WorldWideScience

Sample records for heat pulse technique

  1. Pulse mitigation and heat transfer enhancement techniques. Volume 3: Liquid sodium heat transfer facility and transient response of sodium heat pipe to pulse forward and reverse heat load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, L. C.; Hahn, O. J.; Nguyen, H. X.

    1992-08-01

    This report presents the description of a liquid sodium heat transfer facility (sodium loop) constructed to support the study of transient response of heat pipes. The facility, consisting of the loop itself, a safety system, and a data acquisition system, can be safely operated over a wide range of temperature and sodium flow rate. The transient response of a heat pipe to pulse heat load at the condenser section was experimentally investigated. A 0.457 m screen wick, sodium heat pipe with an outer diameter of 0.127 m was tested under different heat loading conditions. A major finding was that the heat pipe reversed under a pulse heat load applied at the condenser. The time of reversal was approximately 15 to 25 seconds. The startup of the heat pipe from frozen state was also studied. It was found that during the startup process, at least part of the heat pipe was active. The active region extended gradually down to the end of the condenser until all of the working fluid in the heat pipe was molten.

  2. Thermophysical properties by a pulse-heating reflectometric technique: Niobium, 1100 to 2700 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Righini, F.; Spisiak, J.; Bussolino, G.C.; Gualano, M.

    1999-01-01

    Pulse heating experiments were performed on niobium strips, taking the specimens from room temperature to the melting point is less than one second. The normal spectral emissivity of the strips was measured by integrating sphere reflectometry, and, simultaneously, experimental data (radiance temperature, current, voltage drop) for thermophysical properties were collected with submillisecond time resolution. The normal spectral emissivity results were used to compute the true temperature of the niobium strips; the heat capacity, electrical resistivity, and hemispherical total emissivity were evaluated in the temperature range 1,100 to 2,700 K. The results are compared with literature data obtained in pulse-heating experiments. It is concluded that combined measurements of normal spectral emissivity and of thermophysical properties on strip specimens provide results of the same quality as obtained using tubular specimens with a blackbody. The thermophysical property results on niobium also validate the normal spectral emissivity measurements by integrating sphere reflectometry

  3. Pulse induction heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliev, A S; Kachanov, B Y; Kogan, B V

    1993-12-31

    Induction heating and three types of pulse processes were studied. It was found that in pulse processes the frequency and pulse duration of heat treatments do not remain constant. High frequency pulse heat treatments can be used on sprayed coatings; such treatments will result in stronger surfaces with no cracks. For induction hardening, the rate of specific power was 1 to 1.5 kW/sq.cm, for forging it was 0.2 to 0.3 kW/sq.cm and for melting it was 0.05 to 0.1 kW/sq.cm. The application of pulse heating will result in higher rates of specific power.

  4. RF Pulsed Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2002-01-03

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 {micro}s pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE{sub 012} mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  5. Heating effect of substrate of pulsed laser ablation deposition technique towards the orientation of carbon microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choy, L.S.; Irmawati Ramli; Noorhana Yahya; Abdul Halim Shaari

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Carbon thin film has been successfully deposited by second harmonic Nd:YAG pulsed laser ablation deposition, PLAD. The topology and morphology of the deposited layers was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) whereas emission dispersion X-ray (EDX) was used to determine the existence of elements that constitutes the microstructure. Substrate heated at 500 degree Celsius during the laser ablation showed the most homogenous lollipop microstructure as compared to mainly pillars of microstructure ablated at lower substrate temperature. It is found that this also avoid further diffusion of carbon into catalyst in forming iron carbide. (author)

  6. [Application of three heat pulse technique-based methods to determine the stem sap flow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Fan, Jun

    2015-08-01

    It is of critical importance to acquire tree transpiration characters through sap flow methodology to understand tree water physiology, forest ecology and ecosystem water exchange. Tri-probe heat pulse sensors, which are widely utilized in soil thermal parameters and soil evaporation measurement, were applied to implement Salix matsudana sap flow density (Vs) measurements via heat-ratio method (HRM), T-Max method (T-Max) and single-probe heat pulse probe (SHPP) method, and comparative analysis was conducted with additional Grainer's thermal diffusion probes (TDP) measured results. The results showed that, it took about five weeks to reach a stable measurement stage after TPHP installation, Vs measured with three methods in the early stage after installation was 135%-220% higher than Vs in the stable measurement stage, and Vs estimated via HRM, T-Max and SHPP methods were significantly linearly correlated with Vs estimated via TDP method, with R2 of 0.93, 0.73 and 0.91, respectively, and R2 for Vs measured by SHPP and HRM reached 0.94. HRM had relatively higher precision in measuring low rates and reverse sap flow. SHPP method seemed to be very promising to measure sap flow for configuration simplicity and high measuring accuracy, whereas it couldn' t distinguish directions of flow. T-Max method had relatively higher error in sap flow measurement, and it couldn' t measure sap flow below 5 cm3 · cm(-2) · h(-1), thus this method could not be used alone, however it could measure thermal diffusivity for calculating sap flow when other methods were imposed. It was recommended to choose a proper method or a combination of several methods to measure stem sap flow, based on specific research purpose.

  7. Pulse holographic measurement techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Baik, Seong Hoon; Hong, Seok Kyung; Kim, Jeong Moog; Kim, Duk Hyun

    1992-01-01

    With the development of laser, remote inspection techniques using laser have been growing on. The inspection and measurement techniques by pulse holography are well-established technique for precise measurement, and widely used in various fields of industry now. In nuclear industry, this technology is practically used because holographic inspection is remote, noncontact, and precise measurement technique. In relation to remote inspection technology in nuclear industry, state-of-the art of pulse HNDT (Holographic non-destructive testing) and holographic measurement techniques are examined. First of all, the fundamental principles as well as practical problems for applications are briefly described. The fields of pulse holography have been divided into the HNDT, flow visualization and distribution study, and other application techniques. Additionally holographic particle study, bubble chamber holography, and applications to other visualization techniques are described. Lastly, the current status for the researches and applications of pulse holography to nuclear industry which are carried out actively in Europe and USA, is described. (Author)

  8. Heat driven pulse pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Steve M (Inventor); Martins, Mario S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A heat driven pulse pump includes a chamber having an inlet port, an outlet port, two check valves, a wick, and a heater. The chamber may include a plurality of grooves inside wall of the chamber. When heated within the chamber, a liquid to be pumped vaporizes and creates pressure head that expels the liquid through the outlet port. As liquid separating means, the wick, disposed within the chamber, is to allow, when saturated with the liquid, the passage of only liquid being forced by the pressure head in the chamber, preventing the vapor from exiting from the chamber through the outlet port. A plurality of grooves along the inside surface wall of the chamber can sustain the liquid, which is amount enough to produce vapor for the pressure head in the chamber. With only two simple moving parts, two check valves, the heat driven pulse pump can effectively function over the long lifetimes without maintenance or replacement. For continuous flow of the liquid to be pumped a plurality of pumps may be connected in parallel.

  9. Millimicrosecond pulse techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Ian A D

    1959-01-01

    Millimicrosecond Pulse Techniques, Second Edition focuses on millimicrosecond pulse techniques and the development of devices of large bandwidth, extending down to comparatively low frequencies (1 Mc/s). Emphasis is on basic circuit elements and pieces of equipment of universal application. Specific applications, mostly in the field of nuclear physics instrumentation, are considered. This book consists of eight chapters and opens with an introduction to some of the terminology employed by circuit engineers as well as theoretical concepts, including the laws of circuit analysis, Fourier analysi

  10. Development of 8 MW Power Supply Based on Pulse Step Modulation Technique for Auxiliary Heating System on HL-2A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Weidong; Xuan Weimin; Yao Lieying; Wang Yingqiao

    2012-01-01

    The high voltage power supply (HVPS) based on pulse step modulation (PSM) has already been developed for the auxiliary heating system on HL-2A. This power supply consists of many switch power supplies, and its output voltage can be obtained by modulating their delay time and pulse widths. The PSM topology and control principle are presented in this paper. The simple algorithms for the control system are explained clearly. The switch power supply (SPS) module has been built and the test results show it can meet the requirements of the auxiliary heating system. Now, 112 SPS modules and the whole system have already been developed. Its maximum output is about 72 kV/93 A. The protection time is less than 5 μs. The different outputs of this power supply are used for the electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) system with different duty ratios. The experimental results of the entire system are presented. The results indicate that the whole system can meet the requirements of the auxiliary heating system on HL-2A.

  11. Development of long-pulse heating & current drive actuators & operational techniques compatible with a high-Z divertor & first wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tynan, George [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2018-01-09

    This was a collaboration between UCSD and MIT to study the effective application of ion-cyclotron heating (ICRH) on the EAST tokamak, located in China. The original goal was for UCSD to develop a diagnostic that would allow measurement of the steady state, or DC, convection pattern that develops on magnetic field lines that attach or connect to the ICRH antenna. This diagnostic would then be used to develop techniques and approaches that minimize or even eliminate such DC convection during application of strong ICRH heating. This was thought to then indicate reduction or elimination of parasitic losses of heating power, and thus be an indicator of effective RF heating. The original plan to use high speed digital gas-puff imaging (GPI) of the antenna-edge plasma region in EAST was ultimately unsuccessful due to limitations in machine and camera operations. We then decided to attempt the same experiment on the ALCATOR C-MOD tokamak at MIT which had a similar instrument already installed. This effort was ultimately successful, and demonstrated that the underlying idea of using GPI as a diagnostic for ICRH antenna physics would, in fact, work. The two-dimensional velocity fields of the turbulent structures, which are advected by RF-induced E x B flows, are obtained via the time-delay estimation (TDE) techniques. Both the magnitude and radial extension of the radial electric field E-r were observed to increase with the toroidal magnetic field strength B and the ICRF power. The TDE estimations of RF-induced plasma potentials are consistent with previous results based on the probe measurements of poloidal phase velocity. The results suggest that effective ICRH heating with reduced impurity production is possible when the antenna/box system is designed so as to reduce the RF-induced image currents that flow in the grounded conducting antenna frame elements that surround the RF antenna current straps.

  12. High intensity heat pulse problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalamanchili, R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of finite-difference methods for the solution of partial differential equations is common in both design and research and development because of the advance of computers. The numerical methods for the unsteady heat diffusion equation received most attention not only because of heat transfer problems but also happened to be the basis for any study of parabolic partial differential equations. It is common to test the heat equation first even the methods developed for complex nonlinear parabolic partial differential equations arising in fluid mechanics or convective heat transfer. It is concluded that the finite-element method is conservative in both stability and monoscillation characteristics than the finite-difference method but not as conservative as the method of weighted-residuals. Since the finite-element is unique because of Gurtin's variational principle and numerous finite-differences can be constructed, it is found that some finite-difference schemes are better than the finite-element scheme in accuracy also. Therefore, further attention is focused here on finite-difference schemes only. Various physical problems are considered in the field of heat transfer. These include: numerous problems in steady and unsteady heat conduction; heat pulse problems, such as, plasma torch; problems arising from machining operations, such as, abrasive cut-off and surface grinding. (Auth.)

  13. Pulsed Laser Techniques in Laser Heated Diamond Anvil Cells for Studying Methane (CH4) and Water (H2O) at Extreme Pressures and Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtgrewe, N.; Lobanov, S.; Mahmood, M.; Goncharov, A. F.

    2017-12-01

    Scientific advancement in the fields of high pressure material synthesis and research on planetary interiors rely heavily on a variety of techniques for probing such extreme conditions, such as laser-heating diamond anvil cells (LHDACs) (Goncharov et al., J. Synch. Rad., 2009) and shock compression (Nellis et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2001/ Armstrong et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 2008). However, certain chemical properties can create complications in the detection of such extreme states, for example the instability of energetic materials, and detection of these dynamic chemical states by time-resolved methods has proven to be valuable in exploring the kinetics of these materials. Current efforts at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) for exploring the transitions between different phases of condensed matter (Armstrong et. al., APS Mar. Meeting, 2017/ Radousky et al., APS Mar. Meeting, 2017), and X-ray synchrotron pulsed heating are useful techniques but require large facilities and are not always accessible. Instead, optical properties of materials can serve as a window into the state or structure of species through electronic absorption properties. Pump-probe spectroscopy can be used to detect these electronic properties in time and allow the user to develop a picture of complex dynamic chemical events. Here we present data acquired up to 1.5 megabar (Mbar) pressures and temperatures >3000 K using pulsed transmission/reflective spectroscopy combined with a pulsed LHDAC and time-resolved detection (streak camera) (McWilliams et. al., PNAS, 2015/ McWilliams et al., PRL, 2016). Time-resolved optical properties will be presented on methane (CH4) and water (H2O) at P-T conditions found in icy bodies such as Uranus and Neptune (Lee and Scandolo, Nature Comm., 2011). Our results show that the interiors of Uranus and Neptune are optically opaque at P-T conditions corresponding to the mantles of these icy bodies, which has implications for the unusual magnetic fields of these

  14. Fast Heat Pulse Propagation by Turbulence Spreading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, Volker; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Mantica, Paola

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of a cold pulse initiated by edge cooling in JET is compared to propagation of the heat wave originating from a modulation of the heating source roughly at mid radius. It is found that the propagation of the cold pulse is by far faster than what could be predicted on the basis of ...

  15. Heat pulse propagation studies in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, E.D.; Callen, J.D.; Colchin, R.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Hill, K.W.; Izzo, R.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Monticello, D.A.; McGuire, K.; Bell, J.D.

    1986-02-01

    The time scales for sawtooth repetition and heat pulse propagation are much longer (10's of msec) in the large tokamak TFTR than in previous, smaller tokamaks. This extended time scale coupled with more detailed diagnostics has led us to revisit the analysis of the heat pulse propagation as a method to determine the electron heat diffusivity, chi/sub e/, in the plasma. A combination of analytic and computer solutions of the electron heat diffusion equation are used to clarify previous work and develop new methods for determining chi/sub e/. Direct comparison of the predicted heat pulses with soft x-ray and ECE data indicates that the space-time evolution is diffusive. However, the chi/sub e/ determined from heat pulse propagation usually exceeds that determined from background plasma power balance considerations by a factor ranging from 2 to 10. Some hypotheses for resolving this discrepancy are discussed. 11 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Heat pulse propagation studies in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredrickson, E.D.; Callen, J.D.; Colchin, R.J.

    1986-02-01

    The time scales for sawtooth repetition and heat pulse propagation are much longer (10's of msec) in the large tokamak TFTR than in previous, smaller tokamaks. This extended time scale coupled with more detailed diagnostics has led us to revisit the analysis of the heat pulse propagation as a method to determine the electron heat diffusivity, chi/sub e/, in the plasma. A combination of analytic and computer solutions of the electron heat diffusion equation are used to clarify previous work and develop new methods for determining chi/sub e/. Direct comparison of the predicted heat pulses with soft x-ray and ECE data indicates that the space-time evolution is diffusive. However, the chi/sub e/ determined from heat pulse propagation usually exceeds that determined from background plasma power balance considerations by a factor ranging from 2 to 10. Some hypotheses for resolving this discrepancy are discussed. 11 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  17. Pulse Compression Techniques for Laser Generated Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, R. F.; Madaras, E. I.

    1999-01-01

    Laser generated ultrasound for nondestructive evaluation has an optical power density limit due to rapid high heating that causes material damage. This damage threshold limits the generated ultrasound amplitude, which impacts nondestructive evaluation inspection capability. To increase ultrasound signal levels and improve the ultrasound signal-to-noise ratio without exceeding laser power limitations, it is possible to use pulse compression techniques. The approach illustrated here uses a 150mW laser-diode modulated with a pseudo-random sequence and signal correlation. Results demonstrate the successful generation of ultrasonic bulk waves in aluminum and graphite-epoxy composite materials using a modulated low-power laser diode and illustrate ultrasound bandwidth control.

  18. Heat and density pulse propagation in ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannone, L.; Riedl, K.; Stroth, U.; Eberhagen, A.; Gruber, O.; Mertens, V.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the electron thermal conductivity, derived from the radial propagation of the heat pulse generated by a sawtooth crash, have consistently yielded larger values than those obtained by power balance. It has been proposed that this discrepancy could be the result of the coupling of density and temperature perturbations. Numerical modelling of heat and density pulse propagation on ASDEX has been used to address this question. In addition, measurements at various electron densities and in hydrogen and deuterium were undertaken, with the aim of providing a broad base of experimental measurements for testing the various transport models proposed. (author) 9 refs., 1 fig

  19. Heat and density pulse propagation in ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannone, L.; Riedel, K.; Stroth, U.; Eberhagen, A.; Gruber, O.; Mertens, V.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the electron thermal conductivity, derived from the radial propagation of the heat pulse generated by a sawtooth crash, have consistently yielded larger values than those obtained by power balance. It has been proposed that this discrepancy could be the result of the coupling of density and temperature perturbations. Numerical modelling of heat and density pulse propagation on ASDEX has been used to address this question. In addition, measurements at various electron densities and in hydrogen and deuterium were undertaken, with the aim of providing a broad base of experimental measurements for testing the various transport models proposed. (orig.)

