WorldWideScience

Sample records for helical tomotherapy intensity-modulated

  1. Helical tomotherapy provides efficacy similar to that of intensity-modulated radiation therapy with dosimetric benefits for endometrial carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chen-Hsi; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Hsiao, Sheng-Mou; Wei, Ming-Chow; Wu, Wen-Yih; Sun, Hsu-Dong; Tien, Hui-Ju; Wang, Li-Ying; Hsieh, Yen-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy for endometrial cancer. Methods Between November 1, 2006 and November 31, 2010, 31 patients with histologically confirmed endometrial cancer were enrolled. All enrolled patients received total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with adjuvant whole pelvic IMRT or helical tomotherapy. Results The actuarial 3-year overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free rates for the IMRT and helical tomotherapy groups were 87.5% versus 100%, 91.7% versus 51.7%, 91.7% versus 83.3%, and 91.7% versus 51.7%, respectively. The conformal index and uniformity index for IMRT versus helical tomotherapy was 1.25 versus 1.17 (P = 0.04) and 1.08 versus 1.05 (P < 0.01), respectively. Two of 31 patients with cervical stump failure were noted, one in the IMRT group and the other in the helical tomotherapy group. No acute or late grade 3 or 4 toxicities were noted, including proctitis, or genitourinary or gastrointestinal disturbances. Conclusion Helical tomotherapy is as effective as IMRT and has better uniformity and conformal indices, and critical organ-sparing properties. Prospective clinical trials are needed to evaluate the comparative efficacy of IMRT versus helical tomotherapy. PMID:23055750

  2. Helical tomotherapy provides efficacy similar to that of intensity-modulated radiation therapy with dosimetric benefits for endometrial carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh CH

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Chen-Hsi Hsieh,1,4–6 Pei-Wei Shueng,1,3 Sheng-Mou Hsiao,2 Ming-Chow Wei,2 Wen-Yih Wu,2 Hsu-Dong Sun,2 Hui-Ju Tien,1 Li-Ying Wang,7 Yen-Ping Hsieh81Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, 3Department of Radiation Oncology, National Defense Medical Center, 4Department of Medicine, 5Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, 6Oriental Institute of Technology, New Taipei City, 7School and Graduate Institute of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 8Department of Senior Citizen Service Management, National Taichung University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan, ChinaBackground: The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and helical tomotherapy for endometrial cancer.Methods: Between November 1, 2006 and November 31, 2010, 31 patients with histologically confirmed endometrial cancer were enrolled. All enrolled patients received total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with adjuvant whole pelvic IMRT or helical tomotherapy.Results: The actuarial 3-year overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free rates for the IMRT and helical tomotherapy groups were 87.5% versus 100%, 91.7% versus 51.7%, 91.7% versus 83.3%, and 91.7% versus 51.7%, respectively. The conformal index and uniformity index for IMRT versus helical tomotherapy was 1.25 versus 1.17 (P = 0.04 and 1.08 versus 1.05 (P < 0.01, respectively. Two of 31 patients with cervical stump failure were noted, one in the IMRT group and the other in the helical tomotherapy group. No acute or late grade 3 or 4 toxicities were noted, including proctitis, or genitourinary or gastrointestinal disturbances.Conclusion: Helical tomotherapy is as effective as IMRT and has better uniformity and

  3. Comparison of coplanar and noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy and helical tomotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai Hung-Chi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare the differences in dose-volume data among coplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, noncoplanar IMRT, and helical tomotherapy (HT among patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and portal vein thrombosis (PVT. Methods Nine patients with unresectable HCC and PVT underwent step and shoot coplanar IMRT with intent to deliver 46 - 54 Gy to the tumor and portal vein. The volume of liver received 30Gy was set to keep less than 30% of whole normal liver (V30 Results HT provided better uniformity for the planning-target volume dose coverage than both IMRT techniques. The noncoplanar IMRT technique reduces the V10 to normal liver with a statistically significant level as compared to HT. The constraints for the liver in the V30 for coplanar IMRT vs. noncoplanar IMRT vs. HT could be reconsidered as 21% vs. 17% vs. 17%, respectively. When delivering 50 Gy and 60-66 Gy to the tumor bed, the constraints of mean dose to the normal liver could be less than 20 Gy and 25 Gy, respectively. Conclusion Noncoplanar IMRT and HT are potential techniques of radiation therapy for HCC patients with PVT. Constraints for the liver in IMRT and HT could be stricter than for 3DCRT.

  4. Helical tomotherapy based intensity modulated radiotherapy for the management of difficult clinical situations in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Saha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helical tomotherapy (HT can achieve a homogenous dose distribution in the planning target volume while minimizing the dose to the organ at risk. Tomotherapy has been used for complex breast cancer radiotherapy including bilateral breast irradiation, pectus excavatum, and internal mammary chain (IMC nodal irradiation. This report details our experience of using HT in breast cancers in newer clinical indications. Three patients with SCF nodal involvement (case 1, high level III axillary node recurrence (case 2, and composite irradiation of SCF, IMC, and whole breast (case 3 were treated using brachial plexus sparing HT. It was possible to boost the SCF, reirradiate the high level III axillary nodal recurrence and treat complex volume of breast, SCF, and IMC with acceptable and safe dose volume histogram constraints and with good homogeneity and conformity indices. The treatment was successful in controlling disease locoregionally at a 15 months follow-up. No patients reported symptoms suggestive of brachial plexopathy

  5. Dosimetric comparison between helical tomotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans for non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Ling-ling; FENG Lin-chun; WANG Yun-lai; DAI Xiang-kun; XIE Chuan-bin

    2011-01-01

    Background Helical tomotherapy (HT) is a new image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique.It is reported that HT plan for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can give better dose uniformity, dose gradients, and protection for the lung than IMRT plan. We compared the dosimetric characteristics of HT for NSCLC with those of conventional IMRT to observe the superiority of HT.Methods There was a comparative case series comprising 10 patients with NSCLC. Computed tomographic (CT) images of delineated targets were transferred to the PrecisePlan planning system (IMRT) and Tomo planning system (HT). The prescription doses were 70 Gy/33F for the gross tumor volume (GTV) and the visible lymph nodes (GTVnd),and 60 Gy/33F for the clinical target volume (CTV) and the clinical target volume of the visible lymph nodes (CTVnd). The dose restrictions for organs at risk were as follows: the maximum dose to spinal cord ≤45 Gy, V20 to the total lungs <30%,V50 to the heart <50%, and V55 to the esophagus <50%. Both plans were evaluated by means of the dose coverage of the targets, dose-volume histograms (DVHs), and other dosimetric indices.Results The dose coverage, conformity, and homogeneity of the targets' volumes were found to be satisfactory in both plans, but the homogeneity of the HT plan was better than that of IMRT. The high-dose radiation volume (V20-V30) to the lung and the mean lung dose (MLD) decreased (P<0.05), but the low-dose radiation volume (V5-V10) increased slightly in the HT plan (P>0.05). The maximum doses to the spinal cord, heart, esophagus and trachea in the HT plan were lower than those in the IMRT plan, but the differences were not statistically significant.Conclusions The HT plan provids better dose uniformity, dose gradients, and protectiqn for the organs at risk. It can reduce the high-dose radiation volume for lung and the MLD, but may deliver a larger lung volume of low-dose radiation.

  6. Dosimetric Evaluation of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy, and Helical Tomotherapy for Hippocampal-Avoidance Whole Brain Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Yi; Evans, Josh; Xu-Welliver, Meng; Pickett, Cadron; Jia, Guang; Chen, Quan; Zuo, Li

    2015-01-01

    Background Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is a vital tool in radiation oncology and beyond, but it can result in adverse health effects such as neurocognitive decline. Hippocampal Avoidance WBRT (HA-WBRT) is a strategy that aims to mitigate the neuro-cognitive side effects of whole brain radiotherapy treatment by sparing the hippocampi while delivering the prescribed dose to the rest of the brain. Several competing modalities capable of delivering HA-WBRT, include: Philips Pinnacle step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), Varian RapidArc volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc), and helical TomoTherapy (TomoTherapy). Methods In this study we compared these methods using 10 patient datasets. Anonymized planning CT (computerized tomography) scans and contour data based on fused MRI images were collected. Three independent planners generated treatment plans for the patients using three modalities, respectively. All treatment plans met the RTOG 0933 criteria for HA-WBRT treatment. Results In dosimetric comparisons between the three modalities, TomoTherapy has a significantly superior homogeneity index of 0.15 ± 0.03 compared to the other two modalities (0.28 ± .04, p delivery time of 2.5 min compared to the other modalities (15 min for IMRT and 18 min for TomoTherapy). Conclusion TomoTherapy is considered to be the preferred modality for HA-WBRT due to its superior dose distribution. When TomoTherapy is not available or treatment time is a concern, RapidArc can provide sufficient dose distribution meeting RTOG criteria and efficient treatment delivery. PMID:25894615

  7. Radiobiologic comparison of helical tomotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and conformal radiotherapy in treating lung cancer accounting for secondary malignancy risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komisopoulos, Georgios [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Mavroidis, Panayiotis, E-mail: mavroidis@uthscsa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Rodriguez, Salvador; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Nikiforidis, Georgios C.; Sakellaropoulos, Georgios C. [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Patras, Patras (Greece)

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the importance of using measures to predict the risk of inducing secondary malignancies in association with the clinical effectiveness of treatment plans in terms of tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities. This is achieved by using radiobiologic parameters and measures, which may provide a closer association between clinical outcome and treatment delivery. Overall, 4 patients having been treated for lung cancer were examined. For each of them, 3 treatment plans were developed based on the helical tomotherapy (HT), multileaf collimator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT) modalities. The different plans were evaluated using the complication-free tumor control probability (p{sub +}), the overall probability of injury (p{sub I}), the overall probability of control/benefit (p{sub B}), and the biologically effective uniform dose (D{sup ¯¯}). These radiobiologic measures were used to develop dose-response curves (p-D{sup ¯¯} diagram), which can help to evaluate different treatment plans when used in conjunction with standard dosimetric criteria. The risks for secondary malignancies in the heart and the contralateral lung were calculated for the 3 radiation modalities based on the corresponding dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient. Regarding the overall evaluation of the different radiation modalities based on the p{sub +} index, the average values of the HT, IMRT, and CRT are 67.3%, 61.2%, and 68.2%, respectively. The corresponding average values of p{sub B} are 75.6%, 70.5%, and 71.0%, respectively, whereas the average values of p{sub I} are 8.3%, 9.3%, and 2.8%, respectively. Among the organs at risk (OARs), lungs show the highest probabilities for complications, which are 7.1%, 8.0%, and 1.3% for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities, respectively. Similarly, the biologically effective prescription doses (D{sub B}{sup ¯¯}) for the

  8. Image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy with helical tomotherapy for postoperative treatment of high-risk oral cavity cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yu-Jen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to assess the treatment results and toxicity profiles of helical tomotherapy (HT for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer. Methods From December 6, 2006 through October 9, 2009, 19 postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients were enrolled. All of the patients received HT with (84% or without (16% chemotherapy. Results The median follow-up time was 17 months. The 2-year overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free rates were 94%, 84%, 92%, and 94%, respectively. The package of overall treatment time > 13 wk, the interval between surgery and radiation ≤ 6 wk, and the overall treatment time of radiation ≤ 7 wk was 21%, 84%, and 79%, respectively. The percentage of grade 3 mucositis, dermatitis, and leucopenia was 42%, 5% and 5%, respectively. Conclusions HT achieved encouraging clinical outcomes for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients with high compliance. A long-term follow-up study is needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

  9. Re-irradiation of unresectable recurrent head and neck cancer: using Helical Tomotherapy as image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Songmi; Yoo, Eun Jung; Kim, Ji Yoon; Han, Chi Wha; Kim, Ki Jun; Kay, Chul Seung [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Re-irradiation (re-RT) is considered a treatment option for inoperable locoregionally recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC) after prior radiotherapy. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of re-RT using Helical Tomotherapy as image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy in recurrent HNC. Patients diagnosed with recurrent HNC and received re-RT were retrospectively reviewed. Primary endpoint was overall survival (OS) and secondary endpoints were locoregional control and toxicities. The median follow-up period of total 9 patients was 18.7 months (range, 4.1 to 76 months) and that of 3 alive patients was 49 months (range, 47 to 76 months). Median dose of first radiotherapy and re-RT was 64.8 and 47.5 Gy10. Median cumulative dose of the two courses of radiotherapy was 116.3 Gy10 (range, 91.8 to 128.9 Gy10) while the median interval between the two courses of radiation was 25 months (range, 4 to 137 months). The response rate after re-RT of the evaluated 8 patients was 75% (complete response, 4; partial response, 2). Median locoregional relapse-free survival after re-RT was 11.9 months (range, 3.4 to 75.1 months) and 5 patients eventually presented with treatment failure (in-field failure, 2; in- and out-field failure, 2; out-field failure, 1). Median OS of the 8 patients was 20.3 months (range, 4.1 to 75.1 months). One- and two-year OS rates were 62.5% and 50%, respectively. Grade 3 leucopenia developed in one patient as acute toxicity, and grade 2 osteonecrosis and trismus as chronic toxicity in another patient. Re-RT using Helical Tomotherapy for previously irradiated patients with unresectable locoregionally recurrent HNC may be a feasible treatment option with long-term survival and acceptable toxicities.

  10. Treatment verification of helical tomotherapy intensity modulated radiation therapy%螺旋断层放疗系统调强放疗验证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐寿平; 邓小武; 戴相昆; 王连元; 解传滨; 葛瑞刚; 沙翔燕

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical feasibility of quality assurance of helical tomotherapy intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) through a series of clinical case studies. Methods Tomotherapy planning system was used to provide optimized IMRT treatment plans. To verify the dose of IMRT plans,the cylindrical Virtual Water phantom,0.056cm3 AISL, ion chamber and EDR2 film were used for getting the absolute and relative doses from tomotherapy IMRT planning. The film and ion chamber were placed into the phantom. The doses of the interesting points and isodose distribution of the axial plane were measured,then the results were compared with those from the calculation in planning system for verification. Before the irradiation,kVCT images of the phantom were registered by tomotherapy MVCT images. So the setup of phantom was guided for verifying the position. Results The isedose distribution (on the axial plane) measured by the film was well consistent with that calculated by tomotherapy planning system. The error between the measured dose and predicted dose in the measured points was less than 3%. The setup error of the phantom was able to be kept within 1 mm. There was 2 mm offset along the vertical direction of couch from the virtual isocenter to beam isocenter,which should be considered during the phantom/patient setup. Conclusions The procedures for quality assurance of tomotherapy IMRT are feasible in our experience. And helical tomotherapy IMRT QA system has been constituted.%目的 通过螺旋断层放疗系统一系列调强放疗验证方法的研究,探讨其调强放疗的质量保证验证方法是否可行.方法 采用断层放疗计划系统进行调强放疗计划设计.为实现其剂量验证,笔者采用圆柱形固体水模体、0.056cm3 AISL电离室及EDR2胶片来实现对计划进行绝对剂量及相对剂量验证.将剂最胶片和电离室分别置于模体中,调用患者治疗计划束流数据对模体进行模拟照射;由此得出

  11. Dosimetric comparison of postoperative whole pelvic radiotherapy for endometrial cancer using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruijie Yang; Weijuan Jiang; Junjie Wang [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Peking Univ. Third Hospital, Beijing (China)], E-mail: ruijyang@yahoo.com; Shouping Xu; Chuanbin Xie [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital of the People' s Liberation ArmyBeijing (China)

    2010-02-15

    Background. The use of Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and Helical tomotherapy (HT) is increasing in gynecological cancer patients. No published studies have performed a dosimetric evaluation of whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) using HT for postoperative endometrial cancer. The purpose of this study was to perform a direct dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), IMRT and HT plans for WPRT in postoperative endometrial cancer patients, and to evaluate the integral dose to organs at risk (OARs) and normal tissue. Material and methods. We selected ten patients with endometrial cancer undergoing postoperative WPRT. Plans for 3D-CRT, IMRT and HT were developed for each patient. All plans were normalized to deliver 50 Gy to 95% of the PTV. The dosimetry and integral dose to OARs and normal tissue were compared. The significance of differences was tested using a paired two-tailed Student t-test. Results. IMRT were superior to 3D-CRT in dose conformity (conformity index: 0.87 vs. 0.61, p 0.00) and integral dose to OARs and normal tissue, although a greater volume of normal tissue receiving dose below 10 Gy was observed. The results were similar in HT except that the integral dose to normal tissue increased slightly. Compared directly with IMRT, HT showed better dose homogeneity and lower integral dose to rectum and bladder, but the integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue slightly increased. Conclusions. In postoperative WPRT of endometrial cancer, IMRT and HT result in better conformity and lower integral dose to OARs compared with 3D-CRT. The integral dose to normal tissue did not increase significantly in IMRT, although a greater volume of normal tissue is irradiated to the dose below 10 Gy. HT further improves the dose homogeneity and integral dose to rectum and bladder, at the expense of a slightly higher integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue.

  12. Dosimetric comparison of postoperative whole pelvic radiotherapy for endometrial cancer using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruijie; Xu, Shouping; Jiang, Weijuan; Wang, Junjie; Xie, Chuanbin

    2010-01-01

    The use of Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and Helical tomotherapy (HT) is increasing in gynecological cancer patients. No published studies have performed a dosimetric evaluation of whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) using HT for postoperative endometrial cancer. The purpose of this study was to perform a direct dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), IMRT and HT plans for WPRT in postoperative endometrial cancer patients, and to evaluate the integral dose to organs at risk (OARs) and normal tissue. We selected ten patients with endometrial cancer undergoing postoperative WPRT. Plans for 3D-CRT, IMRT and HT were developed for each patient. All plans were normalized to deliver 50 Gy to 95% of the PTV. The dosimetry and integral dose to OARs and normal tissue were compared. The significance of differences was tested using a paired two-tailed Student t-test. IMRT were superior to 3D-CRT in dose conformity (conformity index: 0.87 vs. 0.61, p = 0.00) and integral dose to OARs and normal tissue, although a greater volume of normal tissue receiving dose below 10 Gy was observed. The results were similar in HT except that the integral dose to normal tissue increased slightly. Compared directly with IMRT, HT showed better dose homogeneity and lower integral dose to rectum and bladder, but the integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue slightly increased. In postoperative WPRT of endometrial cancer, IMRT and HT result in better conformity and lower integral dose to OARs compared with 3D-CRT. The integral dose to normal tissue did not increase significantly in IMRT, although a greater volume of normal tissue is irradiated to the dose below 10 Gy. HT further improves the dose homogeneity and integral dose to rectum and bladder, at the expense of a slightly higher integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue.

  13. Dosimetric comparison of postoperative whole pelvic radiotherapy for endometrial cancer using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruijie Yang; Weijuan Jiang; Junjie Wang (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Peking Univ. Third Hospital, Beijing (China)), E-mail: ruijyang@yahoo.com; Shouping Xu; Chuanbin Xie (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital of the People' s Liberation ArmyBeijing (China))

    2010-02-15

    Background. The use of Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and Helical tomotherapy (HT) is increasing in gynecological cancer patients. No published studies have performed a dosimetric evaluation of whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) using HT for postoperative endometrial cancer. The purpose of this study was to perform a direct dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), IMRT and HT plans for WPRT in postoperative endometrial cancer patients, and to evaluate the integral dose to organs at risk (OARs) and normal tissue. Material and methods. We selected ten patients with endometrial cancer undergoing postoperative WPRT. Plans for 3D-CRT, IMRT and HT were developed for each patient. All plans were normalized to deliver 50 Gy to 95% of the PTV. The dosimetry and integral dose to OARs and normal tissue were compared. The significance of differences was tested using a paired two-tailed Student t-test. Results. IMRT were superior to 3D-CRT in dose conformity (conformity index: 0.87 vs. 0.61, p 0.00) and integral dose to OARs and normal tissue, although a greater volume of normal tissue receiving dose below 10 Gy was observed. The results were similar in HT except that the integral dose to normal tissue increased slightly. Compared directly with IMRT, HT showed better dose homogeneity and lower integral dose to rectum and bladder, but the integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue slightly increased. Conclusions. In postoperative WPRT of endometrial cancer, IMRT and HT result in better conformity and lower integral dose to OARs compared with 3D-CRT. The integral dose to normal tissue did not increase significantly in IMRT, although a greater volume of normal tissue is irradiated to the dose below 10 Gy. HT further improves the dose homogeneity and integral dose to rectum and bladder, at the expense of a slightly higher integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue

  14. SmartArc-based volumetric modulated arc therapy for endometrial cancer: a dosimetric comparison with helical tomotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of using volumetric modulated arc therapy with SmartArc (VMAT-S) to achieve radiation delivery efficiency higher than that of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) when treating endometrial cancer, while maintaining plan quality. Methods Nine patients with endometrial cancer were retrospectively studied. Three plans per patient were generated for VMAT-S, IMRT and HT. The dose distributions for the planning target volume (PTV), organs at risk (OARs) and normal tissue were compared. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. Results The average homogeneity index was 1.06, 1.10 and 1.07 for the VMAT-S, IMRT and HT plans, respectively. The V40 for the rectum, bladder and pelvis bone decreased by 9.0%, 3.0% and 3.0%, respectively, in the VMAT-S plan relative to the IMRT plan. The target coverage and sparing of OARs were comparable between the VMAT-S and HT plans. The average MU was 823, 1105 and 8403 for VMAT-S, IMRT and HT, respectively; the average delivery time was 2.6, 8.6 and 9.5 minutes, respectively. Conclusions For endometrial cancer, the VMAT-S plan provided comparable quality with significantly shorter delivery time and fewer MUs than with the IMRT and HT plans. In addition, more homogeneous PTV coverage and superior sparing of OARs in the medium to high dose region were observed in the VMAT-S relative to the IMRT plan. PMID:24175929

  15. Superiority of helical tomotherapy on liver sparing and dose escalation in hepatocellular carcinoma: a comparison study of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qianqian; Wang, Renben; Zhu, Jian; Jin, Linzhi; Zhu, Kunli; Xu, Xiaoqing; Feng, Rui; Jiang, Shumei; Qi, Zhonghua; Yin, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose To compare the difference of liver sparing and dose escalation between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for hepatocellular carcinoma. Patients and methods Sixteen unresectable HCC patients were enrolled in this study. First, some evaluation factors of 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT plans were calculated with prescription dose at 50 Gy/25 fractions. Then, the doses were increased using HT or IMRT independently until either the plans reached 70 Gy or any normal tissue reached the dose limit according to quantitative analysis of normal tissue effects in the clinic criteria. Results The conformal index of 3DCRT was lower than that of IMRT (PV50% (fraction of normal liver treated to at least 50% of the isocenter dose) of the normal liver, there was a significant difference: 3DCRT > IMRT > HT (P<0.001). HT had a lower Dmean (mean dose) and V20 (Vn, the percentage of organ volume receiving ≥n Gy) of liver compared with 3DCRT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively) or IMRT (P=0.508 and P=0.007, respectively). Dmean of nontarget normal liver and V30 of liver were higher for 3DCRT than IMRT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively) or HT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively). Seven patients in IMRT (43.75%) and nine patients in HT (56.25%) reached the isodose 70 Gy, meeting the dose limit of the organs at risk. Conclusion HT may provide significantly better liver sparing and allow more patients to achieve higher prescription dose in HCC radiotherapy. PMID:27445485

  16. Shielding requirements in helical tomotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baechler, S.; Bochud, F. O.; Verellen, D.; Moeckli, R.

    2007-08-01

    Helical tomotherapy is a relatively new intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment for which room shielding has to be reassessed for the following reasons. The beam-on-time needed to deliver a given target dose is increased and leads to a weekly workload of typically one order of magnitude higher than that for conventional radiation therapy. The special configuration of tomotherapy units does not allow the use of standard shielding calculation methods. A conventional linear accelerator must be shielded for primary, leakage and scatter photon radiations. For tomotherapy, primary radiation is no longer the main shielding issue since a beam stop is mounted on the gantry directly opposite the source. On the other hand, due to the longer irradiation time, the accelerator head leakage becomes a major concern. An analytical model based on geometric considerations has been developed to determine leakage radiation levels throughout the room for continuous gantry rotation. Compared to leakage radiation, scatter radiation is a minor contribution. Since tomotherapy units operate at a nominal energy of 6 MV, neutron production is negligible. This work proposes a synthetic and conservative model for calculating shielding requirements for the Hi-Art II TomoTherapy unit. Finally, the required concrete shielding thickness is given for different positions of interest.

  17. Rapid Arc, helical tomotherapy, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy and three dimensional conformal radiation for localized prostate cancer: A dosimetric comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh A Kinhikar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the potential role of RapidArc (RA compared with helical tomotherapy (HT, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy (SW IMRT and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT for localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Prescription doses ranged from 60 Gy to planning target volume (PTV and 66.25 Gy for clinical target volume prostate (CTV-P over 25-30 fractions. PTV and CTV-P coverage were evaluated by conformity index (CI and homogeneity index (HI. Organ sparing comparison was done with mean doses to rectum and bladder. Results: CI 95 were 1.0 ± 0.01 (RA, 0.99 ± 0.01 (HT, 0.97 ± 0.02 (IMRT, 0.98 ± 0.02 (3D CRT for PTV and 1.0 ± 0.00 (RA, HT, SW IMRT and 3D CRT for CTV-P. HI was 0.11 ± 0.03 (RA, 0.16 ± 0.08 (HT, 0.12 ± 0.03 (IMRT, 0.06 ± 0.01 (3D CRT for PTV and 0.03 ± 0.00 (RA, 0.05 ± 0.01 (HT, 0.03 ± 0.01 (SW IMRT and 3D CRT for CTV-P. Mean dose to bladder were 23.68 ± 13.23 Gy (RA, 24.55 ± 12.51 Gy (HT, 19.82 ± 11.61 Gy (IMRT and 23.56 ± 12.81 Gy (3D CRT, whereas mean dose to rectum was 36.85 ± 12.92 Gy (RA, 33.18 ± 11.12 Gy (HT, IMRT and 38.67 ± 12.84 Gy (3D CRT. Conclusion: All studied intensity-modulated techniques yield treatment plans of significantly improved quality when compared with 3D CRT, with HT providing best organs at risk sparing and RA being the most efficient treatment option, reducing treatment time to 1.45-3.7 min and monitor unit to <400 for a 2 Gy fraction.

  18. Superiority of helical tomotherapy on liver sparing and dose escalation in hepatocellular carcinoma: a comparison study of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao QQ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Qianqian Zhao,1,2 Renben Wang,2 Jian Zhu,2 Linzhi Jin,1,2 Kunli Zhu,2 Xiaoqing Xu,2 Rui Feng,2 Shumei Jiang,2 Zhonghua Qi,1,2 Yong Yin2 1School of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Jinan-Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, People’s Republic of China Background and purpose: To compare the difference of liver sparing and dose escalation between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, and helical tomotherapy (HT for hepatocellular carcinoma.Patients and methods: Sixteen unresectable HCC patients were enrolled in this study. First, some evaluation factors of 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT plans were calculated with prescription dose at 50 Gy/25 fractions. Then, the doses were increased using HT or IMRT independently until either the plans reached 70 Gy or any normal tissue reached the dose limit according to quantitative analysis of normal tissue effects in the clinic criteria.Results: The conformal index of 3DCRT was lower than that of IMRT (P<0.001 or HT (P<0.001, and the homogeneity index of 3DCRT was higher than that of IMRT (P<0.001 or HT (P<0.001. HT took the longest treatment time (P<0.001. For V50% (fraction of normal liver treated to at least 50% of the isocenter dose of the normal liver, there was a significant difference: 3DCRT > IMRT > HT (P<0.001. HT had a lower Dmean (mean dose and V20 (Vn, the percentage of organ volume receiving ≥n Gy of liver compared with 3DCRT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively or IMRT (P=0.508 and P=0.007, respectively. Dmean of nontarget normal liver and V30 of liver were higher for 3DCRT than IMRT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively or HT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively. Seven patients in IMRT (43.75% and nine patients in HT (56.25% reached the isodose 70 Gy, meeting the dose limit of the organs at risk.Conclusion: HT may provide significantly better

  19. Which technique for radiation is most beneficial for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer? Intensity modulated proton therapy versus intensity modulated photon treatment, helical tomotherapy and volumetric arc therapy for primary radiation - an intraindividual comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marnitz, Simone; Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Neumann, Oliver; Koehler, Christhardt; Weihrauch, Mirko; Budach, Volker; Cozzi, Luca

    2015-04-17

    To compare highly sophisticated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivered by either helical tomotherapy (HT), RapidArc (RA), IMRT with protons (IMPT) in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer. Twenty cervical cancer patients were irradiated using either conventional IMRT, VMAT or HT; ten received pelvic (PEL) and ten extended field irradiation (EFRT). The dose to the planning-target volume A (PTV_A: cervix, uterus, pelvic ± para-aortic lymph nodes) was 1.8/50.4 Gy. The SIB dose for the parametrium (PTV_B), was 2.12/59.36 Gy. MRI-guided brachytherapy was administered with 5 fractions up to 25 Gy. For EBRT, the lower target constraints were 95% of the prescribed dose in 95% of the target volume. The irradiated small bowel (SB) volumes were kept as low as possible. For every patient, target parameters as well as doses to the organs at risk (SB, bladder, rectum) were evaluated intra-individually for IMRT, HT, VMAT and IMPT. All techniques provided excellent target volume coverage, homogeneity, conformity. With IMPT, there was a significant reduction of the mean dose (Dmean) of the SB from 30.2 ± 4.0 Gy (IMRT); 27.6 ± 5.6 Gy (HT); 34.1 ± 7.0 (RA) to 18.6 ± 5.9 Gy (IMPT) for pelvic radiation and 26.3 ± 3.2 Gy (IMRT); 24.0 ± 4.1 (HT); 25.3 ± 3.7 (RA) to 13.8 ± 2.8 Gy (IMPT) for patients with EFRT, which corresponds to a reduction of 38-52% for the Dmean (SB). Futhermore, the low dose bath (V10Gy) to the small bowel was reduced by 50% with IMPT in comparison to all photon techniques. Furthermore, Dmean to the bladder and rectum was decresed by 7-9 Gy with IMPT in patents with pelvic radiation and EFRT. All modern techniques (were proved to be dosimetrically adequate regarding coverage, conformity and homogeneity of the target. Protons offered the best sparing of small bowel and rectum and therefore could contribute to a significant reduction of acute and late toxicity in cervical cancer treatment.

  20. Encouraging Early Clinical Outcomes With Helical Tomotherapy-Based Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Residual, Recurrent, and/or Progressive Benign/Low-Grade Intracranial Tumors: A Comprehensive Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Tejpal, E-mail: tejpalgupta@rediffmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, ACTREC/TMH, Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai (India); Wadasadawala, Tabassum; Master, Zubin; Phurailatpam, Reena; Pai-Shetty, Rajershi; Jalali, Rakesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, ACTREC/TMH, Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai (India)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report early clinical outcomes of helical tomotherapy (HT)-based image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in brain tumors of varying shape, size, and location. Materials and Methods: Patients with residual, recurrent, and/or progressive low-grade intracranial and skull-base tumors were treated on a prospective protocol of HT-based IMRT and followed clinicoradiologically. Standardized metrics were used for plan evaluation and outcome analysis. Results: Twenty-seven patients with 30 lesions were treated to a median radiotherapy dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions. All HT plans resulted in excellent target volume coverage with steep dose-gradients. The mean (standard deviation) dose homogeneity index and conformity index was 0.07 (0.05) and 0.71 (0.08) respectively. At first response assessment, 20 of 30 lesions were stable, whereas 9 showed partial regression. One patient with a recurrent clival chordoma though neurologically stable showed imaging-defined progression, whereas another patient with stable disease on serial imaging had sustained neurologic worsening. With a median follow-up of 19 months (interquartile range, 11-26 months), the 2-year clinicoradiological progression-free survival and overall survival was 93.3% and 100% respectively. Conclusions: Careful selection of radiotherapy technique is warranted for benign/low-grade brain tumors to achieve durable local control with minimum long-term morbidity. Large or complex-shaped tumors benefit most from IMRT. Our early clinical experience of HT-based IMRT for brain tumors has been encouraging.

  1. Verification of helical tomotherapy delivery using autoassociative kernel regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Rebecca M; Ramsey, Chester R; Garvey, Dustin R; Hines, J Wesley; Robison, Ben H; Outten, Samuel S

    2007-08-01

    Quality assurance (QA) is a topic of major concern in the field of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The standard of practice for IMRT is to perform QA testing for individual patients to verify that the dose distribution will be delivered to the patient. The purpose of this study was to develop a new technique that could eventually be used to automatically evaluate helical tomotherapy treatments during delivery using exit detector data. This technique uses an autoassociative kernel regression (AAKR) model to detect errors in tomotherapy delivery. AAKR is a novel nonparametric model that is known to predict a group of correct sensor values when supplied a group of sensor values that is usually corrupted or contains faults such as machine failure. This modeling scheme is especially suited for the problem of monitoring the fluence values found in the exit detector data because it is able to learn the complex detector data relationships. This scheme still applies when detector data are summed over many frames with a low temporal resolution and a variable beam attenuation resulting from patient movement. Delivery sequences from three archived patients (prostate, lung, and head and neck) were used in this study. Each delivery sequence was modified by reducing the opening time for random individual multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves by random amounts. The errof and error-free treatments were delivered with different phantoms in the path of the beam. Multiple autoassociative kernel regression (AAKR) models were developed and tested by the investigators using combinations of the stored exit detector data sets from each delivery. The models proved robust and were able to predict the correct or error-free values for a projection, which had a single MLC leaf decrease its opening time by less than 10 msec. The model also was able to determine machine output errors. The average uncertainty value for the unfaulted projections ranged from 0.4% to 1.8% of the detector

  2. 宫颈癌术后螺旋断层放疗与常规加速器调强放疗的剂量学比较%Dosimetric comparison between helical tomotherapy and step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy for cervix carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张慧娟; 周桂霞; 戴相昆; 解传滨; 徐寿平; 鞠忠建; 巩汉顺

    2010-01-01

    目的 研究宫颈癌术后螺旋断层放疗(helical tomotherapy,HT)与常规静态调强放疗(IMRT)的剂量学特点.方法 采用10例宫颈癌术后患者CT图像,统一勾画靶区及危及器官(膀胱、直肠、小肠及双侧股骨头),分别传输至HT计划系统和IMRT计划系统,比较两组计划剂量体积直方图、适形度指数(CI)、均匀指数(HI)和危及器官所接受的照射剂量和体积,统一给予阴道残端60 Gy/25次,亚临床病灶50 Gy/25次,同时限定膀胱、直肠、小肠、股骨头等危及器官受照射剂量与体积.统一应用50 Gy处方剂量评价和比较CI和HI.结果 HT组适形指数(0.94±0.03)和均匀指数(1.28±0.02)均明显好于IMRT组(0.85±0.01和1.36±0.03)(t=5.12和-6.34,P<0.01);HT组PTV平均剂量为51.77 Gy显著低于IMRT组54.53 Gy(t=-8.01,P<0.05);HT组膀胱、直肠和小肠最大剂量、平均剂量、V30、V40和V50照射体积均显著低于IMRT组;HT组左、右侧股骨头最大剂量、平均剂量、V30和V40照射体积均显著低于IMRT组.结论 HT与IMRT计划均有较好的靶区剂量分布,但HT组在适形指数、均匀指数及对周围危及器官的保护均比IMRT组有明显优势.%Objective To compare the dosimetric characteristics of helical tomotherapy(HT)and step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy(IMRT)for post-operative cervix cancer patients. Methods Ten patients with post-operative cervix cancer were enrolled in this study.HT and IMRT plans were developed for each patient.The dose distributions of the targets,organs at risk(OARs),CI and HI were analyzed and compared.The prescribed dose was 60 Gy/25 f for CTV1,50 Gy/25 f for CTV2.The iso-dose line of 50 Gy was used.Results The homogeneity indexes(HI)(0.94±0.03),conformity index(C1)(1.28±0.02)in HT group were better than in IMRT group(0.85±0.01 and 1.36±0.03),respectively(t=5.12,-6.34,P<0.001).The Dmean of PTV in HT group(51.77 Gy)was lower than that in IMRT group(54.53 Gy)(t=-8.01,P<0.05).The

  3. Multibeam tomotherapy: a new treatment unit devised for multileaf collimation, intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, Nils; Müller, Reinhold G

    2007-10-01

    A fully integrated system for treatment planning, application, and verification for automated multileaf collimator (MLC) based, intensity-modulated, image-guided, and adaptive radiation therapy (IMRT, IGRT and ART, respectively) is proposed. Patient comfort, which was the major development goal, will be achieved through a new unit design and short treatment times. Our device for photon beam therapy will consist of a new dual energy linac with five fixed treatment heads positioned evenly along one plane but one electron beam generator only. A minimum of moving parts increases technical reliability and reduces motion times to a minimum. Motion is allowed solely for the MLCs, the robotic patient table, and the small angle gantry rotation of +/- 36 degrees. Besides sophisticated electron beam guidance, this compact setup can be built using existing modules. The flattening-filter-free treatment heads are characterized by reduced beam-on time and contain apertures restricted in one dimension to the area of maximum primary fluence output. In the case of longer targets, this leads to a topographic intensity modulation, thanks to the combination of "step and shoot" MLC delivery and discrete patient couch motion. Owing to the limited number of beam directions, this multislice cone beam serial tomotherapy is referred to as "multibeam tomotherapy." Every patient slice is irradiated by one treatment head at any given moment but for one subfield only. The electron beam is then guided to the next head ready for delivery, while the other heads are preparing their leaves for the next segment. The "Multifocal MLC-positioning" algorithm was programmed to enable treatment planning and optimize treatment time. We developed an overlap strategy for the longitudinally adjacent fields of every beam direction, in doing so minimizing the field match problem and the effects of possible table step errors. Clinical case studies show for the same or better planning target volume coverage, better

  4. Helical tomotherapy for single and multiple liver tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Fu-Min

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Dosimetric evaluations of single and multiple liver tumours performed using intensity-modulated helical tomotherapy (HT were quantitatively investigated. Step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SaS-IMRT was used as a benchmark. Methods Sixteen patients separated into two groups with primary hepatocellular carcinomas or metastatic liver tumours previously treated using SaS-IMRT were examined and re-planned by HT. The dosimetric indices used included the conformity index (CI and homogeneity index (HI for the planned target volume (PTV, max/mean dose, quality index (QI, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP, V30 Gy, and V50% for the specified organs at risk (OARs. The monitor units per fraction (MU/fr and delivery time were also analysed. Results For the single tumour group, both planning systems satisfied the required PTV prescription, but no statistical significance was shown by the indexes checking. A shorter delivery time and lower MU/fr value were achieved by the SaS-IMRT. For the group of multiple tumours, the average improvement in CI and HI was 14% and 4% for HT versus SaS-IMRT, respectively. Lower V50%, V30 Gy and QI values were found, indicating a significant dosimetric gain in HT. The NTCP value of the normal liver was 20.27 ± 13.29% for SaS-IMRT and 2.38 ± 2.25% for HT, indicating fewer tissue complications following HT. The latter also required a shorter delivery time. Conclusions Our study suggests dosimetric benefits of HT over SaS-IMRT plans in the case of multiple liver tumours, especially with regards sparing of OARs. No significant dosimetric difference was revealed in the case of single liver tumour, but SaS-IMRT showed better efficiency in terms of MU/fr and delivery time.

  5. Treatment of folliculitis decalvans using intensity-modulated radiation via tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayad, Khaled; Kriz, Jan; Haverkamp, Uwe; Plachouri, Kerasia-Maria; Jeskowiak, Antonia; Sunderkötter, Cord; Eich, Hans Theodor

    2015-11-01

    Folliculitis decalvans (FD) is a form of primary neutrophilic scarring alopecia that is characterized clinically by chronic suppurative folliculitis and often associated with pruritus or even pain. Treatment of FD is often difficult. Herein, we report a case of recalcitrant and painful folliculitis decalvans refractory to antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies, which was successfully treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in order to irreversibly eliminate hair follicles that prove to be one etiological trigger. A 45-year-old male patient with a refractory FD presented with a crusting suppurative folliculitis and atrophic scarring patches on the scalp associated with pain and pruritus. We attempted relief of symptoms by reducing scalp inflammation and eliminating hair follicles through radiation. We delivered 11.0 Gy in two radiation series using tomotherapy, 5.0 Gy in 5 equivalent fractions as a first radiation course. The symptoms markedly decreased but did not totally disappear. Therefore, we delivered a second radiation series 4 months later with an additional 6 Gy. This led to almost complete epilation on the scalp and abolished pain and pruritus on the capillitium. The patient was regularly followed up until 26 months after radiotherapy. Draining lesions or exudation did not recur. He only experienced discrete hair regrowth in the occipital region with folliculitis 12 months after radiotherapy. These residual lesions are currently treated with laser epilation therapy. A radical approach to eliminating hair follicles by repeated radiation therapy may induce lasting relief of symptoms in chronic suppurative FD associated with persistent trichodynia.

  6. Determination comparative study of esophageal cancer treatments with helical tomotherapy; Determinacion estudio comparativo de tratamientos de cancer de esofago con tomoterapia helicoidal, IMRT dinamica y 3DCRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto Monedero, M.; Sanchez Rubio, P.; Rodriguez Romero, R.

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of treatments dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy and helical tomotherapy in cases of esophageal cancer, in terms of PTV coverage and dose reduction in OARs compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy treatments. (Author)

  7. Performance characteristics of an independent dose verification program for helical tomotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac C. F. Chang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Helical tomotherapy with its advanced method of intensity-modulated radiation therapy delivery has been used clinically for over 20 years. The standard delivery quality assurance procedure to measure the accuracy of delivered radiation dose from each treatment plan to a phantom is time-consuming. RadCalc®, a radiotherapy dose verification software, has released specifically for beta testing a module for tomotherapy plan dose calculations. RadCalc®'s accuracy for tomotherapy dose calculations was evaluated through examination of point doses in ten lung and ten prostate clinical plans. Doses calculated by the TomoHDA™ tomotherapy treatment planning system were used as the baseline. For lung cases, RadCalc® overestimated point doses in the lung by an average of 13%. Doses within the spinal cord and esophagus were overestimated by 10%. Prostate plans showed better agreement, with overestimations of 6% in the prostate, bladder, and rectum. The systematic overestimation likely resulted from limitations of the pencil beam dose calculation algorithm implemented by RadCalc®. Limitations were more severe in areas of greater inhomogeneity and less prominent in regions of homogeneity with densities closer to 1 g/cm3. Recommendations for RadCalc® dose calculation algorithms and anatomical representation were provided based on the results of the study.

  8. Treatment of folliculitis decalvans using intensity-modulated radiation via tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsayad, Khaled; Kriz, Jan; Haverkamp, Uwe; Eich, Hans Theodor [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Plachouri, Kerasia-Maria; Jeskowiak, Antonia [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Dermatology, Muenster (Germany); Sunderkoetter, Cord [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Dermatology, Muenster (Germany); University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Translational Dermatoninfectiology, Muenster (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Folliculitis decalvans (FD) is a form of primary neutrophilic scarring alopecia that is characterized clinically by chronic suppurative folliculitis and often associated with pruritus or even pain. Treatment of FD is often difficult. Herein, we report a case of recalcitrant and painful folliculitis decalvans refractory to antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies, which was successfully treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in order to irreversibly eliminate hair follicles that prove to be one etiological trigger. A 45-year-old male patient with a refractory FD presented with a crusting suppurative folliculitis and atrophic scarring patches on the scalp associated with pain and pruritus. We attempted relief of symptoms by reducing scalp inflammation and eliminating hair follicles through radiation. We delivered 11.0 Gy in two radiation series using tomotherapy, 5.0 Gy in 5 equivalent fractions as a first radiation course. The symptoms markedly decreased but did not totally disappear. Therefore, we delivered a second radiation series 4 months later with an additional 6 Gy. This led to almost complete epilation on the scalp and abolished pain and pruritus on the capillitium. The patient was regularly followed up until 26 months after radiotherapy. Draining lesions or exudation did not recur. He only experienced discrete hair regrowth in the occipital region with folliculitis 12 months after radiotherapy. These residual lesions are currently treated with laser epilation therapy. A radical approach to eliminating hair follicles by repeated radiation therapy may induce lasting relief of symptoms in chronic suppurative FD associated with persistent trichodynia. (orig.) [German] Die Folliculitis decalvans (FD) ist eine Form der primaer neutrophilen Alopezie, welche klinisch durch Schmerzen und eitrige Follikel gekennzeichnet ist. Da es bisher kein einheitliches Behandlungskonzept gibt, wird hier ueber eine FD berichtet, welche trotz mehrfacher antibiotischer

  9. Comparison of intensity-modulated tomotherapy with stereotactically guided conformal radiotherapy for brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, V S; Oldham, M; Adams, E J; Bedford, J L; Webb, S; Brada, M

    1999-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) offers the potential to more closely conform dose distributions to the target, and spare organs at risk (OAR). Its clinical value is still being defined. The present study aims to compare IMRT with stereotactically guided conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) for patients with medium size convex-shaped brain tumors. Five patients planned with SCRT were replanned with the IMRT-tomotherapy method using the Peacock system (Nomos Corporation). The planning target volume (PTV) and relevant OAR were assessed, and compared relative to SCRT plans using dose statistics, dose-volume histograms (DVH), and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) stereotactic radiosurgery criteria. The median and mean PTV were 78 cm3 and 85 cm3 respectively (range 62-119 cm3). The differences in PTV doses for the whole group (Peacock-SCRT +/-1 SD) were 2%+/-1.8 (minimum PTV), and 0.1%+/-1.9 (maximum PTV). The PTV homogeneity achieved by Peacock was 12.1%+/-1.7 compared to 13.9%+/-1.3 with SCRT. Using RTOG guidelines, Peacock plans provided acceptable PTV coverage for all 5/5 plans compared to minor coverage deviations in 4/5 SCRT plans; acceptable homogeneity index for both plans (Peacock = 1.1 vs. SCRT = 1.2); and comparable conformity index (1.4 each). As a consequence of the transaxial method of arc delivery, the optic nerves received mean and maximum doses that were 11.1 to 11.6%, and 10.3 to 15.2% higher respectively with Peacock plan. The maximum optic lens, and brainstem dose were 3.1 to 4.8% higher, and 0.6% lower respectively with Peacock plan. However, all doses remained below the tolerance threshold (5 Gy for lens, and 50 Gy for optic nerves) and were clinically acceptable. The Peacock method provided improved PTV coverage, albeit small, in this group of convex tumors. Although the OAR doses were higher using the Peacock plans, all doses remained within the clinically defined threshold and were clinically acceptable. Further improvements may be

  10. Spatially fractionated radiotherapy (GRID) using helical tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Penagaricano, Jose; Yan, Yulong; Liang, Xiaoying; Morrill, Steven; Griffin, Robert J; Corry, Peter; Ratanatharathorn, Vaneerat

    2016-01-08

    Spatially fractionated radiotherapy (GRID) was designed to treat large tumors while sparing skin, and it is usually delivered with a linear accelerator using a commercially available block or multileaf collimator (LINAC-GRID). For deep-seated (skin to tumor distance (> 8 cm)) tumors, it is always a challenge to achieve adequate tumor dose coverage. A novel method to perform GRID treatment using helical tomotherapy (HT-GRID) was developed at our institution. Our approach allows treating patients by generating a patient-specific virtual GRID block (software-generated) and using IMRT technique to optimize the treatment plan. Here, we report our initial clinical experience using HT-GRID, and dosimetric comparison results between HT-GRID and LINAC-GRID. This study evaluates 10 previously treated patients who had deep-seated bulky tumors with complex geometries. Five of these patients were treated with HT-GRID and replanned with LINAC-GRID for comparison. Similarly, five other patients were treated with LINAC-GRID and replanned with HT-GRID for comparison. The prescription was set such that the maximum dose to the GTV is 20 Gy in a single fraction. Dosimetric parameters compared included: mean GTV dose (DGTV mean), GTV dose inhomogeneity (valley-to-peak dose ratio (VPR)), normal tissue doses (DNmean), and other organs-at-risk (OARs) doses. In addition, equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for both GTV and normal tissue were evaluated. In summary, HT-GRID technique is patient-specific, and allows adjustment of the GRID pattern to match different tumor sizes and shapes when they are deep-seated and cannot be adequately treated with LINAC-GRID. HT-GRID delivers a higher DGTV mean, EUD, and VPR compared to LINAC-GRID. HT-GRID delivers a higher DNmean and lower EUD for normal tissue compared to LINAC-GRID. HT-GRID plans also have more options for tumors with complex anatomical relationships between the GTV and the avoidance OARs (abutment or close proximity).

  11. Comparison of Helical tomotherapy and Cyberknife in Spine Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Nam; Yoon, Se Chul; Chi, Byung Ok; Jng, Hong Suk; Sohn, Suk Hyun [Seoul ST.Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Gee Young; Shin, Heon Ju; Choi, Ilbong; Gea, Cheol Seong [Incheon ST.Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Jong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    The purpose of this study is planning comparison of helicaltomotherapy and Cyber knife in spine radiosurgery. Spine radiosurgery is an alternative to invasive spine surgery. The tomotherapy is megavoltage CT(MVCT) based image guided helical IMRT delivery system. The cyberknife using robotic arm and image guided based fiducial marker killo voltage X-ray image. The helical tomotherapy is modulated by a 64-multileaf collimator that has paired, pneumatically driven, 6.25-mm-wide leaves calculated to open or close at approximately every 7 .deg. of LINAC rotation, or 51 times per gantry rotation. But cyber knife use 100 or more than bean path. Although, cord maximum dose in CKP is lower than HTP, target homogeneity in HTP is better than CKP. Target coverage is 85% in CKP, 92% in HTP. It was benefit of helical radiation therapy. Tomotheapy and cyberknife are useful equipment to spine radiosurgery.

  12. 用二维电离室阵列对螺旋断层治疗的调强计划进行剂量验证%Two-dimensional ion chamber array in dose verification for intensity modulated planning of helical tomotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐寿平; 解传滨; 鞠忠建; 戴相昆; 郭妍妍; 巩汉顺; 王连元

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility of dose verification of intensity modulated (IM) planning of helical tomotherapy (HT) using two-dimensional ion chamber array (2DICA),and develop an efficient way to validate the dose delivered under the parameters mirroring those during the treatment. Meth-ods A 2DICA,I'mRT MatriXX and MULTICube equivalent solid water phantom from IBA company were used to verify the dose distribution of 10 IM planning. The combined phantom was set up to measure the dose distributions on coronal and sagittal surface. The precise setup of phantom was guided by HTMVCT images. After the irradiation, the measured dose distributions on the coronal and sngittal plane were compared with those calculated by the IM planning system for verification. The results were evaluated and the feasibility of the different measuring methods was studied. Results The dose distribution measured by the MatriXX 2DICA was well consistent with that calculated by the treatment planning system. The errors between the measured dose and predicted dose in the selected points were within ±3%. In the comparison of the pixel-segmented ionization chamber versus treatment planning system using the 3 mm/3% γ criteria, the passing ratio of pixels with γ parameter ≤1 was 97.76% and 96.83%, respectively. Conclusions MatriXX is a-ble to measure the absolute and relative dose distributions simultaneously,which can be used for dose verifi-cation of IM planning.%目的 研究采用二维电离室阵列对螺旋断层治疗(HT)的调强计划实施剂量验证的可行性,寻求建立一套临床上针对该条件下患者治疗更为有效的剂量验证方法 .方法 采用IBA公司I'mRT MatriXX二维电离室阵列及其相配套MULTICube等效同体水模体对10例患者HT的调强计划实施验证.分别对二维电离室阵列实行冠状及纵向位测量,并获取模体中阵列轴平面和纵断面剂量分布.通过HT系统兆伏级CT图像实现模体精确配准及校

  13. Phase II Study of Preoperative Helical Tomotherapy With a Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engels, Benedikt; Tournel, Koen [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Everaert, Hendrik [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Hoorens, Anne [Department of Pathology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Sermeus, Alexandra [Department of Gastroenterology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Christian, Nicolas; Storme, Guy; Verellen, Dirk [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); De Ridder, Mark, E-mail: mark.deridder@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The addition of concomitant chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy is considered the standard of care for patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. The combined treatment modality increases the complete response rate and local control (LC), but has no impact on survival or the incidence of distant metastases. In addition, it is associated with considerable toxicity. As an alternative strategy, we explored prospectively, preoperative helical tomotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Methods and Materials: A total of 108 patients were treated with intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy using the Tomotherapy Hi-Art II system. A dose of 46 Gy, in daily fractions of 2 Gy, was delivered to the mesorectum and draining lymph nodes, without concomitant chemotherapy. Patients with an anticipated circumferential resection margin (CRM) of less than 2 mm, based on magnetic resonance imaging, received a SIB to the tumor up to a total dose of 55.2 Gy. Acute and late side effects were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: A total of 102 patients presented with cT3-4 tumors; 57 patients entered the boost group and 51 the no-boost group. One patient in the no-boost group developed a radio-hypersensitivity reaction, resulting in a complete tumor remission, a Grade 3 acute and Grade 5 late enteritis. No other Grade {>=}3 acute toxicities occurred. With a median follow-up of 32 months, Grade {>=}3 late gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity were observed in 6% and 4% of the patients, respectively. The actuarial 2-year LC, progression-free survival and overall survival were 98%, 79%, and 93%. Conclusions: Preoperative helical tomotherapy displays a favorable acute toxicity profile in patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. A SIB can be safely administered in patients with a narrow CRM and resulted in a promising LC.

  14. Serial tomotherapy vs. MLC-IMRT (Multileaf Collimator Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy) for simultaneous boost treatment large intracerebral lesions; Serielle Tomotherapie vs. MLC-IMRT (Multileaf Collimator Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy) fuer die simultane Boostbestrahlung mehrerer groesserer Hirnfiliae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, Dirk; Lohr, Frank; Mai, Sabine; Polednik, Martin; Wenz, Frederik [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Abo-Madyan, Yasser [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Kasr-El-Einy Hospital. Cairo Univ. (EG). Dept. of Oncology (NEMROCK); Dobler, Barbara [Klinikum der Universitaet Regensburg (Germany). Strahlentherapie

    2009-07-01

    Introduction: Recent data suggest that a radiosurgery boost treatment for up to three brain metastases in addition to whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is beneficial. Sequential treatment of multiple metastatic lesions is time-consuming and optimal normal tissue sparing is not trivial for larger metastases when separate plans are created and are only superimposed afterwards. Sequential Tomotherapy with noncoplanar arcs and Multi-field IMRT may streamline the process and enable easy simultaneous treatment. We compared plans for 2-3 intracerebral targets calculated with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) based on treatment with MLC or sequential Tomotherapy using the Peacock-System. Treatment time was not to exceed 90 min on a linac with standart dose rate. MIMiC plans without treatment-time restrictions were created as a benchmark. Materials and methods: Calculations are based on a Siemens KD2 linac with a dose rate of 200 MU/min. Step-and-Shoot IMRT is performed with a standard MLC (2 x 29 leaves, 1 cm), serial Tomotherapy with the Multivane-Collimator MIMiC (NOMOS Inc. USA). Treatment plans are created with Corvus 5.0. To create plans with good conformity we chose a noncoplanar beam- and arc geometry for each approach (IMRT 4-, MIMiC 5-couch angles). The benchmark MIMiC plans with maximally steep dose gradients had 9 couch angles. For plan comparison reasons, 10Gy were prescribed to 90% of the PTV. Steepness of dose gradients, homogeneity and conformity were assessed by the following parameters: Volume encompassed by certain isodoses outside the target as well as homogeneity and conformity as indicated by Homogeneity- and Conformity-Index. Results: Plans without treatment-time restrictions had slightest dose to organ at risk (OAR), normal tissue and least Conformity-index. MIMiC- and MLC-IMRT based plans can be treated within the intended period of 90 min, all plans met the required dose. MLC based plans resulted in higher dose to organs at risk (OAR) and dose

  15. Helical tomotherapy. Experiences of the first 150 patients in Heidelberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterzing, F.; Schubert, K.; Sroka-Perez, G.; Kalz, J.; Debus, J.; Herfarth, K. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    Background and purpose: helical tomotherapy was introduced into clinical routine at the Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Germany, in July 2006. This report is intended to describe the experience with the first 150 patients treated with helical tomotherapy. Patient selection, time effort, handling of daily image guidance with megavoltage (MV) CT, and quality of radiation plans shall be assessed. Patients and methods: between July 2006 and May 2007, 150 patients were treated with helical tomotherapy in the University Hospital of Heidelberg. Mean age was 60 years with a minimum of 30 years and a maximum of 85 years. 79 of these patients received radiotherapy as a part of multimodal treatment pre- or postoperatively, 17 patients received treatment as a combined radiochemotherapy. 76% were treated with curative intent. Radiotherapy sites were central nervous system (n = 7), head and neck (n = 28), thoracic (n = 37), abdominal (n = 58) and skeletal system (n = 20). Most common tumor entities were prostate cancer (n = 28), breast cancer (n = 17), gastrointestinal tumors (n = 19), pharyngeal carcinoma (n = 14), lymphoma (n = 13), metastatic disease (bone n = 14, liver n = 6, lung n = 4, lymph node n = 2), sarcoma (n = 8), malignant pleural mesothelioma (n = 5), ovarian cancer treated with whole abdominal irradiation (n = 4), lung cancer (n = 3), skin malignancies (n = 3), chordoma (n = 2), meningioma (n = 2), one ependymoma and one medulloblastoma treated with craniospinal axis irradiation (n = 2), and others (n = 4). Nine patients were treated with single-fraction radiosurgery, nine with image-guided spinal reirradiation, and twelve patients were treated at multiple targets simultaneously. A pretreatment MV-CT scan was performed in 98.2% of the 3,026 fractions applied. After matching with the kilovoltage planning CT, corrections for translations and rotation around longitudinal axis (roll) were done. Results: mean time on table was 24

  16. Dose-escalated simultaneous integrated-boost treatment of prostate cancer patients via helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, M.; Astner, S.T.; Duma, M.N.; Putzhammer, J.; Winkler, C.; Molls, M.; Geinitz, H. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie; Jacob, V. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde; Nieder, C. [Nordland Hospital, Bodoe (Norway). Dept. of Oncology and Palliative Care; Tromsoe Univ. (Norway). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    2012-05-15

    The goal of this work was to assess the feasibility of moderately hypofractionated simultaneous integrated-boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) with helical tomotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer regarding acute side effects and dose-volume histogram data (DVH data). Acute side effects and DVH data were evaluated of the first 40 intermediate risk prostate cancer patients treated with a definitive daily image-guided SIB-IMRT protocol via helical tomotherapy in our department. The planning target volume including the prostate and the base of the seminal vesicles with safety margins was treated with 70 Gy in 35 fractions. The boost volume containing the prostate and 3 mm safety margins (5 mm craniocaudal) was treated as SIB to a total dose of 76 Gy (2.17 Gy per fraction). Planning constraints for the anterior rectal wall were set in order not to exceed the dose of 76 Gy prescribed to the boost volume. Acute toxicity was evaluated prospectively using a modified CTCAE (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) score. SIB-IMRT allowed good rectal sparing, although the full boost dose was permitted to the anterior rectal wall. Median rectum dose was 38 Gy in all patients and the median volumes receiving at least 65 Gy (V65), 70 Gy (V70), and 75 Gy (V75) were 13.5%, 9%, and 3%, respectively. No grade 4 toxicity was observed. Acute grade 3 toxicity was observed in 20% of patients involving nocturia only. Grade 2 acute intestinal and urological side effects occurred in 25% and 57.5%, respectively. No correlation was found between acute toxicity and the DVH data. This institutional SIB-IMRT protocol using daily image guidance as a precondition for smaller safety margins allows dose escalation to the prostate without increasing acute toxicity. (orig.)

  17. Verification of calculated skin doses in postmastectomy helical tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shima; Parker, Brent C; Levine, Renee; Sanders, Mary Ella; Fontenot, Jonas; Gibbons, John; Hogstrom, Kenneth

    2011-10-01

    To verify the accuracy of calculated skin doses in helical tomotherapy for postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). In vivo thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the skin dose at multiple points in each of 14 patients throughout the course of treatment on a TomoTherapy Hi·Art II system, for a total of 420 TLD measurements. Five patients were evaluated near the location of the mastectomy scar, whereas 9 patients were evaluated throughout the treatment volume. The measured dose at each location was compared with calculations from the treatment planning system. The mean difference and standard error of the mean difference between measurement and calculation for the scar measurements was -1.8% ± 0.2% (standard deviation [SD], 4.3%; range, -11.1% to 10.6%). The mean difference and standard error of the mean difference between measurement and calculation for measurements throughout the treatment volume was -3.0% ± 0.4% (SD, 4.7%; range, -18.4% to 12.6%). The mean difference and standard error of the mean difference between measurement and calculation for all measurements was -2.1% ± 0.2% (standard deviation, 4.5%: range, -18.4% to 12.6%). The mean difference between measured and calculated TLD doses was statistically significant at two standard deviations of the mean, but was not clinically significant (i.e., was <5%). However, 23% of the measured TLD doses differed from the calculated TLD doses by more than 5%. The mean of the measured TLD doses agreed with TomoTherapy calculated TLD doses within our clinical criterion of 5%. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prospective Phase I-II Trial of Helical Tomotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy for Postoperative Cervical Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Julie K., E-mail: jschwarz@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Wahab, Sasa [Cobb Center for Radiation Oncology Center, Austell, GA (United States); Grigsby, Perry W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in a prospective trial, the acute and chronic toxicity of patients with cervical cancer treated with surgery and postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) delivered using helical tomotherapy, with or without the administration of concurrent chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: A total of 24 evaluable patients entered the study between March 2006 and August 2009. The indications for postoperative RT were tumor size, lymphovascular space invasion, and the depth of cervical stromal invasion in 15 patients; 9 patients underwent postoperative RT because of surgically positive lymph nodes. All patients underwent pelvic RT delivered with helical tomotherapy and intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Treatment consisted of concurrent weekly platinum in 17, sequential carboplatin/Taxol in 1, and RT alone in 6. The patients were monitored for acute and chronic toxicity using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months (range, 4-49). At the last follow-up visit, 23 patients were alive and disease free. Of the 24 patients, 12 (50%) experienced acute Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity (anorexia in 5, diarrhea in 4, and nausea in 3). One patient developed acute Grade 4 genitourinary toxicity (vesicovaginal fistula). For patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy, the incidence of acute Grade 3 and 4 hematologic toxicity was 71% and 24%, respectively. For patients treated without concurrent chemotherapy, the incidence of acute Grade 3 and 4 hematologic toxicity was 29% and 14%, respectively. Two long-term toxicities occurred (vesicovaginal fistula at 25 months and small bowel obstruction at 30 months). The overall and progression-free survival rate at 3 years for all patients was 100% and 89%, respectively. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that postoperative external RT for cervical cancer delivered with helical tomotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy and with or without

  19. Unilateral and bilateral neck SIB for head and neck cancer patients. Intensity-modulated proton therapy, tomotherapy, and RapidArc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stromberger, Carmen; Budach, Volker; Ghadjar, Pirus; Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Marnitz, Simone [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiotherapy, Berlin (Germany); Cozzi, Luca; Fogliata, Antonella [Humanitas Cancer Center Milan, Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department, Milan (Italy); Jamil, Basil [Klinikum Frankfurt Oder, Praxis fuer Strahlentherapie, Frankfurt Oder (Germany); Raguse, Jan D. [Clinic for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Boettcher, Arne [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    To compare simultaneous integrated boost plans for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT), helical tomotherapy (HT), and RapidArc therapy (RA) for patients with head and neck cancer. A total of 20 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck received definitive chemoradiation with bilateral (n = 14) or unilateral (n = 6) neck irradiation and were planned using IMPT, HT, and RA with 54.4, 60.8, and 70.4 GyE/Gy in 32 fractions. Dose distributions, coverage, conformity, homogeneity to planning target volumes (PTV)s and sparing of organs at risk and normal tissue were compared. All unilateral and bilateral plans showed excellent PTV coverage and acceptable dose conformity. For unilateral treatment, IMPT delivered substantially lower mean doses to contralateral salivary glands (< 0.001-1.1 Gy) than both rotational techniques did (parotid gland: 6-10 Gy; submandibular gland: 15-20 Gy). Regarding the sparing of classical organs at risk for bilateral treatment, IMPT and HT were similarly excellent and RA was satisfactory. For unilateral neck irradiation, IMPT may minimize the dry mouth risk in this subgroup but showed no advantage over HT for bilateral neck treatment regarding classical organ-at-risk sparing. All methods satisfied modern standards regarding toxicity and excellent target coverage for unilateral and bilateral treatment of head and neck cancer at the planning level. (orig.) [German] Planvergleich von intensitaetsmodulierter Protonentherapie (IMPT), Tomotherapie (HT) und RapidArc-Therapie (RA) fuer Patienten mit Plattenepithelkarzinomen der Kopf-Hals-Region unter Anwendung des simultan integrierten Boost-Konzepts (SIB). Fuer 20 Patienten mit Plattenepithelkarzinomen der Kopf-Hals-Region und bilateraler (n = 14) oder unilateraler (n = 6) zervikaler primaerer Radiochemotherapie erfolgte eine IMPT-, HT- und RA-Planung mit 54,4, 60,8 und 70,4 GyE/Gy in 32 Fraktionen. Die Dosisverteilung, Abdeckung, Konformitaet und Homogenitaet der PTVs sowie die

  20. Virtual bolus for total body irradiation treated with helical tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moliner, Gilles; Izar, Françoise; Ferrand, Régis; Bardies, Manuel; Ken, Soléakhéna; Simon, Luc

    2015-11-08

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for total body irradiation (TBI) is practiced in several centers using the TomoTherapy System. In this context the planning target volume (PTV) is the entire body including the skin. A safety margin in the air surrounding the body should be added to take into account setup errors. But using inverse planning, over-fluence peak could be generated in the skin region to insure dose homogeneity. This work proposes to study the performance of the use of a virtual bolus (VB). A VB is a material placed on the skin surface during planning, but absent for the real treatment. The optimal VB that compensates large setup errors without introducing a high-dose increase or hot spots for small setup errors was determined. For two cylindrical phantoms, 20VBs with different densities, thicknesses or designs were tested. Dose coverage of the PTV (V95%) in the presence of simulated setup errors was computed to assess the VB performance. A measure of the dose increase in the phantom center due to the absence of the VB during treatment was also achieved. Finally, the fluence peak at the phantom edge was measured in complete buildup conditions using a large phantom and a detector matrix. Using these VBs, simulated setup errors were compensated to a minimum value of 2.6 and 2.1 cm for small and large phantom, respectively (and only 1.2 and 1.7 cm with no VB). An optimal double-layer VB was found with a density of 0.4 kg.m(-3) and a total thickness of 8mm; an inner layer of 5 mm was declared as the target for the treatment planning system and an additional layer of 3 mm was added to avoid the over-fluence peak. Using this VB, setup errors were compensated up to 2.9 cm. The dose increase was measured to be only +1.5% at the phantom center and over-fluence peak was strongly decreased.

  1. Simultaneous irradiation of the breast and regional lymph nodes in prone position using helical tomotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainz, K; White, J; Chen, G-P; Hermand, J; England, M; Li, X A

    2012-01-01

    Objective We investigated dosimetric advantages of using helical tomotherapy to simultaneously irradiate the breast and regional lymph nodes for patients positioned prone, and compared tomotherapy plan qualities for the prone position with those previously published for the supine position. Methods Tomotherapy plans for 11 patients (5 left breast, 6 right) simulated with the involved breast suspended downward were generated. Each target (ipsilateral breast and supraclavicular, axillary and internal mammary chain nodes) was to receive 45 Gy. Results For targets, V40.5≥99.9% and V42.8≥99.5% for all patients, where V40.5 and V42.8 denote the relative target volume receiving at least 40.5 and 42.8 Gy, respectively. The targets' maximum dose was, on average, approximately 49.5 Gy. The mean doses to the contralateral lung and heart were lower for right-breast cases (2.8 Gy lung, 2.7 Gy heart) than for left-breast cases (3.8 Gy lung, 8.7 Gy heart). Mean organ doses to the ipsilateral lung (9.3 Gy) and contralateral breast (2.3 Gy) from the prone breast tomotherapy plans were similar to those reported for conventional radiotherapy techniques. For the left breast with regional nodes, tomotherapy plans for prone-positioned patients yielded lower mean doses to the contralateral breast and heart than previously reported data for tomotherapy plans for supine-positioned patients. Conclusion Helical tomotherapy with prone breast positioning can simultaneously cover the breast and regional nodes with acceptable uniformity and can provide reduced mean dose to proximal organs at risk compared with tomotherapy with supine position. The similarity of plan quality to existing data for conventional breast radiotherapy indicates that this planning approach is appropriate, and that the risk of secondary tumour formation should not be significantly greater. PMID:22457317

  2. A comparison between two-dimensional ion chamber array and EDR2 film for intensity modulated planning of helical tomotherapy%二维电离室阵列与EDR2胶片在螺旋断层治疗计划剂量验证中的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解传滨; 徐寿平; 鞠忠建; 戴相昆; 葛瑞刚; 巩汉顺

    2011-01-01

    目的 比较EDR2胶片与二维电离室阵列在螺旋断层治疗(HT)计划质量保证过程中的剂量学特性,并分析测量方法间的可能差异.方法 采用IBA公司I′mRT MatriXX二维电离室阵列其相配套MULTICube等效固体水模体,同时夹放EDR2胶片对15例患者HT计划实施剂量学验证,分别实行轴位和纵向摆位测量以获取模体冠、矢状面剂量分布.照后将两种方法所测得的剂量分布与其对应模体计划中计算结果进行比对,以γ分析法(3 mm/3%)评估验证情况及实施效率.结果 15例患者冠状面、矢状面二维电离室阵列和EDR2胶片测量的γ≤1平均通过率分别为97.00%±1.56%和95.98%±2.52%(t=-2.22,P=0.043)、98.28%±1.55%和95.42%±1.99%(t=0.75,P=0.464);其中>90%、>95%通过率比例分别为93.3%、66.7%.两种方法测量所得剂量分布与计算结果在相同平面的几何分布均有较好的符合度,且亦存在一定相关性(r=0.14,P=0.001).结论 日常HT质量保证中二维电离室阵列可有效替代胶片和电离室测量,而胶片验证作为"金标准"为定期相互比对提供了可能.%Objective The aim of this work is to compare the performances of EDR2 film dosimetry with two-dimensional ion chamber array (2DICA) in quality assurance (QA) procedures and to investigate the origin of possible discrepancies between the two methods.Methods A 2DICA, I′mRT MatriXX and MULTICube equivalent solid water phantom from IBA Company were used to verify the dose distribution of 15 tomotherapy plan cases.The combined phantom which includes EDR2 film on the array was set up to measure the dose distribution from coronal and sagittal orientations.After the irradiation, the dose distributions of 2DICA and film were compared with those calculated in the planning system for verification.The results and efficiency were evaluated independently in the two methods.Results The mean number of points satifying γ parameter ≤1 in the coronal and sagittal

  3. Helical tomotherapy with dynamic running-start-stop delivery compared to conventional tomotherapy delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Yi, E-mail: yi.rong@osumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Chen, Yu; Lu, Weiguo [21st Century Oncology, Madison, Wisconsin 53719 (United States); Shang, Lu [Guangxi Polytechnic of Construction and Technology, Nanning (China); Zuo, Li [Radiologic Sciences and Respiratory Therapy Division, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Chen, Quan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Despite superior target dose uniformity, helical tomotherapy{sup ®} (HT) may involve a trade-off between longitudinal dose conformity and beam-on time (BOT), due to the limitation of only three available jaw sizes with the conventional HT (1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 cm). The recently introduced dynamic running-start-stop (RSS) delivery allows smaller jaw opening at the superior and inferior ends of the target when a sharp penumbra is needed. This study compared the dosimetric performance of RSS delivery with the fixed jaw HT delivery. Methods: Twenty patient cases were selected and deidentified prior to treatment planning, including 16 common clinical cases (brain, head and neck (HN), lung, and prostate) and four special cases of whole brain with hippocampus avoidance (WBHA) that require a high degree of dose modulation. HT plans were generated for common clinical cases using the fixed 2.5 cm jaw width (HT2.5) and WBHA cases using 1.0 cm (HT1.0). The jaw widths for RSS were preset with a larger size (RSS5.0 vs HT2.5 and RSS2.5 vs HT1.0). Both delivery techniques were planned based on identical contours, prescriptions, and planning objectives. Dose indices for targets and critical organs were compared using dose-volume histograms, BOT, and monitor units. Results: The average BOT was reduced from 4.8 min with HT2.5 to 2.5 min with RSS5.0. Target dose homogeneity with RSS5.0 was shown comparable to HT2.5 for common clinical sites. Superior normal tissue sparing was observed in RSS5.0 for optic nerves and optic chiasm in brain and HN cases. RSS5.0 demonstrated improved dose sparing for cord and esophagus in lung cases, as well as penile bulb in prostate cases. The mean body dose was comparable for both techniques. For the WBHA cases, the target homogeneity was significantly degraded in RSS2.5 without distinct dose sparing for hippocampus, compared to HT1.0. Conclusions: Compared to the fixed jaw HT delivery, RSS combined with a larger jaw width provides faster

  4. QA for helical tomotherapy: report of the AAPM Task Group 148.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langen, Katja M; Papanikolaou, Niko; Balog, John; Crilly, Richard; Followill, David; Goddu, S Murty; Grant, Walter; Olivera, Gustavo; Ramsey, Chester R; Shi, Chengyu

    2010-09-01

    Helical tomotherapy is a relatively new modality with integrated treatment planning and delivery hardware for radiation therapy treatments. In view of the uniqueness of the hardware design of the helical tomotherapy unit and its implications in routine quality assurance, the Therapy Physics Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine commissioned Task Group 148 to review this modality and make recommendations for quality assurance related methodologies. The specific objectives of this Task Group are: (a) To discuss quality assurance techniques, frequencies, and tolerances and (b) discuss dosimetric verification techniques applicable to this unit. This report summarizes the findings of the Task Group and aims to provide the practicing clinical medical physicist with the insight into the technology that is necessary to establish an independent and comprehensive quality assurance program for a helical tomotherapy unit. The emphasis of the report is to describe the rationale for the proposed QA program and to provide example tests that can be performed, drawing from the collective experience of the task group members and the published literature. It is expected that as technology continues to evolve, so will the test procedures that may be used in the future to perform comprehensive quality assurance for helical tomotherapy units.

