years, in II — 5.90 ± 0.26 years, in group III — 3.90 ± 0.48 years (p < 0.05. The presence of H.pylori infection in children with bronchial asthma was accompanied by lower concentrations of IFN-γ compared to children of group II (8.47 ± 0.14 pg/ml and 9.69 ± 0.32 pg/ml, respectively, p < 0.05. The level of IL‑13 in the blood serum was

  11. Host Nonresponsiveness Does not Interfere With Vaccine-Mediated Protection Against Gastric Helicobacter Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbour, Stacey N; Mitchell, Hazel M; Sutton, Philip

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis results from the inflammation induced by chronic infection. CBA mice are nonresponsive to gastric Helicobacter infection, providing a useful model for examining host regulation of Helicobacter-induced gastritis. We examined whether gastric Helicobacter nonresponsiveness impacts upon vaccine efficacy and whether immune-mediated protection could occur in the absence of inflammation. Mice were vaccinated prior to challenge with Helicobacter felis or H. pylori. Gastritis and H. felis colonization was evaluated histologically. H. pylori colonization was quantified by colony-forming assay. Immunizations protected CBA mice against challenge with either H. felis or H. pylori. Protection against H. felis was marked by a loss of nonresponsiveness and development of an atrophic gastritis with mucus metaplasia. However, vaccine-induced protection against H. pylori was only associated with cell infiltration into the gastric mucosa. Nonresponsiveness to gastric Helicobacter infection did not interfere with vaccination-induced protection. Vaccine-induced protective immunity against H. pylori was linked with the induction of cellular infiltration, but importantly not atrophic gastritis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. PREVALENCE OF Helicobacter spp. IN DOGS FROM CAMPO GRANDE-MS

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    Brunna Mary Okubo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter spp. is a spiral Gram-negative bacterium that has substantial clinical importance. It has been related to diseases such as gastritis and peptic ulcers, and more recently to gastric cancer in humans.  Evidence suggests the potential of animals, particularly domestic ones, as the source of zoonotic infection of helicobacteria since bacteria with similar morphology to those found in animals were observed in the stomach of humans with gastritis. Thus, dogs have been identified to serve as an important host for infectious agents such as Helicobacter spp. From this perspective, the present study aimed to assess the prevalence of Helicobacter spp. in dogs from the Zoonosis Control Center of Campo Grande-MS. Samples of body, fundus, and gastric antrum from 96 dogs were collected to evaluate the presence of Helicobacter spp. through the rapid urease test and histological analysis. Helicobacter spp. was found in 94.7% of the dogs by rapid urease test and in 100% by histological analysis, with bacteria predominance in the stomach fundus region. Keywords: dogs; Helicobacter; urease test.

  13. Helicobacter pylori: its discovery and relevance for medicine Helicobacter pylori: su descubrimiento e importancia en la medicina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Pajares

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available In 1979, Warren was first to observe these bacteria in an inflamed gastric epithelium, and subsequently in peptic ulcer-associated gastritis. In 1981, Marshall starts his research and cultivates the bacteria, performs prospective studies, and administers therapy regimens using antibiotics and bismuth salts. The organism was designated Campylobacter-like after its similarity with said genus. In 1984, Marshall manages to meet Koch's postulates using self-inoculation by ingesting a bacterial culture, which resulted in gastritis that was then treated and cured with bismuth salts and metronidazole. The Gastroenterological Society of Australia rejected the abstract with preliminary data. In 1983, "The Lancet" published such data in two brief letters with the same heading, with each being signed by one of these two researchers. Cooperating with microbiologists they classify the new bacteria within the Helicobacter genus as the pylori species. Gastritis and peptic ulcer are currently considered infectious diseases. Their diagnosis and therapy include bacterial detection methods and antibiotics, respectively. In addition, a causal relationship between Helicobacter pylori and both gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric lymphoma has been established, and its association with some extra-digestive conditions has been suggested.

  14. The Association of Chlamydia pneumonia and Helicobacter pylori IgG Seropositivity With Omentin-1, Visfatin and Adiponectin Levels in Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Reza; Bolkheir, Alireza; Vahdat, Katayoun; Assadi, Majid; Darabi, Hossein; Nabipour, Iraj