  20. Pulsed neutron activation calibration technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehler, P.

    1979-01-01

    A pulsed neutron activation (PNA) for measurement of two-phase flow consists of a pulsed source of fast neutron to activate the oxygen in a steam-water mixture. Flow is measured downstream by an NaI detector. Measured counts are sorted by a multiscaler into different time channels. A counts vs. time distribution typical for two-phase flow with slip between the two phases is obtained. Proper evaluation for the counts/time distribution leads to flow-regime independent equations for the average of the inverse transil time and the average density. After calculation of the average mass flow velocity, the true mass flow is derived

  1. Experimental study of rf pulsed heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Laurent

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic thermal stresses produced by rf pulsed heating can be the limiting factor on the attainable reliable gradients for room temperature linear accelerators. This is especially true for structures that have complicated features for wakefield damping. These limits could be pushed higher by using special types of copper, copper alloys, or other conducting metals in constructing partial or complete accelerator structures. Here we present an experimental study aimed at determining the potential of these materials for tolerating cyclic thermal fatigue due to rf magnetic fields. A special cavity that has no electric field on the surface was employed in these studies. The cavity shape concentrates the magnetic field on one flat surface where the test material is placed. The materials tested in this study have included oxygen free electronic grade copper, copper zirconium, copper chromium, hot isostatically pressed copper, single crystal copper, electroplated copper, Glidcop®, copper silver, and silver plated copper. The samples were exposed to different machining and heat treatment processes prior to rf processing. Each sample was tested to a peak pulsed heating temperature of approximately 110°C and remained at this temperature for approximately 10×10^{6} rf pulses. In general, the results showed the possibility of pushing the gradient limits due to pulsed heating fatigue by the use of copper zirconium and copper chromium alloys.

  2. Pulsed neutron generator for use with pulsed neutron activation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochau, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    A high-output, transportable, pulsed neutron generator has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories for use with Pulsed Neutron Activation (PNA) techniques. The PNA neutron generator generates > 10 10 14 MeV D-T neutrons in a 1.2 millisecond pulse. Each operation of the unit will produce a nominal total neutron output of 1.2 x 10 10 neutrons. The generator has been designed to be easily repaired and modified. The unit requires no additional equipment for operation or measurement of output

  3. Laser Pulse Heating of Spherical Metal Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I. Tribelsky

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider the general problem of laser pulse heating of spherical metal particles with the sizes ranging from nanometers to millimeters. We employ the exact Mie solution of the diffraction problem and solve the heat-transfer equation to determine the maximum temperature rise at the particle surface as a function of optical and thermometric parameters of the problem. Primary attention is paid to the case when the thermal diffusivity of the particle is much larger than that of the environment, as it is in the case of metal particles in fluids. We show that, in this case, for any given duration of the laser pulse, the maximum temperature rise as a function of the particle size reaches a maximum at a certain finite size of the particle. We suggest simple approximate analytical expressions for this dependence, which cover the entire parameter range of the problem and agree well with direct numerical simulations.

  4. Development of Long-Pulse Heating and Current Drive Actuators and Operational Techniques Compatible with a High-Z Divertor and First Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guiding [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-11-02

    Accurate measurement of the edge electron density profile is essential to optimizing antenna coupling and assessment of impurity contamination in studying long-pulse plasma heating and current drive in fusion devices. Measurement of the edge density profile has been demonstrated on the US fusion devices such as C-Mod, DIII-D, and TFTR amongst many devices, and has been used for RF loading and impurity modeling calculations for many years. University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) has recently installed a density profile reflectometer system on the EAST fusion device at the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in China based on the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA)-designed reflectometer system on the DIII-D fusion device at General Atomics Company in San Diego, California. UCLA has been working with USTC to optimize the existing microwave antenna, waveguide system, microwave electronics, and data analysis to produce reliable edge density profiles. During the past budget year, progress has been made in all three major areas: effort to achieve reliable system operations under various EAST operational conditions, effort to optimize system performance, and effort to provide quality density profiles into EAST’s database routinely.

  5. Time differentiated nuclear resonance spectroscopy coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupenko, I., E-mail: kupenko@esrf.fr; Strohm, C. [Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); ESRF-The European Synchrotron, CS 40220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); McCammon, C.; Cerantola, V.; Petitgirard, S.; Dubrovinsky, L. [Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Glazyrin, K. [Photon Science, DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Vasiukov, D.; Aprilis, G. [Laboratory of Crystallography, Material Physics and Technology at Extreme Conditions, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Chumakov, A. I.; Rüffer, R. [ESRF-The European Synchrotron, CS 40220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2015-11-15

    Developments in pulsed laser heating applied to nuclear resonance techniques are presented together with their applications to studies of geophysically relevant materials. Continuous laser heating in diamond anvil cells is a widely used method to generate extreme temperatures at static high pressure conditions in order to study the structure and properties of materials found in deep planetary interiors. The pulsed laser heating technique has advantages over continuous heating, including prevention of the spreading of heated sample and/or the pressure medium and, thus, a better stability of the heating process. Time differentiated data acquisition coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells was successfully tested at the Nuclear Resonance beamline (ID18) of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. We show examples applying the method to investigation of an assemblage containing ε-Fe, FeO, and Fe{sub 3}C using synchrotron Mössbauer source spectroscopy, FeCO{sub 3} using nuclear inelastic scattering, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} using nuclear forward scattering. These examples demonstrate the applicability of pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells to spectroscopic techniques with long data acquisition times, because it enables stable pulsed heating with data collection at specific time intervals that are synchronized with laser pulses.

  6. Molecular dynamics study of lubricant depletion by pulsed laser heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Young Woo; Rosenkranz, Andreas; Talke, Frank E.

    2018-05-01

    In this study, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to numerically investigate the effect of pulsed laser heating on lubricant depletion. The maximum temperature, the lubricant depletion width, the number of evaporated lubricant beads and the number of fragmented lubricant chains were studied as a function of laser peak power, pulse duration and repetition rate. A continuous-wave laser and a square pulse laser were simulated and compared to a Gaussian pulse laser. With increasing repetition rate, pulsed laser heating was found to approach continuous-wave laser heating.

  7. Interpretation of heat and density pulse propagation in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sips, A.C.C.; Costley, A.E.; O'Rourke, J.O.

    1991-01-01

    This paper addresses two key issues in current research on sawtooth induced heat and density pulse measurements in Tokamaks and their interpretation. First, heat and density pulses in JET and TXT show different qualitative behaviour implying substantially different transport coefficients. Second, a new description of the heat pulse has been used to describe measurements cannot be simulated with the widely used diffusive model. In this paper, we show that consistency between all these measurements can be obtained assuming a diffusive propagation for the heat and density pulses and using linearised coupled transport equations. (author) 6 refs., 5 figs

  8. Experimental study of rf pulsed heating

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, L; Nantista, C; Dolgashev, V; Higashi, Y; Aicheler, M; Tantawi, S; Wuensch, W

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic thermal stresses produced by rf pulsed heating can be the limiting factor on the attainable reliable gradients for room temperature linear accelerators. This is especially true for structures that have complicated features for wakefield damping. These limits could be pushed higher by using special types of copper, copper alloys, or other conducting metals in constructing partial or complete accelerator structures. Here we present an experimental study aimed at determining the potential of these materials for tolerating cyclic thermal fatigue due to rf magnetic fields. A special cavity that has no electric field on the surface was employed in these studies. The cavity shape concentrates the magnetic field on one flat surface where the test material is placed. The materials tested in this study have included oxygen free electronic grade copper, copper zirconium, copper chromium, hot isostatically pressed copper, single crystal copper, electroplated copper, Glidcop (R), copper silver, and silver plated co...

  9. ELF wave generation in the ionosphere using pulse modulated HF heating: initial tests of a technique for increasing ELF wave generation efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Barr

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results of a preliminary study to determine the effective heating and cooling time constants of ionospheric currents in a simulated modulated HF heating, `beam painting' configuration. It has been found that even and odd harmonics of the fundamental ELF wave used to amplitude modulate the HF heater are sourced from different regions of the ionosphere which support significantly different heating and cooling time constants. The fundamental frequency and its odd harmonics are sourced in a region of the ionosphere where the heating and cooling time constants are about equal. The even harmonics on the other hand are sourced from regions of the ionosphere characterised by ratios of cooling to heating time constant greater than ten. It is thought that the even harmonics are sourced in the lower ionosphere (around 65 km where the currents are much smaller than at the higher altitudes around 78 km where the currents at the fundamental frequency and odd harmonics maximise.Key words. Electromagnetics (antennae · Ionosphere (active experiments · Radio science (non linear phenomena

  10. Influence of short heat pulses on the helium boiling heat transfer rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, V.K.; Deev, V.I.; Savin, A.N.; Kutsenko, K.V.

    1987-01-01

    Investigation results on heat transfer in the process of helium boiling on a heated wall under conditions of pulsed heat effect are described. Results of the given study point to one of possible ways of heat exchange intensification in boiling helium by supplying short heat pulse to the heater. Even short-time noncontrolled or incidental increase in the heater capacity during experiment with boiling helium can result in a considerable disagreement of experimental data on heat transfer

  11. Heat pulse excitability of vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brichta, Alan M.; Tabatabaee, Hessam; Boutros, Peter J.; Ahn, JoongHo; Della Santina, Charles C.; Poppi, Lauren A.; Lim, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we combined electrophysiology with optical heat pulse stimuli to examine thermodynamics of membrane electrical excitability in mammalian vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons. We recorded whole cell currents in mammalian type II vestibular hair cells using an excised preparation (mouse) and action potentials (APs) in afferent neurons in vivo (chinchilla) in response to optical heat pulses applied to the crista (ΔT ≈ 0.25°C per pulse). Afferent spike trains evoked by heat pulse stimuli were diverse and included asynchronous inhibition, asynchronous excitation, and/or phase-locked APs synchronized to each infrared heat pulse. Thermal responses of membrane currents responsible for APs in ganglion neurons were strictly excitatory, with Q10 ≈ 2. In contrast, hair cells responded with a mix of excitatory and inhibitory currents. Excitatory hair cell membrane currents included a thermoelectric capacitive current proportional to the rate of temperature rise (dT/dt) and an inward conduction current driven by ΔT. An iberiotoxin-sensitive inhibitory conduction current was also evoked by ΔT, rising in heat pulse excitability in vestibular sensory organs and provide quantitative methods for rational application of optical heat pulses to examine protein biophysics and manipulate cellular excitability. PMID:27226448

  12. Application of dynamic response analysis to JET heat pulse data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griguoli, A.; Sips, A.C.C.

    1993-09-01

    The plasma dynamic response can be used to study transport processes in a tokamak plasma. A method has been developed for the application of dynamic response analysis to study perturbations away from the plasma equilibrium. In this report perturbations on the electron temperature following a sawtooth collapse in the center of the plasma are considered. The method has been used to find mathematical description of a series of heat pulses at the Joint European Torus project (JET). From the plasma dynamic response, the time constants which characterise the heat pulse are obtained. These time constants are compared to the transport coefficients found in previous analysis of the JET heat pulse data. Various methods are discussed for applying dynamic response analysis to JET heat pulse data. (author)

  13. Nuclear fuel safety studies by laser pulse heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanadham, C.S.; Kumar, Santosh; Dey, G.K.; Kutty, T.R.G.; Khan, K.B.; Kumar, Arun; Jathar, V.P.; Sahoo, K.C.

    2009-01-01

    The behaviour of nuclear fuels under transient heating conditions is vital to nuclear safety. A laser pulse based heating system to simulate the transient heating conditions experienced by the fuel during reactor accidents like LOCA and RIA is under development at BARC, Mumbai. Some of the concepts used in this system are under testing in pilot studies. This paper describes the results of some pilot studies carried out on unirradiated UO 2 specimens by laser pulse heating, followed by metallography and X-ray diffraction measurements. (author)

  14. Heat pulses in dilute 3He-4He mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husson, L.P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The propagation of heat pulses in dilute 3 He- 4 He mixtures under pressure along a tube, which is long compared to its diameter, is discussed. At high temperatures, where the excitations are in local equilibrium with one another, the propagation of heat pulses in the liquid is determined by the phenomenon of second sound, which is essentially a density wave in the excitation gas. The velocity and attenuation of second sound can be determined from the shape of the transmitted pulse. Measurements on the scattering and absorption of phonons are presented, together with a detailed description of the experimental technique and the electronic equipment. Measurements on the velocity and absorption of second sound are presented. From the results for the velocity of second sound in pure 4 He, values of the phonon and roton parameters are deduced. The velocity data in the mixtures have been used to calculate values of the effective mass of 3 He in superfluid 4 He. The results of these calculations have been compared with values of the effective mass obtained by other authors. The coefficient of second-sound absorption in pure 4 He is computed from theory, making use of the phonon and roton parameters calculated from the second-sound velocity data in pure 4 He. The experimental results on the scattering and absorption of phonons have been analysed. The empirical expressions for the scattering and absorption rates obtained from the diffusive phonon signals were compared with the results of the Baym-Ebner theory, and have also been used to calculate the coefficient of thermal conductivity in dilute 3 He- 4 He mixtures. (Auth.)

  15. On the Transmission Line Pulse Measurement Technique

    OpenAIRE

    X. Rodriguez; M. Eduardo; M. Harington

    2015-01-01

    Transmission Line Pulse is a short pulse (25ns to 150ns) measurement of the current-voltage (I/V) characteristics of the ESD protection built into an integrated circuit. The short TLP pulses are used to simulate the short ESD pulse threats and integrated circuit must tolerate without being damaged. In this work the fundamental principles of how the TLP pulse is generated and used to create I-V characteristic plots will be explored. The measurement will be then used to characterize the I-V cha...

  16. Experimental study of pulsed heating of electromagnetic cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritzkau, D.P.; Menegat, A.; Siemann, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    An experiment to study the effects of pulsed heating in electromagnetic cavities will be performed. Pulsed heating is believed to be the limiting mechanism of high acceleration gradients at short wavelengths. A cylindrical cavity operated in the TE 011 mode at a frequency of 11.424 GHz will be used. A klystron will be used to supply a peak input power of 20 MW with a pulse length of 1.5 μs. The temperature response of the cavity will be measured by a second waveguide designed to excite a TE 012 mode in the cavity with a low-power CW signal at a frequency of 17.8 GHz. The relevant theory of pulsed heating will be discussed and the results from cold-testing the structure will be presented

  17. Heat pulse excitability of vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbitt, Richard D; Brichta, Alan M; Tabatabaee, Hessam; Boutros, Peter J; Ahn, JoongHo; Della Santina, Charles C; Poppi, Lauren A; Lim, Rebecca

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we combined electrophysiology with optical heat pulse stimuli to examine thermodynamics of membrane electrical excitability in mammalian vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons. We recorded whole cell currents in mammalian type II vestibular hair cells using an excised preparation (mouse) and action potentials (APs) in afferent neurons in vivo (chinchilla) in response to optical heat pulses applied to the crista (ΔT ≈ 0.25°C per pulse). Afferent spike trains evoked by heat pulse stimuli were diverse and included asynchronous inhibition, asynchronous excitation, and/or phase-locked APs synchronized to each infrared heat pulse. Thermal responses of membrane currents responsible for APs in ganglion neurons were strictly excitatory, with Q10 ≈ 2. In contrast, hair cells responded with a mix of excitatory and inhibitory currents. Excitatory hair cell membrane currents included a thermoelectric capacitive current proportional to the rate of temperature rise (dT/dt) and an inward conduction current driven by ΔT An iberiotoxin-sensitive inhibitory conduction current was also evoked by ΔT, rising in protein biophysics and manipulate cellular excitability. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Research on digital multi-channel pulse height analysis techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Wuyun; Wei Yixiang; Ai Xianyun; Ao Qi

    2005-01-01

    Multi-channel pulse height analysis techniques are developing in the direction of digitalization. Based on digital signal processing techniques, digital multi-channel analyzers are characterized by powerful pulse processing ability, high throughput, improved stability and flexibility. This paper analyzes key techniques of digital nuclear pulse processing. With MATLAB software, main algorithms are simulated, such as trapezoidal shaping, digital baseline estimation, digital pole-zero/zero-pole compensation, poles and zeros identification. The preliminary general scheme of digital MCA is discussed, as well as some other important techniques about its engineering design. All these lay the foundation of developing homemade digital nuclear spectrometers. (authors)

  19. Pressure heat pumping in the orifice pulse-tube refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, P.C.T. de

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism by which heat is pumped as a result of pressure changes in an orifice pulse-tube refrigerator (OPTR) is analyzed thermodynamically. The thermodynamic cycle considered consists of four steps: (1) the pressure is increased by a factor π 1 due to motion of a piston in the heat exchanger at the warm end of the regenerator; (2) the pressure is decreased by a factor π 2 due to leakage out of the orifice; (3) the pressure is further decreased due to motion of the piston back to its original position; (4) the pressure is increased to its value at the start of the cycle due to leakage through the orifice back into the pulse tube. The regenerator and the heat exchangers are taken to be perfect. The pressure is assumed to be uniform during the entire cycle. The temperature profiles of the gas in the pulse tube after each step are derived analytically. Knowledge of the temperature at which gas enters the cold heat exchanger during steps 3 and 4 provides the heat removed per cycle from this exchanger. Knowledge of the pressure as a function of piston position provides the work done per cycle by the piston. The pressure heat pumping mechanism considered is effective only in the presence of a regenerator. Detailed results are presented for the heat removed per cycle, for the coefficient of performance, and for the refrigeration efficiency as a function of the compression ratio π 1 and the expansion ratio π 2 . Results are also given for the influence on performance of the ratio of specific heats. The results obtained are compared with corresponding results for the basic pulse-tube refrigerator (BPTR) operating by surface heat pumping

  20. Numerical investigation of vessel heating using a copper vapor laser and a pulsed dye laser in treating vascular skin lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushkareva, A. E.; Ponomarev, I. V.; Isaev, A. A.; Klyuchareva, S. V.