  5. A dosimetric selectivity intercomparison of HDR brachytherapy, IMRT and helical tomotherapy in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermesse, Johanne; Biver, Sylvie; Jansen, Nicolas; Coucke, Philippe [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Liege Univ. Hospital (Belgium); Lenaerts, Eric [Dept. of Medical Physics, Liege Univ. Hospital (Belgium); De Patoul, Nathalie; Vynckier, Stefaan [Dept. of Medical Physics, St Luc Univ. Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Scalliet, Pierre [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, St Luc Univ. Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Nickers, Philippe [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Oscar Lambret Center, Lille (France)

    2009-11-15

    Background and purpose: dose escalation in order to improve the biochemical control in prostate cancer requires the application of irradiation techniques with high conformality. The dosimetric selectivity of three radiation modalities is compared: high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT), intensity-modulated radiation radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT). Patients and methods: ten patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated by a 10-Gy HDR-BT boost after external-beam radiotherapy were investigated. For each patient, HDR-BT, IMRT and HT theoretical treatment plans were realized using common contour sets. A 10-Gy dose was prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV). The PTVs and critical organs' dose-volume histograms obtained were compared using Student's t-test. Results: HDR-BT delivers spontaneously higher mean doses to the PTV with smaller cold spots compared to IMRT and HT. 33% of the rectal volume received a mean HDR-BT dose of 3.86 {+-} 0.3 Gy in comparison with a mean IMRT dose of 6.57 {+-} 0.68 Gy and a mean HT dose of 5.58 {+-} 0.71 Gy (p < 0.0001). HDR-BT also enables to better spare the bladder. The hot spots inside the urethra are greater with HDR-BT. The volume of healthy tissue receiving 10% of the prescribed dose is reduced at least by a factor of 8 with HDR-BT (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: HDR-BT offers better conformality in comparison with HT and IMRT and reduces the volume of healthy tissue receiving a low dose. (orig.)

  6. Clinical study on the changes of the tumor target volume and organs at risk in helical tomotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Na; FENG Lin-chun; CAI Bo-ning; HOU Jun; WANG Yun-lai; XIE Chuan-bin

    2012-01-01

    Background Helical tomotherapy (HT) is a new image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT).The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in the target volume and organs at risk (OARs) of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) during helical tomotherapy.Methods Forty-three patients with NPC and treated via HT from March 2008 to January 2010 were reviewed retrospectively.Repeated CT scanning and plan adaptation were conducted at the 20th fraction during radiotherapy.The volumetric differences between the two scans were evaluated for nasopharyngeal tumor and retro- pharyngeal lymph nodes (GTVnx),neck lymph nodes (GTVnd),and parotid glands,as well as the axial diameter of the head.Results The median interval between the two scans was 25 days (23-28 days).The volumetric decrease in GTVnx was 30.1% (median,29.8%) and in GTVnd 41.6% (median,45.9%).The variation in the GTVnd volume was correlated with the weight loss of the patient.The volume of the left parotid gland decreased by 35.5% (median,33.4%) and of the right parotid glands decreased by 36.8% (median,33.5%).The axial diameter of the head decreased by 9.39% (median,9.1%).Conclusions The target volume and OARs of patients with NPC varied considerably during HT.These changes may have potential dosimetric effects on the target volume and/or OARs and influence the clinical outcome.Repeated CT scanning and replanning during the HT for NPC patients with a large target volume or an obvious weight loss are recommended.

  7. Treatment plan comparison between helical tomotherapy and MLC-based IMRT using radiobiological measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University (Sweden); Ferreira, Brigida Costa [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University (Sweden); Shi, Chengyu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Lind, Bengt K [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University (Sweden); Papanikolaou, Nikos [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2007-07-07

    The rapid implementation of advanced treatment planning and delivery technologies for radiation therapy has brought new challenges in evaluating the most effective treatment modality. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using multi-leaf collimators (MLC) and helical tomotherapy (HT) are becoming popular modes of treatment delivery and their application and effectiveness continues to be investigated. Presently, there are several treatment planning systems (TPS) that can generate and optimize IMRT plans based on user-defined objective functions for the internal target volume (ITV) and organs at risk (OAR). However, the radiobiological parameters of the different tumours and normal tissues are typically not taken into account during dose prescription and optimization of a treatment plan or during plan evaluation. The suitability of a treatment plan is typically decided based on dosimetric criteria such as dose-volume histograms (DVH), maximum, minimum, mean and standard deviation of the dose distribution. For a more comprehensive treatment plan evaluation, the biologically effective uniform dose D-bar is applied together with the complication-free tumour control probability (P{sub +}). Its utilization is demonstrated using three clinical cases that were planned with two different forms of IMRT. In this study, three different cancer types at different anatomical sites were investigated: head and neck, lung and prostate cancers. For each cancer type, a linac MLC-based step-and-shoot IMRT plan and a HT plan were developed. The MLC-based IMRT treatment plans were developed on the Philips treatment-planning platform, using the Pinnacle 7.6 software release. For the tomotherapy HiArt plans, the dedicated tomotherapy treatment planning station was used, running version 2.1.2. By using D-bar as the common prescription point of the treatment plans and plotting the tissue response probabilities versus D-bar for a range of prescription doses, a number of plan trials can be

  8. Treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma using simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy via helical tomotherapy: a phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Lei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate short-term safety and efficacy of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy (SMART delivered via helical tomotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC.

  9. Dosimetric analysis of tomotherapy-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy with and without bone marrow sparing for the treatment of cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuli Zhang; Jianping Chen; Heliang He; Weidong Xu; Huayong Jiang; Yadi Wang ; Junmao Gao; Qingzhi Liu; Na Lu; Diandian Chen; Bo Yao

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to compare tomotherapy-based bone marrow-sparing intensity-mod-ulated radiotherapy (BMS-IMRT) with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) without entering the pelvic bone marrow as a planning constraint in the treatment of cervical cancer after hysterectomy. Methods BMS-IMRT and IMRT plans were designed for a cohort of nine patients. The prescribed dose was 45 Gy in 1.8 Gy daily fractions, and 95% of the planned target volume received this dose. The doses were computed using a commercial y available treatment planning system with the convolution/superposi-tion algorithm. Plans were compared according to dose-volume histogram analysis in terms of planning target volume homogeneity and conformity indices (HI and CI) as wel as organ at risk dose and volume parameters. Results BMS-IMRT had advantages over IMRT in terms of CI, but was equivalent to the latter in HI. V5, V10, V20, V30, and V40 of pelvic bone marrow in BMS-IMRT decreased by 0.06%, 17.33%, 22.19%, 13.85%, and 16.46%, respectively, compared with IMRT. Except for V30 of the smal bowel and V30 and V40 of the bladder, no statistical y significant dif erences were found between BMS-IMRT and IMRT in the smal bowel, bladder, and rectum. Conclusion For cervical cancer patients receiving tomotherapy-based radiotherapy after hysterectomy, BMS-IMRT reduced pelvic bone marrow volume receiving low-dose radiation, and it may be conducive to preventing acute hematologic toxicity.

  10. A Comparison of Helical Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, and 3D-Conformal Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poppe, Matthew M.; Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning J.; Zhou Jinghao; Nelson, Carl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Jabbour, Salma K., E-mail: jabbousk@umdnj.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2011-01-01

    We assessed dosimetric differences in pancreatic cancer radiotherapy via helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (HIMRT), linac-based IMRT, and 3D-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) with regard to successful plan acceptance and dose to critical organs. Dosimetric analysis was performed in 16 pancreatic cases that were planned to 54 Gy; both post-pancreaticoduodenectomy (n = 8) and unresected (n = 8) cases were compared. Without volume modification, plans met constraints 75% of the time with HIMRT and IMRT and 13% with 3D-CRT. There was no statistically significantly improvement with HIMRT over conventional IMRT in reducing liver V35, stomach V45, or bowel V45. HIMRT offers improved planning target volume (PTV) dose homogeneity compared with IMRT, averaging a lower maximum dose and higher volume receiving the prescription dose (D100). HIMRT showed an increased mean dose over IMRT to bowel and liver. Both HIMRT and IMRT offer a statistically significant improvement over 3D-CRT in lowering dose to liver, stomach, and bowel. The results were similar for both unresected and resected patients. In pancreatic cancer, HIMRT offers improved dose homogeneity over conventional IMRT and several significant benefits to 3D-CRT. Factors to consider before incorporating IMRT into pancreatic cancer therapy are respiratory motion, dose inhomogeneity, and mean dose.

  11. Comparison of arc-modulated cone beam therapy and helical tomotherapy for three different types of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrich, Silke; Sterzing, Florian; Nill, Simeon; Schubert, Kai; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Debus, Juergen; Oelfke, Uwe [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: Arc-modulated cone beam therapy (AMCBT) is a fast treatment technique deliverable in a single rotation with a conventional C-arm shaped linac. In this planning study, the authors assess the dosimetric properties of single-arc therapy in comparison to helical tomotherapy for three different tumor types. Methods: Treatment plans for three patients with prostate carcinoma, three patients with anal cancer, and three patients with head and neck cancer were optimized for helical tomotherapy and AMCBT. The dosimetric comparison of the two techniques is based on physical quantities derived from dose-volume histograms. Results: For prostate cancer, the quality of dose distributions calculated for AMCBT was of equal quality as that generated for tomotherapy with the additional benefits of a faster delivery and a lower integral dose. For highly complex geometries, the plan quality achievable with helical tomotherapy could not be achieved with arc-modulated cone beam therapy. Conclusions: Rotation therapy with a conventional linac in a single arc is capable to deliver a high and homogeneous dose to the target and spare organs at risk. Advantages of this technique are a fast treatment time and a lower integral dose in comparison to helical tomotherapy. For highly complex cases, e.g., with several target regions, the dose shaping capabilities of AMCBT are inferior to those of tomotherapy. However, treatment plans for AMCBT were also clinically acceptable.

  12. Dosimetric difference amongst 3 techniques: TomoTherapy, sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and RapidArc radiotherapy in the treatment of late-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Francis Kar-ho; Yip, Celia Wai-yi; Cheung, Frankie Chun-hung; Leung, Alex Kwok-cheung; Chau, Ricky Ming-chun; Ngan, Roger Kai-cheong

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the dosimetric difference amongst TomoTherapy, sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and RapidArc radiotherapy in the treatment of late-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten patients with late-stage (Stage III or IV) NPC treated with TomoTherapy or IMRT were selected for the study. Treatment plans with these 3 techniques were devised according to departmental protocol. Dosimetric parameters for organ at risk and treatment targets were compared between TomoTherapy and IMRT, TomoTherapy and RapidArc, and IMRT and RapidArc. Comparison amongst the techniques was done by statistical tests on the dosimetric parameters, total monitor unit (MU), and expected delivery time. All 3 techniques achieved similar target dose coverage. TomoTherapy achieved significantly lower doses in lens and mandible amongst the techniques. It also achieved significantly better dose conformity to the treatment targets. RapidArc achieved significantly lower dose to the eye and normal tissue, lower total MU, and less delivery time. The dosimetric advantages of the 3 techniques were identified in the treatment of late-stage NPC. This may serve as a guideline for selection of the proper technique for different clinical cases. © 2013 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists Published by American Association of Medical Dosimetrists All rights reserved.

  13. Usefulness of Non-coplanar Helical Tomotherapy Using Variable Axis Baseplate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Jin Sook; Chung, Yoon Sun; Lee, Ik Jae; Shin, Dong Bong; Kim, Jong Dae; Kim, Sei Joon; Jeon, Mi Jin; Chok, Yoon Jin; Kim, Ki Kwang; Lee, Seul Bee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Helical Tomotherapy allows only coplanar beam delivery because it does not allow couch rotation. We investigated a method to introduce non-coplanar beam by tilting a patient's head for Tomotherapy. The aim of this study was to compare intrafractional movement during Tomotherapy between coplanar and non-coplanar patient's setup. Helical Tomotherapy was used for treating eight patients with intracranial tumor. The subjects were divided into three groups: one group (coplanar) of 2 patients who lay on S-plate with supine position and wore thermoplastic mask for immobilizing the head, second group (non-coplanar) of 3 patients who lay on S-plate with supine position and whose head was tilted with Variable Axis Baseplate and wore thermoplastic mask, and third group (non-coplanar plus mouthpiece) of 3 patients whose head was tilted and wore a mouthpiece immobilization device and thermoplastic mask. The patients were treated with Tomotherapy after treatment planning with Tomotherapy Planning System. Megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) was performed before and after treatment, and the intrafractional error was measured with lateral(X), longitudinal(Y), vertical(Z) direction movements and vector ({radical}x{sup 2}+{radical}y{sup 2}+{radical}z{sup 2}) value for assessing overall movement. Intrafractional error was compared among three groups by taking the error of MVCT taken after the treatment. As the correction values (X, Y, Z) between MVCT image taken after treatment and CT-simulation image are close to zero, the patient movement is small. When the mean values of movement of each direction for non-coplanar setup were compared with coplanar setup group, X-axis movement was decreased by 13%, but Y-axis and Z-axis movement were increased by 109% and 88%, respectively. Movements of Y-axis and Z-axis with non-coplanar setup were relatively greater than that of X-axis since a tilted head tended to slip down. The mean of X-axis movement of the group who used a

  14. Palliative Irradiation Using Helical Tomotherapy in Recurrent Pelvic Tumors with Prior Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Chul Seung; Yoo, Eun Jung; Kim, Ji Hoon; Ro, Duck Young; Kim, Ki Jun [Incheon St. Mary Hospital, The Catholic University College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    We retrospectively investigated the effect of irradiation using helical tomotherapy in recurrent pelvic tumors that underwent prior irradiation. Fourteen patients with recurrent pelvic tumors consisting of rectal cancer (57.1%), cervical cancer (35.7%) and cancer with an unknown origin (7.1%) were treated with tomotherapy. At the time of irradiation, median tumor size was 3.5 cm and 7 patients complained of pain originating from a recurrent tumor. The median radiation dose delivered to the gross tumor volume, clinical target volume, and planning target volume was 50 Gy, 47.8 Gy and 45 Gy, respectively and delivered at 5 fractions per week over the course of 4 to 5 weeks. Treatment response and duration of local disease control were evaluated using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (ver. 1.0) and the Kaplan-Meyer method. Treatment-related toxicities were assessed through Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (ver. 3.0). The median follow-up time was 17.3 months, while the response rate was 64.3%. Symptomatic improvement appeared in 6 patients (85.7%). The median duration time of local disease control was 25.8 months. The rates of local failure, distant failure, and synchronous local and distant failure were 57.1%, 21.4%, and 7.1%, respectively. Acute toxicities were limited in grade I or II toxicities, except for one patient. No treatment related death or late toxicity was observed. Helical tomotherapy could be suggested as a feasible palliative option in recurrent pelvic tumors with prior radiotherapy. However, to increase treatment effect and overcome the limitation of this outcome, a large clinical study should be performed.

  15. Independent calculation of dose distributions for helical tomotherapy using a conventional treatment planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klüter, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.klueter@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Schubert, Kai; Lissner, Steffen; Sterzing, Florian; Oetzel, Dieter; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany, and Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany, and German Consortium for Translational Cancer Research (DKTK), Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schlegel, Wolfgang [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Oelfke, Uwe [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Nill, Simeon [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric verification of treatment plans in helical tomotherapy usually is carried out via verification measurements. In this study, a method for independent dose calculation of tomotherapy treatment plans is presented, that uses a conventional treatment planning system with a pencil kernel dose calculation algorithm for generation of verification dose distributions based on patient CT data. Methods: A pencil beam algorithm that directly uses measured beam data was configured for dose calculation for a tomotherapy machine. Tomotherapy treatment plans were converted into a format readable by an in-house treatment planning system by assigning each projection to one static treatment field and shifting the calculation isocenter for each field in order to account for the couch movement. The modulation of the fluence for each projection is read out of the delivery sinogram, and with the kernel-based dose calculation, this information can directly be used for dose calculation without the need for decomposition of the sinogram. The sinogram values are only corrected for leaf output and leaf latency. Using the converted treatment plans, dose was recalculated with the independent treatment planning system. Multiple treatment plans ranging from simple static fields to real patient treatment plans were calculated using the new approach and either compared to actual measurements or the 3D dose distribution calculated by the tomotherapy treatment planning system. In addition, dose–volume histograms were calculated for the patient plans. Results: Except for minor deviations at the maximum field size, the pencil beam dose calculation for static beams agreed with measurements in a water tank within 2%/2 mm. A mean deviation to point dose measurements in the cheese phantom of 0.89% ± 0.81% was found for unmodulated helical plans. A mean voxel-based deviation of −0.67% ± 1.11% for all voxels in the respective high dose region (dose values >80%), and a mean local

  16. Feasibility of Concurrent Treatment with the Scanning Ultrasound Reflector Linear Array System (SURLAS) and the Helical Tomotherapy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñagarícano, José A.; Moros, Eduardo; Novák, Petr; Yan, Yulong; Corry, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of concurrent treatment with the Scanning Ultrasound Reflector Linear Array System (SURLAS) and helical tomotherapy (HT) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods The SURLAS was placed on a RANDO phantom simulating a patient with superficial or deep recurrent breast cancer. A Megavoltage CT (MVCT) of the phantom with and without the SURLAS was obtained in the HT system. MVCT images with the SURLAS were obtained for two configurations: i) with the SURLAS' long axis parallel and ii) perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the phantom. The MVCT simulation data set was then transferred to a radiation therapy planning station. Organs at risk (OAR) were contoured including the lungs, heart, abdomen and spinal cord. The metallic parts of the SURLAS were contoured as well and constraints were assigned to completely or directionally block radiation through them. The MVCT-simulation data set and regions of interest (ROI) files were subsequently transferred to the HT planning station. Several HT plans were obtained with optimization parameters that are usually used in the clinic. For comparison purposes, planning was also performed without the SURLAS on the phantom. Results All plans with the SURLAS on the phantom showed adequate dose covering 95% of the planning target volume (PTV D95%), average dose and coefficient of variation of the planning target volume (PTV) dose distribution regardless of the SURLAS' orientation with respect to the RANDO phantom. Likewise, all OAR showed clinically acceptable dose values. Spatial dose distributions and dose-volume histogram (DVH) evaluation showed negligible plan degradation due to the presence of the SURLAS. Beam-on time varied depending on the selected optimization parameters. Conclusion From the perspective of the radiation dosage, concurrent treatment with the SURLAS and HT IMRT is feasible as demonstrated by the obtained clinically acceptable treatment plans. In addition, proper

  17. Critical structure sparing in stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for central lung lesions: helical tomotherapy vs. volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Chi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helical tomotherapy (HT and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT are both advanced techniques of delivering intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Here, we conduct a study to compare HT and partial-arc VMAT in their ability to spare organs at risk (OARs when stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR is delivered to treat centrally located early stage non-small-cell lung cancer or lung metastases. METHODS: 12 patients with centrally located lung lesions were randomly chosen. HT, 2 & 8 arc (Smart Arc, Pinnacle v9.0 plans were generated to deliver 70 Gy in 10 fractions to the planning target volume (PTV. Target and OAR dose parameters were compared. Each technique's ability to meet dose constraints was further investigated. RESULTS: HT and VMAT plans generated essentially equivalent PTV coverage and dose conformality indices, while a trend for improved dose homogeneity by increasing from 2 to 8 arcs was observed with VMAT. Increasing the number of arcs with VMAT also led to some improvement in OAR sparing. After normalizing to OAR dose constraints, HT was found to be superior to 2 or 8-arc VMAT for optimal OAR sparing (meeting all the dose constraints (p = 0.0004. All dose constraints were met in HT plans. Increasing from 2 to 8 arcs could not help achieve optimal OAR sparing for 4 patients. 2/4 of them had 3 immediately adjacent structures. CONCLUSION: HT appears to be superior to VMAT in OAR sparing mainly in cases which require conformal dose avoidance of multiple immediately adjacent OARs. For such cases, increasing the number of arcs in VMAT cannot significantly improve OAR sparing.

  18. Pre-treatment and in-vivo dosimetry of Helical Tomotherapy treatment plans using the Dosimetry Check system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzenga, E.; Cagni, E.; Botti, A.; Orlandi, M.; Iori, M.

    2014-04-01

    Dosimetry Check (DC) is the world's first commercially available software that provides patient-specific pre-treatment (PTD) and in-vivo transit (IVD) dose quality assurance of static and rotational intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatments. To investigate the feasibility of replacing pre-treatment verification with in vivo dosimetry for Helical Tomotherapy (HT), the commissioning and the application of the DC software was realised. Dose distributions were reconstructed from Mega Voltage Computed Tomography (MVCT) detectors, inside phantoms or patients for a total number of 6 treatment plans. Planned, reconstructed MVCT dose and measurements using ionisation chambers and a matrix detector inserted in cylindrical and octagonal phantoms, respectively, were compared at the isocenter and in two dimensions using the γ2D and γ10-index (3% / 3 mm). The dose reconstruction PTD and IVD methods of DC software provided, compared to detector measurements and for three Quality Assurance (QA) plans, similar point dose deviations and γ2D-index passing rates: (0.4 ± 0.1)% vs. (-1.4 ± 1.6)%, and (96.8 ± 0.9)% vs. (98.9 ± 0.6)%, respectively. In terms of γ10-index passing rate, PTD and IVD modalities reached mean values of (99.3 ± 0.1)% and (97.2 ± 1.9)%, respectively. Also for the remaining three clinical plans, similar results were reached for IVD with γ10-index passing rate reaching mean values of (95.9 ± 3.4)%. Therefore, either the PTD and the IVD verification modalities proved to be a very promising tool for the patient-specific QA of HT Plans.

  19. Helical tomo-therapy for axial and para-spinal tumours: Experience of Institut Bergonie (14 cases); Experience de l'institut Bergonie a propos de 14 cas de tomotherapie helicoidale de tumeurs axiales et para-axiales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, H.; Dejean, C.; Henriques de Figueiredo, B.; Sargos, P.; Caron, J. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Bergonie, centre regional de lutte contre le cancer de Bordeaux et du Sud-Ouest, 229, cours de l' Argonne, 33076 Bordeaux cedex (France); Stoeckle, E. [Departement de chirurgie, institut Bergonie, centre regional de lutte contre le cancer de Bordeaux et du Sud-Ouest, 229, cours de l' Argonne, 33076 Bordeaux cedex (France); Bui, B.N.; Italiano, A. [Departement d' oncologie medicale, institut Bergonie, centre regional de lutte contre le cancer de Bordeaux et du Sud-Ouest, 229, cours de l' Argonne, 33076 Bordeaux cedex (France); Gille, O. [Service d' orthopedie, groupe hospitalier Pellegrin, CHU de Bordeaux, place Amelie-Raba-Leon, 33076 Bordeaux cedex (France); Kantor, G. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Bergonie, centre regional de lutte contre le cancer de Bordeaux et du Sud-Ouest, 229, cours de l' Argonne, 33076 Bordeaux cedex (France); Universite Victor-Segalen Bordeaux 2, 146, rue Leo-Saignat, 33076 Bordeaux cedex (France)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose. - To evaluate the feasibility of helical tomo-therapy intensity-modulated radiotherapy for the treatment of axial and para-spinal tumours. Patients and methods. - Fourteen consecutive patients with axial and para-spinal tumours at the Bergonie Institute between June 2007 and June 2009 were analysed. Various localizations were observed: four paravertebral tumours, five primitive vertebral tumours and six ilio-sacral or sacral tumours. Results. - The dose prescribed to the median of the planning target volume (PTV) varied from 45 to 68 Gy depending on histology. The maximum dose delivered to the PTV (D near max or D 2%) was 60.6 Gy (range 46.3-69.1). In the five cases where the tumour was located close to the spinal cord, the median value of D near max was 40.1 Gy (range 37.8-45.4). In the seven where the tumour was situated close to the cauda equina, the median value of D near max was 46.5 Gy (range 39.2-60). For two cases in whom the sciatic nerve was the nervous structure at risk, the D near max was 64.4 and 67 Gy. Six patients were in complete remission, six patients suffered a relapse at a median follow-up of 14.5 months (4-24), two died following local tumour progression and metastasis, tumoral stabilisation had been obtained in two patients. Treatment was well tolerated and was never interrupted in all patients. Conclusions. - Results from this preliminary series are encouraging, particularly concerning the good tolerance of this new intensity-modulated radiotherapy presently more available than proton therapy. (authors)

  20. Helical Tomotherapy Combined with Capecitabine in the Preoperative Treatment of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yii Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of helical tomotherapy plus capecitabine as a preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC. Thirty-six LARC patients receiving preoperative CRT were analyzed. Radiotherapy (RT consisted of 45 Gy to the regional lymph nodes and simultaneous-integrated boost (SIB 50.4 Gy to the tumor, 5 days/week for 5 weeks. Chemotherapy consisted of capecitabine 850 mg/m2, twice daily, during the RT days. Patients underwent surgery 6–8 weeks after completion of CRT. Information was collected for patient characteristics, treatment response, and acute and late toxicities. Grade 3/4 (G3+ toxicities occurred in 11.1% of patients (4/36. Sphincter preservation rate was 85.2% (23/27. Five patients (14.3% achieved pathological complete response. Tumor, nodal, and ypT0-2N0 downstaging were noted in 60% (21/35, 69.6% (16/23, and 57.1% (20/35. Tumor regression grade 2~4 was achieved in 28 patients (80%. After a median follow-up time of 35 months, the most common G3+ late morbidity was ileus and fistula (5.7%, 2/35. The study showed that capecitabine plus helical tomotherapy with an SIB is feasible in treatment of LARC. The treatment modality can achieve a very encouraging sphincter preservation rate and a favorable ypT0-2N0 downstaging rate without excessive toxicity.

  1. High-dose Helical Tomotherapy With Concurrent Full-dose Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jee Suk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Michael L.C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre (Singapore); Koom, Woong Sub; Yoon, Hong In; Chung, Yoonsun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Si Young [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jinsil, E-mail: jsseong@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To improve poor therapeutic outcome of current practice of chemoradiotherapy (CRT), high-dose helical tomotherapy (HT) with concurrent full-dose chemotherapy has been performed on patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), and the results were analyzed. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 39 patients with LAPC treated with radiotherapy using HT (median, 58.4 Gy; range, 50.8-59.9 Gy) and concomitant chemotherapy between 2006 and 2009. Radiotherapy was directed to the primary tumor with a 0.5-cm margin without prophylactic nodal coverage. Twenty-nine patients (79%) received full-dose (1000 mg/m{sup 2}) gemcitabine-based chemotherapy during HT. After completion of CRT, maintenance chemotherapy was administered to 37 patients (95%). Results: The median follow-up was 15.5 months (range, 3.4-43.9) for the entire cohort, and 22.5 months (range, 12.0-43.9) for the surviving patients. The 1- and 2-year local progression-free survival rates were 82.1% and 77.3%, respectively. Eight patients (21%) were converted to resectable status, including 1 with a pathological complete response. The median overall survival and progression-free survival were 21.2 and 14.0 months, respectively. Acute toxicities were acceptable with no gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity higher than Grade 3. Severe late GI toxicity ({>=}Grade 3) occurred in 10 patients (26%); 1 treatment-related death from GI bleeding was observed. Conclusion: High-dose helical tomotherapy with concurrent full-dose chemotherapy resulted in improved local control and long-term survival in patients with LAPC. Future studies are needed to widen the therapeutic window by minimizing late GI toxicity.

  2. Prostate cancer treated with image-guided helical TomoTherapy {sup registered} and image-guided LINAC-IMRT. Correlation between high-dose bladder volume, margin reduction, and genitourinary toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozdz, Sonia; Wendt, Thomas G. [University Hospital Jena, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jena (Germany); Schwedas, Michael; Salz, Henning [University Hospital Jena, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Radiation Oncology, Section of Medical Physics, Jena (Germany); Foller, Susan [University Hospital Jena, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Urology, Jena (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    We compared different image-guidance (IG) strategies for prostate cancer with high-precision IG intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using TomoTherapy {sup registered} (Accuray Inc., Madison, WI, USA) and linear accelerator (LINAC)-IMRT and their impact on planning target volume (PTV) margin reduction. Follow-up data showed reduced bladder toxicity in TomoTherapy patients compared to LINAC-IMRT. The purpose of this study was to quantify whether the treatment delivery technique and decreased margins affect reductions in bladder toxicity. Setup corrections from 30 patients treated with helical TomoTherapy and 30 treated with a LINAC were analyzed. These data were used to simulate three IG protocols based on setup error correction and a limited number of imaging sessions. For all patients, gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was documented and correlated with the treatment delivery technique. For fiducial marker (FM)-based RT, a margin reduction of up to 3.1, 3.0, and 4.8 mm in the left-right (LR), superior-inferior (SI), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions, respectively, could be achieved with calculation of a setup correction from the first three fractions and IG every second day. Although the bladder volume was treated with mean doses of 35 Gy in the TomoTherapy group vs. 22 Gy in the LINAC group, we observed less GU toxicity after TomoTherapy. Intraprostate FMs allow for small safety margins, help decrease imaging frequency after setup correction, and minimize the dose to bladder and rectum, resulting in lower GU toxicity. In addition, IMRT delivered with TomoTherapy helps to avoid hotspots in the bladder neck, a critical anatomic structure associated with post-RT urinary toxicity. (orig.) [German] Wir haben im Rahmen der Prostatakarzinombehandlung verschiedene bildgefuehrte (IG) Strategien der hochpraezisen intensitaetsmodulierten Radiotherapie (IMRT) unter Einsatz der Tomotherapie (TomoTherapy {sup registered}, Accuray Inc., Madison

  3. Dose-volume histogram comparison between static 5-field IMRT with 18-MV X-rays and helical tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Akihiro; Shibamoto, Yuta; Hattori, Yukiko; Tamura, Takeshi; Iwabuchi, Michio; Otsuka, Shinya; Sugie, Chikao; Yanagi, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    We treated prostate cancer patients with static 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using linac 18-MV X-rays or tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays. As X-ray energies differ, we hypothesized that 18-MV photon IMRT may be better for large patients and tomotherapy may be more suitable for small patients. Thus, we compared dose-volume parameters for the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) in 59 patients with T1-3 N0M0 prostate cancer who had been treated using 5-field IMRT. For these same patients, tomotherapy plans were also prepared for comparison. In addition, plans of 18 patients who were actually treated with tomotherapy were analyzed. The evaluated parameters were homogeneity indicies and a conformity index for the PTVs, and D2 (dose received by 2% of the PTV in Gy), D98, Dmean and V10-70 Gy (%) for OARs. To evaluate differences by body size, patients with a known body mass index were grouped by that index ( 25 kg/m(2)). For the PTV, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans compared with the 5-field IMRT plans. For the rectum, V10 Gy and V60 Gy were higher, whereas V20 Gy and V30 Gy were lower in the tomotherapy plans. For the bladder, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans. However, both plans were considered clinically acceptable. Similar trends were observed in 18 patients treated with tomotherapy. Obvious trends were not observed for body size. Tomotherapy provides equivalent dose distributions for PTVs and OARs compared with 18-MV 5-field IMRT. Tomotherapy could be used as a substitute for high-energy photon IMRT for prostate cancer regardless of body size.

  4. A motion phantom study on helical tomotherapy: the dosimetric impacts of delivery technique and motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanagaki, Brian [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908 (United States); Read, Paul W [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Box 800375, Charlottesville, VA 22908 (United States); Molloy, Janelle A [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinics (United States); Larner, James M [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Box 800375, Charlottesville, VA 22908 (United States); Sheng Ke [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Box 800375, Charlottesville, VA 22908 (United States)

    2007-01-07

    Helical tomotherapy (HT) can potentially be used for lung cancer treatment including stereotactic radiosurgery because of its advanced image guidance and its ability to deliver highly conformal dose distributions. However, previous theoretical and simulation studies reported that the effect of respiratory motion on statically planned tomotherapy treatments may cause substantial differences between the calculated and actual delivered radiation isodose distribution, particularly when the treatment is hypofractionated. In order to determine the dosimetric effects of motion upon actual HT treatment delivery, phantom film dosimetry measurements were performed under static and moving conditions using a clinical HT treatment unit. The motion phantom system was constructed using a programmable motor, a base, a moving platform and a life size lung heterogeneity phantom with wood inserts representing lung tissue with a 3.0 cm diameter spherical tumour density equivalent insert. In order to determine the effects of different motion and tomotherapy delivery parameters, treatment plans were created using jaw sizes of 1.04 cm and 2.47 cm, with incremental gantry rotation periods between the minimum allowed (10 s) and the maximum allowed (60 s). The couch speed varied from 0.009 cm s{sup -1} to 0.049 cm s{sup -1}, and delivered to a phantom under static and dynamic conditions with peak-to-peak motion amplitudes of 1.2 cm and 2 cm and periods of 3 and 5 s to simulate human respiratory motion of lung tumours. A cylindrical clinical target volume (CTV) was contoured to tightly enclose the tumour insert. 2.0 Gy was prescribed to 95% of the CTV. Two-dimensional dose was measured by a Kodak EDR2 film. Dynamic phantom doses were then quantitatively compared to static phantom doses in terms of axial dose profiles, cumulative dose volume histograms (DVH), percentage of CTV receiving the prescription dose and the minimum dose received by 95% of the CTV. The larger motion amplitude resulted

  5. Dosimetric comparison of Helical Tomotherapy and Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery for single brain metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linskey Mark E

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helical Tomotherapy (HT integrates linear accelerator and computerized tomography (CT technology to deliver IMRT. Targets are localized (i.e. outlined as gross tumor volume [GTV] and planning target volume [PTV] on the planning kVCT study while daily MVCT is used for correction of patient's set-up and assessment of inter-fraction anatomy changes. Based on dosimetric comparisons, this study aims to find dosimetric equivalency between single fraction HT and Gamma Knife® stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS for the treatment of single brain metastasis. Methods The targeting MRI data set from the GKSRS were used for tomotherapy planning. Five patients with single brain metastasis treated with GKSRS were re-planned in the HT planning station using the same prescribed doses. There was no expansion of the GTV to create the PTV. Sub-volumes were created within the PTV and prescribed to the maximum dose seen in the GKSRS plans to imitate the hot spot normally seen in GKSRS. The PTV objective was set as a region at risk in HT planning using the same prescribed dose to the PTV periphery as seen in the corresponding GKSRS plan. The tumor volumes ranged from 437–1840 mm3. Results Conformality indices are inconsistent between HT and GKSRS. HT generally shows larger lower isodose line volumes, has longer treatment time than GKSRS and can treat a much larger lesion than GKSRS. Both HT and GKSRS single fraction dose-volume toxicity may be prohibitive in treating single or multiple lesions depending on the number and the sizes of the lesions. Conclusion Based on the trend for larger lower dose volumes and more constricted higher dose volumes in HT as compared to GKSRS, dosimetric equivalency was not reached between HT and GKSRS.

  6. SU-E-J-203: Reconstruction of the Treatment Area by Use of Sinogram in Helical Tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haga, A; Nakagawa, K; Ida, S; Sakata, D; Magome, T; Nakano, M; Masutani, Y [The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Maurer, C; Ruchala, K; Chao, E; Casey, D [Accuray Co., Madison (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: TomoTherapy (Accuray Co.) has an image-guided radiotherapy system with megavoltage (MV) X-ray source and the on-board imaging device. With the MV computed tomography (MVCT), it became feasible to perform the efficient daily-3D registration of the patient position before each treatment delivery. This system also allows one to acquire the delivery sinogram during the actual treatment, which partly includes the information of the irradiated object. In this study, we try to develop the image reconstruction during treatment in helical Tomotherapy. Methods: Sinogram data were acquired during helical Tomotherapy delivery using an arc-shaped detector array that consists of 738 xenon-gas filled detector cells. In preprocessing, these were normalized by full air-scan data. A software program was developed that reconstructs 3D images during treatment with corrections as; (1) the regions outside the field were masked not to be added in the backprojection (a masking correction), and (2) each voxel of the reconstructed image was divided by the number of the X-ray passing through its voxel (a ray-passing correction). Results: Without masking and ray-passing corrections, the image reconstruction was failed. The masking correction made the image clear, however, the streak artifact was accompanied. The ray-passing correction reduced this artifact. Although the SNR (the ratio of mean to standard deviation in homogeneous region) and the contrast of the reconstructed image were slightly improved with the ray-passing correction, the masking correction only is enough for the visualization purpose. Conclusion: The visualization of the treatment area was feasible by use of the sinogram in helical Tomotherapy. This proposed method can be utilized in the treatment verification. This work was partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI 24234567. No COI, but the data in this paper were prepared by collaborators in Accuray.

  7. Dosimetric comparison of helical tomo-therapy and standard three-dimensional conformations radiotherapy within the frame of the treatment of a left breast cancer; Comparaison dosimetrique d'une tomotherapie helicoidale et d'une radiotherapie standard conformationnelle tridimensionnelle dans le cadre du traitement du cancer du sein gauche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrous-Anane, S.; Dessard-Diana, B.; Durdux, C.; Giraud, P.; Housset, M.; Giraud, P. [Hopital europeen Georges-Pompidou, 75 - Paris (France); Yassa, M. [Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal (Canada); Hijal, T. [McGill University Health Centre, Montreal (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    The use of intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT) resulted in a reduction of early side effects for patients treated by total mammary irradiation. Helical tomo-therapy uses a great number of circumferential beams which are modulated by an ultra-fast multi-blade collimator to deliver an IMRT with a high dose gradient. However, the use of this technique has been limited for the treatment of breast cancer because of the increased treatment duration and of the increase of low doses for organs at risk. The authors describe a simple technique to irradiate in a conformational and homogeneous way the whole mammary target volume while reducing the dose delivered to organs at risk. They discuss the results obtained during eight treatments of patients suffering from a left breast cancer. Short communication

  8. Correlation between dosimetric effect and intrafraction motion during prostate treatments delivered with helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langen, Katja M; Ngwa, Wilfred; Willoughby, Twyla R; Chauhan, Bhavin; Meeks, Sanford L; Kupelian, Patrick A [Department of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, 1400 South Orange Av., Orlando, FL 32806 (United States); Lu Weiguo; Olivera, Gustavo [TomoTherapy, Inc., 1240 Deming Way, Madison, WI 53717 (United States)], E-mail: katja.langen@orhs.org

    2008-12-21

    The dosimetric impact of intrafraction prostate motion was investigated for helical tomotherapy treatments. Measured motion tracks were used to calculate the dosimetric impact on delivered target dose distributions. A dynamic dose calculation engine was developed to facilitate this evaluation. It was found that the D{sub 95%} (minimum dose to 95% of the volume) changes in the prostate were well correlated with D{sub 95%} changes in the PTV. This means that the dosimetric impact of intrafraction motion is not restricted to the periphery of the target. The amount of motion was not well correlated with the dosimetric impact (measured in target D{sub 95%} changes) of motion. The relationship between motion and its dosimetric impact is complex and depends on the timing and direction of the movement. These findings have implications for motion management techniques. It appears that the use of target margins is not an effective strategy to protect the prostate from the effects of observed intrafraction motion. The complex relationship between motion and its dosimetric effect renders simple threshold-based intervention schemes inefficient. Monitoring of actual prostate motion would allow the documentation of the dosimetric impact and implementation of corrective action if needed. However, when motion management techniques are evaluated, it should be kept in mind that the dosimetric impact of observed prostate motion is small for the majority of fractions.

  9. Optimized planning target volume margin in helical tomotherapy for prostate cancer: is there a preferred method?

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Yuan Jie; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Shim, Jang Bo; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Jang, Min Sun; Yoon, Won Sup; Yang, Dae Sik; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong

    2015-01-01

    To compare the dosimetrical differences between plans generated by helical tomotherapy using 2D or 3D margining technique in in prostate cancer. Ten prostate cancer patients were included in this study. For 2D plans, planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding 5 mm (lateral/anterior-posterior) to clinical target volume (CTV). For 3D plans, 5 mm margin was added not only in lateral/anterior-posterior, but also in superior-inferior to CTV. Various dosimetrical indices, including the prescription isodose to target volume (PITV) ratio, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), target coverage index (TCI), modified dose homogeneity index (MHI), conformation number (CN), critical organ scoring index (COSI), and quality factor (QF) were determined to compare the different treatment plans. Differences between 2D and 3D PTV indices were not significant except for CI (p = 0.023). 3D margin plans (11195 MUs) resulted in higher (13.0%) monitor units than 2D margin plans (9728 MUs). There were no significant d...

  10. Analysis of modulation factor to shorten the delivery time in helical tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hidetoshi; Sasaki, Koji; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Tomita, Natsuo; Makita, Chiyoko; Nakashima, Kuniyasu; Yokoi, Kazushi; Kubota, Takashi; Yoshimoto, Manabu; Iwata, Tohru; Kodaira, Takeshi

    2017-05-01

    A low modulation factor (MF) maintaining a good dose distribution contributes to the shortening of the delivery time and efficiency of the treatment plan in helical tomotherapy. The purpose of this study was to reduce the delivery time using initial values and the upper limit values of MF. First, patients with head and neck cancer (293 cases) or prostate cancer (181 cases) treated between June 2011 and July 2015 were included in the analysis of MF values. The initial MF value (MFinitial ) was defined as the average MFactual value, and the upper limit of the MF value (MFUL ) was defined according the following equation: MFUL = 2 × standard deviation of MFactual value + the average MFactual Next, a treatment plan was designed for patients with head and neck cancer (62 cases) and prostate cancer (13 cases) treated between December 2015 and June 2016. The average MFactual value for the nasopharynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and prostate cases decreased from 2.1 to 1.9 (p = 0.0006), 1.9 to 1.6 (p delivery time for the nasopharynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and prostate cases also decreased from 19.9 s cm(-1) to 16.7 s cm(-1) (p delivery time was shortened by the adaptation of MFinitial and MFUL values with a reduction in the average MFactual for head and neck cancer and prostate cancer cases. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  11. Implant breast reconstruction followed by radiotherapy: Can helical tomotherapy become a standard irradiation treatment?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massabeau, Carole, E-mail: cmassabeau@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Wakil, Georges; Castro Pena, Pablo; Viard, Romain; Zefkili, Sofia; Reyal, Fabien; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain; Kirova, Youlia M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France)

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the benefits and limitations of helical tomotherapy (HT) for loco-regional irradiation of patients after a mastectomy and immediate implant-based reconstruction. Ten breast cancer patients with retropectoral implants were randomly selected for this comparative study. Planning target volumes (PTVs) 1 (the volume between the skin and the implant, plus margin) and 2 (supraclavicular, infraclavicular, and internal mammary nodes, plus margin) were 50 Gy in 25 fractions using a standard technique and HT. The extracted dosimetric data were compared using a 2-tailed Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-rank test. Doses for PTV1 and PTV2 were significantly higher with HT (V95 of 98.91 and 97.91%, respectively) compared with the standard technique (77.46 and 72.91%, respectively). Similarly, the indexes of homogeneity were significantly greater with HT (p = 0.002). HT reduced ipsilateral lung volume that received {>=}20 Gy (16.7 vs. 35%), and bilateral lungs (p = 0.01) and neighboring organs received doses that remained well below tolerance levels. The heart volume, which received 25 Gy, was negligible with both techniques. HT can achieve full target coverage while decreasing high doses to the heart and ipsilateral lung. However, the low doses to normal tissue volumes need to be reduced in future studies.

  12. Image Guided Hypofractionated Radiotherapy by Helical Tomotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma: Toxicity and Impact on Nadir PSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvina Barra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the toxicity of a hypofractionated schedule for primary radiotherapy (RT of prostate cancer as well as the value of the nadir PSA (nPSA and time to nadir PSA (tnPSA as surrogate efficacy of treatment. Material and Methods. Eighty patients underwent hypofractionated schedule by Helical Tomotherapy (HT. A dose of 70.2 Gy was administered in 27 daily fractions of 2.6 Gy. Acute and late toxicities were graded on the RTOG/EORTC scales. The nPSA and the tnPSA for patients treated with exclusive RT were compared to an equal cohort of 20 patients treated with conventional fractionation and standard conformal radiotherapy. Results. Most of patients (83% did not develop acute gastrointestinal (GI toxicity and 50% did not present genitourinary (GU toxicity. After a median follow-up of 36 months only grade 1 of GU and GI was reported in 6 and 3 patients as late toxicity. Average tnPSA was 30 months. The median value of nPSA after exclusive RT with HT was 0.28 ng/mL and was significantly lower than the median nPSA (0.67 ng/mL of the conventionally treated cohort (P=0.02. Conclusions. Hypofractionated RT schedule with HT for prostate cancer treatment reports very low toxicity and reaches a low level of nPSA that might correlate with good outcomes.

  13. Dosimetric evaluation of a three-phase adaptive radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma using helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, Winky Wing Ki, E-mail: winky.fung@gmail.com [Department of Radiotherapy, Hong Kong Sanatorium and Hospital (Hong Kong); Wu, Vincent Wing Cheung [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Teo, Peter Man Lung [Central Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Central (Hong Kong)

    2012-04-01

    helical tomotherapy of NPC.

  14. French national evaluation for helical tomo-therapy: description of indications, dose constraints and set-up margins; Evaluation nationale de la tomotherapie helicoidale: description des indications, des contraintes de dose et des seuils de repositionnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantor, G.; Richaud, P.; Caron, J.; Dejean, C. [Institut Bergonie, Service de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux cedex (France); Mahe, M.A. [Centre Rene-Gauducheau, Service de Radiotherapie, 44 - Saint-Herblain (France); Giraud, P.; Alapetite, C.; Fourquet, A.; Zefkili, S.; Mazal, A. [Institut Curie, Service de Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Giraud, P.; Durdux, C. [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Service d' Oncoradiotherapie, 75 - Paris, (France); Gardner, M. [Centre Rene-Huguenin, Service de Radiotherapie, 92 - Saint-Cloud (France); Le Prise, E. [Centre Eugene-Marquis, Service de Radiotherapie, 35 - Rennes (France); Maire, J.P.; Vendrely, V. [Hopital Saint-Andre, Service de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Lisbona, A.; Munos, C. [Centre Rene-Gauducheau, Service de Physique Medicale, 44 - Saint-Herblain (France)

    2007-11-15

    After a request for proposal initiated by National Institute against cancer (I.n.c.a.) in 2005, three French centers in France started tomo-therapy in the first semester of 2007. A national policy of evaluation was performed to study the feasibility of this innovative technique and to compare the interest of helical tomo-therapy with other modalities of conformal therapy. Common protocols have been designed to facilitate this evaluation. Description of dose, I.M.R.T. levels and constraints are achieved according to each selected indication as: sarcoma, head and neck tumors, lung cancer, mesothelioma, bone metastases, anal carcinoma and craniospinal irradiation. (authors)

  15. Clinical effectiveness, toxicity, and failure patterns of helical tomotherapy for postoperative oral cavity cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh CH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chen-Hsi Hsieh,1–3 Pei-Wei Shueng,1,4 Li-Ying Wang,5 Li-Jen Liao,6 Yu-Chin Lin,7 Ying-Shiung Kuo,8 Wu-Chia Lo,6 Chien-Fu Tseng,8 Hui-Ju Tien,1 Hsiu-Ling Chou,9,10 Yen-Ping Hsieh,11 Le-Jung Wu,1 Yu-Jen Chen3,12–14 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, 2Department of Medicine, 3Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, National Defense Medical Center, 5School and Graduate Institute of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, 6Department of Otolaryngology, 7Division of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, 8Department of Dentistry and Oral Surgery, 9Department of Nursing, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, 10Department of Nursing, Oriental Institute of Technology, Taipei, 11Department of Senior Citizen Service Management, National Taichung University of Science and Technology, Taichung, 12Department of Radiation Oncology, 13Department of Medical Research, Mackay Memorial Hospital, 14Graduate Institute of Sport Coaching Science, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan Background: The outcome of postoperative high- and intermediate-risk oral cavity cancer (OCC patients receiving helical tomotherapy (HT remains limited. Materials and methods: Between November 2006 and November 2012, 53 postoperative high- and intermediate-risk OCC patients treated with HT were enrolled. Results: The 4-year locoregional, local, and regional control rates were 66%, 76.4%, and 94.3%, respectively. The 4-year locoregional control rates of oral tongue and buccal mucosa cancer were 88.3% and 37.1%, respectively (P=0.012. Eleven (20.8% patients experienced locoregional failure. In-field failure occurred in six of 53 (11.3% in the primary area and three of 53 (5.7% in the regional lymph-node area. No marginal failure was noted. Two of 53 (3.8% experienced out-of-field failure. The rates of grade 3 dermatitis

  16. Dosimetric verification of dose calculation algorithm in the lung during total marrow irradiation using helical tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstanty, Ewelina; Malicki, Julian; Łagodowska, Katarzyna; Kowalik, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of proliferative diseases of the hematopoietic system involves, in most cases, chemotherapy combined with radiation therapy, which is intended to provide adequate immunosuppressant. Conventionally, total body irradiation (TBI) was used; however, total marrow irradiation (TMI) performed with helical tomotherapy (HT) has been proposed as an alternative, with the aim of delivering the highest dose in the target area (skeleton bone). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of the dose calculation algorithm for the lung in TMI delivered with HT. Thermoluminescent detectors (TLD-100 Harshaw) were used to measure delivered doses. Doses were calculated for 95 selected points in the central lung (53 TLDs) and near the rib bones (42 TLDs) in the anthropomorphic phantom. A total of 12 Gy were delivered (6 fractions of 2 Gy/fraction). HT-TMI technique reduces the dose delivered to the lungs in a phantom model to levels that are much lower than those reported for TBI delivered by a conventional linear accelerator. The mean calculated lung dose was 5.6 Gy versus a mean measured dose of 5.7 ± 2.4 Gy. The maximum and minimum measured doses were, respectively, 11.3 Gy (chest wall) and 2.8 Gy (central lung). At most of the 95 points, the measured dose was lower than the calculated dose, with the largest differences observed in the region located between the target volume and the adjacent lung tissue. The mean measured dose was lower than the calculated dose in both primary locations: -3.7% in the 42 rib-adjacent detectors and -3.0% in the 53 central lung TLDs. Our study has shown that the measured doses may be lower than those calculated by the HT-TMI calculation algorithm. Although these differences between calculated and measured doses are not clinically relevant, this finding merits further investigation.

  17. Feasibility of Helical Tomotherapy for Debulking Irradiation Before Stem Cell Transplantation in Malignant Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chargari, Cyrus [Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Radiation Oncology, Hopital du Val-de-Grace, Paris (France); Vernant, Jean-Paul [Hematology, Hopital Pitie Salpetriere, Paris (France); Tamburini, Jerome [Hematology, Hopital Cochin, Paris (France); Zefkili, Sofia [Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Fayolle, Maryse [Radiation Oncology, Hopital du Val-de-Grace, Paris (France); Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain [Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Kirova, Youlia M., E-mail: youlia.kirova@curie.net [Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Preliminary clinical experience has suggested that radiation therapy (RT) may be effectively incorporated into conditioning therapy before transplant for patients with refractory/relapsed malignant lymphoma. We investigated the feasibility of debulking selective lymph node irradiation before autologous and/or allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) using helical tomotherapy (HT). Methods and Materials: Six consecutive patients with refractory malignant lymphoma were referred to our institution for salvage HT before SCT. All patients had been previously heavily treated but had bulky residual tumor despite chemotherapy (CT) intensification. Two patients had received previous radiation therapy. HT delivered 30-40 Gy in the involved fields (IF), using 6 MV photons, 2 Gy per daily fraction. Total duration of treatment was 28 to 35 days. Results: Using HT, doses to critical organs (heart, lungs, esophagu, and parotids) were significantly decreased and highly conformational irradiation could be delivered to all clinical target volumes. HT delivery was technically possible, even in patients with lesions extremely difficult to irradiate in other conditions or in patients with previous radiation therapy. No Grade 2 or higher toxicity occurred. Four months after the end of HT, 5 patients experienced complete clinical, radiologic, and metabolic response and were subsequently referred for SCT. Conclusions: By more effectively sparing critical organs, HT may contribute to improving the tolerance of debulking irradiation before allograft. Quality of life may be preserved, and doses to the heart may be decreased. This is particularly relevant in heavily treated patients who are at risk for subsequent heart disease. These preliminary results require further prospective assessment.

  18. Helical tomotherapy in cervical cancer patients. Simultaneous integrated boost concept: technique and acute toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnitz, Simone; Stromberger, Carmen; Kawgan-Kagan, Michael; Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Jahn, Ulrich; Budach, Volker [Dept. of Radiooncology, Charite - Univ. Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Schneider, Achim; Koehler, Christhardt [Dept. of Gynecology Charite - Univ. Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Ulrich, Uwe [Dept. of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Martin Luther Hospital, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the acute toxicity of simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique for dose escalation with helical tomotherapy (HT) in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer. Patients and Methods: 20 patients (FIGO IB1 pN1-IIIB) underwent primary chemoradiation. Prior to chemoradiation, a laparoscopic pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy was performed. A boost region was defined using titanium clips during staging for planning target volume (PTV-B). Patients were treated with five weekly fractions of 1.8 Gy to a total dose of 50.4 Gy to the tumor region and the pelvic (para-aortic) lymph node region (PTV-A), and five weekly fractions of 2.12 Gy to a total dose of 59.36 Gy to the PTV-B. Chemotherapy consisted of weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2}. 19 patients underwent brachytherapy. Dose-volume histograms were evaluated and acute gastrointestinal (GI), genitourinary (GU), and hematologic toxicity were documented (CTCAE v3.0). Results: Pelvic and para-aortic lymph node metastases were confirmed in nine and four patients, respectively. Five patients refused laparoscopic staging. The mean volume of PTV-A and PTV-B was 1,570 {+-} 404 cm{sup 3} and 341 {+-} 125 cm{sup 3}, respectively. The mean dose to the bladder, rectum, and small bowel was 47.85 Gy, 45.76 Gy, and 29.71 Gy, respectively. No grade 4/5 toxicity was observed. Grade 2/3 hematologic toxicity occurred in 50% of patients and 5% experienced grade 3 diarrhea. There was no grade 3 GU toxicity. 19 patients underwent curettage 6-9 weeks after chemoradiation without any evidence of tumor. Conclusion: The concept of SIB for dose escalation in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer is feasible with a low rate of acute toxicity. Whether dose escalation can translate into improved outcome will be assessed after a longer follow-up. (orig.)

  19. Feasibility and response of helical tomotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Catholic Kwandong University International St. Mary' s Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sun yun; Moon, Seong Kwon; Cho, Kwang Hwan; Shin, Eung Jin; Lee, Moon Sung; Ryu, Chang Beom; Ko, Bong Min; Yun, Ji Na [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To investigate the treatment outcome and the toxicity of helical tomotherapy (HT) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We retrospectively reviewed 18 patients with 31 lesions from mCRC treated with HT between 2009 and 2013. The liver (9 lesions) and lymph nodes (9 lesions) were the most frequent sites. The planning target volume (PTV) ranged from 12 to 1,110 mL (median, 114 mL). The total doses ranged from 30 to 70 Gy in 10-30 fractions. When the alpha/beta value for the tumor was assumed to be 10 Gy for the biologically equivalent dose (BED), the total doses ranged from 39 to 119 Gy{sub 10} (median, 55 Gy{sub 10}). Nineteen lesions were treated with concurrent chemotherapy (CCRT). With a median follow-up time of 16 months, the median overall survival for 18 patients was 33 months. Eight lesions (26%) achieved complete response. The 1- and 3-year local progression free survival (LPFS) rates for 31 lesions were 45% and 34%, respectively. On univariate analysis, significant parameters influencing LPFS rates were chemotherapy response before HT, aim of HT, CCRT, PTV, BED, and adjuvant chemotherapy. On multivariate analysis, PTV < or =113 mL and BED >48 Gy{sub 10} were associated with a statistically significant improvement in LFPS. During HT, four patients experienced grade 3 hematologic toxicities, each of whom had also received CCRT. The current study demonstrates the efficacy and tolerability of HT for mCRC. To define optimal RT dose according to tumor size of mCRC, further study should be needed.

  20. Quality control of reaction time sheets tomotherapy equipment; Control de calidad del teimpo de reaccion de las laminas de un equipo de tomoterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevillano Martinez, D.; Minguez Aguilar, C.; Garcia Baltar, J. A.; Delgado Rodriguez, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    The team of helical tomotherapy intensity modulated by a binary multi leaf collimator moved by air pressure. In this paper were obtained independently latency curves multi leaf collimator for comparison with those included in the scheduler. Curves have also been measured by varying the number of sheets used and the orientation of the accelerator.

  1. Effect of CT contrast on volumetric arc therapy planning (RapidArc and helical tomotherapy) for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Alan J.; Vora, Nayana [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Suh, Steve [Department of Radiation Physics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Liu, An, E-mail: aliu@coh.org [Department of Radiation Physics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Schultheiss, Timothy E. [Department of Radiation Physics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of the study were to evaluate the effect of intravenous contrast in the dosimetry of helical tomotherapy and RapidArc treatment for head and neck cancer and determine if it is acceptable during the computed tomography (CT) simulation to acquire only CT with contrast for treatment planning of head and neck cancer. Overall, 5 patients with head and neck cancer (4 men and 1 woman) treated on helical tomotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. For each patient, 2 consecutive CT scans were performed. The first CT set was scanned before the contrast injection and secondary study set was scanned 45 seconds after contrast. The 2 CTs were autoregistered using the same Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine coordinates. Tomotherapy and RapidArc plans were generated on 1 CT data set and subsequently copied to the second CT set. Dose calculation was performed, and dose difference was analyzed to evaluate the influence of intravenous contrast media. The dose matrix used for comparison included mean, minimum and maximum doses of planning target volume (PTV), PTV dose coverage, and V{sub 45} {sub Gy}, V{sub 30} {sub Gy}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} organ doses. Treatment planning on contrasted images generally showed a lower dose to both organs and target than plans on noncontrasted images. The doses for the points of interest placed in the organs and target rarely changed more than 2% in any patient. In conclusion, treatment planning using a contrasted image had insignificant effect on the dose to the organs and targets. In our opinion, only CT with contrast needs to be acquired during the CT simulation for head and neck cancer. Dose calculations performed on contrasted images can potentially underestimate the delivery dose slightly. However, the errors of planning on a contrasted image should not affect the result in clinically significant way.

  2. Investigation of pitch and jaw width to decrease delivery time of helical tomotherapy treatments for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Monica; Fontenot, Jonas D; Gibbons, John P; Lee, Tae Kyu; Rosen, Isaac I; Fields, Robert S; Hogstrom, Kenneth R

    2011-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy plans using a combination of pitch and jaw width settings were developed for 3 patients previously treated for head and neck cancer. Three jaw widths (5, 2.5, and 1 cm) and 4 pitches (0.86, 0.43, 0.287, and 0.215) were used with a (maximum) modulation factor setting of 4. Twelve plans were generated for each patient using an identical optimization procedure (e.g., number of iterations, objective weights, and penalties, etc.), based on recommendations from TomoTherapy (Madison, WI). The plans were compared using isodose plots, dose volume histograms, dose homogeneity indexes, conformity indexes, radiobiological models, and treatment times. Smaller pitches and jaw widths showed better target dose homogeneity and sparing of normal tissue, as expected. However, the treatment time increased inversely proportional to the jaw width, resulting in delivery times of 24 ± 1.9 min for the 1-cm jaw width. Although treatment plans produced with the 2.5-cm jaw were dosimetrically superior to plans produced with the 5-cm jaw, subsequent calculations of tumor control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities suggest that these differences may not be radiobiologically meaningful. Because treatment plans produced with the 5-cm jaw can be delivered in approximately half the time of plans produced with the 2.5-cm jaw (5.1 ± 0.6 min vs. 9.5 ± 1.1 min), use of the 5-cm jaw in routine treatment planning may be a viable approach to decreasing treatment delivery times from helical tomotherapy units. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of dose homogeneity for loose helical tomotherapy delivery in the context of breath-hold radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bryan; Kron, Tomas; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake

    2005-05-01

    Loose helical delivery is a potential solution to account for respiration-driven tumour motion in helical tomotherapy (HT). In this approach, a treatment is divided into a set of interlaced 'loose' helices commencing at different gantry angles. Each loose helix covers the entire target length in one gantry rotation during a single breath-hold. The dosimetric characteristics of loose helical delivery were investigated by delivering a 6 MV photon beam in a HT-like manner. Multiple scenarios of conventional 'tight' HT and loose helical deliveries were modelled in treatment planning software, and carried out experimentally with Kodak EDR2 film. The advantage of loose helical delivery lies in its ability to produce a more homogeneous dose distribution by eliminating the 'thread' effect—an inherent characteristic of HT, which results in dose modulations away from the axis of gantry rotation. However, loose helical delivery was also subjected to undesirable dose modulations in the direction of couch motion (termed 'beating' effect), when the ratio between the number of beam projections per gantry rotation (n) and pitch factor (p) was a non-integer. The magnitude of dose modulations decreased with an increasing n/p ratio. The results suggest that for the current HT unit (n = 51), dose modulations could be kept under 5% by selecting a pitch factor smaller than 7. A pitch factor of this magnitude should be able to treat a target up to 30 cm in length. Loose helical delivery should increase the total session time only by a factor of 2, while the planning time should stay the same since the total number of beam projections remains unchanged. Considering its dosimetric advantage and clinical practicality, loose helical delivery is a promising solution for the future HT treatments of respiration-driven targets.

  4. Arc binary intensity modulated radiation therapy (AB IMRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun

    The state of the art Intensity Modulate Radiation Therapy (IMRT) has been one of the most significant breakthroughs in the cancer treatment in the past 30 years. There are two types of IMRT systems. The first system is the binary-based tomotherapy, represented by the Peacock (Nomos Corp) and Tomo unit (TomoTherapy Inc.), adopting specific binary collimator leafs to deliver intensity modulated radiation fields in a serial or helical fashion. The other uses the conventional dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) to deliver intensity modulated fields through a number of gantry positions. The proposed Arc Binary IMRT attempts to deliver Tomo-like IMRT with conventional dynamic MLC and combines the advantages of the two types of IMRT techniques: (1) maximizing the number of pencil beams for better dose optimization, (2) enabling conventional linear accelerator with dynamic MLC to deliver Tomo-like IMRT. In order to deliver IMRT with conventional dynamic MLC in a binary fashion, the slice-by-slice treatment with limited slice thickness has been proposed in the thesis to accommodate the limited MLC traveling speed. Instead of moving the patient to subsequent treatment slices, the proposed method offsets MLC to carry out the whole treatment, slice by slice sequentially, thus avoid patient position error. By denoting one arc pencil beam set as a gene, genetic algorithm (GA) is used as the searching engine for the dose optimization process. The selection of GA parameters is a crucial step and has been studied in depth so that the optimization process will converge with reasonable speed. Several hypothetical and clinical cases have been tested with the proposed IMRT method. The comparison of the dose distribution with other commercially available IMRT systems demonstrates the clear advantage of the new method. The proposed Arc Binary Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy is not only theoretically sound but practically feasible. The implementation of this method would expand the

  5. Characterization of metal oxide field-effect transistors for first helical tomotherapy Hi-Art II unit in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinhikar Rajesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To characterize metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs for a 6-MV photon beam with a first helical tomotherapy Hi-Art II unit in India. Materials and Methods : Standard sensitivity MOSFETs were first calibrated and then characterized for reproducibility, field size dependence, angular dependence, fade effects, and temperature dependence. The detector sensitivity was estimated for static as well as rotational modes for three jaw settings (1.0 cm × 40 cm, 2.5 cm × 40 cm, and 5 cm × 40 cm at 1.5-cm depth with a source-to-axis distance (SAD of 85 cm in virtual water slabs. The A1SL ion chamber and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs were used to compare the results. Results : No significant difference was found in the detector sensitivity for static and rotational procedures. The average detector sensitivity for static procedures was 1.10 mV/cGy (SD 0.02 while it was 1.12 mV/cGy (SD 0.02 for rotational procedures. The average detector sensitivity found was the same within the experimental uncertainty for static and rotational dose deliveries. The MOSFET reading was consistent and its reproducibility was excellent (+0.5% while there was no significant dependence of field size. The angular dependence of less than 1.0% was observed. There was negligible fading effect of the MOSFET. The MOSFET response was found independent of temperature in the range 18°-30°. The ion chamber readings were assumed to be a reference for the estimation of the MOSFET calibration factor. The ion chamber and the TLD were in good agreement (+2% with each other. Conclusion : This study deals only with the measurements and calibration performed on the surface of the phantom. MOSFET was calibrated and validated for phantom surface measurements for a 6-MV photon beam generated by a tomotherapy machine. The sensitivity of the detector was the same for both modes of treatment delivery with tomotherapy. The performance of the MOSFET was validated

  6. Adaptive radiotherapy for soft tissue changes during helical tomotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duma, M.N.; Kampfer, S.; Winkler, C.; Geinitz, H. [Universitaetsklinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schuster, T. [Universitaetsklinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology

    2012-03-15

    The goal of the present study was to assess the frequency and impact of replanning triggered solely by soft tissue changes observed on the daily setup mega-voltage CT (MVCT) in head and neck cancer (H and N) helical tomotherapy (HT). A total of 11 patients underwent adaptive radiotherapy (ART) using MVCT. Preconditions were a soft tissue change > 0.5 cm and a tight mask. The dose-volume histograms (DVHs) derived from the initial planning kVCT (inPlan), the recalculated DVHs of the fraction (fx) when replanning was decided (actSit) and the DVHs of the new plan (adaptPlan) were compared. Assessed were the following: maximum dose (D{sub max}), minimum dose (D{sub min}), and mean dose (D{sub mean}) to the planning target volume (PTV) normalized to the prescribed dose; the D{sub mean}/fx to the parotid glands (PG), oral cavity (OC), and larynx (Lx); and the D{sub max}/fx to the spinal cord (SC) in Gy/fx. No patient had palpable soft tissue changes. The median weight loss at the moment of replanning was 2.3 kg. The median PTV D{sub mean} was 100% for inPlan, 103% for actSit, and 100% for adaptPlan. The PTV was always covered by the prescribed dose. A statistically significant increase was noted for all organs at risk (OAR) in the actSit. The D{sub mean} to the Lx, the D{sub mean} to the OC and the D{sub max} to the SC were statistically better in the adaptPlan. No statistically significant improvement was achieved by ART for the PGs. No significant correlations between weight and volume loss or between the volume changes of the organs to each other were observed, except a strong positive correlation of the shrinkage of the PGs ({rho} = + 0.77, p = 0.005). Soft tissue shrinkage without clinical palpable changes will not affect the coverage of the PTV, but translates into a higher delivered dose to the PTV itself and the normal tissue outside the PTV. The gain by ART in individual patients - especially in patients who receive doses close to the tolerance doses of the OAR

  7. SU-E-T-337: Dosimetric Study of TMI Using Helical Tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phurailatpam, R; Swamidas, J; Sastri, J; Josi, K; Mathankar, M; Paul, S; Sawant, M; Moundekar, P [ACTREC, TMC, Mumbai, Maharastra (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimtry of TMI using Helical Tomotherapy (HT). Methods: Whole body CT data sets of 4 patients (median age : range:12–37 years) with 5mm slice thickness were used for planning in HT (TPS version 4.2.3). The contouring of the target and organ at risks (OAR) were delineated ( Oncentra Master Plan v 4.1). Two plans were generated using 5cm and 2.5 cm field widths.The modulation factor and pitch was 3 and 0.3 respectively. Dose to PTV, OARs and the dose homogeneity were evaluated. The doses obtained were compared with the existimg literature. Dose delivery verification was carried out by point dose and 2D array measurements with ion chamber and Arc check dosimetry (Sun NuclearTM) system repectively. The prescribed dose was 14.4 Gy in 8 fractions. Results: The mean PTV volume was 7341.28cc (sd=2353) The dose homogeneity index of PTV was 12.03(sd=2.98) for 2.5cm-FW and 14.61 (sd=1.33) for 5cm-FW.The conformation number for 2.5 and 5 cm plans are 0.6328(sd=0.09) and 0.5915 (sd=0.0376) respectively. The mean dose(Gy) to the OARs were as follows for 2.5cm-FW : eyes, lens, lungs, kidneys, heart, liver,thyroid and testes for are 4.12,1.9,6.61,4.04,4.85,6.06,7.17 and 1.27. The mean dose(Gy) to the OARs were as follows for 5cm-FW :eyes, lens, lungs, kidneys, heart, liver,thyroid and testes for are 4.45,3.14,6.79,4.02,5.01,6.01,10.8 and 1.33. The mean variation of the point dose as compared to the expected dose was within 2% and the gamma analysis was at 91%. Conclusion: It was concluded that 5cm field width plans produces optimal dose volume parameters with deliverable treatment time. From this initial dissymmetric study, it was concluded that the treatment planning and the dose delivery verification was feasible considering the complexity of the TMI.