    2016-12-01

    Some adipocytokines are cardioprotective or pro-inflammatory for cardiovascular system. Chronic infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae and Helicobacter pylori has been also considered as novel risk factors for atherosclerosis. The main aim of the current population-based study is to investigate the potential link between circulating adipocytokines and Chlamydia pneumoniae or Helicobacter pylori IgG seropositivities. A total of 250 healthy postmenopausal women who participated in a prospective cohort study were evaluated for IgG antibodies directed against C.pneumoniae and H. pylori. Omentin-1, visfatin, adiponectin, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein were measured by highly specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. The prevalence of IgG antibodies against C. pneumoniae and H. pylori among the studied population was 20.4% (51 women) and 57.2% (143 women), respectively. There were no significant differences in adipocytokine levels between H. pylori IgG seropositive and H. pylori seronegative subjects. Similar results for visfatin and omentin-1 were found when C. pneumoniae IgG seropositive were compared with C. pneumoniae IgG seronegative subjects. However, in general linear model adjusted for age, body mass index and hs-CRP levels revealed significant difference between C. pneumoniae seropositive and C. pneumoniae seronegative subjects for circulating adiponectin. In conclusion, Chlamydia pneumoniae IgG seropositivity was associated with higher adiponectin levels in postmenopausal women. The elucidation of interaction mechanism of Chlamydia pneumoniae and a cardioprotective adipocytokine (adiponectin) will be useful in future therapeutic strategies.

  15. Comparison of histological and molecular diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori in benign lesions and gastric adenocarcinoma Comparação dos diagnósticos histológico e molecular do Helicobacter pylori em lesões benignas e adenocarcinomas gástricos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Gobbo César

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori colonization is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, intestinal metaplasia, adenocarcinoma and lymphoma of the stomach. The objective of this study was to compare the results of the routinely used histology with molecular diagnosis for the detection of H. pylori. Eighty samples from gastric lesions (chronic gastritis, atrophic gastritis, gastric ulcer, and intestinal metaplasia, 18 gastric adenocarcinoma and 10 normal mucosa H. pylori-negative (control samples were obtained. All samples were examined histologically (hematoxylin-eosin and Giemsa staining, and PCR amplifications of the species-specific antigen gene (H3H4 and urease A gene segment (H5H6 of H. pylori were made, using the human gene CYP1A1 for DNA quality control. In the benign lesion and adenocarcinoma the infection was detected in 43% (42/98 and 71% (70/98 by histological and molecular diagnosis (p = 0.0001, respectively. The PCR test detected H. pylori in 27.5% (22/80 of the benign gastric lesions and in 50% (9/18 of the gastric adenocarcinoma cases, the histological diagnosis being negative for this bacterium. About 2.5% of the samples, exclusively from benign lesions and with a positive histological diagnosis, showed negative molecular results for both primers. Statistically significant differences were found between the histological and the molecular method in intestinal metaplasia (p = 0.0461 and gastric adenocarcinoma (p = 0.0011, due to underdetection of H. pylori by the histological method, which is probably due to the low density of the bacterium as a consequence of the severe atrophy of the gastric mucosa. Our findings suggest that PCR is the more efficient method for the assessment of H. pylori infection, especially in metaplasia and gastric adenocarcinoma.A colonização do Helicobacter pylori está associada com gastrite crônica, úlcera péptica, metaplasia intestinal, adenocarcinoma e linfoma gástrico. O objetivo desse estudo foi

  16. Autoantibody production in chronic idiopathic urticaria is not associated with Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atta A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU is a dermatological syndrome, characterized by raised erythematous skin lesions, that affects 20% of the general population and has been associated with autoimmunity. However, some reports have also suggested a close relationship between CIU and Helicobacter pylori infection, which is endemic in developing countries and associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric carcinoma. In the present study, we investigated the occurrence of autoantibodies in sera from 23 CIU subjects infected with H. pylori and from 23 CIU subjects without this infection. The presence of anti-thyroid antibodies was determined by indirect hemagglutination assay and the presence of autoantibodies to IgE and C1INH was determined by ELISA. Antibodies to thyroid antigens were detected at low titers from 100 to 400 in three of 23 (13% CIU-infected subjects and in four of 23 (17% CIU-noninfected subjects. The titers of anti-IgE autoantibodies were similar in these CIU groups, presenting absorbances of 1.16 ± 0.09 and 1.07 ± 0.16, respectively, while a titer of 1.14 ± 0.15 was detected in the healthy control group. The concentration of anti-C1INH autoantibodies was the same in the CIU-infected and -noninfected subjects (7.28 ± 1.31 and 7.91 ± 2.45 ng/ml, respectively, and was 7.20 ± 2.25 ng/ml in the healthy control group. However, the serum levels of complexed anti-C1INH antibodies were increased in CIU-infected subjects compared to CIU-noninfected subjects and healthy controls with an absorbance of 1.51 ± 0.21 vs 1.36 ± 0.16 and 1.26 ± 0.23, respectively (P < 0.05, indicating an impaired clearance of immune complexes in CIU-infected patients. In conclusion, no correlation was observed between H. pylori infection and autoantibody production in CIU patients consistent with reports of clinical studies.

