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Sample records for helical vortex theory

  1. Applications of 2D helical vortex dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2010-01-01

    In the paper, we show how the assumption of helical symmetry in the context of 2D helical vortices can be exploited to analyse and to model various cases of rotating flows. From theory, examples of three basic applications of 2D dynamics of helical vortices embedded in flows with helical symmetry...... of the vorticity field are addressed. These included some of the problems related to vortex breakdown, instability of far wakes behind rotors and vortex theory of ideal rotors....

  2. Motion of a helical vortex

    CERN Document Server

    Fuentes, Oscar Velasco

    2015-01-01

    We study the motion of a single helical vortex in an unbounded, inviscid, incompressible fluid. The vortex is an infinite tube whose centerline is a helix and whose cross section is a circle of small radius (compared to the radius of curvature) where the vorticity is uniform and parallel to the centerline. Ever since Joukowsky (1912) deduced that this vortex translates and rotates steadily without change of form, numerous attempts have been made to compute these self-induced velocities. Here we use Hardin's (1982) solution for the velocity field to find new expressions for the vortex's linear and angular velocities. Our results, verified by numerically computing the Helmholtz integral and the Rosenhead-Moore approximation to the Biot-Savart law, are more accurate than previous results over the whole range of values of the vortex pitch and cross-section. We then use the new formulas to study the advection of passive particles near the vortex; we find that the vortex's motion and capacity to transport fluid dep...

  3. Helicity of the toroidal vortex with swirl

    CERN Document Server

    Bannikova, Elena Yu; Poslavsky, Sergey A

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of solutions of the Bragg-Hawthorne equations we discuss the helicity of thin toroidal vortices with the swirl - the orbital motion along the torus diretrix. It is shown that relationship of the helicity with circulations along the small and large linked circles - directrix and generatrix of the torus - depends on distribution of the azimuthal velocity in the core of the swirling vortex ring. In the case of non-homogeneous swirl this relationship differs from the well-known Moffat relationship - the doubled product of such circulations multiplied by the number of links. The results can be applied to vortices in planetary atmospheres and to vortex movements in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei.

  4. A numerical study of the stabilitiy of helical vortices using vortex methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, J. H.; Guénot, M.; Machefaux, E.; Rasmussen, J. T.; Chatelain, P.; Okulov, V. L.; Sørensen, J. N.; Bergdorf, M.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2007-07-01

    We present large-scale parallel direct numerical simulations using particle vortex methods of the instability of the helical vortices. We study the instability of a single helical vortex and find good agreement with inviscid theory. We outline equilibrium configurations for three double helical vortices—similar to those produced by three blade wind turbines. The simulations confirm the stability of the inviscid model, but predict a breakdown of the vortical system due to viscosity.

  5. A numerical study of the stabilitiy of helical vortices using vortex methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walther, J H [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Guenot, M [Enginering College in Industrial Systems, FR-17041, La Rochelle (France); Machefaux, E [Enginering College in Industrial Systems, FR-17041, La Rochelle (France); Rasmussen, J T [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Chatelain, P [Computational Laboratory, ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Okulov, V L [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Soerensen, J N [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Bergdorf, M [Computational Laboratory, ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Koumoutsakos, P [Computational Laboratory, ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-07-15

    We present large-scale parallel direct numerical simulations using particle vortex methods of the instability of the helical vortices. We study the instability of a single helical vortex and find good agreement with inviscid theory. We outline equilibrium configurations for three double helical vortices-similar to those produced by three blade wind turbines. The simulations confirm the stability of the inviscid model, but predict a breakdown of the vortical system due to viscosity.

  6. Alteration of helical vortex core without change in flow topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Okulov, Valery; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    2011-01-01

    The abrupt expansion of the slender vortex core with changes in flow topology is commonly known as vortex breakdown. We present new experimental observations of an alteration of the helical vortex core in wall bounded turbulent flow with abrupt growth in core size, but without change in flow...... topology. The helical symmetry as such is preserved, although the characteristic parameters of helical symmetry of the vortex core transfer from a smooth linear variation to a different trend under the influence of a non-uniform pressure gradient, causing an increase in helical pitch without changing its...

  7. Helicity conservation under quantum reconnection of vortex rings

    CERN Document Server

    Zuccher, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Here we show that under quantum reconnection, simulated by using the three-dimensional Gross- Pitaevskii equation, self-helicity of a system of two interacting vortex rings remains conserved. By resolving the fine structure of the vortex cores, we demonstrate that total length of the vortex system reaches a maximum at the reconnection time, while both writhe helicity and twist helicity remain separately unchanged throughout the process. Self-helicity is computed by two independent methods, and topological information is based on the extraction and analysis of geometric quantities such as writhe, total torsion and intrinsic twist of the reconnecting vortex rings.

  8. Hydrodynamic Helical Orientations of Nanofibers in a Vortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Tsuda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, I report our recent studies on spectroscopic visualizations of macroscopic helical alignments of nanofibers in vortex flows. Our designed supramolecular nanofibers, formed through self-assemblies of dye molecules, helically align in torsional flows of a vortex generated by mechanical rotary stirring of the sample solutions. The nanofiber, formed through bundling of linear supramolecular polymers, aligns equally in right- and left-handed vortex flows. However, in contrast, a one-handedly twisted nanofiber, formed through helical bundling of the supramolecular polymers, shows unequal helical alignments in these torsional flows. When the helical handedness of the nanofiber matches that of the vortex flow, the nanofiber aligns more efficiently in the flowing fluid. Such phenomena are observed not only with the artificial helical supramolecular nanofibers but also with biological nanofibers such as double-stranded DNA.

  9. Kelvin Waves and Dynamic Knots on Perturbative Helical Vortex Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Kou, Su-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Vortex lines are one-dimensional extended objects in three-dimensional superfluids. Vortex lines have many interesting properties, including Kelvin waves, exotic statistics, and possible entanglement. In this paper, an emergent "quantum world" is explored by projecting helical vortex lines. A one-dimensional quantum Fermionic model is developed to effectively describe the local fluctuations of helical vortex lines. The elementary excitations are knots with half winding-number that obey emergent quantum mechanics. The Biot-Savart equation, and its Kelvin wave solutions on helical vortex lines become Schrodinger equation, and the wave functions of probability waves for finding knots, respectively. This work shows an alternative approach to simulating quantum many-body physics based on classical systems.

  10. Vortex tube optimization theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewins, Jeffery [Cambridge Univ., Magdalene Coll., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bejan, Adrian [Duke Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Durham, NC (United States)

    1999-11-01

    The Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube splits a single high pressure stream of gas into cold and warm streams. Simple models for the vortex tube combined with regenerative precooling are given from which an optimisation can be undertaken. Two such optimisations are needed: the first shows that at any given cut or fraction of the cold stream, the best refrigerative load, allowing for the temperature lift, is nearly half the maximum loading that would result in no lift. The second optimisation shows that the optimum cut is an equal division of the vortex streams between hot and cold. Bounds are obtainable within this theory for the performance of the system for a given gas and pressure ratio. (Author)

  11. Helicity and internal twist within the vortex filament model

    CERN Document Server

    Hietala, N; Salman, H

    2016-01-01

    For ideal fluids, besides energy, kinetic helicity is the only other known quadratic invariant of the Euler equations besides energy and is understood to be inherently linked to the degree of knotting of vortex lines within the fluid. For vortices arising in superfluid $^4$He, the vorticity is concentrated along vortex filaments. In this setting, helicity would be expected to acquire its simplest form. However, the lack of a core structure for vortex filaments appears to result in a helicity that does not retain its key attribute as a quadratic invariant. By defining the spanwise vector to coincide with the Seifert framing, we are able to introduce twist and henceforth recover the key properties of helicity. Through a detailed analysis of the velocity field induced in the vicinity of the superfluid vortices we are able to express our choice of the spanwise vector in terms of the tangential component of velocity along the filament. Since adding an arbitrary tangential velocity does not alter the configuration ...

  12. Observation of an optical vortex beam from a helical undulator in the XUV region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneyasu, Tatsuo; Hikosaka, Yasumasa; Fujimoto, Masaki; Iwayama, Hiroshi; Hosaka, Masahito; Shigemasa, Eiji; Katoh, Masahiro

    2017-09-01

    The observation of an optical vortex beam at 60 nm wavelength, produced as the second-harmonic radiation from a helical undulator, is reported. The helical wavefront of the optical vortex beam was verified by measuring the interference pattern between the vortex beam from a helical undulator and a normal beam from another undulator. Although the interference patterns were slightly blurred owing to the relatively large electron beam emittance, it was possible to observe the interference features thanks to the helical wavefront of the vortex beam. The experimental results were well reproduced by simulation.

  13. Dynamic analysis of a liquid droplet and optimization of helical angles for vortex drainage gas recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Wu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Downhole vortex drainage gas recovery is a new gas production technology. So far, however, the forces and motions of liquid phase in the swirling flow field of wellbores during its field application have not been figured out. In this paper, the forces of liquid droplets in the swirling flow field of wellbores were analyzed on the basis of two-phase fluid dynamics theories. Then, the motion equations of fluid droplets along axial and radical directions were established. Magnitude comparison was performed on several typical acting forces, including Basset force, virtual mass force, Magnus force, Saffman force and Stokes force. Besides, the formula for calculating the optimal helical angle of vortex tools was established according to the principle that the vertical resultant force on fluid droplets should be the maximum. And afterwards, each acting force was comprehensively analyzed in terms of its origin, characteristics and direction based on the established force analysis model. Magnitude comparison indicates that the forces with less effect can be neglected, including virtual mass force, Basset force and convection volume force. Moreover, the vertically upward centrifugal force component occurs on the fluid droplets in swirling flow field instead of those in the conventional flow field of wellbores, which is favorable for the fluid droplets to move upward. The reliability of optimal helical angle calculation formula was verified by means of case analysis. It is demonstrated that with the decrease of well depth, the fluid-carrying capability of gas and the optimal helical angle increase. The research results in this paper have a guiding significance to the optimization design of downhole vortex tools and the field application of downhole vortex drainage gas recovery technology.

  14. On the peculiar structure of a helical wake vortex behind an inclined prolate spheroid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Fengjian; Andersson, Helge I.; Gallardo, José P.;

    2016-01-01

    The self-similarity law for axisymmetric wakes has for the first time been examined and verified in a complex helical vortex in the far part of an asymmetric wake by means of direct numerical simulation (DNS). The helical vortex is the main coherent flow structure in the transitional non......-axisymmetric wake behind an inclined 6:1 prolate spheroid at Reynolds number 3000 based on the minor axis. The gradual development of the complex helical vortex structure has been described in detail all the way from its inception at the spheroid and into the far wake. We observed a complex vortex composition...... in the generation stage, a rare jet-like wake pattern in the near wake and an abrupt change of helical symmetry in the vortex core without an accompanying change in flow topology, i.e. with no recirculation bubble....

  15. The Contribution of Kawada to the Analytical Solution for the Velocity Induced by a Helical Vortex Filament and Modern Applications of Helical Vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukumoto, Yasuhide; Okulov, Valery; Wood, David H.

    2017-01-01

    Currently, the analytical form of the velocity field induced by a helical vortex filament is well known as Hardin’s solution (1982). But essentially the same result had been obtained by a Japanese scientist Sandi Kawada, which predates Hardin by as long as 46 years. Kawada (1936) provided a compr...... a comprehensive treatment of deriving the induced velocity by helical vortices with a view to applying it to the propeller theory. This paper recollects Kawada’s contribution, together with his life devoted to lead the Japanese aeronautical engineering in the time of its dawning....

  16. Twist, writhe and energy from the helicity of magnetic perturbed vortex filaments

    OpenAIRE

    de Andrade, Luiz Carlos Garcia

    2007-01-01

    The twist and writhe numbers and magnetic energy of an orthogonally perturbed vortex filaments are obtained from the computation of the magnetic helicity of geodesic and abnormal magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) vortex filament solutions. Twist is computed from a formula recently derived by Berger and Prior [J. Phys. A 39 (2006) 8321] and finally writhe is computed from the theorem that the helicity is proportional to the sum of twist and writhe. The writhe number is proportional to the total tors...

  17. Introduction to Vortex Lattice Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Pinzón

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Panel methods have been widely used in industry and are well established since the 1970s for aerodynamic analysis and computation. The Vortex Lattice Panel Method presented in this study comes across a sophisticated method that provides a quick solution time, allows rapid changes in geometry and suits well for aerodynamic analysis. The aerospace industry is highly competitive in design efficiency, and perhaps one of the most important factors on airplane design and engineering today is multidisciplinary optimization.  Any cost reduction method in the design cycle of a product becomes vital in the success of its outcome. The subsequent sections of this article will further explain in depth the theory behind the vortex lattice method, and the reason behind its selection as the method for aerodynamic analysis during preliminary design work and computation within the aerospace industry. This article is analytic in nature, and its main objective is to present a mathematical summary of this widely used computational method in aerodynamics.

  18. Evolution and breakdown of helical vortex wakes behind a wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemes, A.; Sherry, M.; Lo Jacono, D.; Blackburn, H. M.; Sheridan, J.

    2014-12-01

    The wake behind a three-bladed Glauert model rotor in a water channel was investigated. Planar particle image velocimetry was used to measure the velocity fields on the wake centre-line, with snapshots phase-locked to blade position of the rotor. Phase- locked averages of the velocity and vorticity fields are shown, with tip vortex interaction and entanglement of the helical filaments elucidated. Proper orthogonal decomposition and topology-based vortex identification are used to filter the PIV images for coherent structures and locate vortex cores. Application of these methods to the instantaneous data reveals unsteady behaviour of the helical filaments that is statistically quantifiable.

  19. Development of new tip-loss corrections based on vortex theory and vortex methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel Simon Pierre; Gaunaa, Mac

    2014-01-01

    A new analytical formulation of the tip-loss factor is established based on helical vortex lament solutions. The derived tip-loss factor can be applied to wind-turbines, propellers or other rotary wings. Similar numerical formulations are used to assess the influence of wake expansion on tip......-losses. Theodorsen's theory is successfully applied for the first time to assess the wake expansion behind a wind turbine. The tip-loss corrections obtained are compared with the ones from Prandtl and Glauert and implemented within a new Blade Element Momentum(BEM) code. Wake expansion is seen to reduce tip......-losses and have a greater influence than wake distortion....

  20. ANALYTICAL SOLUTION FOR THE VELOCITY FIELD INDUCED BY A UNIFORMLY MOVING HELICAL VORTEX FILAMENT IN CYLINDRICAL TUBE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A derivation of an analytical expression for the inviscid velocity field induced by a single right-handed helical vortex filament is presented. The vortex filament moves uniformly and rigidly without change of form in a cylindrical tube, where the vortex filament rotates around its axis with a constant angular velocity and translates along its axis with a constant translational velocity. The key to solve the problem is to set up a moving cylindrical coordinate system fixed on the vortex filament. The result shows that the velocity field is a time-periodic function, and may degenerate into Okulovs's formula when the helical vortex filament slips along the filament itself or stays immobile.

  1. The velocity field induced by a helical vortex tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukumoto, Y.; Okulov, Valery

    2005-01-01

    The influence of finite-core thickness on the velocity field around a vortex tube is addressed. An asymptotic expansion of the Biot-Savart law is made to a higher order in a small parameter, the ratio of core radius to curvature radius, which consists of the velocity field due to lines of monopoles...

  2. The rotor theories by Professor Joukowsky: Vortex theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery L.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Wood, David H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the second of two articles with the main, and largely self-explanatory, title "Rotor theories by Professor Joukowsky". This article considers rotors with finite number of blades and is subtitled "Vortex theories". The first article with subtitle "Momentum theories", assessed the starring ...

  3. Helical solutions of the bidirectional vortex in a cylindrical cyclone: Beltramian and Trkalian motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdalani, Joseph

    2012-10-01

    In this work, two families of helical motions are investigated as prospective candidates for describing the bidirectional vortex field in a right-cylindrical chamber. These basic solutions are relevant to cyclone separators and to idealized representations of vortex-fired liquid and hybrid rocket engines in which bidirectional vortex motion is established. To begin, the bulk fluid motion is taken to be isentropic along streamlines, with no concern for reactions, heat transfer, viscosity, compressibility or unsteadiness. Then using the Bragg-Hawthorne equation for steady, inviscid, axisymmetric motion, two families of Euler solutions are derived. Among the characteristics of the newly developed solutions one may note the axial dependence of the swirl velocity, the Trkalian and Beltramian types of the helical motions, the sensitivity of the solutions to the outlet radius, the alternate locations of the mantle, and the increased axial and radial velocity magnitudes, including the rate of mass transfer across the mantle, for which explicit approximations are obtained. Our results are compared to an existing, complex lamellar model of the bidirectional vortex in which the swirl velocity reduces to a free vortex. In this vein, we find the strictly Beltramian flows to share virtually identical pressure variations and radial pressure gradients with those associated with the complex lamellar motion. Furthermore, both families warrant an asymptotic treatment to overcome their endpoint limitations caused by their omission of viscous stresses. From a broader perspective, the work delineates a logical framework through which self-similar, axisymmetric solutions to bidirectional and multidirectional vortex motions may be pursued. It also illustrates the manner through which different formulations may be arrived at depending on the types of wall boundary conditions. For example, both the slip condition at the sidewall and the inlet flow pattern at the headwall may be enforced or

  4. Landau Theory of Helical Fermi Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Rex; Maciejko, Joseph

    2015-08-07

    We construct a phenomenological Landau theory for the two-dimensional helical Fermi liquid found on the surface of a three-dimensional time-reversal invariant topological insulator. In the presence of rotation symmetry, interactions between quasiparticles are described by ten independent Landau parameters per angular momentum channel, by contrast with the two (symmetric and antisymmetric) Landau parameters for a conventional spin-degenerate Fermi liquid. We project quasiparticle states onto the Fermi surface and obtain an effectively spinless, projected Landau theory with a single projected Landau parameter per angular momentum channel that captures the spin-momentum locking or nontrivial Berry phase of the Fermi surface. As a result of this nontrivial Berry phase, projection to the Fermi surface can increase or lower the angular momentum of the quasiparticle interactions. We derive equilibrium properties, criteria for Fermi surface instabilities, and collective mode dispersions in terms of the projected Landau parameters. We briefly discuss experimental means of measuring projected Landau parameters.

  5. Numerical simulation of helical-vortex effects in Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Levina

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical approach is substantiated for searching for the large-scale alpha-like instability in thermoconvective turbulence. The main idea of the search strategy is the application of a forcing function which can have a physical interpretation. The forcing simulates the influence of small-scale helical turbulence generated in a rotating fluid with internal heat sources and is applied to naturally induced fully developed convective flows. The strategy is tested using the Rayleigh-Bénard convection in an extended horizontal layer of incompressible fluid heated from below. The most important finding is an enlargement of the typical horizontal scale of the forming helical convective structures accompanied by a cells merging, an essential increase in the kinetic energy of flows and intensification of heat transfer. The results of modeling allow explaining how the helical feedback can work providing the non-zero mean helicity generation and the mutual intensification of horizontal and vertical circulation, and demonstrate how the energy of the additional helical source can be effectively converted into the energy of intensive large-scale vortex flow.

  6. A model for precessing helical vortex in the turbine discharge cone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuibin, P. A.; Susan-Resiga, R. F.; Muntean, S.

    2014-03-01

    The decelerated swirling flow in the discharge cone of hydraulic turbine develops various self-induced instabilities and associated low frequency phenomena when the turbine is operated far from the best efficiency regime. In particular, the precessing helical vortex ("vortex rope") developed at part-load regimes is notoriously difficult and expensive to be computed using full three-dimensional turbulent unsteady flow models. On the other hand, modern design and optimization techniques require robust, tractable and accurate a-priori assessment of the turbine flow unsteadiness level within a wide operating range before actually knowing the runner geometry details. This paper presents the development and validation of a quasi-analytical model of the vortex rope in the discharge cone. The first stage is the computing of the axisymmetrical swirling flow at runner outlet with input information related only to the operating point and to the blade outlet angle. Then, the swirling flow profile further downstream is computed in successive cross-sections through the discharge cone. The second stage is the reconstruction of the precessing vortex core parameters in successive cross-sections of the discharge cone. The final stage lies in assembling 3D unsteady flow field in the discharge cone. The end result is validated against both experimental and numerical data.

  7. Self-similarity and helical symmetry in vortex generator flow simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, U.; Velte, Clara Marika; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan;

    2012-01-01

    According to experimental observations, the vortices generated by vortex generators have previously been observed to be self-similar for both the axial (uz) and azimuthal (u) velocity profiles. Further, the measured vortices have been observed to obey the criteria for helical symmetry...... is to investigate how well the simulations can reproduce the physics of the flow and if the same analytical model can be applied. Using this model, parametric studies can be significantly reduced and, further, reliable simulations can substantially reduce the costs of the parametric studies themselves....

  8. Self-Similarity and helical symmetry in vortex generator flow simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, U.; Velte, Clara Marika; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan;

    2014-01-01

    According to experimental observations, the vortices generated by vortex generators have previously been observed to be self-similar for both the axial (uz) and azimuthal (uӨ) velocity profiles. Further, the measured vortices have been observed to obey the criteria for helical symmetry...... is to investigate how well the simulations can reproduce the physics of the flow and if the same analytical model can be applied. Using this model, parametric studies can be significantly reduced and, further, reliable simulations can substantially reduce the costs of the parametric studies themselves....

  9. The Contribution of Kawada to the Analytical Solution for the Velocity Induced by a Helical Vortex Filament

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukumoto, Yasuhide; Okulov, Valery L.; Wood, David H.

    2015-01-01

    The basic solution for the velocity induced by helical vortex filament is well known as Hardin's solution, published in 1982. A study of early publications on helical vortices now shows that the Japanese scientist Kawada from Tokyo Imperial University also produced many of these results in 1936......, which predates Hardin by 46 years. Consequently, in order to honor both, we have studied their derivations to establish the originality of both solutions....

  10. Next-to-Maximal Helicity Violating Amplitudes in Gauge Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kosower, D A

    2004-01-01

    Using the novel diagrammatic rules recently proposed by Cachazo, Svrcek, and Witten, I give a compact, manifestly Lorentz-invariant form for tree-level gauge-theory amplitudes with three opposite helicities.

  11. Gaussian laser beam transformation into an optical vortex beam by helical lens

    CERN Document Server

    Janicijevic, Ljiljana

    2015-01-01

    In this article we investigate the Fresnel diffraction characteristics of the hybrid optical element which is a combination of a spiral phase plate (SPP) with topological charge p and a thin lens with focal length f, named the helical lens (HL). As incident a Gaussian laser beam is treated, having its waist a distance from the HL plane and its axis passing through the centre of the HL. It is shown that the SPP introduces a phase singularity of p-th order to the incident beam, while the lens transforms the beam characteristic parameters. The output light beam is analyzed in detail: its characteristic parameters and focusing properties, amplitude and intensity distributions and the vortex rings profiles and radii, at any z distance behind the HL plane, as well as in the near and far field.

  12. Steady vortex force theory and slender-wing flow diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.T.Yang; R.K.Zhang; Y.R.An; J.Z.Wu

    2007-01-01

    The concept vortex force in aerodynamics is sys-tematically examined based on a new steady vortex-force theory (Wu et al., Vorticity and vortex dynamics, Springer, 2006) which expresses the aerodynamic force (and moment) by the volume and boundary integrals of the Lamb vector.In this paper, the underlying physics of this theory is explo-red, including the general role of the Lamb vector in non-linear aerodynamics, its initial formation, and its relevance to the total-pressure non-uniformity. As a typical example, the theory is applied to the flow over a slender delta wing at a large angle of attack. The highly localized flow structures with high Lamb-vector peaks are identified in terms of their net contribution to various constituents of the total aerody-namic force. This vortex-force diagnosis sheds new light on the flow control and configuration optimization.

  13. Compound heat transfer enhancement for shell side of double-pipe heat exchanger by helical fins and vortex generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Guo, Hongmei; Wu, Jianhua; Du, Wenjuan

    2012-07-01

    To improve heat transfer performance of shell side of double-pipe heat exchanger with helical fins on its inner tube, some vortex generators (VGs) were installed along the centerline of the helical channel. Heat transfer performance and pressure drop characteristic of the enhanced heat exchangers were investigated using air as the working fluid and steam as the heating medium. The helical fins were in the annulus and span its full width at different helical pitch. Wing-type VGs (delta or rectangular wing) and winglet-type VGs (delta or rectangular winglet pair) were used to combine with helical fins. The friction factor and Nusselt number can be well correlated by power-law correlations in the Reynolds number range studied. In order to evaluate the thermal performance of the shell side enhanced over the shell side without enhancement, comparisons were made under three constraints: (1) identical mass flow rate, IMF; (2) identical pressure drop, IPD and (3) identical pumping power, IPP. The results show the shell side enhanced by the compound heat transfer enhancement has better performance than the shell side only enhanced by helical fins at shorter helical pitch under the three constraints.

  14. Vortex lattice theory: A linear algebra approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoun, George C.

    Vortex lattices are prevalent in a large class of physical settings that are characterized by different mathematical models. We present a coherent and generalized Hamiltonian fluid mechanics-based formulation that reduces all vortex lattices into a classic problem in linear algebra for a non-normal matrix A. Via Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), the solution lies in the null space of the matrix (i.e., we require nullity( A) > 0) as well as the distribution of its singular values. We demonstrate that this approach provides a good model for various types of vortex lattices, and makes it possible to extract a rich amount of information on them. The contributions of this thesis can be classified into four main points. The first is asymmetric equilibria. A 'Brownian ratchet' construct was used which converged to asymmetric equilibria via a random walk scheme that utilized the smallest singular value of A. Distances between configurations and equilibria were measured using the Frobenius norm ||·||F and 2-norm ||·||2, and conclusions were made on the density of equilibria within the general configuration space. The second contribution used Shannon Entropy, which we interpret as a scalar measure of the robustness, or likelihood of lattices to occur in a physical setting. Third, an analytic model was produced for vortex street patterns on the sphere by using SVD in conjunction with expressions for the center of vorticity vector and angular velocity. Equilibrium curves within the configuration space were presented as a function of the geometry, and pole vortices were shown to have a critical role in the formation and destruction of vortex streets. The fourth contribution entailed a more complete perspective of the streamline topology of vortex streets, linking the bifurcations to critical points on the equilibrium curves.

  15. Numerical simulation of an excited round jet under helical disturbances by three-dimensional discrete vortex method; Helical kakuran ni yoru reiki enkei funryu no uzuho simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izawa, S.; Kiya, M.; Mochizuki, O. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    1998-09-25

    The evolution of vortical structure in an impulsively started round jet has been studied numerically by means of a three-dimensional vortex blob method. The viscous diffusion of vorticity is approximated by a core spreading model originally proposed by Leonard (1980). The jet is forced by axisymmetric, helical and multiple disturbances. The multiple disturbances are combinations of two helical disturbances of the same mode rotating in the opposite directions. The multiple disturbances are found to enhance both the generation of small-scale structures and the growth rate of the jet. The small-scale structures have highly organized spatial distributions. The core spreading method is effective in aquiring the core overlapping in regions of high extensional rate of strain. 21 refs., 12 figs.

  16. The Potential-Vortex Theory of the Electromagnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Tomilin, A K

    2010-01-01

    Maxwell-Lorenz theory describes only vortex electromagnetic processes. Potential component of the magnetic field is usually excluded by the introduction of mathematical terms: Coulomb and Lorenz gauges. Proposed approach to the construction of the four-dimensional electrodynamics based on the total (four-dimensional) field theory takes into account both vortex and potential components of its characteristics. It is shown that potential components of the electromagnetic field have physical content. System of modified (generalized) Maxwell equations is written. With their help contradictions usually appearing while describing the distribution of electromagnetic waves, are eliminated. Works of other authors obtained similar results are presented and analyzed.

  17. Helical Phase Inflation and Monodromy in Supergravity Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianjun Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study helical phase inflation which realizes “monodromy inflation” in supergravity theory. In the model, inflation is driven by the phase component of a complex field whose potential possesses helicoid structure. We construct phase monodromy based on explicitly breaking global U(1 symmetry in the superpotential. By integrating out heavy fields, the phase monodromy from single complex scalar field is realized and the model fulfills natural inflation. The phase-axion alignment is achieved from explicitly symmetry breaking and gives super-Planckian phase decay constant. The F-term scalar potential provides strong field stabilization for all the scalars except inflaton, which is protected by the approximate global U(1 symmetry. Besides, we show that helical phase inflation can be naturally realized in no-scale supergravity with SU(2,1/SU(2×U(1 symmetry since the supergravity setup needed for phase monodromy is automatically provided in the no-scale Kähler potential. We also demonstrate that helical phase inflation can be reduced to another well-known supergravity inflation model with shift symmetry. Helical phase inflation is free from the UV-sensitivity problem although there is super-Planckian field excursion, and it suggests that inflation can be effectively studied based on supersymmetric field theory while a UV-completed framework is not prerequisite.

  18. Vortex dynamics in superfluids governed by an interacting gauge theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, Salvatore; Valiente, Manuel; Öhberg, Patrik

    2016-08-01

    We study the dynamics of a vortex in a quasi two-dimensional Bose gas consisting of light-matter coupled atoms forming two-component pseudo spins. The gas is subject to a density dependent gauge potential, hence governed by an interacting gauge theory, which stems from a collisionally induced detuning between the incident laser frequency and the atomic energy levels. This provides a back-action between the synthetic gauge potential and the matter field. A Lagrangian approach is used to derive an expression for the force acting on a vortex in such a gas. We discuss the similarities between this force and the one predicted by Iordanskii, Lifshitz and Pitaevskii when scattering between a superfluid vortex and the thermal component is taken into account.

  19. Testing of self-similarity and helical symmetry in vortex generator flow simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Gámiz, Unai; Velte, Clara Marika; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan;

    2016-01-01

    Vortex generators (VGs) are used increasingly by the wind turbine industry as flow control devices to improve rotor bladeperformance. According to experimental observations, the vortices generated by VGs have previously been observed to beself-similar for both the axial (uz) and azimuthal (u...

  20. Exact results for vortex loop operators in 3d supersymmetric theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drukker, Nadav; Okuda, Takuya; Passerini, Filippo

    2014-07-01

    Three dimensional field theories admit disorder line operators, dubbed vortex loop operators. They are defined by the path integral in the presence of prescribed singularities along the defect line. We study half-BPS vortex loop operators for = 2 supersymmetric theories on 3, its deformation and 1 × 2. We construct BPS vortex loops defined by the path integral with a fixed gauge or flavor holonomy for infinitesimal curves linking the loop. It is also possible to include a singular profile for matter fields. For vortex loops defined by holonomy, we perform supersymmetric localization by calculating the fluctuation modes, or alternatively by applying the index theory for transversally elliptic operators. We clarify how the latter method works in situations without fixed points of relevant isometries. Abelian mirror symmetry transforms Wilson and vortex loops in a specific way. In particular an ordinary Wilson loop transforms into a vortex loop for a flavor symmetry. Our localization results confirm the predictions of abelian mirror symmetry.

  1. Helicity, Topology and Kelvin Waves in reconnecting quantum knots

    CERN Document Server

    di Leoni, P Clark; Brachet, M E

    2016-01-01

    Helicity is a topological invariant that measures the linkage and knottedness of lines, tubes and ribbons. As such, it has found myriads of applications in astrophysics and solar physics, in fluid dynamics, in atmospheric sciences, and in biology. In quantum flows, where topology-changing reconnection events are a staple, helicity appears as a key quantity to study. However, the usual definition of helicity is not well posed in quantum vortices, and its computation based on counting links and crossings of vortex lines can be downright impossible to apply in complex and turbulent scenarios. We present a new definition of helicity which overcomes these problems. With it, we show that only certain reconnection events conserve helicity. In other cases helicity can change abruptly during reconnection. Furthermore, we show that these events can also excite Kelvin waves, which slowly deplete helicity as they interact nonlinearly, thus linking the theory of vortex knots with observations of quantum turbulence.

  2. Vortex Strings and Nonabelian sine-Gordon Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Q H

    1999-01-01

    We generalize the Lund-Regge model for vortex string dynamics in 4-dimensional Minkowski space to the arbitrary n-dimensional case. The n-dimensional vortex equation is identified with a nonabelian sine-Gordon equation and its integrability is proven by finding the associated linear equations of the inverse scattering. An explicit expression of vortex coordinates in terms of the variables of the nonabelian sine-Gordon system is derived. In particular, we obtain the n-dimensional vortex soliton solution of the Hasimoto-type from the one soliton solution of the nonabelian sine-Gordon equation.

  3. Quantum Theory Explanation of Helicity Inversion of Laser (Photons) During Reflection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xiang-dong; GUO Kai-hui

    2007-01-01

    Theretical analysis of the helicity inversion of laser (photons) during reflection is made by quantum theory for laser (photons)through an optical helix. The result reveals that the helicity inversion of the laser (photons) occurs when the wave vector of the laser (photon) rotates at an extremely high angular velocity. The dynamic factor that dominates the process is the Coriolis coupling between the spin of the photon and the rotation of the wave vector. This non-intertial effect is treated successfully by simplification of the Maxwell equation in the rotational frame. In addition, the implication of the helicity inversion in information theory is discussed.

  4. General split helicity gluon tree amplitudes in open twistor string theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Louise; Goddard, Peter

    2010-05-01

    We evaluate all split helicity gluon tree amplitudes in open twistor string theory. We show that these amplitudes satisfy the BCFW recurrence relations restricted to the split helicity case and, hence, that these amplitudes agree with those of gauge theory. To do this we make a particular choice of the sextic constraints in the link variables that determine the poles contributing to the contour integral expression for the amplitudes. Using the residue theorem to re-express this integral in terms of contributions from poles at rational values of the link variables, which we determine, we evaluate the amplitudes explicitly, regaining the gauge theory results of Britto et al. [25].

  5. Superconducting vortices in Weinberg - Salam theory; Vortex supraconducteurs de la theorie de Weinberg - Salam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garaud, J.

    2010-09-15

    In this dissertation, we analyze in detail the properties of new string-like solutions of the bosonic sector of the electroweak theory. The new solutions are current carrying generalizations of embedded Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen vortices. We were also able to reproduce all previously known features of vortices in the electroweak theory. Generically vortices are current carrying. They are made of a compact conducting core of charged W bosons surrounded by a nonlinear superposition of Z and Higgs field. Far away from the core, the solution is described by purely electromagnetic Biot and Savart field. Solutions exist for generic parameter values including experimental values of the coupling constants. We show that the current whose typical scale is the billion of Amperes can be arbitrarily large. In the second part the linear stability with respect to generic perturbations is studied. The fluctuation spectrum is qualitatively investigated. When negative modes are detected, they are explicitly constructed and their dispersion relation is determined. Most of the unstable modes can be eliminated by imposing periodic boundary conditions along the vortex. However there remains a unique negative mode which is homogeneous. This mode can probably be eliminated by curvature effects if a small piece of vortex is bent into a loop, stabilized against contraction by the electric current. (author)

  6. Quantitative theory of thermal fluctuations and disorder in the vortex matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dingping Li; Rosenstein Baruch; P Lin

    2006-01-01

    A metastable supercooled homogeneous vortex liquid state exists down to zero fluctuation temperature in systems of mutually repelling objects. The zero-temperature liquid state therefore serves as a (pseudo) `fixed point' controlling the properties of vortex liquid below and even around the melting point. Based on this picture, a quantitative theory of vortex melting and glass transition in Type II superconductors in the framework of Ginzburg-Landau approach is presented. The melting line location is determined and magnetization and specific heat jumps are calculated. The point-like disorder shifts the line downwards and joins the order{disorder transition line. On the other hand, the disorder induces irreversible effects via replica symmetry breaking. The irreversibility line can be calculated within the Gaussian variational method. Therefore, the generic phase diagram contains four phases divided by the irreversibility line and melting line: liquid, solid, vortex glass and Bragg glass. We compare various experimental results with the theoretical formula.

  7. Kawada's Contribution to Induced Velocity by Helical Vortices with Application to Propeller Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukumoto, Y.; Okulov, Valery; Wood, D. H.

    was established, as a research institute attached to the Imperial University of Tokyo in 1918. The laboratory, with only a couple of specialists in airplanes, was not active, and, to be worse, its building was collapsed by the Great Kanto earthquake, calamity attacking Tokyo region in 1923. When the Shohwa era......-Prandtl ideas to rotating bound vortices representing the propeller blades. Helicoidal vortex sheets now replace the free vortex sheet of the Prandtl’s theory. This idea was first carried out mathematically by Sydney Goldstein in his doctor’s thesis at Gottingen University. Goldstein became one of the leading...

  8. Vulcanized Vortex

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Inyong

    2008-01-01

    We investigate vortex configurations with the "vulcanization" term introduced for renormalization of $\\phi_\\star^4$ theory in canonical $\\theta$-deformed noncommutativity. In the small-$\\theta$ limit, we perform numerical calculations and find that nontopological vortex solutions exist as well as Q-ball type solutions, but topological vortex solutions are not admitted.

  9. 由均匀运动双螺旋涡丝诱导的流场的解析解%Analytical Solution of the Flow Field Induced by the Uniformly Moving Double Helical Vortex Filaments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘翔; 黄其柏; 廖道训; 温国珍

    2005-01-01

    The analytical expressions was deduced for the inviscid flow field induced by the double vortex filaments that move uniformly and rigidly without change of its form in a cylindrical tube, where the vortex filaments rotate around its axial with a constant angular velocity and translates along its axial with a constant transferal velocity. It is a key of solving problem to set up a moving cylindrical coordinate system together with the vortex filaments motion, in which the relative velocity field is presumed to be time-independent and with helical symmetry. The result shows that the absolute velocity field and pressure field are all time-periodic functions, and may degenerate into a time-independent field when the helical vortex filaments slip along the filaments themselves or is immobile. The calculation results at the location of pressure peaks and valleys on pipe wall are accordant with experimental results. When the cylindrical pipe radius tends to infinitely large quantity, it is also concluded that the double helical vortex filaments induce flow field in an unbound space.

  10. A field theory approach to the evolution of canonical helicity and energy

    CERN Document Server

    You, Setthivoine

    2016-01-01

    A redefinition of the Lagrangian of a multi-particle system in fields reformulates the single-particle, kinetic, and fluid equations governing fluid and plasma dynamics as a single set of generalized Maxwell's equations and Ohm's law for canonical force-fields. The Lagrangian includes new terms representing the coupling between the motion of particle distributions, between distributions and electromagnetic fields, with relativistic contributions. The formulation shows that the concepts of self-organization and canonical helicity transport are applicable across single-particle, kinetic, and fluid regimes, at classical and relativistic scales. The theory gives the basis for comparing canonical helicity change to energy change in general systems. For example, in a fixed, isolated system subject to non-conservative forces, a species' canonical helicity changes less than total energy only if gradients in density or distribution function are shallow.

  11. A field theory approach to the evolution of canonical helicity and energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, S.

    2016-07-01

    A redefinition of the Lagrangian of a multi-particle system in fields reformulates the single-particle, kinetic, and fluid equations governing fluid and plasma dynamics as a single set of generalized Maxwell's equations and Ohm's law for canonical force-fields. The Lagrangian includes new terms representing the coupling between the motion of particle distributions, between distributions and electromagnetic fields, with relativistic contributions. The formulation shows that the concepts of self-organization and canonical helicity transport are applicable across single-particle, kinetic, and fluid regimes, at classical and relativistic scales. The theory gives the basis for comparing canonical helicity change to energy change in general systems. For example, in a fixed, isolated system subject to non-conservative forces, a species' canonical helicity changes less than total energy only if gradients in density or distribution function are shallow.

  12. A field theory approach to the evolution of canonical helicity and energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, S. [William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    A redefinition of the Lagrangian of a multi-particle system in fields reformulates the single-particle, kinetic, and fluid equations governing fluid and plasma dynamics as a single set of generalized Maxwell's equations and Ohm's law for canonical force-fields. The Lagrangian includes new terms representing the coupling between the motion of particle distributions, between distributions and electromagnetic fields, with relativistic contributions. The formulation shows that the concepts of self-organization and canonical helicity transport are applicable across single-particle, kinetic, and fluid regimes, at classical and relativistic scales. The theory gives the basis for comparing canonical helicity change to energy change in general systems. For example, in a fixed, isolated system subject to non-conservative forces, a species' canonical helicity changes less than total energy only if gradients in density or distribution function are shallow.

  13. Numerical simulation of optical vortex propagation and reflection by the methods of scalar diffraction theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Nikolay V; Pavlov, Pavel V; Malov, A N

    2013-06-30

    Using the equations of scalar diffraction theory we consider the formation of an optical vortex on a diffractive optical element. The algorithms are proposed for simulating the processes of propagation of spiral wavefronts in free space and their reflections from surfaces with different roughness parameters. The given approach is illustrated by the results of numerical simulations. (propagation of wave fronts)

  14. Hub vortex helical instability as the origin of wake meandering in the lee of a model wind-turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Francesco; Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Camarri, Simone; Porte-Agel, Fernando; Gallaire, Francois

    2012-11-01

    Wind tunnel measurements were performed for the wake produced by a three-bladed wind turbine immersed in uniform flow. These tests show the presence of a vorticity structure in the near wake region mainly oriented along the streamwise direction, which is denoted as hub vortex. The hub vortex is characterized by oscillations with frequencies lower than the one connected to the rotational velocity of the rotor, which are ascribed to wake meandering by previous works. This phenomenon consists in transversal oscillations of the wind turbine wake, which are excited by the shedding of vorticity structures from the rotor disc acting as a bluff body. In this work temporal and spatial linear stability analyses of a wind turbine wake are performed on a base flow obtained through time-averaged wind tunnel velocity measurements. This study shows that the low frequency spectral component detected experimentally is the result of a convective instability of the hub vortex, which is characterized by a counter-winding single-helix structure. Simultaneous hot-wire measurements confirm the presence of a helicoidal unstable mode of the hub vortex with a streamwise wavenumber roughly equal to the one predicted from the linear instability analysis.

  15. Theory of specific heat of vortex liquid of high T c superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chen; Chi, Cheng; Wang, Jiangfan

    2016-10-01

    Superconducting thermal fluctuation (STF) plays an important role in both thermodynamic and transport properties in the vortex liquid phase of high T c superconductors. It was widely observed in the vicinity of the critical transition temperature. In the framework of Ginzburg-Landau-Lawrence-Doniach theory in magnetic field, a self-consistent analysis of STF including all Landau levels is given. Besides that, we calculate the contribution of STF to specific heat in vortex liquid phase for high T c cuprate superconductors, and the fitting results are in good agreement with experimental data. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274018).

  16. All Next-to-Maximally-Helicity-Violating One-Loop Gluon Amplitudes in N=4 Super-Yang-Mills Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bern, Z; Kosower, D A; Bern, Zvi; Dixon, Lance J.; Kosower, David A.

    2004-01-01

    We compute the next-to-MHV one-loop n-gluon amplitudes in N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory. These amplitudes contain three negative-helicity gluons and an arbitrary number of positive-helicity gluons, and are the first infinite series of amplitudes beyond the simplest, MHV, amplitudes. We also discuss some aspects of their twistor-space structure.

  17. All conjugate-maximal-helicity-violating amplitudes from topological open string theory in twistor space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiban, Radu; Volovich, Anastasia

    2004-09-24

    It has recently been proposed that the D-instanton expansion of the open topological B model on P(3|4) is equivalent to the perturbative expansion of the maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory in four dimensions. In this letter we show how to construct the gauge theory results for all n-point conjugate-maximal-helicity-violating amplitudes by computing the integral over the moduli space of curves of degree n-3 in P(3|4), providing strong support to the string theory construction.

  18. Instability of a Nielsen-Olesen vortex embedded in the electroweak theory; 2, electroweak vortices and gauge equivalence

    CERN Document Server

    MacDowell, S W; MacDowell, Samuel W; Tornkvist, Ola

    1995-01-01

    Vortex configurations in the electroweak gauge theory are investigated. Two gauge-inequivalent solutions of the field equations, the Z and W vortices, have previously been found. They correspond to embeddings of the abelian Nielsen-Olesen vortex solution into a U(1) subgroup of SU(2)xU(1). It is shown here that any electroweak vortex solution can be mapped into a solution of the same energy with a vanishing upper component of the Higgs field. The correspondence is a gauge equivalence for all vortex solutions except those for which the winding numbers of the upper and lower Higgs components add to zero. This class of solutions, which includes the W vortex, instead corresponds to a singular solution in the one-component gauge. The results, combined with numerical investigations, provide an argument against the existence of other vortex solutions in the gauge-Higgs sector of the Standard Model.

  19. Optimal dynamical systems of Navier-Stokes equations based on generalized helical-wave bases and the fundamental elements of turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, NaiFu; Guan, Hui; Wu, ChuiJie

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present the theory of constructing optimal generalized helical-wave coupling dynamical systems. Applying the helical-wave decomposition method to Navier-Stokes equations, we derive a pair of coupling dynamical systems based on optimal generalized helical-wave bases. Then with the method of multi-scale global optimization based on coarse graining analysis, a set of global optimal generalized helical-wave bases is obtained. Optimal generalized helical-wave bases retain the good properties of classical helical-wave bases. Moreover, they are optimal for the dynamical systems of Navier-Stokes equations, and suitable for complex physical and geometric boundary conditions. Then we find that the optimal generalized helical-wave vortexes fitted by a finite number of optimal generalized helical-wave bases can be used as the fundamental elements of turbulence, and have important significance for studying physical properties of complex flows and turbulent vortex structures in a deeper level.

  20. Revisit to the helicity and the generalized self-organization theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondoh, Y.; Takahashi, T. [Dept. of Electronic Engineering, Gunma Univ., Kiryu, Gunma (Japan); Momota, H. [Illinois Univ., Illinois (United States)

    2000-09-01

    It is clarified that the so-caned 'helicity conservation law' is never the conservation equation of the helicity K itself', but is merely 'the time change rate equation of K', which is passively and resultantly determined by the mutually independent volume and surface integral terms. It is shown that since the total helicity K can never be conserved in the real experimental systems, the conjecture of the total helicity invariance is not physically available to real magnetized plasmas in an exact sense. The well-known relaxation theory by Dr. J. B. Taylor is clarified to be neither the variational principle nor the energy principle, but be merely a mathematical calculation, using the variational calculus in order to find the minimum magnetic energy solution from the set of solutions having the same value of K. With the use of auto-correlations for physical quantities, it is presented that a novel basic formulation of an extended generalized self-organization theory, which is not based on neither the variational principle nor the energy principle. It is clarified that conservation equations concerning with all physical quantities for the dynamic system of interest are naturally embedded in the formulation of the generalized self-organization theory. The self-organized states of every physical quantities of interest may be realized during their own phases and the dynamical system may evolve repeatedly those out of phase organizations, depending on boundary conditions and input powers. It is shown that the conservation laws can be used to extend conventional methods of plasma current drives by energy injections with use of various types of energies, such as magnetic energies, electromagnetic wave energies, internal energies of plasmoids by plasma guns, which induce the thermal plasma flow velocity, various particle beam energies, and so on. (author)

  1. Dyonic non-Abelian vortex strings in supersymmetric and non-supersymmetric theories: tensions and higher derivative corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Eto, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Dyonic non-Abelian local/semi-global vortex strings are studied in detail in supersymmetric/non-supersymmetric Yang-Mills-Higgs theories. While the BPS tension formula is known to be the same as that for the BPS dyonic instanton, we find that the non-BPS tension formula is approximated very well by the well-known tension formula of the BPS dyon. We show that this mysterious tension formula for the dyonic non-BPS vortex stings can be understood from the perspective of a low energy effective field theory. Furthermore, we propose an efficient method to obtain an effective theory of a single vortex string, which includes not only lower derivative terms but also all order derivative corrections by making use of the tension formula. We also find a novel dyonic vortex string whose internal orientation vectors rotate in time and spiral along the string axis.

  2. Kinetics of a network of vortex loops in He II and a theory of superfluid turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemirovskii, Sergey K.

    2008-06-01

    A theory is developed to describe the superfluid turbulence on the base of kinetics of the merging and splitting vortex loops. Because of very frequent reconnections the vortex loops (as a whole) do not live long enough to perform any essential evolution due to the deterministic motion. On the contrary, they rapidly merge and split, and these random recombination processes prevail over other slower dynamic processes. To develop quantitative description we take the vortex loops to have a Brownian structure with the only degree of freedom, which is the length l of the loop. We perform investigation on the base of the Boltzmann type “kinetic equation” for the distribution function n(l) of number of loops with length l . This equation describes a slow change of the density of loops (in space of their lengths l ) due to the deterministic equation of motion and due to fast random change because of the frequent reconnections. By use of the special ansatz in the “collision” integral, we have found the exact power-like solution n(l)∝l-5/2 of “kinetic equation” in the stationary case. This solution is not (thermodynamically) equilibrium, but on the contrary, it describes the state with two mutual fluxes of the length (or energy) in space of sizes of the vortex loops. The term “flux” means just redistribution of length (or energy) among the loops of different sizes due to reconnections. Analyzing this solution we drew several results on the structure and dynamics of the vortex tangle in the turbulent superfluid helium. In particular, we obtained that the mean radius of the curvature is of the order of interline space. We also evaluated the full rate of the reconnection events. Assuming, further, that the processes of random collisions are the fastest ones, we studied the evolution of full length of vortex loops per unit volume—the so-called vortex line density L(t) . It is shown this evolution to obey the famous Vinen equation. The properties of the Vinen

  3. Theory of the vortex-clustering transition in a confined two-dimensional quantum fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Xiaoquan; Nian, Jun; Reeves, Matthew T; Bradley, Ashton S

    2016-01-01

    Clustering of like-sign vortices in a planar bounded domain is known to occur at negative temperature, a phenomenon that Onsager demonstrated to be a consequence of bounded phase space. In a confined superfluid, quantized vortices can support such an ordered phase, provided they evolve as an almost isolated subsystem containing sufficient energy. A detailed theoretical understanding of the statistical mechanics of such states thus requires a microcanonical approach. Here we develop an analytical theory of the vortex clustering transition in a neutral system of quantum vortices confined to a two-dimensional disk geometry, within the microcanonical ensemble. As the system energy increases above a critical value, the system develops global order via the emergence of a macroscopic dipole structure from the homogeneous phase of vortices, spontaneously breaking the Z2 symmetry associated with invariance under vortex circulation exchange, and the rotational SO(2) symmetry due to the disk geometry. The dipole structu...

  4. All Non-Maximally-Helicity-Violating One-Loop Seven-Gluon Amplitudes in N=4 Super-Yang-Mills Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bern, Z; Dixon, L J; Kosower, D A; Bern, Zvi; Duca, Vittorio Del; Dixon, Lance J.; Kosower, David A.

    2004-01-01

    We compute the non-MHV one-loop seven-gluon amplitudes in N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory, which contain three negative-helicity gluons and four positive-helicity gluons. There are four independent color-ordered amplitudes, (- - - + + + +), (- - + - + + +), (- - + + -+ +) and (- + - + - + +). The MHV amplitudes containing two negative-helicity and five positive-helicity gluons were computed previously, so all independent one-loop seven-gluon helicity amplitudes are now known for this theory. We present partial information about an infinite sequence of next-to-MHV one-loop helicity amplitudes, with three negative-helicity and n-3 positive-helicity gluons, and the color ordering (- - - + + ... + +); we give a new coefficient of one class of integral functions entering this amplitude. We discuss the twistor-space properties of the box-integral-function coefficients in the amplitudes, which are quite simple and suggestive.

  5. The Non-Maximally-Helicity-Violating One-Loop Seven-Gluon Amplitudes in N=4 Super-Yang-Mills Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bern, Z.