  8. Helical tomotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy: New therapeutic arms in the breast cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauche, Olivier; Kirova, Youlia M; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Costa, Emilie; Lemanski, Claire; Bourgier, Celine; Riou, Olivier; Tiberi, David; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain; Azria, David

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyse clinical and dosimetric results of helical tomotherapy (HT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in complex adjuvant breast and nodes irradiation. METHODS Seventy-three patients were included (31 HT and 42 VMAT). Dose were 63.8 Gy (HT) and 63.2 Gy (VMAT) in the tumour bed, 52.2 Gy in the breast, 50.4 Gy in supraclavicular nodes (SCN) and internal mammary chain (IMC) with HT and 52.2 Gy and 49.3 Gy in IMC and SCN with VMAT in 29 fractions. Margins to particle tracking velocimetry were greater in the VMAT cohort (7 mm vs 5 mm). RESULTS For the HT cohort, the coverage of clinical target volumes was as follows: Tumour bed: 99.4% ± 2.4%; breast: 98.4% ± 4.3%; SCN: 99.5% ± 1.2%; IMC: 96.5% ± 13.9%. For the VMAT cohort, the coverage was as follows: Tumour bed: 99.7% ± 0.5%, breast: 99.3% ± 0.7%; SCN: 99.6% ± 1.4%; IMC: 99.3% ± 3%. For ipsilateral lung, Dmean and V20 were 13.6 ± 1.2 Gy, 21.1% ± 5% (HT) and 13.6 ± 1.4 Gy, 20.1% ± 3.2% (VMAT). Dmean and V30 of the heart were 7.4 ± 1.4 Gy, 1% ± 1% (HT) and 10.3 ± 4.2 Gy, 2.5% ± 3.9% (VMAT). For controlateral breast Dmean was 3.6 ± 0.2 Gy (HT) and 4.6 ± 0.9 Gy (VMAT). Acute skin toxicity grade 3 was 5% in the two cohorts. CONCLUSION HT and VMAT in complex adjuvant breast irradiation allow a good coverage of target volumes with an acceptable acute tolerance. A longer follow-up is needed to assess the impact of low doses to healthy tissues. PMID:27648167

  9. Helical tomotherapy in the treatment of pediatric malignancies: a preliminary report of feasibility and acute toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beltrán César

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation therapy plays a central role in the management of many childhood malignancies and Helical Tomotherapy (HT provides potential to decrease toxicity by limiting the radiation dose to normal structures. The aim of this article was to report preliminary results of our clinical experience with HT in pediatric malignancies. Methods In this study 66 consecutive patients younger than 14 years old, treated with HT at our center between January 2006 and April 2010, have been included. We performed statistical analyses to assess the relationship between acute toxicity, graded according to the RTOG criteria, and several clinical and treatment characteristics such as a dose and irradiation volume. Results The median age of patients was 5 years. The most common tumor sites were: central nervous system (57%, abdomen (17% and thorax (6%. The most prevalent histological types were: medulloblastoma (16 patients, neuroblastoma (9 patients and rhabdomyosarcoma (7 patients. A total of 52 patients were treated for primary disease and 14 patients were treated for recurrent tumors. The majority of the patients (72% were previously treated with chemotherapy. The median prescribed dose was 51 Gy (range 10-70 Gy. In 81% of cases grade 1 or 2 acute toxicity was observed. There were 11 cases (16,6% of grade 3 hematological toxicity, two cases of grade 3 skin toxicity and one case of grade 3 emesis. Nine patients (13,6% had grade 4 hematological toxicity. There were no cases of grade 4 non-hematological toxicities. On the univariate analysis, total dose and craniospinal irradiation (24 cases were significantly associated with severe toxicity (grade 3 or more, whereas age and chemotherapy were not. On the multivariate analysis, craniospinal irradiation was the only significant independent risk factor for grade 3-4 toxicity. Conclusion HT in pediatric population is feasible and safe treatment modality. It is characterized by an acceptable level of

  10. Dosimetric comparison of helical tomotherapy and dynamic conformal arc therapy in stereotactic radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tsair-Fwu; Chao, Pei-Ju; Wang, Chang-Yu; Lan, Jen-Hong; Huang, Yu-Je; Hsu, Hsuan-Chih; Sung, Chieh-Cheng; Su, Te-Jen; Lian, Shi-Long; Fang, Fu-Min

    2011-01-01

    The dosimetric results of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) performed using dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT) with the Novalis system and helical TomoTherapy (HT) were compared using plan quality indices. The HT plans were created for 10 consecutive patients with VS previously treated with SRS using the Novalis system. The dosimetric indices used to compare the techniques included the conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) for the planned target volume (PTV), the comprehensive quality index (CQI) for nine organs at risk (OARs), gradient score index (GSI) for the dose drop-off outside the PTV, and plan quality index (PQI), which was verified using the plan quality discerning power (PQDP) to incorporate 3 plan indices, to evaluate the rival plans. The PTV ranged from 0.27-19.99 cm(3) (median 3.39 cm(3)), with minimum required PTV prescribed doses of 10-16 Gy (median 12 Gy). Both systems satisfied the minimum required PTV prescription doses. HT conformed better to the PTV (CI: 1.51 ± 0.23 vs. 1.94 ± 0.34; p < 0.01), but had a worse drop-off outside the PTV (GSI: 40.3 ± 10.9 vs. 64.9 ± 13.6; p < 0.01) compared with DCAT. No significant difference in PTV homogeneity was observed (HI: 1.08 ± 0.03 vs. 1.09 ± 0.02; p = 0.20). HT had a significantly lower maximum dose in 4 OARs and significant lower mean dose in 1 OAR; by contrast, DCAT had a significantly lower maximum dose in 1 OAR and significant lower mean dose in 2 OARs, with the CQI of the 9 OARs = 0.92 ± 0.45. Plan analysis using PQI (HT 0.37 ± 0.12 vs. DCAT 0.65 ± 0.08; p < 0.01), and verified using the PQDP, confirmed the dosimetric advantage of HT. However, the HT system had a longer beam-on time (33.2 ± 7.4 vs. 4.6 ± 0.9 min; p < 0.01) and consumed more monitor units (16772 ± 3803 vs. 1776 ± 356.3; p < 0.01). HT had a better dose conformity and similar dose homogeneity but worse dose gradient than DCAT. Plan analysis confirmed the dosimetric advantage of HT

  11. Peripheral Dose Heterogeneity Due to the Thread Effect in Total Marrow Irradiation With Helical Tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Yutaka [Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Verneris, Michael R. [Division of Hematology, Oncology, and Bone Marrow Transplantation, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Dusenbery, Kathryn E. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Wilke, Christopher T. [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Storme, Guy; Weisdorf, Daniel J. [Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Hui, Susanta K., E-mail: huixx019@umn.edu [Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To report potential dose heterogeneity leading to underdosing at different skeletal sites in total marrow irradiation (TMI) with helical tomotherapy due to the thread effect and provide possible solutions to reduce this effect. Methods and Materials: Nine cases were divided into 2 groups based on patient size, defined as maximum left-to-right arm distance (mLRD): small mLRD (≤47 cm) and large mLRD (>47 cm). TMI treatment planning was conducted by varying the pitch and modulation factor while a jaw size (5 cm) was kept fixed. Ripple amplitude, defined as the peak-to-trough dose relative to the average dose due to the thread effect, and the dose–volume histogram (DVH) parameters for 9 cases with various mLRD was analyzed in different skeletal regions at off-axis (eg, bones of the arm or femur), at the central axis (eg, vertebrae), and planning target volume (PTV), defined as the entire skeleton plus 1-cm margin. Results: Average ripple amplitude for a pitch of 0.430, known as one of the magic pitches that reduce thread effect, was 9.2% at 20 cm off-axis. No significant differences in DVH parameters of PTV, vertebrae, or femur were observed between small and large mLRD groups for a pitch of ≤0.287. Conversely, in the bones of the arm, average differences in the volume receiving 95% and 107% dose (V95 and V107, respectively) between large and small mLRD groups were 4.2% (P=.016) and 16% (P=.016), respectively. Strong correlations were found between mLRD and ripple amplitude (rs=.965), mLRD and V95 (rs=−.742), and mLRD and V107 (rs=.870) of bones of the arm. Conclusions: Thread effect significantly influences DVH parameters in the bones of the arm for large mLRD patients. By implementing a favorable pitch value and adjusting arm position, peripheral dose heterogeneity could be reduced.

  12. Helical tomo-therapy of ORL cancers: prospective scintigraphic assessment of parotid gland protection; La tomotherapie helicoidale des cancers ORL: evaluation scintigraphique prospective de la preservation des glandes parotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berges, O.; Zefkili, S.; Bolle, S.; Giraud, P. [Departement d' oncologie-radiotherapie, institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Belin, L.; Savignoni, A. [Departement de biostatistiques, institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Benamor, M.; Petras, S. [Departement de medecine nucleaire, institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Jouffroy, T.; Rodriguez, J. [Departement de chirurgie, service d' ORL, institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Giraud, P. [Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, hopital europeen Georges-Pompidou, 75 - Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors discuss data and results of treatments performed on 19 patients suffering from ORL cancers and submitted to helical tomo-therapy in order to protect their parotid glands. They discuss the planning target volume coverage and the assessment of the salivary excretion fraction by scintigraphy before, and six months and twelve months after the tomography. It appears that the helical tomography protects the parotid glands, thus reducing the incidence and severity of xerostomia by 6 and 12 months. The authors indicate a threshold average dose for the protection of gland functionality. Short communication

  13. Breast cancer and funnel chest. Comparing helical tomotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with regard to the shape of pectus excavatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhl, M.; Sterzing, F.; Habl, G.; Schubert, K.; Hof, H.; Debus, J.; Herfarth, K. [Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-02-15

    Preserving lung, heart, and the contralateral breast from toxicity is a technical challenge in women with funnel chest, who require breast irradiation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether helical tomotherapy (HT) offers an advantage compared to three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for patients with pectus excavatum with regard to its shape. Ten breast cancer patients with pectus excavatum were graded into a low or high deformation group using different indices, measured and calculated by using the planning CT. A planning comparison was performed, creating plans for CRT and HT. Target uniformity, target conformity, and exposure to the organs at risk (OARs) were compared. The uniformity and conformity of the target dose distribution and the median/average dose of the planning target volume (PTV) was inferior in CRT compared to HT in both deformation groups. By using tomotherapy, the volume of the lungs, the contralateral breast, and the heart, which received high dose exposure, could be significantly reduced. Tomotherapy plans led to a significantly higher low dose exposure to the lungs and contralateral breast. This is the first study which evaluates a group of 10 breast cancer patients with funnel chest. Better uniformity and conformity combined with a significant reduction of high dose exposure to the OARs can be reached using tomotherapy. However, tomotherapy plans have a significantly larger volume of low dose to the lungs and contralateral breast. Therefore, the stochastic risk should be considered after low dose exposure in women with low deformation. (orig.)

  14. SU-E-P-37: Helical Tomotherapy to LINAC Plan Conversion Utilizing RayStation Fallback Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X; Penagaricano, J; Liang, X; Morrill, S; Corry, P; Griffin, R; Paudel, N; Ratanatharathorn, V [Vaneerat, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: RayStation Fallback (RSF) plan was developed to switch patient’s treatment from Helical Tomotherapy (HT) to Varian TrueBeam. Helical Tomotherapy plans were compared with the corresponding RSF plans by looking at the following dosimetric parameters: PTV coverage (Dmean and D95), Paddick conformity index (CI), uniformity index (UI=(D98-D2)/Drx) and organ-at-risk (OAR) doses. Methods: Five patients with five tumor sites including larynx, head and neck, esophagus, lung, and prostate previously treated with HT were re-planned using RSF treatment planning station(TPS) to best match the HT treatment plans. IMRT technique with nine fields 6 MV X-ray beams and a static multi-leaf collimator (MLC) were used for RSF plans without any additional attempt to further optimize the RSF plans. Results: A physician evaluated and confirmed the clinical acceptability of the RSF plans. Both HT and RSF plans gave comparable PTV coverage with a maximum percentage difference for D95 of 0.7%. HT plans had a better CIs ranging from 2%–15% higher conformity compared to RSF plans. HT plans also had better UIs for all tumor sites except the esophagus. The UIs were 1.6% to 8.9% lower for HT plans compared to RSF plans. Both HT and RSF plans gave comparable and acceptable OAR doses. However, the integral dose was 1%–15% higher for HT plans compared to RSF plans. Conclusion: RSF plans were simple and fast to generate. In the study cases of 5 various tumor sites, RSF efficiently created clinically acceptable plans without further optimization. However, further optimization for any IMRT plan can be done if clinically warranted. The absolute differences in CI and UI were small between RSF and HT plans.

  15. SU-E-P-30: Clinical Applications of Spatially Fractionated Radiation Therapy (GRID) Using Helical Tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X; Liang, X [University of Arkansas Medical Science, Little Rock, AR (United States); Penagaricano, J [University of Arkansas for Medical Science, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Morrill, S; Corry, P; Paudel, N; Vaneerat, V Ratanatharathorn [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Yan, Y [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Griffin, R [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present the first clinical applications of Helical Tomotherapy-based spatially fractionated radiotherapy (HT-GRID) for deep seated tumors and associated dosimetric study. Methods: Ten previously treated GRID patients were selected (5 HT-GRID and 5 LINAC-GRID using a commercially available GRID block). Each case was re-planned either in HT-GRID or LINAC-GRID for a total of 10 plans for both techniques using same prescribed dose of 20 Gy to maximum point dose of GRID GTV. For TOMO-GRID, a programmable virtual TOMOGRID template mimicking a GRID pattern was generated. Dosimetric parameters compared included: GRID GTV mean dose (Dmean) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD), GRID GTV dose inhomogeneity (Ratio(valley/peak)), normal tissue Dmean and EUD, and other organs-at-risk(OARs) doses. Results: The median tumor volume was 634 cc, ranging from 182 to 4646 cc. Median distance from skin to the deepest part of tumor was 22cm, ranging from 8.9 to 38cm. The median GRID GTV Dmean and EUD was 10.65Gy (9.8–12.5Gy) and 7.62Gy (4.31–11.06Gy) for HT-GRID and was 6.73Gy (4.44–8.44Gy) and 3.95Gy (0.14–4.2Gy) for LINAC-GRID. The median Ratio(valley/peak) was 0.144(0.05–0.29) for HT-GRID and was 0.055(0.0001–0.14) for LINAC-GRID. For normal tissue in HT-GRID, the median Dmean and EUD was 1.24Gy (0.34–2.54Gy) and 5.45 Gy(3.45–6.89Gy) and was 0.61 Gy(0.11–1.52Gy) and 6Gy(4.45–6.82Gy) for LINAC-GRID. The OAR doses were comparable between the HT-GRID and LINAC-GRID. However, in some cases it was not possible to avoid a critical structure in LINAC-GRID; while HT-GRID can spare more tissue doses for certain critical structures. Conclusion: HT-GRID delivers higher GRID GTV Dmean, EUD and Ratio(valley/peak) compared to LINAC-GRID. HT-GRID delivers higher Dmean and lower EUD for normal tissue compared to LINAC-GRID. TOMOGRID template can be highly patient-specific and allows adjustment of the GRID pattern to different tumor sizes and shapes when they are deeply

  16. Preliminary Results of Helical Tomotherapy in Patients with Complex-Shaped Meningiomas Close to the Optic Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiappacasse, Luis, E-mail: lschiap@gmail.com; Cendales, Ricardo; Sallabanda, Kita; Schnitman, Franco; Samblas, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common benign intracranial tumor. Meningiomas close to the optic pathway represent a treatment challenge both for surgery and radiotherapy. The aim of this article is to describe early results of helical tomotherapy treatment in complex-shaped meningiomas close to the optic pathway. Twenty-eight patients were consecutively treated. All patients were immobilized with a thermoplastic head mask and planned with the aid of a magnetic resonance imaging-computed tomography fusion. All treatments included daily image guidance. Pretreatment symptoms and acute toxicity were recorded. Median age was 57.5 years, and 92.8% patients had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status scale {<=}1. The most common localizations were the sella turcica, followed by the cavernous sinus and the sphenoid. The most common symptoms were derived from cranial nerve deficits. Tomotherapy was administered as primary treatment in 35.7% of patients, as an adjuvant treatment in 32.4%, and as a rescue treatment after postsurgical progression in 32.1% patients. Most patients were either inoperable or Simpson IV. Total dose varied between 5000 and 5400 cGy; fractionation varied between 180 and 200 cGy. Median dose to the planning target volume was 51.7 Gy (range, 50.2-55.9 Gy). Median coverage index was 0.89 (range, 0.18-0.97). Median homogeneity index was 1.05 (range, 1-1.12). Acute transient toxicity was grade 1 and included headache in 35.7% patients, ocular pain/dryness in 28.5%, and radiation dermatitis in 25%. Thus far, with a maximal follow-up of 3 years, no late effects have been seen and all patients have a radiological stabilization of the disease. Helical tomotherapy offered a safe and effective therapeutic alternative for patients with inoperable or subtotally resected complex-shaped meningiomas close to the optic pathway. Acceptable coverage and homogeneity indexes were achieved with appropriate values for maximal doses delivered to the eyes, lenses

  17. Hypofractionated helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy of the prostate bed after prostatectomy with or without the pelvic lymph nodes - the PRIAMOS trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krause Sonja

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While evidence on safety and efficacy of primary hypofractionated radiotherapy in prostate cancer is accumulating, data on postoperative hypofractionated treatment of the prostate bed and of the pelvic lymph nodes is still scarce. This phase II trial was initiated to investigate safety and feasibility of hypofractionated treatment of the prostate bed alone or with the pelvic lymph nodes. Methods/design A total of 80 prostate cancer patients with the indication for adjuvant radiotherapy will be enrolled, where 40 patients with a low risk of lymph node involvement (arm 1 and another 40 patients with a high risk of lymph node involvement (arm 2 will each receive 54 Gy in 18 fractions to the prostate bed. Arm 2 will be given 45 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes additionally. Helical Tomotherapy and daily image guidance will be used. Discussion This trial was initiated to substantiate data on hypofractionated treatment of the prostate bed and generate first data on adjuvant hypofractionated radiotherapy of the pelvic lymph nodes. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT01620710

  18. A phase II multi-institutional study assessing simultaneous in-field boost helical tomotherapy for 1-3 brain metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues George; Yartsev Slav; Tay Keng; Pond Gregory R; Lagerwaard Frank; Bauman Glenn

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Our research group has previously published a dosimetric planning study that demonstrated that a 60 Gy/10 fractions intralesional boost with whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) to 30 Gy/10 fractions was biologically equivalent with a stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) boost of 18 Gy/1 fraction with 30 Gy/10 fractions WBRT. Helical tomotherapy (HT) was found to be dosimetrically equivalent to SRS in terms of target coverage and superior to SRS in terms of normal tissue tolerance. ...

  19. SU-E-T-761: TOMOMC, A Monte Carlo-Based Planning VerificationTool for Helical Tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibani, O; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Present a new Monte Carlo code (TOMOMC) to calculate 3D dose distributions for patients undergoing helical tomotherapy treatments. TOMOMC performs CT-based dose calculations using the actual dynamic variables of the machine (couch motion, gantry rotation, and MLC sequences). Methods: TOMOMC is based on the GEPTS (Gama Electron and Positron Transport System) general-purpose Monte Carlo system (Chibani and Li, Med. Phys. 29, 2002, 835). First, beam models for the Hi-Art Tomotherpy machine were developed for the different beam widths (1, 2.5 and 5 cm). The beam model accounts for the exact geometry and composition of the different components of the linac head (target, primary collimator, jaws and MLCs). The beams models were benchmarked by comparing calculated Pdds and lateral/transversal dose profiles with ionization chamber measurements in water. See figures 1–3. The MLC model was tuned in such a way that tongue and groove effect, inter-leaf and intra-leaf transmission are modeled correctly. See figure 4. Results: By simulating the exact patient anatomy and the actual treatment delivery conditions (couch motion, gantry rotation and MLC sinogram), TOMOMC is able to calculate the 3D patient dose distribution which is in principal more accurate than the one from the treatment planning system (TPS) since it relies on the Monte Carlo method (gold standard). Dose volume parameters based on the Monte Carlo dose distribution can also be compared to those produced by the TPS. Attached figures show isodose lines for a H&N patient calculated by TOMOMC (transverse and sagittal views). Analysis of differences between TOMOMC and TPS is an ongoing work for different anatomic sites. Conclusion: A new Monte Carlo code (TOMOMC) was developed for Tomotherapy patient-specific QA. The next step in this project is implementing GPU computing to speed up Monte Carlo simulation and make Monte Carlo-based treatment verification a practical solution.

  20. Stereotactic body radiation therapy via helical tomotherapy to replace brachytherapy for brachytherapy-unsuitable cervical cancer patients – a preliminary result

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh CH

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chen-Hsi Hsieh,1–3 Hui-Ju Tien,1 Sheng-Mou Hsiao,4 Ming-Chow Wei,4 Wen-Yih Wu,4 Hsu-Dong Sun,4 Li-Ying Wang,5 Yen-Ping Hsieh,6 Yu-Jen Chen,3,7–9 Pei-Wei Shueng1,101Department of Radiation Oncology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Medicine, 3Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 5School and Graduate Institute of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Department of Senior Citizen Service Management, National Taichung University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan; 7Department of Radiation Oncology, 8Department of Medical Research, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 9Graduate Institute of Sport Coaching Science, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan; 10Department of Radiation Oncology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, TaiwanAim: To review the experience and to evaluate the results of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT via helical tomotherapy (HT, for the treatment of brachytherapy-unsuitable cervical cancer.Methods: Between September 1, 2008 to January 31, 2012, nine cervical cancer patients unsuitable for brachytherapy were enrolled. All of the patients received definitive whole pelvic radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy, followed by SBRT via HT.Results: The actuarial locoregional control rate at 3 years was 78%. The mean biological equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions of the tumor, rectum, bladder, and intestines was 76.0 ± 7.3, 73.8 ± 13.2, 70.5 ± 10.0, and 43.1 ± 7.1, respectively. Only two had residual tumors after treatment, and the others were tumor-free. Two patients experienced grade 3 acute toxicity: one had diarrhea; and another experienced thrombocytopenia. There were no grade 3 or 4 subacute toxicities. Three patients suffered from manageable rectal bleeding in

  1. An Attempted Substitute Study of Total Skin Electron Therapy Technique by Using Helical Photon Tomotherapy with Helical Irradiation of the Total Skin Treatment: A Phantom Result

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ta Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An anthropomorphic phantom was used to investigate a treatment technique and analyze the dose distributions for helical irradiation of the total skin (HITS by helical tomotherapy (HT. Hypothetical bolus of thicknesses of 0, 10, and 15 mm was added around the phantom body to account for the dose homogeneity and setup uncertainty. A central core structure was assigned as a “complete block” to force the dose tangential delivery. HITS technique with prescribed dose (Dp of 36 Gy in 36 fractions was generated. The radiochromic EBT2 films were used for the dose measurements. The target region with 95.0% of the Dp received by more than 95% of the PTV was obtained. The calculated mean doses for the organs at risk (OARs were 4.69, 3.10, 3.20, and 2.94 Gy for the lung, heart, liver, and kidneys, respectively. The measurement doses on a phantom surface for a plan with 10 mm hypothetical bolus and bolus thicknesses of 0, 1, 2, and 3 mm are 89.5%, 111.4%, 116.9%, and 117.7% of Dp, respectively. HITS can provide an accurate and uniform treatment dose in the skin with limited doses to OARs and is safe to replace a total skin electron beam regimen.

  2. Hypofractionated helical tomotherapy (75 Gy at 2.5 Gy per fraction for localized prostate cancer: long-term analysis of gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong M

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Moonkyoo Kong,1 Seong Eon Hong,1 Sung-Goo Chang21Department of Radiation Oncology, 2Department of Urology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of KoreaBackground: This study is a report on the long-term analysis of acute and late toxicities for patients with localized prostate cancer treated with hypofractionated helical tomotherapy.Methods: From January 2008 through August 2013, 70 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated definitively with hypofractionated helical tomotherapy. The helical tomotherapy was designed to deliver 75 Gy in 2.5 Gy per fraction to the prostate gland, 63 Gy in 2.1 Gy per fraction to the seminal vesicles, and 54 Gy in 1.8 Gy per fraction to the pelvic lymph nodes. Incidence rates and predictive factors for radiation toxicities were analyzed retrospectively.Results: The incidences of grades 0, 1, and 2 acute gastrointestinal (GI toxicity were 51.4%, 42.9%, and 5.7%, and those of acute genitourinary (GU toxicity were 7.1%, 64.3%, and 28.6%, respectively. The maximum dose of rectum and bladder V40 and V50 were significant predictive factors for acute GI and GU toxicity. The cutoff value of rectum maximum dose and bladder V40 and V50 by receiver-operating characteristic curves analysis were 76.5 Gy, 17.3%, and 10.2%, respectively. The incidences of grades 0, 1, and 2 late GI toxicity were 82.0%, 14.0%, and 4.0%, and those of late GU toxicity were 18.0%, 56.0%, and 26.0%, respectively. Rectum V70 and bladder V70 and V75 were significant predictive factors for late GI and GU toxicity. The cutoff value of rectum V70 and bladder V70 and V75 by receiver-operating characteristic curves analysis was 2.8%, 2.8%, and 1.0%, respectively.Conclusion: Hypofractionated helical tomotherapy using a schedule of 75 Gy at 2.5 Gy per fraction had favorable acute and late toxicity rates and no serious complication, such as grade 3 or worse toxicity. To minimize radiation

  3. Helical Tomotherapy With Simultaneous Integrated Boost After Laparoscopic Staging in Patients With Cervical Cancer: Analysis of Feasibility and Early Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnitz, Simone, E-mail: simone.marnitz@charite.de [Department of Radiooncology, Charite University Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Koehler, Christhardt [Department of Gynecology, Charite University Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Burova, Elena; Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Jahn, Ulrich; Gruen, Arne; Budach, Volker; Stromberger, Carmen [Department of Radiooncology, Charite University Medicine, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility and safety of the simultaneous integrated boost technique for dose escalation in combination with helical tomotherapy in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty patients (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IB1 pN1-IVA) underwent primary chemoradiation with helical tomotherapy. Before therapy, 29/40 patients underwent laparoscopic pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. In 21%, 31%, and 3% of the patients, pelvic, pelvic and para-aortic, and skip metastases in the para-aortic region could be confirmed. All patients underwent radiation with 1.8-50.4 Gy to the tumor region and the pelvic (para-aortic) lymph node region (planning target volume-A), and a simultaneous boost with 2.12-59.36 Gy to the boost region (planning target volume-B). The boost region was defined using titan clips during laparoscopic staging. In all other patients, standardized borders for the planning target volume-B were defined. High-dose-rate brachytherapy was performed in 39/40 patients. The mean biologic effective dose to the macroscopic tumor ranged from 87.5 to 97.5 Gy. Chemotherapy consisted of weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2}. Dose-volume histograms and acute gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and hematologic toxicity were evaluated. Results: The mean treatment time was 45 days. The mean doses to the small bowel, rectum, and bladder were 28.5 {+-} 6.1 Gy, 47.9 {+-} 3.8 Gy, and 48 {+-} 3 Gy, respectively. Hematologic toxicity Grade 3 occurred in 20% of patients, diarrhea Grade 2 in 5%, and diarrhea Grade 3 in 2.5%. There was no Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity. All patients underwent curettage 3 months after chemoradiation, which confirmed complete pathologic response in 38/40 patients. Conclusions: The concept of simultaneous integrated boost for dose escalation in patients with cervical cancer is feasible, with a low rate of acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity. Whether dose escalation can be

  4. An automatic dose verification system for adaptive radiotherapy for helical tomotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xiaohu; Chen, Mingli; Parnell, Donald; Olivera, Gustavo; Galmarini, Daniel; Lu, Weiguo

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: During a typical 5-7 week treatment of external beam radiotherapy, there are potential differences between planned patient's anatomy and positioning, such as patient weight loss, or treatment setup. The discrepancies between planned and delivered doses resulting from these differences could be significant, especially in IMRT where dose distributions tightly conforms to target volumes while avoiding organs-at-risk. We developed an automatic system to monitor delivered dose using daily imaging. Methods: For each treatment, a merged image is generated by registering the daily pre-treatment setup image and planning CT using treatment position information extracted from the Tomotherapy archive. The treatment dose is then computed on this merged image using our in-house convolution-superposition based dose calculator implemented on GPU. The deformation field between merged and planning CT is computed using the Morphon algorithm. The planning structures and treatment doses are subsequently warped for analysis and dose accumulation. All results are saved in DICOM format with private tags and organized in a database. Due to the overwhelming amount of information generated, a customizable tolerance system is used to flag potential treatment errors or significant anatomical changes. A web-based system and a DICOM-RT viewer were developed for reporting and reviewing the results. Results: More than 30 patients were analysed retrospectively. Our in-house dose calculator passed 97% gamma test evaluated with 2% dose difference and 2mm distance-to-agreement compared with Tomotherapy calculated dose, which is considered sufficient for adaptive radiotherapy purposes. Evaluation of the deformable registration through visual inspection showed acceptable and consistent results, except for cases with large or unrealistic deformation. Our automatic flagging system was able to catch significant patient setup errors or anatomical changes. Conclusions: We developed an automatic dose

  5. A Feasibility Study of a Tilted Head Position in Helical Tomotherapy for Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Intracranial Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yoonsun; Yoon, Hong In; Ha, Jin Sook; Kim, Seijoon; Lee, Ik Jae

    2015-08-01

    Herein, we evaluated the feasibility of placing patients in a tilted head position as part of routine clinical practice for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) of intracranial tumors using helical tomotherapy (HT), by assessing its dosimetric benefit and setup accuracy. We reviewed treatment plans of four cases that were to receive FSRT for brain lesions in normal and head-tilted positions. These patients underwent two computed tomography (CT) scans: first in the normal supine position and then in the supine position with the head tilted at a 458 angle. Two separate HT plans for each position were generated in these four patients, using the same planning parameters. Plans were compared for target conformity and dose homogeneity. Maximum and average doses to critical organs, including normal brain, brain stem, optic chiasm, optic nerves, and the eyes, were considered. To evaluate setup accuracy, patient movement during treatment was assessed by post-treatment megavoltage CT scans. Both HT plans achieved similar conformal and homogeneous dose coverage to the target. Head-tilted HT delivered lower average and maximum doses to critical organs in the cases where the tumor was located on the same plane with critical organs, particularly when they were not directly attached. Placement in the head-tilted position without a mouthpiece allowed for increased patient movement during treatment, while use of a mouthpiece reduced patient movement to even less than that observed for normal setup in the supine position. This pilot study showed that placement in a tilted head position for FSRT of intracranial tumors using HT may be of clinical use, but depends on the tumor location.

  6. Skin-sparing Helical Tomotherapy vs 3D-conformal Radiotherapy for Adjuvant Breast Radiotherapy: In Vivo Skin Dosimetry Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capelle, Lisa [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Warkentin, Heather; MacKenzie, Marc [Division of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Joseph, Kurian; Gabos, Zsolt; Pervez, Nadeem; Tankel, Keith; Chafe, Susan [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Amanie, John [Division of Statistics and Epidemiology, Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Ghosh, Sunita; Parliament, Matthew [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Abdulkarim, Bassam, E-mail: bassam.abdulkarim@mcgill.ca [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether treatment-planning system (TPS)-calculated dose accurately reflects skin dose received for patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) with standard three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) or skin-sparing helical tomotherapy (HT). Methods and Materials: Fifty patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial investigating acute skin toxicity from adjuvant breast RT with 3D-CRT compared to skin-sparing HT, where a 5-mm strip of ipsilateral breast skin was spared. Thermoluminescent dosimetry or optically stimulated luminescence measurements were made in multiple locations and were compared to TPS-calculated doses. Skin dosimetric parameters and acute skin toxicity were recorded in these patients. Results: With HT there was a significant correlation between calculated and measured dose in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.67, P<.001; r = 0.44, P=.03, respectively) and the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.73, P<.001; r = 0.88, P<.001, respectively). With 3D-CRT there was a significant correlation in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.45, P=.03; r = 0.68, P<.001, respectively); the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.62, P=.001; r = 0.86, P<.001, respectively); and the mid neck (r = 0.42, P=.04, respectively). On average, HT-calculated dose overestimated the measured dose by 14%; 3D-CRT underestimated the dose by 0.4%. There was a borderline association between highest measured skin dose and moist desquamation (P=.05). Skin-sparing HT had greater skin homogeneity (homogeneity index of 1.39 vs 1.65, respectively; P=.005) than 3D-CRT plans. HT plans had a lower skin{sub V50} (1.4% vs 5.9%, respectively; P=.001) but higher skin{sub V40} and skin{sub V30} (71.7% vs 64.0%, P=.02; and 99.0% vs 93.8%, P=.001, respectively) than 3D-CRT plans. Conclusion: The 3D-CRT TPS more accurately reflected skin dose than the HT TPS, which tended to overestimate dose received by 14% in patients

  7. Surface imaging, laser positioning or volumetric imaging for breast cancer with nodal involvement treated by helical TomoTherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crop, Frederik; Pasquier, David; Baczkiewic, Amandine; Doré, Julie; Bequet, Lena; Steux, Emeline; Gadroy, Anne; Bouillon, Jacqueline; Florence, Clement; Muszynski, Laurence; Lacour, Mathilde; Lartigau, Eric

    2016-09-08

    A surface imaging system, Catalyst (C-Rad), was compared with laser-based positioning and daily mega voltage computed tomography (MVCT) setup for breast patients with nodal involvement treated by helical TomoTherapy. Catalyst-based positioning performed better than laser-based positioning. The respective modalities resulted in a standard deviation (SD), 68% confidence interval (CI) of positioning of left-right, craniocaudal, anterior-posterior, roll: 2.4 mm, 2.7 mm, 2.4 mm, 0.9° for Catalyst positioning, and 6.1 mm, 3.8 mm, 4.9 mm, 1.1° for laser-based positioning, respectively. MVCT-based precision is a combination of the interoperator variability for MVCT fusion and the patient movement during the time it takes for MVCT and fusion. The MVCT fusion interoperator variability for breast patients was evaluated at one SD left-right, craniocaudal, ant-post, roll as: 1.4 mm, 1.8 mm, 1.3 mm, 1.0°. There was no statistically significant difference between the automatic MVCT registration result and the manual adjustment; the automatic fusion results were within the 95% CI of the mean result of 10 users, except for one specific case where the patient was positioned with large yaw. We found that users add variability to the roll correction as the automatic registration was more consistent. The patient position uncertainty confidence interval was evaluated as 1.9 mm, 2.2 mm, 1.6 mm, 0.9° after 4 min, and 2.3 mm, 2.8 mm, 2.2 mm, 1° after 10 min. The combination of this patient movement with MVCT fusion interoperator variability results in total standard deviations of patient posi-tion when treatment starts 4 or 10 min after initial positioning of, respectively: 2.3 mm, 2.8 mm, 2.0 mm, 1.3° and 2.7 mm, 3.3 mm, 2.6 mm, 1.4°. Surface based positioning arrives at the same precision when taking into account the time required for MVCT imaging and fusion. These results can be used on a patient-per-patient basis to decide which positioning system performs the best after the

  8. Toxic risk of stereotactic body radiotherapy and concurrent helical tomotherapy followed by erlotinib for non-small-cell lung cancer treatment - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chien-An

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT applied by helical tomotherapy (HT is feasible for lung cancer in clinical. Using SBRT concurrently with erlotinib for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is not reported previously. Case Presentation A 77-year-old man with stage III NSCLC, received erlotinib 150 mg/day, combined with image-guided SBRT via HT. A total tumor dose of 54 Gy/9 fractions was delivered to the tumor bed. The tumor responded dramatically and the combined regimen was well tolerated. After concurrent erlotinib-SBRT, erlotinib was continued as maintenance therapy. The patient developed dyspnea three months after the combined therapy and radiation pneumonitis with interstitial lung disease was suspected. Conclusions Combination SBRT, HT, and erlotinib therapy provided effective anti-tumor results. Nonetheless, the potential risks of enhanced adverse effects between radiation and erlotinib should be monitored closely, especially when SBRT is part of the regimen.

  9. A Phase II Study of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT for Low-Intermediate-High Risk Prostate Cancer Using Helical Tomotherapy: Dose-volumetric parameters predicting early toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor A Macias

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Endpoint: To assess early urinary (GU and rectal (GI toxicities after helical tomotherapy Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT, and to determine their predictive factors.Methods: Since May 2012 forty-five prostate cancer patients were treated with 8 fractions of 5.48 (low risk, 29% or 5.65 Gy (intermediate-high risk, 71% on alternative days over 2.5 weeks. The exclusion criteria were: Gleason score 9-10, PSA >40 ng/mL, cT3b-4, IPSS ≥20 and history of acute urinary retention. During the follow-up a set of potential prognostic factors was correlated with urinary or rectal toxicity.Results: The median follow-up was 13.8 months (2-25 months. There were no grade ≥3 toxicities. Acute grade 2 GU complications were found in a 22.7% of men, but in 2.3% of patients at 1 month, 0% at 6 months and 0% at 12 months. The correspondent figures for grade 2 GI toxicities were: 20.4% (acute, 2.3% (1 month, 3.6% (6 months and 5% (12 months. Acute GI toxicity was significantly correlated with the rectal volume (>15 cm3 receiving 28 Gy, only when expressed as absolute volume. The age (>72 years old was a predictor of GI toxicity after 1 month of treatment. No correlation was found, however, between urinary toxicity and the other analyzed variables. IPSS increased significantly at the time of the last fraction and within the 1st month, returning to the baseline at 6th month. Urinary-related quality of life (IPSS question 8 score, it was not significantly worsen during radiotherapy returning to the baseline levels 1 month after the treatment. At 12 months follow-up patient’s perception of their urinary function improved significantly in comparison with the baseline.Conclusion: Our scheme of 8 fractions on alternative days delivered using helical tomotherapy is well tolerated. We recommend using actual volume instead of percentual volume in the treatment planning, and not to exceed 15 cm3 of rectal volume receiving ≥25 Gy in order to diminish acute GI

  10. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for cancers in childhood; Radiotherapie conformationnelle par modulation d'intensite des tumeurs pediatriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leseur, J.; Le Prise, E. [Centre Eugene-Marquis, Service de Radiotherapie, 35 - Rennes (France); Leseur, J.; Carrie, C.; Beneyton, V. [Centre Leon-Berard, Service de Radiotherapie, 69 - Lyon (France); Bernier, V. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Service de Radiotherapie, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Beneyton, V. [Centre Paul-Strauss, Service de Radiotherapie, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Mahee, M.A.; Supiot, S. [Centre Rene-Gauducheau, Service de Radiotherapie, 44 - Nantes - Saint-Herblain (France)

    2009-10-15

    Approximately 40-50% of children with cancer will be irradiated during their treatment. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (I.M.R.T.) by linear accelerator or helical tomo-therapy improves dose distribution in target volumes and normal tissue sparing. This technology could be particularly useful for pediatric patients to achieve an optimal dose distribution in complex volumes close to critical structures. The use of I.M.R.T. can increase the volume of tissue receiving low-dose radiation, and consequently carcinogenicity in childhood population with a good overall survival and long period of life expectancy. This review will present the current and potential I.M.R.T. indications for cancers in childhood, and discuss the benefits and problems of this technology aiming to define recommendations in the use of I.M.R.T. and specific doses constraints in Pediatrics. (authors)

  11. Metastatic brain cancer: prediction of response to whole-brain helical tomotherapy with simultaneous intralesional boost for metastatic disease using quantitative MR imaging features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Harish; Bauman, Glenn; Rodrigues, George; Bartha, Robert; Ward, Aaron

    2014-03-01

    The sequential application of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and more targeted stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is frequently used to treat metastatic brain tumors. However, SRS has side effects related to necrosis and edema, and requires separate and relatively invasive localization procedures. Helical tomotherapy (HT) allows for a SRS-type simultaneous infield boost (SIB) of multiple brain metastases, synchronously with WBRT and without separate stereotactic procedures. However, some patients' tumors may not respond to HT+SIB, and would be more appropriately treated with radiosurgery or conventional surgery despite the additional risks and side effects. As a first step toward a broader objective of developing a means for response prediction to HT+SIB, the goal of this study was to investigate whether quantitative measurements of tumor size and appearance (including first- and second-order texture features) on a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan acquired prior to treatment could be used to differentiate responder and nonresponder patient groups after HT+SIB treatment of metastatic disease of the brain. Our results demonstrated that smaller lesions may respond better to this form of therapy; measures of appearance provided limited added value over measures of size for response prediction. With further validation on a larger data set, this approach may lead to a means for prediction of individual patient response based on pre-treatment MRI, supporting appropriate therapy selection for patients with metastatic brain cancer.

  12. Dosimetric comparison of helical tomotherapy treatment plans for total marrow irradiation created using GPU and CPU dose calculation engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalichowski, Adrian; Burmeister, Jay

    2013-07-01

    To compare optimization characteristics, plan quality, and treatment delivery efficiency between total marrow irradiation (TMI) plans using the new TomoTherapy graphic processing unit (GPU) based dose engine and CPU/cluster based dose engine. Five TMI plans created on an anthropomorphic phantom were optimized and calculated with both dose engines. The planning treatment volume (PTV) included all the bones from head to mid femur except for upper extremities. Evaluated organs at risk (OAR) consisted of lung, liver, heart, kidneys, and brain. The following treatment parameters were used to generate the TMI plans: field widths of 2.5 and 5 cm, modulation factors of 2 and 2.5, and pitch of either 0.287 or 0.43. The optimization parameters were chosen based on the PTV and OAR priorities and the plans were optimized with a fixed number of iterations. The PTV constraint was selected to ensure that at least 95% of the PTV received the prescription dose. The plans were evaluated based on D80 and D50 (dose to 80% and 50% of the OAR volume, respectively) and hotspot volumes within the PTVs. Gamma indices (Γ) were also used to compare planar dose distributions between the two modalities. The optimization and dose calculation times were compared between the two systems. The treatment delivery times were also evaluated. The results showed very good dosimetric agreement between the GPU and CPU calculated plans for any of the evaluated planning parameters indicating that both systems converge on nearly identical plans. All D80 and D50 parameters varied by less than 3% of the prescription dose with an average difference of 0.8%. A gamma analysis Γ(3%, 3 mm) CPU plan. The average number of voxels meeting the Γ CPU/cluster based system was 579 vs 26.8 min for the GPU based system. There was no difference in the calculated treatment delivery time per fraction. Beam-on time varied based on field width and pitch and ranged between 15 and 28 min. The TomoTherapy GPU based dose engine

  13. Development of a software tool for the management of quality control in a helical tomotherapy unit; Desarrollo de una herramienta de software para la gestion integral del control de calidad en una unidad de tomoterapia helicoidal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Repiso, S.; Hernandez Rodriguez, J.; Martin Rincon, C.; Ramos Pacho, J. A.; Verde Velasco, J. M.; Delgado Aparacio, J. M.; Perez Alvarez, M. e.; Gomez Gonzalez, N.; Cons Perez, V.; Saez Beltran, M.

    2013-07-01

    The large amount of data and information that is managed in units of external radiotherapy quality control tests makes necessary the use of tools that facilitate, on the one hand, the management of measures and results in real time, and on other tasks of management, file, query and reporting of stored data. This paper presents an application of software of own development which is used for the integral management of the helical TomoTherapy unit in the aspects related to the roles and responsibilities of the hospital Radiophysics. (Author)

  14. Bowel sparing in pediatric cranio-spinal radiotherapy: a comparison of combined electron and photon and helical TomoTherapy techniques to a standard photon method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harron, Elizabeth, E-mail: elizabeth.harron@nuh.nhs.uk [Regional Medical Physics Department, Freeman Hospital, Freeman Road, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Lewis, Joanne [Northern Centre for Cancer Care, Freeman Hospital, Freeman Road, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the dose to organs at risk (OARs) from different craniospinal radiotherapy treatment approaches available at the Northern Centre for Cancer Care (NCCC), with a particular emphasis on sparing the bowel. Method: Treatment plans were produced for a pediatric medulloblastoma patient with inflammatory bowel disease using 3D conformal 6-MV photons (3DCP), combined 3D 6-MV photons and 18-MeV electrons (3DPE), and helical photon TomoTherapy (HT). The 3DPE plan was a modification of the standard 3DCP technique, using electrons to treat the spine inferior to the level of the diaphragm. The plans were compared in terms of the dose-volume data to OARs and the nontumor integral dose. Results: The 3DPE plan was found to give the lowest dose to the bowel and the lowest nontumor integral dose of the 3 techniques. However, the coverage of the spine planning target volume (PTV) was least homogeneous using this technique, with only 74.6% of the PTV covered by 95% of the prescribed dose. HT was able to achieve the best coverage of the PTVs (99.0% of the whole-brain PTV and 93.1% of the spine PTV received 95% of the prescribed dose), but delivered a significantly higher integral dose. HT was able to spare the heart, thyroid, and eyes better than the linac-based techniques, but other OARs received a higher dose. Conclusions: Use of electrons was the best method for reducing the dose to the bowel and the integral dose, at the expense of compromised spine PTV coverage. For some patients, HT may be a viable method of improving dose homogeneity and reducing selected OAR doses.

  15. Extended helical tomo-therapy and concomitant chemotherapy for an uterine cervix carcinoma: dosimetry parameters and hematological toxicity; Tomotherapie helicoidale etendue et chimiotherapie concomitante pour un cancer du col de l'uterus: parametres dosimetriques et toxicite hematologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, H.; Thomas, L.; Belhomme, S.; Chemin, A.; Caron, J.; Dejean, C.; Kantor, G.; Richaud, P. [Institut Bergonie, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Floquet, A.; Guyon, F. [Institut Bergonie, Dept. de Chirurgie, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    2009-10-15

    the extended tomo-therapy associated to concomitant chemotherapy is feasible and allows a dose escalation at the ganglions level. It is necessary to continue to study the dosimetry parameters at the hematopoietic marrow level that are predictive for a hematological toxicity. (N.C.)

  16. Treatment outcomes and patterns of radiologic appearance after hypofractionated image-guided radiotherapy delivered with helical tomotherapy (HHT) for lung tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcangeli, Stefano; Falcinelli, Lorenzo; Bracci, Stefano; Greco, Alessandro; Monaco, Alessia; Dognini, Jessica; Chiostrini, Cinzia; Bellavita, Rita; Aristei, Cynthia; Donato, Vittorio

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate treatment outcomes and patterns of CT lung injury after hypofractionated image-guided radiotherapy delivered with helical tomotherapy (HHT) in a series of inoperable lung lesions. 68 patients who were medically inoperable (69 lesions) without evidence of viable extrathoracic disease were included. Dose prescription was driven by tumour location (hilar/pericentral vs peripheral) and/or target volume. 52% of the lesions received a biological equivalent dose (BED10) ≥100 Gy. Assessment of tumour response was based on the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours 1.1 criteria coupled with fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography-CT. Toxicity monitoring was focused on treatment-related pulmonary adverse events according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v. 4.0. Acute and late events were classified as radiation pneumonitis (RP) and radiation fibrosis (RF), respectively. Survival curves were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analyses of survival were performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. After a median follow-up of 12 months (range, 3-31 months), no instances of ≥Grade 4 RP was documented, and clinically severe (Grade 3) RP occurred in 5.8% of the patients. 2 (3%) patients developed a late severe (≥Grade 3) symptomatic RF. No specific pattern of CT lung injury was demonstrated, in both acute and late settings. Median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) for the entire population were 30.8 and 14.1 months, respectively. At multivariate analysis (MVA), BED10 ≥ 100 Gy and KPS ≥ 90 emerged as significant prognostic factors for OS (p = 0.01 and p = 0.001, respectively), and BED10 ≥ 100 Gy for PFS (p = 0.02). Our findings show that HHT adjusted for tumour location and/or target volume is an effective treatment with an acceptable toxicity profile in patients who are medically inoperable with lung tumours and is not

  17. Helical tomotherapy for whole-brain irradiation with integrated boost to multiple brain metastases: evaluation of dose distribution characteristics and comparison with alternative techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levegrün, Sabine; Pöttgen, Christoph; Wittig, Andrea; Lübcke, Wolfgang; Abu Jawad, Jehad; Stuschke, Martin

    2013-07-15

    To quantitatively evaluate dose distribution characteristics achieved with helical tomotherapy (HT) for whole-brain irradiation (WBRT) with integrated boost (IB) to multiple brain metastases in comparison with alternative techniques. Dose distributions for 23 patients with 81 metastases treated with WBRT (30 Gy/10 fractions) and IB (50 Gy) were analyzed. The median number of metastases per patient (N(mets)) was 3 (range, 2-8). Mean values of the composite planning target volume of all metastases per patient (PTV(mets)) and of the individual metastasis planning target volume (PTV(ind met)) were 8.7 ± 8.9 cm(3) (range, 1.3-35.5 cm(3)) and 2.5 ± 4.5 cm(3) (range, 0.19-24.7 cm(3)), respectively. Dose distributions in PTV(mets) and PTV(ind met) were evaluated with respect to dose conformity (conformation number [CN], RTOG conformity index [PITV]), target coverage (TC), and homogeneity (homogeneity index [HI], ratio of maximum dose to prescription dose [MDPD]). The dependence of dose conformity on target size and N(mets) was investigated. The dose distribution characteristics were benchmarked against alternative irradiation techniques identified in a systematic literature review. Mean ± standard deviation of dose distribution characteristics derived for PTV(mets) amounted to CN = 0.790 ± 0.101, PITV = 1.161 ± 0.154, TC = 0.95 ± 0.01, HI = 0.142 ± 0.022, and MDPD = 1.147 ± 0.029, respectively, demonstrating high dose conformity with acceptable homogeneity. Corresponding numbers for PTV(ind met) were CN = 0.708 ± 0.128, PITV = 1.174 ± 0.237, TC = 0.90 ± 0.10, HI = 0.140 ± 0.027, and MDPD = 1.129 ± 0.030, respectively. The target size had a statistically significant influence on dose conformity to PTV(mets) (CN = 0.737 for PTV(mets) ≤4.32 cm(3) vs CN = 0.848 for PTV(mets) >4.32 cm(3), P=.006), in contrast to N(mets). The achieved dose conformity to PTV(mets), assessed by both CN and PITV, was in all investigated volume strata well within the best quartile of

  18. A phase II multi-institutional study assessing simultaneous in-field boost helical tomotherapy for 1-3 brain metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues George

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our research group has previously published a dosimetric planning study that demonstrated that a 60 Gy/10 fractions intralesional boost with whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT to 30 Gy/10 fractions was biologically equivalent with a stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS boost of 18 Gy/1 fraction with 30 Gy/10 fractions WBRT. Helical tomotherapy (HT was found to be dosimetrically equivalent to SRS in terms of target coverage and superior to SRS in terms of normal tissue tolerance. A phase I trial has been now completed at our institution with a total of 60 enrolled patients and 48 evaluable patients. The phase II dose has been determined to be the final phase I cohort dose of 60 Gy/10 fractions. Methods/Design The objective of this clinical trial is to subject the final phase I cohort dose to a phase II assessment of the endpoints of overall survival, intracranial control (ICC and intralesional control (ILC. We hypothesize HT would be considered unsuitable for further study if the median OS for patients treated with the HT SIB technique is degraded by 2 months, or the intracranial progression-free rates (ICC and ILC are inferior by 10% or greater compared to the expected results with treatment by whole brain plus SRS as defined by the RTOG randomized trial. A sample size of 93 patients was calculated based on these parameters as well as the statistical assumptions of alpha = 0.025 and beta = 0.1 due to multiple statistical testing. Secondary assessments of toxicity, health-related quality-of-life, cognitive changes, and tumor response are also integrated into this research protocol. Discussion To summarize, the purpose of this phase II trial is to assess this non-invasive alternative to SRS in terms of central nervous system (CNS control when compared to SRS historical controls. A follow-up phase III trial may be required depending on the results of this trial in order to definitively assess non-inferiority/superiority of this approach

  19. Use of semiconductor diodes for dosimetry TomoTherapy Hi-Art unit; Utilizacion de diodos de semiconductor para la dosimetria de una unidad Tomotherapy Hi-Art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Rodriguez, J.; Garcia Repiso, S.; Martin Rincon, C.; Ramos Pacho, J. A.; Verde Velasco, J. M.; Montes Fuentes, C.; Dena Espinel, E. de; Gomez Llorente, P. L.; Fernandez Bordes, M.

    2011-07-01

    The radiotherapy unit TIT-Art TomoTherapy allows the realization of intensity modulated treatments in a helical manner through design, consisting of a linear accelerator installed on a rotating gantry in combination with the longitudinal movement of the treatment table and a multi leaf collimator (MLC) binary. The acceptance tests include, among other things, the acquisition of a set of dosimetric data (profiles and PDD), for later comparison with a reference set of measures taken at the factory, called the gold standard. Being pre commissioning from the factory, the unit will be accepted provided that the measured data meet the gold standard within preset tolerances. The dosimetric equipment used in the test of acceptance is provided by the manufacturer and so far is done with water tank, camera, software electrometer and associate of Standard Imaging and marketed by TomoTherapy Inc. The objective of this study is to compare the measures obtained with a semiconductor diode with the gold standard. (Author)

  20. National evaluation of helical tomo-therapy: description of guidelines, dose constraints and positioning thresholds; Evaluation nationale de la tomotherapie helicoidale: description des indications, des contraintes de dose et des seuils de repositionnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantor, G. [Institut Bergonie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Mahe, M.A. [Centre Rene-Gauducheau, 44 - Nantes (France); Giraud, P.; Alapetite, C.; Fourquet, A. [Institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Durdux, C. [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, 75 - Paris (France); Gardner, M. [Centre Rene-Huguenin, 92 -Saint-Cloud (France); Maire, J.P.; Vendrely, V. [Hopital Saint-Andre, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    2007-11-15

    The implementation of a national common document of evaluation must allow to make easy and to homogenize a national evaluation and to integrate the new centers that will equip themselves with a helical tomography equipment. (N.C.)

  1. Head and neck region consolidation radiotherapy and prophylactic cranial irradiation with hippocampal avoidance delivered with helical tomotherapy after induction chemotherapy for non-sinonasal neuroendocrine carcinoma of the upper airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Pierfrancesco

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-sinonasal neuroendocrine carcinomas (NSNECs of the head and neck are considered an unfrequent clinico-pathological entity. Combined modality treatment represents an established therapeutic option for undifferentiated forms where distant metastasis is a common pattern of failure. Methods We report on a case of NSNEC treated with sequential chemo-radiation consisting of 6 cycles of cisplatin and etoposide followed by loco-regional radiation to the head and neck and simultaneous prophylactic cranial irradiation to prevent from intracranial spread, delivered with helical tomotherapy with the 'hippocampal avoidance' technique in order to reduce neuro-cognitive late effects. Results One year after the end of the whole combined modality approach, the patient achieved complete remission, with no treatment-related sub-acute and late effects. Conclusions The present report highlights the importance of multidisciplinary management for NSNECs of the head and neck, as the possibility to achieve substantial cure rates with mild side effects with modern radiotherapy techniques.

  2. 局部晚期中低位直肠癌术前螺旋断层同期加量放疗并同步口服卡培他滨化疗的效果%Chemoradiation effect of combined preoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy with oral capecitabine in patients with locally advanced mid-low rectal cancer using a simultaneous integrated boost of tomotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许卫东; 高军茂; 赵一虹; 陈纲; 杜峻峰; 张富利

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of preoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy(IMRT) with oral capecitabine in patients with locally advanced mid-low rectal cancer using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) of tomotherapy.Methods Total 16 patients with resectable locally advanced mid-low rectal cancer (patients with T3 to T4 and/or N ± rectal cancer) were enroll in current study.Patients were received IMRT to 2 dose levels simultaneously (55 and 47.5 Gy in 25 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine 825 mg/m2 twice daily,5 days/week.Total mesorectal excision was performed at 8 to 9 week after the completion of chemoradiation.The primary end point included side effect,the rate of sphinctersparing,postoperative complication and pathological complete response rate (pCR) were observed.Side effects were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0.Results All patients were received chemoradiotion therapy without any break.Tomotherapy showed superiority with respect to target coverage,homogeneity and conformality.Two patients refused to perform radical surgery because of almost complete primary tumor regression and complete symptom relief after neoadjuvant therapy.Fourteen patients underwent surgical resection and 11 patients (78.6%) underwent sphincter-sparing lower anterior resection.Four patients(28.6%) had a pathological complete response.The incidence of grade 1-2 hematologic,gastro-intestinal toxicities were 62.5% (10/16) and 18.8% (3/16).The incidence of grade 3 skin toxicities were 68.8%(10/16).Grade Ⅳ side effect was not observed.Surgical complications (incisional infection on thirteen after surgery) were observed in 1 patient.Conclusion Preoperative simultaneous integrated boost of tomotherapy with concurrent oral capecitabine is safe and well tolerated in patients with a promising local control.However,a larger number of patients and a long follow-up are required to assess its

  3. Cerebrospinal tomo-therapy; Tomotherapie cerebrospinale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fumagalli, I.; Coche-Dequeant, B.; Lacornerie, T.; Reynaert, N.; Lartigau, E. [Centre Oscar-Lambret, 59 - Lille (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report the study of the feasibility of a cerebrospinal tomo-therapy, of the protection of organs at risk, and of tolerance. Nine patients have been treated, one with a bi-fractionated irradiation and the others with a conventional fractionation. Seven had chemotherapy before radiotherapy, and two had intensification with self-grafting of stem cells. The dose constraints and the planning target volume (PTV) differed with respect to the treated organ (kidney, lung, thyroid, parotid, hypophysis). The tolerance was good. It appears that cerebrospinal tomo-therapy results in a better comfort for the patient and an easier treatment plan with a good dose homogeneity. Short communication

  4. CIM—Compact intensity modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleuel, M.; Lang, E.; Gähler, R.; Lal, J.

    2008-07-01

    Compact intensity modulation (CIM), a new method to modulate the intensity of a neutron beam is demonstrated. CIM allows the production of arbitrary signals where the focus point can be chosen and changed without any constraints. A novel feature in this technique compared to spin echo techniques is that the neutron polarization is kept parallel or anti-parallel to the static fields during the passage through the magnetic fields and the beating pattern at the detector is produced by an amplitude modulation (AM) of the adiabatic RF-spin flippers rather than Larmor precession like in neutron spin echo (NSE) instruments; thus, the achievable contrast is very high and the instrument resolution can be changed very quickly. This gives the fascinating possibility at pulsed neutron sources to sweep the modulation frequency of the flippers in order to increase dynamic resolution range during the same neutron pulse.

  5. Multi-institutional Feasibility Study of a Fast Patient Localization Method in Total Marrow Irradiation With Helical Tomotherapy: A Global Health Initiative by the International Consortium of Total Marrow Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Yutaka [Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Vagge, Stefano; Agostinelli, Stefano [Department of Radiation Oncology, Instituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro–National Institute for Cancer Research and University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Han, Eunyoung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Matulewicz, Lukasz [Department of Radiation Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice (Poland); Schubert, Kai [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Chityala, Ravishankar [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Minnesota Super Computer Institute, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Ratanatharathorn, Vaneerat [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Tournel, Koen [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Penagaricano, Jose A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Florian, Sterzing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Mahe, Marc-Andre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Integrated Center of Oncology–René Gauducheau, Saint-Herblain Cédex (France); Verneris, Michael R. [Divisions of Hematology, Oncology, and Bone Marrow Transplantation, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Weisdorf, Daniel J. [Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); and others

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop, characterize, and implement a fast patient localization method for total marrow irradiation. Methods and Materials: Topographic images were acquired using megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) detector data by delivering static orthogonal beams while the couch traversed through the gantry. Geometric and detector response corrections were performed to generate a megavoltage topogram (MVtopo). We also generated kilovoltage topograms (kVtopo) from the projection data of 3-dimensional CT images to reproduce the same geometry as helical tomotherapy. The MVtopo imaging dose and the optimal image acquisition parameters were investigated. A multi-institutional phantom study was performed to verify the image registration uncertainty. Forty-five MVtopo images were acquired and analyzed with in-house image registration software. Results: The smallest jaw size (front and backup jaws of 0) provided the best image contrast and longitudinal resolution. Couch velocity did not affect the image quality or geometric accuracy. The MVtopo dose was less than the MVCT dose. The image registration uncertainty from the multi-institutional study was within 2.8 mm. In patient localization, the differences in calculated couch shift between the registration with MVtopo-kVtopo and MVCT-kVCT images in lateral, cranial–caudal, and vertical directions were 2.2 ± 1.7 mm, 2.6 ± 1.4 mm, and 2.7 ± 1.1 mm, respectively. The imaging time in MVtopo acquisition at the couch speed of 3 cm/s was <1 minute, compared with ≥15 minutes in MVCT for all patients. Conclusion: Whole-body MVtopo imaging could be an effective alternative to time-consuming MVCT for total marrow irradiation patient localization.

  6. Measurement of Dosimetric Parameters for Hi-ART Helical Tomotherapy Unit%Hi-ART螺旋断层治疗机剂量学参数的测量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王运来; 沙翔燕; 戴相坤; 马林; 冯林春; 曲宝林

    2008-01-01

    Objective To develop a measurement method of dosimetric parameters for Hi-ART tomotherapy unit. Methods Percentage depth doses and beam profiles were measured using the dedicated mini water phantom, and compared to the results of 6 MV X-ray from Primus accelerator. Following the AAPM TG51 protocol, absolute dose calibration was carried out under SSD of 85 cm at depth of 1.5 cm for field of 5 cm ×40 cm. The output linearity and reproducibility were evaluated. The output variation with the gantry rotation was also investigated using 0.6 cm3 ion chamber in cylindrical perplex phantom and on-board MVCT detectors. Leaf fluence output factors were quantified for the leaf of interest and its adjacent leaves.Results The buildup depth was around 1.0 cm. The PDD values at 10 cm for Hi-ART and Primus were 59.7% and 64.7%, respectively. Varying with the field width, the lateral and longitudinal beam profiles were not so homogeneous as the Primus fields. The measured dose rate was 848.38 cGy/min. The fitted lint(sec) ,with a relative coefficient of 0. 999. The maximum deviation and standard deviation of output were 1.6% and less than 0.5% ; The maximum deviation and standard deviation of output changed by gantry angle were 1.1% and 0.5 % , respectively. Leaf fluence output factors did not increase significantly when leaves were opened beyond the two adjacent leaves. Conclusions Hi-ART Tomotherapy unit has a very high dose output and inhomogeneous beam profiles owing to its special design of the treatment head. This may be useful in dose calculation and treatment delivery.%目的 探讨Hi-ART螺旋断层治疗机照射野剂量学参数测量的内容和方法.方法 用断层治疗机专门配置的微型扫描水箱在治疗条件下测量了6 MV X线的百分深度剂量和射野离轴比,并与常规Primus加速器6 MV X线进行比较.根据AAPM TG51号报告用Tomotrometer剂量仪和A1SL电离室在源皮距85 cm、照射野40 cm×5 cm、1.5 cm深度条件下对断层

  7. Quality-of-life outcomes in high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with helical tomotherapy in a hypofractionated radiation schedule with long-term androgen suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, N.; Krauze, A.V.; Yee, D.; Parliament, M.; Mihai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Joseph, K.; Murtha, A.; Amanie, J.; Kamal, M.; Pearcey, R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We examined the impact of hypofractionated radiation therapy and androgen suppression therapy (ast) on quality of life (qol) in high-risk prostate cancer patients. Methods Between March 2005 and March 2007, 60 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were enrolled in a prospective phase ii study. All patients received 68 Gy (2.72 Gy per fraction) to the prostate gland and 45 Gy (1.8 Gy per fraction) to the pelvic lymph nodes in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Of the 60 patients, 58 received ast. The University of California–Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index questionnaire was used to prospectively measure qol at baseline (month 0) and at 1, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 months after radiation treatment. The generalized estimating equation approach was used to compare the qol scores at 1, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 months with those at baseline. Results We observed a significant decrease in qol items related to bowel and sexual function. Several qol items related to bowel function were significantly adversely affected at both 1 and 6 months, with improvement toward 6 months. Although decreased qol scores persisted beyond the 6-month mark, they began to re-approach baseline at the 18- to 24-month mark. Most sexual function items were significantly adversely affected at both 1 and 6 months, but the effects were not considered to be a problem by most patients. A complete return to baseline was not observed for either bowel or sexual function. Urinary function items remained largely unaffected, with overall urinary function being the only item adversely affected at 6 months, but not at 1 month. Urinary function returned to baseline and remained unimpaired from 18 months onwards. Conclusions In our study population, who received hypofractionated radiation delivered using dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy with inclusion of the pelvic lymph nodes, and 2–3 years of ast prescription, qol with respect to bowel and sexual function was significantly affected; qol with

  8. Lossless intensity modulation in integrated photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Sunil; Fan, Shanhui

    2012-02-13

    We present a dynamical analysis of lossless intensity modulation in two different ring resonator geometries. In both geometries, we demonstrate modulation schemes that result in a symmetrical output with an infinite on/off ratio. The systems behave as lossless intensity modulators where the time-averaged output optical power is equal to the time-averaged input optical power.

  9. Assessment of Organ Motion in Postoperative Endometrial and Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Eleanor E.R., E-mail: Eleanor.harris@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Latifi, Kujtim; Rusthoven, Chad; Javedan, Ken; Forster, Kenneth [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may be useful to reduce toxicity in gynecologic cancer patients requiring postoperative pelvic irradiation. This study was undertaken to quantify vaginal wall organ motion during the course of postoperative pelvic irradiation using pelvic IMRT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two consecutive patients treated with postoperative pelvic IMRT on helical tomotherapy had fiducial markers placed at the vaginal apex prior to simulation then daily megavoltage computed tomography (CT) scans for positioning. The daily positions of the fiducials were registered and measured in reference to the initial CT scan to quantify the degree of vaginal wall organ motion during the entire course of therapy. Results: The total motion of the fiducials center of mass (COM) was a median of 5.8 mm (range, 0.6-20.2 mm), and 95% of all COM positions fell within 15.7 mm of their original position. Directional margins of 3.1 mm along the right-left axis, 9.5 mm along the superoinferior axis, and of 12.1 mm along the anteroposterior axis encompassed the vaginal fiducials in 95% of treatments. Mean organ deformation for all patients was 3.9 mm, (range, 0-27.5 mm; standard deviation, 3.1 mm), with significant distortions of greater than 10 mm in 17% of secondary image sets. Conclusions: These data suggest a planning target volume margin of 16 mm will account for maximal organ motion in the majority of gynecologic patients undergoing postoperative pelvic IMRT, and it may be possible to incorporate directional motion into the planning target volume margin.

  10. Multi-scenario based robust intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans can account for set-up errors more effectively in terms of normal tissue sparing than planning target volume (PTV) based intensity-modulated photon plans in the head and neck region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuschke, Martin; Kaiser, Andreas; Abu Jawad, Jehad; Pöttgen, Christoph; Levegrün, Sabine; Farr, Jonathan

    2013-06-18

    In a previous report, we compared the conformity of robust intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans with that of helical tomotherapy plans for re-irradiations of head and neck carcinomas using a fixed set-up error of 2 mm. Here, we varied the maximum set-up errors between 0 and 5 mm and compared the robust IMPT-plans with planning target volume (PTV) based intensity-modulated photon therapy (IMRT). Seven patients were treated with a PTV-based tomotherapy plan. Set-up margins of 0, 2, and 5 mm were subtracted from the PTV to generate target volumes (TV) TV(0mm), TV(2mm), and TV(5mm), for which robust IMPT-plans were created assuming range uncertainties of ±3.5% and using worst case optimization assuming set-up errors of 0, 2, and 5 mm, respectively. Robust optimization makes use of the feature that set-up errors in beam direction alone do not affect the distal and proximal margin for that beam. With increasing set-up errors, the body volumes that were exposed to a selected minimum dose level between 20% and 95% of the prescribed dose decreased. In IMPT-plans with 0 mm set-up error, the exposed body volumes were on average 6.2% ± 0.9% larger than for IMPT-plans with 2 mm set-up error, independent of the considered dose level (p plans accounting for 5 mm set-up error, the exposed body volumes were by 11.9% ± 0.8% smaller than for IMPT-plans with 2 mm set-up error at a fixed minimum dose (p plans corresponding to the same IMRT-plan led to a decrease in the mean dose to the temporal lobes and the cerebellum, and in the D2% of the brain stem or spinal cord with increasing set-up errors considered during robust IMPT-planning. For recurrent head and neck cancer, robust IMPT-plan optimization led to a decrease in normal tissue exposure with increasing set-up error for target volumes corresponding to the same PTV.

  11. Assessment tool for planning fallback Tomotherapy treatment plans; Evaluacion de la herramienta fallback planning para planes de tratamiento de tomoterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Rubio, P.; Rodriguez Romero, R.; Montes Uruen, A.

    2015-07-01

    Interruption of radiotherapy treatments in an increase the total time of the same to the detriment of tumour control. In centers that have a unique special unit as the TomoTherapy, is emphasized the difficulty to resume treatment at another unit, since the technique of helical TomoTherapy is not portable to conventional accelerators and therefore requires the planning of new dosimetry distributions emulating the initially obtained and accepted. This work evaluates the ability of an automatic planning tool to mimic TomoTherapy plans. (Author)

  12. Comparing two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the hypofractionated treatment of high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yartsev Slav

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the setting of hypofractionated high-risk prostate cancer treatment. Methods 3DCRT and dIMRT/Helical Tomotherapy(HT planning with 10 CT datasets was undertaken to deliver 68 Gy in 25 fractions (prostate and simultaneously delivering 45 Gy in 25 fractions (pelvic lymph node targets in a single phase. The paradigms of pelvic vessel targeting (iliac vessels with margin are used to target pelvic nodes and conformal normal tissue avoidance (treated soft tissues of the pelvis while limiting dose to identified pelvic critical structures were assessed compared to 3DCRT controls. Both dIMRT/HT and 3DCRT solutions were compared to each other using repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc paired t-tests. Results When compared to conformal pelvic vessel targeting, conformal normal tissue avoidance delivered more homogenous PTV delivery (2/2 t-test comparisons; p dose, 1–3 Gy over 5/10 dose points; p Conclusion dIMRT/HT nodal and pelvic targeting is superior to 3DCRT in dose delivery and critical structure sparing in the setting of hypofractionation for high-risk prostate cancer. The pelvic targeting paradigm is a potential solution to deliver highly conformal pelvic radiation treatment in the setting of nodal location uncertainty in prostate cancer and other pelvic malignancies.

  13. Analysis and simulation of XPM intensity modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Huang; Jianquan Yao

    2005-01-01

    Based on the split-step Fourier method and small signal analysis, an improved analytical solution which describes the cross-phase modulation (XPM) intensity is derived. It can suppress the spurious XPM intensity modulation efficiently in the whole transmission fiber. Thus it is more coincidence with the practical result. Furthermore, it is convenient, because it is independent of channel separation and the dispersion and nonlinear effects interact through the XPM intensity. A criterion of select the step size is described as the derived XPM intensity modulation being taken into account. It is non-uniform distribution method, the simulation accuracy is improved when the step size is determined by the improved XPM intensity.

  14. Lung SBRT: dosimetric and delivery comparison of RapidArc, TomoTherapy, and IMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyh, Ashleigh; Konski, Andre; Nalichowski, Adrian; Maier, Jordan; Lack, Danielle

    2013-07-08

    This study seeks to compare fixed-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (FF IMRT), RapidArc (RA), and helical tomotherapy (HT) to discover the optimal treatment modality to deliver SBRT to the peripheral lung. Eight patients with peripheral primary lung cancer were reviewed. Plans were prescribed a dose of 48 Gy and optimized similarly with heterogeneity corrections. Plan quality was assessed using conformality index (CI100%), homogeneity index (HI), the ratio of the 50% isodose volume to PTV (R50%) to assess intermediate dose spillage, and normal tissue constraints. Delivery efficiency was evaluated using treatment time and MUs. Dosimetric accuracy was assessed using gamma index (3% dose difference, 3 mm DTA, 10% threshold), and measured with a PTW ARRAY seven29 and OCTAVIUS phantom. CI100%, HI, and R50% were lowest for HT compared to seven-field coplanar IMRT and two-arc coplanar RA (p < 0.05). Normal tissue constraints were met for all modalities, except maximum rib dose due to close proximity to the PTV. RA reduced delivery time by 60% compared to HT, and 40% when compared to FF IMRT. RA also reduced the mean MUs by 77% when compared to HT, and by 22% compared to FF IMRT. All modalities can be delivered accurately, with mean QA pass rates over 97%. For peripheral lung SBRT treatments, HT performed better dosimetrically, reducing maximum rib dose, as well as improving dose conformity and uniformity. RA and FF IMRT plan quality was equivalent to HT for patients with minimal or no overlap of the PTV with the chest wall, but was reduced for patients with a larger overlap. RA and IMRT were equivalent, but the reduced treatment times of RA make it a more efficient modality.