  17. Helicobacter pylori infection according to ABO blood group among blood donors in Kosovo

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    Bukurije Zhubi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Numerous studies have reported a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among healthy and non-healthy persons in different places. The Aim of the study is to investigate the seroprevalence of H. pylori infection among Kosovo’s Blood donor associated with ABO/Rhesus blood group.Methods: 671 blood donors are tested for H. pylori antibodies and results are classifi ed by way of donation, age, gender, blood groups and education level. Serum antibodies are analyzed by Enzyme Linked Fluorescent Assay test for H. pylori IgG with Biomerieux HPY-VIDAS.Results: The frequency of IgG antibody for H. pylori among healthy blood donors is 56.9%, there is not found any difference between voluntary and non-voluntary blood donors (57.4% respectively 56.3%(OR=1.05; 95% CI 0.76 to 1.43; p=0.8. H pylori IgG antibodies positive are detected in 57.0 % ( 126 of 221 of women, compared with 56.9 % ( 256 of 450 of men(OR=0.99; 95% CI 0.72 to 1.38; p=0.96. Serpositive donors are older than seronegative ones (31.9 years, respectively 29.5 years, p=0.02. Mean value of IgG antibody of H. pylori is 3.61 with no significant difference between males and females (3.72 respectively 3.44; p=0.2. The seroprevalence of H. pylori infection is similar among blood groups: O (57.4%, A (56.2%, B (59.6%, AB (51.4%, RhD positive (56.7% and RhD negative (58.3%.Conclusions: The seropositivity of H. pylori is moderately higher in the non voluntary and familiar blood donors among the total Kosovo blood donors. There is not found a significant relationship between infection with H. pylori and ABO/Rhesus blood group among blood donors.

  18. Helicobacter pylori infection reduces disease severity in an experimental model of multiple sclerosis

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    Katherine eCook

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has demonstrated that infection with the bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori is less common amongst patients with multiple sclerosis (MS, an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS. We compared the prevalence of H. pylori amongst MS patients and healthy controls, and also investigated the impact of this infection on an animal model for MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE.The H. pylori status of 71 MS patients and 42 healthy controls was determined by serology. Groups of C57BL/6 mice were infected with H. pylori, or given a placebo, prior to inducing EAE. Clinical scores were assessed for all mice, and spleens and spinal cord tissue were harvested. CD4+ T cell subsets were quantified by flow cytometry, and T cell proliferation assays were performed.In MS patients the seroprevalence of H. pylori was half that of healthy controls (p=0.018. Over three independent experiments, prior H. pylori infection had a moderate effect in reducing the severity of EAE (p = 0.012. In line with this, the antigen-specific T cell proliferative responses of infected animals were significantly reduced (p=0.001, and there was a 4-fold reduction in the number of CD4+ cells in the CNS. CD4+ populations in both the CNS and the spleens of infected mice also contained greatly reduced proportions of IFNγ+, IL-17+, T-bet+, and RORγt+ cells, but the proportions of Foxp3+ cells were equivalent. There were no differences in the frequency of splenic CD4+cells expressing markers of apoptosis between infected and uninfected animals.H. pylori was less prevalent amongst MS patients. In mice, the infection exerted some protection against EAE, inhibiting both Th1 and Th17 responses. This could not be explained by the presence of increased numbers of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, or T cell apoptosis. This is the first direct experimental evidence showing that H. pylori may provide protection against inflammatory demyelination

  19. Whole genome-based phylogeny of reptile-associated Helicobacter indicates independent niche adaptation followed by diversification in a poikilothermic host

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    Gilbert, Maarten J.; Duim, Birgitta; Timmerman, Arjen J.; Zomer, Aldert L.; Wagenaar, Jaap A.

