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Sample records for helen kowtaluk alice

  1. Gorgias's "Helen" Revisited.

    Schiappa, Edward

    1995-01-01

    Argues that identifying Gorgias's "Helen" as an epideictic speech is misleading; the speech is not veiled defense of the "Art of Rhetoric"; Gorgias may have inaugurated the prose genre of encomia; and "Helen"'s most significant theoretical contribution is to offer a secular account of the workings of the logos that…

  2. Around ALICE

    2004-01-01

    http://www.cern.ch/cern50/ On the occasion of CERN's Golden Jubilee, at the Centre culturel Jean Monnet de Saint-Genis-Pouilly Exposition from Monday 11 October to Sunday 24 October. A presentation of CERN and the ALICE experiment with photos, student-made projects, computer animations, virtual reality demonstrations, and more. Saturday 16 October* Planting of a commemorative tree at 16:00 Public presentation at 16:30, followed by a visit to the subterranean site of the ALICE experiment (Number of places limited, reservations at: Service Culturel de la Marie de Saint-Genis-Pouilly, tél 04. 50. 20. 52. 59, Office de Tourisme Saint-Genis-Pouilly, tél: 04. 50. 42. 29. 37) * for the occasion of the Open Day, with 50 sites at CERN, see: http://intranet.cern.ch/Chronological/2004/CERN50/

  3. Around ALICE

    2004-01-01

    On the occasion of CERN's Golden Jubilee at Centre Culturel Jean Monnet de Saint-Genis-Pouilly Exposition from Monday 11 October to Sunday 24 October A presentation of CERN and the ALICE experiment with photos, student-made projects, computer animations, virtual reality demonstrations, and more. Saturday 16 October* Planting of a commemorative tree at 16:00 Public presentation at 16:30, followed by a visit to the subterranean site of the ALICE experiment (Number of places limited, reservations at: Service Culturel de la Marie de Saint-Genis-Pouilly, tel 04 50 20 52 59, or the Office de Tourisme Saint-Genis-Pouilly, tel: 04 50 42 29 37) * for the occasion of the Open Day, with 50 sites at CERN, see: http://intranet.cern.ch/Chronological/2004/CERN50/openday/openday_en.html

  4. ALICE Organisation

    Gouriou, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    ALICE is the acronym for A Large Ion Collider Experiment, one of the largest experiments in the world devoted to research in the physics of matter at an infinitely small scale. Hosted at CERN, the European Laboratory for Nuclear Research, this project involves an international collaboration of more than 1400 physicists, engineers and technicians, including about 340 graduate students, from 132 physics institutes in 37 countries across the world.

  5. ALICE Organisation

    Hadre, J

    2015-01-01

    ALICE is the acronym for A Large Ion Collider Experiment, one of the largest experiments in the world devoted to research in the physics of matter at an infinitely small scale. Hosted at CERN, the European Laboratory for Nuclear Research, this project involves an international collaboration of more than 1400 physicists, engineers and technicians, including around 340 graduate students, from 132 physics institutes in 37 countries across the world.

  6. Fitting ALICE

    2004-01-01

    The support structures for the detectors inside the ALICE solenoid magnet (the L3 magnet) were finished in December 2003. After commissioning and testing, over the next year, the structures will be lowered into the cavern and installed in the magnet by spring 2005. At first sight you might mistake them for scaffolding. But a closer look reveals unusual features: Two are made of austenitic (non-magnetic) stainless steel with a cross section that looks like an "H". Another is made of 8 centimetre aluminium square tubes. "Them" are the support structures for the detectors and services inside the ALICE solenoid magnet (the L3 magnet) which were finished in December 2003. «The physicists don't want to have a lot of material close to their detectors; it has to be as few as possible,» says Diego Perini, who is responsible for the common support structures of ALICE. «We therefore had the very difficult task to design something relatively light that i...

  7. ALICE Cosmic Ray Detector

    Fernandez Tellez, A; Martinez Hernandez, M; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M

    2013-01-01

    The ALICE underground cavern provides an ideal place for the detection of high energy atmospheric muons coming from cosmic ray showers. ACORDE detects cosmic ray showers by triggering the arrival of muons to the top of the ALICE magnet.

  8. ALICE HMPID Radiator Vessel

    2003-01-01

    View of the radiator vessels of the ALICE/HMPID mounted on the support frame. Each HMPID module is equipped with 3 indipendent radiator vessels made out of neoceram and fused silica (quartz) windows glued together. The spacers inside the vessel are needed to stand the hydrostatic pressure. http://alice-hmpid.web.cern.ch/alice-hmpid

  9. Helen Mirreni kuningannad / Jaanus Noormets

    Noormets, Jaanus

    2007-01-01

    Stephen Frearsi mängufilm "Kuninganna" ("The Queen") : stsenarist Peter Morgan : kuninganna Elizabeth II kehastab Helen Mirren, peaminister Tony Blair'i Michael Sheen : Suurbritannia, 2006. H. Mirreni filmiauhindadest ja Oscarivõimalustest selle rolli eest

  10. Helene: A Plastic Model

    Umurhan, O. M.; Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.; Schenk, P.; White, O. L.

    2014-12-01

    Helene, the Saturnian L4 Trojan satellite co-orbiting Dionne and sitting within the E-ring, possesses an unusual morphology characteristic of broad km-scale basins and depressions and a generally smooth surface patterned with streaks and grooves which are indicative of non-typical mass transport. Elevation angles do not appear to exceed 10o at most. The nature and origin of the surface materials forming these grooved patterns is unknown. Given the low surface gravity (plastic-like flow like a Bingham fluid, we setup and test a number of likely scenarios to explain the observations. The numerical results qualitatively indicate that treating the mass-wasting materials as a Bingham material reproduces many of the qualitative features observed. We also find that in those simulations in which accretion is concomitant with Bingham mass-wasting, the long time-evolution of the surface flow shows intermittency in the total surface activity (defined as total surface integral of the absolute magnitude of the mass-flux). Detailed analyses identify the locations where this activity is most pronounced and we will discuss these and its implications in further detail.

  11. ALICE brochure (French version)

    Lefevre, C

    2012-01-01

    ALICE is one of the four big experiments for the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which started up in 2008. ALICE will study the quark-gluon plasma, a state of matter that probably existed in the first moments of the universe.

  12. ALICE brochure (French version)

    Lefevre, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    ALICE is one of the four big experiments for the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which started up in 2008. ALICE will study the quark-gluon plasma, a state of matter that probably existed in the first moments of the universe.

  13. ALICE brochure (Danish version)

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    ALICE is one of the four big experiments for the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which started up in 2008. ALICE will study the quark-gluon plasma, a state of matter that probably existed in the first moments of the universe.

  14. ALICE brochure (English version)

    Lefevre, C

    2012-01-01

    ALICE is one of the four big experiments for the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which started up in 2008. ALICE will study the quark-gluon plasma, a state of matter that probably existed in the first moments of the universe.

  15. ALICE brochure (English version)

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    ALICE is one of the four big experiments for the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which started up in 2008. ALICE will study the quark-gluon plasma, a state of matter that probably existed in the first moments of the universe.

  16. ALICE brochure (Italian version)

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    ALICE is one of the four big experiments for the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which started up in 2008. ALICE will study the quark-gluon plasma, a state of matter that probably existed in the first moments of the universe.

  17. ALICE brochure (German version)

    Lefevre, C

    2012-01-01

    ALICE is one of the four big experiments for the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which started up in 2008. ALICE will study the quark-gluon plasma, a state of matter that probably existed in the first moments of the universe.

  18. ALICE brochure (Spanish version)

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    ALICE is one of the four big experiments for the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ALICE will study the quark-gluon plasma, a state of matter that probably existed in the first moments of the universe.

  19. ALICE brochure (English version)

    Marcastel, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    ALICE is one of the four big experiments for the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which started up in 2008. ALICE studies the quark-gluon plasma, a state of matter that probably existed in the first moments of the universe.

  20. ALICE chip processor

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    This tiny chip provides data processing for the time projection chamber on ALICE. Known as the ALICE TPC Read Out (ALTRO), this device was designed to minimize the size and power consumption of the TPC front end electronics. This single chip contains 16 low-power analogue-to-digital converters with six million transistors of digital processing and 8 kbits of data storage.

  1. "Alice imedemaal" Vanemuises

    2004-01-01

    7. veebr. esietendub Vanemuises tantsulavastus "Alice imedemaal". Etendus põhineb briti kirjaniku L. Carrolli samanimelisel lasteraamatul, koreograaf M. Murdmaa, kunstnik K. Jancis ja muusika on kirjutanud ungari helilooja S. Kall̤s, Alice'i osa tantsib korealanna Hye Min Kim

  2. The ALICE data challenges

    Baud, J.P.; Collignon, M.; Collin, F.; Durand, J.; Jarp, S.; Jouanigot, J.M.; Panzer, B.; Carena, W.; Carminati, F.; Divia, R.; Rademakers, F.; Saiz, P.; Schossmaier, K.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Vascotto, A.

    2001-01-01

    Since 1998, the ALICE experiment and the CERN/IT division have jointly executed several large-scale high throughput distributed computing exercises: the ALICE data challenges. The goals of these regular exercises are to test hardware and software components of the data acquisition and computing systems in realistic conditions and to execute an early integration of the overall ALICE computing infrastructure. The authors report on the third ALICE Data Challenge (ADC III) that has been performed at CERN from January to March 2001. The data used during the ADC III are simulated physics raw data of the ALICE TPC, produced with the ALICE simulation program AliRoot. The data acquisition was based on the ALICE online framework called the ALICE Data Acquisition Test Environment (DATE) system. The data, after event building, were then formatted with the ROOT I/O package and a data catalogue based on MySQL was established. The Mass Storage System used during ADC III is CASTOR. Different software tools have been used to monitor the performances. DATE has demonstrated performances of more than 500 MByte/s. An aggregate data throughput of 85 MByte/s was sustained in CASTOR over several days. The total collected data amounts to 100 TBytes in 100.000 files

  3. Mount St. Helens aerosol evolution

    Oberbeck, V.R.; Farlow, N.H.

    1982-08-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mount St. Helens. Analysis of samples shows that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  4. Mount St. Helens aerosol evolution

    Oberbeck, V.R.; Farlow, N.H.; Fong, W.; Snetsinger, K.G.; Ferry, G.V.; Hayes, D.M.

    1982-09-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mt. St. Helens. Analysis of samples show that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  5. The experiments ALICE

    Fabjan, Christian

    2009-01-01

    This article documents the main design choices and the close to 20 years of preparation, detector R&D, construction and installation of ALICE, the dedicated heavy ion experiment at the CERN LHC accelerator.

  6. Computing in ALICE

    Brun, R.; Buncic, P.; Carminati, F.; Morsch, A.; Rademakers, F.; Safarik, K.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the offline framework is to reconstruct and analyse the data coming from real interactions. The ALICE Offline framework, AliRoot, has already been used during the production of the Technical Design Reports of each detector to optimise their design and it is currently used to evaluate the physics performance of the full ALICE detector. This paper describes the AliRoot software environment. We wish to put into perspective the main decisions and the organisation of the offline project. First a general description of the ALICE offline framework (AliRoot) is given, starting with a short historical background followed by a description of the simulation, reconstruction and analysis architecture and the organisation of the ALICE offline project. Finally we briefly indicate the main conclusions of our work on AliRoot

  7. Masterclasses - ALICE - 2012

    Bennett, Polly

    2012-01-01

    29 students from the Lycée International de Ferney participated in the International Masterclasses - hands-on Particle Physics programme. In the CERN training centre they analysed ALICE data looking for strange particles.

  8. ALICE Time Projection Chamber

    Lippmann, C

    2013-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main device in the ALICE 'central barrel' for the tracking and identification (PID) of charged particles. It has to cope with unprecedented densities of charges particles.

  9. Computing in ALICE

    Brun, R; Carminati, F; Morsch, Andreas; Rademakers, F; Safarík, K

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the offline framework is to reconstruct and analyse the data coming from real interactions. The ALICE Offline framework, AliRoot, has already been used during the production of the Technical Design Reports of each detector to optimise their design and it is currently used to evaluate the physics performance of the full ALICE detector. This paper describes the AliRoot software environment. We wish to put into perspective the main decisions and the organisation of the offline project. First a general description of the ALICE offline framework (AliRoot) is given, starting with a short historical background followed by a description of the simulation, reconstruction and analysis architecture and the organisation of the ALICE offline project. Finally we briefly indicate the main conclusions of our work on AliRoot.

  10. ALICE HMPID RICH

    2003-01-01

    Particle identification plays a key role in the complete understanding of heavy-ion collisions in ALICE at the LHC. . The CsI Photodetector . The Radiator . The Front-End Electronics . Detector performance

  11. ALICE honours industries

    2006-01-01

    The third annual ALICE Awards ceremony recognizes three companies for their contribution to the experiment's detector. The ALICE Awards winners pictured with CERN Secretary-General, Maximilian Metzger, during the ceremony. Three industries were honoured at the ALICE Awards ceremony on 17 March for their exceptional work on the collaboration's detector. Representatives from the companies accepted their awards at the ceremony, which was also attended by CERN Secretary-General Maximilian Metzger and members of the ALICE Collaboration Board. VTT Microelectronics of Finland received an award for the production of the thin bump bonded ladders (detector arrays, each consisting of 40 960 active cells) for the silicon pixel detector (SPD) in the inner tracking system. A number of technical hurdles had to be overcome: complex and expensive equipment was procured or upgraded, and processes underwent a detailed study and careful tuning. The ladders have a high and stable yield and the production will soon be completed...

  12. Installing the ALICE detector

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The huge iron yoke in the cavern at Point 2 in the LHC tunnel is prepared for the installation of the ALICE experiment. The yoke is being reused from the previous L3 experiment that was located at the same point during the LEP project from 1989 to 2000. ALICE will be inserted piece by piece into the cradle where it will be used to study collisions between two beams of lead ions.

  13. ALICE High Level Trigger

    Alt, T

    2013-01-01

    The ALICE High Level Trigger (HLT) is a computing farm designed and build for the real-time, online processing of the raw data produced by the ALICE detectors. Events are fully reconstructed from the raw data, analyzed and compressed. The analysis summary together with the compressed data and a trigger decision is sent to the DAQ. In addition the reconstruction of the events allows for on-line monitoring of physical observables and this information is provided to the Data Quality Monitor (DQM). The HLT can process event rates of up to 2 kHz for proton-proton and 200 Hz for Pb-Pb central collisions.

  14. Heavy flavour in ALICE

    Pillot, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Open heavy flavours and heavy quarkonium states are expected to provide essential informa- tion on the properties of the strongly interacting system fo rmed in the early stages of heavy-ion collisions at very high energy density. Such probes are espe cially promising at LHC energies where heavy quarks (both c and b) are copiously produced. The ALICE detector shall measure the production of open heavy flavours and heavy quarkonium st ates in both proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions at the LHC. The expected performances of ALICE for heavy flavour physics is discussed based on the results of simulation studies on a s election of benchmark channels

  15. Central Diffraction in ALICE

    Schicker, R

    2012-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN consists of a central barrel, a muon spectrometer and of additional detectors for trigger and event classification purposes. The low transverse momentum threshold of the central barrel gives ALICE a unique opportunity to study the low mass sector of central production at the LHC. I will report on first analysis results of meson production in double gap events in minimum-bias proton-proton collisions at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV, and will describe a dedicated double gap trigger for future data taking.

  16. The ALICE Pixel Detector

    Mercado-Perez, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    The present document is a brief summary of the performed activities during the 2001 Summer Student Programme at CERN under the Scientific Summer at Foreign Laboratories Program organized by the Particles and Fields Division of the Mexican Physical Society (Sociedad Mexicana de Fisica). In this case, the activities were related with the ALICE Pixel Group of the EP-AIT Division, under the supervision of Jeroen van Hunen, research fellow in this group. First, I give an introduction and overview to the ALICE experiment; followed by a description of wafer probing. A brief summary of the test beam that we had from July 13th to July 25th is given as well

  17. Unruly Woman: An Interview with Helen Lewis.

    Briscoe, Lori; Collins, Erica S.; Deal, Amanda; Hancock, Ron; McGraw, Kristyn; Lewis, Helen

    2000-01-01

    Overviews the career of Helen Lewis as sociologist, social activist, teacher, writer, researcher, and mentor. Helen Lewis discusses growing up in segregated Georgia, her unorthodox approach to education, her fight for social and economic equality, her instrumental role in the development of Appalachian Studies programs, and how social activism…

  18. ALICE Photon Multiplicity Detector

    Nayak, T

    2013-01-01

    Photon Multiplicity Detector (PMD) measures the multiplicity and spatial distribution of photons in the forward region of ALICE on a event-by-event basis. PMD is a pre-shower detector having fine granularity and full azimuthal coverage in the pseudo-rapidity region 2.3 < η < 3.9.

  19. ALICE-ARC integration

    Anderlik, Csaba; Gregersen, Anders Rhod; Kleist, Josva

    2008-01-01

    Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The interoperation has two aspects, one is the data...

  20. The ALICE Electronic Logbook

    Altini, V [INFN, Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita and Sezione INFN Bary (Italy); Carena, F; Carena, W; Chapeland, S; Barroso, V Chibante; Costa, F; Divia, R; Fuchs, U; Makhlyueva, I; Roukoutakis, F; Schossmaier, K; Soos, C; Vyvre, P Vande; Haller, B Von, E-mail: Vasco.Chibante.Barroso@cern.c [CERN, Physics Department, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2010-04-01

    All major experiments need tools that provide a way to keep a record of the events and activities, both during commissioning and operations. In ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) at CERN, this task is performed by the Alice Electronic Logbook (eLogbook), a custom-made application developed and maintained by the Data-Acquisition group (DAQ). Started as a statistics repository, the eLogbook has evolved to become not only a fully functional electronic logbook, but also a massive information repository used to store the conditions and statistics of the several online systems. It's currently used by more than 600 users in 30 different countries and it plays an important role in the daily ALICE collaboration activities. This paper will describe the LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) based architecture of the eLogbook, the database schema and the relevance of the information stored in the eLogbook to the different ALICE actors, not only for near real time procedures but also for long term data-mining and analysis. It will also present the web interface, including the different used technologies, the implemented security measures and the current main features. Finally it will present the roadmap for the future, including a migration to the web 2.0 paradigm, the handling of the database ever-increasing data volume and the deployment of data-mining tools.

  1. The ALICE Electronic Logbook

    Altini, V; Carena, F; Carena, W; Chapeland, S; Barroso, V Chibante; Costa, F; Divia, R; Fuchs, U; Makhlyueva, I; Roukoutakis, F; Schossmaier, K; Soos, C; Vyvre, P Vande; Haller, B Von

    2010-01-01

    All major experiments need tools that provide a way to keep a record of the events and activities, both during commissioning and operations. In ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) at CERN, this task is performed by the Alice Electronic Logbook (eLogbook), a custom-made application developed and maintained by the Data-Acquisition group (DAQ). Started as a statistics repository, the eLogbook has evolved to become not only a fully functional electronic logbook, but also a massive information repository used to store the conditions and statistics of the several online systems. It's currently used by more than 600 users in 30 different countries and it plays an important role in the daily ALICE collaboration activities. This paper will describe the LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) based architecture of the eLogbook, the database schema and the relevance of the information stored in the eLogbook to the different ALICE actors, not only for near real time procedures but also for long term data-mining and analysis. It will also present the web interface, including the different used technologies, the implemented security measures and the current main features. Finally it will present the roadmap for the future, including a migration to the web 2.0 paradigm, the handling of the database ever-increasing data volume and the deployment of data-mining tools.

  2. ALICE Vzero Detector

    Cheynis, B

    2013-01-01

    ALICE is the only experiment at CERN specifically designed to study the Quark-Gluon Plasma, the hot and dense matter which is created in ultra relativistic heavy-ion collisions. - VZERO-A (CINVESTAV-UNAM Mexico): 2.8 328 cm away from Interaction Point - VZERO-C (IPN Lyon): -3.6 88 cm away from Interaction Point

  3. ALICE installs its TPC

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE time projection chamber has been transported to the experimental cavern. The handling of this extremely fragile detector was a long and delicate process. The lorry transporting the TPC took one hour to travel from the assembly hall to the access shaft...200 metres away.The TPC was lowered into the ALICE experimental cavern with extreme care. The gap between the structure and the shaft wall was only 10 centimetres! For ALICE the year started with a flurry of activity...but at a snail's pace. On 8 January, the day CERN reopened after the end-of-year break, teams from ALICE and the TS Department began the transportation of the experiment's time projection chamber (TPC), the largest ever built. This 5-metre long and 5-m diameter cylinder was transported from the clean room where it had been assembled to the experimental cavern. The 300-metre journey took no less than four days! Since the TPC is an extremely fragile object, the utmost precautions were exercised in its transportation. The TPC, which is d...

  4. ALICE Silicon Strip Detector

    Nooren, G

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) constitutes the two outermost layers of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE Experiment. The SSD plays a crucial role in the tracking of the particles produced in the collisions connecting the tracks from the external detectors (Time Projection Chamber) to the ITS. The SSD also contributes to the particle identification through the measurement of their energy loss.

  5. First ALICE detectors installed!

    2006-01-01

    Detectors to track down penetrating muon particles are the first to be placed in their final position in the ALICE cavern. The Alice muon spectrometer: in the foreground the trigger chamber is positioned in front of the muon wall, with the dipole magnet in the background. After the impressive transport of its dipole magnet, ALICE has begun to fill the spectrometer with detectors. In mid-July, the ALICE muon spectrometer team achieved important milestones with the installation of the trigger and the tracking chambers of the muon spectrometer. They are the first detectors to be installed in their final position in the cavern. All of the eight half planes of the RPCs (resistive plate chambers) have been installed in their final position behind the muon filter. The role of the trigger detector is to select events containing a muon pair coming, for instance, from the decay of J/ or Y resonances. The selection is made on the transverse momentum of the two individual muons. The internal parts of the RPCs, made o...

  6. Special report: Mt. St. Helens

    Mt. St Helens Volcano, Cascade Range, Southern Washington, USA (46.20°N, 122.18°W.) All times are local (GMT - 7 h through October 24, GMT - 8 h thereafter. Lava extrusion that probably began October 30 added a new lobe to the composite dome in the crater of Mt. St. Helens. After lava extrusion ended September 10 (see September 22 Eos), rates of deformation in the crater remained low for several weeks, as they had after earlier extrusion episodes. Sulfur dioxide emission ranged from 70 to 190 tons per day between October 9 and 24, but showed no particular trends. Inflation of the dome has caused small thrust faults to form in the surrounding crater floor. In early October the most active thrust, south of the dome, was moving at about 1.5 cm/d, and stations on the north crater rampart showed outward movement of about 0.5 cm/d. By October 24 these rates had increased to 14.5 and 3.5-4 cm/d, respectively, and leveling profiles perpendicular to the dome showed that crater floor tilt rates had reached 400-500 μrad/d, prompting the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to issue an advisory prediction of renewed lava extrusion within the next two weeks.

  7. The ALICE pixel detector

    Mercado Perez, J

    2002-01-01

    The present document is a brief summary of the performed activities during the 2001 Summer Student Programme at CERN under the Scientific Summer at Foreign Laboratories Program organized by the Particles and Fields Division of the Mexican Physical Society (Sociedad Mexicana de Fisica). In this case, the activities were related with the ALICE Pixel Group of the EP-AIT Division, under the supervision of Jeroen van Hunen, research fellow in this group. First, I give an introduction and overview to the ALICE experiment; followed by a description of wafer probing. A brief summary of the test beam that we had from July 13th to July 25th is given as well. (3 refs).

  8. ALICE photon spectrometer crystals

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Members of the mechanical assembly team insert the last few crystals into the first module of ALICE's photon spectrometer. These crystals are made from lead-tungstate, a crystal as clear as glass but with nearly four times the density. When a high-energy particle passes through one of these crystals it will scintillate, emitting a flash of light allowing the energy of photons, electrons and positrons to be measured.

  9. ALICE comes to life

    2002-01-01

    On 26 March, a first major part of the ALICE detector arrived at CERN: one of the four cylinders in composite material for the Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The construction of the TPC 'field cage' (the structure that defines the configuration of the electrical field of the TPC) is the fruit of exceptional collaboration between CERN and the Austrian manufacturer Fischer Advanced Composite Components (Fischer ACC).

  10. ALICE dipole and decoration

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The ALICE cavern receives a painting made specially to mark the 50th anniversary of CERN that is mounted on the L3 solenoid magnet, reused from the LEP experiment that ran from 1989 to 2000. The dipole, which is cooled by demineralised water, will bend the path of muons that leave the huge rectangular solenoid. These muons are heavy electrons that interact less with matter allowing them to be studied at large distances from the interaction point.

  11. ALICE on the move

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    A new management, new modules for its sub-detectors and an increased capacity to probe the properties of the quark-gluon plasma. The new year bodes well for ALICE and ion physics as quarks and gluons prepare to unveil their most profound mysteries.   Installation of one of the new EMCal modules in the detector. Paolo Giubellino, the new ALICE spokesperson, talks with enthusiasm about what has already been done by the ALICE collaboration and what is yet to come. He has recently taken over from Jurgen Schukraft, who led the collaboration from its earliest beginnings. “We had a very exciting first year of operation, with many interesting results coming up in a very short space of time,” says Giubellino, a heavy-ion-physics expert from the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics (see box for details). “The Christmas technical stop wasn’t a break for us as we upgraded the detector, completing the installation of the electromagnetic calorimeter (E...

  12. The ALICE TPC Upgrad

    Castro, Andrew; Alice-Usa Collaboration; Alice-Tpc Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) currently used for ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment at CERN) is a gaseous tracking detector used to study both proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) In order to accommodate the higher luminosit collisions planned for the LHC Run-3 starting in 2021, the ALICE-TPC will undergo a major upgrade during the next LHC shut down. The TPC is limited to a read out of 1000 Hz in minimum bias events due to the intrinsic dead time associated with back ion flow in the multi wire proportional chambers (MWPC) in the TPC. The TPC upgrade will handle the increase in event readout to 50 kHz for heavy ion minimum bias triggered events expected with the Run-3 luminosity by switching the MWPCs to a stack of four Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM) foils. The GEM layers will combine different hole pitches to reduce the dead time while maintaining the current spatial and energy resolution of the existing TPC. Undertaking the upgrade of the TPC represents a massive endeavor in terms of design, production, construction, quality assurance, and installation, thus the upgrade is coordinated over a number of institutes worldwide. The talk will go over the physics motivation for the upgrade, the ALICE-USA contribution to the construction of Inner Read Out Chambers IROCs, and QA from the first chambers built in the U.S

  13. Pentaquark searches with ALICE

    Bobulska, Dana

    2016-01-01

    In this report we present the results of the data analysis for searching for possible invariant mass signals from pentaquarks in the ALICE data. Analysis was based on filtered data from real p-Pb events at psNN=5.02 TeV collected in 2013. The motivation for this project was the recent discovery of pentaquark states by the LHCb collaboration (c ¯ cuud resonance P+ c ) [1]. The search for similar not yet observed pentaquarks is an interesting research topic [2]. In this analysis we searched for a s ¯ suud pentaquark resonance P+ s and its possible decay channel to f meson and proton. The ALICE detector is well suited for the search of certain candidates thanks to its low material budget and strong PID capabilities. Additionally we might expect the production of such particles in ALICE as in heavy-ion and proton-ion collisions the thermal models describes well the particle yields and ratios [3]. Therefore it is reasonable to expect other species of hadrons, including also possible pentaquarks, to be produced w...

  14. ALICE-ARC integration

    Anderlik, C; Gregersen, A R; Kleist, J; Peters, A; Saiz, P

    2008-01-01

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Grid middleware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The inter-operation has two aspects, one is the data management part and the second the job management aspect. The first aspect was solved by using dCache across NDGF to handle data. Therefore, we will concentrate on the second part. Solving it, was somewhat cumbersome, mainly due to the different computing models employed by AliEn and ARC. AliEN uses an Agent based pull model while ARC handles jobs through the more 'traditional' push model. The solution comes as a module implementing the functionalities necessary to achieve AliEn job submission and management to ARC enabled sites

  15. Jet quenching at ALICE

    Bianchi, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    RHIC results on leading hadron suppression indicate that the jets produced in hard processes are strongly quenched by the dense medium created in heavy ion collisions. Most of the energy lost by the leading parton remains within the jet cone, but several questions on the medium modification of the jet structure have not been addressed. These include the longitudinal and transverse structures of the quenched jet, the associated radiation observables, and the dependence on the parton flavor. These topics will be studied by ALICE thanks to both the robustness of its tracking and the charged particle identification system. Large medium effects are expected in both the low pt and in the high pt regions. To make ALICE better suited for jet physics, the performances on high p t particles and jets can be significantly improved by completing the present set-up with a large Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EmCal). This will significantly improve the resolution on the jet energy and on the particle composition (with the detection of both charged and neutral particles). It will also allow to calibrate the jet energy by measuring the high energy photon emitted in the opposite direction. EmCal will be used to trigger on the jet energy itself, thus allowing a significant improvement of the statistics achievable for jets of high energy. Finally, due too both the γ/π 0 and the electron/hadron discrimination, EmCal will enhance the ALICE capabilities at high p t for direct photons and heavy quarks measurements

  16. Alice in Danceland

    Fabio Ciambella

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present an unexplored case study in the field of the studies on adaptation: the dance in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865 by Lewis Carroll and its transformations during the transmodalization. In particular the two most popular film adaptations of the novel of the Victorian writer will be presented and analysed: the cartoon produced by Disney in 1951 and the 2010 film directed by the Californian director Tim Burton. If in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland Carroll introduce a dance performed by some lobsters (precisely in chapter X that is titled "The Lobster Quadrille", in the Disney's masterpiece there is no trace either of lobsters, turtles or griffins. Paradoxically, dancing in the cartoon is a recurring motif, which is the background to the vicissitudes of the protagonist from the beginning to the end. The viewer of Burton’s Alice will be even much more shocked by the presence of the dance in two specific moments of the film – at the beginning and at the end – which are not present nor in the hypotext, nor in its Twentieth-century adaptation. In other words, although the dance is present in the three works, it never appears at the same time.

  17. ALICE: ARC integration

    Anderlik, C; Kleist, J; Peters, A; Saiz, P

    2008-01-01

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Grid middleware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The inter-operation has two aspects, one is the data management part and the second the job management aspect. The first aspect was solved by using dCache across NDGF to handle data. Therefore, we will concentrate on the second part. Solving it, was somewhat cumbersome, mainly due to the different computing models employed by AliEn and ARC. AliEN uses an Agent based pull model while ARC handles jobs through the more 'traditional' push model. The solution comes as a modu...

  18. May 1980 Mount Saint Helens, USA Images

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — An earthquake occurred at 15 32 UT, only seconds before the explosion that began the eruption of Mount St. Helens volcano. This eruption and blast blew off the top...

  19. Helen Dilloni koduaed Dublinis / Virve Poom

    Poom, Virve

    2015-01-01

    Tuntud iiri aiakujundaja Helen Dilloni koduaeda Dublini keskklinnas Sandford Terrace'il peetakse üheks parimaks linnaaiaks. Kaasaegsete aedade hulgas paistab see silma just oma erilisuse ja omanäolisusega

  20. HELEN brings Latin Americans to CERN

    Maximiliem Brice

    2006-01-01

    Latin American students who have arrived at CERN to take up fellowships during the first months of 2006 relax in front of the LHC collaboration buildings, together with the deputy coordinator of HELEN, Veronica Riquer (centre), from Rome University and INFN. The training programme supported by the High Energy Physics Latin American- European Network (HELEN) is in full swing. For 2006, the programme has assigned about 70 fellowships to be spent at CERN by Latin American students and young physicists.

  1. ALICE doffs hat to two companies

    2007-01-01

    During the fifth annual ALICE Industrial Awards ceremony, the ALICE Collaboration honoured two companies for their outstanding contributions to the construction of the experiment.For the past five years, the ALICE collaboration has been presenting its industrial partners with awards for meeting demanding or unusual requirements, for excellence in design or execution, for delivery on-time and on-budget and for outstanding cooperation. This year, on 9 March, ALICE presented awards to two companies for their exceptional performance. From left to right: Kees Oskamp (ALICE SSD), Arie de Haas (ALICE SSD), Gert-Jan Nooren (ALICE SSD), Shon Shmuel (FIBERNET), Yehuda Mor-Yosef (FIBERNET), Hans Boggild (ALICE), Jurgen Schukraft (ALICE Spokesperson), Catherine Decosse (ALICE) and Jean-Robert Lutz (ALICE SSD). FIBERNET Ltd., based in Yokneam, Israel, was rewarded for the excellent and timely assembly of the Silicon Strip Detector boards (SSD) of the Inner Tracking System with cable connections. Special low-mass cables, ...

  2. The ALICE forward multiplicity detector

    Holm Christensen, Christian; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan; Sogaard, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) is a silicon strip detector with 51,200 strips arranged in 5 rings, covering the range $-3.4......The ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) is a silicon strip detector with 51,200 strips arranged in 5 rings, covering the range $-3.4...

  3. Simple models with ALICE fluxes

    Striet, J

    2000-01-01

    We introduce two simple models which feature an Alice electrodynamics phase. In a well defined sense the Alice flux solutions we obtain in these models obey first order equations similar to those of the Nielsen-Olesen fluxtube in the abelian higgs model in the Bogomol'nyi limit. Some numerical solutions are presented as well.

  4. ALICE bags data storage accolades

    2007-01-01

    ComputerWorld has recognized CERN with an award for the 'Best Practices in Storage' for ALICE's data acquisition system, in the category of 'Systems Implementation'. The award was presented to the ALICE DAQ team on 18 April at a ceremony in San Diego, CA. (Top) ALICE physicist Ulrich Fuchs. (Bottom) Three of the five storage racks for the ALICE Data Acquisition system (Photo Antonio Saba). Between 16 and19 April, one thousand people from data storage networks around the world gathered to attend the biannual Storage Networking World Conference. Twenty-five companies and organizations were celebrated as finalists, and five of those were given honorary awards-among them CERN, which tied for first place in the category of Systems Implementation for the success of the ALICE Data Acquisition System. CERN was one of five finalists in this category, which recognizes the winning facility for 'the successful design, implementation and management of an interoperable environment'. 'Successful' could include documentati...

  5. ALICE honours two Italian suppliers

    2006-01-01

    During the ALICE week held in Bologna from 19 to 23 June, the Collaboration recognized two of its top suppliers. From left to right: Robert Terpin (MIPOT), Pier Luigi Bellutti (ITC), Andrea Zanotti, President of ITC, Luciano Bosisio (Trieste University), Gennady Zinovjev (Kiev), Catherine Decosse (CERN), Lodovico Riccati, ALICE Collaboration Board Chair (INFN Torino), Paolo Giubellino (INFN Torino), Mario Zen, Director of ITC, Maurizio Boscardin (ITC), Paolo Tonella (ITC), Jurgen Schukraft, ALICE Spokesperson (CERN), Giacomo Vito Margagliotti (Trieste University), Nevio Grion (INFN Trieste), Marco Bregant (INFN Trieste). Front row from left to right: Paolo Traverso (ITC), Federico Carminati, ALICE Computing Project Leader (CERN), and Jean-Robert Lutz, ITS-SSD Project leader (IPHC Strasbourg). It is in the picturesque city of Bologna that the ALICE Collaboration has rewarded two Italian suppliers, Istituto Trentino di Cultura ITC-irst (Trento) and MIPOT (Cormons), both involved in the construction of the Sili...

  6. Jet physics in ALICE

    Loizides, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    The ALICE experiment is one of the experiments currently prepared for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva, starting operation end of 2007. ALICE is dedicated to the research on nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultra-relativistic energies, which addresses the properties of strongly interacting matter under varying conditions of high density and temperature. The conditions provided at the LHC allow significant qualitative improvement with respect to previous studies. In particular, energetic probes, light quarks and gluons, will be abundantly produced. These probes might be identified by their fragmentation into correlated particles, so called jets, of high enough energy to allow full reconstruction of jet properties; even in the underlying heavy-ion environment. Understanding the dependence of high-energy jet production and fragmentation influenced by the dense medium created in the collision region is an open field of active research. Generally, one expects energy loss of the probes due to medium-induced gluon radiation. It is suggested that hadronization products of these, rather soft gluons may be contained within the jet emission cone, resulting in a modification of the characteristic jet fragmentation, as observed via longitudinal and transverse momentum distributions with respect to the direction of the initial parton, as well as of the multiplicity distributions arising from the jet fragmentation. Particle momenta parallel to the jet axis are softened (jet quenching), while transverse to it increased (transverse heating). The present thesis studies the capabilities of the ALICE detectors to measure these jets and quantifies obtainable rates and the quality of jet reconstruction, in both proton-proton and lead-lead collisions at the LHC. In particular, it is addressed whether modification of the jet fragmentation can be detected within the high-particle-multiplicity environment of central lead-lead collisions. (orig.)

  7. Particle correlations at ALICE

    Erazmus, B.; Lednicky, R.; Lyuboshitz, V.; Martin, L.; Mikhailov, K.; Pluta, J.; Sinyukov, Yu.; Stavinsky, A.; Werner, K

    1998-12-31

    The ability of the ALICE detector for determination of the space-time characteristics of particle production in heavy-ion collisions at LHC from measurements of the correlation functions of identical and non-identical particles at small relative velocities is discussed. The possibility to use the correlations of non-identical particles for a direct determination of the delays in emission of various particle species at time scales as small as 10{sup -23} s is demonstrated. The influence of the multi-boson effects on pion multiplicities, single-pion spectra and two-pion correlation functions is discussed. (author) 63 refs.

  8. Data science in ALICE

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    ALICE is the LHC experiment dedicated to the study of Heavy Ion collisions. In particular, the detector features low momentum tracking and vertexing, and comprehensive particle identification capabilities. In a single central heavy ion collision at the LHC, thousands of particles per unit rapidity are produced, making the data volume, track reconstruction and search of rare signals particularly challenging. Data science and machine learning techniques could help to tackle some of the challenges outlined above. In this talk, we will discuss some early attempts to use these techniques for the processing of detector signals and for the physics analysis. We will also highlight the most promising areas for the application of these methods.

  9. ALICE Transition Radiation Detector

    Pachmayer, Y

    2013-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) is the main electron detector in ALICE. In conduction with the TPC and the ITS, it provides the necessary electron identification capability to study: - Production of light and heavy vector mesons as well as the continuum in the di-electron channel, - Semi leptonic decays of hadrons with open charm and open beauty via the single-electron channel using the displaced vertex information provided by the ITS, - Correlated DD and BB pairs via coincidences of electrons in the central barrel and muons in the forward muon arm, - Jets with high Pτ tracks in one single TRD stack.

  10. Inpatient management of borderline personality disorder at Helen ...

    Inpatient management of borderline personality disorder at Helen Joseph Hospital, Johannesburg. ... South African Journal of Psychiatry ... to the acute inpatient psychiatric assessment unit at the Helen Joseph Hospital, in Johannesburg, over ...

  11. ALICE Expert System

    Ionita, C

    2014-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at CERN employs a number of human operators (shifters), who have to make sure that the experiment is always in a state compatible with taking Physics data. Given the complexity of the system and the myriad of errors that can arise, this is not always a trivial task. The aim of this paper is to describe an expert system that is capable of assisting human shifters in the ALICE control room. The system diagnoses potential issues and attempts to make smart recommendations for troubleshooting. At its core, a Prolog engine infers whether a Physics or a technical run can be started based on the current state of the underlying sub-systems. A separate C++ component queries certain SMI objects and stores their state as facts in a Prolog knowledge base. By mining the data stored in dierent system logs, the expert system can also diagnose errors arising during a run. Currently the system is used by the on-call experts for faster response times, but we expect it to be adopted as a standard tool by reg...

  12. Protecting detectors in ALICE

    Lechman, M.; Augustinus, A.; Chochula, P.; Di Mauro, A.; Stig Jirden, L.; Rosinsky, P.; Schindler, H.; Cataldo, G. de; Pinazza, O.; Kurepin, A.; Moreno, A.

    2012-01-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is one of the big LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiments at CERN in Geneva. It is composed of many sophisticated and complex detectors mounted very compactly around the beam pipe. Each detector is a unique masterpiece of design, engineering and construction and any damage to it could stop the experiment for months or even for years. It is therefore essential that the detectors are protected from any danger and this is one very important role of the Detector Control System (DCS). One of the main dangers for the detectors is the particle beam itself. Since the detectors are designed to be extremely sensitive to particles they are also vulnerable to any excess of beam conditions provided by the LHC accelerator. The beam protection consists of a combination of hardware interlocks and control software and this paper will describe how this is implemented and handled in ALICE. Tools have also been developed to support operators and shift leaders in the decision making related to beam safety. The gained experiences and conclusions from the individual safety projects are also presented. (authors)

  13. The Latest from ALICE

    2009-01-01

    After intensive installation operations from October 2008 until July 2009 (see Bulletin 31/7/2009), ALICE started a full-detector cosmics run in August, which is scheduled to last until the end of October. In addition to the Silicon Pixel and ACORDE detectors, the latter specially built for triggering on cosmic muons, ALICE is now making extensive use of the trigger provided by the Time Of Flight array. The high granularity and the low noise (0.1 Hz/cm2) of the TOF MRPCs, combined with the large coverage (~150 m2), offers a wide range of trigger combinations. This extended cosmic run serves many purposes: to test the performance of each individual detector; to ensure their integration in the central Data Acquisition; to perform alignment and calibration; to check the reconstruction software; to fine-tune the tracking algorithms; and last but not least, to train the personnel for the long shifts ahead. More than 100 million events h...

  14. ALICE Expert System

    Ionita, C; Carena, F

    2014-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at CERN employs a number of human operators (shifters), who have to make sure that the experiment is always in a state compatible with taking Physics data. Given the complexity of the system and the myriad of errors that can arise, this is not always a trivial task. The aim of this paper is to describe an expert system that is capable of assisting human shifters in the ALICE control room. The system diagnoses potential issues and attempts to make smart recommendations for troubleshooting. At its core, a Prolog engine infers whether a Physics or a technical run can be started based on the current state of the underlying sub-systems. A separate C++ component queries certain SMI objects and stores their state as facts in a Prolog knowledge base. By mining the data stored in different system logs, the expert system can also diagnose errors arising during a run. Currently the system is used by the on-call experts for faster response times, but we expect it to be adopted as a standard tool by regular shifters during the next data taking period

  15. ALICE honours two Italian suppliers

    2006-01-01

    From left to right: Robert Terpin (MIPOT), Pier Luigi Bellutti (ITC), Andrea Zanotti, President of ITC, Luciano Bosisio (Trieste University), Gennady Zinovjev (Kiev), Catherine Decosse (CERN), Lodovico Riccati, ALICE Collaboration Board Chair (INFN Torino), Paolo Giubellino (INFN Torino), Mario Zen, Director of ITC, Maurizio Boscardin (ITC), Paolo Tonella (ITC), Jurgen Schukraft, ALICE Spokesperson (CERN), Giacomo Vito Margagliotti (Trieste University), Nevio Grion (INFN Trieste), Marco Bregant (INFN Trieste) Front row from left to right: Paolo Traverso (ITC), Federico Carminati, ALICE Computing Project Leader (CERN), and Jean-Robert Lutz, ITS-SSD Project leader (IPHC Strasbourg).

  16. CERN Open Days 2013, Point 2 - ALICE: ALICE Experiment

    CERN Photolab

    2013-01-01

    Stand description: Visitors will be guided through the ALICE experiment, an extraordinary particle physics detector located at a depth of 80 meters below ground.  ALICE started up in 2008 to study the quark-gluon plasma, a state of matter that probably existed in the first moments of the universe. Visitors will also be able to walk inside the LHC tunnel, where superconducting magnets guide the beams of protons at unprecedented energies around the LHC. In addition to the underground visit, several ALICE physicists and engineers will be available to answer visitors' questions. On surface no restricted access  Above ground, scientific  and other kinds of shows will entertain the visitors to ALICE, even the youngest, throughout the day.

  17. ALICE Particle Identification

    Hussein Ezzelarab, Nada

    2014-01-01

    During my stay at CERN, I have attended lectures mornings and worked on my research project under orienting guidance of my supervisors afternoons. The lectures were informative and pedagog- ically well-prepared and presented. Their contents was an excellent combination of theoretical and experimental topics in high-energy physics. Furthermore, I was privileged to visit the ALICE, CMS and LHCb detectors and the LINIAC accelerator. I have participated in workshop on ”MadGraph software”. I was furnished with excellent experiences and cultural exchanges with good colleagues from different countries. I got opportunities to know what the other students have done, in which projects they were involved and how they performed their scientific researches, especially regarding LHC data analysis. For my own project, I have to prove excellent experience with C++ and of course LINUX, ROOT and AliROOT. Tools such as Histograms, Graphs, Fitting, trees and many others were very essential. Furthermore, I am very proud getti...

  18. Latest results from ALICE

    Scapparone, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    In this paper selected results obtained by the ALICE experiment at the LHC will be presented. Data collected during the pp runs taken at sqrt(s)=0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV and Pb-Pb runs at sqrt(s_NN)=2.76 TeV allowed interesting studies on the properties of the hadronic and nuclear matter: proton runs gave us the possibility to explore the ordinary matter at very high energy and up to very low pt, while Pb-Pb runs provided spectacular events where several thousands of particles produced in the interaction revealed how a very dense medium behaves, providing a deeper picture on the quark gluon plasma(QGP) chemical composition and dynamics.

  19. The ALICE TPC

    Garabatos, C

    2004-01-01

    We describe the ALICE TPC, with emphasis on the design features which are driven by the physics requirements of the detector. In particular, the gas choice and composition, Ne-CO/sub 2/ Ý90-10¿, as well as the unprecedentedly high gain for a TPC (2*10/sup 40/), are direct consequences of the expected performance in the high- multiplicity environment of heavy-ion collisions at the LHC. The characteristics of this mixture are discussed and a viable way of improving the stability of detectors working under these conditions, namely the addition of nitrogen into the mixture, is presented. This results in a more effective Penning transfer of neon excited states onto ionisation of the quencher at no penalty for the charge transport and amplification properties.

  20. ALICE Masterclass on strangeness

    Foka Panagiota

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An educational activity, the International Particle Physics Masterclasses, was developed by the International Particle Physics Outreach Group with the aim to bring the excitement of cutting-edge particle-physics research into the classroom. Thousands of pupils, every year since 2005, in many countries all over the world, are hosted in research centers or universities close to their schools and become “scientists for a day” as they are introduced to the mysteries of particle physics. The program of a typical day includes lectures that give insight to topics and methods of fundamental research followed by a “hands-on” session where the high-school students perform themselves measurements on real data from particle-physics experiments. The last three years data from the ALICE experiment at LHC were used. The performed measurement “strangeness enhancement” and the employed methodology are presented.

  1. First Physics Results from ALICE

    Peressounko, Dmitri; Castillo Castellanos, Javier; Belikov, Iouri

    2010-01-01

    ALICE is the LHC experiment dedicated to the study of heavy-ion collisions. The main purpose of ALICE is to investigate the properties of a state of deconfined nuclear matter, the Quark Gluon Plasma. Heavy flavour measurements will play a crucial role in this investigation. The physics programme of ALICE has started by studying proton-proton collisions at unprecedented high energies. We will present the first results on open heavy flavour and quarkonia in proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV measured by the ALICE experiment at both mid- and forward-rapidities. We will conclude with the prospects for heavy flavour and quarkonium measurements in both proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions. Also presented are first results of neutral meson reconstruction and its perspectives, as well as further physics studies. (author)

  2. ALICE EMCal Physics Performance Report

    Abeysekara, U.; Aronsson, T.; Awes, T.; Badala, A.; Baumgart, S.; Bellwied, R.; Benhabib, L.; Bernard, C.; Bianchi, N.; Blanco, F.; Bortoli, Y.; Boswell, B.; Bourdaud, G.; Bourrion, O.; Boyer, B.; Brown, C.R.; Bruna, E.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calvo Diaz Aldagalan, D.; Capitani, G.P.; Carcagno, Y.; Casanova Diaz, A.; Cherney, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cunqueiro Mendez, L.; Delagrange, H.; Del Franco, M.; Dialinas, M.; Di Nezza, P.; Donoghue, A.; Elnimr, M.; Enokizono, A.; Estienne, M.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fenton-Olsen, B.; Fichera, F.; Figueredo, M.A.S.; Foglio, B.; Fresneau, S.; Fujita, J.; Furget, C.; Gadrat, S.; Garishvili, I.; Germain, M.; Giudice, N.; Gorbunov, Y.N.; Grimaldi, A.; Guernane, R.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harris, J.W.; Hasch, D.; Heinz, M.; Hicks, B.; Hille, P.T.; Hornback, D.; Ichou, R.; Jacobs, P.; Jangal, S.; Jayananda, K.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kharlov, Y.; Klay, J.L.; Knospe, A.G.; Kox, S.; Kral, J.; Laloux, P.; LaPointe, S.; La Rocca, P.; Lewis, S.; Li, Q.; Librizzi, F.; Ma, R.; Madagodahettige Don, D.; Mao, Y.; Markert, C.; Martashvili, I.; Mayes, B.; Milletto, T.; Mlynarz, J.; Muccifora, V.; Mueller, H.; Munhoz, M.G.; Muraz, J.F.; Newby, J.; Nattrass, C.; Noto, F.; Novitzky, N.; Nilsen, B.S.; Odyniec, G.; Orlandi, A.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G.S.; Pavlinov, A.; Pesci, W.; Petrov, V.; Petta, C.; Pichot, P.; Pinsky, L.; Ploskon, M.; Pompei, F.; Pulvirenti, A.; Putschke, J.; Pruneau, C.A.; Rak, J.; Rasson, J.; Read, K.F.; Real, J.S.; Reolon, A.R.; Riggi, F.; Riso, J.; Ronchetti, F.; Roy, C.; Roy, D.; Salemi, M.; Salur, S.; Sano, M.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Sharma, M.; Silvermyr, D.; Smirnov, N.; Soltz, R.; Sorensen, S.; Sparti, V.; Srivastava, B.K.; Stutzmann, J.S.; Symons, J.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tarini, L.; Thomen, R.; Timmins, A.; Turvey, A.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vieira, R.; Viticchie, A.; Voloshin, S.; Vernet, R.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    The ALICE detector at the LHC (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) will carry out comprehensive measurements of high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions, in order to study QCD matter under extreme conditions and the phase transtion between confined matter and the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). This report presents our current state of understanding of the Physics Performance of the large acceptance Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMCal) in the ALICE central detector. The EMCal enhances ALICE’s capabilities for jet measurements. The EMCal enables triggering and full reconstruction of high energy jets in ALICE, and augments existing ALICE capabilities to measure high momentum photons and electrons. Combined with ALICE’s excellent capabilities to track and identify particles from very low pT to high pT , the EMCal enables a comprehensive study of jet interactions in the medium produced in heavy ion collisions at the LHC.

  3. That’s a matter for ALICE!

    Katarina Anthony

    2010-01-01

    ALICE has launched a new online newsletter to report on developments at the detector: ALICE Matters. The fortnightly newsletter will keep members of the collaboration – and a wider readership – up-to-date with the latest news from the detector.   Screenshot of the ALICE Matters website. The new ALICE Matters newsletter highlights the work of ALICE collaborators through news, interviews and feature articles. Published online every fortnight, it will report the latest developments from the experiment, providing information about operation and data taking, installation work during technical stops, and news from ALICE members. The newsletter is aimed at members of the collaboration, but as an online publication it is also open to the general public. “We often receive questions from people who follow our progress and are interested in what's happening at ALICE,” explains Despina Hatzifotiadou, ALICE Outreach Coordinator. “With ALICE Matters, we can n...

  4. Making sense of Mount St. Helens

    Steve Nash

    2010-01-01

    The eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980 resulted in "a grand experiment that you could never have gotten anybody to fund," says Forest Service ecologist Charles Crisafulli. "Everything's new. It's a new landform." Unlike most misbehaving volcanoes, this one provided an accessible laboratory right along the Interstate-5 corridor, with the...

  5. The Helen logos and Herodotus’ Fingerprint

    de Jong, I.; Baragwanath, E.; de Bakker, M.

    2012-01-01

    Herodotus' discussion of the Trojan War in Histories 2.112-20 consists mainly of two strands: a historiographical evaluation of his sources, Homer and the Egyptian priests (116-17, 120), and the presentation of an alternative version (Helen never went to Troy but stayed in Egypt), as heard from the

  6. The ALICE time machine

    Ferretti Alessandro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the Big Bang theory, the Universe was once in an extremely hot and dense state which expanded rapidly. In such a state the normal nuclear matter could not exist: it is believed that a few microsecond after big-bang the matter underwent a phase transition, from a state called Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP to a hadron gas. Some of the unexplained features of the Universe could be explained by the QGP properties. One of the aims of the CERN LHC is to recreate (on a smaller scale a QGP state, compressing and heating ordinary nuclear matter by means of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. The ALICE experiment at CERN is dedicated to the study of the medium produced in these collisions : in particular, the study of the heavy quarkonia suppression pattern can give a measure of the temperature reached in these collisions, helping us to understand how close we are getting to the conditions of the starting point of the Universe.

  7. ALICE rewards one of its suppliers

    2007-01-01

    On 6 October 2007 the ALICE Collaboration Board awarded one of its prestigious Industrial Awards to Hewlett-Packard for its instrumental role in enabling ALICE physicists to collect and process experimental data on the Grid. From left to right: Jurgen Schukraft, ALICE Spokesperson; Michel Bénard, Hewlett Packard, Director, Technology Programs and University Relations; Federico Carminati, ALICE Computing Project Leader; Lodovico Riccati, ALICE Collaboration Board Chairperson; Arnaud Pierson, Hewlett Packard, E.M.E.A Program Manager, University Relations and HP Labs; Latchezar Betev, ALICE Distributed Computing Coordinator.The ALICE DAQ and Offline groups have been collaborating with HP since 1993 in the yearly Computing and GRID physics data challenges programme. These are high-level exercises of readiness of hardware and software frameworks for data acquisition and processing. HP hosted ALICE experts in their "centre de compétences"...

  8. ALICE presents its first award to Industry

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Behind from left to right (Derrière de gauche à droite): Bernardo Mota, member of the ALTRO design team, Jurgen Schukraft, ALICE Spokesperson, Luciano Musa, leader of the ALTRO Design Team and Coordinator of the ALICE TPC FEE, Roberto Camapagnolo, member of the ALICE TPC FEE team, Jean-Pierre Coffin, Deputy of the ALICE Collaboration Board Chairman, Hans de Groot ALICE Resource Coordinator, Laurent Degoujon, ST - Data Converter Design Manager, Claude Engster, member of the ALICE TPC FEE team, Alain Delpi, ST - Data Converter Business Unit Manager, Carmen Gonzalez, member of the ALICE TPC FEE team, Yiota Foka, ALICE Outreach Coordinator; Front: Fabio Formenti , EP-ED Group Leader, Juan Antonio Rubio, ETT Division Leader.

  9. ALICE tests its digital chain

    2007-01-01

    During its 7th data challenge, ALICE successfully tested the infrastructure of its data acquisition, transfer and storage system. The ALICE experiment will need a rock-solid data acquisition, selection, transfer, storage and handling system to analyse the billions of bits of data that will be generated every second. The heavy ion collisions at the LHC will generate 10 times more data per second than proton collisions. The ALICE teams have therefore been hard at it for several years designing a cutting-edge informatics system, whose reliability is regularly put to the test in the annual data challenges. Last December, groups from the Collaboration and the IT Department joined forces, or rather cables, in the 7th of these challenges. The teams of ALICE DAQ (data acquisition), ALICE Offline (data handling), IT-CS-IO (network) and IT-FIO (CASTOR and data storage) all took part in testing the various components of the infrastructure, from data acquisition to transfer and storage. Working in close collaboration,...

  10. ACORDE a cosmic ray detector for ALICE

    Fernandez, A.; Gamez, E.; Herrera, G.; Lopez, R.; Leon-Monzon, I.; Martinez, M.I.; Pagliarone, C.; Paic, G.; Roman, S.; Tejeda, G.; Vargas, M.A.; Vergara, S.; Villasenor, L.; Zepeda, A.

    2007-01-01

    ACORDE is one of the ALICE detectors, presently under construction at CERN. It consists of an array of plastic scintillator counters placed on the three upper faces of the ALICE magnet. It will act as a cosmic ray trigger, and, together with other ALICE sub-detectors, will provide precise information on cosmic rays with primary energies around 10 15 -10 17 eV. Here we describe the design of ACORDE along with the present status and integration into ALICE

  11. PC adapter and patch panel for ALICE

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    These components form part of the ALICE detector data link (DDL). This is a high-speed optical link designed to interface the readout electronics of ALICE detectors to computers for data acquisition. A total of 400 DDLs will be installed on ALICE. These silicon devices have been developed especially for use in the high radiation levels produced in detector environments.

  12. ALICE presents its first award to Industry

    On 19 June, a French company received the first ALICE award to industry. ST Technologies has provided ALICE with a key device for the design of a very sophisticated chip for the readout of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber. Behind from left to right (Derrière de gauche à droite): Bernardo Mota, member of the ALTRO design team, Jurgen Schukraft, ALICE Spokesperson, Luciano Musa, leader of the ALTRO Design Team and Coordinator of the ALICE TPC FEE, Roberto Camapagnolo, member of the ALICE TPC FEE team, Jean-Pierre Coffin, Deputy of the ALICE Collaboration Board Chairman, Hans de Groot ALICE Resource Coordinator, Laurent Degoujon, ST - Data Converter Design Manager, Claude Engster, member of the ALICE TPC FEE team, Alain Delpi, ST - Data Converter Business Unit Manager, Carmen Gonzalez, member of the ALICE TPC FEE team, Yiota Foka, ALICE Outreach Coordinator; Front: Fabio Formenti , EP-ED Group Leader, Juan Antonio Rubio, ETT Division Leader The ALICE experiment is setting new demands on readout electronics i...