  15. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques. Methods: A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0–255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets. Results: Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage

  16. Analysis of te evolution of the parameters of helical tomotherapy beam in relation to the wear of the Target; Analisis de la evolucion de los parametros del haz de tomoterapia helicoidal en relacion con el desgaste del Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Romero, R.; Sanchez Rubio, P.; Medrano Gonzalez del Prado, J. C.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this work is to establish a sensitive indicator to the wear and tear of the target whose evolution allowed to predict some time before replacement. To this end, we study. Retrospect variations in the shape of the cross-section and the beam quality parameter TPR 20.10 experienced by our tomotherapy unit until the last change of target, also analyzing the magnetron replacement as well as the workload of the machine. Since, the daily dose of the machine is set with some frequency (to correct their deviation from the nominal value) and verification of treatment depend on the planning parameters selected (as well as other aspects of functioning of the system as the MLC and the table), has not been considered its. (Author)

  17. Peripheral dose measurement in breast cancer patients submitted to Tomotherapy using thermoluminescent dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina A, O.; Medrano S, A. C.; Azorin N, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Mora G, L. C., E-mail: omedina@xanum.uam.mx [IMSS, Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI, Av. Cuauhtemoc 330, 06725 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) has been one of the most important techniques in medical radiation applications over many years, creating opportunities of advancing in novel radiotherapy techniques particularly in Tomotherapy with photons. LiF:Mg,Ti TLD is one kind of TLD which can be used in Tomotherapy because of having suitable properties such as good sensitivity, small size and tissue equivalence. Hypo fractionation is a radiotherapeutic technique, widely accepted as an important treatment for breast cancer patients, characterized by high doses at which they are exposed for treatment of cancerous tumors that are irradiated precisely with photons from a helical accelerator and aims to decrease the number of sessions from 3 - 6 weeks to 1 - 3 weeks. Results of measuring the peripheral dose (Pd) in breast cancer patients submitted to Tomotherapy with high-energy photons are presented. (Author)

  18. 晚期胰腺癌适形、简化调强及螺旋断层放疗的剂量学评估%Dosimetry Analysis of Conformal Radiotherapy, Simplified Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Helical Tomotherapy for Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    巩汉顺; 王金媛; 丛小虎; 杨涛; 解传滨; 葛瑞刚; 徐伟; 王小深; 鞠忠建

    2015-01-01

    目的:分析比较晚期胰腺癌三维适形放疗(3D-CRT)、简化调强放射治疗(sIMRT)和螺旋断层放疗(HT)的剂量学特点.方法:选择10例晚期胰腺癌腹膜后淋巴结转移患者,分别设计其3D-CRT、sIMRT和HT计划,比较其靶区及危及器官的所受剂量情况.结果:3D-CRT、sIMRT和HT计划平均适形指数分别为0.63、0.79和0.90;与3D-CRT相比较,sIMRT(P=0)、HT(P=0)均具有统计学差异;与sIMRT相比较,HT(P=0)亦存在统计学差异.对3D-CRT而言,sIMRT和HT在肝脏V5、V10等低剂量区均偏高,且三者之间均具有统计学差异(P=0.001,P=0.004);而v∞、V30、V40、v50等高剂量区均偏低,且v30(P=0.002)、V50(P=0)均显示统计学差异.与sIMRT相比,HT中肝脏V5、V10、V20较高,而V30、V40、V50均较低,而其他危及器官中相对于3D-CRT,sIMRT和HT中左/右肾、小肠V5值较高,左/右肾、小肠及胃V20、V30、V40及V50值均较低;与sIMRT相比,HT中左/右肾、小肠V5、V20、V30、V40较低,而胃的v5、V10值则略高,然而其V20、V30、V40及V50均显较低.结论:与3D-CRT相比,晚期胰腺癌sIMRT和HT改善了剂量分布适形度,降低了肝脏、胃、小肠和左、右肾的高剂量区体积;与sIMRT比较,HT靶区剂量更均匀,肝脏等危及器官的高剂量区体积更低.本研究为临床治疗计划设计提供了重要的参考依据.

  19. Implementation of tomo-therapy in France: clinic results over two years; Mise en oeuvre de la tomotherapie en France: resultats cliniques a deux ans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraud, P.; Yassa, M. [Hopital europeen Georges-Pompidou, 75 - Paris (France); Giraud, P.; Zefkili, S.; Campana, F. [Institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Kantor, G.; Dejean, C. [Institut Bergonie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Lisbona, A.; Mahe, M.A. [Centre Rene-Gauducheau, 44 - Nantes (France)

    2010-10-15

    As three French centres (Curie Institute in Paris, Bergonie Institute in Bordeaux, and Rene-Gauducheau centre in Nantes) have been equipped with helical tomo-therapy in 2007, the authors discuss the results obtained after two years of operation. More than six hundred patients have been treated, mainly for head or neck, central nervous system, thorax, pelvic and abdominal cavity, and bone tumours. Session durations, acute toxicity rates, and toxicity effects are discussed. Short communication

  20. 宫颈癌调强放疗中靶区变化与剂量分析%Variation of organ position and dose for cervical cancer patients treated with helical tomotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李奕彤; 王雅棣; 张富利; 许卫东; 姚波; 陈点点; 路娜

    2015-01-01

    Objective To observe the interfractional variation and actual dose for cervical cancer patients treated with tomotherapy.Methods Five patients who received tomotherapy were chosen from Aug 2013 to Feb 2014.A megavohage computed tomography (MVCT) scan was performed before treatment and then registered with the planning CT images.Dose distributions were recalculated and targets were contoured on the MVCT images.The differences between the actual radiation and planning were analyzed.Results In the patients received external radiotherapy, the decline in cervix volume and maximum diameter was 68.90% and 26.91% , respectively (t =5.21, 8.39, P <0.05).Cervix, uterus and CTV movement in left-right, anteroposterior, superoinferior were 1.43,-7.72, 0.02,-0.40,-1.24, -6.51,-0.43,-1.68and-0.22mm.The medianCTV V95% was 99.40% (95.96%-100%), and missing volume was 6.94 cm3 (0-32.30 cm3).Conclusions During radiotherapy for cervical cancer patients, the volume, position and doses are different between initial plan and actual radiation.Based on image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), missing targets are limited.%目的 通过螺旋断层放疗系统(TOMO)观察宫颈癌治疗过程中,肿瘤及邻近组织器官移动所导致的靶区受照剂量的改变.方法 选取2013年8月至2014年2月于本院行TOMO治疗的5例宫颈癌患者,每次治疗前行兆伏级CT(MVCT)扫描与计划CT图像配准后,重新计算剂量分布并勾画肿瘤及靶区.分析分次治疗间肿瘤与靶区体积、位移与受照剂量之间的关系.结果 5例患者外照射结束时宫颈肿物体积、最大径分别平均下降68.90%、26.91%(t =5.21、8.39,P<0.05).肿瘤、子宫、临床靶区(CTV)质心左右、前后、头脚方向中位位移分别为-1.43、-7.72、0.02、0.40、-1.24、-6.51、-0.43、-1.68和-0.22 mm.CTV中位V95%为99.40% (95.96% ~100%),中位漏照体积为6.94 cm3(0 ~32.30 cm3).结论 官颈癌放疗中,肿瘤变化、位置的移动

  1. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abelson, Jonathan A.; Murphy, James D.; Minn, Ann Yuriko; Chung, Melody [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Fisher, George A.; Ford, James M.; Kunz, Pamela [Department of Medical Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Norton, Jeffrey A.; Visser, Brendan C.; Poultsides, George A. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Chang, Daniel T., E-mail: dtchang@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To report the outcomes and toxicities in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with IMRT between 2003 and 2008. Of these 47 patients, 29 were treated adjuvantly and 18 definitively. All received concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. The treatment plans were optimized such that 95% of the planning target volume received the prescription dose. The median delivered dose for the adjuvant and definitive patients was 50.4 and 54.0 Gy, respectively. Results: The median age at diagnosis was 63.9 years. For adjuvant patients, the 1- and 2-year overall survival rate was 79% and 40%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year recurrence-free survival rate was 58% and 17%, respectively. The local-regional control rate at 1 and 2 years was 92% and 80%, respectively. For definitive patients, the 1-year overall survival, recurrence-free survival, and local-regional control rate was 24%, 16%, and 64%, respectively. Four patients developed Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity (9%) and four developed Grade 3 late toxicity (9%). Conclusions: Survival for patients with pancreatic cancer remains poor. A small percentage of adjuvant patients have durable disease control, and with improved therapies, this proportion will increase. Systemic therapy offers the greatest opportunity. The present results have demonstrated that IMRT is well tolerated. Compared with those who received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in previously reported prospective clinical trials, patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated with IMRT in our series had improved acute toxicity.

  2. Application of Monte Carlo methods in tomotherapy and radiation biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ya-Yun

    Helical tomotherapy is an attractive treatment for cancer therapy because highly conformal dose distributions can be achieved while the on-board megavoltage CT provides simultaneous images for accurate patient positioning. The convolution/superposition (C/S) dose calculation methods typically used for Tomotherapy treatment planning may overestimate skin (superficial) doses by 3-13%. Although more accurate than C/S methods, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are too slow for routine clinical treatment planning. However, the computational requirements of MC can be reduced by developing a source model for the parts of the accelerator that do not change from patient to patient. This source model then becomes the starting point for additional simulations of the penetration of radiation through patient. In the first section of this dissertation, a source model for a helical tomotherapy is constructed by condensing information from MC simulations into series of analytical formulas. The MC calculated percentage depth dose and beam profiles computed using the source model agree within 2% of measurements for a wide range of field sizes, which suggests that the proposed source model provides an adequate representation of the tomotherapy head for dose calculations. Monte Carlo methods are a versatile technique for simulating many physical, chemical and biological processes. In the second major of this thesis, a new methodology is developed to simulate of the induction of DNA damage by low-energy photons. First, the PENELOPE Monte Carlo radiation transport code is used to estimate the spectrum of initial electrons produced by photons. The initial spectrum of electrons are then combined with DNA damage yields for monoenergetic electrons from the fast Monte Carlo damage simulation (MCDS) developed earlier by Semenenko and Stewart (Purdue University). Single- and double-strand break yields predicted by the proposed methodology are in good agreement (1%) with the results of published

  3. Experimental Validation of Monte Carlo Simulations Based on a Virtual Source Model for TomoTherapy in a RANDO Phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiankui; Zheng, Yiran; Wessels, Barry; Lo, Simon S; Ellis, Rodney; Machtay, Mitchell; Yao, Min

    2016-12-01

    A virtual source model for Monte Carlo simulations of helical TomoTherapy has been developed previously by the authors. The purpose of this work is to perform experiments in an anthropomorphic (RANDO) phantom with the same order of complexity as in clinical treatments to validate the virtual source model to be used for quality assurance secondary check on TomoTherapy patient planning dose. Helical TomoTherapy involves complex delivery pattern with irregular beam apertures and couch movement during irradiation. Monte Carlo simulation, as the most accurate dose algorithm, is desirable in radiation dosimetry. Current Monte Carlo simulations for helical TomoTherapy adopt the full Monte Carlo model, which includes detailed modeling of individual machine component, and thus, large phase space files are required at different scoring planes. As an alternative approach, we developed a virtual source model without using the large phase space files for the patient dose calculations previously. In this work, we apply the simulation system to recompute the patient doses, which were generated by the treatment planning system in an anthropomorphic phantom to mimic the real patient treatments. We performed thermoluminescence dosimeter point dose and film measurements to compare with Monte Carlo results. Thermoluminescence dosimeter measurements show that the relative difference in both Monte Carlo and treatment planning system is within 3%, with the largest difference less than 5% for both the test plans. The film measurements demonstrated 85.7% and 98.4% passing rate using the 3 mm/3% acceptance criterion for the head and neck and lung cases, respectively. Over 95% passing rate is achieved if 4 mm/4% criterion is applied. For the dose-volume histograms, very good agreement is obtained between the Monte Carlo and treatment planning system method for both cases. The experimental results demonstrate that the virtual source model Monte Carlo system can be a viable option for the

  4. Evaluation of ovary dose for woman of childbearing age woman with breast cancer in tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Soo Hyeong; Park, Soo Yeon; Choi, Ji Min; Park, Ju Young; Kim, Jong Suk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate unwanted scattered dose to ovary by scattering and leakage generated from treatment fields of Tomotherapy for childbearing woman with breast cancer. The radiation treatments plans for left breast cancer were established using Tomotherapy planning system (Tomotherapy, Inc, USA). They were generated by using helical and direct Tomotherapy methods for comparison. The CT images for the planning were scanned with 2.5 mm slice thickness using anthropomorphic phantom (Alderson-Rando phantom, The Phantom Laboratory, USA). The measurement points for the ovary dose were determined at the points laterally 30 cm apart from mid-point of treatment field of the pelvis. The measurements were repeated five times and averaged using glass dosimeters (1.5 mm diameter and 12 mm of length) equipped with low-energy correction filter. The measures dose values were also converted to Organ Equivalent Dose (OED) by the linear exponential dose-response model. Scattered doses of ovary which were measured based on two methods of Tomo helical and Tomo direct showed average of 64.94±0.84 mGy and 37.64±1.20 mGy in left ovary part and average of 64.38±1.85 mGy and 32.96±1.11 mGy in right ovary part. This showed when executing Tomotherapy, measured scattered dose of Tomo Helical method which has relatively greater monitor units (MUs) and longer irradiation time are approximately 1.8 times higher than Tomo direct method. Scattered dose of left and right ovary of childbearing women is lower than ICRP recommended does which is not seriously worried level against the infertility and secondary cancer occurrence. However, as breast cancer occurrence ages become younger in the future and radiation therapy using high-precision image guidance equipment like Tomotherapy is developed, clinical follow-up studies about the ovary dose of childbearing women patients would be more required.

  5. Preoperative volumetric modulated arc therapy and helical tomotherapy for rectal cancer: A dosimetric study%直肠癌术前容积旋转调强放疗和螺旋断层放疗的剂量学比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨咏强; 冯林春; 王运来; 葛瑞刚; 解传滨; 巩汉顺; 徐伟; 丛小虎; 陈静

    2014-01-01

    目的 比较直肠癌术前同期加量放疗中容积旋转调强放疗(volumetric modulated arc therapy,VMAT)和螺旋断层放疗(helical tomotherapy,HT)计划的剂量学差异.方法 对10例Ⅱ~Ⅲ期直肠癌术前同步放化疗患者分别进行VMAT和HT的计划设计,统一给予肿瘤原发病灶及转移淋巴结(肿瘤大体靶区,pGTV)处方剂量56.25 Gy/25 F,高危复发区域和区域淋巴引流区(计划靶区,PTV)50 Gy/25 F,利用剂量体积直方图评价靶区剂量分布和危及器官照射剂量.结果 与HT计划相比,VMAT计划的pGTV适形指数(conformity index,CI)CIpGTV变差(t=-2.803,P=0.005),PTV的中位剂量和最小剂量(D98)升高(t=8.895、3.663,P=0.000、0.005).对小肠的保护VMAT计划优于HT计划,VMAT计划的小肠V15比HT计划降低约19%(t=-3.802,P=0.004).VMAT计划骨盆V10低于HT计划(t=-7.047,P=0.000),但骨盆V30高于HT计划(t=4.704,P=0.001).对膀胱的保护HT计划略优于VMAT计划.VMAT计划机器跳数比HT计划降低约89%(t=-2.666,P=0.008).结论 直肠癌术前同期加量放疗中采用VMAT技术可获得与HT计划相当的剂量分布,对小肠保护略有优势,机器跳数明显降低,但其疗效还需进一步临床评估.

  6. Dosimetric accuracy of tomotherapy dose calculation in thorax lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangili Paola

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyse limits and capabilities in dose calculation of collapsed-cone-convolution (CCC algorithm implemented in helical tomotherapy (HT treatment planning system for thorax lesions. Methods The agreement between measured and calculated dose was verified both in homogeneous (Cheese Phantom and in a custom-made inhomogeneous phantom. The inhomogeneous phantom was employed to mimic a patient's thorax region with lung density encountered in extreme cases and acrylic inserts of various dimensions and positions inside the lung cavity. For both phantoms, different lung treatment plans (single or multiple metastases and targets in the mediastinum using HT technique were simulated and verified. Point and planar dose measurements, both with radiographic extended-dose-range (EDR2 and radiochromic external-beam-therapy (EBT2 films, were performed. Absolute point dose measurements, dose profile comparisons and quantitative analysis of gamma function distributions were analyzed. Results An excellent agreement between measured and calculated dose distributions was found in homogeneous media, both for point and planar dose measurements. Absolute dose deviations Conclusions Very acceptable accuracy was found for complex lung treatment plans calculated with CCC algorithm implemented in the tomotherapy TPS even in the heterogeneous phantom with very low lung-density.

  7. Intensity-modulated whole abdomen irradiation following adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy for FIGO stage III ovarian cancer. Four-year outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Lindel, Katja; Katayama, Sonja; Schubert, Kai; Herfarth, Klaus; Harms, Wolfgang; Debus, Juergen [Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Schneeweiss, Andreas [University of Heidelberg, Nationales Centrum fuer Tumorerkrankungen (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Sohn, Christoph [University of Heidelberg, Department of Gynecology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    A prospective study to assess toxicity and survival outcomes after intensity-modulated whole-abdominal irradiation (IM-WAI) following surgery and adjuvant intravenous carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy in advanced FIGO stage III ovarian cancer. Between 2006 and 2009, 16 patients with optimally resected FIGO stage III ovarian cancer, who had received six cycles of adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy were treated with consolidation IM-WAI. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions, using step-and-shoot (n = 3) or helical tomotherapy (n = 13). The first 10 patients were treated within a phase I trial; the following patients received the same treatment modality. The target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity, the diaphragm, the liver capsule, and the pelvic and para-aortic node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, and bone marrow. Median follow-up was 44 months (range 19.2-67.2 months). No grade 4 toxicities occurred during IM-WAI. Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) grade 3 toxicities were: diarrhea (25 %), leucopenia (19 %), nausea/vomiting (6 %), and thrombocytopenia (6 %). No toxicity-related treatment break was necessary. Small bowel obstruction occurred in a total of 6 patients: in 3 cases (19 %) due to postsurgical adhesions and in 3 cases due to local tumor recurrence (19 %). Median recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 27.6 months (95 % confidence interval, CI = 24-44 months) and median overall survival (OS) was 42.1 months (95 %CI = 17-68 months). The peritoneal cavity was the most frequent site of initial failure. Consolidation IM-WAI following surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy is feasible and can be performed with manageable acute and late toxicity. The favorable RFS outcome is promising and justifies further clinical trials. (orig.) [German] Es wurden Akut- und Langzeittoxizitaet sowie Ueberlebensdaten der konsolidierenden intensitaetsmodulierten Ganzabdomenbestrahlung (''intensity-modulated

  8. Measurement of MV CT dose index for Hi-ART helical tomotherapy unit%Hi-ART螺旋断层放疗机MV螺旋CT剂量指数的测量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王运来; 廖雄飞

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨Hi-ART螺旋断层放疗机MV扇形束CT图像获取过程中患者接受的剂量.方法 用PTW TM30009 CT电离室分别在T40017头部和T40016躯干模体中,选择扫描层厚2、4及6 mm和改变扫描范围等参数,分别测量加权CT剂量指数,计算相应的剂量长度乘积,并与XVIkV锥形束CT、ACQSim模拟定位CT的结果进行比较.结果 Hi-ART螺旋断层治疗机的CT剂量指数与层厚成反比,剂量长度乘积与扫描范围成正比.临床应用条件下Hi-ART的CT剂量指数在头颈部比XVI kV锥形束CT大,但躯干较小.结论 CT剂量指数能反映患者成像过程中接受的剂量,可以作为治疗保证与控制的指标.图像引导过程中应该合理选择层厚,减少扫描范围,最大限度减少患者接受剂量.%Objective To evaluate the patient dose from Hi-ART MV helical CT imaging in image-guided radiotherapy.Methods Weighted CT dose index (CTDI_W) was measured with PTW TM30009 CT ion chamber in head and body phantoms,respectively,for slice thicknesses of 2,4,6 mm with scanned range of 5 cm and 15 cm.Dose length products (DLP) were subsequently calculated.The CTDI_W and DLP were compared with XVI kV CBCT and ACQSim simulator CT for routine clinical protocols.Results An inverse relationship between CTDI and the slice thickness was found.The dose distribution was inhomogeneous owing to the attenuation of the couch.CTDI and DLP had close relationship with the slice thickness and the scanned range.Patient dose from MVCT was lower than XVI CBCT for head,but larger for body scan.Results CTDI_W can be used to assess the patient dose in MV helical CT due to its simplicity for measurement and reproducibility.Regular measurement should be performed in QA & QC program.Appropriate slice thickness and scan range should be chosen to reduce the patient dose.

  9. Place of the tomo-therapy in the irradiation of child trunk tumors; Place de la tomotherapie dans l'irradiation des tumeurs du tronc de l'enfant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beneyton, V.; Quetin, P.; Meyer, P.; Niederst, C.; Noel, G. [Centre Paul-Strauss, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Lutz, P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    2009-10-15

    The life expectancy of these children suffering of trunk gliomas is catastrophic. The increased dose in the tumor volume could be a solution by increasing the rate of local control. The intensity modulated radiotherapy with a tomo-therapy device could allow to reach this objective, given the decrease of doses in organs at risk. The long term evaluation of the radiotherapy effects (neuro sensorial, neuro cognitive, second tumors) should be realised, however, if the purpose of lifetime increase is reached. (N.C.)

  10. 局部晚期宫颈癌螺旋断层放疗同步化疗早晚期不良反应和疗效观察%Acute and late toxicities and efficacy of helical tomotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚波; 王树鹤; 王雅棣; 刘清智; 路娜

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the acute and late toxicities and 2-year treatment outcomes in cervical cancer pa-tients underwent helical tomotherapy (HT) with concurrent chemotherapy and high dose afterloading intraluminal brachy-therapy (HDR). Method 46 patients with cervical cancer of stage Ib-IIIb who had accepted radical radiotherapy were en-rolled in the study. HT-IMRT was utilized as the external irradiation. 14 patients with pelvic lymph nodes involvement were outlined and defined as GTVnd, and then clinical target volume included pelvic lymph nodes (6 patients received ex-tended-field irradiation), GTVnd, whole uterus, cervix and vagina, with an extent of 0.8~1 cm as the planning target vol-ume (PTV). The median prescribed dose for PTV was 50.4 Gy (45-50.4 Gy) at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction;All patients re-ceived concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin at 40 mg/m2/w;After HT at 30-40 Gy, HDR was applied in combination, with a median dose of 30 Gy (30-36 Gy) at point A, and the overall equivalent 2 Gy dose (EQD2) was 90.3 Gy (84.9~98.3 Gy) at point A. Adverse reactions and efficacy were evaluated during treatment and 1~24 months thereafter. Result 24 patients completed 4-5 cycles of concurrent chemotherapy and 22 patients completed 2-3 cycles. Acute toxicities of grade 3 included: leukopenia, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, each occurred in 9 (19.6%), 2 (4.3%), 5 (10.9%), and 1 (2.2%) patients, respectively. Late toxicities of grade 3 occurred in 2 patients, including 1 case with rectal bleeding and an-other 1 case with bladder bleeding. No grade 4 or 5 toxicities were observed. The 2-year recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival and overall survival were 91.7%, 86.0% and 97.1%, respectively. Conclusion Helical tomotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy and high dose afterloading intraluminal brachytherapy mainly causes leukopenia and nausea, which was a feasible therapy with minor late toxicities and satisfactory short-term efficacy.%目的:分析局部晚期

  11. Implementation of intensity modulation with dynamic multileaf collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, J.W.; Yu, C.; Jaffray, D. [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The computer-controlled multileaf collimator (MLC) marks one of the most important advances in radiation therapy. The device efficiently replaces manual blocking to shape fields and can be used to modulate beam intensity. The results of a research programme at William Beaumont Hospital, aimed at bringing dynamic intensity modulation into clinical use, are discussed.

  12. Performance analysis of the ultra-linear optical intensity modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madamopoulos, Nicholas; Dingel, Benjamin

    2006-10-01

    The linear optical intensity modulator is a key component in any broadband optical access-based analog fiber-optic link systems such as sub-carrier multiplexing (SCM) systems, ultra-dense CATV, Radio-over-Fiber (RoF) communications, and other platform access systems. Previously, we have proposed a super-linear optical modulator, having SFDR = 130 -140 dB-Hz 2/3, based on a unique combination of phase-modulator (PM) and a weak ring resonator (RR) modulator within a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI). We presented some of its unique features. In this paper, we characterize further this ultra-linear optical intensity modulator, analyze its RF performance and provide method for parameter optimization. Other excellent features of this modulator design such as high manufacturing tolerance, effect of link insertion loss, adaptive characteristic and device simplicity are also discussed.

  13. New techniques in hadrontherapy: intensity modulated proton beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cella, L; Lomax, A; Miralbell, R

    2001-01-01

    Inverse planning and intensity modulated (IM) X-ray beam treatment techniques can achieve significant improvements in dose distributions comparable to those obtained with forward planned proton beams. However, intensity modulation can also be applied to proton beams and further optimization in dose distribution can reasonably be expected. A comparative planning exercise between IM X-rays and IM proton beams was carried out on two different tumor cases: a pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma and a prostate cancer. Both IM X-rays and IM protons achieved equally homogenous coverage of the target volume in the two tumor sites. Predicted NTCPs were equally low for both treatment techniques. Nevertheless, a reduced low-to-medium dose to the organs at risk and a lesser integral non-target mean dose for IM protons in the two cases favored the use of IM proton beams.

  14. Retrospective feasibility study of simultaneous integrated boost in cervical cancer using tomotherapy: the impact of organ motion and tumor regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrera Fernanda G

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole pelvis intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT is increasingly being used to treat cervical cancer aiming to reduce side effects. Encouraged by this, some groups have proposed the use of simultaneous integrated boost (SIB to target the tumor, either to get a higher tumoricidal effect or to replace brachytherapy. Nevertheless, physiological organ movement and rapid tumor regression throughout treatment might substantially reduce any benefit of this approach. Purpose To evaluate the clinical target volume - simultaneous integrated boost (CTV-SIB regression and motion during chemo-radiotherapy (CRT for cervical cancer, and to monitor treatment progress dosimetrically and volumetrically to ensure treatment goals are met. Methods and materials Ten patients treated with standard doses of CRT and brachytherapy were retrospectively re-planned using a helical Tomotherapy - SIB technique for the hypothetical scenario of this feasibility study. Target and organs at risk (OAR were contoured on deformable fused planning-computed tomography and megavoltage computed tomography images. The CTV-SIB volume regression was determined. The center of mass (CM was used to evaluate the degree of motion. The Dice’s similarity coefficient (DSC was used to assess the spatial overlap of CTV-SIBs between scans. A cumulative dose-volume histogram modeled estimated delivered doses. Results The CTV-SIB relative reduction was between 31 and 70%. The mean maximum CM change was 12.5, 9, and 3 mm in the superior-inferior, antero-posterior, and right-left dimensions, respectively. The CTV-SIB-DSC approached 1 in the first week of treatment, indicating almost perfect overlap. CTV-SIB-DSC regressed linearly during therapy, and by the end of treatment was 0.5, indicating 50% discordance. Two patients received less than 95% of the prescribed dose. Much higher doses to the OAR were observed. A multiple regression analysis showed a significant interaction

  15. Intensity modulation with electrons: calculations, measurements and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, M G; Karlsson, M; Zackrisson, B

    1998-05-01

    Intensity modulation of electron beams is one step towards truly conformal therapy. This can be realized with the MM50 racetrack microtron that utilizes a scanning beam technique. By adjusting the scan pattern it is possible to obtain arbitrary fluence distributions. Since the monitor chambers in the treatment head are segmented in both x- and y-directions it is possible to verify the fluence distribution to the patient at any time during the treatment. Intensity modulated electron beams have been measured with film and a plane parallel chamber and compared with calculations. The calculations were based on a pencil beam method. An intensity distribution at the multileaf collimator (MLC) level was calculated by superposition of measured pencil beams over scan patterns. By convolving this distribution with a Gaussian pencil beam, which has propagated from the MLC to the isocentre, a fluence distribution at isocentre level was obtained. The agreement between calculations and measurements was within 2% in dose or 1 mm in distance in the penumbra zones. A standard set of intensity modulated electron beams has been developed. These beams have been implemented in a treatment planning system and are used for manual optimization. A clinical example (prostate) of such an application is presented and compared with a standard irradiation technique.

  16. Intensity modulation with electrons: calculations, measurements and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Magnus G.; Karlsson, Mikael [Department of Radiation Physics, Umeaa University, S-901 85 Umeaa (Sweden); Zackrisson, Bjoern [Department of Oncology, Umeaa University, S-901 85 Umeaa (Sweden)

    1998-05-01

    Intensity modulation of electron beams is one step towards truly conformal therapy. This can be realized with the MM50 racetrack microtron that utilizes a scanning beam technique. By adjusting the scan pattern it is possible to obtain arbitrary fluence distributions. Since the monitor chambers in the treatment head are segmented in both x- and y-directions it is possible to verify the fluence distribution to the patient at any time during the treatment. Intensity modulated electron beams have been measured with film and a plane parallel chamber and compared with calculations. The calculations were based on a pencil beam method. An intensity distribution at the multileaf collimator (MLC) level was calculated by superposition of measured pencil beams over scan patterns. By convolving this distribution with a Gaussian pencil beam, which has propagated from the MLC to the isocentre, a fluence distribution at isocentre level was obtained. The agreement between calculations and measurements was within 2% in dose or 1 mm in distance in the penumbra zones. A standard set of intensity modulated electron beams has been developed. These beams have been implemented in a treatment planning system and are used for manual optimization. A clinical example (prostate) of such an application is presented and compared with a standard irradiation technique. (author)

  17. Feasibility of Tomotherapy-based image-guided radiotherapy for small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Phong Nguyen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: To assess the tolerance of patients with small cell lung cancer undergoing chemoradiation with tomotherapy-based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT.Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the toxicity profile for nine patients with small cell lung cancer of the limited stage who underwent chemoradiation delivered with helical tomotherapy (HT has been conducted.Results: Acute grade 3-4 hematologic and esophagitis toxicities developed in two and three patients respectively. One patient developed a pulmonary embolism during radiotherapy. Seven patients had weight loss ranging from 0 to 30 pounds (median: 4 pounds. Three patients had treatment breaks ranging from 2 to 12 days. At a median follow-up of 11 months (range: 2-24 months, no patients developed any radiation related toxicities such as grade 3-4 pneumonitis or other long-term complications. The median survival was estimated to be 15 months. There were 2 local recurrences, 3 mediastinal recurrences, and six distant metastases.Conclusion: Grade 3-4 toxicities remained significant during chemoradiation when radiation was delivered with tomotherapy-based IGRT. However, the absence of grade 3-4 pneumonitis is promising and the use of HT needs to be investigated in future prospective studies.

  18. Tomotherapy treatment plan quality assurance: The impact of applied criteria on passing rate in gamma index method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bresciani, Sara; Di Dia, Amalia; Maggio, Angelo; Cutaia, Claudia; Miranti, Anna; Infusino, Erminia; Stasi, Michele [Medical Physics Division, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCCS), 10060 Candiolo (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Pretreatment patient plan verification with gamma index (GI) metric analysis is standard procedure for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the variability of the local and global gamma index obtained during standard pretreatment quality assurance (QA) measurements for plans performed with Tomotherapy unit. The QA measurements were performed with a 3D diode array, using variable passing criteria: 3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm, 1%/1 mm, each with both local and global normalization.Methods: The authors analyzed the pretreatment QA results for 73 verifications; 37 were prostate cancer plans, 16 were head and neck plans, and 20 were other clinical sites. All plans were treated using the Tomotherapy Hi-Art System. Pretreatment QA plans were performed with the commercially available 3D diode array ArcCHECK™. This device has 1386 diodes arranged in a helical geometry spaced 1 cm apart. The dose measurements were acquired on the ArcCHECK™ and then compared with the calculated dose using the standard gamma analysis method. The gamma passing rate (%GP), defined as the percentage of points satisfying the condition GI < 1, was calculated for different criteria (3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm, 1%/1 mm) and for both global and local normalization. In the case of local normalization method, the authors set three dose difference threshold (DDT) values of 2, 3, and 5 cGy. Dose difference threshold is defined as the minimum absolute dose error considered in the analysis when using local normalization. Low-dose thresholds (TH) of 5% and 10% were also applied and analyzed.Results: Performing a paired-t-test, the authors determined that the gamma passing rate is independent of the threshold values for all of the adopted criteria (5%TH vs 10%TH, p > 0.1). Our findings showed that mean %GPs for local (or global) normalization for the entire study group were 93% (98%), 84% (92%), and 66% (61%) for 3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm, and 1%/1 mm criteria

  19. Tomotherapy dose distribution verification using MAGIC-f polymer gel dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavoni, J. F.; Pike, T. L.; Snow, J.; DeWerd, L.; Baffa, O. [Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900 - CEP 14040-901 - Bairro Monte Alegre - Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Medical Radiation Research Center, Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1111 Highland Avenue, B1002 WIMR, Madison, Wisconsin 53705-2275 (United States); Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900 - CEP 14040-901 - Bairro Monte Alegre - Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: This paper presents the application of MAGIC-f gel in a three-dimensional dose distribution measurement and its ability to accurately measure the dose distribution from a tomotherapy unit. Methods: A prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) irradiation was simulated in the gel phantom and the treatment was delivered by a TomoTherapy equipment. Dose distribution was evaluated by the R2 distribution measured in magnetic resonance imaging. Results: A high similarity was found by overlapping of isodoses of the dose distribution measured with the gel and expected by the treatment planning system (TPS). Another analysis was done by comparing the relative absorbed dose profiles in the measured and in the expected dose distributions extracted along indicated lines of the volume and the results were also in agreement. The gamma index analysis was also applied to the data and a high pass rate was achieved (88.4% for analysis using 3%/3 mm and of 96.5% using 4%/4 mm). The real three-dimensional analysis compared the dose-volume histograms measured for the planning volumes and expected by the treatment planning, being the results also in good agreement by the overlapping of the curves. Conclusions: These results show that MAGIC-f gel is a promise for tridimensional dose distribution measurements.

  20. Design and implementation of a ''cheese'' phantom-based Tomotherapy TLD dose intercomparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiefer, Hans; Buchauer, Konrad; Heinze, Simon [Medical Physics Group, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Henke, Guido; Plasswilm, Ludwig [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2015-11-15

    The unique beam-delivery technique of Tomotherapy machines (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, Calif.) necessitates tailored quality assurance. This requirement also applies to external dose intercomparisons. Therefore, the aim of the 2014 SSRMP (Swiss Society of Radiobiology and Medical Physics) dosimetry intercomparison was to compare two set-ups with different phantoms. A small cylindrical Perspex phantom, which is similar to the IROC phantom (Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core, Houston, Tex.), and the ''cheese'' phantom, which is provided by the Tomotherapy manufacturer to all institutions, were used. The standard calibration plans for the TomoHelical and TomoDirect irradiation techniques were applied. These plans are routinely used for dose output calibration in Tomotherapy institutions. We tested 20 Tomotherapy machines in Germany and Switzerland. The ratio of the measured (D{sub m}) to the calculated (D{sub c}) dose was assessed for both phantoms and irradiation techniques. The D{sub m}/D{sub c} distributions were determined to compare the suitability of the measurement set-ups investigated. The standard deviations of the TLD-measured (thermoluminescent dosimetry) D{sub m}/D{sub c} ratios for the ''cheese'' phantom were 1.9 % for the TomoHelical (19 measurements) and 1.2 % (11 measurements) for the TomoDirect irradiation techniques. The corresponding ratios for the Perspex phantom were 2.8 % (18 measurements) and 1.8 % (11 measurements). Compared with the Perspex phantom-based set-up, the ''cheese'' phantom-based set-up without individual planning was demonstrated to be more suitable for Tomotherapy dose checks. Future SSRMP dosimetry intercomparisons for Tomotherapy machines will therefore be based on the ''cheese'' phantom set-up. (orig.) [German] Die einzigartige Bestrahlungstechnik mit Tomotherapie-Bestrahlungsgeraeten (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA) erfordert spezifische

  1. Dosimetric evaluation of helical tomotherapy and two types of volumetric modulated arc therapy for malig-nant pleural mesothelioma%胸膜间皮瘤螺旋断层调强放疗与两种容积旋转调强放疗计划的剂量学评估∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张富利; 许卫东; 蒋华勇; 王雅棣; 高军茂; 刘清智

    2015-01-01

    目的:比较螺旋断层调强放疗( helical tomotherapy, HT)和基于两种加速器的容积旋转调强放疗( volumetric modulated arc therapy, VMAT)在恶性胸膜间皮瘤放疗中的剂量学差异。方法回顾性分析10例无法手术的胸膜间皮瘤患者CT图像,采用Elekta Synergy( S⁃VMAT)和Elekta Axesse加速器( A⁃VMAT)进行VMAT放疗计划以及螺旋断层放疗系统完成HT放疗计划的设计,要求95%的计划靶区( PTV)达到处方剂量60 Gy。比较3种计划在靶区适形度指数( CI)、均匀性指数( HI)、最大剂量( Dmax )、最小剂量( Dmin )、平均剂量( Dmean )以及危及器官( OARs)剂量体积参数方面的差异。结果 HT计划的Dmax、Dmean显著低于S⁃VMAT和A⁃VMAT(P<0�001,P=0�002),而Dmin和CI的差异均无统计学意义(P>0�05)。此外,HT计划的靶区HI显著优于S⁃VMAT和A⁃VMAT (1�04±0�01 vs.1�11±0�03 vs.1�09±0�02, P<0�001);CI也优于后两者,但差异无统计学意义(0�80±0�07 vs.0�71±0�12 vs.0�75±0�08, P>0�05)。3组计划的OARs剂量体积参数的差异均无统计学意义(P>0�05)。与HT计划比较,S⁃VMAT和A⁃VMAT计划的平均实施时间大幅减少[(11�11±3�75)min vs.(3�27±1�65)min vs.(2�57±1�66)min,P<0�05]。结论 VMAT计划在靶区覆盖度与均匀性方面略逊于HT,但治疗时间明显缩短,有利于提高患者治疗过程中的舒适度和重复性。%Objective To compare the impacts of helical tomotherapy ( HT) and two types of volumetric modulated arc thera⁃py ( VMAT) planning for the malignant pleural mesothelioma based on the Elekta Synergy linac ( S⁃VMAT) and the Elekta Axesse lin⁃ac ( A⁃VMAT) , respectively. Methods Ten patients with inoperable malignant pleural mesothelioma were retrospectively planned with the HT, S⁃VMAT and A⁃VMAT. Dose

  2. Pump-to-Signal Intensity Modulation Transfer in Saturated- Gain Fiber Optical Parametric Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Lund-Hansen, Toke; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    The pump-to-signal intensity modulation transfer in saturated degenerate FOPAs is numerically investigated over the whole gain bandwidth. The intensity modulation transfer decreases and the OSNR improves when the amplifier operates in the saturation regime....

  3. Dose profile analysis of small fields in intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medel B, E. [IMSS, Centro Medico Nacional Manuel Avila Camacho, Calle 2 Nte. 2004, Barrio de San Francisco, 72090 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Tejeda M, G.; Romero S, K., E-mail: romsakaren@gmail.com [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Av. San Claudio y 18 Sur, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla, Pue.(Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Small field dosimetry is getting a very important worldwide task nowadays. The use of fields of few centimeters is more common with the introduction of sophisticated techniques of radiation therapy, as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). In our country the implementation of such techniques is just getting started and whit it the need of baseline data acquisition. The dosimetry under small field conditions represents a challenge for the physicists community. In this work, a dose profile analysis was done, using various types of dosimeters for further comparisons. This analysis includes the study of quality parameters as flatness, symmetry, penumbra, and other in-axis measurements. (Author)

  4. Metadevice for intensity modulation with sub-wavelength spatial resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Cencillo-Abad, Pablo; Plum, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Effectively continuous control over propagation of a beam of light requires light modulation with pixelation that is smaller than the optical wavelength. Here we propose a spatial intensity modulator with sub-wavelength resolution in one dimension. The metadevice combines recent advances in reconfigurable nanomembrane metamaterials and coherent all-optical control of metasurfaces. It uses nanomechanical actuation of metasurface absorber strips placed near a mirror in order to control their interaction with light from perfect absorption to negligible loss, promising a path towards dynamic beam diffraction, light focusing and holography without unwanted diffraction artefacts.

  5. Linear algebraic methods applied to intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, S M; Xing, L

    2001-10-01

    Methods of linear algebra are applied to the choice of beam weights for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). It is shown that the physical interpretation of the beam weights, target homogeneity and ratios of deposited energy can be given in terms of matrix equations and quadratic forms. The methodology of fitting using linear algebra as applied to IMRT is examined. Results are compared with IMRT plans that had been prepared using a commercially available IMRT treatment planning system and previously delivered to cancer patients.

  6. Evaluation of PTW Seven29 for tomotherapy patient-specific quality assurance and comparison with ScandiDos Delta4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Pamela; Stathakis, Sotirios; Gutiérrez, Alonso N.; Esquivel, Carlos; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2012-01-01

    For routine quality assurance of helical tomotherapy plans, an alternative method, as opposed to the TomoTherapy suggested cylindrical solid water phantom with film and ionization chamber, is proposed using the PTW Seven29 2D-ARRAY inserted in a dedicated octagonal phantom, called Octavius. First, the sensitivity of the array to pitch was studied by varying the pitch during planning to 0.287, 0.433, 1.0, and 2.0. For each pitch selected, the dependence on field size was investigated by generating plans with field widths (FWs) of 1.06 cm, 2.49 cm, and 5.02 cm, for a total of 12 plans. Secondly, a total of 15 patient QA plans were delivered using helical tomotherapy with the Delta4 and Seven29/Octavius for comparison. Using the clinical gamma criteria, 3% and 3 mm, all FW and pitch plans had a passing percentage of >90%. For patient QA plans, the average gamma pass percentage was 97.0% (94.4–99.8%) for the Delta4 and 97.6% (92.5-100.0%) for the Seven29/Octavius. Both the Seven29/Octavius and Delta4 performed to a high standard of measurement accuracy and had a 90% or greater gamma percent for all plans and were considered clinically acceptable. PMID:22557796

  7. Evaluation of PTW Seven29 for tomotherapy patient-specific quality assurance and comparison with ScandiDos Delta(4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Pamela; Stathakis, Sotirios; Gutiérrez, Alonso N; Esquivel, Carlos; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2012-04-01

    For routine quality assurance of helical tomotherapy plans, an alternative method, as opposed to the TomoTherapy suggested cylindrical solid water phantom with film and ionization chamber, is proposed using the PTW Seven29 2D-ARRAY inserted in a dedicated octagonal phantom, called Octavius. First, the sensitivity of the array to pitch was studied by varying the pitch during planning to 0.287, 0.433, 1.0, and 2.0. For each pitch selected, the dependence on field size was investigated by generating plans with field widths (FWs) of 1.06 cm, 2.49 cm, and 5.02 cm, for a total of 12 plans. Secondly, a total of 15 patient QA plans were delivered using helical tomotherapy with the Delta(4) and Seven29/Octavius for comparison. Using the clinical gamma criteria, 3% and 3 mm, all FW and pitch plans had a passing percentage of >90%. For patient QA plans, the average gamma pass percentage was 97.0% (94.4-99.8%) for the Delta(4) and 97.6% (92.5-100.0%) for the Seven29/Octavius. Both the Seven29/Octavius and Delta(4) performed to a high standard of measurement accuracy and had a 90% or greater gamma percent for all plans and were considered clinically acceptable.

  8. Tomographic patient registration and conformal avoidance tomotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Jennifer Stacy

    Development of tomotherapy has led to the emergence of several processes, providing the basis for many unique investigative opportunities. These processes include setup verification, tomographic verification, megavoltage dose reconstruction, and conformal avoidance tomotherapy. Setup verification and conformal avoidance tomotherapy, in particular, are two closely intertwined matters. In order to avoid critical structures located within or adjacent to indistinct tumor regions, accurate patient positioning from fraction to fraction must be ensured. With tomographic patient registration, a higher level of assurance is offered than with traditional positioning methods. Translational and rotational offsets are calculated directly from projection data using cross- correlation or fast Fourier transforms. Experiments assessing the algorithm's ability to calculate individual offsets were conducted using the University of Wisconsin's Tomotherapy Benchtop. These experiments indicate statistical errors within +/-1 mm for offsets up to approximately 20 mm, with maximum offset errors of about +/-2 mm for displacements up to 35 mm. The angular offset component is within +/-2°. To evaluate the registration process as a whole, experimental results from a few multi-parameter examples are also analyzed. With the development of tomographic patient registration in projection space, efforts to promote further sparing of critical structures are justified. Conformal avoidance tomotherapy has as its objective to treat an indistinct tumor region while conformally avoiding any normal critical structures in that region. To demonstrate the advantages of conformal avoidance tomotherapy, conventional and tomotherapy treatments are contrasted for both nasopharyngeal and breast carcinoma cases. For initial research efforts, computed tomography data sets of a human male and female were obtained via the ``Visible Human Project''. Since these data sets are on the order of hundreds of megabytes, both

  9. 无法切除局限于肝内的肝细胞肝癌HT临床疗效观察%Hypofraction radiotherapy by helical tomotherapy for unresectable but confined intrahepatic hepatocellular carcinoma is efficient and safe in comparison with conventional 3-dimension conformal radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江涛; 曾昭冲; 杨平; 胡永

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety of helical tomotherapy (HT) for hepatocellular carcinoma confined to the liver,and to investigate the efficacy of HT by comparison with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT).Methods In June 2011,hypofractionated HT was performed in 35 patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma confined to the liver who had no distant metastasis or tumor thrombosis.The dose in each fraction increased from 2.4 Gy to 5.0 Gy with a median dose of 3.2 Gy.The median dose for the total treatment was 50.0 Gy.Within the same period,45 patients received conventionally fractionated 3DCRT with a median dose of 54.0 Gy.The adverse reactions,clinical outcomes,and survival time were compared between the two groups.The survival rate was calculated with Kaplan-Meier method,and log-rank test was used to estimate statistical significance of survival differences.Multivariate analysis of survival was carried out with Cox' s regression model.Results There were no significant differences in adversc reactions between the two groups.The objective response rate was significantly higher in the HT group than in the 3DCRT group (60% vs.33%,P=0.024).There was no significant difference in the disease control rate between the two groups (94% vs.89%,P=0.459).The HT group showed significantly higher 1-,2-,and 3-year overall survival rates than the 3DCRT group (97% vs.80%,P=0.025;81% vs.55%,P =0.008;67% vs.50%,P =0.048).The multivariate analysis indicated that tumor smaller than 8 cm,transarterial chemoembolization before radiotherapy,and HT were associated with improved survival (P=0.005;P =0.000;P=0.002).Conclusions HT shows an advantage in precise treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma confined to the liver.With acceptable toxicity,hypofractionated HT shortens the treatment duration and improves the survival in patients.%目的 观察HT对局限于肝内的肝细胞肝癌的安全性,并与3DCRT疗效比较.方法 2011年6月对35例未手

  10. 胸上段食管癌螺旋断层放疗和容积旋转调强放疗的剂量学比较%Dosimetric comparison of helical tomotherapy and volume-modulated arc therapy for upper thoracic esophageal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴相昆; 蔡博宁; 葛瑞刚; 王小深; 王运来

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the dosimetric differences between helical tomotherapy (HT) and volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in the treatment of upper thoracic esophageal carcinoma (UTEC).Methods A total of 10 patients with UTEC were randomly selected.HT plan and double-arc VMAT plan were designed and optimized for each patient.The prescription dose was 50 Gy/30 fractions for gross target volume (GTV), 66 Gy/30 fractions for planned target volume (PTV).The dose distribution and conformal index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) of target volume, the D1%, D5%, Dg5%, D99%, and dose of organ at risk (OAR) were analyzed by using the dose volume histogram (DVH).The monitor units and delivery time were also evaluated.Results For GTV and PTV, the D99% of HT plans were slightly higher than those of VMAT plans (t =4.476, 3.756, P < 0.05) , but no significant differences in D1% , D5% , D95% , HI and CI (P > 0.05) were found.The V10, V15, V20 and mean lung dose (MLD) to the total-lung of HT plans were all significantly lower than those of VMAT plans (t =-3.369,-4.824, -4.869,-3.657, P < 0.05).There were no significant differences for V5, V30 and Dmax of cord (P > 0.05).The monitor units and delivery time of VMAT plans were significantly lower than those of HT plans (t =13.970, 7.982, P < 0.05).Conclusions Both HT and VMAT are appropriate for esophageal cancer radiotherapy.HT significantly reduces the radiation dose of the total-lung, while VMAT has obvious advantages in efficiency.%目的 比较胸上段食管癌螺旋断层(HT)与容积旋转调强放疗(VMAT)计划的剂量学差异.方法 随机抽样法选取10例胸上段食管癌患者,分别设计HT和VMAT双弧照射调强放疗计划,肿瘤靶区体积(GTV)给予66 Gy/30次,计划靶区体积(PTV)给予50 Gy/30次.根据剂量体积直方图(DVH)评价靶区的D1%、D5%、D95%、D99%、适形指数(CI)、均匀性指数(HI)和危及器官(OAR)受量,比较治疗时间和

  11. Preliminary Retrospective Analysis of Daily Tomotherapy Output Constancy Checks Using Statistical Process Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Mezzenga

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the results from a Helical TomoTherapy Hi-Art treatment system relating to quality controls based on daily static and dynamic output checks using statistical process control methods. Individual value X-charts, exponentially weighted moving average charts, and process capability and acceptability indices were used to monitor the treatment system performance. Daily output values measured from January 2014 to January 2015 were considered. The results obtained showed that, although the process was in control, there was an out-of-control situation in the principal maintenance intervention for the treatment system. In particular, process capability indices showed a decreasing percentage of points in control which was, however, acceptable according to AAPM TG148 guidelines. Our findings underline the importance of restricting the acceptable range of daily output checks and suggest a future line of investigation for a detailed process control of daily output checks for the Helical TomoTherapy Hi-Art treatment system.

  12. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Primary Brain Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-min Wang

    2004-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been used to treat primary brain tumors as standard primary and/or adjunctive therapies for decades. It is difficult for conventional radiotherapy to deliver a lethal dose of radiation to the tumors while sparing surrounding normal brain due to complicated structures and multifunction in human brain. With the understanding of radiation physics and computer technology, a number of novel and more precise radiotherapies have been developed in recent years. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is one of these strategies. The use of IMRT in the treatment of primary brain tumors is being increasing nowadays. It shows great promise for some of primary brain tumors and also presents some problems, This review highlights current IMRT in the treatment of mainly primary brain tumors.

  13. Effects of intensity-modulated radiotherapy on human oral microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zi-Yang; Tang, Zi-Sheng; Yan, Chao; Jiang, Yun-Tao; Ma, Rui; Liu, Zheng; Huang, Zheng-Wei

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate changes in the biodiversity of the oral microflora of patients with head and neck cancer treated with postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Pooled dental plaque samples were collected during the radiation treatment from patients receiving IMRT (n = 13) and CRT (n = 12). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to analyze the temporal variation of these plaque samples. The stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rates were also compared between IMRT and CRT patients. Reductions in the severity of hyposalivation were observed in IMRT patients compared with CRT patients. We also observed that the temporal stability of the oral ecosystem was significantly higher in the IMRT group (69.96 ± 7.82%) than in the CRT group (51.98 ± 10.45%) (P oral ecosystem than CRT.

  14. Quantitative shadowgraphy and proton radiography for large intensity modulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ratan, Naren; Sadler, James; Chen, Nicholas; Savert, Alexander; Trines, Raoul; Bingham, Robert; Burrows, Philip N; Kaluza, Malte C; Norreys, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Shadowgraphy is a technique widely used to diagnose objects or systems in various fields in physics and engineering. In shadowgraphy, an optical beam is deflected by the object and then the intensity modulation is captured on a screen placed some distance away. However, retrieving quantitative information from the shadowgrams themselves is a challenging task because of the non-linear nature of the process. Here, a novel method to retrieve quantitative information from shadowgrams, based on computational geometry, is presented for the first time. This process can be applied to proton radiography for electric and magnetic field diagnosis in high-energy-density plasmas and has been benchmarked using a toroidal magnetic field as the object, among others. It is shown that the method can accurately retrieve quantitative parameters with error bars less than 10%, even when caustics are present. The method is also shown to be robust enough to process real experimental results with simple pre- and post-processing techn...

  15. Intensity modulated short circuit current spectroscopy for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavasoglu, Nese; Sertap Kavasoglu, A.; Birgi, Ozcan; Oktik, Sener [Mugla University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Physics Department, TR-48000 Mugla (Turkey); Mugla University Clean Energy Research and Development Centre, TR-48000 Mugla (Turkey)

    2011-02-15

    Understanding charge separation and transport is momentously important for the rectification of solar cell performance. To probe photo-generated carrier dynamics, we implemented intensity modulated short circuit current spectroscopy (IMSCCS) on porous Si and Cu(In{sub x},Ga{sub 1-x})Se{sub 2} solar cells. In this experiment, the solar cells were lightened with sinusoidally modulated monochromatic light. The photocurrent response of the solar cell as a function of modulation frequency is measured as the optoelectronic transfer function of the system. The optoelectronic transfer function introduces the connection between the modulated light intensity and measured AC current of the solar cell. In this study, interaction of free carriers with the density of states of the porous Si and Cu(In{sub x}, Ga{sub 1-x})Se{sub 2} solar cells was studied on the basis of charge transport time by IMSCCS data. (author)

  16. Similarities between static and rotational intensity-modulated plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q Jackie; Yin Fangfang; McMahon, Ryan; Zhu Xiaofeng; Das, Shiva K [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)], E-mail: jackie.wu@duke.edu

    2010-01-07

    The aim of this study was to explore similarities between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) techniques in the context of the number of multi-leaf collimator (MLC) segments required to achieve plan objectives, the major factor influencing plan quality. Three clinical cases with increasing complexity were studied: (a) prostate only, (b) prostate and seminal vesicles and (c) prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. Initial 'gold-standard' plans with the maximum possible organ-at-risk sparing were generated for all three cases. For each case, multiple IMRT and IMAT plans were generated with varying intensity levels (IMRT) and arc control points (IMAT), which translate into varying MLC segments in both modalities. The IMAT/IMRT plans were forced to mimic the organ-at-risk sparing and target coverage in the gold-standard plans, thereby only allowing the target dose inhomogeneity to be variable. A higher target dose inhomogeneity (quantified as D5-dose to the highest 5% of target volume) implies that the plan is less capable of modulation. For each case, given a similar number of MLC segments, both IMRT and IMAT plans exhibit similar target dose inhomogeneity, indicating that there is no difference in their ability to provide dose painting. Target dose inhomogeneity remained approximately constant with decreasing segments, but sharply increased below a specific critical number of segments (70, 100, 110 for cases a, b, c, respectively). For the cases studied, IMAT and IMRT plans are similar in their dependence on the number of MLC segments. A minimum critical number of segments are required to ensure adequate plan quality. Future studies are needed to establish the range of minimum critical number of segments for different treatment sites and target-organ geometries.

  17. Similarities between static and rotational intensity-modulated plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q. Jackie; Yin, Fang-Fang; McMahon, Ryan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Das, Shiva K.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore similarities between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) techniques in the context of the number of multi-leaf collimator (MLC) segments required to achieve plan objectives, the major factor influencing plan quality. Three clinical cases with increasing complexity were studied: (a) prostate only, (b) prostate and seminal vesicles and (c) prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. Initial 'gold-standard' plans with the maximum possible organ-at-risk sparing were generated for all three cases. For each case, multiple IMRT and IMAT plans were generated with varying intensity levels (IMRT) and arc control points (IMAT), which translate into varying MLC segments in both modalities. The IMAT/IMRT plans were forced to mimic the organ-at-risk sparing and target coverage in the gold-standard plans, thereby only allowing the target dose inhomogeneity to be variable. A higher target dose inhomogeneity (quantified as D5—dose to the highest 5% of target volume) implies that the plan is less capable of modulation. For each case, given a similar number of MLC segments, both IMRT and IMAT plans exhibit similar target dose inhomogeneity, indicating that there is no difference in their ability to provide dose painting. Target dose inhomogeneity remained approximately constant with decreasing segments, but sharply increased below a specific critical number of segments (70, 100, 110 for cases a, b, c, respectively). For the cases studied, IMAT and IMRT plans are similar in their dependence on the number of MLC segments. A minimum critical number of segments are required to ensure adequate plan quality. Future studies are needed to establish the range of minimum critical number of segments for different treatment sites and target-organ geometries.

  18. PET-guided dose escalation tomotherapy in malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fodor, Andrei; Dell' Oca, Italo; Pasetti, Marcella; Di Muzio, Nadia Gisella [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Fiorino, Claudio; Broggi, Sara; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Calandrino, Riccardo [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy). Medical Physics; Gianolli, Luigi [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2011-11-15

    To test the feasibility of salvage radiotherapy using PET-guided helical tomotherapy in patients with progressive malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). A group of 12 consecutive MPM patients was treated with 56 Gy/25 fractions to the planning target volume (PTV); FDG-PET/CT simulation was always performed to include all positive lymph nodes and MPM infiltrations. Subsequently, a second group of 12 consecutive patients was treated with the same dose to the whole pleura adding a simultaneous integrated boost of 62.5 Gy to the FDG-PET/CT positive areas (BTV). Good dosimetric results were obtained in both groups. No grade 3 (RTOG/EORTC) acute or late toxicities were reported in the first group, while 3 cases of grade 3 late pneumonitis were registered in the second group: the duration of symptoms was 2-10 weeks. Median overall survival was 8 months (1.2-50.5 months) and 20 months (4.3-33.8 months) from the beginning of radiotherapy, for groups I and II, respectively (p = 0.19). A significant impact on local relapse from radiotherapy was seen (median time to local relapse: 8 vs 17 months; 1-year local relapse-free rate: 16% vs 81%, p = 0.003). The results of this pilot study support the planning of a phase III study of combined sequential chemoradiotherapy with dose escalation to BTV in patients not able to undergo resection. (orig.)

  19. Clinical Implementation of Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Thoracic Malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, Heng; Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing; Zhao, Lina [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Amy [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, Yupeng [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Applied Research, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California (United States); Sahoo, Narayan; Poenisch, Falk [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wu, Richard; Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) can improve dose conformality and better spare normal tissue over passive scattering techniques, but range uncertainties complicate its use, particularly for moving targets. We report our early experience with IMPT for thoracic malignancies in terms of motion analysis and management, plan optimization and robustness, and quality assurance. Methods and Materials: Thirty-four consecutive patients with lung/mediastinal cancers received IMPT to a median 66 Gy(relative biological equivalence [RBE]). All patients were able to undergo definitive radiation therapy. IMPT was used when the treating physician judged that IMPT conferred a dosimetric advantage; all patients had minimal tumor motion (<5 mm) and underwent individualized tumor-motion dose-uncertainty analysis and 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomographic (CT)-based treatment simulation and motion analysis. Plan robustness was optimized by using a worst-case scenario method. All patients had 4D CT repeated simulation during treatment. Results: IMPT produced lower mean lung dose (MLD), lung V{sub 5} and V{sub 20}, heart V{sub 40}, and esophageal V{sub 60} than did IMRT (P<.05) and lower MLD, lung V{sub 20}, and esophageal V{sub 60} than did passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT) (P<.05). D{sub 5} to the gross tumor volume and clinical target volume was higher with IMPT than with intensity modulated radiation therapy or PSPT (P<.05). All cases were analyzed for beam-angle-specific motion, water-equivalent thickness, and robustness. Beam angles were chosen to minimize the effect of respiratory motion and avoid previously treated regions, and the maximum deviation from the nominal dose-volume histogram values was kept at <5% for the target dose and met the normal tissue constraints under a worst-case scenario. Patient-specific quality assurance measurements showed that a median 99% (range, 95% to 100%) of the pixels met the 3% dose/3 mm distance criteria for the

  20. Benchmarking Dosimetric Quality Assessment of Prostate Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senthi, Sashendra, E-mail: sasha.senthi@petermac.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Gill, Suki S. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Haworth, Annette; Kron, Tomas; Cramb, Jim [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Rolfo, Aldo [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Thomas, Jessica [Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Duchesne, Gillian M. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Hamilton, Christopher H.; Joon, Daryl Lim [Radiation Oncology Department, Austin Repatriation Hospital, Heidelberg, VIC (Australia); Bowden, Patrick [Radiation Oncology Department, Tattersall' s Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To benchmark the dosimetric quality assessment of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy and determine whether the quality is influenced by disease or treatment factors. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the data from 155 consecutive men treated radically for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy to 78 Gy between January 2007 and March 2009 across six radiotherapy treatment centers. The plan quality was determined by the measures of coverage, homogeneity, and conformity. Tumor coverage was measured using the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 95% and 100% of the prescribed dose (V{sub 95%} and V{sub 100%}, respectively) and the clinical target volume (CTV) receiving 95% and 100% of the prescribed dose. Homogeneity was measured using the sigma index of the PTV and CTV. Conformity was measured using the lesion coverage factor, healthy tissue conformity index, and the conformity number. Multivariate regression models were created to determine the relationship between these and T stage, risk status, androgen deprivation therapy use, treatment center, planning system, and treatment date. Results: The largest discriminatory measurements of coverage, homogeneity, and conformity were the PTV V{sub 95%}, PTV sigma index, and conformity number. The mean PTV V{sub 95%} was 92.5% (95% confidence interval, 91.3-93.7%). The mean PTV sigma index was 2.10 Gy (95% confidence interval, 1.90-2.20). The mean conformity number was 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.76-0.79). The treatment center independently influenced the coverage, homogeneity, and conformity (all p < .0001). The planning system independently influenced homogeneity (p = .038) and conformity (p = .021). The treatment date independently influenced the PTV V{sub 95%} only, with it being better at the start (p = .013). Risk status, T stage, and the use of androgen deprivation therapy did not influence any aspect of plan quality. Conclusion: Our study has benchmarked measures

  1. Prone Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osa, Etin-Osa O.; DeWyngaert, Keith [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Roses, Daniel [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Speyer, James [Department of Medical Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Guth, Amber; Axelrod, Deborah [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Fenton Kerimian, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Goldberg, Judith D. [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: Silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a technique of prone breast radiation therapy delivered by a regimen of accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concurrent boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 404 patients with stage I-II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled into 2 consecutive protocols, institutional trials 03-30 and 05-181, that used the same regimen of 40.5 Gy/15 fractions delivered to the index breast over 3 weeks, with a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy (total dose 48 Gy). All patients were treated after segmental mastectomy and had negative margins and nodal assessment. Patients were set up prone: only if lung or heart volumes were in the field was a supine setup attempted and chosen if found to better spare these organs. Results: Ninety-two percent of patients were treated prone, 8% supine. Seventy-two percent had stage I, 28% stage II invasive breast cancer. In-field lung volume ranged from 0 to 228.27 cm{sup 3}, mean 19.65 cm{sup 3}. In-field heart volume for left breast cancer patients ranged from 0 to 21.24 cm{sup 3}, mean 1.59 cm{sup 3}. There was no heart in the field for right breast cancer patients. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 0.82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65%-1.04%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 0.53% (95% CI 0.41%-0.69%), and the 5-year overall cumulative death rate was 1.28% (95% CI 0.48%-3.38%). Eighty-two percent (95% CI 77%-85%) of patients judged their final cosmetic result as excellent/good. Conclusions: Prone accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concomitant boost results in excellent local control and optimal sparing of heart and lung, with good cosmesis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1005, a phase 3, multi-institutional, randomized trial is ongoing and is evaluating the equivalence of a similar dose and

  2. Preliminary results of the French experiment of ENT cancers re-irradiation using a tomo-therapy apparatus; Resultats preliminaires de l'experience francaise de reirradiation de cancers ORL par un appareil de tomotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thureau, S.; Gras, L.; Lartigau, E. [Departement universitaire de radiotherapie-curietherapie, centre Oscar-Lambret, Lille (France); Villa, J. [Service de radiotherapie, CHU de Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Giraud, P. [Hopital europeen Georges-Pompidou, Paris (France)

    2011-10-15

    Despite treatment associating surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, recurrences of ENT cancers are frequent. Thus, the intensity-modulated conformational irradiation opens new perspectives because of its high conformity to the target volume and because it allows sane tissues to be saved in case of re-irradiation. The authors report the analysis of characteristics of patients treated in three French institutions between 2007 and 2009 with a tomo-therapy apparatus to re-irradiate ENT cancer recurrences. The analyzed aspects have been the initial tumour characteristics, the recurrence characteristics, dosimetric data and carcinologic results. They demonstrate the feasibility of irradiations with such an apparatus, even for important target volumes. Local control is correct with a low toxicity. Short communication

  3. Comprehensive dosimetric planning comparison for early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer with SABR: fixed-beam IMRT versus VMAT versus TomoTherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xhaferllari, Ilma; El-Sherif, Omar; Gaede, Stewart

    2016-09-08

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is emerging as a leading technology in treating early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). However, two other modalities capable of deliver-ing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) include fixed-beam and helical TomoTherapy (HT). This study aims to provide an extensive dosimetric compari-son among these various IMRT techniques for treating early-stage NSCLC with SABR. Ten early-stage NSCLC patients were retrospectively optimized using three fixed-beam techniques via nine to eleven beams (high and low modulation step-and-shoot (SS), and sliding window (SW)), two VMAT techniques via two partial arcs (SmartArc (SA) and RapidArc (RA)), and three HT techniques via three different fan beam widths (1 cm, 2.5 cm, and 5 cm) for 80 plans total. Fixed-beam and VMAT plans were generated using flattening filter-free beams. SS and SA, HT treatment plans, and SW and RA were optimized using Pinnacle v9.1, Tomoplan v.3.1.1, and Eclipse (Acuros XB v11.3 algorithm), respectively. Dose-volume histogram statistics, dose conformality, and treatment delivery efficiency were analyzed. VMAT treatment plans achieved significantly lower values for contralat-eral lung V5Gy (p ≤ 0.05) compared to the HT plans, and significantly lower mean lung dose (p VMAT techniques, a significant reduction in the total monitor units (p = 0.05) was found in the SA plans, while a significant decrease was observed in the dose falloff parameter, D2cm, (p = 0.05), for the RA treatments. The maximum cord dose was significantly reduced (p = 0.017) in grouped RA&SA plans com-pared to SS. Estimated treatment time was significantly higher for HT and fixed-beam plans compared to RA&SA (p VMAT is dosimetrically advantageous in treating early-stage NSCLC with SABR compared to fixed-beam, while providing significantly shorter treatment times.

  4. Intensity modulated radiation therapy for breast cancer: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buwenge, Milly; Cammelli, Silvia; Ammendolia, Ilario; Tolento, Giorgio; Zamagni, Alice; Arcelli, Alessandra; Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Cilla, Savino; Morganti, Alessio G

    2017-01-01

    Background Owing to highly conformed dose distribution, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has the potential to improve treatment results of radiotherapy (RT). Postoperative RT is a standard adjuvant treatment in conservative treatment of breast cancer (BC). The aim of this review is to analyze available evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on IMRT in BC, particularly in terms of reduction of side effects. Methods A literature search of the bibliographic database PubMed, from January 1990 through November 2016, was performed. Only RCTs published in English were included. Results Ten articles reporting data from 5 RCTs fulfilled the selection criteria and were included in our review. Three out of 5 studies enrolled only selected patients in terms of increased risk of toxicity. Three studies compared IMRT with standard tangential RT. One study compared the results of IMRT in the supine versus the prone position, and one study compared standard treatment with accelerated partial breast IMRT. Three studies reported reduced acute and/or late toxicity using IMRT compared with standard RT. No study reported improved quality of life. Conclusion IMRT seems able to reduce toxicity in selected patients treated with postoperative RT for BC. Further analyses are needed to better define patients who are candidates for this treatment modality. PMID:28293119

  5. Quantitative shadowgraphy and proton radiography for large intensity modulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Ratan, Naren; Sadler, James; Chen, Nicholas; Sävert, Alexander; Trines, Raoul; Bingham, Robert; Burrows, Philip N.; Kaluza, Malte C.; Norreys, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Shadowgraphy is a technique widely used to diagnose objects or systems in various fields in physics and engineering. In shadowgraphy, an optical beam is deflected by the object and then the intensity modulation is captured on a screen placed some distance away. However, retrieving quantitative information from the shadowgrams themselves is a challenging task because of the nonlinear nature of the process. Here, we present a method to retrieve quantitative information from shadowgrams, based on computational geometry. This process can also be applied to proton radiography for electric and magnetic field diagnosis in high-energy-density plasmas and has been benchmarked using a toroidal magnetic field as the object, among others. It is shown that the method can accurately retrieve quantitative parameters with error bars less than 10%, even when caustics are present. The method is also shown to be robust enough to process real experimental results with simple pre- and postprocessing techniques. This adds a powerful tool for research in various fields in engineering and physics for both techniques.

  6. Helicity scalings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plunian, F [ISTerre, CNRS, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Lessinnes, T; Carati, D [Physique Statistique et Plasmas, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium); Stepanov, R, E-mail: Franck.Plunian@ujf-grenoble.fr [Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics of the Russian Academy of Science, Perm (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-22

    Using a helical shell model of turbulence, Chen et al. (2003) showed that both helicity and energy dissipate at the Kolmogorov scale, independently from any helicity input. This is in contradiction with a previous paper by Ditlevsen and Giuliani (2001) in which, using a GOY shell model of turbulence, they found that helicity dissipates at a scale larger than the Kolmogorov scale, and does depend on the helicity input. In a recent paper by Lessinnes et al. (2011), we showed that this discrepancy is due to the fact that in the GOY shell model only one helical mode (+ or -) is present at each scale instead of both modes in the helical shell model. Then, using the GOY model, the near cancellation of the helicity flux between the + and - modes cannot occur at small scales, as it should be in true turbulence. We review the main results with a focus on the numerical procedure needed to obtain accurate statistics.