    2017-01-01

    Reptiles have been shown to host a significant Helicobacter diversity. In order to survive, reptile-associated Helicobacter lineages need to be adapted to the thermally dynamic environment encountered in a poikilothermic host. The whole genomes of reptile-associated Helicobacter lineages can

  20. The Relationship between Oral Hygiene Index and Gastric Helicobacter Pylori Positivity

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    Tolga Önder

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Helicobacter pylori (HP is a bacterial patho­gen that leads to gastroduodenal inflammation, gastric and duodenal ulcer and atrophic gastritis. Colonization of bacteria can be shown by using rapid-urease test during endoscopy. There are conflicting data about the route of transmission and reservoir. It’s thought to be transmitted primarily by oral route. Many studies showed results sup­porting that the presence of bacteria in dental plaques has effects on gastric colonization and eradication. There are data about the potential inhibitory effect of oral flora on HP. We aimed to analyze the association of simplified oral hygiene index -a possible representation of a healthy oral flora- with HP positivity. Methods: Patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy for symptoms of dyspepsia were as­sessed by a dentist for the simplified oral hygiene index (OHI. Patients were classified as good, poor and bad groups based on oral hygiene index scale. Pre-pyloric biopsy materials were assessed using rapid-urease test. Oral hygiene indexes were analyzed retrospectively, groups were compared for HP positivity. Results: 66 patients (30 females, 45.5% were included. Mean age of patients was 34.17±14.7 years. 11 (16.7%, 29 (43.9% and 26 (39.4% patients were classified as in good, poor and bad hygiene index groups, respectively. In patients with good OHI gastric HP positivity was less frequent. Conclusion: Decreased frequency in gastric HP may be observed with maintaining an ideal oral hygiene.

  1. Garlic or jalapeño peppers for treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.

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    Graham, D Y; Anderson, S Y; Lang, T

    1999-05-01

    There have been a number of reports that natural foods such as garlic, honey, and capsaicin can inhibit Helicobacter pylori in vitro and each report has suggested the natural ingredient be used for treatment of the infection. We investigated whether garlic or capsaicin-containing peppers would actually inhibit H. pylori in vivo. We performed a prospective crossover study in healthy H. pylori-infected adults. We used the urea breath test to assess the status of the H. pylori infection. On separate days subjects received three test meals consisting of beef, tortillas, and salad with one of the following: fresh garlic (10 sliced cloves), capsaicin (six sliced fresh jalapeños), two tablets of bismuth subsalicylate (Pepto-Bismol, positive control), or nothing added (negative control). Breath testing was done before the first meal, the evening meal, and the following morning. At least 2 days elapsed between the test substances. Twelve subjects participated (seven men, five women), with an average age of 41.4 yr, range 27-51 yr. Ten subjects received garlic, six received jalapeños, and 11 received bismuth. Neither garlic nor capsaicin had any in vivo effect on H. pylori (median urease activity 28.5 vs 39.8 and 43.7 vs 46.6 before and after garlic and jalapeños, respectively) (p > 0.8). Bismuth had a marked inhibitory effect (median 55.8 vs 14.3 before and after bismuth) (p < 0.001), respectively. This study did not support a role for either garlic or jalapeños in the treatment of H. pylori infection. Caution must be used when attempting to extrapolate data from in vitro studies to the in vivo condition.

  2. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Early Childhood and Growth at School Age.

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    Muhsen, Khitam; Goren, Sophy; Cohen, Dani

    2015-12-01

    There are conflicting results regarding the role of H. pylori in children's growth. We examined differences in growth indices at school age according to H. pylori infection acquisition in preschool age. A prospective study was undertaken between 2004 and 2009, in which of healthy children (N = 139, ages 3-5 years at baseline) were tested for the presence of H. pylori antigen in their stool using enzyme-linked immunoassay and followed-up till age 6-9 years (median follow-up time 45 months). Height, weight, and hemoglobin levels were measured, and socioeconomic data were obtained. Z scores of height for age, weight for age, and body mass index for age at baseline and follow-up were calculated using the 2000 Center for Disease Control and Prevention growth reference curves. Growth velocity (cm/month) between preschool and school age was compared between H. pylori-infected and uninfected children using mixed models. Fifty-three percent of the children were H. pylori positive at baseline, and all except one child tested positive at follow-up. The adjusted mean Z score of height for age at follow-up was significantly lower among H. pylori-infected children than uninfected ones: 0.15 (95% confidence intervals (CIs) 0.02, 0.29) and 0.45 (95% CI 0.29, 0.60), respectively (p = .002). Growth velocity was slower in the former group -0.0264 cm/month (95% CI -0.047, -0.005) (p = .014), after adjusting for baseline height and age. H. pylori infection was not associated with body weight. Helicobacter pylori infection acquired in early childhood may have long-term adverse influence on linear growth at school age. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A changing gastric environment leads to adaptation of lipopolysaccharide variants in Helicobacter pylori populations during colonization.