    2004-10-22

    We compute the non-MHV one-loop seven-gluon amplitudes in N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory, which contain three negative-helicity gluons and four positive-helicity gluons. There are four independent color-ordered amplitudes, (---++++), (--+-+++), (--++-++) and (-+-+-++). The MHV amplitudes containing two negative-helicity and five positive-helicity gluons were computed previously, so all independent one-loop seven-gluon helicity amplitudes are now known for this theory. We present partial information about an infinite sequence of next-to-MHV one-loop helicity amplitudes, with three negative-helicity and n - 3 positive-helicity gluons, and the color ordering (---+{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}++); we give a new coefficient of one class of integral functions entering this amplitude. We discuss the twistor-space properties of the box-integral-function coefficients in the amplitudes, which are quite simple and suggestive.

  6. Theory of formation of helical structures in a perfectly conducting, premagnetized Z-pinch liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Edmund; Velikovich, Alexander; Peterson, Kyle

    2014-10-01

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept uses an azimuthal magnetic field to collapse a thick metallic liner containing preheated fusion fuel. A critical component of the concept is an axial magnetic field, permeating both the fuel and surrounding liner, which reduces the compression necessary to achieve fusion conditions. Recent experiments demonstrate that a liner premagnetized with a 10 T axial field develops helical structures with a pitch significantly larger than an estimate of Bz /Bθ would suggest. The cause of the helical perturbations is still not understood. In this work, we present an analytic, linear theory in which we model the liner as a perfectly conducting metal, and study how bumps and divots on its surface redirect current flow, resulting in perturbations to B as well as j × B . We show that in the presence of axial and azimuthal magnetic field, the theory predicts divots will grow and deform at an angle determined by the magnetic field. We compare theoretical results with three dimensional, resistive MHD simulations. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the National Nuclear Security Administration under DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Theory of the vortex-clustering transition in a confined two-dimensional quantum fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoquan; Billam, Thomas P.; Nian, Jun; Reeves, Matthew T.; Bradley, Ashton S.

    2016-08-01

    Clustering of like-sign vortices in a planar bounded domain is known to occur at negative temperature, a phenomenon that Onsager demonstrated to be a consequence of bounded phase space. In a confined superfluid, quantized vortices can support such an ordered phase, provided they evolve as an almost isolated subsystem containing sufficient energy. A detailed theoretical understanding of the statistical mechanics of such states thus requires a microcanonical approach. Here we develop an analytical theory of the vortex clustering transition in a neutral system of quantum vortices confined to a two-dimensional disk geometry, within the microcanonical ensemble. The choice of ensemble is essential for identifying the correct thermodynamic limit of the system, enabling a rigorous description of clustering in the language of critical phenomena. As the system energy increases above a critical value, the system develops global order via the emergence of a macroscopic dipole structure from the homogeneous phase of vortices, spontaneously breaking the Z2 symmetry associated with invariance under vortex circulation exchange, and the rotational SO (2 ) symmetry due to the disk geometry. The dipole structure emerges characterized by the continuous growth of the macroscopic dipole moment which serves as a global order parameter, resembling a continuous phase transition. The critical temperature of the transition, and the critical exponent associated with the dipole moment, are obtained exactly within mean-field theory. The clustering transition is shown to be distinct from the final state reached at high energy, known as supercondensation. The dipole moment develops via two macroscopic vortex clusters and the cluster locations are found analytically, both near the clustering transition and in the supercondensation limit. The microcanonical theory shows excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations, and signatures of the transition are apparent even for a modest system of 100

  8. 安装涡发生器的矩形截面螺旋通道内流体流动%Fluid flow in rectangular helical channels with vortex generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽; 李佳其; 张春梅; 王翠华; 吴剑华

    2014-01-01

    对安装三角翼型涡发生器的曲率为0.05的矩形截面螺旋通道内的流场进行了实验测量,并将测量值与模拟值进行比较,二者吻合较好。利用数值模拟方法研究了矩形截面螺旋通道内涡量的演变过程,研究了曲率及Reynolds数对涡发生器有效作用距离的影响。结果表明,安装三角翼型涡发生器后,矩形截面内靠近内壁处新出现了两个common-flow-down型的二次涡,新出现的额外涡量的极值为原有涡量的2.0~2.8倍。Reynolds数越大,曲率越小,涡发生器的有效作用距离越长。当曲率为0.05,迎流角为10°,Reynolds数为5370时,其值可达翼高的79倍。%The flow field of rectangular helical channel with triangle winglet pair vortex generator was measured experimentally. The curvature of the helical channel was 0.05. The experimental data are in good agreement with the calculated data. The evolution of vorticity in the helical channel and the influence of Reynolds number and the curvature on the effective influence distance of vortex generator were investigated by numerical method. The results show that, two extra vortices in common-flow-down type emerge near the inner wall in the rectangular cross section of the helical channel with triangle winglet pair vortex generator. The values of extra vorticity are 2.0-2.8 times those of the original vorticity. The effective influence distance of the vortex generator increases with the decrease of curvature and the increase of Reynolds number. It can reach 79 times of the height of the vortex generator with the curvature of 0.05, attack angle of 10° and Reynolds number of 5370.

  9. Reconnection of superfluid vortex bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Sultan Z; Youd, Anthony J; Barenghi, Carlo F

    2008-11-21

    Using the vortex filament model and the Gross-Pitaevskii nonlinear Schroedinger equation, we show that bundles of quantized vortex lines in He II are structurally robust and can reconnect with each other maintaining their identity. We discuss vortex stretching in superfluid turbulence and show that, during the bundle reconnection process, kelvin waves of large amplitude are generated, in agreement with the finding that helicity is produced by nearly singular vortex interactions in classical Euler flows.

  10. Enhanced heat transfermechanism of winglet vortex generator in helical channel with semicircular cross section%翼型涡发生器对半圆形螺旋通道的换热强化机理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雅侠; 张腾; 张春梅; 张丽; 吴剑华

    2016-01-01

    为考察不同形状和布置方式的翼型涡发生器强化半圆形截面螺旋通道的换热特性,对单一以及安装了jxjs、jxjk、sjjs和sjjk 4种涡发生器的螺旋通道内流动与换热特性进行了数值研究,数值模拟结果与实验结果吻合较好.结果表明,研究范围内涡发生器前后180°范围内的换热壁面平均Nusselt数与单一通道的相应值之比的平均值在1.044~1.074之间,流动阻力系数f/f0在1.105~1.188之间.对传热效果而言,矩形翼优于三角形翼,对翼渐缩布置优于渐扩布置.涡发生器产生的纵向脱落涡旋改变了原有的二次流场结构,改善了速度场和温度场的协同性,强化了传热.安装jxjs和sjjs型涡发生器的复合二次流场分别为4涡和2个大涡结构,Re=8000时两者在通道内强化换热作用范围分别可达10.47和12.56倍翼高的距离.%The purpose of this paper is to obtain the enhanced heat transfer characteristic of the winglet vortex generator (VG) in the helical channel with semicircular cross section. The shape and layout of the VG are concerned. CFD software is adopted to simulate the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristic in the smooth helical channel and that installed with four kinds of winglet vortex generator. The four styles of vortex generator are characterized as jxjs, jxjk, sjjs and sjjk VG, respectively. The simulated data coincide well with the experimental data. The results based on the current research show that after installing the vortex generator, the average ratio ofNum toNu0 is in the range of 1.044—1.074 whereNum is the surface average Nusselt number of helical channel within the scope of ±180o away from the vortex generator andNu0 is the corresponding value of smooth helical channel. However, the specific value between the flow resistance coefficientof helical channel with VG and the corresponding value of smooth channel,i.e.f/f0 is in the range of 1.105—1.188. The rectangular winglet VG is

  11. Fermion zero modes in the vortex background of a Chern-Simons-Higgs theory with a hidden sector

    CERN Document Server

    Lozano, Gustavo; Schaposnik, Fidel A

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study a $2+1$ dimensional system in which fermions are coupled to the self-dual topological vortex in $U(1) \\times U(1)$ Chern-Simons theory, where both $U(1)$ gauge symmetries are spontaneously broken. We consider two Abelian Higgs scalars with visible and hidden sectors coupled to a fermionic field through three interaction Lagrangians, where one of them violates the fermion number. Using a fine tuning procedure, we could obtain the number of the fermionic zero modes which is equal to the absolute value of the sum of the vortex numbers in the visible and hidden sectors.

  12. Flame-Vortex Interactions Imaged in Microgravity - To Assess the Theory Flame Stretch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, James F.

    2001-01-01

    The goals of this research are to: 1) Assess the Theory of Flame Stretch by operating a unique flame-vortex experiment under microgravity conditions in the NASA Glenn 2.2 Second Drop Tower (drops to identify operating conditions have been completed); 2) Obtain high speed shadowgraph images (500-1000 frames/s) using the drop rig (images were obtained at one-g, and the NASA Kodak RO camera is being mounted on the drop rig); 3) Obtain shadowgraph and PIV images at 1-g while varying the effects of buoyancy by controlling the Froude number (completed); 4) Numerically model the inwardly-propagating spherical flame that is observed in the experiment using full chemistry and the RUN 1DL code (completed); 5) Send images of the flame shape to Dr. G. Patniak at NRL who is numerically simulating the entire flame-vortex interaction of the present experiment (data transfer completed); and 6) Assess the feasibility of obtaining PIV velocity field images in the drop rig, which would be useful (but not required) for our assessment of the Theory of Flame Stretch (PIV images were obtained at one-g using same low laser power that is available from fiber optic cable in drop tower). The motivation for the work is to obtain novel measurement needed to develop a physically accurate model of turbulent combustion that can help in the control of engine pollutants. The unique experiment allows, for the first time, the detailed study of a negatively-curved (negatively stretched) flame, which is one of the five fundamental types of premixed flames. While there have been studies of flat flames, positively-curved (outwardly-propagating) cases and positively-strained (counterflow) cases, this is the first detailed study of a negatively-curved (inwardly-propagating) flame. The first set of drops in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower showed that microgravity provides more favorable conditions for achieving inwardly-propagating flames (IPFs) than 1-g. A vortex interacts with a flame and creates a spherical

  13. Dynamic modeling of double-helical gear with Timoshenko beam theory and experiment verification

    OpenAIRE

    Jincheng Dong; Sanmin Wang; He Lin; Ying Wang

    2016-01-01

    In the dynamic study of the double-helical gear transmission, the coupling shaft in the middle of the two helical gears is difficult to be handled accurately. In this article, the coupling shaft is treated as the Timoshenko beam elements and is synthesized with the lumped-mass method of the two helical gear pairs. Then, the numerical integration method is used to solve the amplitude–frequency responses and dynamic factors under diverse operating conditions. A gear vibration test rig of closed...

  14. Theory of vortex-lattice melting in a one-dimensional optical lattice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, M.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate quantum and temperature fluctuations of a vortex lattice in a one-dimensional optical lattice. We discuss in particular the Bloch bands of the Tkachenko modes and calculate the correlation function of the vortex positions along the direction of the optical lattice. Because of the

  15. Vortex cutting in superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatz, A.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Kwok, W. K.; Crabtree, G. W.

    2016-08-01

    Vortex cutting and reconnection is an intriguing and still-unsolved problem central to many areas of classical and quantum physics, including hydrodynamics, astrophysics, and superconductivity. Here, we describe a comprehensive investigation of the crossing of magnetic vortices in superconductors using time dependent Ginsburg-Landau modeling. Within a macroscopic volume, we simulate initial magnetization of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor followed by subsequent remagnetization with perpendicular magnetic fields, creating the crossing of the initial and newly generated vortices. The time resolved evolution of vortex lines as they approach each other, contort, locally conjoin, and detach, elucidates the fine details of the vortex-crossing scenario under practical situations with many interacting vortices in the presence of weak pinning. Our simulations also reveal left-handed helical vortex instabilities that accompany the remagnetization process and participate in the vortex crossing events.

  16. Critical non-Abelian vortex in four dimensions and little string theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifman, M.; Yung, A.

    2017-08-01

    As was shown recently, non-Abelian vortex strings supported in four-dimensional N =2 supersymmetric QCD with the U(2) gauge group and Nf=4 quark multiplets (flavors) become critical superstrings. In addition to the translational moduli, non-Abelian strings under consideration carry six orientational and size moduli. Together, they form a ten-dimensional target space required for a superstring to be critical. The target space of the string sigma model is a product of the flat four-dimensional space and a Calabi-Yau noncompact threefold, namely, the conifold. We study closed string states which emerge in four dimensions and identify them with hadrons of four-dimensional N =2 QCD. One massless state was found previously; it emerges as a massless hypermultiplet associated with the deformation of the complex structure of the conifold. In this paper, we find a number of massive states. To this end, we exploit the approach used in LST little string theory, namely, the equivalence between the critical string on the conifold and noncritical c =1 string with the Liouville field and a compact scalar at the self-dual radius. The states we find carry "baryonic" charge (its definition differs from standard). We interpret them as "monopole necklaces" formed (at strong coupling) by the closed string with confined monopoles attached.

  17. Structure and Dynamics of Helical Protein Fragments Investigated by Theory and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Afshin

    This work addresses the conformation and dynamics of model peptides using spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Experimentally, we investigate the structure and dynamics of peptide fragments taken from coiled coil and three helical bundle motifs of bacterial coat proteins. Theoretically, we use molecular dynamics simulations of isolated helices with explicit water molecules to derive trajectories which reveal features about picosecond dynamics and local unfolding events. The assignment of the ^1H, ^{15}N, and ^ {13}C resonances, secondary structure, backbone dynamics, hydration and other biophysical parameters of a 30 residue recombinant peptide corresponding to an immunogenic site on the coiled coil region of Streptococcus pyogenes 24M protein are reported. Our results suggest that this peptide is a symmetric parallel dimeric alpha-helical coiled coil with local defects within the helix and fraying at the termini. The ^1H and ^ {15}N assignments, the hydration, the overall fold, and other biophysical parameters of a recombinant B domain of Staphylococcal protein A (FB) are reported. Our results indicate FB is a highly stable monomeric three helical bundle. A symmetric two domain construct was used to probe the modular assembly of two B domains. Here, spectroscopic results suggest weak interactions between the two domains. The folding pathway of FB was investigated using amide exchange data of the native protein and peptide models. We propose that the helical hairpin consisting of helices II and III is an on-pathway intermediate in the folding of FB. Two 1 ns molecular dynamics simulations (MD) on two mainly helical peptides--an 18 residue peptide corresponding to a portion of the H helix of myoglobin (MBH) and a 14 residue analogue of the C-peptide of ribonuclease A (CRNA) --were carried out in water using the united atom AMBER/OPLS force-field. In the case of MBH, the initial helical conformation progressively frays to a more disordered structure. A

  18. Dynamic modeling of double-helical gear with Timoshenko beam theory and experiment verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jincheng Dong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the dynamic study of the double-helical gear transmission, the coupling shaft in the middle of the two helical gears is difficult to be handled accurately. In this article, the coupling shaft is treated as the Timoshenko beam elements and is synthesized with the lumped-mass method of the two helical gear pairs. Then, the numerical integration method is used to solve the amplitude–frequency responses and dynamic factors under diverse operating conditions. A gear vibration test rig of closed power circuit is developed for in-depth experimental measurements and model validation. After comparing the theoretical data with the practical results, the following conclusions are drawn: (1 the dynamic model with the Timoshenko beam element is quite appropriate and reliable in the dynamic analysis of double-helical gear transmission and is of great theoretical value in the accurate dynamic research of the double-helical gear transmission. (2 In both theoretical analysis and experimental measurements, the dynamic factors of gear pair diminish with the increase in the input torque and augment with the increase in the input speed. (3 The deviation ratio of the theoretical data and the experimental results decrease with the increase in the input torque, reaching the minimum at the highest input speed.

  19. Helicity, topology, and Kelvin waves in reconnecting quantum knots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark di Leoni, P.; Mininni, P. D.; Brachet, M. E.

    2016-10-01

    Helicity is a topological invariant that measures the linkage and knottedness of lines, tubes, and ribbons. As such, it has found myriads of applications in astrophysics, fluid dynamics, atmospheric sciences, and biology. In quantum flows, where topology-changing reconnection events are a staple, helicity appears as a key quantity to study. However, the usual definition of helicity is not well posed in quantum vortices, and its computation based on counting links and crossings of centerline vorticity can be downright impossible to apply in complex and turbulent scenarios. We present a definition of helicity which overcomes these problems and which gives the expected result in the large-scale limit. With it, we show that certain reconnection events can excite Kelvin waves and other complex motions of the centerline vorticity, which slowly deplete helicity as they interact nonlinearly, thus linking the theory of vortex knots with observations of quantum fluids. This process also results in the depletion of helicity in a fully turbulent quantum flow, in a way reminiscent of the decay of helicity in classical fluids.

  20. Vortex solutions in axial or chiral coupled non-relativistic spinor- Chern-Simons theory

    CERN Document Server

    Németh, Z A

    1997-01-01

    The interaction of a spin 1/2 particle (described by the non-relativistic "Dirac" equation of Lévy-Leblond) with Chern-Simons gauge fields is studied. It is shown, that similarly to the four dimensional spinor models, there is a consistent possibility of coupling them also by axial or chiral type currents. Static self dual vortex solutions together with a vortex-lattice are found with the new couplings.

  1. Effects of the arrangement of triangle-winglet-pair vortex generators on heat transfer performance of the shell side of a double-pipe heat exchanger enhanced by helical fins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Shang, Bojun; Meng, Huibo; Li, Yaxia; Wang, Cuihua; Gong, Bin; Wu, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    To improve heat transfer performance of the shell side of a double-pipe heat exchanger enhanced by helical fins, triangle-winglet-pair vortex generators (VG) were installed along the centerline of the helical channel with rectangular cross section. The effects of the arrangement of the triangle-winglet-pair VG, such as the geometry, the angle of attack and the quantity on heat transfer performance and pressure drop characteristics have been investigated experimentally to find out the optimal design of the VG. Air was used as working fluid within the range of Re from 680 to 16,000. The results show that, the heat exchange effectiveness of the shell side with VG is 16.6 % higher than that without VG. The vortices and the unsteadiness of the flow introduced by the VG make a great contribution to the increase. Under identical pressure drop condition, the angle of attack of 30° is the best choice compared with 45° and 60°. Under the three constraints, i.e., identical mass flow rate, identical pressure drop and identical pumping power, the largest VG size can achieve the best enhancement effect. Installation of three pairs of VG within one pitch is an optimal design for the shell side used in the present experiments. The enhancement effect of isosceles right triangle is better than that of right triangle in which one acute angle is 30°.

  2. Vortex transmutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Albert; Zacarés, Mario; García-March, Miguel-Angel; Monsoriu, Juan A; de Córdoba, Pedro Fernández

    2005-09-16

    Using group theory arguments and numerical simulations, we demonstrate the possibility of changing the vorticity or topological charge of an individual vortex by means of the action of a system possessing a discrete rotational symmetry of finite order. We establish on theoretical grounds a "transmutation pass" determining the conditions for this phenomenon to occur and numerically analyze it in the context of two-dimensional optical lattices. An analogous approach is applicable to the problems of Bose-Einstein condensates in periodic potentials.

  3. Instability of a Nielsen-Olesen vortex embedded in the electroweak theory; 1, the single-component Higgs gauge

    CERN Document Server

    MacDowell, S W; MacDowell, Samuel W; Tornkvist, Ola

    1994-01-01

    The stability of an abelian (Nielsen-Olesen) vortex embedded in the electroweak theory against W production is investigated in a gauge defined by the condition of a single-component Higgs field. The model is characterized by the parameters \\beta=({M_H\\over M_Z})^2 and \\gamma=\\cos^2\\theta_{\\rm w} where \\theta_{\\rm w} is the weak mixing angle. It is shown that the equations for W's in the background of the Nielsen-Olesen vortex have no solutions in the linear approximation. A necessary condition for the nonlinear equations to have a solution in the region of parameter space where the abelian vortex is classically unstable is that the W's be produced in a state of angular momentum m such that 0>m>-2n. The integer n is defined by the phase of the Higgs field, \\exp(in\\varphi). Solutions for a set of values of the parameters \\beta and \\gamma in this region were obtained numerically for the case -m=n=1. The possibility of existence of a stationary state for n=1 with W's in the state m=-1 was investigated. The bounda...

  4. Cosmological magnetic helicity and birefrigence from primordial torsion in Lorentz violation theories

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, L Garcia

    2011-01-01

    Cosmological magnetic helicity has been thought to be a fundamental agent for magnetic field amplification in the universe. More recently Semikoz and Sokoloff [Phys Rev Lett 92 (2004): 131.301.] showed that the weakness of the seed fields did not necessarily imply the weakness of magnetic cosmological helicity. In this paper we present a derivation of dynamo equation based upon the flat torsion photon non-minimal coupling through Riemann-Cartan spacetime. From this derivation one computes the necessary conditions for a flat torsion field to generate a galactic dynamo seed, from the cosmological magnetic helicity. A peculiar feature of this dynamo equation is that the resistivity depends upon the Ricci scalar curvature. This feature is also present in turbulent dynamo models. Here the electrical effective conductivity is obtained by making use of flat torsion modes of a $R(\\Gamma)F^{2}$ Lagrangean where R refers to the Ricci-Cartan spacetime. Power spectrum of the magnetic field is also computed. Lorentz viola...

  5. GINZBURG-LANDAU THEORY AND VORTEX LATTICE OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU SHI-PING

    2001-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the vortex lattice of high-temperature superconductors has been studied by solving the generalized Ginzburg-Landau equations derived microscopically. Our numerical simulation indicates that the structure of the vortex lattice is oblique at the temperature far away from the transition temperature Tc, where the mixed s-dx2-ya state is expected to have the lowest energy. Whereas, very close to Tc, the dx2-ya wave is slightly lower energetically, and a triangular vortex lattice recovers. The coexistence and the coupling between the s and d waves would account for the unusual dynamic behaviours such as the upward curvature of the upper critical field curve Hc2(T), as observed in dc magnetization measurements on single-crystal YBa2Cu307 samples.

  6. Life analysis of helical gear sets using Lundberg-Palmgren theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed for surface fatigue life of helical gears. The expected fatigue life of a pinion, gear, or gear set may be calculated from the model. An equation for the dynamic capacity of a gear set was also derived. Dynamic capacity is the transmitted tangential load which gives a 90 percent probability of survival of the gear set for one million pinion revolutions. The equations, when simplified by setting the helix angle to zero, reduce to the results which were previously developed for spur gears. A sample calculation is given which illustrates the use of the new fatigue life model.

  7. Theory of the vortex matter transformations in high-Tc superconductor YBCO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dingping; Rosenstein, Baruch

    2003-04-25

    Flux line lattice in type II superconductors undergoes a transition into a "disordered" phase such as vortex liquid or vortex glass, due to thermal fluctuations and random quenched disorder. We quantitatively describe the competition between the thermal fluctuations and the disorder using the Ginzburg-Landau approach. The following T-H phase diagram of YBCO emerges. There are just two distinct thermodynamical phases, the homogeneous and the crystalline one, separated by a single first order transition line. The line, however, makes a wiggle near the experimentally claimed critical point at 12 T. The "critical point" is reinterpreted as a (noncritical) Kauzmann point in which the latent heat vanishes and the line is parallel to the T axis. The magnetization, the entropy, and the specific heat discontinuities at melting compare well with experiments.

  8. Theory of nonlinear harmonic generation in free-electron lasers with helical wigglers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, G.; Saldin, E.; Schneidmiller, E.; Yurkov, M.

    2007-05-15

    CoherentHarmonicGeneration (CHG), and in particularNonlinearHarmonicGeneration (NHG), is of importance for both short wavelength Free-Electron Lasers (FELs), in relation with the achievement of shorter wavelengths with a fixed electron-beam energy, and high-average power FEL resonators, in relation with destructive effects of higher harmonics radiation on mirrors. In this paper we present a treatment of NHG from helical wigglers with particular emphasis on the second harmonic. Our study is based on an exact analytical solution of Maxwell's equations, derived with the help of a Green's function method. In particular, we demonstrate that nonlinear harmonic generation (NHG) fromhelicalwigglers vanishes on axis. Our conclusion is in open contrast with results in literature, that include a kinematical mistake in the description of the electron motion. (orig.)

  9. A Field Theory Approach to Modeling Helical FCG's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortgang, C.M.

    1998-10-18

    Often helical flux-compressor generator (FCG) design codes are essentially circuit codes which utilize known equations for parameterizing circuit elements such as armature and stator inductance. The authors present an analytical model that is based more on first principals. The stator inductance is calculated using a definition of inductance in terms of the magnetic vector-potential. The calculation accounts for winding-pitch, bifurcations, and works for any ratio of length to diameter. The currents on the armature are calculated self-consistently and are not assumed to simply 'mirror' the stator currents. Resistive losses and magnetic diffusion losses are calculated less rigorously but they are working on better methods. Details of the model and comparison with experiment will be presented.

  10. Vortex dynamics in nonrelativistic Abelian Higgs model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Kozhevnikov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the gauge vortex with arbitrary form of a contour is considered in the framework of the nonrelativistic Abelian Higgs model, including the possibility of the gauge field interaction with the fermion asymmetric background. The equations for the time derivatives of the curvature and the torsion of the vortex contour generalizing the Betchov–Da Rios equations in hydrodynamics, are obtained. They are applied to study the conservation of helicity of the gauge field forming the vortex, twist, and writhe numbers of the vortex contour. It is shown that the conservation of helicity is broken when both terms in the equation of the vortex motion are present, the first due to the exchange of excitations of the phase and modulus of the scalar field and the second one due to the coupling of the gauge field forming the vortex, with the fermion asymmetric background.

  11. Analytical solution for multi-singular vortex Gaussian beams: the mathematical theory of scattering modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, A.; García-March, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel procedure for solving the Schrödinger equation, which in optics is the paraxial wave equation, with an initial multisingular vortex Gaussian beam. This initial condition has a number of singularities in a plane transversal to propagation embedded in a Gaussian beam. We use scattering modes, which are solutions to the paraxial wave equation that can be combined straightforwardly to express the initial condition and therefore allow the problem to be solved. To construct the scattering modes one needs to obtain a particular set of polynomials, which play an analogous role to Laguerre polynomials for Laguerre-Gaussian modes. We demonstrate here the recurrence relations needed to determine these polynomials. To stress the utility and strength of the method we solve first the problem of an initial Gaussian beam with two positive singularities and a negative one embedded in it. We show that the solution permits one to obtain analytical expressions. These can used to obtain mathematical expressions for meaningful quantities, such as the distance at which the positive and negative singularities merge, closing the loop of a vortex line. Furthermore, we present an example of the calculation of an specific discrete-Gauss state, which is the solution of the diffraction of a Laguerre-Gauss state showing definite angular momentum (that is, a highly charged vortex) by a thin diffractive element showing certain discrete symmetry. We show that this problem is therefore solved in a much simpler way than by using the previous procedure based on the integral Fresnel diffraction method.

  12. Helicity scalings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plunian, F [ISTerre, CNRS, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Lessinnes, T; Carati, D [Physique Statistique et Plasmas, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium); Stepanov, R, E-mail: Franck.Plunian@ujf-grenoble.fr [Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics of the Russian Academy of Science, Perm (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-22

    Using a helical shell model of turbulence, Chen et al. (2003) showed that both helicity and energy dissipate at the Kolmogorov scale, independently from any helicity input. This is in contradiction with a previous paper by Ditlevsen and Giuliani (2001) in which, using a GOY shell model of turbulence, they found that helicity dissipates at a scale larger than the Kolmogorov scale, and does depend on the helicity input. In a recent paper by Lessinnes et al. (2011), we showed that this discrepancy is due to the fact that in the GOY shell model only one helical mode (+ or -) is present at each scale instead of both modes in the helical shell model. Then, using the GOY model, the near cancellation of the helicity flux between the + and - modes cannot occur at small scales, as it should be in true turbulence. We review the main results with a focus on the numerical procedure needed to obtain accurate statistics.

  13. Modeling helicity dissipation-rate equation

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    2016-01-01

    Transport equation of the dissipation rate of turbulent helicity is derived with the aid of a statistical analytical closure theory of inhomogeneous turbulence. It is shown that an assumption on the helicity scaling with an algebraic relationship between the helicity and its dissipation rate leads to the transport equation of the turbulent helicity dissipation rate without resorting to a heuristic modeling.

  14. Relativistic vortex dynamics in axisymmetric stationary perfect fluid configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, G.

    2017-06-01

    Relativistic formulation of Helmholtz's vorticity transport equation is presented on the basis of Maxwell-like version of Euler's equation of motion. Entangled characteristics associated with vorticity flux conservation in a vortex tube and in a stream tube are displayed on basis of Greenberg's theory of spacelike congruence of vortex lines and 1+1+(2) decomposition of the gradient of fluid's 4-velocity. Vorticity flux surfaces are surfaces of revolution about the rotation axis and are rotating with fluid's angular velocity due to gravitational isorotation in a stationary axisymmetric perfect fluid configuration. Fluid's angular velocity, angular momentum per baryon, injection energy, and invariant rotational potential are constant on such vorticity flux surfaces. Gravitation causes distortion of coaxial cylindrical vorticity flux surfaces in the limit of post-Newtonian approximation. The rotation of the fluid with angular velocity relative to vorticity flux surfaces generates swirl which causes the stretching of material vortex lines being wrapped on vorticity flux surfaces. Fluid helicity which is conserved in the fluid's rest frame does not remain conserved in a locally nonrotating frame because of the existence of swirl. Vortex lines are twist free in the absence of meridional circulations, but the twisting of spacetime due to dragging effect leads to the increase in vorticity flux in a vortex tube.

  15. Flat Helical Nanosieves

    CERN Document Server

    Mei, Shengtao; Hussain, Sajid; Huang, Kun; Ling, Xiaohui; Siew, Shawn Yohanes; Liu, Hong; Teng, Jinghua; Danner, Aaron; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Compact and miniaturized devices with flexible functionalities are always highly demanded in optical integrated systems. Plasmonic nanosieve has been successfully harnessed as an ultrathin flat platform for complex manipulation of light, including holography, vortex generation and non-linear processes. Compared with most of reported single-functional devices, multi-functional nanosieves might find more complex and novel applications across nano-photonics, optics and nanotechnology. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a promising roadmap for nanosieve-based helical devices, which achieves full manipulations of optical vortices, including its generation, hybridization, spatial multiplexing, focusing and non-diffraction propagation etc., by controlling the geometric phase of spin light via over 121 thousands of spatially-rotated nano-sieves. Thanks to such spin-conversion nanosieve helical elements, it is no longer necessary to employ the conventional two-beam interferometric measurement to characterize optical ...

  16. Vortex rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmetov, D.G. [Lavrentiev Institute of Hydrodynamics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01

    This book presents a comprehensive coverage of the wide field of vortex rings. The book presents the results of systematic experimental investigations, theoretical foundation, as well as the practical applications of vortex rings, such as the extinction of fires at gushing gas and oil wells. All the basic properties of vortex rings as well as their hydrodynamic structures are presented. Special attention is paid to the formation and motion of turbulent vortex rings. (orig.)

  17. Sculptured 3D twister superlattices embedded with tunable vortex spirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Jolly; Vyas, Sunil; Senthilkumaran, Paramasivam; Denz, Cornelia; Joseph, Joby

    2011-09-01

    We present diverse reconfigurable complex 3D twister vortex superlattice structures in a large area embedded with tunable vortex spirals as well as dark rings, threaded by vortex helices. We demonstrate these tunable complex chiral vortex superlattices by the superposition of relatively phase engineered plane waves. The generated complex 3D twister lattice vortex structures are computationally as well as experimentally analyzed using various tools to verify the presence of phase singularities. Our observation indicates the application-specific flexibility of our approach to tailor the transverse superlattice spatial irradiance profile of these longitudinally whirling vortex-cluster units and dark rings.

  18. Vortex free energies in SO(3) and SU(2) lattice gauge theory

    CERN Document Server

    De Forcrand, Philippe; Forcrand, Philippe de; Jahn, Oliver

    2003-01-01

    Lattice gauge theories with gauge groups SO(3) and SU(2) are compared. The free energy of electric twist, an order parameter for the confinement-deconfinement transition which does not rely on centre-symmetry breaking, is measured in both theories. The results are used to calibrate the scale in SO(3).

  19. A study of helical and planar waves on sea urchin sperm flagella, with a theory of how they are generated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, D M; Vernon, G G

    2001-04-01

    When the spermatozoon of Echinus esculentus swims in sea water containing methyl cellulose (viscosity 1.5--4 Pa s), its flagellum may generate either a helical or a planar waveform, each type being stable. The helical wave, which is dextral, is complicated by the concurrent passage of miniature waves along it. These miniature waves have a pulsatile origin in the neck region of the spermatozoon. Our videotape analysis indicates that there are two pulses of mechanical activity for each true cycle of the helical wave. (The true helical frequency was obtained from the apparent wave frequency and the roll frequency of the sperm head, the latter being detectable in some sperm when lit stroboscopically.) The planar wave has a meander shape. During the propagation of planar waves, the sliding displacements are adjustable in either direction; moribund flagella can undergo unrestricted sliding. The planar waves are, in fact, exactly planar only at interfaces. Otherwise, there tend to be torsions in the interbend segments between planar bends. Mechanical stimulation of the flagellum can cause a sudden transition from the helical to the planar waveform. To account for the two modes of beating, we advance the hypothesis that circumferential linkages yield beyond a threshold strain. Whether this yield point is exceeded, we suggest, depends upon the balance between the active shear force and the external viscosity (among other factors). We propose that a subthreshold force originates in one array and then triggers the other dynein arrays circumferentially, but unidirectionally, around the base of the flagellum; whereas a suprathreshold force provokes bi-directional circumferential triggering. These may be the two patterns of activation that result in helical and planar waveforms, respectively. The transition from helical to planar bending may result from an increment in the force produced by the dynein motors. The pulsatile origin of the helical wave resembles behaviour described

  20. Employing Helicity Amplitudes for Resummation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moult, I.; Stewart, I.W.; Tackmann, F.J.; Waalewijn, W.J.

    2015-01-01

    Many state-of-the-art QCD calculations for multileg processes use helicity amplitudes as their fundamental ingredients. We construct a simple and easy-to-use helicity operator basis in soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), for which the hard Wilson coefficients from matching QCD onto SCET are dire

  1. A generalization of vortex lines

    CERN Document Server

    Fecko, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Helmholtz theorem states that, in ideal fluid, vortex lines move with the fluid. Another Helmholtz theorem adds that strength of a vortex tube is constant along the tube. The lines may be regarded as integral surfaces of an 1-dimensional integrable distribution (given by the vorticity 2-form). In general setting of theory of integral invariants, due to Poincare and Cartan, one can find $d$-dimensional integrable distribution whose integral surfaces show both properties of vortex lines: they move with (abstract) fluid and, for appropriate generalization of vortex tube, strength of the latter is constant along the tube.

  2. Multiply Phased Traveling BPS Vortex

    CERN Document Server

    Kimm, Kyoungtae; Cho, Y M

    2016-01-01

    We present the multiply phased current carrying vortex solutions in the U(1) gauge theory coupled to an $(N+1)$-component SU(N+1) scalar multiplet in the Bogomolny limit. Our vortex solutions correspond to the static vortex dressed with traveling waves along the axis of symmetry. What is notable in our vortex solutions is that the frequencies of traveling waves in each component of the scalar field can have different values. The energy of the static vortex is proportional to the topological charge of $CP^N$ model in the BPS limit, and the multiple phase of the vortex supplies additional energy contribution which is proportional to the Noether charge associated to the remaining symmetry.

  3. An acentric rotation of two helical vortices of the same circulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to test the possibility of a secondary solution of the acentric rotation of helical vortex pairs with the same pitch, sign and strength. The investigation addresses the three-dimensional vortex dynamics of thin vortex filaments. As a result of the current investigation...

  4. Helical secondary structure of polyalanine peptides in vacuo: Ac-Alan-LysH^+ (n=5,10,15), experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Mariana; Blum, Volker; Kupser, Peter; von Helden, Gert; Bierau, Frauke; Meijer, Gerard; Scheffler, Matthias

    2009-03-01

    The presence of a solvent is often viewed as indispensable to explain the structure of peptides and proteins. However, well defined secondary structure motifs (helices, sheets, ...) also exist in vacuo, offering a unique ``clean room'' condition to quantify the stabilizing interactions. We here unravel the structure of LysineH^+ capped polyalanine peptides Ac-Alan-LysH^+ (n-5,10,15), by combining experimental multi-photon IR spectra obtained using the FELIX free-electron laser at room-temperature with van der Waals-corrected all-electron density-functional theory (DFT) in the generalized gradient approximation in the FHI-aims code [1]. Earlier ion mobility studies of these molecules indicate helical structure [2], which we here demonstrate quantitatively. For n=5, we find a close energetic competition of different helix motifs (α, 310), with similar and good agreement between measured and calculated vibrational spectra. We show how the LysH^+ termination acts to induce helices also for longer peptides, and how vibrational modes develop with helix length (n=10,15), yielding, e.g., a softening of collective modes towards the infinite helix limit. [1] V. Blum et al, Comp. Phys. Comm. (2008), accepted. [2] M. Kohtani et al., JACS 120, 12975 (1998).

  5. Magnetic Helicity and Planetary Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2012-01-01

    A model planetary dynamo based on the Boussinesq approximation along with homogeneous boundary conditions is considered. A statistical theory describing a large-scale MHD dynamo is found, in which magnetic helicity is the critical parameter

  6. Quasiclassical theory of the vortex state in unconventional systems. Study of magnesium diboride and d-wave superconductors; Quasiklassische Theorie des Vortexzustandes in unkonventionellen Systemen. Betrachtung zu Magnesiumdiborid und d-Wellen-Supraleitern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graser, S.

    2006-07-01

    The two-band superconductor magnesium diboride as well as the high temperature cuprates belong to the class of type-II superconductors. In these systems between an upper and a lower critical magnetic field one can only find an incomplete Meissner effect und magnetic flux penetrates the superconductor in form of quantized flux tubes, so-called vortices. This work is devoted to the vortex state in magnesium diboride and the interplay of vortices and boundaries in d-wave superconductors. First of all analytical results for the quasiparticle density of states in high magnetic fields are obtained within the framework of the quasiclassical theory. Especially the influence of the Fermi surface topology on the spatially averaged quasiparticle density of states is discussed in detail. Furthermore selfconsistent numerical calculations of the pairing potential around an isolated vortex - a model of the vortex state in the vicinity of the lower critical field - are performed. In this context the unusual shrinkage of the vortex core with decreasing temperature, visible only in very clean superconductors and known as the Kramer-Pesch-effect, is examined for a two-band system. The last chapter is concerned with the influence of the flow-field of an isolated phase vortex on the Andreev bound states at the surface of a d-wave superconductor. The local suppression of the Andreev bound states in a shadow-like region between vortex and boundary is the main result and consequences of this ''vortexshadow-effect'' are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Fabrication of graded helical square tower-like Mn sculptured thin films and investigation of their electrical properties: comparison with perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakharpour, Mahsa; Savaloni, Hadi

    2017-06-01

    Mn sculptured thin films were fabricated in form of graded helical square tower-like terraced sculptured Mn thin films (GHSTTS) using oblique angle deposition together with rotation of substrate about its surface normal with fixed rotation angle (90°) and a shadowing block which was fixed at the centre of the substrate holder. The anisotropy of the samples was examined by resistivity measurements at two orthogonal angles. Direct relationship is obtained between resistivity and the anisotropy of the produced samples which showed that both of these parameters increase with decreasing distance from the edge of the shadowing block. Simulation work using the perturbation theory produced results consistent with the experimental observations.

  8. Fabrication of graded helical square tower-like Mn sculptured thin films and investigation of their electrical properties: comparison with perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakharpour, Mahsa; Savaloni, Hadi

    2017-02-01

    Mn sculptured thin films were fabricated in form of graded helical square tower-like terraced sculptured Mn thin films (GHSTTS) using oblique angle deposition together with rotation of substrate about its surface normal with fixed rotation angle (90°) and a shadowing block which was fixed at the centre of the substrate holder. The anisotropy of the samples was examined by resistivity measurements at two orthogonal angles. Direct relationship is obtained between resistivity and the anisotropy of the produced samples which showed that both of these parameters increase with decreasing distance from the edge of the shadowing block. Simulation work using the perturbation theory produced results consistent with the experimental observations.

  9. Helicity conservation in topology-changing reconnections: the flow of linking and coiling across scales

    CERN Document Server

    Scheeler, Martin W; Proment, Davide; Kindlmann, Gordon L; Irvine, William T M

    2014-01-01

    The conjecture that knottedness is a fundamental conserved physical quantity has a long history in fluid mechanics. In ideal flows, the conservation of helicity arises because the topology of vortex lines is invariant. In real flows (including superfluids), the large scale topology of vortex tubes changes through 'reconnection' events, so helicity can only be conserved by transferring to different spatial scales. By measuring the behavior of vortex knots and links in viscous fluid experiments and quantum fluid simulations, we identify a mechanism for helicity scale transfer through reconnections, allowing helicity to be conserved even when the topology is not. We also describe a new method for quantifying helicity across scales, and discuss the transfer of helicity to sub-core local twisting where it may ultimately be dissipated. Remarkably, we find that topology-changing reconnections proceed in a manner than tends to conserve helicity, suggesting that it plays a fundamental role in real fluids, from turbule...

  10. Particle-vortex symmetric liquid

    CERN Document Server

    Mulligan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We introduce an effective theory with manifest particle-vortex symmetry for disordered thin films undergoing a magnetic field-tuned superconductor-insulator transition. The theory may enable one to access both the critical properties of the strong-disorder limit, which has recently been confirmed [Breznay et al., PNAS 113, 280 (2016)] to exhibit particle-vortex symmetric electrical response, and the metallic phase discovered earlier [Mason and Kapitulnik, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 5341 (1999)] in less disordered samples. Within the effective theory, the Cooper-pair and field-induced vortex degrees of freedom are simultaneously incorporated into an electrically-neutral Dirac fermion minimally coupled to an (emergent) Chern-Simons gauge field. A derivation of the theory follows upon mapping the superconductor-insulator transition to the integer quantum Hall plateau transition and the subsequent use of Son's particle-hole symmetric composite Fermi liquid. Remarkably, particle-vortex symmetric response does not requir...

  11. Navier-Stokes solutions of unsteady separation induced by a vortex: Comparison with theory and influence of a moving wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obabko, Aleksandr Vladimirovich

    Numerical solutions of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are considered for the flow induced by a thick-core vortex convecting along an infinite surface in a two-dimensional incompressible flow. The formulation is considered as a model problem of the dynamic-stall vortex and is relevant to other unsteady separation phenomena including vorticity ejections in juncture flows and the vorticity production mechanism in turbulent boundary-layers. Induced by an adverse streamwise pressure gradient due to the presence of the vortex above the wall, a primary recirculation region forms and evolves toward a singular solution of the unsteady non-interacting boundary-layer equations. The resulting eruptive spike provokes a small-scale viscous-inviscid interaction in the high-Reynolds-number regime. In the moderate-Reynolds-numbers regime, the growing recirculation region initiates a large-scale interaction in the form of local changes in the streamwise pressure gradient accelerating the spike formation and resulting small-scale interaction through development of a region of streamwise compression. It also was found to induce regions of streamwise expansion and "child" recirculation regions that contribute to ejections of near-wall vorticity and splitting of the "parent" region into multiple co-rotating eddies. These eddies later merge into a single amalgamated eddy that is observed to pair with the detaching vortex similar to the low-Reynolds-number regime where the large-scale interaction occurs, but there is no spike or subsequent small-scale interaction. It is also found that increasing the wall speed or vortex convection velocity toward a critical value results in solutions that are indicative of flows at lower Reynolds numbers eventually leading to suppression of unsteady separation and vortex detachment processes.

  12. Jet vortex methods

    CERN Document Server

    Holm, Darryl D

    2015-01-01

    Vortex blob methods are typically characterized by a regularization length scale, below which the the dynamics are trivial for isolated blobs. In this article we will find that the dynamics need not be trivial if one is willing to consider distributional derivatives of Dirac delta functionals as valid vorticity distributions. More specifically, a new singular vortex theory is presented for regularised Euler fluid equations of ideal incompressible flow in the plane. We determine the conditions under which such regularised Euler fluid equations may admit vorticity singularities which are stronger than delta functions, e.g., derivatives of delta functions. We also characterise the Hamiltonian dynamics of the higher-order singular vortices. Applications to the design of numerical meth- ods similar to vortex blob methods are also discussed. Such findings shed light onto the rich dynamics which occur below the regularization length scale and enlighten our perspective on the multiscale aspects of regularized fluid m...

  13. Vortex bursting and tracer transport of a counter-rotating vortex pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misaka, T.; Holzäpfel, F.; Hennemann, I.; Gerz, T.; Manhart, M.; Schwertfirm, F.

    2012-02-01

    Large-eddy simulations of a coherent counter-rotating vortex pair in different environments are performed. The environmental background is characterized by varying turbulence intensities and stable temperature stratifications. Turbulent exchange processes between the vortices, the vortex oval, and the environment, as well as the material redistribution processes along the vortex tubes are investigated employing passive tracers that are superimposed to the initial vortex flow field. It is revealed that the vortex bursting phenomenon, known from photos of aircraft contrails or smoke visualization, is caused by collisions of secondary vortical structures traveling along the vortex tube which expel material from the vortex but do not result in a sudden decay of circulation or an abrupt change of vortex core structure. In neutrally stratified and weakly turbulent conditions, vortex reconnection triggers traveling helical vorticity structures which is followed by their collision. A long-lived vortex ring links once again establishing stable double rings. Key phenomena observed in the simulations are supported by photographs of contrails. The vertical and lateral extents of the detrained passive tracer strongly depend on environmental conditions where the sensitivity of detrainment rates on initial tracer distributions appears to be low.

  14. Helices and vector bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Rudakov, A N

    1990-01-01

    This volume is devoted to the use of helices as a method for studying exceptional vector bundles, an important and natural concept in algebraic geometry. The work arises out of a series of seminars organised in Moscow by A. N. Rudakov. The first article sets up the general machinery, and later ones explore its use in various contexts. As to be expected, the approach is concrete; the theory is considered for quadrics, ruled surfaces, K3 surfaces and P3(C).

  15. Helical filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbieri, Nicholas; Lim, Khan; Durand, Magali; Baudelet, Matthieu; Richardson, Martin [Townes Laser Institute, CREOL—The College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Johnson, Eric [Micro-Photonics Laboratory – Center for Optical Material Science, Clemson, Anderson, South Carolina 29634 (United States)

    2014-06-30

    The shaping of laser-induced filamenting plasma channels into helical structures by guiding the process with a non-diffracting beam is demonstrated. This was achieved using a Bessel beam superposition to control the phase of an ultrafast laser beam possessing intensities sufficient to induce Kerr effect driven non-linear self-focusing. Several experimental methods were used to characterize the resulting beams and confirm the observed structures are laser air filaments.

  16. NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION FOR THE HEAT TRANSFER ENHANCEMENT IN HELICAL CONE COILS OVER ORDINARY HELICAL COILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. ABO ELAZM

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This numerical research is introducing the concept of helical cone coils and their enhanced heat transfer characteristics compared to the ordinary helical coils. Helical and spiral coils are known to have better heat and mass transfer than straight tubes, which is attributed to the generation of a vortex at the helical coil known as Dean Vortex. The Dean number which is a dimensionless number used to describe the Dean vortex is a function of Reynolds number and the square root of the curvature ratio, so varying the curvature ratio for the same coil would vary the Dean number. Two scenarios were adopted to study the effect of changing the taper angle (curvature ratio on the heat transfer characteristics of the coil; the commercial software FLUENT was used in the investigation. It was found that Nusselt number increased with increasing the taper angle. A MATLAB code was built based on empirical correlation of Manlapaz and Churchill for ordinary helical coils to calculate the Nusselt number at each coil turn, and then calculate the average Nusselt number for the entire coil turns, the CFD simulation results were found acceptable when compared with the MATLAB results.

  17. Vortex methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chorin, A.J. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Mathematics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Vortex methods originated from the observation that in incompressible inviscid flow vorticity (or, more accurately, circulation) is a conserved quantity, as can be readily deduced from the absence of tangential stresses. Thus, if the vorticity is known at time t=0, one can find the flow at a later time by simply following the vorticity. In this narrow context, a vortex method is a numerical method that follows vorticity. The author restricts himself in these lectures to a special class of numerical vortex methods, those that are based on a Lagrangian transport of vorticity in hydrodynamics by smoothed particles (blobs) and those whose analysis contributes to the understanding of blob methods. Blob methods started in the 1930`s.

  18. Algebraic Fermi liquid from phase fluctuations: "topological" fermions, vortex "berryons," and QED3 theory of cuprate superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, M; Tesanović, Z

    2001-12-17

    Within the phase fluctuation model for the pseudogap state of cuprate superconductors we identify a novel statistical "Berry phase" interaction between the nodal quasiparticles and fluctuating vortex-antivortex excitations. The effective action describing this model assumes the form of an anisotropic Euclidean quantum electrodynamics in (2+1) dimensions (QED (3)) and naturally generates non-Fermi liquid behavior for its fermionic excitations. The doping axis in the x -T phase diagram emerges as a quantum critical line which regulates the low energy fermiology.

  19. Birth and evolution of an optical vortex

    CERN Document Server

    Vallone, Giuseppe; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Sciarrino, Fabio; Villoresi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    When a phase singularity is suddenly imprinted on the axis of an ordinary Gaussian beam, an optical vortex appears and starts to grow radially, by effect of diffraction. This radial growth and the subsequent evolution of the optical vortex under focusing or imaging can be well described in general within the recently introduced theory of circular beams, which generalize the hypergeometric-Gaussian beams and which obey novel kinds of ABCD rules. Here, we investigate experimentally these vortex propagation phenomena and test the validity of circular-beam theory. Moreover, we analyze the difference in radial structure between the newly generated optical vortex and the vortex obtained in the image plane, where perfect imaging would lead to complete closure of the vortex core.

  20. The Life of a Vortex Knot

    CERN Document Server

    Kleckner, Dustin; Irvine, William T M

    2013-01-01

    The idea that the knottedness (hydrodynamic Helicity) of a fluid flow is conserved has a long history in fluid mechanics. The quintessential example of a knotted flow is a knotted vortex filament, however, owing to experimental difficulties, it has not been possible until recently to directly generate knotted vortices in real fluids. Using 3D printed hydrofoils and high-speed laser scanning tomography, we generate vortex knots and links and measure their subsequent evolution. In both cases, we find that the vortices deform and stretch until a series of vortex reconnections occurs, eventually resulting several disjoint vortex rings. This article accompanies a fluid dynamics video entered into the Gallery of Fluid Motion at the 66th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics.

  1. Employing Helicity Amplitudes for Resummation in SCET

    CERN Document Server

    Moult, Ian; Tackmann, Frank J; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2016-01-01

    Helicity amplitudes are the fundamental ingredients of many QCD calculations for multi-leg processes. We describe how these can seamlessly be combined with resummation in Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET), by constructing a helicity operator basis for which the Wilson coefficients are directly given in terms of color-ordered helicity amplitudes. This basis is crossing symmetric and has simple transformation properties under discrete symmetries.

  2. Visualizing Spacetime Curvature via Frame-Drag Vortexes and Tidal Tendexes I. General Theory and Weak-Gravity Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nichols, David A; Zhang, Fan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Brink, Jeandrew; Chen, Yanbei; Kaplan, Jeffrey D; Lovelace, Geoffrey; Matthews, Keith D; Scheel, Mark A; Thorne, Kip S

    2011-01-01

    When one splits spacetime into space plus time, the Weyl curvature tensor (vacuum Riemann tensor) gets split into two spatial, symmetric, and trace-free (STF) tensors: (i) the Weyl tensor's so-called "electric" part or tidal field, and (ii) the Weyl tensor's so-called "magnetic" part or frame-drag field. Being STF, the tidal field and frame-drag field each have three orthogonal eigenvector fields which can be depicted by their integral curves. We call the integral curves of the tidal field's eigenvectors tendex lines, we call each tendex line's eigenvalue its tendicity, and we give the name tendex to a collection of tendex lines with large tendicity. The analogous quantities for the frame-drag field are vortex lines, their vorticities, and vortexes. We build up physical intuition into these concepts by applying them to a variety of weak-gravity phenomena: a spinning, gravitating point particle, two such particles side by side, a plane gravitational wave, a point particle with a dynamical current-quadrupole mo...