  7. Volumetric intensity-modulated arc therapy vs conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a dosimetric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Peter; Chan, Kit Chi; Cheng, Ka Wai; Chan, Ka Yiu; Chau, Ming Chun

    2013-01-01

    Dosimetric comparisons between RapidArc (RA) and conventional Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) techniques for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) were performed to address differences in dose coverage of the target, sparing of organs-at-risk (OARs), delivery of monitor units (MUs) and time, to assess whether the RA technique was more beneficial for treatment of NPC. Eight NPC patients (Stages I–IV), who had completed RA treatment, were selected for this study. Computed tomography data sets were re-planned using 7-fields fixed beam IMRT. Quantitative measurements of dose-endpoint values on the dose-volume histograms were carried out for evaluation of: (i) dose homogeneity (D5% – D95%); (ii) degree of conformity (CI95%); (iii) tumor control probability (TCP); (iv) doses to OARs; (v) normal tissue complication probability (NTCP); (vi) treatment time; and (vii) MUs. RA plans achieved better dose conformity and TCP in planning target volumes (PTVs). Target dose homogeneity was not as high as for IMRT plans. Doses to tempero-mandibular joints, clavicles, parotid glands and posterior neck, and their NTCPs were significantly lower in RA plans (P delivery time for RA treatment technique was also noted. PMID:23188186

  8. Prioritized efficiency optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Birgit S.; Wilkens, Jan J.

    2016-12-01

    A high dosimetric quality and short treatment time are major goals in radiotherapy planning. Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans obtain dose distributions of great conformity but often result in long delivery times which are typically not incorporated into the optimization process. We present an algorithm to optimize delivery efficiency of IMPT plans while maintaining plan quality, and study the potential trade-offs of these interdependent objectives. The algorithm is based on prioritized optimization, a stepwise approach to implemented objectives. First the quality of the plan is optimized. The second step of the prioritized efficiency optimization (PrEfOpt) routine offers four alternatives for reducing delivery time: minimization of the total spot weight sum (A), maximization of the lowest spot intensity of each energy layer (B), elimination of low-weighted spots (C) or energy layers (D). The trade-off between dosimetric quality (step I) and treatment time (step II) is controlled during the optimization by option-dependent parameters. PrEfOpt was applied to a clinical patient case, and plans for different trade-offs were calculated. Delivery times were simulated for two virtual facilities with constant and variable proton current, i.e. independent and dependent on the optimized spot weight distributions. Delivery times decreased without major degradation of plan quality; absolute time reductions varied with the applied method and facility type. Minimizing the total spot weight sum (A) reduced times by 28% for a similar plan quality at a constant current (changes of minimum dose in the target  process can yield reduced delivery times with similar plan qualities. A potential clinical application of PrEfOpt is the generation of multiple plans with different trade-offs for a multicriteria optimization setting. Then, the planner can select the preferred compromise between treatment time and quality for each individual patient.

  9. Dosimetrically Triggered Adaptive Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney (Australia); Stewart, James [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kelly, Valerie [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Xie, Jason [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Brock, Kristy K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Moseley, Joanne [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cho, Young-Bin; Fyles, Anthony [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lundin, Anna; Rehbinder, Henrik; Löf, Johan [RaySearch Laboratories AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Milosevic, Michael, E-mail: mike.milosevic@rmp.uhn.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: The widespread use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer has been limited by internal target and normal tissue motion. Such motion increases the risk of underdosing the target, especially as planning margins are reduced in an effort to reduce toxicity. This study explored 2 adaptive strategies to mitigate this risk and proposes a new, automated method that minimizes replanning workload. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with cervical cancer participated in a prospective clinical study and underwent pretreatment and weekly magnetic resonance (MR) scans over a 5-week course of daily external beam radiation therapy. Target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were contoured on each of the scans. Deformable image registration was used to model the accumulated dose (the real dose delivered to the target and OARs) for 2 adaptive replanning scenarios that assumed a very small PTV margin of only 3 mm to account for setup and internal interfractional motion: (1) a preprogrammed, anatomy-driven midtreatment replan (A-IMRT); and (2) a dosimetry-triggered replan driven by target dose accumulation over time (D-IMRT). Results: Across all 30 patients, clinically relevant target dose thresholds failed for 8 patients (27%) if 3-mm margins were used without replanning. A-IMRT failed in only 3 patients and also yielded an additional small reduction in OAR doses at the cost of 30 replans. D-IMRT assured adequate target coverage in all patients, with only 23 replans in 16 patients. Conclusions: A novel, dosimetry-triggered adaptive IMRT strategy for patients with cervical cancer can minimize the risk of target underdosing in the setting of very small margins and substantial interfractional motion while minimizing programmatic workload and cost.

  10. Prostate Bed Motion During Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klayton, Tracy; Price, Robert; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Sobczak, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Greenberg, Richard [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Li, Jinsheng; Keller, Lanea; Sopka, Dennis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kutikov, Alexander [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Horwitz, Eric M., E-mail: eric.horwitz@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Conformal radiation therapy in the postprostatectomy setting requires accurate setup and localization of the prostatic fossa. In this series, we report prostate bed localization and motion characteristics, using data collected from implanted radiofrequency transponders. Methods and Materials: The Calypso four-dimensional localization system uses three implanted radiofrequency transponders for daily target localization and real-time tracking throughout a course of radiation therapy. We reviewed the localization and tracking reports for 20 patients who received ultrasonography-guided placement of Calypso transponders within the prostate bed prior to a course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy at Fox Chase Cancer Center. Results: At localization, prostate bed displacement relative to bony anatomy exceeded 5 mm in 9% of fractions in the anterior-posterior (A-P) direction and 21% of fractions in the superior-inferior (S-I) direction. The three-dimensional vector length from skin marks to Calypso alignment exceeded 1 cm in 24% of all 652 fractions with available setup data. During treatment, the target exceeded the 5-mm tracking limit for at least 30 sec in 11% of all fractions, generally in the A-P or S-I direction. In the A-P direction, target motion was twice as likely to move posteriorly, toward the rectum, than anteriorly. Fifteen percent of all treatments were interrupted for repositioning, and 70% of patients were repositioned at least once during their treatment course. Conclusion: Set-up errors and motion of the prostatic fossa during radiotherapy are nontrivial, leading to potential undertreatment of target and excess normal tissue toxicity if not taken into account during treatment planning. Localization and real-time tracking of the prostate bed via implanted Calypso transponders can be used to improve the accuracy of plan delivery.

  11. SU-E-T-409: Intensity Modulated Robotic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B; Jin, L; Li, J; Chen, L; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Fan, J [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Virtua Fox Chase Cancer Center, Voorhees, NJ (United States); Zhang, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Qiqihar Medical University, Qiqihar (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: As compared with the IRIS-based models, the MLC-based CyberKnife system allows more efficient treatment delivery due to its improved coverage of large lesions and intensity modulation. The treatment delivery efficiency is mainly determined by the number of selected nodes. This study aimed to demonstrate that relatively small sets of optimally selected nodes could produce high-quality plans. Methods: The full body path of the CyberKnife system consists of 110 nodes, from which we selected various sets for 4 prostate cancer cases using our in-house beamselection software. With the selected nodes we generated IMRT plans using our in-house beamlet-based inverse-planning optimization program. We also produced IMRT plans using the MultiPlan treatment planning system (version 5.0) for the same cases. Furthermore, the nodes selected by MultiPlan were used to produce plans with our own optimization software so that we could compare the quality of the selected sets of nodes. Results: Our beam-selection program selected one node-set for each case, with the number of nodes ranging from 23 to 34. The IMRT plans based on the selected nodes and our in-house optimization program showed adequate target coverage, with favorable critical structure sparing for the cases investigated. Compared with the plans using the nodes selected by MultiPlan, the plans generated with our selected beams provided superior rectum/bladder sparing for 75% of the cases. The plans produced by MultiPlan with various numbers of nodes also suggested that the plan quality was not compromised significantly when the number of nodes was reduced. Conclusion: Our preliminary results showed that with beamletbased planning optimization, one could produce high-quality plans with an optimal set of nodes for MLC-based robotic radiotherapy. Furthermore, our beam-selection strategy could help further improve critical structure sparing.

  12. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Dose Painting to Treat Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Joanna C.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wexler, Leonard H. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); La Quaglia, Michael P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Happersett, Laura [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To examine local control and patterns of failure in rhabdomyosarcoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) with dose painting (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 41 patients underwent DP-IMRT with chemotherapy for definitive treatment. Nineteen also underwent surgery with or without intraoperative RT. Fifty-six percent had alveolar histologic features. The median interval from beginning chemotherapy to RT was 17 weeks (range, 4-25). Very young children who underwent second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT received reduced doses of 24-36 Gy in 1.4-1.8-Gy fractions. Young adults received 50.4 Gy to the primary tumor and lower doses of 36 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to at-risk lymph node chains. Results: With 22 months of median follow-up, the actuarial local control rate was 90%. Patients aged {<=}7 years who received reduced overall and fractional doses had 100% local control, and young adults had 79% (P=.07) local control. Three local failures were identified in young adults whose primary target volumes had received 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Conclusions: DP-IMRT with lower fractional and cumulative doses is feasible for very young children after second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT. DP-IMRT is also feasible in adolescents and young adults with aggressive disease who would benefit from prophylactic RT to high-risk lymph node chains, although dose escalation might be warranted for improved local control. With limited follow-up, it appears that DP-IMRT produces local control rates comparable to those of sequential IMRT in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

  13. Pleural Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenzweig, Kenneth E., E-mail: ken.rosenzweig@mountsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Zauderer, Marjorie G. [Department of Medicine, Thoracic Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Laser, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States); Krug, Lee M. [Department of Medicine, Thoracic Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yorke, Ellen [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Sima, Camelia S. [Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Rimner, Andreas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Flores, Raja [Department of Surgery, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Rusch, Valerie [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: In patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma who are unable to undergo pneumonectomy, it is difficult to deliver tumoricidal radiation doses to the pleura without significant toxicity. We have implemented a technique of using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to treat these patients, and we report the feasibility and toxicity of this approach. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2010, 36 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma and two intact lungs (i.e., no previous pneumonectomy) were treated with pleural IMRT to the hemithorax (median dose, 46.8 Gy; range, 41.4-50.4) at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Results: Of the 36 patients, 56% had right-sided tumors. The histologic type was epithelial in 78%, sarcomatoid in 6%, and mixed in 17%, and 6% had Stage I, 28% had Stage II, 33% had Stage III, and 33% had Stage IV. Thirty-two patients (89%) received induction chemotherapy (mostly cisplatin and pemetrexed); 56% underwent pleurectomy/decortication before IMRT and 44% did not undergo resection. Of the 36 patients evaluable for acute toxicity, 7 (20%) had Grade 3 or worse pneumonitis (including 1 death) and 2 had Grade 3 fatigue. In 30 patients assessable for late toxicity, 5 had continuing Grade 3 pneumonitis. For patients treated with surgery, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 75% and 53%, and the median survival was 26 months. For patients who did not undergo surgical resection, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 69% and 28%, and the median survival was 17 months. Conclusions: Treating the intact lung with pleural IMRT in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma is a safe and feasible treatment option with an acceptable rate of pneumonitis. Additionally, the survival rates were encouraging in our retrospective series, particularly for the patients who underwent pleurectomy/decortication. We have initiated a Phase II trial of induction chemotherapy with pemetrexed and cisplatin with or without pleurectomy

  14. Subcarrier Intensity Modulated Optical Wireless Communications:A Survey from Communication Theory Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md Zoheb Hassan; Md Jahangir Hossain; Julian Cheng; Victor C M Leung

    2016-01-01

    Subcarrier intensity modulation with direct detection is a modulation/detection technique for optical wireless communication sys⁃tems, where a pre⁃modulated and properly biased radio frequency signal is modulated on the intensity of the optical carrier. The most important benefits of subcarrier intensity modulation are as follows: 1) it does not provide irreducible error floor like the con⁃ventional on⁃off keying intensity modulation with a fixed detection threshold; 2) it provides improved spectral efficiency and sup⁃ports higher order modulation schemes; and 3) it has much less implementation complexity compared to coherent optical wireless communications with heterodyne or homodyne detection. In this paper, we present an up⁃to⁃date review of subcarrier intensity modulated optical wireless communication systems. We survey the error rate and outage performance of subcarrier intensity modu⁃lations in the atmospheric turbulence channels considering different modulation and coding schemes. We also explore different contemporary atmospheric turbulence fading mitigation solutions that can be employed for subcarrier intensity modulation. These solutions include diversity combining, adaptive transmission, relay assisted transmission, multiple⁃subcarrier intensity modulations, and optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing. Moreover, we review the performance of subcarrier intensity modulations due to the pointing error and synchronization error.

  15. Three-dimensional dosimetry of TomoTherapy by MRI-based polymer gel technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoichi; Gopishankar, N

    2010-09-14

    Verification of the dose calculation model and the software used for treatment planning is an important step for accurate radiation delivery in radiation therapy. Using BANG3 polymer gel dosimeter with a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, we examined the accuracy of TomoTherapy treatment planning and radiation delivery. We evaluated one prostate treatment case and found the calculated three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions agree with the measured 3D dose distributions with an exception in the regions where the dose was much smaller (25% or less) than the maximum dose (2.5 Gy). The analysis using the gamma-index (3% dose difference and 3 mm distance-to-agreement) for a volume of 12 cm × 11 cm × 9 cm containing the planning target volume showed that the gamma values were smaller than unity for 53% of the voxels. Our measurement protocol and analysis tools can be easily applied to the evaluation of other newer complex radiation delivery techniques, such as intensity-modulated arc therapy, with a reasonably low financial investment.

  16. Treatment and prognosis of patients with late rectal bleeding after intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takemoto Shinya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation proctitis after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT differs from that seen after pelvic irradiation in that this adverse event is a result of high-dose radiation to a very small area in the rectum. We evaluated the results of treatment for hemorrhagic proctitis after IMRT for prostate cancer. Methods Between November 2004 and February 2010, 403 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IMRT at 2 institutions. Among these patients, 64 patients who developed late rectal bleeding were evaluated. Forty patients had received IMRT using a linear accelerator and 24 by tomotherapy. Their median age was 72 years. Each patient was assessed clinically and/or endoscopically. Depending on the severity, steroid suppositories or enemas were administered up to twice daily and Argon plasma coagulation (APC was performed up to 3 times. Response to treatment was evaluated using the Rectal Bleeding Score (RBS, which is the sum of Frequency Score (graded from 1 to 3 by frequency of bleeding and Amount Score (graded from 1 to 3 by amount of bleeding. Stoppage of bleeding over 3 months was scored as RBS 1. Results The median follow-up period for treatment of rectal bleeding was 35 months (range, 12–69 months. Grade of bleeding was 1 in 31 patients, 2 in 26, and 3 in 7. Nineteen of 45 patients (42% observed without treatment showed improvement and bleeding stopped in 17 (38%, although mean RBS did not change significantly. Eighteen of 29 patients (62% treated with steroid suppositories or enemas showed improvement (mean RBS, from 4.1 ± 1.0 to 3.0 ± 1.8, p = 0.003 and bleeding stopped in 9 (31%. One patient treated with steroid enema 0.5-2 times a day for 12 months developed septic shock and died of multiple organ failure. All 12 patients treated with APC showed improvement (mean RBS, 4.7 ± 1.2 to 2.3 ± 1.4, p  Conclusions After adequate periods of observation, steroid suppositories

  17. State of dose prescription and compliance to international standard (ICRU-83) in intensity modulated radiation therapy among academic institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Indra J; Andersen, Aaron; Chen, Zhe Jay; Dimofte, Andrea; Glatstein, Eli; Hoisak, Jeremy; Huang, Long; Langer, Mark P; Lee, Choonik; Pacella, Matthew; Popple, Richard A; Rice, Roger; Smilowitz, Jennifer; Sponseller, Patricia; Zhu, Timothy

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose prescription and recording compliance to international standard (International Commission on Radiation Units & Measurements [ICRU]-83) in patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) among academic institutions. Ten institutions participated in this study to collect IMRT data to evaluate compliance to ICRU-83. Under institutional review board clearance, data from 5094 patients-including treatment site, technique, planner, physician, prescribed dose, target volume, monitor units, planning system, and dose calculation algorithm-were collected anonymously. The dose-volume histogram of each patient, as well as dose points, doses delivered to 100% (D100), 98% (D98), 95% (D95), 50% (D50), and 2% (D2), of sites was collected and sent to a central location for analysis. Homogeneity index (HI) as a measure of the steepness of target and is a measure of the shape of the dose-volume histogram was calculated for every patient and analyzed. In general, ICRU recommendations for naming the target, reporting dose prescription, and achieving desired levels of dose to target were relatively poor. The nomenclature for the target in the dose prescription had large variations, having every permutation of name and number contrary to ICRU recommendations. There was statistically significant variability in D95, D50, and HI among institutions, tumor site, and technique with P values < .01. Nearly 95% of patients had D50 higher than 100% (103.5 ± 6.9) of prescribed dose and varied among institutions. On the other hand, D95 was close to 100% (97.1 ± 9.4) of prescribed dose. Liver and lung sites had a higher D50 compared with other sites. Pelvic sites had a lower variability indicated by HI (0.13 ± 1.21). Variability in D50 is 101.2 ± 8.5, 103.4 ± 6.8, 103.4 ± 8.2, and 109.5 ± 11.5 for IMRT, tomotherapy, volume modulated arc therapy, and stereotactic body radiation therapy with IMRT, respectively. Nearly 95% of

  18. High speed traveling wave electrooptic intensity modulator with a doped PIN semiconductor junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vawter, G.A.; Hietala, V.M.; Wendt, J.R.; Fuchs, B.A.; Hafich, M.; Housel, M.; Armendariz, M.; Sullivan, C.T.

    1996-02-01

    A high-electrooptic-efficiency Mach-Zehnder intensity modulator is demonstrated with a bandwidth exceeding 40 GHZ. The 1 mm-long modulator has a switching voltage comparable to undoped semiconductor designs of much greater length.

  19. Direct UV written Michelson interferometer for RZ signal generation using phase-to-intensity modulation conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peucheret, Christophe; Geng, Yan; Zsigri, Beata

    2005-01-01

    An integrated Michelson delay interferometer structure making use of waveguide gratings as reflective elements is proposed and fabricated by direct ultraviolet writing. Successful return-to-zero alternate-mark-inversion signal generation using phase-to-intensity modulation conversion...

  20. Patient Specification Quality Assurance for Glioblastoma Multiforme Brain Tumors Treated with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Mohammed, H. I.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of performing patient specification quality assurance for patients diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy. The study evaluated ten intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment plans using 10 MV beams, a total dose of 60 Gy (2 Gy/fraction, five fractions a week for a total of six weeks treatment). For the quality assurance protocol we used a two-dimensional ionization-chamber array (2D-...

  1. A dosimetric comparison of 3D-CRT, IMRT, and static tomotherapy with an SIB for large and small breast volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalski, Andrea [Department of Health Science (MRS), The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford Hospital, Gosford, New South Wales (Australia); Atyeo, John, E-mail: john.atyeo@sydney.edu.au [Department of Health Science (MRS), The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Cox, Jennifer [Department of Health Science (MRS), The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia); Rinks, Marianne [Department of Health Science (MRS), The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Radiation Oncology, Cancer Services, Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District, Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Morgia, Marita; Lamoury, Gillian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia)

    2014-07-01

    Radiation therapy to the breast is a complex task, with many different techniques that can be employed to ensure adequate dose target coverage while minimizing doses to the organs at risk. This study compares the dose planning outcomes of 3 radiation treatment modalities, 3 dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and static tomotherapy, for left-sided whole-breast radiation treatment with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Overall, 20 patients with left-sided breast cancer were separated into 2 cohorts, small and large, based on breast volume. Dose plans were produced for each patient using 3D-CRT, IMRT, and static tomotherapy. All patients were prescribed a dose of 45 Gy in 20 fractions to the breast with an SIB of 56 Gy in 20 fractions to the tumor bed and normalized so that D{sub 98%} > 95% of the prescription dose. Dosimetric comparisons were made between the 3 modalities and the interaction of patient size. All 3 modalities offered adequate planning target volume (PTV) coverage with D{sub 98%} > 95% and D{sub 2%} < 107%. Static tomotherapy offered significantly improved (p = 0.006) dose homogeneity to the PTV{sub boost} {sub eval} (0.079 ± 0.011) and breast minus the SIB volume (Breast{sub SIB}) (p < 0.001, 0.15 ± 0.03) compared with the PTV{sub boost} {sub eval} (0.085 ± 0.008, 0.088 ± 0.12) and Breast{sub SIB} (0.22 ± 0.05, 0.23 ± 0.03) for IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively. Static tomotherapy also offered statistically significant reductions (p < 0.001) in doses to the ipsilateral lung mean dose of 6.79 ± 2.11 Gy compared with 7.75 ± 2.54 Gy and 8.29 ± 2.76 Gy for IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively, and significantly (p < 0.001) reduced heart doses (mean = 2.83 ± 1.26 Gy) compared to both IMRT and 3D-CRT (mean = 3.70 ± 1.44 Gy and 3.91 ± 1.58 Gy). Static tomotherapy is the dosimetrically superior modality for the whole breast with an SIB compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT. IMRT is superior to 3D

  2. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy and tomotherapy in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma after curative surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To compare the dosimetric differences between IMRT, VMAT and TOMO planning for gastric cancer patients.Methods: A total of 14 patients with gastric cancer after curative surgery were prospectively enrolled. In each case, IMRT, VMAT and TOMO plans were created (45Gy/25f). Dose distributions and dose–volume histograms for PTV and normal tissue were compared. A paired t test or signed-rank test was applied to compare the averages between techniques.Results:Comparison of the PTV revealed satisfactory coverage by the 95% isodose envelope in three plans. However, significantly higher conformity index (CI) and lower V20 of bone marrow were observed in TOMO plan. Moreover, IMRT and TOMO techniques both showed signiifcant reduced mean dose of the bilateral lungs compared to the VMAT. Not much difference was found in parameters of the kidney, intestine, spine, liver and heart.Conclusion:The IMRT, VMAT and TOMO plans all achieved favorable target coverage and dose sparing of the critical organs in adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric cancer. However, the TOMO technique displayed the best target dose conformity and superior sparing of the bone marrow and lungs.

  3. Treatment plan comparison of Linac step and shoot,Tomotherapy, RapidArc, and Proton therapy for prostate cancer using dosimetrical and biological index

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Suk; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Shim, Jang Bo; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong; Cho, Sam Ju; Lee, Sang Hoon; Min, Chul Kee; Kim, Woo Chul; Cho, Kwang Hwan; Huh, Hyun Do; Lim, Sangwook; Shin, Dongho

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use various dosimetrical indices to determine the best IMRT modality technique for treating patients with prostate cancer. Ten patients with prostate cancer were included in this study. Intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were designed to include different modalities, including the linac step and shoot, Tomotherapy, RapidArc, and Proton systems. Various dosimetrical indices, like the prescription isodose to target volume (PITV) ratio, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), target coverage index (TCI), modified dose homogeneity index (MHI), conformation number (CN), critical organ scoring index (COSI), and quality factor (QF) were determined to compare the different treatment plans. Biological indices such as the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD), based tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were also calculated and used to compare the treatment plans. The RapidArc plan attained better PTV coverage, as evidenc...

  4. Patient Specification Quality Assurance for Glioblastoma Multiforme Brain Tumors Treated with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. I. Al-Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of performing patient specification quality assurance for patients diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy. The study evaluated ten intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment plans using 10 MV beams, a total dose of 60 Gy (2 Gy/fraction, five fractions a week for a total of six weeks treatment. For the quality assurance protocol we used a two-dimensional ionization-chamber array (2D-ARRAY. The results showed a very good agreement between the measured dose and the pretreatment planned dose. All the plans passed >95% gamma criterion with pixels within 5% dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement. We concluded that using the 2D-ARRAY ion chamber for intensity modulated radiation therapy is an important step for intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment plans, and this study has shown that our treatment planning for intensity modulated radiation therapy is accurately done.

  5. Application of failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to pretreatment phases in tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broggi, Sara; Cantone, Marie Claire; Chiara, Anna; Di Muzio, Nadia; Longobardi, Barbara; Mangili, Paola; Veronese, Ivan

    2013-09-06

    The aim of this paper was the application of the failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) approach to assess the risks for patients undergoing radiotherapy treatments performed by means of a helical tomotherapy unit. FMEA was applied to the preplanning imaging, volume determination, and treatment planning stages of the tomotherapy process and consisted of three steps: 1) identification of the involved subprocesses; 2) identification and ranking of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk probability number (RPN) scoring system; and 3) identification of additional safety measures to be proposed for process quality and safety improvement. RPN upper threshold for little concern of risk was set at 125. A total of 74 failure modes were identified: 38 in the stage of preplanning imaging and volume determination, and 36 in the stage of planning. The threshold of 125 for RPN was exceeded in four cases: one case only in the phase of preplanning imaging and volume determination, and three cases in the stage of planning. The most critical failures appeared related to (i) the wrong or missing definition and contouring of the overlapping regions, (ii) the wrong assignment of the overlap priority to each anatomical structure, (iii) the wrong choice of the computed tomography calibration curve for dose calculation, and (iv) the wrong (or not performed) choice of the number of fractions in the planning station. On the basis of these findings, in addition to the safety strategies already adopted in the clinical practice, novel solutions have been proposed for mitigating the risk of these failures and to increase patient safety.

  6. Effects of changing modulation and pitch parameters on tomotherapy delivery quality assurance plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binny, Diana; Lancaster, Craig M; Harris, Selina; Sylvander, Steven R

    2015-09-08

    This study was aimed at investigating delivery quality assurance (DQA) discrepancies observed for helical tomotherapy plans. A selection of tomotherapy plans that initially failed the DQA process was chosen for this investigation. These plans failed the fluence analysis as assessed using gamma criteria (3%, 3 mm) with radiographic film. Each of these plans was modified (keeping the planning constraints the same), beamlets rebatched and reoptimized. By increasing and decreasing the modulation factor, the fluence in a circumferential plane as measured with a diode array was assessed. A subset of these plans was investigated using varied pitch values. Metrics for each plan that were examined were point doses, fluences, leaf opening times, planned leaf sinograms, and uniformity indices. In order to ensure that the treatment constraints remained the same, the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of all the modulated plans were compared to the original plan. It was observed that a large increase in the modulation factor did not significantly improve DVH uniformity, but reduced the gamma analysis pass rate. This also increased the treatment delivery time by slowing down the gantry rotation speed which then increases the maximum to mean non-zero leaf open time ratio. Increasing and decreasing the pitch value did not substantially change treatment time, but the delivery accuracy was adversely affected. This may be due to many other factors, such as the complexity of the treatment plan and site. Patient sites included in this study were head and neck, right breast, prostate, abdomen, adrenal, and brain. The impact of leaf timing inaccuracies on plans was greater with higher modulation factors. Point-dose measurements were seen to be less susceptible to changes in pitch and modulation factors. The initial modulation factor used by the optimizer, such that the TPS generated 'actual' modulation factor within the range of 1.4 to 2.5, resulted in an improved deliverable plan.

  7. Intensity modulation in single-mode microchip Nd:YAG lasers with asymmetric external cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Yi-Dong; Zhang Shu-Lian; Liu Wei-Xin; Mao Wei

    2007-01-01

    Intensity modulation induced by the asymmetric external cavity in single-mode microchip Nd:YAG lasers is presented. Two kinds of experimental results are discussed based on multiple feedback effects. In one case, the intensity modulation curve is a normal sine wave, whose fringe frequency is four times higher than that of a conventional optical feedback system, caused by multiple feedback effects. In the other case, the intensity modulation curve is the overlapping of the above quadruple-frequency signal and conventional optical feedback signal, which is determined by the additional phase difference induced by the asymmetric external cavity. The theoretical analyses are in good agreement with the experimental results. The quadruple-frequency modulation of the laser output intensity can greatly increase the resolution of displacement measurement of an optical feedback system.

  8. An automatic contour propagation method to follow parotid gland deformation during head-and-neck cancer tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faggiano, E; Scalco, E; Rizzo, G [Istituto di Bioimmagini e Fisiologia Molecolare (IBFM), CNR, Milan (Italy); Fiorino, C; Broggi, S; Cattaneo, M; Maggiulli, E; Calandrino, R [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Dell' Oca, I; Di Muzio, N, E-mail: fiorino.claudio@hsr.it [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy)

    2011-02-07

    We developed an efficient technique to auto-propagate parotid gland contours from planning kVCT to daily MVCT images of head-and-neck cancer patients treated with helical tomotherapy. The method deformed a 3D surface mesh constructed from manual kVCT contours by B-spline free-form deformation to generate optimal and smooth contours. Deformation was calculated by elastic image registration between kVCT and MVCT images. Data from ten head-and-neck cancer patients were considered and manual contours by three observers were included in both kVCT and MVCT images. A preliminary inter-observer variability analysis demonstrated the importance of contour propagation in tomotherapy application: a high variability was reported in MVCT parotid volume estimation (p = 0.0176, ANOVA test) and a larger uncertainty of MVCT contouring compared with kVCT was demonstrated by DICE and volume variability indices (Wilcoxon signed rank test, p < 10{sup -4} for both indices). The performance analysis of our method showed no significant differences between automatic and manual contours in terms of volumes (p > 0.05, in a multiple comparison Tukey test), center-of-mass distances (p = 0.3043, ANOVA test), DICE values (p = 0.1672, Wilcoxon signed rank test) and average and maximum symmetric distances (p = 0.2043, p = 0.8228 Wilcoxon signed rank tests). Results suggested that our contour propagation method could successfully substitute human contouring on MVCT images.

  9. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for refractory bilateral breast cancer in a patient with extensive cutaneous metastasis in the chest and abdominal walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu YF

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yueh-Feng Lu,1 Yu-Chin Lin,2 Kuo-Hsin Chen,3,4 Pei-Wei Shueng,1 Hsin-Pei Yeh,1 Chen-Hsi Hsieh1,5,6 1Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, 2Division of Oncology and Hematology, Department of Medicine, 3Department of Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, 4Department of Electrical Engineering, Yuan-Ze University, Taoyuan, 5Department of Medicine, 6Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: Treatment for bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and abdominal skin invasion normally involves conventional radiotherapy (RT; however, conventional RT provides inadequate target volume coverage and excessive treatment of large volumes of normal tissue. Helical tomotherapy (HT has the ability to deliver continuous craniocaudal irradiation that suppresses junction problems and provides good conformity of dose distribution. A 47-year-old female with stage IV bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and pectoralis major muscle invasion, lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural effusion, and multiple bone metastases received chemotherapy and target therapy beginning in January 2014; 4 months after the initiation of chemotherapy, computed tomography revealed progression of chest and abdominal wall invasion. A total dose of 70.2 Gy was delivered to both breasts, the chest wall, the abdominal wall, and the bilateral supraclavicular nodal areas in 39 fractions via HT. The total planning target volume was 4,533.29 cm3. The percent of lung volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V20 was 28%, 22%, and 25% for the right lung, left lung, and whole lung, respectively. The mean dose to the heart was 8.6 Gy. Follow-up computed tomography revealed complete response after the RT course. Grade 1 dysphagia, weight loss, grade 2 neutropenia, and grade 3 dermatitis were noted during the RT course. Pain score decreased from 6 to 1. No cardiac, pulmonary, liver, or intestinal toxicity

  10. Head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy leads to an increase of opportunistic oral pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurhuis, Jennifer M.; Stokman, Monique A.; Witjes, Max J. H.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; van Winkelhoff, Arie J.; Vissink, Arjan; Spijkervet, Frederik K. L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The introduction of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has led to new possibilities in the treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC). Limited information is available on how this more advanced radiation technique affects the oral microflora. In a prospective study we assessed the

  11. Optimizing Planning and Delivery of High-Precision Robotic Radiotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van de Water (Steven)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ High-precision robotic radiotherapy and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) are two relatively new radiotherapy techniques that particularly aim at a highly localized delivery of a curative dose to the tumor, while achieving excellent sparing of the surrounding

  12. Advances in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy physics with intensity modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S

    2000-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy, a specific form of conformal radiation therapy, is currently attracting a lot of attention, and there are high expectations for this class of treatment techniques. Several new technologies are in development, but physicists are still working to improve the physical basis of radiation therapy.

  13. Evaluation of a fast method of EPID-based dosimetry for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Rasmussen, Karl H.; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2010-01-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) could potentially be useful for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) QA. The data density, high resolution, large active area, and efficiency of the MV EPID make it an attractive option. However, EPIDs were designed to be effective imaging devices, but not dosimeters, and as a result they do not measure dose in tissue-equivalent materials.

  14. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal cancer: radiation dosage constraint at the anterior mandible.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonck, H.W.; Jong, J.M. de; Granzier, M.E.; Nieman, F.H.; Baat, C. de; Stoelinga, P.J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Because the survival of endosseous implants in irradiated bone is lower than in non-irradiated bone, particularly if the irradiation dose exceeds 50Gy, a study was carried out to assess the irradiation dose in the anterior mandible, when intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is used. The hypo

  15. Image guided position verification for intensity modulated radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederveen, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to provide a practical framework for dose escalation in the prostate using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and to find out if marker based on-line position verification is clinically feasible and effective. We present a class solution for dose escalation in the pros

  16. Limited benefit of inversely optimised intensity modulation in breast conserving radiotherapy with simultaneously integrated boost

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, Hans Paul; Dolsma, Willemtje; Schilstra, C; Korevaar, Erik W; de Bock, Geertruida H; Maduro, John H; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To examine whether in breast-conserving radiotherapy (RT) with simultaneously integrated boost (SIB), application of inversely planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT-SIB) instead of three-dimensional RT (3D-CRT-SIB) has benefits that justify the additional costs, and

  17. Optimizing Planning and Delivery of High-Precision Robotic Radiotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van de Water (Steven)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ High-precision robotic radiotherapy and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) are two relatively new radiotherapy techniques that particularly aim at a highly localized delivery of a curative dose to the tumor, while achieving excellent sparing of the surrounding he

  18. Practical and clinical considerations in Cobalt-60 tomotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Chandra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt-60 (Co-60 based radiation therapy continues to play a significant role in not only developing countries, where access to radiation therapy is extremely limited, but also in industrialized countries. Howver, technology has to be developed to accommodate modern techniques, in-clud-ing image guided and adaptive radiation therapy (IGART. In this paper we describe some of the practical and clinical considerations for Co-60 based tomotherapy by comparing Co-60 and 6 MV linac-based tomotherapy plans for a head and neck (HandN cancer and a prostate cancer case. The tomotherapy IMRT plans were obtained by modeling a MIMiC binary multi-leaf collimator attached to a Theratron-780c Co-60 unit and a 6 MV linear accelerator (CL2100EX. The EGSnrc/BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC code was used for the modeling of the treatment units with the MIMiC collimator and EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc code was used for beamlet dose data. An in-house inverse treatment planning program was then used to generate optimized tomotherapy dose distributions for the H and N and prostate cases. The dose distributions, cumulative dose area histograms (DAHs and dose difference maps were used to evaluate and compare Co-60 and 6 MV based tomotherapy plans. A quantitative analysis of the dose distributions and dose-volume histograms shows that both Co-60 and 6 MV plans achieve the plan objectives for the targets (CTV and nodes and OARs (spinal cord in HandN case, and rectum in prostate case.

  19. Helical filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbieri, Nicholas; Lim, Khan; Durand, Magali; Baudelet, Matthieu; Richardson, Martin [Townes Laser Institute, CREOL—The College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Johnson, Eric [Micro-Photonics Laboratory – Center for Optical Material Science, Clemson, Anderson, South Carolina 29634 (United States)

    2014-06-30

    The shaping of laser-induced filamenting plasma channels into helical structures by guiding the process with a non-diffracting beam is demonstrated. This was achieved using a Bessel beam superposition to control the phase of an ultrafast laser beam possessing intensities sufficient to induce Kerr effect driven non-linear self-focusing. Several experimental methods were used to characterize the resulting beams and confirm the observed structures are laser air filaments.

  20. Randomization techniques for the intensity modulation-based quantum stream cipher and progress of experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kentaro; Hirota, Osamu

    2011-08-01

    The quantum noise based direct encryption protocol Y-OO is expected to provide physical complexity based security, which is thought to be comparable to information theoretic security in mathematical cryptography, for the. physical layer of fiber-optic communication systems. So far, several randomization techniques for the quantum stream cipher by Y-OO protocol have been proposed, but most of them were developed under the assumption that phase shift keying is used as the modulation format. On the other hand, the recent progress in the experimental study on the intensity modulation based quantum stream cipher by Y-OO protocol raises expectations for its realization. The purpose of this paper is to present design and implementation methods of a composite model of the intensity modulation based quantum stream cipher with some randomization techniques. As a result this paper gives a viewpoint of how the Y-OO cryptosystem is miniaturized.

  1. Filter Bank Multicarrier (FBMC) for long-reach intensity modulated optical access networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saljoghei, Arsalan; Gutiérrez, Fernando A.; Perry, Philip; Barry, Liam P.

    2017-04-01

    Filter Bank Multi Carrier (FBMC) is a modulation scheme which has recently attracted significant interest in both wireless and optical communications. The interest in optical communications arises due to FBMC's capability to operate without a Cyclic Prefix (CP) and its high resilience to synchronisation errors. However, the operation of FBMC in optical access networks has not been extensively studied either in downstream or upstream. In this work we use experimental work to investigate the operation of FBMC in intensity modulated Passive Optical Networks (PONs) employing direct detection in conjunction with both direct and external modulation schemes. The data rates and propagation lengths employed here vary from 8.4 to 14.8 Gb/s and 0-75 km. The results suggest that by using FBMC it is possible to accomplish CP-Less transmission up to 75 km of SSMF in passive links using cost effective intensity modulation and detection schemes.

  2. Optical Intensity Modulation in an LiNbO3 Slab-Coupled Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalin Lu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical intensity modulation has been demonstrated through switching the optical beam between the main core waveguide and a closely attached leaky slab waveguide by applying a low-voltage electrical field. Theory for simulating such an LiNbO3 slab-coupled waveguide structure was suggested, and the result indicates the possibility of making the spatial guiding mode large, circular and symmetric, which further allows the potential to significantly reduce the coupling losses with adjacent lasers and optical networks. Optical intensity modulation using electro-optic effect was experimentally demonstrated in a 5 cm long waveguide fabricated by using a procedure of soft proton exchange and then an overgrowth of thin LN film on top of a c-cut LiNbO3 wafer.

  3. Study on the Optimization Algorithms for Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong-jie

    2005-01-01

    @@ Radiotherapy, together with the surgery and chemotherapy, are the three main means for tumor treatment. It is a historic advancement for tumor treatment that the classical three-dimensional (3D)conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) evolved into the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Whereas,the advantages of IMRT have not yet been fully utilized, because of the complicated clinical conditions.The IMRT planning, one of the key issues of IMRT application, still has many problems open to be further studied.

  4. Simplified polarization demultiplexing based on Stokes vector analysis for intensity-modulation direct-detection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinyu; Yan, Lianshan; Chen, Zhiyu; Yi, Anlin; Pan, Yan; Jiang, Lin; Pan, Wei; Luo, Bin

    2016-10-01

    A simple and effective polarization demultiplexing method is proposed based on the improved Stokes vector analysis and digital signal processor algorithm for the intensity-modulation direct-detection optical communication systems. Such a scheme could significantly simplify optical receivers with low system cost. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of our proposed method and show that only 1- and 1.7-dB power penalties are measured for 10- and 25-km transmissions compared to back-to-back case.

  5. Surface phase defects induced downstream laser intensity modulation in high-power laser facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhang; Wei Zhou; Wanjun Dai; Dongxia Hu; Xuewei Deng; Wanqing Huang; Lidan Zhou; Qiang Yuan; Xiaoxia Huang; De’en Wang; Ying Yang

    2016-01-01

    Optics surface phase defects induced intensity modulation in high-power laser facility for inertial confinement fusion research is studied. Calculations and experiments reveal an exact mapping of the modulation patterns and the optics damage spot distributions from the surface phase defects. Origins are discussed during the processes of optics manufacturing and diagnostics, revealing potential improvements for future optics manufacturing techniques and diagnostic index, which is meaningful for fusion level laser facility construction and its operation safety.

  6. Comparison study of intensity modulated arc therapy using single or multiple arcs to intensity modulated radiation therapy for high-risk prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashamalla, Hani; Tejwani, Ajay; Parameritis, Loannis; Swamy, Uma; Luo, Pei Ching; Guirguis, Adel; Lavaf, Amir [Weill Medical College of Cornell University, Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is a form of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) that delivers dose in single or multiple arcs. We compared IMRT plans versus single-arc field (1ARC) and multi-arc fields (3ARC) IMAT plans in high-risk prostate cancer. Sixteen patients were studied. Prostate (PTV{sub P}), right pelvic (PTV{sub RtLN}) and left pelvic lymph nodes (PTV{sub LtLN}), and organs at risk were contoured. PTVP, PTV{sub RtLN}, and PTV{sub LtLN} received 50.40 Gy followed by a boost to PTV{sub B} of 28.80 Gy. Three plans were per patient generated: IMRT, 1ARC, and 3ARC. We recorded the dose to the PTV, the mean dose (D{sub MEAN}) to the organs at risk, and volume covered by the 50% isodose. Efficiency was evaluated by monitor units (MU) and beam on time (BOT). Conformity index (CI), Paddick gradient index, and homogeneity index (HI) were also calculated. Average Radiation Therapy Oncology Group CI was 1.17, 1.20, and 1.15 for IMRT, 1ARC, and 3ARC, respectively. The plans' HI were within 1% of each other. The D{sub MEAN} of bladder was within 2% of each other. The rectum D{sub MEAN} in IMRT plans was 10% lower dose than the arc plans (p < 0.0001). The GI of the 3ARC was superior to IMRT by 27.4% (p = 0.006). The average MU was highest in the IMRT plans (1686) versus 1ARC (575) versus 3ARC (1079). The average BOT was 6 minutes for IMRT compared to 1.3 and 2.9 for 1ARC and 3ARC IMAT (p < 0.05). For high-risk prostate cancer, IMAT may offer a favorable dose gradient profile, conformity, MU and BOT compared to IMRT.

  7. Two-tone intensity-modulated optical stimulus for self-referencing microwave characterization of high-speed photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heng; Zhang, Shangjian; Zou, Xinhai; Zhang, Yali; Lu, Rongguo; Zhang, Zhiyao; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Liu, Yong

    2016-08-01

    The two-tone intensity modulated optical stimulus is proposed and demonstrated for measuring the high-frequency response of photodetectors. The method provides a narrow linewidth and wide bandwidth optical stimulus based on the two-tone modulation of a Mach-Zehnder electro-optical intensity modulator, and achieves the self-referenced measurement of photodetectors without the need for correcting the power variation of optical stimulus. Moreover, the two-tone intensity modulation method allows bias-independent measurement with doubled measuring frequency range. In the experiment, the consistency between our method and the conventional methods verifies the simple but accurate measurement.

  8. Dosimetric Comparison of Three-Dimensional Conformal Proton Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy, and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Treatment of Pediatric Craniopharyngiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehling, Nicholas S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Grosshans, David R., E-mail: dgrossha@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bluett, Jaques B. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Palmer, Matthew T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Song, Xiaofei; Amos, Richard A.; Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Meyer, Jeffrey J.; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Cranial irradiation in pediatric patients is associated with serious long-term adverse effects. We sought to determine whether both three-dimensional conformal proton radiotherapy (3D-PRT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) decrease integral dose to brain areas known to harbor neuronal stem cells, major blood vessels, and other normal brain structures for pediatric patients with craniopharyngiomas. Methods and Materials: IMRT, forward planned, passive scattering proton, and IMPT plans were generated and optimized for 10 pediatric patients. The dose was 50.4 Gy (or cobalt Gy equivalent) delivered in 28 fractions with the requirement for planning target volume (PTV) coverage of 95% or better. Integral dose data were calculated from differential dose-volume histograms. Results: The PTV target coverage was adequate for all modalities. IMRT and IMPT yielded the most conformal plans in comparison to 3D-PRT. Compared with IMRT, 3D-PRT and IMPT plans had a relative reduction of integral dose to the hippocampus (3D-PRT, 20.4; IMPT, 51.3%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), dentate gyrus (27.3, 75.0%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), and subventricular zone (4.5, 57.8%{sup Asterisk-Operator }). Vascular organs at risk also had reduced integral dose with the use of proton therapy (anterior cerebral arteries, 33.3{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 100.0%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; middle cerebral arteries, 25.9%{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 100%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; anterior communicating arteries, 30.8{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 41.7%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; and carotid arteries, 51.5{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 77.6{sup Asterisk-Operator }). Relative reduction of integral dose to the infratentorial brain (190.7{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 109.7%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), supratentorial brain without PTV (9.6, 26.8%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), brainstem (45.6, 22.4%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), and whole brain without PTV (19.4{sup Asterisk

  9. Bridging the gap between IMRT and VMAT: Dense angularly sampled and sparse intensity modulated radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To propose an alternative radiation therapy (RT) planning and delivery scheme with optimal angular beam sampling and intrabeam modulation for improved dose distribution while maintaining high delivery efficiency. Methods: In the proposed approach, coined as dense angularly sampled and sparse intensity modulated RT (DASSIM-RT), a large number of beam angles are used to increase the angular sampling, leading to potentially more conformal dose distributions as compared to conventional IMRT. At the same time, intensity modulation of the incident beams is simplified to eliminate the dispensable segments, compensating the increase in delivery time caused by the increased number of beams and facilitating the plan delivery. In a sense, the proposed approach shifts and transforms, in an optimal fashion, some of the beam segments in conventional IMRT to the added beams. For newly available digital accelerators, the DASSIM-RT delivery can be made very efficient by concatenating the beams so that they can be delivered sequentially without operator’s intervention. Different from VMAT, the level of intensity modulation in DASSIS-RT is field specific and optimized to meet the need of each beam direction. Three clinical cases (a head and neck (HN) case, a pancreas case, and a lung case) are used to evaluate the proposed RT scheme. DASSIM-RT, VMAT, and conventional IMRT plans are compared quantitatively in terms of the conformality index (CI) and delivery efficiency. Results: Plan quality improves generally with the number and intensity modulation of the incident beams. For a fixed number of beams or fixed level of intensity modulation, the improvement saturates after the intensity modulation or number of beams reaches to a certain level. An interplay between the two variables is observed and the saturation point depends on the values of both variables. For all the cases studied here, the CI of DASSIM-RT with 15 beams and 5 intensity levels (0.90, 0.79, and 0.84 for the

  10. A computational implementation and comparison of several intensity modulated proton therapy treatment planning algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haisen S; Romeijn, H Edwin; Fox, Christopher; Palta, Jatinder R; Dempsey, James F

    2008-03-01

    The authors present a comparative study of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment planning employing algorithms of three-dimensional (3D) modulation, and 2.5-dimensional (2.5D) modulation, and intensity modulated distal edge tracking (DET) [A. Lomax, Phys. Med. Biol. 44, 185-205 (1999)] applied to the treatment of head-and-neck cancer radiotherapy. These three approaches were also compared with 6 MV photon intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). All algorithms were implemented in the University of Florida Optimized Radiation Therapy system using a finite sized pencil beam dose model and a convex fluence map optimization model. The 3D IMPT and the DET algorithms showed considerable advantages over the photon IMRT in terms of dose conformity and sparing of organs at risk when the beam number was not constrained. The 2.5D algorithm did not show an advantage over the photon IMRT except in the dose reduction to the distant healthy tissues, which is inherent in proton beam delivery. The influences of proton beam number and pencil beam size on the IMPT plan quality were also studied. Out of 24 cases studied, three cases could be adequately planned with one beam and 12 cases could be adequately planned with two beams, but the dose uniformity was often marginally acceptable. Adding one or two more beams in each case dramatically improved the dose uniformity. The finite pencil beam size had more influence on the plan quality of the 2.5D and DET algorithms than that of the 3D IMPT. To obtain a satisfactory plan quality, a 0.5 cm pencil beam size was required for the 3D IMPT and a 0.3 cm size was required for the 2.5D and the DET algorithms. Delivery of the IMPT plans produced in this study would require a proton beam spot scanning technique that has yet to be developed clinically.

  11. Intensity modulated radiation therapy using laser-accelerated protons: a Monte Carlo dosimetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourkal, E; Li, J S; Xiong, W; Nahum, A; Ma, C M

    2003-12-21

    In this paper we present Monte Carlo studies of intensity modulated radiation therapy using laser-accelerated proton beams. Laser-accelerated protons coming out of a solid high-density target have broad energy and angular spectra leading to dose distributions that cannot be directly used for therapeutic applications. Through the introduction of a spectrometer-like particle selection system that delivers small pencil beams of protons with desired energy spectra it is feasible to use laser-accelerated protons for intensity modulated radiotherapy. The method presented in this paper is a three-dimensional modulation in which the proton energy spectrum and intensity of each individual beamlet are modulated to yield a homogeneous dose in both the longitudinal and lateral directions. As an evaluation of the efficacy of this method, it has been applied to two prostate cases using a variety of beam arrangements. We have performed a comparison study between intensity modulated photon plans and those for laser-accelerated protons. For identical beam arrangements and the same optimization parameters, proton plans exhibit superior coverage of the target and sparing of neighbouring critical structures. Dose-volume histogram analysis of the resulting dose distributions shows up to 50% reduction of dose to the critical structures. As the number of fields is decreased, the proton modality exhibits a better preservation of the optimization requirements on the target and critical structures. It is shown that for a two-beam arrangement (parallel-opposed) it is possible to achieve both superior target coverage with 5% dose inhomogeneity within the target and excellent sparing of surrounding tissue.

  12. Dependence of achievable plan quality on treatment technique and planning goal refinement: a head-and-neck intensity modulated radiation therapy application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, X Sharon; Ruan, Dan; Lee, Steve P; Pham, Andrew; Kupelian, Patrick; Low, Daniel A; Steinberg, Michael; Demarco, John

    2015-03-15

    To develop a practical workflow for retrospectively analyzing target and normal tissue dose-volume endpoints for various intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery techniques; to develop technique-specific planning goals to improve plan consistency and quality when feasible. A total of 165 consecutive head-and-neck patients from our patient registry were selected and retrospectively analyzed. All IMRT plans were generated using the same dose-volume guidelines for TomoTherapy (Tomo, Accuray), TrueBeam (TB, Varian) using fixed-field IMRT (TB_IMRT) or RAPIDARC (TB_RAPIDARC), or Siemens Oncor (Siemens_IMRT, Siemens). A MATLAB-based dose-volume extraction and analysis tool was developed to export dosimetric endpoints for each patient. With a fair stratification of patient cohort, the variation of achieved dosimetric endpoints was analyzed among different treatment techniques. Upon identification of statistically significant variations, technique-specific planning goals were derived from dynamically accumulated institutional data. Retrospective analysis showed that although all techniques yielded comparable target coverage, the doses to the critical structures differed. The maximum cord doses were 34.1 ± 2.6, 42.7 ± 2.1, 43.3 ± 2.0, and 45.1 ± 1.6 Gy for Tomo, TB_IMRT, TB_RAPIDARC, and Siemens_IMRT plans, respectively. Analyses of variance showed significant differences for the maximum cord doses but no significant differences for other selected structures among the investigated IMRT delivery techniques. Subsequently, a refined technique-specific dose-volume guideline for maximum cord dose was derived at a confidence level of 95%. The dosimetric plans that failed the refined technique-specific planning goals were reoptimized according to the refined constraints. We observed better cord sparing with minimal variations for the target coverage and other organ at risk sparing for the Tomo cases, and higher parotid doses for C-arm linear accelerator-based IMRT

  13. A Novel Temperature-Compensated, Intensity-Modulated Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Yong Dong; Hwa-Yaw Tam

    2008-01-01

    An intensity-modulated, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor system based on radio-frequency (RF) signal measurement is presented. The RF signal is generated at a photodetector by two modulated optical signals reflected from the sensing FBG and a reference one. Bragg wavelength shift of the sensing FBG changes intensity of the RF signal by changing phase difference between the two optical signals, with temperature effect being compensated automatically by the reference FBG. Strain measurement with a maximum sensitivity of -0.34 μV/με has been achieved.

  14. A Two-Dimensional Signal Space for Intensity-Modulated Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Karout, Johnny; Kschischang, Frank R; Agrell, Erik

    2012-01-01

    A two-dimensional signal space for intensity- modulated channels is presented. Modulation formats using this signal space are designed to maximize the minimum distance between signal points while satisfying average and peak power constraints. The uncoded, high-signal-to-noise ratio, power and spectral efficiencies are compared to those of the best known formats. The new formats are simpler than existing subcarrier formats, and are superior if the bandwidth is measured as 90% in-band power. Existing subcarrier formats are better if the bandwidth is measured as 99% in-band power.

  15. Combining discrete cosine transform with clipping for PAPR reduction in intensity-modulated OFDM systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-peng; Chen, Shou-fa; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Ming; Tang, Jin; Chen, Lin

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal is reduced by combining the discrete cosine transform (DCT) with clipping in optical intensity-modulated direct-detection (IM/DD) OFDM systems. First, the data are transformed into new modified data by DCT. Second, the proposed scheme utilizes the clipping technique to further reduce the PAPR of OFDM signal. We experimentally demonstrate that the optical OFDM transmission system with this proposed scheme can achieve significant performance improvement in terms of PAPR and bit error rate (BER) compared with the original optical OFDM systems.

  16. Feasibility report of image guided stereotactic body radiotherapy (IG-SBRT) with tomotherapy for early stage medically inoperable lung cancer using extreme hypofractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, Wes; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Jaradat, Hazim A.; Orton, Nigel P.; Khuntia, Deepak; Mehta, Minesh P. [Univ. of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Human Oncology; Traynor, Anne [Univ. of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Medicine; Weigel, Tracey [Univ. of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Surgery

    2006-09-15

    We report on the technical feasibility, dosimetric aspects, and daily image-guidance capability with megavoltage CT (MVCT) of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using helical tomotherapy for medically inoperable T1/2 N0 M0 non-small cell lung cancer. Nine patients underwent treatment planning with 4D-CT in a double vacuum based immobilization system to minimize tumor motion and to define a lesion-specific 4D-motion envelope. Patients received 60 Gy in 5 fractions within 10 days to a PTV defined by a motion envelope plus a 6 mm expansion for microscopic extension and setup error using tomotherapy, with daily pretreatment MVCT image guidance. The primary endpoint was technical feasibility. Secondary endpoints were defining the acute and sub-acute toxicities and tumor response. Forty three of 45 fractions were successfully delivered, with an average delivery time of 22 minutes. MVCT provided excellent tumor visualization for daily image guidance. No significant tumor regression was observed on MVCT in any patient during therapy. Median mean normalized total doses were: tumor 117 Gy{sub 10}; residual lung 9 Gy{sub 3}. Maximum fraction-size equivalent dose values were: esophagus 5 Gy{sub 3}{sup 9}; cord 7 Gy{sub 3}{sup 6}. No patient experienced = grade 2 pulmonary toxicity. 3 complete, 4 partial and 2 stable responses were observed, with <3 months median follow-up. The mean tumor regression is 72%. SBRT using tomotherapy proved to be feasible, safe and free of major technical limitations or acute toxicities. Daily pretreatment MVCT imaging allows for precise daily tumor targeting with the patient in the actual treatment position, and therefore provides for precise image guidance.

  17. Volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy in lung cancer: Current literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh B Rana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT is a novel radiation technique that delivers a highly conformal radiation dose to the target by allowing the simultaneous variation of gantry rotation speed, dose rate and multiple-leaf collimators leaf positions. The aim of this study was to review the current literature on two VMAT systems, RapidArc and SmartArc with main focus on planning studies of lung cancer. A systematic review of available data was conducted using MEDLINE/PubMed with the keywords ′′lung′′ and "VMAT". The published data show that VMAT techniques have clear superiority over three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with regard to improving dose conformity and sparing of organs at risks (OARs. The data indicates that for lung tumor VMAT and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT provide equivalent dose homogeneity, dose conformity and target volume coverage; however, contradictory results were obtained in terms of OARs sparing. The major advantages of VMAT over IMRT are the reduction in the number of monitor units and faster treatment delivery times without compromising the quality of the treatment plans. Moreover, faster delivery time is more patient-friendly and it minimizes intra-fractional patient motion allowing treatment volumes stay within their respective treatment margins. Current literature data shows that VMAT can be a good option to treat lung cancer; however, data on clinical trials are still lacking. The clinical trials are essential to confirm the safety and efficacy of VMAT techniques.

  18. Pelvic nodal dose escalation with prostate hypofractionation using conformal avoidance defined (H-CAD) intensity modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Theodore S.; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Jaradat, Hazim; Raisbeck, Bridget M.; Ritter, Mark A. [Univ. of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Human Oncology

    2006-09-15

    The management of prostate cancer patients with a significant risk of pelvic lymph node involvement is controversial. Both whole pelvis radiotherapy and dose escalation to the prostate have been linked to improved outcome in such patients, but it is unclear whether conventional whole pelvis doses of only 45-50 Gy are optimal for ultimate nodal control. The purpose of this study is to examine the dosimetric and clinical feasibility of combining prostate dose escalation via hypofractionation with conformal avoidance-based IMRT (H-CAD) dose escalation to the pelvic lymph nodes. One conformal avoidance and one conventional plan were generated for each of eight patients. Conformal avoidance-based IMRT plans were generated that specifically excluded bowel, rectum, and bladder. The prostate and lower seminal vesicles (PTV 70) were planned to receive 70 Gy in 2.5 Gy/fraction while the pelvic lymph nodes (PTV 56) were to concurrently receive 56 Gy in 2 Gy/fraction. The volume of small bowel receiving >45 Gy was restricted to 300 ml or less. These conformal avoidance plans were delivered using helical tomotherapy or LINAC-based IMRT with daily imaging localization. All patients received neoadjuvant and concurrent androgen deprivation with a planned total of two years. The conventional, sequential plans created for comparison purposes for all patients consisted of a conventional 4-field pelvic box prescribed to 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) followed by an IMRT boost to the prostate of 25.2 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) yielding a final prostate dose of 75.6 Gy. For all plans, the prescription dose was to cover the target structure. Equivalent uniform dose (EUD) analyses were performed on all targets and dose-volume histograms (DVH) were displayed in terms of both physical and normalized total dose (NTD), i.e. dose in 2 Gy fraction equivalents. H-CAD IMRT plans were created for and delivered to all eight patients. Analysis of the H-CAD plans demonstrates prescription dose coverage of >95

  19. Dosimetric comparison of three intensity-modulate radiation therapy treatment modules for nasopharyngeal carcinoma%鼻咽癌三种调强放疗计划剂量学对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李奇欣; 岳麒; 柏朋刚; 陈开强; 张秀春; 林少俊; 瞿宜艳

    2014-01-01

    目的 对比鼻咽癌常规固定野调强(IMRT)、容积旋转调强(VMAT)以及断层调强(HT)3种不同调强放疗计划的剂量学差异.方法 选择18例接受VMAT治疗的鼻咽癌患者,以相同处方剂量和目标条件分别重新进行IMRT和HT计划设计.比较3种计划靶区的均匀度(HI)、适形度(CI)、最大剂量以及平均剂量.危及器官的最大量和平均量以及感兴趣区的剂量体积、计划执行时间和机器跳数(MU).结果 3种计划在靶区的覆盖率满足临床要求.IMRT计划在靶区的HI和CI方面结果最差,HT计划结果最优.危及器官方面,IMRT计划受量最高,HT计划的脊髓、脑干和腮腺受量最低;但对于视神经、晶状体以及视交叉HT计划的受量最高而VMAT计划的受量最低.IMRT的治疗时间(8.0±0.5)min高于VMAT(3.9±0.1)min和HT(7.4±0.9) min.与VMAT相比,IMRT每次治疗为(711.4 ±78.7) MU,高于VMAT的(596.4±33.7) MU.结论 鼻咽癌IMRT、VMAT以及HT计划在靶区覆盖和危及器官保护上都可以达到临床要求,在靶区的适形度和均匀性上HT计划优于VMAT和IMRT,但在治疗时间和加速器的机器跳数上VMAT较有优势.%Objective To compare the dosimetric differences of fixed field intensity-modulated radiation therapy(IMRT),volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients.Methods Eighteen NPC patients previously treated with VMAT were retrospectively included and re-planned using HT and IMRT (7 fields) techniques utilizing the same dose prescription and optimization objectives.The following parameters were compared across the three types of plans:homogeneity index (HI),conformity index (CI),maximum dose (Dmax) and mean dose (Dmean) of targets ; the Dmax and Dmean of organs at risk (OARs) ; the doses and volumes of volume of interest; the treatment delivery time and monitor units (MU).Results Clinically acceptable target coverage could be achieved by IMRT,VMAT and

  20. MIMO Free-Space Optical Communication Employing Subcarrier Intensity Modulation in Atmospheric Turbulence Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Popoola, Wasiu O.; Ahmadi, Vahid; Leitgeb, Erich

    In this paper, we analyse the error performance of transmitter/receiver array free-space optical (FSO) communication system employing binary phase shift keying (BPSK) subcarrier intensity modulation (SIM) in clear but turbulent atmospheric channel. Subcarrier modulation is employed to eliminate the need for adaptive threshold detector. Direct detection is employed at the receiver and each subcarrier is subsequently demodulated coherently. The effect of irradiance fading is mitigated with an array of lasers and photodetectors. The received signals are linearly combined using the optimal maximum ratio combining (MRC), the equal gain combining (EGC) and the selection combining (SelC). The bit error rate (BER) equations are derived considering additive white Gaussian noise and log normal intensity fluctuations. This work is part of the EU COST actions and EU projects.

  1. Accommodating practical constraints for intensity-modulated radiation therapy by means of compensators

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, J

    2001-01-01

    intensity distribution, inverse modelling of the radiation attenuation within the compensator is required. Two novel and independent approaches, based on deconvolution and system identification, respectively, are proposed to accomplish this. To compare the approach with the 'rival' state of the art beam modulation technique, theoretical and experimental examination of the modulated fields generated by manufactured compensators and multileaf collimators is presented. This comparison focused on the achievable resolution of the intensity modulated beams in lateral and longitudinal directions. To take into account the characteristics of a clinical environment, a comprehensive study has been carried out to investigate the suitability of the most common commercially available treatment couch systems for their suitability for IMRT treatments. In this context, an original rule based advisory system has been developed to alert the operator of any potential collision of the beam with the moveable supporting structures ...

  2. MIMO Intensity-Modulation Channels: Capacity Bounds and High SNR Characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas

    2016-10-01

    The capacity of MIMO intensity modulation channels is studied. The nonnegativity of the transmit signal (intensity) poses a challenge on the precoding of the transmit signal, which limits the applicability of classical schemes in this type of channels. To resolve this issue, capacity lower bounds are developed by using precoding-free schemes. This is achieved by channel inversion or QR decomposition to convert the MIMO channel to a set of parallel channels. The achievable rate of a DC-offset SVD based scheme is also derived as a benchmark. Then, a capacity upper bound is derived and is shown to coincide with the achievable rate of the QR decomposition based scheme at high SNR, consequently characterizing the high-SNR capacity of the channel. The high-SNR gap between capacity and the achievable rates of the channel inversion and the DC-offset SVD based schemes is also characterized. Finally, the ergodic capacity of the channel is also briefly discussed.

  3. Simple tool for prediction of parotid gland sparing in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gensheimer, Michael F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Hummel-Kramer, Sharon M., E-mail: sharonhummel@comcast.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA (United States); Cain, David; Quang, Tony S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Sparing one or both parotid glands is a key goal when planning head and neck cancer radiation treatment. If the planning target volume (PTV) overlaps one or both parotid glands substantially, it may not be possible to achieve adequate gland sparing. This finding results in physicians revising their PTV contours after an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan has been run and reduces workflow efficiency. We devised a simple formula for predicting mean parotid gland dose from the overlap of the parotid gland and isotropically expanded PTV contours. We tested the tool using 44 patients from 2 institutions and found agreement between predicted and actual parotid gland doses (mean absolute error = 5.3 Gy). This simple method could increase treatment planning efficiency by improving the chance that the first plan presented to the physician will have optimal parotid gland sparing.

  4. Analysis of small-signal intensity modulation of semiconductor lasers taking account of gain suppression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Moustafa Ahmed; Ali El-Lafi

    2008-07-01

    This paper demonstrates theoretical characterization of intensity modulation of semiconductor lasers (SL’s). The study is based on a small-signal model to solve the laser rate equations taking into account suppression of optical gain. Analytical forms of the small-signal modulation response and modulation bandwidth are derived. Influences of the bias current, modulation index and modulation frequency as well as gain suppression on modulation characteristics are examined. Computer simulation of the model is applied to 1.55-m InGaAsP lasers. The results show that when the SL is biased far-above threshold, the increase of gain suppression increases both the modulation response and its peak frequency. The modulation bandwidth also increases but the laser damping rate decreases. Quantitative description of the relationships of both modulation bandwidth vs. relaxation frequency and maximum modulation bandwidth vs. nonlinear gain coefficient are presented.

  5. Implementation of intensity modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer in a private radiotherapy service in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poitevin-Chacón, María Adela; Reséndiz González, Gabriel; Alvarado Zermeño, Adriana; Flores Castro, Jesús Manuel; Flores Balcázar, Christian Haydée; Rosales Pérez, Samuel; Pérez Pastenes, Miguel Angel; Rodríguez Laguna, Alejandro; Vázquez Fernández, Patricio; Calvo Fernández, Alejandro; Bastida Ventura, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) allows physicians to deliver higher conformal doses to the tumour, while avoiding adjacent structures. As a result the probability of tumour control is higher and toxicity may be reduced. However, implementation of IMRT is highly complex and requires a rigorous quality assurance (QA) program both before and during treatment. The present article describes the process of implementing IMRT for localized prostate cancer in a radiation therapy department. In our experience, IMRT implementation requires careful planning due to the need to simultaneously implement specialized software, multifaceted QA programs, and training of the multidisciplinary team. Establishing standardized protocols and ensuring close collaboration between a multidisciplinary team is challenging but essential. PMID:25535587

  6. Approximated segmentation considering technical and dosimetric constraints in intensity-modulated radiation therapy with electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Kiesel, Antje

    2010-01-01

    In intensity-modulated radiation therapy, optimal intensity distributions of incoming beams are decomposed into linear combinations of leaf openings of a multileaf collimator (segments). In order to avoid inefficient dose delivery, the decomposition should satisfy a number of dosimetric constraints due to suboptimal dose characteristics of small segments. However, exact decomposition with dosimetric constraints is only in limited cases possible. The present work introduces new heuristic segmentation algorithms for the following optimization problem: Find a segmentation of an approximated matrix using only allowed fields and minimize the approximation error. Finally, the decomposition algorithms were implemented into an optimization programme in order to examine the assumptions of the algorithms for a clinical example. As a result, identical dose distributions with much fewer segments and a significantly smaller number of monitor units could be achieved using dosimetric constraints. Consequently, the dose deli...

  7. High-speed operation of optical exclusive OR circuit based on balanced detection and intensity modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Takiguchi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the evaluated results of an optical exclusive OR (XOR circuit for high-speed binary signals, which operates based on balanced detection and intensity modulation. This circuit partly adopts simple electronics in order to achieve simple configuration and operation. Two input optical binary signals into a balanced photo detector produce an electrical signal for directly driving a modulator. The modulator modulates the lightwave from a laser diode and generates optical XOR output of the two input optical signals. After briefly explaining its configuration and operating principle, We demonstrate some experimental results to show its potential. We show its successful operation at 40 Gbit/s binary signals including bit error rate measurement.

  8. Optical intensity modulation direct detection versus heterodyne detection: A high-SNR capacity comparison

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas

    2016-09-15

    An optical wireless communications system which employs either intensity-modulation and direct-detection (IM-DD) or heterodyne detection (HD) is considered. IM-DD has lower complexity and cost than HD, but on the other hand, has lower capacity. It is therefore interesting to investigate the capacity gap between the two systems. The main focus of this paper is to investigate this gap at high SNR. Bounds on this gap are established for two cases: between IM-DD and HD, and between IM-DD and an HD-PAM which is an HD system employing pulse-amplitude modulation (PAM). While the gap between IM-DD and HD increases as the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) increases, the gap between IM-DD and an HD-PAM is upper bounded by a constant at high SNR. © 2015 IEEE.

  9. Emotional Intensity Modulates the Integration of Bimodal Angry Expressions: ERP Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihui Pan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Integration of information from face and voice plays a central role in social interactions. The present study investigated the modulation of emotional intensity on the integration of facial-vocal emotional cues by recording EEG for participants while they were performing emotion identification task on facial, vocal, and bimodal angry expressions varying in emotional intensity. Behavioral results showed the rates of anger and reaction speed increased as emotional intensity across modalities. Critically, the P2 amplitudes were larger for bimodal expressions than for the sum of facial and vocal expressions for low emotional intensity stimuli, but not for middle and high emotional intensity stimuli. These findings suggested that emotional intensity modulates the integration of facial-vocal angry expressions, following the principle of Inverse Effectiveness (IE in multimodal sensory integration.

  10. Feasibility of an online adaptive replanning method for cranial frameless intensity-modulated radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, Juan Francisco, E-mail: jfcdrr@gmail.com [Departamento de Oncología Radioterápica, Hospital Quirón, Barcelona (Spain); San José, Sol [Departamento de Oncología Radioterápica, Hospital Quirón, Barcelona (Spain); Garrido, LLuís [Institut de Ciències del Cosmos i Departament ECM, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Puertas, Enrique; Moragues, Sandra; Pozo, Miquel [Departamento de Oncología Radioterápica, Hospital Quirón, Barcelona (Spain); Casals, Joan, E-mail: jfcdrr@yahoo.es [Departamento de Oncología Radioterápica, Hospital Quirón, Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-10-01

    To introduce an approach for online adaptive replanning (i.e., dose-guided radiosurgery) in frameless stereotactic radiosurgery, when a 6-dimensional (6D) robotic couch is not available in the linear accelerator (linac). Cranial radiosurgical treatments are planned in our department using intensity-modulated technique. Patients are immobilized using thermoplastic mask. A cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan is acquired after the initial laser-based patient setup (CBCT{sub setup}). The online adaptive replanning procedure we propose consists of a 6D registration-based mapping of the reference plan onto actual CBCT{sub setup}, followed by a reoptimization of the beam fluences (“6D plan”) to achieve similar dosage as originally was intended, while the patient is lying in the linac couch and the original beam arrangement is kept. The goodness of the online adaptive method proposed was retrospectively analyzed for 16 patients with 35 targets treated with CBCT-based frameless intensity modulated technique. Simulation of reference plan onto actual CBCT{sub setup}, according to the 4 degrees of freedom, supported by linac couch was also generated for each case (4D plan). Target coverage (D99%) and conformity index values of 6D and 4D plans were compared with the corresponding values of the reference plans. Although the 4D-based approach does not always assure the target coverage (D99% between 72% and 103%), the proposed online adaptive method gave a perfect coverage in all cases analyzed as well as a similar conformity index value as was planned. Dose-guided radiosurgery approach is effective to assure the dose coverage and conformity of an intracranial target volume, avoiding resetting the patient inside the mask in a “trial and error” way so as to remove the pitch and roll errors when a robotic table is not available.

  11. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for sinonasal malignancies with a focus on optic pathway preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To assess if intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT can possibly lead to improved local control and lower incidence of vision impairment/blindness in comparison to non-IMRT techniques when treating sinonasal malignancies; what is the most optimal dose constraints for the optic pathway; and the impact of different IMRT strategies on optic pathway sparing in this setting. Methods and materials A literature search in the PubMed databases was conducted in July, 2012. Results Clinical studies on IMRT and 2D/3D (2 dimensional/3 dimensional RT for sinonasal malignancies suggest improved local control and lower incidence of severe vision impairment with IMRT in comparison to non-IMRT techniques. As observed in the non-IMRT studies, blindness due to disease progression may occur despite a lack of severe toxicity possibly due to the difficulty of controlling locally very advanced disease with a dose ≤ 70 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy’s influence on the the risk of severe optic toxicity after radiotherapy is unclear. A maximum dose of ≤ 54 Gy with conventional fractionation to the optic pathway may decrease the risk of blindness. Increased magnitude of intensity modulation through increasing the number of segments, beams, and using a combination of coplanar and non-coplanar arrangements may help increase dose conformality and optic pathway sparing when IMRT is used. Conclusion IMRT optimized with appropriate strategies may be the treatment of choice for the most optimal local control and optic pathway sparing when treating sinonasal malignancy.