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    Anna Skoglund

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomachs of half of the human population, and causes development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric adenocarcinoma. H. pylori-associated chronic atrophic gastritis (ChAG with loss of the acid-producing parietal cells, is correlated with an increased risk for development of gastric adenocarcinoma. The majority of H. pylori isolates produce lipopolysaccharides (LPS decorated with human-related Lewis epitopes, which have been shown to phase-vary in response to different environmental conditions. We have characterized the adaptations of H. pylori LPS and Lewis antigen expression to varying gastric conditions; in H. pylori isolates from mice with low or high gastric pH, respectively; in 482 clinical isolates from healthy individuals and from individuals with ChAG obtained at two time points with a four-year interval between endoscopies; and finally in isolates grown at different pH in vitro. Here we show that the gastric environment can contribute to a switch in Lewis phenotype in the two experimental mouse models. The clinical isolates from different human individuals showed that intra-individual isolates varied in Lewis antigen expression although the LPS diversity was relatively stable within each individual over time. Moreover, the isolates demonstrated considerable diversity in the levels of glycosylation and in the sizes of fucosylated O-antigen chains both within and between individuals. Thus our data suggest that different LPS variants exist in the colonizing H. pylori population, which can adapt to changes in the gastric environment and provide a means to regulate the inflammatory response of the host during disease progression.

  4. Gastric Helicobacter pylori infection associates with an increased risk of colorectal polyps in African Americans.

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    Brim, Hassan; Zahaf, Marwah; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O; Nouraie, Mehdi; Pérez-Pérez, Guillermo I; Smoot, Duane T; Lee, Edward; Razjouyan, Hadie; Ashktorab, Hassan

    2014-04-28

    Gastric Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and colorectal polyps are more prevalent in African Americans than in the general population. We aimed to investigate whether gastric H. pylori infection is associated with colorectal polyps in African Americans. Medical records of African Americans, 40 years and older (n = 1256) who underwent bidirectional gastrointestinal endoscopy on the same day were reviewed. H. pylori status was assessed by immunohistochemistry on gastric specimens. Colorectal polyps were confirmed by histological examination of colorectal biopsies. A subset of serum samples from healthy and polyp-bearing patients (n = 163) were analyzed by ELISA for anti-H. pylori and anti-CagA antibodies. The crude and adjusted effect of H. pylori on the risk of colorectal adenoma and polyp were computed by logistic regression models. The prevalence of colorectal polyps and adenomas were 456 (36%) and 300 (24%) respectively. Colorectal polyps were more prevalent in gastric H. pylori infected than non-infected subjects [43% vs. 34%; Odds Ratio (OR) (95% CI): 1.5 (1.2-1.9), P = 0.001]. Patients with H. pylori-associated chronic active gastritis were at high risk to have adenomas [Unadjusted OR (95% CI): 1.3 (1.0-1.8); P = 0.04]. There was no difference in histopathology, size, or location of polyps with respect to H. pylori status. Gastric H. pylori infection, age, male gender and high risk clinical presentations were independent risk factors for colorectal polyps. Serological testing also revealed a higher prevalence of H. pylori and its toxin Cag-A in polyp patients vs. non polyp patients' sera, although in a non-statistically significant manner. This study showed that current gastric H. pylori infection is associated with an increased risk of colorectal polyps in African Americans. Patients with H. pylori induced gastritis may benefit from early screening colonoscopy as a preventative measure for colorectal cancer.

  5. Common coinfections of Giardia intestinalis and Helicobacter pylori in non-symptomatic Ugandan children.

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    Johan Ankarklev

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis and the pathogenic bacterium Helicobacter pylori are well known for their high prevalences in human hosts worldwide. The prevalence of both organisms is known to peak in densely populated, low resource settings and children are infected early in life. Different Giardia genotypes/assemblages have been associated with different symptoms and H. pylori with induction of cancer. Despite this, not much data are available from sub-Saharan Africa with regards to the prevalence of different G. intestinalis assemblages and their potential association with H. pylori infections. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fecal samples from 427 apparently healthy children, 0-12 years of age, living in urban Kampala, Uganda were analyzed for the presence of H. pylori and G. intestinalis. G. intestinalis was found in 86 (20.1% out of the children and children age 1<5 years had the highest rates of colonization. H. pylori was found in 189 (44.3% out of the 427 children and there was a 3-fold higher risk of concomitant G. intestinalis and H. pylori infections compared to non-concomitant G. intestinalis infection, OR = 2.9 (1.7-4.8. No significant association was found in the studied population with regard to the presence of Giardia and gender, type of toilet, source of drinking water or type of housing. A panel of 45 G. intestinalis positive samples was further analyzed using multi-locus genotyping (MLG on three loci, combined with assemblage-specific analyses. Giardia MLG analysis yielded a total of five assemblage AII, 25 assemblage B, and four mixed assemblage infections. The assemblage B isolates were highly genetically variable but no significant association was found between Giardia assemblage type and H. pylori infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study shows that Giardia assemblage B dominates in children in Kampala, Uganda and that the presence of H. pylori is an associated risk factor for G