  13. Managing Information Flow in ALICE

    Augustinus, A; Moreno, A; Kurepin, A N; De Cataldo, G; Pinazza, O; Rosinský, P; Lechman, M; Jirdén, L S

    2011-01-01

    ALICE is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The ALICE detector control system is an integrated system collecting 18 different detectors’ controls and general services. Is implemented using the commercial SCADA package PVSS. Information of general interest, such as beam and condition data, and data related to shared plants or systems, are made available to all the subsystems via the distribution capabilities of PVSS. Great care has been taken to build a modular and hierarchical system, limiting the interdependencies of the various subsystems. Accessing remote resources in a PVSS distributed environment is very simple and can be initiated unilaterally. In order to improve the reliability of distributed data and to avoid unforeseen and unwished dependencies, the ALICE DCS group has enforced the centralization of global data required by the subsystems. A tool has been developed to monitor the level of interdependency and to understand the ...

  14. Industrial collaborators honoured by ALICE

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Picture 01 : the winners gather after the ALICE Award ceremony (from left to right): Yuri Saveliev, Stanislav Burachas and Sergei Beloglovsky of North Crystals; Maximilian Metzger, CERN's secretary-general; Rang Cai of ATM; Jürgen Schukraft, ALICE spokesperson; Erich Pamminger and Daniel Gattinger of FACC; and Tiejun Wang of ATM. The ALICE collaboration has presented its second round of awards to three companies for their novel and remarkable contributions to major detector systems: Advance Technology and Materials (ATM), Fischer Advanced Composite Components (FACC) and North Crystals. The awards presented to these three leaders in advanced, modern materials were beautifully sculpted from one of the oldest materials used by mankind to manufacture tools - Mexican Obsidian

  15. The Ghost Tradition: Helen Of Troy In The Elizabethan Era

    RADUCANU ADRIANA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reputedly the most beautiful woman who has ever lived, Helen of Troy (or Sparta is less well known for her elusive, ghost-like dimension. Homer wrote that the greatest war of Western classical antiquity started because of Helen's adultery followed by her elopement to Troy. Other ancient writers and historians, among theme Aeschylus, Stesichorus, Hesiod, Pausanias, Aristophanes, Euripides and Gorgias of Leontini, challenged the Homeric version, in various ways and attempted to exonerate Helen either by focusing on her phantom/ ghost/ as the generic object of man's desire and scorn or by casting doubt on the mechanisms of the blaming process. This paper argues that the Elizabethans Christopher Marlowe and William Shakespeare adopted and adapted the anti-Homer version of the depiction of Helen, what I here call “the ancient Helen ghost tradition”; nevertheless, in so doing they further reinforced the character's demonic features and paradoxically achieved a return to the adulterous Homeric Helen.

  16. Overview of recent ALICE results

    Gunji, Taku

    2016-12-15

    The ALICE experiment explores the properties of strongly interacting QCD matter at extremely high temperatures created in Pb-Pb collisions at LHC and provides further insight into small-system physics in (high-multiplicity) pp and p-Pb collisions. The ALICE collaboration presented 27 parallel talks, 50 posters, and 1 flash talk at Quark Matter 2015 and covered various topics including collective dynamics, correlations and fluctuations, heavy flavors, quarkonia, jets and high p{sub T} hadrons, electromagnetic probes, small system physics, and the upgrade program. This paper highlights some of the selected results.

  17. Overview of recent ALICE results

    Gunji, Taku

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE experiment explores the properties of strongly interacting QCD matter at extremely high temperatures created in Pb-Pb collisions at LHC and provides further insight into small-system physics in (high-multiplicity) pp and p-Pb collisions. The ALICE collaboration presented 27 parallel talks, 50 posters, and 1 flash talk at Quark Matter 2015 and covered various topics including collective dynamics, correlations and fluctuations, heavy flavors, quarkonia, jets and high $p_{\\rm T}$ hadrons, electromagnetic probes, small system physics, and the upgrade program. This paper highlights some of the selected results.

  18. ALICE Time Of Flight Detector

    Alici, A

    2013-01-01

    Charged particles in the intermediate momentum range are identified in ALICE by the Time Of Flight (TOF) detector. The time measurement with the TOF, in conjunction with the momentum and track length measured by the tracking detector, is used to calculate the particle mass.

  19. On the horizon for ALICE

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    ALICE – the LHC experiment specifically designed to study the physics of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) and, more generally, of strongly interacting matter at extreme energy densities – is planning a series of upgrades during the long shutdowns of the accelerator in the coming years. The new ALICE will have enhanced read-out capabilities and improved efficiency when tracking particles and identifying the vertex of the interactions.     Corrado Gargiulo, ALICE's Project Engineer with ITS prototype. The new ITS will consist of 7 layers of silicon sensors supported by a ultra-light carbon fibre structure.  The LHC has been operated with lead ions for only about two months, but this has been sufficient for ALICE and other LHC experiments to produce results that previous accelerators took several years of operation to produce. “Prior to the start-up of the LHC heavy-ion programme, the nature of the QGP as an almost-perfect liquid had already...

  20. ALICE Holds Up to Challenge

    2006-01-01

    ALICE's main austenitic stainless steel support structure (the Space Frame) has recently gone through many tests that proved quite challenging: insuring the structure is sound and lowering it horizontally into the ALICE cavern. This structure is constructed to hold the large volume detectors, such as the Time Projection Chamber, Transition Radiation Detector and Time of Flight inside the ALICE solenoid magnet. After the final assembly at CERN, two large mobile cranes were needed for the job of lifting and turning the 14 tonne frame onto its side. Once shifted, it was placed in Building SX2, one of the surface assembly areas designated for ALICE. The structure, which is 8 m in diameter and 7 m long, underwent many tests in its new position. Geometric control tests were performed by measuring each of the 18 cells and placing wooden or metal samples constructed to the same dimensions as the real thing inside the structure. The most important check was the movement of the real Time Projection Chamber from its s...

  1. Alice in the Real World

    Parker, Tom

    2012-01-01

    As a fifth-grade mathematics teacher, the author tries to create authentic problem-solving activities that connect to the world in which his students live. He discovered a natural connection to his students' real world at a computer camp. A friend introduced him to Alice, a computer application developed at Carnegie Mellon, under the leadership of…

  2. The ALICE Magnetic System Computation.

    Klempt, W; CERN. Geneva; Swoboda, Detlef

    1995-01-01

    In this note we present the first results from the ALICE magnetic system computation performed in the 3-dimensional way with the Vector Fields TOSCA code (version 6.5) [1]. To make the calculations we have used the IBM RISC System 6000-370 and 6000-550 machines combined in the CERN PaRC UNIX cluster.

  3. ALICE HLT Cluster operation during ALICE Run 2

    Lehrbach, J.; Krzewicki, M.; Rohr, D.; Engel, H.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Lindenstruth, V.; Berzano, D.; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is one of the four major detectors located at the LHC at CERN, focusing on the study of heavy-ion collisions. The ALICE High Level Trigger (HLT) is a compute cluster which reconstructs the events and compresses the data in real-time. The data compression by the HLT is a vital part of data taking especially during the heavy-ion runs in order to be able to store the data which implies that reliability of the whole cluster is an important matter. To guarantee a consistent state among all compute nodes of the HLT cluster we have automatized the operation as much as possible. For automatic deployment of the nodes we use Foreman with locally mirrored repositories and for configuration management of the nodes we use Puppet. Important parameters like temperatures, network traffic, CPU load etc. of the nodes are monitored with Zabbix. During periods without beam the HLT cluster is used for tests and as one of the WLCG Grid sites to compute offline jobs in order to maximize the usage of our cluster. To prevent interference with normal HLT operations we separate the virtual machines running the Grid jobs from the normal HLT operation via virtual networks (VLANs). In this paper we give an overview of the ALICE HLT operation in 2016.

  4. Satellite sar detection of hurricane helene (2006)

    Ju, Lian; Cheng, Yongcun; Xu, Qing

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the wind structure of hurricane Helene (2006) over the Atlantic Ocean is investigated from a C-band RADARSAT-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image acquired on 20 September 2006. First, the characteristics, e.g., the center, scale and area of the hurricane eye (HE) are determined. ...... observations from the stepped frequency microwave radiometer (SFMR) on NOAA P3 aircraft. All the results show the capability of hurricane monitoring by satellite SAR. Copyright © 2013 by the International Society of Offshore and Polar Engineers (ISOPE)....

  5. ALICE moves into warp drive.

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Since its successful start-up in 2010, the LHC has been performing outstandingly, providing to the experiments long periods of stable collisions and an integrated luminosity that greatly exceeds the planned targets. To fully explore these privileged conditions, we aim at maximizing the experiment's data taking productivity during stable collisions. We present in this paper the evolution of the online systems in order to spot reasons of inefficiency and address new requirements. This paper describes the features added to the ALICE Electronic Logbook (eLogbook) to allow the Run Coordination team to identify, prioritize, fix and follow causes of inefficiency in the experiment. Thorough monitoring of the data taking efficiency provides reports for the collaboration to portray its evolution and evaluate the measures (fix...

  6. Overview of results from ALICE

    Płoskoń, Mateusz

    2014-01-01

    ALICE is a dedicated experiment for measurements of heavy-ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A wealth of experimental data recorded in 2010, 2011 and 2012 suggests that a strongly interacting de-confined medium is created in collisions of lead ions at a centre-of-mass energy √S_N_N = 2.76 TeV. In order to quantify the properties of this hot and dense matter, measurements were performed in smaller systems, such as proton-proton and proton-lead, where effects related to the medium are expected to be negligible. We present an overview of recent measurements of particle production and particle correlations in proton-proton, Pb-Pb and p-Pb collisions at the LHC by ALICE Collaboration.

  7. The ALICE detector data link

    Rubin, G; Csató, P; Dénes, E; Kiss, T; Meggyesi, Z; Sulyán, J; Vesztergombi, G; Eged, B; Gerencsér, I; Novák, I; Soós, C; Tarján, D; Telegdy, A; Tóth, N

    1999-01-01

    The ALICE detector data link has been designed to cover all the needs for data transfer between the detector and the data-acquisition system. It is a 1 Gbit/s, full-duplex, multi-purpose fibre optic link that can be used as a medium for the bi-directional transmission of data blocks between the front-end electronics and the data- acquisition system and also for the remote control and test of the front-end electronics, In this paper the concept, the protocol, the specific test tools, the prototypes of the detector data link and the read-out receiver card, their application in the ALICE-TPC test system and the integration with the DATE software are presented. The test results on the performance are also shown. (14 refs).

  8. Measurements of Jets in ALICE

    Nattrass, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE detector can be used for measurements of jets in pp , p Pb, and Pb–Pb collisions. Measurements of jets in pp collisions are consis- tent with expectations from perturbative calculations and jets in p Pb scale with the number of nucleon–nucleon collisions, indicating that cold nuclear matter effects are not observed for jets. Measurements in Pb–Pb collisions demonstrate suppression of jets relative to expectations from binary scaling to the equivalent number of nucleon–nucleon collisions

  9. ALICE through the phase transition

    CERN. Geneva

    2000-01-01

    While proton-proton collisions will be the principal diet of CERN's LHC machine, heavy-ion collisions will also be on the menu. The ALICE experiment will be ready and waiting. Another of ALICE's TDRs concerns the experiment's inner tracking system (ITS). This is the innermost layer of the detector, responsible for tracking emerging particles where their density will be at its highest. ALICE physicists have been working with colleagues from fellow LHC experiment LHCb to develop silicon pixel chips for the inner two layers of the ITS.The result is a chip with 50 x 425 mu m cells; a prototype detector based on this chip is being tested this year.The ITS has six layers, all using silicon technology, and about 10 million digital and 2 million analogue readout channels to digest the huge number of particles produced in LHC lead-ion collisions. The collaboration has opted for a hybrid ITS structure combining sensors, electronics and mechanical support. Beam tests so far have indicated that the ITS should achieve pos...

  10. Managing information flow in ALICE

    Pinazza, O.; Augustinus, A.; Chochula, P.Ch.; Jirden, L.S.; Lechman, M.; Rosinsky, P.; Cataldo, G. de; Kurepin, A.N.; Moreno, A.

    2012-01-01

    ALICE is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The ALICE detector control system (DCS) is an integrated system collecting 18 different detectors' controls and general services. DCS is implemented using the commercial SCADA package PVSS. Information of general interest, such as beam and condition data, and data related to shared plants or systems, are made available to all the subsystems via the distribution capabilities of PVSS. Great care has been taken to build a modular and hierarchical system, limiting the inter-dependencies of the various subsystems. Accessing remote resources in a PVSS distributed environment is very simple and can be initiated unilaterally. In order to improve the reliability of distributed data and to avoid unforeseen and unwished dependencies, the ALICE DCS group has enforced the centralization of global data required by the subsystems. A tool has been developed to monitor the level of inter-dependency and to understand the optimal layout of the distributed connections, allowing for an interactive visualization of the distribution topology. (authors)

  11. ALICE upgrades its powerful eyes

    Yuri Kharlov, ALICE Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ALICE Photon Spectrometer (PHOS) is a high-resolution photon detector that measures the photons coming out of the extremely hot plasma created in the lead-lead collisions at the LHC. Taking advantage of the long accelerator shut-down, the ALICE teams are now repairing and upgrading the existing modules and getting ready to install the brand-new module in time for the next run. The upgraded PHOS detector will be faster and more stable with wider acceptance and improved photon identification.   PHOS crystal matrix during repair. The key feature and the main complexity of the ALICE PHOS detector is that it operates at a temperature of -25°C, which makes it the second-coldest equipment element at the LHC after the cryogenic superconducting magnets. Since 2009 when it was installed, the PHOS detector, with its cold and warm volumes, has been immersed in airtight boxes to avoid condensation in the cold volumes. The 10,752 lead tungstate crystals of the PHOS were completely insulated fr...

  12. The ALICE data quality monitoring

    Haller, B von; Roukoutakis, F; Chapeland, S; Carena, F; Carena, W; Barroso, V Chibante; Costa, F; Divia, R; Fuchs, U; Makhlyueva, I; Schossmaier, K; Soos, C; Vyvre, P Vande; Altini, V

    2010-01-01

    ALICE is one of the four experiments installed at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), especially designed for the study of heavy-ion collisions. The online Data Quality Monitoring (DQM) is an important part of the data acquisition (DAQ) software. It involves the online gathering, the analysis by user-defined algorithms and the visualization of monitored data. This paper presents the final design, as well as the latest and coming features, of the ALICE's specific DQM software called AMORE (Automatic MonitoRing Environment). It describes the challenges we faced during its implementation, including the performances issues, and how we tested and handled them, in particular by using a scalable and robust publish-subscribe architecture.We also review the on-going and increasing adoption of this tool amongst the ALICE collaboration and the measures taken to develop, in synergy with their respective teams, efficient monitoring modules for the sub-detectors. The related packaging and release procedure needed by such a distributed framework is also described. We finally overview the wide range of usages people make of this framework, and we review our own experience, before and during the LHC start-up, when monitoring the data quality on both the sub-detectors and the DAQ side in a real-world and challenging environment.

  13. Obituary: Helen Dodson Prince, 1905-2002

    Lindner, Rudi Paul

    2009-01-01

    Helen Dodson Prince, a pioneer in the observation of solar flares, a pioneer in women's rise in the profession of astronomy, and a respected and revered educator of future astronomers, died on 4 February 2002 in Arlington, Virginia. Helen Dodson was born in Baltimore, Maryland, on 31 December 1905. Her parents were Helen Walter and Henry Clay Dodson. Helen went to Goucher College in nearby Towson with a full scholarship in mathematics. She turned to astronomy under the influence of a legendary teacher, Professor Florence P. Lewis, and she graduated in 1927. Funded by grants and private charity, she earned the Ph.D. in astronomy at the University of Michigan under the direction of Heber Doust Curtis in 1933. Dodson taught at Wellesley College from 1933 until 1943, when she went on leave to spend the last three years of World War II at the MIT Radiation Laboratory. She returned to Goucher after the war as professor of astronomy and mathematics, and in 1947 she came back to Michigan both as professor of astronomy and staff member of the McMath-Hulbert Observatory, of which she became associate director. In 1976 she retired from Michigan and spent her later years in Alexandria, Virginia. In 1932 Dodson held the Dean Van Meter fellowship from Goucher; in 1954 she received the Annie Jump Cannon Prize from the AAS; and in 1974 The University of Michigan honored her with its Faculty Distinguished Achievement Award. She published over 130 articles, mostly on her research specialty, solar flares. Dodson's interest in the Sun began at Michigan, although her dissertation was, like so many Michigan dissertations of the era, on stellar spectroscopy, "A Study of the Spectrum of 25 Orionis." She came to Michigan during the establishment and growth of the solar observatory at Lake Angelus, the creation of three gifted and industrious amateurs. Heber Curtis fostered the growth of the McMath-Hulbert enterprise and brought it into the University. Dodson's solar activity grew as a

  14. NOTE receives the prestigious ALICE Industrial Award

    2006-01-01

    "NOTE Lund has been given the ALICE Industrial Award due to good co-operation, great capacity for innovation and high quality of work, as a PCB manufacturer in the CERN project ALICE. Only a small number of awards have so far been conferred to a select number of companies."

  15. ALICE electromagnetic calorimeter technical design report

    Cortese, P.; Peitzmann, T.; de Haas, A.P.; Nooren, G.J.L.; Oskamp, C.J.; van den Brink, A.; Ivan, C.G.; Kamermans, R.; Kuijer, P.G.; Botje, M.A.J.; van der Kolk, N.; Mischke, A.; van Leeuwen, M.

    2008-01-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) at the LHC contains a wide array of detector systems for measuring hadrons, leptons, and photons. ALICE is designed to carry out comprehensive measurements of high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions, in order to study QCD matter under extreme conditions and to

  16. Studies for dimuon measurement with ALICE

    Jouan, D.

    1995-01-01

    The idea of measuring dimuon in the ALICE detector is not new, since it already appeared in the Aachen Conference. In the meantime studies were aiming at the use of the two detectors of LHC p-p physics, CMS and ATLAS, already dedicated to dimuon measurement, for these same measurements in heavy ion collisions, whereas the detector dedicated to heavy ions physics at LHC, ALICE, was considering all the other observables. Recently, the interest for dimuon measurements in ALICE was renewed by demands from LHC committee, stiring the activities of a working group in the ALICE collaboration, also associated to a more recent move from new groups. In the following the author briefly describes the interest of measuring dimuons in heavy ion collisions, particularly in ALICE, then the experimental strategy and first estimates of the performances that could be reached with the proposed system

  17. ALICE gets its first ‘upgrade’

    2009-01-01

    The ALICE experiment has reached another milestone with the successful installation of the first two modules of the electromagnetic calorimeter. Preparations for installing the EMCal in the ALICE cavern. On 17 and 19 March the first two sections of the electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal) were fitted in the ALICE cavern. The full EMCal, a lead-scintillator sampling calorimeter, will be made up of 12 separate modules plus 2 half modules. Weighing 8 tons each, these modules required a whole new support structure to be built and a sophisticated ‘bridge’ device (pictured) to install them in situ. Project Leader, Tom Cormier from Wayne State University, notes that: "The EMCal is a late addition to ALICE, arriving in effect as a first upgrade. Indeed full approval with construction funds occurred only in early 2008." Although ALICE has excellent momentum measurement and identification capabilities for charged hadrons it previously lac...

  18. The opsis of Helen: Performative Intertextuality in Euripides

    Aspasia Skouroumouni Stavrinou

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Features of the play’s staging, costume, and gestures achieve a series of allusions to comparable features in the genre of comedy and thus reinforce the comic elements of the plot and characters of Helen.

  19. Support for NUMA hardware in HelenOS

    Horký, Vojtěch

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this master thesis is to extend HelenOS operating system with the support for ccNUMA hardware. The text of the thesis contains a brief introduction to ccNUMA hardware, an overview of NUMA features and relevant features of HelenOS (memory management, scheduling, etc.). The thesis analyses various design decisions of the implementation of NUMA support -- introducing the hardware topology into the kernel data structures, propagating this information to user space, thread affinity to ...

  20. ALICE Upgrades: Plans and Potentials

    Tieulent, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    The ALICE collaboration consolidated and completed the installation of current detectors during LS1 with the aim to accumulate 1 nb$^{-1}$ of Pb-Pb collisions during Run 2 corresponding to about 10 times the Run 1 integrated luminosity. In parallel, the ALICE experiment has a rich detector upgrade programme scheduled during the second LHC long shutdown (LS2, 2018-2019) in order to fully exploit the LHC Runs 3 and 4. The main objectives of this programme are: improving the tracking precision and enabling the read-out of all Pb-Pb interactions at a rate of up to 50 kHz, with the goal to record an integrated luminosity of 10 nb$^{-1}$ after LS2 in minimum-bias trigger mode. This sample would represent an increase by a factor of one hundred with respect to the minimum-bias sample expected during Run 2. The implementation of this upgrade programme, foreseen in LS2, includes: a new low-material Inner Tracking System at central rapidity with a forward rapidity extension to add vertexing capabilities to the current M...

  1. Defect branes as Alice strings

    Okada, Takashi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2015-01-01

    There exist various defect-brane backgrounds in supergravity theories which arise as the low energy limit of string theories. These backgrounds typically have non-trivial monodromies, and if we move a charged probe around the center of a defect, its charge will be changed by the action of the monodromy. During the process, the charge conservation law seems to be violated. In this paper, to resolve this puzzle, we examine a dynamics of the charge changing process and show that the missing charge of the probe is transferred to the background. We then explicitly construct the resultant background after the charge transfer process by utilizing dualities. This background has the same monodromy as the original defect brane, but has an additional charge which does not have any localized source. In the literature, such a charge without localized source is known to appear in the presence of Alice strings. We argue that defect branes can in fact be regarded as a realization of Alice strings in string theory and examine the charge transfer process from that perspective.

  2. Defect branes as Alice strings

    Okada, Takashi [Theoretical Biology Laboratory, RIKEN,Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Sakatani, Yuho [Department of Physics and Astronomy,Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-25

    There exist various defect-brane backgrounds in supergravity theories which arise as the low energy limit of string theories. These backgrounds typically have non-trivial monodromies, and if we move a charged probe around the center of a defect, its charge will be changed by the action of the monodromy. During the process, the charge conservation law seems to be violated. In this paper, to resolve this puzzle, we examine a dynamics of the charge changing process and show that the missing charge of the probe is transferred to the background. We then explicitly construct the resultant background after the charge transfer process by utilizing dualities. This background has the same monodromy as the original defect brane, but has an additional charge which does not have any localized source. In the literature, such a charge without localized source is known to appear in the presence of Alice strings. We argue that defect branes can in fact be regarded as a realization of Alice strings in string theory and examine the charge transfer process from that perspective.

  3. The ALICE analysis train system

    Zimmermann, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In the ALICE experiment hundreds of users are analyzing big datasets on a Grid system. High throughput and short turn-around times are achieved by a centralized system called the LEGO trains. This system combines analysis from different users in so-called analysis trains which are then executed within the same Grid jobs thereby reducing the number of times the data needs to be read from the storage systems. The centralized trains improve the performance, the usability for users and the bookkeeping in comparison to single user analysis. The train system builds upon the already existing ALICE tools, i.e. the analysis framework as well as the Grid submission and monitoring infrastructure. The entry point to the train system is a web interface which is used to configure the analysis and the desired datasets as well as to test and submit the train. Several measures have been implemented to reduce the time a train needs to finish and to increase the CPU efficiency.

  4. More Than ALICE: Development of an augmented reality mobile application for the ALICE detector

    Ouellette, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    More Than ALICE is a mobile application for iOS and Android built in the Unity Engine. This project concerns the development of the second edition of the application, which is meant to completely succeed the original version built in 2014. The purpose of the application is to describe the various components of the ALICE detector and to overlay live collisions to increase public awareness for the research goals of the ALICE collaboration. The application provides an augmented reality (AR) interface via the Vuforia SDK to track images of the ALICE detector or components of the paper model of ALICE that can be purchased at the ALICE secretariat office. For those without access to either images of the detector or the detector model, the app provides a virtual detector model (VR) that contains the same functionality as the augmented reality.

  5. The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector System (SPD)

    Kluge, A; Antinori, Federico; Burns, M; Cali, I A; Campbell, M; Caselle, M; Ceresa, S; Dima, R; Elias, D; Fabris, D; Krivda, Marian; Librizzi, F; Manzari, Vito; Morel, M; Moretto, Sandra; Osmic, F; Pappalardo, G S; Pepato, Adriano; Pulvirenti, A; Riedler, P; Riggi, F; Santoro, R; Stefanini, G; Torcato De Matos, C; Turrisi, R; Tydesjo, H; Viesti, G; PH-EP

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE silicon pixel detector (SPD) comprises the two innermost layers of the ALICE inner tracker system. The SPD includes 120 detector modules (half-staves) each consisting of 10 ALICE pixel chips bump bonded to two silicon sensors and one multi-chip read-out module. Each pixel chip contains 8192 active cells, so that the total number of pixel cells in the SPD is ≈ 107. The on-detector read-out is based on a multi-chip-module containing 4 ASICs and an optical transceiver module. The constraints on material budget and detector module dimensions are very demanding.

  6. Common Readout System in ALICE

    Jubin, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is going for a major physics upgrade in 2018. This upgrade is necessary for getting high statistics and high precision measurement for probing into rare physics channels needed to understand the dynamics of the condensed phase of QCD. The high interaction rate and the large event size in the upgraded detectors will result in an experimental data flow traffic of about 1 TB/s from the detectors to the on-line computing system. A dedicated Common Readout Unit (CRU) is proposed for data concentration, multiplexing, and trigger distribution. CRU, as common interface unit, handles timing, data and control signals between on-detector systems and online-offline computing system. An overview of the CRU architecture is presented in this manuscript.

  7. ALICE Time of Flight Module

    The Time-Of-Flight system of ALICE consists of 90 such modules, each containing 15 or 19 Multigap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) strips. This detector is used for identification of charged particles. It measures with high precision (50 ps) the time of flight of charged particles and therefore their velocity. The curvature of the particle trajectory inside the magnetic field gives the momentum, thus the particle mass is calculated and the particle is identified The MRPC is a stack of resistive glass plates, separated from each other by nylon fishing line. The mass production of the chambers (~1600, covering a surface of 150 m2) was done at INFN Bologna, while the first prototypes were bult at CERN.

  8. The ALICE data acquisition system

    Carena, F; Chapeland, S; Chibante Barroso, V; Costa, F; Dénes, E; Divià, R; Fuchs, U; Grigore, A; Kiss, T; Simonetti, G; Soós, C; Telesca, A; Vande Vyvre, P; Von Haller, B

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the design, the construction, the commissioning and the operation of the Data Acquisition (DAQ) and Experiment Control Systems (ECS) of the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The DAQ and the ECS are the systems used respectively for the acquisition of all physics data and for the overall control of the experiment. They are two computing systems made of hundreds of PCs and data storage units interconnected via two networks. The collection of experimental data from the detectors is performed by several hundreds of high-speed optical links. We describe in detail the design considerations for these systems handling the extreme data throughput resulting from central lead ions collisions at LHC energy. The implementation of the resulting requirements into hardware (custom optical links and commercial computing equipment), infrastructure (racks, cooling, power distribution, control room), and software led to many innovative solutions which are described together with ...

  9. Common Readout System in ALICE

    Jubin, Mitra

    2017-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is going for a major physics upgrade in 2018. This upgrade is necessary for getting high statistics and high precision measurement for probing into rare physics channels needed to understand the dynamics of the condensed phase of QCD. The high interaction rate and the large event size in the upgraded detectors will result in an experimental data flow traffic of about 1 TB/s from the detectors to the on-line computing system. A dedicated Common Readout Unit (CRU) is proposed for data concentration, multiplexing, and trigger distribution. CRU, as common interface unit, handles timing, data and control signals between on-detector systems and online-offline computing system. An overview of the CRU architecture is presented in this manuscript.

  10. Helen Sirp - talent kodus ja võõrsil / Auri Jürna

    Jürna, Auri, 1984-

    2013-01-01

    Eesti väljapanek "Ministry of Creative Affairs" Londoni moenädalal International Fashion Showcase. Väljapaneku autoriteks Helen Sirp, Kadri Kruus, Kristina Viirpalu, Kristian Steinberg, Karl Annus. Pikemalt Helen Sirbist

  11. Correlations in small systems with ALICE

    Lakomov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    ALICE is dedicated to the study of the strongly interacting matter, the so-called Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), formed in heavy-ion collisions at the LHC. In addition, ALICE also actively participated in the pp and p–Pb collision programs. In particular, the measurements of the twoparticle azimuthal correlations in pp collisions at √ s = 7 TeV and in p–Pb collisions at √ sNN = 5.02 TeV have been performed by the ALICE Collaboration during Run I of the LHC. Similar long-range correlations in p–Pb and Pb–Pb collisions have been observed on the near and away side — also known as the double ridge. Further investigations showed the importance of the Multi-Parton Interactions (MPI) in high-multiplicity collisions in small systems. In this work the ALICE results on the correlations in small systems are presented including MPI measurements in pp collisions.

  12. Alice'i imedemaa Pariisis / Isabel Chiang

    Chiang, Isabel

    2000-01-01

    1998. a. Pariisis Catherine Alice Mamet' poolt asutatud mööblisalongist, seal tegutsevate disainerite (Pucci de Rossi, Satch, Guy Ferrer, Pablo Pares jt.) loomingunäiteid. Pariisis disaini õppiva tudengi Isabel Chiangi eluloolisi andmeid. 15 illustratsiooni

  13. ... ALICE forges ahead with further detectors

    2006-01-01

    Following the installation of the HMPID, the project has progressed swiftly with further detectors being lowered into the ALICE cavern. The first supermodule of the ALICE transition radiation detector was successfully installed on 10 October. The TRD collaborators from Germany standing next to the supermodule mounted in a rotating frame (bottom left corner) in the ALICE cavern. In the final configuration, 18 supermodules that make up the transition radiation detector will cylindrically surround the large time projection chamber in the central barrel of the ALICE experiment. Each supermodule is about 7 metre long and consists of 30 drift chambers in six layers. The construction of the modules is a collaboration between five institutes in Germany (Universities of Frankfurt and Heidelberg and Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH in Darmstadt), Romania (NIPNE Bucharest) and Russia (JINR Dubna) with radiators (See 'Did you know?' section) produced at the University of Muenster, Germany. During the summer, ...

  14. ALICE: Simulated lead-lead collision

    2003-01-01

    This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ALICE detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in 2008. ALICE will focus on the study of collisions between nuclei of lead, a heavy element that produces many different particles when collided. It is hoped that these collisions will produce a new state of matter known as the quark-gluon plasma, which existed billionths of a second after the Big Bang.

  15. Microstrip detector for the ALICE experiment

    Laurent Guiraud

    1996-01-01

    This photo shows a close up of one of the silicon microstrip detectors that will be installed on the ALICE experiment at the LHC. 1698 double-sided modules of these silicon microstrips will be installed in the two outermost layers of the ALICE inner tracking system. The microstrips have to be specially designed to withstand the high resolution levels at the heart of the detector.

  16. Prototype ALICE front-end card

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    This circuit board is a prototype 48-channel front end digitizer card for the ALICE time projection chamber (TPC), which takes electrical signals from the wire sensors in the TPC and shapes the data before converting the analogue signal to digital data. A total of 4356 cards will be required to process the data from the ALICE TPC, the largest of this type of detector in the world.

  17. Event by event physics in ALICE

    Christakoglou, Panos

    2009-01-01

    Fluctuations of thermodynamic quantities are fundamental for the study of the QGP phase transition. The ALICE experiment is well suited for precise event-by-event measurements of various quantities. In this article, we review the capabilities of ALICE to study the fluctuations of several key observables such as the net charge, the temperature, and the particle ratios. Among the observables related to correlations, we review the balance functions and the long range correlations.

  18. ALICE takes its ITS to heart

    2007-01-01

    In the study of heavy-ion events, the ALICE Inner Tracking System must use the most delicate materials. A hundred physicists and engineers from around the world witnessed its impressive journey to the centre of the ALICE experiment. ALICE's ITS on its way into the TCP. On 15 March, after 15 years of development, construction, commissioning and testing, the Inner Tracking System (ITS) finally reached its ultimate destination at the heart of ALICE. With almost five square meters of double-sided silicon strip detectors and over one square meter of silicon drift detectors, ALICE's ITS is the largest system built for either type of silicon detector. In ALICE's search for heavy-ion events at the LHC, it is necessary for the ITS to be extremely lightweight and delicate. For this reason the ITS was designed and built using the smallest amounts of only the lightest materials, with the design team developing innovative construction and assembly systems. The team prepared in detail for the final transport from the fi...

  19. The fifth annual ALICE Industrial Awards ceremony on 9 March, 2007.

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE collaboration presents Quantum Corp with an award for the high performance cluster file system (StorNext) for the ALICE DAQ system, and for their outstanding cooperation in implementing the software.From left to right: Jurgen Schukraft (ALICE Spokesperson), Pierre vande Vyvre (ALICE DAQ), Hans Boggild (ALICE), Ewan Johnston (Quantum Corp.), Derek Barrilleaux (Quantum Corp.), Lance Hukill (Quantum Corp.), Ulrich Fuchs (ALICE DAQ), Catherine Decosse (ALICE) and Roberto Divia (ALICE DAQ).

  20. Redox pioneer:Professor Christine Helen Foyer.

    Del Río, Luis A

    2011-10-15

    Dr. Christine Foyer (B.Sc. 1974; Ph.D. 1977) is recognized here as a Redox Pioneer because she has published an article on redox biology that has been cited more than 1000 times, 4 other articles that have been cited more than 500 times, and a further 32 articles that have been each cited more than 100 times. During her Ph.D. at the Kings College, University of London, United Kingdom, Dr. Foyer discovered that ascorbate and glutathione and enzymes linking NADPH, glutathione, and ascorbate are localized in isolated chloroplast preparations. These observations pioneered the discovery of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle, now known as Foyer-Halliwell-Asada pathway after the names of the three major contributors, a crucial mechanism for H(2)O(2) metabolism in both animals and plants. Dr. Foyer has made a very significant contribution to our current understanding of the crucial roles of ascorbate and glutathione in redox biology, particularly in relation to photosynthesis, respiration, and chloroplast and mitochondrial redox signaling networks. "My view is that science…is compulsive and you have to keep with it all the time and not get despondent when things do not work well. Being passionate about science is what carries you through the hard times so that it isn't so much work, as a hobby that you do for a living. It is the thrill of achieving a better understanding and finding real pleasure in putting new ideas together, explaining data and passing on knowledge that keeps you going no matter what!" --Prof. Christine Helen Foyer.

  1. Mineral dust transport toward Hurricane Helene (2006)

    Schwendike, Juliane; Jones, Sarah C.; Vogel, Bernhard; Vogel, Heike

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the transport of mineral dust from its source regions in West Africa toward the developing tropical cyclone Helene (2006) and diagnoses the resulting properties of the air influencing the tropical cyclonegenesis. The model system COSMO-ART (Consortium for Small-Scale Modelling-Aerosols and Reactive Trace gases) in which the emission and transport of mineral dust as well as the radiation feedback are taken into account, was used. The emission of mineral dust between 9 and 14 September 2006 occurred in association with the relatively strong monsoon flow and northeasterly trade winds, with gust fronts of convective systems over land, and with the Atlantic inflow. Additionally, increased surface wind speed was linked to orographical effects at the Algerian Mountains, Atlas Mountains, and the Hoggar. The dust, as part of the Saharan air layer, is transported at low levels by the monsoon flow, the Harmattan, the northeasterly trade winds, and the monsoon trough, and is transported upward in the convergence zone between Harmattan and monsoon flow, in the baroclinic zone along the West African coastline, and by convection. At around 700 hPa the dust is transported by the African easterly jet. Dry and dust-free air is found to the north-northwest of the developing tropical depression due to descent in an anticyclone. Based on the model data, it was possible to distinguish between dry (from the anticyclone), dry and dusty (from the Harmattan and northeasterly trade winds), and dusty and moist air (from the monsoon flow and in the tropical depression due to convection).

  2. The ALICE data acquisition system

    Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Dénes, E. [Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Wigner Research Center, Budapest (Hungary); Divià, R.; Fuchs, U. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Grigore, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Politehnica Univesity of Bucharest, Bucharest (Romania); Kiss, T. [Cerntech Ltd., Budapest (Hungary); Simonetti, G. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica ‘M. Merlin’, Bari (Italy); Soós, C.; Telesca, A.; Vande Vyvre, P. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Haller, B. von, E-mail: bvonhall@cern.ch [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2014-03-21

    In this paper we describe the design, the construction, the commissioning and the operation of the Data Acquisition (DAQ) and Experiment Control Systems (ECS) of the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The DAQ and the ECS are the systems used respectively for the acquisition of all physics data and for the overall control of the experiment. They are two computing systems made of hundreds of PCs and data storage units interconnected via two networks. The collection of experimental data from the detectors is performed by several hundreds of high-speed optical links. We describe in detail the design considerations for these systems handling the extreme data throughput resulting from central lead ions collisions at LHC energy. The implementation of the resulting requirements into hardware (custom optical links and commercial computing equipment), infrastructure (racks, cooling, power distribution, control room), and software led to many innovative solutions which are described together with a presentation of all the major components of the systems, as currently realized. We also report on the performance achieved during the first period of data taking (from 2009 to 2013) often exceeding those specified in the DAQ Technical Design Report.

  3. European Researchers Night, Students on Shift at ALICE

    Fons Rademakers

    2010-01-01

    During European Researchers' Night, on Friday 24 September 2010, from 17:00 to 24:00, pupils from French and Swiss schools visited ALICE and took shifts in the control room, helping the ALICE physicists run the experiment.

  4. ALICE opens its new nerve centre

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-nine fully equipped and ergonomic workstations, one meeting area and 11 large format screens in a completely refurbished room: the ALICE Run Control Centre (ARC) implements the best and newest solutions for its shift workers and expert operators, including access for persons with reduced mobility and very soon a magic window for Point 2 visitors.   The ALICE Run Control Centre. “Our initial intention was just to optimise the old layout,” says Federico Ronchetti from Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy), a CERN scientific associate currently appointed as ALICE Run Coordinator and person in charge of the ALICE Consolidation Task Force. “However, during the review process, we carried out a study of all the existing control rooms at CERN and became aware we needed a radical change. Hence we started planning a complete redesign of the workspace.” Designed and equipped over many years, the old ALICE control room did not have enough space to fit al...

  5. Performance of the ALICE VZERO system

    Abbas, E.; Adam, J.; Adamova, D.; Adare, A.M.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agocs, A.G.; Agostinelli, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Masoodi, A.Ahmad; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S.A.; Ahn, S.U.; Aimo, I.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Molina, R.Alfaro; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz Avina, E.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anson, C.; Anticic, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshauser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I.C.; Arslandok, M.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T.C.; Aysto, J.; Azmi, M.D.; Bach, M.; Badala, A.; Baek, Y.W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Ban, J.; Baral, R.C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnafoldi, G.G.; Barnby, L.S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P.C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I.G.; Beck, H.; Behera, N.K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergognon, A.A.E.; Bertens, R.A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Bottger, S.; Bogdanov, A.; Boggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsar, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossu, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Braidot, E.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T.A.; Browning, T.A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G.E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, W.; Carena, F.; Carlin Filho, N.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Diaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castillo Hernandez, J.F.; Casula, E.A.R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J.L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D.D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C.H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S.U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J.G.; Cormier, T.M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortes Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M.R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M.E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Alaniz, E.Cruz; Albino, R.Cruz; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, K.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Dash, A.; De, S.; de Barros, G.O.V.; De Caro, A.; De Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; De Marco, N.; Denes, E.; De Pasquale, S.; Deppman, A.; Erasmo, G.D.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M.A.; Di Bari, D.; Dietel, T.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Divia, R.; Djuvsland, O.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Donigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A.K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A.K.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H.A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Fenton-Olsen, B.; Feofilov, G.; Fernandez Tellez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M.A.S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F.M.; Fiore, E.M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhoje, J.J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D.R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Geuna, C.; Gheata, M.; Gheata, A.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glassel, P.; Gomez, R.; Ferreiro, E.G.; Gonzalez-Trueba, L.H.; Gonzalez-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Goswami, A.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L.K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J.F.; Grossiord, J.Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, O.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Han, B.H.; Hanratty, L.D.; Hansen, A.; Harmanova-Tothova, Z.; Harris, J.W.; Hartig, M.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heckel, S.T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hess, B.A.; Hetland, K.F.; Hicks, B.; Hippolyte, B.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hrivnacova, I.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T.J.; Hwang, D.S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, G.M.; Innocenti, P.G.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jacholkowski, A.; Jacobs, P.M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H.J.; Janik, M.A.; Jayarathna, P.H.S.Y.; Jena, S.; Jha, D.M.; Jimenez Bustamante, R.T.; Jones, P.G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kaidalov, A.B.; Kalcher, S.; Kalinak, P.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J.H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Ketzer, B.; Khan, M.M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S.A.; Khan, K.H.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, M.; Kim, T.; Kim, B.; Kim, S.; Kim, M.; Kim, D.J.; Kim, J.S.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, D.W.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bosing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M.L.; Knospe, A.G.; Kohler, M.K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kompaniets, M.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Kralik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kravcakova, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P.G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A.B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, V.; Kushpil, S.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M.J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; La Pointe, S.L.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Lechman, M.; Lee, S.C.; Lee, G.R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R.C.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; Leon, H.; Leoncino, M.; Leon Monzon, I.; Levai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M.A.; Ljunggren, H.M.; Lodato, D.F.; Loenne, P.I.; Loggins, V.R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Loo, K.K.; Lopez, X.; Lopez Torres, E.; Lovhoiden, G.; Lu, X.G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, R.; Ma, K.; Madagodahettige-Don, D.M.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D.P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Mangotra, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mares, J.; Margagliotti, G.V.; Margotti, A.; Marin, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N.A.; Martinengo, P.; Martinez, M.I.; Martinez Garcia, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazumder, R.; Mazzoni, M.A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Perez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A.N.; Miskowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mizuno, S.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montano Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Moon, T.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D.A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Muller, H.; Munhoz, M.G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B.K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T.K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B.S.; Niida, T.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B.S.; Nilsson, M.S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nystrand, J.; Ochirov, A.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S.K.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A.C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Ostrowski, P.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Padilla, F.; Pagano, P.; Paic, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S.K.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G.S.; Park, W.J.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D.I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Perez Lara, C.E.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Pestov, Y.; Petracek, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piyarathna, D.B.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P.L.M.; Poghosyan, M.G.; Polak, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Pospisil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S.K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C.A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Raiha, T.S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Rasanen, S.S.; Rascanu, B.T.; Rathee, D.; Rauch, W.; Rauf, A.W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K.F.; Real, J.S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R.J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A.R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.P.; Reygers, K.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R.A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Roed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Rohrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, P.; Roy, C.; Rubio Montero, A.J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Safarik, K.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P.K.; Saini, J.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakai, S.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C.A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Sandor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Santoro, R.; Sarkamo, J.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, H.R.; Schmidt, C.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Scott, P.A.; Segato, G.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senyukov, S.; Seo, J.; Serci, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, S.; Sharma, N.; Rohni, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Sicking, E.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, T.; Sinha, B.C.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T.B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.J.M.; Sogaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, M.; Song, J.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B.K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J.H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A.A.P.; Subieta Vasquez, M.A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Sumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T.J.M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M.A.; J.Tapia Takaki, D.; Peloni, A.Tarantola; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Munoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Minasyan, A.Ter; Terrevoli, C.; Thader, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A.R.; Tlusty, D.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Trubnikov, V.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W.H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T.S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Ulrich, J.; Uras, A.; Urciuoli, G.M.; Usai, G.L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Van Hoorne, J.W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vannucci, L.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, Y.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, A.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y.P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Volkl, M.A.; Voloshin, S.; Voloshin, K.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrlakova, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, V.; Wagner, B.; Wan, R.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, M.; Watanabe, K.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J.P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Williams, M.C.S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C.G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, S.; Yang, P.; Yang, H.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.K.; Yoon, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Zavada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zgura, I.S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, F.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.; Zyzak, M.

    2013-01-01

    ALICE is an LHC experiment devoted to the study of strongly interacting matter in proton--proton, proton--nucleus and nucleus--nucleus collisions at ultra-relativistic energies. The ALICE VZERO system, made of two scintillator arrays at asymmetric positions, one on each side of the interaction point, plays a central role in ALICE. In addition to its core function as a trigger, the VZERO system is used to monitor LHC beam conditions, to reject beam-induced backgrounds and to measure basic physics quantities such as luminosity, particle multiplicity, centrality and event plane direction in nucleus--nucleus collisions. After describing the VZERO system, this publication presents its performance over more than four years of operation at the LHC.

  6. ALICE physicists receive 2014 Lise Meitner Prize

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    On Wednesday, 3 September, four ALICE physicists were presented with the European Physical Society's 2014 Lise Meitner Prize for their outstanding contributions to nuclear physics (see here).   ALICE collaboration members Johanna Stachel (Heidelberg University, Germany), Peter Braun-Munzinger (GSI, Germany), Paolo Giubellino (INFN Turin, Italy, and CERN) and Jürgen Schukraft (CERN) were presented with their awards at a private ceremony held in the Globe of Science and Innovation. In addition to members of the ALICE collaboration, the ceremony was attended by members of the CERN Management including the Director-General, Rolf Heuer, as well as the EPS Nuclear Physics Board Chair, Douglas MacGregor, and the EPS Lise Meitner Prize Committee Chair, Victor Zamfir. For more information, please see "EPS honours CERN's heavy-ion researchers".  From left to right: Douglas MacGregor (EPS); Prize recipients Jürgen Schukraft,&a...

  7. Jet physics at the LHC with ALICE

    Morsch, A.

    2005-01-01

    In central Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC, jet rates are expected to be high at energies at which ALICE can reconstruct jets over the background of the underlying event. This will open the possibility to quantify the effect of partonic energy loss through medium induced gluon radiation, jet quenching, by detailed measurement of the modification of the longitudinal and transverse structure of identified jets. In order to obtain probes sensitive to the properties of the QCD medium, it is mandatory to measure the high-p T parton fragments together with the low-p T particles from the radiated gluons. Hence, the excellent charged particle tracking capabilities of ALICE combined with the proposed electromagnetic calorimeter for ALICE, EMCAL, represent an ideal tool for jet quenching studies at the LHC. (orig.)

  8. The ALICE Central Trigger Processor (CTP) upgrade

    Krivda, M.; Alexandre, D.; Barnby, L.S.; Evans, D.; Jones, P.G.; Jusko, A.; Lietava, R.; Baillie, O. Villalobos; Pospíšil, J.

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE Central Trigger Processor (CTP) at the CERN LHC has been upgraded for LHC Run 2, to improve the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) data-taking efficiency and to improve the physics performance of ALICE. There is a new additional CTP interaction record sent using a new second Detector Data Link (DDL), a 2 GB DDR3 memory and an extension of functionality for classes. The CTP switch has been incorporated directly onto the new LM0 board. A design proposal for an ALICE CTP upgrade for LHC Run 3 is also presented. Part of the development is a low latency high bandwidth interface whose purpose is to minimize an overall trigger latency

  9. ALICE gives its first thesis awards

    2008-01-01

    For the first time the ALICE collaboration has given two of its doctoral students awards for their outstanding theses. Winners Christian Holm Christensen and Zaida Conesa del Valle holding their awards.On 29 October the ALICE collaboration honoured two students for their outstanding theses at a ceremony held at CERN. The two awards, one of which was given for a physics thesis and the other for a technical thesis, went to Zaida Conesa Del Valle (Laboratoire de physique subatomique et des technologies associées) and Christian Holm Christensen (Niels Bohr Institute) respectively. "It is very gratifying to see that the collaboration appreciates our work," said Zaida Conesa del Valle, winner of the physics award for her thesis: Performance of the ALICE Muon Spectrometer. Weak Boson Production and Measurement in Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC. "I also feel specially thankful to all the people who worked with me," she added. "It was pl...

  10. Helen M. Walker: Influential in 1929 and Still Cited Today.

    Rice, Marti H.; Stallings, William M.

    Helen M. Walker contributed to the field of educational research and statistics during a 55-year career. Born in Iowa in 1891, Walker earned a bachelor's degree from Iowa Wesleyan College and taught high school mathematics for nine years. She then taught at the University of Kansas while doing graduate work. One source noted that she was the first…

  11. Helen Lehismets võitis vaibakavandite konkursi / Lea Pruuli

    Pruuli, Lea

    1999-01-01

    Tarbekunstimuuseumi vaibakavandite konkursil "Kootud pildid" valiti teostamiseks tekstiilikunstnik Helen Lehismetsa vaibakavand "Aed". Ostupreemia ئ Urmas Viigi kavandile "EW ja AW". Osalejad. Konkursile esitatud kavandeid ja vaibaks kootud peapreemiatööd eksponeeritakse Tarbekunstimuuseumis 22. okt. avataval näirtusel "Kootud pildid".

  12. Volcano ecology: flourishing on the flanks of Mount St. Helens

    Rhonda Mazza; Charlie Crisafulli

    2016-01-01

    Mount St. Helens’ explosive eruption on May 18, 1980, was a pivotal moment in the field of disturbance ecology. The subsequent sustained, integrated research effort has shaped the development of volcano ecology, an emerging field of focused research. Excessive heat, burial, and impact force are some of the disturbance mechanisms following an eruption. They are also...

  13. Mount St. Helens 30 years later: a landscape reconfigured.

    Rhonda Mazza

    2010-01-01

    On May 18, 1980, after two months of tremors, Mount St. Helens erupted spectacularly and profoundly changed a vast area surrounding the volcano. The north slope of the mountain catastrophically failed, forming the largest landslide witnessed in modern times. The largest lobe of this debris avalanche raced 14 miles down the Toutle River...

  14. Mount St. Helens: Still erupting lessons 31 years later

    Rhonda Mazza; Charlie Crisafulli; Fred Swanson

    2011-01-01

    The massive volcanic eruption of Mount St. Helens 31 years ago provided the perfect backdrop for studying the earliest stages of forest development. Immediately after the eruption, some areas of the blast area were devoid of life. On other parts of the volcanic landscape, many species survived, although their numbers were greatly reduced. Reassembly began at many...

  15. 25 years of ecological change at Mount St. Helens.

    V.H. Dale; C.M. Crisafulli; F.J. Swanson

    2005-01-01

    18 May 2005 marks the 25th anniversary of the massive eruption of Mount St. Helens. This eruption involved diverse geological processes (1) that disturbed forests, meadows, lakes, an drivers (2) (see the figure). A huge landslide and searing flows of hot gases and pumic framents (pyroclastic flows) inundated 60 km2 of land, obliterating...

  16. Memory is all: Alice B. Toklas

    Janet Flanner

    2015-01-01

    An essay of Janet Flanner (1892–1978), American writer and journalist, European, mostly Paris correspondent of the magazine The New Yorker, titled Memory is all: Alice B. Toklas, was first published on 15 December 1975 in The New Yorker. The essay describes the life of Alice B. Toklas following the death of her lifelong partner, the writer Gertrude Stein, her efforts and work regarding the posthumous publication of Stein’s books, her care for Stein’s famous collection of paintings, but it als...

  17. More than ALICE: Development of an augmented reality mobile application for the ALICE detector

    Stamatouli, Anastasia

    2017-01-01

    More Than ALICE is a mobile application for iOS and Android devices. This project concerns the development of the v2.1 of the application which is meant to enhance the capacity of tracking quickly and reliably parts of the detector and its paper model. It recognises different parts of it and displays labels explaining its structure. Additionally, visualisation of the collisions can also be shown on the top of the camera image. More Than ALICE aims to increase the public awareness of the research goals of the ALICE collaboration. The application provides an Augmented Reality (AR) interface to track the detector during underground visits or its paper model which can be purchased at the ALICE secretariat. For those without access to either the detector or the paper model, the app provides the virtual model of the detector where the users can explore and understand the different parts of the detector and see real-time collisions.

  18. Memory is all: Alice B. Toklas

    Janet Flanner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An essay of Janet Flanner (1892–1978, American writer and journalist, European, mostly Paris correspondent of the magazine The New Yorker, titled Memory is all: Alice B. Toklas, was first published on 15 December 1975 in The New Yorker. The essay describes the life of Alice B. Toklas following the death of her lifelong partner, the writer Gertrude Stein, her efforts and work regarding the posthumous publication of Stein’s books, her care for Stein’s famous collection of paintings, but it also gives us some impressions of the very personality of Alice B. Toklas, while highlighting the Paris salon gatherings before World War II. Above all, it is a description of events, vulnerability and helplessness of Alice B. Toklas in the grip of inheritance interests that finally dispersed the very collection of paintings of Gertrude Stein, which “had had the benefit of her pure and sacred passion before price became one of their miraculous merits.” The essay was translated by Nataša Velikonja.

  19. ALICE TRD results from prototype tests

    Andronic, A; Blume, C; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bucher, D; Catanescu, G; Ciobanu, M; Daues, H W; Devismes, A; Finck, C; Herrmann, N; Lister, T A; Mahmoud, Tariq; Peitzmann, Thomas; Petrovici, M; Reygers, K; Santo, R; Schicker, R; Sedykha, S; Simon, R S; Stachel, J; Stelzer, H; Wessels, J P; Winkelmann, O; Windelband, B; Xu, C

    2002-01-01

    We present results from tests of a prototype of the TRD for the ALICE experiment at LHC. We investigate the performance-of different radiator types, composed of foils, fibres and foams. The pion rejection performance for different methods of analysis over a momentum range from 0.7 to 2 GeV/c is presented. (8 refs).

  20. Playing around in Lewis Carroll's "Alice" Books

    Susina, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Mathematician Charles Dodgson's love of play and his need for rules came together in his use of popular games as part of the structure of the two famous children's books, "Alice in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking-Glass," he wrote under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. The author of this article looks at the interplay between…

  1. Installation of the ALICE dipole magnet

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    The large dipole magnet is installed on the ALICE detector at CERN. This magnet, which is cooled by demineralised water, will bend the path of muons that leave the huge rectangular solenoid (in the background). These muons are heavy electrons that interact less with matter, allowing them to traverse the main section of the detector.

  2. Round Two for Three ALICE Industrial Awards

    2004-01-01

    Excellency in industrial collaboration with the LHC experimental teams is one important contribution to the successful development and realization of the experiments. A few weeks ago the ALICE collaboration presented a second round of awards to industrial collaborators for their novel and remarkable contributions to major detector systems.

  3. Experiences with the ALICE Mesos infrastructure

    Berzano, D.; Eulisse, G.; Grigoraş, C.; Napoli, K.

    2017-10-01

    Apache Mesos is a resource management system for large data centres, initially developed by UC Berkeley, and now maintained under the Apache Foundation umbrella. It is widely used in the industry by companies like Apple, Twitter, and Airbnb and it is known to scale to 10 000s of nodes. Together with other tools of its ecosystem, such as Mesosphere Marathon or Metronome, it provides an end-to-end solution for datacenter operations and a unified way to exploit large distributed systems. We present the experience of the ALICE Experiment Offline & Computing in deploying and using in production the Apache Mesos ecosystem for a variety of tasks on a small 500 cores cluster, using hybrid OpenStack and bare metal resources. We will initially introduce the architecture of our setup and its operation, we will then describe the tasks which are performed by it, including release building and QA, release validation, and simple Monte Carlo production. We will show how we developed Mesos enabled components (called “Mesos Frameworks”) to carry out ALICE specific needs. In particular, we will illustrate our effort to integrate Work Queue, a lightweight batch processing engine developed by University of Notre Dame, which ALICE uses to orchestrate release validation. Finally, we will give an outlook on how to use Mesos as resource manager for DDS, a software deployment system developed by GSI which will be the foundation of the system deployment for ALICE next generation Online-Offline (O2).

  4. First detector installed inside the ALICE solenoid...

    2006-01-01

    ALICE's emblematic red magnet welcomed its first detector on 23 September, when the array of seven Cherenkov detectors, named HMPID, was successfully installed. ALICE team members standing in front of the completed HMPID detector.The red magnet, viewed from its front opening. The HMPID unit, seen from the back (top right corner of photo) is placed on a frame and lifted onto a platform during the installation. After the installation of the ACORDE scintillator array and the muon trigger and tracking chambers, the ALICE collaboration fitted the first detector inside the solenoid. The HMPID, for High Momentum Particle Identification, was installed at the 2 o'clock position in the central and most external region of the space frame, just below the solenoid yoke. It will be used to extend the hadron identification capability of the ALICE experiment up to 5 GeV/c, thus complementing the reach of the other particle identification systems (ITS, TPC and TOF). The HMPID is a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector in a...

  5. ALICE physicists receive 2014 Lise Meitner Prize

    Jeanneret, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    September 3rd, 2014: ALICE collaboration members Johanna Stachel (Heidelberg University, Germany), Peter Braun-Munzinger (GSI, Germany), Paolo Giubellino (INFN Turin, Italy, and CERN) and Jürgen Schukraft (CERN) were presented the 2014 Lise Meitner Prize at a private ceremony held in the Globe of Science and Innovation.

  6. Development of ALICE microstrip detectors at IRST

    Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Gregori, P.; Rachevskaia, I.; Zorzi, N.