    2018-02-01

    A computer simulation technique was employed to study the selective heating of a tissue vessel using emission from a pulsed copper vapor laser and a pulsed dye laser. The depth and size of vessels that could be selectively and safely removed were determined for the lasers under examination.

  1. Pulse heating and ignition for off-centre ignited targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdy, A.I.; Takabe, H.; Mima, K.

    1999-01-01

    An off-centre ignition model has been used to study the ignition conditions for laser targets related to the fast ignition scheme. A 2-D hydrodynamic code has been used, including alpha particle heating. The main goal of the study is the possibility of obtaining a high gain ICF target with fast ignition. In order to determine the ignition conditions, samples with various compressed core densities having different spark density-radius product (i.e. areal density) values were selected. The study was carried out in the presence of an external heating source, with a constant heating rate. A dependence of the ignition conditions on the heating rate of the external pulse is demonstrated. For a given set of ignition conditions, our simulation showed that an 11 ps pulse with 17 kJ of injected energy into the spark area was required to achieve ignition for a compressed core with a density of 200 g/cm 3 and 0.5 g/cm 2 spark areal density. It is shown that the ignition conditions are highly dependent on the heating rate of the external pulse. (author)

  2. Pulse radiolysis - new approaches to the classical technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagorski, Z P [Institute of Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland)

    1973-01-01

    The present status of classical pulse radiolysis is described as well as trends in the further development of this technique (the investigation of radiolysis with nano- and picoseconds time resolution, new optica and electrochemical methods of intermediate species detection). The attention is concentrated on experimental difficulties of particular versions and the achievements are reviewed critically. This paper is the background for experiments being performed in the Institute of Nuclear Research on new techniques of pulse radiolysis.

  3. Selection of heat transfer model for describing short-pulse laser heating silica-based sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Xiangnan; Nie Jinsong; Li Hua; Bian Jintian

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental equations of Fourier heat transfer model and non-Fourier heat transfer model were numerically solved, with the finite difference method. The relative changes between temperature curves of the two heat transfer models were analyzed under laser irradiation with different pulse widths of 10 ns, 1 ns, 100 ps, 10 ps. The impact of different thermal relaxation time on non-Fourier model results was discussed. For pulses of pulse width less than or equal to 100 ps irradiating silicon material, the surface temperature increases slowly and carrier effect happens, which the non-Fourier model can reflect properly. As for general material, when the pulse width is less than or equal to the thermal relaxation time of material, carrier effect occurs. In this case, the non-Fourier model should be used. (authors)

  4. Pulsed neutron generator for mass flow measurement using the pulsed neutron activation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochau, G.E.; Hornsby, D.R.; Mareda, J.F.; Riggan, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    A high-output, transportable neutron generator has been developed to measure mass flow velocities in reactor safety tests using the Pulsed Neutron Activation (PNA) Technique. The PNA generator produces >10 10 14 MeV D-T neutrons in a 1.2 millisecond pulse. The Millisecond Pulse (MSP) Neutron Tube, developed for this application, has an expected operational life of 1000 pulses, and it limits the generator pulse repetition rate to 12 pulses/minute. A semiconductor neutron detector is included in the generator package to monitor the neutron output. The control unit, which can be operated manually or remotely, also contains a digital display with a BCD output for the neutron monitor information. The digital logic of the unit controls the safety interlocks and rejects transient signals which could accidently fire the generator

  5. Identification of critical equipment and determination of operational limits in helium refrigerators under pulsed heat load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Rohan; Ghosh, Parthasarathi; Chowdhury, Kanchan

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale helium refrigerators are subjected to pulsed heat load from tokamaks. As these plants are designed for constant heat loads, operation under such varying load may lead to instability in plants thereby tripping the operation of different equipment. To understand the behavior of the plant subjected to pulsed heat load, an existing plant of 120 W at 4.2 K and another large-scale plant of 18 kW at 4.2 K have been analyzed using a commercial process simulator Aspen Hysys®. A similar heat load characteristic has been applied in both quasi steady state and dynamic analysis to determine critical stages and equipment of these plants from operational point of view. It has been found that the coldest part of both the cycles consisting JT-stage and its preceding reverse Brayton stage are the most affected stages of the cycles. Further analysis of the above stages and constituting equipment revealed limits of operation with respect to variation of return stream flow rate resulted from such heat load variations. The observations on the outcome of the analysis can be used for devising techniques for steady operation of the plants subjected to pulsed heat load.

  6. A non-local model analysis of heat pulse propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, T.; Itoh, S.I.; Yagi, M.; Stroth, U.

    1998-01-01

    The anomalous transport in high temperature plasma has been studied for a long time, from the beginning of the fusion research. Since the electron channel in stellarators and tokamaks is clearly anomalous, it is of fundamental importance to investigate the electron heat diffusivity coefficient, χ e and to understand the physical mechanism. Recently, the experimental data for the transient transport of the heat pulse propagation in fusion plasma has been accumulated. An observation was reported on W7-AS which the heat flux changes faster than the change of the temperature profile, responding to the switching on off of the central heating power. The observation on the transient response has simulated the transport modeling, e.g., the critical marginality which implies the existence of a finite threshold in ∇T for the excitation of the turbulence, or the model in which the thermal conductivity is assumed to depend on the heating power. Extensive study is made by use of these models, and the critical marginally model seems to be insufficient to explain various transient transport. The rapid change of the plasma state and its hysteresis nature were successfully modeled by a heating-power-dependent model. The foundation of this model, however, is left for future work. The development of the transport modeling remains to be an urgent problem. In this paper, we investigate the role of the non-locality of the plasma transport in the study of the heat pulse propagation. For this purpose, a model equation is proposed, in which the non-local effect is taken into account in the heat flux. The properties of this model are investigated by performing a transport simulation. The organization of this paper is as follows: In Sec. II, the model equation is proposed and the properties of the model are explained. Using the model equation, the switching on off experiment is simulated in Sec. III. Summary and discussion are given in Sec. IV. (author)

  7. Heat effect of pulsed Er:YAG laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibst, Raimund; Keller, Ulrich

    1990-06-01

    Pulsed Er:YAG laser radiation has been found to be effective for dental enamel and dentin removal. Damage to the surrounding hard tissue is little, but before testing the Er:YAG laser clinically for the preparation of cavities, possible effects on the soft tissue of the pulp must be known. In order to estimate pulp damage , temperature rise in dentin caused by the laser radiation was measured by a thermocouple. Additionally, temperature distributions were observed by means of a thermal imaging system. The heat effect of a single Er:YAG laser pulse is little and limited to the vicinity of the impact side. Because heat energy is added with each additional pulse , the temperature distribution depends not only on the radiant energy, but also on the number of pulses and the repetition rate. Both irradiation conditions can be found , making irreversible pulp damage either likely or unlikely. The experimental observations can be explained qualitatively by a simple model of the ablation process.

  8. Dynamic response of the target container under pulsed heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liping Ni [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    The structural mechanics of a liquid target container for pulsed spallation sources have been simulated using both a commercial code and a PSI-developed program. Results from the transient thermal-structural analysis showed that, due to inertia effects, the dynamic stress in the target container is contributed mainly from direct heating in the initial time stage, and later from the pressure wave in the target liquid once it reaches the wall. (author) figs., tab., refs.

  9. Beta dosimetry using pulsed laser heating of TLD materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quam, W.

    1983-01-01

    Use of a pulsed CO 2 laser to heat the surface of hot-pressed LiF chips has been investigated. The thermoluminescent traps in the first 10 to 20 μm of depth may be read out with good efficiency, which will allow entrance dose and exit dose to be determined using a standard chip. These dose data can be used to calculate beta dose and gamma dose separately. Readout speed is estimated to be a few milliseconds per chip

  10. Quasiperiodic Raman technique for ultrashort pulse generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, D.D.; Walker, D.R.; Shverdin, M.Y.; Yin, G.Y.; Harris, S.E.

    2003-01-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a new Raman technique that produces 200 sidebands, ranging in wavelength from 3 μm to 195 nm. By studying multiphoton ionization of nitric oxide (NO) molecules, we show mutual phase coherence among 15 visible sidebands covering 0.63 octaves of bandwidth

  11. Techniques for the improvement of heat exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyghe, J.

    1983-01-01

    The target of the described techniques is either to improve the performances of the equipements or to reduce their cost price. These techniques were developed at the laboratory scale and some of them were tested in pilot units. Neither of them has yet been applied in commercial plants. Different type of corrogated tubes, thin film evaporation, dropwise condensation, plastic tube or plates, tube configuration and heat pipes are examined [fr

  12. Generation of Quasi-Gaussian Pulses Based on Correlation Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POHOATA, S.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Gaussian pulses have been mostly used within communications, where some applications can be emphasized: mobile telephony (GSM, where GMSK signals are used, as well as the UWB communications, where short-period pulses based on Gaussian waveform are generated. Since the Gaussian function signifies a theoretical concept, which cannot be accomplished from the physical point of view, this should be expressed by using various functions, able to determine physical implementations. New techniques of generating the Gaussian pulse responses of good precision are approached, proposed and researched in this paper. The second and third order derivatives with regard to the Gaussian pulse response are accurately generated. The third order derivates is composed of four individual rectangular pulses of fixed amplitudes, being easily to be generated by standard techniques. In order to generate pulses able to satisfy the spectral mask requirements, an adequate filter is necessary to be applied. This paper emphasizes a comparative analysis based on the relative error and the energy spectra of the proposed pulses.

  13. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with nanosecond laser pulses: Nanoparticle heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedyalkov, N.N.; Imamova, S.E.; Atanasov, P.A.; Toshkova, R.A.; Gardeva, E.G.; Yossifova, L.S.; Alexandrov, M.T.; Obara, M.

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental results on the heating process of gold nanoparticles irradiated by nanosecond laser pulses are presented. The efficiency of particle heating is demonstrated by in-vitro photothermal therapy of human tumor cells. Gold nanoparticles with diameters of 40 and 100 nm are added as colloid in the cell culture and the samples are irradiated by nanosecond pulses at wavelength of 532 nm delivered by Nd:YAG laser system. The results indicate clear cytotoxic effect of application of nanoparticle as more efficient is the case of using particles with diameter of 100 nm. The theoretical analysis of the heating process of nanoparticle interacting with laser radiation is based on the Mie scattering theory, which is used for calculation of the particle absorption coefficient, and two-dimensional heat diffusion model, which describes the particle and the surrounding medium temperature evolution. Using this model the dependence of the achieved maximal temperature in the particles on the applied laser fluence and time evolution of the particle temperature is obtained.

  14. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with nanosecond laser pulses: Nanoparticle heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedyalkov, N. N.; Imamova, S. E.; Atanasov, P. A.; Toshkova, R. A.; Gardeva, E. G.; Yossifova, L. S.; Alexandrov, M. T.; Obara, M.

    2011-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental results on the heating process of gold nanoparticles irradiated by nanosecond laser pulses are presented. The efficiency of particle heating is demonstrated by in-vitro photothermal therapy of human tumor cells. Gold nanoparticles with diameters of 40 and 100 nm are added as colloid in the cell culture and the samples are irradiated by nanosecond pulses at wavelength of 532 nm delivered by Nd:YAG laser system. The results indicate clear cytotoxic effect of application of nanoparticle as more efficient is the case of using particles with diameter of 100 nm. The theoretical analysis of the heating process of nanoparticle interacting with laser radiation is based on the Mie scattering theory, which is used for calculation of the particle absorption coefficient, and two-dimensional heat diffusion model, which describes the particle and the surrounding medium temperature evolution. Using this model the dependence of the achieved maximal temperature in the particles on the applied laser fluence and time evolution of the particle temperature is obtained.

  15. Active heat pulse sensing of 3-D-flow fields in streambeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Eddie W.; Shanafield, Margaret A.; Noorduijn, Saskia; McCallum, James; Lewandowski, Jörg; Batelaan, Okke

    2018-03-01

    Profiles of temperature time series are commonly used to determine hyporheic flow patterns and hydraulic dynamics in the streambed sediments. Although hyporheic flows are 3-D, past research has focused on determining the magnitude of the vertical flow component and how this varies spatially. This study used a portable 56-sensor, 3-D temperature array with three heat pulse sources to measure the flow direction and magnitude up to 200 mm below the water-sediment interface. Short, 1 min heat pulses were injected at one of the three heat sources and the temperature response was monitored over a period of 30 min. Breakthrough curves from each of the sensors were analysed using a heat transport equation. Parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis was undertaken using the differential evolution adaptive metropolis (DREAM) algorithm, an adaption of the Markov chain Monte Carlo method, to estimate the flux and its orientation. Measurements were conducted in the field and in a sand tank under an extensive range of controlled hydraulic conditions to validate the method. The use of short-duration heat pulses provided a rapid, accurate assessment technique for determining dynamic and multi-directional flow patterns in the hyporheic zone and is a basis for improved understanding of biogeochemical processes at the water-streambed interface.

  16. The pulses as a diagnostic technique in the sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, G.C.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a method of finding physical parameters by studying the pulses in the Sun. For the sake of a mathematical approach, we consider an ideal, highly relevant model which could exist in the Sun with the effects of ionization, due to which there will be a continuous formation of ionized particles. It is observed that the pulse originated at the centre of a dipole field propagates along the magnetic field. We derive a dispersion relation for these types of pulses, propagating from the centre to the solar surface. The time taken by the pulse from its source to the solar surface is also estimated, with due account of the ionization effects on the pulse. Without proper account of these effects, the technique employed in determing the physical parameters may lead to error. Temporal and spatial damping of the pulses lead to estimates of the velocity distribution of the ionized particles and of the amplitude of the magnetic field of the wave in pulse. (orig.)

  17. Real-time pulse deinterleaving using digital delay line techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, L. F.; Palermo, T. J.

    This paper describes an implementation of a tracking pulse sorter based on predictive gating techniques. Real-time pulse sorters or pulse train gating devices have been utilized by the ELINT signal analyst for many years. The more elementary of these devices employed a retriggerable delay interval and an acceptance gate, which were used in predictive fashion to track pulse trains whose PRIs fall within the limits of the programmed delay interval. This design utilizes the pulse hit/miss history of individual track files in a variation of a sequential observer detection algorithm. Use of a digital delay line with pulse history allows multiple pulse trains to be tracked simultaneously and independently without interference. The design also provides flexibility in lock-on and track criteria to allow maintenance of acquisition probability and false alarm rate in dense signal environments and with low SNRs. The hardware provides time interval resolution to 12.5 nsec and covers a PRI range of 50 microsec to 50 msec.

  18. Electron heating enhancement by frequency-chirped laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, E.; Afarideh, H., E-mail: hafarideh@aut.ac.ir [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadighi-Bonabi, R., E-mail: Sadighi@sharif.ir [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9567, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Riazi, Z. [Physics and Accelerator School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hora, H. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2014-09-14

    Propagation of a chirped laser pulse with a circular polarization through an uprising plasma density profile is studied by using 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulation. The laser penetration depth is increased in an overdense plasma compared to an unchirped pulse. The induced transparency due to the laser frequency chirp results in an enhanced heating of hot electrons as well as increased maximum longitudinal electrostatic field at the back side of the solid target, which is very essential in target normal sheath acceleration regime of proton acceleration. For an applied chirp parameter between 0.008 and 0.01, the maximum amount of the electrostatic field is improved by a factor of 2. Furthermore, it is noticed that for a chirped laser pulse with a₀=5, because of increasing the plasma transparency length, the laser pulse can penetrate up to about n{sub e}≈6n{sub c}, where n{sub c} is plasma critical density. It shows 63% increase in the effective critical density compared to the relativistic induced transparency regime for an unchirped condition.

  19. Synthesis of cubic Y zeolite using a pulsed microwave heating system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araújo L.R.G. de

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Cubic Y zeolite were successfully synthesized using microwave heating for 18 - 25 min, whereas 10 - 50 h are required by hydrothermal heating technique depending upon the lattice Si/Al ratio. To this end, we used a commercial microwave oven modified in order to provide pulsed microwave pumping on the synthesis mixtures. The obtained samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, BET surface area and infrared spectroscopy measurements. As a result, we verify that Y zeolite samples obtained from hydrogels containing low aluminum contents, present a good degree of crystallinity and then can be suitable for using in adsorption and catalysis experiments.