  3. Self-consistent Bogoliubov-de Gennes theory of the vortex lattice state in a two-dimensional strongly type-II superconductor at high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, Vladimir; Duan, Wenye; Maniv, Tsofar

    2017-01-01

    A self-consistent Bogoliubov-de Gennes theory of the vortex lattice state in a 2D strong type-II superconductor at high magnetic fields reveals a novel quantum mixed state around the semiclassical Hc 2, characterized by a well-defined Landau-Bloch band structure in the quasiparticle spectrum and suppressed order-parameter amplitude, which sharply crossover into the well-known semiclassical (Helfand-Werthamer) results upon decreasing magnetic field. Application to the 2D superconducting state observed recently on the surface of the topological insulator Sb2Te3 accounts well for the experimental data, revealing a strong type-II superconductor, with unusually low carrier density and very small cyclotron mass, which can be realized only in the strong coupling superconductor limit.

  4. A parametric study of blade vortex interaction noise for two, three, and four-bladed model rotors at moderate tip speeds Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, K. P.; Harris, W. L.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation of blade slap due to blade vortex interaction (BVI) has been conducted. This investigation consisted of an examination of BVI blade slap for two, three, and four-bladed model rotors at tip Mach numbers ranging from 0.20 to 0.50. Blade slap contours have been obtained for each configuration tested. Differences in blade slap contours, peak sound pressure level, and directivity for each configuration tested are noted. Additional fundamental differences, such as multiple interaction BVI, are observed and occur for only specific rotor blade configurations. The effect of increasing the Mach number on the BVI blade slap for various rotor blade combinations has been quantified. A peak blade slap Mach number scaling law is proposed. Comparison of measured BVI blade slap with theory is made.

  5. Brownian motion of helical flagella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshikawa, H; Saito, N

    1979-07-01

    We develops a theory of the Brownian motion of a rigid helical object such as bacterial flagella. The statistical properties of the random forces acting on the helical object are discussed and the coefficients of the correlations of the random forces are determined. The averages , and are also calculated where z and theta are the position along and angle around the helix axis respectively. Although the theory is limited to short time interval, direct comparison with experiment is possible by using the recently developed cinematography technique.

  6. Role of Cross Helicity in Cascade Processes of MHD turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Mizeva, Irina; Frick, Peter; 10.1134/S1028335809020128

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the spectral properties of the developed isotropic (non-Alfven) MHD turbulence stationary excited by an external force, which injects the cross helicity into the flow simultaneously with the energy. It is shown that the cross helicity blocks the spectral energy transfer in MHD turbulence and results in energy accumulation in the system. This accumulation proceeds until the vortex intensification compensates the decreasing efficiency of nonlinear interactions. The formula for estimating the average turbulence energy is obtained for the set ratio between the injected helicity and energy. It is remarkable that the turbulence accumulates the injected cross helicity at its low rate injection -- the integral correlation coefficient significantly exceeds the ratio between the injected helicity and the energy. It is shown that the spectrum slope gradually increases from "5/3" to "2" with the cross helicity level.

  7. Analysis of wind turbine aerodynamics and aeroelasticity using vortex-based methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel Simon Pierre

    Momentum analysis through Blade Element Momentum (BEM) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are the two major paths commonly followed for wind turbine aerodynamic and aeroelastic research. Instead, the current PhD thesis focuses on the application of vortex-based methods. Vortex-based methods...... are understood as both simple vortex models and advanced numerical vortex methods. Prandtl’s tip-loss factor and Coleman’s yaw model are examples of features that were obtained using simple vortex models and implemented in BEM-based codes. Low-order vortex lattice codes and high-order vortex particle methods...... have regained interest in wind energy applications over the last two decades. The current work derives and illustrates some of the potential benefits of vortex-based analyses. The two key wake geometries used in this study to derive simple vortex models are the cylindrical and helical wake models. Both...

  8. Brownian vortexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Lin, Jiayi; Darby, Ellis; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Grier, David G.

    2009-07-01

    Mechanical equilibrium at zero temperature does not necessarily imply thermodynamic equilibrium at finite temperature for a particle confined by a static but nonconservative force field. Instead, the diffusing particle can enter into a steady state characterized by toroidal circulation in the probability flux, which we call a Brownian vortex. The circulatory bias in the particle’s thermally driven trajectory is not simply a deterministic response to the solenoidal component of the force but rather reflects interplay between advection and diffusion in which thermal fluctuations extract work from the nonconservative force field. As an example of this previously unrecognized class of stochastic heat engines, we consider a colloidal sphere diffusing in a conventional optical tweezer. We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that nonconservative optical forces bias the particle’s fluctuations into toroidal vortexes whose circulation can reverse direction with temperature or laser power.

  9. Employing Helicity Amplitudes for Resummation

    CERN Document Server

    Moult, Ian; Tackmann, Frank J; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2015-01-01

    Many state-of-the-art QCD calculations for multileg processes use helicity amplitudes as their fundamental ingredients. We construct a simple and easy-to-use helicity operator basis in soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), for which the hard Wilson coefficients from matching QCD onto SCET are directly given in terms of color-ordered helicity amplitudes. Using this basis allows one to seamlessly combine fixed-order helicity amplitudes at any order they are known with a resummation of higher-order logarithmic corrections. In particular, the virtual loop amplitudes can be employed in factorization theorems to make predictions for exclusive jet cross sections without the use of numerical subtraction schemes to handle real-virtual infrared cancellations. We also discuss matching onto SCET in renormalization schemes with helicities in $4$- and $d$-dimensions. To demonstrate that our helicity operator basis is easy to use, we provide an explicit construction of the operator basis, as well as results for the hard m...

  10. Characterization of Vortex Generator Induced Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika

    The aim of this thesis is the characterization and modeling of the longitudinal structures actuated by vortex generators. Results from generic studies performed at low Reynolds numbers have shown that the device induced vortices possess helical structure of the vortex core. Further, their ability...... to control separation and downstream evolution across the chord of a circular sector have been studied. Similar flow structures to the ones found in the generic experiments have been found in a higher Reynolds number setting, more applicable to realistic cases common to, e.g., aeronautical applications...

  11. Numerical Study of Mechanism of U-shaped Vortex Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Ping; Liu, Chaoqun

    2014-01-01

    This paper illustrates the mechanism of U-shaped vortex formation which is found both by experiment and DNS. The main goal of this paper is to explain how the U-shaped vortex is formed and further develops. According to the results obtained by our direct numerical simulation with high order accuracy, the U-shaped vortex is part of the coherent vortex structure and is actually the tertiary streamwise vortices induced by the secondary vortices. The new finding is quite different from existing theories which describe that the U-shaped vortex is newly formed as the head of young turbulence spot and finally break down to small pieces. In addition, we find that the U-shaped vortex has the same vorticity sign as the original {\\lambda}-shaped vortex tube legs and serves as a second neck to supply vorticity to the ringlike vortex when the original vortex tube is stretched and multiple rings are generated.

  12. Particle-vortex symmetric liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We introduce an effective theory with manifest particle-vortex symmetry for disordered thin films undergoing a magnetic field-tuned superconductor-insulator transition. The theory may enable one to access both the critical properties of the strong-disorder limit, which has recently been confirmed by Breznay et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 113, 280 (2016), 10.1073/pnas.1522435113] to exhibit particle-vortex symmetric electrical response, and the nearby metallic phase discovered earlier by Mason and Kapitulnik [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 5341 (1999), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.82.5341] in less disordered samples. Within the effective theory, the Cooper-pair and field-induced vortex degrees of freedom are simultaneously incorporated into an electrically neutral Dirac fermion minimally coupled to a (emergent) Chern-Simons gauge field. A derivation of the theory follows upon mapping the superconductor-insulator transition to the integer quantum Hall plateau transition and the subsequent use of Son's particle-hole symmetric composite Fermi liquid. Remarkably, particle-vortex symmetric response does not require the introduction of disorder; rather, it results when the Dirac fermions exhibit vanishing Hall effect. The theory predicts approximately equal (diagonal) thermopower and Nernst signal with a deviation parameterized by the measured electrical Hall response at the symmetric point.

  13. Spectral large-eddy simulations and vortex dynamics in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lesieur, M

    1999-01-01

    We present a point of view of large-eddy simulations (LES) in Fourier space, where the eddy coefficients are expressed thanks to a two- point spectral closure of isotropic turbulence, the EDQNM theory. Returning to real space, this leads to models of the structure- function family (plain, selective or filtered). These models are applied with success to predict the statistical distributions and coherent-vortex dynamics for a wide variety of turbulent flows. In three-dimensional decaying isotropic turbulence, we confirm the existence of a k/sup 4/ infrared backscatter in the kinetic-energy spectrum, and predict a new k/sup 2/ law for the pressure spectrum in this range. In the mixing layer (temporal or spatial), we show how to manipulate the topology of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices, from quasi two- dimensionality to helical pairing. The latter vortex organization is found in a backward-facing step just behind the step, and yields big staggered Lambda -vortices which are carried away downstream. In a developed turb...

  14. Anatomy of a Bathtub Vortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas; Stenum, Bjarne

    2003-01-01

    We present experiments and theory for the "bathtub vortex," which forms when a fluid drains out of a rotating cylindrical container through a small drain hole. The fast down-flow is found to be confined to a narrow and rapidly rotating "drainpipe" from the free surface down to the drain hole. Sur...

  15. A computational study of the topology of vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spall, Robert E.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1991-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional numerical simulation of vortex breakdown using the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations has been performed. Solutions to four distinct types of breakdown are identified and compared with experimental results. The computed solutions include weak helical, double helix, spiral, and bubble-type breakdowns. The topological structure of the various breakdowns as well as their interrelationship are studied. The data reveal that the asymmetric modes of breakdown may be subject to additional breakdowns as the vortex core evolves in the streamwise direction. The solutions also show that the freestream axial velocity distribution has a significant effect on the position and type of vortex breakdown.

  16. Generation of polarization vortex beams by segmented quarter-wave plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingtao Xin; Xiaoping Lou; Zhehai Zhou; Mingli Dong; Lianqing Zhu

    2016-01-01

    A spatially variable retardation device,an SQWP,is designed to generate polarization vortex beams.The transformation of Laguerre-Gaussian beams by the SQWP is further studied,and it is found that the SQWPs can also be used to generate helical beams and measure the topological charges of helical beams.

  17. Scattering of a vortex pair by a single quantum vortex in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, L. A.; Smirnov, A. I.; Mironov, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the scattering of vortex pairs (the particular case of 2D dark solitons) by a single quantum vortex in a Bose-Einstein condensate with repulsive interaction between atoms. For this purpose, an asymptotic theory describing the dynamics of such 2D soliton-like formations in an arbitrary smoothly nonuniform flow of a ultracold Bose gas is developed. Disregarding the radiation loss associated with acoustic wave emission, we demonstrate that vortex-antivortex pairs can be put in correspondence with quasiparticles, and their behavior can be described by canonical Hamilton equations. For these equations, we determine the integrals of motion that can be used to classify various regimes of scattering of vortex pairs by a single quantum vortex. Theoretical constructions are confirmed by numerical calculations performed directly in terms of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We propose a method for estimating the radiation loss in a collision of a soliton-like formation with a phase singularity. It is shown by direct numerical simulation that under certain conditions, the interaction of vortex pairs with a core of a single quantum vortex is accompanied by quite intense acoustic wave emission; as a result, the conditions for applicability of the asymptotic theory developed here are violated. In particular, it is visually demonstrated by a specific example how radiation losses lead to a transformation of a vortex-antivortex pair into a vortex-free 2D dark soliton (i.e., to the annihilation of phase singularities).

  18. Currents for Arbitrary Helicity

    CERN Document Server

    Dragon, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Using Mackey's classification of unitary representations of the Poincar\\'e group on massles states of arbitrary helicity we disprove the claim that states with helicity |h|>=1 cannot couple to a conserved current by constructing such a current.

  19. Cut-and-connect of two antiparallel vortex tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melander, Mogens V.; Hussain, Fazle

    1988-01-01

    Motivated by an early conjecture that vortex cut-and-connect plays a key role in mixing and production of turbulence, helicity and aerodynamic noise, the cross-linking of two antiparallel viscous vortex tubes via direct numerical simulation is studied. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved by a dealiased pseudo-spectral method with 64 cubed grid points in a periodic domain for initial Reynolds numbers Re up to 1000. The vortex tubes are given an initial sinusoidal perturbation to induce a collision and keep the two tubes pressed against each other as annihilation continues. Cross-sectional and wire plots of various properties depict three stages of evolution: (1) Inviscid induction causing vortex cores to first approach and form a contact zone with a dipole cross-section, and then to flatten and stretch; (2) Vorticity annihilation in the contact zone accompanied by bridging between the two vortices at both ends of the contact zone due to a collection of cross-linked vortex lines, now orthogonal to the initial vortex tubes. The direction of dipole advection in the contact zone reverses; and (3) Threading of the remnants of the original vortices in between the bridges as they pull apart. The crucial stage 2 is shown to be a simple consequence of vorticity annihilation in the contact zone, link-up of the un-annihilated parts of vortex lines, and stretching and advection by the vortex tube swirl of the cross-linked lines, which accumulate at stagnation points in front of the annihilating vortex dipole. It is claimed that bridging is the essence of any vorticity cross-linking and that annihilation is sustained by stretching of the dipole by the bridges. Vortex reconnection details are found to be insensitive to asymmetry. Modeling of the reconnection process is briefly examined. The 3D spatial details of scalar transport (at unity Schmidt number), enstrophy production, dissipation and helicity are also examined.

  20. Response to “Comment on ‘Motion of a helical vortex filament in superfluid {sup 4}He under the extrinsic form of the local induction approximation”’ [Phys. Fluids 26, 019101 (2014)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Gorder, Robert A., E-mail: rav@knights.ucf.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816-1364 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    I agree with the authors regarding their comments on the Donnelly-Glaberson instability for such helical filaments as those obtained in my paper. I also find merit in their derivation of the quantum LIA (local induction approximation) in the manner of the LIA of Boffetta et al. However, I disagree with the primary criticisms of Hietala and Hänninen. In particular, though they suggest LIA and local nonlinear equation modes are not comparable since the former class of models contains superfluid friction parameters, note that since these parameters are small one may take them to zero and consider a qualitative comparison of the models (which is what was done in my paper). Second, while Hietala and Hänninen criticize certain assumptions made in my paper (and the paper of Shivamoggi where the model comes from) since the results break-down when Ak → ∞, note that in my paper I state that any deviations from the central axis along which the filament is aligned must be sufficiently bounded in variation. Therefore, it was already acknowledged that Ak(=|Φ{sub x}|) should be sufficiently bounded, precluding the Ak → ∞ case. I also show that, despite what Hietala and Hänninen claim, the dispersion relation obtained in my paper is consistent with LIA, where applicable. Finally, while Hietala and Hänninen claim that the dispersion parameter should be complex valued, I show that their dispersion relation is wrong, since it was derived incorrectly (they assume the complex modulus of the potential function is constant, yet then use this to obtain a potential function with non-constant modulus)

  1. Bifurcation and instability problems in vortex wakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aref, H [Center for Fluid Dynamics and Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, DK-2800 (Denmark); Broens, M [Center for Fluid Dynamics and Department of Mathematics, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, DK-2800 (Denmark); Stremler, M A [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    A number of instability and bifurcation problems related to the dynamics of vortex wake flows are addressed using various analytical tools and approaches. We discuss the bifurcations of the streamline pattern behind a bluff body as a vortex wake is produced, a theory of the universal Strouhal-Reynolds number relation for vortex wakes, the bifurcation diagram for 'exotic' wake patterns behind an oscillating cylinder first determined experimentally by Williamson and Roshko, and the bifurcations in topology of the streamlines pattern in point vortex streets. The Hamiltonian dynamics of point vortices in a periodic strip is considered. The classical results of von Karman concerning the structure of the vortex street follow from the two-vortices-in-a-strip problem, while the stability results follow largely from a four-vortices-in-a-strip analysis. The three-vortices-in-a-strip problem is argued to be relevant to the wake behind an oscillating body.

  2. Bifurcation and instability problems in vortex wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aref, Hassan; Brøns, Morten; Stremler, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    A number of instability and bifurcation problems related to the dynamics of vortex wake flows are addressed using various analytical tools and approaches. We discuss the bifurcations of the streamline pattern behind a bluff body as a vortex wake is produced, a theory of the universal Strouhal......-Reynolds number relation for vortex wakes, the bifurcation diagram for "exotic" wake patterns behind an oscillating cylinder first determined experimentally by Williamson & Roshko, and the bifurcations in topology of the streamlines pattern in point vortex streets. The Hamiltonian dynamics of point vortices...... in a periodic strip is considered. The classical results of von Kármán concerning the structure of the vortex street follow from the two-vortices-in-a-strip problem, while the stability results follow largely from a four-vortices-in-a-strip analysis. The three-vortices-in-a-strip problem is argued...

  3. Helicity dependent parton distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Scopetta, Sergio; 10.4249/scholarpedia.10226

    2011-01-01

    The helicity dependent parton distributions describe the number density of partons with given longitudinal momentum x and given polarization in a hadron polarized longitudinally with respect to its motion. After the discovery, more than 70 years ago, that the proton is not elementary, the observation of Bjorken scaling in the late 1960s lead to the idea of hadrons containing almost pointlike constituents, the partons. Since then, Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) has played a crucial role in our understanding of hadron structure. Through DIS experiments it has been possible to link the partons to the quarks, and to unveil the presence of other pointlike constituents, the gluons, which lead into a dynamical theory of quarks and gluons - quantum chromodynamics (QCD). Polarized DIS, i.e. the collision of a longitudinally polarized lepton beam on a polarized target (either longitudinally or transversely polarized), provides a complementary information regarding the structure of the nucleon. Whereas ordinary DIS pro...

  4. An investigation of the vortex method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pryor, Jr., Duaine Wright [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The vortex method is a numerical scheme for solving the vorticity transport equation. Chorin introduced modern vortex methods. The vortex method is a Lagrangian, grid free method which has less intrinsic diffusion than many grid schemes. It is adaptive in the sense that elements are needed only where the vorticity is non-zero. Our description of vortex methods begins with the point vortex method of Rosenhead for two dimensional inviscid flow, and builds upon it to eventually cover the case of three dimensional slightly viscous flow with boundaries. This section gives an introduction to the fundamentals of the vortex method. This is done in order to give a basic impression of the previous work and its line of development, as well as develop some notation and concepts which will be used later. The purpose here is not to give a full review of vortex methods or the contributions made by all the researchers in the field. Please refer to the excellent review papers in Sethian and Gustafson, chapters 1 Sethian, 2 Hald, 3 Sethian, 8 Chorin provide a solid introduction to vortex methods, including convergence theory, application in two dimensions and connection to statistical mechanics and polymers. Much of the information in this review is taken from those chapters, Chorin and Marsden and Batchelor, the chapters are also useful for their extensive bibliographies.

  5. Theory of concentrated vortices an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseenko, S V; Okulov, V L

    2007-01-01

    Vortex motion is one of the basic states of a flowing continuum. Intere- ingly, in many cases vorticity is space-localized, generating concentrated vortices. Vortex filaments having extremely diverse dynamics are the most characteristic examples of such vortices. Notable examples, in particular, include such phenomena as self-inducted motion, various instabilities, wave generation, and vortex breakdown. These effects are typically ma- fested as a spiral (or helical) configuration of a vortex axis. Many publications in the field of hydrodynamics are focused on vortex motion and vortex effects. Only a few books are devoted entirely to v- tices, and even fewer to concentrated vortices. This work aims to highlight the key problems of vortex formation and behavior. The experimental - servations of the authors, the impressive visualizations of concentrated vortices (including helical and spiral) and pictures of vortex breakdown primarily motivated the authors to begin this work. Later, the approach based on the hel...

  6. On the lifetime of an intense localized barotropic vortex on the {beta}-plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reznik, G.M. [Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation). P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology; Grimshaw, R. [Monash Univ., Clayton, Victoria (Australia). Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics

    1999-12-01

    The study presents an asymptotic theory for the long time evolution of an intense barotropic vortex, on the {beta}-plane. Three stages are described: first, the near-field development of {beta}-gyres; second, the intensification of the quadrupole and secondary axisymmetric components with vortex decay. The theory takes into account of all three stages and provides estimates for the vortex lifetime.

  7. Cavitating vortex characterization based on acoustic signal detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digulescu, A.; Murgan, I.; Candel, I.; Bunea, F.; Ciocan, G.; Bucur, D. M.; Dunca, G.; Ioana, C.; Vasile, G.; Serbanescu, A.

    2016-11-01

    In hydraulic turbines operating at part loads, a cavitating vortex structure appears at runner outlet. This helical vortex, called vortex rope, can be cavitating in its core if the local pressure is lower that the vaporization pressure. An actual concern is the detection of the cavitation apparition and the characterization of its level. This paper presents a potentially innovative method for the detection of the cavitating vortex presence based on acoustic methods. The method is tested on a reduced scale facility using two acoustic transceivers positioned in ”V” configuration. The received signals were continuously recorded and their frequency content was chosen to fit the flow and the cavitating vortex. Experimental results showed that due to the increasing flow rate, the signal - vortex interaction is observed as modifications on the received signal's high order statistics and bandwidth. Also, the signal processing results were correlated with the data measured with a pressure sensor mounted in the cavitating vortex section. Finally it is shown that this non-intrusive acoustic approach can indicate the apparition, development and the damping of the cavitating vortex. For real scale facilities, applying this method is a work in progress.

  8. Shearing Wind Helicity and Thermal Wind Helicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Helicity is defined as H=V.ω, where V and ω are the velocity and vorticity vectors, respectively.Many works have pointed out that the larger the helicity is, the longer the life cycle of the weather system is. However, the direct relationship of the helicity to the evolution of the weather system is not quite clear. In this paper, the concept of helicity is generalized as shearing wind helicity (SWH). Dynamically,it is found that the average SWH is directly related to the increase of the average cyclonic rotation of the weather system. Physically, it is also pointed out that the SWH, as a matter of fact, is the sum of the torsion terms and the divergence term in the vorticity equation. Thermal wind helicity (TWH), as a derivative of SWH, is also discussed here because it links the temperature field and the vertical wind field. These two quantities may be effective for diagnosing a weather system. This paper applies these two quantities in cylindrical coordinates to study the development of Hurricane Andrew to validate their practical use. Through analyzing the hurricane, it is found that TWH can well describe the characteristics of the hurricane such as the strong convection and release of latent heat. SWH is not only a good quantity for diagnosing the weather system, but also an effective one for diagnosing the development of the hurricane.

  9. Fractional vortex Hilbert's Hotel

    CERN Document Server

    Gbur, Greg

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate how the unusual mathematics of transfinite numbers, in particular a nearly perfect realization of Hilbert's famous hotel paradox, manifests in the propagation of light through fractional vortex plates. It is shown how a fractional vortex plate can be used, in principle, to create any number of "open rooms," i.e. topological charges, simultaneously. Fractional vortex plates are therefore demonstrated to create a singularity of topological charge, in which the vortex state is completely undefined and in fact arbitrary.

  10. Topological Aspect of Knotted Vortex Filaments in Excitable Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Ji-Rong; ZHU Tao; DUAN Yi-Shi

    2008-01-01

    Scroll waves exist ubiquitously in three-dimensional excitable media.The rotation centre can be regarded as a topological object called the vortex filament.In three-dimensional space,the vortex filaments usually form closed loops,and can be even linked and knotted.We give a rigorous topological description of knotted vortex filaments.By using the Φ-mapping topological current theory,we rewrite the topological current form of the charge density of vortex filaments,and using this topological current we reveal that the Hopf invariant of vortex filaments is just the sum of the linking and self-linking numbers of the knotted vortex filaments.We think that the precise expression of the Hopf invariant may imply a new topological constraint on knotted vortex filaments.

  11. Diagnosis of a Severe Rainstorm Event Induced by Eastly Wave and Vortex in Off Southeast Coast of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Feng

    2009-01-01

    Using the NCEP reanalysis at 1° ×1° resolution in conjunction with satellite imagery, a study is undertaken of easterly wave related rainstorm events on August 3~4, 2001 in seaboards between northern Fujian and southern Zhejiang, expounding the scheme for computing helicity, and exploring the rainstorm evolution and the genesis of the Yandang mountains-triggered a meso-vortex (Duan and Chen, 2005) by means of helicity and Q vector divergence. Besides, MM5V2 is employed to simulate the easterly wave caused meso-vortex. Results show that the development of the central intensity and location of the high-valued helicity is well indicative of the fallout area and the genesis of the meso-vortex, discovering that the space/time evolutions of helicity serve as indicators of some utility for the rainfall occurrence; it is revealed that the calculated helicity is of higher precision than MM5V2 simulations in predicting the initial position and the track of the meso-vortex, with their combination contributing to the improvement of predicting the meso-vortex, also, the space/time evolutions in the superimposition of the zone of large-value helicity gradients upon that of high-value Q vector divergence gradients can be used to accurately forecast the rainstorm happening and initial position of the meso-vortex, thereby illustrating the higher ability of diagnosing the precipitation and its system in the superimposed region.

  12. Sadovskii vortex in strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freilich, Daniel; Llewellyn Smith, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    A Sadovskii vortex is a patch of fluid with uniform vorticity surrounded by a vortex sheet. Using a boundary element type method, we investigate the steady states of this flow in an incompressible, inviscid straining flow. Outside the vortex, the fluid is irrotational. In the limiting case where the entire circulation is due to the vortex patch, this is a patch vortex (Moore & Saffman, Aircraft wake turbulence and its detection 1971). In the other limiting case, where all the circulation is due to the vortex sheet, this is a hollow vortex (Llewellyn Smith and Crowdy, J. Fluid Mech. 691, 2012). This flow has two governing nondimensional parameters, relating the strengths of the straining field, vortex sheet, and patch vorticity. We study the relationship between these two parameters, and examine the shape of the resulting vortices. We also work towards a bifurcation diagram of the steady states of the Sadovskii vortex in an attempt to understand the connection between vortex sheet and vortex patch desingularizations of the point vortex. Support from NSF-CMMI-0970113.

  13. Delaying vortex breakdown by waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, M. F.; Jiang, L. B.; Wu, J. Z.; Ma, H. Y.; Pan, J. Y.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of spiral waves on delaying vortex breakdown in a tube is studied experimentally and theoretically. When a harmonic oscillation was imposed on one of guiding vanes in the tube, the breakdown was observed to be postponed appreciately. According to the generalized Lagrangian mean theory, proper forcing spiral waves may produce an additional streaming momentum, of which the effect is favorable and similar to an axial suction at downstream end. The delayed breakdown position is further predicted by using nonlinear wave theory. Qualitative agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, and experimental comparison of the effects due to forcing spiral wave and axial suction is made.

  14. Streamwise Vortex Interaction with a Horseshoe Vortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Piotr Doerffer; Pawel Flaszynski; Franco Magagnato

    2003-01-01

    Flow control in turbomachinery is very difficult because of the complexity of its fully 3-D flow structure. The authors propose to introduce streamwise vortices into the control of internal flows. A simple configuration of vortices was investigated in order to better understand the flow control methods by means of streamwise vortices.The research presented here concerns streamwise vortex interaction with a horseshoe vortex. The effects of such an interaction are significantly dependent on the relative location of the streamwise vortex in respect to the leading edge of the profile. The streamwise vortex is induced by an air jet. The horseshoe vortex is generated by the leading edge of a symmetric profile. Such a configuration gives possibility to investigate the interaction of these two vortices alone. The presented analysis is based on numerical simulations by means of N-S compressible solver with a two-equation turbulence model.

  15. Magnetic Helicity in a Cyclic Convective Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Zhang, Mei; Augustson, Kyle C.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic helicity is a fundamental agent for magnetic self-organization in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamos. As a conserved quantity in ideal MHD, it establishes a strict topological coupling between large and small-scale magnetic fields. The generation of magnetic fields on scales larger than the velocity field is linked to an upscale transfer of magnetic helicity, either locally in spectral space as in the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in MHD turbulence or non-locally, as in the turbulent alpha-effect of mean-field dynamo theory. Thus, understanding the generation, transport, and dissipation of magnetic helicity is an essential prerequisite to understanding manifestations of magnetic self-organization in the solar dynamo, including sunspots, the prominent dipole and quadrupole moments, and the 22-year magnetic activity cycle. We investigate the role of magnetic helicity in a convective dynamo model that exhibits regular magnetic cycles. The cycle is marked by coherent bands of toroidal field that persist within the convection zone and that are antisymmetric about the equator. When these toriodal bands interact across the equator, it initiates a global restructuring of the magnetic topology that contributes to the reversal of the dipole moment. Thus, the polar field reversals are preceeded by a brief reversal of the subsurface magnetic helicity. There is some evidence that the Sun may exhibit a similar magnetic helicity reversal prior to its polar field reversals.

  16. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P St J; Beravat, R; Wong, G K L

    2017-02-28

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic 'space', cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of 'numerical experiments' based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Authors.

  17. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P. St. J.; Beravat, R.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2017-02-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic `space', cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of `numerical experiments' based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  18. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beravat, R.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2017-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic ‘space’, cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of ‘numerical experiments’ based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069771

  19. Vortex mechanism in hydrocyclones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐继润; 刘正宁; 邢军; 李新跃; 黄慧; 徐海燕; 罗茜

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of analyzing the vortex characteristics, a new mechanism of the vortex formation in hydrocyclones is developed. The main concept of the mechanism is that the vortex flow in a hydrocyclone is resulted from the overlapping of container rotation and hole leakage. The model is then used to explain the compound distribution of free vortex and forced vortex, predict the similarity of tangential velocity at different input pressures, and make count of the principle of small hydrocyclone with lower cut-size than large one. Meanwhile a new possible approach to a large hydro-cyclone with lower cut-size by minimizing or eliminating the air core is discussed briefly.

  20. Magnetic Helicity Conservation and Astrophysical Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Vishniac, E T; Vishniac, Ethan T.; Cho, Jungyeon

    2000-01-01

    We construct a magnetic helicity conserving dynamo theory which incorporates a calculated magnetic helicity current. In this model the fluid helicity plays a small role in large scale magnetic field generation. Instead, the dynamo process is dominated by a new quantity, derived from asymmetries in the second derivative of the velocity correlation function, closely related to the `twist and fold' dynamo model. The turbulent damping term is, as expected, almost unchanged. Numerical simulations with a spatially constant fluid helicity and vanishing resistivity are not expected to generate large scale fields in equipartition with the turbulent energy density. In fact, there seems to be little prospect for driving a fast dynamo in a closed box containing homogeneous turbulence. On the other hand, there is an efficient analog to the $\\alpha-\\Omega$ dynamo. Systems whose turbulence is driven by some anisotropic local instability in shearing flow, like real stars and accretion disks, and some computer simulations, ma...

  1. Depicting Vortex Stretching and Vortex Relaxing Mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符松; 李启兵; 王明皓

    2003-01-01

    Different from many existing studies on the paranetrization of vortices, we investigate the effectiveness of two new parameters for identifying the vortex stretching and vortex relaxing mechanisms. These parameters are invariants and identify three-dimensional flow structures only, i.e. they diminish in two-dimensional flows. This is also unlike the existing vortex identification approaches which deliver information in two-dimensional flows. The present proposals have been successfully applied to identify the stretching and relaxing vortices in compressible mixing layers and natural convection flows.

  2. Linear Eсkman friction in the mechanism of the cyclone-anticyclone vortex asymmetry and in a new theory of rotating superfluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey G. Chefranov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aims The observed experimental and natural phenomenon of cyclone-anticyclone vortex asymmetry implies that a relatively more stable and showing a longer life, as well as a relatively more intense mode of rotation with an anticyclonic circulation direction (opposite to the direction of rotation of the medium as a whole is realized as compared with an oppositely directed rotation of the cyclonic vortex mode. Until now, however, it was not a success to identify a universal triggering mechanism responsible for the formation of the corresponding breaking of chiral vortex symmetry. Materials and methods In this paper we reveal the said linear universal instability mechanism of breaking of chiral symmetry in the sign of vortex circulation in the rotating medium in the presence of linear Eckman friction. Results Obtained is a condition for the linear dissipative - centrifugal instability (DCI, which leads (only when considering the external linear Eckman friction for an abovethreshold value of rotation frequency of the underlying boundary surface of fluid to the breaking of chiral symmetry in the Lagrangian fluid particle dynamics and the corresponding realization of the cyclone-anticyclone vortex asymmetry. Conclusion A new non-stationary solution to the problem for the disc which carries out weak axial-torsional oscillations in fluid with the frequency which are superimposed on its rotation with the previously considered frequency ω0 in connection with the experimental data on the rotating superfluid helium II has been found. It gives the possibility to conclude that the effects of external, linear on velocity, friction forces must be important to include into consideration for the solve of any fundamental problems of hydrodynamics in bounded systems (as for the blood dynamics in cardiovascular system, for example.

  3. Cascade of vortex tube collisions at ReΓ = 10 000

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rees, Wim; Hussain, Fazle; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2011-11-01

    We present simulations of the collision of two anti-parallel vortex tubes, with and without axial flow in a periodic box at ReΓ = 10 000 using a remeshed vortex method. In the non-axial flow case, after the first, well-known vortex reconnection of the tubes, a quiescent period is followed by a second vortex collision of the remaining structures. The characteristics of this second collision are an increase of energy in the small scales of the flow; remnant vorticity left behind in thread-like structures; a persistent - 7 / 3 slope in the three-dimensional energy spectrum; and a significant increase in enstrophy and helicity in the flow. Characteristics of the secondary collision are also observed during the first reconnection of the vortex tubes with axial flow. The simulations indicate that vortical flows containing initially large-scale vortical structures can transfer energy from large scales to smaller scales through a cascade of vortex collisions.

  4. Bifurcation of Vortex Density Current in Trapped Bose Condensates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Tao; ZHANG ShengLi

    2002-01-01

    Vortex density current in the Gross-Pitaevskii theory is studied. It is shown that the inner structure of the topological vortices can be classified by Brouwer degrees and Hopf indices of φ-mapping. The dynamical equations of vortex density current have been given. The bifurcation behavior at the critical points of the current is discussed in detail.

  5. Maxwell's Demon in the Ranque-Hilsch Vortex Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, R.; Zeegers, J. C. H.; Kuerten, J. G. M.; Michalek, W. R.

    2012-08-01

    A theory was developed that explains energy separation in a vortex tube, known as one of the Maxwellian demons. It appears that there is a unique relation between the pressures in the exits of the vortex tube and its temperatures. Experimental results show that the computed and measured temperatures are in very good agreement.

  6. Comparison of four different models of vortex generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, U.; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2012-01-01

    A detailed comparison between four different models of vortex generators is presented in this paper. To that end, a single Vortex Generator on a flat plate test case has been designed and solved by the following models. The first one is the traditional mesh-resolved VG and the second one, called...... Actuator Vortex Generator Model (AcVG), is based on the lifting force theory of Bender, Anderson and Yagle, the BAY Model, which provides an efficient method for computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of flow with VGs, and the forces are applied into the computational domain using the actuator shape...... model. This AcVG Model enables to simulate the effects of the Vortex Generators without defining the geometry of the vortex generator in the mesh and makes it easier for researchers the investigations of different vortex generator lay outs. Both models have been archived by the in house EllipSys CFD...

  7. Interferometric measurement of the helical mode of a single photon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvez, E J; Coyle, L E; Johnson, E; Reschovsky, B J, E-mail: egalvez@colgate.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Colgate University, 13 Oak Drive, Hamilton, NY 13346 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    We present measurements of the helical mode of single photons and do so by sending heralded photons through a Mach-Zehnder interferometer that prepares the light in a helical mode with topological charge one, and interferes it with itself in the fundamental non-helical mode. Masks placed after the interferometer were used to diagnose the amplitude and phase of the mode of the light. Auxiliary measurements verified that the light was in a non-classical state. The results are in good agreement with theory. The experiments demonstrate in a direct way that single photons carry the entire spatial helical-mode information.

  8. FT-IR spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations of 13C isotopologues of the helical peptide Z-Aib6-OtBu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeko, Timothy; Hannigan, Steven F; Jacisin, Timothy; Guberman-Pfeffer, Matthew J; Falcone, Eric R; Guildford, Melissa J; Szabo, Christopher; Cole, Kathryn E; Placido, Jessica; Daly, Erin; Kubasik, Matthew A

    2014-01-01

    Isotope-edited FT-IR spectroscopy is a combined synthetic and spectroscopic method used to characterize local (e.g., residue-level) vibrational environments of biomolecules. We have prepared the 3(10) helical peptide Z-Aib6-OtBu and seven (13)C-enriched analogues that vary only in the number and position(s) of (13)C═O isotopic enrichment. FT-IR spectra of these eight peptides solvated in the nonpolar aprotic solvent dichloromethane have been collected and compared to frequency, intensity, and normal mode results of DFT calculations. Single (13)C enrichment of amide functional groups tends to localize amide I vibrational eigenmodes, providing residue-specific information regarding the local environment (e.g., hydrogen bonding or solvent exposure) of the peptide bond. Double (13)C enrichment of Z-Aib6-OtBu allows for examination of interamide coupling between two labeled amide functional groups, providing experimental evidence of interamide coupling in the context of 3(10) helical structure. Although the calculated and observed interamide couplings of Z-Aib6-OtBu are a few cm(-1) and less, the eight peptides exhibit distinct infrared spectra, revealing details of interamide coupling and residue level vibrational environments.

  9. A Helical Polymer with a Cooperative Response to Chiral Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Mark M.; Peterson, Norman C.; Sato, Takahiro; Teramoto, Akio; Cook, Robert; Lifson, Shneior

    1995-06-01

    Polyisocyanates, long studied as theoretical models for wormlike chains in dilute solution and liquid crystals, differ from their biological helical analogs in the absence of a predetermined helical sense. These polymers have an unusual sensitivity to chiral effects that arises from a structure in which alternating right- and left-handed long helical blocks are separated by infrequent and mobile helical reversals. Statistical thermodynamic methods yield an exact description of the polymer and the cooperative nature of its chiral properties. Minute energies that favor one of the helical senses drive easily measurable conformational changes, even though such energies may be extremely difficult to calculate from structural theory. In addition, the chiral nature of the polymer can be used to test theoretical ideas concerned with cholesteric liquid crystals, one of which solves the problem of assigning the helical sense.

  10. Current helicity and electromotive force of magnetoconvection influenced by helical background fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ruediger, Guenther

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the empirical finding that the known hemispheric rules for the current helicity at the solar surface are not strict, the excitation of small-scale current helicity by the influence of a large-scale helical magnetic background fields on nonrotating magnetoconvection is demonstrated. It is shown within a quasilinear analytic theory of driven turbulence and by nonlinear simulations of magnetoconvection that the resulting small-scale current helicity has the same sign as the large-scale current helicity while the ratio of both pseudo-scalars is of the order of the magnetic Reynolds number of the convection. The same models do not provide finite values of the small-scale kinetic helicity. On the other hand, a turbulence-induced electromotive force is produced including the diamagnetic pumping term as well as the eddy diffusivity but no alpha effect. It is thus argued that the relations by Pouquet & Patterson (1978) and Keinigs (1983) for the simultaneous existence of small-scale current helicity a...

  11. Stability of helical tip vortices in a rotor far wake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2007-01-01

    , corresponding to Rankine, Gaussian and Scully vortices, at radial extents ranging from the core radius of a tip vortex to several rotor radii. The analysis shows that the stability of tip vortices largely depends on the radial extent of the hub vorticity as well as on the type of vorticity distribution. As part......As a means of analysing the stability of the wake behind a multi-bladed rotor the stability of a multiplicity of helical vortices embedded in an assigned flow field is addressed. In the model the tip vortices in the far wake are approximated by infinitely long helical vortices with constant pitch...... and radius. The work is a further development of a model developed in Okulov (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 521, p. 319) in which the linear stability of N equally azimuthally spaced helical vortices was considered. In the present work the analysis is extended to include an assigned vorticity field due to root...

  12. Helical surface structures

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, A; Brandenburg, Axel; Blackman, Eric G.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past few years there has been growing interest in helical magnetic field structures seen at the solar surface, in coronal mass ejections, as well as in the solar wind. Although there is a great deal of randomness in the data, on average the extended structures are mostly left-handed on the northern hemisphere and right-handed on the southern. Surface field structures are also classified as dextral (= right bearing) and sinistral (= left bearing) occurring preferentially in the northern and southern hemispheres respectively. Of particular interest here is a quantitative measurement of the associated emergence rates of helical structures, which translate to magnetic helicity fluxes. In this review, we give a brief survey of what has been found so far and what is expected based on models. Particular emphasis is put on the scale dependence of the associated fields and an attempt is made to estimate the helicity flux of the mean field vs. fluctuating field.

  13. Helical superconducting black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P

    2012-05-25

    We construct novel static, asymptotically five-dimensional anti-de Sitter black hole solutions with Bianchi type-VII(0) symmetry that are holographically dual to superconducting phases in four spacetime dimensions with a helical p-wave order. We calculate the precise temperature dependence of the pitch of the helical order. At zero temperature the black holes have a vanishing entropy and approach domain wall solutions that reveal homogenous, nonisotropic dual ground states with an emergent scaling symmetry.

  14. The use of low-radius circular-cross-section helical strakes for the reduction of VIV of tapered cylinders at high Reynolds numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Jens; Christensen, Silas Sverre

    2017-01-01

    Helical strakes are known to reduce or suppress vortex-induced vibrations, VIV, of circular structures. The design of the strakes is generally recommended to be a triple-start helical strake system, with a strake height corresponding to approximately 10% of the diameter of the structure and 15% f...

  15. Cryptanalysis of Vortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aumasson, Jean-Philippe; Dunkelman, Orr; Mendel, Florian;

    2009-01-01

    Vortex is a hash function that was first presented at ISC'2008, then submitted to the NIST SHA-3 competition after some modifications. This paper describes several attacks on both versions of Vortex, including collisions, second preimages, preimages, and distinguishers. Our attacks exploit flaws ...

  16. Aerodynamically shaped vortex generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Velte, Clara Marika; Øye, Stig;

    2016-01-01

    An aerodynamically shaped vortex generator has been proposed, manufactured and tested in a wind tunnel. The effect on the overall performance when applied on a thick airfoil is an increased lift to drag ratio compared with standard vortex generators. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  17. Vortices and vortex lattices in quantum ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. M.; Marchant, N. G.; O’Dell, D. H. J.; Parker, N. G.

    2017-03-01

    The experimental realization of quantum-degenerate Bose gases made of atoms with sizeable magnetic dipole moments has created a new type of fluid, known as a quantum ferrofluid, which combines the extraordinary properties of superfluidity and ferrofluidity. A hallmark of superfluids is that they are constrained to rotate through vortices with quantized circulation. In quantum ferrofluids the long-range dipolar interactions add new ingredients by inducing magnetostriction and instabilities, and also affect the structural properties of vortices and vortex lattices. Here we give a review of the theory of vortices in dipolar Bose–Einstein condensates, exploring the interplay of magnetism with vorticity and contrasting this with the established behaviour in non-dipolar condensates. We cover single vortex solutions, including structure, energy and stability, vortex pairs, including interactions and dynamics, and also vortex lattices. Our discussion is founded on the mean-field theory provided by the dipolar Gross–Pitaevskii equation, ranging from analytic treatments based on the Thomas–Fermi (hydrodynamic) and variational approaches to full numerical simulations. Routes for generating vortices in dipolar condensates are discussed, with particular attention paid to rotating condensates, where surface instabilities drive the nucleation of vortices, and lead to the emergence of rich and varied vortex lattice structures. We also present an outlook, including potential extensions to degenerate Fermi gases, quantum Hall physics, toroidal systems and the Berezinskii–Kosterlitz–Thouless transition.

  18. Anatomy of a bathtub vortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, A; Bohr, T; Stenum, B; Rasmussen, J Juul; Lautrup, B

    2003-09-05

    We present experiments and theory for the "bathtub vortex," which forms when a fluid drains out of a rotating cylindrical container through a small drain hole. The fast down-flow is found to be confined to a narrow and rapidly rotating "drainpipe" from the free surface down to the drain hole. Surrounding this drainpipe is a region with slow upward flow generated by the Ekman layer at the bottom of the container. This flow structure leads us to a theoretical model similar to one obtained earlier by Lundgren [J. Fluid Mech. 155, 381 (1985)

  19. Evolution of a Vortex in a Strain Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, N. C.; Danielson, J. R.; Dubin, D. H. E.; Surko, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    Experiments and vortex-in-cell simulations are used to study an initially axisymmetric, spatially distributed vortex subject to an externally imposed strain flow. The experiments use a magnetized pure electron plasma to model an inviscid two-dimensional fluid. The results are compared to a theory assuming an elliptical region of constant vorticity. For relatively flat vorticity profiles, the dynamics and stability threshold are in close quantitative agreement with the theory. Physics beyond the constant-vorticity model, such as vortex stripping, is investigated by studying the behavior of nonflat vorticity profiles.

  20. Unusually Stable Helical Coil Allotrope of Phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Guan, Jie; Jiang, Jingwei; Tománek, David

    2016-12-14

    We have identified an unusually stable helical coil allotrope of phosphorus. Our ab initio density functional theory calculations indicate that the uncoiled, isolated straight one-dimensional chain is equally stable as a monolayer of black phosphorus dubbed phosphorene. The coiling tendency and the attraction between adjacent coil segments add an extra stabilization energy of ∼12 meV/atom to the coil allotrope, similar in value to the ∼16 meV/atom interlayer attraction in bulk black phosphorus. Thus, the helical coil structure is essentially as stable as black phosphorus, the most stable phosphorus allotrope known to date. With an optimum radius of 2.4 nm, the helical coil of phosphorus may fit well and even form inside wide carbon nanotubes.

  1. Large-scale dynamics of magnetic helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkmann, Moritz; Dallas, Vassilios

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we investigate the dynamics of magnetic helicity in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent flows focusing at scales larger than the forcing scale. Our results show a nonlocal inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, which occurs directly from the forcing scale into the largest scales of the magnetic field. We also observe that no magnetic helicity and no energy is transferred to an intermediate range of scales sufficiently smaller than the container size and larger than the forcing scale. Thus, the statistical properties of this range of scales, which increases with scale separation, is shown to be described to a large extent by the zero flux solutions of the absolute statistical equilibrium theory exhibited by the truncated ideal MHD equations.

  2. Helicity, Reconnection, and Dynamo Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Hantao

    1998-11-01

    The inter-relationships between magnetic helicity, magnetic reconnection, and dynamo effects are discussed. In laboratory experiments, where two plasmas are driven to merge, the helicity content of each plasma strongly affects the reconnection rate, as well as the shape of the diffusion region. Conversely, magnetic reconnection events also strongly affect the global helicity, resulting in efficient helicity cancellation (but not dissipation) during counter-helicity reconnection and a finite helicity increase or decrease (but less efficiently than dissipation of magnetic energy) during co-helicity reconnection. Close relationships also exist between magnetic helicity and dynamo effects. The turbulent electromotive force along the mean magnetic field (alpha-effect), due to either electrostatic turbulence or the electron diamagnetic effect, transports mean-field helicity across space without dissipation. This has been supported by direct measurements of helicity flux in a laboratory plasma. When the dynamo effect is driven by electromagnetic turbulence, helicity in the turbulent field is converted to mean-field helicity. In all cases, however, dynamo processes conserve total helicity except for a small battery effect, consistent with the observation that the helicity is approximately conserved during magnetic relaxation.

  3. An optical vortex coronagraph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, David M.

    2005-08-01

    An optical vortex may be characterized as a dark core of destructive interference in a beam of spatially coherent light. This dark core may be used as a filter to attenuate a coherent beam of light so an incoherent background signal may be detected. Applications of such a filter include: eye and sensor protection, forward-scattered light measurement, and the detection of extra-solar planets. Optical vortices may be created by passing a beam of light through a vortex diffractive optical element, which is a plate of glass etched with a spiral pattern, such that the thickness of the glass increases in the azimuthal direction. An optical vortex coronagraph may be constructed by placing a vortex diffractive optical element near the image plane of a telescope. An optical vortex coronagraph opens a dark window in the glare of a distant star so nearby terrestrial sized planets and exo-zodiacal dust may be detected. An optical vortex coronagraph may hold several advantages over other techniques presently being developed for high contrast imaging, such as lower aberration sensitivity and multi-wavelength operation. In this manuscript, I will discuss the aberration sensitivity of an optical vortex coronagraph and the key advantages it may hold over other coronagraph architectures. I will also provide numerical simulations demonstrating high contrast imaging in the presence of low-order static aberrations.

  4. Center-vortex loops with one selfintersection

    CERN Document Server

    Moosmann, Julain

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the 2D behavior of one-fold selfintersecting, topologically stabilized center-vortex loops in the confining phase of an SU(2) Yang-Mills theory. This coarse-graining is described by curve-shrinking evolution of center-vortex loops immersed in a flat 2D plane driving the renormalization-group flow of an effective `action'. We observe that the system evolves into a highly ordered state at finite noise level, and we speculate that this feature is connected with 2D planar high $T_c$ superconductivity in $FeAs$ systems.

  5. Fast Josephson vortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malishevskii, A.S.; Silin, V.P.; Uryupin, S.A

    2002-12-30

    For the magnetically coupled waveguide and long Josephson junction we gave the analytic description of two separate velocity domains where the free motion of traveling vortex (2{pi}-kink) exists. The role of the mutual influence of waveguide and long Josephson junction is discussed. It is shown the possibility of the fast vortex motion with the velocity much larger than Swihart velocity of Josephson junction and close to the speed of light in the waveguide. The excitation of motion of such fast Josephson vortex is described.

  6. Mathisson's helical motions demystified

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, L Filipe O; Zilhão, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    The motion of spinning test particles in general relativity is described by Mathisson-Papapetrou-Dixon equations, which are undetermined up to a spin supplementary condition, the latter being today still an open question. The Mathisson-Pirani (MP) condition is known to lead to rather mysterious helical motions which have been deemed unphysical, and for this reason discarded. We show that these assessments are unfounded and originate from a subtle (but crucial) misconception. We discuss the kinematical explanation of the helical motions, and dynamically interpret them through the concept of hidden momentum, which has an electromagnetic analogue. We also show that, contrary to previous claims, the frequency of the helical motions coincides exactly with the zitterbewegung frequency of the Dirac equation for the electron.

  7. Helical plasma thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beklemishev, A. D., E-mail: bekl@bk.ru [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR{sup ®} rocket engine.

  8. Q-switched Nd:YAG optical vortex lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D J; Kim, J W; Clarkson, W A

    2013-12-02

    Q-switched operation of a high-quality Nd:YAG optical vortex laser with the first order Laguerre-Gaussian mode and well-determined helical wavefronts using a fiber-based pump beam conditioning scheme is reported. A simple two-mirror resonator incorporating an acousto-optic Q-switch was employed, along with an etalon and a Brewster plate to enforce the particular helicity of the output. The laser yielded Q-switched pulses with ~250 μJ pulse energy and ~33 ns pulse duration (FWHM) at a 0.1 kHz repetition rate for 5.1 W of absorbed pump power. The handedness of the helical wavefronts was preserved regardless of the repetition rates. The prospects of further power scaling and improved laser performance are discussed.

  9. How superfluid vortex knots untie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleckner, Dustin; Kauffman, Louis H.; Irvine, William T. M.