    2001-01-01

    We report on the development of double-sided, AC-coupled, microstrip detectors oriented to the A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE). The main design and processing issues are presented, together with some selected results from the electrical characterization of detectors and related test structures

  7. ALICE Transition Radiation Detector (TRD), test beam.

    2003-01-01

    Electrons and positrons can be discriminated from other charged particles using the emission of transition radiation - X-rays emitted when the particles cross many layers of thin materials. To develop such a Transition Radiation Detector(TRD) for ALICE many detector prototypes were tested in mixed beams of pions and electrons, as in the example shown here.

  8. Fibre optic cables for the ALICE experiment

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    These thin fibres will transmit the signal received in detectors at the ALICE experiment when it starts up with the LHC in 2008. The analogue signals produced in the detectors are first converted into digital pulse, which are transported in light down such fibres. Computers then read this digital signal to produce the final set of data.

  9. ALICE HLT Run 2 performance overview.

    Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Lindenstruth, Volker; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    For the LHC Run 2 the ALICE HLT architecture was consolidated to comply with the upgraded ALICE detector readout technology. The software framework was optimized and extended to cope with the increased data load. Online calibration of the TPC using online tracking capabilities of the ALICE HLT was deployed. Offline calibration code was adapted to run both online and offline and the HLT framework was extended to support that. The performance of this schema is important for Run 3 related developments. An additional data transport approach was developed using the ZeroMQ library, forming at the same time a test bed for the new data flow model of the O2 system, where further development of this concept is ongoing. This messaging technology was used to implement the calibration feedback loop augmenting the existing, graph oriented HLT transport framework. Utilising the online reconstruction of many detectors, a new asynchronous monitoring scheme was developed to allow real-time monitoring of the physics performance of the ALICE detector, on top of the new messaging scheme for both internal and external communication. Spare computing resources comprising the production and development clusters are run as a tier-2 GRID site using an OpenStack-based setup. The development cluster is running continuously, the production cluster contributes resources opportunistically during periods of LHC inactivity.

  10. Gender roles for Alice and Bob

    Harris, Philip

    2013-04-01

    As the head of a department that is striving to achieve bronze status under the Athena SWAN (Scientific Women's Academic Network) programme, I have become extremely sensitive to gender stereotyping, and I am afraid that the "Alice and Bob" image on the cover of your March issue on quantum frontiers set off some alarm bells.

  11. Particle identification in ALICE: a Bayesian approach

    Adam, J.; Adamova, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Albuquerque, D. S. D.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anticic, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshaeuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badala, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Balasubramanian, S.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnafoeldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Camejo, A. Batista; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Benacek, P.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Boggild, H.; Boldizsar, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossu, F.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Cabala, J.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Diaz, L. Calero; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castellanos, J. Castillo; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Sanchez, C. Ceballos; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Barroso, V. Chibante; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Balbastre, G. Conesa; del Valle, Z. Conesa; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Morales, Y. Corrales; Cortes Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Denes, E.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Corchero, M. A. Diaz; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divia, R.; Djuvsland, O.; Dobrin, A.; Gimenez, D. Domenicis; Doenigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernandez Tellez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Girard, M. Fusco; Gaardhoje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glaessel, P.; Gomez Coral, D. M.; Ramirez, A. Gomez; Gonzalez, A. S.; Gonzalez, V.; Gonzalez-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Goerlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grachov, O. A.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Haake, R.; Haaland, O.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamon, J. C.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Hellbaer, E.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Horak, D.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacazio, N.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovska, S.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Bustamante, R. T. Jimenez; Jones, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Uysal, A. Karasu; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Khan, M. Mohisin; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Klewin, S.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kostarakis, P.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Meethaleveedu, G. Koyithatta; Kralik, I.; Kravcakova, A.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kucera, V.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, S.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Lehas, F.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Monzon, I. Leon; Leon Vargas, H.; Leoncino, M.; Levai, P.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; Torres, E. Lopez; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Lutz, T. H.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mares, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marin, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Blanco, J. Martin; Martinengo, P.; Martinez, M. I.; Garcia, G. Martinez; Pedreira, M. Martinez; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Mcdonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Perez, J. Mercado; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miskowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montano Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; De Godoy, D. A. Moreira; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muehlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Munzer, R. H.; Murakami, H.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Naik, B.; Nair, R.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Natal da Luz, H.; Nattrass, C.; Navarro, S. R.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, R.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Oravec, M.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, D.; Pagano, P.; Paic, G.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Da Costa, H. Pereira; Peresunko, D.; Lara, C. E. Perez; Lezama, E. Perez; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petracek, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pimentel, L. O. D. L.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Ploskon, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Rami, F.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Raesaenen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rocco, E.; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M.; Manso, A. Rodriguez; Roed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Roehrich, D.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Montero, A. J. Rubio; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Saarinen, S.; Sadhu, S.; Sadovsky, S.; Safarik, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sandor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sarkar, D.; Sarkar, N.; Sarma, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Sefcik, M.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Senyukov, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shahzad, M. I.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Sheikh, A. I.; Shigaki, K.; Shou, Q.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; de Souza, R. D.; Sozzi, F.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stankus, P.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Suljic, M.; Sultanov, R.; Sumbera, M.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Tabassam, U.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Munoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thaeder, J.; Thakur, D.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trombetta, G.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vala, M.; Palomo, L. Valencia; Vallero, S.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vyvre, P. Vande; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limon, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Baillie, O. Villalobos; Villatoro Tello, A.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Voelkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrlakova, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weiser, D. F.; Westerhoff, U.; Whitehead, A. M.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yang, H.; Yano, S.; Yasin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I. -K.; Yoon, J. H.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Zavada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, C.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a Bayesian approach to particle identification (PID) within the ALICE experiment. The aim is to more effectively combine the particle identification capabilities of its various detectors. After a brief explanation of the adopted methodology and formalism, the performance of the Bayesian

  12. Alice, Greenfoot, and Scratch--A Discussion

    Utting, Ian; Cooper, Stephen; Kolling, Michael; Maloney, John; Resnick, Mitchel

    2010-01-01

    This article distills a discussion about the goals, mechanisms, and effects of three environments which aim to support the acquisition and development of computing concepts (problem solving and programming) in pre-University and non-technical students: Alice, Greenfoot, and Scratch. The conversation started in a special session on the topic at the…

  13. Particle identification in ALICE: a Bayesian approach

    Adam, J.; Adamová, Dagmar; Benáček, Pavel; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Brož, M.; Čepila, J.; Contreras, J. G.; Eyyubova, G.; Ferencei, Jozef; Horák, D.; Křížek, Filip; Kučera, Vít; Mareš, Jiří A.; Petráček, V.; Pospíšil, Jan; Schulc, M.; Špaček, M.; Šumbera, Michal; Vaňát, Tomáš; Závada, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 131, č. 5 (2016), s. 168 ISSN 2190-5444 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : ALICE collaboration * heavy ion collisions Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders; BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.753, year: 2016

  14. The ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC

    Aamodt, K.; de Haas, A.P.; Grebenyuk, O.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304848883; Ivan, C.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304847747; Kamermans, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073698733; Mischke, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325781435; Nooren, G.J.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07051349X; Oskamp, C.J.; Peitzmann, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833959; Simili, E.; van den Brink, A.; van Eijndhoven, N.J.A.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072823674; Yuting, B.

    2008-01-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a general-purpose, heavy-ion detector at the CERN LHC which focuses on QCD, the strong-interaction sector of the Standard Model. It is designed to address the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at extreme values of energy

  15. ALICE: Physics Performance Report, Volume II

    Alessandro, B; Antinori, F; Belikov, J A

    2006-01-01

    ALICE is a general-purpose heavy-ion experiment designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC. It currently involves more than 900 physicists and senior engineers, from both the nuclear and high-energy physics sectors, from over 90 institutions in about 30 countries. The ALICE detector is designed to cope with the highest particle multiplicities above those anticipated for Pb-Pb collisions (dN ch /dy up to 8000) and it will be operational at the start-up of the LHC. In addition to heavy systems, the ALICE Collaboration will study collisions of lower-mass ions, which are a means of varying the energy density, and protons (both pp and pA), which primarily provide reference data for the nucleus-nucleus collisions. In addition, the pp data will allow for a number of genuine pp physics studies. The detailed design of the different detector systems has been laid down in a number of Technical Design Reports issued between mid-1998 and the end of 2004. The experiment is currently under construction and will be ready for data taking with both proton and heavy-ion beams at the start-up of the LHC. Since the comprehensive information on detector and physics performance was last published in the ALICE Technical Proposal in 1996, the detector, as well as simulation, reconstruction and analysis software have undergone significant development. The Physics Performance Report (PPR) provides an updated and comprehensive summary of the performance of the various ALICE subsystems, including updates to the Technical Design Reports, as appropriate. The PPR is divided into two volumes. Volume I, published in 2004 (CERN/LHCC 2003-049, ALICE Collaboration 2004 J. Phys. G: Nucl. Part. Phys. 30 1517-1763), contains in four chapters a short theoretical overview and an extensive reference list concerning the physics topics of interest to ALICE, the experimental conditions at the LHC, a short summary and update

  16. Helen Hart, remarkable plant pathologist (1900-1971).

    Wilcoxson, R D

    1996-01-01

    Helen Hart was a Professor of Plant Pathology at the University of Minnesota from 1924 until retirement in 1966. Born in Janeville, Wisconsin, she died at Grants Pass, Oregon. Her scholarly research concentrated on wheat stem rust to understand host pathogen relationships and to develop rust-resistant cultivars. She did not teach formal courses but was heavily involved in making seminars a vital part of instruction, in teaching languages needed for graduate studies, and as an informal advisor for most rust research theses. She had common sense, excellent scientific judgment, and sound instincts on personnel matters that served the department well. A talented science writer, Hart served as editor of hundreds of theses and departmental manuscripts for publication. Her writing and editing skills were used as associate editor of Phytopathology for two years and as editor-in-chief from 1944-1951. A strong advocate of The American Phytopathological Society, Helen Hart served on Council for 12 years and as President in 1956. Helen Hart was a great professional scientist who had a far-reaching impact on plant pathology during the twentieth century.

  17. The scene is set for ALICE

    2008-01-01

    Now that the electromagnetic calorimeter support and the mini space frame have been installed, practically all ALICE’s infrastructure is in place. The calorimeter support, an austenitic stainless steel shell weighing 30 tonnes, was slid gently inside the detector, in between the face of the magnet and the space frame. With the completion of two major installation projects, the scene is finally set for the ALICE experiment…or at least it nearly is, as a few design studies, minor installation jobs and measurements still need to be carried out before the curtain can finally be raised. The experiment’s chief engineer Diego Perini confirms: "All the heavy infrastructure for ALICE has been in place and ready for the grand opening since December 2007." The next step will be the installation of additional modules on the TOF and TRD detectors between January and March 2008, and physicists have already started testing the equipment with co...

  18. Performance optimisations for distributed analysis in ALICE

    Betev, L; Gheata, M; Grigoras, C; Hristov, P

    2014-01-01

    Performance is a critical issue in a production system accommodating hundreds of analysis users. Compared to a local session, distributed analysis is exposed to services and network latencies, remote data access and heterogeneous computing infrastructure, creating a more complex performance and efficiency optimization matrix. During the last 2 years, ALICE analysis shifted from a fast development phase to the more mature and stable code. At the same time, the framewo rks and tools for deployment, monitoring and management of large productions have evolved considerably too. The ALICE Grid production system is currently used by a fair share of organized and individual user analysis, consuming up to 30% or the available r esources and ranging from fully I/O - bound analysis code to CPU intensive correlations or resonances studies. While the intrinsic analysis performance is unlikely to improve by a large factor during the LHC long shutdown (LS1), the overall efficiency of the system has still to be improved by a...

  19. The Wonderland of Operating the ALICE Experiment

    Augustinus, A; Pinazza, O; Rosinský, P; Lechman, M; Jirdén, L; Chochula, P

    2011-01-01

    ALICE is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. Composed of 18 sub-detectors each with numerous subsystems that need to be controlled and operated in a safe and efficient way. The Detector Control System (DCS) is the key to this and has been used by detector experts with success during the commissioning of the individual detectors. During the transition from commissioning to operation, more and more tasks were transferred from detector experts to central operators. By the end of the 2010 datataking campaign, the ALICE experiment was run by a small crew of central operators, with only a single controls operator. The transition from expert to non-expert operation constituted a real challenge in terms of tools, documentation and training. A relatively high turnover and diversity in the operator crew that is specific to the HEP experiment environment (as opposed to the more stable operation crews for accelerators) made this challenge even bigger. Thi...

  20. New Fast Interaction Trigger for ALICE

    Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk

    2017-02-11

    The LHC heavy-ion luminosity and collision rate from 2021 onwards will considerably exceed the design parameters of the present ALICE forward trigger detectors and the introduction of the Muon Forward Tracker (MFT) will significantly reduce the space available for the new trigger detectors. To comply with these conditions a new Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT) will be built. FIT will be the main forward trigger, luminometer, and interaction-time detector. It will also determine multiplicity, centrality, and reaction plane of heavy-ion collisions. FIT will consist of two arrays of Cherenkov quartz radiators with MCP-PMT sensors and of a plastic scintillator ring. By increasing the overall acceptance of FIT, the scintillator will improve centrality and event plane resolution. It will also add sensitivity for the detection of beam-gas events and provide some degree of redundancy. FIT is currently undergoing an intense R&D and prototyping period. It is scheduled for installation in ALICE during 2020.

  1. ATLAS, CMS, LHCb and ALICE Career Networking Event 2015

    Marinov, Andrey; Strom, Derek Axel

    2015-01-01

    A networking event for alumni of the ATLAS, CMS, LHCb and ALICE experiments as well as current ATLAS/CMS/LHCb/ALICE postdocs and graduate students. This event offers an insight into career opportunities outside of academia. Various former members of the ATLAS, CMS, LHCb and ALICE collaborations will give presentations and be part of a panel discussion and elaborate on their experience in companies in a diverse range of fields (industry, finance, IT,...). Details at https://indico.cern.ch/event/440616

  2. The ALICE Software Release Validation cluster

    Berzano, D; Krzewicki, M

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important steps of software lifecycle is Quality Assurance: this process comprehends both automatic tests and manual reviews, and all of them must pass successfully before the software is approved for production. Some tests, such as source code static analysis, are executed on a single dedicated service: in High Energy Physics, a full simulation and reconstruction chain on a distributed computing environment, backed with a sample “golden” dataset, is also necessary for the quality sign off. The ALICE experiment uses dedicated and virtualized computing infrastructures for the Release Validation in order not to taint the production environment (i.e. CVMFS and the Grid) with non-validated software and validation jobs: the ALICE Release Validation cluster is a disposable virtual cluster appliance based on CernVM and the Virtual Analysis Facility, capable of deploying on demand, and with a single command, a dedicated virtual HTCondor cluster with an automatically scalable number of virtual workers on any cloud supporting the standard EC2 interface. Input and output data are externally stored on EOS, and a dedicated CVMFS service is used to provide the software to be validated. We will show how the Release Validation Cluster deployment and disposal are completely transparent for the Release Manager, who simply triggers the validation from the ALICE build system's web interface. CernVM 3, based entirely on CVMFS, permits to boot any snapshot of the operating system in time: we will show how this allows us to certify each ALICE software release for an exact CernVM snapshot, addressing the problem of Long Term Data Preservation by ensuring a consistent environment for software execution and data reprocessing in the future. (paper)

  3. Physics Requirements for the ALICE DAQ system

    Vande Vyvre, P

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Abstract The goal of this note is to review the requirements for the DAQ system originated from the various physics topics that will be studied by the ALICE experiment. It summarises all the current requirements both for Pb-Pb and p-p interactions. The consequences in terms of throughput at different stages of the DAQ system are presented for different running scenarios.

  4. Performance optimisations for distributed analysis in ALICE

    Betev, L; Gheata, A; Grigoras, C; Hristov, P; Gheata, M

    2014-01-01

    Performance is a critical issue in a production system accommodating hundreds of analysis users. Compared to a local session, distributed analysis is exposed to services and network latencies, remote data access and heterogeneous computing infrastructure, creating a more complex performance and efficiency optimization matrix. During the last 2 years, ALICE analysis shifted from a fast development phase to the more mature and stable code. At the same time, the frameworks and tools for deployment, monitoring and management of large productions have evolved considerably too. The ALICE Grid production system is currently used by a fair share of organized and individual user analysis, consuming up to 30% or the available resources and ranging from fully I/O-bound analysis code to CPU intensive correlations or resonances studies. While the intrinsic analysis performance is unlikely to improve by a large factor during the LHC long shutdown (LS1), the overall efficiency of the system has still to be improved by an important factor to satisfy the analysis needs. We have instrumented all analysis jobs with ''sensors'' collecting comprehensive monitoring information on the job running conditions and performance in order to identify bottlenecks in the data processing flow. This data are collected by the MonALISa-based ALICE Grid monitoring system and are used to steer and improve the job submission and management policy, to identify operational problems in real time and to perform automatic corrective actions. In parallel with an upgrade of our production system we are aiming for low level improvements related to data format, data management and merging of results to allow for a better performing ALICE analysis

  5. Upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    Reidt, Felix; Collaboration, for the ALICE

    2014-01-01

    During the Long Shutdown 2 of the LHC in 2018/2019, the ALICE experiment plans the installation of a novel Inner Tracking System. It will replace the current six layer detector system with a seven layer detector using Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors. The upgraded Inner Tracking System will have significantly improved tracking and vertexing capabilities, as well as readout rate to cope with the expected increased Pb-Pb luminosity of the LHC. The choice of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors has be...

  6. MAPS development for the ALICE ITS upgrade

    Yang, P; Aglieri, G; Cavicchioli, C; Chalmet, P L; Chanlek, N; Collu, A; Gao, C; Hillemanns, H; Junique, A; Kofarago, M; Keil, M; Kugathasan, T; Kim, D; Kim, J; Lattuca, A

    2015-01-01

    Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) offer the possibility to build pixel detectors and tracking layers with high spatial resolution and low material budget in commercial CMOS processes. Significant progress has been made in the field of MAPS in recent years, and they are now considered for the upgrades of the LHC experiments. This contribution will focus on MAPS detectors developed for the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS) upgrade and manufactured in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS imaging senso...

  7. Monitoring System for ALICE Surface Areas

    Demirbasci, Oguz

    2016-01-01

    I have been at CERN for 12 weeks within the scope of Summer Student Programme working on a monitoring system project for surface areas of the ALICE experiment during this period of time. The development and implementation of a monitoring system for environmental parameters in the accessible areas where a cheap hardware setup can be deployed were aim of this project. This report explains how it was developed by using Arduino, Raspberry PI, WinCC OA and DIM protocol.

  8. One module of the ALICE photon spectrometer

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The first module for the ALICE photon spectrometer has been completed. Each of the five modules will contain 3584 lead-tungstate crystals, a material as transparent as ordinary silica glass but with nearly four times the density. When a high-energy particle passes through one of these crystals it will scintillate, allowing the energy of electrons, positrons and photons to be measured through the 17 920 detection channels.

  9. Diffraction in ALICE and trigger efficiencies

    Navin, Sparsh; Lietava, Roman

    ALICE is built to measure the properties of strongly interacting matter created in heavy-ion collisions. In addition, taking advantage of the low pT acceptance in the central barrel, ALICE is playing an important role in understanding pp collisions with minimum bias triggers at LHC energies. The work presented in this thesis is based on pp data simulated by the ALICE collaboration and early data collected at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. A procedure to calculate trigger efficiencies and an estimate of the systematic uncertainty due to the limited acceptance of the detector are shown. A kinematic comparison between Monte Carlo event generators, PYTHIA 6, PYTHIA 8 and PHOJET is also presented. To improve the description of diffraction in PYTHIA, a hard diffractive component was added to PYTHIA 8 in 2009, which is described. Finally a trigger with a high efficiency for picking diffractive events is used to select a sample with an enhanced diffractive component from pp data. These data are compared to Monte ...

  10. ALICE A Large Ion Collider Experiment

    Mager, M; Rohr, D M; Suljic, M; Miskowiec, D C; Donigus, B; Mercado-perez, J; Lohner, D; Bertelsen, H; Kox, S; Cheynis, B; Sambyal, S S; Usai, G; Agnello, M; Toscano, L; Miake, Y; Inaba, M; Maldonado cervantes, I A; Fernandez tellez, A; Kulibaba, V; Zinovjev, G; Martynov, Y; Usenko, E; Pshenichnov, I; Nikolaev, S; Vasiliev, A; Vinogradov, A; Moukhanova, T; Vasilyev, A; Kozlov, Y; Voloshin, K; Kiselev, S; Kirilko, Y; Lyublev, E; Kondratyeva, N; Gameiro munhoz, M; Alarcon do passo suaide, A; Lagana fernandes, C; Carlin filho, N; Yin, Z; Zhu, J; Luo, J; Pikna, M; Bombara, M; Pastircak, B; Marangio, G; Gianotti, P; Muccifora, V; Sputowska, I A; Ilkiv, I; Christiansen, P; Dodokhov, V; Yurevich, V; Fedunov, A; Malakhov, A; Efremov, A; Feofilov, G; Vinogradov, L; Asryan, A; Kovalenko, V; Piyarathna, D; Myers, C J; Martashvili, I; Oh, H; Cherney, M G; D'erasmo, G; Wagner, V; Smakal, R; Sartorelli, G; Xaplanteris karampatsos, L; Mlynarz, J; Murray, C J; Oh, S; Becker, B; Zbroszczyk, H P; Feldkamp, L; Pappalardo, G; Khlebnikov, A; Basmanov, V; Punin, V; Demanov, V; Naseer, M A; Gotovac, S; Zgura, S I; Yang, H; Vernet, R; Son, C; Shtejer diaz, K; Hwang, S; Alfaro molina, J R; Jahnke, C; Richter, M R; Garcia-solis, E J; Hitchcock, T M; Bazo alba, J L; Utrobicic, A; Brun, R; Divia, R; Hillemanns, H; Schukraft, J; Riedler, P; Eulisse, G; Von haller, B; Kushpil, V; Ivanov, M; Malzacher, P; Schweda, K O; Renfordt, R A E; Reygers, K J; Pachmayer, Y C; Gaardhoeje, J J; Bearden, I G; Porteboeuf, S J; Borel, H; Pereira da costa, H D A; Faivre, J; Germain, M; Schutz, Y R; Delagrange, H; Batigne, G; Stocco, D; Estienne, M D; Bergognon, A A E; Zoccarato, Y D; Jones, P G; Levai, P; Bencedi, G; Khan, M M; Mahapatra, D P; Ghosh, P; Das, T K; Cicalo, C; De falco, A; Mazzoni, A M; Cerello, P; De marco, N; Riccati, L; Saavedra san martin, O; Paic, G; Ovchynnyk, V; Karavicheva, T; Kucheryaeva, M; Skuratovskiy, O; Mal kevich, D; Bogdanov, A; Pereira, L G; Cai, X; Zhu, X; Wang, M; Kar, S; Fan, F; Sitar, B; Cerny, V; Aggarwal, M M; Bianchi, N; Torii, H; Hori, Y; Tsuji, T; Herrera corral, G A; Kowalski, M; Rybicki, A; Deloff, A; Petrovici, A; Nomokonov, P; Parfenov, A; Koshurnikov, E; Shahaliyev, E; Rogochaya, E; Kondratev, V; Oreshkina, N; Tarasov, A; Norenberg, M; Bodnya, E; Bogolyubskiy, M; Symons, T; Blanco, F; Madagodahettige don, D M; Umaka, E N; Schaefer, B; De pasquale, S; Fusco girard, M; Kim, J; Jeon, H; Nandi, B K; Kumar, J; Sarkar - sinha, T; Arcelli, S; Scapparone, E; Shevel, A; Nikulin, V; Komkov, B; Voloshin, S; Hille, P T; Kannan, S; Dainese, A; Matynia, R M; Dabala, L B; Zimmermann, M B; Vinogradov, Y; Vikhlyantsev, O; Telnov, A; Tumkin, A; Van leeuwen, M; Erdal, H A; Keidel, R; Rui, R; Yeo, I; Vilakazi, Z; Klay, J L; Boswell, B D; Lindenstruth, V; Tveter, T S; Batzing, P C; Breitner, T G; Sahoo, R; Roy, A; Musa, L; Perini, D; Vande vyvre, P; Fuchs, U; Oberegger, M; Aglieri rinella, G; Salgueiro domingues da silva, R M; Kalweit, A P; Greco, V; Bellini, F; Bond, P M; Mohammadi, N; Marin, A M; Glassel, P; Schicker, R M; Staley, F M; Castillo castellanos, J E; Furget, C; Real, J; Martino, J F; Evans, D; Sahu, P K; Sahu, S K; Ahammed, Z; Saini, J; Bala, R; Gupta, R; Di bari, D; Biasotto, M; Nappi, G; Esumi, S; Sano, M; Roehrich, D; Lonne, P; Drakin, Y; Manko, V; Nikulin, S; Yushmanov, I; Kozlov, K; Kerbikov, B; Stavinskiy, A; Sultanov, R; Raniwala, R; Zhou, D; Zhu, H; Meres, M; Kralik, I; Parmar, S; Rizzi, V; Orlandi, A; Lea, R; Kuijer, P G; Figiel, J; Gorlich, L M; Shabratova, G; Lobanov, V; Zaporozhets, S; Ivanov, A; Iglovikov, V; Ochirov, A; Petrov, V; Jacobs, P M; De gruttola, D; Corsi, F; Varma, R; Nania, R; Wilkinson, J J; Samsonov, V; Pruneau, C A; Caines, H L; Aronsson, T; Adare, A M; Zwick, S M; Fearick, R W; Ostrowski, P K; Kulasinski, K; Heine, N; Wilk, A; Ilkaev, R; Ilkaeva, L; Pavlov, V; Mikhaylyukov, K; Rybin, A; Naumov, N; Mudnic, E; Cortese, P; Listratenko, O; Stan, I; Nooren, G; Song, J; Krawutschke, T; Kim, S Y; Hwang, D S; Lee, S H; Leon monzon, I; Vorobyev, I; Skaali, B; Wikne, J; Dordic, O; Yan, Y; Mazumder, R; Shahoyan, R; Kluge, A; Pellegrino, F; Safarik, K; Tauro, A; Foka, P; Frankenfeld, U M; Masciocchi, S; Schwarz, K E; Bailhache, R M; Anguelov, V; Hansen, A; Vulpescu, B; Baldisseri, A; Aphecetche, L B; Berenyi, D; Sahoo, S; Nayak, T K; Muhuri, S; Patra, R N; Adhya, S P; Potukuchi, B; Masoni, A; Scomparin, E; Beole, S; Mizuno, S; Enyo, H; Cuautle flores, E; Gonzalez zamora, P; Djuvsland, O; Altinpinar, S; Wagner, B; Fehlker, D; Velure, A; Potin, S; Kurepin, A; Ryabinkin, E; Kiselev, I; Pestov, Y; Hayrapetyan, A; Manukyan, N; Lutz, J; Belikov, I; Roy, C S; Takahashi, J; Araujo silva figueredo, M; Tang, S; Szarka, I; Kapusta, S; Hasko, J; Putis, M; Sandor, L; Vrlakova, J; Das, S; Hayashi, S; Van rijn, A J; Siemiarczuk, T; Petrovici, M; Petris, M; Stenlund, E A; Malinina, L; Fateev, O; Kolozhvari, A; Altsybeev, I; Sadovskiy, S; Soloviev, A; Ploskon, M A; Mayes, B W; Sorensen, S P; Mazer, J A; Awes, T; Virgili, T; Pagano, P; Krus, M; Sett, P; Bhatt, H; Sinha, B; Khan, P; Antonioli, P; Scioli, G; Sakaguchi, H; Volkov, S; Khanzadeev, A; Malaev, M; Lisa, M A; Loggins, V R; Schuster, T R; Scharenberg, R P; Turrisi, R; Debski, P R; Oleniacz, J; Westerhoff, U; Yanovskiy, V; Domrachev, S; Smirnova, Y; Zimmermann, S; Veldhoen, M; Van der maarel, J; Kileng, B; Seo, J; Lopez torres, E; Camerini, P; Jang, H J; Buthelezi, E Z; Suleymanov, M K O; Belmont moreno, E; Zhao, C; Perales, M; Kobdaj, C; Spyropoulou-stassinaki, M; Roukoutakis, F; Keil, M; Morsch, A; Rademakers, A; Soos, C; Zampolli, C; Grigoras, C; Chibante barroso, V M; Schuchmann, S; Grigoras, A G; Lafuente mazuecos, A; Wegrzynek, A T; Bielcikova, J; Kushpil, S; Braun-munzinger, P; Andronic, A; Zimmermann, A; Rosnet, P; Ramillien barret, V; Lopez, X B; Arbor, N; Erazmus, B E; Pichot, P; Pillot, P; Grossiord, J; Boldizsar, L; Khan, S; Puddu, G; Marras, D; Siddhanta, S; Costanza, S; Botta, E; Gallio, M; Masera, M; Simonetti, L; Prino, F; Oppedisano, C; Vargas trevino, A D; Nystrand, J I; Ullaland, K; Haaland, O S; Huang, M; Naumov, S; Zinovjev, M; Trubnikov, V; Alkin, A; Ivanytskyi, O; Guber, F; Karavichev, O; Nyanin, A; Sibiryak, Y; Peresunko, D Y; Patarakin, O; Aleksandrov, D; Blau, D; Yasnopolskiy, S; Chumakov, M; Vetlitskiy, I; Nedosekin, A; Selivanov, A; Okorokov, V; Grigoryan, A; Papikyan, V; Kuhn, C C; Wan, R; Cajko, F; Siska, M; Mares, J; Zavada, P; Ceballos sanchez, C; Reolon, A R; Gunji, T; Snellings, R; Mayer, C; Klusek-gawenda, M J; Schiaua, C C; Andrei, C; Herghelegiu, A I; Soegaard, C; Panebrattsev, Y; Penev, V; Efimov, L; Zanevskiy, Y; Vechernin, V; Zarochentsev, A; Kolevatov, R; Agapov, A; Polishchuk, B; Nattrass, C; Anticic, T; Kwon, Y; Kim, M; Moon, T; Seger, J E; Petran, M; Sahoo, B; Das bose, L; Hushnud, H; Hatzifotiadou, D; Shigaki, K; Jha, D M; Murray, S; Badala, A; Putevskoy, S; Shapovalova, E; Haiduc, M; Mitu, C M; Mischke, A; Grelli, A; Hetland, K F; Rachevski, A; Menchaca-rocha, A A; De cuveland, J; Hutter, D; Langhammer, M; Dahms, T; Watkins, E P; Gago medina, A M; Planinic, M; Riegler, W; Telesca, A; Knichel, M L; Lazaridis, L; Ferencei, J; Martin, N A; Appelshaeuser, H; Heckel, S T; Windelband, B S; Nielsen, B S; Chojnacki, M; Baldit, A; Manso, F; Crochet, P; Espagnon, B; Uras, A; Lietava, R; Lemmon, R C; Agocs, A G; Viyogi, Y; Pal, S K; Singhal, V; Khan, S A; Alam, S N; Rodriguez cahuantzi, M; Maslov, M; Kurepin, A; Ippolitov, M; Lebedev, V; Tsvetkov, A; Klimov, A; Agafonov, G; Martemiyanov, A; Loginov, V; Kononov, S; Hnatic, M; Kalinak, P; Trzaska, W H; Raha, S; Canoa roman, V; Cruz albino, R; Botje, M; Gladysz-dziadus, E; Marszal, T; Oskarsson, A N E; Otterlund, I; Tydesjo, H; Ljunggren, H M; Vodopyanov, A; Akichine, P; Kuznetsov, A; Vedeneyev, V; Naumenko, P; Bilov, N; Rogalev, R; Evdokimov, S; Braidot, E; Bellwied, R; De caro, A; Kang, J H; Gorbunov, Y; Lee, J; Pachr, M; Dash, S; Roy, P K; Cifarelli, L; Laurenti, G; Margotti, A; Sugitate, T; Ivanov, V; Zhalov, M; Salzwedel, J S N; Pavlinov, A; Harris, J W; Caballero orduna, D; Fiore, E M; Pluta, J M; Kisiel, A R; Wrobel, D; Klein-boesing, C; Grimaldi, A; Zhitnik, A; Nazarenko, S; Zavyalov, N; Miroshnikov, D; Kuryakin, A; Vyushin, A; Mamonov, A; Vickovic, L; Niculescu, M; Fragiacomo, E; Ahn, S U; Ahn, S; Foertsch, S V; Brown, C R; Lovhoiden, G; Harton, A V; Khosonthongkee, K; Langoy, R; Schmidt, H R; Betev, L; Buncic, P; Di mauro, A; Martinengo, P; Gargiulo, C; Grosse-oetringhaus, J F; Costa, F; Baltasar dos santos pedrosa, F; Laudi, E; Adamova, D; Lippmann, C; Schmidt, C J; Book, J H; Grajcarek, R; Christensen, C H; Dupieux, P; Bastid, N; Rakotozafindrabe, A M; Conesa balbastre, G; Martinez-garcia, G; Suire, C P; Ducroux, L; Tieulent, R N; Jusko, A; Barnafoldi, G G; Pochybova, S; Hussain, T; Dubey, A K; Acharya, S; Gupta, A; Ricci, R A; Meddi, F; Vercellin, E; Chujo, T; Watanabe, K; Onishi, H; Akiba, Y; Vergara limon, S; Tejeda munoz, G; Skjerdal, K; Svistunov, S; Reshetin, A; Maevskaya, A; Antonenko, V; Mishustin, N; Meleshko, E; Korsheninnikov, A; Balygin, K; Zagreev, B; Akindinov, A; Mikhaylov, K; Gushchin, O; Grigoryev, V; Gulkanyan, H; Sanchez castro, X; Peretti pezzi, R; Oliveira da silva, A C; Harmanova, Z; Vokal, S; Beitlerova, A; Rak, J; Ghosh, S K; Bhati, A K; Spiriti, E; Ronchetti, F; Casanova diaz, A O; Kuzmin, N; Melkumov, G; Zinchenko, A; Shklovskaya, A; Bunzarov, Z I; Chernenko, S; Rogachevskiy, O; Toulina, T; Kompaniets, M; Titov, A; Kharlov, Y; Dantsevich, G; Stolpovskiy, M; Porter, R J; Datskova, O V; Kim, D S; Jung, W W; Kim, H; Bielcik, J; Pospisil, V; Cepila, J; Das, D; Williams, C; Pesci, A; Roshchin, E; Grounds, A; Humanic, T; Steinpreis, M D; Yaldo, C G; Smirnov, N; Heinz, M T; Connors, M E; Barile, F; Lunardon, M; Orzan, G; Wielanek, D H; Servais, E L J; Patecki, M; Passfeld, A; Zhelezov, S; Morkin, A; Zabelin, O; Hobbs, D A; Gul, M; Ramello, L; Van den brink, A; Bertens, R A; Lodato, D F; Haque, M R; Kim, E J; Coccetti, F; Margagliotti, G V; Rauf, A W; Sandoval, A; Berger, M E; Munzer, R H; Qvigstad, H; Lindal, S; Cervantes jr, M; Kebschull, U W; Engel, H; Karasu uysal, A; Lien, J A; Hess, B A; Calvo villar, E; Augustinus, A; Carena, W; Chochula, P; Chapeland, S; Dobrin, A F; Reidt, F; Bock, F; Festanti, A; Galdames perez, A; Sumbera, M; Averbeck, R P; Garabatos cuadrado, J; Reichelt, P S; Marquard, M; Stachel, J; Wang, Y; Boggild, H; Gulbrandsen, K H; Hansen, J C; Charvet, J F; Shabetai, A; Hadjidakis, C M; Krivda, M; Vertesi, R; Mitra, J; Altini, V; Ferretti, A; Gagliardi, M; Sakata, D; Niida, T; Martinez hernandez, M I; Yang, S; Karpechev, E; Veselovskiy, A; Konevskikh, A; Finogeev, D; Fokin, S; Karadzhev, K; Kucheryaev, Y; Plotnikov, V; Ryabinin, M; Golubev, A; Kaplin, V; Ter-minasyan, A; Abramyan, A; Raniwala, S; Hippolyte, B; Strmen, P; Krivan, F; Kalliokoski, T E A; Chang, B; De cataldo, G; Paticchio, V; Fantoni, A; Gomez jimenez, R; Christakoglou, P; Cyz, A; Wilk, G A; Kurashvili, P; Pop, A; Arefiev, V; Batyunya, B; Lioubochits, V; Zryuev, V; Sokolov, M; Patalakha, D; Pinsky, L; Timmins, A R; Petracek, V; Krelina, M; Chattopadhyay, S; Basile, M; Falchieri, D; Miftakhov, N; Garner, R M; Konyushikhin, M; Joseph, N; Srivastava, B K; Cleymans, J W A; Dietel, T; Soramel, F; Pawlak, T J; Kucinski, M; Janik, M A; Surma, K D; Wessels, J P; Riggi, F; Ivanov, A; Selin, I; Budnikov, D; Filchagin, S; Sitta, M; Gheata, M; Danu, A; Peitzmann, T; Reicher, M; Helstrup, H; Subasi, M; Mathis, A M; Nilsson, M S; Rist, J A S; Jena, C; Lara martinez, C E; Vasileiou, M

    2002-01-01

    %title\\\\ \\\\ALICE is a general-purpose heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC. It currently includes more than 750~physicists and $\\sim$70 institutions in 27 countries.\\\\ \\\\The detector is designed to cope with the highest particle multiplicities anticipated for Pb-Pb reactions (dN/dy~$\\approx$~8000) and it will be operational at the start-up of the LHC. In addition to heavy systems, the ALICE Collaboration will study collisions of lower-mass ions, which are a means of varying the energy density, and protons (both pp and p-nucleus), which provide reference data for the nucleus-nucleus collisions.\\\\ \\\\ALICE consists of a central part, which measures event-by-event hadrons, electrons and photons, and a forward spectrometer to measure muons. The central part, which covers polar angles from 45$^{0} $ to 135$^{0} $ ($\\mid \\eta \\mid $ < 0.9) over the full azimuth, is embedded in the large L3 solenoidal mag...

  11. CERN: ALICE in the looking-glass

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    While proton-proton collisions will provide the main research thrust at CERN's planned LHC high energy collider to be built in the LEP tunnel, its 27-kilometre superconducting magnet ring will also be able to handle all the other high energy beams on the CERN menu, opening up the possibility of both heavy ion and electron-proton collisions to augment the LHC research programme. A major new character in the LHC cast - ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) - has recently published a letter of intent, announcing its intention to appear on the LHC stage. Three letters of intent for major LHC proton-proton experiments were aired last year (January, page 6), and ALICE, if approved, would cohabit with the final solution for the protonproton sector (see box). Only a single major heavy ion experiment is envisaged. The protonproton detectors have some heavy ion capability, but could only look at some very specific signals. (Detailed plans for LHC's electron proton collision option are on hold, awaiting the initial exploration of this field by the new HERA collider which came into operation last year at the DESY Laboratory in Hamburg.) Describing the ALICE detector and its research aims, spokesman Jurgen Schukraft echoes T.D.Lee's observations on the state of particle physics. It is becoming increasingly clear that resolving some of today's particle puzzles require a deeper understanding of the vacuum

  12. ALICE's first vacuum bakeout a success

    2007-01-01

    At the beginning of April, the ALICE central beryllium beam pipe and absorber beam pipes were successfully conditioned. The installation and bakeout shell surround the beam pipe (lower left), running through the middle of the ITS and TPC. Notice the high-tech cooling system, an additional precaution to avoid overheating the ALICE detection equipment.One end of the vacuum sector during the bakeout and pure gas refill. It is unusual for a vacuum sector to end as it does in the middle of a non-accessible detector and made the installation and cabling of the bakeout equipment a more difficult procedure. Just before Easter, the first bakeout and NEG activation of experimental chambers in the LHC was carried out, followed by ultra pure gas refill. The bakeout consisted of externally heating the chambers under vacuum in order to lower their outgassing. This same heating process also activates the NEG, a coating on the inside surface of the beam vacuum chambers, which pumps the residual gas. ALICE's bakeout was pa...

  13. ALICE: The best is yet to come

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    The ALICE wonderland is the ion-ion collisions. However, the proton run was intensely used by the collaboration to get to know its detector in detail and to produce its first results in QCD-related matters. This very successful preparatory phase will now allow ALICE to enter the uncharted territory of the quark-gluon plasma at the extreme energies provided by the LHC.   The ALICE detector is optimized to study ion-ion collisions in which quark-gluon plasma may be formed. This type of matter, which existed a few moments after the Big Bang and appears when quarks and gluons are deconfined to form a highly dense and hot soup, has been studied at CERN’s SPS in the 1990s and later, from 2000 onwards, at much higher energy at RHIC in the US. Now it’s ALICE’s turn. “Quark-gluon plasma is created at very high temperatures but starts to cool down very quickly to become normal matter again. The high energy of the LHC puts us much higher above the threshold of its for...

  14. Alice Walker’s Womanism in Meridian

    GAN Lin

    2015-01-01

    Meridian is one of Alice Walker’s early work. It tells a story that happened in the American south during the 1960s and early 70s’. It describes the life of the main character, Meridian Hill, a black woman from a southern town, who got out of the oppression of white society, and ends up in participate in Civil Rights Movement. The paper firstly illustrates the soul of womanism—anti-sexism, anti-racism, sisiterhood as well as the maternity love, then analyzes how these theories permeated into the novel—Meridian. The paper paid attention to the function of this novel on the improvement of Alice Walker ’s womanism. In proving that womanism not only permeates into Meridian, but also improved womanism from many perspectives, it comes to the conclusion that Meridian is a novel to improve Alice Walker’s womanism, it serves as the good novel to highlight the African Culture, and made a great contribution for the encouragement of black women to seek for freedom in the society.

  15. The ALICE Dimuon Spectrometer High Level Trigger

    Becker, B; Cicalo, Corrado; Das, Indranil; de Vaux, Gareth; Fearick, Roger; Lindenstruth, Volker; Marras, Davide; Sanyal, Abhijit; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Staley, Florent; Steinbeck, Timm; Szostak, Artur; Usai, Gianluca; Vilakazi, Zeblon

    2009-01-01

    The ALICE Dimuon Spectrometer High Level Trigger (dHLT) is an on-line processing stage whose primary function is to select interesting events that contain distinct physics signals from heavy resonance decays such as J/psi and Gamma particles, amidst unwanted background events. It forms part of the High Level Trigger of the ALICE experiment, whose goal is to reduce the large data rate of about 25 GB/s from the ALICE detectors by an order of magnitude, without loosing interesting physics events. The dHLT has been implemented as a software trigger within a high performance and fault tolerant data transportation framework, which is run on a large cluster of commodity compute nodes. To reach the required processing speeds, the system is built as a concurrent system with a hierarchy of processing steps. The main algorithms perform partial event reconstruction, starting with hit reconstruction on the level of the raw data received from the spectrometer. Then a tracking algorithm finds track candidates from the recon...

  16. LS1 Report: ALICE ups the ante

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    SPS up and running... LHC almost cold... CCC Operators back at their desks... all telltale signs of the start of Run 2! For the experiments, that means there are just a few short months left for them to prepare for beams. The CERN Bulletin will be checking in with each of the Big Four to see how they are getting on during these closing months...   It has been a long road for the ALICE LS1 team. From major improvements to the 19 sub-detectors to a full re-cabling and replacement of LEP-era electrical infrastructure, no part of the ALICE cavern has gone untouched.* With the experiment set to close in early December, the teams are making finishing touches before turning their focus towards re-commissioning and calibration. "Earlier this week, we installed the last two modules of the di-jet calorimeter," explains Werner Riegler, ALICE technical coordinator. "These are the final parts of a 60 degree calorimeter extension that is installed opposite the present calorimeter, c...

  17. The ALICE Inner Tracking System Upgrade

    Siddhanta, Sabyasachi

    2015-01-01

    The long term plan of ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a detailed investigation and characterisation of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). ALICE has devised a comprehensive upgrade strategy to enhance its physics capabilities and to exploit the LHC running conditions after the second long shutdown of the LHC scheduled in 2019-20. The upgraded ALICE will focus on high precision measurements of rare probes over a wide range of momenta, which will significantly improve the performance with respect to the present experimental set up. The upgrade strategy is based on the fact that after LS2 LHC will progressively increase its luminosity with Pb beams eventually reaching an interaction rate of about 50 kHz. To exploit the new LHC capabilities, several existing detectors will undergo a substantial upgrade and new detectors will be added. Within this upgrade strategy, the Inner Tracking System (ITS) upgrade forms an important cornerstone, providing precise measurements for...

  18. 78 FR 43064 - Safety Zone; Maritime Heritage Festival Fireworks, St. Helens, OR

    2013-07-19

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Maritime Heritage Festival Fireworks, St. Helens, OR AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION... associated with fireworks displays. As part of the Maritime Heritage Festival Fireworks in St. Helens, OR, the festival will feature a fireworks display. The Coast Guard expects approximately 1,000 people to...

  19. Friendly Letters on the Correspondence of Helen Keller, Anne Sullivan, and Alexander Graham Bell.

    Blatt, Burton

    1985-01-01

    Excerpts from the letters between Alexander Graham Bell and Anne Sullivan and Helen Keller are given to illustrate the educational and personal growth of Helen Keller as well as the educational philosophy of Bell regarding the education of the deaf blind. (DB)

  20. Colonos y soldados en Oriente Helenístico

    Adolfo Domínguez Monedero

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo estudia las formas que asume el asentamiento de soldados en el mundo helenístico. En primer lugar, se estudia la época de Alejandro Magno en cuanto que precedente; en efecto, Alejandro ha utilizado en gran medida a sus soldados para fundar nuevas colonias, que son un medio de proteger y defender sus conquistas. Este procedimiento ha sido igualmente empleado por sus sucesores, los reyes helenísticos. Aquí estudio ante todo los reinos Seiéucida y Tolemaico, haciendo especial hincapié en los diferentes métodos de los que cada uno de ellos se ha servido, y los distintos fines que debía alcanzar cada una de sus respectivas políticas de asentamiento. Del mismo modo, en cada uno de los tres casos abordados me detengo ante todo en las relaciones entre macedonios, griegos, indígenas y no griegos en general en las nuevas fundaciones. Como conclusión, se resalta el sentido general de todo el proceso en la conformación del mundo helenístico.This paper analyzes the ways in which the settlement of soldiers has been accomplished in the Hellenistic world. Firstly, I study the age of Alexander the Great as a precedent; Alexander has greatly used his soldiers in the foundation of new colonies as a way to protect and defend his conquests. This procedure has been also used by his successors, the Hellenistic kings. I study mainly the Seleucid and the Ptolemaic Kingdoms, stressing the different ways each of them has used, and the different purposes of their different settiement politics. In the three cases deait the relations between Macedonians, Greeks, Natives and non-greeks in general in the new foundations are underlined. As a conclusión the overall meaning of all the process in the shaping of the Hellenistic worid is emphasized.

  1. The ALICE silicon pixel detector system

    Kapusta, S.

    2009-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is again reaching its startup phase at the European Organization for Particle Physics (CERN). The LHC started its operation on the 10 th of September, 2008 with huge success managing to sent the the first beam successfully around the entire ring in less than an hour after the first injection in one direction, and later that day in the opposite direction. Unfortunately, on the 19 th of September, an accident occurred during the 5.5 TeV magnet commissioning in Sector 34, which will significantly delay the operation of the LHC. The ALICE experiment will exploit the collisions of accelerated ions produced at the LHC to study strongly interacting matter at extreme densities and high temperatures. e ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) represents the two innermost layers of the ALICE Inner Traing System (ITS) located at radii of 3.9 cm and 7.6 cm from the Interaction Point (IP). One of the main tasks of the SPD is to provide precise traing information. is information is fundamental for the study of weak decays of heavy flavor particles, since the corresponding signature is a secondary vertex separated from the primary vertex only by a few hundred micrometers. e tra density could be as high as 80 tracks per cm 2 in the innermost SPD layer as a consequence of a heavy ion collision. The SPD will provide a spatial resolution of around ≅12 μm in the rφ direction and ≅70 μm in the z direction. The expected occupancy of the SPD ranges from 0.4% to 1.5% which makes it an excellent charged particle multiplicity detector in the pseudorapidity region |η| < 2. Furthermore, by combining all possible hits in the SPD, one can get a rough estimate of the position of the primary interaction. One of the challenges is the tight material budget constraint (<1% radiation length per layer) in order to limit the scattering of the traversing particles. e silicon sensor and its readout chip have a total thickness of only 350 μm and the signal lines from the

  2. ALICE Diffractive Detector Control System for RUN-II in the ALICE Experiment

    INSPIRE-00522336; Martinez, M.I.; Monzon, I. Leon

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes general characteristics of the deployment and commissioned of the Detector Control System (DCS) AD0 for the second phase of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The AD0 detector is installed in the ALICE experiment to provide a better selection of diffractive events.

  3. Particle Identification Studies with an ALICE Test TPC

    Christiansen, P

    2007-01-01

    Using a test TPC, consisting of the ALICE TPC field cage prototype in combination with the final ALICE TPC readout and electronics, the energy loss distribution and resolution were measured for identified protons. The measurements were compared to theoretical calculations and good quantitative agreement was found when detector effects were taken into account. The implications for particle identification are discussed.

  4. Uinunud Alice'i toas teeb imesid lavamaagia / Jaanus Kaasik

    Kaasik, Jaanus

    2004-01-01

    7. veebr. esietendus Vanemuises tantsulavastus "Alice imedemaal". Etendus põhineb briti kirjaniku L. Carrolli samanimelisel lasteraamatul, koreograaf M. Murdmaa, kunstnik K. Jancis ja muusika on kirjutanud ungari helilooja S. Kall̤s, Alice'i osa tantsib korealanna Hye Min Kim

  5. Assessing the catalogue module of Alice for window software ...

    The paper presents a general description of Alice For Window Software with a detailed analysis of the catalogue module. It highlights the basic features of the module such as add, edit, delete, search field and the grab button. The cataloguing process is clearly delineated. The paper also discusses Alice For Window ...

  6. ALICE - A computer program for nuclear data acquisition

    Skaali, T.B.

    1981-02-01

    This manual contains the users guide and the program documentation for the ALICE data acquisition system. The ALICE Users Guide, which is contained in part 1 of the manual, can be read independently of the program documentation in part 2. The ALICE program is written in the interpretive language NODAL. Due to the inherent slow execution speed of interpreted code time-consuming tasks such as non-linear least squares peak fitting cannot be implemented. On the other hand the special features of the NODAL language have made possible facilities in ALICE which hardly could have been realized by, e.g. a FORTRAN program. The complete system can be divided in two parts, i) the ALICE program written in NODAL, and ii) a data acquisition package which logically represents an extension of the SINTRAN III operating system. The system is thus portable to other NORD- 10/100 installations provided that the floating hardware is 48 bits. (Auth.)

  7. Open access for ALICE analysis based on virtualization technology

    Buncic, P; Schutz, Y

    2015-01-01

    Open access is one of the important leverages for long-term data preservation for a HEP experiment. To guarantee the usability of data analysis tools beyond the experiment lifetime it is crucial that third party users from the scientific community have access to the data and associated software. The ALICE Collaboration has developed a layer of lightweight components built on top of virtualization technology to hide the complexity and details of the experiment-specific software. Users can perform basic analysis tasks within CernVM, a lightweight generic virtual machine, paired with an ALICE specific contextualization. Once the virtual machine is launched, a graphical user interface is automatically started without any additional configuration. This interface allows downloading the base ALICE analysis software and running a set of ALICE analysis modules. Currently the available tools include fully documented tutorials for ALICE analysis, such as the measurement of strange particle production or the nuclear modi...

  8. Muon pair study at LHC: ALICE experiment

    Chevallier, M.; Cheynis, B.; Grossiord, J.Y.; Guinet, D.; Guichard, A.; Lautesse, P.; Jacquin, M.; Nikulin, V.

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear matter at very high density, possibly as a quark gluon plasma, will be studied with ALICE at LHC, via the measurement of heavy quark resonances detected through their dimuon decay. The group is participating, since the end of 1996, in the development of the tracking chambers of the dimuon arm. These detectors are wire chambers with segmented cathodes and should measure the position of the tracks with a resolution of ≅ 100 μm in order to get a dimuon mass resolution better than 100 MeV. (authors)

  9. Leading charged particle correlations at ALICE

    Krizek, F

    2012-01-01

    A leading charged particle correlation analysis was performed on p + p data measured by the ALICE experiment at √s = 7 TeV. The main emphasis was on the xE distributions for a given charged hadron trigger momentum pTt. It was observed that dN/dxE is driven by the imbalance function at low xE. At high xE it shows exponential behavior and the extracted slope can be related to hzti of the trigger particle.

  10. The ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC

    Aamodt, K [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Abrahantes Quintana, A [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnologicas y Desarrollo Nuclear (CEADEN), Madrid/Havana, Spain (Cuba); Achenbach, R [Kirchhoff-Institut fuer Physik, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany BMBF (Germany); Acounis, S [SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, Universite de Nantes, CNRS/IN2P3, Nantes (France); Adamova, D [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Nuclear Physics Institute, Rez/Prague (Czech Republic); Adler, C [Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany BMBF (Germany); Aggarwal, M [Physics Department, Panjab University, Chandigarh (India); Agnese, F [IPHC, Universite Louis Pasteur, CNRS/IN2P3, Strasbourg (France); Rinella, G Aglieri [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Reasearch, Geneva (Switzerland); Ahammed, Z [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata (India); Ahmad, A; Ahmad, N; Ahmad, S [Department of Physics Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh (India); Akindinov, A [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Akishin, P [JINR, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, (Russian Federation); Aleksandrov, D [Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Alessandro, B; Alfarone, G [Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Alfaro, R [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico); Alici, A [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita and Sezione INFN, Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: Hans-Ake.Gustafsson@hep.lu.se (and others)

    2008-08-15

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a general-purpose, heavy-ion detector at the CERN LHC which focuses on QCD, the strong-interaction sector of the Standard Model. It is designed to address the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at extreme values of energy density and temperature in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Besides running with Pb ions, the physics programme includes collisions with lighter ions, lower energy running and dedicated proton-nucleus runs. ALICE will also take data with proton beams at the top LHC energy to collect reference data for the heavy-ion programme and to address several QCD topics for which ALICE is complementary to the other LHC detectors. The ALICE detector has been built by a collaboration including currently over 1000 physicists and engineers from 105 Institutes in 30 countries. Its overall dimensions are 16 x 16 x 26 m{sup 3} with a total weight of approximately 10 000 t. The experiment consists of 18 different detector systems each with its own specific technology choice and design constraints, driven both by the physics requirements and the experimental conditions expected at LHC. The most stringent design constraint is to cope with the extreme particle multiplicity anticipated in central Pb-Pb collisions. The different subsystems were optimized to provide high-momentum resolution as well as excellent Particle Identification (PID) over a broad range in momentum, up to the highest multiplicities predicted for LHC. This will allow for comprehensive studies of hadrons, electrons, muons, and photons produced in the collision of heavy nuclei. Most detector systems are scheduled to be installed and ready for data taking by mid-2008 when the LHC is scheduled to start operation, with the exception of parts of the Photon Spectrometer (PHOS), Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) and Electro Magnetic Calorimeter (EMCal). These detectors will be completed for the high-luminosity ion run expected in 2010

  11. The Fast Interaction Trigger Upgrade for ALICE

    Garcia-Solis, Edmundo

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major detector upgrade for the second LHC long shutdown (2019–20). The LHC heavy-ion luminosity and collision rate from 2021 onwards will considerably exceed the design parameters of the present ALICE forward trigger detectors. Furthermore, the introduction of a new Muon Forward Tracker (MFT) will significantly reduce the space available for the upgraded trigger detectors. To comply with these conditions a Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT) has been designed. FIT will be the primary forward trigger, luminosity, and collision time measurement detector. The FIT will be capable of triggering at an interaction rate of 50 kHz, with a time resolution better than 30 ps, with 99% efficiency. It will also determine multiplicity, centrality, and reaction plane. FIT will consist of two arrays of Cherenkov radiators with MCP-PMT sensors and of a single, large-size scintillator ring. The arrays will be placed on both sides of the interaction point (IP). Because of the presence of the h...