  20. Heat-pulse flowmeter for a liquid breeder blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Masatoshi; Shibano, Kyohei; Tanaka, Teruya; Muroga, Takeo

    2013-01-01

    Liquid metals Li, Pb-17Li and Sn-20Li are candidate liquid breeders in fusion reactors. The development of a flowmeter that can be applied to high-temperature liquid metals is an important issue. A heat-pulse flowmeter is proposed in the present study. Its basic performance was investigated by means of a loop experiment with Pb-17Li and a numerical simulation. The temperature distribution in flowing Pb-17Li was obtained by local transient heating of the outer surface of a loop tube. The temperature distribution gradually changed and resembled the movement of a hot spot, which had a higher temperature than its surroundings. This hot spot moved along the flow and passed through the tips of the thermocouples. The change in temperature distribution with the movement of the hot spot was monitored by three thermocouples exposed to the Pb-17Li flow. The results of the loop experiments were numerically simulated by assuming a certain flow rate, and the temperature profile obtained in the loop experiment was in agreement with the simulation results. The time taken by the hot spot to pass through the tips of the thermocouples was measured and simulated, and the correlation between this time and the average flow velocity was evaluated. The results indicated the average flow velocity can be obtained using the heat-pulse flowmeter proposed in this study. (author)

  1. Heat transfer modelling of pulsed laser-tissue interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urzova, J.; Jelinek, M.

    2018-03-01

    Due to their attributes, the application of medical lasers is on the rise in numerous medical fields. From a biomedical point of view, the most interesting applications are the thermal interactions and the photoablative interactions, which effectively remove tissue without excessive heat damage to the remaining tissue. The objective of this work is to create a theoretical model for heat transfer in the tissue following its interaction with the laser beam to predict heat transfer during medical laser surgery procedures. The dimensions of the ablated crater (shape and ablation depth) were determined by computed tomography imaging. COMSOL Multiphysics software was used for temperature modelling. The parameters of tissue and blood, such as density, specific heat capacity, thermal conductivity and diffusivity, were calculated from the chemical ratio. The parameters of laser-tissue interaction, such as absorption and reflection coefficients, were experimentally determined. The parameters of the laser beam were power density, repetition frequency, pulse length and spot dimensions. Heat spreading after laser interaction with tissue was captured using a Fluke thermal camera. The model was verified for adipose tissue, skeletal muscle tissue and heart muscle tissue.

  2. Non-local model analysis of heat pulse propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Takuya; Itoh, Sanae-I.; Yagi, Masatoshi

    1998-01-01

    A new theoretical model equation which includes the non-local effect in the heat flux is proposed to study the transient transport phenomena. A non-local heat flux, which is expressed in terms of the integral equation, is superimposed on the conventional form of the heat flux. This model is applied to describe the experimental results from the power switching [Stroth U, et al 1996 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 38 1087] and the power modulation experiments [Giannone L, et al 1992 Nucl. Fusion 32 1985] in the W7-AS stellarator. A small fraction of non-local component in the heat flux is found to be very effective in modifying the response against an external modulation. The transient feature of the transport property, which are observed in the response of heat pulse propagation, are qualitatively reproduced by the transport simulations based on this model. A possibility is discussed to determine the correlation length of the non-local effect experimentally by use of the results of transport simulations. (author)

  3. Model techniques for testing heated concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanou, G.D.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental techniques are described which may be used in the laboratory to measure strains of model concrete structures representing to scale actual structures of any shape or geometry, operating at elevated temperatures, for which time-dependent creep and shrinkage strains are dominant. These strains could be used to assess the distribution of stress in the scaled structure and hence to predict the actual behaviour of concrete structures used in nuclear power stations. Similar techniques have been employed in an investigation to measure elastic, thermal, creep and shrinkage strains in heated concrete models representing to scale parts of prestressed concrete pressure vessels for nuclear reactors. (author)

  4. A Technique for Temperature and Ultimate Load Calculations of Thin Targets in a Pulsed Electron Beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen-Walther; Lundsager, Per

    1979-01-01

    A technique is presented for the calculation of transient temperature distributions and ultimate load of rotationally symmetric thin membranes with uniform lateral load and exposed to a pulsed electron beam from a linear accelerator. Heat transfer by conduction is considered the only transfer...... mechanism. The ultimate load is calculated on the basis of large plastic strain analysis. Analysis of one aluminum and one titanium membrane is shown....

  5. A single-probe heat pulse method for estimating sap velocity in trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bernal, Álvaro; Testi, Luca; Villalobos, Francisco J

    2017-10-01

    Available sap flow methods are still far from being simple, cheap and reliable enough to be used beyond very specific research purposes. This study presents and tests a new single-probe heat pulse (SPHP) method for monitoring sap velocity in trees using a single-probe sensor, rather than the multi-probe arrangements used up to now. Based on the fundamental conduction-convection principles of heat transport in sapwood, convective velocity (V h ) is estimated from the temperature increase in the heater after the application of a heat pulse (ΔT). The method was validated against measurements performed with the compensation heat pulse (CHP) technique in field trees of six different species. To do so, a dedicated three-probe sensor capable of simultaneously applying both methods was produced and used. Experimental measurements in the six species showed an excellent agreement between SPHP and CHP outputs for moderate to high flow rates, confirming the applicability of the method. In relation to other sap flow methods, SPHP presents several significant advantages: it requires low power inputs, it uses technically simpler and potentially cheaper instrumentation, the physical damage to the tree is minimal and artefacts caused by incorrect probe spacing and alignment are removed. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Modelling hot electron generation in short pulse target heating experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sircombe N.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Target heating experiments planned for the Orion laser facility, and electron beam driven fast ignition schemes, rely on the interaction of a short pulse high intensity laser with dense material to generate a flux of energetic electrons. It is essential that the characteristics of this electron source are well known in order to inform transport models in radiation hydrodynamics codes and allow effective evaluation of experimental results and forward modelling of future campaigns. We present results obtained with the particle in cell (PIC code EPOCH for realistic target and laser parameters, including first and second harmonic light. The hot electron distributions are characterised and their implications for onward transport and target heating are considered with the aid of the Monte-Carlo transport code THOR.

  7. Thermal diffusivity of diamond films using a laser pulse technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albin, S.; Winfree, W.P.; Crews, B.S.

    1990-01-01

    Polycrystalline diamond films were deposited using a microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process. A laser pulse technique was developed to measure the thermal diffusivity of diamond films deposited on a silicon substrate. The effective thermal diffusivity of a diamond film on silicon was measured by observing the phase and amplitude of the cyclic thermal waves generated by laser pulses. An analytical model is presented to calculate the effective inplane (face-parallel) diffusivity of a two-layer system. The model is used to reduce the effective thermal diffusivity of the diamond/silicon sample to a value for the thermal diffusivity and conductivity of the diamond film

  8. Pulsed electrical discharges for medicine and biology techniques, processes, applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kolikov, Victor

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the application of pulsed electrical discharges in water and water dispersions of metal nanoparticles in medicine (surgery, dentistry, and oncology), biology, and ecology. The intensive electrical and shock waves represent a novel technique to destroy viruses and this way to  prepare anti-virus vaccines. The method of pulsed electrical discharges in water allows to decontaminate water from almost all known bacteria and spores of fungi being present in human beings. The nanoparticles used are not genotoxic and mutagenic. This book is useful for researchers and graduate students.

  9. Simple Theory of Thermal Fatigue Caused by RF Pulse Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzikov, S

    2004-01-01

    The projects of electron-positron linear colliders imply that accelerating structures and other RF components will undergo action of extremely high RF fields. Except for breakdown threat there is an effect of the damage due to multi-pulse mechanical stress caused by Ohmic heating of the skin layer. A new theory of the thermal fatigue is considered. The theory is based on consideration of the quasi-elastic interaction between neighbor grains of metal due to the expansion of the thermal skin-layer. The developed theory predicts a total number of the RF pulses needed for surface degradation in dependence on temperature rise, pulse duration, and average temperature. The unknown coefficients in the final formula were found, using experimental data obtained at 11.4 GHz for the copper. In order to study the thermal fatigue at higher frequencies and to compare experimental and theoretical results, the experimental investigation of degradation of the copper cavity exposed to 30 GHz radiation is carried out now, basing...

  10. Dependence of core heating properties on heating pulse duration and intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Sunahara, Atsushi; Cai, Hongbo; Sakagami, Hitoshi; Mima, Kunioki

    2009-11-01

    In the cone-guiding fast ignition, an imploded core is heated by the energy transport of fast electrons generated by the ultra-intense short-pulse laser at the cone inner surface. The fast core heating (˜800eV) has been demonstrated at integrated experiments with GEKKO-XII+ PW laser systems. As the next step, experiments using more powerful heating laser, FIREX, have been started at ILE, Osaka university. In FIREX-I (phase-I of FIREX), our goal is the demonstration of efficient core heating (Ti ˜ 5keV) using a newly developed 10kJ LFEX laser. In the first integrated experiments, the LFEX laser is operated with low energy mode (˜0.5kJ/4ps) to validate the previous GEKKO+PW experiments. Between the two experiments, though the laser energy is similar (˜0.5kJ), the duration is different; ˜0.5ps in the PW laser and ˜ 4ps in the LFEX laser. In this paper, we evaluate the dependence of core heating properties on the heating pulse duration on the basis of integrated simulations with FI^3 (Fast Ignition Integrated Interconnecting) code system.

  11. Fabrication techniques to eliminate postweld heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochhead, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    Postweld heat treatments to reduce residual stresses (stress relief operations) have been a common practice in the pressure vessel industry for a large number of years. A suitable heat treatment operation can, in particular for low alloy steels, have additional beneficial effects, i.e. a reduction in peak hardness values in the heat-affected zone, an improvement in weld metal properties, and a lowering of the adverse effects of the welding process on the mechanical properties of the parent material adjacent to the weld metal. However, continuing studies in the field of brittle fracture, improved parent materials, and more sophisticated nondestructive testing techniques have led to the elimination of such a practice in ever-increasing thickness ranges and types of material. For instance, the recently issued BS 5500 compared with BS 1113 (1969) lifts the thickness limit requiring stress relief in certain circumstances from 19 to 35mm for C steels. With respect to materials the CEGB has stated that as a result of successful operational experience it will no longer be necessary to postweld heat treat butt welds in 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo tubes of certain dimensions. Despite this trend, over a period of years a number of instances have arisen where, because of some factor, postweld heat treatment, although perhaps desirable, is not possible. This Paper describes several such examples. It must be noted that the examples quoted consist of relatively important and major items. It has been necessary within the confines of this Paper to condense the reports. It is hoped that no significant factors have been omitted. (author)

  12. Lipase biofilm deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronne, Antonio; Bloisi, Francesco; Calabria, Raffaela; Califano, Valeria; Depero, Laura E.; Fanelli, Esther; Federici, Stefania; Massoli, Patrizio; Vicari, Luciano R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A lipase film was deposited with Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique. • FTIR spectra show that laser irradiation do not damage lipase molecule. • Laser fluence controls the characteristics of complex structure generated by MAPLE. - Abstract: Lipase is an enzyme that finds application in biodiesel production and for detection of esters and triglycerides in biosensors. Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE), a technique derived from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for deposition of undamaged biomolecules or polymers, is characterized by the use of a frozen target obtained from a solution/suspension of the guest material (to be deposited) in a volatile matrix (solvent). The presence of the solvent avoids or at least reduces the potential damage of guest molecules by laser radiation but only the guest material reaches the substrate in an essentially solvent-free deposition. MAPLE can be used for enzymes immobilization, essential for industrial application, allowing the development of continuous processes, an easier separation of products, the reuse of the catalyst and, in some cases, enhancing enzyme properties (pH, temperature stability, etc.) and catalytic activity in non-aqueous media. Here we show that MAPLE technique can be used to deposit undamaged lipase and that the complex structure (due to droplets generated during extraction from target) of the deposited material can be controlled by changing the laser beam fluence

  13. Lipase biofilm deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronne, Antonio [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Industrial Production, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy); Bloisi, Francesco, E-mail: bloisi@na.infn.it [SPIN – CNR, Naples (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy); Calabria, Raffaela; Califano, Valeria [Istituto Motori – CNR, Naples (Italy); Depero, Laura E. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia, Brescia (Italy); Fanelli, Esther [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Industrial Production, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy); Federici, Stefania [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia, Brescia (Italy); Massoli, Patrizio [Istituto Motori – CNR, Naples (Italy); Vicari, Luciano R.M. [SPIN – CNR, Naples (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • A lipase film was deposited with Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique. • FTIR spectra show that laser irradiation do not damage lipase molecule. • Laser fluence controls the characteristics of complex structure generated by MAPLE. - Abstract: Lipase is an enzyme that finds application in biodiesel production and for detection of esters and triglycerides in biosensors. Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE), a technique derived from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for deposition of undamaged biomolecules or polymers, is characterized by the use of a frozen target obtained from a solution/suspension of the guest material (to be deposited) in a volatile matrix (solvent). The presence of the solvent avoids or at least reduces the potential damage of guest molecules by laser radiation but only the guest material reaches the substrate in an essentially solvent-free deposition. MAPLE can be used for enzymes immobilization, essential for industrial application, allowing the development of continuous processes, an easier separation of products, the reuse of the catalyst and, in some cases, enhancing enzyme properties (pH, temperature stability, etc.) and catalytic activity in non-aqueous media. Here we show that MAPLE technique can be used to deposit undamaged lipase and that the complex structure (due to droplets generated during extraction from target) of the deposited material can be controlled by changing the laser beam fluence.

  14. Application of Laser Pulse Heating to Simulate Thermomechanical Damage at Gun Bore Surfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cote, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Laser pulse heating experiments were performed to provide insights into the thermomechanical damage effects that occur at the surface of coated and uncoated gun steel under cyclic rapid heating and cooling...

  15. Fission yield covariance generation and uncertainty propagation through fission pulse decay heat calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorito, L.; Diez, C.J.; Cabellos, O.; Stankovskiy, A.; Van den Eynde, G.; Labeau, P.E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fission yield data and uncertainty comparison between major nuclear data libraries. • Fission yield covariance generation through Bayesian technique. • Study of the effect of fission yield correlations on decay heat calculations. • Covariance information contribute to reduce fission pulse decay heat uncertainty. - Abstract: Fission product yields are fundamental parameters in burnup/activation calculations and the impact of their uncertainties was widely studied in the past. Evaluations of these uncertainties were released, still without covariance data. Therefore, the nuclear community expressed the need of full fission yield covariance matrices to be able to produce inventory calculation results that take into account the complete uncertainty data. State-of-the-art fission yield data and methodologies for fission yield covariance generation were researched in this work. Covariance matrices were generated and compared to the original data stored in the library. Then, we focused on the effect of fission yield covariance information on fission pulse decay heat results for thermal fission of 235 U. Calculations were carried out using different libraries and codes (ACAB and ALEPH-2) after introducing the new covariance values. Results were compared with those obtained with the uncertainty data currently provided by the libraries. The uncertainty quantification was performed first with Monte Carlo sampling and then compared with linear perturbation. Indeed, correlations between fission yields strongly affect the uncertainty of decay heat. Eventually, a sensitivity analysis of fission product yields to fission pulse decay heat was performed in order to provide a full set of the most sensitive nuclides for such a calculation

  16. Techniques for Pump-Probe Synchronisation of Fsec Radiation Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Schlarb, Holger

    2005-01-01

    The increasing interest on the production of ultra-short photon pulses in future generations of Free-Electron Lasers operating in the UV, VUV or X-ray regime demands new techniques to reliably measure and control the arrival time of the FEL-pulses at the experiment. For pump-probe experiments using external optical lasers the desired synchronisation is in the order of tens of femtoseconds, the typical duration of the FEL pulse. Since, the accelerators are large scale facilities of the length of several hundred meters or even kilometers, the problem of synchronisation has to be attacked twofold. First, the RF acceleration sections upstream of the magnetic bunch compressors need to be stabilised in amplitude and phase to high precision. Second, the remain electron beam timing jitter needs to be determined with femtosecond accuracy for off-line analysis. In this talk, several techniques using the electron or the FEL beam to monitor the arrival time are presented, and the proposed layout of the synchronisation sy...

  17. Performance of large-scale helium refrigerators subjected to pulsed heat load from fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, R.; Ghosh, P.; Chowdhury, K. [Cryogenic Engineering Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India)

    2012-07-01

    The immediate effect of pulsed heat load from fusion devices in helium refrigerators is wide variation in mass flow rate of low pressure stream returning to the cold-box. In this paper, a four expander based modified Claude cycle has been analyzed in quasi steady and dynamic simulations using Aspen HYSYS to identify critical equipment that may be affected due to such flow rate fluctuations at the return stream and their transient performance. Additional constraints on process parameters over steady state design have been identified. Suitable techniques for mitigation of fluctuation of return stream have also been explored. (author)

  18. Performance of large-scale helium refrigerators subjected to pulsed heat load from fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, R.; Ghosh, P.; Chowdhury, K.