    2016-07-01

    Knots and links often occur in physical systems, including shaken strands of rope and DNA (ref. ), as well as the more subtle structure of vortices in fluids and magnetic fields in plasmas. Theories of fluid flows without dissipation predict these tangled structures persist, constraining the evolution of the flow much like a knot tied in a shoelace. This constraint gives rise to a conserved quantity known as helicity, offering both fundamental insights and enticing possibilities for controlling complex flows. However, even small amounts of dissipation allow knots to untie by means of `cut-and-splice’ operations known as reconnections. Despite the potentially fundamental role of these reconnections in understanding helicity--and the stability of knotted fields more generally--their effect is known only for a handful of simple knots. Here we study the evolution of 322 elemental knots and links in the Gross-Pitaevskii model for a superfluid, and find that they universally untie. We observe that the centreline helicity is partially preserved even as the knots untie, a remnant of the perfect helicity conservation predicted for idealized fluids. Moreover, we find that the topological pathways of untying knots have simple descriptions in terms of minimal two-dimensional knot diagrams, and tend to concentrate in states which are twisted in only one direction. These results have direct analogies to previous studies of simple knots in several systems, including DNA recombination and classical fluids. This similarity in the geometric and topological evolution suggests there are universal aspects in the behaviour of knots in dissipative fields.

  10. Convectively driven vortex flows in the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Bonet, J A; Almeida, J Sanchez; Cabello, I; Domingo, V

    2008-01-01

    We have discovered small whirlpools in the Sun, with a size similar to the terrestrial hurricanes (<~0.5 Mm). The theory of solar convection predicts them, but they had remained elusive so far. The vortex flows are created at the downdrafts where the plasma returns to the solar interior after cooling down, and we detect them because some magnetic bright points (BPs) follow a logarithmic spiral in their way to be engulfed by a downdraft. Our disk center observations show 0.009 vortexes per Mm^2, with a lifetime of the order of 5 min, and with no preferred sense of rotation. They are not evenly spread out over the surface, but they seem to trace the supergranulation and the mesogranulation. These observed properties are strongly biased by our type of measurement, unable to detect vortexes except when they are engulfing magnetic BPs.

  11. 基于弹簧理论的螺旋弯曲管柱强度分析%A Spring Theory-based Strength Analysis of the Helical Buckling String

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    窦益华; 于洋; 夏辉; 曹银萍

    2012-01-01

    为了了解螺旋弯曲状态下管柱的应力分布规律,根据管柱螺旋弯曲的特点,利用弹簧理论,结合螺旋弯曲管柱力学分析成果,导出了螺旋弯曲状态下管柱内、外侧的第四相当应力计算公式,弥补了传统管柱力学分析的不足,提高了受压弯曲管柱强度校核的针对性与准确性。分析结果表明,在轴向压力作用下,弯曲管柱内侧的最大相当应力恒大于外侧,并且随着轴向压力的增大,管柱内侧最大相当应力线性增大。因此,对于受压弯曲管柱,应以管柱内壁为应力危险.占校核苴碾序.%To understand the stress distribution law of pipestring in the state of helical buckling, the method to calculate the fourth phase equivalent stress of the inner and outer walls of pipestring in helical buckling was derived considering the features of helical buckling string, adopting the spring theory and referring to the dynamic analysis achievements of the string. This study makes up for the weakness of traditional dynamic analysis of pipestring and improves the pertinence and accuracy of checking the strength of pressurized buckling string. The analysis shows that under the effect of axial pressure, the maximum equivalent stress of the inner wall of the string is always grea- ter than that of the outer wall. Moreover, the maximum equivalent stress of the inner wall within the string increases linearly with the increase of axial pressure. Therefore, as for pressurized buckling string, the inner wall of the string should be taken as the dangerous point of stress to check the strength.

  12. Vortex development on slender missiles at supersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. M.; Dillenius, M. F. E.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental effort has been made to develop a vortex-prediction capability on circular and noncircular missiles at supersonic speeds. Predicted vortex patterns are computed by two linear-theory computer codes. One calculates the strengths and initial locations of the vortices, and the other calculates their trajectories. A short color motion picture has been produced from the calculations to illustrate the predicted vortex patterns on a typical missile. Experimental vapor-screen photographs are presented to show the longitudinal development of the vortices on a fin-control missile. Comparisons are made between these data and the predicted vortices to assess the accuracy of the theory. The theory appears to be fairly accurate in predicting the number, locations, and relative strengths of individual vortices which develop over the missile, but cannot predict vortex sheets or diffuse vorticity whenever they occur.

  13. Vortex flow hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, A. M., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to quantify the hysteresis associated with various vortex flow transition points and to determine the effect of planform geometry. The transition points observed consisted of the appearance (or disappearance) of trailing edge vortex burst and the transition to (or from) flat plate or totally separated flows. Flow visualization with smoke injected into the vortices was used to identify the transitions on a series of semi-span models tested in a low speed tunnel. The planforms tested included simple deltas (55 deg to 80 deg sweep), cranked wings with varying tip panel sweep and dihedral, and a straked wing. High speed movies at 1000 frames per second were made of the vortex flow visualization in order to better understand the dynamics of vortex flow, burst and transition.

  14. Modeling gasodynamic vortex cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, A. E.; Fauve, S.

    2017-08-01

    We aim at studying gasodynamic vortex cooling in an analytically solvable, thermodynamically consistent model that can explain limitations on the cooling efficiency. To this end, we study an angular plus radial flow between two (coaxial) rotating permeable cylinders. Full account is taken of compressibility, viscosity, and heat conductivity. For a weak inward radial flow the model qualitatively describes the vortex cooling effect, in terms of both temperature and the decrease of the stagnation enthalpy, seen in short uniflow vortex (Ranque) tubes. The cooling does not result from external work and its efficiency is defined as the ratio of the lowest temperature reached adiabatically (for the given pressure gradient) to the lowest temperature actually reached. We show that for the vortex cooling the efficiency is strictly smaller than 1, but in another configuration with an outward radial flow, we find that the efficiency can be larger than 1. This is related to both the geometry and the finite heat conductivity.

  15. Vector Lattice Vortex Solitons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-Dong; YE Fang-Wei; DONG Liang-Wei; LI Yong-Ping

    2005-01-01

    @@ Two-dimensional vector vortex solitons in harmonic optical lattices are investigated. The stability properties of such solitons are closely connected to the lattice depth Vo. For small Vo, vector vortex solitons with the total zero-angular momentum are more stable than those with the total nonzero-angular momentum, while for large Vo, this case is inversed. If Vo is large enough, both the types of such solitons are stable.

  16. Buoyant Norbury's vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Mark; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Salman, Hayder

    2014-11-01

    Norbury's vortices are a one-parameter family of axisymmetric vortex rings that are exact solutions to the Euler equations. Due to their relative simplicity, they are extensively used to model the behavior of real vortex rings found in experiments and in Nature. In this work, we extend the original formulation of the problem to include buoyancy effects for the case where the fluid that lies within the vortex has a different density to that of the ambient. In this modified formulation, buoyancy effects enter the problem through the baroclinic term of the vorticity equation. This permits an efficient numerical solution of the governing equation of motion in terms of a vortex contour method that tracks the evolution of the boundary of the vortex. Finally, we compare our numerical results with the theoretical analysis of the short-time evolution of a buoyant vortex. Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through grant DPI2011-28356-C03-02 and by the London Mathematical Society.

  17. Generation of Subwavelength Plasmonic Nanovortices via Helically Corrugated Metallic Nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Changming; Oladipo, Abiola O; Panoiu, Nicolae C; Ye, Fangwei

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that plasmonic helical gratings consisting of metallic nanowires imprinted with helical grooves or ridges can be used efficiently to generate plasmonic vortices with radius much smaller than the operating wavelength. In our proposed approach, these helical surface gratings are designed so that plasmon modes with different azimuthal quantum numbers (topological charge) are phase-matched, thus allowing one to generate optical plasmonic vortices with arbitrary topological charge. The general principles for designing plasmonic helical gratings that facilitate efficient generation of such plasmonic vortices are derived and their applicability to the conversion of plasmonic vortices with zero angular momentum into plasmonic vortices with arbitrary angular momentum is illustrated in several particular cases. Our analysis, based both on the exact solutions for the electromagnetic field propagating in the helical plasmonic grating and a coupled-mode theory, suggests that even in the presence of metal lo...

  18. Magnetic helicity in stellar dynamos new numerical experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, A; Subramanian, K

    2002-01-01

    The theory of large scale dynamos is reviewed with particular emphasis on the problem of magnetic helicity conservation in the presence of closed and open boundaries. It is concluded that in solar and stellar large scale dynamos the production and destruction of magnetic helicity during one cycle may still be accomplished by ordinary Spitzer resistivity. This is mainly because of geometric effects causing significant magnetic helicity cancellation on each hemisphere, but also partly because the generation of toroidal field by shear does not involve the production of magnetic helicity. A number of alternatives are discussed and dismissed. These include open boundaries which lead to preferential loss of large scale magnetic helicity together with large scale magnetic fields. It is also shown that artificially induced losses of small scale field do not accelerate the production of large scale (poloidal) field. In fact, resistively limited evolution towards saturation is also found at intermediate scales before t...

  19. On Helical Projection and Its Application in Screw Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riliang Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available As helical surfaces, in their many and varied forms, are finding more and more applications in engineering, new approaches to their efficient design and manufacture are desired. To that end, the helical projection method that uses curvilinear projection lines to map a space object to a plane is examined in this paper, focusing on its mathematical model and characteristics in terms of graphical representation of helical objects. A number of interesting projective properties are identified in regard to straight lines, curves, and planes, and then the method is further investigated with respect to screws. The result shows that the helical projection of a cylindrical screw turns out to be a Jordan curve, which is determined by the screw's axial profile and number of flights. Based on the projection theory, a practical approach to the modeling of screws and helical surfaces is proposed and illustrated with examples, and its possible application in screw manufacturing is discussed.

  20. Magnetic field and temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity in type-II superconducting films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, G; Leo, A; Cirillo, C; Attanasio, C; Nigro, A; Pace, S

    2009-06-24

    We study the vortex dynamics in the instability regime induced by high dissipative states well above the critical current in Nb superconducting strips. The magnetic field and temperature behavior of the critical vortex velocity corresponding to the observed dynamic instability is ascribed to intrinsic non-equilibrium phenomena. The Larkin-Ovchinnikov (LO) theory of electronic instability in high velocity vortex motion has been applied to interpret the temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity. The magnetic field dependence of the vortex critical velocity shows new features in the low-field regime not predicted by LO.

  1. Magnetic field and temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity in type-II superconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimaldi, G; Leo, A; Cirillo, C; Attanasio, C; Nigro, A; Pace, S [CNR-INFM Laboratorio Regionale SuperMat, Via Salvador Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (Italy)], E-mail: grimaldi@sa.infn.it

    2009-06-24

    We study the vortex dynamics in the instability regime induced by high dissipative states well above the critical current in Nb superconducting strips. The magnetic field and temperature behavior of the critical vortex velocity corresponding to the observed dynamic instability is ascribed to intrinsic non-equilibrium phenomena. The Larkin-Ovchinnikov (LO) theory of electronic instability in high velocity vortex motion has been applied to interpret the temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity. The magnetic field dependence of the vortex critical velocity shows new features in the low-field regime not predicted by LO.

  2. Controlling vortex motion and vortex kinetic friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Franco; Savel'ev, Sergey

    2006-05-01

    We summarize some recent results of vortex motion control and vortex kinetic friction. (1) We describe a device [J.E. Villegas, S. Savel'ev, F. Nori, E.M. Gonzalez, J.V. Anguita, R. Garcìa, J.L. Vicent, Science 302 (2003) 1188] that can easily control the motion of flux quanta in a Niobium superconducting film on an array of nanoscale triangular magnets. Even though the input ac current has zero average, the resulting net motion of the vortices can be directed along either one direction, the opposite direction, or producing zero net motion. We also consider layered strongly anisotropic superconductors, with no fixed spatial asymmetry, and show [S. Savel'ev, F. Nori, Nature Materials 1 (2002) 179] how, with asymmetric drives, the ac motion of Josephson and/or pancake vortices can provide a net dc vortex current. (2) In analogy with the standard macroscopic friction, we present [A. Maeda, Y. Inoue, H. Kitano, S. Savel'ev, S. Okayasu, I. Tsukada, F. Nori , Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 077001] a comparative study of the friction force felt by vortices in superconductors and charge density waves.

  3. Vortex-Based Aero- and Hydrodynamic Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemati, Maziar Sam

    Flow control strategies often require knowledge of unmeasurable quantities, thus presenting a need to reconstruct flow states from measurable ones. In this thesis, the modeling, simulation, and estimator design aspects of flow reconstruction are considered. First, a vortex-based aero- and hydrodynamic estimation paradigm is developed to design a wake sensing algorithm for aircraft formation flight missions. The method assimilates wing distributed pressure measurements with a vortex-based wake model to better predict the state of the flow. The study compares Kalman-type algorithms with particle filtering algorithms, demonstrating that the vortex nonlinearities require particle filters to yield adequate performance. Furthermore, the observability structure of the wake is shown to have a negative impact on filter performance regardless of the algorithm applied. It is demonstrated that relative motions can alleviate the filter divergence issues associated with this observability structure. In addition to estimator development, the dissertation addresses the need for an efficient unsteady multi-body aerodynamics testbed for estimator and controller validation studies. A pure vortex particle implementation of a vortex panel-particle method is developed to satisfy this need. The numerical method is demonstrated on the impulsive startup of a flat plate as well as the impulsive startup of a multi-wing formation. It is clear, from these validation studies, that the method is able to accommodate the unsteady wake effects that arise in formation flight missions. Lastly, successful vortex-based estimation is highly dependent on the reliability of the low-order vortex model used in representing the flow of interest. The present treatise establishes a systematic framework for vortex model improvement, grounded in optimal control theory and the calculus of variations. By minimizing model predicted errors with respect to empirical data, the shortcomings of the baseline vortex model

  4. Formation of helical ion chains

    CERN Document Server

    Nigmatullin, Ramil; De Chiara, Gabriele; Morigi, Giovanna; Plenio, Martin B; Retzker, Alex

    2011-01-01

    We study the nonequilibrium dynamics of the linear to zigzag structural phase transition exhibited by an ion chain confined in a trap with periodic boundary conditions. The transition is driven by reducing the transverse confinement at a finite quench rate, which can be accurately controlled. This results in the formation of zigzag domains oriented along different transverse planes. The twists between different domains can be stabilized by the topology of the trap and under laser cooling the system relaxes to a helical chain with possibly nonzero winding number. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to obtain a large sample of possible trajectories for different quench rates. The scaling of the average winding number with different quench rates is compared to the prediction of the Kibble-Zurek theory, and a good quantitative agreement is found.

  5. Coherent Vortex Evolution in Drift Wave Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, R.; Terry, P. W.

    1998-11-01

    Localized structures in turbulence are subject to loss of coherence by mixing. Phase space structures, such as drift-hole, (P. W. Terry, P. H. Diamond, T. S. Hahm, Phys. Fluids B) 2 9 2048 (1990) possess a self-electric field, which if sufficiently large maintains particle trapping against the tidal deformations of ambient turbulence. We show here that intense vortices in fluid drift wave turbulence avoid mixing by suppressing ambient turbulence with the strong flow shear of the vortex edge. Analysis of turbulence evolution in the vortex edge recovers Rapid Distortion Theory (G. K. Batchelor and I. Proudman, Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math.) 7 83 (1954) as the short time limit and the shear suppression scaling theory (H. Biglari, P. H. Diamond and P. W. Terry, Phys. Fluids B) 2 1 (1990) as the long time limit. Shear suppression leads to an amplitude condition for coherence and delineates the Gaussian core from the non Gaussian tail of the probability distribution function. The amplitude condition of shear suppression is compared with the trapping condition for phase space holes. The possibility of nonlinear vortex growth will be examined by considering electron dynamics in the vortex evolution.

  6. Evolution of supersonic corner vortex in a hypersonic inlet/isolator model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He-Xia; Tan, Hui-Jun; Sun, Shu; Ling, Yu

    2016-12-01

    There are complex corner vortex flows in a rectangular hypersonic inlet/isolator. The corner vortex propagates downstream and interacts with the shocks and expansion waves in the isolator repeatedly. The supersonic corner vortex in a generic hypersonic inlet/isolator model is theoretically and numerically analyzed at a freestream Mach number of 4.92. The cross-flow topology of the corner vortex flow is found to obey Zhang's theory ["Analytical analysis of subsonic and supersonic vortex formation," Acta Aerodyn. Sin. 13, 259-264 (1995)] strictly, except for the short process with the vortex core situated in a subsonic flow which is surrounded by a supersonic flow. In general, the evolution history of the corner vortex under the influence of the background waves in the hypersonic inlet/isolator model can be classified into two types, namely, from the adverse pressure gradient region to the favorable pressure gradient region and the reversed one. For type 1, the corner vortex is a one-celled vortex with the cross-sectional streamlines spiraling inwards at first. Then the Hopf bifurcation occurs and the streamlines in the outer part of the limit cycle switch to spiraling outwards, yielding a two-celled vortex. The limit cycle shrinks gradually and finally vanishes with the streamlines of the entire corner vortex spiraling outwards. For type 2, the cross-sectional streamlines of the corner vortex spiral outwards first. Then a stable limit cycle is formed, yielding a two-celled vortex. The short-lived limit cycle forces the streamlines in the corner vortex to change the spiraling trends rapidly. Although it is found in this paper that there are some defects on the theoretical proof of the limit cycle, Zhang's theory is proven useful for the prediction and qualitative analysis of the complex corner vortex in a hypersonic inlet/isolator. In addition, three conservation laws inside the limit cycle are obtained.

  7. Helical electron-beam microbunching by harmonic coupling in a helical undulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsing, E; Musumeci, P; Reiche, S; Tikhoplav, R; Marinelli, A; Rosenzweig, J B; Gover, A

    2009-05-01

    Microbunching of a relativistic electron beam into a helix is examined analytically and in simulation. Helical microbunching is shown to occur naturally when an e beam interacts resonantly at the harmonics of the combined field of a helical magnetic undulator and an axisymmetric input laser beam. This type of interaction is proposed as a method to generate a strongly prebunched e beam for coherent emission of light with orbital angular momentum at virtually any wavelength. The results from the linear microbunching theory show excellent agreement with three-dimensional numerical simulations.

  8. Confining Bond Rearrangement in the Random Center Vortex Model

    CERN Document Server

    Altarawneh, Derar; Engelhardt, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present static meson-meson and baryon--anti-baryon potentials in Z(2) and Z(3) random center vortex models for the infrared sector of Yang-Mills theory, i.e., hypercubic lattice models of random vortex world-surfaces. In particular, we calculate Polyakov loop correlators of two static mesons resp. (anti-)baryons in a center vortex background and observe that their expectation values follow the minimal area law and show bond rearrangement behavior. The static meson-meson and baryon--anti-baryon potentials are compared with theoretical predictions and lattice QCD simulations.

  9. Vortex patterns in a superconducting-ferromagnetic rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romaguera, Antonio R. de C, E-mail: antonio.romaguera@df.ufrpe.b [Departamento de Fi' sica, Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, 52171-900 Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil); Doria, Mauro M. [Departamento de Fi' sica dos Solidos, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Peeters, Francois M. [Departement Fysica, Universiteit Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2010-10-01

    A superconducting rod with a magnetic moment on top develops vortices obtained here through 3D calculations of the Ginzburg-Landau theory. The inhomogeneity of the applied field brings new properties to the vortex patterns that vary according to the rod thickness. We find that for thin rods (disks) the vortex patterns are similar to those obtained in presence of a homogeneous magnetic field instead because they consist of giant vortex states. For thick rods novel patterns are obtained as vortices are curve lines in space that exit through the lateral surface.

  10. Magnetic response of holographic Lifshitz superconductors: Vortex and Droplet solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lala, Arindam, E-mail: arindam.lala@bose.res.in

    2014-07-30

    In this paper a holographic model of s-wave superconductor with anisotropic Lifshitz scaling has been considered. In the presence of an external magnetic field our holographic model exhibits both vortex and droplet solutions. Based on analytic methods we have shown that the anisotropy has no effect on the vortex and droplet solutions whereas it may affect the condensation. Our vortex solution closely resembles the Ginzburg–Landau theory and a relation between the upper critical magnetic field and superconducting coherence length has been speculated from this comparison. Using Sturm–Liouville method, the effect of anisotropy on the critical parameters in insulator/superconductor phase transitions has been analyzed.

  11. Topological Structure of Knotted Vortex Lines in Liquid Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Yi-Shi; ZHAO Li; ZHANG Xin-Hui

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a novel decomposition expression for the U(1) gauge field in liquid crystals (LCs) is derived.Using this decomposition expression and the φ-mapping topological current theory,.we investigate the topological structure of the vortex lines in LCs in detail. A topological invariant, i.e., the Chern-Simons (CS) action for the knotted vortex lines is presented, and the CS action is shown to be the total sum of all the self-linking and linking numbers of the knot family. Moreover, it is pointed out that the CS action is preserved in the branch processes of the knotted vortex lines.

  12. Combining Fixed-Order Helicity Amplitudes With Resummation Using SCET

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Iain W; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2012-01-01

    We discuss how to construct a simple and easy-to-use helicity operator basis in Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET), for which the hard Wilson coefficients from matching QCD onto SCET are directly given in terms of the color-ordered QCD helicity amplitudes. This provides an interface to seamlessly combine fixed-order helicity amplitudes, which are the basic building blocks of state-of-the-art next-to-leading order calculations for multileg processes, with a resummation of higher-order logarithmic corrections using SCET.

  13. Helical Ordering in Chiral Block Copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Hong, Sung Woo; Chen, Dian; Grason, Gregory; Russell, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Introducing molecular chirality into the segments of block copolymers can influence the nature of the resultant morphology. Such an effect was found for poly(styrene-b-L-lactide) (PS-b-PLLA) diblock copolymers where hexagonally packed PLLA helical microdomains (H* phase) form in a PS matrix. However, molecular ordering of PLLA within the helical microdomains and the transfer of chirality from the segmental level to the mesoscale is still not well understood. We developed a field theoretic model to describe the interactions between segments of chiral blocks, which have the tendency to form a ``cholesteric'' texture. Based on the model, we calculated the bulk morphologies of chiral AB diblock copolymers using self-consistent field theory (SCFT). Experiments show that the H* phase only forms when microphase separation between PS and PLLA block happens first and crystallization of PLLA block is suppressed or happens within confined microdomain. Hence, crystalline ordering is not necessary for H* phase formation. The SCFT offers the chance to explore the range of thermodynamic stability of helical structures in the phase diagram of chiral block copolymer melts, by tuning parameters not only like the block segregation strength and composition, but also new parameters such as the ratio between preferred helical pitch to the radius of gyration and the Frank elastic constant for inter-segment distortions.

  14. Muon Beam Helical Cooling Channel Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Flanagan, G; Kazakevich, G M; Marhauser, Frank; Neubauer, Michael; Roberts, T; Yoshikawa, C; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Kashikhin, V S; Lopes, Mattlock; Tollestrup, A; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zloblin, A

    2013-06-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet.

  15. Nonlinear helical MHD instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zueva, N.M.; Solov' ev, L.S.

    1977-07-01

    An examination is made of the boundary problem on the development of MHD instability in a toroidal plasma. Two types of local helical instability are noted - Alfven and thermal, and the corresponding criteria of instability are cited. An evaluation is made of the maximum attainable kinetic energy, limited by the degree to which the law of conservation is fulfilled. An examination is made of a precise solution to a kinematic problem on the helical evolution of a cylindrical magnetic configuration at a given velocity distribution in a plasma. A numerical computation of the development of MHD instability in a plasma cylinder by a computerized solution of MHD equations is made where the process's helical symmetry is conserved. The development of instability is of a resonance nature. The instability involves the entire cross section of the plasma and leads to an inside-out reversal of the magnetic surfaces when there is a maximum unstable equilibrium configuration in the nonlinear stage. The examined instability in the tore is apparently stabilized by a magnetic hole when certain limitations are placed on the distribution of flows in the plasma. 29 references, 8 figures.

  16. Nano magnetic vortex wall guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Y. Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A concept of nano magnetic vortex wall guide is introduced. Two architectures are proposed. The first one is properly designed superlattices while the other one is bilayer nanostrips. The concept is verified by micromagnetic simulations. Both guides can prevent the vortex core in a magnetic vortex wall from colliding with sample surface so that the information stored in the vortex core can be preserved during its transportation from one location to another one through the guides.

  17. Vortex Characterization for Engineering Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankun-Kelly, M; Thompson, D S; Jiang, M; Shannahan, B; Machiraju, R

    2008-01-30

    Realistic engineering simulation data often have features that are not optimally resolved due to practical limitations on mesh resolution. To be useful to application engineers, vortex characterization techniques must be sufficiently robust to handle realistic data with complex vortex topologies. In this paper, we present enhancements to the vortex topology identification component of an existing vortex characterization algorithm. The modified techniques are demonstrated by application to three realistic data sets that illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of our approach.

  18. System Identification of a Vortex Lattice Aerodynamic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Kholodar, Denis; Dowell, Earl H.

    2001-01-01

    The state-space presentation of an aerodynamic vortex model is considered from a classical and system identification perspective. Using an aerodynamic vortex model as a numerical simulator of a wing tunnel experiment, both full state and limited state data or measurements are considered. Two possible approaches for system identification are presented and modal controllability and observability are also considered. The theory then is applied to the system identification of a flow over an aerodynamic delta wing and typical results are presented.

  19. Magnetic vortex racetrack memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Liwei D.; Jin, Yongmei M.

    2017-02-01

    We report a new type of racetrack memory based on current-controlled movement of magnetic vortices in magnetic nanowires with rectangular cross-section and weak perpendicular anisotropy. Data are stored through the core polarity of vortices and each vortex carries a data bit. Besides high density, non-volatility, fast data access, and low power as offered by domain wall racetrack memory, magnetic vortex racetrack memory has additional advantages of no need for constrictions to define data bits, changeable information density, adjustable current magnitude for data propagation, and versatile means of ultrafast vortex core switching. By using micromagnetic simulations, current-controlled motion of magnetic vortices in cobalt nanowire is demonstrated for racetrack memory applications.

  20. Vortices and vortex lattices in quantum ferrofluids

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A M; O'Dell, D H J; Parker, N G

    2016-01-01

    The achievement of quantum-degenerate Bose gases composed of atoms with sizeable magnetic dipole moments has realized quantum ferrofluids, a form of fluid which combines the extraordinary properties of superfluidity and ferrofluidity. A hallmark of superfluids is that they are constrained to circulate through vortices with quantized circulation. These excitations underpin a variety of rich phenomena, including vortex lattices, quantum turbulence, the Berenzinksii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition and Kibble-Zurek defect formation. Here we provide a comprehensive review of the theory of vortices and vortex lattices in quantum ferrofluids created from dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates, exploring the interplay of magnetism with vorticity and contrasting this with the established behaviour in non-dipolar condensates. Our discussion is based on the mean-field theory provided by the dipolar Gross-Pitaevskii equation, from analytic treatments based on the Thomas-Fermi and variational approaches to full numerical simula...

  1. A nonabelian particle–vortex duality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Murugan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We define a nonabelian particle–vortex duality as a 3-dimensional analogue of the usual 2-dimensional worldsheet nonabelian T-duality. The transformation is defined in the presence of a global SU(2 symmetry and, although derived from a string theoretic setting, we formulate it generally. We then apply it to so-called “semilocal strings” in an SU(2G×U(1L gauge theory, originally discovered in the context of cosmic string physics.

  2. TOPOLOGY AND VORTEX STRUCTURES OF A CURVING TURBINE CASCADE WITH TIP CLEARANCE ( Ⅱ )- TOPOLOGICAL FLOW PATTERN AND VORTEX STRUCTURE IN THE TRANSVERSE SECTION OF A BLADE CASCADE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨庆海; 黄洪雁; 韩万今

    2002-01-01

    By means of ink trace visualization of the flows in conventional straight,positively curved and negatively curved cascades with tip clearance, and measurement of the aerodynamic parameters in transverse section, and by appling topology theory, the topological structures and vortex structure in the transverse section of a blade cascade were analyzed. Compared with conventional straight cascade, blade positive curving eliminates the separation line of the upper passage vortex, and leads the secondary vortex to change from close separation to open separation, while blade negative curving effects merely the positions of singular points and the intensities and scales of vortex.

  3. Vortex properties of mesoscopic superconducting samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, Leonardo R.E. [Laboratorio de Supercondutividade e Materiais Avancados, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife 50670-901 (Brazil); Barba-Ortega, J. [Grupo de Fi' sica de Nuevos Materiales, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Souza Silva, C.C. de [Laboratorio de Supercondutividade e Materiais Avancados, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife 50670-901 (Brazil); Albino Aguiar, J., E-mail: albino@df.ufpe.b [Laboratorio de Supercondutividade e Materiais Avancados, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife 50670-901 (Brazil)

    2010-10-01

    In this work we investigated theoretically the vortex properties of mesoscopic samples of different geometries, submitted to an external magnetic field. We use both London and Ginzburg-Landau theories and also solve the non-linear Time Dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations to obtain vortex configurations, equilibrium states and the spatial distribution of the superconducting electron density in a mesoscopic superconducting triangle and long prisms with square cross-section. For a mesoscopic triangle with the magnetic field applied perpendicularly to sample plane the vortex configurations were obtained by using Langevin dynamics simulations. In most of the configurations the vortices sit close to the corners, presenting twofold or three-fold symmetry. A study of different meta-stable configurations with same number of vortices is also presented. Next, by taking into account de Gennes boundary conditions via the extrapolation length, b, we study the properties of a mesoscopic superconducting square surrounded by different metallic materials and in the presence of an external magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the square surface. It is determined the b-limit for the occurrence of a single vortex in a mesoscopic square of area d{sup 2}, for 4{xi}(0){<=}d{<=}10{xi}(0).

  4. Local topological charge analysis of electromagnetic vortex beam based on empirical mode decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Hui, Xiaonan; Zhang, Weite; Jin, Xiaofeng; Chi, Hao; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-01-01

    The topological charge of an electromagnetic vortex beam depends on its wavefront helicity. For mixed vortex beams composed of several different coaxial vortices, the topological charge spectrum can be obtained by Fourier transform. However, the vortex beam is generally divergent and imperfect. It makes it significant to investigate the local topological charges, especially in radio frequency regime. Fourier transform based methods are restrained by the uncertainty principle and cannot achieve high angular resolution and mode resolution simultaneously. In this letter, an analysis method for local topological charges of vortex beams is presented based on the empirical mode decomposition (EMD). From EMD, the intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) can be obtained to construct the bases of the electromagnetic wave, and each local topological charge can be respectively defined. With this method the local value achieves both high resolution of azimuth angle and topological charge, meanwhile the amplitudes of each OAM mode...

  5. Frequency response of Lamb-Oseen vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Rodríguez, F. J.; Parras, L.; del Pino, C.

    2016-12-01

    In this numerical study we present the frequency response of the Lamb-Oseen (Gaussian) vortex for two synthetic jet configurations. The first one consists of an annular axial jet that is superimposed on the Gaussian vortex. The other configuration deals with an off-axis, single-point, axial jet (SPI). We detect that the system responds to the forcing for a given axial wavenumber, k, exciting natural modes of the vortex by a resonance mechanism. We propose an explanation for the physical mechanism responsible for the maximum energy gain obtained by comparing our results with the different branches found theoretically by Fabre et al (2006 J. Fluid Mech. 551 235-74). We find high energy gains in both cases ({G}∞ ≃ {10}3 for the annular jet and {G}∞ ≃ {10}4 for the SPI jet), so these types of forcing are able to produce responses of the system strong enough to reach a non-linear state. Axisymmetric modes, with azimuthal wavenumber m = 0, produce the highest energy gain while applying an annular forcing. However, other modes, such as the helical one m = 1 and also double helix modes with m = 2, contribute in the SPI configuration. We find that the best region to be tested experimentally in both cases is the region that corresponds to the L2 branch described by Fabre and his collaborators. Furthermore, and whenever using these L2 branch frequencies, the response of the system is always axisymmetric, independently of the type of excitation. Finally, we conclude that the energy gain with the SPI jet is one order of magnitude greater than for the annular jet, so that the single-point off-axis jet is a feasible candidate to design a control device.

  6. Dynamics of Vortex Cavitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, P.C.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the mechanisms with which tip vortex cavitation is responsible for broadband pressure fluctuations on ship propellers. Hypotheses for these are described in detail by Bosschers (2009). Validation is provided by three main cavitation-tunnel experiments, one on a model propeller

  7. Vortex Dynamics in Anisotropic Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, David Gordon

    Measurements of the ac screening response and resistance of superconducting Bi_2Sr _2CaCu_2O _8 (BSCCO) crystals have been used to probe the dynamics of the magnetic flux lines within the mixed state as a function of frequency, temperature, and applied dc field. For the particular range of temperature and magnetic field in which measurements were made, the systematic behavior of the observed dissipation peak in the screening response is consistent with electromagnetic skin size effects rather than a phase transition. According to microscopic theories of the interaction between the flux lines and a driving ac field, such a skin size effect is expected for the case when the vortex motion is diffusive in nature. However, diffusive motion is inconsistent with simple activation models that use a single value for the pinning energy (derived from direct measurement of the dc resistance). This contradiction suggests a distribution of pinning energies within the sample. Interlayer vortex decoupling has been directly observed as a function of temperature and applied magnetic field using electronic transport perpendicular to the layers in synthetic amorphous MoGe/Ge multilayer samples. Perpendicular transport has been shown to be a far more sensitive measure of the phase coupling between layers than in-plane properties. Below the decoupling temperature T_{D} the resistivity anisotropy collapses and striking nonlinearities appear in the perpendicular current-voltage behavior, which are not observed in parallel transport. A crossover in behavior is also observed at a field H _{x}, in accordance with theory. The data suggest the presence of a phase transition into a state with finite in-plane resistivity. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.).

  8. Dynamics of the vortex wakes of flying and swimming vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, J M

    1995-01-01

    The vortex wakes of flying and swimming animals provide evidence of the history of aero- and hydrodynamic force generation during the locomotor cycle. Vortex-induced momentum flux in the wake is the reaction of forces the animal imposes on its environment, which must be in equilibrium with inertial and external forces. In flying birds and bats, the flapping wings generate lift both to provide thrust and to support the weight. Distinct wingbeat and wake movement patterns can be identified as gaits. In flow visualization experiments, only two wake patterns have been identified: a vortex ring gait with inactive upstroke, and a continuous vortex gait with active upstroke. These gaits may be modelled theoretically by free vortex and lifting line theory to predict mechanical energy consumption, aerodynamic forces and muscle activity. Longer-winged birds undergo a distinct gait change with speed, but shorter-winged species use the vortex ring gait at all speeds. In swimming fish, the situation is more complex: the wake vortices form a reversed von Kármán vortex street, but little is known about the mechanism of generation of the wake, or about how it varies with speed and acceleration or with body form and swimming mode. An unresolved complicating factor is the interaction between the drag wake of the flapping fish body and the thrusting wake from the tail.

  9. Passive Wake Vortex Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, J M

    2001-10-18

    The collapse of the Soviet Union and ending of the Cold War brought about many significant changes in military submarine operations. The enemies that the US Navy faces today and in the future will not likely be superpowers armed with nuclear submarines, but rather smaller, rogue nations employing cheaper diesel/electric submarines with advanced air-independent propulsion systems. Unlike Cold War submarine operations, which occurred in deep-water environments, future submarine conflicts are anticipated to occur in shallow, littoral regions that are complex and noisy. Consequently, non-acoustic signatures will become increasingly important and the submarine stealth technology designed for deep-water operations may not be effective in these environments. One such non-acoustic signature is the surface detection of a submarine's trailing vortex wake. If a submarine runs in a slightly buoyant condition, its diving planes must be inclined at a negative angle of attack to generate sufficient downforce, which keeps the submarine from rising to the surface. As a result, the diving planes produce a pair of counter-rotating trailing vortices that propagate to the water surface. In previous deep-water operations, this was not an issue since the submarines could dive deep enough so that the vortex pair became incoherent before it reached the water surface. However, in shallow, littoral environments, submarines do not have the option of diving deep and, hence, the vortex pair can rise to the surface and leave a distinct signature that might be detectable by synthetic aperture radar. Such detection would jeopardize not only the mission of the submarine, but also the lives of military personnel on board. There has been another attempt to solve this problem and reduce the intensity of trailing vortices in the wakes of military submarines. The research of Quackenbush et al. over the past few years has been directed towards an idea called ''vortex leveraging

  10. Helical CT for lumbosacral spinal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsuno, Satoshi; Fukuda, Kunihiko [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of helical CT for lumbosacral pathology. We performed helical CT with multiplanar reconstruction, including the formation of oblique transaxial and coronal images, in 62 patients with various lumboscral disorders, including 32 non-enhanced CT and 36 CT after myelography. We correlated the appearance of the stenotic spinal canal and neoplastic disease with the findings on MRI obtained at nearly the same time. We obtained helical CT images in all cases in about 30 seconds. The diagnostic ability of helical CT was roughly equal to that of MRI in patients with spondylosis deformans, spondylolisthesis and herniated nucleus pulposus. There was no significant difference in diagnostic value for degenerative lumbosacral disease with canal and foraminal stenosis between non-enhanced and post-myelography helical CT. However, non-enhanced helical CT could not clearly demonstrate neoplastic disease because of the poor contrast resolution. Helical CT was useful in evaluating degenerative disorder and its diagnostic value was nearly equal to that of MRI. We considered that helical CT may be suitable for the assessment of patients with severe lumbago owing to the markedly shortened examination time. However, if helical CT is used as a screening method for lumbosacral disease, one must be careful of its limitations, for example, poor detectability of neoplastic disease, vascular anomalies and so on. (author)

  11. Helicity Transfer in Turbulent Models

    CERN Document Server

    Biferale, L; Toschi, F

    1998-01-01

    Helicity transfer in a shell model of turbulence is investigated. We show that a Reynolds-independent helicity flux is present in the model when the large scale forcing breaks inversion symmetry. The equivalent in Shell Models of the ``2/15 law'', obtained from helicity conservation in Navier-Stokes eqs., is derived and tested. The odd part of helicity flux statistic is found to be dominated by a few very intense events. In a particular model, we calculate analytically leading and sub-leading contribution to the scaling of triple velocity correlation.

  12. Broadband optical isolator based on helical metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hu; Yang, ZhenYu; Zhao, Ming; Wu, Lin; Zhang, Peng

    2015-05-01

    Based on helical metamaterials, a new broadband optical isolator with a triple-helix structure is proposed in this paper. The right-handed circularly polarized light can transmit through the isolator with its polarization unchanged. The reverse propagating light, which is caused by the reflection of the latter optical devices, is converted into left-handed circularly polarized light that is suppressed by the proposed isolator because of absorption. Our design has some unprecedented advantages such as broad frequency ranges and a compact structure; moreover, neither polarizers nor adscititious magnetic fields are required. Properties of the isolator are investigated using the finite-difference time-domain method, and this phenomenon is studied by the mechanism of helical antenna theory.

  13. Driving Solar Eruptions via Helicity Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Joel Timothy; Antiochos, Spiro K.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2017-08-01

    One of the important questions in solar physics is, “How does the Sun store and release energy in coronal mass ejections"? Key to answering this question is understanding how the sun (a) stores magnetic energy in the form of a solar filament and (b) suddenly releases this energy as a coronal mass ejection. An important model for the energy release is the ‘magnetic breakout’ - a positive-feedback mechanism between filament ejection and magnetic reconnection. Recent theory and numerical calculations have demonstrated that helicity injected into the corona via photospheric driving can accumulate in the form of a filament channel of strongly sheared magnetic fields that can provide the free energy for a coronal mass ejection. We present preliminary calculations that, for the first time, incorporate helicity injection in a breakout topology to model a fully self-consistent eruption, from filament formation to ejection.

  14. Instabilities of a rotating helical rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yunyoung; Ko, William; Kim, Yongsam; Lim, Sookkyung

    2016-11-01

    Bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Vibrio alginolyticus have helical flagellar filament. By rotating a motor, which is located at the bottom end of the flagellar filament embedded in the cell body, CCW or CW, they swim forward or backward. We model a left-handed helix by the Kirchhoff rod theory and use regularized Stokes formulation to study an interaction between the surrounding fluid and the flagellar filament. We perform numerical studies focusing on relations between physical parameters and critical angular frequency of the motor, which separates overwhiring from twirling. We are also interested in the buckling instability of the hook, which is very flexible elastic rod. By measuring buckling angle, which is an angle between rotational axis and helical axis, we observe the effects of physical parameters on buckling of the hook.

  15. Helical structure of longitudinal vortices embedded in turbulent wall-bounded flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Okulov, Valery

    2009-01-01

    Embedded vortices in turbulent wall-bounded flow over a flat plate, generated by a passive rectangular vane-type vortex generator with variable angle \\beta to the incoming flow in a low-Reynolds number flow (Re = 2600 based on the inlet grid mesh size L = 0:039 m and free stream velocity U......_{\\infty} = 1.0 ms^{-1}) have been studied with respect to helical symmetry. The studies were carried out in a low-speed closed-circuit wind tunnel utilizing Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV). The vortices have been shown to possess helical symmetry, allowing the flow to be described in a simple...

  16. Density filament and helical field line structures in three dimensional Weibel-mediated collisionless shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritaka, Toseo; Sakawa, Youichi; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Morita, Taichi; Yamaura, Yuta; Ishikawa, Taishi; Takabe, Hideaki

    2016-03-01

    Collisionless shocks mediated by Weibel instability are attracting attention for their relevance to experimental demonstrations of astrophysical shocks in high-intensity laser facilities. The three dimensional structure of Weibel-mediated shocks is investigated through a fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulation. The structures obtained are characterized by the following features: (i) helical magnetic field lines elongated in the direction upstream of the shock region, (ii) high and low density filaments inside the helical field lines. These structures originate from the interaction between counter-streaming plasma flow and magnetic vortexes caused by Weibel instability, and potentially affect the shock formation mechanism.

  17. Detection of cavitation vortex in hydraulic turbines using acoustic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candel, I.; Bunea, F.; Dunca, G.; Bucur, D. M.; Ioana, C.; Reeb, B.; Ciocan, G. D.

    2014-03-01

    Cavitation phenomena are known for their destructive capacity in hydraulic machineries and are caused by the pressure decrease followed by an implosion when the cavitation bubbles find an adverse pressure gradient. A helical vortex appears in the turbine diffuser cone at partial flow rate operation and can be cavitating in its core. Cavity volumes and vortex frequencies vary with the under-pressure level. If the vortex frequency comes close to one of the eigen frequencies of the turbine, a resonance phenomenon may occur, the unsteady fluctuations can be amplified and lead to important turbine and hydraulic circuit damage. Conventional cavitation vortex detection techniques are based on passive devices (pressure sensors or accelerometers). Limited sensor bandwidths and low frequency response limit the vortex detection and characterization information provided by the passive techniques. In order to go beyond these techniques and develop a new active one that will remove these drawbacks, previous work in the field has shown that techniques based on acoustic signals using adapted signal content to a particular hydraulic situation, can be more robust and accurate. The cavitation vortex effects in the water flow profile downstream hydraulic turbines runner are responsible for signal content modifications. Basic signal techniques use narrow band signals traveling inside the flow from an emitting transducer to a receiving one (active sensors). Emissions of wide band signals in the flow during the apparition and development of the vortex embeds changes in the received signals. Signal processing methods are used to estimate the cavitation apparition and evolution. Tests done in a reduced scale facility showed that due to the increasing flow rate, the signal -- vortex interaction is seen as modifications on the received signal's high order statistics and bandwidth. Wide band acoustic transducers have a higher dynamic range over mechanical elements; the system's reaction time

  18. The shock-vortex interaction patterns affected by vortex flow regime and vortex models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Keun-Shik; Barik, Hrushikesh; Chang, Se-Myong

    2009-08-01

    We have used a third-order essentially non-oscillatory method to obtain numerical shadowgraphs for investigation of shock-vortex interaction patterns. To search different interaction patterns, we have tested two vortex models (the composite vortex model and the Taylor vortex model) and as many as 47 parametric data sets. By shock-vortex interaction, the impinging shock is deformed to a S-shape with leading and lagging parts of the shock. The vortex flow is locally accelerated by the leading shock and locally decelerated by the lagging shock, having a severely elongated vortex core with two vertices. When the leading shock escapes the vortex, implosion effect creates a high pressure in the vertex area where the flow had been most expanded. This compressed region spreads in time with two frontal waves, an induced expansion wave and an induced compression wave. They are subsonic waves when the shock-vortex interaction is weak but become supersonic waves for strong interactions. Under a intermediate interaction, however, an induced shock wave is first developed where flow speed is supersonic but is dissipated where the incoming flow is subsonic. We have identified three different interaction patterns that depend on the vortex flow regime characterized by the shock-vortex interaction.

  19. Direct numerical simulations of helical dynamo action: MHD and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Gómez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetohydrodynamic dynamo action is often invoked to explain the existence of magnetic fields in several astronomical objects. In this work, we present direct numerical simulations of MHD helical dynamos, to study the exponential growth and saturation of magnetic fields. Simulations are made within the framework of incompressible flows and using periodic boundary conditions. The statistical properties of the flow are studied, and it is found that its helicity displays strong spatial fluctuations. Regions with large kinetic helicity are also strongly concentrated in space, forming elongated structures. In dynamo simulations using these flows, we found that the growth rate and the saturation level of magnetic energy and magnetic helicity reach an asymptotic value as the Reynolds number is increased. Finally, extensions of the MHD theory to include kinetic effects relevant in astrophysical environments are discussed.

  20. IUTAM Symposium on Hamiltonian Dynamics, Vortex Structures, Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Borisov, Alexey V; Mamaev, Ivan S; Sokolovskiy, Mikhail A; IUTAM BOOKSERIES : Volume 6

    2008-01-01

    This work brings together previously unpublished notes contributed by participants of the IUTAM Symposium on Hamiltonian Dynamics, Vortex Structures, Turbulence (Moscow, 25-30 August 2006). The study of vortex motion is of great interest to fluid and gas dynamics: since all real flows are vortical in nature, applications of the vortex theory are extremely diverse, many of them (e.g. aircraft dynamics, atmospheric and ocean phenomena) being especially important. The last few decades have shown that serious possibilities for progress in the research of real turbulent vortex motions are essentially related to the combined use of mathematical methods, computer simulation and laboratory experiments. These approaches have led to a series of interesting results which allow us to study these processes from new perspectives. Based on this principle, the papers collected in this proceedings volume present new results on theoretical and applied aspects of the processes of formation and evolution of various flows, wave a...

  1. Helicity and its role in the varieties of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, David C.; Bates, Jason W.

    Magnetic helicity has appeared as an important but slippery quantity in the theory of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in two contexts: (1) as a slowly-decaying ideal invariant that can control to some extent the formation of a "relaxed" MHD state—one far from thermal equilibrium—in laboratory confinement devices such as the toroidal pinch; and (2) as a potentially inversely-cascadable global quantity in driven, homogeneous MHD turbulence. In the former case, the origin of helicity is straightforwardly clear: electric current is forced to flow along a dc magnetic field, generating poloidal magnetic flux and causing the magnetic field lines to kink up, helically. In the latter, helicity's origins and physical interpretation are more obscure, sometimes having to do with mechanically driven helical motions which supposedly generate magnetic helicity that, however, no longer has any obvious "linked flux" interpretation. In both cases, its usefulness and even its definition sometimes depend sensitively on boundary conditions in a way that, say, those for energy do not. We will examine what the utility of the concept of magnetic helicity has so far been shown to be in discussing turbulent MHD, and comment on some of the ways it differs from other global ideal invariants that have been discussed, such as kinetic energy in 2D Navier-Stokes flows, and mean-square magnetic vector potential in 2D MHD. Attention will be devoted to the evidence for variational principles such as "maximal helicity," or "minimum energy," conjectured to predict various relaxation processes and late-time laminar states in evolving MHD situations. What is believed to be an important distinction between applications of the principles to decaying and driven situations will be stressed. Our discussion will be confined to the cases of small but non-zero transport coefficients, and will not deal with any possible role of helicity in ideal MHD.

  2. Realizing topological stability of magnetic helices in exchange-coupled multilayers for all-spin-based system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fust, Sergej; Mukherjee, Saumya; Paul, Neelima; Stahn, Jochen; Kreuzpaintner, Wolfgang; Böni, Peter; Paul, Amitesh

    2016-09-01

    Topologically stabilized spin configurations like helices in the form of planar domain walls (DWs) or vortex-like structures with magnetic functionalities are more often a theoretical prediction rather than experimental realization. In this paper we report on the exchange coupling and helical phase characteristics within Dy-Fe multilayers. The magnetic hysteresis loops with temperature show an exchange bias field of around 1.0 kOe at 10 K. Polarized neutron reflectivity reveal (i) ferrimagnetic alignment of the layers at low fields forming twisted magnetic helices and a more complicated but stable continuous helical arrangement at higher fields (ii) direct evidence of helices in the form of planar 2π-DWs within both layers of Fe and Dy. The helices within the Fe layers are topologically stabilized by the reasonably strong induced in-plane magnetocrystalline anisotropy of Dy and the exchange coupling at the Fe-Dy interfaces. The helices in Dy are plausibly reminiscent of the helical ordering at higher temperatures induced by the field history and interfacial strain. Stability of the helical order even at large fields have resulted in an effective modulation of the periodicity of the spin-density like waves and subsequent increase in storage energy. This opens broad perspectives for future scientific and technological applications in increasing the energy density for systems in the field of all-spin-based engineering which has the potential for energy-storing elements on nanometer length scales.

  3. Vortex Crystals with Chiral Stripes in Itinerant Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Ryo; Hayami, Satoru; Barros, Kipton; Chern, Gia-Wei; Motome, Yukitoshi; Batista, Cristian D.

    2016-10-01

    We study noncoplanar magnetic ordering in frustrated itinerant magnets. For a family of Kondo square lattice models with classical local moments, we find that a double-Q noncoplanar vortex crystal has lower energy than the single-Q helical order expected from the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction when the lattice symmetry dictates four global maxima in the bare magnetic susceptibility. By expanding in the small Kondo exchange and the degree of noncoplanarity, we demonstrate that this noncoplanar state arises from a Fermi surface instability occurring in independent sections connected by two ordering wave vectors.

  4. Quark Helicity and Transversity Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Dae Sung

    2016-01-01

    The quark transversity distribution inside nucleon is less understood than the quark unpolarized and helicity distributions inside nucleon. In particular, it is important to know clearly why the quark helicity and transversity distributions are different. We investigate the origin of their discrepancy.

  5. Delta-singular vortex dynamics on a rotating sphere and stability of coupled atmospheric centers of action

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, I I; Chefranov, A G

    2010-01-01

    Existence of a stationary mode for a Hamiltonian dynamic system of two point vortexes with different signs on different latitudes of a uniform rotating sphere complying with observed data is stated. It is shown that such mode realization is possible only in the case when the more intensive cyclonic vortex has greater latitude than that of the anticyclonic vortex. A criterion of exponential instability of the stationary vortex mode taken into account impact of the polar vortexes is obtained. Compliance of the theory to observed data and reanalysis for coupled quasi-stationary systems of cyclonic and anticyclonic atmosphere action centers above oceans in the Northern Hemisphere is considered.

  6. Fluid-magnetic helicity in axisymmetric stationary relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, G.

    2017-10-01

    The present work is intended to gain a fruitful insight into the understanding of the formations of magneto-vortex configurations and their role in the physical processes of mutual exchange of energies associated with fluid's motion and the magnetic fields in an axisymmetric stationary hydromagnetic system subject to strong gravitational field (e.g., neutron star/magnetar). It is found that the vorticity flux vector field associated with vorticity 2-form is a linear combination of fluid's vorticity vector and of magnetic vorticity vector. The vorticity flux vector obeys Helmholtz's flux conservation. The energy equation associated with the vorticity flux vector field is deduced. It is shown that the mechanical rotation of vorticity flux surfaces contributes to the formation of vorticity flux vector field. The dynamo action for the generation of toroidal components of vorticity flux vector field is described in the presence of meridional circulations. It is shown that the stretching of twisting magnetic lines due to differential rotation leads to the breakdown of gravitational isorotation in the absence of meridional circulations. An explicit expression consists of rotation of vorticity flux surface, energy and angular momentum per baryon for the fluid-magnetic helicity current vector is obtained. The conservation of fluid-magnetic helicity is demonstrated. It is found that the fluid-magnetic helicity displays the energy spectrum arising due to the interaction between the mechanical rotation of vorticity flux surfaces and the fluid's motion obeying Euler's equations. The dissipation of a linear combination of modified fluid helicity and magnetic twist is shown to occur due to coupled effect of frame dragging and meridional circulation. It is found that the growing twist of magnetic lines causes the dissipation of modified fluid helicity in the absence of meridional circulations.