  12. Fast intensity-modulated arc therapy based on 2-step beam segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratengeier, Klaus; Gainey, Mark; Sauer, Otto A.; Richter, Anne; Flentje, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Josef-Schneider-Str. 11, 97080 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Single or few arc intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is intended to be a time saving irradiation method, potentially replacing classical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The aim of this work was to evaluate the quality of different IMAT methods with the potential of fast delivery, which also has the possibility of adapting to the daily shape of the target volume. Methods: A planning study was performed. Novel double and triple IMAT techniques based on the geometrical analysis of the target organ at risk geometry (2-step IMAT) were evaluated. They were compared to step and shoot IMRT reference plans generated using direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO). Volumetric arc (VMAT) plans from commercial preclinical software (SMARTARC) were used as an additional benchmark to classify the quality of the novel techniques. Four cases with concave planning target volumes (PTV) with one dominating organ at risk (OAR), viz., the PTV/OAR combination of the ESTRO Quasimodo phantom, breast/lung, spine metastasis/spinal cord, and prostate/rectum, were used for the study. The composite objective value (COV) and other parameters representing the plan quality were studied. Results: The novel 2-step IMAT techniques with geometry based segment definition were as good as or better than DMPO and were superior to the SMARTARC VMAT techniques. For the spine metastasis, the quality measured by the COV differed only by 3%, whereas the COV of the 2-step IMAT for the other three cases decreased by a factor of 1.4-2.4 with respect to the reference plans. Conclusions: Rotational techniques based on geometrical analysis of the optimization problem (2-step IMAT) provide similar or better plan quality than DMPO or the research version of SMARTARC VMAT variants. The results justify pursuing the goal of fast IMAT adaptation based on 2-step IMAT techniques.

  13. MIMO FSO communication using subcarrier intensity modulation over double generalized gamma fading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiang; Yao, Mingwu; Wang, Xiaoyang

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence-induced fading is known to have a serious detrimental effect on the performance of free-space optical (FSO) communication. The involvement of multiple lasers and photodetectors in FSO systems offers an effective way to overcome fading. Very recently, a new generic fading model, called double-generalized gamma (double GG), is developed for accurately describing irradiance fading over a wide range of turbulence conditions. Therefore, for a general and exact study of the multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) FSO system, the double GG fading model is adopted in this paper. We investigate the MIMO FSO systems using subcarrier intensity modulation. Two typical transmit diversity schemes, repetition code (RC) and orthogonal space-time block code (OSTBC), are considered. We first propose a new power series expression for the probability density function of the double GG fading. Then we derive the average error rate expressions for both schemes in terms of double power series. The truncated forms of the derived power series enable the rapid and accurate numerical computation of the error rates. Furthermore, we present the asymptotic error rate analyses at high electrical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for both schemes. Closed-form diversity order and coding gain for both schemes are also obtained. Our numerical results, verified by simulation, confirm that RC outperforms OSTBC for MIMO FSO systems with subcarrier intensity modulation in double GG fading. The asymptotic coding gain of the RC scheme over the OSTBC scheme is analytically quantified for varying degrees of the fading strength.

  14. Physics aspects of prostate tomotherapy: Planning optimization and image-guidance issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorino, Claudio; Alongi, Filippo; Broggi, Sara (Medical Physics, S. Raffaele Inst., Milano (Italy)) (and others)

    2008-08-15

    Purpose. To review planning and image-guidance aspects of more than 3 years experience in the treatment of prostate cancer with Helical Tomotherapy (HT). Methods and materials. Planning issues concerning two Phase I-II clinical studies were addressed: in the first one, 58 Gy in 20 fractions were delivered to the prostatic bed for post-prostatectomy patients: in the second one, a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) approach was applied for radical treatment, delivering 71.4-74.2 Gy to the prostate in 28 fractions. On-line daily MVCT image guidance was applied: bone match was used for post-operative patients while prostate match was applied for radically treated patients. MVCT data of a large sample of both categories of patients were reviewed. Results. At now, more than 250 patients were treated. Planning data show the ability of HT in creating highly homogeneous dose distributions within PTVs. Organs at risk (OAR) sparing also showed to be excellent. HT was also found to favorably compare to inversely-optimized IMAT in terms of PTVs coverage and dose distribution homogeneity. In the case of pelvic nodes irradiation, a large sparing of bowel was evident compared to 3DCRT and conventional 5-fields IMRT. The analysis of MVCT data showed a limited motion of the prostate (about 5% of the fractions show a deviation =3 mm in posterior-anterior direction), due to the careful application of rectal emptying procedures. Based on phantom measurements and on the comparison with intra-prostatic calcification-based match, direct visualization prostate match seems to be sufficiently reliable in assessing shifts =3 mm. Conclusions. HT offers excellent planning solutions for prostate cancer, showing to be highly efficient in a SIB scenario. Daily MVCT information showed evidence of a limited motion of the prostate in the context of rectal filling control obtained by instructing patients in self-administrating a rectal enema

  15. Currents for Arbitrary Helicity

    CERN Document Server

    Dragon, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Using Mackey's classification of unitary representations of the Poincar\\'e group on massles states of arbitrary helicity we disprove the claim that states with helicity |h|>=1 cannot couple to a conserved current by constructing such a current.

  16. Feasibility of tomotherapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy. Dosimetry comparison with conventional radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Nam P.; Krafft, Shane P. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Vos, Paul [East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC (US). Dept. of Biostatistics] (and others)

    2011-09-15

    To compare the dosimetry of tomotherapy and the conventional half-beam technique (HBT) or non-split beam technique (NSBT) for target coverage and radiation dose to the lacrimal glands and lens. A retrospective review of 7 patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy who had radiotherapy because of disease progression on high steroid dose is reported: 3 patients were treated with tomotherapy and 4 patients with HBT. Compared to HBT, tomotherapy may provide better target coverage and significant reduction of radiation dose to the lacrimal glands and a higher dose to the lens. The NSBT improved target coverage but resulted in significantly higher doses to the lens and lacrimal glands. Tomotherapy may provide better coverage of the target volume and may be more effective in reducing severe exophthalmos compared to the conventional radiotherapy technique. (orig.)

  17. Measurement of Frequency Shift Characteristics Based on LiNbO3 Waveguide Electro-Optic Intensity Modulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Meng; Hui-Juan Zhou; Yi Liao; Qiong Yao

    2008-01-01

    High-speed and wide-band LiNbO3 waveguide electro-optic intensity modulator has drawn great attention in the field of optical fiber communi-cation and sensor. This paper reports the research results on the measurement of frequency shift character-istics of Mach-Zehnder electro-optic intensity modulator. Two measurement methods of frequency shift character-istics for high and low frequency modulations are studied in theory and experiment and demonstrate different results. The realization of a multi-wavelength optical source based on Mach-Zehnder electro-optic intensity modulator has been introduced. The technique to reach the maximum intensity for interesting shift frequency, particularly for heterodyne detection of Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensing, has been given.

  18. Characteristics and performance of an intensity-modulated optically pumped magnetometer in comparison to the classical M(x) magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultze, Volkmar; Ijsselsteijn, Rob; Scholtes, Theo; Woetzel, Stefan; Meyer, Hans-Georg

    2012-06-18

    We compare the performance of two methods for the synchronization of the atomic spins in optically pumped magnetometers: intensity modulation of the pump light and the classical M(x) method using B(1) field modulation. Both techniques use the same set-up and measure the resulting features of the light after passing a micro-fabricated Cs cell. The intensity-modulated pumping shows several advantages: better noise-limited magnetic field sensitivity, misalignment between pumping and spin synchronization is excluded, and magnetometer arrays without any cross-talk can be easily set up.

  19. Dosimetric studies of cadmium free alloy used in compensator based intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Sandeep; Punia, Rajesh; Tyagi, Atul; Singh, Mann P.

    2017-10-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate dosimetric properties of cadmium free alloy which is used in compensator based intensity modulated radiotherapy (cIMRT). A mixture of lead, bismuth and tin was used to prepare the alloy whose melting point is 90-95 °C. Slabs of different thicknesses ranging from 0.71 cm to 6.14 cm were prepared. Density of alloy was measured by Archimedes' principle using water. For six megavolt (6 MV) photon beam energy transmission, linear effective attenuation coefficient (μeff), tissue phantom ratio (TPR1020), beam hardening, surface dose (Ds), percentage depth dose (PDD) and effect of scatter has been measured and analyzed for different field sizes and different thickness of compensator. Effect of extended source to detector distance (SDD) on transmissions and μeff was measured. The density of alloy was found to be 9.5456 g/cm3. At SDD of 100 cm, μeff was observed 0.4253 cm-1 for a field size of 10×10 cm 2. Calculated TPR1020 was found to be within 3% of experimental TPR1020 . It was found to be increasing with increasing thickness of compensator. Ds was found to decrease with thickness of compensator and increase with wider collimator opening due to increased scattered dose. Compensator slabs of 1 cm, 1.98 cm and 4.16 cm decreased surface dose by 4.2%, 6.1% and 9.5% respectively for a field size of 10×10 cm2 at 100 cm SDD. For small field size of 3×3 cm2 and 5×5 cm2 PDDs are increased from 3.0% to 5.5% of open beam PDDs as compensator thickness increased from 1 cm to 6.14 cm at a depth of 10 cm in water while variation in PDD is insignificant in for larger field sizes 10×10 cm2 to 20×20 cm2. A high degree of intensity modulation is essential in cIMRT and it can be achieved with this compensator material. Dosimetric properties analyzed in this study establish this alloy as a reliable, reusable, optimally dense and cost effective compensator material.

  20. RISK FACTORS FOR HEARING LOSS IN PATIENTS TREATED WITH INTENSITY-MODULATED RADIOTHERAPY FOR HEAD-AND-NECK TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Zuur; Y.J. Simis; E.A. Lamers; A.A. Hart; W.A. Dreschler; A.J. Balm; C.R. Rasch

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) is a common treatment of head-and-neck carcinoma. The objective of this study was to perform a prospective multivariate assessment of the dose-effect relationship between intensity-modulated RT and hearing loss. Methods and Materials: Pure tone audiometry at 0.250-16 kHz w

  1. The impact of leaf width and plan complexity on DMLC tracking of prostate intensity modulated arc therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommer, Tobias; Falk, Marianne; Poulsen, Per Rugaard

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is commonly used to treat prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of leaf width and plan complexity on dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking for prostate motion management during IMAT treatments.Methods: Prostate...

  2. Shortening delivery times of intensity modulated proton therapy by reducing proton energy layers during treatment plan optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van de Water (Steven); H.M. Kooy; B.J.M. Heijmen (Ben); M.S. Hoogeman (Mischa)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPurpose To shorten delivery times of intensity modulated proton therapy by reducing the number of energy layers in the treatment plan. Methods and Materials We have developed an energy layer reduction method, which was implemented into our in-house-developed multicriteria treatment

  3. Shortening delivery times of intensity modulated proton therapy by reducing proton energy layers during treatment plan optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van de Water (Steven); H.M. Kooy; B.J.M. Heijmen (Ben); M.S. Hoogeman (Mischa)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPurpose To shorten delivery times of intensity modulated proton therapy by reducing the number of energy layers in the treatment plan. Methods and Materials We have developed an energy layer reduction method, which was implemented into our in-house-developed multicriteria treatment plann

  4. A treatment planning study of the potential of geometrical tracking for intensity modulated proton therapy of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    af Rosenschöld, Per Munck; Aznar, Marianne C; Nygaard, Ditte E;

    2010-01-01

    Proton therapy of lung cancer holds the potential for a reduction of the volume of irradiated normal lung tissue. In this work we investigate the robustness of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans to motion, and evaluate a geometrical tumour tracking method to compensate for tumour...

  5. Acute toxicity profile of craniospinal irradiation with intensity-modulated radiation therapy in children with medulloblastoma: A prospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, M.C.; Kusters, J.M.; Gidding, C.E.M.; Schieving, J.H.; Lindert, E.J. van; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Janssens, G.O.R.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To report on the acute toxicity in children with medulloblastoma undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with daily intrafractionally modulated junctions. METHODS: Newly diagnosed patients, aged 3-21, with standard-risk (SR) or high-risk (HR) medulloblastoma were

  6. The potential benefit of swallowing sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy to reduce swallowing dysfunction : An in silico planning comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, Hans Paul; Christianen, Miranda E M C; Bijl, Hendrik P; Schilstra, C; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To apply recently developed predictive models for swallowing dysfunction to compare the predicted probabilities of swallowing dysfunction for standard intensity modulated radiotherapy (ST-IMRT) and swallowing sparing IMRT (SW-IMRT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty head and neck cancer patient

  7. Intensity modulated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy for larynx preservation of advanced resectable hypopharyngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Hsing-Lung

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyze the rate of larynx preservation in patients of locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT plus concurrent chemotherapy, and compare the results with patients treated with primary surgery. Methods Between January 2003 and November 2007, 14 patients were treated with primary surgery and 33 patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT using IMRT technique. Survival rate, larynx preservation rate were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis was conducted for significant prognostic factors with Cox-regression method. Results The median follow-up was 19.4 months for all patients, and 25.8 months for those alive. The 5-year overall survival rate was 33% and 44% for primary surgery and definitive CCRT, respectively (p = 0.788. The 5-year functional larynx-preservation survival after IMRT was 40%. Acute toxicities were common, but usually tolerable. The rates of treatment-related mucositis (≥ grade 2 and pharyngitis (≥ grade 3 were higher in the CCRT group. For multivariate analysis, treatment response and cricoid cartilage invasion strongly correlated with survival. Conclusions IMRT plus concurrent chemotherapy may preserve the larynx without compromising survival. Further studies on new effective therapeutic agents are essential.

  8. Clinical results of a pilot study on stereovision-guided stereotactic radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shidong; Kleinberg, Lawrence R; Rigamonti, Daniele; Wharam, Moody D; Rashid, Abdul; Jackson, Juan; Djajaputra, David; He, Shenjen; Creasey, Tunisia; DeWeese, Theodore L

    2010-12-01

    Real-time stereovision-guidance has been introduced for efficient and convenient fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) and image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This first pilot study is to clinically evaluate its accuracy and precision as well as impact on treatment doses. Sixty-one FSR patients wearing stereotactic masks (SMs) and nine IMRT patients wearing flexible masks (FMs), were accrued. Daily target reposition was initially based-on biplane-radiographs and then adjusted in six degrees of freedom under real-time stereovision guidance. Mean and standard deviation of the head displacements measured the accuracy and precision. Head positions during beam-on times were measured with real-time stereovisions and used for determination of delivered doses. Accuracy ± ± precision in direction with the largest errors shows improvement from 0.4 ± 2.3 mm to 0.0 ± 1.0 mm in the inferior-to-superior direction for patients wearing SM or from 0.8 ± 4.3 mm to 0.4 ± 1.7 mm in the posterior-to-anterior direction for patients wearing FM. The image-guidance increases target volume coverage by >30% for small lesions. Over half of head position errors could be removed from the stereovision-guidance. Importantly, the technique allows us to check head position during beam-on time and makes it possible for having frameless head refixation without tight masks.

  9. Retrospective Estimation of the Quality of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plans for Lung Cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Koo, Jihye; Chung, Weon Kuu; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    This study estimated the planning quality of intensity-modulated radiotherapy in 42 lung cancer cases to provide preliminary data for the development of a planning quality assurance algorithm. Organs in or near the thoracic cavity (ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, heart, liver, esophagus, spinal cord, and bronchus) were selected as organs at risk (OARs). Radiotherapy plans were compared using the conformity index (CI), coverage index (CVI), and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), OAR-PTV distance and OAR-PTV overlap volume, and the V10Gy, V20Gy, and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of the OARs. The CI, CVI, and HI of the PTV were 0.54 - 0.89 , 0.90 - 1.00 , and 0.11 - 0.41, respectively. The mean EUDs (V10Gy, V20Gy) of the ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, esophagus, cord, liver, heart, and bronchus were 8.07 Gy (28.06, 13.17), 2.59 Gy (6.53, 1.18), 7.02 Gy (26.17, 12.32), 3.56 Gy (13.56, 4.48), 0.72 Gy (2.15, 0.91), 5.14 Gy (19.68, 8.62), and 10.56 Gy (36.08, 19.79), respectivel...

  10. Accounting for range uncertainties in the optimization of intensity modulated proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Chan, Timothy C Y; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2007-05-21

    Treatment plans optimized for intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) may be sensitive to range variations. The dose distribution may deteriorate substantially when the actual range of a pencil beam does not match the assumed range. We present two treatment planning concepts for IMPT which incorporate range uncertainties into the optimization. The first method is a probabilistic approach. The range of a pencil beam is assumed to be a random variable, which makes the delivered dose and the value of the objective function a random variable too. We then propose to optimize the expectation value of the objective function. The second approach is a robust formulation that applies methods developed in the field of robust linear programming. This approach optimizes the worst case dose distribution that may occur, assuming that the ranges of the pencil beams may vary within some interval. Both methods yield treatment plans that are considerably less sensitive to range variations compared to conventional treatment plans optimized without accounting for range uncertainties. In addition, both approaches--although conceptually different--yield very similar results on a qualitative level.

  11. Improved Outcomes with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Combined with Temozolomide for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel J. Aherne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is optimally treated by maximal debulking followed by combined chemoradiation. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT is gaining widespread acceptance in other tumour sites, although evidence to support its use over three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the treatment of gliomas is currently lacking. We examined the survival outcomes for patients with GBM treated with IMRT and Temozolomide. Methods and Materials. In all, 31 patients with GBM were treated with IMRT and 23 of these received chemoradiation with Temozolomide. We correlated survival outcomes with patient functional status, extent of surgery, radiation dose, and use of chemotherapy. Results. Median survival for all patients was 11.3 months, with a median survival of 7.2 months for patients receiving 40.05 Gray (Gy and a median survival of 17.4 months for patients receiving 60 Gy. Conclusions. We report one of the few series of IMRT in patients with GBM. In our group, median survival for those receiving 60 Gy with Temozolomide compared favourably to the combined therapy arm of the largest randomised trial of chemoradiation versus radiation to date (17.4 months versus 14.6 months. We propose that IMRT should be considered as an alternative to 3DCRT for patients with GBM.

  12. On the Capacity of the Intensity-Modulation Direct-Detection Optical Broadcast Channel

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas

    2016-01-12

    The capacity of the intensity-modulation directdetection optical broadcast channel (OBC) is investigated, under both average and peak intensity constraints. An outer bound on the capacity region is derived by adapting Bergmans’ approach to the OBC. Inner bounds are derived by using superposition coding with either truncated-Gaussian (TG) distributions or discrete distributions. While the discrete distribution achieves higher rates, the TG distribution leads to a simpler representation of the achievable rate region. At high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), it is shown that the TG distribution is nearly optimal. It achieves the symmetric-capacity within a constant gap (independent of SNR), which approaches half a bit as the number of users grows. It also achieves the capacity region within a constant gap. At low SNR, it is shown that on-off keying (OOK) with time-division multipleaccess (TDMA) is optimal. This is interesting in practice since both OOK and TDMA have low complexity. At moderate SNR (typically [0,8] dB), a discrete distribution with a small alphabet size achieves fairly good performance.

  13. On the Capacity Region of the Intensity-Modulation Direct-Detection Optical Broadcast Channel

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas

    2015-08-11

    The capacity of the intensity-modulation direct-detection free-space optical broadcast channel (OBC) is investigated. The Gaussian model with input-independent Gaussian noise is used, with both average and peak intensity constraints. An outer bound on the capacity region is derived by adapting Bergmans\\' approach to the OBC. Inner bounds are derived by using superposition coding with either truncated-Gaussian distributions or discrete distributions. While the discrete input distribution achieves higher rates than the truncated-Gaussian distribution, the latter allows expressing the achievable rate region in a closed form. At high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), it is shown that the truncated-Gaussian distribution is nearly optimal. It achieves the symmetric-capacity within a constant gap (independent of SNR), which approaches half a bit as the number of users grows large. It also achieves the capacity region within a constant gap, which depends on the number of users. At low SNR, it is shown that on-off keying with time-division multiple-access (TDMA) is optimal, as it achieves any point on the boundary of the developed outer bound. This is interesting in practice since both OOK and TDMA have low complexity. At moderate SNR (typically [0,8] dB), a discrete distribution with a small alphabet size achieves a fairly good performance in terms of symmetric rate.

  14. Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator Development For Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy And Homeland Security Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y -; Caporaso, G J; Guethlein, G; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Gower, E; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Stanley, J; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-06-17

    Compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator technology is being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The DWA accelerator uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. Its high electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The DWA concept can be applied to accelerate charge particle beams with any charge to mass ratio and energy. Based on the DWA system, a novel compact proton therapy accelerator is being developed. This proton therapy system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources. Applications of the DWA accelerator to problems in homeland security will also be discussed.

  15. Residual intensity modulation in resonator fiber optic gyros with sinusoidal wave phase modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Di-qing YING; Qiang LI; Hui-lian MA; Zhong-he JIN

    2014-01-01

    We present how residual intensity modulation (RIM) affects the performance of a resonator fiber optic gyro (R-FOG) through a sinusoidal wave phase modulation technique. The expression for the R-FOG system’s demodulation curve under RIM is obtained. Through numerical simulation with different RIM coefficients and modulation frequencies, we find that a zero deviation is induced by the RIM effect on the demodulation curve, and this zero deviation varies with the RIM coefficient and modulation frequency. The expression for the system error due to this zero deviation is derived. Simulation results show that the RIM-induced error varies with the RIM coefficient and modulation frequency. There also exists optimum values for the RIM coefficient and modulation frequency to totally eliminate the RIM-induced error, and the error increases as the RIM coefficient or modulation frequency deviates from its optimum value;however, in practical situations, these two parameters would not be exactly fixed but fluctuate from their respective optimum values, and a large system error is induced even if there exists a very small deviation of these two critical parameters from their optimum values. Simulation results indicate that the RIM-induced error should be con-sidered when designing and evaluating an R-FOG system.

  16. Comparative outcomes for three-dimensional conformal versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy for esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freilich, J; Hoffe, S E; Almhanna, K; Dinwoodie, W; Yue, B; Fulp, W; Meredith, K L; Shridhar, R

    2015-01-01

    Emerging data suggests a benefit for using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the management of esophageal cancer. We retrospectively reviewed patients treated at our institution who received definitive or preoperative chemoradiation with either IMRT or 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) between October 2000 and January 2012. Kaplan Meier analysis and the Cox proportional hazard model were used to evaluate survival outcomes. We evaluated a total of 232 patients (138 IMRT, 94 3DCRT) who received a median dose of 50.4 Gy (range, 44-64.8) to gross disease. Median follow up for all patients, IMRT patients alone, and 3DCRT patients alone was 18.5 (range, 2.5-124.2), 16.5 (range, 3-59), and 25.9 months (range, 2.5-124.2), respectively. We observed no significant difference based on radiation technique (3DCRT vs. IMRT) with respect to median overall survival (OS) (median 29 vs. 32 months; P = 0.74) or median relapse free survival (median 20 vs. 25 months; P = 0.66). On multivariable analysis (MVA), surgical resection resulted in improved OS (HR 0.444; P 20% weight loss (OR 0.51; P = 0.050). Our data suggest that while IMRT-based chemoradiation for esophageal cancer does not impact survival there was significantly less toxicity. In the IMRT group there was significant decrease in weight loss and grade ≥3 toxicity compared to 3DCRT.

  17. Rational use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy: the importance of clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Neve, Wilfried; De Gersem, Werner; Madani, Indira

    2012-01-01

    During the last 2 decades, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) became a standard technique despite its drawbacks of volume delineation, planning, robustness of delivery, challenging quality assurance, and cost as compared with non-IMRT. The theoretic advantages of IMRT dose distributions are generally accepted, but the clinical advantages remain debatable because of the lack of clinical assessment of the effort that is required to overshadow the disadvantages. Rational IMRT use requires a positive advantage/drawback balance. Only 5 randomized clinical trials (RCTs), 3 in the breast and 2 in the head and neck, which compare IMRT with non-IMRT (2-dimensional technique in four fifths of the trials), have been published (as of March 2011), and all had toxicity as the primary endpoint. More than 50 clinical trials compared results of IMRT-treated patients with a non-IMRT group, mostly historical controls. RCTs systematically showed a lower toxicity in IMRT-treated patients, and the non-RCTs confirmed these findings. Toxicity reduction, counterbalancing the drawbacks of IMRT, was convincing for breast and head and neck IMRT. For other tumor sites, the arguments favoring IMRT are weaker because of the inability to control bias outside the randomized setting. For anticancer efficacy endpoints, like survival, disease-specific survival, or locoregional control, the balance between advantages and drawbacks is fraught with uncertainties because of the absence of robust clinical data.

  18. Flow angle dependent photoacoustic Doppler power spectra under intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic Doppler (PAD power spectra showing an evident Doppler shift represent the major characteristics of the continuous wave-excited or burst wave-excited versions of PAD flow measurements. In this paper, the flow angle dependences of the PAD power spectra are investigated using an experiment setup that was established based on intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation. The setup has an overall configuration that is similar to a previously reported configuration, but is more sophisticated in that it accurately aligns the laser illumination with the ultrasound detection process, and in that it picks up the correct sample position. In the analysis of the power spectra data, we find that the background power spectra can be extracted by combining the output signals from the two channels of the lock-in amplifier, which is very useful for identification of the PAD power spectra. The power spectra are presented and analyzed in opposite flow directions, at different flow speeds, and at different flow angles. The power spectra at a 90° flow angle show the unique properties of symmetrical shapes due to PAD broadening. For the other flow angles, the smoothed power spectra clearly show a flow angle cosine relationship.

  19. Dosimetric comparison of tools for intensity modulated radiation therapy with gamma analysis: a phantom study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbas Ugur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dosimetry of the Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT is very important because of the complex dose distributions. Diode arrays are the most common and practical measurement tools for clinical usage for IMRT. Phantom selection is critical for QA process. IMRT treatment plans are recalculated for the phantom irradiation in QA. Phantoms are made in different geometrical shapes to measure the doses of different types of irradiation techniques. Comparison of measured and calculated dose distributions for IMRT can be made by using gamma analysis. In this study, 10 head-and-neck IMRT QA plans were created with Varian Eclipse 8.9 treatment planning system. Water equivalent RW3-slab phantoms, Octavius-2 phantom and PTW Seven29 2D-array were used for QA measurements. Gantry, collimator and couch positions set to 00 and QA plans were delivered to RW3 and Octavius phantoms. Then the positions set to original angles and QA plans irradiated again. Measured and calculated fluence maps were evaluated with gamma analysis for different DD and DTA criteria. The effect of different set-up conditions for RW3 and Octavius phantoms in QA plan delivery evaluated by gamma analysis. Results of gamma analysis show that using RW3-slab phantoms with setting parameters to 00 is more appropriate for IMRT QA.

  20. Dosimetric comparison of tools for intensity modulated radiation therapy with gamma analysis: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbas, Ugur; Okutan, Murat; Demir, Bayram; Koksal, Canan

    2015-07-01

    Dosimetry of the Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is very important because of the complex dose distributions. Diode arrays are the most common and practical measurement tools for clinical usage for IMRT. Phantom selection is critical for QA process. IMRT treatment plans are recalculated for the phantom irradiation in QA. Phantoms are made in different geometrical shapes to measure the doses of different types of irradiation techniques. Comparison of measured and calculated dose distributions for IMRT can be made by using gamma analysis. In this study, 10 head-and-neck IMRT QA plans were created with Varian Eclipse 8.9 treatment planning system. Water equivalent RW3-slab phantoms, Octavius-2 phantom and PTW Seven29 2D-array were used for QA measurements. Gantry, collimator and couch positions set to 00 and QA plans were delivered to RW3 and Octavius phantoms. Then the positions set to original angles and QA plans irradiated again. Measured and calculated fluence maps were evaluated with gamma analysis for different DD and DTA criteria. The effect of different set-up conditions for RW3 and Octavius phantoms in QA plan delivery evaluated by gamma analysis. Results of gamma analysis show that using RW3-slab phantoms with setting parameters to 00 is more appropriate for IMRT QA.

  1. Risk of second malignant neoplasm following proton versus intensity-modulated photon radiotherapies for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, Phillip J.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Krishnan, Sunil; Scarboro, Sarah B.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2010-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the sixth most common cancer in the world, is a global health concern. Radiotherapy for HCC is uncommon, largely because of the likelihood of radiation-induced liver disease, an acute side effect that is often fatal. Proton beam therapy (PBT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may offer HCC patients a better option for treating the diseased liver tissue while largely sparing the surrounding tissues, especially the non-tumor liver. However, even advanced radiotherapies carry a risk of late effects, including second malignant neoplasms (SMNs). It is unclear whether PBT or IMRT confers less risk of an SMN than the other. The purpose of this study was to compare the predicted risk of developing an SMN for a patient with HCC between PBT and IMRT. For both treatments, radiation doses in organs and tissues from primary radiation were determined using a treatment planning system; doses in organs and tissues from stray radiation from PBT were determined using Monte Carlo simulations and from IMRT using thermo-luminescent dosimeter measurements. Risk models of SMN incidence were taken from the literature. The predicted absolute lifetime attributable risks of SMN incidence were 11.4% after PBT and 19.2% after IMRT. The results of this study suggest that using proton beams instead of photon beams for radiotherapy may reduce the risk of SMN incidence for some HCC patients.

  2. Extrapleural pneumonectomy, photodynamic therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Kevin L; Both, Stefan; Friedberg, Joseph S; Rengan, Ramesh; Hahn, Stephen M; Cengel, Keith A

    2010-09-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has recently been proposed for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Here, we describe our experience with a multimodality approach for the treatment of mesothelioma, incorporating extrapleural pneumonectomy, intraoperative photodynamic therapy and postoperative hemithoracic IMRT. From 2004-2007, we treated 11 MPM patients with hemithoracic IMRT, 7 of whom had undergone porfimer sodium-mediated PDT as an intraoperative adjuvant to surgical debulking. The median radiation dose to the planning treatment volume (PTV) ranged from 45.4-54.5 Gy. For the contralateral lung, V20 ranged from 1.4-28.5%, V5 from 42-100% and MLD from 6.8-16.5 Gy. In our series, 1 patient experienced respiratory failure secondary to radiation pneumonitis that did not require mechanical ventilation. Multimodality therapy combining surgery with increased doses of radiation using IMRT, and newer treatment modalities such as PDT , appears safe. Future prospective analysis will be needed to demonstrate efficacy of this approach in the treatment of malignant mesothelioma. Efforts to reduce lung toxicity and improve dose delivery are needed and provide the promise of improved local control and quality of life in a carefully chosen multidisciplinary approach.

  3. An open-loop RFOG based on harmonic division technique to suppress LD's intensity modulation noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Diqing; Wang, Zeyu; Mao, Jianmin; Jin, Zhonghe

    2016-11-01

    A harmonic division technique is proposed for an open-loop resonator fiber optic gyro (RFOG) to suppress semiconductor laser diode's (LD's) intensity modulation noise. The theoretical study indicates the RFOG with this technique is immune to the intensity noise. The simulation and experimental results show this technique would lead to a diminished linear region, which still could be acceptable for an RFOG applied to low rotation rate detection. The tests for the gyro output signal are carried out with/without noise suppressing methods, including the harmonic division technique and previously proposed signal compensation technique. With the harmonic division technique at the rotation rate of 10 deg/s, the stability of gyro output signal is improved from 1.07 deg/s to 0.0361 deg/s, whose noise suppressing ratio is more than 3 times as that of the signal compensation technique. And especially, a 3.12 deg/s signal jump is significantly removed with the harmonic division technique; in contrast, a residual 0.36 deg/s signal jump still exists with the signal compensation technique. It is concluded the harmonic division technique does work in intensity noise suppressing under dynamic condition, and it is superior to the signal compensation technique.

  4. Capacity Bounds and High-SNR Capacity of MIMO Intensity-Modulation Optical Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas

    2017-06-01

    The capacity of the intensity modulation direct detection multiple-input multiple-output channel is studied. Therein, the nonnegativity constraint of the transmit signal limits the applicability of classical schemes, including precoding. Thus, new ways are required for deriving capacity lower and upper bounds for this channel. To this end, capacity lower bounds are developed by deriving the achievable rates of two precoding-free schemes: Channel inversion and QR decomposition. The achievable rate of a DC-offset SVD-based scheme is also derived as a benchmark. Then, capacity upper bounds are derived and compared against the lower bounds. As a result, the capacity at high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is characterized for the case where the number of transmit apertures is not larger than the number of receive apertures, and is shown to be achievable by the QR decomposition scheme. This is shown for a channel with average intensity or peak intensity constraints. For a channel with both constraints, the high-SNR capacity is approximated within a small gap. Extensions to a channel with more transmit apertures than receive apertures are discussed, and capacity bounds for this case are derived.

  5. [Vestibular disorders and nausea during head and neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, É; Righini, C A; Chamorey, E; Villa, J; Atallah, I; Reyt, É; Coffre, A; Schmerber, S

    2016-06-01

    We studied whether there is a relationship between nausea and vestibular disorders in patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. We performed a prospective single-centre study that enrolled 31 patients. A videonystagmography was carried out before and within 15 days after radiation therapy for each patient. Nausea was assessed at baseline, every week, and at the post-radiotherapy videonystagmography visit. Twenty-six patients had benefited from a complete interpretable videonystagmography. For 14 of these patients vestibular damage was diagnosed post-radiotherapy. During irradiation, six patients felt nauseous, but without dizziness. In univariate analysis, we found a relationship statistically significant between the average dose received by the vestibules and vestibular disorder videonystagmography (P=0.001, odds ratio [OR]: 1.08 [1.025-.138]), but there was no relationship between vestibular disorder videonystagmography and nausea (P=0.701). Irradiation of the vestibular system during IMRT does not seem to explain the nausea. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of scanning LIMM (Laser Intensity Modulation Method) to characterise polarisation variability in dielectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Mark; Cain, Markys, E-mail: mark.stewart@npl.co.u [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-01

    The Laser Intensity Modulation Method (LIMM) has traditionally been used to characterise the depth dependence of polarisation of piezoelectric materials{sup 1}. Although the technique is simple, it is difficult to extract the polarisation / depth data from the measured pyroelectric current because of the complex mathematics pertaining to the physics of the technique. However, the laser probe may still be used as a comparative or qualitative tool in mapping out the polarisation across the surface of a material. A novel scanning LIMM system has been developed to map the variation in piezoelectric activity across a range of samples. The system has been upgraded with a galvanometer mirror scanner to increase speed and reduce sensitivity to acoustic noise. The improvements are discussed and tested on a range of case studies. The technique can be used to show differences in piezoelectric activity caused by features such as inhomogeneous material composition, porosity and mechanical damage. The method has application as a quality control tool for materials and device manufacturers.

  7. Impact of machines on plan quality: volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, S; Cozzolino, M; Oliviero, C; Fiorentino, A; Chiumento, C; Fusco, V

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of different machines on plan quality using both intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) techniques. Eight patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx were selected at random. Plans were computed for IMRT and VMAT Smart Arc, using Pinnacle TPS for an Elekta (IMRT-E, VMAT-E) and Varian linac (IMRT-V, VMAT-V). A three-dose level prescription was used to deliver 70, 63 and 58.1 Gy to regions of macroscopic, microscopic high- and low-risk disease, respectively. All doses were given in 35 fractions. Comparisons were performed on dose-volume histogram data, monitor units (MU), and delivery time. VMAT-E plans resulted slightly MU efficient (-24 % p delivery time (-19 % p < 0.05) compared to IMRT-E. All the delivery techniques resulted in equivalent target coverage in terms of D(98) % and D(2) %. For VMAT technique, a significant improvement of 7 % in homogeneity index (HI) for PTV58.1 was observed for Varian machine. A slight improvement in OARs sparing was observed with Elekta machine both for IMRT and VMAT techniques. Similar plan quality was observed for Elekta and Varian linacs, significant differences were observed in delivery efficiency, as MU number and delivery times, in favor of Elekta and Varian, respectively.

  8. Meningioma Causing Visual Impairment: Outcomes and Toxicity After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maclean, Jillian, E-mail: jillian.maclean@uclh.nhs.uk [Radiotherapy Department, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Fersht, Naomi [Radiotherapy Department, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Bremner, Fion [Neuro-Ophthalmology Department, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom); Stacey, Chris; Sivabalasingham, Suganya [Radiotherapy Department, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Short, Susan [Radiotherapy Department, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, St James University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate ophthalmologic outcomes and toxicity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with meningiomas causing visual deficits. Methods and Materials: A prospective observational study with formal ophthalmologic and clinical assessment of 30 consecutive cases of meningioma affecting vision treated with IMRT from 2007 to 2011. Prescriptions were 50.4 Gy to mean target dose in 28 daily fractions. The median follow-up time was 28 months. Twenty-six meningiomas affected the anterior visual pathway (including 3 optic nerve sheath meningiomas); 4 were posterior to the chiasm. Results: Vision improved objectively in 12 patients (40%). Improvements were in visual field (5/16 patients), color vision (4/9 patients), acuity (1/15 patients), extraocular movements (3/11 patients), ptosis (1/5 patients), and proptosis (2/6 patients). No predictors of clinical response were found. Two patients had minor reductions in tumor dimensions on magnetic resonance imaging, 1 patient had radiological progression, and the other patients were stable. One patient experienced grade 2 keratitis, 1 patient had a minor visual field loss, and 5 patients had grade 1 dry eye. Conclusion: IMRT is an effective method for treating meningiomas causing ophthalmologic deficits, and toxicity is minimal. Thorough ophthalmologic assessment is important because clinical responses often occur in the absence of radiological change.

  9. Risk of second malignant neoplasm following proton versus intensity-modulated photon radiotherapies for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taddei, Phillip J; Howell, Rebecca M; Krishnan, Sunil; Scarboro, Sarah B; Mirkovic, Dragan; Newhauser, Wayne D, E-mail: ptaddei@mdanderson.or [Division of Radiation Oncology, Unit 1202, University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2010-12-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the sixth most common cancer in the world, is a global health concern. Radiotherapy for HCC is uncommon, largely because of the likelihood of radiation-induced liver disease, an acute side effect that is often fatal. Proton beam therapy (PBT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may offer HCC patients a better option for treating the diseased liver tissue while largely sparing the surrounding tissues, especially the non-tumor liver. However, even advanced radiotherapies carry a risk of late effects, including second malignant neoplasms (SMNs). It is unclear whether PBT or IMRT confers less risk of an SMN than the other. The purpose of this study was to compare the predicted risk of developing an SMN for a patient with HCC between PBT and IMRT. For both treatments, radiation doses in organs and tissues from primary radiation were determined using a treatment planning system; doses in organs and tissues from stray radiation from PBT were determined using Monte Carlo simulations and from IMRT using thermo-luminescent dosimeter measurements. Risk models of SMN incidence were taken from the literature. The predicted absolute lifetime attributable risks of SMN incidence were 11.4% after PBT and 19.2% after IMRT. The results of this study suggest that using proton beams instead of photon beams for radiotherapy may reduce the risk of SMN incidence for some HCC patients.

  10. Adjuvant radiotherapy for gallbladder cancer: A dosimetric comparison of conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Nan Sun; Qi Wang; Ben-Xing Gu; Yan-Hong Zhu; Jian-Bin Hu; Guo-Zhi Shi; Shu Zheng

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of conformal radiotherapy (CRT) and compare with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of gallbladder cancer.METHODS: Between November 2003 and January 2010, 20 patients with gallbladder cancer were treated with CRT with or without chemotherapy after surgical resection. Preliminary survival data were collected and examined using both Kaplan-Meier and actuarial analysis. Demographic and treatment parameters were collected. All patients were planned to receive 46-56 Gy in 1.8 or 2.0 Gy per fraction. CRT planning was compared with IMRT.RESULTS: The most common reported acute toxicities requiring medication (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade2) were nausea (10/20 patients) and diarrhea (3/20).There were no treatment-related deaths. Compared with CRT planning, IMRT significantly reduced the volume of right kidney receiving > 20 Gy and the volume of liver receiving > 30 Gy. IMRT has a negligible impact on the volume of left kidney receiving > 20 Gy. The 95% of prescribed dose for a planning tumor volume using either 3D CRT or IMRT planning were 84.0% ±6.7%, 82.9% ± 6.1%, respectively (P > 0.05).CONCLUSION: IMRT achieves similar excellent target coverage as compared with CRT planning, while reducingthe mean liver dose and volume above threshold dose. IMRT offers better sparing of the right kidney compared with CRT planning, with a significantly lower mean dose and volume above threshold dose.

  11. Including robustness in multi-criteria optimization for intensity-modulated proton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wei; Trofimov, Alexei; Madden, Thomas; Kooy, Hanne; Bortfeld, Thomas; Craft, David

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to include robustness into a multi-criteria optimization (MCO) framework for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The approach allows one to simultaneously explore the trade-off between different objectives as well as the trade-off between robustness and nominal plan quality. In MCO, a database of plans each emphasizing different treatment planning objectives, is pre-computed to approximate the Pareto surface. An IMPT treatment plan that strikes the best balance between the different objectives can be selected by navigating on the Pareto surface. In our approach, robustness is integrated into MCO by adding robustified objectives and constraints to the MCO problem. Uncertainties of the robust problem are modeled by pre-calculated dose-influence matrices for a nominal scenario and a number of pre-defined error scenarios. A robustified objective represents the worst objective function value that can be realized for any of the error scenarios. The optimization method is based on a linear...

  12. SU-E-P-18: Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, W; Qiao, X; Zhou, Z; Song, Y; Zhang, R; Zhen, C [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the outcomes and prognostic factors of cervical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: Thirty-seven patients with cervical esophageal SCC treated with IMRT were analyzed retrospectively. They received 54–66 Gy in 27–32 fractions. Nineteen patients received concurrent (n=12) or sequential (n=7) platinum-based two drugs chemoradiotherapy. Overall survival (OS), local control rates (LCR) and prognostic factors were evaluated. Acute toxicities and patterns of first failures were observed. Results: The median follow-up was 46 months for alive patients. The l-, 3-, 4- and 5-year OS of the all patients were 83.8%, 59.1%, 47.5% and 32.6% respectively. The median survival time was 46 months. The l-, 3-,4- and 5-year LCR were 82.9%, 63.0%, 54.5% and 54.5%, respectively. Univariate and Multivariate analysis all showed that size of GTV was an independent prognostic factor (p=0.033, p=0.039). There were no patients with Grade 3 acute radiation esophagitis and Grade 2–4 acute pneumonitis. The local failure accounted for 70.0% of all treatment-related failures. Conclusion: IMRT is safe and effective in the treatment of cervical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Size of GTV is an independent prognostic factor. Local failure still remains the main reason of treatment failures. The authors declare no conflicts of interest in preparing this article.

  13. A nested partitions framework for beam angle optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Souza, Warren D; Nazareth, Daryl P [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhang, Hao H; Shi Leyuan [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Meyer, Robert R [Computer Sciences Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)], E-mail: dsouzaw@ohsu.edu

    2008-06-21

    Coupling beam angle optimization with dose optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) increases the size and complexity of an already large-scale combinatorial optimization problem. We have developed a novel algorithm, nested partitions (NP), that is capable of finding suitable beam angle sets by guiding the dose optimization process. NP is a metaheuristic that is flexible enough to guide the search of a heuristic or deterministic dose optimization algorithm. The NP method adaptively samples from the entire feasible region, or search space, and coordinates the sampling effort with a systematic partitioning of the feasible region at successive iterations, concentrating the search in promising subsets. We used a 'warm-start' approach by initiating NP with beam angle samples derived from an integer programming (IP) model. In this study, we describe our implementation of the NP framework with a commercial optimization algorithm. We compared the NP framework with equi-spaced beam angle selection, the IP method, greedy heuristic and random sampling heuristic methods. The results of the NP approach were evaluated using two clinical cases (head and neck and whole pelvis) involving the primary tumor and nodal volumes. Our results show that NP produces better quality solutions than the alternative considered methods.

  14. A nested partitions framework for beam angle optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Warren D.; Zhang, Hao H.; Nazareth, Daryl P.; Shi, Leyuan; Meyer, Robert R.

    2008-06-01

    Coupling beam angle optimization with dose optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) increases the size and complexity of an already large-scale combinatorial optimization problem. We have developed a novel algorithm, nested partitions (NP), that is capable of finding suitable beam angle sets by guiding the dose optimization process. NP is a metaheuristic that is flexible enough to guide the search of a heuristic or deterministic dose optimization algorithm. The NP method adaptively samples from the entire feasible region, or search space, and coordinates the sampling effort with a systematic partitioning of the feasible region at successive iterations, concentrating the search in promising subsets. We used a 'warm-start' approach by initiating NP with beam angle samples derived from an integer programming (IP) model. In this study, we describe our implementation of the NP framework with a commercial optimization algorithm. We compared the NP framework with equi-spaced beam angle selection, the IP method, greedy heuristic and random sampling heuristic methods. The results of the NP approach were evaluated using two clinical cases (head and neck and whole pelvis) involving the primary tumor and nodal volumes. Our results show that NP produces better quality solutions than the alternative considered methods.

  15. Improved planning time and plan quality through multicriteria optimization for intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, David L; Hong, Theodore S; Shih, Helen A; Bortfeld, Thomas R

    2012-01-01

    To test whether multicriteria optimization (MCO) can reduce treatment planning time and improve plan quality in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Ten IMRT patients (5 with glioblastoma and 5 with locally advanced pancreatic cancers) were logged during the standard treatment planning procedure currently in use at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Planning durations and other relevant planning information were recorded. In parallel, the patients were planned using an MCO planning system, and similar planning time data were collected. The patients were treated with the standard plan, but each MCO plan was also approved by the physicians. Plans were then blindly reviewed 3 weeks after planning by the treating physician. In all cases, the treatment planning time was vastly shorter for the MCO planning (average MCO treatment planning time was 12 min; average standard planning time was 135 min). The physician involvement time in the planning process increased from an average of 4.8 min for the standard process to 8.6 min for the MCO process. In all cases, the MCO plan was blindly identified as the superior plan. This provides the first concrete evidence that MCO-based planning is superior in terms of both planning efficiency and dose distribution quality compared with the current trial and error-based IMRT planning approach. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Random and systematic beam modulator errors in dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsai, Homayon [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Cho, Paul S [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Phillips, Mark H [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Giansiracusa, Robert S [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Axen, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2003-05-07

    This paper reports on the dosimetric effects of random and systematic modulator errors in delivery of dynamic intensity modulated beams. A sliding-widow type delivery that utilizes a combination of multileaf collimators (MLCs) and backup diaphragms was examined. Gaussian functions with standard deviations ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 mm were used to simulate random positioning errors. A clinical example involving a clival meningioma was chosen with optic chiasm and brain stem as limiting critical structures in the vicinity of the tumour. Dose calculations for different modulator fluctuations were performed, and a quantitative analysis was carried out based on cumulative and differential dose volume histograms for the gross target volume and surrounding critical structures. The study indicated that random modulator errors have a strong tendency to reduce minimum target dose and homogeneity. Furthermore, it was shown that random perturbation of both MLCs and backup diaphragms in the order of {sigma} = 1 mm can lead to 5% errors in prescribed dose. In comparison, when MLCs or backup diaphragms alone was perturbed, the system was more robust and modulator errors of at least {sigma} = 1.5 mm were required to cause dose discrepancies greater than 5%. For systematic perturbation, even errors in the order of {+-}0.5 mm were shown to result in significant dosimetric deviations.

  17. Validation of a track repeating algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy: clinical cases study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes, Pablo P.; Eley, John G.; Liu, Amy; Mirkovic, Dragan; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Titt, Uwe; Mohan, Radhe

    2016-04-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are acknowledged as the most accurate technique to calculate dose distributions. However, due its lengthy calculation times, they are difficult to utilize in the clinic or for large retrospective studies. Track-repeating algorithms, based on MC-generated particle track data in water, accelerate dose calculations substantially, while essentially preserving the accuracy of MC. In this study, we present the validation of an efficient dose calculation algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy, the fast dose calculator (FDC), based on a track-repeating technique. We validated the FDC algorithm for 23 patients, which included 7 brain, 6 head-and-neck, 5 lung, 1 spine, 1 pelvis and 3 prostate cases. For validation, we compared FDC-generated dose distributions with those from a full-fledged Monte Carlo based on GEANT4 (G4). We compared dose-volume-histograms, 3D-gamma-indices and analyzed a series of dosimetric indices. More than 99% of the voxels in the voxelized phantoms describing the patients have a gamma-index smaller than unity for the 2%/2 mm criteria. In addition the difference relative to the prescribed dose between the dosimetric indices calculated with FDC and G4 is less than 1%. FDC reduces the calculation times from 5 ms per proton to around 5 μs.

  18. Direct-aperture optimization applied to selection of beam orientations in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, J. L.; Webb, S.

    2007-01-01

    Direct-aperture optimization (DAO) was applied to iterative beam-orientation selection in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), so as to ensure a realistic segmental treatment plan at each iteration. Nested optimization engines dealt separately with gantry angles, couch angles, collimator angles, segment shapes, segment weights and wedge angles. Each optimization engine performed a random search with successively narrowing step sizes. For optimization of segment shapes, the filtered backprojection (FBP) method was first used to determine desired fluence, the fluence map was segmented, and then constrained direct-aperture optimization was used thereafter. Segment shapes were fully optimized when a beam angle was perturbed, and minimally re-optimized otherwise. The algorithm was compared with a previously reported method using FBP alone at each orientation iteration. An example case consisting of a cylindrical phantom with a hemi-annular planning target volume (PTV) showed that for three-field plans, the method performed better than when using FBP alone, but for five or more fields, neither method provided much benefit over equally spaced beams. For a prostate case, improved bladder sparing was achieved through the use of the new algorithm. A plan for partial scalp treatment showed slightly improved PTV coverage and lower irradiated volume of brain with the new method compared to FBP alone. It is concluded that, although the method is computationally intensive and not suitable for searching large unconstrained regions of beam space, it can be used effectively in conjunction with prior class solutions to provide individually optimized IMRT treatment plans.

  19. Layered ACO-OFDM for intensity-modulated direct-detection optical wireless transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Qian, Chen; Guo, Xuhan; Wang, Zhaocheng; Cunningham, David G; White, Ian H

    2015-05-04

    Layered asymmetrically clipped optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (ACO-OFDM) with high spectral efficiency is proposed in this paper for optical wireless transmission employing intensity modulation with direct detection. In contrast to the conventional ACO-OFDM, which only utilizes odd subcarriers for modulation, leading to an obvious spectral efficiency loss, in layered ACO-OFDM, the subcarriers are divided into different layers and modulated by different kinds of ACO-OFDM, which are combined for simultaneous transmission. In this way, more subcarriers are used for data transmission and the spectral efficiency is improved. An iterative receiver is also proposed for layered ACO-OFDM, where the negative clipping distortion of each layer is subtracted once it is detected so that the signals from different layers can be recovered. Theoretical analysis shows that the proposed scheme can improve the spectral efficiency by up to 2 times compared with conventional ACO-OFDM approaches with the same modulation order. Meanwhile, simulation results confirm a considerable signal-to-noise ratio gain over ACO-OFDM at the same spectral efficiency.

  20. Organisational standards for the delivery of intensity-modulated radiation therapy in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, A; Warde, P; Sharpe, M; Oliver, T K; Bak, K; Leszczynski, K; Etheridge, S; Fleming, K; Gutierrez, E; Favell, L; Green, E

    2009-04-01

    By minimising the effect of irradiation on surrounding tissue, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can deliver higher, more effective doses to the targeted tumour site, minimising treatment-related morbidity and possibly improving cancer control and cure. A multidisciplinary IMRT Expert Panel was convened to develop the organisational standards for the delivery of IMRT. The systematic literature search used MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database, the National Guidelines Clearing House and the Health Technology Assessment Database. An environmental scan of unpublished literature used the Google search engine to review the websites of key organisations, cancer agencies/centres and vendor sites in Canada, the USA, Australia and Europe. In total, 22 relevant guidance documents were identified; 12 from the published literature and 10 from the environmental scan. Professional and organisational standards for the provision of IMRT were developed through the analysis of this evidence and the consensus opinion of the IMRT Expert Panel. The resulting standards address the following domains: planning of new IMRT programmes, practice setting requirements, tools, devices and equipment requirements; professional training requirements; role of personnel; and requirements for quality assurance and safety. Here the IMRT Expert Panel offers organisational and professional standards for the delivery of IMRT, with the intent of promoting innovation, improving access and enhancing patient care.

  1. Analysis of Factors Influencing the Development of Xerostomia during Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Ken; Stevens, Jason; Yepes, Juan Fernando; Randall, Marcus E.; Kudrimoti, Mahesh; Feddock, Jonathan; Xi, Jing; Kryscio, Richard J.; Miller, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Factors influencing xerostomia during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were assessed. METHODS A 6-week study of 32 head and neck cancer (HNC) patients was performed. Subjects completed the Xerostomia Inventory (XI) and provided stimulated saliva (SS) at baseline, week two and at end of IMRT. Influence of SS flow rate (SSFR), calcium and mucin 5b (MUC5b) concentrations and radiation dose on xerostomia was determined. RESULTS HNC subjects experienced mean SSFR decline of 36% by visit two (N=27; p=0.012) and 57% by visit three (N=20; p=0.0004), Concentrations of calcium and MUC5b increased, but not significantly during IMRT (p>0.05). Xerostomia correlated most with decreasing salivary flow rate as determined by Spearman correlations (p<0.04) and linear mixed models (p<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS Although IMRT is sparing to the parotid glands, it has an early effect on SSFR and the constituents in saliva in a manner that is associated with the perception of xerostomia. PMID:23523462

  2. Intensity modulated radiation therapy with field rotation--a time-varying fractionation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dink, Delal; Langer, Mark P; Rardin, Ronald L; Pekny, Joseph F; Reklaitis, Gintaras V; Saka, Behlul

    2012-06-01

    This paper proposes a novel mathematical approach to the beam selection problem in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning. The approach allows more beams to be used over the course of therapy while limiting the number of beams required in any one session. In the proposed field rotation method, several sets of beams are interchanged throughout the treatment to allow a wider selection of beam angles than would be possible with fixed beam orientations. The choice of beamlet intensities and the number of identical fractions for each set are determined by a mixed integer linear program that controls jointly for the distribution per fraction and the cumulative dose distribution delivered to targets and critical structures. Trials showed the method allowed substantial increases in the dose objective and/or sparing of normal tissues while maintaining cumulative and fraction size limits. Trials for a head and neck site showed gains of 25%-35% in the objective (average tumor dose) and for a thoracic site gains were 7%-13%, depending on how strict the fraction size limits were set. The objective did not rise for a prostate site significantly, but the tolerance limits on normal tissues could be strengthened with the use of multiple beam sets.

  3. Shearing Wind Helicity and Thermal Wind Helicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Helicity is defined as H=V.ω, where V and ω are the velocity and vorticity vectors, respectively.Many works have pointed out that the larger the helicity is, the longer the life cycle of the weather system is. However, the direct relationship of the helicity to the evolution of the weather system is not quite clear. In this paper, the concept of helicity is generalized as shearing wind helicity (SWH). Dynamically,it is found that the average SWH is directly related to the increase of the average cyclonic rotation of the weather system. Physically, it is also pointed out that the SWH, as a matter of fact, is the sum of the torsion terms and the divergence term in the vorticity equation. Thermal wind helicity (TWH), as a derivative of SWH, is also discussed here because it links the temperature field and the vertical wind field. These two quantities may be effective for diagnosing a weather system. This paper applies these two quantities in cylindrical coordinates to study the development of Hurricane Andrew to validate their practical use. Through analyzing the hurricane, it is found that TWH can well describe the characteristics of the hurricane such as the strong convection and release of latent heat. SWH is not only a good quantity for diagnosing the weather system, but also an effective one for diagnosing the development of the hurricane.

  4. Modeling and Validation of Performance Limitations for the Optimal Design of Interferometric and Intensity-Modulated Fiber Optic Displacement Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moro, Erik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-07

    Optical fiber sensors offer advantages over traditional electromechanical sensors, making them particularly well-suited for certain measurement applications. Generally speaking, optical fiber sensors respond to a desired measurand through modulation of an optical signal's intensity, phase, or wavelength. Practically, non-contacting fiber optic displacement sensors are limited to intensity-modulated and interferometric (or phase-modulated) methodologies. Intensity-modulated fiber optic displacement sensors relate target displacement to a power measurement. The simplest intensity-modulated sensor architectures are not robust to environmental and hardware fluctuations, since such variability may cause changes in the measured power level that falsely indicate target displacement. Differential intensity-modulated sensors have been implemented, offering robustness to such intensity fluctuations, and the speed of these sensors is limited only by the combined speed of the photodetection hardware and the data acquisition system (kHz-MHz). The primary disadvantages of intensity-modulated sensing are the relatively low accuracy (?m-mm for low-power sensors) and the lack of robustness, which consequently must be designed, often with great difficulty, into the sensor's architecture. White light interferometric displacement sensors, on the other hand, offer increased accuracy and robustness. Unlike their monochromatic-interferometer counterparts, white light interferometric sensors offer absolute, unambiguous displacement measurements over large displacement ranges (cm for low-power, 5 mW, sources), necessitating no initial calibration, and requiring no environmental or feedback control. The primary disadvantage of white light interferometric displacement sensors is that their utility in dynamic testing scenarios is limited, both by hardware bandwidth and by their inherent high-sensitivity to Doppler-effects. The decision of whether to use either an intensity-modulated

  5. Three dimensional intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT): Dosimetry algorithm and inverse treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Niko [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Oklahoma University Health Science Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73104 (United States); Cancer Therapy and Research Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The feasibility of intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) to improve dose conformity for irregularly shaped targets has been previously investigated by researchers by means of using partially shielded sources. However, partial shielding does not fully explore the potential of IMBT. The goal of this study is to introduce the concept of three dimensional (3D) intensity modulated brachytherapy and solve two fundamental issues regarding the application of 3D IMBT treatment planning: The dose calculation algorithm and the inverse treatment planning method. Methods: A 3D IMBT treatment planning system prototype was developed using the MATLAB platform. This system consists of three major components: (1) A comprehensive IMBT source calibration method with dosimetric inputs from Monte Carlo (EGSnrc) simulations; (2) a ''modified TG-43'' (mTG-43) dose calculation formalism for IMBT dosimetry; and (3) a physical constraint based inverse IMBT treatment planning platform utilizing a simulated annealing optimization algorithm. The model S700 Axxent electronic brachytherapy source developed by Xoft, Inc. (Fremont, CA), was simulated in this application. Ten intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) cases were studied. For each case, an ''isotropic plan'' with only optimized source dwell time and a fully optimized IMBT plan were generated and compared to the original plan in various dosimetric aspects, such as the plan quality, planning, and delivery time. The issue of the mechanical complexity of the IMBT applicator is not addressed in this study. Results: IMBT approaches showed superior plan quality compared to the original plans and the isotropic plans to different extents in all studied cases. An extremely difficult case with a small breast and a small distance to the ribs and skin, the IMBT plan minimized the high dose volume V{sub 200} by 16.1% and 4.8%, respectively, compared to the original and the

  6. Intensity Modulated Radiation Treatment of Prostate Cancer Guided by High Field MR Spectroscopic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    for radiation treatment planning. Med Phys 2003;30:88–97. 9. Vedam SS, Keall PJ, Kini VR, Mostafavi H, Shukla HP, Mohan R. Acquiring a four-dimensional...G.; Shukla , H.; et al. Acquiring 4D thoracic CT scans using a multislice helical method. Phys. Med. Biol. 49:2053–67; 2004. 66. Low. D.A.; Nystrom...Phys 1983;10:410–5. 18. Schultheiss TE, Orton CG. Models in radiotherapy : definition of decision criteria. Med Phys 1985;12:183–7. 19. Martel MK

  7. Toxicity after post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy using Australian guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Stephen; Aherne, Noel J; Last, Andrew; Assareh, Hassan; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2017-06-17

    We evaluated single institution toxicity outcomes after post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT) via image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) with implanted fiducial markers following national eviQ guidelines, for which late toxicity outcomes have not been published. Prospectively collected toxicity data were retrospectively reviewed for 293 men who underwent 64-66 Gy IG-IMRT to the prostate bed between 2007 and 2015. Median follow-up after PPRT was 39 months. Baseline grade ≥2 genitourinary (GU), gastrointestinal (GI) and sexual toxicities were 20.5%, 2.7% and 43.7%, respectively, reflecting ongoing toxicity after radical prostatectomy. Incidence of new (compared to baseline) acute grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity was 5.8% and 10.6%, respectively. New late grade ≥2 GU, GI and sexual toxicity occurred in 19.1%, 4.7% and 20.2%, respectively. However, many patients also experienced improvements in toxicities. For this reason, prevalence of grade ≥2 GU, GI and sexual toxicities 4 years after PPRT was similar to or lower than baseline (21.7%, 2.6% and 17.4%, respectively). There were no grade ≥4 toxicities. Post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT using Australian contouring guidelines appears to have tolerable acute and late toxicity. The 4-year prevalence of grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity was virtually unchanged compared to baseline, and sexual toxicity improved over baseline. This should reassure radiation oncologists following these guidelines. Late toxicity rates of surgery and PPRT are higher than following definitive IG-IMRT, and this should be taken into account if patients are considering surgery and likely to require PPRT. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  8. Intensity modulated radiation therapy and chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: Results of feasibility study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Rui Bai; Guo-Hua Wu; Wei-Jian Guo; Xu-Dong Wu; Yuan Yao; Yin Chen; Ren-Hua Zhou; Dong-Qin Lu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore whether intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in combination with chemotherapy could increase radiation dose to gross tumor volume without severe acute radiation related toxicity by decreasing the dose to the surrounding normal tissue in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer.METHODS: Twenty-one patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer were evaluated in this clinical trial,Patients would receive the dose of IMRT from 21Gy to 30Gy in 7 to 10 fractions within two weeks after conventional radiotherapy of 30Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks. The total escalation tumor dose would be 51, 54,57, 60Gy, respectively. 5-fluororacil (5-FU) or gemcitabine was given concurrently with radiotherapy during the treatment course.RESULTS: Sixteen patients who had completed the radiotherapy plan with doses of 51Gy (3 cases), 54Gy (3 cases), 57Gy (3 cases) and 60Gy (7 cases) were included for evaluation. The median levels of CA19-9 prior to and after radiotherapy were 716 U/ml and 255 U/ml respectively (P<0.001) in 13 patients who demonstrated high levels of CA19-9 before radiotherapy. Fourteen patients who suffered from pain could reduce at least 1/3-1/2 amount of analgesic intake and 5 among these patients got complete relief of pain. Ten patients improved in Kamofsky performance status (KPS). The median follow-up period was 8 months and one-year survival rate was 35 %. No patient suffered more than grade Ⅲ acute toxicities induced by radiotherapy.CONCLUSION: Sixty Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks with late course IMRT technique combined with concurrent 5-FU chemotherapy can provide a definitely palliative benefit with tolerable acute radiation related toxicity for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

  9. Reduced Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelian, Jason M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Callister, Matthew D., E-mail: Callister.matthew@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Ashman, Jonathan B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Young-Fadok, Tonia M. [Division of Colorectal Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Borad, Mitesh J. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Gunderson, Leonard L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce dose to small bowel, bladder, and bone marrow compared with three-field conventional radiotherapy (CRT) technique in the treatment of rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using IMRT to treat rectal cancer and report patient clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of patients with rectal cancer who were treated at Mayo Clinic Arizona with pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, acute toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0, tumor response, and perioperative morbidity were collected. Results: From 2004 to August 2009, 92 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-one (66%) patients were treated with CRT, and 31 (34%) patients were treated with IMRT. All but 2 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. There was no significant difference in median dose (50.4 Gy, CRT; 50 Gy, IMRT), preoperative vs. postoperative treatment, type of concurrent chemotherapy, or history of previous pelvic RT between the CRT and IMRT patient groups. Patients who received IMRT had significantly less gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Sixty-two percent of patients undergoing CRT experienced {>=}Grade 2 acute GI side effects, compared with 32% among IMRT patients (p = 0.006). The reduction in overall GI toxicity was attributable to fewer symptoms from the lower GI tract. Among CRT patients, {>=}Grade 2 diarrhea and enteritis was experienced among 48% and 30% of patients, respectively, compared with 23% (p = 0.02) and 10% (p = 0.015) among IMRT patients. There was no significant difference in hematologic or genitourinary acute toxicity between groups. In addition, pathologic complete response rates and postoperative morbidity between treatment groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: In the management of rectal cancer, IMRT is associated with a

  10. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Localized Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarty, Twisha; Crane, Christopher H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mansfield, Paul F. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Briere, Tina M.; Beddar, A. Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mok, Henry; Reed, Valerie K.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Das, Prajnan, E-mail: PrajDas@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate dosimetric parameters, acute toxicity, pathologic response, and local control in patients treated with preoperative intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for localized gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods: Between November 2007 and April 2010, 25 patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma were treated with induction chemotherapy, followed by preoperative IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy and, finally, surgical resection. The median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in 18 patients, capecitabine in 3, and other regimens in 4. Subsequently, resection was performed with total gastrectomy in 13 patients, subtotal gastrectomy in 7, and other surgeries in 5. Results: Target coverage, expressed as the ratio of the minimum dose received by 99% of the planning target volume to the prescribed dose, was a median of 0.97 (range, 0.92-1.01). The median V{sub 30} (percentage of volume receiving at least 30 Gy) for the liver was 26%; the median V{sub 20} (percentage of volume receiving at least 20 Gy) for the right and left kidneys was 14% and 24%, respectively; and the median V{sub 40} (percentage of volume receiving at least 40 Gy) for the heart was 18%. Grade 3 acute toxicity developed in 14 patients (56%), including dehydration in 10, nausea in 8, and anorexia in 5. Grade 4 acute toxicity did not develop in any patient. There were no significant differences in the rates of acute toxicity, hospitalization, or feeding tube use in comparison to those in a group of 50 patients treated with preoperative three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. R0 resection was obtained in 20 patients (80%), and pathologic complete response occurred in 5 (20%). Conclusions: Preoperative IMRT for gastric adenocarcinoma was well tolerated, accomplished excellent target coverage and normal structure sparing, and led to appropriate

  11. Dosimetric comparison using different multileaf collimeters in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for upper thoracic esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yuchuan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To study the impacts of multileaf collimators (MLC width [standard MLC width of 10 mm (sMLC and micro-MLC width of 4 mm (mMLC] in the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT planning for the upper thoracic esophageal cancer (UTEC. Methods and materials 10 patients with UTEC were retrospectively planned with the sMLC and the mMLC. The monitor unites (MUs and dose volume histogram-based parameters [conformity index (CI and homogeneous index (HI] were compared between the IMRT plans with sMLC and with mMLC. Results The IMRT plans with the mMLC were more efficient (average MUs: 703.1 ± 68.3 than plans with the sMLC (average MUs: 833.4 ± 73.8 (p p 5 (3260.3 ± 374.0 vs 3404.5 ± 374.4/gEUD (1815.1 ± 281.7 vs 1849.2 ± 297.6 of the spinal cord, the V10 (33.2 ± 6.5 vs 34.0 ± 6.7, V20 (16.0 ± 4.6 vs 16.6 ± 4.7, MLD (866.2 ± 174.1 vs 887.9 ± 172.1 and gEUD (938.6 ± 175.2 vs 956.8 ± 171.0 of the lungs were observed in the plans with the mMLC, respectively (p Conclusions Comparing to the sMLC, the mMLC not only demonstrated higher efficiencies and more optimal target coverage, but also considerably improved the dose sparing of OARs in the IMRT planning for UTEC.

  12. Hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hye Jin; Kay, Chul Seung; Son, Seok Hyun; Kim, Myung Soo; Jo, In Young; Lee, So Jung; Lee, Dong Hwan; Suh, Hong Jin; Choi, Yong Sun [Incheon St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this work was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with localized prostate cancer. Thirty-nine patients who received radical hypofractionated IMRT were retrospectively reviewed. Based on a pelvic lymph node involvement risk of 15% as the cutoff value, we decided whether to deliver treatment prostate and seminal vesicle only radiotherapy (PORT) or whole pelvis radiotherapy (WPRT). Sixteen patients (41%) received PORT with prostate receiving 45 Gy in 4.5 Gy per fraction in 2 weeks and the other 23 patients (59%) received WPRT with the prostate receiving 72 Gy in 2.4 Gy per fraction in 6 weeks. The median equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions to the prostate was 79.9 Gy based on the assumption that the α/β ratio is 1.5 Gy. The median follow-up time was 38 months (range, 4 to 101 months). The 3-year biochemical failure-free survival rate was 88.2%. The 3-year clinical failure-free and overall survival rates were 94.5% and 96.3%, respectively. The rates of grade 2 acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were 20.5% and 12.8%, respectively. None of the patients experienced grade ≥3 acute GU and GI toxicities. The grade 2-3 late GU and GI toxicities were found in 8.1% and 5.4% of patients, respectively. No fatal late toxicity was observed. Favorable biochemical control with low rates of toxicity was observed after hypofractionated IMRT, suggesting that our radiotherapy schedule can be an effective treatment option in the treatment of localized prostate cancer.

  13. Outcomes After Intensity-Modulated Versus Conformal Radiotherapy in Older Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekelman, Justin E., E-mail: bekelman@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mitra, Nandita [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Efstathiou, Jason [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Liao Kaijun [Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sunderland, Robert; Yeboa, Deborah N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Armstrong, Katrina [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: There is little evidence comparing complications after intensity-modulated (IMRT) vs. three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for prostate cancer. The study objective was to test the hypothesis that IMRT, compared with CRT, is associated with a reduction in bowel, urinary, and erectile complications in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We undertook an observational cohort study using registry and administrative claims data from the SEER-Medicare database. We identified men aged 65 years or older diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer in the United States between 2002 and 2004 who received IMRT (n = 5,845) or CRT (n = 6,753). The primary outcome was a composite measure of bowel complications. Secondary outcomes were composite measures of urinary and erectile complications. We also examined specific subsets of bowel (proctitis/hemorrhage) and urinary (cystitis/hematuria) events within the composite complication measures. Results: IMRT was associated with reductions in composite bowel complications (24-month cumulative incidence 18.8% vs. 22.5%; hazard ratio [HR] 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-0.93) and proctitis/hemorrhage (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.64-0.95). IMRT was not associated with rates of composite urinary complications (HR 0.93; 95% CI, 0.83-1.04) or cystitis/hematuria (HR 0.94; 95% CI, 0.83-1.07). The incidence of erectile complications involving invasive procedures was low and did not differ significantly between groups, although IMRT was associated with an increase in new diagnoses of impotence (HR 1.27, 95% CI, 1.14-1.42). Conclusion: IMRT is associated with a small reduction in composite bowel complications and proctitis/hemorrhage compared with CRT in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

  14. Perioperative intensity-modulated brachytherapy for refractory orbital rhabdomyosarcomas in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strege, Rainer Joachim; Mehdorn, Maximilian H. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany); Kovacs, Gyoergy [Interdisciplinary Brachytherapy Unit, Univ. Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Meyer, Jens Eduard [Dept. of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Univ. Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Holland, Detlef [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Univ. Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany); Claviez, Alexander [Dept. of Pediatrics, Univ. Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: to evaluate the feasibility and toxicity of perioperative intensity-modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) as well as functional outcome in children with therapy-refractory orbital rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS). Patients and methods: since 1993, children with therapy-refractory orbital RMS have been treated by a multidisciplinary approach combining function-preserving, mostly R1 tumor resection and perioperative IMBT at the University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. All children with orbital RMS, who were enrolled in this multidisciplinary treatment protocol between 1993 and 2002, were prospectively assessed with respect to evaluation of side effects and functional outcome. Results: ten children (six boys, four girls) were included. Median age was 6.5 years (range, 1-19 years) at the beginning of our treatment and 6.0 years (range 1-17 years) at diagnosis. All children were in Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group (IRSG) group III and had embryonal subtype. Estimated 5-year survival was 62% {+-} 18%. There was no radiation-related toxicity grade 3 or 4 observed. The eyes were primarily preserved in all cases. One child underwent secondary orbital exenteration 10 months after completion of IMBT. Visual acuity could be preserved apart from one child developing significant visual deterioration due to radiation cataract grade 2. The cosmetic results were good or very good in eight and moderate in two children. Four children died of their disease. Conclusion: this interdisciplinary, individually tailored and function-preserving treatment procedure has proven to be a well-tolerated therapeutic option in cases with refractory orbital RMS. It provides both improvement of local tumor control and quality of life. (orig.)