    2012-01-01

    The immediate effect of pulsed heat load from fusion devices in helium refrigerators is wide variation in mass flow rate of low pressure stream returning to the cold-box. In this paper, a four expander based modified Claude cycle has been analyzed in quasi steady and dynamic simulations using Aspen HYSYS to identify critical equipment that may be affected due to such flow rate fluctuations at the return stream and their transient performance. Additional constraints on process parameters over steady state design have been identified. Suitable techniques for mitigation of fluctuation of return stream have also been explored. (author)

  19. Heat wave propagation in a thin film irradiated by ultra-short laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jae Gwon; Kim, Cheol Jung; Lim, C. H.

    2004-01-01

    A thermal wave solution of a hyperbolic heat conduction equation in a thin film is developed on the basis of the Green's function formalism. Numerical computations are carried out to investigate the temperature response and the propagation of the thermal wave inside a thin film due to a heat pulse generated by ultra-short laser pulses with various laser pulse durations and thickness of the film

  20. MICROCALORIMETER SPECTROSCOPY AT HIGH PULSE RATES: A MULTI-PULSE FITTING TECHNIQUE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J. W.; Alpert, B. K.; Doriese, W. B.; Joe, Y. I.; O’Neil, G. C.; Swetz, D. S.; Ullom, J. N. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway MS 686.02, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Fischer, D. A.; Jaye, C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Brookhaven National Lab, Brookhaven, NY (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Transition Edge Sensor microcalorimeters can measure X-ray and gamma-ray energies with very high energy resolution and high photon-collection efficiency. For this technology to reach its full potential in future X-ray observatories, each sensor must be able to measure hundreds or even thousands of photon energies per second. Current “optimal filtering” approaches to achieve the best possible energy resolution work only for photons that are well isolated in time, a requirement which is in direct conflict with the need for high-rate measurements. We describe a new analysis procedure to allow fitting for the pulse height of all photons even in the presence of heavy pulse pile-up. In the limit of isolated pulses, the technique reduces to standard optimal filtering with long records. We employ reasonable approximations to the noise covariance function in order to render this procedure computationally viable even for very long data records. The technique is employed to analyze X-ray emission spectra at 600 eV and 6 keV at rates up to 250 counts s{sup −1} in microcalorimeters having exponential signal decay times of approximately 1.2 ms.

  1. Study of phonon-induced energy transfer processes in crystals using heat pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, A.R.

    1978-03-01

    The artificial generation of acoustic lattice vibrations by a heat pulse technique is developed in order to probe phonon interactions in molecular crystals. Specifically, the phonon-assisted delocalization of ''trapped'' excited triplet state energy in the aromatic crystal 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene (TCB) is studied in a quantitative manner by monitoring the time-resolved decrease in trap phosphorescence intensity due to the propagation of a well-defined heat pulse. The excitation distribution in a single trap system, such as the X-trap in neat h 2 -TCB, is discussed in terms of the energy partition function relating the temperature dependence of the trap phosphorescence intensity to the trap depth, exciton bandwidth, and the number of exciton band states. In a multiple trap system, such as the hd and h 2 isotopic traps in d 2 -TCB, the excitation distribution is distinctly non-Boltzmann; yet it may be discussed in terms of a preferential energy transfer between the two trap states via the exciton band. For both trap systems, a previously developed kinetic model is presented which relates the efficiency of trap-band energy exchange to the density of band states and the trap-phonon coupling matrix elements. A bolometric technique for determining the thermal response time of the heater/crystal system is presented. The phonon mean free path in the crystal is size-limited, and the heater/crystal boundary conductance is reasonably close to previously reported values. The theory of heat pulse phonon spectroscopy is presented and discussed in terms of black-body phonon radiation

  2. Quantitative effects of rapid heating on soot-particle sizing through analysis of two-pulse LII

    KAUST Repository

    Cenker, Emre

    2017-02-27

    During the rapid laser pulse heating and consecutive cooling in laser-induced incandescence (LII), soot particles may undergo thermal annealing and sublimation processes which lead to a permanent change in its optical properties and its primary particle size, respectively. Overall, effects of these two processes on soot and LII model-based particle sizing are investigated by measuring the two-color time-resolved (2C-TiRe) LII signal decay from in-flame soot after two consecutive laser pulses at 1064-nm wavelength. Experiments are carried out on a non-premixed laminar ethylene/air flame from a Santoro burner with both low and moderate laser fluences suitable for particle sizing. The probe volume is set to a radial position close to the flame axis where the soot particles are known to be immature or less graphitic. With the first pulse, soot is pre-heated, and the LII signal after the consecutive second pulse is used for analysis. The two-color incandescence emission technique is used for the pyrometric determination of the LII-heated peak soot temperature at the second pulse. A new LII simulation tool is developed which accounts for particle heating via absorption and annealing, and cooling via sublimation, conduction, and radiation with various existing sub-models from the literature. The same approach of using two laser pulses is implemented in the simulations. Measurements indicate that thermal annealing and associated absorption enhancement becomes important at laser fluences above 0.17 J/cm2 for the immature in-flame soot. After a heating pulse at 0.33 J/cm2, the increase of the soot absorption function is calculated as 35% using the temperature measured at the second pulse and an absorption model based on the Rayleigh approximation. Present annealing model, on the other hand, predicts graphitization of soot even in the absence of laser heating at typical flame temperatures. Recorded experimental LII signal decays and LII-heated peak soot temperature

  3. Transient thermal and nonthermal electron and phonon relaxation after short-pulsed laser heating of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giri, Ashutosh; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-01-01

    Several dynamic thermal and nonthermal scattering processes affect ultrafast heat transfer in metals after short-pulsed laser heating. Even with decades of measurements of electron-phonon relaxation, the role of thermal vs. nonthermal electron and phonon scattering on overall electron energy transfer to the phonons remains unclear. In this work, we derive an analytical expression for the electron-phonon coupling factor in a metal that includes contributions from equilibrium and nonequilibrium distributions of electrons. While the contribution from the nonthermal electrons to electron-phonon coupling is non-negligible, the increase in the electron relaxation rates with increasing laser fluence measured by thermoreflectance techniques cannot be accounted for by only considering electron-phonon relaxations. We conclude that electron-electron scattering along with electron-phonon scattering have to be considered simultaneously to correctly predict the transient nature of electron relaxation during and after short-pulsed heating of metals at elevated electron temperatures. Furthermore, for high electron temperature perturbations achieved at high absorbed laser fluences, we show good agreement between our model, which accounts for d-band excitations, and previous experimental data. Our model can be extended to other free electron metals with the knowledge of the density of states of electrons in the metals and considering electronic excitations from non-Fermi surface states

  4. Heat Fluxes and Evaporation Measurements by Multi-Function Heat Pulse Probe: a Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V.; Ciocca, F.; Hopmans, J. W.; Kamai, T.; Lunati, I.; Parlange, M. B.

    2012-04-01

    Multi Functional Heat Pulse Probes (MFHPP) are multi-needles probes developed in the last years able to measure temperature, thermal properties such as thermal diffusivity and volumetric heat capacity, from which soil moisture is directly retrieved, and electric conductivity (through a Wenner array). They allow the simultaneous measurement of coupled heat, water and solute transport in porous media, then. The use of only one instrument to estimate different quantities in the same volume and almost at the same time significantly reduces the need to interpolate different measurement types in space and time, increasing the ability to study the interdependencies characterizing the coupled transports, especially of water and heat, and water and solute. A three steps laboratory experiment is realized at EPFL to investigate the effectiveness and reliability of the MFHPP responses in a loamy soil from Conthey, Switzerland. In the first step specific calibration curves of volumetric heat capacity and thermal conductivity as function of known volumetric water content are obtained placing the MFHPP in small samplers filled with the soil homogeneously packed at different saturation degrees. The results are compared with literature values. In the second stage the ability of the MFHPP to measure heat fluxes is tested within a homemade thermally insulated calibration box and results are matched with those by two self-calibrating Heatflux plates (from Huxseflux), placed in the same box. In the last step the MFHPP are used to estimate the cumulative subsurface evaporation inside a small column (30 centimeters height per 8 centimeters inner diameter), placed on a scale, filled with the same loamy soil (homogeneously packed and then saturated) and equipped with a vertical array of four MFHPP inserted close to the surface. The subsurface evaporation is calculated from the difference between the net sensible heat and the net heat storage in the volume scanned by the probes, and the

  5. Two-phase flow measurement by pulsed neutron activation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehler, P.

    1978-01-01

    The Pulsed Neutron Activation (PNA) technique for measuring the mass flow velocity and the average density of two-phase mixtures is described. PNA equipment can be easily installed at different loops, and PNA techniques are non-intrusive and independent of flow regimes. These features of the PNA technique make it suitable for in-situ measurement of two-phase flows, and for calibration of more conventional two-phase flow measurement devices. Analytic relations governing the various PNA methods are derived. The equipment and procedures used in the first air-water flow measurement by PNA techniques are discussed, and recommendations are made for improvement of future tests. In the present test, the mass flow velocity was determined with an accuracy of 2 percent, and average densities were measured down to 0.08 g/cm 3 with an accuracy of 0.04 g/cm 3 . Both the accuracy of the mass flow velocity measurement and the lower limit of the density measurement are functions of the injected activity and of the total number of counts. By using a stronger neutron source and a larger number of detectors, the measurable density can be decreased by a factor of 12 to .007 g/cm 3 for 12.5 cm pipes, and to even lower ranges for larger pipes

  6. A correlation-based pulse detection technique for gamma-ray/neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faisal, Muhammad; Schiffer, Randolph T.; Flaska, Marek; Pozzi, Sara A.; Wentzloff, David D.

    2011-01-01

    We present a correlation-based detection technique that significantly improves the probability of detection for low energy pulses. We propose performing a normalized cross-correlation of the incoming pulse data to a predefined pulse template, and using a threshold correlation value to trigger the detection of a pulse. This technique improves the detector sensitivity by amplifying the signal component of incoming pulse data and rejecting noise. Simulation results for various different templates are presented. Finally, the performance of the correlation-based detection technique is compared to the current state-of-the-art techniques.

  7. Analysis of pulse-shape discrimination techniques for BC501A using GHz digital signal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooney, B.D.; Dinwiddie, D.R.; Nelson, M.A.; Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini W.

    2001-01-01

    A comparison study of pulse-shape analysis techniques was conducted for a BC501A scintillator using digital signal processing (DSP). In this study, output signals from a preamplifier were input directly into a 1 GHz analog-to-digital converter. The digitized data obtained with this method was post-processed for both pulse-height and pulse-shape information. Several different analysis techniques were evaluated for neutron and gamma-ray pulse-shape discrimination. It was surprising that one of the simplest and fastest techniques resulted in some of the best pulse-shape discrimination results. This technique, referred to here as the Integral Ratio technique, was able to effectively process several thousand detector pulses per second. This paper presents the results and findings of this study for various pulse-shape analysis techniques with digitized detector signals.

  8. Transport and calorimetric properties of AISI 321 by pulse thermal diffusivity and calorimetric techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perovic, N.L.; Maglic, K.D.; Stanimirovic, A.M.; Vukovic, G.S.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the thermophysical properties of AISI 321 stainless steel was the last part of work within the IAEA-coordinated Research Programme for the Establishment of a Database of Thermophysical Properties of LW and HW Reactor Materials (IAEA CRP) effected at the Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca (NIV). The AISI 321 stainless steel belongs to the group of construction materials whose thermophysical and calorimetric properties have significance for the IAEA CRP. Because there have been few investigations of the thermal properties of this material, the CRP foresaw the need for new measurements, which are reported in this paper. Experimental research performed at NIV consisted of the investigation of thermal diffusivity, electric resistivity, and specific heat capacity of this austenitic stainless steel. The thermal diffusivity was measured by the laser pulse technique, and the elastic resistivity and specific heat capacity were determined by use of millisecond-resolution pulse calorimetry. All measurements were performed from ambient temperature to above 1000 o C, within which temperature range the material maintains its structure and stable thermophysical properties. Values for the thermal conductivity were computed from data on the thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity, and the room-temperature density. (author)

  9. Research on imploded plasma heating by short pulse laser for fast ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, R.; Kitagawa, Y.; Mima, K.

    2001-01-01

    Since the peta watt module (PWM) laser was constructed in 1995, investigated are heating processes of imploded plasmas by intense short pulse lasers. In order to heat the dense plasma locally, a heating laser pulse should be guided into compressed plasmas as deeply as possible. Since the last IAEA Fusion Conference, the feasibility of fast ignition has been investigated by using the short pulse GEKKO MII glass laser and the PWM laser with GEKKO XII laser. We found that relativistic electrons are generated efficiently in a preformed plasma to heat dense plasmas. The coupling efficiency of short pulse laser energy to a solid density plasma is 40% when no plasmas are pre-formed, and 20% when a large scale plasma is formed by a long pulse laser pre-irradiation. The experimental results are confirmed by numerical simulations using the simulation code 'MONET' which stands for the Monte-Carlo Electron Transport code developed at Osaka. In the GEKKO XII and PWM laser experiments, intense heating pulses are injected into imploded plasmas. As a result of the injection of heating pulse, it is found that high energy electrons and ions could penetrate into imploded core plasmas to enhance neutron yield by factor 3∼5. (author)

  10. Pulse shaping using the optical Fourier transform technique - for ultra-high-speed signal processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palushani, Evarist; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Galili, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the generation of a 1.6 ps FWHM flat-top pulse using the optical Fourier transform technique. The pulse is validated in a 320 Gbit/s demultiplexing experiment.......This paper reports on the generation of a 1.6 ps FWHM flat-top pulse using the optical Fourier transform technique. The pulse is validated in a 320 Gbit/s demultiplexing experiment....

  11. Long-Pulse Operation and High-Energy Particle Confinement Study in ICRF Heating of LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutoh, Takashi; Kumazawa, Ryuhei; Seki, Tetsuo

    2004-01-01

    Long-pulse operation and high-energy particle confinement properties were studied using ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating for the Large Helical Device. For the minority-ion mode, ions with energies up to 500 keV were observed by concentrating the ICRF heating power near the plasma axis. The confinement of high-energy particles was studied using the power-modulation technique. This confirmed that the confinement of high-energy particles was better with the inward-shifted configuration than with the normal configuration. This behavior was the same for bulk plasma confinement. Long-pulse operation for more than 2 min was achieved during the experimental program in 2002. This was mainly due to better confinement of the helically trapped particles and accumulation of fewer impurities in the region of the plasma core, in conjunction with substantial hardware improvements. Currently, the plasma operation time is limited by an unexpected density rise due to outgassing from the chamber materials. The temperature of the local carbon plates of the divertor exceeded 400 deg, C, and a charge-coupled device camera observed the hot spots. The hot spot pattern was well explained by a calculation of the accelerated-particle orbits, and those accelerated particles came from outside the plasma near the ICRF antenna

  12. A computational model for heterogeneous heating during pulsed laser irradiation of polymers doped with light-absorbing microparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marla, Deepak; Zhang, Yang; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud

    2016-01-01

    characteristics. This work presents a study based on a computational model of laser heating of polymer doped with light-absorbing microparticles accounting for the heterogeneous nature of heating. The work aims at gaining a fundamental insight into the nature of the heating process and to understand the role......Doping of polymers with light-absorbing microparticles to increase their optical properties is a commonly used pre-treatment technique in laser processing of polymers. The presence of these particles plays an important role during laser heating of the polymer that influences its surface...... of microparticles. The results suggest that apart from the laser intensity and pulse duration, the properties of the microparticles including their size and distribution also play an important role during the laser heating of polymers....

  13. Pulse radiolysis based on a femtosecond electron beam and a femtosecond laser light with double-pulse injection technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jinfeng; Kondoh, Takafumi; Kozawa, Takahiro; Yoshida, Youichi; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2006-01-01

    A new pulse radiolysis system based on a femtosecond electron beam and a femtosecond laser light with oblique double-pulse injection was developed for studying ultrafast chemical kinetics and primary processes of radiation chemistry. The time resolution of 5.2 ps was obtained by measuring transient absorption kinetics of hydrated electrons in water. The optical density of hydrated electrons was measured as a function of the electron charge. The data indicate that the double-laser-pulse injection technique was a powerful tool for observing the transient absorptions with a good signal to noise ratio in pulse radiolysis

  14. Laser pulse heating of nuclear fuels for simulation of reactor power

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laser applications; nuclear fuel elements; nuclear safety. ... accident (LOCA) and reactivity initiated accident (RIA), a laser pulse heating system is under ... As a prelude to work on irradiated nuclear fuel specimens, pilot studies on unirradiated ...

  15. Customer Overview of Pulsed Laser Heating for Evaluation of Gun Bore Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    properties of the gun bore materials. Ideally, well validated interior ballistics modeling has been carried out (typically with NOVA) to provide time...03002, February 2003. 5. J. Warrender, C. Mulligan, and J. Underwood , “Analysis of thermo-mechanical cracking in refractory coatings using variable pulse duration laser pulse heating,” Wear 263 1540 (2007).

  16. Impact of Dissociation and Sensible Heat Release on Pulse Detonation and Gas Turbine Engine Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    2001-01-01

    A thermodynamic cycle analysis of the effect of sensible heat release on the relative performance of pulse detonation and gas turbine engines is presented. Dissociation losses in the PDE (Pulse Detonation Engine) are found to cause a substantial decrease in engine performance parameters.