  7. Magnetic design constraints of helical solenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, M. L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Krave, S. T. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Tompkins, J. C. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yonehara, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Flanagan, G. [Muons Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Kahn, S. A. [Muons Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Melconian, K. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-01-30

    Helical solenoids have been proposed as an option for a Helical Cooling Channel for muons in a proposed Muon Collider. Helical solenoids can provide the required three main field components: solenoidal, helical dipole, and a helical gradient. In general terms, the last two are a function of many geometric parameters: coil aperture, coil radial and longitudinal dimensions, helix period and orbit radius. In this paper, we present design studies of a Helical Solenoid, addressing the geometric tunability limits and auxiliary correction system.

  8. Simulations of vortex generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoutsakos, P.

    1995-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via direct numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. We consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the stream direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise vorticity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations complement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators at NASA Ames and Stanford University (Saddoughi, 1994, and Jacobson and Reynolds, 1993). Jacobson and Reynolds (1993) used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and he observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds. Our task is to simulate the flows generated by these devices and to conduct a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin (1994). The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands of particles allow for high resolution simulations. The results of the present simulations would help us assess some of the effects of three-dimensionality in experiments and investigate the role

  9. Optimal response in the Lamb-Oseen vortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Zhi-Wei [Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027 (China); Sun, De-Jun, E-mail: dsun@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027 (China)

    2011-08-22

    The optimal response in the Lamb-Oseen vortex is studied by considering the harmonically forced problem with frequency ω. High variance levels are sustained in these systems under periodic forcing. In the axisymmetric case n=0, the response is the largest when the input frequency is zero. When considering helical perturbations n=1, large response is excited through resonance mechanism at moderate and large wavelengths. At smaller wavelengths, large response is excited by steady forcing. For perturbations with higher azimuthal wavenumbers |n|>1, the magnitudes of the response are smaller than those for helical modes. For given axial wavenumber and input frequency, the response increases rapidly with Re, which points to the significance of energy growth in high-Reynolds-number practical flows. -- Highlights: → The level of the response energy is compared to that without forcing. → Different azimuthal modes are studied and compared. → The reason of the location of peaks for helical modes is presented. → The non-smoothness of curves for helical modes is explained. → The optimal perturbation can be activated by forcing.

  10. Topological fluid mechanics of point vortex motions

    CERN Document Server

    Boyland, P; Aref, H; Boyland, Philip; Stremler, Mark; Aref, Hassan

    1999-01-01

    Topological techniques are used to study the motions of systems of point vortices in the infinite plane, in singly-periodic arrays, and in doubly-periodic lattices. The reduction of each system using its symmetries is described in detail. Restricting to three vortices with zero net circulation, each reduced system is described by a one degree of freedom Hamiltonian. The phase portrait of this reduced system is subdivided into regimes using the separatrix motions, and a braid representing the topology of all vortex motions in each regime is computed. This braid also describes the isotopy class of the advection homeomorphism induced by the vortex motion. The Thurston-Nielsen theory is then used to analyse these isotopy classes, and in certain cases strong conclusions about the dynamics of the advection can be made.

  11. Vortex cores and vortex motion in superconductors with anisotropic Fermi surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvis, J. A.; Herrera, E.; Guillamón, I.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.

    2017-02-01

    Explaning static and dynamic properties of the vortex lattice in anisotropic superconductors requires a careful characterization of vortex cores. The vortex core contains Andreev bound states whose spatial extension depends on the anisotropy of the electronic band-structure and superconducting gap. This might have an impact on the anisotropy of the superconducting properties and on vortex dynamics. Here we briefly summarize basic concepts to understand anisotropic vortex cores and review vortex core imaging experiments. We further discuss moving vortex lattices and the influence of vortex core shape in vortex motion. We find vortex motion in highly tilted magnetic fields. We associate vortex motion to the vortex entry barrier and the screening currents at the surface. We find preferential vortex motion along the main axis of the vortex lattice. After travelling integers of the intervortex distance, we find that vortices move more slowly due to the washboard potential of the vortex lattice.

  12. Helical-mode magnetostatic resonances in small ferrite particles and singular metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenetskii, E O

    2010-12-08

    Small ferrite-disk particles with magnetostatic (magneto-dipole) oscillations are characterized by the topological-phase states-the vortex states. In a recently published paper (Kamenetskii et al 2010 Phys. Rev. A 81 053823), it was shown that such magnetic vortices act as traps, providing purely subwavelength confinement of electromagnetic fields. The symmetry properties of magnetostatic-vortex ferrite disks allow one to propose new-type subwavelength microwave structures. In this paper it is demonstrated that the unique topological properties of the fields in a ferrite disk are intimately related to the symmetry breaking effects of magnetostatic oscillations. This analysis is based on postulates about a physical meaning of the magnetostatic-potential function ψ(r, t) as a complex scalar wavefunction, which presumes a long-range phase coherence in magnetic dipole-dipole interactions. The proper solutions are found based on an analysis of magnetostatic-wave propagation in a helical coordinate system. It is shown that while a composition of two helical waves may acquire a geometrical phase over-running of 2π during a period, every separate helical wave has a dynamical phase over-running of π and so behaves as a double-valued function. This results in the appearance of helical-mode magnetostatic resonances in quasi-2D ferrite disks. The solutions give magnetostatic-wave power-flow-density vortices with cores at the disk center and azimuthally running waves of magnetization. The near fields of magnetostatic-vortex ferrite-disk particles are characterized by space-time symmetry violation. For incident electromagnetic waves, such particles, with sizes much less than the free-space electromagnetic wavelength, appear as local singular regions. From the properties of a composition of magnetostatic-vortex ferrite-disk particles, one may propose novel metamaterials-singular metamaterials.

  13. The Advanced Helical Generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisman, D B; Javedani, J B; Ellsworth, G F; Kuklo, R M; Goerz, D A; White, A D; Tallerico, L J; Gidding, D A; Murphy, M J; Chase, J B

    2009-10-26

    A high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) generator called the Advanced Helical Generator (AHG) has been designed, built, and successfully tested. The AHG incorporates design principles of voltage and current management to obtain a high current and energy gain. Its design was facilitated by the use of modern modeling tools as well as high precision manufacture. The result was a first-shot success. The AHG delivered 16 Mega-Amperes of current and 11 Mega-Joules of energy to a quasi-static 80 nH inductive load. A current gain of 154 times was obtained with a peak exponential rise time of 20 {micro}s. We will describe in detail the design and testing of the AHG.

  14. Maxwell’s demon in the Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liew, R.; Zeegers, J.C.H.; Kuerten, J.G.M.; Michalek, W.R.

    2012-01-01

    A theory was developed that explains energy separation in a vortex tube, known as one of the Maxwellian demons. It appears that there is a unique relation between the pressures in the exits of the vortex tube and its temperatures. Experimental results show that the computed and measured temperatures

  15. Vortex line in a neutral finite-temperature superfluid Fermi gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Nicolai; Bruun, G. M.; Schneider, B. I.;

    2004-01-01

    The structure of an isolated vortex in a dilute two-component neutral superfluid Fermi gas is studied within the context of self-consistent Bogoliubov-de Gennes theory. Various thermodynamic properties are calculated, and the shift in the critical temperature due to the presence of the vortex...

  16. Surface effects on the pancake vortex phase diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Col, Alvise de; Geshkenbein, Vadim B.; Menon, Gautam I.; Blatter, Gianni

    2004-05-01

    We discuss the effects of a surface on the vortex system in a layered superconductor with vanishingly small Josephson coupling. Within a London theory, we derive the modified pancake vortex interaction in samples with a finite number of layers. We discuss the implications of these modifications for the zero-field transition and for the melting transition in finite fields formulated within a substrate model [Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 (2000) 2698]. Close to the surface, the lattice becomes unstable below the bulk thermodynamic melting temperature. We analyze the resulting surface-induced melting using density functional theory.

  17. Buckling transition in long α-helices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palenčár, Peter; Bleha, Tomáš, E-mail: bleha@savba.sk [Polymer Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 845 41 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2014-11-07

    The treatment of bending and buckling of stiff biopolymer filaments by the popular worm-like chain model does not provide adequate understanding of these processes at the microscopic level. Thus, we have used the atomistic molecular-dynamic simulations and the Amber03 force field to examine the compression buckling of α-helix (AH) filaments at room temperature. It was found that the buckling instability occurs in AHs at the critical force f{sub c} in the range of tens of pN depending on the AH length. The decrease of the force f{sub c} with the contour length follows the prediction of the classic thin rod theory. At the force f{sub c} the helical filament undergoes the swift and irreversible transition from the smoothly bent structure to the buckled one. A sharp kink in the AH contour arises at the transition, accompanied by the disruption of the hydrogen bonds in its vicinity. The kink defect brings in an effective softening of the AH molecule at buckling. Nonbonded interactions between helical branches drive the rearrangement of a kinked AH into the ultimate buckled structure of a compact helical hairpin described earlier in the literature.

  18. Cylindrical vortex wake model: skewed cylinder, application to yawed or tilted rotors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel Simon Pierre; Gaunaa, Mac

    2016-01-01

    in Blade Element Momentum method codes for yawed conditions. Here, all the components of the full vortex system are analyzed in view of extending Blade Element Momentum models. The main assumptions of the current study are a constant uniform circulation, an infinite number of blades, an un-expanding wake......A vortex system consisting of a bound vortex disk, a root vortex and a vortex cylinder is presented and applied for skewed wake situations. Both the longitudinal and tangential components of vorticity of the cylinder are considered. A subset of this system leads to a model, which is commonly used...... shape and a finite tip-speed ratio. The investigation remains within the context of inviscid potential flow theory. The model is derived for horizontal-axis rotors in general, but results are presented for wind-turbine applications. For each vortex element, the velocity components in all directions...

  19. Orbital angular momentum of helical necklace beams in colloid-based nonlinear optical metamaterials (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walasik, Wiktor T.; Silahli, Salih Z.; Litchinitser, Natalia M.

    2016-09-01

    Colloidal metamaterials are a robust and flexible platform for engineering of optical nonlinearities and studies of light filamentation. To date, nonlinear propagation and modulation instability of Gaussian beams and optical vortices carrying orbital angular momentum were studied in such media. Here, we investigate the propagation of necklace beams and the conservation of the orbital angular momentum in colloidal media with saturable nonlinearity. We study various scenarios leading to generation of helical necklace beams or twisted beams, depending on the radius, power, and charge of the input vortex beam. Helical beams are build of two separate solitary beams with circular cross-sections that spiral around their center of mass as a result of the equilibrium between the attraction force of in-phase solitons and the centrifugal force associated with the rotational movement. A twisted beam is a single beam with an elliptical cross-section that rotates around it's own axis. We show that the orbital angular momentum is converted into the rotational motion at different rates for helical and twisted beams. While earlier studies reported that solitary beams are expelled form the initial vortex ring along straight trajectories tangent to the vortex ring, we show that depending on the charge and the power of the initial beam, these trajectories can diverge from the tangential direction and may be curvilinear. These results provide a detailed description of necklace beam dynamics in saturable nonlinear media and may be useful in studies of light filamentation in liquids and light propagation in highly scattering colloids and biological samples.

  20. Aircraft Wake Vortex Deformation in Turbulent Atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Hennemann, Ingo; Holzaepfel, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Large-scale distortion of aircraft wake vortices appears to play a crucial role for aircraft safety during approach and landing. Vortex distortion is investigated based on large eddy simulations of wake vortex evolution in a turbulent atmosphere. A vortex identification method is developed that can be adapted to the vortex scales of interest. Based on the identified vortex center tracks, a statistics of vortex curvature radii is established. This statistics constitutes the basis for understan...

  1. Development of a perturbation generator for vortex stability studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riester, J. E.; Ash, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    Theory predicts vortex instability when subjected to certain types of disturbances. It was desired to build a device which could introduce controlled velocity perturbations into a trailing line vortex in order to study the effects on stability. A perturbation generator was designed and manufactured which can be attached to the centerbody of an airfoil type vortex generator. Details of design tests and manufacturing of the perturbation generator are presented. The device produced controlled perturbation with frequencies in excess of 250 Hz. Preliminary testing and evaluation of the perturbation generator performance was conducted in a 4 inch cylindrical pipe. Observations of vortex shedding frequencies from a centerbody were measured. Further evaluation with the perturbation generator attached to the vortex generator in a 2 x 3 foot wind tunnel were also conducted. Hot-wire anemometry was used to confirm the perturbation generator's ability to introduce controlled frequency fluctuations. Comparison of the energy levels of the disturbances in the vortex core was made between locations 42 chord lengths and 15 chord lengths downstream.

  2. Vortex-Surface Interactions: Vortex Dynamics and Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-16

    a) Main vortex structures developing on a typical submarine hull; (b) Schematic illustrating a horseshoe vortex at a wing-body junction of a " Rood ...secondary vortices. Firstly, looking at Figure 7, showing only the secondary vortices being visualized by our technique , we see that a tongue of secondary

  3. Evolution of optical vortex distributions in stochastic vortex fields

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available dipole,? Opt. Commun. 236, 433?440 (2004). [23] Dana, I. and Freund, I., ?Vortex-lattice wave fields,? Opt. Commun. . [24] Jenkins, R., Banerji, J., and Davies, A., ?The generation of optical vortices and shape preserving vortex arrays in hollow...

  4. Cosmic acceleration and the helicity-0 graviton

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rham, Claudia; Gabadadze, Gregory; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Pirtskhalava, David

    2011-05-01

    We explore cosmology in the decoupling limit of a nonlinear covariant extension of Fierz-Pauli massive gravity obtained recently in arXiv:1007.0443. In this limit the theory is a scalar-tensor model of a unique form defined by symmetries. We find that it admits a self-accelerated solution, with the Hubble parameter set by the graviton mass. The negative pressure causing the acceleration is due to a condensate of the helicity-0 component of the massive graviton, and the background evolution, in the approximation used, is indistinguishable from the ΛCDM model. Fluctuations about the self-accelerated background are stable for a certain range of parameters involved. Most surprisingly, the fluctuation of the helicity-0 field above its background decouples from an arbitrary source in the linearized theory. We also show how massive gravity can remarkably screen an arbitrarily large cosmological constant in the decoupling limit, while evading issues with ghosts. The obtained static solution is stable against small perturbations, suggesting that the degravitation of the vacuum energy is possible in the full theory. Interestingly, however, this mechanism postpones the Vainshtein effect to shorter distance scales. Hence, fifth force measurements severely constrain the value of the cosmological constant that can be neutralized, making this scheme phenomenologically not viable for solving the old cosmological constant problem. We briefly speculate on a possible way out of this issue.

  5. Holographic Metals and Insulators with Helical Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Donos, Aristomenis; Kiritsis, Elias

    2014-01-01

    Homogeneous, zero temperature scaling solutions with Bianchi VII spatial geometry are constructed in Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theory. They correspond to quantum critical saddle points with helical symmetry at finite density. Assuming $AdS_{5}$ UV asymptotics, the small frequency/(temperature) dependence of the AC/(DC) electric conductivity along the director of the helix are computed. A large class of insulating and conducting anisotropic phases is found, as well as isotropic, metallic phases. Conduction can be dominated by dissipation due to weak breaking of translation symmetry or by a quantum critical current.

  6. Four-fold way to helicity

    CERN Document Server

    Elbistan, M; Zhang, P -M

    2016-01-01

    Bialynicki-Birula's "photon wave equation", derived from a Dirac/Weyl-type action principle, is symmetric w.r.t. duality transformations, but the associated Noether quantity vanishes. Replacing fields by potentials in the definition and using instead a Klein-Gordon-type action allows us to recover the previously proposed conserved "double-Chern-Simons" expression of helicity. A similar argument applied to the original Bialynicki-Birula setting yields Lipkin's "zilch". The Dirac/Weyl-type approach, applied to our potential-modified theory, yields again zero conserved charge. Our results are consistent with the theorem of Weinberg and Witten.

  7. Turbulent Dynamos and Magnetic Helicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Hantao

    1999-04-01

    It is shown that the turbulent dynamo alpha-effect converts magnetic helicity from the turbulent field to the mean field when the turbulence is electromagnetic while the magnetic helicity of the mean-field is transported across space when the turbulence is elcetrostatic or due to the elcetron diamagnetic effect. In all cases, however, the dynamo effect strictly conserves the total helicity expect for a battery effect which vanishes in the limit of magnetohydrodynamics. Implications for astrophysical situations, especially for the solar dynamo, are discussed.

  8. SPring-8 twin helical undulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, T; Tanaka, T; Tanabe, T; Maréchal, X M; Kumagai, K; Kitamura, H

    1998-05-01

    There are several ways of producing circularly polarized light, such as using asymmetric devices, crossed undulators etc. The SPring-8 helical undulator introduces a simple way of producing both horizontal and vertical fields in one undulator. All the magnet arrays are arranged above and below the plane of the electron orbit, so there is no limitation of access from the sides of the undulator. For the SPring-8 BL25SU, two helical undulators will be installed in tandem, and the helicity of the polarization can be switched at up to 10 Hz using five kicker magnets.

  9. What makes single-helical metamaterials generate "pure" circularly polarized light?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Yang, ZhenYu; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Peng; Lu, ZeQing; Yu, Yang; Li, ShengXi; Yuan, XiuHua

    2012-01-16

    Circular polarizers with left-handed helical metamaterials can transmit right-handed circularly polarized (RCP) light with few losses. But a certain amount of left-handed circularly polarized (LCP) light will occur in the transmitted light, which is the noise of the circular polarizer. Therefore, we defined the ratio of the RCP light intensity to the LCP light intensity as the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. In our previous work, it's found that circular polarizers with multi-helical metamaterials have two orders higher S/N ratios than that of single-helical metamaterials. However, it has been a great challenge to fabricate such multi-helical structures with micron or sub-micron feature sizes. Is it possible for the single-helical metamaterials to obtain equally high S/N ratios as the multi-helical ones? To answer this question, we systematically investigated the influences of structure parameters of single-helical metamaterials on the S/N ratios using the finite-different time-domain (FDTD) method. It was found that the single-helical metamaterials can also reach about 30dB S/N ratios, which are equal to the multi-helical ones. Furthermore, we explained the phenomenon by the antenna theory and optimized the performances of the single-helical circular polarizers.

  10. Decay of helical and non-helical magnetic knots

    CERN Document Server

    Candelaresi, Simon

    2011-01-01

    We present calculations of the relaxation of magnetic field structures that have the shape of particular knots and links. A set of helical magnetic flux configurations is considered, which we call $n$-foil knots of which the trefoil knot is the most primitive member. We also consider two non-helical knots, namely the Borromean rings as well as a single interlocked flux rope that also serves as the logo of the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Pune, India. The field decay characteristics of both configurations is investigated and compared with previous calculations of helical and non-helical triple ring configurations. For the $n$-foil knots the decay is described by power laws that range form $t^{-2/3}$ to $t^{-1/3}$, which can be as slow as the $t^{-1/3}$ behavior for helical triple-ring structures that was seen in earlier work. The two non-helical configurations decay like $t^{-1}$, which is somewhat slower than the previously obtained $t^{-3/2}$ behavior in the decay of interlocked ...

  11. Verification of an analytic fit for the vortex core profile in superfluid Fermi gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhelst, Nick, E-mail: nick.verhelst@uantwerpen.be [TQC, Universiteit Antwerpen, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerpen (Belgium); Klimin, Serghei, E-mail: sergei.klimin@uantwerpen.be [TQC, Universiteit Antwerpen, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerpen (Belgium); Department of Theoretical Physics, State University of Moldova, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Tempere, Jacques [TQC, Universiteit Antwerpen, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerpen (Belgium); Lyman Laboratory of Physics, Harvard University (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The vortex profile in an imbalanced Fermi condensate is investigated. • The analytic fit for the vortex profile is compared with numerical simulations. • The analytic fit excellently agrees with numeric results in the BCS-BEC crossover. - Abstract: A characteristic property of superfluidity and -conductivity is the presence of quantized vortices in rotating systems. To study the BEC-BCS crossover the two most common methods are the Bogoliubov-De Gennes theory and the usage of an effective field theory. In order to simplify the calculations for one vortex, it is often assumed that the hyperbolic tangent yields a good approximation for the vortex structure. The combination of a variational vortex structure, together with cylindrical symmetry yields analytic (or numerically simple) expressions. The focus of this article is to investigate to what extent this analytic fit truly reflects the vortex structure throughout the BEC-BCS crossover at finite temperatures. The vortex structure will be determined using the effective field theory presented in [Eur. Phys. Journal B 88, 122 (2015)] and compared to the variational analytic solution. By doing this it is possible to see where these two structures agree, and where they differ. This comparison results in a range of applicability where the hyperbolic tangent will be a good fit for the vortex structure.

  12. Energy fluxes in helical magnetohydrodynamics and dynamo action

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahendra K Verma

    2003-10-01

    Renormalized viscosity, renormalized resistivity, and various energy fluxes are calculated for helical magnetohydrodynamics using perturbative field theory. The calculation is of first-order in perturbation. Kinetic and magnetic helicities do not affect the renormalized parameters, but they induce an inverse cascade of magnetic energy. The sources for the large-scale magnetic field have been shown to be (1) energy flux from large-scale velocity field to large-scale magnetic field arising due to non-helical interactions and (2) inverse energy flux of magnetic energy caused by helical interactions. Based on our flux results, a primitive model for galactic dynamo has been constructed. Our calculations yield dynamo time-scale for a typical galaxy to be of the order of 108 years. Our field-theoretic calculations also reveal that the flux of magnetic helicity is backward, consistent with the earlier observations based on absolute equilibrium theory.

  13. Solitary vortexes in magnetohydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vainshtein, S.I.

    1985-12-01

    Stationary configurations in magnetohydrodynamics are investigated for the following two particular cases: (1) there is no motion, which corresponds to a state of magnetostatic equilibrium; and (2) the magnetic field intensity becomes zero, i.e., hydrodynamic vortexes are involved. It is shown that in certain cases the line-of-force topology must be sufficiently simple in order before a stationary or equilibrium state can be achieved. It is also shown that in the two-dimensional case, the magnetic surfaces of an equilibrium configuration represent coaxial cylindrical surfaces. 12 references.

  14. Vortex Flow Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    j . 1978. 93. Grabowski , W.J.; "Solutions of the Navier-Stokes Equations for Vortex Breakdown," NASA CR...including foreign nations. This technical report has been reviewed and is approved for publication. LAWRENCE W. ROGERS Q LOWELL C. KEEL, Major, USAF Project...or’ a w U - a LU LU U- LU C - J ’di 2 2 C LU I- 4 S Ua * - w x 2 40 20 I- 2 LU W S ~ 00 * U. 4 I- 𔃾 LU a 4 U 4 2 C C LU 4 a 4a 2 I- 4 a 3 9

  15. Robustness of a coherence vortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Cleberson R; Jesus-Silva, Alcenisio J; Fonseca, Eduardo J S

    2016-09-20

    We study, experimentally and theoretically, the behavior of a coherence vortex after its transmission through obstacles. Notably, we find that such a vortex survives and preserves its effective topological charge. Despite suffering changes on the modulus of the coherence function, these changes disappear during propagation.

  16. Vortex duality in higher dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, Aron Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    A dynamic vortex line traces out a world sheet in spacetime. This thesis shows that the information of all its dynamic behaviour is completely contained in the world sheet. Furthermore a mathematical framework for order–disorder phase transitions in terms of the proliferation of such vortex world sh

  17. Monopole-Antimonopole and Vortex Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Teh, R; Teh, Rosy; Wong, Khai-Ming

    2004-01-01

    The SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs theory supports the existence of monopoles, antimonopoles, and vortex rings. In this paper, we would like to present new exact static antimonopole-monopole-antimonopole (A-M-A) configurations. The net magnetic charge of these configurations is always negative one, whilst the net magnetic charge at the origin is always positive one for all positive integer values of the solution parameter $m$. However, when $m$ increases beyond one, vortex rings appear coexisting with these A-M-A configurations. The number of vortex rings increases proportionally with the value of $m$. They are magnetically neutral and are located in space where the Higgs field vanishes. We also show that a single point singularity in the Higgs field need not corresponds to a structureless 1-monopole at the origin but to a zero size monopole-antimonopole-monopole (MAM) structure. These exact solutions are a different kind of BPS solutions as they satisfy the first order Bogomol'nyi equation but possess infinite energ...

  18. Monopole-antimonopole and vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Rosy; Wong, Khai-Ming

    2005-08-01

    The SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs theory supports the existence of monopoles, antimonopoles, and vortex rings. In this paper, we would like to present new exact static antimonopole-monopole-antimonopole (A-M-A) configurations. The net magnetic charge of these configurations is always -1, while the net magnetic charge at the origin is always +1 for all positive integer values of the solution's parameter m. However, when m increases beyond 1, vortex rings appear coexisting with these AMA configurations. The number of vortex rings increases proportionally with the value of m. They are located in space where the Higgs field vanishes along rings. We also show that a single-point singularity in the Higgs field does not necessarily correspond to a structureless 1-monopole at the origin but to a zero-size monopole-antimonopole-monopole (MAM) structure when the solution's parameter m is odd. This monopole is the Wu-Yang-type monopole and it possesses the Dirac string potential in the Abelian gauge. These exact solutions are a different kind of Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) solutions as they satisfy the first-order Bogomol'nyi equation but possess infinite energy due to a point singularity at the origin of the coordinate axes. They are all axially symmetrical about the z-axis.

  19. Vortex lines attached to dark solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates and boson-vortex duality in 3+1 dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, A. Muñoz; Yu, Xiaoquan; Nian, Jun

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate the existence of stationary states composed of vortex lines attached to planar dark solitons in scalar Bose-Einstein condensates. Dynamically stable states of this type are found at low values of the chemical potential in channeled condensates, where the long-wavelength instability of dark solitons is prevented. In oblate, harmonic traps, U-shaped vortex lines attached by both ends to a single planar soliton are shown to be long-lived states. Our results are reported for parameters typical of current experiments, and open up a way to explore the interplay of different topological structures. These configurations provide Dirichlet boundary conditions for vortex lines and thereby mimic open strings attached to D-branes in string theory. We show that these similarities can be formally established by mapping the Gross-Pitaevskii theory into a dual effective string theory for open strings via a boson-vortex duality in 3+1 dimensions. Combining a one-form gauge field living on the soliton plane which couples to the end points of vortex lines and a two-form gauge field which couples to vortex lines, we obtain a gauge-invariant dual action of open vortex lines with their end points attached to dark solitons.

  20. Asymmetric catalysis with helical polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Megens, Rik P.; Roelfes, Gerard

    Inspired by nature, the use of helical biopolymer catalysts has emerged over the last years as a new approach to asymmetric catalysis. In this Concept article the various approaches and designs and their application in asymmetric catalysis will be discussed.

  1. Asymmetric catalysis with helical polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Megens, Rik P.; Roelfes, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by nature, the use of helical biopolymer catalysts has emerged over the last years as a new approach to asymmetric catalysis. In this Concept article the various approaches and designs and their application in asymmetric catalysis will be discussed.

  2. Vortex fields and the Lamb-Stokes dissipation relation of fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scofield, D.F. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74076 (United States); Huq, Pablo [College of Marine and Earth Studies, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)], E-mail: huq@udel.edu

    2008-06-09

    Energy dissipation in Newtonian fluids containing a unified vortex field is shown to depend on -{eta}{integral}{sub V}({omega}{sup 2}+{lambda}{sup 2}{zeta}{sup 2})dV, where {eta}, {omega} and {zeta}=ux{omega} are viscosity, vorticity and swirl. This term augments viscous dissipation where stream tube geometry is curved, e.g., in turbulent or helical flows.

  3. Vortex sound in confined flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmans, Gerardus Carolus Johannus

    The interaction of vortex structures with the acoustic velocity field is prerequisite for the production or absorption of acoustic energy. When the source region in which this interaction occurs is much smaller than the wavelength of the acoustic wave, it is possible to neglect wave propagation in the source region itself. Such a source region is called 'compact' and it results in a simplified description of the acoustic source. We have restricted ourselves to compact source regions. Three relevant applications have been studied: speech modelling, damping of acoustic waves by means of diaphragms, and the prediction of flow-induced resonances in bifurcated pipe systems with T-shaped junctions. Experimental as well as numerical work has been carried out for rigid in vitro models of the vocal folds. It was found that it is possible to use a simplified quasi- steady model, which describes the boundary-layer flow in the glottis, to reasonably predict the separation point during a part of one cycle of the vocal-fold movement. This results in a reasonable prediction of the source of sound in voiced speech. Furthermore, it was found that the instability of the jet, that is formed downstream of the glottis, can be a significant source of broad-band sound. A diaphragm used as a constriction in a pipe is a common element in mufflers. This configuration is investigated theoretically, numerically, and experimentally. Results of the quasi-steady flow model and of the numerical calculations are in good agreement with results of experiments. Theory also correctly describes the limit of high frequencies. For the intermediate frequencies we found some deviation between theory and experiments, which is not yet fully understood. The flow through T-joints, with sharp edges, has been numerically investigated as a function of the acoustic amplitude, the Strouhal number, and the flow configuration. In the limit of low frequencies the acoustic source in a T-joint can be described by means

  4. The next large helical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iiyoshi, Atsuo; Yamazaki, Kozo

    1995-06-01

    Helical systems have the strong advantage of inherent steady-state operation for fusion reactors. Two large helical devices with fully superconducting coil systems are presently under design and construction. One is the LHD (Large Helical Device) [Fusion Technol. 17, 169 (1990)] with major radius=3.9 m and magnetic field=3-4 T, that is under construction during 1990-1997 at NIFS (National Institute for Fusion Science), Nagoya/Toki, Japan; it features continuous helical coils and a clean helical divertor focusing on edge configuration optimization. The other one in the W7-X (Wendelstein 7-X) [in Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion Nuclear Research, 1990, (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 3, p. 525] with major radius=5.5 m and magnetic field=3 T, that is under review at IPP (Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics), Garching, Germany; it has adopted a modular coil system after elaborate optimization studies. These two programs are complementary in promoting world helical fusion research and in extending the understanding of toroidal plasmas through comparisons with large tokamaks.

  5. omega-Helices in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkhbayar, Purevjav; Boldgiv, Bazartseren; Matsushima, Norio

    2010-05-01

    A modification of the alpha-helix, termed the omega-helix, has four residues in one turn of a helix. We searched the omega-helix in proteins by the HELFIT program which determines the helical parameters-pitch, residues per turn, radius, and handedness-and p = rmsd/(N - 1)(1/2) estimating helical regularity, where "rmsd" is the root mean square deviation from the best fit helix and "N" is helix length. A total of 1,496 regular alpha-helices 6-9 residues long with p < or = 0.10 A were identified from 866 protein chains. The statistical analysis provides a strong evidence that the frequency distribution of helices versus n indicates the bimodality of typical alpha-helix and omega-helix. Sixty-two right handed omega-helices identified (7.2% of proteins) show non-planarity of the peptide groups. There is amino acid preference of Asp and Cys. These observations and analyses insist that the omega-helices occur really in proteins.

  6. Lift enhancement by trapped vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of lift enhancement by trapped vortex are provided. Efforts are continuously being made to find simple ways to convert wings of aircraft from an efficient cruise configuration to one that develops the high lift needed during landing and takeoff. The high-lift configurations studied here consist of conventional airfoils with a trapped vortex over the upper surface. The vortex is trapped by one or two vertical fences that serve as barriers to the oncoming stream and as reflection planes for the vortex and the sink that form a separation bubble on top of the airfoil. Since the full three-dimensional unsteady flow problem over the wing of an aircraft is so complicated that it is hard to get an understanding of the principles that govern the vortex trapping process, the analysis is restricted here to the flow field illustrated in the first slide. It is assumed that the flow field between the two end plates approximates a streamwise strip of the flow over a wing. The flow between the endplates and about the airfoil consists of a spanwise vortex located between the suction orifices in the endplates. The spanwise fence or spoiler located near the nose of the airfoil serves to form a separated flow region and a shear layer. The vorticity in the shear layer is concentrated into the vortex by withdrawal of fluid at the suction orifices. As the strength of the vortex increases with time, it eventually dominates the flow in the separated region so that a shear or vertical layer is no longer shed from the tip of the fence. At that point, the vortex strength is fixed and its location is such that all of the velocity contributions at its center sum to zero thereby making it an equilibrium point for the vortex. The results of a theoretical analysis of such an idealized flow field are described.

  7. Superfluid Vortex Cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaeva, I. A.; Lindemann, U.; Jiang, N.; de Waele, A. T. A. M.; Thummes, G.

    2004-06-01

    A superfluid vortex cooler (SVC) is a combination of a fountain pump and a vortex cooler. The working fluid in the SVC is 4He at a temperature below the lambda line. The cooler has no moving parts, is gravity independent, and hardly requires any additional infrastructure. At saturated vapour pressure the SVC is capable of reaching a temperature as low as 0.75 K. At pressures close to the melting pressure the temperature can be brought down to 0.65 K. As the SVC operates only below the lambda line, it has to be precooled e.g. by a liquid-helium bath or a cryocooler. As a first step of our research we have carried out a number of experiments, using a liquid-helium bath as a precooler for the SVC. In this arrangement we have reached temperatures below 1 K with 3.5 mW heating power supplied to the fountain part of the SVC at 1.4 K. The next step was combining the SVC with a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR), developed at the University of Giessen. It is a two-stage G-M type refrigerator with 3He as a working fluid that reached a lowest temperature of 1.27 K. In this contribution we report on the results of the SVC tests in liquid helium and the progress in the integration of the SVC with the PTR.

  8. Bose glass scaling for superconducting vortex arrays revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, David R. [Lyman Laboratory of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Vinokur, V. M. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2000-03-01

    Lidmar and Wallin have recently pointed out that Bose glass scaling theory predicts a linear cusp in the phase boundary of vortex matter with correlated disorder as a function temperature of temperature and perpendicular magnetic field. Here, we collect a number of consequences of this observation for physical quantities near the Bose glass transition. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  9. Vortex statistics for turbulence in a container with rigid boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clercx, H.J.H.; Nielsen, A.H.

    2000-01-01

    The evolution of vortex statistics for decaying two-dimensional turbulence in a square container with rigid no-slip walls is compared with a few available experimental results and with the scaling theory of two-dimensional turbulent decay as proposed by Carnevale et al. Power-law exponents...

  10. Cosmic Acceleration and the Helicity-0 Graviton

    CERN Document Server

    de Rham, Claudia; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Pirtskhalava, David

    2010-01-01

    We explore cosmology in the decoupling limit of a non-linear covariant extension of Fierz-Pauli massive gravity obtained recently in arXiv:1007.0443. In this limit the theory is a scalar-tensor model of a unique form defined by symmetries. We find that it admits a self-accelerated solution, with the Hubble parameter set by the graviton mass. The negative pressure causing the acceleration is due to a condensate of the helicity-0 component of the massive graviton, and the background evolution, in the approximation used, is indistinguishable from the \\Lambda CDM model. Fluctuations about the self-accelerated background are stable for a certain range of parameters involved. Most surprisingly, the fluctuation of the helicity-0 field above its background decouples from an arbitrary source in the linearized theory. We also show how massive gravity can remarkably screen an arbitrarily large cosmological constant in the decoupling limit, while evading issues with ghosts. The obtained static solution is stable against ...

  11. Helicity Selection Rules and Non-Interference for BSM Amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Azatov, Aleksandr; Machado, Camila S.; Riva, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Precision studies of scattering processes at colliders provide powerful indirect constraints on new physics. We study the helicity structure of scattering amplitudes in the SM and in the context of an effective Lagrangian description of BSM dynamics. Our analysis reveals a novel set of helicity selection rules according to which, in the majority of 2 to 2 scattering processes at high energy, the SM and the leading BSM effects do not interfere. In such situations, the naive expectation that dimension-6 operators represent the leading BSM contribution is compromised, as corrections from dimension-8 operators can become equally (if not more) important well within the validity of the effective field theory approach.

  12. Small-$x$ asymptotics of the quark helicity distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Kovchegov, Yuri V; Sievert, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    We construct a numerical solution of the small-$x$ evolution equations recently derived in \\cite{Kovchegov:2015pbl} for the (anti)quark helicity TMDs and PDFs as well as the $g_1$ structure function. We focus on the case of large $N_c$ where one finds a closed set of equations. Employing the extracted intercept, we are able to predict directly from theory the behavior of the helicity PDFs at small $x$, which should have important phenomenological consequences. We also give an estimate of how much of the proton's spin may be at small $x$ and what impact this has on the so-called "spin crisis."

  13. Generation of cylindrically polarized vector vortex beams with digital micromirror device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Lei; Liu, Weiwei; Wang, Meng; Zhong, Mincheng; Wang, Ziqiang; Li, Yinmei, E-mail: liyinmei@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Optics and Optical Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui Province 230026 (China); Ren, Yuxuan [National Center for Protein Sciences Shanghai, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, CAS, Shanghai 201210 (China)

    2014-11-14

    We propose a novel technique to directly transform a linearly polarized Gaussian beam into vector-vortex beams with various spatial patterns. Full high-quality control of amplitude and phase is implemented via a Digital Micro-mirror Device (DMD) binary holography for generating Laguerre-Gaussian, Bessel-Gaussian, and helical Mathieu–Gaussian modes, while a radial polarization converter (S-waveplate) is employed to effectively convert the optical vortices into cylindrically polarized vortex beams. Additionally, the generated vector-vortex beams maintain their polarization symmetry after arbitrary polarization manipulation. Due to the high frame rates of DMD, rapid switching among a series of vector modes carrying different orbital angular momenta paves the way for optical microscopy, trapping, and communication.

  14. Unsteady hydraulic simulation of the cavitating part load vortex rope in Francis turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brammer, J.; Segoufin, C.; Duparchy, F.; Lowys, P. Y.; Favrel, A.; Avellan, F.

    2017-04-01

    For Francis turbines at part load operation a helical vortex rope is formed due to the swirling nature of the flow exiting the runner. This vortex creates pressure fluctuations which can lead to power swings, and the unsteady loading can lead to fatigue damage of the runner. In the case that the vortex rope cavitates there is the additional risk that hydro-acoustic resonance can occur. It is therefore important to be able to accurately simulate this phenomenon to address these issues. In this paper an unsteady, multi-phase CFD model was used to simulate two part-load operating points, for two different cavitation conditions. The simulation results were validated with test-rig data, and showed very good agreement. These results also served as an input for FEA calculations and fatigue analysis, which are presented in a separate study.

  15. Regimes of flow past a vortex generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Okulov, V.L.; Naumov, I.V.

    2012-01-01

    A complete parametric investigation of the development of multi-vortex regimes in a wake past simple vortex generator has been carried out. It is established that the vortex structure in the wake is much more complicated than a simple monopole tip vortex. The vortices were studied by stereoscopic...

  16. Some discussions on Arctic vortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hai; Sun Lantao; Wu Huiding; Li Xiang

    2006-01-01

    The Arctic vortex is a persistent large-scale cyclonic circulation in the middle and upper troposphere and the stratosphere. Its activity and variation control the semi-permanent active centers of Pan-Arctic and the short-time cyclone activity in the subarctic areas. Its strength variation, which directly relates to the atmosphere, ocean, sea ice and ecosystem of the Arctic, can affect the lower atmospheric circulation, the weather of subarctic area and even the weather of middle latitude areas. The 2003 Chinese Second Arctic Research Expedition experienced the transition of the stratosphereic circulation from a warm anticyclone to a cold cyclone during the ending period of Arctic summertime, a typical establishing process of the polar vortex circulation. The impact of the polar vortex variation on the low-level circulation has been investigated by some scientists through studying the coupling mechanisms of the stratosphere and troposphere. The impact of the Stratospheric Sudden Warming (SFW) events on the polar vortex variation was drawing people's great attention in the fifties of the last century. The Arctic Oscillation (AO) , relating to the variation of the Arctic vortex, has been used to study the impact of the Arctic vortex on climate change. The recent Arctic vortex studies are simply reviewed and some discussions on the Arctic vertex are given in the paper. Some different views and questions are also discussed.

  17. Vortex equations governing the fractional quantum Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, Luciano, E-mail: lmedina@nyu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Polytechnic School of Engineering, New York University, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    An existence theory is established for a coupled non-linear elliptic system, known as “vortex equations,” describing the fractional quantum Hall effect in 2-dimensional double-layered electron systems. Via variational methods, we prove the existence and uniqueness of multiple vortices over a doubly periodic domain and the full plane. In the doubly periodic situation, explicit sufficient and necessary conditions are obtained that relate the size of the domain and the vortex numbers. For the full plane case, existence is established for all finite-energy solutions and exponential decay estimates are proved. Quantization phenomena of the magnetic flux are found in both cases.

  18. Helical muon beam cooling channel engineering design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-08-07

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet. The first phase of this project saw the development of a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb3Sn based HS test section. Two very novel ideas are required to realize the design. The first idea is the use of dielectric inserts in the RF cavities to make them smaller for a given frequency so that the cavities and associated plumbing easily fit inside the magnet cryostat. Calculations indicate that heat loads will be tolerable, while RF breakdown of the dielectric inserts will be suppressed by the pressurized hydrogen gas. The second new idea is the use of a multi-layer Nb3Sn helical solenoid. The technology demonstrations for the two aforementioned key components of a 10T, 805 MHz HCC were begun in this project. The work load in the Fermilab Technical Division made it difficult to test a multi-layer Nb3Sn solenoid as originally planned. Instead, a complementary project was approved by the DOE

  19. Helical muon beam cooling channel engineering design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-08-07

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet. The first phase of this project saw the development of a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb3Sn-based HS test section. Two very novel ideas are required to realize the design. The first idea is the use of dielectric inserts in the RF cavities to make them smaller for a given frequency so that the cavities and associated plumbing easily fit inside the magnet cryostat. Calculations indicate that heat loads will be tolerable, while RF breakdown of the dielectric inserts will be suppressed by the pressurized hydrogen gas. The second new idea is the use of a multi-layer Nb3Sn helical solenoid. The technology demonstrations for the two aforementioned key components of a 10T, 805 MHz HCC were begun in this project. The work load in the Fermilab Technical Division made it difficult to test a multi-layer Nb3Sn solenoid as originally planned. Instead, a complementary

  20. Bathtub vortex induced by instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, Jiro; Abe, Kazuki; Yokoyama, Naoto

    2014-10-01

    The driving mechanism and the swirl direction of the bathtub vortex are investigated by the linear stability analysis of the no-vortex flow as well as numerical simulations. We find that only systems having plane symmetries with respect to vertical planes deserve research for the swirl direction. The bathtub vortex appearing in a vessel with a rectangular cross section having a drain hole at the center of the bottom is proved to be induced by instability when the flow rate exceeds a threshold. The Coriolis force is capable of determining the swirl direction to be cyclonic.

  1. The large-scale dynamics of magnetic helicity

    CERN Document Server

    Linkmann, Moritz

    2016-01-01

    In this Letter we investigate the dynamics of magnetic helicity in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent flows focusing at scales larger than the forcing scale. Our results show a non-local inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, which occurs directly from the forcing scale into the largest scales of the magnetic fields. We also observe that no magnetic helicity and no energy is transferred to an intermediate range of scales sufficiently smaller than the container size and larger than the forcing scale. Thus, the statistical properties of this range of scales, which increases with scale separation, is shown to be described to a large extent by the zero-flux solutions of the absolute statistical equilibrium theory exhibited by the truncated ideal MHD equations.

  2. Dual electromagnetism: Helicity, spin, momentum, and angular momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Nori, Franco

    2012-01-01

    The dual symmetry between electric and magnetic fields is an important intrinsic property of Maxwell equations in free space. This symmetry underlies the conservation of optical helicity (chirality). However, the standard field-theory formulation of electromagnetism lacks helicity conservation because the field Lagrangian is not dual symmetric. To resolve this discrepancy between the symmetries of the Lagrangian and Maxwell equations, we put forward a dual-symmetric Lagrangian formulation of electromagnetism. This preserves the form of Maxwell equations, all fundamental conservation laws of standard electromagnetism, but recovers the helicity conservation as one of the Noether currents. Moreover, we show that the dual-symmetric electromagnetism naturally yields a meaningful separation of the spin and orbital degrees of freedom of light, in complete agreement with other recent results.

  3. Design principles for Bernal spirals and helices with tunable pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejer, Szilard N; Chakrabarti, Dwaipayan; Kusumaatmaja, Halim; Wales, David J

    2014-08-21

    Using the framework of potential energy landscape theory, we describe two in silico designs for self-assembling helical colloidal superstructures based upon dipolar dumbbells and Janus-type building blocks, respectively. Helical superstructures with controllable pitch length are obtained using external magnetic field driven assembly of asymmetric dumbbells involving screened electrostatic as well as magnetic dipolar interactions. The pitch of the helix is tuned by modulating the Debye screening length over an experimentally accessible range. The second design is based on building blocks composed of rigidly linked spheres with short-range anisotropic interactions, which are predicted to self-assemble into Bernal spirals. These spirals are quite flexible, and longer helices undergo rearrangements via cooperative, hinge-like moves, in agreement with experiment.

  4. Dynamic signatures of driven vortex motion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. K.; Lopez, D.; Olsson, R. J.; Paulius, L. M.; Petrean, A. M.; Safar, H.

    1999-09-16

    We probe the dynamic nature of driven vortex motion in superconductors with a new type of transport experiment. An inhomogeneous Lorentz driving force is applied to the sample, inducing vortex velocity gradients that distinguish the hydrodynamic motion of the vortex liquid from the elastic and-plastic motion of the vortex solid. We observe elastic depinning of the vortex lattice at the critical current, and shear induced plastic slip of the lattice at high Lorentz force gradients.

  5. Vortex electronis and squids

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the nature of vortices in high-Tc superconductors is a crucial subject for research on superconductive electronics, especially for superconducting interference devices (SQUIDs), it is also a fundamental problem in condensed-matter physics. Recent technological progress in methods for both direct and indirect observation of vortices, e.g. scanning SQUID, terahertz imaging, and microwave excitation, has led to new insights into vortex physics, the dynamic behavior of vortices in junctions and related questions of noise. This book presents the current status of research activity and provides new information on the applications of SQUIDs, including magnetocardiography, immunoassays, and laser-SQUID microscopes, all of which are close to being commercially available.

  6. Entangled vector vortex beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Carvacho, Gonzalo; Graffitti, Francesco; Vitelli, Chiara; Piccirillo, Bruno; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    Light beams having a vectorial field structure, or polarization, that varies over the transverse profile and a central optical singularity are called vector vortex (VV) beams and may exhibit specific properties such as focusing into "light needles" or rotation invariance. VV beams have already found applications in areas ranging from microscopy to metrology, optical trapping, nano-optics, and quantum communication. Individual photons in such beams exhibit a form of single-particle quantum entanglement between different degrees of freedom. On the other hand, the quantum states of two photons can be also entangled with each other. Here, we combine these two concepts and demonstrate the generation of quantum entanglement between two photons that are both in VV states: a form of entanglement between two complex vectorial fields. This result may lead to quantum-enhanced applications of VV beams as well as to quantum information protocols fully exploiting the vectorial features of light.

  7. Vortex loops and Majoranas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chesi, Stefano [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); CEMS, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Jaffe, Arthur [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); Loss, Daniel [CEMS, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Pedrocchi, Fabio L. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel (Switzerland)

    2013-11-15

    We investigate the role that vortex loops play in characterizing eigenstates of interacting Majoranas. We give some general results and then focus on ladder Hamiltonian examples as a test of further ideas. Two methods yield exact results: (i) A mapping of certain spin Hamiltonians to quartic interactions of Majoranas shows that the spectra of these two examples coincide. (ii) In cases with reflection-symmetric Hamiltonians, we use reflection positivity for Majoranas to characterize vortices in the ground states. Two additional methods suggest wider applicability of these results: (iii) Numerical evidence suggests similar behavior for certain systems without reflection symmetry. (iv) A perturbative analysis also suggests similar behavior without the assumption of reflection symmetry.

  8. Vortex cores and vortex motion in superconductors with anisotropic Fermi surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvis, J.A. [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Ciencias Naturales, Facultad de ingeniería y Ciencias Básicas, Universidad Central, Bogotá (Colombia); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Herrera, E.; Guillamón, I.; Vieira, S. [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada de Altos Campos Magnéticos y Bajas Temperaturas, UAM, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Suderow, H., E-mail: hermann.suderow@uam.es [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada de Altos Campos Magnéticos y Bajas Temperaturas, UAM, CSIC, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The observation of vortex cores is reviewed, with emphasis in new experiments. • Vortex cores are follow superconducting gap and Fermi surface shapes. • The vortex core shape influences vortex dynamics. - Abstract: Explaning static and dynamic properties of the vortex lattice in anisotropic superconductors requires a careful characterization of vortex cores. The vortex core contains Andreev bound states whose spatial extension depends on the anisotropy of the electronic band-structure and superconducting gap. This might have an impact on the anisotropy of the superconducting properties and on vortex dynamics. Here we briefly summarize basic concepts to understand anisotropic vortex cores and review vortex core imaging experiments. We further discuss moving vortex lattices and the influence of vortex core shape in vortex motion. We find vortex motion in highly tilted magnetic fields. We associate vortex motion to the vortex entry barrier and the screening currents at the surface. We find preferential vortex motion along the main axis of the vortex lattice. After travelling integers of the intervortex distance, we find that vortices move more slowly due to the washboard potential of the vortex lattice.

  9. Vortex Formation in the Wake of Dark Matter Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, G. A.; Pinheiro, M. J.

    Future spaceflight will require a new theory of propulsion; specifically one that does not require mass ejection. A new theory is proposed that uses the general view that closed currents pervade the entire universe and, in particular, there is a cosmic mechanism to expel matter to large astronomical distances involving vortex currents as seen with blazars and blackholes. At the terrestrial level, force producing vortices have been related to the motion of wings (e.g., birds, duck paddles, fish's tail). In this paper, vortex structures are shown to exist in the streamlines aft of a spaceship moving at high velocity in the vacuum. This is accomplished using the density excitation method per a modified Chameleon Cosmology model. This vortex structure is then shown to have similarities to spacetime models as Warp-Drive and wormholes, giving rise to the natural extension of Hawking and Unruh radiation, which provides the propulsive method for space travel where virtual electron-positron pairs, absorbed by the gravitational expansion forward of the spaceship emerge from an annular vortex field aft of the spaceship as real particles, in-like to propellant mass ejection in conventional rocket theory.

  10. A NUMERICAL STUDY ON VORTEX RINGS WITH SWIRLHu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A finite difference scheme in cylindrical coordinates was used to study the three-dimensional (3D) motion of a vortex ring with swirl and the passage interaction between two vortex rings. For the 3D evolution of a single thin ring, the azimuthal perturbation modes grow linearly in the early stage. According to their growth rates, two bands of growing waves, which correspond to the first and the second radial mode respectively, can be observed. The result is similar to the prediction of short wave instability theory for swirl-free vortex rings. For the passage process between two rings, results show that the azimuthal velocity is in inverse proportion to radius while the azimuthal vorticity is in proportion to radius during the interaction.