  12. Particle identification in ALICE: a Bayesian approach

    Adam, Jaroslav; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Shakeel; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Silva De Albuquerque, Danilo; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Millan Almaraz, Jesus Roberto; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Balasubramanian, Supraja; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belyaev, Vladimir; Benacek, Pavel; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Bossu, Francesco; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Cabala, Jan; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Cerkala, Jakub; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chauvin, Alex; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danisch, Meike Charlotte; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Conti, Camila; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; Deplano, Caterina; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Drozhzhova, Tatiana; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Endress, Eric; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erdemir, Irem; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabbietti, Laura; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Fleck, Martin Gabriel; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fronze, Gabriele Gaetano; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Sanchez Gonzalez, Andres; Gonzalez, Victor; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Grachov, Oleg Anatolievich; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Gronefeld, Julius Maximilian; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hamon, Julien Charles; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Hellbar, Ernst; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Horak, David; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Inaba, Motoi; Incani, Elisa; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacazio, Nicolo; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovska, Slavka; Jadlovsky, Jan; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jakubowska, Monika Joanna; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Daehyeok; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Klewin, Sebastian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kopcik, Michal; Kostarakis, Panagiotis; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Kumar, Lokesh; Kumar, Shyam; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Ladron De Guevara, Pedro; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Seongjoo; Lehas, Fatiha; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leon Vargas, Hermes; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Lutz, Tyler Harrison; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Mcdonald, Daniel; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murakami, Hikari; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Nattrass, Christine; Rosado Navarro, Sebastian; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Ranjit; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nellen, Lukas; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okatan, Ali; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Oravec, Matej; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pagano, Davide; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Pei, Hua; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Ozelin De Lima Pimentel, Lais; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-Lucian; Rocco, Elena; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Saarinen, Sampo; Sadhu, Samrangy; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Sarkar, Debojit; Sarkar, Nachiketa; Sarma, Pranjal; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schulc, Martin; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Sefcik, Michal; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Senyukov, Serhiy; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shadura, Oksana; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shahzad, Muhammed Ikram; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Mona; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Sheikh, Ashik Ikbal; Shigaki, Kenta; Shou, Qiye; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Zixuan; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Derradi De Souza, Rafael; Sozzi, Federica; Spacek, Michal; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stankus, Paul; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Suljic, Miljenko; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Szabo, Alexander; Szanto De Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Tabassam, Uzma; Takahashi, Jun; Tambave, Ganesh Jagannath; Tanaka, Naoto; Tarhini, Mohamad; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-Gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thaeder, Jochen Mathias; Thakur, Dhananjaya; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Trogolo, Stefano; Trombetta, Giuseppe; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Veldhoen, Misha; Velure, Arild; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Weiser, Dennis Franz; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Whitehead, Andile Mothegi; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yasin, Zafar; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaborowska, Anna; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correia Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Chunhui, Zhang; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zyzak, Maksym

    2016-05-25

    We present a Bayesian approach to particle identification (PID) within the ALICE experiment. The aim is to more effectively combine the particle identification capabilities of its various detectors. After a brief explanation of the adopted methodology and formalism, the performance of the Bayesian PID approach for charged pions, kaons and protons in the central barrel of ALICE is studied. PID is performed via measurements of specific energy loss (dE/dx) and time-of-flight. PID efficiencies and misidentification probabilities are extracted and compared with Monte Carlo simulations using high purity samples of identified particles in the decay channels ${\\rm K}_{\\rm S}^{\\rm 0}\\rightarrow \\pi^+\\pi^-$, $\\phi\\rightarrow {\\rm K}^-{\\rm K}^+$ and $\\Lambda\\rightarrow{\\rm p}\\pi^-$ in p–Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}= 5.02$TeV. In order to thoroughly assess the validity of the Bayesian approach, this methodology was used to obtain corrected $p_{\\rm T}$ spectra of pions, kaons, protons, and D$^0$ mesons in pp coll...

  13. Readout of the upgraded ALICE-ITS

    Szczepankiewicz, A.; ALICE Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The ALICE experiment will undergo a major upgrade during the second long shutdown of the CERN LHC. As part of this program, the present Inner Tracking System (ITS), which employs different layers of hybrid pixels, silicon drift and strip detectors, will be replaced by a completely new tracker composed of seven layers of monolithic active pixel sensors. The upgraded ITS will have more than twelve billion pixels in total, producing 300 Gbit/s of data when tracking 50 kHz Pb-Pb events. Two families of pixel chips realized with the TowerJazz CMOS imaging process have been developed as candidate sensors: the ALPIDE, which uses a proprietary readout and sparsification mechanism and the MISTRAL-O, based on a proven rolling shutter architecture. Both chips can operate in continuous mode, with the ALPIDE also supporting triggered operations. As the communication IP blocks are shared among the two chip families, it has been possible to develop a common Readout Electronics. All the sensor components (analog stages, state machines, buffers, FIFOs, etc.) have been modelled in a system level simulation, which has been extensively used to optimize both the sensor and the whole readout chain design in an iterative process. This contribution covers the progress of the R&D efforts and the overall expected performance of the ALICE-ITS readout system.

  14. Readout of the upgraded ALICE-ITS

    Szczepankiewicz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE experiment will undergo a major upgrade during the second long shutdown of the CERN LHC. As part of this program, the present Inner Tracking System (ITS), which employs different layers of hybrid pixels, silicon drift and strip detectors, will be replaced by a completely new tracker composed of seven layers of monolithic active pixel sensors. The upgraded ITS will have more than twelve billion pixels in total, producing 300 Gbit/s of data when tracking 50 kHz Pb–Pb events. Two families of pixel chips realized with the TowerJazz CMOS imaging process have been developed as candidate sensors: the ALPIDE, which uses a proprietary readout and sparsification mechanism and the MISTRAL-O, based on a proven rolling shutter architecture. Both chips can operate in continuous mode, with the ALPIDE also supporting triggered operations. As the communication IP blocks are shared among the two chip families, it has been possible to develop a common Readout Electronics. All the sensor components (analog stages, state machines, buffers, FIFOs, etc.) have been modelled in a system level simulation, which has been extensively used to optimize both the sensor and the whole readout chain design in an iterative process. This contribution covers the progress of the R&D efforts and the overall expected performance of the ALICE-ITS readout system.

  15. MAPS development for the ALICE ITS upgrade

    Yang, P.; Aglieri, G.; Cavicchioli, C.; Chalmet, P. L.; Chanlek, N.; Collu, A.; Gao, C.; Hillemanns, H.; Junique, A.; Kofarago, M.; Keil, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.; Lattuca, A.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Marras, D.; Mager, M.; Martinengo, P.; Mazza, G.; Mugnier, H.; Musa, L.; Puggioni, C.; Rousset, J.; Reidt, F.; Riedler, P.; Snoeys, W.; Siddhanta, S.; Usai, G.; van Hoorne, J. W.; Yi, J.

    2015-03-01

    Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) offer the possibility to build pixel detectors and tracking layers with high spatial resolution and low material budget in commercial CMOS processes. Significant progress has been made in the field of MAPS in recent years, and they are now considered for the upgrades of the LHC experiments. This contribution will focus on MAPS detectors developed for the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS) upgrade and manufactured in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS imaging sensor process on wafers with a high resistivity epitaxial layer. Several sensor chip prototypes have been developed and produced to optimise both charge collection and readout circuitry. The chips have been characterised using electrical measurements, radioactive sources and particle beams. The tests indicate that the sensors satisfy the ALICE requirements and first prototypes with the final size of 1.5 × 3 cm2 have been produced in the first half of 2014. This contribution summarises the characterisation measurements and presents first results from the full-scale chips.

  16. Upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    INSPIRE-00246160

    2015-05-20

    {During the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in 2018/2019, the ALICE experiment plans the installation of a novel Inner Tracking System (ITS). The upgraded detector will fully replace the current ITS having six layers by seven layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). The upgraded ITS will have significantly improved tracking and vertexing capabilities, as well as readout rate to cope with the expected increased Pb-Pb luminosity in LHC. The choice of MAPS has been driven by the specific requirements of ALICE as a heavy ion experiment dealing with rare probes at low $p_\\mathrm{T}$. This leads to stringent requirements on the material budget of 0.3$\\%~X/X_{0}$ per layer for the three innermost layers. Furthermore, the detector will see large hit densities of $\\sim 19~\\mathrm{cm}^{-2}/\\mathrm{event}$ on average for minimum-bias events in the inner most layer and has to stand moderate radiation loads of 700 kRad TID and $1\\times 10^{13}$ 1 MeV n$_\\mathrm{eq}/\\mathrm{cm}^{2}$ NIEL at maximum. The MAPS dete...

  17. Readout of the upgraded ALICE-ITS

    Szczepankiewicz, A., E-mail: Adam.Szczepankiewicz@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Institute of Computer Science, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-07-11

    The ALICE experiment will undergo a major upgrade during the second long shutdown of the CERN LHC. As part of this program, the present Inner Tracking System (ITS), which employs different layers of hybrid pixels, silicon drift and strip detectors, will be replaced by a completely new tracker composed of seven layers of monolithic active pixel sensors. The upgraded ITS will have more than twelve billion pixels in total, producing 300 Gbit/s of data when tracking 50 kHz Pb–Pb events. Two families of pixel chips realized with the TowerJazz CMOS imaging process have been developed as candidate sensors: the ALPIDE, which uses a proprietary readout and sparsification mechanism and the MISTRAL-O, based on a proven rolling shutter architecture. Both chips can operate in continuous mode, with the ALPIDE also supporting triggered operations. As the communication IP blocks are shared among the two chip families, it has been possible to develop a common Readout Electronics. All the sensor components (analog stages, state machines, buffers, FIFOs, etc.) have been modelled in a system level simulation, which has been extensively used to optimize both the sensor and the whole readout chain design in an iterative process. This contribution covers the progress of the R&D efforts and the overall expected performance of the ALICE-ITS readout system.

  18. Detection of atmospheric muons with ALICE detectors

    Alessandro, B.; Cortes Maldonado, I.; Cuautle, E.; Fernandez Tellez, A.; Gomez Jimenez, R.; Gonzalez Santos, H.; Herrera Corral, G.; Leon, I.; Martinez, M.I.; Munoz Mata, J.L.; Podesta, P.; Ramirez Reyes, A.; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M.; Sitta, M.; Subieta, M.; Tejeda Munoz, G.; Vargas, A.; Vergara, S.

    2010-01-01

    The calibration, alignment and commissioning of most of the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment at the CERN LHC) detectors have required a large amount of cosmic events during 2008. In particular two types of cosmic triggers have been implemented to record the atmospheric muons passing through ALICE. The first trigger, called ACORDE trigger, is performed by 60 scintillators located on the top of three sides of the large L3 magnet surrounding the central detectors, and selects atmospheric muons. The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) installed on the first two layers of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) gives the second trigger, called SPD trigger. This trigger selects mainly events with a single atmospheric muon crossing the SPD. Some particular events, in which the atmospheric muon interacts with the iron of the L3 magnet and creates a shower of particles crossing the SPD, are also selected. In this work the reconstruction of events with these two triggers will be presented. In particular, the performance of the ACORDE detector will be discussed by the analysis of multi-muon events. Some physical distributions are also shown.

  19. MAPS development for the ALICE ITS upgrade

    Yang, P.; Gao, C.; Huang, G.; Aglieri, G.; Cavicchioli, C.; Hillemanns, H.; Junique, A.; Kofarago, M.; Keil, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Tobon, C.A. Marin; Mager, M.; Martinengo, P.; Chalmet, P.L.; Chanlek, N.; Collu, A.; Marras, D.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.; Lattuca, A.

    2015-01-01

    Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) offer the possibility to build pixel detectors and tracking layers with high spatial resolution and low material budget in commercial CMOS processes. Significant progress has been made in the field of MAPS in recent years, and they are now considered for the upgrades of the LHC experiments. This contribution will focus on MAPS detectors developed for the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS) upgrade and manufactured in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS imaging sensor process on wafers with a high resistivity epitaxial layer. Several sensor chip prototypes have been developed and produced to optimise both charge collection and readout circuitry. The chips have been characterised using electrical measurements, radioactive sources and particle beams. The tests indicate that the sensors satisfy the ALICE requirements and first prototypes with the final size of 1.5 × 3 cm 2 have been produced in the first half of 2014. This contribution summarises the characterisation measurements and presents first results from the full-scale chips

  20. The ALICE TPC front end electronics

    Musa, L; Bialas, N; Bramm, R; Campagnolo, R; Engster, Claude; Formenti, F; Bonnes, U; Esteve-Bosch, R; Frankenfeld, Ulrich; Glässel, P; Gonzales, C; Gustafsson, Hans Åke; Jiménez, A; Junique, A; Lien, J; Lindenstruth, V; Mota, B; Braun-Munzinger, P; Oeschler, H; Österman, L; Renfordt, R E; Ruschmann, G; Röhrich, D; Schmidt, H R; Stachel, J; Soltveit, A K; Ullaland, K

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present the front end electronics for the time projection chamber (TPC) of the ALICE experiment. The system, which consists of about 570000 channels, is based on two basic units: (a) an analogue ASIC (PASA) that incorporates the shaping-amplifier circuits for 16 channels; (b) a mixed-signal ASIC (ALTRO) that integrates 16 channels, each consisting of a 10-bit 25-MSPS ADC, the baseline subtraction, tail cancellation filter, zero suppression and multi-event buffer. The complete readout chain is contained in front end cards (FEC), with 128 channels each, connected to the detector by means of capton cables. A number of FECs (up to 25) are controlled by a readout control unit (RCU), which interfaces the FECs to the data acquisition (DAQ), the trigger, and the detector control system (DCS) . A function of the final electronics (1024 channels) has been characterized in a test that incorporates a prototype of the ALICE TPC as well as many other components of the final set-up. The tests show that the ...

  1. AliEn - EDG Interoperability in ALICE

    Bagnasco, S; Buncic, P; Carminati, F; Cerello, P G; Saiz, P

    2003-01-01

    AliEn (ALICE Environment) is a GRID-like system for large scale job submission and distributed data management developed and used in the context of ALICE, the CERN LHC heavy-ion experiment. With the aim of exploiting upcoming Grid resources to run AliEn-managed jobs and store the produced data, the problem of AliEn-EDG interoperability was addressed and an in-terface was designed. One or more EDG (European Data Grid) User Interface machines run the AliEn software suite (Cluster Monitor, Storage Element and Computing Element), and act as interface nodes between the systems. An EDG Resource Broker is seen by the AliEn server as a single Computing Element, while the EDG storage is seen by AliEn as a single, large Storage Element; files produced in EDG sites are registered in both the EDG Replica Catalogue and in the AliEn Data Catalogue, thus ensuring accessibility from both worlds. In fact, both registrations are required: the AliEn one is used for the data management, the EDG one to guarantee the integrity and...

  2. The ALICE Glance Shift Accounting Management System (SAMS)

    Martins Silva, H.; Abreu Da Silva, I.; Ronchetti, F.; Telesca, A.; Maidantchik, C.

    2015-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is an experiment at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider) studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma. The experiment operation requires a 24 hours a day and 7 days a week shift crew at the experimental site, composed by the ALICE collaboration members. Shift duties are calculated for each institute according to their correlated members. In order to ensure the full coverage of the experiment operation as well as its good quality, the ALICE Shift Accounting Management System (SAMS) is used to manage the shift bookings as well as the needed training. ALICE SAMS is the result of a joint effort between the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) and the ALICE Collaboration. The Glance technology, developed by the UFRJ and the ATLAS experiment, sits at the basis of the system as an intermediate layer isolating the particularities of the databases. In this paper, we describe the ALICE SAMS development process and functionalities. The database has been modelled according to the collaboration needs and is fully integrated with the ALICE Collaboration repository to access members information and respectively roles and activities. Run, period and training coordinators can manage their subsystem operation and ensure an efficient personnel management. Members of the ALICE collaboration can book shifts and on-call according to pre-defined rights. ALICE SAMS features a user profile containing all the statistics and user contact information as well as the Institutes profile. Both the user and institute profiles are public (within the scope of the collaboration) and show the credit balance in real time. A shift calendar allows the Run Coordinator to plan data taking periods in terms of which subsystems shifts are enabled or disabled and on-call responsible people and slots. An overview display presents the shift crew present in the control room and allows the Run Coordination team to confirm the presence

  3. Status and perspectives of ALICE at the LHC

    Corral, Gerardo H. [Physics Department, CINVESTAV, P.O. Box 14740, Mexico, D.F (Mexico); Collaboration: ALICE Collaboration

    2013-04-15

    ALICE is one of the four large experiments at the LHC. It focuses on the study of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Its main goal is to study in great detail the properties of matter under extreme energy densities. We discuss some aspects of the ALICE research program, the experiment future plans as well as some general items of the ALICE upgrade. The present detector allows to study diffractive physics and photon induced processes. A proposal to install detectors in the forward region is presented here. These detectors would allow to study processes with rapidity gaps larger than those presently covered.

  4. Status and perspectives of ALICE at the LHC

    Corral, Gerardo H.

    2013-01-01

    ALICE is one of the four large experiments at the LHC. It focuses on the study of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Its main goal is to study in great detail the properties of matter under extreme energy densities. We discuss some aspects of the ALICE research program, the experiment future plans as well as some general items of the ALICE upgrade. The present detector allows to study diffractive physics and photon induced processes. A proposal to install detectors in the forward region is presented here. These detectors would allow to study processes with rapidity gaps larger than those presently covered.

  5. Patterns in Seismicity at Mt St Helens and Mt Unzen

    Lamb, Oliver; De Angelis, Silvio; Lavallee, Yan

    2014-05-01

    Cyclic behaviour on a range of timescales is a well-documented feature of many dome-forming volcanoes. Previous work on Soufrière Hills volcano (Montserrat) and Volcán de Colima (Mexico) revealed broad-scale similarities in behaviour implying the potential to develop general physical models of sub-surface processes [1]. Using volcano-seismic data from Mt St Helens (USA) and Mt Unzen (Japan) this study explores parallels in long-term behaviour of seismicity at two dome-forming systems. Within the last twenty years both systems underwent extended dome-forming episodes accompanied by large Vulcanian explosions or dome collapses. This study uses a suite of quantitative and analytical techniques which can highlight differences or similarities in volcano seismic behaviour, and compare the behaviour to changes in activity during the eruptive episodes. Seismic events were automatically detected and characterized on a single short-period seismometer station located 1.5km from the 2004-2008 vent at Mt St Helens. A total of 714 826 individual events were identified from continuous recording of seismic data from 22 October 2004 to 28 February 2006 (average 60.2 events per hour) using a short-term/long-term average algorithm. An equivalent count will be produced from seismometer recordings over the later stages of the 1991-1995 eruption at MT Unzen. The event count time-series from Mt St Helens is then analysed using Multi-taper Method and the Short-Term Fourier Transform to explore temporal variations in activity. Preliminary analysis of seismicity from Mt St Helens suggests cyclic behaviour of subannual timescale, similar to that described at Volcán de Colima and Soufrière Hills volcano [1]. Frequency Index and waveform correlation tools will be implemented to analyse changes in the frequency content of the seismicity and to explore their relations to different phases of activity at the volcano. A single station approach is used to gain a fine-scale view of variations in

  6. Mt. St. Helens' aerosols: some tropospheric and stratospheric effects

    Michalsky, J.J.; Stokes, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    Aerosol optical depth measurements based on the attenuation of direct solar radiation before and after the six major explosive eruptions of Mt. St. Helens during 1980 are presented. These automated measurements are from a site 200 km mostly east and slightly north of the volcano. From the analysis it was concluded that in several cases the conversion of sulfur gases to sulfates proceeded much more rapidly (hours) than is usually found for tropospheric conditions. A possible explanation may be the greater availability of OH due to the presence of substantial water in the plume. The second major result of the analysis was that there was no evidence of a residual aerosol burden. Turbidity data taken between eruptions in 1980 were virtually identical in terms of magnitude and wavelength dependence to 1979 turbidity

  7. Resonancias Vocales y Memoria Sonora en Helen Brown

    Andrés Grumann Sölter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available El artículo se concentra en indagar aspectos referidos a la intensificación de los usos de la voz y la sonorización musical que proponen Trinidad Piriz y Daniel Marabolí en Helen Brown (2013. Dando cuenta de un marco teórico que cuestiona la dimensión referencial con la que se analiza frecuentemente al teatro y proponiendo una aproximación fenomenológica que dé cuenta de la materialidad performativa que insta a intensificar las resonancias de la voz y la capacidad audible del sonido, el escrito analiza dos escenas o tracks en los que la memoria hecha cuerpo compromete de un modo particular a los espectadores que participan de la performance escénica.

  8. The isotopic and chemical evolution of Mount St. Helens

    Halliday, A.N.; Fallick, A.E.; Dickin, A.P.; Mackenzie, A.B.; Stephens, W.E.; Hildreth, W.

    1983-01-01

    Isotopic and major and trace element analysis of nine samples of eruptive products spanning the history of the Mt. St. Helens volcano suggest three different episodes; (1) 40,000-2500 years ago: eruptions of dacite with ??{lunate}Nd = +5, ??{lunate}Sr = -10, variable ??18O, 206Pb/204Pb ??? 18.76, Ca/Sr ??? 60, Rb/Ba ??? 0.1, La/Yb ??? 18, (2) 2500-1000 years ago: eruptions of basalt, andesite and dacite with ??{lunate}Nd = +4 to +8, ??{lunate}Sr = -7 to -22, variable ??18O (thought to represent melting of differing mantle-crust reservoirs), 206Pb/204Pb = 18.81-18.87, variable Ca/Sr, Rb/Ba, La/Yb and high Zr, (3) 1000 years ago to present day: eruptions of andesite and dacite with ??{lunate}Nd = +6, ??{lunate}Sr = -13, ??18O ???6???, variable 206Pb/204Pb, Ca/Sr ??? 77, Rb/Ba = 0.1, La/Yb ??? 11. None of the products exhibit Eu anomalies and all are LREE enriched. There is a strong correlation between 87Sr/86Sr and differentiation indices. These data are interpreted in terms of a mantle heat source melting young crust bearing zircon and garnet, but not feldspar, followed by intrusion of this crustal reservoir by mantle-derived magma which caused further crustal melting and contaminated the crustal magma system with mafic components. Since 1000 years ago all the eruptions have been from the same reservoir which has displayed a much more gradual re-equilibration of Pb isotopic compositions than other components suggesting that Pb is being transported via a fluid phase. The Nd and Sr isotopic compositions lie along the mantle array and suggest that the mantle underneath Mt. St. Helens is not as depleted as MORB sources. There is no indication of seawater involvement in the source region. ?? 1983.

  9. Prototype tests for the ALICE TRD

    Andronic, A.; Appelshaeuser, H.; Herrmann, N.; Mahmoud, T.; Schicker, R.; Stachel, J.; Wessels, J.; Windelband, B.; Xu, C.; Blume, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Daues, H.; Devismes, A.; Finck, Ch.; Sedykh, S.; Simon, R. S.; Stelzer, H.; Bucher, D.; Lister, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Reygers, K.; Santo, R.; Winkelmann, O.; Catanescu, V.; Ciobanu, M.; Petrovici, M.; Blume, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Daues, H.; Devismes, A.; Finck, Ch.; Sedykh, S.; Simon, R. S.; Stelzer, H.

    2001-01-01

    The ALICE Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) has been designed to improve the pion rejection capability of the ALICE detector by at least a factor of 100 for momenta above 2 GeV/c. To demonstrate that this goal is achievable, during the last year we have conducted prototype tests at the pion (with natural electron content) beam facility at GSI Darmstadt. A complete description of the experimental setup and of the results (including references) can be found in two previous papers by Andronic et al. Many types of radiators were tested, composed of foils, fibres and foams. Here we summarize the results concerning the pion rejection performance in case of a fibre (of 17 μm diameter) radiator, which was established to be the best candidate for the final radiator. To extract the pion rejection factor we have studied three different methods: i) truncated mean of integrated energy deposit, TMQ; ii) likelihood on integrated energy deposit, L-Q; iii) bidimensional likelihood on energy deposit and position of the largest cluster found in the drift region of the DC, L-QX. We present the pion efficiency (the inverse of the rejection factor) as function of electron efficiency (90% electron efficiency is the commonly used value) in case of fibre radiators for the momentum of 1 GeV/c. The truncated mean method, although it delivers sizeably worse identification, has the advantage of being very easy to use, being advantageous especially for an on-line identification. The bidimensional likelihood delivers the best rejection factor. In general, the three methods employed here give results in good agreement with earlier studies. By doubling the equivalent thickness of the radiator one gains a factor of about 2 in pion rejection power. However, it remains to be seen how the additional material will influence (by producing secondary particles) the performance of the TRD itself and of other ALICE sub-detectors. The pion efficiency at 90% electron efficiency as function of momentum is

  10. Recent ALICE results on hadronic resonance production

    Badalà, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Hadronic resonances are a valuable tool to study the properties of the medium formed in heavy-ion collisions. In particular, they can provide information on particle-formation mechanisms and on the properties of the medium at chemical freeze-out. Furthermore they contribute to the systematic study of parton energy loss and quark recombination. Measurements of resonances in pp and in p-Pb collisions provide a necessary baseline for heavy-ion data and help to disentangle initial-state effects from medium-induced effects. In this paper the latest ALICE results on mid-rapidity K*(892)^0 and {\\phi}(1020) production in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at LHC energies are presented

  11. ALICE & LHCb: refinements for the restart

    2009-01-01

    Following the previous issue, the Bulletin continues its series to find out what the six LHC experiments have been up to since last September, and how they are preparing for the restart. Previously we looked at CMS and ATLAS; this issue we will round up the past 10 months of activity at ALICE and LHCb. LHCb The cavern of the LHCb experiment. This year has given LHCb the chance to install the 5th and final plane of muon chambers, which will improve the triggering at nominal luminosity. This is the final piece of the experiment to be installed. "Now the detector looks exactly as it does in the technical design report," confirms Andrei Golutvin, LHCb Spokesperson. "We also took advantage of this shutdown to make several improvements. For example, we modified the high voltage system of the electromagnetic calorimeter to reduce noise further to a negligible level. We also took some measures to improve ...

  12. The ALICE DAQ infoLogger

    Chapeland, S.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Dénes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Grigore, A.; Ionita, C.; Delort, C.; Simonetti, G.; Soós, C.; Telesca, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Von Haller, B.; Alice Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a heavy-ion experiment studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The ALICE DAQ (Data Acquisition System) is based on a large farm of commodity hardware consisting of more than 600 devices (Linux PCs, storage, network switches). The DAQ reads the data transferred from the detectors through 500 dedicated optical links at an aggregated and sustained rate of up to 10 Gigabytes per second and stores at up to 2.5 Gigabytes per second. The infoLogger is the log system which collects centrally the messages issued by the thousands of processes running on the DAQ machines. It allows to report errors on the fly, and to keep a trace of runtime execution for later investigation. More than 500000 messages are stored every day in a MySQL database, in a structured table keeping track for each message of 16 indexing fields (e.g. time, host, user, ...). The total amount of logs for 2012 exceeds 75GB of data and 150 million rows. We present in this paper the architecture and implementation of this distributed logging system, consisting of a client programming API, local data collector processes, a central server, and interactive human interfaces. We review the operational experience during the 2012 run, in particular the actions taken to ensure shifters receive manageable and relevant content from the main log stream. Finally, we present the performance of this log system, and future evolutions.

  13. External access to ALICE controls conditions data

    Jadlovský, J; Jadlovská, A; Sarnovský, J; Jajčišin, Š; Čopík, M; Jadlovská, S; Papcun, P; Bielek, R; Čerkala, J; Kopčík, M; Chochula, P; Augustinus, A

    2014-01-01

    ALICE Controls data produced by commercial SCADA system WINCCOA is stored in ORACLE database on the private experiment network. The SCADA system allows for basic access and processing of the historical data. More advanced analysis requires tools like ROOT and needs therefore a separate access method to the archives. The present scenario expects that detector experts create simple WINCCOA scripts, which retrieves and stores data in a form usable for further studies. This relatively simple procedure generates a lot of administrative overhead – users have to request the data, experts needed to run the script, the results have to be exported outside of the experiment network. The new mechanism profits from database replica, which is running on the CERN campus network. Access to this database is not restricted and there is no risk of generating a heavy load affecting the operation of the experiment. The developed tools presented in this paper allow for access to this data. The users can use web-based tools to generate the requests, consisting of the data identifiers and period of time of interest. The administrators maintain full control over the data – an authorization and authentication mechanism helps to assign privileges to selected users and restrict access to certain groups of data. Advanced caching mechanism allows the user to profit from the presence of already processed data sets. This feature significantly reduces the time required for debugging as the retrieval of raw data can last tens of minutes. A highly configurable client allows for information retrieval bypassing the interactive interface. This method is for example used by ALICE Offline to extract operational conditions after a run is completed. Last but not least, the software can be easily adopted to any underlying database structure and is therefore not limited to WINCCOA.

  14. The ALICE data quality monitoring system

    Haller, B von; Telesca, A; Chapeland, S; Carena, F; Carena, W; Barroso, V Chibante; Costa, F; Denes, E; Divià, R; Fuchs, U; Simonetti, G; Soós, C; Vyvre, P Vande

    2011-01-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The online Data Quality Monitoring (DQM) is a key element of the Data Acquisition's software chain. It provide shifters with precise and complete information to quickly identify and overcome problems, and as a consequence to ensure acquisition of high quality data. DQM typically involves the online gathering, the analysis by user-defined algorithms and the visualization of monitored data. This paper describes the final design of ALICE'S DQM framework called AMORE (Automatic MOnitoRing Environment), as well as its latest and coming features like the integration with the offline analysis and reconstruction framework, a better use of multi-core processors by a parallelization effort, and its interface with the eLogBook. The concurrent collection and analysis of data in an online environment requires the framework to be highly efficient, robust and scalable. We will describe what has been implemented to achieve these goals and the procedures we follow to ensure appropriate robustness and performance. We finally review the wide range of usages people make of this framework, from the basic monitoring of a single sub-detector to the most complex ones within the High Level Trigger farm or using the Prompt Reconstruction and we describe the various ways of accessing the monitoring results. We conclude with our experience, before and after the LHC startup, when monitoring the data quality in a challenging environment.

  15. The ALICE data quality monitoring system

    von Haller, B.; Telesca, A.; Chapeland, S.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Denes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Simonetti, G.; Soós, C.; Vande Vyvre, P.; ALICE Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The online Data Quality Monitoring (DQM) is a key element of the Data Acquisition's software chain. It provide shifters with precise and complete information to quickly identify and overcome problems, and as a consequence to ensure acquisition of high quality data. DQM typically involves the online gathering, the analysis by user-defined algorithms and the visualization of monitored data. This paper describes the final design of ALICE'S DQM framework called AMORE (Automatic MOnitoRing Environment), as well as its latest and coming features like the integration with the offline analysis and reconstruction framework, a better use of multi-core processors by a parallelization effort, and its interface with the eLogBook. The concurrent collection and analysis of data in an online environment requires the framework to be highly efficient, robust and scalable. We will describe what has been implemented to achieve these goals and the procedures we follow to ensure appropriate robustness and performance. We finally review the wide range of usages people make of this framework, from the basic monitoring of a single sub-detector to the most complex ones within the High Level Trigger farm or using the Prompt Reconstruction and we describe the various ways of accessing the monitoring results. We conclude with our experience, before and after the LHC startup, when monitoring the data quality in a challenging environment.

  16. A trigger simulation framework for the ALICE experiment

    Antinori, F; Carminati, F; Gheata, A; Gheata, M

    2011-01-01

    A realistic simulation of the trigger system in a complex HEP experiment is essential for performing detailed trigger efficiency studies. The ALICE trigger simulation is evolving towards a framework capable of replaying the full trigger chain starting from the input to the individual trigger processors and ending with the decision mechanisms of the ALICE central trigger processor. This paper describes the new ALICE trigger simulation framework that is being tested and deployed. The framework handles details like trigger levels, signal delays and busy signals, implementing the trigger logic via customizable trigger device objects managed by a robust scheduling mechanism. A big advantage is the high flexibility of the framework, which is able to mix together components described with very different levels of detail. The framework is being gradually integrated within the ALICE simulation and reconstruction frameworks.

  17. ALICE installs new hardware in preparation for the 2012 run

    CERN Bulletin and ALICE Matters

    2012-01-01

    2011 was a fantastic year for the heavy-ion run at ALICE despite unprecedented challenges and difficult conditions. The data collected is at least one order of magnitude greater than the 2010 data. Thanks to a planned upgrade to two subdetectors during the 2011/2012 winter shutdown and a reorganisation of ALICE’s Physics Working Groups that should allow them to better deal with the greater challenges imposed by the LHC, the collaboration is confident that the 2011 run will allow ALICE to extend its physics reach and improve its performance.   Photograph of ALICE taken by Antonio Saba during this year's winter shutdown. The annual winter shutdown has been a very intense period for the ALICE collaboration. In conjunction with the general maintenance, modifications and tests of the experiment, two major projects – the installation of 3 supermodules of the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) and 2 supermodules of the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMCal) – hav...

  18. VHMPID: a new detector for the ALICE experiment at LHC

    Agócs, A Gu; Barnaföldi, G G; Bellwied, R; Bencze, Gy; Berényi, D; Boldizsár, L; Cuautle, E; De Cataldo, G; Di Bari, D; Di Mauro, A; Dominguez, I; Futó, E; García, E; Hamar, G; Harris, J; Harton, A; Kovács, L; Lévai, P; Lipusz, Cs; Markert, C; Martinengo, P; Martinez, M I; Mastromarco, M; Mayani, D; Molnár, L; Nappi, E; Ortiz, A; Paić, G; Pastore, C; Patino, M E; Perini, D; Perrino, D; Peskov, V; Pinsky, L; Piuz, F; Pochybová, S; Smirnov, N; Song, J; Timmins, A; Varga, D; Vargas, A; Vergara, S; Volpe, G; Yi, J; Yoo, I K

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the basic idea of VHMPID, an upgrade detector for the ALICE experiment at LHC, CERN. The main goal of this detector is to extend the particle identification capabilities of ALICE to give more insight into the evolution of the hot and dense matter created in Pb-Pb collisions. Starting from the physics motivations and working principles the challenges and current status of development is detailed.

  19. VHMPID: a new detector for the ALICE experiment at LHC

    Perini D.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the basic idea of VHMPID, an upgrade detector for the ALICE experiment at LHC, CERN. The main goal of this detector is to extend the particle identification capabilities of ALICE to give more insight into the evolution of the hot and dense matter created in Pb-Pb collisions. Starting from the physics motivations and working principles the challenges and current status of development is detailed.

  20. The ALICE Transition Radiation Detector: construction, operation, and performance

    Acharya, Shreyasi; Adam, Jaroslav; Ahmad, Nazeer; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Umaka, Ejiro Naomi; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vala, Martin; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Bhom, Jihyun

    2018-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) was designed and built to enhance the capabilities of the ALICE detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). While aimed at providing electron identification and triggering, the TRD also contributes significantly to the track reconstruction and calibration in the central barrel of ALICE. In this paper the design, construction, operation, and performance of this detector are discussed. A pion rejection factor of up to 410 is achieved at a momentum of 1 G...

  1. Overview of ALICE results at Quark Matter 2014

    Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete

    2014-11-15

    The results released by the ALICE Collaboration at Quark Matter 2014 address topics from identified-particle jet fragmentation functions in pp collisions, to the search for collective signatures in p–Pb collisions to precision measurements of jet quenching with D mesons in Pb–Pb collisions. This paper gives an overview of the contributions (31 parallel talks, 2 flash talks and 80 posters) by the ALICE Collaboration at Quark Matter 2014.

  2. ALICE takes root in Saint-Genis-Pouilly

    Patrice Loiez

    2004-01-01

    To celebrate the CERN 50th anniversary and to emphasize the close ties between the community of Saint-Genis-Pouilly, CERN and the ALICE Collaboration, Hubert Bertrand, Mayor of Saint-Genis-Pouilly and Christian Fabjan, Technical Coordinator of the ALICE Experiment, planted a tree on Saturday 16 October 2004 in front of the Jean Monet Culture Center.

  3. ALICE takes root in Saint-Genis-Pouilly

    2004-01-01

    To celebrate the CERN 50th anniversary and to emphasize the close ties between the community of Saint-Genis-Pouilly, CERN and the ALICE Collaboration, Hubert Bertrand, Mayor of Saint-Genis-Pouilly and Christian Fabjan, Technical Coordinator of the ALICE Experiment, planted a tree on Saturday 16 October 2004 in front of the Jean Monet Culture Center.

  4. Performance of the ALICE Experiment at the CERN LHC

    Abelev, Betty Bezverkhny; Adam, Jaroslav; Adamova, Dagmar; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agostinelli, Andrea; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ahn, Sang Un; Ahn, Sul-Ah; Aimo, Ilaria; Aiola, Salvatore; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto Perez, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Berger, Martin Emanuel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, Fernando; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubskiy, Mikhail; Boehmer, Felix Valentin; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Boettger, Stefan; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile Ioan; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortese, Pietro; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dainese, Andrea; Dang, Ruina; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Kushal; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; De Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Divia, Roberto; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Dorheim, Sverre; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutt Mazumder, Abhee Kanti; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Eschweiler, Dominic; Espagnon, Bruno; Esposito, Marco; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigory; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floratos, Emmanouil; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Garishvili, Irakli; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghidini, Bruno; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Jimenez, Ramon; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grajcarek, Robert; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guilbaud, Maxime Rene Joseph; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Khan, Kamal; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harris, John William; Hartmann, Helvi; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hicks, Bernard Richard; Hippolyte, Boris; Hladky, Jan; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Ionita, Costin; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Ivanytskyi, Oleksii; Jacholkowski, Adam Wlodzimierz; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyungtaik; Jusko, Anton; Kalcher, Sebastian; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Ketzer, Bernhard Franz; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kohler, Markus Konrad; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Konevskikh, Artem; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kramer, Frederick; Kravcakova, Adela; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Krus, Miroslav; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kucera, Vit; Kucheryaev, Yury; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; Ladron De Guevara, Pedro; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lea, Ramona; Lee, Graham Richard; Legrand, Iosif; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenhardt, Matthieu Laurent; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leoncino, Marco; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera Renee; Loginov, Vitaly; Lohner, Daniel; Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luo, Jiebin; Luparello, Grazia; Luzzi, Cinzia; Ma, Rongrong; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahapatra, Durga Prasad; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martashvili, Irakli; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mlynarz, Jocelyn; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Nattrass, Christine; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nilsen, Bjorn Steven; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Okatan, Ali; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Sahoo, Pragati; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pachr, Milos; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Painke, Florian; Pajares Vales, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palmeri, Armando; Pant, Divyash; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Patalakha, Dmitry; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Paul, Biswarup; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Pesci, Alessandro; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petran, Michal; Petris, Mariana; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Pohjoisaho, Esko Heikki Oskari; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Vladimir; Potukuchi, Baba; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Rauf, Aamer Wali; Razazi, Vahedeh; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reicher, Martijn; Reidt, Felix; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Rivetti, Angelo; Rocco, Elena; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Sharma, Rohni; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossegger, Stefan; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Salgado Lopez, Carlos Alberto; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sanchez Rodriguez, Fernando Javier; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Santagati, Gianluca; Sarkar, Debojit; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schulc, Martin; Schuster, Tim Robin; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Patrick Aaron; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Segato, Gianfranco; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Seo, Jeewon; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shabratova, Galina; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Natasha; Sharma, Satish; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Skjerdal, Kyrre; Smakal, Radek; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Soegaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Spacek, Michal; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Steinpreis, Matthew Donald; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Stolpovskiy, Mikhail; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Subieta Vasquez, Martin Alfonso; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Susa, Tatjana; Symons, Timothy; Szanto De Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Takahashi, Jun; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarantola Peloni, Attilio; Tarazona Martinez, Alfonso; Tarzila, Madalina-Gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terrevoli, Cristina; Ter-Minasyan, Astkhik; Thaeder, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Torii, Hisayuki; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ulery, Jason Glyndwr; Ullaland, Kjetil; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Vannucci, Luigi; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veldhoen, Misha; Velure, Arild; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wagner, Vladimir; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Watanabe, Daisuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Xiang, Changzhou; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yang, Shiming; Yano, Satoshi; Yasnopolskiy, Stanislav; Yi, Jungyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zach, Cenek; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, You; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Zyzak, Maksym

    2014-01-01

    ALICE is the heavy-ion experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The experiment continuously took data during the first physics campaign of the machine from fall 2009 until early 2013, using proton and lead-ion beams. In this paper we describe the running environment and the data handling procedures, and discuss the performance of the ALICE detectors and analysis methods for various physics observables.

  5. ALICE's main austenitic stainless steel support structure (the Space Frame)

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    This structure is constructed to hold the large volume detectors, such as the Time Projection Chamber, Transition Radiation Detector and Time of Flight inside the ALICE solenoid magnet. After the final assembly at CERN, two large mobile cranes were needed for the job of lifting and turning the 14 tonne frame onto its side. Once shifted, it was placed in Building SX2, one of the surface assembly areas designated for ALICE.

  6. The ALICE Experiment at the LHC and the Mexican Contribution

    Herrera Corral, G.

    2007-01-01

    The final installation of the detectors that form ALICE has started on year 2005. The first device of ALICE that was completed and set up to work was the Cosmic Ray Detector. The V0A detector will be installed and commissioned on the summer of 2007. These two detectors were designed and built in Mexico. Here we give a very general description of these two devices

  7. Blind quantum computation protocol in which Alice only makes measurements

    Morimae, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2013-05-01

    Blind quantum computation is a new secure quantum computing protocol which enables Alice (who does not have sufficient quantum technology) to delegate her quantum computation to Bob (who has a full-fledged quantum computer) in such a way that Bob cannot learn anything about Alice's input, output, and algorithm. In previous protocols, Alice needs to have a device which generates quantum states, such as single-photon states. Here we propose another type of blind computing protocol where Alice does only measurements, such as the polarization measurements with a threshold detector. In several experimental setups, such as optical systems, the measurement of a state is much easier than the generation of a single-qubit state. Therefore our protocols ease Alice's burden. Furthermore, the security of our protocol is based on the no-signaling principle, which is more fundamental than quantum physics. Finally, our protocols are device independent in the sense that Alice does not need to trust her measurement device in order to guarantee the security.

  8. Open access for ALICE analysis based on virtualization technology

    Buncic, P; Gheata, M; Schutz, Y

    2015-01-01

    Open access is one of the important leverages for long-term data preservation for a HEP experiment. To guarantee the usability of data analysis tools beyond the experiment lifetime it is crucial that third party users from the scientific community have access to the data and associated software. The ALICE Collaboration has developed a layer of lightweight components built on top of virtualization technology to hide the complexity and details of the experiment-specific software. Users can perform basic analysis tasks within CernVM, a lightweight generic virtual machine, paired with an ALICE specific contextualization. Once the virtual machine is launched, a graphical user interface is automatically started without any additional configuration. This interface allows downloading the base ALICE analysis software and running a set of ALICE analysis modules. Currently the available tools include fully documented tutorials for ALICE analysis, such as the measurement of strange particle production or the nuclear modification factor in Pb-Pb collisions. The interface can be easily extended to include an arbitrary number of additional analysis modules. We present the current status of the tools used by ALICE through the CERN open access portal, and the plans for future extensions of this system. (paper)

  9. Upgrade of the ALICE muon trigger electronics

    Dupieux, P; Joly, B; Jouve, F; Manen, S; Vandaële, R

    2014-01-01

    The ALICE muon trigger is a large scale detector based on single gap bakelite RPCs. An upgrade of the electronics is needed in order to withstand the increase of luminosity after the LHC Long Shutdown-2 in 2018-2019. The detector will be read out at the minimum bias rate of 100 kHz in Pb–Pb collisions (including a safety factor of 2), two orders of magnitude above the present design. For the most exposed RPCs and in the present conditions of operation, the total integrated charge could be as high as 100 mC/cm 2 with rates up to 100 Hz/cm 2 , which is above the present limit for safe operation. In order to overcome these limitations, upgrade projects of the Front-End (FE) and Readout Electronics are scheduled. The readout upgrade at high rate with low dead time requires changing most of the present electronics. It involves a new design for the 234 Local cards receiving the LVDS signals from the FE electronics and the 16 Regional concentrator cards. The readout chain is completed by a single Common Readout Unit developed for most ALICE sub-detectors. The new architecture of the muon trigger readout will be briefly presented. The present FE electronics, designed for the streamer mode, must be replaced to prevent ageing of the RPCs in the future operating conditions. The new FE called FEERIC (for Front-End Electronics Rapid Integrated Circuit) will have to perform amplification of the analog input signals. This will allow for RPC operation in a low-gain avalanche mode, with a much smaller charge deposit (factor 3-5) in the detector as compared to the present conditions. The purpose is to discriminate RPC signals with a charge threshold around 100 fC, in both polarities, and with a time jitter below 1 ns. We will describe the FE card and FEERIC ASIC features and first prototype performance, report on test results obtained on a cosmic test bench and discuss ongoing developments

  10. The isotopic and chemical evolution of Mount St. Helens

    Halliday, A.N.; Fallick, A.E.; Dickin, A.P.; Mackenzie, A.B.; Stephens, W.E.

    1983-01-01

    Isotopic and major and trace element analysis of nine samples of eruptive products spanning the history of the Mt. St. Helens volcano suggest three different episodes; (1) 40,000-2500 years ago: eruptions of dacite with epsilonsub(Nd) = +5, epsilonsub(Sr) = -10, variable delta 18 O, 206 Pb/ 204 Pb approx.= 18.76, Ca/Sr approx.= 60, Rb/Ba- approx.= 0.1, La/Yb approx.= 18, (2) 2500-1000 years ago: eruptions of basalt, andesite and dacite with epsilonsub(Nd) = +4 to + 8, epsilonsub(Sr) = -7 to -22, variable delta 18 O (thought to represent melting of differing mantle-crust reservoirs), 206 Pb/ 204 Pb = 18.81-18.87, variable Ca/Sr, Rb/Ba, La/Yb and high Zr, (3) 1000 years ago to present day: eruptions of andesite and dacite with epsilonsub(Nd) = + 6, epsilonsub(Sr) = -13, delta 18 O approx.= 6per mille, variable 206 Pb/ 204 Pb, Ca/Sr approx.= 77, Rb/Ba = 0.1, La/Yb approx.= 11. None of the products exhibit Eu anomalies and all are LREE enriched. There is a strong correlation between 87 Sr/ 86 Sr and differentiation indices. These data are interpreted in terms of a mantle heat source melting young crust bearing zircon and garnet, but not feldspar, followed by intrusion of this crustal reservoir by mantle-derived magma which caused further crustal melting and contaminated the crustal magma system with mafic components. Since 1000 years ago all the eruptions have been from the same reservoir which has displayed a much more gradual re-equilibration of Pb isotopic compositions than other components suggesting that Pb is being transported via a fluid phase. The Nd and Sr isotopic compositions lie along the mantle array and suggest that the mantle underneath Mt. St. Helens is not as depleted as MORB sources. There is no indication of seawater involvement in the source region. (orig.)

  11. Status of the ALICE CERN Analysis Facility

    Meoni, Marco; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Carminati, Federico

    2010-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at CERN LHC is using a PROOF-enabled cluster for fast physics analysis, detector calibration and reconstruction of small data samples. The current system (CAF - CERN Analysis Facility) consists of some 120 CPU cores and about 45 TB of disk space distributed across the CAF hosts. One of the most important aspects of the data analysis on the CAF is the speed with which it can be carried out. The system is particularly aimed at the prototyping phase of analyses that need a high number of iterations and thus require a short response time. Quasi-online quality assurance of data can be obtained. The paper describes the design principles of the PROOF framework and presents the current setup, performance tests and usage statistics. Subsets of selected data can be automatically staged in CAF from the Grid storage systems, therefore data distribution and staging techniques are described in depth. A fairshare algorithm to adjust the priorities of concurrently running sessions is also examined. Furthermore, the adaptation of PROOF to the AliEn/gLite Grid middleware is described. This approach enables a dynamic startup of PROOF nodes worldwide with the purpose to process much larger physics datasets.

  12. Inbetriebnahme und Kalibrierung der ALICE-TPC

    Wiechula, Jens

    2008-01-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment), is the dedicated heavy-ion experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It is optimised to reconstruct and identify the particles created in a lead-lead collision with a centre of mass energy of 5.5TeV. The main tracking detector is a large-volume time-projection chamber (TPC). With an active volume of about 88m^3 and a total readout area of 32.5m^2 it is the most challenging TPC ever build. A central electrode divides the 5m long detector into two drift regions. Each readout side is subdivided into 18 inner and 18 outer multi-wire proportional read-out chambers. The readout area is subdivide into 557568 pads, where each pad is read out by and electronics chanin. A complex calibration is needed in order to reach the design position-resolution of the reconstructed particle tracks of about 200um. One part of the calibration lies in understanding the electronic-response. The work at hand presents results of the pedestal and noise behaviour of the front-end elect...

  13. ALICE HLT high speed tracking on GPU

    Gorbunov, Sergey; Aamodt, Kenneth; Alt, Torsten; Appelshauser, Harald; Arend, Andreas; Bach, Matthias; Becker, Bruce; Bottger, Stefan; Breitner, Timo; Busching, Henner; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Cleymans, Jean; Cicalo, Corrado; Das, Indranil; Djuvsland, Oystein; Engel, Heiko; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Fearick, Roger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hille, Per Thomas; Kalcher, Sebastian; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Kisel, Ivan; Kretz, Matthias; Lara, Camillo; Lindal, Sven; Lindenstruth, Volker; Masoodi, Arshad Ahmad; Ovrebekk, Gaute; Panse, Ralf; Peschek, Jorg; Ploskon, Mateusz; Pocheptsov, Timur; Ram, Dinesh; Rascanu, Theodor; Richter, Matthias; Rohrich, Dieter; Ronchetti, Federico; Skaali, Bernhard; Smorholm, Olav; Stokkevag, Camilla; Steinbeck, Timm Morten; Szostak, Artur; Thader, Jochen; Tveter, Trine; Ullaland, Kjetil; Vilakazi, Zeblon; Weis, Robert; Yin, Zhong-Bao; Zelnicek, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The on-line event reconstruction in ALICE is performed by the High Level Trigger, which should process up to 2000 events per second in proton-proton collisions and up to 300 central events per second in heavy-ion collisions, corresponding to an inp ut data stream of 30 GB/s. In order to fulfill the time requirements, a fast on-line tracker has been developed. The algorithm combines a Cellular Automaton method being used for a fast pattern recognition and the Kalman Filter method for fitting of found trajectories and for the final track selection. The tracker was adapted to run on Graphics Processing Units (GPU) using the NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) framework. The implementation of the algorithm had to be adjusted at many points to allow for an efficient usage of the graphics cards. In particular, achieving a good overall workload for many processor cores, efficient transfer to and from the GPU, as well as optimized utilization of the different memories the GPU offers turned out to be cri...

  14. Hierarchical trigger of the ALICE calorimeters

    Muller, Hans; Novitzky, Norbert; Kral, Jiri; Rak, Jan; Schambach, Joachim; Wang, Ya-Ping; Wang, Dong; Zhou, Daicui

    2010-01-01

    The trigger of the ALICE electromagnetic calorimeters is implemented in 2 hierarchically connected layers of electronics. In the lower layer, level-0 algorithms search shower energy above threshold in locally confined Trigger Region Units (TRU). The top layer is implemented as a single, global trigger unit that receives the trigger data from all TRUs as input to the level-1 algorithm. This architecture was first developed for the PHOS high pT photon trigger before it was adopted by EMCal also for the jet trigger. TRU units digitize up to 112 analogue input signals from the Front End Electronics (FEE) and concentrate their digital stream in a single FPGA. A charge and time summing algorithm is combined with a peakfinder that suppresses spurious noise and is precise to single LHC bunches. With a peak-to-peak noise level of 150 MeV the linear dynamic range above threshold spans from MIP energies at 215 up to 50 GeV. Local level-0 decisions take less than 600 ns after LHC collisions, upon which all TRUs transfer ...

  15. Alice-Anne Martin (1926 - 2016)

    2016-01-01

    Alice-Anne Martin, known as “Schu” from her maiden name Schubert, passed away on 8 January 2016.   (Image: Gérard Bertin) Hired the year CERN was founded, 1954, when the construction of the Laboratory had not even begun, Schu first worked at the Villa de Cointrin (a historic building now within the grounds of Geneva airport) as a secretary. In this role, she typed the convention between CERN and the Swiss Confederation, prepared by Stéphanie Tixier, as well as some of the "Yellow Reports" that have marked key points in the Laboratory’s history. For example, using a special typewriter with two keyboards – Latin and Greek – she typed the Yellow Report on the KAM theorem by Rolf Hagedorn. Schu also worked with Felix Bloch, the first Director-General of CERN, and later became the secretary of Herbert Coblenz, the first CERN librarian. She was head of the team that edited the proceedings of the ...

  16. Resource-loaded planning for ALICE

    Gastal, M

    2005-01-01

    The ALICE experimental area management team faces various challenges when it comes to sharing scarce resources, indispensable to any efficient installation in a category one worksite. Space, cranes, jigs, and personnel with key competences have to be carefully allocated to activities so as to avoid slowing down work progress. To this intent, a resource loaded planning has been developed that allows highlighting coactivities and prioritizing critical tasks. It uses the built-in capabilities of Microsoft Project. The use of this scheduling tool leads to a more efficient use of time and a safer work environment. The installation sequence resulting from this schedule is presented in this paper. The first part of the sequence focuses on the revision of the coils in the SX2 building. The dipole has then to be installed in the RB26 side of the UX25 cavern. This complex and resource intensive activity has to be performed in parallel with the services installation inside the L3 magnet. On the RB24 side of the cavern t...

  17. ITS Module for the ALICE Experiment

    Ordan, Julien Marius

    2017-01-01

    The pictures showcase the mounting of a module of the New Inner Tracking System (ITS) of ALICE, which will be installed in the heart of the experiment in 2020 and will track particles produced in the collisions. The Inner Layers of the ITS are made of 48 of this modules, which are called “staves”, as they are placed as the staves of a barrel, in cylindrical concentric layers around the particle beam line, and centred with respect to the interaction point. Each Inner Layer stave has a sensitive area of about 1.5cm x 27cm, constituted by 9 aligned silicon pixel chip sensors (1.5cm x 3 cm x 50 micron). The sensors are glued on a light carbon fibre support and are connected through a flex printed circuit, which carries both the power supply and the signals. The Inner Layer staves cover a cylindrical volume around the beam line up to a radius of about 4 cm, while 4 additional layers, called Middle and Outer Layers, reach a radius of about 400 cm. The stave of the Middle and Outer Layers are bigger and host 196...

  18. Measurements of SO2 in the Mount St. Helens debris

    Kerr, J.B.; Evans, F.J.; Mateer, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    Routine measurements of ozone and SO 2 are made with the Dobson and Brewer spectrophotometers at the Atmospheric Environment Service in Downsview Ontario. On May 20 and 21, 1980, large values of column SO 2 were observed with both spectrophotometers at the time of passage of the Mount St. Helens debris. Enhanced SO 2 values were first observed at 1800Z on May 20. The maximum column amount of SO 2 measured was 0.06 cm at 2200 Z. On May 21, SO 2 values slowly decreased from 0.03 cm at 1100 Z cm to 0.01 cm at 2000Z. Typical SO 2 amounts due to pollution at the Downsview site are approximately 0.003 to 0.005 cm. At the same time of maximum SO 2 enhancement, both Dobson and Brewer spectrophotometers measured a 0.040 cm decrease of total ozone. It is not clear whether the decrease of total ozone was caused by the volcanic cloud or natural ozone variability. Air mass trajectories indicate that the altitude of the debris cloud, which passed over Downsview at the time, was between 10 km and 12 km

  19. Geologic Map of the Helen Planitia Quadrangle (V-52), Venus

    Lopez, Ivan; Hansen, Vicki L.

    2008-01-01

    The Magellan spacecraft orbited Venus from August 10, 1990, until it plunged into the Venusian atmosphere on October 12, 1994. Magellan Mission objectives included (1) improving the knowledge of the geological processes, surface properties, and geologic history of Venus by analysis of surface radar characteristics, topography, and morphology and (2) improving the knowledge of the geophysics of Venus by analysis of Venusian gravity. The Helen Planitia quadrangle (V-52), located in the southern hemisphere of Venus between lat 25 deg S. and 50 deg S. and between long 240 deg E. and 270 deg E., covers approximately 8,000,000 km2. Regionally, the map area is located at the southern limit of an area of enhanced tectonomagmatic activity and extensional deformation, marked by a triangle that has highland apexes at Beta, Atla, and Themis Regiones (BAT anomaly) and is connected by the large extensional belts of Devana, Hecate, and Parga Chasmata. The BAT anomaly covers approximately 20 percent of the Venusian surface.

  20. Physical and chemical characteristics of Mt. St. Helens airborne debris

    Sedlacek, W.A.; Heiken, G.H.; Mroz, E.J.; Gladney, E.S.; Perrin, D.R.; Leifer, R.; Fisenne, I.; Hinchliffe, L.; Chuan, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Tephra and aerosols from the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helens, Washington were sampled in the lower stratosphere with a WB-57F aircraft. The main body of the plume was intercepted over western Kansas on May 20, 48 hours after the eruption, at an altitude of 15.2 km. Concentrations on filter samples were 26 ng of SO 4 /g of air and 579 ng of ash/g of air. Angular glass pyroclasts ranged in size from 0.5 to 10 μm, with a mean grain size of 2 μm. Samples collected at altitudes of 16.7 and 12.5 km had only traces of SO 4 and ash. A second flight was flown, 72 hours after the eruption, on May 21. From north Texas to central Wyoming, at an altitude of 15.2 km, 4 /g of air were sampled. At an altitude of 18.3 km, from central Wyoming to NW New Mexico, the plume density and character were variable. Glassy pyroclasts similar to those sampled on the first flight range in size from 0.5 to 4 μm dia. Trace element analysis revealed some volatile element enrichment, but far less than previously observed in the plume from St. Augustine Volcano, 1976. Values of 210 Po/ 210 Pb were 0.7 to 1.32 comparable to the secular equilibrium value of 1.0 and far less than ratios previously reported by Lambert

  1. The Anatomy of A.L.I.C.E.

    Wallace, Richard S.

    This paper is a technical presentation of Artificial Linguistic Internet Computer Entity (A.L.I.C.E.) and Artificial Intelligence Markup Language (AIML), set in context by historical and philosophical ruminations on human consciousness. A.L.I.C.E., the first AIML-based personality program, won the Loebner Prize as "the most human computer" at the annual Turing Test contests in 2000, 2001, and 2004. The program, and the organization that develops it, is a product of the world of free software. More than 500 volunteers from around the world have contributed to her development. This paper describes the history of A.L.I.C.E. and AIML-free software since 1995, noting that the theme and strategy of deception and pretense upon which AIML is based can be traced through the history of Artificial Intelligence research. This paper goes on to show how to use AIML to create robot personalities like A.L.I.C.E. that pretend to be intelligent and selfaware. The paper winds up with a survey of some of the philosophical literature on the question of consciousness. We consider Searle's Chinese Room, and the view that natural language understanding by a computer is impossible. We note that the proposition "consciousness is an illusion" may be undermined by the paradoxes it apparently implies. We conclude that A.L.I.C.E. does pass the Turing Test, at least, to paraphrase Abraham Lincoln, for some of the people some of the time.