  15. Advanced intensity-modulation continuous-wave lidar techniques for ASCENDS CO2 column measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. W.; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-10-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  16. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for Column CO2 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Nehrir, A. R.; Obland, M. D.; Liu, Z.; Browell, E. V.; Chen, S.; Kooi, S. A.; Fan, T. F.

    2015-12-01

    Global and regional atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission and Atmospheric Carbon and Transport (ACT) - America airborne investigation are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are being investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space and airborne platforms to meet the mission science measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud returns. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of intervening optically thin clouds, thereby minimizing bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the Earth's surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques and provides very high (at sub-meter level) range resolution. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These techniques are used in a new data processing architecture to support the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) and ACT-America programs.

  17. Kilovoltage Intrafraction Monitoring for Prostate Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy: First Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Jin Aun [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School and Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Booth, Jeremy T. [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Poulsen, Per R.; Fledelius, Walther; Worm, Esben Schjodt [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, and Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University (Denmark); Eade, Thomas; Hegi, Fiona; Kneebone, Andrew [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Kuncic, Zdenka [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Keall, Paul J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School and Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Most linear accelerators purchased today are equipped with a gantry-mounted kilovoltage X-ray imager which is typically used for patient imaging prior to therapy. A novel application of the X-ray system is kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM), in which the 3-dimensional (3D) tumor position is determined during treatment. In this paper, we report on the first use of KIM in a prospective clinical study of prostate cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients with implanted fiducial markers undergoing conventionally fractionated IMAT (RapidArc) were enrolled in an ethics-approved study of KIM. KIM involves acquiring kV images as the gantry rotates around the patient during treatment. Post-treatment, markers in these images were segmented to obtain 2D positions. From the 2D positions, a maximum likelihood estimation of a probability density function was used to obtain 3D prostate trajectories. The trajectories were analyzed to determine the motion type and the percentage of time the prostate was displaced {>=}3, 5, 7, and 10 mm. Independent verification of KIM positional accuracy was performed using kV/MV triangulation. Results: KIM was performed for 268 fractions. Various prostate trajectories were observed (ie, continuous target drift, transient excursion, stable target position, persistent excursion, high-frequency excursions, and erratic behavior). For all patients, 3D displacements of {>=}3, 5, 7, and 10 mm were observed 5.6%, 2.2%, 0.7% and 0.4% of the time, respectively. The average systematic accuracy of KIM was measured at 0.46 mm. Conclusions: KIM for prostate IMAT was successfully implemented clinically for the first time. Key advantages of this method are (1) submillimeter accuracy, (2) widespread applicability, and (3) a low barrier to clinical implementation. A disadvantage is that KIM delivers additional imaging dose to the patient.

  18. Survival benefit of adding chemotherapy to intensity modulated radiation in patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemei Ji

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate the contribution of chemotherapy for patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC treated by intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and to identify the optimal combination treatment strategy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between 2006 and 2010, 276 patients with stage II-IVb NPC were treated by IMRT alone or IMRT plus chemotherapy. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy included neoadjuvant or concurrent, or neoadjuvant plus concurrent protocols. The IMRT alone and chemoradiotherapy groups were well-matched for prognostic factors, except N stage, with more advanced NPC in the chemoradiotherapy arm. RESULTS: With a mean follow-up of 33.8 months, the 3-year actuarial rates of overall survival (OS, metastasis-free survival (MFS, relapse-free survival (RFS, and disease-free survival (DFS were 90.3%, 84.2%, 80.3%, and 69.2% for all of the patients, respectively. Compared with the IMRT alone arm, patients treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy had a significantly better DFS (HR = 2.64; 95% CI, 1.12-6.22; P = 0.03, patients with neoadjuvant-concurrent chemoradiotherapy had a significant improvement in RFS and DFS (HR = 4.03; 95% CI, 1.35-12.05; P = 0.01 and HR = 2.43; 95% CI, 1.09-5.44; P = 0.03, neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy provided no significant benefit in OS, MFS, RFS, and DFS. Stage group and alcohol consumption were prognostic factors for OS and N stage was a significant predictor for DFS. CONCLUSIONS: Addition of concurrent or neoadjuvant-concurrent chemotherapy to IMRT is available to prolong RFS or DFS for locoregionally advanced NPC. Such work could be helpful to guide effective individualized therapy.

  19. Whole pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer: a preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Ji Hyeon; Kim, Yeon Joo; Kim, Young Seok [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2013-12-15

    To assess the clinical efficacy and toxicity of whole pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (WP-IMRT) for high-risk prostate cancer. Patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated between 2008 and 2013 were reviewed. The study included patients who had undergone WP-IMRT with image guidance using electronic portal imaging devices and/or cone-beam computed tomography. The endorectal balloon was used in 93% of patients. Patients received either 46 Gy to the whole pelvis plus a boost of up to 76 Gy to the prostate in 2 Gy daily fractions, or 44 Gy to the whole pelvis plus a boost of up to 72.6 Gy to the prostate in 2.2 Gy fractions. The study cohort included 70 patients, of whom 55 (78%) had a Gleason score of 8 to 10 and 50 (71%) had a prostate-specific antigen level > 20 ng/mL. The androgen deprivation therapy was combined in 62 patients. The biochemical failure-free survival rate was 86.7% at 2 years. Acute any grade gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity rates were 47% and 73%, respectively. The actuarial rate of late grade 2 or worse toxicity at 2 years was 12.9% for GI, and 5.7% for GU with no late grade 4 toxicity. WP-IMRT was well tolerated with no severe acute or late toxicities, resulting in at least similar biochemical control to that of the historic control group with a small field. The long-term efficacy and toxicity will be assessed in the future, and a prospective randomized trial is needed to verify these findings.

  20. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for T4 nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Treatment results and locoregional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.L.Y.; Tsai, C.L.; Chen, W.Y.; Wang, C.W. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Div. of Radiation Oncology; Huang, Y.S.; Chen, Y.F. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Dept. of Medical Imaging; Kuo, S.H. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Div. of Radiation Oncology; National Taiwan Univ. College of Medicine, Taipei (China). Graduate Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Hong, R.L. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Div. of Medical Oncology; Ko, J.Y.; Lou, P.J. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to examine outcomes in patients with T4 nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and materials: Between 2007 and 2010, 154 patients with nonmetastatic T4 NPC were treated with IMRT to a total dose of 70 Gy in 33-35 fractions. In addition, 97 % of patients received concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. The median follow-up time was 52.8 months. Results: The rates of 5-year actuarial locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, progression free-survival, and overall survival (OS) were 81.2, 72.2, 61.9, and 78.1 %, respectively. A total of 27 patients had locoregional recurrence: 85.2 % in-field failures, 11.1 % marginal failures, and 3.7 % out-of-field failures. Fourteen patients with locoregional recurrence received aggressive treatments, including nasopharyngectomy, neck dissection, or re-irradiation, and the 5-year OS rate tended to be better (61.9 %) compared to those receiving conservative treatment (32.0 %, p = 0.051). In patients treated with 1 course of radiotherapy, grade {>=} 3 toxicities of ototoxicity, neck fibrosis, xerostomia, epistaxis, and radiographic temporal lobe necrosis occurred in 18.2, 9.8, 6.3, 2.1, and 5.6 % of patients, respectively. Increased ototoxicity, osteonecrosis, severe nasal bleeding, and temporal necrosis were observed in patients treated by re-irradiation. Conclusion: IMRT offers good locoregional control in patients with T4 NPC. For patients with locoregional recurrence after definitive radiotherapy, aggressive local treatment may be considered for a better outcome. (orig.)

  1. Fast voxel and polygon ray-tracing algorithms in intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christopher; Romeijn, H Edwin; Dempsey, James F

    2006-05-01

    We present work on combining three algorithms to improve ray-tracing efficiency in radiation therapy dose computation. The three algorithms include: An improved point-in-polygon algorithm, incremental voxel ray tracing algorithm, and stereographic projection of beamlets for voxel truncation. The point-in-polygon and incremental voxel ray-tracing algorithms have been used in computer graphics and nuclear medicine applications while the stereographic projection algorithm was developed by our group. These algorithms demonstrate significant improvements over the current standard algorithms in peer reviewed literature, i.e., the polygon and voxel ray-tracing algorithms of Siddon for voxel classification (point-in-polygon testing) and dose computation, respectively, and radius testing for voxel truncation. The presented polygon ray-tracing technique was tested on 10 intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning cases that required the classification of between 0.58 and 2.0 million voxels on a 2.5 mm isotropic dose grid into 1-4 targets and 5-14 structures represented as extruded polygons (a.k.a. Siddon prisms). Incremental voxel ray tracing and voxel truncation employing virtual stereographic projection was tested on the same IMRT treatment planning cases where voxel dose was required for 230-2400 beamlets using a finite-size pencil-beam algorithm. Between a 100 and 360 fold cpu time improvement over Siddon's method was observed for the polygon ray-tracing algorithm to perform classification of voxels for target and structure membership. Between a 2.6 and 3.1 fold reduction in cpu time over current algorithms was found for the implementation of incremental ray tracing. Additionally, voxel truncation via stereographic projection was observed to be 11-25 times faster than the radial-testing beamlet extent approach and was further improved 1.7-2.0 fold through point-classification using the method of translation over the cross product technique.

  2. Postoperative pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy in high risk endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Karin K; Milgrom, Sarah A; Abu-Rustum, Nadeem R; Kollmeier, Marisa A; Gardner, Ginger J; Tew, William P; Barakat, Richard R; Alektiar, Kaled M

    2013-03-01

    According to national surveys, the use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in gynecologic cancers is on the rise, yet there is still some reluctance to adopt adjuvant IMRT as standard practice. The purpose of this study is to report a single-institution experience using postoperative pelvic IMRT with or without chemotherapy in high-risk endometrial cancer. From 11/2004 to 12/2009, 46 patients underwent hysterectomy/bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for stage I-III (22% stage I/II and 78% stage III) endometrial cancer. Median IMRT dose was 50.4Gy. Adjuvant chemotherapy was given to 30 (65%) patients. With a median follow-up of 52months, 4 patients recurred: 1 vaginal plus lung metastasis, 2 isolated para-aortic recurrences, and 1 lungs and liver metastasis. Five-year relapse rate was 9% (95% CI, 0-13.6%). Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 88% (95% CI, 77-98%) and overall survival (OS) was 97% (95% CI, 90-100%). There were 2 patients with non-hematological grade 3 toxicity: 1 (2%) acute and 1 (2%) chronic gastrointestinal toxicity. In patients treated with IMRT and chemotherapy (n=30), 5 had grade 3 leukopenia, 8 grade 2 anemia, and 2 grade 2 thrombocytopenia. Oncologic outcomes with postoperative IMRT were very good, with DFS and OS rates of >88% at median follow-up of 52months, despite a preponderance (78%) of stage III disease. Toxicity was minimal even in the setting of an aggressive trimodality (65% of patients) approach. Data from this study and emerging data from RTOG trial 0418 demonstrate the advantages of IMRT in high-risk endometrial cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. DMLC motion tracking of moving targets for intensity modulated arc therapy treatment - a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, Jens; Korreman, Stine; Persson, Gitte (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Cattell, Herb; Svatos, Michelle (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA (United States)); Sawant, Amit; Venkat, Raghu; Carlson, David; Keall, Paul (Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States))

    2009-02-15

    Intensity modulated arc therapy offers great advantages with the capability of delivering a fast and highly conformal treatment. However, moving targets represent a major challenge. By monitoring a moving target it is possible to make the beam follow the motion, shaped by a Dynamic MLC (DMLC). The aim of this work was to evaluate the dose delivered to moving targets using the RapidArcTM (Varian Medical Systems, Inc.) technology with and without a DMLC tracking algorithm. Material and methods. A Varian Clinac iX was equipped with a preclinical RapidArcTM and a 3D DMLC tracking application. A motion platform was placed on the couch, with the detectors on top: a PTW seven29 and a Scandidos Delta4. One lung plan and one prostate plan were delivered. Motion was monitored using a Real-time Position Management (RPM) system. Reference measurements were performed for both plans with both detectors at state (0) 'static, no tracking'. Comparing measurements were made at state (1) 'motion, no tracking' and state (2) 'motion, tracking'. Results. Gamma analysis showed a significant improvement from measurements of state (1) to measurements of state (2) compared to the state (0) measurements: Lung plan; from 87 to 97% pass. Prostate plan; from 81 to 88% pass. Sub-beam information gave a much reduced pattern of periodically spatial deviating dose points for state (2) than for state (1). Iso-dose curve comparisons showed a slightly better agreement between state (0) and state (2) than between state (0) and state (1). Conclusions. DMLC tracking together with RapidArcTM make a feasible combination and is capable of improving the dose distribution delivered to a moving target. It seems to be of importance to minimize noise influencing the tracking, to gain the full benefit from the application.

  4. Carotid sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy on early glottic cancer: Preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hoon Sik; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Jeong, Ho Jin; Song, Jin Ho; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Park, Jung Je; Woo, Seung Hoon; Kang, Ki Mun [Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    To compare the dose distribution between carotid sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and opposed lateral field technique (LAFT), and to determine the effects of carotid sparing IMRT in early glottic cancer patients who have risk factors for atherosclerosis. Ten early glottic cancer patients were treated with carotid sparing IMRT. For each patient, the conventional LAFT plan was developed for comparison. IMRT and LAFT plans were compared in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage, conformity index, homogeneity index, and the doses to planning organ at risk volume (PRV) for carotid arteries, spinal cord and pharyngeal constrictor muscle. Recurrence was not observed in any patients during the follow-up period. V95% for PTV showed no significant difference between IMRT and LAFT plans, while V100% was significantly higher in the IMRT plan (95.5% vs. 94.6%, p = 0.005). The homogeneity index (11.6%) and conformity index (1.4) in the IMRT plan were significantly better than those in the LAFT plans (8.5% and 5.1, respectively) (p = 0.005). The median V5Gy (90.0%), V25Gy (13.5%), and V50Gy (0%) for carotid artery PRV in the IMRT plan were significantly lower than those in the LAFT plan (99.1%, 89.0%, and 77.3%, respectively) (p = 0.005). Our study suggests that carotid sparing IMRT can significantly decrease the dose to carotid arteries compared to LAFT, and it would be considered for early glottic cancer patient with high risk of atherosclerosis.

  5. Estimating the costs of intensity-modulated and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, J H E; McGowan, T; Redmond-Misner, R; Beca, J; Warde, P; Gutierrez, E; Hoch, J S

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy is a common treatment for many cancers, but up-to-date estimates of the costs of radiotherapy are lacking. In the present study, we estimated the unit costs of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (imrt) and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-crt) in Ontario. An activity-based costing model was developed to estimate the costs of imrt and 3D-crt in prostate cancer. It included the costs of equipment, staff, and supporting infrastructure. The framework was subsequently adapted to estimate the costs of radiotherapy in breast cancer and head-and-neck cancer. We also tested various scenarios by varying the program maturity and the use of volumetric modulated arc therapy (vmat) alongside imrt. From the perspective of the health care system, treating prostate cancer with imrt and 3D-crt respectively cost $12,834 and $12,453 per patient. The cost of radiotherapy ranged from $5,270 to $14,155 and was sensitive to analytic perspective, radiation technique, and disease site. Cases of head-and-neck cancer were the most costly, being driven by treatment complexity and fractions per treatment. Although imrt was more costly than 3D-crt, its cost will likely decline over time as programs mature and vmat is incorporated. Our costing model can be modified to estimate the costs of 3D-crt and imrt for various disease sites and settings. The results demonstrate the important role of capital costs in studies of radiotherapy cost from a health system perspective, which our model can accommodate. In addition, our study established the need for future analyses of imrt cost to consider how vmat affects time consumption.

  6. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in the Salvage of Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu Sufang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, National University Cancer Institute, National University Health System, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Lin Shaojun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian (China); Tham, Ivan W.K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, National University Cancer Institute, National University Health System, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Pan Jianji; Lu Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian (China); Lu, Jiade J., E-mail: mdcljj@nus.edu.sg [Department of Radiation Oncology, National University Cancer Institute, National University Health System, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Local recurrences of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) may be salvaged by reirradiation with conventional techniques, but with significant morbidity. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may improve the therapeutic ratio by reducing doses to normal tissue. The aim of this study was to address the efficacy and toxicity profile of IMRT for a cohort of patients with locally recurrent NPC. Methods and Materials: Between August 2003 and June 2009, 70 patients with radiologic or pathologically proven locally recurrent NPC were treated with IMRT. The median time to recurrence was 30 months after the completion of conventional radiation to definitive dose. Fifty-seven percent of the tumors were classified asrT3-4. The minimum planned doses were 59.4 to 60 Gy in 1.8- to 2-Gy fractions per day to the gross disease with margins, with or without chemotherapy. Results: The median dose to the recurrent tumor was 70 Gy (range, 50-77.4 Gy). Sixty-five patients received the planned radiation therapy; 5 patients received between 50 and 60 Gy because of acute side effects. With a median follow-up time of 25 months, the rates of 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 65.8%, 65.8%, and 67.4%, respectively. Moderate to severe late toxicities were noted in 25 patients (35.7%). Eleven patients (15.7%) had posterior nasal space ulceration, 17 (24.3%) experienced cranial nerve palsies, 12 (17.1%) had trismus, and 12 (17.1%) experienced deafness. Extended disease-free interval (relative risk 2.049) and advanced T classification (relative risk 3.895) at presentation were adverse prognostic factors. Conclusion: Reirradiation with IMRT provides reasonable long-term control in patients with locally recurrent NPC.

  7. Sparing level Ib lymph nodes by intensity-modulated radiotherapy in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Ou, Dan; He, Xiayun; Hu, Chaosu

    2014-12-01

    We retrospectively investigated the patterns of locoregional relapse and survival of patients to evaluate whether sparing level Ib lymph nodes by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma was feasible. One hundred and twenty nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients received treatment with level Ib lymph nodes spared by IMRT between January 2005 and August 2008 in our center. Before treatment, each patient underwent enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the nasopharynx and neck. Patients with negative cervical lymph nodes received radiotherapy to the nasopharynx, skull base and upper neck drainage areas, while patients with cervical lymph node involvement received treatment to the whole neck. The prescription doses were 66-70.4 Gy/30-32 fractions to the gross tumor volume of nasopharynx, 66 Gy to the positive neck nodes, 60 Gy to the high-risk clinical target volume and 54 Gy to the low-risk clinical target volume. Patients staged III, IV A/B or II also received chemotherapy. The median follow-up of these 120 patients was 54 months. The 5-year local control, regional control, distant metastasis-free and overall survival rates were 90.7, 96.5, 84.8 and 81.4 %, respectively. Four patients suffered regional recurrence: 2, 1 and 1 experienced regional recurrence in level II, retropharyngeal and parotid lymph nodes, respectively. In nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with negative level Ib lymph nodes who are treated with level Ib-sparing IMRT, regional lymph node recurrence alone is rare. Therefore, sparing level Ib lymph nodes by IMRT is feasible in selected patients.

  8. DEMAT: A multi-institutional dosimetry audit of rotational and static intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafond, Caroline; Chiavassa, Sophie; Bertaut, Cindy; Boussion, Nicolas; Chapel, Nathalie; Chapron, Lucie; Coste, Frédéric; Crespin, Sylvain; Dy, Gilles; Faye, Papa Abdoulaye; Leleu, Cyril; Bouvier, Jeanne; Madec, Ludovic; Mesgouez, Jérôme; Palisson, Jérémy; Vela, Anthony; Delpon, Grégory

    2016-05-01

    Static beam intensity-modulated-radiation-therapy (IMRT) and/or Volumetric-Modulated-Arc-Therapy (VMAT) are now available in many regional radiotherapy departments. The aim of this multi-institutional audit was to design a new methodology based on radiochromic films to perform an independent quality control. A set of data were sent to all participating centres for two clinical localizations: prostate and Head and Neck (H&N) cancers. The agreement between calculations and measurements was verified in the Octavius phantom (PTW) by point measurements using ionization chambers and by 2D measurements using EBT3 radiochromic films. Due to uncertainties in the whole procedure, criteria were set to 5% and 3% in local dose and 3mm in distance excluding doses lower than 10% of the maximum doses. No normalization point or area was used for the quantitative analysis. 13 radiotherapy centres participated in this audit involving 28 plans (12 IMRT, 16 VMAT). For point measurements, mean errors were -0.18±1.54% and 0.00±1.58% for prostate and H&N cases respectively. For 2D measurements with 5%/3mm criteria, gamma map analysis showed a pixel pass rate higher than 95% for prostate and H&N. Mean gamma index was lower than 0.4 for prostate and 0.5 for H&N. Both techniques yielded similar results. This study showed the feasibility of an independent quality control by peers for conventional IMRT and VMAT. Results from all participating centres were found to be in good agreement. This regional study demonstrated the feasibility of our new methodology based on radiochromic films without dose normalization on a specific point. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Intensity modulated radiotherapy versus volumetric modulated arc therapy in breast cancer: A comparative dosimetric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KR Muralidhar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT has the capacity to optimize the dose distribution. We analyzed the dosimetric differences of plans in treatment planning system (TPS between VMAT and IMRT in treating breast cancer. Methods: Fourteen patients were simulated, planned, and treated with VMAT using single, double or partial arcs. IMRT treatments were generated using 4 to 5 tangential IMRT fields for the same patients. All treatment plans were planned for 50 Gy in 25 fractions. The VMAT and IMRT plans were compared using the planning target volume (PTV dose and doses to the other organs at risk (OARs. Results: For the PTV, comparable minimum, mean, maximum, median, and modal dose as well equivalent sphere diameter of the structure (Equis were observed between VMAT and IMRT plans and found that these values were significantly equal in both techniques. The right lung mean and modal doses were considerably higher in VMAT plans while maximum value was considerably lower when compared with IMRT plans. The left lung mean and modal doses were higher with VMAT while maximum doses were higher in IMRT plans. The mean dose to the heart and maximum dose to the spinal cord was lower with IMRT. The mean dose to the body was higher in VMAT plans while the maximum dose was higher in IMRT plans. Conclusion: Four field tangential IMRT delivered comparable PTV dose with generally less dose to normal tissues in our breast cancer treatment study. The IMRT plans typically had more favourable dose characteristics to the lung, heart, and spinal cord and body dose when compared with VMAT. The only minor advantage of VMAT for breast cases was slightly better PTV coverage.

  10. Automation and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Individualized High-Quality Tangent Breast Treatment Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purdie, Thomas G., E-mail: Tom.Purdie@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Techna Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Dinniwell, Robert E.; Fyles, Anthony [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sharpe, Michael B. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Techna Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the large-scale clinical implementation and performance of an automated treatment planning methodology for tangential breast intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Automated planning was used to prospectively plan tangential breast IMRT treatment for 1661 patients between June 2009 and November 2012. The automated planning method emulates the manual steps performed by the user during treatment planning, including anatomical segmentation, beam placement, optimization, dose calculation, and plan documentation. The user specifies clinical requirements of the plan to be generated through a user interface embedded in the planning system. The automated method uses heuristic algorithms to define and simplify the technical aspects of the treatment planning process. Results: Automated planning was used in 1661 of 1708 patients receiving tangential breast IMRT during the time interval studied. Therefore, automated planning was applicable in greater than 97% of cases. The time for treatment planning using the automated process is routinely 5 to 6 minutes on standard commercially available planning hardware. We have shown a consistent reduction in plan rejections from plan reviews through the standard quality control process or weekly quality review multidisciplinary breast rounds as we have automated the planning process for tangential breast IMRT. Clinical plan acceptance increased from 97.3% using our previous semiautomated inverse method to 98.9% using the fully automated method. Conclusions: Automation has become the routine standard method for treatment planning of tangential breast IMRT at our institution and is clinically feasible on a large scale. The method has wide clinical applicability and can add tremendous efficiency, standardization, and quality to the current treatment planning process. The use of automated methods can allow centers to more rapidly adopt IMRT and enhance access to the documented

  11. Efficacy and prognostic factors of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for large primary hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FANG Ziyan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the efficacy of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in treating large primary hepatocellular carcinoma (LHCC which is unsuitable for surgery or has poor response to radiofrequency ablation, interventional therapy, and other local treatments, and to identify the prognostic factors for survival. MethodsWe retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 29 LHCC patients who received IMRT from April 2008 to August 2011. There were five fractions per week and the dose for each fraction was 2 to 6 Gy; the total dose was 50 to 70 Gy. The short-term efficacy and prognosis were observed and analyzed. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival rates and the log-rank test was used for survival difference analysis. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox regression model. ResultsThe complete remission, partial remission, stable disease, and disease progression rates were 3.57%, 32.14%, 53.57%, and 10.72%, respectively. The overall median progression-free survival (PFS time was 6.43 months, and the median overall survival (OS time was 11.43 months. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 46.79% and 25.23%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed tumor response rate was an independent prognostic factor for PFS. The Cox proportional hazard model suggested the tumor response rate and prescribed dose were the independent prognostic factors for PFS. In addition, the independent prognostic factors for OS included tumor response rate, tumor diameter, and tumor volume. The common acute radiotherapy toxicities included gastrointestinal discomfort, radiation-induced liver damage, and myelosuppression. ConclusionIMRT is a safe and effective option for the LHCC patients who are unsuitable for surgery or in the cases that other local therapies fail.

  12. Duplicating a tandem and ovoids distribution with intensity-modulated radiotherapy: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Harish K; Avadhani, Jaiteerth S; deBoer, Steven F; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Kuettel, Michael R; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2007-07-17

    Brachytherapy plays an important role in the definitive treatment of cervical cancers by radiotherapy. In the present study, we investigated whether sliding-window intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can achieve a pear-shaped distribution with a similar sharp dose falloff identical to that of brachytherapy. The computed tomography scans of a tandem and ovoid patient were pushed to both a high dose rate (HDR) and an IMRT treatment planning system (TPS) after the rectum, bladder, and left and right femoral heads had been outlined, ensuring identical structures in both planning systems. A conventional plan (7 Gy in 5 fractions, defined as the average dose to the left and right point A) was generated for HDR treatment. The 150%, 125%, 100%, 75%, 50%, and 25% isodose curves were drawn on each slice and then transferred to the IMRT TPS. The 100% isodose envelope from the HDR plan was the target for IMRT planning. A 7-field IMRT plan using 6-MV X-ray beams was generated and compared with the HDR plan using isodose conformity to the target and 125% volume, dose-volume histograms, and integral dose. The resulting isodose distribution demonstrated good agreement between the HDR and IMRT plans in the 100% and 125% isodose range. The dose falloff in the HDR plan was much steeper than that in the IMRT plan, but it also had a substantially higher maximum dose. Integral dose for the target, rectum, and bladder were found to be 6.69 J, 1.07 J, and 1.02 J in the HDR plan; the respective values for IMRT were 3.47 J, 1.79 J, and 1.34 J. Our preliminary results indicate that the HDR dose distribution can be replicated using a standard sliding-window IMRT dose delivery technique for points lying closer to the three-dimensional isodose envelope surrounding point A. Differences in radiobiology and patient positioning between the two techniques merit further consideration.

  13. The impact of intensity modulated radiotherapy on the skin dose for deep seated tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. S. Abou-Elenein; Ehab M. Attalla; Hany Ammar; Ismail Eldesoky; Mohamed Farouk; Shaimaa Shoer

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) on surface doses for brain, abdomen and pelvis deep located tumors treated with 6 MV photon and to evaluate the skin dose calculation accuracy of the XIO 4.04 treatment planning system. Methods: More investigations for the influences of IMRT on skin doses would increase its applications for many treatment sites. Measuring skin doses in real treatment situations would reduce the uncertainty of skin dose prediction. In this work a pediatric human phantom was covered by a layer of 1 mm bolus at three treatment sites and thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were inserted into the bolus at each treatment site before CT scan. Two different treatment plans [three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and IMRT] for each treatment sites were performed on XIO 4.04 treatment planning system using superposition algorism. Results: The results showed that the surface doses for 3DCRT were higher than the surface doses in IMRT by 1.6%, 2.5% and 3.2% for brain, abdomen and pelvis sites respectively. There was good agreement between measured and calculated surface doses, where the calculated surface dose was 15.5% for brain tumor calculated with 3DCRT whereas the measured surface dose was 12.1%. For abdomen site the calculated surface dose for IMRT treatment plan was 16.5% whereas the measured surface dose was 12.6%. Conclusion: The skin dose in IMRT for deep seated tumors is lower than that in 3DCRT which is another advantage for the IMRT. The TLD readings showed that the difference between the calculated and measured point dose is negligible. The superposition calculation algorism of the XIO 4.04 treatment planning system modeled the superficial dose well.

  14. Estimating the costs of intensity-modulated and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, J.H.E.; McGowan, T.; Redmond-Misner, R.; Beca, J.; Warde, P.; Gutierrez, E.; Hoch, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy is a common treatment for many cancers, but up-to-date estimates of the costs of radiotherapy are lacking. In the present study, we estimated the unit costs of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (imrt) and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-crt) in Ontario. Methods An activity-based costing model was developed to estimate the costs of imrt and 3D-crt in prostate cancer. It included the costs of equipment, staff, and supporting infrastructure. The framework was subsequently adapted to estimate the costs of radiotherapy in breast cancer and head-and-neck cancer. We also tested various scenarios by varying the program maturity and the use of volumetric modulated arc therapy (vmat) alongside imrt. Results From the perspective of the health care system, treating prostate cancer with imrt and 3D-crt respectively cost $12,834 and $12,453 per patient. The cost of radiotherapy ranged from $5,270 to $14,155 and was sensitive to analytic perspective, radiation technique, and disease site. Cases of head-and-neck cancer were the most costly, being driven by treatment complexity and fractions per treatment. Although imrt was more costly than 3D-crt, its cost will likely decline over time as programs mature and vmat is incorporated. Conclusions Our costing model can be modified to estimate the costs of 3D-crt and imrt for various disease sites and settings. The results demonstrate the important role of capital costs in studies of radiotherapy cost from a health system perspective, which our model can accommodate. In addition, our study established the need for future analyses of imrt cost to consider how vmat affects time consumption. PMID:27330359

  15. A modular approach to intensity-modulated arc therapy optimization with noncoplanar trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Dávid; Bortfeld, Thomas; Unkelbach, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Utilizing noncoplanar beam angles in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the potential to combine the benefits of arc therapy, such as short treatment times, with the benefits of noncoplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans, such as improved organ sparing. Recently, vendors introduced treatment machines that allow for simultaneous couch and gantry motion during beam delivery to make noncoplanar VMAT treatments possible. Our aim is to provide a reliable optimization method for noncoplanar isocentric arc therapy plan optimization. The proposed solution is modular in the sense that it can incorporate different existing beam angle selection and coplanar arc therapy optimization methods. Treatment planning is performed in three steps. First, a number of promising noncoplanar beam directions are selected using an iterative beam selection heuristic; these beams serve as anchor points of the arc therapy trajectory. In the second step, continuous gantry/couch angle trajectories are optimized using a simple combinatorial optimization model to define a beam trajectory that efficiently visits each of the anchor points. Treatment time is controlled by limiting the time the beam needs to trace the prescribed trajectory. In the third and final step, an optimal arc therapy plan is found along the prescribed beam trajectory. In principle any existing arc therapy optimization method could be incorporated into this step; for this work we use a sliding window VMAT algorithm. The approach is demonstrated using two particularly challenging cases. The first one is a lung SBRT patient whose planning goals could not be satisfied with fewer than nine noncoplanar IMRT fields when the patient was treated in the clinic. The second one is a brain tumor patient, where the target volume overlaps with the optic nerves and the chiasm and it is directly adjacent to the brainstem. Both cases illustrate that the large number of angles utilized by isocentric noncoplanar VMAT plans

  16. Proton energy optimization and reduction for intensity-modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino; Liao, Li; Li, Yupeng; Jiang, Shengpeng; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Zhu, X. Ronald; Gomez, Daniel; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-10-01

    Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is commonly delivered via the spot-scanning technique. To ‘scan’ the target volume, the proton beam is controlled by varying its energy to penetrate the patient’s body at different depths. Although scanning the proton beamlets or spots with the same energy can be as fast as 10-20 m s-1, changing from one proton energy to another requires approximately two additional seconds. The total IMPT delivery time thus depends mainly on the number of proton energies used in a treatment. Current treatment planning systems typically use all proton energies that are required for the proton beam to penetrate in a range from the distal edge to the proximal edge of the target. The optimal selection of proton energies has not been well studied. In this study, we sought to determine the feasibility of optimizing and reducing the number of proton energies in IMPT planning. We proposed an iterative mixed-integer programming optimization method to select a subset of all available proton energies while satisfying dosimetric criteria. We applied our proposed method to six patient datasets: four cases of prostate cancer, one case of lung cancer, and one case of mesothelioma. The numbers of energies were reduced by 14.3%-18.9% for the prostate cancer cases, 11.0% for the lung cancer cases and 26.5% for the mesothelioma case. The results indicate that the number of proton energies used in conventionally designed IMPT plans can be reduced without degrading dosimetric performance. The IMPT delivery efficiency could be improved by energy layer optimization leading to increased throughput for a busy proton center in which a delivery system with slow energy switch is employed.

  17. Patterns of relapse following surgery and postoperative intensity modulated radiotherapy for oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collan, Juhani; Vaalavirta, Leila; Kajanti, Mikael; Tenhunen, Mikko; Saarilahti, Kauko (Dept. of Oncology, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, and Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)), E-mail: kauko.saarilahti@hus.fi; Lundberg, Marie; Baeck, Leif; Maekitie, Antti (Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, and Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland))

    2011-10-15

    Background. To investigate the patterns of relapse following intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) given after radical surgery for oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer. Patients and methods. One hundred and two patients with oral or oropharyngeal cancer were treated with radical surgery followed by IMRT up to a mean total dose of 60 Gy between years 2001 and 2007. Thirty-nine of the patients (%) also received concomitant weekly cisplatin. Forty of the patients had oral and 62 had oropharyngeal cancer. Data on the tumour, patient and treatment factors were collected. Following therapy the patients were followed by clinical examination, endoscopy and MRI/CT at 2- to 3-months interval up to 2 years and thereafter at 6-month intervals. Results. The mean follow-up time of the patients was 55 months (range, 26-106 months). The rate for local tumour control for the whole cohort was 92.2%: 87.5% for oral cancer patients and 96.7% for oropharyngeal cancer patients. The 5-year disease specific survival was 90.2% and 5-year overall survival 84.3%. During the follow-up eight locoregional recurrences were observed, three at the primary tumour site and one at regional nodal site and four at both sites. The mean time to primary tumour recurrence was seven months (range, 2-10 months) and to nodal recurrence seven months (range, 2-12 months). Distant metastasis occurred in six (6%) patients. The factors associated with poor prognosis were the primary tumour size and tumour site with oral cancers having worse outcome. The treatment was well tolerated with no unexpected toxicities. The most frequent late toxicity was dysphagia necessitating permanent PEG in five patients. This was correlated with the advanced primary tumour size and resulting in wide tumour excision and reconstruction. Conclusions. Surgery combined with postoperative radiotherapy given as IMRT results in low level of tumour recurrence

  18. Gamma evaluation combined with isocenter optimal matching in intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Jino; Choi, Jin Hwa; Park, Suk Won; Park, Kwangwoo; Park, Sungho

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) dose comparisons are widely performed by using a gamma evaluation with patient-specific intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) or dose delivery quality assurance (DQA). In this way, a pass/fail determination is made for a particular treatment plan. When gamma evaluation results are close to the failure criterion, the pass/fail decision may change applying a small shift to the center of the 2D dose distribution. In this study, we quantitatively evaluated the meaning of such a small relative shift in a 2D dose distribution comparison. In addition, we propose the use of a small shift for a pass/fail criterion in gamma analysis, where the concept of isocenter optimal matching (IOM) is applied to IMRT QA of 20 patients. Gamma evaluations were performed to compare two dose distributions, one with and the other without IOM. In-house software was developed in C++ in order to find IOM values including both translational and rotational shifts. Upon gamma evaluation failure, further investigation was initiated using IOM. In this way, three groups were categorized: group 1 for `pass' on gamma evaluation, group 21 for `fail' on the gamma evaluation and `pass' on the gamma the evaluation with IOM, and group 22 for `fail' on the both gamma evaluations and the IOM calculation. IOM results revealed that some failures could be considered as a `pass'. In group 21, 88.98% (fail) of the averaged gamma pass rate changed to 90.45% (pass) when IOM was applied. On average, a ratio of γ ≥ 1 was reduced by 11.06% in 20 patients. We propose that gamma evaluations that do not pass with a rate of 85% to 90% may be augmented with IOM to reveal a potential pass result.

  19. Exercise intensity modulates the appearance of circulating microvesicles with proangiogenic potential upon endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Eurico N; González-Alonso, José; Parris, Christopher; Rakobowchuk, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The effect of endurance exercise on circulating microvesicle dynamics and their impact on surrounding endothelial cells is unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that exercise intensity modulates the time course of platelet (PMV) and endothelial-derived (EMV) microvesicle appearance in the circulation through hemodynamic and biochemical-related mechanisms, and that microvesicles formed during exercise would stimulate endothelial angiogenesis in vitro. Nine healthy young men had venous blood samples taken before, during, and throughout the recovery period after 1 h of moderate [46 ± 2% maximal oxygen uptake (V̇o2max)] or heavy (67 ± 2% V̇o2max) intensity semirecumbent cycling and a time-matched resting control trial. In vitro experiments were performed by incubating endothelial cells with rest and exercise-derived microvesicles to examine their effects on cell angiogenic capacities. PMVs (CD41(+)) increased from baseline only during heavy exercise (from 21 ± 1 × 10(3) to 55 ± 8 × 10(3) and 48 ± 6 × 10(3) PMV/μl at 30 and 60 min, respectively; P 0.05), whereas EMVs (CD62E(+)) were unchanged (P > 0.05). PMVs were related to brachial artery shear rate (r(2) = 0.43) and plasma norepinephrine concentrations (r(2) = 0.21) during exercise (P microvesicles enhanced endothelial proliferation, migration, and tubule formation compared with rest microvesicles (P microvesicles stimulate human endothelial cells by enhancing angiogenesis and proliferation. This involvement of microvesicles may be considered a novel mechanism through which exercise mediates vascular healing and adaptation. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  20. An Anatomically Validated Brachial Plexus Contouring Method for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Velde, Joris, E-mail: joris.vandevelde@ugent.be [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Audenaert, Emmanuel [Department of Physical Medicine and Orthopedic Surgery, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Speleers, Bruno; Vercauteren, Tom; Mulliez, Thomas [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Vandemaele, Pieter; Achten, Eric [Department of Radiology, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Kerckaert, Ingrid; D' Herde, Katharina [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Van Hoof, Tom [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines for the brachial plexus (BP) using anatomically validated cadaver datasets. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were used to obtain detailed visualizations of the BP region, with the goal of achieving maximal inclusion of the actual BP in a small contoured volume while also accommodating for anatomic variations. Methods and Materials: CT and MRI were obtained for 8 cadavers positioned for intensity modulated radiation therapy. 3-dimensional reconstructions of soft tissue (from MRI) and bone (from CT) were combined to create 8 separate enhanced CT project files. Dissection of the corresponding cadavers anatomically validated the reconstructions created. Seven enhanced CT project files were then automatically fitted, separately in different regions, to obtain a single dataset of superimposed BP regions that incorporated anatomic variations. From this dataset, improved BP contouring guidelines were developed. These guidelines were then applied to the 7 original CT project files and also to 1 additional file, left out from the superimposing procedure. The percentage of BP inclusion was compared with the published guidelines. Results: The anatomic validation procedure showed a high level of conformity for the BP regions examined between the 3-dimensional reconstructions generated and the dissected counterparts. Accurate and detailed BP contouring guidelines were developed, which provided corresponding guidance for each level in a clinical dataset. An average margin of 4.7 mm around the anatomically validated BP contour is sufficient to accommodate for anatomic variations. Using the new guidelines, 100% inclusion of the BP was achieved, compared with a mean inclusion of 37.75% when published guidelines were applied. Conclusion: Improved guidelines for BP delineation were developed using combined MRI and CT imaging with validation by anatomic dissection.

  1. A general model for stray dose calculation of static and intensity-modulated photon radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauri, Pascal, E-mail: pascal.hauri2@uzh.ch; Schneider, Uwe [Faculty of Science, University of Zurich, Zurich 8057, Switzerland and Radiotherapy Hirslanden, Hirslanden Medical Center, Aarau 5000 (Switzerland); Hälg, Roger A.; Besserer, Jürgen [Radiotherapy Hirslanden, Hirslanden Medical Center, Aarau 5000 (Switzerland)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: There is an increasing number of cancer survivors who are at risk of developing late effects caused by ionizing radiation such as induction of second tumors. Hence, the determination of out-of-field dose for a particular treatment plan in the patient’s anatomy is of great importance. The purpose of this study was to analytically model the stray dose according to its three major components. Methods: For patient scatter, a mechanistic model was developed. For collimator scatter and head leakage, an empirical approach was used. The models utilize a nominal beam energy of 6 MeV to describe two linear accelerator types of a single vendor. The parameters of the models were adjusted using ionization chamber measurements registering total absorbed dose in simple geometries. Whole-body dose measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters in an anthropomorphic phantom for static and intensity-modulated treatment plans were compared to the 3D out-of-field dose distributions calculated by a combined model. Results: The absolute mean difference between the whole-body predicted and the measured out-of-field dose of four different plans was 11% with a maximum difference below 44%. Computation time of 36 000 dose points for one field was around 30 s. By combining the model-calculated stray dose with the treatment planning system dose, the whole-body dose distribution can be viewed in the treatment planning system. Conclusions: The results suggest that the model is accurate, fast and can be used for a wide range of treatment modalities to calculate the whole-body dose distribution for clinical analysis. For similar energy spectra, the mechanistic patient scatter model can be used independently of treatment machine or beam orientation.

  2. Expert Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Abraham J., E-mail: wua@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Chang, Daniel T. [Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Hong, Theodore S. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Kleinberg, Lawrence R. [Johns Hopkins Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Mamon, Harvey J. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Sciences University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Goodman, Karyn A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose/Objective(s): Current guidelines for esophageal cancer contouring are derived from traditional 2-dimensional fields based on bony landmarks, and they do not provide sufficient anatomic detail to ensure consistent contouring for more conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Therefore, we convened an expert panel with the specific aim to derive contouring guidelines and generate an atlas for the clinical target volume (CTV) in esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials: Eight expert academically based gastrointestinal radiation oncologists participated. Three sample cases were chosen: a GEJ cancer, a distal esophageal cancer, and a mid-upper esophageal cancer. Uniform computed tomographic (CT) simulation datasets and accompanying diagnostic positron emission tomographic/CT images were distributed to each expert, and the expert was instructed to generate gross tumor volume (GTV) and CTV contours for each case. All contours were aggregated and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the degree of concordance between experts and to generate draft consensus contours. The panel then refined these contours to generate the contouring atlas. Results: The κ statistics indicated substantial agreement between panelists for each of the 3 test cases. A consensus CTV atlas was generated for the 3 test cases, each representing common anatomic presentations of esophageal cancer. The panel agreed on guidelines and principles to facilitate the generalizability of the atlas to individual cases. Conclusions: This expert panel successfully reached agreement on contouring guidelines for esophageal and GEJ IMRT and generated a reference CTV atlas. This atlas will serve as a reference for IMRT contours for clinical practice and prospective trial design. Subsequent patterns of failure analyses of clinical datasets using these guidelines may require modification in the future.

  3. Application of influence diagrams to prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jürgen; Phillips, Mark H.; Cho, Paul S.; Kalet, Ira; Doctor, Jason N.

    2004-05-01

    The purpose is to incorporate clinically relevant factors such as patient-specific and dosimetric information as well as data from clinical trials in the decision-making process for the selection of prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. The approach is to incorporate the decision theoretic concept of an influence diagram into the solution of the multiobjective optimization inverse planning problem. A set of candidate IMRT plans was obtained by varying the importance factors for the planning target volume (PTV) and the organ-at-risk (OAR) in combination with simulated annealing to explore a large part of the solution space. The Pareto set for the PTV and OAR was analysed to demonstrate how the selection of the weighting factors influenced which part of the solution space was explored. An influence diagram based on a Bayesian network with 18 nodes was designed to model the decision process for plan selection. The model possessed nodes for clinical laboratory results, tumour grading, staging information, patient-specific information, dosimetric information, complications and survival statistics from clinical studies. A utility node was utilized for the decision-making process. The influence diagram successfully ranked the plans based on the available information. Sensitivity analyses were used to judge the reasonableness of the diagram and the results. In conclusion, influence diagrams lend themselves well to modelling the decision processes for IMRT plan selection. They provide an excellent means to incorporate the probabilistic nature of data and beliefs into one model. They also provide a means for introducing evidence-based medicine, in the form of results of clinical trials, into the decision-making process.

  4. The inaugural Frank Ellis Lecture--latrogenic cancer: the impact of intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, E J

    2006-05-01

    It is an honour and personal pleasure to give the inaugural Frank Ellis Lecture to celebrate his 100th birthday, and to acknowledge his enormous contributions to radiation oncology. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) allows dose to be concentrated in the tumour volume while sparing normal tissues. However, the downside to IMRT is the potential to increase the number of radiation-induced second cancers because more fields are used which involves a bigger volume of normal tissue exposed to lower doses. It has been estimated that IMRT may double the incidence of solid cancers in long-term survivors. This may be acceptable in older patients if balanced by an improvement in local tumour control and reduced toxicity. On the other hand, the incidence of second cancers is higher in children, so that doubling it may not be acceptable. IMRT represents a special case for children. First, they are more sensitive to radiation-induced cancer than adults. Second, radiation scattered from the treatment volume is more important in the small body of the child. Third, there is the question of genetic susceptibility, as many childhood cancers involve a germline mutation. The levels of leakage radiation in current Linacs can be reduced, but the cost would be substantial. An alternative strategy is to replace X-rays with protons. This is an advantage only if the proton machine uses a pencil scanning beam, as passive modulation of a scattering foil produces neutrons, which results in an effective dose to the patient higher than that characteristic of IMRT.

  5. Optimizing patient positioning for intensity modulated radiation therapy in hippocampal-sparing whole brain radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siglin, Joshua; Champ, Colin E; Vakhnenko, Yelena; Witek, Matthew E; Peng, Cheng; Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Harrison, Amy S; Shi, Wenyin

    2014-01-01

    Sparing the hippocampus during whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) offers potential neurocognitive benefits. However, previously reported intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans use multiple noncoplanar beams for treatment delivery. An optimized coplanar IMRT template for hippocampal-sparing WBRT would assist in clinical workflow and minimize resource utilization. In this study, we sought to determine the optimal patient position to facilitate coplanar treatment planning and delivery of hippocampal-sparing WBRT using IMRT. A variable angle, inclined board was utilized for patient positioning. An anthropomorphic phantom underwent computed tomography simulation at various head angles. The IMRT goals were designed to achieve target coverage of the brain while maintaining hippocampal dose-volume constraints designed to conform to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0933 protocol. Optimal head angle was then verified using data from 8 patients comparing coplanar and noncoplanar WBRT IMRT plans. Hippocampal, hippocampal avoidance region, and whole brain mean volumes were 1.1 cm(3), 12.5 cm(3), and 1185.1 cm(3), respectively. The hippocampal avoidance region occupied 1.1% of the whole brain planning volume. For the 30-degree head angle, a 7-field coplanar IMRT plan was generated, sparing the hippocampus to a maximum dose of 14.7 Gy; D100% of the hippocampus was 7.4 Gy and mean hippocampal dose was 9.3 Gy. In comparison, for flat head positioning the hippocampal Dmax was 22.9 Gy with a D100% of 9.2 Gy and mean dose of 11.7 Gy. Target coverage and dose homogeneity was comparable with previously published noncoplanar IMRT plans. Compared with conventional supine positioning, an inclined head board at 30 degrees optimizes coplanar whole brain IMRT treatment planning. Clinically acceptable hippocampal-sparing WBRT dosimetry can be obtained using a simplified coplanar plan at a 30-degree head angle, thus obviating the need for complex and time consuming noncoplanar

  6. Dosimetric Studies of Mixed Energy Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Abdul Haneefa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dosimetric studies of mixed field photon beam intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT for prostate cancer using pencil beam (PB and collapsed cone convolution (CCC algorithms using Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning system (v. 4.3 are investigated in this study. Three different plans were generated using 6 MV, 15 MV, and mixed beam (both 6 and 15 MV. Fifteen patients with two sets of plans were generated: one by using PB and the other by using CCC for the same planning parameters and constraints except the beam energy. For each patient’s plan of high energy photons, one set of photoneutron measurements using solid state neutron track detector (SSNTD was taken for this study. Mean percentage of V66 Gy in the rectum is 18.55±2.8, 14.58±2.1, and 16.77±4.7 for 6 MV, 15 MV, and mixed-energy plans, respectively. Mean percentage of V66 Gy in bladder is 16.54±2.1, 17.42±2.1, and 16.94±41.9 for 6 MV, 15 MV, and mixed-energy plans, respectively. Mixed fields neutron contribution at the beam entrance surface is 45.62% less than at 15 MV photon beam. Our result shows that, with negligible neutron contributions, mixed field IMRT has considerable dosimetric advantage.

  7. HybridArc: A novel radiation therapy technique combining optimized dynamic arcs and intensity modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robar, James L., E-mail: james.robar@cdha.nshealth.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax (Canada); Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax (Canada); Thomas, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax (Canada)

    2012-01-01

    This investigation focuses on possible dosimetric and efficiency advantages of HybridArc-a novel treatment planning approach combining optimized dynamic arcs with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams. Application of this technique to two disparate sites, complex cranial tumors, and prostate was examined. HybridArc plans were compared with either dynamic conformal arc (DCA) or IMRT plans to determine whether HybridArc offers a synergy through combination of these 2 techniques. Plans were compared with regard to target volume dose conformity, target volume dose homogeneity, sparing of proximal organs at risk, normal tissue sparing, and monitor unit (MU) efficiency. For cranial cases, HybridArc produced significantly improved dose conformity compared with both DCA and IMRT but did not improve sparing of the brainstem or optic chiasm. For prostate cases, conformity was improved compared with DCA but not IMRT. Compared with IMRT, the dose homogeneity in the planning target volume was improved, and the maximum doses received by the bladder and rectum were reduced. Both arc-based techniques distribute peripheral dose over larger volumes of normal tissue compared with IMRT, whereas HybridArc involved slightly greater volumes of normal tissues compared with DCA. Compared with IMRT, cranial cases required 38% more MUs, whereas for prostate cases, MUs were reduced by 7%. For cranial cases, HybridArc improves dose conformity to the target. For prostate cases, dose conformity and homogeneity are improved compared with DCA and IMRT, respectively. Compared with IMRT, whether required MUs increase or decrease with HybridArc was site-dependent.

  8. The Cambridge Breast Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy Trial: Comparison of Clinician- versus Patient-reported Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukesh, M B; Qian, W; Wah Hak, C C; Wilkinson, J S; Barnett, G C; Moody, A M; Wilson, C; Coles, C E

    2016-06-01

    Breast radiotherapy-associated toxicity is often reported using clinical and photographic assessments. The addition of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) is becoming more common. This study investigated the concordance between clinician- and patient-reported outcomes. The Cambridge Breast Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) trial prospectively collected data on clinician assessment and PROMs at 2 and 5 years after breast radiotherapy. Clinician assessment included physical examination and photographic assessment. PROMs included European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) BR23 questionnaire and four breast radiotherapy-specific questions. The correlation between patient and clinician scores were analysed on an independent patient basis using percentage agreement, Cohen's kappa coefficient (k) and Bowker's test of symmetry. The analysis was repeated after stratifying patients based on age, baseline Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (HADS) and baseline body image score. At 2 and 5 years, a weak level of concordance was seen between the clinician-based assessment and PROMS for all the five toxicity end points (k = 0.05-0.21), with individual patient-based agreement of 32.9-78.3% and a highly discordant Bowker's test of symmetry (P < 0.001). The most frequently reported moderate-severe toxicity by patients was change in breast appearance (14% at both 2 and 5 years), whereas it was breast induration (36% and 25% at 2 and 5 years, respectively) by the clinicians. The lack of concordance was not affected by patient's age, baseline HADS and baseline body image score. This study found that moderate-severe toxicity reported by patients is low and the overall concordance between clinicians and patients is low. This could be due to methodological limitations or alternatively reflects the subjective nature of PROMs. Incorporation of a patient's perception on treatment-related toxicity will have important implications for treatment

  9. Patterns of Disease Recurrence Following Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garden, Adam S., E-mail: agarden@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Morrison, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Stugis, Erich M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Glisson, Bonnie S. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Frank, Steven J.; Beadle, Beth M.; Gunn, Gary B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Schwartz, David L. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Kies, Merill S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Weber, Randal S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ang, K. Kian; Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To report mature results of a large cohort of patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx who were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The database of patients irradiated at The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center was searched for patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal cancer and treated with IMRT between 2000 and 2007. A retrospective review of outcome data was performed. Results: The cohort consisted of 776 patients. One hundred fifty-nine patients (21%) were current smokers, 279 (36%) former smokers, and 337 (43%) never smokers. T and N categories and American Joint Committee on Cancer group stages were distributed as follows: T1/x, 288 (37%); T2, 288 (37%); T3, 113 (15%); T4, 87 (11%); N0, 88(12%); N1/x, 140 (18%); N2a, 101 (13%); N2b, 269 (35%); N2c, 122 (16%); and N3, 56 (7%); stage I, 18(2%); stage II, 40(5%); stage III, 150(19%); and stage IV, 568(74%). Seventy-one patients (10%) presented with nodes in level IV. Median follow-up was 54 months. The 5-year overall survival, locoregional control, and overall recurrence-free survival rates were 84%, 90%, and 82%, respectively. Primary site recurrence developed in 7% of patients, and neck recurrence with primary site control in 3%. We could only identify 12 patients (2%) who had locoregional recurrence outside the high-dose target volumes. Poorer survival rates were observed in current smokers, patients with larger primary (T) tumors and lower neck disease. Conclusions: Patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated with IMRT have excellent disease control. Locoregional recurrence was uncommon, and most often occurred in the high dose volumes. Parotid sparing was accomplished in nearly all patients without compromising tumor coverage.

  10. Vaginal Motion and Bladder and Rectal Volumes During Pelvic Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy After Hysterectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhingran, Anuja, E-mail: ajhingra@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Salehpour, Mohammad [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Sam, Marianne; Levy, Larry; Eifel, Patricia J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate variations in bladder and rectal volume and the position of the vaginal vault during a 5-week course of pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after hysterectomy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients were instructed how to fill their bladders before simulation and treatment. These patients underwent computed tomography simulations with full and empty bladders and then underwent rescanning twice weekly during IMRT; patients were asked to have full bladder for treatment. Bladder and rectal volumes and the positions of vaginal fiducial markers were determined, and changes in volume and position were calculated. Results: The mean full and empty bladder volumes at simulation were 480 cc (range, 122-1,052) and 155 cc (range, 49-371), respectively. Bladder volumes varied widely during IMRT: the median difference between the maximum and minimum volumes was 247 cc (range, 96-585). Variations in rectal volume during IMRT were less pronounced. For the 16 patients with vaginal fiducial markers in place throughout IMRT, the median maximum movement of the markers during IMRT was 0.59 cm in the right-left direction (range, 0-0.9), 1.46 cm in the anterior-posterior direction (range, 0.8-2.79), and 1.2 cm in the superior-inferior direction (range, 0.6-2.1). Large variations in rectal or bladder volume frequently correlated with significant displacement of the vaginal apex. Conclusion: Although treatment with a full bladder is usually preferred because of greater sparing of small bowel, our data demonstrate that even with detailed instruction, patients are unable to maintain consistent bladder filling. Variations in organ position during IMRT can result in marked changes in the position of the target volume and the volume of small bowel exposed to high doses of radiation.

  11. Intensity modulated whole pelvic radiotherapy in patients with cervix cancer: analysis of acute toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Min; Lee, Hyung Sik; Hur, Won Joo; Cha, Moon Seok; Kim, Hyun Ho [School of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    To evaluate acute toxicities in cervix cancer patients receiving intensity modulated whole pelvic radiation therapy (IM-WPRT). Between August 2004 and April 2006, 17 patients who underwent IM-WPRT were analysed. An intravenous contrast agent was used for radiotherapy planning computed tomography (CT). The central clinical target volume (CTV) included the primary tumor, uterus, vagina, and parametrium. The nodal CTV was defined as the lymph nodes larger than 1 cm seen on CT and the contrased-enhanced pelvic vessels. The planning target volume (PTV) was the 1-cm expanded volume around the central CTV, except for a 5-mm expansion from the posterior vagina, and the nodal PTV was defined as the nodal CTV plus a 1.5 cm margin. IM-WPRT was prescribed to deliver a dose of 50 Gy to more than 95% of the PTV. Acute toxicity was assessed with common toxicity criteria up to 60 days after radiotherapy. Grade 1 nausea developed in 10 (58.9%) patients, and grade 1 and 2 diarrhea developed in 11 (64.7%) and 1 (5.9%) patients, respectively. No grade 3 or higher gastrointestinal toxicity was seen. Leukopenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia occurred in 15 (88.2%). 7 (41.2%), and 2 (11.8%) patients, respectively, as hematologic toxicities. Grade 3 leukopenia developed in 2 patients who were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. IM-WPRT can be a useful treatment for cervix cancer patients with decreased severe acute toxicities and a resultant improved compliance to whole pelvic irradiation.

  12. Clinical Realization of Sector Beam Intensity Modulation for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery: A Pilot Treatment Planning Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Lijun, E-mail: lijunma@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Mason, Erica; Sneed, Penny K.; McDermott, Michael; Polishchuk, Alexei; Larson, David A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Sahgal, Arjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the clinical feasibility and potential benefits of sector beam intensity modulation (SBIM) specific to Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). Methods and Materials: SBIM is based on modulating the confocal beam intensities from individual sectors surrounding an isocenter in a nearly 2π geometry. This is in contrast to conventional GKSRS delivery, in which the beam intensities from each sector are restricted to be either 0% or 100% and must be identical for any given isocenter. We developed a SBIM solution based on available clinical planning tools, and we tested it on a cohort of 12 clinical cases as a proof of concept study. The SBIM treatment plans were compared with the original clinically delivered treatment plans to determine dosimetric differences. The goal was to investigate whether SBIM would improve the dose conformity for these treatment plans without prohibitively lengthening the treatment time. Results: A SBIM technique was developed. On average, SBIM improved the Paddick conformity index (PCI) versus the clinically delivered plans (clinical plan PCI = 0.68 ± 0.11 vs SBIM plan PCI = 0.74 ± 0.10, P=.002; 2-tailed paired t test). The SBIM plans also resulted in nearly identical target volume coverage (mean, 97 ± 2%), total beam-on times (clinical plan 58.4 ± 38.9 minutes vs SBIM 63.5 ± 44.7 minutes, P=.057), and gradient indices (clinical plan 3.03 ± 0.27 vs SBIM 3.06 ± 0.29, P=.44) versus the original clinical plans. Conclusion: The SBIM method is clinically feasible with potential dosimetric gains when compared with conventional GKSRS.

  13. Multivariate analysis of factors predicting prostate dose in intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Tsuneyuki; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yoshinori; Kitsuda, Kenji; Notogawa, Takuya; Miki, Katsuhito; Nakamura, Kiyonao; Ishigaki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a multivariate analysis to determine relationships between prostate radiation dose and the state of surrounding organs, including organ volumes and the internal angle of the levator ani muscle (LAM), based on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images after bone matching. We analyzed 270 CBCT data sets from 30 consecutive patients receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer. With patients in the supine position on a couch with the HipFix system, data for center of mass (COM) displacement of the prostate and the state of individual organs were acquired and compared between planning CT and CBCT scans. Dose distributions were then recalculated based on CBCT images. The relative effects of factors on the variance in COM, dose covering 95% of the prostate volume (D95%), and percentage of prostate volume covered by the 100% isodose line (V100%) were evaluated by a backward stepwise multiple regression analysis. COM displacement in the anterior-posterior direction (COMAP) correlated significantly with the rectum volume (δVr) and the internal LAM angle (δθ; R = 0.63). Weak correlations were seen for COM in the left-right (R = 0.18) and superior-inferior directions (R = 0.31). Strong correlations between COMAP and prostate D95% and V100% were observed (R ≥ 0.69). Additionally, the change ratios in δVr and δθ remained as predictors of prostate D95% and V100%. This study shows statistically that maintaining the same rectum volume and LAM state for both the planning CT simulation and treatment is important to ensure the correct prostate dose in the supine position with bone matching. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Toxicity after intensity-modulated, image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flentje, Michael [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany); Guckenberger, Matthias; Ok, Sami; Polat, Buelent; Sweeney, Reinhart A.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate toxicity after dose-escalated radiotherapy for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated treatment planning (IMRT) and image-guided treatment (IGRT) delivery. Patients and Methods: 100 patients were treated with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) IMRT for prostate cancer: doses of 76.23 Gy and 60 Gy in 33 fractions were prescribed to the prostate and the seminal vesicles, respectively, for intermediate- and high-risk patients (n = 74). The total dose was 73.91 Gy in 32 fractions for low-risk patients and after transurethral resection of the prostate (n = 26). The pelvic lymphatics were treated with 46 Gy in 25 fractions in patients with high risk of lymph node metastases using an SIB to the prostate (n = 25). IGRT was practiced with cone-beam computed tomography. Acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was evaluated prospectively (CTCAE v3.0). Results: Treatment was completed as planned by all patients. Acute GI and GU toxicity grade {>=} 2 was observed in 12% and 42% of the patients, respectively, with 4% suffering from GU toxicity grade 3. 6 weeks after treatment, the incidence of acute toxicity grade {>=} 2 had decreased to 12%. With a median follow-up of 26 months, late GI and GU toxicity grade {>=} 2 was seen in 1.5% and 7.7% of the patients at 24 months. Four patients developed late toxicity grade 3 (GI n = 1; GU n = 3). Presence of acute GI and GU toxicity was significantly associated with late GI (p = 0.0007) and GU toxicity (p = 0.006). Conclusion: High-dose radiotherapy for prostate cancer using IMRT and IGRT resulted in low rates of acute toxicity and preliminary results of late toxicity are promising. (orig.)

  15. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for ASCENDS O2 Column Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. Wallace; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-01-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  16. Automatically-generated rectal dose constraints in intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Taejin; Kim, Yong Nam; Kim, Soo Kon; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Park, Soah; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Han, Taejin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Meyeon; Kim, Kyoung-Joo; Bae, Hoonsik; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-06-01

    The dose constraint during prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization should be patient-specific for better rectum sparing. The aims of this study are to suggest a novel method for automatically generating a patient-specific dose constraint by using an experience-based dose volume histogram (DVH) of the rectum and to evaluate the potential of such a dose constraint qualitatively. The normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) of the rectum with respect to V %ratio in our study were divided into three groups, where V %ratio was defined as the percent ratio of the rectal volume overlapping the planning target volume (PTV) to the rectal volume: (1) the rectal NTCPs in the previous study (clinical data), (2) those statistically generated by using the standard normal distribution (calculated data), and (3) those generated by combining the calculated data and the clinical data (mixed data). In the calculated data, a random number whose mean value was on the fitted curve described in the clinical data and whose standard deviation was 1% was generated by using the `randn' function in the MATLAB program and was used. For each group, we validated whether the probability density function (PDF) of the rectal NTCP could be automatically generated with the density estimation method by using a Gaussian kernel. The results revealed that the rectal NTCP probability increased in proportion to V %ratio , that the predictive rectal NTCP was patient-specific, and that the starting point of IMRT optimization for the given patient might be different. The PDF of the rectal NTCP was obtained automatically for each group except that the smoothness of the probability distribution increased with increasing number of data and with increasing window width. We showed that during the prostate IMRT optimization, the patient-specific dose constraints could be automatically generated and that our method could reduce the IMRT optimization time as well as maintain the

  17. Acute Esophagus Toxicity in Lung Cancer Patients After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwint, Margriet [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Uyterlinde, Wilma [Department of Thoracic Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nijkamp, Jasper; Chen, Chun; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heuvel, Michel van den [Department of Thoracic Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Knegjens, Joost; Herk, Marcel van [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Belderbos, Jose, E-mail: j.belderbos@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-effect relation between acute esophageal toxicity (AET) and the dose-volume parameters of the esophagus after intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: One hundred thirty-nine patients with inoperable NSCLC treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy were prospectively analyzed. The fractionation scheme was 66 Gy in 24 fractions. All patients received concurrently a daily dose of cisplatin (6 mg/m Superscript-Two ). Maximum AET was scored according to Common Toxicity Criteria 3.0. Dose-volume parameters V5 to V70, D{sub mean} and D{sub max} of the esophagus were calculated. A logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the dose-effect relation between these parameters and grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 AET. The outcome was compared with the clinically used esophagus V35 prediction model for grade {>=}2 after radical 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) treatment. Results: In our patient group, 9% did not experience AET, and 31% experienced grade 1 AET, 38% grade 2 AET, and 22% grade 3 AET. The incidence of grade 2 and grade 3 AET was not different from that in patients treated with CCRT using 3DCRT. The V50 turned out to be the most significant dosimetric predictor for grade {>=}3 AET (P=.012). The derived V50 model was shown to predict grade {>=}2 AET significantly better than the clinical V35 model (P<.001). Conclusions: For NSCLC patients treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy, the V50 was identified as most accurate predictor of grade {>=}3 AET. There was no difference in the incidence of grade {>=}2 AET between 3DCRT and IMRT in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  18. Standard fractionation intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT of primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuller Clifton D

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT affords unparalleled capacity to deliver conformal radiation doses to tumors in the central nervous system. However, to date, there are few reported outcomes from using IMRT, either alone or as a boost technique, for standard fractionation radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. Methods Forty-two patients were treated with IMRT alone (72% or as a boost (28% after 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT. Thirty-three patients with primary disease and 9 patients with recurrent tumors were included. Thirty-four patients (81% had surgery, with gross tumor resection in 13 patients (36%; 22 patients (53% received chemo-radiotherapy. The median total radiation dose for all patients was 60 Gy with a range from 30.6 to 74 Gy. Standard fractions of 1.8 Gy/day to 2.0 Gy/day were utilized. Results Median survival was 8.7 months, with 37 patients (88% deceased at last contact. Nonparametric analysis showed no survival difference in IMRT-boost vs. IMRT-only groups. Conclusion While technically feasible, preliminary results suggest delivering standard radiation doses by IMRT did not improve survival outcomes in this series compared to historical controls. In light of this lack of a survival benefit and the costs associated with use of IMRT, future prospective trials are needed to evaluate non-survival endpoints such as quality of life and functional preservation. Short of such evidence, the use of IMRT for treatment of GBM needs to be carefully rationalized.

  19. Performance evaluation of intensity modulated optical OFDM system with digital baseband distortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanin, Evgeny

    2011-02-28

    Bit-Error-Ratio (BER) of intensity modulated optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) system is analytically evaluated accounting for nonlinear digital baseband distortion in the transmitter and additive noise in the photo receiver. The nonlinear distortion that is caused by signal clipping and quantization is taken into consideration. The signal clipping helps to overcome the system performance limitation related to high peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) of the OFDM signal and to minimize the value of optical power that is required for achieving specified BER. The signal quantization due to a limited bit resolution of the digital to analog converter (DAC) causes an optical power penalty in the case when the bit resolution is too low. By introducing an effective signal to noise ratio (SNR) the optimum signal clipping ratio, system BER and required optical power at the input to the receiver is evaluated for the OFDM system with multi-level quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) applied to the optical signal subcarriers. Minimum required DAC bit resolution versus the size of QAM constellation is identified. It is demonstrated that the bit resolution of 7 and higher causes negligibly small optical power penalty at the system BER=10⁻³ when 256-QAM and a constellation of lower size is applied. The performance of the optical OFDM system is compared to the performance of the multi-level amplitude-shift keying (M-ASK) system for the same number of information bits transmitted per signal sample. It is demonstrated that in the case of the matched receiver the M-ASK system outperforms OFDM and requires 3-3.5 dB less of optical power at BER=10⁻³ when 1-4 data bits are transmitted per signal sample.

  20. Dosimetric validation of new semiconductor diode dosimetry system for intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kinhikar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The new diode Isorad was validated for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and the observations during the validation are reported. Materials and Methods: The validation includes intrinsic precision, post-irradiation stability, dose linearity, dose-rate effect, angular response, source to surface (SSD dependence, field size dependence, and dose calibration. Results: The intrinsic precision of the diode was more than 1% (1 σ. The linearity found in the whole range of dose analyzed was 1.93% (R 2 = 1. The minimum and maximum variation in the measured and calculated dose were found to be 0.78% (with 25 MU at ioscentre and 4.8% (with 1000 MU at isocentre, respectively. The maximal variation in angular response with respect to arbitrary angle 0° found was 1.31%. The diode exhibited a 51.7% and 35% decrease in the response in the 35 cm and 20 cm SSD range, respectively. The minimum and the maximum variation in the measured dose from the diode and calculated dose were 0.82% (5 cm × 5 cm and 3.75% (30 cm × 30 cm, respectively. At couch 270°, the response of the diode was found to vary maximum by 1.4% with ΁ 60 gantry angle. Mean variation between measured dose with diode and planned dose by TPS was found to be 1.3% (SD 0.75 for IMRT patient-specific quality assurance. Conclusion: For the evaluation of IMRT, use of cylindrical diode is strongly recommended.

  1. Stochastic versus deterministic kernel-based superposition approaches for dose calculation of intensity-modulated arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Grace; Earl, Matthew A.; Luan, Shuang; Wang, Chao; Cao, Daliang; Yu, Cedric X.; Naqvi, Shahid A.

    2008-09-01

    Dose calculations for radiation arc therapy are traditionally performed by approximating continuous delivery arcs with multiple static beams. For 3D conformal arc treatments, the shape and weight variation per degree is usually small enough to allow arcs to be approximated by static beams separated by 5°-10°. But with intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT), the variation in shape and dose per degree can be large enough to require a finer angular spacing. With the increase in the number of beams, a deterministic dose calculation method, such as collapsed-cone convolution/superposition, will require proportionally longer computational times, which may not be practical clinically. We propose to use a homegrown Monte Carlo kernel-superposition technique (MCKS) to compute doses for rotational delivery. The IMAT plans were generated with 36 static beams, which were subsequently interpolated into finer angular intervals for dose calculation to mimic the continuous arc delivery. Since MCKS uses random sampling of photons, the dose computation time only increased insignificantly for the interpolated-static-beam plans that may involve up to 720 beams. Ten past IMRT cases were selected for this study. Each case took approximately 15-30 min to compute on a single CPU running Mac OS X using the MCKS method. The need for a finer beam spacing is dictated by how fast the beam weights and aperture shapes change between the adjacent static planning beam angles. MCKS, however, obviates the concern by allowing hundreds of beams to be calculated in practically the same time as for a few beams. For more than 43 beams, MCKS usually takes less CPU time than the collapsed-cone algorithm used by the Pinnacle3 planning system.

  2. Clinical Dosimetric Comparison among Different Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plans for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjiang Sun

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the dosimetric differences of different intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT plans for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. Methods: 5-, 7- and 9-fields of IMRT plans in 16 NPC patients were respectively designed and synchronous dimention technology was applied to compare the dosimetric differences in target areas and involved organs. Results: The recovery rate in target area was 95% while the plan was evidently worse in 5-field than in 7- and 9-fields (P < 0.05. Whereas the maximum dosage (Dmax, mean dosage (Dmean and minimum dosage (Dmin were similar between 7- and 9-fields (P > 0.05, which were obviously lower in 5-field, and the differences were both significant (P < 0.05. In addition, the conformity and homogeneity indexes in target area had no significant difference between 7- and 9-fields, but were markedly better than in 5-field (P < 0.05. Indexes in each involved organs were the lowest in 5-field than in other fields (P < 0.05, but were similar between 7- and 9-fields (P > 0.05, which were all lower than tolerant dosage. As for BODY, there were significant differences in V10 - V20 between 5-field and other fields (P < 0.05, but were similar in V25 - V30 (P > 0.05. However, 7- and 9-fields were similar in V10 - V20 (P > 0.05. Conclusion: 7-field IMRT plan is the optimal one for NPC on both clinical dosimetric requirements and field-establishment principles.