  11. Generalized helicity and Beltrami fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buniy, Roman V., E-mail: roman.buniy@gmail.com [Schmid College of Science, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 (United States); Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0EH (United Kingdom); Kephart, Thomas W., E-mail: tom.kephart@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    We propose covariant and non-abelian generalizations of the magnetic helicity and Beltrami equation. The gauge invariance, variational principle, conserved current, energy–momentum tensor and choice of boundary conditions elucidate the subject. In particular, we prove that any extremal of the Yang–Mills action functional 1/4 ∫{sub Ω}trF{sub μν}F{sup μν}d{sup 4}x subject to the local constraint ε{sup μναβ}trF{sub μν}F{sub αβ}=0 satisfies the covariant non-abelian Beltrami equation. -- Highlights: •We introduce the covariant non-abelian helicity and Beltrami equation. •The Yang–Mills action and instanton term constraint lead to the Beltrami equation. •Solutions of the Beltrami equation conserve helicity.

  12. Vortex lines in a ferromagnetic spin-triplet superconductor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Li; Yang Jie; Xie Qun-Ying; Tian Miao; Duan Yi-Shi

    2012-01-01

    Based on Duan's topological current theory,we show that in a ferromagnetic spin-triplet superconductor there is a topological defect of string structures which can be interpreted as vortex lines.Such defects are different from the Abrikosov vortices in one-component condensate systems.We investigate the inner topological structure of the vortex lines.The topological charge density,velocity,and topological current of the vortex lines can all be expressed in terms of δ function,which indicates that the vortices can only arise from the zero points of an order parameter field.The topological charges of vortex lines are quantized in terms of the Hopf indices and Brouwer degrees of φ-mapping.The divergence of the self-induced magnetic field can be rigorously determined by the corresponding order parameter fields and its expression also takes the form of a δ-like function.Finally,based on the implicit function theorem and the Taylor expansion,we conduct detailed studies on the bifurcation of vortex topological current and find different directions of the bifurcation.

  13. Vortex state in ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betto, Davide; Coey, J. M. D.

    2014-05-01

    The evolution of the magnetic state of a soft ferromagnetic nanoparticle with its size is usually thought to be from superparamagnetic single domain to blocked single domain to a blocked multidomain structure. Néel pointed out that a vortex configuration produces practically no stray field at the cost of an increase in the exchange energy, of the order of RJS2lnR /c, where JS2 is the bond energy, R is the particle radius, and c is of the order of the exchange length. A vortex structure is energetically cheaper than single domain when the radius is greater than a certain value. The correct sequence should include a vortex configuration between the single domain and the multidomain states. The critical size is calculated for spherical particles of four important materials (nickel, magnetite, permalloy, and iron) both numerically and analytically. A vortex state is favored in materials with high magnetisation.

  14. Vortex migration in protoplanetary discs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papaloizou John C. B.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Vortices embedded in protoplanetary discs can act as obstacles to the unperturbed disc flow. The resulting velocity perturbations propagate away from the vortex in the form of density waves that transport angular momentum. Any asymmetry between the inner and the outer density wave means that the region around the vortex has to change its angular momentum. We find that this leads to orbital migration of the vortex. Asymmetric waves always arise except in the case of a disc with constant pressure, for isothermal as well as non-isothermal discs. Depending on the size and strength of the vortex, the resulting migration time scales can be as short as a few thousand orbits.

  15. Topology of helical fluid flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten; Brøns, Morten

    2014-01-01

    the zeroes of a single real function of one variable, and we show that three different flow topologies can occur, depending on a single dimensionless parameter. By including the self-induced velocity on the vortex filament by a localised induction approximation, the stream function is slightly modified...

  16. The inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Wolf-Christian; Busse, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of magnetic helicity, $H^M$, which is responsible for large-scale magnetic structure formation in electrically conducting turbulent media is investigated in forced and decaying three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. This is done with the help of high resolution direct numerical simulations and statistical closure theory. The numerically observed spectral scaling of $H^M$ is at variance with earlier work using a statistical closure model [Pouquet et al., J. Fluid Mech. \\textbf{77} 321 (1976)]. By revisiting this theory a universal dynamical balance relation is found that includes effects of kinetic helicity, as well as kinetic and magnetic energy on the inverse cascade of $H^M$ and explains the above-mentioned discrepancy. Considering the result in the context of mean-field dynamo theory suggests a nonlinear modification of the $\\alpha$-dynamo effect important in the context of magnetic field excitation in turbulent plasmas.

  17. Inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Wolf-Christian; Malapaka, Shiva Kumar; Busse, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of magnetic helicity HM, which is responsible for large-scale magnetic structure formation in electrically conducting turbulent media, is investigated in forced and decaying three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. This is done with the help of high-resolution direct numerical simulations and statistical closure theory. The numerically observed spectral scaling of HM is at variance with earlier work using a statistical closure model [Pouquet et al., J. Fluid Mech. 77, 321 (1976)]. By revisiting this theory, a universal dynamical balance relation is found that includes the effects of kinetic helicity as well as kinetic and magnetic energies on the inverse cascade of HM and explains the above-mentioned discrepancy. Consideration of the result in the context of mean-field dynamo theory suggests a nonlinear modification of the α-dynamo effect, which is important in the context of magnetic-field excitation in turbulent plasmas.

  18. New omega vortex identification method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, ChaoQun; Wang, YiQian; Yang, Yong; Duan, ZhiWei

    2016-08-01

    A new vortex identification criterion called Ω-method is proposed based on the ideas that vorticity overtakes deformation in vortex. The comparison with other vortex identification methods like Q-criterion and λ 2-method is conducted and the advantages of the new method can be summarized as follows: (1) the method is able to capture vortex well and very easy to perform; (2) the physical meaning of Ω is clear while the interpretations of iso-surface values of Q and λ 2 chosen to visualize vortices are obscure; (3) being different from Q and λ 2 iso-surface visualization which requires wildly various thresholds to capture the vortex structure properly, Ω is pretty universal and does not need much adjustment in different cases and the iso-surfaces of Ω=0.52 can always capture the vortices properly in all the cases at different time steps, which we investigated; (4) both strong and weak vortices can be captured well simultaneously while improper Q and λ 2 threshold may lead to strong vortex capture while weak vortices are lost or weak vortices are captured but strong vortices are smeared; (5) Ω=0.52 is a quantity to approximately define the vortex boundary. Note that, to calculate Ω, the length and velocity must be used in the non-dimensional form. From our direct numerical simulation, it is found that the vorticity direction is very different from the vortex rotation direction in general 3-D vortical flow, the Helmholtz velocity decomposition is reviewed and vorticity is proposed to be further decomposed to vortical vorticity and non-vortical vorticity.

  19. Optical and Infrared Helical Metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaschke Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available By tailoring metamaterials with chiral unit cells, giant optical activity and strong circular dichroism have been achieved successfully over the past decade. Metamaterials based on arrays of metal helices have revolutionized the field of chiral metamaterials, because of their capability of exhibiting these pronounced chiro-optical effects over previously unmatched bandwidths. More recently, a large number of new metamaterial designs based on metal helices have been introduced with either optimized optical performance or other chiro-optical properties for novel applications.

  20. A hypothesis on neutrino helicity

    CERN Document Server

    Sahin, I

    2016-01-01

    It is firmly established by experimental results that neutrinos are almost 100\\% longitudinally polarized and left-handed. It is also confirmed by neutrino oscillation experiments that neutrinos have tiny but non-zero masses. Since the helicity is not a Lorentz invariant quantity for massive particles, neutrinos can not be strictly left-handed. On the other hand, it is generally assumed that ultrarelativistic massive fermions can be described well enough by the Weyl equations. We discuss the validity of this assumption and propose a new hypothesis according to which neutrinos can be described by pure helicity states although they are not massless.

  1. Magnetic Helicity Injection in Solar Active Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Qi Zhang

    2006-01-01

    We present the evolution of magnetic field and its relationship with magnetic (current) helicity in solar active regions from a series of photospheric vector magnetograms obtained by Huairou Solar Observing Station, longitudinal magnetograms by MDI of SOHO and white light images of TRACE. The photospheric current helicity density is a quantity reflecting the local twisted magnetic field and is related to the remaining magnetic helicity in the photosphere, even if the mean current helicity density brings the general chiral property in a layer of solar active regions. As new magnetic flux emerges in active regions, changes of photospheric current helicity density with the injection of magnetic helicity into the corona from the subatmosphere can be detected, including changes in sign caused by the injection of magnetic helicity of opposite sign. Because the injection rate of magnetic helicity and photospheric current helicity density have different means in the solar atmosphere,the injected magnetic helicity is probably not proportional to the current helicity density remaining in the photosphere. The evidence is that rotation of sunspots does not synchronize exactly with the twist of photospheric transverse magnetic field in some active regions (such as, delta active regions). They represent different aspects of magnetic chirality. A combined analysis of the observational magnetic helicity parameters actually provides a relative complete picture of magnetic helicity and its transfer in the solar atmosphere.

  2. Formation number for vortex dipoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadri, Vahid; Krueger, Paul S.

    2016-11-01

    This investigation considers the axisymmetric formation of two opposite sign concentric vortex rings from jet ejection between concentric cylinders. This arrangement is similar to planar flow in that the vortex rings will travel together when the gap between the cylinders is small, similar to a vortex dipole, but it has the advantage that the vortex motion is less constrained than the planar case (vortex stretching and vortex line curvature is allowed). The flow was simulated numerically at a jet Reynolds number of 1,000 (based on ΔR and the jet velocity), jet pulse length-to-gap ratio (L / ΔR) in the range 10-20, and gap-to-outer radius ratio (ΔR /Ro) in the range 0.01-0.1. Small gap ratios were chosen for comparison with 2D results. In contrast with 2D results, the closely paired vortices in this study exhibited pinch-off from the generating flow and finite formation numbers. The more complex flow evolution afforded by the axisymmetric model and its influence on the pinch-off process will be discussed. This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1133876 and SMU. This supports are gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Vortex migration in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Paardekooper, S -J; Papaloizou, J C B

    2010-01-01

    We consider the radial migration of vortices in two-dimensional isothermal gaseous disks. We find that a vortex core, orbiting at the local gas velocity, induces velocity perturbations that propagate away from the vortex as density waves. The resulting spiral wave pattern is reminiscent of an embedded planet. There are two main causes for asymmetries in these wakes: geometrical effects tend to favor the outer wave, while a radial vortensity gradient leads to an asymmetric vortex core, which favors the wave at the side that has the lowest density. In the case of asymmetric waves, which we always find except for a disk of constant pressure, there is a net exchange of angular momentum between the vortex and the surrounding disk, which leads to orbital migration of the vortex. Numerical hydrodynamical simulations show that this migration can be very rapid, on a time scale of a few thousand orbits, for vortices with a size comparable to the scale height of the disk. We discuss the possible effects of vortex migrat...

  4. Optical Vortex Solitons in Parametric Wave Mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, T J; Buryak, A V; Sammut, R A; Alexander, Tristram J.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Buryak, Alexander V.; Sammut, Rowland A.

    2000-01-01

    We analyze two-component spatial optical vortex solitons supported by degenerate three- or four-wave mixing in a nonlinear bulk medium. We study two distinct cases of such solitons, namely, parametric vortex solitons due to phase-matched second-harmonic generation in a optical medium with competing quadratic and cubic nonlinear response, and vortex solitons in the presence of third-harmonic generation in a cubic medium. We find, analytically and numerically, the structure of two-component vortex solitons, and also investigate modulational instability of their plane-wave background. In particular, we predict and analyze in detail novel types of vortex solitons, a `halo-vortex', consisting of a two-component vortex core surrounded by a bright ring of its harmonic field, and a `ring-vortex' soliton which is a vortex in a harmonic field that guides a bright localized ring-like mode of a fundamental frequency field.

  5. Crystalline Scaling Geometries from Vortex Lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Ning

    2013-01-01

    We study magnetic geometries with Lifshitz and/or hyperscaling violation exponents (both with a hard wall cutoff in the IR and a smooth black brane horizon) which have a complex scalar field which couples to the magnetic field. The complex scalar is unstable to the production of a vortex lattice in the IR. The lattice is a normalizable mode which is relevant (i.e. grows into the IR.) When one considers linearized backreaction of the lattice on the metric and gauge field, the metric forms a crystalline structure. We analyze the scaling of the free energy, thermodynamic entropy, and entanglement in the lattice phase and find that in the smeared limit, the leading order correction to thermodynamic properties due to the lattice has the scaling behavior of a theory with a hyperscaling violation exponent between 0 and 1, indicating a flow to an effectively lower-dimensional theory in the deep IR.

  6. Vortex, Molecular Spin and Nanovorticity An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    McCormack, Percival

    2012-01-01

    The subject of this book is the physics of vortices. A detailed analysis of the dynamics of vortices will be presented. The important topics of vorticity and molecular spin will be dealt with, including the electromagnetic analogy and quantization in superfluids. The effect of molecular spin on the dynamics of molecular nano-confined fluids using the extended Navier-Stokes equations will also be covered –especially important to the theory and applicability of nanofluidics and associated devices. The nanoscale boundary layer and nanoscale vortex core are regions of intense vorticity (molecular spin). It will be shown, based on molecular kinetic theory and thermodynamics, that the macroscopic (solid body) rotation must be accompanied by internal rotation of the molecules. Electric polarization of the internal molecular rotations about the local rotation axis –the Barnett effect – occurs. In such a spin aligned system, major changes in the physical properties of the fluid result.

  7. The Transport of Relative Canonical Helicity

    CERN Document Server

    You, Setthivoine

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of relative canonical helicity is examined in the two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic formalism. Canonical helicity is defined here as the helicity of the plasma species' canonical momentum. The species' canonical helicity are coupled together and can be converted from one into the other while the total gauge-invariant relative canonical helicity remains globally invariant. The conversion is driven by enthalpy differences at a surface common to ion and electron canonical flux tubes. The model provides an explanation for why the threshold for bifurcation in counter-helicity merging depends on the size parameter. The size parameter determines whether magnetic helicity annihilation channels enthalpy into the magnetic flux tube or into the vorticity flow tube components of the canonical flux tube. The transport of relative canonical helicity constrains the interaction between plasma flows and magnetic fields, and provides a more general framework for driving flows and currents from enthalpy or inductive b...

  8. Low Temperature Limit of the Vortex Core Radius and the Kramer-Pesch Effect in NbSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. I.; Kiefl, R. F.; Brewer, J. H.; Chakhalian, J.; Dunsiger, S.; Morris, G. D.; Sonier, J. E.; Macfarlane, W. A.

    2000-08-01

    Muon spin rotation ( μSR) has been used to measure the magnetic field distribution in the vortex state of the type-II superconductor NbSe2 ( Tc = 7.0 K) below T = 2 K. The distribution is consistent with a highly ordered hexagonal vortex lattice with a well resolved high-field cutoff associated with the finite size of the vortex cores. The temperature dependence of the core radius is much weaker than the temperature dependence predicted from the Bogoliubov-de Gennes theory. Furthermore, the vortex radius measured by μSR near the low temperature quantum limit is about an order of magnitude larger than predicted.

  9. Lift Enhancement of a Vortex-Sink Attached to a Flat Plate

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Xi; Mohseni, Kamran

    2012-01-01

    As observed in natural fliers, stabilized vortices on the surface of an airfoil or wing could provide lift enhancement. Similar concept can be applied in fixed lifting surfaces. Potential flow theory is employed to model lift enhancement by attaching a vortex-sink pair to the top surface of a flat plate in a pseudo-steady flow. Using this flow model, a parametric study on the location of the vortex-sink pair is performed in order to optimize lift enhancement. Lift coefficient calculations are presented for a range of vortex-sink positions, vortex-sink strengths, and flat-plate angles of attack. It is shown that beyond the lift contribution terms due to the vortex-sink strength, lift enhancement could be also achieved by a translating velocity of the vortex-sink in a non-equilibrium position. This vortex-sink velocity term is more pronounced when the vortex-sink is placed close to the top surface of the flat-plate near the leading or the trailing edges of the flat plate. It is concluded that increasing the vor...

  10. Influence of Magnetic Helicity in MHD

    CERN Document Server

    Candelaresi, Simon; Brandenburg, Axel

    2010-01-01

    Observations have shown that the Sun's magnetic field has helical structures. The helicity content in magnetic field configurations is a crucial constraint on the dynamical evolution of the system. Since helicity is connected with the number of links we investigate configurations with interlocked magnetic flux rings and one with unlinked rings. It turns out that it is not the linking of the tubes which affects the magnetic field decay, but the content of magnetic helicity.

  11. On the triple correlations in helical turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Chkhetiani, O

    1997-01-01

    The evolution of correlation characteristics in homogeneous helical turbulence is considered. Additional K'arm'an-Howarth type equations, describing the evolution of the mixed correlation tensor of the velocity and vorticity are obtained. In the helical scaling region, the solution of obtained equation gives the exact relation between antisymmetric component of a rank-three tensor and the average dissipation of helicity. This relation is a helical analogue of Kolmogorov's known 4/5 law.

  12. Highly intense monocycle terahertz vortex generation by utilizing a Tsurupica spiral phase plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Kang, Bong Joo; Kim, Won Tae; Sasaki, Yuta; Niinomi, Hiromasa; Suizu, Koji; Rotermund, Fabian; Omatsu, Takashige

    2016-12-01

    Optical vortex, possessing an annular intensity profile and an orbital angular momentum (characterized by an integer termed a topological charge) associated with a helical wavefront, has attracted great attention for diverse applications due to its unique properties. In particular for terahertz (THz) frequency range, several approaches for THz vortex generation, including molded phase plates consisting of metal slit antennas, achromatic polarization elements and binary-diffractive optical elements, have been recently proposed, however, they are typically designed for a specific frequency. Here, we demonstrate highly intense broadband monocycle vortex generation near 0.6 THz by utilizing a polymeric Tsurupica spiral phase plate in combination with tilted-pulse-front optical rectification in a prism-cut LiNbO3 crystal. A maximum peak power of 2.3 MW was obtained for THz vortex output with an expected topological charge of 1.15. Furthermore, we applied the highly intense THz vortex beam for studying unique nonlinear behaviors in bilayer graphene towards the development of nonlinear super-resolution THz microscopy and imaging system.

  13. A prediction model for the vortex shedding noise from the wake of an airfoil or axial flow fan blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C.; Chung, M. K.; Kim, Y.-H.

    1993-06-01

    An analytical model is presented for predicting the vortex shedding noise generated from the wake of axial flow fan blades. The downstream wake of a fan blade is assumed to be dominated by the von Karman vortex street, and the strength and the shedding frequency of the wake vortex are determined from the wake structure model. The fluctuating pressure and lift on the blade surface, which are induced from the vortices in the wake, are analyzed by incorporating the wake model for the von Karman vortex street with thin airfoil theory. The predicted vortex shedding frequency and the overall sound pressure level compare favorably with the measured results for the vortex shedding noise from axial flow fans.

  14. Helical vortices generated by flapping wings of bumblebees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farge, Marie; Engels, Thomas; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Schneider, Kai; Lehmann, Fritz; Sesterhenn, Jörn

    2016-11-01

    We analyze high resolution numerical simulation data of a bumblebee with fixed body and prescribed wing motion, flying in a numerical wind tunnel, presented in. The inflow condition of the tunnel varies from unperturbed laminar to strongly turbulent. The flow generated by the flapping wings indicates the important role of the leading edge vortex (LEV), responsible for elevated lift production and which is not significantly altered by the inflow turbulence. The LEV has a conical structure due to the three-dimensional motion of the wings. This flow configuration produces strong vorticity on the sharp leading edge and the outwards velocity (from the root to the tip of the wing) in the spanwise direction. Flow visualizations show that the generated vortical structures are characterized by a strong helicity. We study the evolution of the mean helicity for each wing and analyze the impact of turbulent inflow. We thankfully acknowledge financial support from the French-German AIFIT project funded by DFG and ANR (Grant 15-CE40-0019). DK gratefully acknowledges financial support from the JSPS postdoctoral fellowship.

  15. Electromagnetic helicity wavelets: a model for quasar engines?

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    The complex distance function $\\zeta$, which plays a prominent role in the definition of scalar (acoustic) wavelets, is found to determine a complex extension of the spherical coordinate system that is ideally suited for the construction of highly focused electromagnetic beams with helicities conforming to the oblate spheroidal geometry of $\\zeta$. This is used to build a basis of electromagnetic wavelets $F^m$ radiated or absorbed by the branch disk $D$ of $\\zeta$. $F^m$ has integer angular momentum $m$ around the z axis and definite spheroidal helicity. We use a regularization method to compute its singular charge-current density and show that the total charge vanishes. Hence $F^m$ is due solely to electric and magnetic polarization currents. $D$ acts as a magnetic dipole antenna, and its axis as a coupled electric dipole antenna. We propose this as an idealized electromagnetic model for quasars (in flat spacetime, without gravity), with $D$ representing the accretion disk and the vortex singularities along...

  16. Hybrid helical snakes and rotators for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant, E.D.

    1995-06-13

    The spin rotators and Siberian snakes presently envisaged for RHIC utilize helical dipole magnets. The snakes and the rotators each consist of four helices, each with a full twist (360{degrees}) of the field. Here we investigate an alternate layout, namely combinations of helical and pure bending magnet, and show that this may have advantages.

  17. Enantiomeric differentiation by synthetic helical polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashima, Eiji; Iida, Hiroki; Okamoto, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the synthesis of helical polymers and their applications as chiral materials, in particular chiral stationary phases (CSPs), for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are reviewed with an emphasis on the key role of the helical conformations with one-handedness for the prominent chiral recognition of enantiomers. The historical background of artificial optically active helical polymers is also briefly described.

  18. Single-particle based helical reconstruction—how to make the most of real and Fourier space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Sachse

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The helical assembly is a fundamental organization principle of biomacromolecules. To determine the structures of helical filaments or tubes has been helped by the fact that many different views of the helical unit are present to reconstruct a three-dimensional image from a single helix. In this review, I present the current state of helical image reconstruction from electron cryo-micrographs by introducing Fourier-based processing alongside real-space approaches. Based on this foundation, I describe how they can be applied to determine the symmetry and high-resolution structure of helical assemblies. In the past, the main structure determination approach of helical assemblies from electron micrographs was the Fourier-Bessel method, which is based on a comprehensive theory and has generated many successful applications in the last 40 years. The emergence of the single-particle technique allowed segmented helical specimens to be treated as single particles, thus rendering new specimens amenable to 3D helical reconstruction and facilitating high-resolution structure analysis. However, helical symmetry determination remains the crucial step for a successful 3D reconstruction. Depending on the helical specimen, Fourier and real-space approaches or a combination of both provide important clues to establish the correct helical symmetry. I discuss recent developments in combining traditional Fourier-Bessel procedures with single-particle algorithms to provide a versatile and comprehensive approach to structure determination of helical specimens. Upon introduction of direct electron detectors, a series of near-atomic resolution structures from helical assemblies have become available. As helical organization is fundamental to many structural assemblies of the cell, these approaches to structure elucidation open up promising capabilities to study the underlying structures at atomistic resolution.

  19. Vortex and characteristics of prestrained type-II deformable superconductors under magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zeling; Wang, Xingzhe; Zhou, Youhe

    2016-04-01

    Based on the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) theory and the linear deformation theory, we present a numerical investigation of magnetic vortex characteristics of a type-II deformable superconductor with prestrain. The effect of prestrain on the wave function, vortex dynamics and energy density of a superconducting film is analyzed by solving the nonlinear TDGL equations in the presence of magnetic field. The results show that the prestrain has a remarkable influence on the magnetic vortex distribution and the vortex dynamics, as well as value of wave function of the superconductor. The different prestrains, i.e., pre-given compression and tension strains, result in dissimilar characteristics on a half-plane of deformable superconductor in an applied magnetic field, and the vortex distribution and entrance in a two dimensional superconducting film. The studies demonstrated that the compression prestrain may speed up the vortexes entering into the region of the superconducting film and increases the vortex number in comparison with those of free-prestrain case, while the tension prestrain shows the reversal features. The energy density and spectrum in the superconductor are further demonstrated numerically and discussed. The present investigation is an attempt to give insight into the superconductivity and electromagnetic characteristics taking into account the elastic deformation in superconductors.

  20. Non-local dynamics governing the self-induced motion of a planar vortex filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2015-06-01

    While the Hasimoto planar vortex filament is one of the few exact solutions to the local induction approximation (LIA) approximating the self-induced motion of a vortex filament, it is natural to wonder whether such a vortex filament solution would exist for the non-local Biot-Savart dynamics exactly governing the filament motion, and if so, whether the non-local effects would drastically modify the solution properties. Both helical vortex filaments and vortex rings are known to exist under both the LIA and non-local Biot-Savart dynamics; however, the planar filament is a bit more complicated. In the present paper, we demonstrate that a planar vortex filament solution does exist for the non-local Biot-Savart formulation, provided that a specific non-linear integral equation (governing the spatial structure of such a filament) has a non-trivial solution. By using the Poincaré-Lindstedt method, we are able to obtain an accurate analytical approximation to the solution of this integral equation under physically reasonable assumptions. To obtain these solutions, we approximate local effects near the singularity of the integral equation using the LIA and non-local effects using the Biot-Savart formulation. Mathematically, the results constitute an analytical solution to an interesting nonlinear singular integro-differential equation in space and time variables. Physically, these results show that planar vortex filaments exist and maintain their forms under the non-local Biot-Savart formulation, as one would hope. Due to the regularization approach utilized, we are able to compare the structure of the planar filaments obtained under both LIA and Biot-Savart formulations in a rather straightforward manner, in order to determine the role of the non-locality on the structure of the planar filament.

  1. Forming of space charge wave with broad frequency spectrum in helical relativistic two-stream electron beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysenko, Alexander V.; Volk, Iurii I.; Serozhko, A.

    2017-01-01

    We elaborate a quadratic nonlinear theory of plural interactions of growing space charge wave (SCW) harmonics during the development of the two-stream instability in helical relativistic electron beams. It is found that in helical two-stream electron beams the growth rate of the two-stream instab...

  2. Numerical simulation of quasi-streamwise hairpin-like vortex generation in turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Nan; LU Li-peng; DUAN Zhen-zhen; YUAN Xiang-jiang

    2008-01-01

    A mechanism for generation of near wall quasi-streamwise hairpin-like vortex (QHV) and secondary quasi-streamwise vortices (SQV) is presented. The conceptual model of resonant triad in the theory of hydrodynamic instability and direct numerical simulation of a turbulent boundary layer were applied to reveal the formation of QHV and SQV. The generation procedures and the characteristics of the vortex structures are obtained, which share some similarities with previous numerical simulations. The research using resonant triad conceptual model and numerical simulation provides a possibility for investigating and controling the vortex structures, which play a dominant role in the evolution of coherent structures in the near-wall region.

  3. Magnetic response of holographic Lifshitz superconductors:Vortex and Droplet solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Lala, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a holographic model of $s$-wave superconductor with anisotropic Lifshitz scaling has been considered. In the presence of an external magnetic field our holographic model exhibits both vortex and droplet solutions. Based on analytic methods we have shown that the anisotropy has no effects on the vortex and droplet solutions whereas it may affect the condensation. Our vortex solution closely resembles with the Ginzburg-Landau theory and a relation between the upper critical magnetic field and superconducting coherence length has been speculated from this comparison. Using Sturm-Liouville method the effects of anisotropy on the critical parameters in insulator/superconductor phase transitions has been analyzed.

  4. Force balance on two-dimensional superconductors with a single moving vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chun Kit; Arahata, Emiko; Kato, Yusuke

    2014-03-01

    We study forces on two-dimensional superconductors with a single moving vortex based on a recent fully self-consistent calculation of DC conductivity in an s-wave superconductor (E. Arahata and Y. Kato, arXiv:1310.0566). By considering momentum balance of the whole liquid, we attempt to identify various contributions to the total transverse force on the vortex. This provides an estimation of the effective Magnus force based on the quasiclassical theory generalized by Kita [T. Kita, Phys. Rev. B, 64, 054503 (2001)], which allows for the Hall effect in vortex states.

  5. Helical Birods: An Elastic Model of Helically Wound Double-Stranded Rods

    KAUST Repository

    Prior, Christopher

    2014-03-11

    © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. We consider a geometrically accurate model for a helically wound rope constructed from two intertwined elastic rods. The line of contact has an arbitrary smooth shape which is obtained under the action of an arbitrary set of applied forces and moments. We discuss the general form the theory should take along with an insight into the necessary geometric or constitutive laws which must be detailed in order for the system to be complete. This includes a number of contact laws for the interaction of the two rods, in order to fit various relevant physical scenarios. This discussion also extends to the boundary and how this composite system can be acted upon by a single moment and force pair. A second strand of inquiry concerns the linear response of an initially helical rope to an arbitrary set of forces and moments. In particular we show that if the rope has the dimensions assumed of a rod in the Kirchhoff rod theory then it can be accurately treated as an isotropic inextensible elastic rod. An important consideration in this demonstration is the possible effect of varying the geometric boundary constraints; it is shown the effect of this choice becomes negligible in this limit in which the rope has dimensions similar to those of a Kirchhoff rod. Finally we derive the bending and twisting coefficients of this effective rod.

  6. Accurate analysis of arbitrarily-shaped helical groove waveguide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hong-Tao; Wei Yan-Yu; Gong Yu-Bin; Yue Ling-Na; Wang Wen-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a theory on accurately analysing the dispersion relation and the interaction impedance of electromagnetic waves propagating through a helical groove waveguide with arbitrary groove shape, in which the complex groove profile is synthesized by a series of rectangular steps. By introducing the influence of high-order evanescent modes on the connection of any two neighbouring steps by an equivalent susceptance under a modified admittance matching condition, the assumption of the neglecting discontinuity capacitance in previously published analysis is avoided, and the accurate dispersion equation is obtained by means of a combination of field-matching method and admittancematching technique. The validity of this theory is proved by comparison between the measurements and the numerical calculations for two kinds of helical groove waveguides with different groove shapes.

  7. Performance tests on helical Savonius rotors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamoji, M.A.; Kedare, S.B. [Department of Energy Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay (India); Prabhu, S.V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay (India)

    2009-03-15

    Conventional Savonius rotors have high coefficient of static torque at certain rotor angles and a negative coefficient of static torque from 135 to 165 and from 315 to 345 in one cycle of 360 . In order to decrease this variation in static torque from 0 to 360 , a helical Savonius rotor with a twist of 90 is proposed. In this study, tests on helical Savonius rotors are conducted in an open jet wind tunnel. Coefficient of static torque, coefficient of torque and coefficient of power for each helical Savonius rotor are measured. The performance of helical rotor with shaft between the end plates and helical rotor without shaft between the end plates at different overlap ratios namely 0.0, 0.1 and 0.16 is compared. Helical Savonius rotor without shaft is also compared with the performance of the conventional Savonius rotor. The results indicate that all the helical Savonius rotors have positive coefficient of static torque at all the rotor angles. The helical rotors with shaft have lower coefficient of power than the helical rotors without shaft. Helical rotor without shaft at an overlap ratio of 0.0 and an aspect ratio of 0.88 is found to have almost the same coefficient of power when compared with the conventional Savonius rotor. Correlation for coefficient of torque and power is developed for helical Savonius rotor for a range of Reynolds numbers studied. (author)

  8. Predictive supracolloidal helices from patchy particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ruohai; Mao, Jian; Xie, Xu-Ming; Yan, Li-Tang

    2014-11-01

    A priori prediction of supracolloidal architectures from nanoparticle and colloidal assembly is a challenging goal in materials chemistry and physics. Despite intense research in this area, much less has been known about the predictive science of supracolloidal helices from designed building blocks. Therefore, developing conceptually new rules to construct supracolloidal architectures with predictive helicity is becoming an important and urgent task of great scientific interest. Here, inspired by biological helices, we show that the rational design of patchy arrangement and interaction can drive patchy particles to self-assemble into biomolecular mimetic supracolloidal helices. We further derive a facile design rule for encoding the target supracolloidal helices, thus opening the doors to the predictive science of these supracolloidal architectures. It is also found that kinetics and reaction pathway during the formation of supracolloidal helices offer a unique way to study supramolecular polymerization, and that well-controlled supracolloidal helices can exhibit tailorable circular dichroism effects at visible wavelengths.

  9. Nucleonic helicity distributions revisited with an emphasis on their evolutions and twists

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajen Kundu

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we uphold and extend the formalism advocated by us more than a decade ago in order to extract information on various distribution functions describing nucleonic helicity structure and calculate a complete set of splitting functions relevant for their quantum chromodynamics (QCD) evolutions using light-front Hamiltonian perturbation theory in light front gauge + = 0. Twist-two structures of the helicity distributions are self-evident in our calculation. Sum rules associated with these helicity distributions are also verified in a frame-independent way.

  10. Dynamical systems analysis of fluid transport in time-periodic vortex ring flows

    OpenAIRE

    Shariff, Karim; Leonard, Anthony; Ferziger, Joel H.

    2006-01-01

    It is known that the stable and unstable manifolds of dynamical systems theory provide a powerful tool for understanding Lagrangian aspects of time-periodic flows. In this work we consider two time-periodic vortex ring flows. The first is a vortex ring with an elliptical core. The manifolds provide information about entrainment and detrainment of irrotational fluid into and out of the volume transported with the ring. The likeness of the manifolds with features observed in flow visualization ...

  11. A possible quantum fluid-dynamical approach to vortex motion in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Nishiyama, Seiya

    2016-01-01

    The essential point of Bohr-Mottelson theory is to assume a irrotational flow. As was already suggested by Marumori and Watanabe, the internal rotational motion, i.e., the vortex motion, however, may exist also in nuclei. So, we have a necessity of taking the vortex motion into consideration. In a classical fluid dynamics, there are various ways to treat the internal rotational velocity. The Clebsch representation, v(x) = -\

  12. Vortex Laser at Exceptional Point

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xing-Yuan; Li, Ying; Li, Bo; Ma, Ren-Min

    2016-01-01

    The optical vortices carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) are commonly generated by modulating the available conventional light beam. This article shows that a micro-laser operates at the exceptional point (EP) of the non-Hermitian quantum system can directly emit vortex laser with well-defined OAM at will. Two gratings (the refractive index modulation and along azimuthal direction and the grating protruding from the micro-ring cavity) modulate the eigenmode of a micro-ring cavity to be a vortex laser mode. The phase-matching condition ensures that we can tune the OAM of the vortex beam to be arbitrary orders by changing the grating protruding from the micro-ring cavity while the system is kept at EP. The results are obtained by analytical analysis and confirmed by 3D full wave simulations.

  13. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    CERN Document Server

    Altmeier, M; Bisplinghoff, J; Bissel, T; Bollmann, R; Busch, M; Büsser, K; Colberg, T; Demiroers, L; Diehl, O; Dohrmann, F; Engelhardt, H P; Eversheim, P D; Felden, O; Gebel, R; Glende, M; Greiff, J; Gross, A; Gross-Hardt, R; Hinterberger, F; Jahn, R; Jeske, M; Jonas, E; Krause, H; Lahr, U; Langkau, R; Lindemann, T; Lindlein, J; Maier, R; Maschuw, R; Mayer-Kuckuck, T; Meinerzhagen, A; Naehle, O; Pfuff, M; Prasuhn, D; Rohdjess, H; Rosendaal, D; Von Rossen, P; Sanz, B; Schirm, N; Schulz-Rojahn, M; Schwarz, V; Scobel, W; Thomas, S; Trelle, H J; Weise, E; Wellinghausen, A; Wiedmann, W; Woller, K; Ziegler, R

    1999-01-01

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9 deg. <= THETA<=72 deg. and 0 deg. <=phi (cursive,open) Greek<=360 deg. in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes. (author)

  14. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altmeier, M.; Bauer, F.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bissel, T.; Bollmann, R.; Busch, M.; Buesser, K.; Colberg, T.; Demiroers, L.; Diehl, O.; Dohrmann, F.; Engelhardt, H.P.; Eversheim, P.D.; Felden, O.; Gebel, R.; Glende, M.; Greiff, J.; Gross, A.; Gross-Hardt, R.; Hinterberger, F.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Jonas, E.; Krause, H.; Lahr, U.; Langkau, R.; Lindemann, T.; Lindlein, J.; Maier, R.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuck, T.; Meinerzhagen, A.; Naehle, O.; Pfuff, M.; Prasuhn, D.; Rohdjess, H.; Rosendaal, D.; Rossen, P. von; Sanz, B.; Schirm, N.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwarz, V.; Scobel, W.; Thomas, S.; Trelle, H.J.; Weise, E.; Wellinghausen, A.; Wiedmann, W.; Woller, K.; Ziegler, R

    1999-07-21

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9 deg. {<=}{theta}{<=}72 deg. and 0 deg. {<=}phi (cursive,open) Greek{<=}360 deg. in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes. (author)

  15. Adjustable phase planar helical undulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Roger G.; Lidia, Steve

    1993-11-01

    We present here the design description of a new type of planar helical undulator, which we are constructing for the SPEAR storage ring at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. It comprises four rows of pure permanent magnet blocks, one row in each quadrant about the axis defined by the electron beam. Rows may be translated longitudinally with respect to each other to change the helicity of the magnetic field they create at the position of the beam. They may also be translated longitudinally to vary the energy of the x-rays emitted, unlike designs where this function is performed by varying the gap between the rows. This work includes numerical calculations of the fields, electron trajectories, and x-ray spectra, including off-axis effects.

  16. An experimental superconducting helical undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caspi, S.; Taylor, C. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Improvements in the technology of superconducting magnets for high energy physics and recent advancements in SC materials with the artificial pinning centers (APC){sup 2}, have made a bifilar helical SC device an attractive candidate for a single-pass free electron laser (FEL){sup 3}. Initial studies have suggested that a 6.5 mm inner diameter helical device, with a 27 mm period, can generate a central field of 2-2.5 Tesla. Additional studies have also suggested that with a stored energy of 300 J/m, such a device can be made self-protecting in the event of a quench. However, since the most critical area associated with high current density SC magnets is connected with quenching and training, a short experimental device will have to be built and tested. In this paper we discuss technical issues relevant to the construction of such a device, including a conceptual design, fields, and forces.

  17. A Experimental Study of Viscous Vortex Rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Mauricio

    Motivated by the role played by vortex rings in the process of turbulent mixing, the work is focused on the problem of stability and viscous decay of a single vortex ring. A new classification is proposed for vortex rings which is based on extensive hot-wire measurements of velocity in the ring core and wake and flow visualization. Vortex rings can be classified as laminar, wavy, turbulence-producing, and turbulent. Prediction of vortex ring type is shown to be possible based on the vortex ring Reynolds number. Linear growth rates of ring diameter with time are observed for all types of vortex rings, with different growth rates occurring for laminar and turbulent vortex rings. Data on the viscous decay of vortex rings are used to provide experimental confirmation of the accuracy of Saffman's equation for the velocity of propagation of a vortex ring. Experimental data indicate that instability of the vortex ring strongly depends on the mode of generation and can be delayed by properly adjusting the generation parameters. A systematic review of the literature on vortex-ring interactions is presented in the form of an appendix, which helps identify areas in which further research may be fruitful.

  18. Rotor theories by Professor Joukowsky: Momentum theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kuik, G. A. M.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Okulov, V. L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the first of two papers on the history of rotor aerodynamics with special emphasis on the role of Joukowsky. The present one focuses on the development of the momentum theory while the second one surveys the development of vortex theory for rotors. Joukowsky has played a major role ...

  19. Fractional vortex dipole phase filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Joseph, Joby; Senthilkumaran, Paramasivam

    2014-10-01

    In spatial filtering experiments, the use of vortex phase filters plays an important role in realizing isotropic edge enhancement. In this paper, we report the use of a vortex dipole phase filter in spatial filtering. A dipole made of fractional vortices is used, and its filtering characteristics are studied. It is observed that the filter performance can be tuned by varying the distance of separation between the vortices of the dipole to achieve better contrast and output noise suppression, and when this distance tends to infinity, the filter performs like a 1-D Hilbert mask. Experimental and simulation results are presented.

  20. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Libal, Andras J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  1. Generation of nonlinear vortex precursors

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yue-Yue; Liu, Chengpu

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study the propagation of a few-cycle pulse carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) through a dense atomic system. Nonlinear precursors consisting of high-order vortex har- monics are generated in the transmitted field due to ultrafast Bloch oscillation. The nonlinear precursors survive to propagation effects and are well separated with the main pulse, which provide a straightforward way of measuring precursors. By the virtue of carrying high-order OAM, the obtained vortex precursors as information carriers have potential applications in optical informa- tion and communication fields where controllable loss, large information-carrying capacity and high speed communication are required.

  2. Emulsification-Induced Homohelicity in Racemic Helical Polymer for Preparing Optically Active Helical Polymer Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Biao; Deng, Jinrui; Deng, Jianping

    2016-04-01

    Optically active nano- and microparticles have constituted a significant category of advanced functional materials. However, constructing optically active particles derived from synthetic helical polymers still remains as a big challenge. In the present study, it is attempted to induce a racemic helical polymer (containing right- and left-handed helices in equal amount) to prefer one predominant helicity in aqueous media by using emulsifier in the presence of chiral additive (emulsification process). Excitingly, the emulsification process promotes the racemic helical polymer to unify the helicity and directly provides optically active nanoparticles constructed by chirally helical polymer. A possible mechanism is proposed to explain the emulsification-induced homohelicity effect. The present study establishes a novel strategy for preparing chirally helical polymer-derived optically active nanoparticles based on racemic helical polymers.

  3. Helical Antimicrobial Sulfono- {gamma} -AApeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yaqiong; Wu, Haifan; Teng, Peng; Bai, Ge; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cao, Chuanhai; Cai, Jianfeng

    2015-06-11

    Host-defense peptides (HDPs) such as magainin 2 have emerged as potential therapeutic agents combating antibiotic resistance. Inspired by their structures and mechanism of action, herein we report the fi rst example of antimicrobial helical sulfono- γ - AApeptide foldamers. The lead molecule displays broad-spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against multi-drug-resistant Gram- positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Time-kill studies and fl uorescence microscopy suggest that sulfono- γ -AApeptides eradicate bacteria by taking a mode of action analogous to that of HDPs. Clear structure - function relationships exist in the studied sequences. Longer sequences, presumably adopting more-de fi ned helical structures, are more potent than shorter ones. Interestingly, the sequence with less helical propensity in solution could be more selective than the stronger helix-forming sequences. Moreover, this class of antimicrobial agents are resistant to proteolytic degradation. These results may lead to the development of a new class of antimicrobial foldamers combating emerging antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  4. Electrodynamic duality and vortex unbinding in driven-dissipative condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachtel, G.; Sieberer, L. M.; Diehl, S.; Altman, E.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the superfluid properties of two-dimensional driven Bose liquids, such as polariton condensates, using their long-wavelength description in terms of a compact Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) equation for the phase dynamics. We account for topological defects (vortices) in the phase field through a duality mapping between the compact KPZ equation and a theory of nonlinear electrodynamics coupled to charges. Using the dual theory, we derive renormalization group equations that describe vortex unbinding in these media. When the nonequilibirum drive is turned off, the KPZ nonlinearity λ vanishes and the RG flow gives the usual Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) transition. On the other hand, with nonlinearity λ >0 vortices always unbind, even if the same system with λ =0 is superfluid. We predict the finite-size scaling behavior of the superfluid stiffness in the crossover governed by vortex unbinding showing its clear distinction from the scaling associated with the KT transition.

  5. Vortex Lines and Monopoles in Electrically Conducting Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ji-Biao; REN Ji-Rong; LI Ran

    2009-01-01

    Based on the C-mapping topological current theory and the decomposition of gauge potential theory, the vortex lines and the monopoles in electrically conducting plasmas are studied.It is pointed out that these two topological structures respectively inhere in two-dimensional and three-dimensional topological currents, which can be derived from the same topological term , and both these topological structures are characterized by the φ-mapping topological numbers-Hopf indices and Brouwer degrees.Furthermore, the spatial bifurcation of vortex lines and the generation and annihilation of monopoles are also discussed.At last, we point out that the Hopf invariant is a proper topological invariant to describe the knotted solitons.

  6. Melting of heterogeneous vortex matter: The vortex `nanoliquid'

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S S Banerjee; S Goldberg; Y Myasoedov; M Rappaport; E Zeldov; A Soibel; F de la Cruz; C J van der Beek; M Konczykowski; T Tamegai; V Vinokur

    2006-01-01

    Disorder and porosity are parameters that strongly influence the physical behavior of materials, including their mechanical, electrical, magnetic and optical properties. Vortices in superconductors can provide important insight into the effects of disorder because their size is comparable to characteristic sizes of nanofabricated structures. Here we present experimental evidence for a novel form of vortex matter that consists of inter-connected nanodroplets of vortex liquid caged in the pores of a solid vortex structure, like a liquid permeated into a nanoporous solid skeleton. Our nanoporous skeleton is formed by vortices pinned by correlated disorder created by high-energy heavy ion irradiation. By sweeping the applied magnetic field, the number of vortices in the nanodroplets is varied continuously from a few to several hundred. Upon cooling, the caged nanodroplets freeze into ordered nanocrystals through either a first-order or a continuous transition, whereas at high temperatures a uniform liquid phase is formed upon delocalization-induced melt- ing of the solid skeleton. This new vortex nanoliquid displays unique properties and symmetries that are distinct from both solid and liquid phases.

  7. Absolute versus convective helical magnetorotational instability in a Taylor-Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Priede, Jānis

    2008-01-01

    We analyze numerically the magnetorotational instability of a Taylor-Couette flow in a helical magnetic field (HMRI) using the inductionless approximation defined by a zero magnetic Prandtl number (Pm=0). The Chebyshev collocation method is used to calculate the eigenvalue spectrum for small amplitude perturbations. First, we carry out a detailed conventional linear stability analysis with respect to perturbations in the form of Fourier modes that corresponds to the convective instability which is not in general self-sustained. The helical magnetic field is found to extend the instability to a relatively narrow range beyond its purely hydrodynamic limit defined by the Rayleigh line. There is not only a lower critical threshold at which HMRI appears but also an upper one at which it disappears again. The latter distinguishes the HMRI from a magnetically-modified Taylor vortex flow. Second, we find an absolute instability threshold as well. In the hydrodynamically unstable regime before the Rayleigh line, the t...

  8. Acoustic Radiation by 3D Vortex Rings in Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedor V. Shugaev

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic radiation emitted by three-dimensional (3D vortex rings in air has been investigated on the basis of the unsteady Navier–Stokes equations. Power series expansions of the unknown functions with respect to the initial vorticity which is supposed to be small are used. In such a manner the system of the Navier–Stokes equations is reduced to a parabolic system with constant coefficients at high derivatives. The initial value problem is as follows. The vorticity is defined inside a toroid at t = 0. Other gas parameters are assumed to be constant throughout the whole space at t = 0. The solution is expressed by multiple integrals which are evaluated with the aid of the Korobov grids. Density oscillations are analyzed. The results show that the frequency band depends on the initial size of the vortex ring and its helicity. The presented data may be applied to the study of a flow in a wake region behind an aerodynamic body.

  9. Dust trapping in inviscid vortex pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Angilella, Jean-Regis

    2010-01-01

    The motion of tiny heavy particles transported in a co-rotating vortex pair, with or without particle inertia and sedimentation, is investigated. The dynamics of non-inertial sedimenting particles is shown to be chaotic, under the combined effect of gravity and of the circular displacement of the vortices. This phenomenon is very sensitive to particle inertia, if any. By using nearly hamiltonian dynamical system theory for the particle motion equation written in the rotating reference frame, one can show that small inertia terms of the particle motion equation strongly modify the Melnikov function of the homoclinic trajectories and heteroclinic cycles of the unperturbed system, as soon as the particle response time is of the order of the settling time (Froude number of order unity). The critical Froude number above which chaotic motion vanishes and a regular centrifugation takes place is obtained from this Melnikov analysis and compared to numerical simulations. Particles with a finite inertia, and in the abs...

  10. Backreaction of excitations on a vortex

    CERN Document Server

    Arodz, H; Arodz, Henryk; Hadasz, Leszek

    1997-01-01

    Excitations of a vortex are usually considered in a linear approximation neglecting their backreaction on the vortex. In the present paper we investigate backreaction of Proca type excitations on a straightlinear vortex in the Abelian Higgs model. We propose exact Ansatz for fields of the excited vortex. From initial set of six nonlinear field equations we obtain (in a limit of weak excitations) two linear wave equations for the backreaction corrections. Their approximate solutions are found in the cases of plane wave and wave packet type excitations. We find that the excited vortex radiates vector field and that the Higgs field has a very broad oscillating component.

  11. Diagnostics of BubbleMode Vortex Breakdown in Swirling Flow in a Large-Aspect-Ratio Cylinder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulikov, D. V.; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Naumov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    We report for the first time on the possible formation of regions with counterflow (bubble-mode vortex breakdown or explosion) at the center of strongly swirling flow generated by a rotating endwall in a large-aspect-ratio cylindrical cavity filled with a liquid medium. Previously, the possibility...... of bubble-mode breakdown was studied in detail for cylindrical cavities of moderate aspect ratio (length to radius ratios up to H/R ∼ 3.5), while flows in large-aspect-ratio cylinders were only associated with regimes of self-organized helical vortex multiplets. In the present study, a regime...... with nonstationary bubble-mode vortex breakdown has been observed in a cylindrical cavity with H/R = 4.5....

  12. Merger of Long Vortex Filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Khandekar, Akshay

    2012-01-01

    This fluid dynamics video demonstrates the merger of long vortex filaments is shown experimentally. Two counter-rotating vortices are generated using in a tank with very high aspect ratio. PIV demonstrates the merger of the vortices within a single orbit.

  13. Thermal inhomogeneities in vortex tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemesh, N. I.; Senchuk, L. A.

    An experimental study of the effect of the temperature of the inlet gas on the temperature difference between the hot and cold streams discharged from a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube is described. The experimental results are presented in graphical form. It is that the temperature difference increases with the temperature of the entering gas.

  14. Instability of vortex pair leapfrogging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tophøj, Laust; Aref, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    pairs fly off to infinity, and a "walkabout" mode, where the vortices depart from leapfrogging but still remain within a finite distance of one another. We show numerically that this transition is more gradual, a result that we relate to earlier investigations of chaotic scattering of vortex pairs [L...

  15. 150 Years of vortex dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aref, Hassan

    2010-01-01

    An IUTAM symposium with the title of this paper was held on October 12-16, 2008, in Lyngby and Copenhagen, Denmark, to mark the sesquicentennial of publication of Helmholtz's seminal paper on vortex dynamics. This volume contains the proceedings of the Symposium. The present paper provides...

  16. Chaos in body-vortex interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Johan Rønby; Aref, Hassan

    2010-01-01

    The model of body–vortex interactions, where the fluid flow is planar, ideal and unbounded, and the vortex is a point vortex, is studied. The body may have a constant circulation around it. The governing equations for the general case of a freely moving body of arbitrary shape and mass density...... of a circle is integrable. As the body is made slightly elliptic, a chaotic region grows from an unstable relative equilibrium of the circle-vortex case. The case of a cylindrical body of any shape moving in fluid otherwise at rest is also integrable. A second transition to chaos arises from the limit between...... and an arbitrary number of point vortices are presented. The case of a body and a single vortex is then investigated numerically in detail. In this paper, the body is a homogeneous, elliptical cylinder. For large body–vortex separations, the system behaves much like a vortex pair regardless of body shape. The case...

  17. Plasma transport simulation modeling for helical confinement systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, K.; Amano, T.