  6. Helicobacter pylori coinfection is a confounder, modulating mucosal inflammation in oral submucous fibrosis

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    Rajendran R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The oral cavity has been considered a potential reservoir for Helicobacter pylori (H pylori , from where the organism causes recurrent gastric infections. Aim: With this case-control study we tried to evaluate the role of H pylori in the etiology of mucosal inflammation, a condition that compounds the morbid state associated with oral submucous fibrosis (OSF. Materials and Methods : Subjects ( n = 150 were selected following institutional regulations on sample collection and grouped into test cases and positive and negative controls based on the presence of mucosal fibrosis and inflammation. The negative controls had none of the clinical signs. All patients underwent an oral examination as well as tests to assess oral hygiene/periodontal disease status; a rapid urease test (RUT of plaque samples was also done to estimate the H pylori bacterial load. We used univariate and mutivariate logistic regression for statistical analysis of the data and calculated the odds ratios to assess the risk posed by the different variables. Results : The RUT results differed significantly between the groups, reflecting the variations in the bacterial loads in each category. The test was positive in 52% in the positive controls (where nonspecific inflammation of oral mucosa was seen unassociated with fibrosis, in 46% of the test cases, and in 18% of the negative controls (healthy volunteers (χ2 = 13.887; P < 0.01. A positive correlation was seen between the oral hygiene/periodontal disease indices and RUT reactivity in all the three groups. Conclusions: The contribution of the H pylori in dental plaque to mucosal inflammation and periodontal disease was significant. Logistic regression analysis showed gastrointestinal disease and poor oral hygiene as being the greatest risk factors for bacterial colonization, irrespective of the subject groups. A positive correlation exists between RUT reactivity and the frequency of mucosal inflammation.

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection and metabolic parameters: Is there an association in elderly population?

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    Narges Sotuneh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The association between Helicobacter pylori (HP, as one of the most prevalent infections, and serum glucose level was inconsistent with previous studies. Moreover, there are contradictory reports about the relationship between HP infection and lipid profile. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between HP infection with glycemic and lipid profiles in elderly people. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 1,300 subjects over 60 years in Amirkola Health and Ageing Project. After using a standard questionnaire, the venous sampling was done to determine FBS, triglyceride (TG, cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL and IgG anti-HP after a 12-h overnight fast. The information about the individuals was analyzed using SPSS-17. The P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The prevalence of HP infection in diabetic and nondiabetic subjects was 77.5% and 75.7%, respectively, which had no statistically significant difference. Also, there was no significant difference between the serum lipid level including TG, LDL and HDL cholesterol with levels of anti-HP antibodies. The rate of HP infection in patients with hypertension was 75% and 78.3% in healthy patients, in which the difference was not statistically significant. In terms of body mass index (BMI, the prevalence of infection in the group with normal BMI was 77.3% and for the overweight and obese elderly population, it was 74.7%, and 77.5%, respectively (P = 0.445. Conclusions: The findings revealed that in a large population of elderly in the northern part of Iran, HP infection is not associated with BMI, serum glucose and lipid profile as well as blood pressure.

  8. Human gastric mucins differently regulate Helicobacter pylori proliferation, gene expression and interactions with host cells.

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    Emma C Skoog

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori colonizes the mucus niche of the gastric mucosa and is a risk factor for gastritis, ulcers and cancer. The main components of the mucus layer are heavily glycosylated mucins, to which H. pylori can adhere. Mucin glycosylation differs between individuals and changes during disease. Here we have examined the H. pylori response to purified mucins from a range of tumor and normal human gastric tissue samples. Our results demonstrate that mucins from different individuals differ in how they modulate both proliferation and gene expression of H. pylori. The mucin effect on proliferation varied significantly between samples, and ranged from stimulatory to inhibitory, depending on the type of mucins and the ability of the mucins to bind to H. pylori. Tumor-derived mucins and mucins from the surface mucosa had potential to stimulate proliferation, while gland-derived mucins tended to inhibit proliferation and mucins from healthy uninfected individuals showed little effect. Artificial glycoconjugates containing H. pylori ligands also modulated H. pylori proliferation, albeit to a lesser degree than human mucins. Expression of genes important for the pathogenicity of H. pylori (babA, sabA, cagA, flaA and ureA appeared co-regulated in response to mucins. The addition of mucins to co-cultures of H. pylori and gastric epithelial cells protected the viability of the cells and modulated the cytokine production in a manner that differed between individuals, was partially dependent of adhesion of H. pylori to the gastric cells, but also revealed that other mucin factors in addition to adhesion are important for H. pylori-induced host signaling. The combined data reveal host-specific effects on proliferation, gene expression and virulence of H. pylori due to the gastric mucin environment, demonstrating a dynamic interplay between the bacterium and its host.