  3. The generalized equivalent uniform dose function as a basis for intensity-modulated treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi Beong; Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, MO (United States)]. E-mail: deasy@castor.wustl.edu

    2002-10-21

    The efficiency of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning depends critically on the presence or absence of multiple local minima in the feasible search space. We analyse the convexity of the generalized equivalent uniform dose equation (Niemierko A 1999 Med. Phys. 26 1100) when used either in the objective function or in the constraints. The practical importance of this analysis is that convex objective functions minimized over convex feasibility spaces do not have multiple local minima; likewise for concave objective functions maximized over convex feasibility spaces. Both of these situations are referred to as 'convex problems' and computationally efficient local search methods can be used for their solution. We also show that the Poisson-based tumour control probability objective function is strictly concave (if one neglects inter-patient heterogeneity), and hence it implies a single local minimum if maximized over a convex feasibility space. Even when including inter-patient heterogeneity, multiple local minima, although theoretically possible, are expected to be of minimal concern. The generalized equivalent uniform dose function (EUD{sub a}) is proved to be convex or concave depending on its only parameter a: when a is equal to or greater than 1, minimizing EUD{sub a} on a convex feasibility space leads to a single minimum; when a is less than 1, maximizing EUD{sub a} on a convex feasibility space leads to a single minimum. We also study a recently proposed practical, yet difficult, IMRT treatment planning formulation: unconstrained optimization of the objective function proposed by Wu et al (2002 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 52 224-35), which is expressed in terms of the EUD{sub a} for the target and normal tissues. This formulation may theoretically lead to multiple local minima. We propose a procedure for improving resulting solutions based on the convexity properties of the underlying objective function terms

  4. The generalized equivalent uniform dose function as a basis for intensity-modulated treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Beong; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2002-10-01

    The efficiency of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning depends critically on the presence or absence of multiple local minima in the feasible search space. We analyse the convexity of the generalized equivalent uniform dose equation (Niemierko A 1999 Med. Phys. 26 1100) when used either in the objective function or in the constraints. The practical importance of this analysis is that convex objective functions minimized over convex feasibility spaces do not have multiple local minima; likewise for concave objective functions maximized over convex feasibility spaces. Both of these situations are referred to as 'convex problems' and computationally efficient local search methods can be used for their solution. We also show that the Poisson-based tumour control probability objective function is strictly concave (if one neglects inter-patient heterogeneity), and hence it implies a single local minimum if maximized over a convex feasibility space. Even when including inter-patient heterogeneity, multiple local minima, although theoretically possible, are expected to be of minimal concern. The generalized equivalent uniform dose function (EUDa) is proved to be convex or concave depending on its only parameter a: when a is equal to or greater than 1, minimizing EUDa on a convex feasibility space leads to a single minimum; when a is less than 1, maximizing EUDa on a convex feasibility space leads to a single minimum. We also study a recently proposed practical, yet difficult, IMRT treatment planning formulation: unconstrained optimization of the objective function proposed by Wu et al (2002 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 52 224-35), which is expressed in terms of the EUDa for the target and normal tissues. This formulation may theoretically lead to multiple local minima. We propose a procedure for improving resulting solutions based on the convexity properties of the underlying objective function terms.

  5. Interfractional variability in intensity-modulated radiotherapy of prostate cancer with or without thermoplastic pelvic immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.A.; Kim, C.Y.; Park, Y.J.; Yoon, W.S.; Lee, N.K.; Yang, D.S. [Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    To determine the variability of patient positioning errors associated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer and to assess the impact of thermoplastic pelvic immobilization on these errors using kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). From February 2012 to June 2012, the records of 314 IMRT sessions in 19 patients with prostate cancer, performed with or without immobilization at two different facilities in the Korea University Hospital were analyzed. The kV CBCT images were matched to simulation computed tomography (CT) images to determine the simulation-to-treatment variability. The shifts along the x (lateral)-, y (longitudinal)- and z (vertical)-axes were measured, as was the shift in the three dimensional (3D) vector. The measured systematic errors in the immobilized group during treatment were 0.46 ± 1.75 mm along the x-axis, - 0.35 ± 3.83 mm along the y-axis, 0.20 ± 2.75 mm along the z-axis and 4.05 ± 3.02 mm in the 3D vector. Those of nonimmobilized group were - 1.45 ± 7.50 mm along the x-axis, 1.89 ± 5.07 mm along the y-axis, 0.28 ± 3.81 mm along the z-axis and 8.90 ± 4.79 mm in the 3D vector. The group immobilized with pelvic thermoplastics showed reduced interfractional variability along the x- and y-axes and in the 3D vector compared to the nonimmobilized group (p < 0.05). IMRT with thermoplastic pelvic immobilization in patients with prostate cancer appears to be useful in stabilizing interfractional variability during the planned treatment course. (orig.)

  6. Rationale and development of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy post-prostatectomy: the present standard of care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray JR

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Julia R Murray,1,2 Helen A McNair,2 David P Dearnaley1,2 1Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research, London, 2Department of Radiotherapy, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, UK Abstract: The indications for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy have evolved over the last decade, although the optimal timing, dose, and target volume remain to be well defined. The target volume is susceptible to anatomical variations with its borders interfacing with the rectum and bladder. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy has become the gold standard for radical prostate radiotherapy. Here we review the current evidence for image-guided techniques with intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the prostate bed and describe current strategies to reduce or account for interfraction and intrafraction motion. Keywords: radiotherapy, prostate cancer, post-prostatectomy, image-guided radiation therapy

  7. Electronic polarization-division demultiplexing based on digital signal processing in intensity-modulation direct-detection optical communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Kazuro

    2014-01-27

    We propose a novel configuration of optical receivers for intensity-modulation direct-detection (IM · DD) systems, which can cope with dual-polarization (DP) optical signals electrically. Using a Stokes analyzer and a newly-developed digital signal-processing (DSP) algorithm, we can achieve polarization tracking and demultiplexing in the digital domain after direct detection. Simulation results show that the power penalty stemming from digital polarization manipulations is negligibly small.

  8. Continuous-time method and its discretization to inverse problem of intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Ken'ichi; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Abou Al-Ola, Omar M.; Yoshinaga, Tetsuya

    2014-06-01

    We propose a novel approach for solving box-constrained inverse problems in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning based on the idea of continuous dynamical methods and split-feasibility algorithms. Our method can compute a feasible solution without the second derivative of an objective function, which is required for gradient-based optimization algorithms. We prove theoretically that a double Kullback-Leibler divergence can be used as the Lyapunov function for the IMRT planning system.

  9. Studies on the interfacial charge transfer processes of nanocrystalline CdSe thin film electrodes by intensity modulated photocurrent spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Interfacial charge transfer kinetics of the nanocrystalline CdSe thin film electrodes have been studied in sodium polysulfide solutions by intensity modulated photocurrent spectroscopy (IMPS). The interfacial direct and indirect charge transfer and recombination processes were analyzed in terms of the parameters: normalized steady state photocurrents and surface state lifetimes obtained by measuring the IMPS responses under different applied potentials and different solution concentrations. IMPS responses of polycrystalline CdSe thin film electrodes were also presented for comparison.

  10. Mach-Zehnder Type Annealed Proton Exchange Waveguide and Coplanar Waveguide Modulation Electrode LiNbO3 Intensity Modulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jian; ZHU Xue-jun

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of a conventional LiNbO3 intensity modulator made up of a Mach-Zehnder(MZ) type annealed proton exchange(APE) waveguide and coplanar waveguide(CPW) modulation electrode are presented. The APE waveguide characteristics and their relations with process parameters are analyzed. At the same time, the electrical characteristics of modulation electrode, such as modulation voltage, microwave effective index associated with modulation bandwidth, characteristics impedance, are also investigated in detail.

  11. Long-term decision regret after post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, Thomas P; Chin, Stephen; Manuel, Lucy; Wen, Shelly; Hoffman, Matthew; Wilcox, Shea W; Aherne, Noel J

    2017-02-01

    Decision regret (DR) may occur when a patient believes their outcome would have been better if they had decided differently about their management. Although some studies investigate DR after treatment for localised prostate cancer, none report DR in patients undergoing surgery and post-prostatectomy radiotherapy. We evaluated DR in this group of patients overall, and for specific components of therapy. We surveyed 83 patients, with minimum 5 years follow-up, treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) and post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) to 64-66 Gy following www.EviQ.org.au protocols. A validated questionnaire identified DR if men either indicated that they would have been better off had they chosen another treatment, or they wished they could change their mind about treatment. There was an 85.5% response rate, with median follow-up post-IMRT 78 months. Adjuvant IG-IMRT was used in 28% of patients, salvage in 72% and ADT in 48%. A total of 70% of patients remained disease-free. Overall, 16.9% of patients expressed DR for treatment, with fourfold more regret for the RP component of treatment compared to radiotherapy (16.9% vs 4.2%, P = 0.01). DR for androgen deprivation was 14.3%. Patients were regretful of surgery due to toxicity, not being adequately informed about radiotherapy as an alternative, positive margins and surgery costs (83%, 33%, 25% and 8% of regretful patients respectively). Toxicity caused DR in the three radiotherapy-regretful and four ADT-regretful patients. Patients were twice as regretful overall, and of surgery, for salvage vs adjuvant approaches (both 19.6% vs 10.0%). Decision regret after RP and post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT is uncommon, although patients regret RP more than post-operative IG-IMRT. This should reassure urologists referring patients for post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT, particularly in the immediate adjuvant setting. Other implications include appropriate patient selection for RP (and

  12. Larynx-sparing techniques using intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar Ad, Voichita, E-mail: voichita.bar-ad@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lin, Haibo [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hwang, Wei-Ting [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Deville, Curtiland [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dutta, Pinaki R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tochner, Zelig; Both, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to explore whether the laryngeal dose can be reduced by using 2 intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques: whole-neck field IMRT technique (WF-IMRT) vs. junctioned IMRT (J-IMRT). The effect on planning target volumes (PTVs) coverage and laryngeal sparing was evaluated. WF-IMRT technique consisted of a single IMRT plan, including the primary tumor and the superior and inferior neck to the level of the clavicular heads. The larynx was defined as an organ at risk extending superiorly to cover the arytenoid cartilages and inferiorly to include the cricoid cartilage. The J-IMRT technique consisted of an IMRT plan for the primary tumor and the superior neck, matched to conventional antero-posterior opposing lower neck fields at the level of the thyroid notch. A central block was used for the anterior lower neck field at the level of the larynx to restrict the dose to the larynx. Ten oropharyngeal cancer cases were analyzed. Both the primary site and bilateral regional lymphatics were included in the radiotherapy targets. The averaged V95 for the PTV57.6 was 99.2% for the WF-IMRT technique compared with 97.4% (p = 0.02) for J-IMRT. The averaged V95 for the PTV64 was 99.9% for the WF-IMRT technique compared with 98.9% (p = 0.02) for J-IMRT and the averaged V95 for the PT70 was 100.0% for WF-IMRT technique compared with 99.5% (p = 0.04) for J-IMRT. The averaged mean laryngeal dose was 18 Gy with both techniques. The averaged mean doses within the matchline volumes were 69.3 Gy for WF-MRT and 66.2 Gy for J-IMRT (p = 0.03). The WF-IMRT technique appears to offer an optimal coverage of the target volumes and a mean dose to the larynx similar with J-IMRT and should be further evaluated in clinical trials.

  13. Distant Metastases in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Min, E-mail: min.yao@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lu Minggen [School of Public Health, University of Nevada at Reno, Reno, NV (United States); Savvides, Panayiotis S. [Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Rezaee, Rod; Zender, Chad A.; Lavertu, Pierre [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Machtay, Mitchell [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the pattern and risk factors for distant metastases in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) after curative treatment with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study of 284 HNSCC patients treated in a single institution with IMRT. Sites included were oropharynx (125), oral cavity (70), larynx (55), hypopharynx (17), and unknown primary (17). American Joint Committee on Cancer stage distribution includes I (3), II (19), III (42), and IV (203). There were 224 males and 60 females with a median age of 57. One hundred eighty-six patients were treated with definitive IMRT and 98 postoperative IMRT. One hundred forty-nine patients also received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 22.8 months (range, 0.07-77.3 months) and 29.5 months (4.23-77.3 months) for living patients. The 3-year local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival were 94.6%, 96.4%, 92.5%, 84.1%, and 68.95%, respectively. There were 45 patients with distant metastasis. In multivariate analysis, distant metastasis was strongly associated with N stage (p = 0.046), T stage (p < 0.0001), and pretreatment maximum standardized uptake value of the lymph node (p = 0.006), but not associated with age, gender, disease sites, pretreatment standardized uptake value of the primary tumor, or locoregional control. The freedom from distant metastasis at 3 years was 98.1% for no factors, 88.6% for one factor, 68.3% for two factors, and 41.7% for three factors (p < 0.0001 by log-rank test). Conclusion: With advanced radiation techniques and concurrent chemotherapy, the failure pattern has changed with more patients failing distantly. The majority of patients with distant metastases had no local or regional failures, indicating that these patients might have microscopic distant

  14. Larynx-sparing techniques using intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar Ad, Voichita; Lin, Haibo; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Deville, Curtiland; Dutta, Pinaki R; Tochner, Zelig; Both, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to explore whether the laryngeal dose can be reduced by using 2 intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques: whole-neck field IMRT technique (WF-IMRT) vs. junctioned IMRT (J-IMRT). The effect on planning target volumes (PTVs) coverage and laryngeal sparing was evaluated. WF-IMRT technique consisted of a single IMRT plan, including the primary tumor and the superior and inferior neck to the level of the clavicular heads. The larynx was defined as an organ at risk extending superiorly to cover the arytenoid cartilages and inferiorly to include the cricoid cartilage. The J-IMRT technique consisted of an IMRT plan for the primary tumor and the superior neck, matched to conventional antero-posterior opposing lower neck fields at the level of the thyroid notch. A central block was used for the anterior lower neck field at the level of the larynx to restrict the dose to the larynx. Ten oropharyngeal cancer cases were analyzed. Both the primary site and bilateral regional lymphatics were included in the radiotherapy targets. The averaged V95 for the PTV57.6 was 99.2% for the WF-IMRT technique compared with 97.4% (p = 0.02) for J-IMRT. The averaged V95 for the PTV64 was 99.9% for the WF-IMRT technique compared with 98.9% (p = 0.02) for J-IMRT and the averaged V95 for the PT70 was 100.0% for WF-IMRT technique compared with 99.5% (p = 0.04) for J-IMRT. The averaged mean laryngeal dose was 18 Gy with both techniques. The averaged mean doses within the matchline volumes were 69.3 Gy for WF-MRT and 66.2 Gy for J-IMRT (p = 0.03). The WF-IMRT technique appears to offer an optimal coverage of the target volumes and a mean dose to the larynx similar with J-IMRT and should be further evaluated in clinical trials.

  15. Simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) in nasopharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, Gabriela [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland); Peponi, Evangelia; Glanzmann, Christoph; Kunz, Guntram; Renner, Christoph; Tomuschat, Katja

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and safety of using simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) to treat nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) in a Caucasian cohort. Outcome was analyzed with respect to dose-volume histogram (DVH) values. Patients and Methods: Between 03/2002 and 01/2008, 39 NPC patients underwent SIB-IMRT (37 Caucasians; 31 males; mean age 53 years [16-78 years]). 41% presented with WHO (World Health Organization) type 1 unfavorable histology, 85% with stage III/IV disease. 19 patients had total gross tumor volume (GTV) 16-70 cm{sup 3} (mean 36 cm{sup 3}), while 16 had GTV > 70 cm{sup 3} (73-217 cm{sup 3}; mean 115 cm{sup 3}). All patients with stage II-IV disease received concomitant cisplatin. The prescribed SIB dose delivered to the planning target volume (PTV) was 70 Gy (2.00 Gy/fraction) in 17, 69.6 Gy (2.11 Gy/fraction) in 19, and 66 Gy (2.20 Gy/fraction) in three patients. Results: 3-year local relapse-free, nodal relapse-free, distant metastases-free, disease-free rates and overall survival were 86%, 89%, 85%, 72%, and 85% (median follow-up 30 months [8-71 months]). Histology was a significant prognostic factor concerning overall survival, with worst prognosis in WHO type 1 compared to type 2/3 (75% vs. 93%; p = 0.03). There was a trend in favor of WHO type 2/3 regarding local control (74% vs. 94%; p = 0.052). The PTV DVHs showed a slight left shift compared to reported series. Three patients developed grade 3 late effects (xerostomia [n=2], dysphagia [n=1], hearing loss [n=1]). Conclusion: In comparison with predominantly Asian NPC IMRT series in the literature, chemo-IMRT in the own Caucasian cohort, characterized by less radioresponsive WHO type 1, was equally effective. Treatment tolerance was excellent. (orig.)

  16. Pelvic Ewing sarcomas. Three-dimensional conformal vs. intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mounessi, F.S.; Lehrich, P.; Haverkamp, U.; Eich, H.T. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Willich, N. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). RiSK - Registry for the Evaluation of Late Side Effects after Radiotherapy in Childhood and Adolescence; Boelling, T. [Center for Radiation Oncology, Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    The goal of the present work was to assess the potential advantage of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) over three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) planning in pelvic Ewing's sarcoma. A total of 8 patients with Ewing sarcoma of the pelvis undergoing radiotherapy were analyzed. Plans for 3D-CRT and IMRT were calculated for each patient. Dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV), conformity and homogeneity indices, as well as further parameters were evaluated. Results The average dose coverage values for PTV were comparable in 3D-CRT and IMRT plans. Both techniques had a PTV coverage of V{sub 95} > 98 % in all patients. Whereas the IMRT plans achieved a higher conformity index compared to the 3D-CRT plans (conformity index 0.79 {+-} 0.12 vs. 0.54 {+-} 0.19, p = 0.012), the dose distribution across the target volumes was less homogeneous with IMRT planning than with 3D-CRT planning. This difference was statistically significant (homogeneity index 0.11 {+-} 0.03 vs. 0.07 {+-} 0.0, p = 0.035). For the bowel, D{sub mean} and D{sub 1%}, as well as V{sub 2} to V{sub 60} were reduced in IMRT plans. For the bladder and the rectum, there was no significant difference in D{sub mean}. However, the percentages of volumes receiving at least doses of 30, 40, 45, and 50 Gy (V{sub 30} to V{sub 50}) were lower for the rectum in IMRT plans. The volume of normal tissue receiving at least 2 Gy (V{sub 2}) was significantly higher in IMRT plans compared with 3D-CRT, whereas at high dose levels (V{sub 30}) it was significantly lower. Compared to 3D-CRT, IMRT showed significantly better results regarding dose conformity (p = 0.012) and bowel sparing at dose levels above 30 Gy (p = 0.012). Thus, dose escalation in the radiotherapy of pelvic Ewing's sarcoma can be more easily achieved using IMRT. (orig.)

  17. Efficiency of analytical and sampling-based uncertainty propagation in intensity-modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, N.; Hennig, P.; Wieser, H. P.; Bangert, M.

    2017-07-01

    The sensitivity of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment plans to uncertainties can be quantified and mitigated with robust/min-max and stochastic/probabilistic treatment analysis and optimization techniques. Those methods usually rely on sparse random, importance, or worst-case sampling. Inevitably, this imposes a trade-off between computational speed and accuracy of the uncertainty propagation. Here, we investigate analytical probabilistic modeling (APM) as an alternative for uncertainty propagation and minimization in IMPT that does not rely on scenario sampling. APM propagates probability distributions over range and setup uncertainties via a Gaussian pencil-beam approximation into moments of the probability distributions over the resulting dose in closed form. It supports arbitrary correlation models and allows for efficient incorporation of fractionation effects regarding random and systematic errors. We evaluate the trade-off between run-time and accuracy of APM uncertainty computations on three patient datasets. Results are compared against reference computations facilitating importance and random sampling. Two approximation techniques to accelerate uncertainty propagation and minimization based on probabilistic treatment plan optimization are presented. Runtimes are measured on CPU and GPU platforms, dosimetric accuracy is quantified in comparison to a sampling-based benchmark (5000 random samples). APM accurately propagates range and setup uncertainties into dose uncertainties at competitive run-times (GPU ≤slant {5} min). The resulting standard deviation (expectation value) of dose show average global γ{3% / {3}~mm} pass rates between 94.2% and 99.9% (98.4% and 100.0%). All investigated importance sampling strategies provided less accuracy at higher run-times considering only a single fraction. Considering fractionation, APM uncertainty propagation and treatment plan optimization was proven to be possible at constant time complexity

  18. Failure Patterns After Hemithoracic Pleural Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimner, Andreas, E-mail: rimnera@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Spratt, Daniel E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zauderer, Marjorie G. [Department of Medicine, Thoracic Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York (United States); Rosenzweig, Kenneth E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Wu, Abraham J.; Foster, Amanda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yorke, Ellen D. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Adusumilli, Prasad; Rusch, Valerie W. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Krug, Lee M. [Department of Medicine, Thoracic Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: We previously reported our technique for delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the entire pleura while attempting to spare the lung in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Herein, we report a detailed pattern-of-failure analysis in patients with MPM who were unresectable or underwent pleurectomy/decortication (P/D), uniformly treated with hemithoracic pleural IMRT. Methods and Materials: Sixty-seven patients with MPM were treated with definitive or adjuvant hemithoracic pleural IMRT between November 2004 and May 2013. Pretreatment imaging, treatment plans, and posttreatment imaging were retrospectively reviewed to determine failure location(s). Failures were categorized as in-field (within the 90% isodose line), marginal (<90% and ≥50% isodose lines), out-of-field (outside the 50% isodose line), or distant. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months from diagnosis and the median time to in-field local failure from the end of RT was 10 months. Forty-three in-field local failures (64%) were found with a 1- and 2-year actuarial failure rate of 56% and 74%, respectively. For patients who underwent P/D versus those who received a partial pleurectomy or were deemed unresectable, the median time to in-field local failure was 14 months versus 6 months, respectively, with 1- and 2-year actuarial in-field local failure rates of 43% and 60% versus 66% and 83%, respectively (P=.03). There were 13 marginal failures (19%). Five of the marginal failures (38%) were located within the costomediastinal recess. Marginal failures decreased with increasing institutional experience (P=.04). Twenty-five patients (37%) had out-of-field failures. Distant failures occurred in 32 patients (48%). Conclusions: After hemithoracic pleural IMRT, local failure remains the dominant form of failure pattern. Patients treated with adjuvant hemithoracic pleural IMRT after P/D experience a significantly longer time to local and distant failure than

  19. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy for Cervical and Endometrial Cancer: A Prospective Report on Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandecasteele, Katrien, E-mail: Katrien.Vandecasteele@uzgent.be [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Tummers, Philippe; Makar, Amin [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Eijkeren, Marc van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Delrue, Louke [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Denys, Hannelore [Department of Medical Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Lambert, Bieke [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Beerens, Anne-Sophie [Department of Pathology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Van den Broecke, Rudy [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Lambein, Kathleen [Department of Pathology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Fonteyne, Valerie; De Meerleer, Gert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To report on toxicity after postoperative intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) for cervical (CC) and endometrial cancer (EC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-four CC and 41 EC patients were treated with postoperative IMAT. If indicated, para-aortic lymph node irradiation (preventive or when affected, PALN) and/or concomitant cisplatin (40 mg/m Superscript-Two , weekly) was administered. The prescribed dose for IMAT was 45 Gy (CC, 25 fractions) and 46 Gy (EC, 23 fractions), followed by a brachytherapeutic boost if possible. Radiation-related toxicity was assessed prospectively. The effect of concomitant cisplatin and PALN irradiation was evaluated. Results: Regarding acute toxicity (n = 65), Grade 3 and 2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity was observed in zero and 63% of patients (79% CC, 54% EC), respectively. Grade 3 and 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was observed in 1% and 18% of patients, respectively. Grade 2 (21%) and 3 (12%) hematologic toxicity (n = 41) occurred only in CC patients. Seventeen percent of CC patients and 2% of EC patients experienced Grade 2 fatigue and skin toxicity, respectively. Adding cisplatin led to an increase in Grade >2 nausea (57% vs. 9%; p = 0.01), Grade 2 nocturia (24% vs. 4%; p = 0.03), Grade {>=}2 hematologic toxicity (38% vs. nil, p = 0.003), Grade {>=}2 leukopenia (33% vs. nil, p = 0.009), and a strong trend toward more fatigue (14% vs. 2%; p = 0.05). Para-aortic lymph node irradiation led to an increase of Grade 2 nocturia (31% vs. 4%, p = 0.008) and a strong trend toward more Grade >2 nausea (44% vs. 18%; p = 0.052). Regarding late toxicity (n = 45), no Grade 3 or 4 late toxicity occurred. Grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity, genitourinary toxicity, and fatigue occurred in 4%, 9%, and 1% of patients. Neither concomitant cisplatin nor PALN irradiation increased late toxicity rates. Conclusions: Postoperative IMAT for EC or CC is associated with low acute and late toxicity. Concomitant chemotherapy and PALN irradiation

  20. Osteoradionecrosis of the mandible. Minimized risk profile following Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, G.; Huguenin, P.; Luetolf, U.M.; Glanzmann, C. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland); Studer, S.P.; Zwahlen, R.A.; Graetz, K.W. [Dept. of Craniomaxillofacial Surgery, Univ. Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-05-15

    Background and purpose: osteoradionecrosis (ON) of the mandible is a serious late complication of high-dose radiation therapy for tumors of the oropharynx and oral cavity. After doses between 60 and 72 Gy using standard fractionation, an incidence of ON between 5% and 15% is reported in a review from 1989, whereas in more recent publications using moderately accelerated or hyperfractionated irradiation and doses between 69 and 81 Gy, the incidence of ON is between < 1% and {proportional_to} 6%. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is expected to translate into a further important reduction of ON. The aim of this descriptive study was to assess absolute and relative bone volumes exposed to high IMRT doses, related to observed bone tolerance. Patients and methods: between December 2001 and November 2004, 73 of 123 patients treated with IMRT were identified as subgroup ''at risk'' for ON (> 60 Gy for oropharyngeal or oral cavity cancer). 21/73 patients were treated in a postoperative setting, 52 patients underwent primary definitive irradiation. In 56 patients concomitant cisplatin-based chemotherapy was applied. Mean follow-up time was 22 months (12-46 months). Oral cavity including the mandible bone outside the planning target volume was contoured and dose-volume constraints were defined in order to spare bone tissue. Dose-volume histograms were obtained from contoured mandible in each patient and were analyzed and related to clinical mandible bone tolerance. Results: using IMRT with doses between 60 and 75 Gy (mean 67 Gy), on average 7.8, 4.8, 0.9, and 0.3 cm{sup 3} were exposed to doses > 60, 65, 70, and 75 Gy, respectively. These values are substantially lower than when using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The difference has been approximately quantified by comparison with a historic series. Additional ON risk factors of the patients were also analyzed. Only one grade 3 ON of the lingual horizontal branch, treated with

  1. Leakage-Penumbra effect in intensity modulated radiation therapy step-and-shoot dose delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Grigor N Grigorov; James CL Chow

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the leakage-penumbra(LP) effect with a proposed correction method for the step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy(IMRT).METHODS: Leakage-penumbra dose profiles from 10 randomly selected prostate IMRT plans were studied. The IMRT plans were delivered by a Varian 21 EX linear accelerator equipped with a 120-leaf multileaf collimator(MLC). For each treatment plan created by the Pinnacle3 treatment planning system,a 3-dimensional LP dose distribution generated by 5 coplanar photon beams,starting from 0o with equal separation of 72 o,was investigated. For each photon beam used in the stepand-shoot IMRT plans,the first beam segment was set to have the largest area in the MLC leaf-sequencing,and was equal to the planning target volume(PTV). The overshoot effect(OSE) and the segment positional errors were measured using a solid water phantom with Kodak(TL and X-OMAT V) radiographic films. Film dosimetric analysis and calibration were carried out using a film scanner(Vidar VXR-16). The LP dose profiles were determined by eliminating the OSE and segment positional errors with specific individual irradiations. RESULTS: A non-uniformly distributed leaf LP dose ranging from 3% to 5% of the beam dose was measured in clinical IMRT beams. An overdose at the gap between neighboring segments,represented as dose peaks of up to 10% of the total BP,was measured. The LP effect increased the dose to the PTV and surrounding critical tissues. In addition,the effectdepends on the number of beams and segments for each beam. Segment positional error was less than the maximum tolerance of 1 mm under a dose rate of 600 monitor units per minute in the treatment plans. The OSE varying with the dose rate was observed in all photon beams,and the effect increased from 1 to 1.3 Gy per treatment of the rectal intersection. As the dosimetric impacts from the LP effect and OSE may increase the rectal post-radiation effects,a correction of LP was proposed and demonstrated for

  2. Optimal beam design on intensity-modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost in nasopharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mei-Chun; Hu, Yu-Wen; Liu, Ching-Sheng; Lee, Jeun-Shenn; Huang, Pin-I; Yen, Sang-Hue; Lee, Yuh-Lin; Hsieh, Chun-Mei; Shiau, Cheng-Ying

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to determine the optimal beam design among various combinations of field numbers and beam trajectories for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique for the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). We used 10 fields with gantry angles of 155°, 130°, 75°, 25°, 0° L, 0° R, 335°, 285°, 230°, and 205° denoted as F10. To decrease doses in the spinal cord, the F10 technique was designed by featuring 2 pairs of split-opposed beam fields at 155° to 335° and 205° to 25°, as well as one pair of manually split beam fields at 0°. The F10 technique was compared with 4 other common field arrangements: F7E, 7 fields with 50° equally spaced gantry angles; F7, the basis of F10 with 155°, 130°, 75°, 0°, 285°, 230°, and 205°; F9E, 9 fields with 40° equally spaced gantry angles; and FP, 7 posterior fields with 180°, 150°, 120°, 90°, 270°, 240°, and 210°. For each individual case of 10 patients, the customized constraints derived after optimization with the standard F10 technique were applied to 4 other field arrangements. The 4 new optimized plans of each individual case were normalized to achieve the same coverage of planning target volume (PTV)63Gy as that of the standard F10 technique. The F10 field arrangement exhibited the best coverage in PTV70Gy and the least mean dose in the trachea-esophagus region. Furthermore, the F10 field arrangement demonstrated the highest level of conformity in the low-dose region and the least monitor unit. The F10 field arrangement performed more outstandingly than the other field arrangements in PTV70Gy coverage and spared the central organ. This arrangement also exhibited the highest conformity and delivery efficiency. The F10 technique is recommended as the standard beam geometry for the SIB-IMRT of NPC. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Elective Lymph Node Irradiation With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: Is Conventional Dose Fractionation Necessary?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedi, Meena; Firat, Selim; Semenenko, Vladimir A.; Schultz, Christopher; Tripp, Patrick; Byhardt, Roger [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Wang, Dian, E-mail: dwang@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the standard of care for head-and-neck cancer (HNC). We treated patients with HNC by delivering either a moderate hypofractionation (MHF) schedule (66 Gy at 2.2 Gy per fraction to the gross tumor [primary and nodal]) with standard dose fractionation (54-60 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction) to the elective neck lymphatics or a conventional dose and fractionation (CDF) schedule (70 Gy at 2.0 Gy per fraction) to the gross tumor (primary and nodal) with reduced dose to the elective neck lymphatics. We analyzed these two cohorts for treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Between November 2001 and February 2009, 89 patients with primary carcinomas of the oral cavity, larynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and nasopharynx received definitive IMRT with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Twenty patients were treated using the MHF schedule, while 69 patients were treated with the CDF schedule. Patient characteristics and dosimetry plans were reviewed. Patterns of failure including local recurrence (LR), regional recurrence (RR), distant metastasis (DM), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and toxicities, including rate of feeding tube placement and percentage of weight loss, were reviewed and analyzed. Results: Median follow-up was 31.2 months. Thirty-five percent of patients in the MHF cohort and 77% of patients in the CDF cohort received chemotherapy. No RR was observed in either cohort. OS, DFS, LR, and DM rates for the entire group at 2 years were 89.3%, 81.4%, 7.1%, and 9.4%, respectively. Subgroup analysis showed no significant differences in OS (p = 0.595), DFS (p = 0.863), LR (p = 0.833), or DM (p = 0.917) between these two cohorts. Similarly, no significant differences were observed in rates of feeding tube placement and percentages of weight loss. Conclusions: Similar treatment outcomes were observed for MHF and CDF cohorts. A dose of 50 Gy at 1.43 Gy per fraction may be sufficient to electively

  4. Bone marrow-sparing intensity-modulated radiation therapy for Stage I seminoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilli, Thomas; Boudreau, Chantal; Doucet, Robert; Alizadeh, Moein; Lambert, Carole; Van Nguyen, Thu; Taussky, Daniel (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, CRCHUM - Centre de Recherche du Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Hopital Notre Dame, Montreal (Canada)), e-mail: daniel.taussky.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca

    2011-05-15

    Background. A direct association between radiotherapy dose, side-effects and secondary cancers has been described in patients with seminoma. A treatment planning study was performed in order to compare computed tomography-based traditional radiotherapy (CT-tRT) versus bone marrow-sparing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (BMS-IMRT) in patients with Stage I seminoma. Material and methods. We optimized in 10 patients a CT-tRT and a BMS-IMRT treatment plan to deliver 20 Gy to the para-aortic nodes. CT-tRT and IMRT consisted of anteroposterior-posterioranterior parallel-opposed and seven non-opposed coplanar fields using 16 and 6-MV photon energies, respectively. Dose-Volume Histograms for clinical target volume (CTV), planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) were compared for both techniques using Wilcoxon matched-pair signed rank-test. Results. Dmean to CTV and PTV were similar for both techniques, even if CT-tRT showed a slightly improved target coverage in terms of PTV-D95% (19.7 vs. 19.5 Gy, p 0.005) and PTV-V95% (100 vs. 99.7%, p = 0.011) compared to BMS-IMRT. BMS-IMRT resulted in a significant reduction (5.2 Gy, p = 0.005) in the Dmean to the active bone marrow (ABM). The V100% and V75% of the OARs were reduced with BMS-IMRT by: ABM-V100% = 51.7% and ABM-V75% = 42.3%; bowel-V100% = 15.7% and bowel-V75% = 16.8%; stomach-V100% = 22% and stomach-V75% = 27.7%; pancreas-V100% = 37.1% and pancreas-V75% = 35.9% (p = 0.005 for all variables). Conclusions. BMS-IMRT reduces markedly the dose to the OARs compared to CT-tRT. This should translate into a reduction in acute and long-term toxicity, as well as into the risk of secondary solid and hematological cancers

  5. Dosimetric comparison between jaw tracking and static jaw techniques in intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhongsu; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Yibao; Zhang, Yunjun; Cheng, Jinsheng; Su, Xu

    2015-01-27

    To compare the dosimetric differences between jaw tracking technique (JTT) and static jaw technique (SJT) in dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (d-IMRT) and assess the potential advantages of jaw tracking technique. Two techniques, jaw tracking and static jaw, were used respectively to develop the d-IMRT plans for 28 cancer patients with various lesion sites: head and neck, lungs, esophageal, abdominal, prostate, rectal and cervical. The dose volume histograms (DVH) and selected dosimetric indexes for the whole body and for organs at risk (OARs) were compared. A two dimensional ionization chamber Array Seven29 (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) and OCTAVIUS Octagonal phantom (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) were used to verify all the plans. For all patients, the treatment plans using both techniques met the clinical requirements. The V5, V10, V20, V30, V40 (volumes receiving 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 Gy at least, respectively), mean dose (Dmean) for the whole body and V5, V10, V20, Dmean for lungs in the JTT d-IMRT plans were significantly less than the corresponding values of the SJT d-IMRT plans (p < 0.001). The JTT d-IMRT plans deposited lower maximum dose (Dmax) to the lens, eyes, brainstem, spinal cord, and right optic nerve, the doses reductions for these OARs ranged from 2.2% to 28.6%. The JTT d-IMRT plans deposited significantly lower Dmean to various OARs (all p values < 0.05), the mean doses reductions for these OARs ranged from 1.1% to 31.0%, and the value reductions depend on the volume and the location of the OARs. The γ evaluation method showed an excellent agreement between calculation and measurement for all techniques with criteria of 3%/3 mm. Both jaw tracking and static jaw d-IMRT plans can achieve comparable target dose coverage. JTT displays superior OARs sparing than SJT plans. These results are of clinical importance, especially for the patients with large and complex targets but close to some highly radio-sensitive organs to spare, and for patients

  6. Treatment planning, optimization, and beam delivery technqiues for intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengbusch, Evan R.

    , beamlet weight, the number of delivered beamlets, and the number of delivery angles. These methods are evaluated via treatment planning studies including left-sided whole breast irradiation, lung stereotactic body radiotherapy, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and whole brain radiotherapy with hippocampal avoidance. Improvements in efficiency and efficacy relative to traditional proton therapy and intensity modulated photon radiation therapy are discussed.

  7. A feedback constraint optimization method for intensity-modulated radiation therapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, YONGWU; SUN, XIAONAN; WANG, QI; ZHOU, QINXUAN; GU, BENXING; SHI, GUOZHI; JIANG, DONGLIANG

    2015-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is able to achieve good target conformance with a limited dose to organs at risk (OARs); however, IMRT increases the irradiation volume and monitor units (MUs) required. The present study aimed to evaluate the use of an IMRT plan with fewer segments and MUs, while maintaining quality in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. In the present study, two types of IMRT plan were therefore compared: The direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO)-RT method and the feedback constraint DMPO-RT (fc_DMPO-RT) method, which utilizes compensative feedback constraint in DMPO-RT and maintains optimization. Plans for 23 patients were developed with identical dose prescriptions. Each plan involved synchronous delivery to various targets, with identical OAR constraints, by means of 7 coplanar fields. The average dose, maximum dose, dose-volume histograms of targets and the OAR, MUs of the plan, the number of segments, delivery time and accuracy were subsequently compared. The fc_DMPO-RT exhibited superior dose distribution in terms of the average, maximum and minimum doses to the gross tumor volume compared with that of DMPO-RT (t=62.7, 20.5 and 22.0, respectively; P<0.05). The fc_DMPO-RT also resulted in a smaller maximum dose to the spinal cord (t=7.3; P<0.05), as well as fewer MUs, fewer segments and decreased treatment times than that of the DMPO-RT (t=6.2, 393.4 and 244.3, respectively; P<0.05). The fc_DMPO-RT maintained plan quality with fewer segments and MUs, and the treatment time was significantly reduced, thereby resulting in reduced radiation leakage and an enhanced curative effect. Therefore, introducing feedback constraint into DMPO may result in improved IMRT planning. In nasopharyngeal carcinoma specifically, feedback constraint resulted in the improved protection of OARs in proximity of targets (such as the brainstem and parotid) due to sharp dose distribution and reduced MUs. PMID:26622793

  8. Treatment of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Adjuvant or Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sher, David J., E-mail: dsher@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thotakura, Vijaya [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Balboni, Tracy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Lorch, Jochen [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald J. [Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Tishler, Roy B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The optimal management of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) typically involves surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in the setting of adverse pathologic features. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is frequently used to treat oral cavity cancers, but published IMRT outcomes specific to this disease site are sparse. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for OCSCC. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of all patients treated at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for OCSCC with adjuvant or definitive IMRT between August 2004 and December 2009. The American Joint Committee on Cancer disease stage criteria distribution of this cohort included 5 patients (12%) with stage I; 10 patients (24%) with stage II (n = 10, 24%),; 14 patients (33%) with stage III (n = 14, 33%),; and 13 patients (31%) with stage IV. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS); secondary endpoints were locoregional control (LRC) and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: Forty-two patients with OCSCC were included, 30 of whom were initially treated with surgical resection. Twenty-three (77%) of 30 surgical patients treated with adjuvant IMRT also received concurrent chemotherapy, and 9 of 12 (75%) patients treated definitively without surgery were treated with CRT or induction chemotherapy and CRT. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years (interquartile range, 1.1-3.1 years) for all patients, the 2-year actuarial rates of OS and LRC following adjuvant IMRT were 85% and 91%, respectively, and the comparable results for definitive IMRT were 63% and 64% for OS and LRC, respectively. Only 1 patient developed symptomatic osteoradionecrosis, and among patients without evidence of disease, 35% experienced grade 2 to 3 late dysphagia, with only 1 patient who was continuously gastrostomy-dependent. Conclusions: In this single-institution series, postoperative IMRT was associated with promising LRC

  9. Quantification of beam complexity in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Weiliang, E-mail: wdu@mdanderson.org; Cho, Sang Hyun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Kudchadker, Rajat J. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Excessive complexity in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans increases the dose uncertainty, prolongs the treatment time, and increases the susceptibility to changes in patient or target geometry. To date, the tools for quantitative assessment of IMRT beam complexity are still lacking. In this study, The authors have sought to develop metrics to characterize different aspects of beam complexity and investigate the beam complexity for IMRT plans of different disease sites. Methods: The authors evaluated the beam complexity scores for 65 step-and-shoot IMRT plans from three sites (prostate, head and neck, and spine) and 26 volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for the prostate. On the basis of the beam apertures and monitor unit weights of all segments, the authors calculated the mean aperture area, extent of aperture shape irregularity, and degree of beam modulation for each beam. Then the beam complexity values were averaged to obtain the complexity metrics of the IMRT plans. The authors studied the correlation between the beam complexity metrics and the quality assurance (QA) results. Finally, the effects of treatment planning parameters on beam complexity were studied. Results: The beam complexity scores were not uniform among the prostate IMRT beams from different gantry angles. The lateral beams had larger monitor units and smaller shape irregularity, while the anterior-posterior beams had larger modulation values. On average, the prostate IMRT plans had the smallest aperture irregularity, beam modulation, and normalized monitor units; the head and neck IMRT plans had large beam irregularity and beam modulation; and the spine stereotactic radiation therapy plans often had small beam apertures, which may have been associated with the relatively large discrepancies between planned and QA measured doses. There were weak correlations between the beam complexity scores and the measured dose errors. The prostate VMAT beams showed

  10. SU-F-BRD-06: Robust Dose Calculation in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosch, R [ASU, Tempe, AZ (United States); Liu, W [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Commissioning data for intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) must be post-processed by fits to ad-hoc functions to derive the dose calculation kernel parameters in a treatment planning system (TPS). Whether from experimental measurement or Monte Carlo simulation, the limited and noisy nature of such data makes this task very challenging. We present a method to improve the modeling of the lateral dose distribution of clinical energy proton beams in water to commission an in-house IMPT dose calculation engine. Methods: A linear sum of three Gaussian distribution functions was fitted to the lateral dose data in logarithmic scale. Starting values of fitting solutions were determined from the Generalized Highland Approximation. We exhaustively optimized the combinations of data weights with upper bounds of the fitting solutions to minimize confidence intervals of the fitting solutions while maintaining the coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}). Results: Across all energies, average confidence bounds improved 72.88% [Max: 88.28%, Min: 55.05%] for small angle coulomb scattering, 114.25% [409.13%, 66.72%,] for nuclear scattering, and 68.66% [141.09%, 33.27%] for large angle coulomb scattering, while the coefficients of determination of the fits (R{sup 2}) remained comparable. On average R {sup 2} only changed 0.18% and were very close to 1 (approx. 0.999). Wilcoxon signed rank tests comparing unweighted/unbounded fits with weighted/bounded fits averaged 0.0146 (Max: 0.177, Min: 7.05×10−{sup 7}) for small angle Coulomb, 0.0903 (0.945, 7.05×10−{sup 7}) for nuclear, and 0.254 (0.871, 1.86×10−{sup 6}) for large angle Coulomb scattering. This allows rejection of the null hypothesis for small angle Coulomb scattering at the 0.015 level and nuclear interaction at the 0.1 level. Conclusion: Optimal weights assigned to IMPT lateral dose data minimized fitting to stochastic noise in the tail region. Optimizing the upper bounds of fitting parameters improved

  11. Intensity Modulated Proton Beam Radiation for Brachytherapy in Patients With Cervical Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clivio, Alessandro [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Kluge, Anne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Cozzi, Luca, E-mail: lucozzi@iosi.ch [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Köhler, Christhardt [Department of Gynecology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Neumann, Oliver [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Vanetti, Eugenio [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Marnitz, Simone [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in patients with cervical cancer in terms of coverage, conformity, and dose–volume histogram (DVH) parameters correlated with recommendations from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients with histologically proven cervical cancer underwent primary chemoradiation for the pelvic lymph nodes, the uterus, the cervix, and the parametric region, with a symmetric margin of 1 cm. The prescription was for 50.4 Gy, with 1.8 Gy per fraction. The prescribed dose to the parametria was 2.12 Gy up to 59.36 Gy in 28 fractions as a simultaneous boost. For several reasons, the patients were unable to undergo brachytherapy. As an alternative, IMPT was planned with 5 fractions of 6 Gy to the cervix, including the macroscopic tumor with an MRI-guided target definition, with an isotropic margin of 5 mm for planning target volume (PTV) definition. Groupe-Europeen de Curietherapie and European society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) criteria were used for DVH evaluation. Reference comparison plans were optimized for volumetric modulated rapid arc (VMAT) therapy with the RapidArc (RA). Results: The dose to the high-risk volume was calculated with α/β = 10 with 89.6 Gy. For IMPT, the clinical target volume showed a mean dose of 38.2 ± 5.0 Gy (35.0 ±1.8 Gy for RA). The D{sub 98%} was 31.9 ± 2.6 Gy (RA: 30.8 ± 1.0 Gy). With regard to the organs at risk, the 2Gy Equivalent Dose (EQD2) (α/β = 3) to 2 cm{sup 3} of the rectal wall, sigmoid wall, and bladder wall was 62.2 ± 6.4 Gy, 57.8 ± 6.1 Gy, and 80.6 ± 8.7 Gy (for RA: 75.3 ± 6.1 Gy, 66.9 ± 6.9 Gy, and 89.0 ± 7.2 Gy, respectively). For the IMPT boost plans in combination with external beam radiation therapy, all DVH parameters correlated with <5% risk for grades 2 to 4 late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: In patients who are not eligible for brachytherapy, IMPT as a boost

  12. Salivary Gland Tumors Treated With Adjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfeld, Jonathan D., E-mail: jdschoenfeld@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Sher, David J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Norris, Charles M. [Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Balboni, Tracy A.; Tishler, Roy B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the recent single-institution experience of patients with salivary gland tumors who had undergone adjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 35 salivary gland carcinoma patients treated primarily at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute between 2005 and 2010 with surgery and adjuvant IMRT. The primary endpoints were local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival. The secondary endpoints were acute and chronic toxicity. The median follow-up was 2.3 years (interquartile range, 1.2-2.8) among the surviving patients. Results: The histologic types included adenoid cystic carcinoma in 15 (43%), mucoepidermoid carcinoma in 6 (17%), adenocarcinoma in 3 (9%), acinic cell carcinoma in 3 (9%), and other in 8 (23%). The primary sites were the parotid gland in 17 (49%), submandibular glands in 6 (17%), tongue in 4 (11%), palate in 4 (11%), and other in 4 (11%). The median radiation dose was 66 Gy, and 22 patients (63%) received CRT. The most common chemotherapy regimen was carboplatin and paclitaxel (n = 14, 64%). A trend was seen for patients undergoing CRT to have more adverse prognostic factors, including Stage T3-T4 disease (CRT, n = 12, 55% vs. n = 4, 31%, p = .29), nodal positivity (CRT, n = 8, 36% vs. n = 1, 8%, p = .10), and positive margins (n = 13, 59% vs. n = 5, 38%, p = .30). One patient who had undergone CRT developed an in-field recurrence, resulting in an overall actuarial 3-year local control rate of 92%. Five patients (14%) developed distant metastases (1 who had undergone IMRT only and 4 who had undergone CRT). Acute Grade 3 mucositis, esophagitis, and dermatitis occurred in 8%, 8%, and 8% (1 each) of IMRT patients and in 18%, 5%, and 14% (4, 1, and 3 patients) of the CRT group, respectively. No acute Grade 4 toxicity occurred. The most common late toxicity was Grade 1 xerostomia (n = 8, 23%). Conclusions: Treatment of

  13. Bile Acid Malabsorption After Pelvic and Prostate Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: An Uncommon but Treatable Condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Victoria [Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Benton, Barbara [Gastroenterology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Sohaib, Aslam [Department of Radiology, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Dearnaley, David [Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Andreyev, H. Jervoise N., E-mail: j@andreyev.demon.co.uk [Gastroenterology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a significant therapeutic advance in prostate cancer, allowing increased tumor dose delivery and increased sparing of normal tissues. IMRT planning uses strict dose constraints to nearby organs to limit toxicity. Bile acid malabsorption (BAM) is a treatable disorder of the terminal ileum (TI) that presents with symptoms similar to radiation therapy toxicity. It has not been described in patients receiving RT for prostate cancer in the contemporary era. We describe new-onset BAM in men after IMRT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Diagnosis of new-onset BAM was established after typical symptoms developed, selenium-75 homocholic acid taurine (SeHCAT) scanning showed 7-day retention of <15%, and patients' symptoms unequivocally responded to a bile acid sequestrant. The TI was identified on the original radiation therapy plan, and the radiation dose delivered was calculated and compared with accepted dose-volume constraints. Results: Five of 423 men treated in a prospective series of high-dose prostate and pelvic IMRT were identified with new onset BAM (median age, 65 years old). All reported having normal bowel habits before RT. The volume of TI ranged from 26-141 cc. The radiation dose received by the TI varied between 11.4 Gy and 62.1 Gy (uncorrected). Three of 5 patients had TI treated in excess of 45 Gy (equivalent dose calculated in 2-Gy fractions, using an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3) with volumes ranging from 1.6 cc-49.0 cc. One patient had mild BAM (SeHCAT retention, 10%-15%), 2 had moderate BAM (SeHCAT retention, 5%-10%), and 2 had severe BAM (SeHCAT retention, <5%). The 3 patients whose TI received {>=}45 Gy developed moderate to severe BAM, whereas those whose TI received <45 Gy had only mild to moderate BAM. Conclusions: Radiation delivered to the TI during IMRT may cause BAM. Identification of the TI from unenhanced RT planning computed tomography scans is difficult and may impede

  14. Postoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy in high risk prostate cancer: a dosimetric comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digesú, Cinzia; Cilla, Savino; De Gaetano, Andrea; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Macchia, Gabriella; Ippolito, Edy; Deodato, Francesco; Panunzi, Simona; Iapalucci, Chiara; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; D'Angelo, Elisa; Padula, Gilbert D A; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa; Piermattei, Angelo; Morganti, Alessio G

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with 3D conformal technique (3D-CRT), with respect to target coverage and irradiation of organs at risk for high dose postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) of the prostate fossa. 3D-CRT and IMRT treatment plans were compared with respect to dose to the rectum and bladder. The dosimetric comparison was carried out in 15 patients considering 2 different scenarios: (1) exclusive prostate fossa irradiation, and (2) pelvic node irradiation followed by a boost on the prostate fossa. In scenario (1), a 3D-CRT plan (box technique) and an IMRT plan were calculated and compared for each patient. In scenario (2), 3 treatment plans were calculated and compared for each patient: (a) 3D-CRT box technique for both pelvic (prophylactic nodal irradiation) and prostate fossa irradiation (3D-CRT only); (b) 3D-CRT box technique for pelvic irradiation followed by an IMRT boost to the prostatic fossa (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT); and (c) IMRT for both pelvic and prostate fossa irradiation (IMRT only). For exclusive prostate fossa irradiation, IMRT significantly reduced the dose to the rectum (lower Dmean, V50%, V75%, V90%, V100%, EUD, and NTCP) and the bladder (lower Dmean, V50%, V90%, EUD and NTCP). When prophylactic irradiation of the pelvis was also considered, plan C (IMRT only) performed better than plan B (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT) as respect to both rectum and bladder irradiation (reduction of Dmean, V50%, V75%, V90%, equivalent uniform dose [EUD], and normal tissue complication probability [NTCP]). Plan (b) (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT) performed better than plan (a) (3D-CRT only) with respect to dose to the rectum (lower Dmean, V75%, V90%, V100%, EUD, and NTCP) and the bladder (Dmean, EUD, and NTCP). Postoperative IMRT in prostate cancer significantly reduces rectum and bladder irradiation compared with 3D-CRT.

  15. An immobilization system for claustrophobic patients in head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Siyong; Akpati, Hilary C; Li, Jonathan G; Liu, Chihray R; Amdur, Robert J; Palta, Jatinder R

    2004-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an immobilization treatment system used for claustrophobic patients in head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Instead of the thermoplastic facemask, the Vac Fix (S & S Par Scientific, Odense, Denmark) mold is used for immobilization of claustrophobic patients at the University of Florida in head-and-neck IMRT. The immobilization procedure combines the use of commercial stereotactic infrared (IR) ExacTrac camera system (BrainLAB, Inc., Westchester, IL) for patient setup and monitoring. The Vac Fix mold is placed on the headrest and folded up as needed to provide support before the mold is hardened. For the camera system, a frame referred to as a "tattoo-free immobilization accessory" is fabricated, on which the IR markers can be placed. A patient-specific dental impression is made with the bite tray. The movement of the markers, connected through the dental impression of the patient, accurately represents the overall patient motion. Patient movement is continuously monitored and repositioning is performed whenever patient movement exceeds the predefined tolerance limit. Monitored patient movements are recorded at a certain frequency. Recorded data are analyzed and compared with those of patients immobilized with the thermoplastic facemask plus the camera system that is the standard immobilization system in our clinic. For three patients treated with the Vac Fix mold plus the camera system, on average, the histogram-based uncertainties, U(95)(5), U(95)(20), and mean displacement, R(mean) (mm) were 1.03, 1.08, and 0.60, respectively. These values are close to those obtained with the mask plus the camera system. The Vac Fix mold plus the camera system often requires more beam interruptions because of repositioning than the mask plus the camera system (on average, the Vac Fix mold plus the camera system required repositioning 7.7 times and the mask plus the camera system required repositioning 1.8 times during 20

  16. Optimal beam design on intensity-modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost in nasopharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Mei-Chun [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hu, Yu-Wen; Liu, Ching-Sheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lee, Jeun-Shenn [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Pin-I; Yen, Sang-Hue; Lee, Yuh-Lin; Hsieh, Chun-Mei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shiau, Cheng-Ying, E-mail: cyshiau@vghtpe.gov.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to determine the optimal beam design among various combinations of field numbers and beam trajectories for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique for the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). We used 10 fields with gantry angles of 155°, 130°, 75°, 25°, 0° L, 0° R, 335°, 285°, 230°, and 205° denoted as F10. To decrease doses in the spinal cord, the F10 technique was designed by featuring 2 pairs of split-opposed beam fields at 155° to 335° and 205° to 25°, as well as one pair of manually split beam fields at 0°. The F10 technique was compared with 4 other common field arrangements: F7E, 7 fields with 50° equally spaced gantry angles; F7, the basis of F10 with 155°, 130°, 75°, 0°, 285°, 230°, and 205°; F9E, 9 fields with 40° equally spaced gantry angles; and FP, 7 posterior fields with 180°, 150°, 120°, 90°, 270°, 240°, and 210°. For each individual case of 10 patients, the customized constraints derived after optimization with the standard F10 technique were applied to 4 other field arrangements. The 4 new optimized plans of each individual case were normalized to achieve the same coverage of planning target volume (PTV){sub 63} {sub Gy} as that of the standard F10 technique. The F10 field arrangement exhibited the best coverage in PTV{sub 70} {sub Gy} and the least mean dose in the trachea-esophagus region. Furthermore, the F10 field arrangement demonstrated the highest level of conformity in the low-dose region and the least monitor unit. The F10 field arrangement performed more outstandingly than the other field arrangements in PTV{sub 70} {sub Gy} coverage and spared the central organ. This arrangement also exhibited the highest conformity and delivery efficiency. The F10 technique is recommended as the standard beam geometry for the SIB-IMRT of NPC.

  17. Lateral loss and dose discrepancies of multileaf collimator segments in intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chee W; Das, Indra J; Huq, M Saiful

    2003-11-01

    In the step-and-shoot technique delivery of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), each static field consists of a number of beamlets, some of which may be very small. In this study, we measured the dose characteristics for a range of field sizes: 2 x 2 to 12 x 10 cm2 for 6 and 15 MV x rays. For a given field length, a number of treatment fields are set up by sequentially increasing the field width using a multi leaf collimator. A set of fields is delivered with the accelerator operated in the IMRT mode. Using an ion chamber, the output factors at 1 cm and 3 cm laterally from a field edge are measured at different depths in a solid water phantom. Our results show that with insufficient lateral distance in at least one direction, the absorbed dose never reaches the equilibrium values, and can be significantly lower for very small field sizes. For example, the output factor of the 2 x 2 cm2 field relative to 10 x 10 cm2 at d(max0 is 0.832 and 0.790 for 6 MV and 15 MV x rays, respectively. Multiple output factor curves are obtained for different field lengths and different buildup conditions. Thus under nonequilibrium conditions, output factors are critically dependent on the field size and the conventional method of determining the equivalent square does not apply. Comparison of output factors acquired in the commissioning of the accelerator with those measured in the present study under conditions of nonequilibrium shows large discrepancies between the two sets of measurements. Thus monitor units generated by a treatment planning system using beam data commissioned with symmetric fields may be underestimated by > 5%, depending on the size and shape of the segments. To facilitate manual MU calculation as an independent check in step-and-shoot IMRT, the concept of effective equivalent square (EES) is introduced. Using EES, output factors can be calculated using existing beam data for fields with asymmetric collimator settings and under conditions of lateral

  18. EBT GAFCHROMIC{sup TM} film dosimetry in compensator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaezzadeh, Seyedali [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Allahverdi, Mahmoud, E-mail: alahverdi@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Radiotherapy—Oncology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nedaie, Hasan A. [Department of Radiotherapy—Oncology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ay, Mohammadreza [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shirazi, Alireza; Yarahmadi, Mehran [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    The electron benefit transfer (EBT) GAFCHROMIC films possess a number of features making them appropriate for high-quality dosimetry in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Compensators to deliver IMRT are known to change the beam-energy spectrum as well as to produce scattered photons and to contaminate electrons; therefore, the accuracy and validity of EBT-film dosimetry in compensator-based IMRT should be investigated. Percentage-depth doses and lateral-beam profiles were measured using EBT films in perpendicular orientation with respect to 6 and 18 MV photon beam energies for: (1) different thicknesses of cerrobend slab (open, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, and 6.0 cm), field sizes (5×5, 10×10, and 20×20 cm{sup 2}), and measurement depths (D{sub max}, 5.0 and 10.0 cm); and (2) step-wedged compensator in a solid phantom. To verify results, same measurements were implemented using a 0.125 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber in a water phantom and also in Monte Carlo simulations using the Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code. The mean energy of photons was increased due to beam hardening in comparison with open fields at both 6 and 18 MV energies. For a 20×20 cm{sup 2} field size of a 6 MV photon beam and a 6.0 cm thick block, the surface dose decreased by about 12% and percentage-depth doses increased up to 3% at 30.0 cm depth, due to the beam-hardening effect induced by the block. In contrast, at 18 MV, the surface dose increased by about 8% and depth dose reduced by 3% at 30.0 cm depth. The penumbral widths (80% to 20%) increase with block thickness, field size, and beam energy. The EBT film results were in good agreement with the ionization chamber dose profiles and Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code simulation behind the step-wedged compensator. Also, there was a good agreement between the EBT-film and the treatment-planning results on the anthropomorphic phantom. The EBT films can be accurately used as a 2D dosimeter for dose

  19. Multifield Optimization Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Head and Neck Tumors: A Translation to Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gillin, Michael; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Garden, Adam S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Gunn, G. Brandon [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Weber, Randal S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kies, Merrill S. [Department of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lewin, Jan S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Palmer, Matthew B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sahoo, Narayan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Liu, Wei; Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Background: We report the first clinical experience and toxicity of multifield optimization (MFO) intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for patients with head and neck tumors. Methods and Materials: Fifteen consecutive patients with head and neck cancer underwent MFO-IMPT with active scanning beam proton therapy. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) had comprehensive treatment extending from the base of the skull to the clavicle. The doses for chemoradiation therapy and radiation therapy alone were 70 Gy and 66 Gy, respectively. The robustness of each treatment plan was also analyzed to evaluate sensitivity to uncertainties associated with variations in patient setup and the effect of uncertainties with proton beam range in patients. Proton beam energies during treatment ranged from 72.5 to 221.8 MeV. Spot sizes varied depending on the beam energy and depth of the target, and the scanning nozzle delivered the spot scanning treatment “spot by spot” and “layer by layer.” Results: Ten patients presented with SCC and 5 with adenoid cystic carcinoma. All 15 patients were able to complete treatment with MFO-IMPT, with no need for treatment breaks and no hospitalizations. There were no treatment-related deaths, and with a median follow-up time of 28 months (range, 20-35 months), the overall clinical complete response rate was 93.3% (95% confidence interval, 68.1%-99.8%). Xerostomia occurred in all 15 patients as follows: grade 1 in 10 patients, grade 2 in 4 patients, and grade 3 in 1 patient. Mucositis within the planning target volumes was seen during the treatment of all patients: grade 1 in 1 patient, grade 2 in 8 patients, and grade 3 in 6 patients. No patient experienced grade 2 or higher anterior oral mucositis. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first clinical report of MFO-IMPT for head and neck tumors. Early clinical outcomes are encouraging and warrant further investigation of proton therapy in prospective clinical trials.

  20. Factors influencing the incidence of sinusitis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients after intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yan-xia; Liu, Lan-ping; Li, Lei; Li, Xu; Cao, Xiu-juan; Dong, Wei; Yang, Xin-hua; Xu, Jin; Yu, Shui; Hao, Jun-fang

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence of sinusitis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients before and after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to analyze factors associated with the incidence of sinusitis following IMRT. We retrospectively analyzed 283 NPC patients who received IMRT in our hospital from March 2009 to May 2011. The diagnostic criteria for sinusitis are based on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. CT or MRI scans were performed before and after IMRT to evaluate the incidence of sinusitis. Factors influencing the incidence of sinusitis were analyzed by log-rank univariate and logistic multivariate analyses. Among the 283 NPC patients, 128 (45.2 %) suffered from sinusitis before radiotherapy. The incidence rates of sinusitis in patients with T1, T2, T3, and T4 NPC before radiotherapy were 22.6, 37.5, 46.8, and 61.3 %, respectively (χ 2 = 14.548, p = 0.002). Among the 155 NPC patients without sinusitis before radiotherapy, the incidence rates of sinusitis at the end of radiotherapy and at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months after radiotherapy were 32.9, 43.2, 61.3, 68.4, 73.5, 69.7, and 61.3 %, respectively (χ 2 = 86.461, p sinusitis in NPC patients after IMRT (p = 0.003, 0.006, 0.002, and 0.020). Multivariate analysis showed that T stage, invasion of the nasal cavity, and nasal irrigation were influential factors for the incidence of sinusitis in NPC patients after IMRT (p = 0.002, 0.002, and 0.000). There was a higher incidence of sinusitis with higher T stage among NPC patients before radiotherapy, and the incidence of sinusitis in NPC patients after IMRT was high (45.2 %). The incidence of sinusitis increased rapidly within the first 3 months after IMRT, and the number of sinusitis cases peaked at 6-9 months after IMRT and showed a trend toward stabilization after 1 year. Advanced T stage, invasion of the nasal cavity, and nasal irrigation were positively associated with the incidence

  1. Particle swarm optimizer for weighting factor selection in intensity-modulated radiation therapy optimization algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Zhang, Pengcheng; Zhang, Liyuan; Shu, Huazhong; Li, Baosheng; Gui, Zhiguo

    2017-01-01

    In inverse treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the objective function is typically the sum of the weighted sub-scores, where the weights indicate the importance of the sub-scores. To obtain a high-quality treatment plan, the planner manually adjusts the objective weights using a trial-and-error procedure until an acceptable plan is reached. In this work, a new particle swarm optimization (PSO) method which can adjust the weighting factors automatically was investigated to overcome the requirement of manual adjustment, thereby reducing the workload of the human planner and contributing to the development of a fully automated planning process. The proposed optimization method consists of three steps. (i) First, a swarm of weighting factors (i.e., particles) is initialized randomly in the search space, where each particle corresponds to a global objective function. (ii) Then, a plan optimization solver is employed to obtain the optimal solution for each particle, and the values of the evaluation functions used to determine the particle's location and the population global location for the PSO are calculated based on these results. (iii) Next, the weighting factors are updated based on the particle's location and the population global location. Step (ii) is performed alternately with step (iii) until the termination condition is reached. In this method, the evaluation function is a combination of several key points on the dose volume histograms. Furthermore, a perturbation strategy - the crossover and mutation operator hybrid approach - is employed to enhance the population diversity, and two arguments are applied to the evaluation function to improve the flexibility of the algorithm. In this study, the proposed method was used to develop IMRT treatment plans involving five unequally spaced 6MV photon beams for 10 prostate cancer cases. The proposed optimization algorithm yielded high-quality plans for all of the cases, without human

  2. Disease Control After Reduced Volume Conformal and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Childhood Craniopharyngioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Radiological Sciences, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Kun, Larry E.; Hua, Chia-Ho [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Radiological Sciences, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Biostatistics, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Sanford, Robert A.; Boop, Frederick A. [Semmes Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Neurosurgery, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To estimate the rate of disease control after conformal radiation therapy using reduced clinical target volume (CTV) margins and to determine factors that predict for tumor progression. Methods and Materials: Eighty-eight children (median age, 8.5 years; range, 3.2-17.6 years) received conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy between 1998 and 2009. The study group included those prospectively treated from 1998 to 2003, using a 10-mm CTV, defined as the margin surrounding the solid and cystic tumor targeted to receive the prescription dose of 54 Gy. The CTV margin was subsequently reduced after 2003, yielding 2 groups of patients: those treated with a CTV margin greater than 5 mm (n=26) and those treated with a CTV margin less than or equal to 5 mm (n=62). Disease progression was estimated on the basis of additional variables including sex, race, extent of resection, tumor interventions, target volume margins, and frequency of weekly surveillance magnetic resonance (MR) imaging during radiation therapy. Median follow-up was 5 years. Results: There was no difference between progression-free survival rates based on CTV margins (>5 mm vs ≤5 mm) at 5 years (88.1% ± 6.3% vs 96.2% ± 4.4% [P=.6386]). There were no differences based on planning target volume (PTV) margins (or combined CTV plus PTV margins). The PTV was systematically reduced from 5 to 3 mm during the time period of the study. Factors predictive of superior progression-free survival included Caucasian race (P=.0175), no requirement for cerebrospinal fluid shunting (P=.0066), and number of surveillance imaging studies during treatment (P=.0216). Patients whose treatment protocol included a higher number of weekly surveillance MR imaging evaluations had a lower rate of tumor progression. Conclusions: These results suggest that targeted volume reductions for radiation therapy using smaller margins are feasible and safe but require careful monitoring. We are currently investigating

  3. Absence of multiple local minima effects in intensity modulated optimization with dose-volume constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llacer, Jorge [EC Engineering Consultants, LLC 130, Forest Hill Drive, Los Gatos, CA (United States); Deasy, Joseph O [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bortfeld, Thomas R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 30 Fruit Street, Boston, MA (United States); Solberg, Timothy D [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Promberger, Claus [BrainLAB AG, Ammerthalstrasse 8, 85551 Heimstetten (Germany)

    2003-01-21

    This paper reports on the analysis of intensity modulated radiation treatment optimization problems in the presence of non-convex feasible parameter spaces caused by the specification of dose-volume constraints for the organs-at-risk (OARs). The main aim was to determine whether the presence of those non-convex spaces affects the optimization of clinical cases in any significant way. This was done in two phases: (1) Using a carefully designed two-dimensional mathematical phantom that exhibits two controllable minima and with randomly initialized beamlet weights, we developed a methodology for exploring the nature of the convergence characteristics of quadratic cost function optimizations (deterministic or stochastic). The methodology is based on observing the statistical behaviour of the residual cost at the end of optimizations in which the stopping criterion is progressively more demanding and carrying out those optimizations to very small error changes per iteration. (2) Seven clinical cases were then analysed with dose-volume constraints that are stronger than originally used in the clinic. The clinical cases are two prostate cases differently posed, a meningioma case, two head-and-neck cases, a spleen case and a spine case. Of the 14 different sets of optimizations (with and without the specification of maximum doses allowed for the OARs), 12 fail to show any effect due to the existence of non-convex feasible spaces. The remaining two sets of optimizations show evidence of multiple minima in the solutions, but those minima are very close to each other in cost and the resulting treatment plans are practically identical, as measured by the quality of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). We discuss the differences between fluence maps resulting from those similar treatment plans. We provide a possible reason for the observed results and conclude that, although the study is necessarily limited, the annealing characteristics of a simulated annealing method may not be

  4. Absence of multiple local minima effects in intensity modulated optimization with dose-volume constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llacer, Jorge; Deasy, Joseph O.; Bortfeld, Thomas R.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Promberger, Claus

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on the analysis of intensity modulated radiation treatment optimization problems in the presence of non-convex feasible parameter spaces caused by the specification of dose-volume constraints for the organs-at-risk (OARs). The main aim was to determine whether the presence of those non-convex spaces affects the optimization of clinical cases in any significant way. This was done in two phases: (1) Using a carefully designed two-dimensional mathematical phantom that exhibits two controllable minima and with randomly initialized beamlet weights, we developed a methodology for exploring the nature of the convergence characteristics of quadratic cost function optimizations (deterministic or stochastic). The methodology is based on observing the statistical behaviour of the residual cost at the end of optimizations in which the stopping criterion is progressively more demanding and carrying out those optimizations to very small error changes per iteration. (2) Seven clinical cases were then analysed with dose-volume constraints that are stronger than originally used in the clinic. The clinical cases are two prostate cases differently posed, a meningioma case, two head-and-neck cases, a spleen case and a spine case. Of the 14 different sets of optimizations (with and without the specification of maximum doses allowed for the OARs), 12 fail to show any effect due to the existence of non-convex feasible spaces. The remaining two sets of optimizations show evidence of multiple minima in the solutions, but those minima are very close to each other in cost and the resulting treatment plans are practically identical, as measured by the quality of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). We discuss the differences between fluence maps resulting from those similar treatment plans. We provide a possible reason for the observed results and conclude that, although the study is necessarily limited, the annealing characteristics of a simulated annealing method may not be

  5. Correcting radiation survey data to account for increased leakage during intensity modulated radiotherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kairn, T. [Premion Cancer Care, Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower Qld 4066, Australia and Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, G.P.O. Box 2434, Brisbane Qld 4000 (Australia); Crowe, S. B.; Trapp, J. V. [Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, G.P.O. Box 2434, Brisbane Qld 4000 (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatments require more beam-on time and produce more linac head leakage to deliver similar doses to conventional, unmodulated, radiotherapy treatments. It is necessary to take this increased leakage into account when evaluating the results of radiation surveys around bunkers that are, or will be, used for IMRT. The recommended procedure of applying a monitor-unit based workload correction factor to secondary barrier survey measurements, to account for this increased leakage when evaluating radiation survey measurements around IMRT bunkers, can lead to potentially costly overestimation of the required barrier thickness. This study aims to provide initial guidance on the validity of reducing the value of the correction factor when applied to different radiation barriers (primary barriers, doors, maze walls, and other walls) by evaluating three different bunker designs.Methods: Radiation survey measurements of primary, scattered, and leakage radiation were obtained at each of five survey points around each of three different radiotherapy bunkers and the contribution of leakage to the total measured radiation dose at each point was evaluated. Measurements at each survey point were made with the linac gantry set to 12 equidistant positions from 0° to 330°, to assess the effects of radiation beam direction on the results.Results: For all three bunker designs, less than 0.5% of dose measured at and alongside the primary barriers, less than 25% of the dose measured outside the bunker doors and up to 100% of the dose measured outside other secondary ba