    1991-08-01

    New empirical and theoretical transport models for helical confinement systems are developed based on the neoclassical transport theory including the effect of radial electric field and multi-helicity magnetic components, and the drift wave turbulence transport for electrostatic and electromagnetic modes, or the anomalous semi-empirical transport. These electron thermal diffusivities are compared with CHS (Compact Helical System) experimental data, which indicates that the central transport coefficient of the ECH plasma agrees with the neoclassical axi-symmetric value and the transport outside the half radius is anomalous. On the other hand, the transport of NBI-heated plasmas is anomalous in the whole plasma region. This anomaly is not explained by the electrostatic drift wave turbulence models in these flat-density-profile discharges. For the detailed prediction of plasma parameters in LHD (Large Helical Device), 3-D(dimensional) equilibrium/1-D transport simulations including empirical or drift wave turbulence models are carried out, which suggests that the global confinement time of LHD is determined mainly by the electron anomalous transport near the plasma edge region rather than the helical ripple transport in the core region. Even if the ripple loss can be eliminated, the increase of the global confinement is 10%. However, the rise in the central ion temperature is more than 20%. If the anomalous loss can be reduced to the half level of the present scaling, like so-called `H-mode` of the tokamak discharge, the neoclassical ripple loss through the ion channel becomes important even in the plasma core. The 5% radial inward shift of the plasma column with respect to the major radius is effective for improving plasma confinement and raising more than 50% of the fusion product by reducing this neoclassical asymmetric ion transport loss and increasing 10% in the plasma radius. (author).

  18. Helical Aharonov-Casher edge states

    OpenAIRE

    Heremans, J. J.; Xu, L. L.

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that an Aharonov-Casher vector potential in a two-dimensional geometry can lead to helical edge states. The Aharonov-Casher vector potential is the electromagnetic dual of the magnetic vector potential, and leads to traveling states at the sample edge in analogy to the integer quantum Hall effect. The helical edge states are predicted to appear in a narrow channel geometry with parabolic or sufficiently symmetric confinement potential. The implications of the helical Aharonov-Cash...

  19. Revisiting fermion helicity flip in Podolsky's Electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Sales, Jorge Henrique; Thibes, Ronaldo

    2016-01-01

    The spin projection of a massive particle onto its direction of motion is called helicity (or "handedness"). It can therefore be positive or negative. When a particle's helicity changes from positive to negative (or vice-versa) due to its interaction with other particles or fields, we say there is a helicity flip. In this work we show that such helicity flip can be seen for an electron of $20 MeV$ of energy interacting with a charged scalar meson through the exchange of a virtual photon. This photon {\\it does not} necessarily need to be Podolsky's proposed photon; in fact, it is independent of it.

  20. Higher helicity invariants and solar dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, D. D.; Illarionov, E. A.; Akhmet'ev, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Modern models of nonlinear dynamo saturation in celestial bodies (specifically, on the Sun) are largely based on the consideration of the balance of magnetic helicity. This physical variable has also a topological meaning: it is associated with the linking coefficient of magnetic tubes. In addition to magnetic helicity, magnetohydrodynamics has a number of topological integrals of motion (the so-called higher helicity moments). We have compared these invariants with magnetic helicity properties and concluded that they can hardly serve as nonlinear constraints on dynamo action.

  1. Angular momentum flux of nonparaxial acoustic vortex beams and torques on axisymmetric objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Likun; Marston, Philip L

    2011-12-01

    An acoustic vortex in an inviscid fluid and its radiation torque on an axisymmetric absorbing object are analyzed beyond the paraxial approximation to clarify an analogy with an optical vortex. The angular momentum flux density tensor from the conservation of angular momentum is used as an efficient description of the transport of angular momentum. Analysis of a monochromatic nonparaxial acoustic vortex beam indicates that the local ratio of the axial (or radial) flux density of axial angular momentum to the axial (or radial) flux density of energy is exactly equal to the ratio of the beam's topological charge l to the acoustic frequency ω. The axial radiation torque exerted by the beam on an axisymmetric object centered on the beam's axis due to the transfer of angular momentum is proportional to the power absorbed by the object with a factor l/ω, which can be understood as a result of phonon absorption from the beam. Depending on the vortex's helicity, the torque is parallel or antiparallel to the beam's axis.

  2. Transferability of different classical force fields for right and left handed α-helices constructed from enantiomeric amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Santu; Sarkar, Sujit; Pandey, Prithvi Raj; Roy, Sudip

    2016-02-21

    Amino acids can form d and l enantiomers, of which the l enantiomer is abundant in nature. The naturally occurring l enantiomer has a greater preference for a right handed helical conformation, and the d enantiomer for a left handed helical conformation. The other conformations, that is, left handed helical conformations of the l enantiomers and right handed helical conformations of the d enantiomers, are not common. The energetic differences between left and right handed alpha helical peptide chains constructed from enantiomeric amino acids are investigated using quantum chemical calculations (using the M06/6-311g(d,p) level of theory). Further, the performances of commonly used biomolecular force fields (OPLS/AA, CHARMM27/CMAP and AMBER) to represent the different helical conformations (left and right handed) constructed from enantiomeric (D and L) amino acids are evaluated. 5- and 10-mer chains from d and l enantiomers of alanine, leucine, lysine, and glutamic acid, in right and left handed helical conformations, are considered in the study. Thus, in total, 32 α-helical polypeptides (4 amino acids × 4 conformations of 5-mer and 10-mer) are studied. Conclusions, with regards to the performance of the force fields, are derived keeping the quantum optimized geometry as the benchmark, and on the basis of phi and psi angle calculations, hydrogen bond analysis, and different long range helical order parameters.

  3. A preliminary study of the effects of vortex diffusers (winglets) on wing flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Farmer, M. G.

    1975-01-01

    Some experimental flutter results are presented for a simple, flat-plate wing model and for the same wing model equipped with two different upper surface vortex diffusers over the Mach number range from about 0.70 to 0.95. Both vortex diffusers had the same planform, but one weighed about 0.3 percent of the basic wing weight, whereas the other weighed about 1.8 percent of the wing weight. The addition of the lighter vortex diffuser reduced the flutter dynamic pressure by about 3 percent; the heavier vortex diffuser reduced the flutter dynamic pressure by about 12 percent. The experimental flutter results are compared at a Mach number of 0.80 with analytical flutter results obtained by using doublet lattice and lifting surface (Kernel function) unsteady aerodynamic theories.

  4. Hall Effect in the Vortex Lattice of d-Wave Superconductors with Anisotropic Fermi Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Wataru; Ueki, Hikaru; Kita, Takafumi

    2017-02-01

    On the basis of the augmented quasiclassical theory of superconductivity with the Lorentz force, we study the magnetic field dependence of the charge distribution due to the Lorentz force in a d-wave vortex lattice with anisotropic Fermi surfaces. Owing to the competition between the energy-gap and Fermi surface anisotropies, the charge profile in the vortex lattice changes dramatically with increasing magnetic field because of the overlaps of each nearest vortex-core charge. In addition, the accumulated charge in the core region may reverse its sign as a function of magnetic field. This strong field dependence of the vortex-core charge cannot be observed in the model with an isotropic Fermi surface.

  5. Effect of Geometric Modifications on the Performance of Vortex Tube - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Kshirsagar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The vortex tube is device, which produces hot and cold air streams simultaneously at its two ends from a source of compressed air without any moving part. Literature review of this paper is to understand the effect of various parameters like inlet pressure of air, number of nozzles, cold orifice diameter and hot end valve angle on the performance of vortex tube. Also by the literature review it is clear that there is no theory so perfect, which gives the satisfactory explanation of the vortex tube phenomenon. Due to this reason researcher conduct the series of experimentation to understand the effect of various parameters mentioned above on the performance of vortex tube.

  6. Nucleon Helicity and Transversity Parton Distributions from Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Ji, Xiangdong; Lin, Huey-Wen; Zhang, Jian-Hui

    2016-01-01

    We present the first lattice-QCD calculation of the isovector polarized parton distribution functions (both helicity and transversity) using the large-momentum effective field theory (LaMET) approach for direct Bjorken-$x$ dependence. We first review the detailed steps of the procedure in the unpolarized case, then generalize to the helicity and transversity cases. We also derive a new mass-correction formulation for all three cases. We then compare the effects of each finite-momentum correction using lattice data calculated at $M_\\pi\\approx 310$ MeV. Finally, we discuss the implications of these results for the poorly known antiquark structure and predict the sea-flavor asymmetry in the transversely polarized nucleon.

  7. Small-x Asymptotics of the Quark Helicity Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovchegov, Yuri V; Pitonyak, Daniel; Sievert, Matthew D

    2017-02-03

    We construct a numerical solution of the small-x evolution equations derived in our recent work [J. High Energy Phys. 01 (2016) 072.JHEPFG1029-847910.1007/JHEP01(2016)072] for the (anti)quark transverse momentum dependent helicity TMDs and parton distribution functions (PDFs) as well as the g_{1} structure function. We focus on the case of large N_{c}, where one finds a closed set of equations. Employing the extracted intercept, we are able to predict directly from theory the behavior of the quark helicity PDFs at small x, which should have important phenomenological consequences. We also give an estimate of how much of the proton's spin carried by the quarks may be at small x and what impact this has on the spin puzzle.

  8. Helicity selection rules and noninterference for BSM amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azatov, Aleksandr; Contino, Roberto; Machado, Camila S.; Riva, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    Precision studies of scattering processes at colliders provide powerful indirect constraints on new physics. We study the helicity structure of scattering amplitudes in the standard model (SM) and in the context of an effective Lagrangian description of beyond-the-SM (BSM) dynamics. Our analysis reveals a novel set of helicity selection rules according to which, in the majority of 2 →2 scattering processes at high energy, the SM and the leading BSM effects do not interfere. In such situations, the naive expectation that dimension-6 operators represent the leading BSM contribution is compromised, as corrections from dimension-8 operators can become equally (if not more) important well within the validity of the effective field theory approach.

  9. Two vortex-blob regularization models for vortex sheet motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Sung-Ik

    2014-04-01

    Evolving vortex sheets generally form singularities in finite time. The vortex blob model is an approach to regularize the vortex sheet motion and evolve past singularity formation. In this paper, we thoroughly compare two such regularizations: the Krasny-type model and the Beale-Majda model. It is found from a linear stability analysis that both models have exponentially decaying growth rates for high wavenumbers, but the Beale-Majda model has a faster decaying rate than the Krasny model. The Beale-Majda model thus gives a stronger regularization to the solution. We apply the blob models to the two example problems: a periodic vortex sheet and an elliptically loaded wing. The numerical results show that the solutions of the two models are similar in large and small scales, but are fairly different in intermediate scales. The sheet of the Beale-Majda model has more spiral turns than the Krasny-type model for the same value of the regularization parameter δ. We give numerical evidences that the solutions of the two models agree for an increasing amount of spiral turns and tend to converge to the same limit as δ is decreased. The inner spiral turns of the blob models behave differently with the outer turns and satisfy a self-similar form. We also examine irregular motions of the sheet at late times and find that the irregular motions shrink as δ is decreased. This fact suggests a convergence of the blob solution to the weak solution of infinite regular spiral turns.

  10. Vortex tube reconnection at Re = 104

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rees, Wim M.; Hussain, Fazle; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2012-07-01

    We present simulations of the long-time dynamics of two anti-parallel vortex tubes with and without initial axial flow, at Reynolds number Re = Γ/ν = 104. Simulations were performed in a periodic domain with a remeshed vortex method using 785 × 106 particles. We quantify the vortex dynamics of the primary vortex reconnection that leads to the formation of elliptical rings with axial flow and report for the first time a subsequent collision of these rings. In the absence of initial axial flow, a -5/3 slope of the energy spectrum is observed during the first reconnection of the tubes. The resulting elliptical vortex rings experience a coiling of their vortex lines imparting an axial flow inside their cores. These rings eventually collide, exhibiting a -7/3 slope of the energy spectrum. Studies of vortex reconnection with an initial axial flow exhibit also the -7/3 slope during the initial collision as well as in the subsequent collision of the ensuing elliptical vortex rings. We quantify the detailed vortex dynamics of these collisions and examine the role of axial flow in the breakup of vortex structures.

  11. Influence of mesoscale topography on vortex intensity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The effect of mesoscale topography on multi-vortex self-organization is investigated numerically in this paper using a barotropic primitive equation model with topographic term. In the initial field there are one DeMaria major vortex with the maximum wind radius rm of 80 km at the center of the computational domain, and four meso-β vortices in the vicinity of rm to the east of the major vortex center.When there is no topography present, the initial vortices self-organize into a quasi-final state flow pattern, I.e. A quasi-axisymmetric vortex whose intensity is close to that of the initial major vortex. However, when a mesoscale topography is incorporated, the spatial scale of the quasi-final state vortex reduces, and the relative vorticity at the center of the vortex and the local maximum wind speed remarkably increase. The possible mechanism for the enhancement of the quasi-final state vortex might be that the negative relative vorticity lump,generated above the mesoscale topography because of the constraint of absolute vorticity conservation, squeezes the center of positive vorticity towards the mountain slope area, and thus reduces the spatial range of the major vortex. Meanwhile, because the total kinetic energy is basically conservative, the squeezing directly leads to the concentration of the energy in a smaller area, I.e. The strengthening of the vortex.

  12. Impact of vibrational entropy on the stability of unsolvated peptide helices with increasing length

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Mariana; Scheffler, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Helices are a key folding motif in protein structure. The question which factors determine helix stability for a given polypeptide or protein is an ongoing challenge. Here we use van der Waals corrected density-functional theory to address a part of this question in a bottom-up approach. We show how intrinsic helical structure is stabilized with length and temperature for a series of experimentally well studied unsolvated alanine based polypeptides, Ac-Alan-LysH+. By exploring extensively the conformational space of these molecules, we find that helices emerge as the preferred structure in the length range n=4-8 not just due to enthalpic factors (hydrogen bonds and their cooperativity, van der Waals dispersion interactions, electrostatics), but importantly also by a vibrational entropic stabilization over competing conformers at room temperature. The stabilization is shown to be due to softer low-frequency vibrational modes in helical conformers than in more compact ones. This observation is corroborated by i...

  13. Diagnostics of spatial structure of vortex multiplets in a swirl flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naumov, I. V.; Okulov, Valery; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2011-01-01

    for different heights of this cylinder. The working liquid was 80-percent water-glycerin mixture, and small air bubbles were used as the tracers. The lid was rotated with a constant angular velocity under the studied conditions, and air was accumulated in the zones of decreased pressure on axes of vortices....... Visualization of flow structure for unstable swirl flows and cylinder aspect ratios from 3.2 to 5.5 allowed first identification of these regimes as multispiral breakdowns with formation of helical-like vortex duplets, triplets and quadruplets....

  14. Helical coil thermal hydraulic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramello, M.; Bertani, C.; De Salve, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-11-01

    A model has been developed in Matlab environment for the thermal hydraulic analysis of helical coil and shell steam generators. The model considers the internal flow inside one helix and its associated control volume of water on the external side, both characterized by their inlet thermodynamic conditions and the characteristic geometry data. The model evaluates the behaviour of the thermal-hydraulic parameters of the two fluids, such as temperature, pressure, heat transfer coefficients, flow quality, void fraction and heat flux. The evaluation of the heat transfer coefficients as well as the pressure drops has been performed by means of the most validated literature correlations. The model has been applied to one of the steam generators of the IRIS modular reactor and a comparison has been performed with the RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code applied to an inclined straight pipe that has the same length and the same elevation change between inlet and outlet of the real helix. The predictions of the developed model and RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code are in fairly good agreement before the dryout region, while the dryout front inside the helical pipes is predicted at a lower distance from inlet by the model.

  15. Vortex sound in the presence of a low Mach number flow across a drum-like silencer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, S K

    2011-05-01

    The sound generated by a vortex propagating across a two-dimensional duct section with flexible walls (membranes) in an infinitely long rigid duct conveying a flow is investigated numerically using the matched asymptotic expansion technique and the potential theory. The effects of the initial vortex position, the mechanical properties of the flexible walls, and the mean flow on the sound generation are examined in detail. Results show that the presence of a vortex inside a uniform mean flow can strengthen or attenuate the sound generation, depending on the phase of the membrane vibration when the vortex starts vigorous interaction with the membranes and the strength of the mean flow. The results tend to imply that there is a higher chance of sound amplification when a vortex stream is moving closer to the lighter membrane under a relatively strong mean flow or when the mean flow is weak. The chances of sound amplification or attenuation are equal otherwise.

  16. Segregation of helicity in inertial wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, A.

    2017-03-01

    Inertial waves are known to exist in the Earth's rapidly rotating outer core and could be important for the dynamo generation. It is well known that a monochromatic inertial plane wave traveling parallel to the rotation axis (along positive z ) has negative helicity while the wave traveling antiparallel (negative z ) has positive helicity. Such a helicity segregation, north and south of the equator, is necessary for the α2-dynamo model based on inertial waves [Davidson, Geophys. J. Int. 198, 1832 (2014), 10.1093/gji/ggu220] to work. The core is likely to contain a myriad of inertial waves of different wave numbers and frequencies. In this study, we investigate whether this characteristic of helicity segregation also holds for an inertial wave packet comprising waves with the same sign of Cg ,z, the z component of group velocity. We first derive the polarization relations for inertial waves and subsequently derive the resultant helicity in wave packets forming as a result of superposition of two or more waves. We find that the helicity segregation does hold for an inertial wave packet unless the wave numbers of the constituent waves are widely separated. In the latter case, regions of opposite color helicity do appear, but the mean helicity retains the expected sign. An illustration of this observation is provided by (a) calculating the resultant helicity for a wave packet formed by superposition of four upward-propagating inertial waves with different wave vectors and (b) conducting the direct numerical simulation of a Gaussian eddy under rapid rotation. Last, the possible effects of other forces such as the viscous dissipation, the Lorentz force, buoyancy stratification, and nonlinearity on helicity are investigated and discussed. The helical structure of the wave packet is likely to remain unaffected by dissipation or the magnetic field, but can be modified by the presence of linearly stable stratification and nonlinearity.

  17. Vortex scattering by step topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, A. K.; Johnson, E. R.; McDonald, N. R.

    The scattering at a rectilinear step change in depth of a shallow-water vortex pair consisting of two patches of equal but opposite-signed vorticity is studied. Using the constants of motion, an explicit relationship is derived relating the angle of incidence to the refracted angle after crossing. A pair colliding with a step from deep water crosses the escarpment and subsequently propagates in shallow water refracted towards the normal to the escarpment. A pair colliding with a step from shallow water either crosses and propagates in deep water refracted away from the normal or, does not cross the step and is instead totally internally reflected by the escarpment. For large depth changes, numerical computations show that the coherence of the vortex pair is lost on encountering the escarpment.

  18. Perturbations of vortex ring pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Gubser, Steven S; Parikh, Sarthak

    2015-01-01

    We study pairs of co-axial vortex rings starting from the action for a classical bosonic string in a three-form background. We complete earlier work on the phase diagram of classical orbits by explicitly considering the case where the circulations of the two vortex rings are equal and opposite. We then go on to study perturbations, focusing on cases where the relevant four-dimensional transfer matrix splits into two-dimensional blocks. When the circulations of the rings have the same sign, instabilities are mostly limited to wavelengths smaller than a dynamically generated length scale at which single-ring instabilities occur. When the circulations have the opposite sign, larger wavelength instabilities can occur.

  19. Collisions of Vortex Filament Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banica, Valeria; Faou, Erwan; Miot, Evelyne

    2014-12-01

    We consider the problem of collisions of vortex filaments for a model introduced by Klein et al. (J Fluid Mech 288:201-248, 1995) and Zakharov (Sov Phys Usp 31(7):672-674, 1988, Lect. Notes Phys 536:369-385, 1999) to describe the interaction of almost parallel vortex filaments in three-dimensional fluids. Since the results of Crow (AIAA J 8:2172-2179, 1970) examples of collisions are searched as perturbations of antiparallel translating pairs of filaments, with initial perturbations related to the unstable mode of the linearized problem; most results are numerical calculations. In this article, we first consider a related model for the evolution of pairs of filaments, and we display another type of initial perturbation leading to collision in finite time. Moreover, we give numerical evidence that it also leads to collision through the initial model. We finally study the self-similar solutions of the model.

  20. Divergence of optical vortex beams

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, Salla Gangi; Prabhakar, Shashi; Anwar, Ali; Banerji, J; Singh, R P

    2015-01-01

    We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that the propagation of optical vortices in free space can be analysed by using the width ($w(z)$) of the host Gaussian beam and the inner and outer radii of the vortex beam at the source plane ($z=0$) as defined in \\textit{Optics Letters \\textbf{39,} 4364-4367 (2014)}. We also studied the divergence of vortex beams, considered as the rate of change of inner or outer radius with the propagation distance, and found that it varies with the order in the same way as that of the inner and outer radii at zero propagation distance. These results may be useful in designing optical fibers for orbital angular momentum modes that play a crucial role in quantum communication.

  1. Activation energy of fractional vortices and spectroscopy of a vortex molecule in long Josephson junction; Aktivierungsenergie fraktionaler Flusswirbel und Spektroskopie an Vortex-Molekuelen in langen Josephsonkontakten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckenmaier, Kai

    2010-06-09

    This thesis is divided into two parts, the measurement of the activation energy of a fractional vortex and the spectroscopy of a vortex-molecule. Fractional vortices can be studied in long 0-{kappa} Josephson junctions, where a jump of the Josephson phase is created artificially with a pair of tiny current injectors. To compensate for this phase discontinuity, a {rho} vortex is formed. Here, {rho} describes the vortex's so called topological charge. The {rho} vortices are pinned at the discontinuity and they carry the fraction ({rho}/2).{phi}{sub 0} of magnetic flux, with the magnetic flux quantum {phi}{sub 0} 2.07.10{sup -15}. Two stable vortex configurations are possible, a direct Vortex and a complementary one. {rho} depends on the injector current. When the bias current of the junction exceeds a characteristic threshold, which dependents on {rho}, the Lorentz force is bigger than the pinning force of the vortex and a fluxon is pulled away. In this case a complementary ({rho}-2{pi}) vortex is left behind. This switching of the {rho} vortex and the resulting emission of a fluxon can be described as a Kramers like escape of a particle out of a tilted washboard potential. The washboard potential is tilted to the point where the barrier is small enough, so that the particle can escape via thermal or quantum fluctuations. In the case of thermal fluctuations the barrier height is called activation energy. The activation energy can be determined by measuring the junction's switching current statistics. In this thesis, the activation energy, necessary for the vortex escape, was measured as a function of {rho} and a homogenous external magnetic field perpendicular to the junction. The main focus was the investigation of 0-{pi} junctions. The temperature dependence of the activation energy was investigated, too. It turns out, that the transition-state-theory is convenient to describe the switching probability of the standard Nb-AlO{sub x}-Nb junctions at 4.2 K

  2. Dust vortex flows in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, P.K

    2002-12-30

    Coherent nonlinear structures in the form of dust vortex flows have been observed in unmagnetized laboratory dusty plasmas. Our objective here is show that the dynamics of such dust vortices is governed by a modified Navier-Stokes equation (MNSE) and that the stationary solutions of the MNSE can be represented as monopolar as well as a row of identical Stuart and a row of counter-rotating vortices.

  3. Experimental characteristics of vortex heaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piralishvili, Sh. A.; Novikov, N. N.

    The performance of a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube is investigated experimentally for the case where the tube operates as a heater, with the mass of the heated gas remaining constant. The results obtained indicate that energy separation zones with sufficiently high (50 percent) relative heating effects can be achieved for a gas flow ratio of unity. A nomogram is presented for calculating the relative and absolute heating effects as a function of the tube geometry.

  4. Prediction and Control of Vortex Dominated and Vortex-wake Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Osama

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the activities and accomplishments under this research grant, including a list of publications and dissertations, produced in the field of prediction and control of vortex dominated and vortex wake flows.

  5. A Nonlinear Vortex Induced Vibration Model of Marine Risers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Juan; HUANG Weiping

    2013-01-01

    With the exploitation of oil and gas in deep water,the traditional vortex induced vibration (VIV) theory is challenged by the unprecedented flexibility of risers.A nonlinear time-dependent VIV model is developed in this paper based on a VIV lift force model and the Morison equation.Both the inline vibration induced by the flow due to vortex shedding and the fluid-structure interaction in the transverse direction are included in the model.One of the characteristics of the model is the response-dependent lift force with nonlinear damping,which is different from other VIV models.The calculations show that the model can well describe the VIV of deepwater risers with the results agreeing with those calculated by other models.

  6. Untangling knots via reaction-diffusion dynamics of vortex strings

    CERN Document Server

    Maucher, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    We introduce and illustrate a new approach to the unknotting problem via the dynamics of vortex strings in a nonlinear partial differential equation of reaction-diffusion type. To untangle a given knot, a Biot-Savart construction is used to initialize the knot as a vortex string in the FitzHugh-Nagumo equation. Remarkably, we find that the subsequent evolution preserves the topology of the knot and can untangle an unknot into a circle. Illustrative test case examples are presented, including the untangling of a hard unknot known as the culprit. Our approach to the unknotting problem has two novel features, in that it applies field theory rather than particle mechanics and uses reaction-diffusion dynamics in place of energy minimization.

  7. Geometry and Dynamics of Vortex Loops at Superfluid Phase Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gary A.

    2004-03-01

    The geometrical properties of thermally-excited vortex loops near a superfluid phase transition can be deduced from the dynamics of the transition. The frictional force on a loop is proportional to the total length of the vortex core, and hence depends on the fractal Hausdorff dimension DH of the random-walking core. By comparing the results for the loop dynamics with the dynamic-scaling predictions of Halperin and Hohenberg for the relaxation time, we find DH = (D+2)/2 = 2.5 in D = 3 dimensions, if the dynamic exponent is z = D/2. Computing the frequency-dependence of the superfluid density and comparing with the dynamic scaling of Fisher, Fisher, and Huse gives just the same value. Since Shenoy and co-workers have found precisely the same DH from a Flory-scaling analysis of the loop random walk, our results show that Shenoy's theory is exact if dynamic scaling is exact.

  8. Vortex driven phase transition in Topologically Massive QED

    CERN Document Server

    Hoshino, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    There is chiral like symmetry for 4-component massless fermion in (2+1)-dimensional gauge theory.Since QED$_{3}$ with Chern-Simons term contains vortex solution for vector potential,one may expect vortex driven phase transition as Kosterlitz-Thouless type where chiral condensate is washed away at zero temperature.To study this possibility,we evaluate the fermion propagator by Dyson-Schwinger equation numerically and spectral function analytically in the Landau gauge.For quenched case we adopt Ball-Chiu vertex to keep gauge invariance of the results.The critical value of topological mass,above which chiral condensate washed away, turned out to be $O(10^{-2})e^{2}$ at least for weak coupling in both cases.

  9. Characterization of vortex pinning through the Campbell length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willa, Roland; Geshkenbein, Vadim B.; Blatter, Gianni

    Vortex pinning is decisive in establishing dissipation-free current flow in a type-II superconductor; knowledge and optimization of the pinning landscape (pinscape) is of major importance for applications. The ac magnetic response, characterized by the Campbell penetration depth λC, provides valuable information on the pinscape, besides the critical current density jc. While microscopic derivations of jc are available both in the weak and strong pinning limits, this is not the case for the Campbell length, whose understanding has remained on a phenomenological level so far. Based on the microscopic theory of strong pinning, we have established a proper link between the Campbell length and the pinscape parameters. This new quantitative formalism captures all experimentally observed signatures, among which are the dependence of λC on the vortex state preparation and the hysteresis in λC upon thermal cycling the field-cooled state.

  10. Untangling Knots Via Reaction-Diffusion Dynamics of Vortex Strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maucher, Fabian; Sutcliffe, Paul

    2016-04-01

    We introduce and illustrate a new approach to the unknotting problem via the dynamics of vortex strings in a nonlinear partial differential equation of reaction-diffusion type. To untangle a given knot, a Biot-Savart construction is used to initialize the knot as a vortex string in the FitzHugh-Nagumo equation. Remarkably, we find that the subsequent evolution preserves the topology of the knot and can untangle an unknot into a circle. Illustrative test case examples are presented, including the untangling of a hard unknot known as the culprit. Our approach to the unknotting problem has two novel features, in that it applies field theory rather than particle mechanics and uses reaction-diffusion dynamics in place of energy minimization.

  11. Topology of Vortex-Wing Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Chris; Rockwell, Donald

    2016-11-01

    Aircraft flying together in an echelon or V formation experience aerodynamic advantages. Impingement of the tip vortex from the leader (upstream) wing on the follower wing can yield an increase of lift to drag ratio. This enhancement is known to depend on the location of vortex impingement on the follower wing. Particle image velocimetry is employed to determine streamline topology in successive crossflow planes, which characterize the streamwise evolution of the vortex structure along the chord of the follower wing and into its wake. Different modes of vortex-follower wing interaction are created by varying both the spanwise and vertical locations of the leader wing. These modes are defined by differences in the number and locations of critical points of the flow topology, and involve bifurcation, attenuation, and mutual induction. The bifurcation and attenuation modes decrease the strength of the tip vortex from the follower wing. In contrast, the mutual induction mode increases the strength of the follower tip vortex. AFOSR.

  12. Vortex rings impinging on permeable boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Bateman, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Experiments with vortex rings impinging permeable and solid boundaries are presented in order to investigate the influence of permeability. Utilizing Particle Image Velocimetry, we compared the behaviour of a vortex ring impinging four different reticulated foams (with permeability k ˜ 26 - 85 × 10-8 m2) and a solid boundary. Results show how permeability affects the stretching phenomena of the vortex ring and the formation and evolution of the secondary vortex ring with opposite sign. Moreover, permeability also affects the macroscopic no-slip boundary condition found on the solid boundary, turning it into an apparent slip boundary condition for the most permeable boundary. The apparent slip-boundary condition and the flux exchange between the ambient fluid and the foam are jointly responsible for both the modified formation of the secondary vortex and changes on the vortex ring diameter increase.

  13. An axisymmetric steady state vortex ring model

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ruo-Qian

    2016-01-01

    Based on the solution of Atanasiu et al. (2004), a theoretical model for axisymmetric vortex flows is derived in the present study by solving the vorticity transport equation for an inviscid, incompressible fluid in cylindrical coordinates. The model can describe a variety of axisymmetric flows with particular boundary conditions at a moderately high Reynolds number. This paper shows one example: a high Reynolds number laminar vortex ring. The model can represent a family of vortex rings by specifying the modulus function using a Rayleigh distribution function. The characteristics of this vortex ring family are illustrated by numerical methods. For verification, the model results compare well with the recent direct numerical simulations (DNS) in terms of the vorticity distribution and streamline patterns, cross-sectional areas of the vortex core and bubble, and radial vorticity distribution through the vortex center. Most importantly, the asymmetry and elliptical outline of the vorticity profile are well capt...

  14. Magnetic Helicity and the Solar Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to open a new window into the solar dynamo, convection, and magnetic reconnection through measurement of the helicity density of magnetic fields in the photosphere and tracing of large-scale patterns of magnetic helicity in the corona.

  15. The AGS synchrotron with four helical magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoupas N.; Huang, H.; Roser, T.; MacKay, W.W.; Trbojevic, D.

    2012-05-20

    The idea of using two partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. The placement of four helical magnets in the AGS ring provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS which uses two partial helical magnets. First, the symmetric placement of the four helical magnets allows for a better control of the AGS optics with reduced values of the beta functions especially near beam injection, second, the vertical spin direction during beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, and third, it provides for a larger 'spin tune gap', which allows the vertical and horizontal tunes to be placed, and prevent the horizontal and vertical intrinsic spin resonances of the AGS to occur during the acceleration cycle. Although the same spin gap can be obtained with a single or two partial helices, the required high field strength of a single helix makes its use impractical, and that of the double helix rather difficult. In this paper we will provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.

  16. Helical Magnetic Fields in AGN Jets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y. J. Chen; G.-Y. Zhao; Z.-Q. Shen

    2014-09-01

    We establish a simple model to describe the helical magnetic fields in AGN jets projected on the sky plane and the line-of-sight. This kind of profile has been detected in the polarimetric VLBI observation of many blazar objects, suggesting the existence of helical magnetic fields in these sources.

  17. Magnetism near Vortex Cores of Cuprate Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. C.; Prudchenko, K.; Launspach, B.; Ruiz, E. J.; Boekema, C.

    2005-03-01

    We examined muon-spin-resonance (μSR) vortex data of Bi2212, Tl2223, and YBCO to search for antiferromagnetism (AF) near the vortex cores. [1] Field distributions were obtained from μSR data using Maximum-Entropy analysis. The grainboundary and vortex signals were fitted by Gaussian and Lorentzian curves, the latter suggestive of extra AF ordering. Narrow Gaussians fit the grainboundary signals well, independent of temperature. For T B17 (2003) 3436.

  18. Astronomical demonstration of an optical vortex coronagraph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartzlander, Grover A; Ford, Erin L; Abdul-Malik, Rukiah S; Close, Laird M; Peters, Mary A; Palacios, David M; Wilson, Daniel W

    2008-07-07

    Using an optical vortex coronagraph and simple adaptive optics techniques, we have made the first convincing demonstration of an optical vortex coronagraph that is coupled to a star gazing telescope. We suppressed by 97% the primary star of a resolvable binary system, Cor Caroli. The stars had an angular separation of 1.9lambda/D at our imaging camera. The secondary star suffered no suppression from the vortex lens.

  19. Helical chirality induction of expanded porphyrin analogues

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jun-Ichiro Setsune

    2012-11-01

    Expanded porphyrin analogues with unique figure-eight conformation were prepared by way of useful pyrrole intermediates such as bis(azafulvene)s and 2-borylpyrrole. Supramolecular chirogenesis of cyclooctapyrrole O1 with 32-cycloconjugation was successfully applied to determine absolute configuration of chiral carboxylic acids. Dinuclear CuII complex of cyclooctapyrrole O2 with interrupted -conjugation was resolved by HPLC into enantiomers and their helical handedness was determined by theoretical simulation of their CD spectral pattern. Enantioselective induction of helicity in the metal helicate formation in the presence of a chiral promoter was demonstrated by using ()-(+)-1-(1-phenyl)ethylamine that favoured , helicity. Dinuclear CoII complexes of cyclotetrapyrroletetrapyridine O3 were found to be substitution labile and pick up amino acid anions in water. Those amino acid complexes of O3Co2 were rendered to adopt a particular unidirectional helical conformation preferentially depending on the ligated amino acid anion.

  20. The quasi-vortex-lattice method for wings with edge vortex separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pao, J. L.; Lan, E.

    1980-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of wings with leading-edge vortex separation were predicted using a method based on a flow model with free vortex elements which are allowed to merge into a concentrated core. The calculated pressure distribution is more accurate than that predicted by methods with discrete vortex filaments alone. In addition, the computer time is reduced approximately by half.

  1. Recent Advances in Study of Oceanic Vortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Gang; LI Li; LIU Qinyu

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the recent advances in the study of oceanic vortex are outlined. Firstly, the previous studies on oceanic vortex are reviewed. Secondly, some prominent features of oceanic vortex in the Gulf Stream, the Kuroshio, the South China Sea and the Japan Sea regions are depicted based upon the observations and numerical modeling results. Generally, the lifetime of these oceanic vortices ranges from several weeks to several months, and their horizontal scales vary from tens of kilometers to hundreds of kilometers. Their vertical scales are on the order of thousands of meters. Finally, some theoretical studies, mainly on the splitting of a cyclonic vortex and the merging of anticyclonic vortices, are introduced.

  2. Solubilization and fractionation of paired helical filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, P J; Correas, I; Avila, J

    1992-09-01

    Paired helical filaments isolated from brains of two different patients with Alzheimer's disease were extensively treated with the ionic detergent, sodium dodecyl sulphate. Filaments were solubilized at different extents, depending on the brain examined, thus suggesting the existence of two types of paired helical filaments: sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble and insoluble filaments. In the first case, the number of structures resembling paired helical filaments greatly decreased after the detergent treatment, as observed by electron microscopy. Simultaneously, a decrease in the amount of sedimentable protein was also observed upon centrifugation of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-treated paired helical filaments. A sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble fraction was isolated as a supernatant after low-speed centrifugation of the sodium dodecyl sulphate-treated paired helical filaments. The addition of the non-ionic detergent Nonidet-P40 to this fraction resulted in the formation of paired helical filament-like structures. When the sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble fraction was further fractionated by high-speed centrifugation, three subfractions were observed: a supernatant, a pellet and a thin layer between these two subfractions. No paired helical filaments were observed in any of these subfractions, even after addition of Nonidet P-40. However, when they were mixed back together, the treatment with Nonidet P-40 resulted in the visualization of paired helical filament-like structures. These results suggest that at least two different components are needed for the reconstitution of paired helical filaments as determined by electron microscopy. The method described here may allow the study of the components involved in the formation of paired helical filaments and the identification of possible factors capable of blocking this process.

  3. Direct numerical simulation and stability analyses of three-dimensional swirling jets and wakes exhibiting vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruith, Michael Rudolf

    Vortex breakdown of nominally axisymmetric, swirling incompressible jets and wakes issuing into a semi-infinite domain is studied by means of direct numerical simulations, as well as local and global linear stability analyses. From the point of view of specifying conditions at the open boundaries, this class of flows is particularly challenging due to its ability to support traveling waves. Several boundary conditions, ranging from free-slip and various homogeneous Neumann conditions to radiation conditions, are implemented in a staggered grid, finite difference algorithm that solves the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations in cylindrical coordinates by means of a fractional step method. Their advantages and shortcomings are evaluated in detail, and the question of the proper implementation of intermediate step boundary conditions is addressed. The data obtained from a large variety of test simulations points to the radiation condition as the most suitable lateral and outflow boundary condition for both high and low entrainment jets and wakes. A two-parameterc low entrainment velocity profile for which the steady, axisymmetric breakdown is well studied is selected for further investigation. Hence, issues regarding the role of three-dimensionality and unsteadiness with respect to the existence, mode selection, and internal structure of vortex breakdown can be addressed in terms of the two governing parameters and the Reynolds number. Low Reynolds numbers are found to yield flow fields lacking breakdown bubbles or helical breakdown modes even for high swirl. In contrast, highly swirling flows at large Reynolds numbers exhibit bubble, helical or double helical breakdown modes, where the axisymmetric mode is promoted by a jet-like axial velocity profile, while a wake-like profile renders the flow helically unstable and ultimately yields non-axisymmetric breakdown modes. It is shown that a transition from super- to subcritical flow, accurately predicts the parameter

  4. Cationic Nitrogen Doped Helical Nanographenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Feng, Xinliang; Berger, Reinhard; Popov, Alexey A; Weigand, Jan J; Vincon, Ilka; Machata, Peter; Hennersdorf, Felix; Zhou, Youjia; Fu, Yubin

    2017-09-13

    Herein, we report on the synthesis of a series of novel cationic nitrogen doped nanographenes (CNDN) by rhodium catalyzed annulation reactions. This powerful method allows for the synthesis of cationic nanographenes with non-planar, axial chiral geometries. Single-crystal X-ray analysis reveals helical and cove-edged structures. Compared to their all-carbon analogues, the CNDN exhibit energetically lower lying frontier orbitals with a reduced optical energy gap and an electron accepting behavior. All derivatives show quasi reversible reductions in cyclic voltammetry. Depending on the number of nitrogen dopant, in situ spectroelectrochemistry proves the formation of neutral radicals (one nitrogen dopant) or radical cations (two nitrogen dopants) upon reduction. The developed synthetic protocol paves the way for the design and synthesis of expanded nanographenes or even graphene nanoribbons containing cationic nitrogen doping. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Best packing of identical helices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Youngsik; Hong, Kyungpyo; Kim, Hyoungjun; No, Sungjong; Oh, Seungsang

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we prove the unique existence of a ropelength-minimizing conformation of the θ-spun double helix in a mathematically rigorous way, and find the minimal ropelength {{{Rop}}}* (θ )=-\\tfrac{8π }{t} where t is the unique solution in [-θ ,0] of the equation 2-2\\cos (t+θ )={t}2. Using this result, the pitch angles of the standard, triple and quadruple helices are around 39.3771^\\circ , 42.8354^\\circ and 43.8351^\\circ , respectively, which are almost identical with the approximated pitch angles of the zero-twist structures previously known by Olsen and Bohr. We also find the ropelength of the standard N-helix.

  6. Large-scale instabilities of helical flows

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, Alexandre; Brachet, Marc-Étienne

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale hydrodynamic instabilities of periodic helical flows are investigated using $3$D Floquet numerical computations. A minimal three-modes analytical model that reproduce and explains some of the full Floquet results is derived. The growth-rate $\\sigma$ of the most unstable modes (at small scale, low Reynolds number $Re$ and small wavenumber $q$) is found to scale differently in the presence or absence of anisotropic kinetic alpha (\\AKA{}) effect. When an $AKA$ effect is present the scaling $\\sigma \\propto q\\; Re\\,$ predicted by the $AKA$ effect theory [U. Frisch, Z. S. She, and P. L. Sulem, Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena 28, 382 (1987)] is recovered for $Re\\ll 1$ as expected (with most of the energy of the unstable mode concentrated in the large scales). However, as $Re$ increases, the growth-rate is found to saturate and most of the energy is found at small scales. In the absence of \\AKA{} effect, it is found that flows can still have large-scale instabilities, but with a negative eddy-viscosity sca...

  7. Influence of Helical Cell Shape on Motility of Helicobacter Pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, Joseph; Martinez, Laura; Salama, Nina; Bansil, Rama; Boston University Collaboration; University of Washington Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria's body shape plays an important role in motility by effecting chemotaxis, swimming mechanisms, and swimming speed. A prime example of this is the bacteria Helicobacter Pylori;whose helical shape has long been believed to provide an advantage in penetrating the viscous mucus layer protecting the stomach lining, its niche environment. To explore this we have performed bacteria tracking experiments of both wild-type bacteria along with mutants, which have a straight rod shape. A wide distribution of speeds was found. This distribution reflects both a result of temporal variation in speed and different shape morphologies in the bacterial population. Our results show that body shape plays less role in a simple fluid. However, in a more viscous solution the helical shape results in increased swimming speeds. In addition, we use experimentally obtained cell shape measurements to model the hydrodynamic influence of cell shape on swimming speed using resistive force theory. The results agree with the experiment, especially when we fold in the temporal distribution. Interestingly, our results suggest distinct wild-type subpopulations with varying number of half helices can lead to different swimming speeds. NSF PHY

  8. Bootstrapping One-Loop QCD Amplitudeswith General Helicities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Carola F.; Bern, Zvi; Dixon, Lance J.; Forde, Darren; Kosower, David A.

    2006-04-25

    The recently developed on-shell bootstrap for computing one-loop amplitudes in non-supersymmetric theories such as QCD combines the unitarity method with loop-level on-shell recursion. For generic helicity configurations, the recursion relations may involve undetermined contributions from non-standard complex singularities or from large values of the shift parameter. Here we develop a strategy for sidestepping difficulties through use of pairs of recursion relations. To illustrate the strategy, we present sets of recursion relations needed for obtaining n-gluon amplitudes in QCD. We give a recursive solution for the one-loop n-gluon QCD amplitudes with three or four color-adjacent gluons of negative helicity and the remaining ones of positive helicity. We provide an explicit analytic formula for the QCD amplitude A{sub 6;1}(1{sup -}, 2{sup -}, 3{sup -}, 4{sup +}, 5{sup +}, 6{sup +}), as well as numerical results for A{sub 7;1}(1{sup -}, 2{sup -}, 3{sup -}, 4{sup +}, 5{sup +}, 6{sup +}, 7{sup +}), A{sub 8;1}(1{sup -}, 2{sup -}, 3{sup -}, 4{sup +}, 5{sup +}, 6{sup +}, 7{sup +}, 8{sup +}), and A{sub 8;1}(1{sup -}, 2{sup -}, 3{sup -}, 4{sup -}, 5{sup +}, 6{sup +}, 7{sup +}, 8{sup +}). We expect the on-shell bootstrap approach to have widespread applications to phenomenological studies at colliders.

  9. Velocity and pressure fluctuations induced by the precessing helical vortex in a conical diffuser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, A.; Bosioc, A.; Nilsson, H.; Muntean, S.; Susan-Resiga, R.

    2014-03-01

    The flow unsteadiness generated in the draft tube cone of hydraulic turbines affects the turbine operation. Therefore, several swirling flow configurations are investigated using a swirling apparatus in order to explore the unsteady phenomena. The swirl apparatus has two parts: the swirl generator and the test section. The swirl generator includes two blade rows being designed such that the exit velocity profile resembles that of a turbine with fixed pitch. The test section includes a divergent part similar to the draft tube cone of a Francis turbine. A new control method based on a magneto rheological brake is used in order to produce several swirling flow configurations. As a result, the investigations are performed for six operating regimes in order to quantify the flow from part load operation, corresponding to runaway speed, to overload operation, corresponding to minimum speed, at constant guide vane opening. The part load operation corresponds to 0.7 times the best efficiency discharge, while the overload operation corresponds to 1.54 times the best efficiency discharge. LDV measurements are performed along three survey axes in the test section. The first survey axis is located just downstream the runner in order to check the velocity field at the swirl generator exit, while the next two survey axes are located at the inlet and at the outlet of the draft tube cone. Two velocity components are simultaneously measured on each survey axis. The measured unsteady velocity components are used to validate the results of unsteady numerical simulations, conducted using the OpenFOAM CFD code. The computational domain covers the entire swirling apparatus, including strouts, guide vanes, runner, and the conical diffuser. A dynamic mesh is used together with sliding GGI interfaces to include the effect of the rotating runner. The Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the RNG k-ε turbulence model are utilized to simulate the unsteady turbulent flow throughout the swirl generator.

  10. Topological Excitation in Skyrme Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Yi-Shi; ZHANG Xin-Hui; LIU Yu-Xiao

    2007-01-01

    Based on the φ-mapping topological current theory and the decomposition of gauge potential theory, we investigate knotted vortex lines and monopoles in Skyrme theory and simply discuss the branch processes (splitting, merging, and intersection) during the evolution of the monopoles.

  11. Vortex ring state by full-field actuator disc model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, J.N.; Shen, W.Z.; Munduate, X. [DTU, Dept. of Energy Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1997-08-01

    One-dimensional momentum theory provides a simple analytical tool for analysing the gross flow behavior of lifting propellers and rotors. Combined with a blade-element strip-theory approach, it has for many years been the most popular model for load and performance predictions of wind turbines. The model works well at moderate and high wind velocities, but is not reliable at small wind velocities, where the expansion of the wake is large and the flow field behind the rotor dominated by turbulent mixing. This is normally referred to as the turbulent wake state or the vortex ring state. In the vortex ring state, momentum theory predicts a decrease of thrust whereas the opposite is found from experiments. The reason for the disagreement is that recirculation takes place behind the rotor with the consequence that the stream tubes past the rotor becomes effectively chocked. This represents a condition at which streamlines no longer carry fluid elements from far upstream to far downstream, hence one-dimensional momentum theory is invalid and empirical corrections have to be introduced. More sophisticated analytical or semi-analytical rotor models have been used to describe stationary flow fields for heavily loaded propellers. In recent years generalized actuator disc models have been developed, but up to now no detailed computations of the turbulent wake state or the vortex ring state have been performed. In the present work the phenomenon is simulated by direct simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations, where the influence of the rotor on the flow field is modelled simply by replacing the blades by an actuator disc with a constant normal load. (EG) 13 refs.

  12. New vortex-matter size effect observed in Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8 + delta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y M; Fuhrer, M S; Zettl, A; Ooi, S; Tamegai, T

    2001-04-16

    The vortex-matter 3D to 2D phase transition is studied in micron-sized Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8 + delta) single crystals using local Hall magnetization measurements. At a given temperature, the second magnetization peak, the signature of a possible 3D--2D vortex phase transition, disappears for samples smaller than a critical length. We suggest that this critical length should be equated with the 2D vortex lattice ab-plane correlation length R(2D)(c). The magnitude and temperature dependence of R(2D)(c) agree well with Larkin-Ovchinnikov collective pinning theory.

  13. Three-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau simulation of a vortex line displaced by a zigzag of pinning spheres

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mauro M Doria; Antonio R de C Romaguera; Welles A M Margado

    2006-01-01

    A vortex line is shaped by a zigzag of pinning centers and we study here how far the stretched vortex line is able to follow this path. The pinning center is described by an insulating sphere of coherence length size such that in its surface the de Gennes boundary condition applies. We calculate the free energy density of this system in the framework of the Ginzburg-Landau theory and study the critical displacement beyond which the vortex line is detached from the pinning center.

  14. Rotating hot-wire investigation of the vortex responsible for blade-vortex interaction noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Richard Remo

    1988-01-01

    This distribution of the circumferential velocity of the vortex responsible for blade-vortex interaction noise was measured using a rotating hot-wire rake synchronously meshed with a model helicopter rotor at the blade passage frequency. Simultaneous far-field acoustic data and blade differential pressure measurements were obtained. Results show that the shape of the measured far-field acoustic blade-vortex interaction signature depends on the blade-vortex interaction geometry. The experimental results are compared with the Widnall-Wolf model for blade-vortex interaction noise.

  15. Vortex diffusion and vortex-line hysteresis in radial quantum turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saluto, L., E-mail: lidia.saluto@unipa.it [DEIM, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Jou, D., E-mail: david.jou@uab.es [Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Mongiovi, M.S., E-mail: m.stella.mongiovi@unipa.it [DEIM, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2014-05-01

    We study the influence of vortex diffusion on the evolution of inhomogeneous quantized vortex tangles. A simple hydrodynamical model to describe inhomogeneous counterflow superfluid turbulence is used. As an illustration, we obtain solutions for these effects in radial counterflow of helium II between two concentric cylinders at different temperatures. The vortex diffusion from the inner hotter cylinder to the outer colder cylinder increases the vortex length density everywhere as compared with the non-diffusive situation. The possibility of hysteresis in the vortex line density under cyclical variations of the heat flow is explored.

  16. Volume of a vortex and the Bradlow bound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, C.; Speight, J. M.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate that the geometric volume of a soliton coincides with the thermodynamical volume also for field theories with higher-dimensional vacuum manifolds (e.g., for gauged scalar field theories supporting vortices or monopoles), generalizing the recent results of Ref. [C. Adam, M. Haberichter, and A. Wereszczynski, Phys. Lett. B 754, 18 (2016)., 10.1016/j.physletb.2016.01.009]. We apply this observation to understand Bradlow-type bounds for general Abelian gauge theories supporting vortices, as well as some thermodynamical aspects of said theories. In the case of SDiff Bogomolny-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) models (being examples of perfect fluid models) we show that the base-space independent geometric volume (area) of the vortex is exactly equal to the Bradlow volume (a minimal volume for which BPS soliton solutions exist). This volume can be finite for compactons or infinite for infinitely extended solitons (in flat Minkowski space-time).

  17. Role of van der Waals interactions for the intrinsic stability of polyalanine helices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Blum, Volker; Ireta, Joel; Scheffler, Matthias

    2009-03-01

    The helical motif is an ubiquitous conformation adopted by aminoacid residues in a protein structure and helix formation is the simplest example of the protein folding process. How stable is the folded peptide helix in comparison to a random coil structure? What are the interactions responsible for stabilizing the helical conformation? Answering these questions has thus a direct implication for understanding protein folding. In this work we use density functional theory (DFT) augmented with a non-empirical correction for van der Waals (vdW) forces to study the stability of alanine polypeptide helices in vacuo. We find a large stabilization of the native helical forms when vdW correction is used. It amounts to 121%, 157% and 83% on top of the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) functional in the case of infinite α, π and 310 helices, respectively. Thus, the experimentally observed α helix is significantly stabilized by vdW forces both over the fully extended and the 310 conformations. Our findings also suggest an explanation to the remarkable stability of gas-phase alanine helices up to high temperatures [M. Kohtani et al. JACS 126, 7420 (2004)].