  9. Incidence of helicobacter pylori in dental plaque of saudi gastritis patients.

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    Al-Refai, Abdel-Nasser M; Fathalla, Sami E; Nagamani, Rambhala; Al-Momen, Sami

    2002-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) was identified in dental plaque, raising the possibility of future gastritis and peptic ulceration. This trial was to study the association between presence of H. pylori in dental plaque and in the stomachs of patients with gastritis; the effect of oral hygiene and periodontal condition on the stomach. Seventy-five Saudi adult dyspeptic patients, together with 60 healthy persons as control. Two samples of dental plaque were taken from gingival crevice of deepest pocket. One sample was kept in Christensen's urea agar and incubated for H. pylori detection by rapid urease test. The second sample was kept in 5% sheep blood agar, chocolate agar and a selective medium to culture the H. pylori. Gastric urease test was done for the same patients. (1) Plaque urease test results showed 89% positive patients. (2) Dental plaque Index:- Mild dental plaque accumulation in 24%, moderate in 41%, while severe accumulation was in 35% of the patients. (3) Gingival Index: Showed mild, moderate and severe gingivitis in 17%, 48% and 35% of patients, respectively. (4) Community periodontal index of treatment needs (CPITN): Showed gingivitis, mild periodontitis and moderate periodontitis in 50%, 23% and 27% of patients, respectively. (5)Gastric urease results: 87% of patients were positive. (6)All cultured samples results were negative The ability to detect H. pylori in dental plaque samples offers a potential for a noninvasive test for gastric infection and would lend support for oral spread of H. pylori as the princi-pal mode of transmission. However, the presence of H. pylori in dental plaque and in the stomach (in gastritis patients) could permit not only a target for therapeutic procedures but also a monitor-ing tool for the efficacy of therapy.

  10. Healthy Eating for Men

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    ... Men Women Home Health Wellness Healthy Aging Healthy Aging 4 Types of Foods to Help Boost Your ... clean plate, there are many negative long-term consequences. Try these rewards instead. View More Articles Freshly ...

  11. Healthy Lifestyle: Women's Health

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    ... reduce menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes and sleep disturbances. However, regular exercise can help you maintain a healthy weight, relieve stress and improve your quality of life. For most healthy women, the Department ...

  12. Having a Healthy Pregnancy

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    ... Stones Brain and Nervous System Having a Healthy Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Teens > Having a Healthy Pregnancy Print ... or she can help you to get treatment. Pregnancy Discomforts Pregnancy can cause some uncomfortable side effects. ...

  13. Extremely high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Mahachai, Varocha; Shiota, Seiji; Uchida, Tomohisa; Ratanachu-ek, Thawee; Tshering, Lotay; Tung, Nguyen Lam; Fujioka, Toshio; Moriyama, Masatsugu; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2013-05-14

    To revealed the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in the Bhutanese population. We recruited a total of 372 volunteers (214 females and 158 males; mean age of 39.6 ± 14.9 years) from three Bhutanese cities (Thimphu, Punaka, and Wangdue). The status of H. pylori infection was determined based on five different tests: the rapid urease test (CLO test), culture, histology, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and serum anti H. pylori-antibody. The serological test showed a significantly higher positive rate compared with the CLO test, culture, histology and IHC (P Bhutan was 73.4%. The prevalence of H. pylori infection significantly decreased with age (P Bhutan may be attributed to the high prevalence of H. pylori infection.

  14. Reduced genome size of Helicobacter pylori originating from East Asia.

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    Dong, Quan-Jiang; Wang, Li-Li; Tian, Zi-Bing; Yu, Xin-Jun; Jia, Sheng-Jiao; Xuan, Shi-Ying

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a major pathogen colonizing the human stomach, shows great genetic variation. Comparative analysis of strains from different H. pylori populations revealed that the genome size of strains from East Asia decreased to 1.60 Mbp, which is significantly smaller than that from Europe or Africa. In parallel with the genome reduction, the number of protein coding genes was decreased, and the guanine-cytosine content was lowered to 38.9%. Elimination of non-essential genes by mutations is likely to be a major cause of the genome reduction. Bacteria with a small genome cost less energy. Thus, H. pylori strains from East Asia may have proliferation and growth advantages over those from Western countries. This could result in enhanced capacity of bacterial spreading. Therefore, the reduced genome size potentially contributes to the high prevalence of H. pylori in East Asia.