  17. Increasing the bit rate in OCDMA systems using pulse position modulation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbab, Vahid R; Saghari, Poorya; Haghi, Mahta; Ebrahimi, Paniz; Willner, Alan E

    2007-09-17

    We have experimentally demonstrated two novel pulse position modulation techniques, namely Double Pulse Position Modulation (2-PPM) and Differential Pulse Position Modulation (DPPM) in Time-Wavelength OCDMA systems that will operate at a higher bit rate compared to traditional OOK-OCDMA systems with the same bandwidth. With 2-PPM technique, the number of active users will be more than DPPM while their bit rate is almost the same. Both techniques provide variable quality of service in OCDMA networks.

  18. Experimental Study of RF Pulsed Heating on Oxygen Free Electronic Copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2003-02-10

    When the thermal stresses induced by RF pulsed heating are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Therefore, pulsed heating limits the maximum surface magnetic field and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz was designed to study pulsed heating on Oxygen Free Electronic (OFE) copper. An X-band klystron delivered up to 10 MW to the cavities in 1.5 {micro}s pulses at 60 Hz repetition rate. One run was executed at a temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Cracks at grain boundaries, slip bands and cracks associated with these slip bands were observed. The second run consisted of 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses with a temperature rise of 82 K, and cracks at grain boundaries and slip bands were seen. Additional information can be derived from the power-coupling iris, and we conclude that a pulsed temperature rise of 250 K for several million pulses leads to destruction of copper. These results can be applied to any mode of any OFE copper cavity.

  19. Hot pressing of nanocrystalline tantalum using high frequency induction heating and pulse plasma sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowicz, J.; Adamek, G.; Sopata, M.; Koper, J. K.; Siwak, P.

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents the results of nanocrystalline powder tantalum consolidation using hot pressing. The authors used two different heating techniques during hot pressing: high-frequency induction heating (HFIH) and pulse plasma sintering (PPS). A comparison of the structure, microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of the bulk nanocrystalline tantalum obtained in both techniques was performed. The nanocrystalline powder was made to start from the microcrystalline one using the high-energy ball milling process. The nanocrystalline powder was hot-pressed at 1000 °C, whereas, for comparison, the microcrystalline powder was hot pressed up to 1500 °C for proper consolidation. The authors found that during hot pressing, the powder partially reacts with the graphite die covered by boron nitride, which facilitated punches and powder displacement in the die during densification. Tantalum carbide and boride in the nanocrystalline material was found, which can improve the mechanical properties. The hardness of the HFIH and PPS nanocrystalline tantalum was as high as 625 and 615 HV, respectively. The microstructure was more uniform in the PPS nanomaterial. The corrosion resistance in both cases deteriorated, in comparison to the microcrystalline material, while the PPS material corrosion resistance was slightly better than that of the HFIH one.

  20. Heat pulse probe measurements of soil water evaporation in a corn field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latent heat fluxes from cropped fields consist of soil water evaporation and plant transpiration. It is difficult to accurately separate evapotranspiration into evaporation and transpiration. Heat pulse probes have been used to measure bare field subsurface soil water evaporation, however, the appl...

  1. Relaxation of ion energy spectrum just after turbulent heating pulse in TRIAM-1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Hiraki, Naoji; Nakamura, Yukio; Itoh, Satoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1982-07-01

    The temporal evolution and spatial profile of the ion energy spectrum just after the application of a toroidal current pulse for turbulent heating are investigated experimentally in the TRIAM-1 tokamak and also numerically using the Fokker-Planck equation. The two-component ion energy spectrum formed by turbulent heating relaxes to a single one within tausub(i) (the ion collision time).

  2. Heat Transfer and Cooling Techniques at Low Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Baudouy, B

    2014-07-17

    The first part of this chapter gives an introduction to heat transfer and cooling techniques at low temperature. We review the fundamental laws of heat transfer (conduction, convection and radiation) and give useful data specific to cryogenic conditions (thermal contact resistance, total emissivity of materials and heat transfer correlation in forced or boiling flow for example) used in the design of cooling systems. In the second part, we review the main cooling techniques at low temperature, with or without cryogen, from the simplest ones (bath cooling) to the ones involving the use of cryocoolers without forgetting the cooling flow techniques.

  3. Heat Transfer and Cooling Techniques at Low Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudouy, B [Saclay (France)

    2014-07-01

    The first part of this chapter gives an introduction to heat transfer and cooling techniques at low temperature. We review the fundamental laws of heat transfer (conduction, convection and radiation) and give useful data specific to cryogenic conditions (thermal contact resistance, total emissivity of materials and heat transfer correlation in forced or boiling flow for example) used in the design of cooling systems. In the second part, we review the main cooling techniques at low temperature, with or without cryogen, from the simplest ones (bath cooling) to the ones involving the use of cryocoolers without forgetting the cooling flow techniques.

  4. Portable double-sided pulsed laser heating system for time-resolved geoscience and materials science applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprilis, G; Strohm, C; Kupenko, I; Linhardt, S; Laskin, A; Vasiukov, D M; Cerantola, V; Koemets, E G; McCammon, C; Kurnosov, A; Chumakov, A I; Rüffer, R; Dubrovinskaia, N; Dubrovinsky, L

    2017-08-01

    A portable double-sided pulsed laser heating system for diamond anvil cells has been developed that is able to stably produce laser pulses as short as a few microseconds with repetition frequencies up to 100 kHz. In situ temperature determination is possible by collecting and fitting the thermal radiation spectrum for a specific wavelength range (particularly, between 650 nm and 850 nm) to the Planck radiation function. Surface temperature information can also be time-resolved by using a gated detector that is synchronized with the laser pulse modulation and space-resolved with the implementation of a multi-point thermal radiation collection technique. The system can be easily coupled with equipment at synchrotron facilities, particularly for nuclear resonance spectroscopy experiments. Examples of applications include investigations of high-pressure high-temperature behavior of iron oxides, both in house and at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility using the synchrotron Mössbauer source and nuclear inelastic scattering.

  5. Application of Streaming Effect and Joule Heating Effect of Pulse Current in Crack Healing of Metal Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Chu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Remanufacture engineering is an emerging industry that saves resources as well as protects the environment. However, cracks on remanufactured components can result in serious trouble. Therefore, in order to avoid unnecessary waste of resources and energy, these cracks should be repaired radically in order to ensure the smooth progressing of the remanufacturing process. Consequently, the crack healing technique of metal materials is very important in the field of remanufacturing. In this study, the U-shape vane stainless steel of a centrifugal compressor which had cracks was processed by pulse current using a high pulse current discharge device, and the influence of the streaming effect and Joule heating effect of pulse current on the crack healing of metal materials was studied, aiming to provide references for the better application of this technology in the remanufacturing field in the future.

  6. Improvement of SOI microdosimeter performance using pulse shape discrimination techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelius, I.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Microdosimetry is used to study the radiobiological properties of densely ionising radiations encountered in hadron therapy and space environments by measuring energy deposition in microscopic volumes. The creation of a solid state microdosimeter to replace the traditional tissue equivalent proportional counter is a topic of ongoing research. The Centre for Medical Radiation Physics has been investigating a technique using microscopic arrays of reverse biased pn junctions to measure the linear energy transfer of ions. A prototype silicon-on-insulator (SOI) microdosimeter was developed and measurements were conducted at boron neutron capture therapy, proton therapy, and fast neutron therapy facilities. Previous studies have shown the current microdosimeter possesses a poorly defined sensitive volume, a consequence of charge collection events being measured for ion strikes outside the pn junction via the diffusion of charge carriers. As a result, the amount of charge collected by the microdosimeter following an ion strike has a strong dependence on the location of the strike on the device and the angle of incidence of the ion. The aim of this work was to investigate the use of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) techniques to preclude the acquisition of events resulting from ion strikes outside the depletion region of the pn junction. Experiments were carried out using the Heavy Ion Microprobe (HIMP) at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, Australia. The HIMP was used to measure the charge collection time as a function of ion strike location on the microdosimeter array. As expected, the charge collection time was seen to increase monotonically as the distance of the ion strike from the junction increased. The charge collection time corresponding to ion strikes within the junction was determined. Through use of suitable electronics it was possible to gate the charge collection signal based on simultaneous measurements of

  7. Heat pulse propagation studies on DIII-D and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Austin, M. E.; Groebner, R.; Manickam, J.; Rice, B.; Schmidt, G.; Snider, R.

    2000-12-01

    Sawtooth phenomena have been studied on DIII-D and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [D. Meade and the TFTR Group, in Proceedings of the International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion, Washington, DC, 1990 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 1, pp. 9-24]. In the experiments the sawtooth characteristics were studied with fast electron temperature (ECE) and soft x-ray diagnostics. For the first time, measurements of a strong ballistic electron heat pulse were made in a shaped tokamak (DIII-D) [J. Luxon and DIII-D Group, in Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Kyoto (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 1, p. 159] and the "ballistic effect" was stronger than was previously reported on TFTR. Evidence is presented in this paper that the ballistic effect is related to the fast growth phase of the sawtooth precursor. Fast, 2 ms interval, measurements on DIII-D were made of the ion temperature evolution following sawteeth and partial sawteeth to document the ion heat pulse characteristics. It is found that the ion heat pulse does not exhibit the very fast, "ballistic" behavior seen for the electrons. Further, for the first time it is shown that the electron heat pulses from partial sawtooth crashes (on DIII-D and TFTR) are seen to propagate at speeds close to those expected from the power balance calculations of the thermal diffusivities whereas heat pulses from fishbones propagate at rates more consistent with sawtooth induced heat pulses. These results suggest that the fast propagation of sawtooth-induced heat pulses is not a feature of nonlinear transport models, but that magnetohydrodynamic events can have a strong effect on electron thermal transport.

  8. Literature survey of heat transfer enhancement techniques in refrigeration applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M.K.; Shome, B. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering and Mechanics

    1994-05-01

    A survey has been performed of the technical and patent literature on enhanced heat transfer of refrigerants in pool boiling, forced convection evaporation, and condensation. Extensive bibliographies of the technical literature and patents are given. Many passive and active techniques were examined for pure refrigerants, refrigerant-oil mixtures, and refrigerant mixtures. The citations were categorized according to enhancement technique, heat transfer mode, and tube or shell side focus. The effects of the enhancement techniques relative to smooth and/or pure refrigerants were illustrated through the discussion of selected papers. Patented enhancement techniques also are discussed. Enhanced heat transfer has demonstrated significant improvements in performance in many refrigerant applications. However, refrigerant mixtures and refrigerant-oil mixtures have not been studied extensively; no research has been performed with enhanced refrigerant mixtures with oil. Most studies have been of the parametric type; there has been inadequate examination of the fundamental processes governing enhanced refrigerant heat transfer, but some modeling is being done and correlations developed. It is clear that an enhancement technique must be optimized for the refrigerant and operating condition. Fundamental processes governing the heat transfer must be examined if models for enhancement techniques are to be developed; these models could provide the method to optimize a surface. Refrigerant mixtures, with and without oil present, must be studied with enhancement devices; there is too little known to be able to estimate the effects of mixtures (particularly NARMs) with enhanced heat transfer. Other conclusions and recommendations are offered.

  9. Heat pulse analysis in JET and relation to local energy transport models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, J.C.M. de; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.; Han, W.; Sack, C.; Taroni, A.

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of a perturbation T e of the electron temperature depends on the linearised expression of the heat flux q e and may be not simply related to the local value of the electron heat conductivity χ e . It is possible that local heat transport models predicting similar temperature profiles and global energy confinement properties, imply a different propagation of heat pulses. We investigate here this possibility for the case of two models developed at JET. We also present results obtained at JET on a set of discharges covering the range of currents from 2 to 5 MA. Only L-modes, limiter discharges are considered here. Experimental results on the scaling of χ HP , the value of χ e related to heat pulse propagation, are compared with those of χ HP derived from the models. (author) 7 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Analytical vs. Simulation Solution Techniques for Pulse Problems in Non-linear Stochastic Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwankiewicz, R.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    Advantages and disadvantages of available analytical and simulation techniques for pulse problems in non-linear stochastic dynamics are discussed. First, random pulse problems, both those which do and do not lead to Markov theory, are presented. Next, the analytical and analytically-numerical tec......Advantages and disadvantages of available analytical and simulation techniques for pulse problems in non-linear stochastic dynamics are discussed. First, random pulse problems, both those which do and do not lead to Markov theory, are presented. Next, the analytical and analytically...

  11. An Efficient Digital Pulse Shape Discrimination Technique for Scintillation Detectors Based on FPGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamel, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Different techniques for pulse discrimination (PSD) of the scintillation pulses have been developed. The PSD of scintillation pulese can been used in several applications as Positron Emission Topography (PET) system. Each technique analyzes the resulting pulses from the absorption of radiation in the scintillation pulses were filtered and digitized then it is captured using DAQ, and it sent to the host computer for processing. The spatial resolution of images that generated in PET system can be improved by applying the proposed PSD. In this thesis various digital PSD techniques are proposed to discriminate the scintillation pulses. These techniques are based on discrete sine transform (DST). discrete cosine transform (DCT). Discrete hartley transform (DHT), Discrete Goertzel transform (DGT),and principal component analysis (PCA). Then the output coefficients of the discrete transforms are classified using one of the following classifiers T-test,tuned, or support vector machine (SVM).

  12. heat flow in a finite isolated pulsed avalanche semiconductor diode

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    1981-03-01

    Mar 1, 1981 ... high-power high-efficiency avalanche semiconductor devices. The ... computed, and useful practical design curves for a specified operation .... iv. For spherical shells of radius, ρ(x,y,z) = √x2+y2+z2. > R, the heat source.

  13. HPGe detectors timing using pulse shape analysis techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespi, F.C.L.; Vandone, V.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Million, B.; Riboldi, S.; Wieland, O.

    2010-01-01

    In this work the Pulse Shape Analysis has been used to improve the time resolution of High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors. A set of time aligned signals was acquired in a coincidence measurement using a coaxial HPGe and a cerium-doped lanthanum chloride (LaCl 3 :Ce) scintillation detector. The analysis using a Constant Fraction Discriminator (CFD) time output versus the HPGe signal shape shows that time resolution ranges from 2 to 12 ns depending on the slope in the initial part of the signal. An optimization procedure of the CFD parameters gives the same final time resolution (8 ns) as the one achieved after a correction of the CFD output based on the current pulse maximum position. Finally, an algorithm based on Pulse Shape Analysis was applied to the experimental data and a time resolution between 3 and 4 ns was obtained, corresponding to a 50% improvement as compared with that given by standard CFDs.

  14. Characterizing convective heat transfer using infrared thermography and the heated-thin-foil technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stafford, Jason; Walsh, Ed; Egan, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    Convective heat transfer, due to axial flow fans impinging air onto a heated flat plate, is investigated with infrared thermography to assess the heated-thin-foil technique commonly used to quantify two-dimensional heat transfer performance. Flow conditions generating complex thermal profiles have been considered in the analysis to account for dominant sources of error in the technique. Uncertainties were obtained in the measured variables and the influences on the resultant heat transfer data are outlined. Correction methods to accurately account for secondary heat transfer mechanisms were developed and results show that as convective heat transfer coefficients and length scales decrease, the importance of accounting for errors increases. Combined with flow patterns that produce large temperature gradients, the influence of heat flow within the foil on the resultant heat transfer becomes significant. Substantial errors in the heat transfer coefficient are apparent by neglecting corrections to the measured data for the cases examined. Methods to account for these errors are presented here, and demonstrated to result in an accurate measurement of the local heat transfer map on the surface

  15. Multi-time-scale heat transfer modeling of turbid tissues exposed to short-pulsed irradiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghan; Guo, Zhixiong

    2007-05-01

    A combined hyperbolic radiation and conduction heat transfer model is developed to simulate multi-time-scale heat transfer in turbid tissues exposed to short-pulsed irradiations. An initial temperature response of a tissue to an ultrashort pulse irradiation is analyzed by the volume-average method in combination with the transient discrete ordinates method for modeling the ultrafast radiation heat transfer. This response is found to reach pseudo steady state within 1 ns for the considered tissues. The single pulse result is then utilized to obtain the temperature response to pulse train irradiation at the microsecond/millisecond time scales. After that, the temperature field is predicted by the hyperbolic heat conduction model which is solved by the MacCormack's scheme with error terms correction. Finally, the hyperbolic conduction is compared with the traditional parabolic heat diffusion model. It is found that the maximum local temperatures are larger in the hyperbolic prediction than the parabolic prediction. In the modeled dermis tissue, a 7% non-dimensional temperature increase is found. After about 10 thermal relaxation times, thermal waves fade away and the predictions between the hyperbolic and parabolic models are consistent.