  2. Federico Antinori elected as the new ALICE Spokesperson

    Iva Raynova

    2016-01-01

    On 8 April 2016 the ALICE Collaboration Board elected Federico Antinori from INFN Padova (Italy) as the new ALICE Spokesperson.   During his three-year mandate, starting in January 2017, he will lead a collaboration of more than 1500 people from 154 physics institutes across the globe. Antinori has been a member of the collaboration ever since it was created and he has already held many senior leadership positions. Currently he is the experiment’s Physics Coordinator and as such he has the responsibility to overview the whole sector of physics analysis. During his mandate ALICE has produced many of its most prominent results. Before that he was the Coordinator of the Heavy Ion First Physics Task Force, charged with the analysis of the first Pb-Pb data samples. In 2007 and 2008 Federico served as ALICE Deputy Spokesperson. He was also the first ALICE Trigger Coordinator, having a central role in defining the experiment’s trigger menus from the first run in 2009 until the end of...

  3. Detector performance of the ALICE silicon pixel detector

    Cavicchioli, C

    2011-01-01

    The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) forms the two innermost layers of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS). It consists of two barrel layers of hybrid silicon pixel detectors at radii of 39 and 76 mm. The physics targets of the ALICE experiment require that the material budget of the SPD is kept within approximate to 1\\%X(0) per layer. This has set some stringent constraints on the design and construction of the SPD. A unique feature of the ALICE SPD is that it is capable of providing a prompt trigger signal, called Fast-OR, which contributes to the L0 trigger decision. The pixel trigger system allows to apply a set of algorithms for the trigger selection, and its output is sent to the Central Trigger Processor (CTP). The detector has been installed in the experiment in summer 2007. During the first injection tests in June 2008 the SPD was able to record the very first sign of life of the LHC by registering secondary particles from the beam dumped upstream the ALICE experiment. In the following months the...

  4. 10'000 ton ALICE gets her UK-built "Brain"

    Maddock, Julia

    2007-01-01

    For one of the four LEP experiments, called ALICE, the process got a step closer last week when a crucial part of the 10'000-ton detector, the British-built Central Trigger Processor (CTP), was installed in the ALICE cavern, some 150 feet underground. (plus background information about ALICE) (2,5 pages)

  5. The "Unsavory Researches" of Helen Campbell: A 19th-Century Journalist's Investigation of Urban Women's Poverty.

    Henry, Susan

    In 1886, the New York "Tribune" ran a series of articles by Helen Campbell, "The Prisoners of Poverty," which investigated the sufferings of working women in New York's slums. Initially a fiction and housekeeping writer, Helen Campbell's home economics orientation first pointed her toward the problems of the poor. In the late…

  6. Upgrade of the ALICE Experiment: Letter of Intent

    Abelev, B; Adamová, D; Aggarwal, M M; Aglieri Rinella, G; Agnello, M; Agostinelli, A; Agrawal, N; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad, N; Ahmad Masoodi, A; Ahmed, I; Ahn, S U; Ahn, S A; Aimo, I; Aiola, S; Ajaz, M; Akindinov, A; Aleksandrov, D; Alessandro, B; Alexandre, D; Alici, A; Alkin, A; Alme, J; Alt, T; Altini, V; Altinpinar, S; Altsybeev, I; Alves Garcia Prado, C; Anderssen, E C; Andrei, C; Andronic, A; Anguelov, V; Anielski, J; Anticic, T; Antinori, F; Antonioli, P; Aphecetche, L; Appelshäuser, H; Arbor, N; Arcelli, S; Armesto, N; Arnaldi, R; Aronsson, T; Arsene, I C; Arslandok, M; Augustinus, A; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmi, M D; Bach, M; Badalà, A; Baek, Y W; Bagnasco, S; Bailhache, R; Bairathi, V; Bala, R; Baldisseri, A; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Bán, J; Baral, R C; Barbera, R; Barile, F; Barnaföldi, G G; Barnby, L S; Barret, V; Bartke, J; Basile, M; Bastian Van Beelen, J; Bastid, N; Basu, S; Bathen, B; Batigne, G; Battistin, M; Batyunya, B; Batzing, P C; Baudot, J; Baumann, C; Bearden, I G; Beck, H; Bedda, C; Behera, N K; Belikov, I; Bellini, F; Bellwied, R; Belmont-Moreno, E; Bencedi, G; Benettoni, M; Benotto, F; Beole, S; Berceanu, I; Bercuci, A; Berdnikov, Y; Berenyi, D; Berger, M E; Bertens, R A; Berzano, D; Besson, A; Betev, L; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhatti, A; Bhattacharjee, B; Bhom, J; Bianchi, L; Bianchi, N; Bianchin, C; Bielcík, J; Bielcíková, J; Bilandzic, A; Bjelogrlic, S; Blanco, F; Blau, D; Blume, C; Bock, F; Boehmer, F V; Bogdanov, A; Boggild, H; Bogolyubsky, M; Boldizsár, L; Bombara, M; Book, J; Borel, H; Borissov, A; Bornschein, J; Borshchov, V N; Bortolin, C; Bossú, F; Botje, M; Botta, E; Böttger, S; Braun-Munzinger, P; Breitner, T; Broker, T A; Browning, T A; Broz, M; Bruna, E; Bruno, G E; Budnikov, D; Buesching, H; Bufalino, S; Buncic, P; Busch, O; Buthelezi, Z; Caffarri, D; Cai, X; Caines, H; Caliva, A; Calvo Villar, E; Camerini, P; Canoa Roman, V; Carena, F; Carena, W; Cariola, P; Carminati, F; Casanova Díaz, A; Castillo Castellanos, J; Casula, E A R; Catanescu, V; Caudron, T; Cavicchioli, C; Ceballos Sanchez, C; Cepila, J; Cerello, P; Chang, B; Chapeland, S; Charvet, J L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chattopadhyay, S; Cherney, M; Cheshkov, C; Cheynis, B; Chibante Barroso, V; Chinellato, D D; Chochula, P; Chojnacki, M; Choudhury, S; Christakoglou, P; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, S U; Cicalo, C; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Claus, G; Cleymans, J; Colamaria, F; Colella, D; Coli, S; Colledani, C; Collu, A; Colocci, M; Conesa Balbastre, G; Conesa del Valle, Z; Connors, M E; Contin, G; Contreras, J G; Cormier, T M; Corrales Morales, Y; Cortese, P; Cortés Maldonado, I; Cosentino, M R; Costa, F; Crochet, P; Cruz Albino, R; Cuautle, E; Cunqueiro, L; Dainese, A; Dang, R; Danu, A; Da Riva, E; Das, D; Das, I; Das, K; Das, S; Dash, A; Dash, S; De, S; Decosse, C; Delagrange, H; Deloff, A; Dénes, E; D'Erasmo, G; de Barros, G O V; De Caro, A; de Cataldo, G; de Cuveland, J; De Falco, A; De Gruttola, D; De Marco, N; De Pasquale, S; De Robertis, G; De Roo, K; de Rooij, R; Diaz Corchero, M A; Dietel, T; Divià, R; Di Bari, D; Di Liberto, S; Di Mauro, A; Di Nezza, P; Djuvsland, o; Dobrin, A; Dobrowolski, T; Domenicis Gimenez, D; Dönigus, B; Dordic, O; Dorheim, S; Dorokhov, A; Doziere, G; Dubey, A K; Dubla, A; Ducroux, L; Dulinski, W; Dupieux, P; Dutta Majumdar, A K; Ehlers III, R J; Elia, D; Engel, H; Erazmus, B; Erdal, H A; Eschweiler, D; Espagnon, B; Estienne, M; Esumi, S; Evans, D; Evdokimov, S; Eyyubova, G; Fabris, D; Faivre, J; Falchieri, D; Fantoni, A; Fasel, M; Fehlker, D; Feldkamp, L; Felea, D; Feliciello, A; Feofilov, G; Ferencei, J; Fernández Téllez, A; Ferreiro, E G; Ferretti, A; Festanti, A; Figiel, J; Figueredo, M A S; Filchagin, S; Finogeev, D; Fionda, F M; Fiore, E M; Fiorenza, G; Floratos, E; Floris, M; Foertsch, S; Foka, P; Fokin, S; Fragiacomo, E; Francescon, A; Franco, M; Frankenfeld, U; Fuchs, U; Furget, C; Fusco Girard, M; Gaardhoje, J J; Gagliardi, M; Gajanana, D; Gallio, M; Gangadharan, D R; Ganoti, P; Garabatos, C; Garcia-Solis, E; Gargiulo, C; Garishvili, I; Gerhard, J; Germain, M; Gheata, A; Gheata, M; Ghidini, B; Ghosh, P; Ghosh, S K; Gianotti, P; Giubilato, P; Giubellino, P; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Glässel, P; Gomez, R; Gomez Marzoa, M; González-Zamora, P; Gorbunov, S; Görlich, L; Gotovac, S; Graczykowski, L K; Grajcarek, R; Greiner, L C; Grelli, A; Grigoras, A; Grigoras, C; Grigoriev, V; Grigoryan, A; Grigoryan, S; Grinyov, B; Grion, N; Grondin, D; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F; Grossiord, J -Y; Grosso, R; Guber, F; Guernane, R; Guerzoni, B; Guilbaud, M; Gulbrandsen, K; Gulkanyan, H; Gunji, T; Gupta, A; Gupta, R; H Khan, K; Haake, R; Haaland, o; Hadjidakis, C; Haiduc, M; Hamagaki, H; Hamar, G; Hanratty, L D; Hansen, A; Harris, J W; Hartmann, H; Harton, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayashi, S; Heckel, S T; Heide, M; Helstrup, H; Hennes, E; Herghelegiu, A; Herrera Corral, G; Hess, B A; Hetland, K F; Hicks, B; Hillemanns, H; Himmi, A; Hippolyte, B; Hladky, J; Hristov, P; Huang, M; Hu-Guo, C; Humanic, T J; Hutter, D; Hwang, D S; Igolkin, S; Ijzermans, P; Ilkaev, R; Ilkiv, I; Inaba, M; Incani, E; Innocenti, G M; Ionita, C; Ippolitov, M; Irfan, M; Ivanov, M; Ivanov, V; Ivanytskyi, O; Jacholkowski, A; Jadlovsky, J; Jahnke, C; Jang, H J; Janik, M A; Jayarathna, P H S Y; Jena, S; Jimenez Bustamante, R T; Jones, P G; Jung, H; Junique, A; Jusko, A; Kalcher, S; Kalinak, P; Kalweit, A; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kaplin, V; Kar, S; Karasu Uysal, A; Karavichev, O; Karavicheva, T; Karpechev, E; Kebschull, U; Keidel, R; Keil, M; Ketzer, B; Khan, M Mohisin; Khan, P; Khan, S A; Khanzadeev, A; Kharlov, Y; Kileng, B; Kim, B; Kim, D; Kim, D W; Kim, D J; Kim, J S; Kim, M; Kim, M; Kim, S; Kim, T; Kirsch, S; Kisel, I; Kiselev, S; Kisiel, A; Kiss, G; Klay, J L; Klein, J; Klein-Bösing, C; Kluge, A; Knichel, M L; Knospe, A G; Kobdaj, C; Kofarago, M; Köhler, M K; Kollegger, T; Kolojvari, A; Kondratiev, V; Kondratyeva, N; Konevskikh, A; Kovalenko, V; Kowalski, M; Kox, S; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G; Kral, J; Králik, I; Kramer, F; Kravcáková, A; Krelina, M; Kretz, M; Krivda, M; Krizek, F; Krus, M; Krymov, E B; Kryshen, E; Krzewicki, M; Kucera, V; Kucheriaev, Y; Kugathasan, T; Kuhn, C; Kuijer, P G; Kulakov, I; Kumar, J; Kurashvili, P; Kurepin, A; Kurepin, A B; Kuryakin, A; Kushpil, S; Kushpil, V; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Ladron de Guevara, P; Lagana Fernandes, C; Lakomov, I; Langoy, R; Lara, C; Lardeux, A; Lattuca, A; La Pointe, S L; La Rocca, P; Lea, R; Lee, G R; Legrand, I; Lehnert, J; Lemmon, R C; Lenhardt, M; Lenti, V; Leogrande, E; Leoncino, M; León Monzón, I; Lesenechal, Y; Lévai, P; Li, S; Lien, J; Lietava, R; Lindal, S; Lindenstruth, V; Lippmann, C; Lisa, M A; Listratenko, O M; Ljunggren, H M; Lodato, D F; Loddo, F; Loenne, P I; Loggins, V R; Loginov, V; Lohner, D; Loizides, C; Lopez, X; López Torres, E; Lu, X -G; Luettig, P; Lunardon, M; Luo, J; Luparello, G; Luzzi, C; M Gago, A; M Jacobs, P; Ma, R; Maevskaya, A; Mager, M; Mahapatra, D P; Maire, A; Malaev, M; Maldonado Cervantes, I; Malinina, L; Mal'Kevich, D; Maltsev, N A; Malzacher, P; Mamonov, A; Manceau, L; Manko, V; Manso, F; Manzari, V; Mapelli, A; Marchisone, M; Mares, J; Margagliotti, G V; Margotti, A; Marín, A; Marin Tobon, C A; Markert, C; Marquard, M; Marras, D; Martashvili, I; Martin, N A; Martinengo, P; Martínez, M I; Martínez García, G; Martin Blanco, J; Martynov, Y; Mas, A; Masciocchi, S; Masera, M; Maslov, M; Masoni, A; Massacrier, L; Mastroserio, A; Mattiazzo, S; Matyja, A; Mayer, C; Mazer, J; Mazumder, R; Mazza, G; Mazzoni, M A; Meddi, F; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Mercado Pérez, J; Meres, M; Miake, Y; Mikhaylov, K; Milano, L; Milosevic, J; Mischke, A; Mishra, A N; Miskowiec, D; Mitu, C M; Mlynarz, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Mongelli, M; Montaño Zetina, L; Montes, E; Morando, M; Moreira De Godoy, D A; Morel, F; Moretto, S; Morreale, A; Morsch, A; Muccifora, V; Mudnic, E; Muhammad Bhopal, F; Muhuri, S; Mukherjee, M; Müller, H; Munhoz, M G; Murray, S; Musa, L; Musinsky, J; Nandi, B K; Nania, R; Nappi, E; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nazarenko, S; Nedosekin, A; Nicassio, M; Niculescu, M; Nielsen, B S; Nikolaev, S; Nikulin, S; Nikulin, V; Nilsen, B S; Noferini, F; Nomokonov, P; Nooren, G; Nyanin, A; Nystrand, J; Oeschler, H; Oh, S; Oh, S K; Okatan, A; Olah, L; Oleniacz, J; Oliveira Da Silva, A C; Onderwaater, J; Oppedisano, C; Ortiz Velasquez, A; Oskarsson, A; Otwinowski, J; Oyama, K; Pachmayer, Y; Pachr, M; Pagano, P; Paic, G; Painke, F; Pajares, C; Pal, S K; Palmeri, A; Panati, S; Pant, D; Pantano, D; Papikyan, V; Pappalardo, G S; Park, W J; Passfeld, A; Pastore, C; Patalakha, D I; Paticchio, V; Paul, B; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Pereira Da Costa, H; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E; Peresunko, D; Pérez Lara, C E; Peryt, W; Pesci, A; Pestov, Y; Petagna, P; Petrácek, V; Petran, M; Petris, M; Petrovici, M; Petta, C; Pham, H; Piano, S; Pikna, M; Pillot, P; Pinazza, O; Pinsky, L; Piyarathna, D B; Ploskon, M; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Pochybova, S; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Poghosyan, M G; Pohjoisaho, E H O; Polichtchouk, B; Poljak, N; Pop, A; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S; Porter, J; Pospisil, V; Potukuchi, B; Prasad, S K; Preghenella, R; Prino, F; Protsenko, M A; Pruneau, C A; Pshenichnov, I; Puddu, G; Puggioni, C; Punin, V; Putschke, J; Qvigstad, H; Rachevski, A; Raha, S; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ramello, L; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Räsänen, S S; Rascanu, B T; Rasson, J E; Rathee, D; Rauf, A W; Razazi, V; Read, K F; Real, J S; Redlich, K; Reed, R J; Rehman, A; Reichelt, P; Reicher, M; Reidt, F; Renfordt, R; Reolon, A R; Reshetin, A; Rettig, F; Revol, J -P; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Ricci, R A; Richert, T; Richter, M; Riedler, P; Riegler, W; Riggi, F; Rivetti, A; Rocco, E; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M; Rodriguez Manso, A; Roed, K; Rogochaya, E; Rohni, S; Rohr, D; Röhrich, D; Romita, R; Ronchetti, F; Ronflette, L; Rosnet, P; Rossegger, S; Rossewij, M J; Rossi, A; Roudier, S; Rousset, J; Roy, A; Roy, C; Roy, P; Rubio Montero, A J; Rui, R; Russo, R; Ryabinkin, E; Ryabov, Y; Rybicki, A; Sacchetti, M; Sadovsky, S; Safarík, K; Sahlmuller, B; 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Zinovjev, G; Zoccarato, Y; Zynovyev, M; Zyzak, M; CERN. Geneva. The LHC experiments Committee; LHCC

    2014-01-01

    The long term goal of the ALICE experiment is to provide a precise characterization of the high-density, high-temperature phase of strongly interacting matter. To achieve this goal, high-statistics precision measurement are required. The general upgrade strategy for the ALICE detector is conceived to deal with this challenge with expected Pb-Pb interaction rates of up to 50 kHz aiming at an integrated luminosity of the order of 10 nb^-1. With the proposed timeline, starting the high-rate operation progressively after 2018 shutdown, the goals set up in our upgrade plans should be achieved collecting data until mid-2020's. In this document we present the main physics motivations for running the LHC with heavy ions at high luminosities and discuss the modifications and replacements needed in the ALICE detectors, the online systems and offline system. The schedule, cost estimate and organization of the upgrade programme are presented as well.

  7. Disability Exclusion and Rights: The Life Story of Alice Jamieson

    Allison Lynch

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a commonly held belief that fear of disability by society is the reason for segregation of the disabled. Although acknowledging the validity of such a belief, this paper disputes this claim as it pertains to sufferers of mental illness. Specifically it explores one woman’s development of dissociative identity disorder as a result of years of incestuous abuse. Alice Jamieson developed multiple personalities in order to survive her horrendous childhood, which ultimately caused her to live a life of segregation and social exclusion. Alice did however; experience the enabling effects of positive, supportive relationships on rare occasions throughout her childhood (with her grandfather and her adult life (with a work colleague. The telling of her story bought Alice a powerful sense of healing and has helped raise awareness of childhood sexual abuse and its devastating consequences.

  8. ALICE Connex : Mobile Volunteer Computing and Edutainment Platform

    Chalumporn, Gantaphon

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices are very powerful and trend to be developed. They have functions that are used in everyday life. One of their main tasks is to be an entertainment devices or gaming platform. A lot of technologies are now accepted and adopted to improve the potential of education. Edutainment is a combination of entertainment and education media together to make use of both benefits. In this work, we introduce a design of edutainment platform which is a part of mobile volunteer computing and edutainment platform called ‘ALICE Connex’ for ALICE at CERN. The edutainment platform focuses to deliver enjoyment and education, while promotes ALICE and Volunteer Computing platform to general public. The design in this work describes the functionality to build an effective edutainment with real-time multiplayer interaction on round-based gameplay, while integrates seamless edutainment with basic particle physic content though game mechanism and items design. For the assessment method we will observe the enjoyment o...

  9. The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector Control and Calibration Systems

    Calì, Ivan Amos; Manzari, Vito; Stefanini, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis was carried out in the Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) group of the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The SPD is the innermost part (two cylindrical layers of silicon pixel detec- tors) of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS). During the last three years I have been strongly involved in the SPD hardware and software development, construction and commissioning. This thesis is focused on the design, development and commissioning of the SPD Control and Calibration Systems. I started this project from scratch. After a prototyping phase now a stable version of the control and calibration systems is operative. These systems allowed the detector sectors and half-barrels test, integration and commissioning as well as the SPD commissioning in the experiment. The integration of the systems with the ALICE Experiment Control System (ECS), DAQ and Trigger system has been accomplished and the SPD participated in the experimental December 2007 commissioning run. The complex...

  10. Neutral meson production measurements with the ALICE at the LHC

    Ganoti Paraskevi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Identified hadron spectra are considered to be sensitive to the transport properties of strongly interacting matter produced in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. π0 and η mesons in ALICE are identified via their two-photon decays by using calorimeters and the central tracking system. In the latter, photons are measured via their conversion to electron-positron pairs in the material of the inner ALICE barrel tracking detectors. The measured production spectra in pp, p–Pb and Pb–Pb collisions at mid–rapidity and over a wide pT range will be presented in the available Large Hadron Collider (LHC energies of Run I. The resulting nuclear modification factor RAA at different centrality classes shows a clear pattern of strong suppression in the hot QCD medium with respect to pp collisions. Comparison of the ALICE results on neutral mesons with lower-energy experiments is also discussed.

  11. AliEn: ALICE environment on the GRID

    Bagnasco, S; Betev, L; Buncic, P; Carminati, F; Cirstoiu, C; Grigoras, C; Hayrapetyan, A; Harutyunyan, A; Peters, A J; Saiz, P

    2008-01-01

    Starting from mid-2008, the ALICE detector at CERN LHC will collect data at a rate of 4PB per year. ALICE will use exclusively distributed Grid resources to store, process and analyse this data. The top-level management of the Grid resources is done through the AliEn (ALICE Environment) system, which is in continuous development since year 2000. AliEn presents several original solutions, which have shown their viability in a number of large exercises of increasing complexity called Data Challenges. This paper describes the AliEn architecture: Job Management, Data Management and UI. The current status of AliEn will be illustrated, as well as the performance of the system during the data challenges. The paper also describes the future AliEn development roadmap

  12. Computing Architecture of the ALICE Detector Control System

    Augustinus, A; Moreno, A; Kurepin, A N; De Cataldo, G; Pinazza, O; Rosinský, P; Lechman, M; Jirdén, L S

    2011-01-01

    The ALICE Detector Control System (DCS) is based on a commercial SCADA product, running on a large Windows computer cluster. It communicates with about 1200 network attached devices to assure safe and stable operation of the experiment. In the presentation we focus on the design of the ALICE DCS computer systems. We describe the management of data flow, mechanisms for handling the large data amounts and information exchange with external systems. One of the key operational requirements is an intuitive, error proof and robust user interface allowing for simple operation of the experiment. At the same time the typical operator task, like trending or routine checks of the devices, must be decoupled from the automated operation in order to prevent overload of critical parts of the system. All these requirements must be implemented in an environment with strict security requirements. In the presentation we explain how these demands affected the architecture of the ALICE DCS.

  13. The ALICE High Level Trigger: status and plans

    Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Gorbunov, Sergey; Breitner, Timo; Lehrbach, Johannes; Lindenstruth, Volker; Berzano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    The ALICE High Level Trigger (HLT) is an online reconstruction, triggering and data compression system used in the ALICE experiment at CERN. Unique among the LHC experiments, it extensively uses modern coprocessor technologies like general purpose graphic processing units (GPGPU) and field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) in the data flow. Realtime data compression is performed using a cluster finder algorithm implemented on FPGA boards. These data, instead of raw clusters, are used in the subsequent processing and storage, resulting in a compression factor of around 4. Track finding is performed using a cellular automaton and a Kalman filter algorithm on GPGPU hardware, where both CUDA and OpenCL technologies can be used interchangeably. The ALICE upgrade requires further development of online concepts to include detector calibration and stronger data compression. The current HLT farm will be used as a test bed for online calibration and both synchronous and asynchronous processing frameworks already before t...

  14. AliEn: ALICE Environment on the GRID

    Bagnasco, S; Buncic, P; Carminati, F; Cirstoiu, C; Grigoras, C; Hayrapetyan, A; Harutyunyan, A; Peters, A J; Saiz, P

    2007-01-01

    Starting from mid-2008, the ALICE detector at CERN LHC will collect data at a rate of 4PB per year. ALICE will use exclusively distributed Grid resources to store, process and analyse this data. The top-level management of the Grid resources is done through the AliEn (ALICE Environment) system, which is in continuous development since year 2000. AliEn presents several original solutions, which have shown their viability in a number of large exercises of increasing complexity called Data Challenges. This paper describes the AliEn architecture: Job Management, Data Management and UI. The current status of AliEn will be illustrated, as well as the performance of the system during the data challenges. The paper also describes the future AliEn development roadmap.

  15. The effective action of a BPS Alice string

    Chatterjee, Chandrasekhar; Nitta, Muneto [Keio University, Department of Physics, and Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2017-11-15

    Recently a BPS Alice string has been found in a U(1) x SO(3) gauge theory coupled with three charged complex scalar fields in the triplet representation (in JHEP 1709:046 arXiv:1703.08971 [hep-th], 2017). It is a half BPS state preserving a half of the supercharges when embedded into a supersymmetric gauge theory. In this paper, we study zero modes of a BPS Alice string. After presenting U(1) and translational zero modes, we construct the effective action of these modes. In contrast to a previous analysis of the conventional Alice string for which only large distance behaviors are known, we can exactly perform a calculation in the full space thanks to the BPS properties. (orig.)

  16. A Bayesian approach to particle identification in ALICE

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Among the LHC experiments, ALICE has unique particle identification (PID) capabilities exploiting different types of detectors. During Run 1, a Bayesian approach to PID was developed and intensively tested. It facilitates the combination of information from different sub-systems. The adopted methodology and formalism as well as the performance of the Bayesian PID approach for charged pions, kaons and protons in the central barrel of ALICE will be reviewed. Results are presented with PID performed via measurements of specific energy loss (dE/dx) and time-of-flight using information from the TPC and TOF detectors, respectively. Methods to extract priors from data and to compare PID efficiencies and misidentification probabilities in data and Monte Carlo using high-purity samples of identified particles will be presented. Bayesian PID results were found consistent with previous measurements published by ALICE. The Bayesian PID approach gives a higher signal-to-background ratio and a similar or larger statist...

  17. Evénements ALICE - French version only

    2004-01-01

    Le 29 septembre 2004 à 15h00, programme « A la rencontre d'ALICE », à la Médiathèque municipale de Saint-Genis-Pouilly, France. Histoire pour des enfants (à partir de 8 ans), extraite de la bande dessinée: « ALICE et la soupe de quarks et de gluons ». Le 2 octobre 2004 à 11h00, programme « A la rencontre d'ALICE », à la Médiathèque municipale de Saint-Genis-Pouilly, France. Présentation ALICE pour les adolescents (à partir de 14 ans).

  18. Radiation hard analog circuits for ALICE ITS upgrade

    Gajanana, D; Gromov, V; Kuijer, P; Kugathasan, T; Snoeys, W

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE experiment is planning to upgrade the ITS (Inner Tracking System) [1] detector during the LS2 shutdown. The present ITS will be fully replaced with a new one entirely based on CMOS monolithic pixel sensor chips fabricated in TowerJazz CMOS 0.18 μ m imaging technology. The large (3 cm × 1.5 cm  = 4.5 cm(2)) ALPIDE (ALICE PIxel DEtector) sensor chip contains about 500 Kpixels, and will be used to cover a 10 m(2) area with 12.5 Gpixels distributed over seven cylindrical layers. The ALP...

  19. Probe station for testing of ALICE silicon drift detectors

    Humanic, T J; Piemonte, C; Rashevsky, A; Sugarbaker, E R; Vacchi, A

    2003-01-01

    Large area, 7.25 cm multiplied by 8.76 cm silicon drift detectors have been developed and are in production for the ALICE experiment at LHC. An active area of the detector of more than 50 cm**2 imposes high demands on the quality of processing and raw material. Automated testing procedures have been developed to test detectors before mounting them on the ladders. Probe stations for ALICE SDD testing were designed and built at INFN, Trieste and Ohio State University (OSU). Testing procedures, detector selection criteria and some details of the OSU probe station design are discussed.

  20. The Time Projection Chamber for the ALICE Experiment

    Lippmann, C

    2008-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber of the ALICE Experiment has been installed in the experimental setup in the underground area at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva. The Alice TPC ReadOut (ALTRO) chip implements intelligent signal processing on the Front-End-Electronics. During the years of 2007 and 2008 commissioning and calibration of the TPC have been carried out with cosmic rays, radioactive Krypton isotopes and with tracks produced by a UV laser system. In addition to these in this publication we present first results on energy loss measurements and on the momentum resolution.

  1. FPGA Co-processor for the ALICE High Level Trigger

    Grastveit, G.; Lindenstruth, V.; Loizides, C.; Roehrich, D.; Skaali, B.; Steinbeck, T.; Stock, R.; Tilsner, H.; Ullaland, K.; Vestbo, A.; Vik, T.

    2003-01-01

    The High Level Trigger (HLT) of the ALICE experiment requires massive parallel computing. One of the main tasks of the HLT system is two-dimensional cluster finding on raw data of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC), which is the main data source of ALICE. To reduce the number of computing nodes needed in the HLT farm, FPGAs, which are an intrinsic part of the system, will be utilized for this task. VHDL code implementing the Fast Cluster Finder algorithm, has been written, a testbed for functional verification of the code has been developed, and the code has been synthesized

  2. Test Results of the ALICE-HMPID Detector Commissioning

    Volpe, G

    2008-01-01

    The ALICE High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (HMPID) consists of seven identical proximity focusing RICH counters. It covers in total 11 m2, exploiting large area CsI photocathodes for Cherenkov light imaging. The detector is installed in the ALICE solenoid, ready for the data acquisition. By means of the Detector Control System, the Front-end (FEE) and the Readout (R/O) electronics, the MWPC high voltages, the cooling and the gas system have been tested. The HMPID module gas pressure, temperature, current and voltage trends have been monitored and archived in the ORACLE database. In this paper a comprehensive review on the test results is presented.

  3. Racism, Disable-ism, and Heterosexism in the Making of Helen Keller

    Prettol, Andy

    2008-01-01

    In his paper "Racism, Disable-ism, and Heterosexism in the Making of Helen Keller" Andy Prettol offers an analysis of prevailing narratives about Helen Keller. Prettol focuses on the dynamic interplay of race, (dis)ability, sexuality, and gender inherent to all Keller stories of triumph that are so popular in elementary schools across the U.S. He examines three specific works: William Gibson's playscript The Miracle Worker, written in 1956; the film of the same title directed by Arthur Penn i...

  4. Pseudotachylyte formation in volcanic conduits: Montserrat vs. Mount St. Helens

    Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallee, Y.; Petrakova, L.; Ferk, A.; Di Toro, G.; Hess, K.; Ferri, F.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    Seismogenic fracture and faulting may result in non-equilibrium frictional melting of rock, which upon cooling and recrystallisation forms pseudotachylyte. In volcanic environments, the transition from endogenous to exogenous growth can be attributed to a shift in magma rheology into the brittle regime, and thus the ascent of high-viscosity magma can form discrete shear zones, comparable to tectonic faults, along conduit margins. Pseudotachylytes have, until now, rarely been noted in exogenous volcanic materials and seldom in active volcanic environments. This is despite the simultaneous occurrence of high pressures and differential stresses, which make high-viscosity magmas ideal candidates for the occurrence of frictional melting. Here, we compare the chemical, thermal, magnetic and structural properties of two candidate volcanic pseudotachylytes; one from Soufriere Hills (Montserrat) and one from Mount St. Helens (USA). Additionally, we present data from a set of high-velocity rotary shear experiments on the host materials of these natural pseudotachylytes in which melting was induced after just 10's of centimeters of slip at realistic extrusion velocities (0.4 - 1.6 ms-1) and low normal stresses (0.5-2 MPa). After 1-2 meters of slip a continuous melt layer formed, at which point friction decreased and the fault zone displayed slip-weakening behaviour. For volcanic conduits, this would facilitate temporarily elevated slip rates, or an increase in extrusion rate, and could cause transitions in dome morphology and eruption style. This study demonstrates that shear fracturing in magma or sliding along conduit margins can readily result in frictional melting. The conspicuous absence of pseudotachylytes in active volcanic environments is likely the result of exceptionally high background temperatures which precipitate near-equilibrium melting, thereby obviating one of the characteristic signatures of pseudotachylyte - glassy protomelts formed by selective melting of

  5. Counting, accounting, and accountability: Helen Verran's relational empiricism.

    Kenney, Martha

    2015-10-01

    Helen Verran uses the term 'relational empiricism' to describe situated empirical inquiry that is attentive to the relations that constitute its objects of study, including the investigator's own practices. Relational empiricism draws on and reconfigures Science and Technology Studies' traditional concerns with reflexivity and relationality, casting empirical inquiry as an important and non-innocent world-making practice. Through a reading of Verran's postcolonial projects in Nigeria and Australia, this article develops a concept of empirical and political 'accountability' to complement her relational empiricism. In Science and an African Logic, Verran provides accounts of the relations that materialize her empirical objects. These accounts work to decompose her original objects, generating new objects that are more promising for the specific postcolonial contexts of her work. The process of decomposition is part of remaining accountable for her research methods and accountable to the worlds she is working in and writing about. This is a practice of narrating relations and learning to tell better technoscientific stories. What counts as better, however, is not given, but is always contextual and at stake. In this way, Verran acts not as participant-observer, but as participant-storyteller, telling stories to facilitate epistemic flourishing within and as part of a historically located community of practice. The understanding of accountability that emerges from this discussion is designed as a contribution, both practical and evocative, to the theoretical toolkit of Science and Technology Studies scholars who are interested in thinking concretely about how we can be more accountable to the worlds we study.

  6. Experience with the silicon strip detector of ALICE

    Nooren, G.J.L.

    2009-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) forms the two outermost layers of the ALICE Inner Track- ing System (ITS), connecting the TPC with the inner layers of the ITS. The SSD consists of 1698 double-sided silicon microstrip modules, 95 μm pitch, distributed in two cylindrical bar- rels, whose radii are

  7. Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions: Alice H. Eagly

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Alice H. Eagly, winner of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions, is cited for her work in the field of social psychology, the psychology of gender, and the use of meta-analytic techniques. She envisions a psychology that extends from individual cognitions to societal structures. In addition to the citation, a biography and selected…

  8. GEM Foil Quality Assurance For The ALICE TPC Upgrade

    Brücken Erik

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC at CERN is dedicated to heavy ion physics to explore the structure of strongly interacting matter. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC of ALICE is a tracking detector located in the central region of the experiment. It offers excellent tracking capabilities as well as particle identification. After the second long shutdown (LS2 the LHC will run at substantially higher luminosities. To be able to increase the data acquisition rate by a factor of 100, the ALICE TPC experiment has to replace the Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC –based readout chambers. The MWPC are operated with gating grid that limits the rate to O(kHz. The new ReadOut Chamber (ROC design is based on Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM technology operating in continuous mode. The current GEM productions scheme foresees the production of more than 800 GEM foils of different types. To fulfill the requirements on the performance of the GEM TPC readout, necessitates thorough Quality Assurance (QA measures. The QA scheme, developed by the ALICE collaboration, will be presented in detail.

  9. Measurement of Forward-Backward Charged Particle Correlations with ALICE

    Søgaard, Carsten

    Part I of the defence covers experimental development carried out in the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research - CERN. For the Time Projection Chamber a sophisticated laser calibration system has been developed by the Niels Bohr Institute...

  10. Alice moltiplicata. Un teatro fluido per nuove pratiche di resistenza

    Giuseppe Sofo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available "L come Alice" is a 2013 show establishing a link between various versions of Lewis Carroll’s character. This archetype is connected with Antonin Artaud’s translation, Walt Disney’s cartoon, a film by Jan Švankmajer, as well as with Gilles Deleuze’s philosophy.

  11. ALICE breaks through the one Gigabyte/sec barrier

    2003-01-01

    The test phases of the ALICE data acquisition system, known as the Data Challenges, are celebrating their fourth anniversary. The fruit of collaboration between several of the experiment's groups and IT Division, the 2002 tests concentrated on the system's performance and stability.

  12. Performance of the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC

    Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Mis̈kowiec, D.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montano Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Twinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Sahoo, P.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Pesci, A.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Ploskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L M; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H O; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J. P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Rd, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Safarík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Sánchez Rodríguez, F. J.; Sándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, P. A.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, C. B.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J M; Saard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A P; Subieta Vasquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Sumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J M; Szanto De Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Ter Minasyan, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Vannucci, L.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; Van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, P. Y.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; Von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C S; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Xiang, C.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I. K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-01-01

    ALICE is the heavy-ion experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The experiment continuously took data during the first physics campaign of the machine from fall 2009 until early 2013, using proton and lead-ion beams. In this paper we describe the running environment and the data handling

  13. GEM Foil Quality Assurance For The ALICE TPC Upgrade

    Brücken, Erik; Hildén, Timo

    2018-02-01

    The ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is dedicated to heavy ion physics to explore the structure of strongly interacting matter. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) of ALICE is a tracking detector located in the central region of the experiment. It offers excellent tracking capabilities as well as particle identification. After the second long shutdown (LS2) the LHC will run at substantially higher luminosities. To be able to increase the data acquisition rate by a factor of 100, the ALICE TPC experiment has to replace the Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) -based readout chambers. The MWPC are operated with gating grid that limits the rate to O(kHz). The new ReadOut Chamber (ROC) design is based on Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology operating in continuous mode. The current GEM productions scheme foresees the production of more than 800 GEM foils of different types. To fulfill the requirements on the performance of the GEM TPC readout, necessitates thorough Quality Assurance (QA) measures. The QA scheme, developed by the ALICE collaboration, will be presented in detail.

  14. The “24 hours” of the ALICE magnet

    2005-01-01

    The ALICE dipole magnet, now in its final location in the cavern at Point 2 , has run at full current for 24 hours. The dipole of the ALICE muon spectrometer has successfully completed new tests in its final position. The ALICE detector is based on two large magnets - the big solenoid magnet formerly used by L3 on LEP, and a new dipole magnet, built through a strong and successful collaboration with a team from JINR in Russia, under the direction of Detlef Swoboda from TS-LEA at CERN. By October 2004, the dipole had been assembled in a preliminary position in the ALICE cavern, and in November it successfully passed extensive testing (CERN Bulletin 04/05). Now it has been transferred to its final position on the far side of the L3 solenoid, and has passed tests with flying colours. The first â€ワpre-assembly” was necessary to perform all the remaining machining operations for fixing the coils and to verify the assembly tooling, as the available space in the final location is very limited and does no...

  15. Romanian Physicists at CERN work for the Alice Program

    2007-01-01

    "For the past six years a team of Romanian scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Magurele, Romania, work as part of an international team of CERN to recreate the very first moments of the Universe, right after the Big Bang. The experiment was called Alice."(2 pages)

  16. Upgrade of the ALICE Experiment Letter Of Intent

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, Dagmar; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Čepila, J.; Ferencei, J.; Křelina, M.; Krus, M.; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kushpil, Vasilij; Mareš, Jiří A.; Pachr, M.; Petráček, V.; Petráň, M.; Polák, Karel; Pospíšil, V.; Šmakal, R.; Šumbera, Michal; Tlustý, D.; Vajzer, Michal; Wagner, V.; Zach, Č.; Závada, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 8 (2014), 087001 ISSN 0954-3899 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : ALICE Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders; BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics (FZU-D) Impact factor: 2.777, year: 2014

  17. The Sky Is No Longer the Limit for Alice

    Monge, Louise

    2016-01-01

    In March 2016, representatives from Australian Science Teachers Association (ASTA) were invited to BHP Billiton's head office in Melbourne, Australia, to listen to astronautical engineer and NASA New Horizons Mission Operations Manager Alice Bowman discuss her career trajectory and the role her choices in education played in her success. Alice…

  18. ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) Readout Sector in Lab

    2003-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main particle tracking detector in ALICE. Charged particles crossing the gas of the TPC knock electrons out of their atoms, which drift in the eletric field. By measuring the arrival of electrons at the end of the chamber, at segments such as the one shown here, the TPC will reconstruct the paths of the original charged particles.

  19. AliEn - GRID application for ALICE Collaboration

    Zgura, Ion-Sorin

    2003-01-01

    AliEn (ALICE Environment) is a GRID framework built on top of the latest Internet standards for information exchange and authentication (SOAP, PKI) and common Open Source components. AliEn provides a virtual file catalogue that allows transparent access to distributed data-sets and a number of collaborating Web services which implement the authentication, job execution, file transport, performance monitor and event logging.The ALICE experiment has developed AliEn as an implementation of distributed computing infrastructure needed to simulate, reconstruct and analyze data from the experiment. The sites that belong to the ALICE Virtual Organisation can be seen and used as a single entity - any available node executes jobs and access to logical and datasets is transparent to the user. In developing AliEn common standards and solutions in the form of Open Source components were used. Only 1% (25k physical lines of code in Perl) is native AliEn code while 99% of the code has been imported in form of Open Sources packages and Perl modules. Currently ALICE is using the system for distributed production of Monte Carlo data at over 30 sites on four continents. During the last twelve months more than 30,000 jobs have been successfully run under AliEn control worldwide, totalling 25 CPU years and producing 20 TB of data. The user interface is compatible to EU DataGrid at the level of authentication and job description language. In perspective AliEn will be interfaced to the mainstream Grid infrastructure in HEP and it will remain to serve as interface between ALICE Offline framework and external Grid infrastructure. (authors)

  20. Fermilab's Helen Edwards receives prestigious 2003 Robert R. Wilson prize from the American Physical Society

    2002-01-01

    Helen Edwards has been awarded the 2003 Robert R. Wilson prize. She was cited for "her pivotal achievement and critical contribution as the leader in the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the Tevatron, and for her continued contributions to the development of high gradient superconducting linear accelerators as well as bright and intense electron sources." (1/2 page).

  1. Effects on the Mount St. Helens volcanic cloud on turbidity at Ann Arbor, Michigan

    Ryznar, E.; Weber, M.R.; Hallaron, T.S.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of turbidity were made at the University of Michigan irradiance and metorlogical measurement facility just prior to, during and after the passage of the volcanic cloud from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. They were made with a Volz sunphotometer at wavelengths of 500 and 880 nm

  2. Tupikteid ei ole / Aimi Püüa, Kristina Orion, Helen Põllo, Kaie Piiskop

    2015-01-01

    Innove õppekava ja metoodika keskuse juhataja Kaie Piiskop, testide ja uuringute keskuse juht Aimi Püüa, karjääriteenuste üksuse juht Kristina Orion, haridus- ja teadusministeeriumi kutsehariduse osakonna juhataja Helen Põllo arutlesid teemal kuidas jätkata haridusteed

  3. Water sampling at the Berge Helene FPSO at Chinguetti field in Mauritania using passive samplers

    Korytar, P.; Galien, van der W.

    2007-01-01

    Three rounds of water sampling were performed at the Berge Helene FPSO at the Chinguetti field in Mauritania using passive samplers attached to the FPSO to determine the levels of contamination that could potentially accumulate in organisms. Two rounds were carried out prior to the commencement of

  4. Posteruption arthropod succession on the Mount St. Helens volcano: the ground-dwelling beetle fauna (Coleoptera).

    R.R. Parmenter; C.M. Crisafulli; N. Korbe; G. Parsons; M. Edgar; J.A. MacMahon

    2005-01-01

    The 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens created a complex mosaic of disturbance types over a 600 km2 area. From 1980 through 2000 we monitored beetle species relative abundance and faunal composition of assemblages at undisturbed reference sites and in areas subjected to tephra-fall, blowdown, and pyroclastic flow volcanic disturbance. We...

  5. Helen Mirren võitis Elizabeth II rolliga brittide Oscari / Triin Tael

    Tael, Triin

    2007-01-01

    Stephen Frearsi mängufilmis "Kuninganna" ("The Queen") kuninganna Elizabeth II kehastav Helen Mirren sai oma rolli eest parima naisnäitleja Bafta (Briti filmiakadeemia auhind). Linateos pälvis ka aasta parima filmi tiitli. Ka teistest võitjatest

  6. Rhetoric, Possibility, and Women's Status in Ancient Athens: Gorgias' and Isocrates' Encomiums of Helen.

    Biesecker, Susan L.

    1992-01-01

    Critiques teleological narrative structures implicit in the work of some classical historians, adopting instead a multilayered historiographical method. Argues that a law instituted in 451/450 B.C.E. by Pericles opened up a possibility for resisting women's exclusion from the public sphere. Reads Gorgias' and Isocrates' speeches on Helen of Troy…

  7. Lateral blasts at Mount St. Helens and hazard zonation

    Crandell, D.R.; Hoblitt, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    Lateral blasts at andesitic and dacitic volcanoes can produce a variety of direct hazards, including ballistic projectiles which can be thrown to distances of at least 10 km and pyroclastic density flows which can travel at high speed to distances of more than 30 km. Indirect effect that may accompany such explosions include wind-borne ash, pyroclastic flows formed by the remobilization of rock debris thrown onto sloping ground, and lahars. Two lateral blasts occurred at a lava dome on the north flank of Mount St. Helens about 1200 years ago; the more energetic of these threw rock debris northeastward across a sector of about 30?? to a distance of at least 10 km. The ballistic debris fell onto an area estimated to be 50 km2, and wind-transported ash and lapilli derived from the lateral-blast cloud fell on an additional lobate area of at least 200 km2. In contrast, the vastly larger lateral blast of May 18, 1980, created a devastating pyroclastic density flow that covered a sector of as much as 180??, reached a maximum distance of 28 km, and within a few minutes directly affected an area of about 550 km2. The May 18 lateral blast resulted from the sudden, landslide-induced depressurization of a dacite cryptodome and the hydrothermal system that surrounded it within the volcano. We propose that lateral-blast hazard assessments for lava domes include an adjoining hazard zone with a radius of at least 10 km. Although a lateral blast can occur on any side of a dome, the sector directly affected by any one blast probably will be less than 180??. Nevertheless, a circular hazard zone centered on the dome is suggested because of the difficulty of predicting the direction of a lateral blast. For the purpose of long-term land-use planning, a hazard assessment for lateral blasts caused by explosions of magma bodies or pressurized hydrothermal systems within a symmetrical volcano could designate a circular potential hazard area with a radius of 35 km centered on the volcano

  8. Clast comminution during pyroclastic density current transport: Mt St Helens

    Dawson, B.; Brand, B. D.; Dufek, J.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic clasts within pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) tend to be more rounded than those in fall deposits. This rounding reflects degrees of comminution during transport, which produces an increase in fine-grained ash with distance from source (Manga, M., Patel, A., Dufek., J. 2011. Bull Volcanol 73: 321-333). The amount of ash produced due to comminution can potentially affect runout distance, deposit sorting, the volume of ash lofted into the upper atmosphere, and increase internal pore pressure (e.g., Wohletz, K., Sheridan, M. F., Brown, W.K. 1989. J Geophy Res, 94, 15703-15721). For example, increased pore pressure has been shown to produce longer runout distances than non-comminuted PDC flows (e.g., Dufek, J., and M. Manga, 2008. J. Geophy Res, 113). We build on the work of Manga et al., (2011) by completing a pumice abrasion study for two well-exposed flow units from the May 18th, 1980 eruption of Mt St Helens (MSH). To quantify differences in comminution from source, sampling and the image analysis technique developed in Manga et al., 2010 was completed at distances proximal, medial, and distal from source. Within the units observed, data was taken from the base, middle, and pumice lobes within the outcrops. Our study is unique in that in addition to quantifying the degree of pumice rounding with distance from source, we also determine the possible range of ash sizes produced during comminution by analyzing bubble wall thickness of the pumice through petrographic and SEM analysis. The proportion of this ash size is then measured relative to the grain size of larger ash with distance from source. This allows us to correlate ash production with degree of rounding with distance from source, and determine the fraction of the fine ash produced due to comminution versus vent-fragmentation mechanisms. In addition we test the error in 2D analysis by completing a 3D image analysis of selected pumice samples using a Camsizer. We find that the roundness of PDC

  9. Balti aadlipreili kunstiharrastusest : Helene Marie Zoege von Manteuffel (1773/74-1842) = Artistic pursuits of an aristocratic Baltic lady : Helene Marie Zoege von Manteuffel (1773/74-1842) / Kadi Polli

    Polli, Kadi, 1973-

    2014-01-01

    Aadlitüdrukute haridusest ja kunstiharidusest Balti valgustusaja kunsti(haridus)maastikul. Perekond Zoege von Manteuffeli kunstilembusest ja Ojasoo mõisa tähtsusest baltisaksa kunstiajaloos. Helene Mariest Franz Gerhard Kügelgeni õpilasena ja abikaasana

  10. ALICES: an advanced object-oriented software workshop for simulators

    Sayet, R.L.; Rouault, G.; Pieroux, D.; Houte, U. Van

    1999-01-01

    Reducing simulator development costs while improving model quality, user-friendliness and teaching capabilities, is a major target for many years in the simulation industry. It has led to the development of specific software tools which have been improved progressively following the new features and capabilities offered by the software industry. Unlike most of these software tools, ALICES (which is a French acronym for 'Interactive Software Workshop for the Design of Simulators') is not an upgrade of a previous generation of tools, like putting a graphical front-end to a classical code generator, but a really new development. Its design specification is based on previous experience with different tools as well as on new capabilities of software technology, mainly in Object Oriented Design. This allowed us to make a real technological 'jump' in the simulation industry, beyond the constraints of some traditional approaches. The main objectives behind the development of ALICES were the following: (1) Minimizing the simulator development time and costs: a simulator development consists mainly in developing software. One way to reduce costs is to facilitate reuse of existing software by developing standard components, and by defining interface standards, (2) Insuring that the produced simulator can be maintained and updated at a minimal cost: a simulator must evolve along with the simulated process, and it is then necessary to update periodically the simulator. The cost of an adequate maintenance is highly dependent of the quality of the software workshop, (3) Covering the whole simulator development process: from the data package to the acceptance tests and for maintenance and upgrade activities; with the whole development team, even if it is dispatched at different working sites; respecting the Quality Assurance rules and procedures (CORYS T.E.S.S. and TRACTEBEL are ISO-9001 certified). The development of ALICES was also done to comply with the following two main

  11. A Gentle Frost: Poet Helen Frost Talks about the Healing Power of Poetry and Her Latest Novel

    Margolis, Rick

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with poet Helen Frost. Frost talked about how poetry can help at-risk children. She also related the challenges she faced when she wrote her latest book titled "The Braid."

  12. Measurements of heavy-flavour decay leptons with ALICE

    Sakai Shingo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of electrons and muons from heavy-flavour hadron decays at central and forward rapidity performed by the ALICE Collaboration in p–Pb (√sNN = 5.02 TeV and Pb–Pb collisions (√sNN = 2.76 TeV. Electrons are reconstructed using several detectors of the ALICE central barrel. Muons are reconstructed using the muon spectrometer at forward rapidity (2.5 < y < 4. The nuclear modification factors in Pb–Pb (RAA and in p–Pb (RpPb collisions, and the azimuthal anisotropy (v2 in Pb– Pb collisions will be discussed. Theoretical predictions are compared with the data. In addition, the measurement of the azimuthal correlation between electrons from heavyflavour hadron decays and charged hadrons in p–Pb collisions will be shown.

  13. A security architecture for the ALICE grid services

    Schreiner, Steffen; Buchmann, Johannes; Betev, Latchezar; Grigoras, Alina

    2012-01-01

    Globally distributed research cyberinfrastructures, like the ALICE Grid Services, need to provide traceability and accountability of operations and internal interactions. This document presents a new security architecture for the ALICE Grid Services, allowing to establish non-repudiation with respect to creatorship and ownership of Grid files and jobs. It is based on mutually authenticated and encrypted communication using X.509 Public Key Infrastructure and the Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol. Introducing certified Grid file entries and signed Grid jobs by implementing a model of Mediated Definite Delegation it allows to establish long-term accountability concerning Grid jobs and files. Initial submissions as well as any alteration of Grid jobs are becoming verifiable and can be traced back to the originator. The architecture has been implemented as a prototype along with the development of a new central Grid middleware, called jAliEn.

  14. Will ALICE run in the HL-LHC era?

    Wessels, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    We will present the perspectives for ion running in the HL-LHC era. In particular, ALICE is preparing a significant upgrade of its rate capabilities and is further extending its particle identification potential. This paves the way for heavy ion physics at unprecedented luminosities, which are expected in the HL-LHC era with the heaviest ions. Here, we outline a scenario, in which ALICE will be taking data at a luminosity of L > 6*10 27 cm -2 *s -1 for Pb-Pb with the aim of collecting at least 10 nb -1 . The potential interest of data-taking during high luminosity proton runs for ATLAS and CMS will also be commented. (author)

  15. Pioneras del punk: el caso de Alice Bag

    Soraya Alonso Alconada

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo es presentar a la música chicana Alice Bag como una de las figuras influyentes en la temprana escena punk de Los Ángeles, California, quien ayudó a abrir el camino a una afluencia mayor de mujeres en la música punk, poniendo así algunos temas feministas en primera línea. De este modo, trataremos de ampliar el ámbito de estudio del punk. Tanto su autobiografía Violence Girl, From East L.A. Rage to Hollywood Stage (2011 y su casi recién estrenado LP Alice Bag (2016 abarcan temas relacionados con la condición de las mujeres chicanas, convirtiendo al punk en una poderosa plataforma de la que se ayuda para articular conceptos feministas y étnicos.

  16. The Level 0 Pixel Trigger system for the ALICE experiment

    Rinella, G Aglieri; Kluge, A; Krivda, M

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector contains 1200 readout chips. Fast-OR signals indicate the presence of at least one hit in the 8192 pixel matrix of each chip. The 1200 bits are transmitted every 100 ns on 120 data readout optical links using the G-Link protocol. The Pixel Trigger System extracts and processes them to deliver an input signal to the Level 0 trigger processor targeting a latency of 800 ns. The system is compact, modular and based on FPGA devices. The architecture allows the user to define and implement various trigger algorithms. The system uses advanced 12-channel parallel optical fiber modules operating at 1310 nm as optical receivers and 12 deserializer chips closely packed in small area receiver boards. Alternative solutions with multi-channel G-Link deserializers implemented directly in programmable hardware devices were investigated. The design of the system and the progress of the ALICE Pixel Trigger project are described in this paper

  17. The ALICE Transition Radiation Detector: Construction, operation, and performance

    Alice Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) was designed and built to enhance the capabilities of the ALICE detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). While aimed at providing electron identification and triggering, the TRD also contributes significantly to the track reconstruction and calibration in the central barrel of ALICE. In this paper the design, construction, operation, and performance of this detector are discussed. A pion rejection factor of up to 410 is achieved at a momentum of 1 GeV/ c in p-Pb collisions and the resolution at high transverse momentum improves by about 40% when including the TRD information in track reconstruction. The triggering capability is demonstrated both for jet, light nuclei, and electron selection.

  18. Members of the ALICE collaboration greet the arrival of the experiment's first 500 lead tungstate crystals

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    L. to r: Vladislav Manko (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, PHOS project leader), Arne Klovning (University of Bergen, PHOS technical coordinator), Vyacheslav Demanov (VNIIEF, Sarov), Bjorn Pommeresche (University of Bergen), Hans de Groot (CERN, ALICE resource coordinator), Dimitri Alexandrov (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow), Mikhail Ippolitov (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow), Yuri Vinogradov (VNIIEF, Sarov), Chris Fabjan (CERN, ALICE technical coordinator), Yuri Sibiriak (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow), Sergei Sadovsky (IHEP, Protvino), Jurgen Schukraft (CERN, ALICE spokesperson).

  19. AliEn - ALICE environment on the GRID

    Saiz, P; Buncic, P; Piskac, R; Revsbech, J E; Sego, V

    2003-01-01

    AliEn (http://alien.cern.ch) (ALICE Environment) is a Grid framework built on top of the latest Internet standards for information exchange and authentication (SOAP, PKI) and common Open Source components. AliEn provides a virtual file catalogue that allows transparent access to distributed datasets and a number of collaborating Web services which implement the authentication, job execution, file transport, performance monitor and event logging. In the paper we will present the architecture and components of the system.

  20. Lead tungstate crystal of the ALICE Photon Spectrometer (PHOS)

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    A consignment of 500 lead tungstate crystals arrived at CERN from the northern Russian town of Apatity in May. Destined for the ALICE heavy-ion experiment in preparation for the Large Hadron Collider, each crystal is an 18 cm long rod with a 2.2 cm square section, and weighs some 750 g. A total of 17 000 crystals will make up the experiment's photon spectrometer.

  1. AliEn - ALICE environment on the GRID

    Saiz, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Buncic, P.; Piskac, R.; Revsbech, J.-E.; Sego, V.

    2003-01-01

    AliEn (http://alien.cern.ch) (ALICE Environment) is a Grid framework built on top of the latest Internet standards for information exchange and authentication (SOAP, PKI) and common Open Source components. AliEn provides a virtual file catalogue that allows transparent access to distributed datasets and a number of collaborating Web services which implement the authentication, job execution, file transport, performance monitor and event logging. In the paper we will present the architecture and components of the system

  2. Track finding with neural networks in ALICE ITS

    Batyunya, B.V.; Belikov, Yu.A.; Fedunov, A.G.; Zinchenko, A.I.