  15. Review: clinical management of Helicobacter pylori infection in China.

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    Xie, Chuan; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been associated with gastric disorders. The situation of H. pylori infection in China-where a high prevalence of H. pylori infection, a high incidence of gastric cancer, and widespread resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin exist-is quite different from that in Western countries. In order for Chinese clinicians to better manage H. pylori infection, a Chinese Study Group on H. pylori published four consensus reports regarding the management of H. pylori infection in China between 1999 and 2012. The eradication rate with standard triple therapy was pylori in China in recent years. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The role of the gastrointestinal microbiome in Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis.

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    Sheh, Alexander; Fox, James G

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of Helicobacter pylori overturned the conventional dogma that the stomach was a sterile organ and that pH valueshypochlorhydria, duodenal ulcers, and gastric cancer. It is now appreciated that the human stomach supports a bacterial community with possibly 100s of bacterial species that influence stomach homeostasis. Other bacteria colonizing the stomach may also influence H. pylori-associated gastric pathogenesis by creating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and modulating inflammatory responses. In this review, we summarize the available literature concerning the gastric microbiota in humans, mice, and Mongolian gerbils. We also discuss the gastric perturbations, many involving H. pylori, that facilitate the colonization by bacteria from other compartments of the gastrointestinal tract, and identify risk factors known to affect gastric homeostasis that contribute to changes in the microbiota.

  17. Helicobacter pylori colonization of the oral cavity: A milestone discovery

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    Yee, John KC

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, the severity of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections has not significantly diminished. After successful eradication, the annual H. pylori recurrence rate is approximately 13% due to oral H. pylori infection. Established clinical diagnostic techniques do not identify an oral etiologic basis of H. pylori prior to gastric infection. There has been disagreement as to whether oral infection of H. pylori exists or not, with no definite conclusion. In medical practice, negative results with the urea breath test suggest that the stomach infection of H. pylori is cured in these patients. In fact, patients can present negative urea breath test results and yet exhibit H. pylori infection due to oral infection. The present paper provides evidence that H. pylori oral infection is nonetheless present, and the oral cavity represents a secondary site for H. pylori colonization. PMID:26811613

  18. Helicobacter pylori infection: New pathogenetic and clinical aspects

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    Hagymási, Krisztina; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects more than half of the world’s human population, but only 1% to 3% of infected people consequently develop gastric adenocarcinomas. The clinical outcome of the infection is determined by host genetic predisposition, bacterial virulence factors, and environmental factors. The association between H. pylori infection and chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric cell carcinoma, and B cell mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been well established. With the exception of unexplained iron deficiency anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, H. pylori infection has no proven role in extraintestinal diseases. On the other hand, there is data showing that H. pylori infection could be beneficial for some human diseases. The unpredictability of the long-term consequences of H. pylori infection and the economic challenge in eradicating it is why identification of high-risk individuals is crucial. PMID:24914360

  19. Prevention of Gastric Cancer: Eradication of Helicobacter Pylori and Beyond

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    Tetsuya Tsukamoto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although its prevalence is declining, gastric cancer remains a significant public health issue. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is known to colonize the human stomach and induce chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer. Results using a Mongolian gerbil model revealed that H. pylori infection increased the incidence of carcinogen-induced adenocarcinoma, whereas curative treatment of H. pylori significantly lowered cancer incidence. Furthermore, some epidemiological studies have shown that eradication of H. pylori reduces the development of metachronous cancer in humans. However, other reports have warned that human cases of atrophic metaplastic gastritis are already at risk for gastric cancer development, even after eradication of these bacteria. In this article, we discuss the effectiveness of H. pylori eradication and the morphological changes that occur in gastric dysplasia/cancer lesions. We further assess the control of gastric cancer using various chemopreventive agents.

  20. Supporting data for analysis of the Helicobacter pylori exoproteome

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    Christina A. Snider

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research was to analyze the composition of the Helicobacter pylori exoproteome at multiple phases of bacterial growth (Snider et al., 2015 [1]. H. pylori was grown in a serum-free medium and at serial time points, aliquots were centrifuged and fractionated to yield culture supernatant, a soluble cellular fraction, and a membrane fraction. Samples were analyzed by single dimensional LC-MS/MS analyses and multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT. Here we present data showing the numbers of assigned spectra and proportional abundance of individual proteins in each of the samples analyzed, along with a calculation of the level of enrichment of individual proteins in the supernatant compared to the soluble cellular fraction.