  16. Nuclear pulse signal processing techniques based on blind deconvolution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Pengfei; Yang Lei; Qi Zhong; Meng Xiangting; Fu Yanyan; Li Dongcang

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a method of measurement and analysis of nuclear pulse signal, the FPGA to control high-speed ADC measurement of nuclear radiation signals and control the high-speed transmission status of the USB to make it work on the Slave FIFO mode, using the LabVIEW online data processing and display, using the blind deconvolution method to remove the accumulation of signal acquisition, and to restore the nuclear pulse signal with a transmission speed, real-time measurements show that the advantages. (authors)

  17. Flat-top pulse generation by the optical Fourier transform technique for ultrahigh speed signal processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palushani, Evarist; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Galili, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the generation of 1.6-ps fullwidth at half-maximum flat-top pulses by the optical Fourier transform technique, and the utilization of these pulses in a 320-Gb/s demultiplexing experiment. It is demonstrated how a narrow pulse having a 15-nm wide third-order super-Gaussian sp......This paper reports on the generation of 1.6-ps fullwidth at half-maximum flat-top pulses by the optical Fourier transform technique, and the utilization of these pulses in a 320-Gb/s demultiplexing experiment. It is demonstrated how a narrow pulse having a 15-nm wide third-order super...

  18. Wilcoxon signed-rank-based technique for the pulse-shape analysis of HPGe detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, S.; Quintana, B.; Barrientos, D.

    2016-07-01

    The characterization of the electric response of segmented-contact high-purity germanium detectors requires scanning systems capable of accurately associating each pulse with the position of the interaction that generated it. This process requires an algorithm sensitive to changes above the electronic noise in the pulse shapes produced at different positions, depending on the resolution of the Ge crystal. In this work, a pulse-shape comparison technique based on the Wilcoxon signed-rank test has been developed. It provides a method to distinguish pulses coming from different interaction points in the germanium crystal. Therefore, this technique is a necessary step for building a reliable pulse-shape database that can be used later for the determination of the position of interaction for γ-ray tracking spectrometry devices such as AGATA, GRETA or GERDA. The method was validated by comparison with a χ2 test using simulated and experimental pulses corresponding to a Broad Energy germanium detector (BEGe).

  19. Wilcoxon signed-rank-based technique for the pulse-shape analysis of HPGe detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martín, S.; Quintana, B.; Barrientos, D.

    2016-01-01

    The characterization of the electric response of segmented-contact high-purity germanium detectors requires scanning systems capable of accurately associating each pulse with the position of the interaction that generated it. This process requires an algorithm sensitive to changes above the electronic noise in the pulse shapes produced at different positions, depending on the resolution of the Ge crystal. In this work, a pulse-shape comparison technique based on the Wilcoxon signed-rank test has been developed. It provides a method to distinguish pulses coming from different interaction points in the germanium crystal. Therefore, this technique is a necessary step for building a reliable pulse-shape database that can be used later for the determination of the position of interaction for γ-ray tracking spectrometry devices such as AGATA, GRETA or GERDA. The method was validated by comparison with a χ"2 test using simulated and experimental pulses corresponding to a Broad Energy germanium detector (BEGe).

  20. PLASMA SLOSHING IN PULSE-HEATED SOLAR AND STELLAR CORONAL LOOPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reale, F., E-mail: fabio.reale@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Fisica and Chimica, Università di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)

    2016-08-01

    There is evidence that coronal heating is highly intermittent, and flares are the high energy extreme. The properties of the heat pulses are difficult to constrain. Here, hydrodynamic loop modeling shows that several large amplitude oscillations (∼20% in density) are triggered in flare light curves if the duration of the heat pulse is shorter than the sound crossing time of the flaring loop. The reason for this is that the plasma does not have enough time to reach pressure equilibrium during heating, and traveling pressure fronts develop. The period is a few minutes for typical solar coronal loops, dictated by the sound crossing time in the decay phase. The long period and large amplitude make these oscillations different from typical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. This diagnostic can be applied both to observations of solar and stellar flares and to future observations of non-flaring loops at high resolution.

  1. Effect of heat-induced pain stimuli on pulse transit time and pulse wave amplitude in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, Marit H N; Loeve, Arjo J; Kortekaas, Minke C; Niehof, Sjoerd P; Mik, Egbert G; Stolker, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Pain is commonly assessed subjectively by interpretations of patient behaviour and/or reports from patients. When this is impossible the availability of a quantitative objective pain assessment tool based on objective physiological parameters would greatly benefit clinical practice and research beside the standard self-report tests. Vasoconstriction is one of the physiological responses to pain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether pulse transit time (PTT) and pulse wave amplitude (PWA) decrease in response to this vasoconstriction when caused by heat-induced pain. The PTT and PWA were measured in healthy volunteers, on both index fingers using photoplethysmography and electrocardiography. Each subject received 3 heat-induced pain stimuli using a Temperature-Sensory Analyzer thermode block to apply a controlled, increasing temperature from 32.0 °C to 50.0 °C to the skin. After reaching 50.0 °C, the thermode was immediately cooled down to 32.0 °C. The study population was divided into 2 groups with a time-interval between the stimuli 20s or 60s. The results showed a significant (p  Heat-induced pain causes a decrease of PTT and PWA. Consequently, it is expected that, in the future, PTT and PWA may be applied as objective indicators of pain, either beside the standard self-report test, or when self-report testing is impossible.

  2. A simple optical spectral calibration technique for pulsed THz sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnen, F.J.P.; G. Berden,; Jongma, R.T.

    2010-01-01

    We have quantified the sensitivity of a simple method to measurethe frequency spectrum of pulsed terahertz (THz) radiation. The THzpulses are upconverted to the optical regime by sideband generation in a zinctelluride (ZnTe) crystal using a continuous wave (cw) narrow-bandwidthnear-infrared laser. A

  3. Relaxation of ion energy spectrum just after turbulent heating pulse in TRIAM-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Hiraki, Naoji; Nakamura, Yukio; Itoh, Satoshi

    1982-01-01

    The temporal evolution and spatial profile of the ion energy spectrum just after the application of a toroidal current pulse for turbulent heating are investigated experimentally in the TRIAM-1 tokamak and also numerically using the Fokker-Planck equation. The two-component ion energy spectrum formed by turbulent heating relaxes to a single one within tausub(i) (the ion collision time). (author)

  4. Optimal time-domain technique for pulse width modulation in power electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Mayergoyz

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Optimal time-domain technique for pulse width modulation is presented. It is based on exact and explicit analytical solutions for inverter circuits, obtained for any sequence of input voltage rectangular pulses. Two optimal criteria are discussed and illustrated by numerical examples.

  5. Passivation of organic light emitting diode anode grid lines by pulsed Joule heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janka, M.; Gierth, R.; Rubingh, J.E.; Abendroth, M.; Eggert, M.; Moet, D.J.D.; Lupo, D.

    2015-01-01

    We report the self-aligned passivation of a current distribution grid for an organic light emitting diode (OLED) anode using a pulsed Joule heating method to align the passivation layer accurately on the metal grid. This method involves passing an electric current through the grid to cure a polymer

  6. Interpretation of heat and density pulse measurements in JET in terms of coupled transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, J.C.M. de; O'Rourke, J.; Sips, A.C.C.; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.

    1990-01-01

    The perturbations of electron density and temperature profiles in a tokamak following a sawtooth collapse are considered. An analytic model for the interpretation of such perturbations is presented. It is shown that the perturbation can be decomposed into two contributions, which are eigenmodes of the linearised coupled diffusion equations for particle and energy. The approximations made in the analytical treatment are checked using computer simulations. Measurements of heat and density pulses in Joint European Torus are used to illustrate the power of the new approach. It is shown that using the coupled equations, an improved description of the heat and density pulses is obtained. The analysis yields the four diffusion coefficients in the linearised transport matrix. The non-zero off-diagonal elements explain certain salient features of the measurements, notably a marked decrease of the local density which occurs during the maximum of the temperature pulse. (author)

  7. Comparison of the heat shock response induced by conventional heating and two methods of delivery of pulsed radiofrequency energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurence, J.A.; University of Sydney, NSW; McKenzie, D.R.; Veas, L.; French, P.W.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In 2001, we published a (hypothetical) mechanism by which radiofrequency (RF) radiation from mobile phones could induce cancer, via the chronic induction of the heat shock response (HSR). This hypothesis provides the focus for our research. Other groups have reported induction of the HSR by RF at apparently non thermal levels. The aim of this study was to determine whether the HSR induced by RF is (a) truly non thermal and (b) quantitatively or qualitatively different from that induced by conventional heating of cells. A rat mast cell line, RBL-2H3, was chosen as the target RBL-2H3 cells were exposed in an air incubator at 41.1 deg C for 45 minutes and 75 minutes, and then returned to a 37 deg C incubator. Sham exposures were performed in the same air incubator at 37 deg C. Cells were exposed for 1 hour in the two pulsed RF exposure systems. The first was a converted 750W microwave oven that emits a short burst of 2.45GHz pulses at the start of each contiguous six minute period. This exposes cells to an average specific energy absorption rate (SAR) of 20W/kg. The second system was a TEM cell, which simulates. GSM pulses - the earner frequency is 0.9GHz pulse modulated at 217Hz. The SAR was approx 0.1W/kg. Both of these exposure systems are housed in incubators maintained at 37 deg C. Sham exposures were performed in the two systems with the same conditions but with no RF radiation present. Cell samples for the conventional heating and microwave exposures were taken 0, 2. 5, 5 and 20 hours after exposure, and expression of heat shock proteins hsp 110, 90, 70, 60 and 56 were determined by Western Blotting and compared between exposures

  8. Interference Mitigation Technique for Coexistence of Pulse-Based UWB and OFDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohno Kohei

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ultra-wideband (UWB is a useful radio technique for sharing frequency bands between radio systems. It uses very short pulses to spread spectrum. However, there is a potential for interference between systems using the same frequency bands at close range. In some regulatory systems, interference detection and avoidance (DAA techniques are required to prevent interference with existing radio systems. In this paper, the effect of interference on orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM signals from pulse-based UWB is discussed, and an interference mitigation technique is proposed. This technique focuses on the pulse repetition cycle of UWB. The pulse repetition interval is set the same or half the period of the OFDM symbol excluding the guard interval to mitigate interference. These proposals are also made for direct sequence (DS-UWB. Bit error rate (BER performance is illustrated through both simulation and theoretical approximations.

  9. An extended diffusive model for calculating thermal diffusivity from single monopole tokamak heat pulse propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinak, M.

    1990-02-01

    The problem of deducing χ e from measurements of the propagation of a monopole heatpulse is considered. An extended diffusive model, which takes into account perturbed sources and sinks is extended to the case of a monopole heat input. χ e is expressed as a function of two observables, the heat pulse velocity and the radial damping rate. Two simple expressions valid for two different ranges of the radius of the poloidal waist of the beam power profile are given. The expressions are valid in the heat pulse measurement region, extending radially 0.05a beyond the beam power waist to near 0.6a. The inferred χ e is a local value, not an average value of the radial χ e profile. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  10. Characterization of irradiated fuel rods using pulsed eddy current techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, M.R.; Francis, W.C.

    1975-11-01

    A number of irradiated fuel rods and unfueled zircaloy cladding tubes (''water tubes'') were obtained from the Saxton reactor through arrangements with the Westinghouse Electric Corporation for use in subsequent irradiation effects and fuel behavior programs. A comprehensive nondestructive and corroborative destructive characterization program was undertaken on these fuel rods and tubes by ANC to provide baseline data on their characteristics prior to further testing and for comparison against post-post data. This report deals primarily with one portion of the NDT program performed remotely in the hot cells. The portion of interest in this paper is the pulsed eddy current inspection used in the nondestructive phase of the work. 6 references

  11. Nuclear pulse signal processing technique based on blind deconvolution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Pengfei; Yang Lei; Fu Tingyan; Qi Zhong; Li Dongcang; Ren Zhongguo

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for measurement and analysis of nuclear pulse signal, with which pile-up signal is removed, the signal baseline is restored, and the original signal is obtained. The data acquisition system includes FPGA, ADC and USB. The FPGA controls the high-speed ADC to sample the signal of nuclear radiation, and the USB makes the ADC work on the Slave FIFO mode to implement high-speed transmission status. Using the LabVIEW, it accomplishes online data processing of the blind deconvolution algorithm and data display. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate advantages of the method. (authors)

  12. Performance of the periodic pulse technique--4. Periodic pulse reaction kinetics of oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutyraldehyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, T.; Ii, M.; Murakami, Y.

    1980-07-01

    The periodic pulse method was used to study the reaction mechanism and kinetics of the oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutyraldehyde (IBA) by following the formation rates of methacrolein (MA), carbon monoxide and dioxide (CO/sub x/), and other products (P) as a function of pulse widths and reactant partial pressures at 350/sup 0/C over a 2:3 antimony oxide/molybdenum trioxide catalyst. The results were consistent with a mechanism according to which IBA reacts with oxygen retained by the catalyst to form MA, causing reduction of the catalyst. The IBA also adsorbed on the surface as an oxygenated species which either reacted with gas-phase oxygen to form CO/sub x/ or desorbed as an oxygenated P. The reduced catalyst surface was reoxidized by oxygen adsorption. Implications of catalyst tailoring for increased MA yields by improving the redox mechanism and inhibiting the surface reactions, are discussed.

  13. Retrospective Study on Laser Treatment of Oral Vascular Lesions Using the "Leopard Technique": The Multiple Spot Irradiation Technique with a Single-Pulsed Wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Hidetaka; Ohshiro, Takafumi; Romeo, Umberto; Noguchi, Tadahide; Maruoka, Yutaka; Gaimari, Gianfranco; Tomov, Georgi; Wada, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Kae; Ohshiro, Toshio; Asamura, Shinichi

    2018-06-01

    This study aimed to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of laser treatment of oral vascular lesions using the multiple spot irradiation technique with a single-pulsed wave. In laser therapy for vascular lesions, heat accumulation induced by excessive irradiation can cause adverse events postoperatively, including ulcer formation, resultant scarring, and severe pain. To prevent heat accumulation and side effects, we have applied a multiple pulsed spot irradiation technique, the so-called "leopard technique" (LT) to oral vascular lesions. This approach was originally proposed for laser treatment of nevi. It can avoid thermal concentration at the same spot and spare the epithelium, which promotes smooth healing. The goal of the study was to evaluate this procedure and treatment outcomes. The subjects were 46 patients with 47 oral vascular lesions treated with the LT using a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm), including 24 thick lesions treated using a combination of the LT and intralesional photocoagulation. All treatment outcomes were satisfactory without serious complications such as deep ulcer formation, scarring, bleeding, or severe swelling. Laser therapy with the LT is a promising less-invasive treatment for oral vascular lesions.

  14. Thermal analysis of an indirectly heat pulsed non-volatile phase change material microwave switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Robert M.; El-Hinnawy, Nabil; Borodulin, Pavel; Wagner, Brian P.; King, Matthew R.; Jones, Evan B.; Howell, Robert S.; Lee, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    We show the finite element simulation of the melt/quench process in a phase change material (GeTe, germanium telluride) used for a radio frequency switch. The device is thermally activated by an independent NiCrSi (nickel chrome silicon) thin film heating element beneath a dielectric separating it electrically from the phase change layer. A comparison is made between the predicted and experimental minimum power to amorphize (MPA) for various thermal pulse powers and pulse time lengths. By including both the specific heat and latent heat of fusion for GeTe, we find that the MPA and the minimum power to crystallize follow the form of a hyperbola on the power time effect plot. We also find that the simulated time at which the entire center GeTe layer achieves melting accurately matches the MPA curve for pulse durations ranging from 75–1500 ns and pulse powers from 1.6–4 W

  15. Pulse Mask Controlled HFAC Resonant Converter for high efficiency Industrial Induction Heating with less harmonic distortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarajan Booma

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses about the fixed frequency pulse mask control based high frequency AC conversion circuit for industrial induction heating applications. Conventionally, for induction heating load, the output power control is achieved using the pulse with modulation based converters. The conventional converters do not guarantee the zero voltage switching condition required for the minimization of the switching losses. In this paper, pulse mask control scheme for the power control of induction heating load is proposed. This power control strategy allows the inverter to operate closer to the resonant frequency, to obtain zero voltage switching condition. The proposed high frequency AC power conversion circuit has lesser total harmonic distortion in the supply side. Modeling of the IH load, design of conversion circuit and principle of the control scheme and its implementation using low cost PIC controller are briefly discussed. Simulation results obtained using the Matlab environment are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the pulse mask scheme. The obtained results indicate the reduction in losses, improvement in the output power and lesser harmonic distortion in the supply side by the proposed converter. The hardware results are in good agreement with the simulation results.

  16. Thermal analysis of an indirectly heat pulsed non-volatile phase change material microwave switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Robert M., E-mail: rm.young@ngc.com; El-Hinnawy, Nabil; Borodulin, Pavel; Wagner, Brian P.; King, Matthew R.; Jones, Evan B.; Howell, Robert S.; Lee, Michael J. [Northrop Grumman Corp., Electronic Systems, P.O. Box 1521, Baltimore, Maryland 21203 (United States)

    2014-08-07

    We show the finite element simulation of the melt/quench process in a phase change material (GeTe, germanium telluride) used for a radio frequency switch. The device is thermally activated by an independent NiCrSi (nickel chrome silicon) thin film heating element beneath a dielectric separating it electrically from the phase change layer. A comparison is made between the predicted and experimental minimum power to amorphize (MPA) for various thermal pulse powers and pulse time lengths. By including both the specific heat and latent heat of fusion for GeTe, we find that the MPA and the minimum power to crystallize follow the form of a hyperbola on the power time effect plot. We also find that the simulated time at which the entire center GeTe layer achieves melting accurately matches the MPA curve for pulse durations ranging from 75–1500 ns and pulse powers from 1.6–4 W.