  18. Analysis of the Radar Reflectivity of Aircraft Vortex Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Karim; Wray, Alan; Yan, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Radar has been proposed as a way to track wake vortices to reduce aircraft spacing and tests have revealed radar echoes from aircraft wakes in clear air. The results are always interpreted qualitatively using Tatarski's theory of weak scattering by isotropic atmospheric turbulence. The goal of the present work was to predict the value of the radar cross-section (RCS) using simpler models. This is accomplished in two steps. First, the refractive index is obtained. Since the structure of the aircraft wakes is different from atmospheric turbulence, three simple mechanisms specific to vortex wakes are considered: (1) Radial density gradient in a two-dimensional vortex, (2) three-dimensional fluctuations in the vortex cores, and (3) Adiabatic transport of the atmospheric fluid in a two-dimensional oval surrounding the pair of vortices. The index of refraction is obtained more precisely for the two-dimensional mechanisms than for the three-dimensional ones. In the second step, knowing the index of refraction, a scattering analysis is performed. Tatarski's weak scattering approximation is kept but the usual assumptions of a far-field and a uniform incident wave are dropped. Neither assumption is generally valid for a wake that is coherent across the radar beam. For analytical insight, a simpler approximation that invokes, in addition to weak scattering, the far-field and wide cylindrical beam assumptions, is also developed and compared with the more general analysis. The predicted RCS values for the oval surround the vortices (mechanism C) agree with the experiments of Bilson conducted over a wide range of frequencies. However, the predictions have a cut-off away from normal incidence which is not present in the measurements. Estimates suggest that this is due to turbulence in the baroclinic vorticity generated at the boundary of the oval. The reflectivity of a vortex itself (mechanism A) is comparable to that of the oval (mechanism C) but cuts-off at frequencies lower

  19. Duality and helicity: the photon wave function approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbistan, M.; Horváthy, P. A.; Zhang, P.-M.

    2017-08-01

    The photon wave equation proposed in terms of the Riemann-Silberstein vector is derived from a first-order Dirac/Weyl-type action principle. It is symmetric w.r.t. duality transformations, but the associated Noether quantity vanishes. Replacing the fields by potentials and using instead a quadratic Klein-Gordon-type Lagrangian allows us to recover the double-Chern-Simons expression of conserved helicity and is shown to be equivalent to recently proposed alternative frameworks. Applied to the potential-modified theory the Dirac/Weyl-type approach yields again zero conserved charge, whereas the Klein-Gordon-type approach applied to the original setting yields Lipkin's ;zilch;.

  20. Pinch-off of axisymmetric vortex pairs in the limit of vanishing vortex line curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadri, V.; Krueger, P. S.

    2016-07-01

    Pinch-off of axisymmetric vortex pairs generated by flow between concentric cylinders with radial separation ΔR was studied numerically and compared with planar vortex dipole behavior. The axisymmetric case approaches planar vortex dipole behavior in the limit of vanishing ΔR. The flow was simulated at a jet Reynolds number of 1000 (based on ΔR and the jet velocity), jet pulse length-to-gap ratio ( /L Δ R ) in the range 10-20, and gap-to-outer radius ratio ( /Δ R R o ) in the range 0.01-0.1. Contrary to investigations of strictly planar flows, vortex pinch-off was observed for all gap sizes investigated. This difference was attributed to the less constrained geometry considered, suggesting that even very small amounts of vortex line curvature and/or vortex stretching may disrupt the absence of pinch-off observed in strictly planar vortex dipoles.

  1. Simulations of Active Vortex Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, N. N.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. We consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the streamwise direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise voracity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations c Implement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators that have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University. Jacobson and Reynolds used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds. More recently, Lachowiez and Wlezien are investigating the flow generated by an electro-mechanically driven lid to be used for assertion control in aerodynamic applications. We are simulating the flows generated by these devices and we are conducting a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin. The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands ol'particle's allow for high resolution simulations

  2. Single Band Helical Antenna in Axial Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parminder Singh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Helical antennas have been widely used in a various useful applications, due to their low weight and low profile conformability, easy and cheap realization.Radiation properties of this antenna are examined both theoretically and experimentally. In this paper, an attempt has been made to investigate new helical antenna structure for Applications. CST MWS Software is used for the simulation and design calculations of the helical antennas. The axial ratio, return loss, VSWR, Directivity, gain, radiation pattern is evaluated. Using CST MWS simulation software proposed antenna is designed/simulated and optimized. The antenna exhibits a single band from 0 GHz to 3 GHz for GPS and several satellite applications

  3. Analysis on two novel spherical helical antennas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hou ZHANG; Yingzeng YIN; Dongyu XIA

    2009-01-01

    Two novel spherical helical antennas are designed by projecting the planar equiangular spiral antenna onto hemisphere and partial sphere surfaces.Their radiation properties are analyzed by the moment method with curved basis and test function,and the curves of the voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR),gain,polarization and pattern that change with frequency are also given,respectively.It can be seen that the circular polarization band of the novel hemispherical helical antenna is broader.The gain curve of the partial spherical helical antenna is flatter and the structure is simpler.

  4. Investigation of backfire monofilar helical antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Thomas Gunst; Larsen, Niels Vesterdal; Gothelf, Ulrich Vesterager

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of the electromagnetic properties of the backfire monofilar helical antenna. The current distribution along the helical conductor, the input impedance, and the front-to-back ratio are calculated and analyzed for the backfire operation of the antenna....... A parametric study of the helical geometry and the resulting antenna characteristics will be described and discussed. The currents and fields are calculated using the simulation software AWAS based on the Method of Moments with a wire representation of the ground plane....

  5. Vortex metrology using Fourier analysis techniques: vortex networks correlation fringes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel-Toro, Luciano; Sierra-Sosa, Daniel; Tebaldi, Myrian; Bolognini, Néstor

    2012-10-20

    In this work, we introduce an alternative method of analysis in vortex metrology based on the application of the Fourier optics techniques. The first part of the procedure is conducted as is usual in vortex metrology for uniform in-plane displacement determination. On the basis of two recorded intensity speckled distributions, corresponding to two states of a diffuser coherently illuminated, we numerically generate an analytical signal from each recorded intensity pattern by using a version of the Riesz integral transform. Then, from each analytical signal, a two-dimensional pseudophase map is generated in which the vortices are located and characterized in terms of their topological charges and their core's structural properties. The second part of the procedure allows obtaining Young's interference fringes when Fourier transforming the light passing through a diffracting mask with multiple apertures at the locations of the homologous vortices. In fact, we use the Fourier transform as a mathematical operation to compute the far-field diffraction intensity pattern corresponding to the multiaperture set. Each aperture from the set is associated with a rectangular hole that coincides both in shape and size with a pixel from recorded images. We show that the fringe analysis can be conducted as in speckle photography in an extended range of displacement measurements. Effects related with speckled decorrelation are also considered. Our experimental results agree with those of speckle photography in the range in which both techniques are applicable.

  6. Formation of Ion Phase-Space Vortexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Trulsen, J.; Armstrong, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The formation of ion phase space vortexes in the ion two stream region behind electrostatic ion acoustic shocks are observed in a laboratory experiment. A detailed analysis demonstrates that the evolution of such vortexes is associated with ion-ion beam instabilities and a nonlinear equation for ...

  7. Tight Focusing of Partially Coherent Vortex Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tight focusing of partially polarized vortex beams has been studied. Compact form of the coherence matrix has been derived for polarized vortex beams. Effects of topological charge and polarization distribution of the incident beam on intensity distribution, degree of polarization, and coherence have been investigated.

  8. The linear stability of swirling vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargan-Shingles, C.; Rudman, M.; Ryan, K.

    2016-11-01

    The stability of vortex rings with an azimuthal component of velocity is investigated numerically for various combinations of ring wavenumber and swirl magnitude. The vortex rings are equilibrated from an initially Gaussian distribution of azimuthal vorticity and azimuthal velocity, at a circulation-based Reynolds number of 10 000, to a state in which the vortex core is qualitatively identical to that of the piston generated vortex rings. The instability modes of these rings can be characterised as Kelvin instability modes, analogous to instability modes observed for Gaussian and Batchelor vortex pairs. The shape of an amplified mode typically depends only on the azimuthal wavenumber at the centre of the vortex core and the magnitude of the corresponding velocity component. The wavenumber of a particular sinuous instability varies with radius from the vortex ring centre for rings of finite aspect ratio. Thicker rings spread the amplification over a wider range of wavenumbers for a particular resonant mode pair, while the growth rate and the azimuthal wavenumber corresponding to the peak growth both vary as a function of the wavenumber variation. Normalisation of the wavenumber and the growth rate by a measure of the wavenumber variation allows a coherent description of stability modes to be proposed, across the parameter space. These results provide a framework for predicting the development of resonant Kelvin instabilities on vortex rings with an induced component of swirling velocity.

  9. Ring vortex solitons in nonlocal nonlinear media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Briedis, D.; Petersen, D.E.; Edmundson, D.;

    2005-01-01

    or higher charge fundamental vortices as well as higher order (multiple ring) vortex solitons. Our results pave the way for experimental observation of stable vortex rings in other nonlocal nonlinear systems including Bose-Einstein condensates with pronounced long-range interparticle interaction....

  10. Vortex attraction and the formation of sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E. N.

    1992-01-01

    A downdraft vortex ring in a stratified atmosphere exhibits universal attraction for nearby vertical magnetic flux bundles. It is speculated that the magnetic fields emerging through the surface of the sun are individually encircled by one or more subsurface vortex rings, providing an important part of the observed clustering of magnetic fibrils to form pores and sunspots.

  11. Investigation of Wake-Vortex Aircraft Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sonya T.

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is addressing airport capacity enhancements during instrument meteorological conditions though the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program. The major goal of the TAP program is to develop the technology that will allow air traffic levels during instrument meteorological condition to approach those achieved during visual operations. The Reduced Spacing Operations (RSO) subelement of TAP at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) will develop the Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS). The purpose of the AVOSS is to integrate current and predicted weather conditions, wake vortex transport and decay knowledge, wake vortex sensor data, and operational definitions of acceptable strengths for vortex encounters to produce dynamic wake vortex separation criteria. The proposed research is in support of the wake vortex hazard definition component of the LaRC AVOSS development research. The research program described in the next section provided an analysis of the static test data and uses this data to evaluate the accuracy vortex/wake-encounter models. The accuracy of these models has not before been evaluated using experimental data. The research results also presented the first analysis of the forces and moments imparted on an airplane during a wake vortex encounter using actual flight test data.

  12. On a few Aspects of Vortex Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prantik Sinha

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Intricacies of vortex motion have been drawing the attention of scientists for many years. A number of works both experimental and numerical have been conducted to understand the various features of vortex motion and its effects on drag, etc. In the present experimental work we have made an attempt to visualize the patterns of both Forced and Free vortex motion. Here colored die has been used to understand the profiles and an arrow shaped strip marks the difference between irrotational and rotational flow. In the Forced vortex motion it has been observed that the parabolic profile remains invariant with the flow rate (speed of paddle, height of the lowest point of the profile decreases with the increase in flow rate (paddle speed. In the Free Vortex motion observations, the hyperbolic profile doesn’t change with the change in flow rate. In this case, suction is created towards the centre where as in the case of Force vortex no such suction arises. With the reduction in the size of the orifice diameter, the profile becomes less steep for Free vortex. In this case the velocity profile in the core region is straight, as the radius increases the profile becomes rectangular hyperbola where as in the case of Forced vortex the velocity profile maintains its linear nature for the entire range of radii.

  13. The bathtub vortex in a rotating container

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas; Stenum, B.

    2006-01-01

    We study the time-independent free-surface flow which forms when a fluid drains out of a container, a so-called bathtub vortex. We focus on the bathtub vortex in a rotating container and describe the free-surface shape and the complex flow structure using photographs of the free surface, flow...

  14. Structure of a bathtub vortex: importance of the bottom boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukimoto, Shinji; Niino, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Takashi; Kimura, Ryuji; Moulin, Frederic Y.

    2010-03-01

    A bathtub vortex in a cylindrical tank rotating at a constant angular velocity Ω is studied by means of a laboratory experiment, a numerical experiment and a boundary layer theory. The laboratory and numerical experiments show that two regimes of vortices in the steady-state can occur depending on Ω and the volume flux Q through the drain hole: when Q is large and Ω is small, a potential vortex is formed in which angular momentum outside the vortex core is constant in the non-rotating frame. However, when Q is small or Ω is large, a vortex is generated in which the angular momentum decreases with decreasing radius. Boundary layer theory shows that the vortex regimes strongly depend on the theoretical radial volume flux through the bottom boundary layer under a potential vortex : when the ratio of Q to the theoretical boundary-layer radial volume flux Q b (scaled by {2π R^2 ( Ω ν )^1/2}) at the outer rim of the vortex core is larger than a critical value (of order 1), the radial flow in the interior exists at all radii and Regime I is realized, where R is the inner radius of the tank and ν the kinematic viscosity. When the ratio is less than the critical value, the radial flow in the interior nearly vanishes inside a critical radius and almost all of the radial volume flux occurs only in the boundary layer, resulting in Regime II in which the angular momentum is not constant with radius. This criterion is found to explain the results of the laboratory and numerical experiments very well.

  15. Dissipation in thin superconducting current biased films due to vortex motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulaevskii, Lev N [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the problem of dissipation in thin superconducting films with thickness d on the order of the coherence length {zeta}, and width {omega} much narrower than the Pearl length, {Lambda} >> {omega} >> {zeta}, was discussed as the main cause for the behavior of I-V characteristics observed in thin high-temperature superconducting films. In thin and narrow films or strips with width w >> {zeta} the barrier for phase slips by creation of temporary normal regions across the entire film width is too big, thus phase slips become highly improbable. Instead, we consider a vortex crossing the strip from one edge to the other, perpendicular to the bias current, as the dominant mechanism for generalized phase slips resulting in detectable voltage pulses. We derive the rate of vortex crossings using the general theory of transition rates between metastable states. In mean field theory, the saddle point solution of the rate equation gives the vortex position inside the strip, where the kinetic energy of supercurrents is maximum. However, the free energy barrier derived in such an approach is strongly renormalized by superconducting fluctuations and this effect was not accounted for previously. They drastically reduce the rate of vortex crossings and, consequently, dissipation. We present results for the amplitude and duration of voltage pulses induced by vortex motion and their consequences on I-V characteristics, when heating due to vortex crossings is negligible. We found ohmic behavior at low bias currents, power law behavior at intermediate currents and exponential I-V characteristics at currents close to the critical one. The impact of vortex motion in superconducting strips on the observation of so-called dark counts (voltage pulses) in superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors is discussed.

  16. Time-Correlated Vortex Tunneling in Layered Superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Miller

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The nucleation and dynamics of Josephson and Abrikosov vortices determine the critical currents of layered high-Tc superconducting (HTS thin films, grain boundaries, and coated conductors, so understanding their mechanisms is of crucial importance. Here, we treat pair creation of Josephson and Abrikosov vortices in layered superconductors as a secondary Josephson effect. Each full vortex is viewed as a composite fluid of micro-vortices, such as pancake vortices, which tunnel coherently via a tunneling matrix element. We introduce a two-terminal magnetic (Weber blockade effect that blocks tunneling when the applied current is below a threshold value. We simulate vortex tunneling as a dynamic, time-correlated process when the current is above threshold. The model shows nearly precise agreement with voltage-current (V-I characteristics of HTS cuprate grain boundary junctions, which become more concave rounded as temperature decreases, and also explains the piecewise linear V-I behavior observed in iron-pnictide bicrystal junctions and other HTS devices. When applied to either Abrikosov or Josephson pair creation, the model explains a plateau seen in plots of critical current vs. thickness of HTS-coated conductors. The observed correlation between theory and experiment strongly supports the proposed quantum picture of vortex nucleation and dynamics in layered superconductors.

  17. Numerical simulation of broadband vortex terahertz beams propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, V. A.; Kulya, M. S.; Bespalov, V. G.

    2016-08-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) represents new informational degree of freedom for data encoding and multiplexing in fiber and free-space communications. OAM-carrying beams (also called vortex beams) were successfully used to increase the capacity of optical, millimetre-wave and radio frequency communication systems. However, the investigation of the OAM potential for the new generation high-speed terahertz communications is also of interest due to the unlimited demand of higher capacity in telecommunications. Here we present a simulation-based study of the propagating in non-dispersive medium broadband terahertz vortex beams generated by a spiral phase plate (SPP). The algorithm based on scalar diffraction theory was used to obtain the spatial amplitude and phase distributions of the vortex beam in the frequency range from 0.1 to 3 THz at the distances 20-80 mm from the SPP. The simulation results show that the amplitude and phase distributions without unwanted modulation are presented in the wavelengths ranges with centres on the wavelengths which are multiple to the SPP optical thickness. This fact may allow to create the high-capacity near-field communication link which combines OAM and wavelength-division multiplexing.

  18. EXPERIMENTAL AND NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF FREE SURFACE VORTEX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hai-feng; CHEN Hong-xun; MA Zheng; ZHOU Yi

    2008-01-01

    An experimental model was set up to investigate the formation and evolution of the free surface vortex. A Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure the free surface vortex flow field at different development stages. Flow visualization was used to locate the vortex position and find its structure. Empirical formulas about the critical submergence and the whole field structure were obtained. It is found that the tangential velocity distribution is similar to that of the Rankine vortex and the radial velocity changes little in the vortex functional scope. Vortex starts from the free surface and gradually intensifies to air entrainment vortex. The vortex core moves during the formation and evolution of the free surface vortex. Based on the experimental model, the vortex position and structure were predicted by numerical simulation combined with a vortex model and compared with that of the experiments, which shows satisfactory agreement.

  19. Computational hydrodynamics of animal swimming: boundary element method and three-dimensional vortex wake structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, J Y; Chahine, G L

    2001-12-01

    The slender body theory, lifting surface theories, and more recently panel methods and Navier-Stokes solvers have been used to study the hydrodynamics of fish swimming. This paper presents progress on swimming hydrodynamics using a boundary integral equation method (or boundary element method) based on potential flow model. The unsteady three-dimensional BEM code 3DynaFS that we developed and used is able to model realistic body geometries, arbitrary movements, and resulting wake evolution. Pressure distribution over the body surface, vorticity in the wake, and the velocity field around the body can be computed. The structure and dynamic behavior of the vortex wakes generated by the swimming body are responsible for the underlying fluid dynamic mechanisms to realize the high-efficiency propulsion and high-agility maneuvering. Three-dimensional vortex wake structures are not well known, although two-dimensional structures termed 'reverse Karman Vortex Street' have been observed and studied. In this paper, simulations about a swimming saithe (Pollachius virens) using our BEM code have demonstrated that undulatory swimming reduces three-dimensional effects due to substantially weakened tail tip vortex, resulting in a reverse Karman Vortex Street as the major flow pattern in the three-dimensional wake of an undulating swimming fish.

  20. Shielding requirements in helical tomotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baechler, S.; Bochud, F. O.; Verellen, D.; Moeckli, R.

    2007-08-01

    Helical tomotherapy is a relatively new intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment for which room shielding has to be reassessed for the following reasons. The beam-on-time needed to deliver a given target dose is increased and leads to a weekly workload of typically one order of magnitude higher than that for conventional radiation therapy. The special configuration of tomotherapy units does not allow the use of standard shielding calculation methods. A conventional linear accelerator must be shielded for primary, leakage and scatter photon radiations. For tomotherapy, primary radiation is no longer the main shielding issue since a beam stop is mounted on the gantry directly opposite the source. On the other hand, due to the longer irradiation time, the accelerator head leakage becomes a major concern. An analytical model based on geometric considerations has been developed to determine leakage radiation levels throughout the room for continuous gantry rotation. Compared to leakage radiation, scatter radiation is a minor contribution. Since tomotherapy units operate at a nominal energy of 6 MV, neutron production is negligible. This work proposes a synthetic and conservative model for calculating shielding requirements for the Hi-Art II TomoTherapy unit. Finally, the required concrete shielding thickness is given for different positions of interest.

  1. Helical Two-Revolutional Cyclical Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Olejníková

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Paper presents a family of helical two-revolutional cyclical surfaces, which arecreated by movement of the circle alongside the helical cycloidal curve, where circle islocated in the curve normal plane and its centre is on this curve. Helical cycloidal curvecan be created by simultaneous revolution of a point about two different axes 3o, 2o and byscrewing about axis 1o in the space. Form of the helical cycloidal curve and also of thehelical two-revolutional cyclical surface is dependent on the relative position of the threeaxes of revolutions, on multiples of angular velocities and orientations of separaterevolutions. Analytic representation, classification of surfaces and some of their geometricproperties are derived.

  2. Helicity at Photospheric and Chromospheric Heights

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, S K; Sankarasubramanian, K

    2009-01-01

    In the solar atmosphere the twist parameter $\\alpha$ has the same sign as magnetic helicity. It has been observed using photospheric vector magnetograms that negative/positive helicity is dominant in the northern/southern hemisphere of the Sun. Chromospheric features show dextral/sinistral dominance in the northern/southern hemisphere and sigmoids observed in X-rays also have a dominant sense of reverse-S/forward-S in the northern/southern hemisphere. It is of interest whether individual features have one-to-one correspondence in terms of helicity at different atmospheric heights. We use UBF \\Halpha images from the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST) and other \\Halpha data from Udaipur Solar Observatory and Big Bear Solar Observatory. Near-simultaneous vector magnetograms from the DST are used to establish one-to-one correspondence of helicity at photospheric and chromospheric heights. We plan to extend this investigation with more data including coronal intensities.

  3. Spin versus helicity in processes involving transversity

    CERN Document Server

    Mekhfi, Mustapha

    2011-01-01

    We construct the spin formalism in order to deal in a direct and natural way with processes involving transversity which are now of increasing popularity. The helicity formalism which is more appropriate for collision processes of definite helicity has been so far used also to manage processes with transversity, but at the price of computing numerous helicity amplitudes generally involving unnecessary kinematical variables.In a second step we work out the correspondence between both formalisms and retrieve in another way all results of the helicity formalism but in simpler forms.We then compute certain processes for comparison.A special process:the quark dipole magnetic moment is shown to be exclusively treated within the spin formalism as it is directly related to the transverse spin of the quark inside the baryon.

  4. Synthesis and structure of neutral double helicate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU, Xun-Cheng; ZHOU, Zhi-Fen; ZHU, Shou-Rong; CHEN, Yun-Ti; LENG, Xue-Bing; WENG, Lin-Hong; LIN, Hua-Kuan

    2000-01-01

    A new approach to geaerating supramolecular architectures, based on easy-to-prepare sehiff base ligands, is described to gether with its application to the self-assembly of supramolecu lar neutral double helicates.

  5. Mechanical resonances of helically coiled carbon nanowires

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saini, D; Behlow, H; Podila, R; Dickel, D; Pillai, B; Skove, M J; Serkiz, S M; Rao, A M

    2014-01-01

    ...) mainly due to their geometrical complexity. The advent of helically coiled micro/nanoscale structures in nano-robotics, nano-inductors, and impact protection coatings has necessitated the development of new methodologies for determining...

  6. Microfluidic Lithography of Bioinspired Helical Micromotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yunru; Shang, Luoran; Gao, Wei; Zhao, Ze; Wang, Huan; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2017-07-29

    Considerable efforts have been devoted to developing artificial micro/nanomotors that can convert energy into movement. A flow lithography integrated microfluidic spinning and spiraling system is developed for the continuous generation of bioinspired helical micromotors. Because the generation processes could be precisely tuned by adjusting the flow rates and the illuminating frequency, the length, diameter, and pitch of the helical micromotors were highly controllable. Benefiting from the fast online gelation and polymerization, the resultant helical micromotors could be imparted with Janus, triplex, and core-shell cross-sectional structures that have never been achieved by other methods. Owing to the spatially controlled encapsulation of functional nanoparticles in the microstructures, the helical micromotors can perform locomotion not only by magnetically actuated rotation or corkscrew motion but also through chemically powered catalytic reaction. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Helical magnetized wiggler for synchrotron radiation laser

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Mei; Hirshfield, J L

    1999-01-01

    A helical magnetized iron wiggler has been built for a novel infrared synchrotron radiation laser (SRL) experiment. The wiggler consists of four periods of helical iron structure immersed in a solenoid field. This wiggler is to impart transverse velocity to a prebunched 6 MeV electron beam, and thus to obtain a desired high orbit pitch ratio for the SRL. Field tapering at beam entrance is considered and tested on a similar wiggler. Analytic and simulated characteristics of wigglers of this type are discussed and the performance of the fabricated wigglers is demonstrated experimentally. A 4.7 kG peak field was measured for a 6.4 mm air gap and a 5.4 cm wiggler period at a 20 kG solenoid field. The measured helical fields compare favorably with the analytical solution. This type of helical iron wigglers has the potential to be scaled to small periods with strong field amplitude.

  8. STUDY ON A NOVEL ELLIPSOIDAL HELICAL ANTENNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Dongyu; Zhang Hou; Wang Chong; Zhang Qianyue

    2007-01-01

    A novel ellipsoidal helical antenna is proposed and studied in this letter.As a special instance,the hemispherical helical antennas are analyzed firstly,which indicates that the characteristics of a two-arm unit are better than that of a single-arm unit.Based on this,the ellipsoidal helical antenna,formed by changing the axial direction's dimension of the two-arm hemispherical helical antenna,is analyzed by the moment method with curved basic and testing function.The effects to VSWR (Voltage Standing Wave Ratio),gain,polarization and patterns by the axial direction's dimensions are investigated.The study results provide dependable gist to the choice of antenna format according to the practical requirements.

  9. The VORTEX coronagraphic test bench

    CERN Document Server

    Jolivet, Aissa; Huby, Elsa; Absil, Olivier; Delacroix, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Surdej, Jean; Habraken, Serge

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the infrared coronagraphic test bench of the University of Li\\`ege named VODCA (Vortex Optical Demonstrator for Coronagraphic Applications). The goal of the bench is to assess the performances of the Annular Groove Phase Masks (AGPMs) at near- to mid-infrared wavelengths. The AGPM is a subwavelength grating vortex coronagraph of charge two (SGVC2) made out of diamond. The bench is designed to be completely achromatic and will be composed of a super continuum laser source emitting in the near to mid-infrared, several parabolas, diaphragms and an infrared camera. This way, we will be able to test the different AGPMs in the M, L, K and H bands. Eventually, the bench will also allow the computation of the incident wavefront aberrations on the coronagraph. A reflective Lyot stop will send most of the stellar light to a second camera to perform low-order wavefront sensing. This second system coupled with a deformable mirror will allow the correction of the wavefront aberrations. We also ai...

  10. Vortex dynamics in $R^4$

    CERN Document Server

    Shashikanth, Banavara N

    2011-01-01

    The vortex dynamics of Euler's equations for a constant density fluid flow in $R^4$ is studied. Most of the paper focuses on singular Dirac delta distributions of the vorticity two-form $\\omega$ in $R^4$. These distributions are supported on two-dimensional surfaces termed {\\it membranes} and are the analogs of vortex filaments in $R^3$ and point vortices in $R^2$. The self-induced velocity field of a membrane is shown to be unbounded and is regularized using a local induction approximation (LIA). The regularized self-induced velocity field is then shown to be proportional to the mean curvature vector field of the membrane but rotated by 90 degrees in the plane of normals. Next, the Hamiltonian membrane model is presented. The symplectic structure for this model is derived from a general formula for vorticity distributions due to Marsden and Weinstein (1983). Finally, the dynamics of the four-form $\\omega \\wedge \\omega$ is examined. It is shown that Ertel's vorticity theorem in $R^3$, for the constant density...

  11. Experimental Study of the Flow in Helical Circular Pipes: Torsion Effect on the Flow Velocity and Turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An objective of the present paper is to experimentally clarify the torsion effect on the flow in helical circular pipes. We have made six helical circular pipes having different pitches and common non-dimensional curvature δ of about 0.1. The torsion parameter β0, which is defined by β0 = τ/(2δ)1/2 with non-dimensional torsion τ, are taken to be 0.02, 0.45, 0.69, 1.01, 1.38 and 1.89 covering from small to very large pitch. The velocity distributions and the turbulence of the flow are measured using an X-type hot-wire anemometer in the range of the Reynolds number from 200 to 20000. The results obtained are summarized as follows: The mean secondary flow pattern in a cross section of the pipe changes from an ordinary twin-vortex type as is seen in a curved pipe without torsion (toroidal pipe) to a single vortex type after one of the twin-vortex gradually disappears as β0 increases. The circu lation direction of the single vortex is the same as the direction of torsion of the pipe. The mean velocity distribution of the axial flow is similar to that of the toroidal pipe at small β0, but changes its shape as β0 increases, and attains the shape similar to that in a straight circular pipe when β0 = 1.89. It is also found that the critical Reynolds number, at which the flow shows a marginal behavior to turbulence, decreases as β0 increases for small β0, and then increases after taking a minimum at β0 ≈ 1.4 as β0 increases. The minimum of the critical Reynolds number experimentally obtained is about 400 at β0≈ 1.4.

  12. Kinematic dynamo induced by helical waves

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Xing

    2014-01-01

    We investigate numerically the kinematic dynamo induced by the superposition of two helical waves in a periodic box as a simplified model to understand the dynamo action in astronomical bodies. The effects of magnetic Reynolds number, wavenumber and wave frequency on the dynamo action are studied. It is found that this helical-wave dynamo is a slow dynamo. There exists an optimal wavenumber for the dynamo growth rate. A lower wave frequency facilitates the dynamo action and the oscillations o...

  13. Cosmological Magnetic Fields from Primordial Helical Seeds

    CERN Document Server

    Sigl, G

    2002-01-01

    Most early Universe scenarios predict negligible magnetic fields on cosmological scales if they are unprocessed during subsequent expansion of the Universe. We present a new numerical treatment of the evolution of primordial fields and apply it to weakly helical seeds as they occur in certain early Universe scenarios. We find that initial helicities not much larger than the baryon to photon number can lead to fields of about 10^{-13} Gauss with coherence scales slightly below a kilo-parsec today.

  14. Duality and helicity: A symplectic viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbistan, M.; Duval, C.; Horváthy, P. A.; Zhang, P.-M.

    2016-10-01

    The theorem which says that helicity is the conserved quantity associated with the duality symmetry of the vacuum Maxwell equations is proved by viewing electromagnetism as an infinite dimensional symplectic system. In fact, it is shown that helicity is the moment map of duality acting as an SO (2) group of canonical transformations on the symplectic space of all solutions of the vacuum Maxwell equations.

  15. Microscopic Structure of a Vortex Line in a Dilute Superfluid Fermi Gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Nicolai; Bruun, G. M.; Clark, C. W.;

    2003-01-01

    The microscopic properties of a single vortex in a dilute superfluid Fermi gas at zero temperature are examined within the framework of self-consistent Bogoliubov–de Gennes theory. Using only physical parameters as input, we study the pair potential, the density, the energy, and the current...

  16. Modelling of asteroid formation in planetary vortex and calculation its orbital parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Klychinska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of planetary vortex as the initial state of creation of the star systems is used to the study of conditions of formation of asteroids and calculation its orbital parameters. In application to Main asteroid belt of the Solar system the kind coincidence of theoretical and experimental data is got.

  17. Rotor Wake Vortex Definition Using 3C-PIV Measurements: Corrected for Vortex Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Casey L.; Brooks, Thomas F.; vanderWall, Berend; Richard, Hughues Richard; Raffel, Markus; Beaumier, Philippe; Delrieux, Yves; Lim, Joon W.; Yu, Yung H.; Tung, Chee

    2003-01-01

    Three-component (3-C) particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements, within the wake across a rotor disk plane, are used to determine wake vortex definitions important for BVI (Blade Vortex Interaction) and broadband noise prediction. This study is part of the HART II test program conducted using a 40 percent scale BO-105 helicopter main rotor in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW). In this paper, measurements are presented of the wake vortex field over the advancing side of the rotor operating at a typical descent landing condition. The orientations of the vortex (tube) axes are found to have non-zero tilt angles with respect to the chosen PIV measurement cut planes, often on the order of 45 degrees. Methods for determining the orientation of the vortex axis and reorienting the measured PIV velocity maps (by rotation/projection) are presented. One method utilizes the vortex core axial velocity component, the other utilizes the swirl velocity components. Key vortex parameters such as vortex core size, strength, and core velocity distribution characteristics are determined from the reoriented PIV velocity maps. The results are compared with those determined from velocity maps that are not corrected for orientation. Knowledge of magnitudes and directions of the vortex axial and swirl velocity components as a function of streamwise location provide a basis for insight into the vortex evolution.

  18. The method to control the submarine horseshoe vortex by breaking the vortex core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhi-hua; XIONG Ying; TU Cheng-xu

    2014-01-01

    The quality of the inflow across the propeller is closely related with the hydrodynamic performance and the noise characteristics of the propeller. For a submarine, with a horseshoe vortex generated at the junction of the main body and the appendages, the submarine wake is dominated by a kind of highly non-uniform flow field, which has an adverse effect on the performance of the submarine propeller. In order to control the horseshoe vortex and improve the quality of the submarine wake, the flow field around a submarine model is simulated by the detached eddies simulation (DES) method, and the vortex configuration is displayed using the second invariant of the velocity derivative tensor. The state and the transition process of the horseshoe vortex are analyzed, then a modified method to break the vortex core by a vortex baffle is proposed. The flow numerical simulation is carried out to study the effect of this method. Numerical simulations show that, with the breakdown of the vortex core, many unstable vortices are shed and the energy of the horseshoe vortex is dissipated quickly, and the uniformity of the submarine wake is improved. The submarine wake test in a wind tunnel has verified the effect of the method to control the horseshoe vortex. The vortex baffle can improve the wake uniformity in cases of high Reynolds numbers as well, and it does not have adverse effects on the maneuverability and the speed ability of the submarine.

  19. Analysis of an idealized body-vortex systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Johan Rønby; Aref, Hassan

    2008-01-01

    We explore the class of dynamical systems consisting of a body, N point vortices, and one or more passive particles in an ideal, unbounded, planar fluid. The body is represented by a closed curve and is free to move in response to the fluid motion. The vortices have fixed strengths and are intended...... in hand. They can be analyzed using techniques from the theory of dynamical systems with a finite number of degrees of freedom. The simplest such system, a single point vortex and a circular body, is integrable. If we add vortices, or change other features of the system such as the body shape, the motion...

  20. Intrahepatic arterioportal shunt: helical CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiroga, S.; Sebastia, M.C.; Moreiras, M.; Pallisa, E.; Rius, J.M.; Alvarez-Castells, A. [I. D. I. Hospital General i Universitari Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain). Servei de Radiodiagnostic

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the appearance of intrahepatic arterioportal shunts (APS) on two-phase helical CT, with emphasis on the importance of the hepatic arterial-dominant phase (HAP) to demonstrate perfusion disorders. We review eight cases of APS diagnosed by helical CT in our institution from January 1996 to March 1997 and describe the CT findings that established diagnosis. Five of them were confirmed by angiography. In seven (87.5 %) cases of APS we found early enhancement of the peripheral portal branches during the HAP of helical CT, whereas the superior mesenteric and splenic veins remained unenhanced. In five (62.5 %) cases of APS, transient, peripheral, triangular parenchymal enhancement was depicted during the HAP of helical CT; in four of these cases there was associated early enhancement of the portal branches. Helical CT can show perfusion alterations that might remain undiagnosed with conventional CT. An understanding of the hemodynamic changes that occur in APS can help in the interpretation of focal transient hepatic parenchymal enhancement and to differentiate APS from hypervascular tumors. We believe that the helical CT findings described herein are characteristic enough to suggest the diagnosis of APS. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 16 refs.

  1. The AGS with four helical magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoupas, N.; Huang, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.

    2010-02-25

    The idea of using multiple partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron, to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. This modification provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets. First, it provides a larger 'spin tune gap' for the placement of the vertical betatron tune of the AGS during acceleration, second, the vertical spin direction during the beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, third, the symmetric placement of the snakes allows for a better control of the AGS optics, and for reduced values of the beta and eta functions, especially near injection, fourth, the optical properties of the helical magnets also favor the placement of the horizontal betatron tune in the 'spin tune gap', thus eliminating the horizontal spin resonances. In this paper we provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and we compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.

  2. Computational design and characterization of a monomeric helical dinuclear metalloprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Jennifer R; Kono, Hidetoshi; Lahr, Steven; Wang, Wei; DeGrado, William F; Saven, Jeffery G

    2003-12-12

    The de novo design of di-iron proteins is an important step towards understanding the diversity of function among this complex family of metalloenzymes. Previous designs of due ferro (DF) proteins have resulted in tetrameric and dimeric four-helix bundles having crystallographically well-defined structures and active-site geometries. Here, the design and characterization of DFsc, a 114 residue monomeric four-helix bundle, is presented. The backbone was modeled using previous oligomeric structures and appropriate inter-helical turns. The identities of 26 residues were predetermined, including the primary and secondary ligands in the active site, residues involved in active site accessibility, and the gamma beta gamma beta turn between helices 2 and 3. The remaining 88 amino acid residues were determined using statistical computer aided design, which is based upon a recent statistical theory of protein sequences. Rather than sampling sequences, the theory directly provides the site-specific amino acid probabilities, which are then used to guide sequence design. The resulting sequence (DFsc) expresses well in Escherichia coli and is highly soluble. Sedimentation studies confirm that the protein is monomeric in solution. Circular dichroism spectra are consistent with the helical content of the target structure. The protein is structured in both the apo and the holo forms, with the metal-bound form exhibiting increased stability. DFsc stoichiometrically binds a variety of divalent metal ions, including Zn(II), Co(II), Fe(II), and Mn(II), with micromolar affinities. 15N HSQC NMR spectra of both the apo and Zn(II) proteins reveal excellent dispersion with evidence of a significant structural change upon metal binding. DFsc is then a realization of complete de novo design, where backbone structure, activity, and sequence are specified in the design process.

  3. Dielectric saturation of the ion hydration shell and interaction between two double helices of DNA in mono- and multivalent electrolyte solutions: foundations of the epsilon-modified Poisson-Boltzmann theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavryushov, Sergei

    2007-05-17

    Potentials of mean force between single Na+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ cations and a highly charged spherical macroion in SPC/E water have been determined using molecular dynamics simulations. Results are compared to the electrostatic energy calculations for the primitive polarization model (PPM) of hydrated cations describing the ion hydration shell as a dielectric sphere of low permittivity (Gavryushov, S.; Linse, P. J. Phys. Chem. B 2003, 107, 7135). Parameters of the ion dielectric sphere and radius of the macroion/water dielectric boundary were extracted by means of this comparison to approximate the short-range repulsion of ions near the interface. To explore the counterion distributions around a simplified model of DNA, the obtained PPM parameters for Na+ and Ca2+ have been substituted into the modified Poisson-Boltzmann (MPB) equations derived for the PPM and named the epsilon-MPB (epsilon-MPB) theory. epsilon-MPB results for DNA suggest that such polarization effects are important in the case of 2:1 electrolyte and highly charged macromolecules. The three-dimensional implementation of the epsilon-MPB theory was also applied to calculation of the energies of interaction between two parallel macromolecules of DNA in solutions of NaCl and CaCl2. Being compared to results of MPB calculations without the ion polarization effects, it suggests that the ion hydration shell polarization and inhomogeneous solvent permittivity might be essential factors in the experimentally known hydration forces acting between charged macromolecules and bilayers at separations of less than 20 A between their surfaces.

  4. Alternative Methods for Field Corrections in Helical Solenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, M. L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Krave, S. T. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Tompkins, J. C. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yonehara, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Flanagan, G. [Muons Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Kahn, S. A. [Muons Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Melconian, K. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Helical cooling channels have been proposed for highly efficient 6D muon cooling. Helical solenoids produce solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical gradient field components. Previous studies explored the geometric tunability limits on these main field components. In this paper we present two alternative correction schemes, tilting the solenoids and the addition of helical lines, to reduce the required strength of the anti-solenoid and add an additional tuning knob.

  5. Evolution of the vortex state in the BCS-BEC crossover of a quasi two-dimensional superfluid Fermi gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xuebing; Zhou, Kezhao; Zhang, Zhidong

    2016-11-01

    We use the path-integral formalism to investigate the vortex properties of a quasi-two dimensional (2D) Fermi superfluid system trapped in an optical lattice potential. Within the framework of mean-field theory, the cooper pair density, the atom number density, and the vortex core size are calculated from weakly interacting BCS regime to strongly coupled while weakly interacting BEC regime. Numerical results show that the atoms gradually penetrate into the vortex core as the system evolves from BEC to BCS regime. Meanwhile, the presence of the optical lattice allows us to analyze the vortex properties in the crossover from three-dimensional (3D) to 2D case. Furthermore, using a simple re-normalization procedure, we find that the two-body bound state exists only when the interaction is stronger than a critical one denoted by G c which is obtained as a function of the lattice potential’s parameter. Finally, we investigate the vortex core size and find that it grows with increasing interaction strength. In particular, by analyzing the behavior of the vortex core size in both BCS and BEC regimes, we find that the vortex core size behaves quite differently for positive and negative chemical potentials. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51331006, 51590883, and 11204321) and the Project of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KJZD-EW-M05-3).

  6. Microscale vortex laser with controlled topological charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing-Yuan; Chen, Hua-Zhou; Li, Ying; Li, Bo; Ma, Ren-Min

    2016-12-01

    A microscale vortex laser is a new type of coherent light source with small footprint that can directly generate vector vortex beams. However, a microscale laser with controlled topological charge, which is crucial for virtually any of its application, is still unrevealed. Here we present a microscale vortex laser with controlled topological charge. The vortex laser eigenmode was synthesized in a metamaterial engineered non-Hermitian micro-ring cavity system at exceptional point. We also show that the vortex laser cavity can operate at exceptional point stably to lase under optical pumping. The microscale vortex laser with controlled topological charge can serve as a unique and general building block for next-generation photonic integrated circuits and coherent vortex beam sources. The method we used here can be employed to generate lasing eigenmode with other complex functionalities. Project supported by the “Youth 1000 Talent Plan” Fund, Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 201421) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11574012 and 61521004).

  7. Nonlinear ion acoustic waves scattered by vortexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yuji; Yoshida, Zensho

    2016-09-01

    The Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) hierarchy is the archetype of infinite-dimensional integrable systems, which describes nonlinear ion acoustic waves in two-dimensional space. This remarkably ordered system resides on a singular submanifold (leaf) embedded in a larger phase space of more general ion acoustic waves (low-frequency electrostatic perturbations). The KP hierarchy is characterized not only by small amplitudes but also by irrotational (zero-vorticity) velocity fields. In fact, the KP equation is derived by eliminating vorticity at every order of the reductive perturbation. Here, we modify the scaling of the velocity field so as to introduce a vortex term. The newly derived system of equations consists of a generalized three-dimensional KP equation and a two-dimensional vortex equation. The former describes 'scattering' of vortex-free waves by ambient vortexes that are determined by the latter. We say that the vortexes are 'ambient' because they do not receive reciprocal reactions from the waves (i.e., the vortex equation is independent of the wave fields). This model describes a minimal departure from the integrable KP system. By the Painlevé test, we delineate how the vorticity term violates integrability, bringing about an essential three-dimensionality to the solutions. By numerical simulation, we show how the solitons are scattered by vortexes and become chaotic.

  8. A VORTEX MODEL OF A HELICOPTER ROTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin BUTOESCU

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A vortex model of a helicopter rotor is presented. Each blade of the rotor has three degrees of freedom: flapping, lagging and feathering. The motions after each degree of freedom are also known for all blades. The blade is modelled as a thin vortex surface. The wakes are free fluid surfaces. A system of five equations are obtained: the first one is the integral equation of the lifting surface (rotor, the next three describe the wakes motion, and the last one relates the vortex strength on the wakes and the variation of vorticity on the rotor. A numerical solution of this system is presented. To avoid the singularities that can occur due to the complexity of vortex system, a desingularized model of the vortex core was adopted. A Mathcad worksheet containing the method has been written.The original contribution of the work. The calculation method of the motion of the wakes free vortex system, the development of the vortex cores in time and a new method to approximate the aerodynamic influence of remoted wake regions.

  9. Studies on positive conveying in helically channeled single screw extruders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A solids conveying theory called double-flight driving theory was proposed for helically channeled single screw extruders. In the extruder, screw channel rotates against static barrel channel, which behaves as cooperative embedded twin-screws for the positive conveying. They turn as two parallel arc plates, between which an arc-plate solid-plug was assumed. By analyzing the forces on the solid-plug in the barrel channel and screw channel, the boundary conditions when the solid-plug is waived of being cut off on barrel wall, were found to have the capacity of the positive conveying. Experimental data were obtained using a specially designed extruder with a helically channeled barrel in the feeding zone and a pressure-adjustable die. The effects of the barrel channel geometry and friction coefficients on the conveying mechanism were presented and compared with the experimental results. The simulations showed that the positive conveying could be achieved after optimizing extruder designs. Compared with the traditional design with the friction-drag conveying, the throughput is higher while screw torque and energy consumption are decreased. Besides, the design criteria of the barrel channel were also discussed.

  10. Imaging of vortex chains in Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolocan, V.O.; Veauvy, C.; Liu, Y.; Servant, F.; Lejay, P.; Mailly, D.; Hasselbach, K

    2004-05-01

    Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} is an unconventional superconductor with a superconducting transition temperature of {approx}1.5 K. The formation of vortex chains in Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} is observed, they have been directly imaged by {mu}SQUID force microscopy at low temperature. Ginzburg-Landau theory for anisotropic superconductors is in qualitative agreement with the observed dependencies of the vortex chains on the variation of the tilting angle or the amplitude of the external magnetic field.

  11. N-S Simulations of Crow-Type Instabilities in Vortex Wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Z. C.; Baek, K.

    1999-01-01

    Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes simulations of the Crow instability of wake vortices are conducted using large-eddy simulations without background turbulence. Sinusoidal displacement has been specified as the initial perturbation for the vortex system. The results have shown that the minimum Crow instability wavelength is about one vortex spacing shorter than predicted by Crow's linear stability theory. The planar- standing-wave-angle value and the amplitude indifference behavior agree with Crow's analysis. Simulations with periodicity in the axial direction have indicated minor influence of axial flow on the Crow instability.

  12. N-S Simulations of Crow-Type Instabilities in Vortex Wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Z. C.; Baek, K.

    1999-01-01

    Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes simulations of the Crow instability of wake vortices are conducted using large-eddy simulations without background turbulence. Sinusoidal displacement has been specified as the initial perturbation for the vortex system. The results have shown that the minimum Crow instability wavelength is about one vortex spacing shorter than predicted by Crow's linear stability theory. The planar- standing-wave-angle value and the amplitude indifference behavior agree with Crow's analysis. Simulations with periodicity in the axial direction have indicated minor influence of axial flow on the Crow instability.

  13. Navier-Stokes calculations for vortex rings in an unbounded domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Katsuya; Kuwahara, Kunio; Liu, C. H.

    1993-01-01

    A computational code for the vorticity-potential method is developed for a three-dimensional bounded vorticity field. The evaluation of the boundary data for the vector potential in the code is improved so that the numerical solution simulates that in an unbounded domain to a high order. The time evolution of two vortex rings and that of an elliptic ring are investigated with this code. The cut-and-connect phenomena of vortex rings are successfully captured. The results are compared with those of asymptotic theory and the experiment. They also highlight the need for additional theoretical and numerical investigations.

  14. Helicity in proton-proton elastic scattering and the spin structure of the pomeron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewerz, Carlo; Lebiedowicz, Piotr; Nachtmann, Otto; Szczurek, Antoni

    2016-12-01

    We discuss different models for the spin structure of the nonperturbative pomeron: scalar, vector, and rank-2 symmetric tensor. The ratio of single-helicity-flip to helicity-conserving amplitudes in polarised high-energy proton-proton elastic scattering, known as the complex r5 parameter, is calculated for these models. We compare our results to experimental data from the STAR experiment. We show that the spin-0 (scalar) pomeron model is clearly excluded by the data, while the vector pomeron is inconsistent with the rules of quantum field theory. The tensor pomeron is found to be perfectly consistent with the STAR data.

  15. Self-Duality Helicity and Higher-Loop Euler-Heisenberg Effective Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Gerald V.; Schubert, Christian

    2004-10-01

    The Euler-Heisenberg effective action in a self-dual background is remarkably simple at two-loop. This simplicity is due to the inter-relationship between self-duality, helicity and supersymmetry. Applications include two-loop helicity amplitudes, beta-functions and nonperturbative effects. The two-loop Euler-Heisenberg effective Lagrangian for QED in a self-dual background field is naturally expressed in terms of one-loop quantities. This mirrors similar behavior recently found in two-loop amplitudes in N=4 SUSY Yang-Mills theory.

  16. Helicity in proton–proton elastic scattering and the spin structure of the pomeron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Ewerz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We discuss different models for the spin structure of the nonperturbative pomeron: scalar, vector, and rank-2 symmetric tensor. The ratio of single-helicity-flip to helicity-conserving amplitudes in polarised high-energy proton–proton elastic scattering, known as the complex r5 parameter, is calculated for these models. We compare our results to experimental data from the STAR experiment. We show that the spin-0 (scalar pomeron model is clearly excluded by the data, while the vector pomeron is inconsistent with the rules of quantum field theory. The tensor pomeron is found to be perfectly consistent with the STAR data.

  17. Helicity in Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering and the Spin Structure of the Pomeron

    CERN Document Server

    Ewerz, Carlo; Nachtmann, Otto; Szczurek, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    We discuss different models for the spin structure of the nonperturbative pomeron: scalar, vector, and rank-2 symmetric tensor. The ratio of single-helicity-flip to helicity-conserving amplitudes in polarised high-energy proton-proton elastic scattering, known as the complex r_5 parameter, is calculated for these models. We compare our results to experimental data from the STAR experiment. We show that the spin-0 (scalar) pomeron model is clearly excluded by the data, while the vector pomeron is inconsistent with the rules of quantum field theory. The tensor pomeron is found to be perfectly consistent with the STAR data.

  18. Contrasting vortex-gyration dispersions for different lattice bases in one-dimensional magnetic vortex arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong-Soo; Jeong, Han-Byeol; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2013-09-01

    We performed micromagnetic numerical and analytical calculations in studying the effects of change in the primitive unit cells of one-dimensional (1D) vortex arrays on collective vortex-gyration dispersion. As the primitive basis, we consider alternating constituent materials (NiMnSb vs. Permalloy) and alternating dimensions including constituent disk diameter and thickness. In the simplest case, that of one vortex-state disk of given dimensions and single material in the primitive cell, only a single branch of collective vortex-gyration dispersion appears. By contrast, two constituent disks' different alternating materials, thicknesses, and diameters yield characteristic two-branch dispersions, the band widths and gaps of which differ in each case. This work offers not only an efficient means of manipulating collective vortex-gyration band structures but also a foundation for the development of a rich variety of 1D or 2D magnonic crystals and their band structures based on dipolar-coupled-vortex arrays.

  19. Evaluation of travelling vortex speed by means of vortex tracking and dynamic mode decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyhlík, Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    The article deals with the analysis of unsteady periodic flow field related to synthetic jet creation. The analyses are based on the data obtained using ANSYS Fluent solver. Numerical results are validated by hot wire anemometry data measured along the jet centerline. The speed of travelling vortex ring is evaluated by using vortex tracking method and by using dynamic mode decomposition method. Vortex identification is based on residual vorticity which allows identifying regions in the flow field where fluid particles perform the rotational motion. The regime of the synthetic jet with Re = 329 and S = 19.7 is chosen. Both the vortex tracking and the dynamic mode decomposition based vortex speed evaluation indicate an increase in the vortex speed close to the orifice and then decrease with maximum reaching almost one and half of orifice centerline velocity. The article contains extended version the article presented at the conference AEaNMiFMaE 2016.

  20. Phase diagrams of vortex matter with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions in layered superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingyou; Varney, Christopher N.; Fangohr, Hans; Babaev, Egor

    2017-01-01

    It was recently proposed to use the stray magnetic fields of superconducting vortex lattices to trap ultracold atoms for building quantum emulators. This calls for new methods for engineering and manipulating of the vortex states. One of the possible routes utilizes type-1.5 superconducting layered systems with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions. In order to explore the possible vortex states that can be engineered, we present two phase diagrams of phenomenological vortex matter models with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions featuring several attractive and repulsive length scales. The phase diagrams exhibit a plethora of phases, including conventional 2D lattice phases, five stripe phases, dimer, trimer, and tetramer phases, void phases, and stable low-temperature disordered phases. The transitions between these states can be controlled by the value of an applied external field.