    1996-01-01

    A program based on Neural Networks technique was developed for track recognition in ALICE ITS. The efficiency of this program was estimated on Monte Carlo simulated events for particles with p T ≤ 100 MeV/c. The advantages of this program are the high performance, the capability of track finding in conditions of the high particle multiplicity and the ability to find tracks distorted by the multiple Coulomb scattering and the energy losses. 7 refs., 1 tab

  3. Quality Assurance procedures for the construction of ALICE TOF detector

    Akindinov, A.; Alessandrini, S.; Alici, A.; Antonioli, P.; Arcelli, S.; Basile, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Cavazza, D.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; D'Antone, I.; De Caro, A.; De Pasquale, S.; Di Bartolomeo, A.; Furini, M.; Fusco Girard, M.; Golovin, V.; Grishuk, Yu.; Guerzoni, M.; Guida, M.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Jung, W. W.; Kim, H. N.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. W.; Kiselev, S.; Laurenti, G.; Luvisetto, M. L.; Mal'kevich, D.; Margotti, A.; Massera, F.; Meneghini, S.; Michinelli, R.; Nania, R.; Noferini, F.; Pancaldi, G.; Pesci, A.; Pilastrini, R.; Pinazza, O.; Preghenella, R.; Rizzi, M.; Ryabinin, M.; Scapparone, E.; Scioli, G.; Sellitto, S.; Semeria, F.; Serra, S.; Silvestri, R.; Smirnitski, A.; Ugolini, E.; Usenko, E.; Voloshin, K.; Williams, M. C. S.; Zagreev, B.; Zampolli, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zinine, A.; Zucchini, A.; Zuffa, M.

    2006-08-01

    The goal of the MRPC-detector production for the ALICE TOF is to guarantee the same excellent performances obtained so far with all the prototypes. A set of quality assurance tests has been developed for this purpose; these tests are applied both to the single chamber components and to the assembled detectors. In this paper the results of these tests over a few hundreds MRPCs of the mass production will be presented.

  4. Production of ALICE microstrip detectors at ITC-irst

    Gregori, Paolo; Bellutti, Pierluigi; Boscardin, Maurizio; Collini, Amos; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Pucker, Georg; Zorzi, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    We report on the results from the production of 600 double-sided silicon microstrip detectors for the ALICE experiment. We present the fabrication process and some selected results from the electrical characterization of detectors and test structures. The large amount of experimental data allowed a statistically relevant analysis to be performed. The main technological aspects related to production yield optimization will also be addressed

  5. Quality Assurance procedures for the construction of ALICE TOF detector

    Akindinov, A.; Alessandrini, S.; Alici, A.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of the MRPC-detector production for the ALICE TOF is to guarantee the same excellent performances obtained so far with all the prototypes. A set of quality assurance tests has been developed for this purpose; these tests are applied both to the single chamber components and to the assembled detectors. In this paper the results of these tests over a few hundreds MRPCs of the mass production will be presented

  6. A Dashboard for the Italian Computing in ALICE

    Elia, D.; Vino, G.; Bagnasco, S.; Crescente, A.; Donvito, G.; Franco, A.; Lusso, S.; Mura, D.; Piano, S.; Platania, G.; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    A dashboard devoted to the computing in the Italian sites for the ALICE experiment at the LHC has been deployed. A combination of different complementary monitoring tools is typically used in most of the Tier-2 sites: this makes somewhat difficult to figure out at a glance the status of the site and to compare information extracted from different sources for debugging purposes. To overcome these limitations a dedicated ALICE dashboard has been designed and implemented in each of the ALICE Tier-2 sites in Italy: in particular, it provides a single, interactive and easily customizable graphical interface where heterogeneous data are presented. The dashboard is based on two main ingredients: an open source time-series database and a dashboard builder tool for visualizing time-series metrics. Various sensors, able to collect data from the multiple data sources, have been also written. A first version of a national computing dashboard has been implemented using a specific instance of the builder to gather data from all the local databases.

  7. Monitoring and calibration of the ALICE time projection chamber

    Larsen, Dag Toppe

    The aim of the A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) experiment at CERN is to study the properties of the Quark–Gluon Plasma (QGP). With energies up to 5.5 A T eV for Pb+Pb collisions, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) sets a new benchmark for heavy- ion collisions, and opens the door to a so far unexplored energy domain. A closer look at some of the physics topics of ALICE is given in Chapter 1. ALICE consists of several sub-detectors and other sub-systems. The various sub- detectors are designed for exploring different aspects of the particle production of an heavy-ion collision. Chapter 2 gives some insight into the design. The main tracking detector is the Time Projection Chamber (TPC). It has more than half million read-out channels, divided into 216 Read-out Partitions (RPs). Each RP is a separate Front-End Electronics (FEE) entity, as described in Chapter 3. A complex Detector Control System (DCS) is needed for configuration, monitoring and control. The heart of it on the RP side is a small embedded ...

  8. Jets with ALICE: from vacuum to high-temperature QCD

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    ALICE measures jets in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions to study modifications of the jet fragmentation due to cold nuclear and hot QCD matter. In pp collisions ALICE has measured inclusive jet yields, the ratio of yields with different resolution R, a variety of jet shapes and the semi-inclusive rate of jets recoiling against a high transverse momentum hadron trigger. These measurements are compared to NLO calculations including hadronization corrections and to MC models. Jets in pp are primarily conceived as a vacuum reference for jet observables in p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions. In p-Pb collisions ALICE explores cold nuclear matter effects on jet yields, jet fragmentation and dijet acoplanarity. The hot and dense medium created in heavy-ion collisions is expected to modify the fragmentation of high energy partonic projectiles leading to changes in the energy and structure of the reconstructed jets with respect to pp jets. The study of modified jets aims at understanding the detailed mechanisms of in-medium energy...

  9. The Readout Control Unit of the ALICE TPC

    Lien, J A; Musa, L

    2004-01-01

    The ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main tracking detector of the central barrel of the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider) Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), being constructed at CERN, Geneva. It is a 88 m$^{3}$ cylinder filled with gas and divided into two drift regions by the central electrode located at its axial center. The readout chambers of the TPC are multi-wire proportional chambers with cathode pad readout. About 570 000 pads are read-out by an electronics chain of amplification, digitalization and pre-processing. One of the challenges in designing the TPC for ALICE is the design of Front End Electronics (FEE) to cope with the data rates and the channel occupancy. The Readout Control Unit (RCU), which is presented in this work, is designed to control and monitor the Front End Electronics, and to collect and ship data to the High Level Trigger and the Data Acquisition System, via the Detector Data Link (DDL - optical fibre). The RCU must be capable of reading out up to 200 Mbytes/s f...

  10. Ré-imaginer Alice au pays des merveilles

    Florence Cheron

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland fait l’objet d’adaptations cinématographiques dès les débuts du cinéma. De nombreuses analyses soulèvent, et ce dès les années 1990, le lien tacite entre les films de Tim Burton et les aventures d’Alice. Que ce soient les personnages, les univers ou encore l’absurdité des situations, il semblait évident que le cinéaste en viendrait un jour à filmer sa vision des écrits de Lewis Carroll, comme l’aboutissement d’une idée qui serait en germe depuis toujours. Le réalisateur rendant hommage aux premières illustrations mais aussi aux différentes adaptations d’Alice au cinéma, effectue une synthèse visuelle et narrative de l’ensemble de ces œuvres comme si son Alice in Wonderland devait être une transposition-somme.

  11. Successful beam tests for ALICE Transition Radiation Detector

    2002-01-01

    Another round of beam tests of prototypes for the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) for ALICE has been completed and there are already some good results. Mass production of the components of the detector will start early next year.   Top view of the setup for the Transition Radiation Detector prototype tests at CERN.On the left, can be seen the full-scale TRD prototype together with four smaller versions. These are busy days for the TRD (Transition Radiation Detector) team of ALICE. Twenty people - mainly from Germany, but also from Russia and Japan - were working hard during the beam tests this autumn at CERN to assess the performance of their detector prototypes. Analysis of the data shows that the TRD can achieve the desired physics goal even for the highest conceivable multiplicities in lead-lead collisions at the LHC. In its final configuration in the ALICE experiment, the TRD will greatly help in identifying high-momentum electrons, which are 'needles in a haystack' that consists mostly of...

  12. The C-RORC PCIe Card and its Application in the ALICE and ATLAS Experiments

    Engel, H; Costa, F; Crone, G J; Eschweiler, D; Francis, D; Green, B; Joos, M; Kebschull, U; Kiss, T; Kugel, A; Panduro Vasquez, J G; Soos, C; Teixeira-Dias, P; Tremblet, L; Vande Vyvre, P; Vandelli, W; Vermeulen, J C; Werner, P; Wickens, F J

    2015-01-01

    The ALICE and ATLAS DAQ systems read out detector data via point-to-point serial links into custom hardware modules, the ALICE RORC and ATLAS ROBIN. To meet the increase in operational requirements both experiments are replacing their respective modules with a new common module, the C-RORC. This card, developed by ALICE, implements a PCIe Gen 2 x8 interface and interfaces to twelve optical links via three QSFP transceivers. This paper presents the design of the C-RORC, its performance and its application in the ALICE and ATLAS experiments.

  13. Dr Phil Mjwara Director General, Department of Science and Technology (DST) Ministry of Science and Technology Republic of South Africa visit the Alice experiment introduce by Prof. Jurgen Schukraft, spokeperson for Alice.

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    Dr Phil Mjwara Director General, Department of Science and Technology (DST) Ministry of Science and Technology Republic of South Africa visit the Alice experiment introduce by Prof. Jurgen Schukraft, spokeperson for Alice.

  14. The team from ALICE DAQ (Data acquisition) involved in the 7th ALICE data challenge. First row: Sylvain Chapeland, Ulrich Fuchs, Pierre Vande Vyvre, Franco Carena Second row: Wisla Carena, Irina MAKHLYUEVA , Roberto Divia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2007-01-01

    The team from ALICE DAQ (Data acquisition) involved in the 7th ALICE data challenge. First row: Sylvain Chapeland, Ulrich Fuchs, Pierre Vande Vyvre, Franco Carena Second row: Wisla Carena, Irina MAKHLYUEVA , Roberto Divia

  15. 17 September 2013 - Polish Members of Parliament visiting the Tunnel at Point 2 with Senior Engineer, Technology Department A. Siemko and visiting the ALICE cavern with ALICE Collaboration, B. Erazmus

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    17 September 2013 - Polish Members of Parliament visiting the Tunnel at Point 2 with Senior Engineer, Technology Department A. Siemko and visiting the ALICE cavern with ALICE Collaboration, B. Erazmus

  16. A.L.I.C.E.: an ACE in Digitaland

    Huma Shah

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Artificial linguistic Internet computer entity, A.L.I.C.E. is considered head and shoulders above other artificial conversational entities, an ACE in digitaland. Three times winner of Loebner’s annual instantiation of Turing’s Test for machine intelligence in 2000, 2001 and 2004 judged most human-like machine, A.L.I.C.E. was additionally gold medal champion in 2004, for most knowledgeable programme in Chatterbox Challenge and won bronze medal for most popular ACE. As a modern Eliza, A.L.I.C.E appears as a dark-haired, blue-eyed female avatar, or e-person. The programme’s architecture contains a combinatory scheme including key-word matching, spell checker, grammatical parser, random sentence generator and case-based reasoning or next-neighbour classification. These features allow A.L.I.C.E. to correctly identify the sense of word ‘live’ to produce responses about residential location when asked “where do you live?” and ask question about “subject” being “studied” when presented with “I study a lot”. As a discourse model, discourse features such as information exchange, disclosure of intentions, goals and desires are minimally exhibited in A.L.I.C.E.’s conversations; its verbal behaviour is akin to that of autistic children. However, A.L.I.C.E. type programmes appear on e-commerce Internet sites in a variety of roles; their use will continue to grow as more companies see their deployment as enhancing humancomputer interaction while building brand awareness and increasing sales. ELBOT, Loebner’s 2003 bronze runner up and Chatterbox 2003 winner, is the underlying technology behind text-based dialogical query system Anna, used by Swedish furniture store IKEA. As a virtual customer service agent, NY Wall Street Journal considered it a most useful ACE. As seen in both the Loebner Contests and Chatterbox Challenges, in unrestricted domains these programmes have a long way to go before they are able to constrain their

  17. First measurements with the ALICE detector at LHC

    Elia, D.

    2009-01-01

    The ALICE experiment is designed to measure the properties of strongly interacting matter created in heavy-ion collisions at LHC. The apparatus has several features, such as low p T acceptance and powerful tracking over a broad momentum range, that make ALICE also an important contributor to the first proton-proton physics. In this respect the ALICE physics program aims both at setting the baseline for the understanding of the heavy-ion data and exploring the new energy domain. The charged-particle multiplicity and pseudorapidity density distributions will be the first measurements that ALICE will perform, both in p-p and in Pb-Pb collisions. As those observables correspond to basic properties of the collisions in the new energy domain at LHC, their knowledge will allow to constrain the hadroproduction models and correctly configure the Monte Carlo generators. Moreover, the measurement of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density in the central rapidity region will extend the existing energy dependence pattern and provide an estimate of the energy density attained in the early phase of the collision. Besides these very first measurements, p T spectra of both all charged and identified particles, baryon number transport and strangeness production analyses will also be carried out within the p-p first physics programme. Since it will follow the first p-p run, the early heavy-ion data taking is expected to be carried out with a fully commissioned detector: in particular alignment and calibrations will be available from the previously collected comics and p-p samples. Data quality and statistics should allow, already with this pilot run, to explore quite a rich physics spectrum. The first few 10 4 events (both minimum bias and central collisions) will provide information about global event properties such us multiplicity, pseudorapidity density and elliptical flow. With a statistics of 10 5 to 10 6 events particle spectra, resonances, differential flow and

  18. Mount St. Helens: Controlled-source audio-frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) data and inversions

    Wynn, Jeff; Pierce, Herbert A.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a series of geoelectrical soundings carried out on and near Mount St. Helens volcano, Washington, in 2010–2011. These soundings used a controlled-source audio-frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) approach (Zonge and Hughes, 1991; Simpson and Bahr, 2005). We chose CSAMT for logistical reasons: It can be deployed by helicopter, has an effective depth of penetration of as much as 1 kilometer, and requires less wire than a Schlumberger sounding.

  19. Tähistame Helen Kelleri 130. sünniaastapäeva

    Keskküla, Raissa

    2010-01-01

    Helen Kellerist ja tema sünniaastapäeva tähistamisest, samuti Eesti Pimekurtide Tugiliidu ettevõtmistest: koostöölepingust Eesti Kujurite Ühendusega, punktkirjas väljaantud raamatust "Õppimise ime", Hilton/Perkins programmi kaasabil Eesti pimekurtide ja nägemis-liitpuudega lastega töötavate õpetajate ning töötajate koolitamiset

  20. The Myth of the Male Breadwinner: Women and Industrialization in the Caribbean by Helen I. Safa

    Maurer, WM

    1996-01-01

    What are the implications of women's entry into the industrial workforce for their empowerment at the level of the household, workplace, and political arena? Helen Safa's book compares the experiences of women in Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and Cuba to provide an insightful commentary on the gendered dimensions of the international division of labor. She documents changes in women's status as Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic moved from import-substitution to e...

  1. Helen Howitt: una semilla canadiense en la enfermería latinoamericana Helen Howitt: uma semente canadense na enfermagem latino-americana Helen Howitt: A Canadian seed in Latin American nursing

    ANA LUISA VELANDIA MORA

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo se propone hacer visible la presencia de Helen Howitt en la enfermería latinoamericana. Paralelamente pretende hacer un análisis de la influencia política del Servicio Cooperativo Interamericano de Salud Pública en la enfermería de la región y la presencia de organizaciones religiosas, especialmente norteamericanas, en varios países latinoamericanos. Helen Howitt, enfermera canadiense egresada de la Universidad de Alberta, fue enviada en 1942 por la Organización Panamericana de la Salud, OPS para que asesorara en Colombia al Ministerio de Trabajo, Higiene y Previsión Social. Pasó a formar parte del proyecto de apertura y organización de la Escuela Nacional Superior de Enfermeras, y fue su primera directora. Helen Howitt fue directora de la Escuela de Enfermería del Hospital Santo Tomás de la Zona del Canal de Panamá entre 1933 y 1938, luego fundadora y primera directora de la Escuela Nacional Superior de Enfermeras de Colombia entre los años 1943 y 1951; posteriormente de la Escuela Nacional de Enfermeras de Bolivia entre 1953 y 1959, cuando fue invitada a cumplir un cargo similar en Venezuela. A todos estos países llegó primero como consultora del respectivo Ministerio de Salud, a través de convenios con el Servicio Cooperativo Interamericano de Salud Pública. La Fundación Rockefeller daba becas para todos los países latinos. En la Escuela del Hospital Santo Tomás de Panamá había estudiantes de toda la América Central, Venezuela, Colombia, hasta del Ecuador y la Argentina. La Rockefeller quería unificar la enfermería en toda Latinoamérica. Llegó primero a Venezuela; y las enfermeras que se graduaron en Panamá fueron las líderes en América Latina, donde trataron de fundar escuelas.O presente trabalho pretende visibilizar a presença de Hellen Howitt na enfermagem latino-americana. Paralelamente, procura fazer uma análise sobre a influência política do Serviço Cooperativo Interamericano de Sa

  2. Helen Howitt: una semilla canadiense en la enfermería latinoamericana Helen Howitt: A Canadian seed in Latin American nursing Helen Howitt: uma semente canadense na enfermagem latino-americana

    VELANDIA MORA ANA LUISA

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo se propone hacer visible la presencia de Helen Howitt en la enfermería latinoamericana. Paralelamente pretende hacer un análisis de la influencia política del Servicio Cooperativo Interamericano de Salud Pública en la enfermería de la región y la presencia de organizaciones religiosas, especialmente norteamericanas, en varios países latinoamericanos. Helen Howitt, enfermera canadiense egresada de la Universidad de Alberta, fue enviada en 1942 por la Organización Panamericana de la Salud, OPS para que asesorara en Colombia al Ministerio de Trabajo, Higiene y Previsión Social. Pasó a formar parte del proyecto de apertura y organización de la Escuela Nacional Superior de Enfermeras, y fue su primera directora. Helen Howitt fue directora de la Escuela de Enfermería del Hospital Santo Tomás de la Zona del Canal de Panamá entre 1933 y 1938, luego fundadora y primera directora de la Escuela Nacional Superior de Enfermeras de Colombia entre los años 1943 y 1951; posteriormente de la Escuela Nacional de Enfermeras de Bolivia entre 1953 y 1959, cuando fue invitada a cumplir un cargo similar en Venezuela. A todos estos países llegó primero como consultora del respectivo Ministerio de Salud, a través de convenios con el Servicio Cooperativo Interamericano de Salud Pública. La Fundación Rockefeller daba becas para todos los países latinos. En la Escuela del Hospital Santo Tomás de Panamá había estudiantes de toda la América Central, Venezuela, Colombia, hasta del Ecuador y la Argentina. La Rockefeller quería unificar la enfermería en toda Latinoamérica. Llegó primero a Venezuela; y las enfermeras que se graduaron en Panamá fueron las líderes en América Latina, donde trataron de fundar escuelas.This work's purpose is to make more visible Hellen Howitt's presence in Latin American nursing. At the same time it pretends to make an analysis on the political influence of the Interamerican Cooperative Public

  3. Isocrates’ Encomium of Helen: Reply to Gorgias and the Unicity of his Epideictic Discourse

    Ticiano Curvelo Estrela de Lacerda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Around 390-80 BC, the Athenian Isocrates composed one of his first speeches as an educator, the Helen. According to most scholars, this speech seems to be a replica to the famous Eulogy of Helen by Gorgias, which, according to Isocrates (§14, would have made not an encomium, but an apology on behalf of the Spartan queen. In the Isocratic encomium, we noticed some dissonance between the proemium and the rest of the work. In fact, we do not have in the proemium the expected laudatory tone, but it is configured, on the contrary, as an invective to sophists groups contemporary of Isocrates, and culminates in the end with an allusive criticism of the Leontine sophist. Thus, what the IV century BC sophists have in common with the mythical Helen? In other words, would there be a common thread that would ensure a discursive unity in that epideictic exercise of Isocrates? This study aims to discuss these issues and review how they are being discussed by some commentators of Isocrates, since the Rhetoric of Aristotle to the reception of the matter among some scholars of Classical Rhetoric in the XX century.

  4. Proximal ecological effects of the 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens

    Swanson, F. J.

    1988-01-01

    The diversity of ecosystems and volcanic processes involved in the 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens, southwest Washington, provide an excellent setting for examining effects of volcanic events on ecosystems. These eruptions included a lateral blast, debris avalanche, mudflows, pyroclastic flows, and airfall tephra. Affected ecosystems within 30 km of the vent were lakes, streams, upland and riparian forest, and meadows. Ecological disturbances imposed by the Mount St. Helens events were predominantly physical, rather than climatic or chemical which are the dominant classes of disturbances considered in analysis of global catastrophes. Analysis of ecosystem response to disturbance should be based on consideration of composition and structure of the predisturbance system in terms that represent potential survivability of organisms, mechanisms in the primary disturbance, initial survivors, secondary disturbances arising from the primary disturbance and the biological responses to secondary disturbances, invasion of the site by new propagules, interactions among secondary disturbance processes and surviving and invading organisms. Predicting ecosystem response to disturbance is enchanced by considering the mechanisms of disturbance rather than type of disturbance. In the 1980 Mount St. Helens events, the disturbance types, involved primarily the mechanisms of sedimentation, heating, and shear stress. Each disturbance type involved one or more mechanisms. Ecosystem response varied greatly across the landscape. Analysis of ecosystem response to disturbance, regardless of type, should include detailed consideration of the properties of individual species, primary and secondary disturbance mechanisms, and their distributions across landscapes.

  5. Storia di un Vulcano I GPS di Trimble per monitorare Mount St. Helen

    Edoardo Carlucci

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Venticinque anni fa il peggior disastro vulcanico nella storia degli Stati Uniti attirò l’attenzione di tutto il mondo. L’esplosione, preceduta da un paio di mesi di piccole scosse di terremoto, squarciò il fianco Nord del vulcano St. Helens il 18 maggio 1980, provocando allo stesso tempo il più grande smottamento della storia. L’eruzione seguente all’esplosione cancellò tutta l’area circostante, facendo 57 vittime tra la popolazione e formando un profondo cratere a forma di ferro di cavallo; per sei anni si susseguirono altre piccole eruzioni che portarono alla formazione di un’altra cupola lavica dopodiché Loo-wit (il Guardiano del Fuoco, come i nativi americani usavano chiamare il vulcano St. Helens, si addormentò di nuovo. Prima del fatidico giorno Mount St. Helens era la nona cima per altezza negli Stati Uniti; dopo il 18 maggio essa diventava la trentesima.

  6. Mount St. Helens, 1980 to now—what’s going on?

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Driedger, Carolyn L.; Faust, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Mount St. Helens seized the world’s attention in 1980 when the largest historical landslide on Earth and a powerful explosive eruption reshaped the volcano, created its distinctive crater, and dramatically modified the surrounding landscape. An enormous lava dome grew episodically in the crater until 1986, when the volcano became relatively quiet. A new glacier grew in the crater, wrapping around and partly burying the lava dome. From 1987 to 2003, sporadic earthquake swarms and small steam explosions indicated that magma (molten rock) was being replenished deep underground. In 2004, steam-and-ash explosions heralded the start of another eruption. A quieter phase of continuous lava extrusion followed and lasted until 2008, building a new dome and doubling the volume of lava on the crater floor. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey and University of Washington’s Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network maintain constant watch for signs of renewed activity at Mount St. Helens and other Cascade volcanoes. Now is an ideal time for both actual and virtual visitors to Mount St. Helens to learn more about dramatic changes taking place on and beneath this active volcano.

  7. Student Perceptions of Instructional Tools in Programming Logic: A Comparison of Traditional versus Alice Teaching Environments

    Schultz, Leah

    2011-01-01

    This research investigates the implementation of the programming language Alice to teach computer programming logic to computer information systems students. Alice has been implemented in other university settings and has been reported to have many benefits including object-oriented concepts and an engaging and fun learning environment. In this…

  8. Technical design report for the upgrade of the ALICE inner tracking system

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Anderssen, E. C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bairathi, V.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastian Van Beelen, J.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Battistin, M.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baudot, J.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Benettoni, M.; Benotto, F.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371577810; Berzano, D.; Besson, A.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhatti, A.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371578248; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355079615; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Boehmer, F. V.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bornschein, J.; Borshchov, V. N.; Bortolin, C.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070139032; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411885812; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Cariola, P.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A R; Catanescu, V.; Caudron, T.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411888056; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Claus, G.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Coli, S.; Colledani, C.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Da Riva, E.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Decosse, C.; Delagrange, H.; Delo, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Barros, G. O V; De Caro, A.; De Cataldo, G.; De Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Robertis, G.; De Roo, K.; De Rooij, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315888644; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, O.; Dobrin, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372618715; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dorheim, S.; Dorokhov, A.; Doziere, G.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355502488; Ducroux, L.; Dulinski, W.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A S; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fiorenza, G.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Franco, M.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gajanana, D.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubilato, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; Gomez Marzoa, M.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Greiner, L. C.; Grelli, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326052577; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grondin, D.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J. Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, I.M.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Hennes, E.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hillemanns, H.; Himmi, A.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Hu-Guo, C.; Humanic, T. J.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Igolkin, S.; Ijzermans, P.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jacho lkowski, A.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H S Y; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Junique, A.; Jusko, A.; Kalcher, S.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keil, M.; Ketzer, B.; Khan, M. Mohisin; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Krymov, E. B.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/362845670; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074064975; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladron De Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; La Pointe, S. L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355080192; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; Lesenechal, Y.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Listratenko, O. M.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loddo, F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lu, X. G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355080400; Luzzi, C.; M. Gago, A.; M. Jacobs, P.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Maltsev, N. A.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mapelli, A.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Marras, D.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Maslov, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Mattiazzo, S.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazumder, R.; Mazza, G.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325781435; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Mongelli, M.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Morel, F.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhammad Bhopal, F.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07051349X; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323375618; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Panati, S.; Pant, D.; Pantano, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Passfeld, A.; Pastore, C.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833959; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Pestov, Y.; Petagna, P.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Pham, H.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Poskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L M; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H O; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Protsenko, M. A.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Puggioni, C.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rasson, J. E.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/32823219X; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J. P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossewij, M. J.; Rossi, A.; Roudier, S.; Rousset, J.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sacchetti, M.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Sánchez Rodríguez, F. J.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Santoro, R.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schipper, J. D.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, P. A.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senyukhov, S.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Sgura, I.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/165585781; Snoeys, W.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Sooden, V.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Špalek, J.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A P; Subieta Vasquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Šuljić, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J M; Szanto De Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Ter Minasyan, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turchetta, R.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Tymchuk, I. T.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Valentino, V.; Valin, I.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Vannucci, L.; Van Der Maarel, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412860996; Van Hoorne, J. W.; Van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vasta, P.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Verlaat, B.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; Von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerho, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C S; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Winter, M.; Xiang, C.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I. K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/352841931; Zhao, C.; Zherebchevsky, V. I.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-01-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is studying the physics of strongly interacting matter, and in particular the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), using proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The ALICE Collaboration is

  9. Alignment of the ALICE Inner Tracking System with cosmic-ray tracks

    Aamodt, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Christakoglou, P.; de Haas, A.P.; de Rooij, R. S.; Grelli, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326052577; Ivan, C.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304847747; Kamermans, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073698733; Mischke, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325781435; Nooren, G.J.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07051349X; Oskamp, C.J.; Peitzmann, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833959; Simili, E.; van den Brink, A.; van Leeuwen, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/250599171; Verweij, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330542133

    2010-01-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiment devoted to investigating the strongly interacting matter created in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC energies. The ALICE ITS, Inner Tracking System, consists of six cylindrical layers of silicon detectors with

  10. Open charm analysis with the ALICE detector in pp collisions at LHC

    Ivan, C.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304847747

    2009-01-01

    The upcoming ALICE experiment, at the Large Hadron Collider located at CERN, is designed to investigate the physics of strongly interacting matter at very high energy densities. In this thesis we present an analysis strategy for the feasibility of reconstructing open charm mesons with ALICE via the

  11. Prototype of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) Field-Cage

    2003-01-01

    The ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main particle tracking detector in ALICE. Charged particles crossing the gas of the TPC knock electons out of their atoms, which then drift in in the electric field. By measuring the arrival of electrons at the end of the chamber, the TPC will reconstruct the paths of the original charged particles.

  12. "Alice imedemaal" reaalsust tõsiselt ei võta / Margit Tõnson

    Tõnson, Margit, 1978-

    2004-01-01

    7. veebr. esietendus Vanemuises tantsulavastus "Alice imedemaal". Etendus põhineb briti kirjaniku L. Carrolli samanimelisel lasteraamatul, koreograaf M. Murdmaa, kunstnik K. Jancis ja muusika on kirjutanud ungari helilooja S. Kall̤s, Alice'i osa tantsib korealanna Hye Min Kim

  13. Kaspar Jancis kujundas "Alice'i" arvuti abil / Kaspar Jancis ; interv. Raimu Hanson

    Jancis, Kaspar

    2004-01-01

    7. veebr. esietendub Vanemuises tantsulavastus "Alice imedemaal". Etendus põhineb briti kirjaniku L. Carrolli samanimelisel lasteraamatul, koreograaf M. Murdmaa, kunstnik K. Jancis ja muusika on kirjutanud ungari helilooja S. Kall̤s, Alice'i osa tantsib korealanna Hye Min Kim

  14. ALICE TPC gas system is the first of the LHC experiments to be put on line

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Picture 01 : the Physics Department's DT1 gas systems team in their laboratory. Picture 02 : Chilo Garabatos (ALICE) and Stefan Haider (PH-DT1-GS) in front of the gas system for the ALICE TPC which has just been put on line.

  15. ALICE common read-out receiver card status and HLT implementation

    Engel, Heiko; Kebschull, Udo [IRI, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Collaboration: ALICE-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The ALICE Common Read-Out Receiver Card (C-RORC) is an FPGA based PCIe read out board with optical interfaces primarily developed to replace the previous ALICE High-Level Trigger (HLT) and Data Acquisition (DAQ) Read-Out Receiver Cards from Run1 with a state of the art hardware platform to cope with the increased link rates and event data volume of Run2. The large scale production of the C-RORCs for Run2 has been completed in cooperation with ATLAS and the boards are installed in the productive clusters of ALICE HLT, ALICE DAQ and ATLAS TDAQ ROS. This contribution describes the hardware and firmware of the C-RORC in the ALICE HLT application and its online processing capabilities. Additionally, a high level dataflow description approach to implement hardware processing steps more efficiently is presented.

  16. Compression of TPC data in the ALICE experiment

    Nicolaucig, A.; Mattavelli, M.; Carrato, S.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper two algorithms for the compression of the data generated by the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) detector of the ALICE experiment at CERN are described. The first algorithm is based on a lossless source code modeling technique, i.e. the original TPC signal information can be reconstructed without errors at the decompression stage. The source model exploits the temporal correlation that is present in the TPC data to reduce the entropy of the source. The second algorithm is based on a source model which is lossy if samples of the TPC signal are considered one by one. Conversely, the source model is lossless or quasi-lossless if some physical quantities that are of main interest for the experiment are considered. These quantities are the area and the location of the center of mass of each TPC signal pulse. Obviously entropy coding is applied to the set of events defined by the two source models to reduce the bit rate to the corresponding source entropy. Using TPC simulated data according to the expected ALICE TPC performance, the lossless and the lossy compression algorithms achieve a data reduction, respectively, to 49.2% and in the range of 34.2% down to 23.7% of the original data rate. The number of operations per input symbol required to implement the compression stage for both algorithms is relatively low, so that a real-time implementation embedded in the TPC data acquisition chain using low-cost integrated electronics is a realistic option to effectively reduce the data storing cost of ALICE experiment

  17. DRM2: the readout board for the ALICE TOF upgrade

    Falchieri, Davide

    2018-01-01

    For the upgrade of the ALICE TOF electronics, we have designed a new version of the readout board, named DRM2, a card able to read the data coming from the TDC Readout Module boards via VME. A Microsemi Igloo2 FPGA acts as the VME master and interfaces the GBTx link for transmitting data and receiving triggers and a low-jitter clock. Compared to the old board, the DRM2 is able to cope with faster trigger rates and provides a larger data bandwidth towards the DAQ. The results of the measurements on the received clock jitter and data transmission performances in a full crate are given.

  18. Performance of prototypes for the ALICE electromagnetic calorimeter

    Allen, J.; Awes, T.; Badala, A.; Baumgart, S.; Bellwied, R.; Benhabib, L.; Bernard, C.; Bianchi, N.; Blanco, F.; Bortoli, Y.; Bourdaud, G.; Bourrion, O.; Boyer, B.; Bruna, E.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calvo Diaz Aldagalan, D.; Capitani, G.P.; Carcagno, Y.; Casanova Diaz, A.

    2010-01-01

    The performance of prototypes for the ALICE electromagnetic sampling calorimeter has been studied in test beam measurements at FNAL and CERN. A 4x4 array of final design modules showed an energy resolution of about 11%/√(E(GeV))+1.7% with a uniformity of the response to electrons of 1% and a good linearity in the energy range from 10 to 100 GeV. The electromagnetic shower position resolution was found to be described by 1.5mm+5.3mm/√(E(GeV)). For an electron identification efficiency of 90% a hadron rejection factor of >600 was obtained.

  19. Alice Kask : Maalid ja joonistused = Paintings and drawings / Anu Allas

    Allas, Anu, 1977-

    2007-01-01

    Maalikunstnik Alice Kase loomingust, mis on pälvinud usalduse tänu oma suveräänsusele, süvenemisele ja tõsidusele. Tema tööde jõud seisneb teose ja füüsilise objekti lahutamatuses, iga nüanss maali pinnal sünnib kuju võtnud materjalist enesest. Tema maalid on väga avatud, kohati isegi ohtlikult avatud kõikvõimalikele tõlgendusviisidele, neis on tasakaalustatud segu ilust, täiuselubadusest, hirmutavusest ning kaosest

  20. Measurements of quarkonia with the central detectors of ALICE

    Sommer, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The production of quarkonia, the bound state of an heavy quark with its anti-particle, has for a long time been seen as a key process to understand the properties of nuclear matter in a relativistic heavy-ion collision. This thesis presents studies on the production of quarkonia in heavy-ion collisions at the new Large Hadron collider (LHC). The focus is set on the decay of J/Psi and Upsilon-states into their di-electronic decay channel, measured within the central detectors of the ALICE detector. (orig.)

  1. Measurements of quarkonia with the central detectors of ALICE

    Sommer, Wolfgang

    2008-03-26

    The production of quarkonia, the bound state of an heavy quark with its anti-particle, has for a long time been seen as a key process to understand the properties of nuclear matter in a relativistic heavy-ion collision. This thesis presents studies on the production of quarkonia in heavy-ion collisions at the new Large Hadron collider (LHC). The focus is set on the decay of J/Psi and Upsilon-states into their di-electronic decay channel, measured within the central detectors of the ALICE detector. (orig.)

  2. High-level trigger system for the LHC ALICE experiment

    Bramm, R; Lien, J A; Lindenstruth, V; Loizides, C; Röhrich, D; Skaali, B; Steinbeck, T M; Stock, Reinhard; Ullaland, K; Vestbø, A S; Wiebalck, A

    2003-01-01

    The central detectors of the ALICE experiment at LHC will produce a data size of up to 75 MB/event at an event rate less than approximately equals 200 Hz resulting in a data rate of similar to 15 GB/s. Online processing of the data is necessary in order to select interesting (sub)events ("High Level Trigger"), or to compress data efficiently by modeling techniques. Processing this data requires a massive parallel computing system (High Level Trigger System). The system will consist of a farm of clustered SMP-nodes based on off- the-shelf PCs connected with a high bandwidth low latency network.

  3. A study of Double Pomeron Exchange in ALICE

    Kirk, A.

    1998-01-01

    The non-Abelian nature of QCD suggests that particles that have a gluon constituent, such as glueballs or hybrids, should exist. Experiments WA76, WA91 and WA102 have performed a dedicated search for these states in central production using the CERN Omega Spectrometer. New results from central production show that there is a kinematical filter which can select out glueball candidates from known qqbar states. A further study of this at high energies is essential in order to get information on the M(X0) > 2 GeV region. This paper describes how this could be done using the the ALICE detector at the LHC.

  4. High level trigger system for the ALICE experiment

    Frankenfeld, U.; Roehrich, D.; Ullaland, K.; Vestabo, A.; Helstrup, H.; Lien, J.; Lindenstruth, V.; Schulz, M.; Steinbeck, T.; Wiebalck, A.; Skaali, B.

    2001-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will detect up to 20,000 particles in a single Pb-Pb event resulting in a data rate of ∼75 MByte/event. The event rate is limited by the bandwidth of the data storage system. Higher rates are possible by selecting interesting events and subevents (High Level trigger) or compressing the data efficiently with modeling techniques. Both require a fast parallel pattern recognition. One possible solution to process the detector data at such rates is a farm of clustered SMP nodes, based on off-the-shelf PCs, and connected by a high bandwidth, low latency network

  5. First p-Pb results from the ALICE experiment

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    We present the first results from proton-lead collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=5.02 TeV obtained by the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC. They are based on the data obtained during the pilot p-Pb run in September 2012. The measurements include the pseudorapidity density, transverse momentum distribution and the nuclear modification factor of unidentified charged particles. Our results will be compared to previous p-p, A-A and d-A experimental results and to the available theoretical model predictions. Prospects for the long p-Pb run at the beginning of 2013 will be given.

  6. The readout system for the ALICE zero degree calorimeters

    Siddhanta, S; De Falco, A; Floris, M; Masoni, A; Puddu, G; Serci, S; Uras, A; Usai, G; Arnaldi, R; Bianchi, L; Bossu, F; Chiavassa, E; De Marco, N; Ferretti, A; Gagliardi, M; Gallio, M; Luparello, G; Musso, A; Oppedisano, C; Piccotti, A; Scomparin, E; Vercellin, E; Cortese, P; Dellacasa, G

    2011-01-01

    ALICE at the CERN LHC will investigate the physics of strongly interacting matter at extreme energy densities where the formation of the Quark Gluon Plasma is expected. Its properties can be studied from observations like the production of mesons w ith charm and beauty quarks. These signals have to be studied as a function of energy density, which is determined by the centrality of collisions. One of the physics observables that is closely related with the centrality of the collision is the number o f spectator nucleons that can be measured by the Zero Degree Calorimeters (ZDC). Having a direct geometric interpretation allows to extract the impact parameter with minimal model assumptions. This paper describes the readout system of the ZDC. The ZDC re adout consists of a VME system with a ZDC Readout Card, a VME Processor, Discriminators, a ZDC Trigger Card, scalers, QDCs and TDCs. The system was successfully tested during the 2009 ALICE data taking and is currently operational at the LHC.

  7. The new Inner Tracking System of the ALICE experiment

    Martinengo, P.; Alice Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    The ALICE experiment will undergo a major upgrade during the next LHC Long Shutdown scheduled in 2019-20 that will enable a detailed study of the properties of the QGP, exploiting the increased Pb-Pb luminosity expected during Run 3 and Run 4. The replacement of the existing Inner Tracking System with a completely new ultra-light, high-resolution detector is one of the cornerstones within this upgrade program. The main motivation of the ITS upgrade is to provide ALICE with an improved tracking capability and impact parameter resolution at very low transverse momentum, as well as to enable a substantial increase of the readout rate. The new ITS will consist of seven layers of innovative Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors with the innermost layer sitting at only 23 mm from the interaction point. This talk will focus on the design and the physics performance of the new ITS, as well as the technology choices adopted. The status of the project and the results from the prototypes characterization will also be presented.

  8. Intrusion Prevention and Detection in Grid Computing - The ALICE Case

    Gomez, Andres; Lara, Camilo; Kebschull, Udo

    2015-12-01

    Grids allow users flexible on-demand usage of computing resources through remote communication networks. A remarkable example of a Grid in High Energy Physics (HEP) research is used in the ALICE experiment at European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN. Physicists can submit jobs used to process the huge amount of particle collision data produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Grids face complex security challenges. They are interesting targets for attackers seeking for huge computational resources. Since users can execute arbitrary code in the worker nodes on the Grid sites, special care should be put in this environment. Automatic tools to harden and monitor this scenario are required. Currently, there is no integrated solution for such requirement. This paper describes a new security framework to allow execution of job payloads in a sandboxed context. It also allows process behavior monitoring to detect intrusions, even when new attack methods or zero day vulnerabilities are exploited, by a Machine Learning approach. We plan to implement the proposed framework as a software prototype that will be tested as a component of the ALICE Grid middleware.

  9. ALFA: The new ALICE-FAIR software framework

    Al-Turany, M.; Buncic, P.; Hristov, P.; Kollegger, T.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Lebedev, A.; Lindenstruth, V.; Manafov, A.; Richter, M.; Rybalchenko, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Winckler, N.

    2015-12-01

    The commonalities between the ALICE and FAIR experiments and their computing requirements led to the development of large parts of a common software framework in an experiment independent way. The FairRoot project has already shown the feasibility of such an approach for the FAIR experiments and extending it beyond FAIR to experiments at other facilities[1, 2]. The ALFA framework is a joint development between ALICE Online- Offline (O2) and FairRoot teams. ALFA is designed as a flexible, elastic system, which balances reliability and ease of development with performance using multi-processing and multithreading. A message- based approach has been adopted; such an approach will support the use of the software on different hardware platforms, including heterogeneous systems. Each process in ALFA assumes limited communication and reliance on other processes. Such a design will add horizontal scaling (multiple processes) to vertical scaling provided by multiple threads to meet computing and throughput demands. ALFA does not dictate any application protocols. Potentially, any content-based processor or any source can change the application protocol. The framework supports different serialization standards for data exchange between different hardware and software languages.

  10. ALICE makes a clean sweep at Point 2

    2001-01-01

    Since the middle of June the ALICE collaboration has taken up residence at Point 2, previously occupied by L3, and is now preparing the cavern for the arrival of its detector. The last muon chambers of the L3 experiment were removed at the beginning of July. Anyone who knew L3 when it was in operation will be in for a shock if they go down to the cavern at Point 2, which looks as if it's been emptied of all its contents. The members of the ALICE collaboration would not quite share that point of view, however, as some components still have to be dismantled before the cavern can receive its new detector. The collaboration, which has inherited L3's huge red magnet, took over at Point 2 in the middle of June and is now getting down to work. This is the first major stage in the installation of the future detector, which has to be ready to observe its first LHC collisions on 1 April 2006. The first difficulty is to remove the support tube running through the magnet. This huge 32-metre long, 4.5-m diameter, 300-t...

  11. The upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    Ravasenga, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    In 2021, for the third run of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), Pb-Pb collisions will be performed at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon of 5.5 TeV, with an integrated luminosity of $6 \\times 10^{27}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ and at an unprecedented interaction rate up to 50 kHz. To fulfil the requirements of the ALICE physics program for Run 3, the ALICE experiment at LHC is planning a major upgrade during the Long Shutdown 2 of LHC in 2019-2020. One of the key elements, is the construction of a new ultra-light and high-resolution Inner Tracking System (ITS). The upgraded ITS will significantly enhance the determination of the distance of closest approach to the primary vertex, the tracking efficiency at low transverse momenta, and the read-out rate capabilities, with respect to what can be achieved with the current detector. It will consist of seven layers equipped with silicon Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) with a pixel size of the order of $30 \\times 30 \\mu m^2$. They will be produced by Towerjazz ...

  12. Mediated definite delegation - Certified Grid jobs in ALICE and beyond

    Schreiner, Steffen; Grigoras, Costin; Litmaath, Maarten; Betev, Latchezar; Buchmann, Johannes

    2012-12-01

    Grid computing infrastructures need to provide traceability and accounting of their users’ activity and protection against misuse and privilege escalation, where the delegation of privileges in the course of a job submission is a key concern. This work describes an improved handling of Multi-user Grid Jobs in the ALICE Grid Services. A security analysis of the ALICE Grid job model is presented with derived security objectives, followed by a discussion of existing approaches of unrestricted delegation based on X.509 proxy certificates and the Grid middleware gLExec. Unrestricted delegation has severe security consequences and limitations, most importantly allowing for identity theft and forgery of jobs and data. These limitations are discussed and formulated, both in general and with respect to an adoption in line with Multi-user Grid Jobs. A new general model of mediated definite delegation is developed, allowing a broker to dynamically process and assign Grid jobs to agents while providing strong accountability and long-term traceability. A prototype implementation allowing for fully certified Grid jobs is presented as well as a potential interaction with gLExec. The achieved improvements regarding system security, malicious job exploitation, identity protection, and accountability are emphasized, including a discussion of non-repudiation in the face of malicious Grid jobs.

  13. Raw-data display and visual reconstruction validation in ALICE

    Tadel, M

    2008-01-01

    ALICE Event Visualization Environment (AliEVE) is based on ROOT and its GUI, 2D and 3D graphics classes. A small application kernel provides for registration and management of visualization objects. CINT scripts are used as an extensible mechanism for data extraction, selection and processing as well as for steering of frequent event-related tasks. AliEVE is used for event visualization in offline and high-level trigger frameworks. Mechanisms and base-classes provided for visual representation of raw-data for different detector-types are described. Common infrastructure for thresholding and color-coding of signal/time information, placement of detector-modules in various 2D/3D layouts and for user-interaction with displayed data is presented. Methods for visualization of raw-data on different levels of detail are discussed as they are expected to play an important role during early detector operation with poorly understood detector calibration, occupancy and noise-levels. Since September 2006 ALICE applies a regular visual-scanning procedure to simulated proton-proton data to detect any shortcomings in cluster finding, tracking and primary and secondary vertex reconstruction. A high-level of interactivity is required to allow in-depth exploration of event-structure. Navigation back to simulation records is supported for debugging purposes. Standard 2D projections and transformations are available for clusters, tracks and simplified detector geometry

  14. Angular power spectrum in publically released ALICE events

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Muñoz Martinez, Jose L.

    2018-02-01

    We study the particles emitted in the fireball following a Relativistic Heavy Ion Collision with the traditional angular analysis employed in cosmology and earth sciences, producing Mollweide plots of the number and pt distribution of a few actual, publically released ALICE-collaboration events and calculating their angular power spectrum. We also examine the angular spectrum of a simple two-particle correlation. While this may not be the optimal way of analyzing heavy ion data, our intention is to provide a one to one comparison to analysis in cosmology. With the limited statistics at hand, we do not find evidence for acoustic peaks but a decrease of Cl that is reminiscent of viscous attenuation, but subject to a strong effect from the rapidity acceptance which probably dominates (so we also subtract the m = 0 component). As an exercise, we still extract a characteristic Silk damping length (proportional to the square root of the viscosity over entropy density ratio) to illustrate the method. The absence of acoustic-like peaks is also compatible with a crossover from the QGP to the hadron gas (because a surface tension at domain boundaries would effect a restoring force that could have driven acoustic oscillations). Presently we do not understand a depression of the l = 6 multipole strength; perhaps ALICE could reexamine it with full statistics.

  15. The Alice dimuon trigger: overview and electronics prototypes

    Arnaldi, R.; Baldit, A.; Barret, V.; Bastid, N.

    2000-01-01

    ALICE is the LHC experiment (2005) dedicated to the study of heavy ion collisions. Amongst the ALICE sub-detectors, the muon spectrometer will investigate the dimuon production from heavy resonance (J/ψ,γ) decays, which is believed to be a promising signature of the QGP (quark Gluon Plasma) formation. For maximum efficiency of the spectrometer, a dedicated dimuon trigger is presently built. The detector part itself is based on RPCs operated in streamer mode and is the topic of another contribution to this conference. This paper gives the principle and the simulated performances of the trigger and is also focussed on the description of the electronics prototypes and future developments. The RPCs are read-out by X and Y orthogonal strips: the front-end chips are presently developed. The signals are sent to the trigger electronics which basically performs a pt cut on the tracks to reduce the background. A prototype of fast (decision time 200 ns) programmable electronics working in a pipelined mode at 40 MHz has been built and tested. This prototype handles simultaneously 160 digital information from the strips. The tests of the trigger card have required the construction of a pattern generator (160 bits at 40 MHz). (author)

  16. Radiation hard analog circuits for ALICE ITS upgrade

    Gajanana, D.; Gromov, V.; Kuijer, P.; Kugathasan, T.; Snoeys, W.

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE experiment is planning to upgrade the ITS (Inner Tracking System) [1] detector during the LS2 shutdown. The present ITS will be fully replaced with a new one entirely based on CMOS monolithic pixel sensor chips fabricated in TowerJazz CMOS 0.18 μ m imaging technology. The large (3 cm × 1.5 cm  = 4.5 cm 2 ) ALPIDE (ALICE PIxel DEtector) sensor chip contains about 500 Kpixels, and will be used to cover a 10 m 2 area with 12.5 Gpixels distributed over seven cylindrical layers. The ALPOSE chip was designed as a test chip for the various building blocks foreseen in the ALPIDE [2] pixel chip from CERN. The building blocks include: bandgap and Temperature sensor in four different flavours, and LDOs for powering schemes. One flavour of bandgap and temperature sensor will be included in the ALPIDE chip. Power consumption numbers have dropped very significantly making the use of LDOs less interesting, but in this paper all blocks are presented including measurement results before and after irradiation with neutrons to characterize robustness against displacement damage

  17. Studies for the ALICE Inner Tracking System Upgrade

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079168; Musa, Luciano

    The ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC identifies D0 mesons via secondary-vertex reconstruction and topological cuts to reduce the corresponding combinatorial background in heavy-ion collisions. The D0 meson is produced promptly in initial, hard scatterings via the strong interaction or as feed-down from weakly decaying B hadrons. Within this thesis, a novel method for the separation of prompt and feed-down D0 mesons using cut variations was implemented and applied to data from p–Pb collisions at $\\sqrt(s_\\mathrm{NN})=5.02$ TeV. The effectiveness of the secondary-vertex reconstruction strongly depends on the performance and in particular the pointing resolution of the Inner Tracking System. The upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System for the Long Shutdown 2 of the LHC in 2019/2020 will significantly improve its vertex-reconstruction and tracking capabilities. It will be equipped with Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors manufactured using the TowerJazz 180nm CMOS process on wafers with a high-resistivity epitax...

  18. Radiation hard analog circuits for ALICE ITS upgrade

    Gajanana, D.; Gromov, V.; Kuijer, P.; Kugathasan, T.; Snoeys, W.

    2016-03-01

    The ALICE experiment is planning to upgrade the ITS (Inner Tracking System) [1] detector during the LS2 shutdown. The present ITS will be fully replaced with a new one entirely based on CMOS monolithic pixel sensor chips fabricated in TowerJazz CMOS 0.18 μ m imaging technology. The large (3 cm × 1.5 cm = 4.5 cm2) ALPIDE (ALICE PIxel DEtector) sensor chip contains about 500 Kpixels, and will be used to cover a 10 m2 area with 12.5 Gpixels distributed over seven cylindrical layers. The ALPOSE chip was designed as a test chip for the various building blocks foreseen in the ALPIDE [2] pixel chip from CERN. The building blocks include: bandgap and Temperature sensor in four different flavours, and LDOs for powering schemes. One flavour of bandgap and temperature sensor will be included in the ALPIDE chip. Power consumption numbers have dropped very significantly making the use of LDOs less interesting, but in this paper all blocks are presented including measurement results before and after irradiation with neutrons to characterize robustness against displacement damage.

  19. Studies on the upgrade of the ALICE central tracker

    Mager, Magnus; Musa, Luciano

    2012-11-14

    When two high-energy lead ions collide, as they currently do inside the “Large Hadron Collider” (LHC) of the “European Organization for Nuclear Research” (CERN), energy densities similar to those shortly (some 1ps to 10μs) after the Big Bang are created. At these energies quarks are loosing their confinement into hadrons and may move around freely, the “quark-gluon plasma” (QGP) is created. Such a picture deserves of course a thorough check and a precise measurement. There are however intrinsic difficulties to overcome: the macroscopic free energy (about 1 mJ) of these collision allow for an infinite number of processes to happen and finally—-due to mass-energy equivalence--a significant number (order of 10,000) of particles is created. The ALICE experiment was designed to be able to cope with this large number of particles, it can measure the properties (species and momentum) of the big majority. This requires a very fine segmentation of the detector. The central part of ALICE is made of a 90 ...

  20. Fourth Data Challenge for the ALICE data acquisition system

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The ALICE experiment will study quark-gluon plasma using beams of heavy ions, such as those of lead. The particles in the beams will collide thousands of times per second in the detector and each collision will generate an event containing thousands of charged particles. Every second, the characteristics of tens of thousands of particles will have to be recorded. Thus, to be effective, the data acquisition system (DAQ) must meet extremely strict performance criteria. To this end, the ALICE Data Challenges entail step-by-step testing of the DAQ with existing equipment that is sufficiently close to the final equipment to provide a reliable indication of performance. During the fourth challenge, in 2002, a data acquisition rate of 1800 megabytes per second was achieved by using some thirty parallel-linked PCs running the specially developed DATE software. During the final week of tests in December 2002, the team also tested the Storage Tek linear magnetic tape drives. Their bandwidth is 30 megabytes per second a...

  1. Future Upgrade and Physics Perspectives of the ALICE TPC

    INSPIRE-00033137

    The ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) proposes major detector upgrades to fully exploit the increase of the luminosity of the LHC in RUN~3 and to extend the physics reach for rare probes at low transverse momentum. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is one of the main tracking and PID devices in the central barrel of ALICE. The maximum trigger rate of the TPC is currently limited to about 3.5 kHz by the operation of a gating grid system. In order to make full use of the luminosity in RUN 3, the TPC is foreseen to be operated in an ungated mode with continuous readout. The existing MWPC readout will be replaced by a Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detector (MPGD) based readout, which provides intrinsic ion capture capability without gating. Extensive detector R\\&D employing Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and Micro-Mesh Gaseous detector (Micromegas) technologies, and simulation studies to advance the techniques for the corrections of space-charge distortions have been performed since 2012. In this pap...

  2. TAB Bonded SSD Module for the STAR and ALICE Trackers

    Lutz, Jean Robert; Baudot, J; Bonnet, D; Coffin, J P; Germain, M; Gojak, C; Jundt, F; Kühn, C E; Suire, C; Tarchini, A; Berst, D; Clauss, G; Colledani, C; Dulinski, W; Boucham, A; Bouvier, S; Castillo, J; Drancourt, C; Erazmus, B; Guilloux, G; Martin, L; Roy, C

    1999-01-01

    Presentation made at LEB99, 20-24 September 1999A novel compact detector module has been produced by the "IReS"-"Subatech"-"Thomson-CSF-Detexis" collaboration. It includes a Double-Sided (DS) Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) and the related Front End Electronics (FEE) located on two hybrids, one for the N side and one for the P side. Bumpless Tape Automated Bonding (TAB) is used to connect the detector to the hybrids by means of microcables with neither wirebonding nor pitch adapter. Each of the six dedicated ALICE128C FE chip [1], located on the hybrid, is TABed on identical single layer microcables, which connect its inputs to the DS SSD and its outputs to the hybrid [2]. These microcables are bent in order to fold over the two hybrids on the DS SSD. This module meets the specifications of two experiments, ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) on the LHC accelerator at CERN [3] and STAR (Solenoid Tracker At Rhic) on the RHIC accelerator at BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory)[4]. It can be used with air cooli...

  3. Alice Munro's "Runaway" in the Mirror of Sigmund Freud

    Raheleh Bahador

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mirroring the complexities of the human psyche, literature has received new comprehension through a psychoanalytic lens.  Alice Munro's "Runaway" (2003 is character-based and has the psychological analysis potential but it had never received such kind of study. The objective of the present paper is to read Munro's "Runaway" in the mirror of Sigmund Freud to detect the psychological aspects of its fictional characters. The characters are driven by the Freudian mental agencies and undergo phases of psychic disorder.  In the present paper, Munro's short fiction has been discussed based on Sigmund Freud's theory of the Unconscious and its connection with the interpretation of dreams as well as the symbolization of three main characters based on tripartite agencies of the id, ego and superego. Clarifying the latent and manifest levels of characters and the world of dreams indicates the artistic creation of Alice Munro in handling complex characterization. The unconscious and its connection with the female character's dreams have been discussed. The unconscious of the female character is reflected in her dreams in result of repression and asocial drives and desires. Unconscious through dreams is the mirror of the repressed psyche of the female character. Scrutinizing the three main characters in terms of Freudian psychic trilogy, they prove to fit their psychological Freudian terms.

  4. Upgrade of the Inner Tracking System of ALICE

    Kofarago, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The upgrade of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of ALICE is planned for the second long shutdown of the LHC in 2019-2020. The ALICE physics program after the shutdown requires the ITS to have improved tracking capabilities and improved impact parameter resolution at very low transverse momentum, as well as a substantial increase in the readout rate. To fulfill these requirements the current ITS will be replaced by seven layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors. The new detector will be moved as close as 23 mm to the interaction point and will have a significantly reduced material budget. Several prototypes of the sensor have been developed to test different aspects of the sensor design including prototypes with analog and digital readout, as well as small and final-size sensors. These prototypes have been thoroughly characterized both in laboratory tests and at test beam facilities including studies on the radiation hardness of the sensors. This contribution gives an overview of the current status of the rese...

  5. Front-end electronics for the ALICE calorimeters

    Wang, Ya-Ping; Muller, Hans; Cai, Xu; Zhou, Daicui; Yin, Zhong-Bao; Awes, Terry C.; Wang, Dong

    2010-01-01

    The ALICE calorimeters PHOS and EMCal are based on Avalanche Photo-Diode (APD) photosensors with Charge Sensitive Preamplifiers (CSP) for readout of the scintillating elements. The amplified signals are read out via 32-channel shaper/digitizer front-end electronics (FEE) with 14-bit effective dynamic range. The electronics is based on second order shapers with dual gain for each channel, getting digitized by ALTRO chips. Each APD channel is equipped with an individual 10-bit APD gain adjustment and 2×2 channel clusters generate a 100 ns shaped analog sums output (Fast OR) for the associated Trigger Region Units (TRU). The Fast OR signals are generated by first order shapers with a dynamic range of 12-bit given by the ADC in the TRU cards. Board controller firmware in the FPGA provides local monitoring and configuration of all parameters via the ALICE DCS system. The signal to noise ratio for MIP at 215 MeV is not, vert, similar7 per channel with a noise level of 30 MeV at room temperature for a dynamic range...

  6. Mediated definite delegation - Certified Grid jobs in ALICE and beyond

    Schreiner, Steffen; Buchmann, Johannes; Grigoras, Costin; Litmaath, Maarten; Betev, Latchezar

    2012-01-01

    Grid computing infrastructures need to provide traceability and accounting of their users’ activity and protection against misuse and privilege escalation, where the delegation of privileges in the course of a job submission is a key concern. This work describes an improved handling of Multi-user Grid Jobs in the ALICE Grid Services. A security analysis of the ALICE Grid job model is presented with derived security objectives, followed by a discussion of existing approaches of unrestricted delegation based on X.509 proxy certificates and the Grid middleware gLExec. Unrestricted delegation has severe security consequences and limitations, most importantly allowing for identity theft and forgery of jobs and data. These limitations are discussed and formulated, both in general and with respect to an adoption in line with Multi-user Grid Jobs. A new general model of mediated definite delegation is developed, allowing a broker to dynamically process and assign Grid jobs to agents while providing strong accountability and long-term traceability. A prototype implementation allowing for fully certified Grid jobs is presented as well as a potential interaction with gLExec. The achieved improvements regarding system security, malicious job exploitation, identity protection, and accountability are emphasized, including a discussion of non-repudiation in the face of malicious Grid jobs.

  7. Operational experience with the ALICE High Level Trigger

    Szostak, Artur

    2012-12-01

    The ALICE HLT is a dedicated real-time system for online event reconstruction and triggering. Its main goal is to reduce the raw data volume read from the detectors by an order of magnitude, to fit within the available data acquisition bandwidth. This is accomplished by a combination of data compression and triggering. When HLT is enabled, data is recorded only for events selected by HLT. The combination of both approaches allows for flexible data reduction strategies. Event reconstruction places a high computational load on HLT. Thus, a large dedicated computing cluster is required, comprising 248 machines, all interconnected with InfiniBand. Running a large system like HLT in production mode proves to be a challenge. During the 2010 pp and Pb-Pb data-taking period, many problems were experienced that led to a sub-optimal operational efficiency. Lessons were learned and certain crucial changes were made to the architecture and software in preparation for the 2011 Pb-Pb run, in which HLT had a vital role performing data compression for ALICE's largest detector, the TPC. An overview of the status of the HLT and experience from the 2010/2011 production runs are presented. Emphasis is given to the overall performance, showing an improved efficiency and stability in 2011 compared to 2010, attributed to the significant improvements made to the system. Further opportunities for improvement are identified and discussed.

  8. Operational experience with the ALICE High Level Trigger

    Szostak, Artur

    2012-01-01

    The ALICE HLT is a dedicated real-time system for online event reconstruction and triggering. Its main goal is to reduce the raw data volume read from the detectors by an order of magnitude, to fit within the available data acquisition bandwidth. This is accomplished by a combination of data compression and triggering. When HLT is enabled, data is recorded only for events selected by HLT. The combination of both approaches allows for flexible data reduction strategies. Event reconstruction places a high computational load on HLT. Thus, a large dedicated computing cluster is required, comprising 248 machines, all interconnected with InfiniBand. Running a large system like HLT in production mode proves to be a challenge. During the 2010 pp and Pb-Pb data-taking period, many problems were experienced that led to a sub-optimal operational efficiency. Lessons were learned and certain crucial changes were made to the architecture and software in preparation for the 2011 Pb-Pb run, in which HLT had a vital role performing data compression for ALICE's largest detector, the TPC. An overview of the status of the HLT and experience from the 2010/2011 production runs are presented. Emphasis is given to the overall performance, showing an improved efficiency and stability in 2011 compared to 2010, attributed to the significant improvements made to the system. Further opportunities for improvement are identified and discussed.

  9. Multivariate Analysis Techniques for charm reconstruction with ALICE

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    ALICE is the experiment at the LHC dedicated to heavy-ion collisions. One of the key tools to investigate the strongly-interacting medium (Quark-Gluon Plasma, QGP) formed in heavy-ion collisions is the measurement of open-charm particle production. In particular, charmed baryons, such as ΛC, provide essential information for the understanding of charm thermalisation and hadronisation in the QGP. Data from proton-proton and proton-Pb collisions are needed as a reference for interpreting the results in Pb-Pb collisions, as well as to study charm hadronisation into baryons "in-vacuum". The relatively short lifetime of the ΛC baryon, cτ~60μm, makes the reconstruction of its decay a challenging task that profits from the excellent performance of ALICE in terms of secondary vertex reconstruction and particle identification. The application of multivariateanalysis (MVA) techniques through Boosted Decision Trees can facilitate the separation of the ΛC signal from the background, and as such be a complementary ap...

  10. Commissioning and initial experience with the ALICE on-line

    Altini, V; Anticic, T; Carena, F; Carena, W; Chapeland, S; Barroso, V Chibante; Costa, F; Divia, R; Fuchs, U; Makhlyueva, I; Roukoutakis, F; Schossmaier, K; Soos, C; Vyvre, P Vande; Haller, B von; Denes, E; Kiss, T

    2010-01-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A large bandwidth and flexible Data Acquisition System (DAQ) has been designed and deployed to collect sufficient statistics in the short running time available per year for heavy ions and to accommodate very different requirements originated from the 18 sub-detectors. This paper will present the large scale tests conducted to assess the standalone DAQ performances, the interfaces with the other online systems and the extensive commissioning performed in order to be fully prepared for physics data taking. It will review the experience accumulated since May 2007 during the standalone commissioning of the main detectors and the global cosmic runs and the lessons learned from this exposure on the b attle field . It will also discuss the test protocol followed to integrate and validate each sub-detector with the online systems and it will conclude with the first results of the LHC injection tests and startup in September 2008. Several papers of the same conference present in more details some elements of the ALICE DAQ system.

  11. Commissioning and initial experience with the ALICE on-line

    Altini, V [INFN, Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita and Sezione INFN Bari (Italy); Anticic, T [Ruder Botkovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Carena, F; Carena, W; Chapeland, S; Barroso, V Chibante; Costa, F; Divia, R; Fuchs, U; Makhlyueva, I; Roukoutakis, F; Schossmaier, K; Soos, C; Vyvre, P Vande; Haller, B von [CERN, Physics department, Geneva (Switzerland); Denes, E; Kiss, T, E-mail: pierre.vande.vyvre@cern.c [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-04-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A large bandwidth and flexible Data Acquisition System (DAQ) has been designed and deployed to collect sufficient statistics in the short running time available per year for heavy ions and to accommodate very different requirements originated from the 18 sub-detectors. This paper will present the large scale tests conducted to assess the standalone DAQ performances, the interfaces with the other online systems and the extensive commissioning performed in order to be fully prepared for physics data taking. It will review the experience accumulated since May 2007 during the standalone commissioning of the main detectors and the global cosmic runs and the lessons learned from this exposure on the {sup b}attle field{sup .} It will also discuss the test protocol followed to integrate and validate each sub-detector with the online systems and it will conclude with the first results of the LHC injection tests and startup in September 2008. Several papers of the same conference present in more details some elements of the ALICE DAQ system.

  12. Commissioning and initial experience with the ALICE on-line

    Altini, V.; Anticic, T.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Dénes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Kiss, T.; Makhlyueva, I.; Roukoutakis, F.; Schossmaier, K.; Soós, C.; Vande Vyvre, P.; von Haller, B.; ALICE Collaboration

    2010-04-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A large bandwidth and flexible Data Acquisition System (DAQ) has been designed and deployed to collect sufficient statistics in the short running time available per year for heavy ions and to accommodate very different requirements originated from the 18 sub-detectors. This paper will present the large scale tests conducted to assess the standalone DAQ performances, the interfaces with the other online systems and the extensive commissioning performed in order to be fully prepared for physics data taking. It will review the experience accumulated since May 2007 during the standalone commissioning of the main detectors and the global cosmic runs and the lessons learned from this exposure on the "battle field". It will also discuss the test protocol followed to integrate and validate each sub-detector with the online systems and it will conclude with the first results of the LHC injection tests and startup in September 2008. Several papers of the same conference present in more details some elements of the ALICE DAQ system.

  13. Dynamic parallel ROOT facility clusters on the Alice Environment

    Luzzi, C; Betev, L; Carminati, F; Grigoras, C; Saiz, P; Manafov, A

    2012-01-01

    The ALICE collaboration has developed a production environment (AliEn) that implements the full set of the Grid tools enabling the full offline computational work-flow of the experiment, simulation, reconstruction and data analysis, in a distributed and heterogeneous computing environment. In addition to the analysis on the Grid, ALICE uses a set of local interactive analysis facilities installed with the Parallel ROOT Facility (PROOF). PROOF enables physicists to analyze medium-sized (order of 200-300 TB) data sets on a short time scale. The default installation of PROOF is on a static dedicated cluster, typically 200-300 cores. This well-proven approach, has its limitations, more specifically for analysis of larger datasets or when the installation of a dedicated cluster is not possible. Using a new framework called PoD (Proof on Demand), PROOF can be used directly on Grid-enabled clusters, by dynamically assigning interactive nodes on user request. The integration of Proof on Demand in the AliEn framework provides private dynamic PROOF clusters as a Grid service. This functionality is transparent to the user who will submit interactive jobs to the AliEn system.

  14. Intrusion Prevention and Detection in Grid Computing - The ALICE Case

    Gomez, Andres; Lara, Camilo; Kebschull, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Grids allow users flexible on-demand usage of computing resources through remote communication networks. A remarkable example of a Grid in High Energy Physics (HEP) research is used in the ALICE experiment at European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN. Physicists can submit jobs used to process the huge amount of particle collision data produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Grids face complex security challenges. They are interesting targets for attackers seeking for huge computational resources. Since users can execute arbitrary code in the worker nodes on the Grid sites, special care should be put in this environment. Automatic tools to harden and monitor this scenario are required. Currently, there is no integrated solution for such requirement. This paper describes a new security framework to allow execution of job payloads in a sandboxed context. It also allows process behavior monitoring to detect intrusions, even when new attack methods or zero day vulnerabilities are exploited, by a Machine Learning approach. We plan to implement the proposed framework as a software prototype that will be tested as a component of the ALICE Grid middleware. (paper)

  15. The ALICE Dimuon Trigger Overview and Electronics Prototypes

    Arnaldi, R; Barret, V; Bastid, N; Blanchard, G; Chiavassa, E; Cortese, P; Crochet, Philippe; Dellacasa, G; De Marco, N; Drancourt, C; Dupieux, P; Espagnon, B; Fargeix, J; Ferretti, A; Gallio, M; Genoux-Lubain, A; Lamoine, L; Lefèvre, F; Luquin, Lionel; Manso, F; Métivier, V; Musso, A; Oppedisano, C; Piccotti, A; Royer, L; Roig, O; Rosnet, P; Scalas, E; Scomparin, E; Vercellin, Ermanno

    2000-01-01

    Presentation made at RPC99 and submitted to NIM ALICE is the LHC experiment (2005) dedicated to the study of heavy ion collisions. Amongst the ALICE sub-detectors, the muon spectrometer will investigate the dimuon production from heavy resonance (J/psi, Gamma) decays, which is believed to be a promising signature of the QGP (Quark Gluon Plasma) formation.For maximum efficiency of the spectrometer, a dedicated dimuon trigger is presently built. The detector partis itself based on RPCs operated in streamer mode and is the topic of another contribution to this conference. This paper gives the principle and the simulated performances of the trigger and is also focussed on the description of the electronics prototypes and future developments. The RPCs are read-out by X and Y orthogonal strips: the front-end chips are presently developed. The signals are sent to the trigger electronics which basically performs a pt cut on the tracks to reduce the background. A prototype of fast (decision time 200 ns) programmable e...

  16. Jets with ALICE. From vacuum to QCD at high temperatures

    Leticia, Cunqueiro [University of Muenster (Germany); Collaboration: ALICE-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The hot and dense medium created in heavy-ion collisions is expected to modify the yield and radiation pattern of jets relative to proton proton collisions. The study of medium-induced modifications in jets aims at the understanding of the detailed mechanisms of in medium energy loss of partons and of fundamental properties of QCD at high temperatures. ALICE measures jets in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions, where pp and p-Pb are conceived primarily as a reference for vacuum and cold nuclear effects respectively. The jet program comprises measurements like yields for different resolution R, intra-jet and inter-jet modifications via jet shapes and hadron-jet correlations, path length dependence of energy loss via jet flow v{sub 2}, hadrochemistry via jet constituent identification, flavour/mass hierarchy of energy loss via heavy flavour tagging etc. Several of the latest ALICE jet physics results are presented and discussed with emphasis on new studies on jet substructure and jet shapes.

  17. Large-amplitude traveling ionospheric distrubance produced by the May 18, 1980, explosion of Mount St. Helens

    Roberts, D.H.; Klobuchar, J.A.; Fougere, P.F.; Hendrickson, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    A remarkable long-lived, large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance (TID), excited by the May 18, 1980, explosion of Mount St. Helens, has been detected in total electron content monitor data. Oscillatory perturbations in the electron column density of the ionosphere with amplitudes about 10% of the nominal daytime content were detected at three stations whose ionospheric penetration points lie between 1610 and 1890 km from Mount St. Helens. Smaller perturbations were detected at five of six additional stations between 3760 and 4950 km away. The period of the TID increased linearly with great-circle distance from Mount St. Helens, ranging from roughly-equal37 min at the nearest station to roughly-equal116 min at the most distant one. The TID persisted for at least four cycles at the three close stations and three cycles at the more distant stations and was qualitatively similar to TID's produced by the low-altitude thermonuclear detonations of the 1960's. The disturbance front of this TID accelerated from an average velocity of roughly-equal350 m/s between Mt. St. Helens and the close stations to an average velocity of roughly-equal550 m/s to the more distant ones.A model based on the free wave response of an isothermal atmosphere to a point disturbance provides a good fit to the data at the three closest stations, but no such model can account for all of the data. Modeling of the long-distance behavior of the Mount St. Helens TID in terms of upper-atmosphere guided gravity waves is complicated by the requirement of exciting them by a ground-level explosion. There was no evidence for a strong supersonic shock wave in the ionosphere. As a result, the Mount St. Helens disturbance may prove to be a cleaner test of detailed theories of the point excitation and propagation of gravity waves in a realistic atmosphere than were TID's excited by thermonuclear weapons

  18. VP Structure of Mount St. Helens, Washington, USA, imaged with local earthquake tomography

    Waite, G.P.; Moran, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new P-wave velocity model for Mount St. Helens using local earthquake data recorded by the Pacific Northwest Seismograph Stations and Cascades Volcano Observatory since the 18 May 1980 eruption. These data were augmented with records from a dense array of 19 temporary stations deployed during the second half of 2005. Because the distribution of earthquakes in the study area is concentrated beneath the volcano and within two nearly linear trends, we used a graded inversion scheme to compute a coarse-grid model that focused on the regional structure, followed by a fine-grid inversion to improve spatial resolution directly beneath the volcanic edifice. The coarse-grid model results are largely consistent with earlier geophysical studies of the area; we find high-velocity anomalies NW and NE of the edifice that correspond with igneous intrusions and a prominent low-velocity zone NNW of the edifice that corresponds with the linear zone of high seismicity known as the St. Helens Seismic Zone. This low-velocity zone may continue past Mount St. Helens to the south at depths below 5??km. Directly beneath the edifice, the fine-grid model images a low-velocity zone between about 2 and 3.5??km below sea level that may correspond to a shallow magma storage zone. And although the model resolution is poor below about 6??km, we found low velocities that correspond with the aseismic zone between about 5.5 and 8??km that has previously been modeled as the location of a large magma storage volume. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Eruption prediction aided by electronic tiltmeter data at mount st. Helens.

    Dzurisin, D; Westphal, J A; Johnson, D J

    1983-09-30

    Telemetry from electronic tiltmeters in the crater at Mount St. Helens contributed to accurate predictions of all six effusive eruptions from June 1981 to August 1982. Tilting of the crater floor began several weeks before each eruption, accelerated sharply for several days, and then abruptly changed direction a few minutes to days before extrusion began. Each episode of uplift was caused by the intrusion of magma into the lava dome from a shallow source, causing the dome to inflate and eventually rupture. Release of magma pressure and increased surface loading by magma added to the dome combined to cause subsidence just prior to extrusion.

  20. Evaluation of radon progeny from Mount St. Helens eruptions. Final report

    Lepel, E.A.; Olsen, K.B.; Thomas, V.W.; Eichner, F.N.

    1982-09-01

    A network of twelve monitoring sites around Mount St. Helens was established to evaluate possible short-lived radioactivity in the fallen ash. Seven sites were located near major population centers of Washington and Oregon, and five sites were located within 80 km of the volcano. Each site monitored the radioactivity present by the use of thermoluminescent dosimeters which recorded the total exposure to radioactivity over the exposure period. Eruptions occurring on July 22, August 7, and October 16 to 18, 1980 were monitored. No statistically significant quantities of measurable radon daughters were observed

  1. Helen Flanders Dunbar, John Dewey, and clinical pragmatism: reflections on method in psychosomatic medicine and bioethics.

    Hart, Curtis W

    2002-01-01

    This article outlines the method utilized by physicians and major figures in the founding of Clinical Pastoral Education, Helen Flanders Dunbar, in her work of 1943, Psychosomatic Diagnosis, and relates it to the currently evolving approach in bioethics known as clinical pragmatism. It assesses Dewey's influence on both Dunbar in psychosomatic medicine and clinical pragmatism in bioethics, and illustrates the breadth of influence of the school of philosophical thought known as pragmatism with which Dewey's name and those of William James and Charles Sanders Pierce are most often identified.

  2. On the Social Nature of Objectivity: Helen Longino and Justin Biddle

    Jaana Eigi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available According to Helen Longino, objectivity is necessarily social as it depends on critical interactions in community. Justin Biddle argues that Longino’s account presupposes individuals that are completely open to any criticism; as such individuals are in principle able to criticise their beliefs on their own, Longino's account is not really social. In the first part of my paper I argue that even for completely open individuals, criticism for maintaining objectivity is only possible in community. In the second part I challenge Biddle’s interpretation of Longino’s conception of the individual. I conclude that Longino’s account is necessarily social.

  3. Commissioning of the ALICE-LHC online data quality monitoring framework

    Roukoutakis, Filimon; Haller, Barthelemy von

    2009-01-01

    ALICE is one of the experiments installed at CERN Large Hadron Collider, dedicated to the study of heavy-ion collisions. The final ALICE data acquisition system has been installed and is being used for the testing and commissioning of detectors. Data Quality Monitoring (DQM) is an important aspect of the online procedures for a HEP experiment. In this presentation we overview the commissioning and the integration of ALICE's AMORE (Automatic MOnitoRing Environment), a custom-written distributed application aimed at providing DQM services in a large, experiment-wide scale.

  4. LVDS tester: a systematic test of cable signal transmission at the ALICE experiment

    Barnby, L; Bombara, M; Evans, D; Jones, G T; Jones, P G; Jovanović, P; Jusko, A; Kour, R; Králik, I; Krivda, M; Lazzeroni, C; Lietava, R; Matthews, Z L; Navin, S; Palaha, A; Petrov, P; Platt, R; Šándor, L; Scott, P; Urbán, J; Villalobos Baillie, O; Tapia Takaki, J D

    2010-01-01

    In the ALICE experiment, the Low-Voltage Differential Signalling (LVDS) format is used for the transmission of trigger inputs from the detectors to the Central Trigger Processor (CTP), the L0 trigger outputs from Local Trigger Units (LTU) boards back to the detectors and the BUSY inputs from the sub-detectors to the CTP. ALICE has designed a set-up, called the LVDS transmission tester, that aims to measure various transmission quality parameters and the bit-error rate (BER) for long period runs in an automatic way. In this paper, this method is described and the conclusions from these tests for the ALICE LVDS cables are discussed

  5. LVDS tester: a systematic test of cable signal transmission at the ALICE experiment

    Barnby, L; Bhasin, A; Evans, D; Jones, G T; Jones, P G; Jovanovic, P; Jusko, A; Kour, R; Krivda, M; Lazzeroni, C; Lietava, R; Matthews, Z L; Navin, S; Palaha, A; Petrov, P; Platt, R; Scott, P; Bombara, M; Kralik, I; Sandor, L

    2010-01-01

    In the ALICE experiment, the Low-Voltage Differential Signalling (LVDS) format is used for the transmission of trigger inputs from the detectors to the Central Trigger Processor (CTP), the L0 trigger outputs from Local Trigger Units (LTU) boards back to the detectors and the BUSY inputs from the sub-detectors to the CTP. ALICE has designed a set-up, called the LVDS transmission tester, that aims to measure various transmission quality parameters and the bit-error rate (BER) for long period runs in an automatic way. In this paper, this method is described and the conclusions from these tests for the ALICE LVDS cables are discussed.

  6. Zircon reveals protracted magma storage and recycling beneath Mount St. Helens

    Claiborne, L.L.; Miller, C.F.; Flanagan, D.M.; Clynne, M.A.; Wooden, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Current data and models for Mount St. Helens volcano (Washington, United States) suggest relatively rapid transport from magma genesis to eruption, with no evidence for protracted storage or recycling of magmas. However, we show here that complex zircon age populations extending back hundreds of thousands of years from eruption age indicate that magmas regularly stall in the crust, cool and crystallize beneath the volcano, and are then rejuvenated and incorporated by hotter, young magmas on their way to the surface. Estimated dissolution times suggest that entrained zircon generally resided in rejuvenating magmas for no more than about a century. Zircon elemental compositions reflect the increasing influence of mafic input into the system through time, recording growth from hotter, less evolved magmas tens of thousands of years prior to the appearance of mafic magmas at the surface, or changes in whole-rock geochemistry and petrology, and providing a new, time-correlated record of this evolution independent of the eruption history. Zircon data thus reveal the history of the hidden, long-lived intrusive portion of the Mount St. Helens system, where melt and crystals are stored for as long as hundreds of thousands of years and interact with fresh influxes of magmas that traverse the intrusive reservoir before erupting. ?? 2010 Geological Society of America.

  7. The mechanisms of fine particle generation and electrification during Mount St. Helens volcanic eruption

    Cheng, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Microscopical investigation of volcanic ash collected from ground stations during Mount St. Helens eruptions reveal a distinctive bimodel size distribution with high concentrations of particle ranges at (1) 200-100 microns and (2) 20-0.1 microns. Close examination of individual particles shows that most larger ones are solidified magma particles of porous pumice with numerous gas bubbles in the interior and the smaller ones are all glassy fragments without any detectable gas bubbles. Elemental analysis demonstrates that the fine fragments all have a composition similar to that of the larger pumice particles. Laboratory experiments suggest that the formation of the fine fragments is by bursting of glassy bubbles from a partially solidified surface of a crystallizing molten magma particle. The production of gas bubbles is due to the release of absorbed gases in molten magma particles when solubility decreases during phase transition. Diffusion cloud chamber experiments strongly indicate that sub-micron volcanic fragments are highly hygroscopic and extremely active as cloud condensation nuclei. Ice crystals also are evidently formed on those fragments in a supercooled (-20 C) cloud chamber. It has been reported that charge generation from ocean volcanic eruptions is due to contact of molten lava with sea water. This seems to be insufficient to explain the observed rapid and intense lightning activities over Mount St. Helens eruptions. Therefore, a hypothesis is presented here that highly electrically charged fine solid fragments are ejected by bursting of gas bubbles from the surface of a crystallizing molten magma particles.

  8. Quality assurance for the ALICE Monte Carlo procedure

    Ajaz, M; Hristov, Peter; Revol, Jean Pierre

    2009-01-01

    We implement the already existing macro,$ALICE_ROOT/STEER /CheckESD.C that is ran after reconstruction to compute the physics efficiency, as a task that will run on proof framework like CAF. The task was implemented in a C++ class called AliAnalysisTaskCheckESD and it inherits from AliAnalysisTaskSE base class. The function of AliAnalysisTaskCheckESD is to compute the ratio of the number of reconstructed particles to the number of particle generated by the Monte Carlo generator.The class AliAnalysisTaskCheckESD was successfully implemented. It was used during the production for first physics and permitted to discover several problems (missing track in the MUON arm reconstruction, low efficiency in the PHOS detector etc.). The code is committed to the SVN repository and will become standard tool for quality assurance.

  9. Bending Test of Conductor for ALICE and LHCb Dipole Magnets

    Giudici, P A; CERN. Geneva; Flegel, W

    2000-01-01

    Abstract It is foreseen that the coils for the two magnets will be manufactured by winding flat pancakes, which are subsequently shaped to a semi-cylindrical form (ALICE) or bent by 45 degrees (LHCb). We propose here several methods and describe tests that were performed to estimate tolerances and forces which will have to be expected during the manufacturing process. To this end, short Aluminium conductor lengths of adequate cross-section were bent around a shaper piece to an angle of 90 degrees. The tests were repeated for conductors both wrapped with prepreg insulation tape and without this tape. The different test set-ups and the obtained results are described in this note.

  10. Performance of prototypes for the ALICE electromagnetic calorimeter

    Allen, J; Badala, A; Baumgart, S; Bellwied, R; Benhabib, L; Bernard, C; Bianchi, N; Blanco, F; Bortoli, Y; Bourdaud, G; Bourrion, O; Boyer, B; Bruna, E; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calvo Diaz Aldagalan, D; Capitani, G P; Carcagno, Y; Casanova Diaz, A; Cherney, M; Conesa Balbastre, G; Cormier, T M; Cunqueiro Mendez, L; Delagrange, H; Del Franco, M; Dialinas, M; Di Nezza, P; Donoghue, A; Elnimr, M; Enokizono, A; Estienne, M; Faivre, J; Fantoni, A; Fichera, F; Foglio, B; Fresneau, S; Fujita, J; Furget, C; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Germain, M; Giudice, N; Gorbunov, Y; Grimaldi, A; Guardone, N; Guernane, R; Hadjidakis, C; Hamblen, J; Harris, J W; Hasch, D; Heinz, M; Hille, P T; Hornback, D; Ichou, R; Jacobs, P; Jangal, S; Jayananda, K; Klay, J L; Knospe, A G; Kox, S; Kral, J; Laloux, P; LaPointe, S; La Rocca, P; Lewis, S; Li, Q; Librizzi, F; Madagodahettige Don, D; Martashvili, I; Mayes, B; Milletto, T; Muccifora, V; Muller, H; Muraz, J F; Nattrass, C; Noto, F; Novitzky, N; Odyniec, G; Orlandi, A; Palmeri, A; Pappalardo, G S; Pavlinov, A; Pesci, W; Petrov, V; Petta, C; Pichot, P; Pinsky, L; Ploskon, M; Pompei, F; Pulvirenti, A; Putschke, J; Pruneau, C A; Rak, J; Rasson, J; Read, K F; Real, J S; Reolon, A R; Riggi, F; Riso, J; Ronchetti, F; Roy, C; Roy, D; Salemi, M; Salur, S; Sharma, M; Silvermyr, D; Smirnov, N; Soltz, R; Sparti, V; Stutzmann, J.-S; Symons, T J.M; Tarazona Martinez, A; Tarini, L; Thomen, R; Timmins, A; van Leeuwen, M; Vieira, R; Viticchie, A; Voloshin, S; Wang, D; Wang, Y; Ward, R M

    2010-01-01

    The performance of prototypes for the ALICE electromagnetic sampling calorimeter has been studied in test beam measurements at FNAL and CERN. A $4\\times4$ array of final design modules showed an energy resolution of about 11% /$\\sqrt{E(\\mathrm{GeV})}$ $\\oplus$ 1.7 % with a uniformity of the response to electrons of 1% and a good linearity in the energy range from 10 to 100 GeV. The electromagnetic shower position resolution was found to be described by 1.5 mm $\\oplus$ 5.3 mm /$\\sqrt{E \\mathrm{(GeV)}}$. For an electron identification efficiency of 90% a hadron rejection factor of $>600$ was obtained.

  11. An Integration of MICROMEGAS Based Muon Tracking Chambers in ALICE

    Cussonneau, J P; CERN. Geneva

    1999-01-01

    A global solution for the muon tracking chambers of ALICE based on the detector MICROMEGAS [1], is investigated at SUBATECH. A technical design of the structures of the MICROMEGAS modules is presented as well as their assemblies in individual chamber and their final integration in the five tracking stations required for the muon spectrometer. The whole concept is based on only 3 kinds of MICROMEGAS units. Within these stand-alone modules, the 2D location is achieved by taking advantage of charge division with resistive strips. Including the support frames for the mosaic of detectors, the average station thickness will stay below 3% of Xo. The whole electronics features about 1.3 106 channels. Preliminary considerations on the MICROMEGAS FEE and its on-board integration are discussed. A first estimation of the total cost of this option stays well inside the assigned budget of the technical proposal.

  12. Study of jet production in ALICE experiment at LHC collider

    Jangal, Swensy

    The jet is one of the probes allowing testing strong interaction theory predictions, QCD, and to extract physical properties from a particular state of nuclear matter : Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). This PhD work is aimed to show ALICE capacities to measure jets coming from collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The detection of particles constituting jets, their association with reconstruction algorithms and the construction of observables such as jet pT spectrum of Hump-Backed Plateau is a hard work. We detail these different steps from simulation allowing to estimate jet rates we could expect for our analysis and to evaluate the impact of experimental measure on final observables. We finally present pT spectrum and Hump-Backed Plateau from first p+p collisions at LHC to whom mean corrections have been applied.

  13. Characterisation of pixel sensor prototypes for the ALICE ITS upgrade

    Reidt, Felix [CERN (Switzerland); Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: ALICE-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    ALICE is preparing a major upgrade of its experimental apparatus to be installed in the second long LHC shutdown (LS2) in the years 2018-2019. A key element of the upgrade is the replacement of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) deploying Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). The upgraded ITS will have a reduced material budget while increasing the pixel density and readout rate capabilities. The novel design leads to higher pointing and momentum resolution as well as a p{sub T} acceptance extended to lower values. The corresponding sensor prototypes were qualified in laboratory measurements and beam tests with respect to their radiation tolerance and detection efficiency. This talk summarises recent results on the characterisation of prototypes belonging to the ALPIDE family.

  14. J/psi production in pp collisions from ALICE

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The ALICE experiment studied J/psi production in the mu+mu- and e+e- decay channels. Inclusive cross sections were measured at both forward and central rapidity down to zero transverse momentum. The results are compared with NRQCD calculations and, for the pp sample collected at sqrt(s)=2.76 TeV, are used as a reference for the determination of nuclear effects on J/psi production in Pb-Pb. At central rapidity, the fraction of J/psi coming from B-decays has been evaluated down to p_T=1.3 GeV/c. In addition, the J/psi yield has been found to linearly increase as a function of the charged hadron multiplicity produced in the collision. Finally, the first LHC results on J/psi polarization, an essential observable for the understanding of the production mechanisms and for theory comparisons, will be presented.

  15. First irradiation test results of the ALICE SAMPA ASIC

    Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Winje, Fredrik Lindseth; Velure, Arild

    2018-01-01

    With the continuous scaling of the CMOS technology, the CMOS circuits are considered to be more tolerant to Single event Latchup (SEL) effects due to the reduction in the supply voltages. This paper reports the results from SEL testing performed on the first two prototypes for the new readout ASIC (SAMPA). During RUN 3/RUN 4 at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the SAMPA chip will be used for the upgrade of read-out front end electronics of the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and Muon Chambers (MCH). The first prototype MPW1 and the second prototype V2 of the SAMPA chip were delivered in 2015 and 2016, respectively. The results are summarized from two different proton beam irradiation campaigns, conducted for SAMPA MPW1 and V2 prototypes at The Svedberg Laboratory (TSL) in Uppsala, and the Center of Advanced Radiation Technology (KVI) in Groningen, respectively.

  16. The Laser of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber

    Renault, G; Westergaard, J; GaardhOJe, J J

    2007-01-01

    The large TPC ($95 \\mathrm{m}^3$) of the ALICE detector at the CERN LHC was commissioned in summer 2006. The first tracks were observed both from the cosmic ray muons and from the laser rays injected into the TPC. In this article the basic principles of operating the $266 \\mathrm{nm}$ lasers are presented, showing the installation and adjustment of the optical system and describing the control system. To generate the laser tracks, a wide laser beam is split into several hundred narrow beams by fixed micro-mirrors at stable and known positions throughout the TPC. In the drift volume, these narrow beams generate straight tracks at many angles. Here we describe the generation of the first tracks and compare them with simulations.

  17. The Laser Calibration System of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber

    Renault, G; Nielsen, B S; Westergaard, J

    2005-01-01

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) is the only experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) dedicated to the study of heavy ion collisions. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main tracking detector covering the pseudo rapidity range $|\\eta|< 0.9$. It is designed for a maximum multiplicity \\dNdy = 8000. The aim of the laser system is to simulate ionizing tracks at predifined positions throughout the drift volume in order to monitor the TPC response to a known source. In particular, the alignment of the read-out chambers will be performed, and variations of the drift velocity due to drift field imperfections can be measured and used as calibration data in the physics data analysis. In this paper we present the design of the pulsed UV laser and optical system, together with the control and monitoring systems.

  18. Development of Microstrip Silicon Detectors for Star and ALICE

    Arnold, L; Coffin, J P; Guillaume, G; Guthneck, L; Higueret, S; Hundt, F; Kühn, C E; Lutz, Jean Robert; Pozdniakov, S; Rami, F; Tarchini, A; Boucham, A; Bouvier, S; Erazmus, B; Germain, M; Giliberto, S; Martin, L; Le Moal, C; Roy, C; Colledani, C; Dulinski, W; Turchetta, R

    1998-01-01

    The physics program of STAR and ALICE at ultra-relativistic heavy ion colliders, RHIC and LHC respectively, requires very good tracking capabilities. Some specific quark gluon plasma signatures, based on strange matter measurements implies quite a good secondary vertex reconstruction.For this purpose, the inner trackers of both experiments are composed of high-granularity silicon detectors. The current status of the development of double-sided silicon microstrip detectors is presented in this work.The global performance for tracking purpose adn particle identification are first reviewed. Then tests of the detectors and of the associated readout electronics are described. In-beam measurements of noise, spatial resolution, efficiency and charge matching capability, as well as radiation hardness, are examined.

  19. AliEn: ALICE Environment on the GRID

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    AliEn is the GRID middleware used by the ALICE collaboration. It provides all the components that are needed to manage the distributed resources. AliEn is used for all the computing workflows of the experiment: Montecarlo production, data replication and reconstruction and organixed or chaotic user analysis. Moreover, AliEn is also being used by other experiments like PANDA and CBM. The main components of AliEn are a centralized file and metadata catalogue, a job execution model and file replication model. These three components have been evolving over the last 10 years to make sure that the satisfy the computing requirements of the experiment, which keep increasing every year.

  20. Performance of the ALICE secondary vertex b-tagging algorithm

    INSPIRE-00262232

    2016-11-04

    The identification of jets originating from beauty quarks in heavy-ion collisions is important to study the properties of the hot and dense matter produced in such collisions. A variety of algorithms for b-jet tagging was elaborated at the LHC experiments. They rely on the properties of B hadrons, i.e. their long lifetime, large mass and large multiplicity of decay products. In this work, the b-tagging algorithm based on displaced secondary-vertex topologies is described. We present Monte Carlo based performance studies of the algorithm for charged jets reconstructed with the ALICE tracking system in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\text{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV. The tagging efficiency, rejection rate and the correction of the smearing effects of non-ideal detector response are presented.

  1. Triggering with the ALICE TRD. Results and prospects

    Klein, Jochen; Pachmayer, Yvonne [Physikalisches Institut, University of Heidelberg (Germany); Westerhoff, Uwe [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Collaboration: ALICE-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The ALICE Transition Radiation Detector provides multiple level-1 trigger contributions. The signatures are based on tracks which are reconstructed in an FPGA array from chamber-wise track segments. The latter are calculated on the detector-mounted frontend electronics. The massive parallelization allows for the low latency trigger 8 us after the interaction. We show the performance of the triggers on electrons and jets during LHC Run 1. Further, we discuss improvements and prospects for Run 2. In particular, an online calculation of the distance of closest approach to the primary vertex shall be used to reject the dominant background from the conversion of photons at large radii. The combination of tracks over stack and sector boundaries will help to improve the efficiency of the jet trigger.

  2. Intrusion Prevention and Detection in Grid Computing - The ALICE Case

    INSPIRE-00416173; Kebschull, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Grids allow users flexible on-demand usage of computing resources through remote communication networks. A remarkable example of a Grid in High Energy Physics (HEP) research is used in the ALICE experiment at European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN. Physicists can submit jobs used to process the huge amount of particle collision data produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Grids face complex security challenges. They are interesting targets for attackers seeking for huge computational resources. Since users can execute arbitrary code in the worker nodes on the Grid sites, special care should be put in this environment. Automatic tools to harden and monitor this scenario are required. Currently, there is no integrated solution for such requirement. This paper describes a new security framework to allow execution of job payloads in a sandboxed context. It also allows process behavior monitoring to detect intrusions, even when new attack methods or zero day vulnerabilities are exploited, by a Machin...

  3. Studies for the ALICE inner tracking system upgrade

    Reidt, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC identifies D"0 mesons via secondary-vertex reconstruction and topological cuts to reduce the corresponding combinatorial background in heavy-ion collisions. The D"0 meson is produced promptly in initial, hard scatterings via the strong interaction or as feed-down from weakly decaying B hadrons. Within this thesis, a novel method for the separation of prompt and feed-down D"0 mesons using cut variations was implemented and applied to data from p-Pb collisions at √(s_N_N)=5.02 TeV. The effectiveness of the secondary-vertex reconstruction strongly depends on the performance and in particular the pointing resolution of the Inner Tracking System. The upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System for the Long Shutdown 2 of the LHC in 2019/2020 will significantly improve its vertex-reconstruction and tracking capabilities. It will be equipped with Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors manufactured using the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS process on wafers with a high-resistivity epitaxial layer. In another part of this thesis, several pixel-chip prototypes of the ALPIDE architecture with in-pixel amplification and discrimination as well as in-matrix data reduction were characterised. The pALPIDE-2 prototype was measured to fulfil the requirements in terms of detection efficiency, fake-hit rate, position resolution and tolerance to irradiation with non-ionising energy loss. Based on simulations modelling the tracking and vertex-reconstruction performance of the upgraded Inner Tracking System, the perspective of the feed-down separation using cut variations after the upgrade was assessed within this thesis.

  4. Studies for the ALICE inner tracking system upgrade

    Reidt, Felix

    2016-04-28

    The ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC identifies D{sup 0} mesons via secondary-vertex reconstruction and topological cuts to reduce the corresponding combinatorial background in heavy-ion collisions. The D{sup 0} meson is produced promptly in initial, hard scatterings via the strong interaction or as feed-down from weakly decaying B hadrons. Within this thesis, a novel method for the separation of prompt and feed-down D{sup 0} mesons using cut variations was implemented and applied to data from p-Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN})=5.02 TeV. The effectiveness of the secondary-vertex reconstruction strongly depends on the performance and in particular the pointing resolution of the Inner Tracking System. The upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System for the Long Shutdown 2 of the LHC in 2019/2020 will significantly improve its vertex-reconstruction and tracking capabilities. It will be equipped with Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors manufactured using the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS process on wafers with a high-resistivity epitaxial layer. In another part of this thesis, several pixel-chip prototypes of the ALPIDE architecture with in-pixel amplification and discrimination as well as in-matrix data reduction were characterised. The pALPIDE-2 prototype was measured to fulfil the requirements in terms of detection efficiency, fake-hit rate, position resolution and tolerance to irradiation with non-ionising energy loss. Based on simulations modelling the tracking and vertex-reconstruction performance of the upgraded Inner Tracking System, the perspective of the feed-down separation using cut variations after the upgrade was assessed within this thesis.

  5. Topological selections for V0 (K0s, Lambda) and Cascade (Xi, Omega) reconstruction in ALICE

    Maire, Antonin

    2011-01-01

    The figures are illustrations of topological selections used by ALICE to reconstruct ϕ(1020), V0 particles (K°s and Λ, single-strange particles) and cascades (Ξ- and Ω-, charged multi-strange baryons).

  6. Democracy and Schooling in California: The Legacy of Helen Heffernan and Corinne Seeds. Historical Studies in Education

    Weiler, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Helen Heffernan and Corinne Seeds were nationally recognized as leaders of the progressive education movement and were key figures in what was probably the most concerted attempt to put the ideals of progressive education into practice in a state-wide system of public education in the United States. This book examines the struggle over public…

  7. Kuidas toetate sel õppeaastal oma valla koolilapsi? / Külle Viks, Helen Metsma, Aivar Surva...[jt.

    2009-01-01

    Küsimusele vastavad: Türi vallavalitsuse haridusspetsialist Külle Viks, Sõmerpalu valla lastekaitse ja sotsiaaltoetuste spetsialist Helen Metsma, Mäetaguse vallavanem Aivar Surva, Rapla abivallavanem Imbi Kalberg, Kärdla linna haridusnõunik Juta Alev, Albu vallavalitsuse sotsiaalnõunik Claire Miljukova, Võru linnavalitsuse haridusspetsialist Kristi Aavakivi

  8. Mount St. Helens ash and mud: Chemical properties and effects on germination and establishment of trees and browse plants.

    M.A. Radwan; Dan L. Campbell

    1981-01-01

    Chemical properties of ash and mud from the 1980 volcanic eruption of Mount St. Helens and their effect on germination and seedling production of selected plants were studied. The volcanic materials were low in some important nutrients and cation exchange capacity, and they adversely affected seedling production. Catsear, a preferred wildlife browse, and lodgepole pine...

  9. Leonardo da Vinci jõudis Tallinna / Orest Kormašov, Helen Kokk ; intervjueerinud Ants Juske

    Kormašov, Orest, 1964-

    2010-01-01

    Kadrioru Kunstimuuseumis eksponeeritakse 5.-12. veebruarini 2010. a. Leonardo da Vinci arvatavat autoportreed. Itaalia kunstiajaloolased kaasasid autoportree uurimisse Tallinna Ülikooli maaliosakonna juhataja Orest Kormašovi, kes teostas klassikalise portreeskulptuuri, ja Eesti Kunstiakadeemia graafilise disaini tudengi Helen Koka, kes valmistas arvutiimitatsiooni

  10. Impossible Practice and Theories of the Impossible: A Response to Helene Illeris's "Potentials of Togetherness"

    Kallio-Tavin, Mira

    2014-01-01

    In a recent commentary in "Studies in Art Education," Helene Illeris (2013) discussed the idea of "performative experimental communities" via a critique of visual culture pedagogy and the romanticism of community-oriented art education in Nordic countries. Illeris underpinned her arguments with Jean-Luc Nancy's (1997)…

  11. Making distributed ALICE analysis simple using the GRID plug-in

    Gheata, A; Gheata, M

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an interface within the ALICE analysis framework that allows transparent usage of the experiment's distributed resources. This analysis plug-in makes it possible to configure back-end specific parameters from a single interface and to run with no change the same custom user analysis in many computing environments, from local workstations to PROOF clusters or GRID resources. The tool is used now extensively in the ALICE collaboration for both end-user analysis and large scale productions.

  12. Status of the Grid Computing for the ALICE Experiment in the Czech Republic

    Adamova, D; Hampl, J; Chudoba, J; Kouba, T; Svec, J; Mendez, Lorenzo P; Saiz, P

    2010-01-01

    The Czech Republic (CR) has been participating in the LHC Computing Grid project (LCG) ever since 2003 and gradually, a middle-sized Tier-2 center has been built in Prague, delivering computing services for national HEP experiments groups including the ALICE project at the LHC. We present a brief overview of the computing activities and services being performed in the CR for the ALICE experiment.

  13. The Incidence of Plastic Debris along Tyume River in Alice, South Africa

    Mupindu Wiseman; Mangizvo Remigios Vurayayi

    2012-01-01

    The article is premised on the Zero Waste theory and it addresses the environmental impact of unscientific disposal of plastic debris along Tyume River in Alice Town, South Africa. The researchers confirmed that Alice community lacks awareness on plastic waste management as evidenced by inappropriate disposal of plastic waste along the river causing environmental pollution. Behavioral action is lacking and can be enhanced through environment education and economic enterprise initiatives at th...

  14. The ALICE time projection chamber - a technological challenge in LHC heavy ion physics

    Bächler, J

    2004-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber is the main tracking detector in the central region of the ALICE experiment. This paper addresses the specific technological challenges for the detector and the solutions adopted to cope with the extreme particle densities in LHC heavy ion collisions. We will present the major components of the detector with an outlook of its expected performance in the LHC heavy ion program, as well as recent results from the comprehensive ALICE TPC test facility. (3 refs).

  15. Measurement of Photomultipier Plateau Curves and Single MIP response in the AD detector at ALICE

    Sanchez Falero, Sebastian De Jesus

    2015-01-01

    The Alice Diffractive (AD) detector is a forward detector in the ALICE experiment at CERN. It is aimed to the triggering on diffractive events and extends the pseudorapidity coverage to about 4.9 < /n/ < 6.3. In this work, a PMT's efficiency plateau and single MIP response are measured using a replica of the detector's scintillator modules, electronic and data acquisition system and cosmic rays as particle source.

  16. Beam test results of the irradiated Silicon Drift Detector for ALICE

    Kushpil, S.; Crescio, E.; Giubellino, P.; Idzik, M.; Kolozhvari, A.; Kushpil, V.; Martinez, M. I.; Mazza, G.; Mazzoni, A.; Meddi, F.; Nouais, D.; Petracek, V.; Piemonte, C.; Rashevsky, A.; Riccati, L.

    2005-01-01

    The Silicon Drift Detectors will equip two of the six cylindrical layers of high precision position sensitive detectors in the ITS of the ALICE experiment at LHC. In this paper we report the beam test results of a SDD irradiated with 1 GeV electrons. The aim of this test was to verify the radiation tolerance of the device under an electron fluence equivalent to twice particle fluence expected during 10 years of ALICE operation.

  17. The ALICE Workload Management System: Status before the real data taking

    Bagnasco, S; Betev, L; Buncic, P; Carminati, F; Furano, F; Grigoras, A; Grigoras, C; Lorenzo, P Mendez; Peters, A J; Saiz, P

    2010-01-01

    With the startup of LHC, the ALICE detector will collect data at a rate that, after two years, will reach 4PB per year. To process such a large amount of data, ALICE has developed AliEn, a distributed computing environment, integrated with the WLCG environment. The ALICE environment presents several original solutions, which have shown their viability in a number of large exercises of increasing complexity called ALICE Data Challenges. Within the ALICE distributed computing environment, the AliEn Workload Management Structure was created to submit to the WLCG infrastructure, and has played a crucial role to achieve the mentioned results. ALICE has more than 80 sites distributed all over the world and this WMS together with the operations management structure defined by the experiment has demonstrated a reliability and performance level ready to begin the data taking at the end of the year. In this talk we will focus on the description and current status of the AliEn WMS, emphasizing the last functionalities that have been included to handle from a single entry point the different matchmaking services of WLCG (lcg-RB, gLite WMS) and also the CREAM Computing Element; the latter has been extensively tested by the experiment during summer 2008.

  18. Event visualisation in ALICE - current status and strategy for Run 3

    Niedziela, Jeremi; von Haller, Barthélémy

    2017-10-01

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) is one of the four big experiments running at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which focuses on the study of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) being produced in heavy-ion collisions. The ALICE Event Visualisation Environment (AliEve) is a tool providing an interactive 3D model of the detector’s geometry and a graphical representation of the data. Together with the online reconstruction module, it provides important quality monitoring of the recorded data. As a consequence it has been used in the ALICE Run Control Centre during all stages of Run 2. Static screenshots from the online visualisation are published on the public website - ALICE LIVE. Dedicated converters have been developed to provide geometry and data for external projects. An example of such project is the Total Event Display (TEV) - a visualisation tool recently developed by the CERN Media Lab based on the Unity game engine. It can be easily deployed on any platform, including web and mobile platforms. Another external project is More Than ALICE - an augmented reality application for visitors, overlaying detector descriptions and event visualisations on the camera’s picture. For the future Run 3 both AliEve and TEV will be adapted to fit the ALICE O2 project. Several changes are required due to the new data formats, especially so-called Compressed Time Frames.

  19. Helen Howitt: una semilla canadiense en la enfermería latinoamericana

    ANA LUISA VELANDIA MORA

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo se propone hacer visible la presencia de Helen Howitt en la enfermería latinoamericana. Paralelamente pretende hacer un análisis de la influencia política del Servicio Cooperativo Interamericano de Salud Pública en la enfermería de la región y la presencia de organizaciones religiosas, especialmente norteamericanas, en varios países latinoamericanos. Helen Howitt, enfermera canadiense egresada de la Universidad de Alberta, fue enviada en 1942 por la Organización Panamericana de la Salud, OPS para que asesorara en Colombia al Ministerio de Trabajo, Higiene y Previsión Social. Pasó a formar parte del proyecto de apertura y organización de la Escuela Nacional Superior de Enfermeras, y fue su primera directora. Helen Howitt fue directora de la Escuela de Enfermería del Hospital Santo Tomás de la Zona del Canal de Panamá entre 1933 y 1938, luego fundadora y primera directora de la Escuela Nacional Superior de Enfermeras de Colombia entre los años 1943 y 1951; posteriormente de la Escuela Nacional de Enfermeras de Bolivia entre 1953 y 1959, cuando fue invitada a cumplir un cargo similar en Venezuela. A todos estos países llegó primero como consultora del respectivo Ministerio de Salud, a través de convenios con el Servicio Cooperativo Interamericano de Salud Pública. La Fundación Rockefeller daba becas para todos los países latinos. En la Escuela del Hospital Santo Tomás de Panamá había estudiantes de toda la América Central, Venezuela, Colombia, hasta del Ecuador y la Argentina. La Rockefeller quería unificar la enfermería en toda Latinoamérica. Llegó primero a Venezuela; y las enfermeras que se graduaron en Panamá fueron las líderes en América Latina, donde trataron de fundar escuelas.

  20. Separating volcanic deformation and atmospheric signals at Mount St. Helens using Persistent Scatterer InSAR

    Welch, Mark D.; Schmidt, David A.

    2017-09-01

    Over the past two decades, GPS and leveling surveys have recorded cycles of inflation and deflation associated with dome building eruptions at Mount St. Helens. Due to spatial and temporal limitations of the data, it remains unknown whether any deformation occurred prior to the most recent eruption of 2004, information which could help anticipate future eruptions. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), which boasts fine spatial resolution over large areas, has the potential to resolve pre-eruptive deformation that may have occurred, but eluded detection by campaign GPS surveys because it was localized to the edifice or crater. Traditional InSAR methods are challenging to apply in the Cascades volcanic arc because of a combination of environmental factors, and past attempts to observe deformation at Mount St. Helens were unable to make reliable observations in the crater or on much of the edifice. In this study, Persistent Scatterer InSAR, known to mitigate issues of decorrelation caused by environmental factors, is applied to four SAR data sets in an attempt to resolve localized sources of deformation on the volcano between 1995 and 2010. Many interferograms are strongly influenced by phase delay from atmospheric water vapor and require correction, evidenced by a correlation between phase and topography. To assess the bias imposed by the atmosphere, we perform sensitivity tests on a suite of atmospheric correction techniques, including several that rely on the correlation of phase delay to elevation, and explore approaches that directly estimate phase delay using the ERA-Interim and NARR climate reanalysis data sets. We find that different correction methods produce velocities on the edifice of Mount St. Helens that differ by up to 1 cm/yr due to variability in how atmospheric artifacts are treated in individual interferograms. Additionally, simple phase-based techniques run the risk of minimizing any surface deformation signals that may themselves be

  1. Photogrammetric Analysis of the Current Dome-Building Eruption of Mount St. Helens Volcano

    Diefenbach, A. K.; Dzurisin, D.; Crider, J. G.; Schilling, S. P.

    2006-12-01

    Beginning in October 2004 and continuing to present day, the eruption of Mount St. Helens has provided a unique opportunity to experiment with new tools and techniques to study the dome-building eruption of a Cascade volcano. At the onset of eruption, a permanent camera station called Sugar Bowl was installed on the northeast rim of the crater about 2 km from the vent. Since that time, four additional cameras have been installed on the rim and crater floor to provide continuous visual observation of dome growth and crater conditions. We have analyzed images from four of the cameras to measure variations in three-dimensional lineal growth rates of lava spines extruding from the growing dome. Using photogrammetric techniques it is possible to obtain quantitative information on the geometry and displacement of a changing topographic model, in this case the evolving dome and glaciers in the crater of Mount St. Helens. The technique is an inexpensive, high-resolution, and efficient method that uses standard commercial software and an off-the-shelf digital camera to determine the x, y, z positions of selected points on the model surface. The model geometry at any given time is defined by the positions of all the points, and displacements are measured by tracking the changing positions of the points through time. Lineal extrusion rates during the first few months of the eruption ranged from 6-11 m/d, and subsequent estimates by other techniques were 4-5 m/d (Dzurisin et. al, 2005). For the past six months the extrusion rate has leveled off at 1 m/d, possibly indicative of steady-state extrusion or an approaching pause in the eruption. Another aspect of the project involves the use of overlapping oblique photos taken from a helicopter in 2004 and 2005 to produce fast and coarse digital elevation models (DEMs), which supplement high resolution DEMs produced by the USGS every 1 - 2 months. Comparing these results with seismicity and ground tilt measured by shallow borehole

  2. Dielectron production in proton-proton collisions with ALICE

    Koehler, Markus Konrad

    2015-10-01

    Ultrarelativistic hadron collisions, such as delivered since a couple of years at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), provide new insights into the properties of strongly interacting matter at high temperatures and densities, which is expected to have existed a few of a millionth seconds after the big bang. Electromagnetic probes, such as leptons and photons, are emitted during the entire collision. Since they do not undergo strong interactions, they reflect the entire evolution of the collision. Pairs of leptons, so called dileptons, have the advantage compared to real photons, that they do not only carry momentum, but also have a non-zero invariant mass. The invariant mass spectrum of dileptons is a superposition of several components and allows to address different characteristics of the medium. To understand dielectron production in heavy-ion collisions, reference measurements in proton-proton (pp) collisions are necessary. pp collisions reflect the vacuum contribution of the particles produced in heavy-ion collisions. The analysis of pp collisions is an essential step towards the extraction of medium influences on the vector meson spectral functions and the thermal radiation in heavy-ion collisions. In this thesis, the production of electron-positron pairs (dielectrons) in pp collisions at a collision energy of 7 TeV in the ALICE central barrel is analysed. ALICE has unique particle identification capabilities at low momentum. Electrons and positrons are identified with a high purity and combined to pairs. The invariant mass distribution of dielectrons is corrected for detector effects and the selection criteria in the analysis with Monte Carlo simulations. The dielectron invariant mass spectrum of known hadronic sources is calculated based on the cross sections measured in other decay channels using the known decay kinematics. This so called hadronic cocktail represents the dielectron spectrum at the moment of kinematic freeze-out and can be compared to the

  3. Dynamics of seismogenic volcanic extrusion at Mount St Helens in 2004-05

    Iverson, R.M.; Dzurisin, D.; Gardner, C.A.; Gerlach, T.M.; LaHusen, R.G.; Lisowski, M.; Major, J.J.; Malone, S.D.; Messerich, J.A.; Moran, S.C.; Pallister, J.S.; Qamar, A.I.; Schilling, S.P.; Vallance, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    The 2004-05 eruption of Mount St Helens exhibited sustained, near-equilibrium behaviour characterized by relatively steady extrusion of a solid dacite plug and nearly periodic shallow earthquakes. Here we present a diverse data set to support our hypothesis that these earthquakes resulted from stick-slip motion along the margins of the plug as it was forced incrementally upwards by ascending, solidifying, gas-poor magma. We formalize this hypothesis with a dynamical model that reveals a strong analogy between behaviour of the magma-plug system and that of a variably damped oscillator. Modelled stick-slip oscillations have properties that help constrain the balance of forces governing the earthquakes and eruption, and they imply that magma pressure never deviated much from the steady equilibrium pressure. We infer that the volcano was probably poised in a near-eruptive equilibrium state long before the onset of the 2004-05 eruption. ??2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  4. Anthropology in a postcolonial colony: Helen I. Safa's contribution to Puerto Rican ethnography.

    Duany, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    This article assesses Helen I. Safa's legacy to anthropological thought in Puerto Rico. The first part of the article locates Safa's research on the Island within a long tradition of fieldwork by U.S. scholars since the early twentieth century. More recent research, conducted mostly by Puerto Rican women anthropologists and other social scientists, has expanded upon Safa's insights on gender and work. The second part of the essay analyzes Safa's major empirical work, The Urban Poor of Puerto Rico: A Study in Development and Inequality. Above all, this book helped overcome the theoretical impasse over the culture of poverty that characterized much of urban anthropology during the 1960s and 1970s. The article concludes with an appraisal of the relevance of Safa's work for the ethnography of contemporary Puerto Rico.

  5. Monitoring a restless volcano: The 2004 eruption of Mount St. Helens

    Gardner, C.

    2005-01-01

    Although the precise course of volcanic activity is difficult to predict, volcanologists are pretty adept at interpreting volcanic signals from well-monitored volcanoes in order to make short-term forecasts. Various monitoring tools record effects to give us warning before eruptions, changes in eruptive behavior during eruptions, or signals that an eruption is ending. Foremost among these tools is seismic monitoring. The character, size, depth and rate of earthquakes are all important to the interpretation of what is happening belowground. The first inkling of renewed activity at Mount St. Helens began in the early hours of Sept. 23, when a seismic swarm - tens to hundreds of earthquakes over days to a week - began beneath the volcano. This article details the obervations made during the eruptive sequence.

  6. American Self-Fashioning in Helen Foster Snow's My China Years.

    Constance J. Post

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In My China Years: A Memoir, Helen Foster Snow draws upon her Puritan roots in fashioning an American self that affirms the power of an individual exemplary life, the ability to exercise free will amid struggle, an optimism borne of hope, and a way to represent failure and success. Self-fashioning, which Stephen Greenblatt attributes to the rise of an autonomous self in early modern Europe, is shaped by Snow as a distinctly American identity based on a secular Puritanism she found more congenial than the Puritanism of her ancestors on both sides of the Atlantic. The many resemblances noted by Snow between the Chinese Communist Army and seventeenth-century English Puritanism led her to interrogate Puritanism, both in its traditional form and its secularised variant. What emerges in the pages of My China Years is an attempt to fashion an American self by negotiating an old Puritanism with the new by way of a triangulation with China.

  7. Chronology and pyroclastic stratigraphy of the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    Criswell, C. William

    1987-01-01

    The eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980 can be subdivided into six phases: the paroxysmal phase I, the early Plinian phase II, the early ash flow phase III, the climactic phase IV, the late ash flow phase V, and phase VI, the activity of which consisted of a low-energy ash plume. These phases are correlated with stratigraphic subunits of ash-fall tephra and pyroclastic flow deposits. Sustained vertical discharge of phase II produced evolved dacite with high S/Cl ratios. Ash flow activity of phase III is attributed to decreases in gas content, indicated by reduced S/Cl ratios and increased clast density of the less evolved gray pumice. Climactic events are attributed to vent clearing and exhaustion of the evolved dacite.

  8. The role of mycorrhizal fungi and microsites in primary succession on Mount St. Helens.

    Titus, J; Del Moral, R

    1998-03-01

    This study was designed to examine the role of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae (VAM) and microsites on the growth of pioneer species. Flat, rill, near-rock, and dead lupine microsites were created in plots in barren areas of the Pumice Plain of Mount St. Helens. VAM propagules were added to the soil in half of the plots. Six pioneer species were planted into both VAM and non-VAM inoculated microsites. Plants in dead lupine microsites were greater in biomass than those in flat, rill, and near-rock microsites. Significant effects of VAM on plant biomass did not occur. Microsites continue to be important to plant colonization on the Pumice Plain, but VAM do not yet appear to play an important role. This may be due to limited nutrient availability and the facultatively mycotrophic nature of the colonizing plant species. It is unlikely that VAM play an important role in successional processes in newly emplaced nutrient-poor surfaces.

  9. Trophic Interactions during Primary Succession: Herbivores Slow a Plant Reinvasion at Mount St. Helens.

    Fagan, William F; Bishop, John G

    2000-02-01

    Lupines (Lupinus lepidus var. lobbii), the earliest plant colonists of primary successional habitats at Mount St. Helens, were expected to strongly affect successional trajectories through facilitative effects. However, their effects remain localized because initially high rates of reinvasive spread were short lived, despite widespread habitat availability. We experimentally tested whether insect herbivores, by reducing plant growth and fecundity at the edge of the expanding lupine population, could curtail the rate of reinvasion and whether those herbivores had comparable impacts in the older, more successionally advanced core region. We found that removing insect herbivores increased both the areal growth of individual lupine plants and the production of new plants in the edge region, thereby accelerating the lupine's intrinsic rate of increase at the front of the lupine reinvasion. We found no such impacts of herbivory in the core region, where low plant quality or a complex of recently arrived natural enemies may hold herbivores in check. In the context of invasion theory, herbivore-mediated decreases in lupine population growth rate in the edge region translate into decreased rates of lupine spread, which we quantify here using diffusion models. In the Mount St. Helens system, decreased rate of lupine reinvasion will result in reductions in rates of soil formation, nitrogen input, and entrapment of seeds and detritus that are likely to postpone or alter trajectories of primary succession. If the type of spatial subtleties in herbivore effects we found here are common, with herbivory focused on the edge of an expanding plant population and suppressed or ineffective in the larger, denser central region (where the plants might be more readily noticed and studied), then insect herbivores may have stronger impacts on the dynamics of primary succession and plant invasions than previously recognized.

  10. Attenuation and scattering tomography of the deep plumbing system of Mount St. Helens

    De Siena, Luca; Thomas, Christine; Waite, Greg P.; Moran, Seth C.; Klemme, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We present a combined 3-D P wave attenuation, 2-D S coda attenuation, and 3-D S coda scattering tomography model of fluid pathways, feeding systems, and sediments below Mount St. Helens (MSH) volcano between depths of 0 and 18 km. High-scattering and high-attenuation shallow anomalies are indicative of magma and fluid-rich zones within and below the volcanic edifice down to 6 km depth, where a high-scattering body outlines the top of deeper aseismic velocity anomalies. Both the volcanic edifice and these structures induce a combination of strong scattering and attenuation on any seismic wavefield, particularly those recorded on the northern and eastern flanks of the volcanic cone. North of the cone between depths of 0 and 10 km, a low-velocity, high-scattering, and high-attenuation north-south trending trough is attributed to thick piles of Tertiary marine sediments within the St. Helens Seismic Zone. A laterally extended 3-D scattering contrast at depths of 10 to 14 km is related to the boundary between upper and lower crust and caused in our interpretation by the large-scale interaction of the Siletz terrane with the Cascade arc crust. This contrast presents a low-scattering, 4–6 km2 “hole” under the northeastern flank of the volcano. We infer that this section represents the main path of magma ascent from depths greater than 6 km at MSH, with a small north-east shift in the lower plumbing system of the volcano. We conclude that combinations of different nonstandard tomographic methods, leading toward full-waveform tomography, represent the future of seismic volcano imaging.

  11. Orthos, an alarm system for the ALICE DAQ operations

    Chapeland, Sylvain; Carena, Franco; Carena, Wisla; Chibante Barroso, Vasco; Costa, Filippo; Denes, Ervin; Divia, Roberto; Fuchs, Ulrich; Grigore, Alexandru; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Soos, Csaba; Telesca, Adriana; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; von Haller, Barthelemy

    2012-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The DAQ (Data Acquisition System) facilities handle the data flow from the detectors electronics up to the mass storage. The DAQ system is based on a large farm of commodity hardware consisting of more than 600 devices (Linux PCs, storage, network switches), and controls hundreds of distributed hardware and software components interacting together. This paper presents Orthos, the alarm system used to detect, log, report, and follow-up abnormal situations on the DAQ machines at the experimental area. The main objective of this package is to integrate alarm detection and notification mechanisms with a full-featured issues tracker, in order to prioritize, assign, and fix system failures optimally. This tool relies on a database repository with a logic engine, SQL interfaces to inject or query metrics, and dynamic web pages for user interaction. We describe the system architecture, the technologies used for the implementation, and the integration with existing monitoring tools.

  12. The ALICE Time of Flight Readout System AFRO

    Kluge, A

    1999-01-01

    The ALICE Time of Flight Detector system comprises more than 100.000 channels and covers an area of more than 100 m2. The timing resolution should be better than 150 ps. This combination of requirements poses a major challenge to the readout system. All detector timing measurements are referenced to a unique start signal t0. This signal is generated at the time an event occurs. Timing measurements are performed using a multichannel TDC chip which requires a 40 MHz reference clock signal. The general concept of the readout system is based on a modular architecture. Detector cells are combined to modules of 1024 channels. Each of these modules can be read out and calibrated independently from each other. By distributing a reference signal, a timing relationship between the modules is established. This reference signal can either be the start signal t0 or the TDC-reference clock. The readout architecture is divided into three steps; the TDC controller, the module controller, and the time of flight controller. Th...

  13. Study of hard processes in the ALICE experiment

    Vajzer, Michal; Bielcikova, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Jets are collimated sprays of particles resulting from fragmentation of associated hard scattered partons. They are measured in different types of collisions at different energies to test perturbative quantum chromodynamic calculations and are used to study the hard scattering, fragmentation, hadronisation and other properties of partons. These properties studied in simple systems such as proton-proton collisions, serve as a baseline to investigate their modifications by hot and dense nuclear matter created in high energy heavy-ion collisions. This thesis presents analysis of data from minimum bias proton-proton collisions at centre of mass energy of 2.76 and 7 TeV collected using the ALICE detector system at the LHC is presented with jet transverse momenta in range from 20 GeV/c to 100 GeV/c. Reconstruction of the inclusive jet cross-section from charged tracks at midrapidity is done using standard modern anti-k$_T$ and k$_T$ algorithms with underlying event subtraction and correction for detector effects vi...

  14. ALICE: structures weighing several tonnes are moved with millimetric precision

    2005-01-01

    The ALICE collaboration has just conducted one of its most spectacular transport operations to date in lifting the dipole of the muon spectrometer and reassembling it on the other side of the huge solenoid magnet. This incredible feat involved lifting no fewer than 900 tonnes of equipment over the red octagonal yoke inherited from the L3 experiment at a height of 18 metres. Following initial assembly and successful testing at the end of last year (see Bulletin No. 4/2005), the dipole was completely dismantled and moved to the other end of the cavern. The yoke was transported as 28 modules, each weighing 30 tonnes. The most spectacular feat of all, though, was undoubtedly the removal of the two 32-tonne coils. The first of these was moved on 18 April, as recorded in the following photos: A special lifting gantry weighing 5 tonnes had to be developed to move and install the coils. Huge clamps, which can be seen at the front, were used to rotate these enormous 32-tonne components. The whole assembly was raised ...

  15. ALICE measurements of heavy-flavour production at the LHC

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of open charm and beauty production in Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC gives access to the mechanisms of heavy-quark transport and energy loss in hot and dense QCD matter. The ALICE apparatus allows us to measure heavy flavour particles over a wide acceptance, using hadronic and electronic final states at central rapidity and muonic final states at forward rapidity, in both cases with coverage down to low transverse momentum. These measurements, in pp collisions, besides constituting the reference for the heavy-ion studies, provide acceptance-wise unique information on heavy-quark production at LHC energies. After presenting results for pp collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 2.76 and 7 TeV, we focus on the observation of the suppression of heavy-flavour production in central Pb-Pb collisions and of the azimuthal anisotropy of charmed hadrons in semi-central collisions at 2.76 TeV.

  16. Development of high $\\beta^*$-optics for ALICE

    Hermes, Pascal Dominik; Wessels, Johannes Peter

    This thesis describes a feasibility study for a special optical configuration in Insertion Region 2 (IR2) of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is host of the ALICE detector. This configuration allows the study of elastic and diffractive scattering during LHC high-intensity proton operation, in parallel to the nominal physics studies in all LHC experiments at the design energy of 7 TeV per beam. Such measurements require the instal- lation of additional Roman Pot (RP) detectors in the very forward region, at longitudinal distances of 150 m to 220 m from the Interaction Point (IP). Apart from being adjusted for a specific betatron phase advance between the IP and the RP detectors, such a configuration must be optimized for the largest possible $\\beta^*$ -value, to be sensitive for the smallest possible four-momentum transfer $|t|$. A value of $\\beta^*$ = 18 m is compatible with a bunch spacing of 25 ns, considering the LHC design emittance of N = 3.75 μm rad, and a required bunch-bunch separation of $12 \\...

  17. Direct Photon and Neutral Mesons Measurements with the ALICE Detector

    Matyja, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at LHC is dedicated to studies of the Quark– Gluon Plasma (QGP) state, which is going to be created in heavy-ion collisions. Both photons and neutral mesons are excellent probes for QGP formation. Photons are produced during the different stages of the expan- sion of the initial hot matter fireball. They do not interact strongly with the medium and passing through it, they carry information on their emis- sion point. The prompt photons which are formed at the early stage of the collision enable us to test perturbative QCD constraining parton distri- butions and fragmentation functions. Looking into the regime of thermal photons, one can extract the temperature of the medium. The medium- induced energy loss of particles can be investigated via the measurement of neutral meson spectra for different centrality classes as well as via neutral meson–hadron correlations. A decrease of the nuclear modification factor ( R AA ) with centrality of the collision is observed. The suppression of th...

  18. A continuous read-out TPC for the ALICE upgrade

    Lippmann, C., E-mail: C.Lippmann@gsi.de

    2016-07-11

    The largest gaseous Time Projection Chamber (TPC) in the world, the ALICE TPC, will be upgraded based on Micro Pattern Gas Detector technology during the second long shutdown of the CERN Large Hadron Collider in 2018/19. The upgraded detector will operate continuously without the use of a triggered gating grid. It will thus be able to read all minimum bias Pb–Pb events that the LHC will deliver at the anticipated peak interaction rate of 50 kHz for the high luminosity heavy-ion era. New read-out electronics will send the continuous data stream to a new online farm at rates up to 1 TByte/s. A fractional ion feedback of below 1% is required to keep distortions due to space charge in the TPC drift volume at a tolerable level. The new read-out chambers will consist of quadruple stacks of Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM), combining GEM foils with a different hole pitch. Other key requirements such as energy resolution and operational stability have to be met as well. A careful optimisation of the performance in terms of all these parameters was achieved during an extensive R&D program. A working point well within the design specifications was identified with an ion backflow of 0.63%, a local energy resolution of 11.3% (sigma) and a discharge probability comparable to that of standard triple GEM detectors.

  19. Orthos, an alarm system for the ALICE DAQ operations

    Chapeland, Sylvain; Carena, Franco; Carena, Wisla; Chibante Barroso, Vasco; Costa, Filippo; Divia, Roberto; Fuchs, Ulrich; Grigore, Alexandru; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Soos, Csaba; Telesca, Adriana; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Denes, Ervin

    2012-01-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The DAQ (Data Acquisition System) facilities handle the data flow from the detectors electronics up to the mass storage. The DAQ system is based on a large farm of commodity hardware consisting of more than 600 devices (Linux PCs, storage, network switches), and controls hundreds of distributed hardware and software components interacting together. This paper presents Orthos, the alarm system used to detect, log, report, and follow-up abnormal situations on the DAQ machines at the experimental area. The main objective of this package is to integrate alarm detection and notification mechanisms with a full-featured issues tracker, in order to prioritize, assign, and fix system failures optimally. This tool relies on a database repository with a logic engine, SQL interfaces to inject or query metrics, and dynamic web pages for user interaction. We describe the system architecture, the technologies used for the implementation, and the integration with existing monitoring tools.

  20. Hadronic resonance production measured with the ALICE detector

    Dash, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Hadronic resonances serve as a unique tool to study the properties of hot and dense matter pro- duced in heavy-ion collisions. These properties can be studied by measuring the ratios of hadronic resonance yields to the yields of longer-lived hadrons which can be used to investigate the re- scattering effects and the chemical freeze-out temperature. Resonance measurements in pp and p–Pb collisions provide a necessary baseline for heavy-ion data and help to disentangle the initial- state effects from medium-induced effects. The ALICE Collaboration has measured resonances such as, K ∗ (892) 0 and φ (1020) in pp, p–Pb, and Pb–Pb collisions at the LHC energies. These resonances are reconstructed via their hadronic decay channel in a wide momentum range at midrapidity. In this work, we present recent results on the transverse momentum spectra, mean transverse momentum, ratios of resonance production relative to that of long-lived hadrons.

  1. Very high momentum particle identification in ALICE at the LHC

    Agocs, A; Barnafoldi, G G; Boldizsar, L; Cuautle, E; De Cataldo, G; Di Bari, D; Di Mauro, A; Dominguez, I; Fodor, Z; Futo, E; Garcia, E; Hamar, G; Harris, J W; Levai, P; Martinengo, P; Mayani, D; Molnar, L; Nappi, E; Ortiz, A; Paic, G; Perini, D; Perrino, D; Peskov, V; Piuz, F; Smirnov, N; Varga, D; Volpe, G

    2010-01-01

    We propose to construct and install a limited acceptance detector to identify hadrons (pions, K, p) up to 30 GeV/c on a track-by-track basis in space available in ALICE. Details and PID performance simulation results will be presented for two possible options, including a high transverse momentum (pT) trigger for this detector. The first option is a RICH design with a C4F10 gas UV-photon radiator, UV-mirror, quartz window and pad-readout. This design requires additional tracking detectors to enable high pT triggering. A second option is a combination of three detectors: a RICH with CF4 gas both as a UV-photon radiator and as a gas amplification medium (a windowless approach); and a threshold Cherenkov detector (C4F10) with a quartz window and pad readout. The response for minimum ionizing particles (MIP) and UV-photons in these detectors can be well separated. With an additional tracking detector this design will also provide high pT triggering. The simulation includes UV-photon production due to CF4 scintill...

  2. Open-charm production measurements with ALICE at the LHC

    Pagano, P.

    2016-01-01

    The LHC heavy-ion physics program aims at investigating the properties of strongly-interacting matter under extreme conditions of temperature and energy density where the formation of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) is expected. Heavy-flavour hadrons, containing charm and beauty quarks, are considered efficient probes to investigate the properties of the QGP produced in heavy-ion collisions. Heavy quarks are produced in hard partonic scattering processes in the initial stage of hadronic collisions and propagate through the hot and dense medium created in the collision losing energy interacting with the medium via radiative and collisional processes. The high precision tracking, good vertexing capabilities and excellent particle identification offered by the ALICE experiment allow us to measure particles containing heavy quarks in a wide transversemomentum range in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions. A review of the main results on prompt D-mesons production, reconstructed via their hadronic decays at mid-rapidity, in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV, p-Pb collisions at √s_N_N = 5.02 TeV and Pb-Pb collisions at √s_N_N = 2.76 TeV will be shown

  3. First ALICE results on quarkonium production at Run 2 energies

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Quarkonium production in hadronic collisions (either proton-proton or heavy ions) has been extensively studied in both fixed target and collider experiments. It is understood as the production of a heavy quark pair (ccbar or bbar depending on the quarkonium state) in a hard scattering process which occurs early in the collision, followed by the evolution of this quark pair into a colorless bound state. While the production of the quark pair is reasonably well described by perturbative QCD calculations, its evolution into the bound state is inherently non-perturbative and is studied experimentally in pp collisions. In heavy ion collisions on the other hand, quarkonia are used to probe the properties of the medium formed in the collision and in particular that of the quark-gluon plasma, via competing mechanisms such as color screening, thermal dissociation or recombination, as well as so-called cold nuclear matter effects such as shadowing, gluon saturation or energy loss. The first ALICE results on quarkonium...

  4. No more escape for particle jets in ALICE

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    Particle jets are key tools for physicists to probe the quark-gluon plasma, a state of matter that existed a few moments after the Big Bang and that is reproduced in heavy-ion collisions at the LHC. The ALICE experiment is being upgraded to include a new calorimeter arm designed to extend significantly its capabilities to detect and measure jets of particles.   DCal and PHOS new support beams and support cradle are assembled and ready for installation. The new calorimeter, called the “DCal”, is a large lead-scintillator detector with photo-diode readout placed in the opposite azimuth to the existing electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal). This is the optimal configuration for the measurements of back-to-back jets, which originate in the interactions of ultra-high-energy quarks and gluons. The Dcal has been built by the same international team from institutes in France, Italy and the US that built the EMCal, with additional new contributions from institutes in Japan and Chin...

  5. A Bayesian approach to particle identification in ALICE

    Wilkinson, Jeremy [Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: ALICE-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Particle identification (PID) is one of the major strengths of the ALICE detector at the LHC, and provides essential insight into quark-gluon plasma formation in heavy-ion collisions. PID is most effective when complementary identification techniques (such as specific energy loss in the Time Projection Chamber, or flight times measured by the Time Of Flight detector) are combined, however with standard PID techniques it can be difficult to combine these signals, especially when detectors with non-Gaussian responses are used. Here, an alternative probabilistic PID approach based on Bayes' theorem will be presented. This method facilitates the combination of different detector technologies based on the combined probability of a particle type to produce the signals measured in various detectors. The Bayesian PID approach will be briefly outlined, and benchmark analyses will be presented for high-purity samples of pions, kaons, and protons, as well as for the two-pronged decay D{sup 0} → K{sup -}π{sup +}, comparing the performance of the standard PID approach with that of the Bayesian approach. Finally, prospects for measuring the Λ{sub c} baryon in the three-pronged decay channel Λ{sub c}{sup +} → pK{sup -}π{sup +} are presented.

  6. A Preshower Photon Multiplicity Detector for the ALICE Experiment

    Aggarwal, M M; Baba, P V K S; Badyal, S K; Bharti, A; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhatia, V S; Chattopadhyay, S; Dubey, A K; Dutta-Majumdar, M R; Mazumdar, K; Ganti, M S; Ghosh, P; Sen-Gupta, A; Gupta, V K; Mahapatra, D P; Mangotra, L K; Mohanty, B; Nayak, T K; Phatak, S C; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Rao, N K; Sambyal, S S; Singaraju, R N; Sinha, B; Trivedi, M D; Viyogi, Y P

    1999-01-01

    A preshower Photon Multiplicity Detector (PMD) is proposed to be implemented in the ALICE experiment to study event shapes and isospin fluctuations. The PMD, to be mounted on the magnet door at 6m from the vertex, has fine granularity and full azimuthal coverage in the pseudo-rapidity region 1.8

  7. Trigger region unit for the ALICE PHOS calorimeter

    Müller, Hans; Li Qing Xia; Pimenta, Rui; Röhrich, Dieter; Skaali, Bernhard; Oltean, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    The Photon Spectrometer (PHOS) of ALICE measures electromagnetic showers of up to 100 GeV via a large matrix of PWO crystals, each read out by an APD. Trigger regions consist of 28*16 crystals, inter-connected via analogue signals generated on front-end cards and transmitted to Trigger Region Units (TRU) which digitize and process the analogue hit information. Eight TRU cards are embedded inside each PHOS module in water-cooled cassettes, each inserted between a block 14 FEE readout cards. Analogue sums are generated by fast summing shapers, with their outputs connected to the TRU via equal-length differential cables. The TRU receives analogue sums on 112 inputs and digitizes these via 12 bit ADCs which are inter-connected with a central FPGA via serial LVDS links. The level-0 and level-1 trigger algorithms are based on pipelined charge summing over 4 consecutive samples and over 4*4 crystal windows. Low latency level-0 decisions and more refined level-1 decisions are generated as a 40 MHz Yes/No sequence whi...

  8. Strangeness Production in Jets with ALICE at the LHC

    Smith, Chrismond; Harton, Austin; Garcia, Edmundo; Alice Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The study of strange particle production is an important tool for understanding the properties of the hot and dense QCD medium created in heavy-ion collisions at ultra-relativistic energies. The study of strange particles in these collisions provides information on parton fragmentation, a fundamental QCD process. While measurements at low and intermediate pT, are already in progress at the LHC, the study of high momentum observables is equally important for a complete understanding of the QCD matter, this can be achieved by studying jet interactions. We propose the measurement of the characteristics of the jets containing strange particles. Starting with proton-proton collisions, we have calculated the inclusive pTJet spectra and the spectra for jets containing strange particles (K-short or lambda), and we are extending this analysis to lead-lead collisions. In this talk the ALICE experiment will be described, the methodology used for the data analysis and the available results will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants PHY-1305280 and PHY-1407051.

  9. Zwischen Aufbegehren und bürgerlicher Rolle: die Lebensgemeinschaft von Helene Lange und Gertrud Bäumer The partnership of Helene Lange und Gertrud Bäumer: a both rebellious and domestic way of life

    Mechthilde Vahsen

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Die Forschungsarbeiten analysieren private weibliche Beziehungsformen und ihre Bedeutung für die erste deutsche Frauenbewegung. Im Zentrum der Betrachtung steht eines der wichtigsten Führungspaare dieser Zeit: Helene Lange und Gertrud Bäumer. Die Dissertation von Göttert liefert einen wichtigen Beitrag zur Netzwerkforschung, Schaser beschäftigt sich in ihrer innovativen Studie mit der Lebensgemeinschaft der beiden Frauen, die sie in die frauenbewegten und politischen Kontexte einordnet.These studies analyse the private aspects of female relationship and their significance for the first wave of the German women’s movement. The focus is on the leading couple at that particular time: Helene Lange and Gertrud Bäumer. The dissertation by Göttert contributes an important piece to the network research, whereas Schaser describes in her innovative study the partnership of the two women, which is strongly related to the feminist and political context.

  10. Grid Computing at GSI for ALICE and FAIR - present and future

    Schwarz, Kilian; Uhlig, Florian; Karabowicz, Radoslaw; Montiel-Gonzalez, Almudena; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Preuss, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    The future FAIR experiments CBM and PANDA have computing requirements that fall in a category that could currently not be satisfied by one single computing centre. One needs a larger, distributed computing infrastructure to cope with the amount of data to be simulated and analysed. Since 2002, GSI operates a tier2 center for ALICE-CERN. The central component of the GSI computing facility and hence the core of the ALICE tier2 centre is a LSF/SGE batch farm, currently split into three subclusters with a total of 15000 CPU cores shared by the participating experiments, and accessible both locally and soon also completely via Grid. In terms of data storage, a 5.5 PB Lustre file system, directly accessible from all worker nodes is maintained, as well as a 300 TB xrootd-based Grid storage element. Based on this existing expertise, and utilising ALICE's middleware ‘AliEn’, the Grid infrastructure for PANDA and CBM is being built. Besides a tier0 centre at GSI, the computing Grids of the two FAIR collaborations encompass now more than 17 sites in 11 countries and are constantly expanding. The operation of the distributed FAIR computing infrastructure benefits significantly from the experience gained with the ALICE tier2 centre. A close collaboration between ALICE Offline and FAIR provides mutual advantages. The employment of a common Grid middleware as well as compatible simulation and analysis software frameworks ensure significant synergy effects.

  11. Petrology of the 2004-2006 Mount St. Helens lava dome -- implications for magmatic plumbing and eruption triggering: Chapter 30 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    Pallister, John S.; Thornber, Carl R.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Clynne, Michael A.; Lowers, Heather; Mandeville, Charles W.; Brownfield, Isabelle K.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Eighteen years after dome-forming eruptions ended in 1986, and with little warning, Mount St. Helens began to erupt again in October 2004. During the ensuing two years, the volcano extruded more than 80×106 m3 of gas-poor, crystal-rich dacite lava. The 2004-6 dacite is remarkably uniform in bulk-rock composition and, at 65 percent SiO2

  12. Helium sources to groundwater in active volcanic terrain, and implications for tritium-helium dating at Mount St. Helens

    Gates, John B. [Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 217 Bessey Hall, Lincoln NE 68588 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Groundwater helium sources and residence times were investigated using groundwater discharging from springs surrounding Mount St. Helens in the Cascades region of the United States. Significant contributions of mantle helium were found in all samples and are attributable to interaction between groundwater and magmatic gases. Bounding calculations for residence times were made on the basis of helium isotope mixing plots and historical tritium data. (authors)

  13. Kas olete mõelnud välismaal õpetamisele? / Edward Kess, Helen Oppar, Sergei Ptšjolkin ... [jt.

    2011-01-01

    Küsimusele vastavad Tallinna 37. keskkooli eesti keele ja kirjanduse õpetaja Edward Kess, Varstu keskkooli loodusainete õpetaja Helen Oppar, Tallinna Mustjõe gümnaasiumi füüsikaõpetaja Sergei Ptšjolkin, Sürgavere põhikooli muusikaõpetaja Helve Tähis, Nõo reaalgümnaasiumi inglise keele õpetaja Tiina Tuuling ning Rahumäe põhikooli matemaatikaõpetaja Kadri Hiob

  14. JACoW ADAPOS: An architecture for publishing ALICE DCS conditions data

    Lång, John; Bond, Peter; Chochula, Peter; Kurepin, Alexander; Lechman, Mateusz; Pinazza, Ombretta

    2018-01-01

    ALICE Data Point Service (ADAPOS) is a software architecture being developed for the RUN3 period of LHC, as a part of the effort to transmit conditions data from ALICE Detector Control System (DCS) to Event Processing Network (EPN), for distributed processing. The key processes of ADAPOS, Engine and Terminal, run on separate machines, facing different networks. Devices connected to DCS publish their state as DIM services. Engine gets updates to the services, and converts them into a binary stream. Terminal receives it over 0MQ, and maintains an image of the DCS state. It sends copies of the image, at regular intervals, over another 0MQ connection, to a readout process of ALICE Data Acquisition.

  15. Online calibration of the ALICE-TPC in LHC-Run 2

    Vorobyev, Ivan [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Excellence Cluster Universe (Germany); Collaboration: ALICE-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main tracking detector at the ALICE Experiment at the LHC. Its performance and calibration directly influence the calibration of other detectors in the ALICE central barrel. To address this issue during the first LHC running period, a two-step offline calibration was employed, in which first the TPC and then the other detectors were calibrated. However, such a scheme will not be feasible for the Run 3 period, because the TPC will run in a continuous readout mode, producing a vast amount of data that needs to be significantly compressed on the fly for data storage. This will require the calibration step to run online within the High Level Trigger environment. In this talk, the online calibration concept and the implementation for the ALICE-TPC already in Run 2 are discussed.

  16. Construction and performance of the ALICE Transition Radiation Detector

    Emschermann, David

    2010-01-20

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) has been designed to identify electrons in the pion dominated background of heavy-ions collisions. As electrons do not interact strongly, they allow to probe the early phase of the interaction. As trigger on high-p{sub t} e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs within 6.5 {mu}s after collision, the TRD can initiate the readout of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The TRD is composed of 18 super modules arranged in a barrel geometry in the central part of the ALICE detector. It offers almost 1.2 million readout channels on a total area of close to 700 m{sup 2}. The particle detection properties of the TRD depend crucially on details in the design of the cathode pad readout plane. The design parameters of the TRD readout pad plane are introduced and analysed regarding their physical properties. The noise patterns observed in the detector can be directly linked to the static pad capacitance distribution and corrected for it. A summary is then given of the TRD services infrastructure at CERN: a 70 kW low voltage system, a 1080 channel 2.5 kV high voltage setup and the Ethernet network serving more than 600 nodes. Two beam tests were conducted at the CERN PS accelerator in 2004 and 2007 using full sized TRD chambers from series production. Details on the setups are presented with particular emphasis on the custom tailored data acquisition systems. Finally the performance of the TRD is studied, focusing on the pion rejection capability and the excellent position resolution. (orig.)

  17. Construction and performance of the ALICE Transition Radiation Detector

    Emschermann, David

    2010-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) has been designed to identify electrons in the pion dominated background of heavy-ions collisions. As electrons do not interact strongly, they allow to probe the early phase of the interaction. As trigger on high-p t e + e - pairs within 6.5 μs after collision, the TRD can initiate the readout of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The TRD is composed of 18 super modules arranged in a barrel geometry in the central part of the ALICE detector. It offers almost 1.2 million readout channels on a total area of close to 700 m 2 . The particle detection properties of the TRD depend crucially on details in the design of the cathode pad readout plane. The design parameters of the TRD readout pad plane are introduced and analysed regarding their physical properties. The noise patterns observed in the detector can be directly linked to the static pad capacitance distribution and corrected for it. A summary is then given of the TRD services infrastructure at CERN: a 70 kW low voltage system, a 1080 channel 2.5 kV high voltage setup and the Ethernet network serving more than 600 nodes. Two beam tests were conducted at the CERN PS accelerator in 2004 and 2007 using full sized TRD chambers from series production. Details on the setups are presented with particular emphasis on the custom tailored data acquisition systems. Finally the performance of the TRD is studied, focusing on the pion rejection capability and the excellent position resolution. (orig.)

  18. Mount Saint Helens, Washington, USA, SRTM Perspective: Shaded Relief and Colored Height

    2004-01-01

    Mount Saint Helens is a prime example of how Earth's topographic form can greatly change even within our lifetimes. The mountain is one of several prominent volcanoes of the Cascade Range that stretches from British Columbia, Canada, southward through Washington, Oregon, and into northern California. Mount Adams (left background) and Mount Hood (right background) are also seen in this view, which was created entirely from elevation data produced by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Prior to 1980, Mount Saint Helens had a shape roughly similar to other Cascade peaks, a tall, bold, irregular conic form that rose to 2950 meters (9677 feet). However, the explosive eruption of May 18, 1980, caused the upper 400 meters (1300 feet) of the mountain to collapse, slide, and spread northward, covering much of the adjacent terrain (lower left), leaving a crater atop the greatly shortened mountain. Subsequent eruptions built a volcanic dome within the crater, and the high rainfall of this area lead to substantial erosion of the poorly consolidated landslide material. Eruptions at Mount Saint Helens subsided in 1986, but renewed volcanic activity here and at other Cascade volcanoes is inevitable. Predicting such eruptions still presents challenges, but migration of magma within these volcanoes often produces distinctive seismic activity and minor but measurable topographic changes that can give warning of a potential eruption. Three visualization methods were combined to produce this image: shading of topographic slopes, color coding of topographic height, and then projection into a perspective view. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the northeast-southwest (left to right) direction, so that northeast slopes appear bright and southwest slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations. The perspective view simulates the

  19. Virtual reality visualization algorithms for the ALICE high energy physics experiment on the LHC at CERN

    Myrcha, Julian; Trzciński, Tomasz; Rokita, Przemysław

    2017-08-01

    Analyzing massive amounts of data gathered during many high energy physics experiments, including but not limited to the LHC ALICE detector experiment, requires efficient and intuitive methods of visualisation. One of the possible approaches to that problem is stereoscopic 3D data visualisation. In this paper, we propose several methods that provide high quality data visualisation and we explain how those methods can be applied in virtual reality headsets. The outcome of this work is easily applicable to many real-life applications needed in high energy physics and can be seen as a first step towards using fully immersive virtual reality technologies within the frames of the ALICE experiment.

  20. Determination of the event collision time with the ALICE detector at the LHC

    Adam, Jaroslav; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Shakeel; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Silva De Albuquerque, Danilo; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; An, Mangmang; Andrei, Cristian; Andrews, Harry Arthur; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Anwar, Rafay; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Balasubramanian, Supraja; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Espinoza Beltran, Lucina Gabriela; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Bonora, Matthias; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Braun-munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buhler, Paul; Iga Buitron, Sergio Arturo; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Cabala, Jan; Caffarri, Davide; Caines, Helen Louise; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Cerkala, Jakub; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chauvin, Alex; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crkovska, Jana; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danisch, Meike Charlotte; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Conti, Camila; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Derradi De Souza, Rafael; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Deplano, Caterina; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Drozhzhova, Tatiana; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Duggal, Ashpreet Kaur; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Endress, Eric; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Esumi, Shinichi; Eulisse, Giulio; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabbietti, Laura; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Francisco, Audrey; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fronze, Gabriele Gaetano; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gajdosova, Katarina; Gallio, Mauro; Duarte Galvan, Carlos; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-solis, Edmundo Javier; Garg, Kunal; Garg, Prakhar; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; De Leone Gay, Maria Beatriz; Germain, Marie; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Sanchez Gonzalez, Andres; Gonzalez, Victor; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Greiner, Leo Clifford; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grion, Nevio; Gronefeld, Julius Maximilian; Grosse-oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grosso, Raffaele; Gruber, Lukas; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Bautista Guzman, Irais; Haake, Rudiger; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hamon, Julien Charles; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Hellbar, Ernst; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Florian; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Hladky, Jan; Horak, David; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hughes, Charles; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Inaba, Motoi; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Isakov, Vladimir; Islam, Md Samsul; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacak, Barbara; Jacazio, Nicolo; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovska, Slavka; Jadlovsky, Jan; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jakubowska, Monika Joanna; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Khatun, Anisa; Khuntia, Arvind; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Daehyeok; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-boesing, Christian; Klewin, Sebastian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kopcik, Michal; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Kumar, Lokesh; Kumar, Shyam; Kundu, Sourav; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lapidus, Kirill; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lazaridis, Lazaros; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Seongjoo; Lehas, Fatiha; Lehner, Sebastian; Lehrbach, Johannes; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Llope, William; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Lupi, Matteo; Lutz, Tyler Harrison; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Mas, Alexis Jean-michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzilli, Marianna; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Mhlanga, Sibaliso; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Mishra, Tribeni; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montes Prado, Esther; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munning, Konstantin; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murakami, Hikari; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Myers, Corey James; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Nattrass, Christine; Rosado Navarro, Sebastian; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Ranjit; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Negrao De Oliveira, Renato Aparecido; Nellen, Lukas; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Oravec, Matej; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pacik, Vojtech; Pagano, Davide; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palni, Prabhakar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Jonghan; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Pei, Hua; Peitzmann, Thomas; Peng, Xinye; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Ozelin De Lima Pimentel, Lais; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Poppenborg, Hendrik; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Pozdniakov, Valeriy; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Rana, Dhan Bahadur; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Ratza, Viktor; Ravasenga, Ivan; Read, Kenneth Francis; Redlich, Krzysztof; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-lucian; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Saarinen, Sampo; Sadhu, Samrangy; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Baidyanath; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Sarkar, Debojit; Sarkar, Nachiketa; Sarma, Pranjal; Sas, Mike Henry Petrus; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schmidt, Martin; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Sefcik, Michal; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Senyukov, Serhiy; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sett, Priyanka; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shadura, Oksana; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Anjali; Sharma, Mona; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Sheikh, Ashik Ikbal; Shigaki, Kenta; Shou, Qiye; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singhal, Vikas; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Zixuan; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Sozzi, Federica; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stankus, Paul; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Suljic, Miljenko; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Suzuki, Ken; Swain, Sagarika; Szabo, Alexander; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Tabassam, Uzma; Takahashi, Jun; Tambave, Ganesh Jagannath; Tanaka, Naoto; Tarhini, Mohamad; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thakur, Dhananjaya; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Tikhonov, Anatoly; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Tripathy, Sushanta; Trogolo, Stefano; Trombetta, Giuseppe; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Umaka, Ejiro Naomi; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vala, Martin; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vazquez Doce, Oton; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Velure, Arild; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Vertesi, Robert; Vickovic, Linda; Vigolo, Sonia; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Voscek, Dominik; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Weiser, Dennis Franz; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Whitehead, Andile Mothegi; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Willems, Guido Alexander; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Witt, William Edward; Yalcin, Serpil; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correia Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Chunhui, Zhang; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zmeskal, Johann

    2017-02-24

    Particle identification is an important feature of the ALICE detector at the LHC. In particular, for particle identification via the time-of-flight technique, the precise determination of the event collision time represents an important ingredient of the quality of the measurement. In this paper, the different methods used for such a measurement in ALICE by means of the T0 and the TOF detectors are reviewed. Efficiencies, resolution and the improvement of the particle identification separation power of the methods used are presented for the different LHC colliding systems (pp , p-Pb and Pb-Pb) during the first period of data taking of LHC (Run 1).

  1. Open heavy-flavour measurements in Pb-Pb collisions with ALICE at the LHC

    Mischke, André

    2017-01-01

    The ALICE experiment has measured charm and beauty production in Pb–Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{S_{\\rm{NN}}}= 2.76 \\text{ TeV}$ and $5.02 \\text{ TeV}$, via the reconstruction of hadronic D-meson decays and semi-leptonic Dand B-meson decays. In this contribution, an overview is given on current open heavy-flavour results from ALICE ranging from the nuclear modification factor to elliptic flow measurements and on the interpretation of the data by comparing with different model calculations of in-medium energy loss.

  2. A fast high-voltage current-peak detection system for the ALICE transition radiation detector

    Verclas, Robert [Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: ALICE-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    During LHC operation in run 1, the gaseous detectors of ALICE occasionally experienced simultaneous trips in their high voltage which affected the majority of the high voltage channels. These trips are caused by large anode currents in the detector and are potentially related to LHC machine operations. We developed and installed a fast current-peak detection system for the ALICE Transition Radiation Detector. This system is based on FPGA technology and monitors 144 out 522 high voltage channels minimally invasively at a maximum readout rate of 2 MHz. It is an integral part of the LHC beam monitoring system. We report on the latest status.

  3. Probing and irradiation tests of ALICE pixel chip wafers and sensors

    Cinausero, M; Antinori, F; Chochula, P; Dinapoli, R; Dima, R; Fabris, D; Galet, G; Lunardon, M; Manea, C; Marchini, S; Martini, S; Moretto, S; Pepato, Adriano; Prete, G; Riedler, P; Scarlassara, F; Segato, G F; Soramel, F; Stefanini, G; Turrisi, R; Vannucci, L; Viesti, G

    2004-01-01

    In the framework of the ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) project a system dedicated to the tests of the ALICE1LHCb chip wafers has been assembled and is now in use for the selection of pixel chips to be bump-bonded to sensor ladders. In parallel, radiation hardness tests of the SPD silicon sensors have been carried out using the 27 MeV proton beam delivered by the XTU TANDEM accelerator at the SIRAD facility in LNL. In this paper we describe the wafer probing and irradiation set-ups and we report the obtained results. (6 refs).

  4. Study of D-mesons using hadronic decay channels with the ALICE detector

    Bala, Renu

    2010-01-01

    At LHC energy, heavy quarks will be abundantly produced and the design of the ALICE Experiment will allow us to study their production using several channels. We investigate the feasibility of the study of D mesons reconstructed in their exclusive hadronic decay channel. After reviewing the ALICE potential for such studies, we will present some results for the two more promising decay channels i.e D0->KPi and D+ -> K-Pi+Pi+ obtained with 7 TeV pp data and 5.5 A TeV Pb-Pb Monte Carlo data .

  5. Environmental Impact of the Helen, Research, and Chicago Mercury Mines on Water, Sediment, and Biota in the Upper Dry Creek Watershed, Lake County, California

    Rytuba, James J.; Hothem, Roger L.; May, Jason T.; Kim, Christopher S.; Lawler, David; Goldstein, Daniel; Brussee, Brianne E.

    2009-01-01

    The Helen, Research, and Chicago mercury (Hg) deposits are among the youngest Hg deposits in the Coast Range Hg mineral belt and are located in the southwestern part of the Clear Lake volcanic field in Lake County, California. The mine workings and tailings are located in the headwaters of Dry Creek. The Helen Hg mine is the largest mine in the watershed having produced about 7,600 flasks of Hg. The Chicago and Research Hg mines produced only a small amount of Hg, less than 30 flasks. Waste rock and tailings have eroded from the mines, and mine drainage from the Helen and Research mines contributes Hg-enriched mine wastes to the headwaters of Dry Creek and contaminate the creek further downstream. The mines are located on federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (USBLM). The USBLM requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) measure and characterize Hg and geochemical constituents in tailings, sediment, water, and biota at the Helen, Research, and Chicago mines and in Dry Creek. This report is made in response to the USBLM request to conduct a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA - Removal Site Investigation (RSI). The RSI applies to removal of Hg-contaminated mine waste from the Helen, Research, and Chicago mines as a means of reducing Hg transport to Dry Creek. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of mine tailings, waste rock, sediment, and water at the Helen, Research, and Chicago mines on April 19, 2001, during a storm event. Further sampling of water, sediment, and biota at the Helen mine area and the upper part of Dry Creek was completed on July 15, 2003, during low-flow conditions. Our results permit a preliminary assessment of the mining sources of Hg and associated chemical constituents that could elevate levels of monomethyl Hg (MMeHg) in the water, sediment, and biota that are impacted by historic mining.

  6. Rockslide-debris avalanche of May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens Volcano, Washington

    Glicken, Harry

    1996-01-01

    This report provides a detailed picture of the rockslide-debris avalanche of the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens volcano. It provides a characterization of the deposit, a reinterpretation of the details of the first minutes of the eruption of May 18, and insight into the transport mechanism of the mass movement. Details of the rockslide event, as revealed by eyewitness photographs, are correlated with features of the deposit. The photographs show three slide blocks in the rockslide movement. Slide block I was triggered by a magnitude 5.1 earthquake at 8:32 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time (P.D.T.). An exploding cryptodome burst through slide block II to produce the 'blast surge.' Slide block III consisted of many discrete failures that were carried out in continuing pyroclastic currents generated from the exploding cryptodome. The cryptodome continued to depressurize after slide block III, producing a blast deposit that rests on top of the debris-avalanche deposit. The hummocky 2.5 cubic kilometer debris-avalanche deposit consists of block facies (pieces of the pre-eruption Mount St. Helens transported relatively intact) and matrix facies (a mixture of rocks from the old mountain and cryptodome dacite). Block facies is divided into five lithologic units. Matrix facies was derived from the explosively generated current of slide block III as well as from disaggregation and mixing of debris-avalanche blocks. The mean density of the old cone was measured to be abut 20 percent greater than the mean density of the avalanche deposit. Density in the deposit does not decrease with distance which suggests that debris-avalanche blocks were dilated at the mountain, rather than during transport. Various grain-size parameters that show that clast size converges about a mean with distance suggest mixing during transport. The debris-avalanche flow can be considered a grain flow, where particles -- either debris-avalanche blocks or the clasts within the blocks -- collided and

  7. Conduit degassing and thermal controls on eruption styles at Mount St. Helens

    Schneider, Andrew; Rempel, Alan W.; Cashman, Katharine V.

    2012-12-01

    The explosivity of silicic eruptions depends on the interplay between magma rheology, exsolution kinetics, and degassing. Magma degassing is governed by the competing effects of vertical transport within the conduit and the lateral flux of gas out of the conduit (Diller et al., 2006; Jaupart and Allegre, 1991). We combine a simplified treatment of these degassing processes with thermodynamic modeling to examine the conditions present at Mount St. Helens during the spine extruding eruption from 2004 to 2008. We find that two parameters are primarily responsible for controlling the eruptive style: the magma chamber temperature, and a dimensionless parameter that gauges the efficiency of lateral degassing. Together, these parameters determine whether and where magma can solidify at depth to form a dense solid plug that is gradually extruded as a volcanic spine. We show that the small (50 oC) decrease in magma chamber temperature between eruptive activity in the 1980s and that of 2004-2008, combined with a modest increase in degassing efficiency associated with lower volumetric flux, can explain the observed change in erupted material from viscous lava flows to solidified spines. More generally, we suggest that similar threshold behavior may explain observed abrupt transitions in effusive eruptive styles at other intermediate composition volcanoes. Finally, we extrapolate our results to suggest that the increase in degassing efficiency accompanying decreasing magma supply rates may have caused the transition from explosive to effusive activity in late 1980.

  8. Reading, Trauma and Literary Caregiving 1914-1918: Helen Mary Gaskell and the War Library.

    Haslam, Sara

    2018-03-28

    This article is about the relationship between reading, trauma and responsive literary caregiving in Britain during the First World War. Its analysis of two little-known documents describing the history of the War Library, begun by Helen Mary Gaskell in 1914, exposes a gap in the scholarship of war-time reading; generates a new narrative of "how," "when," and "why" books went to war; and foregrounds gender in its analysis of the historiography. The Library of Congress's T. W. Koch discovered Gaskell's ground-breaking work in 1917 and reported its successes to the American Library Association. The British Times also covered Gaskell's library, yet researchers working on reading during the war have routinely neglected her distinct model and method, skewing the research base on war-time reading and its association with trauma and caregiving. In the article's second half, a literary case study of a popular war novel demonstrates the extent of the "bitter cry for books." The success of Gaskell's intervention is examined alongside H. G. Wells's representation of textual healing. Reading is shown to offer sick, traumatized and recovering combatants emotional and psychological caregiving in ways that she could not always have predicted and that are not visible in the literary/historical record.

  9. Inpatient management of borderline personality disorder at Helen Joseph Hospital, Johannesburg

    Laila Paruk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this report was to establish a profile of patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD admitted to the acute inpatient psychiatric assessment unit at the Helen Joseph Hospital, in Johannesburg, over the course of 1 year. Methods: A retrospective record review was conducted to investigate the prevalence, demographics, reasons for admission, treatment, length of stay and follow-up of a group of inpatients during 2010 with a diagnosis of BPD, based on DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria, allocated on discharge. Results: Considering evidence retrospectively, the quality of the BPD diagnosis allocated appeared adequate. Statistical analysis revealed findings mainly in keeping with other reports, for example, that patients with BPD are above-average users of resources who make significantly more use of emergency services and that they generally do not adhere well to their scheduled outpatient follow-up arrangements. The longer average length of inpatient stay of this group with BPD, however, exceeded the typically brief period generally recommended for acute inpatient containment and emergency intervention. Conclusion: Implementation of targeted prevention and early intervention strategies, based on systematised programmes such as dialectical behavioural therapy and mentalisation based therapy, may be useful in addressing these problems experienced with integrating the in- and outpatient management of BPD. Keywords: Borderline personality; inpatient; acute

  10. O desejo na Grécia Helenística

    Zeferino Rocha

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho é a terceira e última parte de uma pesquisa sobre “O desejo na Grécia Antiga”. Na primeira parte, reunimos as manifestações do desejo nos poemas épicos, líricos e trágicos, bem como nas máximas dos sete sábios e na doutrina dos filósofos pré-socráticos da Grécia Arcaica. Na segunda, apresentamos o essencial da sistematização teórica que, na Grécia Clássica, Sócrates, Platão e Aristóteles deram a essas primeiras manifestações do desejo. Nesta última parte, depois de lembrar a origem e as características da cultura helenística, vamos ver o que os epicuristas e os estóicos, no contexto de suas respectivas filosofias, disseram sobre o desejo no Jardim de Epicuro e no Pórtico Antigo de Zenão e Crísipo.

  11. Temporal changes in stress preceding the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    Lehto, H.L.; Roman, D.C.; Moran, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    The 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH), Washington, was preceded by a swarm of shallow volcano-tectonic earthquakes (VTs) that began on September 23, 2004. We calculated locations and fault-plane solutions (FPS) for shallow VTs recorded during a background period (January 1999 to July 2004) and during the early vent-clearing phase (September 23 to 29, 2004) of the 2004-2008 eruption. FPS show normal and strike-slip faulting during the background period and on September 23; strike-slip and reverse faulting on September 24; and a mixture of strike-slip, reverse, and normal faulting on September 25-29. The orientation of ??1 beneath MSH, as estimated from stress tensor inversions, was found to be sub-horizontal for all periods and oriented NE-SW during the background period, NW-SE on September 24, and NE-SW on September 25-29. We suggest that the ephemeral ~90?? change in ??1 orientation was due to intrusion and inflation of a NE-SW-oriented dike in the shallow crust prior to the eruption onset. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Ambient noise tomography across Mount St. Helens using a dense seismic array

    Wang, Yadong

    2017-05-08

    We investigated upper crustal structure with data from a dense seismic array deployed around Mount St. Helens for 2 weeks in the summer of 2014. Interstation cross correlations of ambient seismic noise data from the array were obtained, and clear fundamental mode Rayleigh waves were observed between 2.5 and 5 s periods. In addition, higher-mode signals were observed around 2 s period. Frequency-time analysis was applied to measure fundamental mode Rayleigh wave phase velocities, which were used to invert for 2-D phase velocity maps. An azimuth-dependent traveltime correction was implemented to mitigate potential biases introduced due to an inhomogeneous noise source distribution. Reliable phase velocity maps were only obtained between 3 and 4 s periods due to limitations imposed by the array aperture and higher-mode contamination. The phase velocity tomography results, which are sensitive to structure shallower than 6 km depth, reveal an ~10–15% low-velocity anomaly centered beneath the volcanic edifice and peripheral high-velocity anomalies that likely correspond to cooled igneous intrusions. We suggest that the low-velocity anomaly reflects the high-porosity mixture of lava and ash deposits near the surface of the edifice, a highly fractured magmatic conduit and hydrothermal system beneath the volcano, and possibly a small contribution from silicate melt.

  13. Four-year prospective study of the respiratory effects of volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens

    Buist, A.S.; Vollmer, W.M.; Johnson, L.R.; Bernstein, R.S.; McCamant, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes the 4-yr follow-up of 712 loggers exposed over an extended period to varying levels of fresh volcanic ash from the 1980 eruptions of Mt. St. Helens. Concerns related to the irritant effect the ash might have on the airways and also to its fibrogenic potential if exposures were intense and continued over many years. Our subjects were divided into 3 groups: high, low, and no exposure. Baseline testing was begun in June 1980, 1 month after the major eruption, and follow-up testing continued on an annual basis through 1984; 88% of the loggers have been tested at least 3 times. Analysis of lung function data showed that a significant, exposure-related decline in FEV1 occurred during the first year after the eruption. The decline was short-lived, however, and by 1984 the differences between exposure groups were no longer significant. Self-reported symptoms of cough, phlegm, and wheeze showed a similar pattern. No ash-related changes were seen in chest roentgenograms taken in 1980 and in 1984. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the inhaled ash caused mucus hypersecretion and/or airway inflammation that reversed when the exposure levels decreased. The ash levels to which the loggers were exposed were low compared with permissible occupational levels for nuisance dusts, but generally higher than the total suspended particulate levels permissible in ambient air

  14. Erosion by flowing lava: Geochemical evidence in the Cave Basalt, Mount St. Helens, Washington

    Williams, D.A.; Kadel, S.D.; Greeley, R.; Lesher, C.M.; Clynne, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    We sampled basaltic lava flows and underlying dacitic tuff deposits in or near lava tubes of the Cave Basalt, Mount St. Helens, Washington to determine whether the Cave Basalt lavas contain geochemical evidence of substrate contamination by lava erosion. The samples were analyzed using a combination of wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results indicate that the oldest, outer lava tube linings in direct contact with the dacitic substrate are contaminated, whereas the younger, inner lava tube linings are uncontaminated and apparently either more evolved or enriched in residual liquid. The most heavily contaminated lavas occur closer to the vent and in steeper parts of the tube system, and the amount of contamination decreases with increasing distance downstream. These results suggest that erosion by lava and contamination were limited to only the initially emplaced flows and that erosion was localized and enhanced by vigorous laminar flow over steeper slopes. After cooling, the initial Cave Basalt lava flows formed an insulating lining within the tubes that prevented further erosion by later flows. This interpretation is consistent with models of lava erosion that predict higher erosion rates closer to sources and over steeper slopes. A greater abundance of xenoliths and xenocrysts relative to xenomelts in hand samples indicates that mechanical erosion rather than thermal erosion was the dominant erosional process in the Cave Basalt, but further sampling and petrographic analyses must be performed to verify this hypothesis. ?? Springer-Verlag 2003.

  15. Overlaid Alice: a statistical model computer code including fission and preequilibrium models

    Blann, M.

    1976-01-01

    The most recent edition of an evaporation code originally written previously with frequent updating and improvement. This version replaces the version Alice described previously. A brief summary is given of the types of calculations which can be done. A listing of the code and the results of several sample calculations are presented

  16. Prototyping of Silicon Strip Detectors for the Inner Tracker of the ALICE Experiment

    Sokolov, Oleksiy

    2006-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at CERN will study heavy ion collisions at a center-of-mass energy 5.5∼TeV per nucleon. Particle tracking around the interaction region at radii r<45 cm is done by the Inner Tracking System (ITS), consisting of six cylindrical layers of silicon detectors. The outer two layers of

  17. Using Alice 2.0 to Design Games for People with Stroke.

    Proffitt, Rachel; Kelleher, Caitlin; Baum, M Carolyn; Engsberg, Jack

    2012-08-01

    Computer and videogames are gaining in popularity as rehabilitation tools. Unfortunately, most systems still require extensive programming/engineering knowledge to create, something that therapists, as novice programmers, do not possess. There is software designed to allow novice programmers to create storyboard and games through simple drag-and-drop formats; however, the applications for therapeutic game development have not been studied. The purpose of this study was to have an occupational therapy (OT) student with no prior computer programming experience learn how to create computer games for persons with stroke using Alice 2.0, a drag-and-drop editor, designed by Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, PA). The OT student learned how to use Alice 2.0 through a textbook, tutorials, and assistance from computer science students. She kept a journal of her process, detailing her successes and challenges. The OT student created three games for people with stroke using Alice 2.0. She found that although there were many supports in Alice for creating stories, it lacked critical pieces necessary for game design. Her recommendations for a future programming environment for therapists were that it (1) be efficient, (2) include basic game design pieces so therapists do not have to create them, (3) provide technical support, and (4) be simple. With the incorporation of these recommendations, a future programming environment for therapists will be an effective tool for therapeutic game development.

  18. Light vector meson production in pp collisions at root s=7 TeV ALICE Collaboration

    Abelev, B.; Adamová, Dagmar; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Čepila, J.; Krus, M.; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kushpil, Vasilij; Mareš, Jiří A.; Pachr, M.; Petráček, V.; Petráň, M.; Polák, Karel; Pospíšil, V.; Šmakal, R.; Šumbera, Michal; Tlustý, D.; Vajzer, Michal; Wagner, V.; Zach, Č.; Závada, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 710, 4-5 (2012), s. 557-568 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08015 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : heavy ion collisions * LHC * ALICE Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 4.569, year: 2012

  19. A Linguistic Analysis of Rhetorical Strategies in Selected Narratives of Alice Walker

    Matunda, Robert Stephen Mokaya

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to analyze rhetorical strategies of Alice Walker in four narratives, namely, "The Color Purple, In Search of Our Mother's Gardens, Possessing the Secret of Joy, and Now Is the Time To Open Your Heart". As such, this study helps to expand the body of investigation relating linguistics to literature and medium…

  20. Epiphanic Awakenings in Raymond Carver's "Cathedral" and Alice Walker's "Everyday Use"

    Sadeq, Ala Eddin; Al-Badawi, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores how two short stories from very different backgrounds conclude in a significant epiphany for the characters. Raymond Carver's short story "Cathedral" and Alice Walker's "Everyday Use" are studied to see how the husband in Carver's work is blinder than his visually-impaired overnight guest, and the…