  17. Ion heat pulse after sawtooth crash in the JFT-2M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Y.; Okano, F.; Suzuki, N.; Mori, M.; Hoshino, K.; Maeda, H.; Takizuka, T.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.

    1993-08-01

    The ion heat pulse after sawtooth crash is studied with the time-of-flight neutral measurement on the JFT-2M tokamak. The rapid change of the bulk ion energy distribution near the edge is observed after sawtooth crash. The delay time is measured and the effective measuring position is estimated by a neutral transport code, then the thermal conductivity, χ i HP , of about 15±10m 2 /sec is evaluated for the L-mode plasma. The simple diffusive model with constant χ i HP , however, does not explain the amplitude of the pulse in the ion energy distribution. (author)

  18. Extension of thermophysical and thermodynamic property measurements by laser pulse heating up to 10,000 K. I. Under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohse, R. W.

    1990-07-01

    The necessity for increased high-temperature data reliability and extension of thermophysical property measurements up to 5000 K and above are discussed. A new transient-type laser-autoclave technique (LAT) has been developed to extend density and heat capacity measurements of high-temperature multicomponent systems far beyond their melting and boiling points. Pulsed multibeam laser heating is performed in an autoclave under high inert gas pressure to eliminate evaporation. The spherical samples are positioned by containment-free acoustic levitation regardless of their conductive or magnetic properties. Temperature, spectral and total emittances are determined by a new microsecond six-wavelength pyrometer coupled to a fast digital data acquisition system. The density is determined by high resolution microfocus X-ray shadow technique. The heat capacity is obtained from the cooling rate. Further applications are a combination of the laser-autoclave with splat cooling techniques for metastable structure synthesis and amorphous metals research and an extension of the LAT for the study of critical phenomena and the measurement of critical-point temperatures.

  19. Interaction with the lower ionosphere of electromagnetic pulses from lightning - Heating, attachment, and ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taranenko, Y. N.; Inan, U. S.; Bell, T. F.

    1993-01-01

    A Boltzmann formulation of the electron distribution function and Maxwell's equations for the EM fields are used to simulate the interaction of lightning radiated EM pulses with the lower ionosphere. Ionization and dissociative attachment induced by the heated electrons cause significant changes in the local electron density, N(e). Due to 'slow' field changes of typical lightning EM pulses over time scales of tens of microsec, the distribution function follows the quasi-equilibrium solution of the Boltzmann equation in the altitude range of interest (70 to 100 km). The EM pulse is simulated as a planar 100 microsec long single period oscillation of a 10 kHz wave injected at 70 km. Under nighttime conditions, individual pulses of intensity 10-20 V/m (normalized to 100 km horizontal distance) produce changes in N(e) of 1-30 percent while a sequence of pulses leads to strong modification of N(e) at altitudes less than 95 km. The N(e) changes produce a 'sharpening' of the lower ionospheric boundary by causing a reduction in electron density at 75-85 km (due to attachment) and a substantial increase at 85-95 km (due to ionization) (e.g., the scale height decreases by a factor of about 2 at about 85 km for a single 20 V/m EM pulse). No substantial N(e) changes occur during daytime.

  20. One-dimensional nonlinear inverse heat conduction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hills, R.G.; Hensel, E.C. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The one-dimensional nonlinear problem of heat conduction is considered. A noniterative space-marching finite-difference algorithm is developed to estimate the surface temperature and heat flux from temperature measurements at subsurface locations. The trade-off between resolution and variance of the estimates of the surface conditions is discussed quantitatively. The inverse algorithm is stabilized through the use of digital filters applied recursively. The effect of the filters on the resolution and variance of the surface estimates is quantified. Results are presented which indicate that the technique is capable of handling noisy measurement data

  1. [Rapid measurement of trace mercury in aqueous solutions with optical-electrical dual pulse LIBS technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Xiong, Wei; Chen, Yu-Qi; Li, Run-Hua

    2011-02-01

    A wood slice was used as absorber to transfer liquid sample to solid sample in order to solve the problems existing in directly analyzing aqueous solutions with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). An optical-electrical dual pulse LIBS (OEDP-LIBS) technique was first used to enhance atomic emission of mercury in laser-induced plasma. The calibration curves of mercury were obtained by typical single pulse LIBS and OEDP-LIBS techniques. The limit of detection (LOD) of mercury in these two techniques reaches 2.4 and 0.3 mg x L(-1), respectively. Under current experimental conditions, the time-integrated a tomic emission of mercury at 253.65 nm was enhanced 50 times and the LOD of mercury was improved by one order, if comparing OEDP-LIBS to single pulse LIBS. The required time for a whole analysis process is less than 5 minutes. As the atomic emission of mercury decays slowly while increasing the delay time between electrical pulse and laser pulse, increasing the electrical pulse width can further enhance the time integrated intensity of mercury emission and improve the detection sensitivity of mercury by OEDP-LIBS technique.

  2. Baseline restoration technique based on symmetrical zero-area trapezoidal pulse shaper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Guoqiang, E-mail: 24829500@qq.com [Key Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Techniques in Geosciences Sichuan, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059 (China); Yang, Jian, E-mail: 22105653@qq.com [Key Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Techniques in Geosciences Sichuan, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059 (China); Hu, Tianyu; Ge, Liangquan [Key Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Techniques in Geosciences Sichuan, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059 (China); Ouyang, Xiaoping [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi’an 710024,China (China); Zhang, Qingxian; Gu, Yi [Key Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Techniques in Geosciences Sichuan, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059 (China)

    2017-06-21

    Since the baseline of the unipolar pulse shaper have the direct-current (DC) offset and drift, an additional baseline estimator is need to obtain baseline values in real-time. The bipolar zero-area (BZA) pulse shapers can be used for baseline restoration, but they cannot restrain the baseline drift due to their asymmetrical shape. In this study, three trapezoids are synthesized as a symmetrical zero-area (SZA) shape, which can remove the DC offset and restrain the baseline drift. This baseline restoration technique can be easily implemented in digital pulse processing (DPP) systems base on the recursive algorithm. To strengthen our approach, the iron's characteristic x-ray was detected using a Si-PIN diode detector. Compared with traditional trapezoidal pulse shapers, the SZA trapezoidal pulse shaper improved the energy resolution from 237 eV to 216 eV for the 6.403 keV Kα peak.

  3. A New Technique for SET Pulse Width Measurement in Chains of Inverters Using Pulsed Laser Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferlet-Cavrois, V.; Fel, N.; Gaillardin, M.; Baggio, J.; Girard, S.; Flament, O.; Paillet, P.; McMorrow, D.; Melinger, J. S.; Kobayashi, D.; Hirose, K.; Saito, H.; Pouget, V.; Essely, F.; Schwank, J. R.; Flores, R. S.; Dodd, P. E.; Shaneyfelt, M. R.

    2009-01-01

    A new technique is developed to measure precisely and accurately the width of propagating voltage transients induced by irradiation of inverter chains. The technique is based on measurement of the supply current in a detection inverter, and permits a direct determination of the transient width with a 50 GHz bandwidth. (authors)

  4. Sensitivity analysis of a pulse nutrient addition technique for estimating nutrient uptake in large streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurence Lin; J.R. Webster

    2012-01-01

    The constant nutrient addition technique has been used extensively to measure nutrient uptake in streams. However, this technique is impractical for large streams, and the pulse nutrient addition (PNA) has been suggested as an alternative. We developed a computer model to simulate Monod kinetics nutrient uptake in large rivers and used this model to evaluate the...

  5. An Optimal Control Approach for an Overall Cryogenic Plant Under Pulsed Heat Loads

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez Palacin, Luis; Blanco Viñuela, Enrique; Maekawa, Ryuji; Chalifour, Michel

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the optimal management of a cryogenic plant composed by parallel refrigeration plants, which provide supercritical helium to pulsed heat loads. First, a data reconciliation approach is proposed to estimate precisely the refrigerator variables necessary to deduce the efficiency of each refrigerator. Second, taking into account these efficiencies, an optimal operation of the system is proposed and studied. Finally, while minimizing the power consumption of the refrigerators, the control system maintains stable operation of the cryoplant under pulsed heat loads. The management of the refrigerators is carried out by an upper control layer, which balances the relative production of cooling power in each refrigerator. In addition, this upper control layer deals with the mitigation of malfunctions and faults in the system. The proposed approach has been validated using a dynamic model of the cryoplant developed with EcosimPro software, based on first principles (mass and energy balances) and the...

  6. Stability and fast heat removal with He-II cooling for pulsed superconductive magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desportes, H.

    1979-01-01

    The use of pressurized superfluid helium between 1.6 K and 1.8 K is being considered for a number of superconducting magnet applications. This type of cooling is particularly interesting in the case of pulsed field magnets where large heat fluxes need to be evacuated in a short time. This paper reviews a few recent experiments on heat transport properties and stability in He-II, which contribute to evaluating its potential use for such an application. Present technology is illustrated by the description of a large test facility recently operated at Saclay

  7. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental hard tissues with an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Andreas; Krillke, Raphael Franz; Frentzen, Matthias; Bourauel, Christoph; Stark, Helmut; Schelle, Florian

    2015-02-01

    Heat generation during the removal of dental hard tissues may lead to a temperature increase and cause painful sensations or damage dental tissues. The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental hard tissues following laser ablation using an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) system. A total of 85 specimens of dental hard tissues were used, comprising 45 specimens of human dentine evaluating a thickness of 1, 2, and 3 mm (15 samples each) and 40 specimens of human enamel with a thickness of 1 and 2 mm (20 samples each). Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1,064 nm, a pulse duration of 9 ps, and a repetition rate of 500 kHz with an average output power of 6 W. Specimens were irradiated for 0.8 s. Employing a scanner system, rectangular cavities of 1-mm edge length were generated. A temperature sensor was placed at the back of the specimens, recording the temperature during the ablation process. All measurements were made employing a heat-conductive paste without any additional cooling or spray. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the dental hard tissue (enamel or dentine) and the thickness of the respective tissue (p dental hard tissues, heat generation has to be considered. Especially during laser ablation next to pulpal tissues, painful sensations and potential thermal injury of pulp tissue might occur.

  8. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy (PDR): an analysis of the technique at 2 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thienpont, M [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde; Van Eijkeren, M; Van Hecke, H; Boterberg, T; De Neve, W

    1995-12-01

    A total of 154 applications was analysed using a pulsed dose brachytherapy technique for 138 patients over a 2 year period with emphasis on technical aspects influencing the overall treatment time. Vaginal ovoids were used in 59 cases, plastic tubes in 52, a Fletcher-type in 18, vaginal cylinders in 14 and a perineal template in 11 cases. Pulses were given at hourly intervals with a median dose rate of 0.6 Gy per pulse (range 0.4 to 3 Gy). The number of pulses per application varied from 3 to 134 (median 32). The number of dwell positions varied from 1 to 542 over 1 to 18 catheters. Patient related problems were few. The room was entered almost every 77 minutes. We noted 561 status codes in 147 applications. Of the 25 different codes, the most frequent one was due to the door left open when a pulse had to be given (35%) or due to constriction of the plastic catheters at the transfer tube junction (26%). However, the median total treatment time was increased by only 5 minutes. With pulsed dose rate brachytherapy at hourly pulses we can treat our patients within the planned time despite frequent room entrance and occurrence of an appreciable number of status codes. This technique seems to fulfill its promise to replace low dose rate brachytherapy.

  9. Rapid further heating of tokamak plasma by fast-rising magnetic pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, N.; Nihei, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Ichimura, M.; Morikawa, J.; Hoshino, K.; Uchida, T.

    1977-01-01

    The object of the experiment was to study the rapid further heating of a tokamak plasma and its influence on confinement. For this purpose, a high-voltage theta-pinch pulse was applied to a tokamak plasma and production of a high-temperature (keV) plasma was ensured within a microsecond. The magnetic pulse is applied at the plasma current maximum parallel or antiparallel to the study toroidal field. In either case, the pulsed field quickly penetrates the plasma and the plasma resistivity estimated from the penetration time is about 100 times larger than the classical. A burst of energetic neutrals of approximately 1 μs duration was observed and the energy distribution had two components of the order of 1 keV and 0.1 keV in the antiparallel case. Doppler broadening measurement shows heating of ions to a temperature higher than 200 eV; however, the line profile is not always Maxwellian distribution. The X-rays disappear at the moment of applying the magnetic pulse and reappear about 100 μs later with an intensive burst, while both energy levels are the same (approximately 100 keV). (author)

  10. Base adsorption calorimetry for characterising surface acidity: a comparison between pulse flow and conventional ''static'' techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felix, S.P.; Savill-Jowitt, C.; Brown, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    A pulsed flow adsorption microcalorimeter (pulse-FMC) has been developed by modifying a Setaram 111. It is tested in comparison with a conventional pulsed static adsorption microcalorimeter (pulse-SMC) for characterising surface acidity of solid acid catalysts. Small pulses of 1% ammonia in helium are delivered to an activated catalyst sample and its surface acidity is differentially profiled in terms of the molar enthalpy of ammonia adsorption (ΔH ads o ) using a combination of differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and a downstream thermal conductivity detector (TCD). The pulsing action and its sequences are controlled by in-house developed software and the TCD output also is logged into a PC. Thus, the pulse-FMC is fully automated. Two sulfonated polystyrene resin-type catalysts, Amberlyst 15 and Amberlyst 35, a zeolite of the type H + -ZSM-5 (CT 410) and an acid activated clay (Fulcat 220) are characterised at appropriate temperatures using both the new technique and the conventional static base adsorption method. ΔH ads o versus surface coverage profiles of all the four catalysts obtained from both pulse-FMC and the conventional method are found to be comparable. Results are interpreted in terms of the extent to which NH 3 adsorption on the catalysts surface is under thermodynamic control in the two methods

  11. Neutron Spectroscopy for pulsed beams with frame overlap using a double time-of-flight technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrig, K. P.; Goldblum, B. L.; Brown, J. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bevins, J.; Harasty, M.; Laplace, T. A.; Matthews, E. F.

    2018-01-01

    A new double time-of-flight (dTOF) neutron spectroscopy technique has been developed for pulsed broad spectrum sources with a duty cycle that results in frame overlap, where fast neutrons from a given pulse overtake slower neutrons from previous pulses. Using a tunable beam at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, neutrons were produced via thick-target breakup of 16 MeV deuterons on a beryllium target in the cyclotron vault. The breakup spectral shape was deduced from a dTOF measurement using an array of EJ-309 organic liquid scintillators. Simulation of the neutron detection efficiency of the scintillator array was performed using both GEANT4 and MCNP6. The efficiency-corrected spectral shape was normalized using a foil activation technique to obtain the energy-dependent flux of the neutron beam at zero degrees with respect to the incoming deuteron beam. The dTOF neutron spectrum was compared to spectra obtained using HEPROW and GRAVEL pulse height spectrum unfolding techniques. While the unfolding and dTOF results exhibit some discrepancies in shape, the integrated flux values agree within two standard deviations. This method obviates neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy challenges posed by pulsed beams with frame overlap and opens new opportunities for pulsed white neutron source facilities.

  12. Modeling of intense pulsed ion beam heated masked targets for extreme materials characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, John J.; Schenkel, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Intense, pulsed ion beams locally heat materials and deliver dense electronic excitations that can induce material modifications and phase transitions. Material properties can potentially be stabilized by rapid quenching. Pulsed ion beams with pulse lengths of order ns have recently become available for materials processing. Here, we optimize mask geometries for local modification of materials by intense ion pulses. The goal is to rapidly excite targets volumetrically to the point where a phase transition or local lattice reconstruction is induced followed by rapid cooling that stabilizes desired material's properties fast enough before the target is altered or damaged by, e.g., hydrodynamic expansion. By using a mask, the longitudinal dimension can be large compared to the transverse dimension, allowing the possibility of rapid transverse cooling. We performed HYDRA simulations that calculate peak temperatures for a series of excitation conditions and cooling rates of silicon targets with micro-structured masks and compare these to a simple analytical model. The model gives scaling laws that can guide the design of targets over a wide range of pulsed ion beam parameters.

  13. Laser pulse heating of steel mixing with WC particles in a irradiated region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuja, S. Z.; Yilbas, B. S.; Ali, H.; Karatas, C.

    2016-12-01

    Laser pulse heating of steel mixing with tungsten carbide (WC) particles is carried out. Temperature field in the irradiated region is simulated in line with the experimental conditions. In the analysis, a laser pulse parameter is introduced, which defines the laser pulse intensity distribution at the irradiated surface. The influence of the laser parameter on the melt pool size and the maximum temperature increase in the irradiated region is examined. Surface temperature predictions are compared with the experimental data. In addition, the distribution of WC particles and their re-locations in the treated layer, due to combination of the natural convection and Marangoni currents, are predicted. The findings are compared to the experimental data. It is found that surface temperature predictions agree well with the experimental data. The dislocated WC particles form a streamlining in the near region of the melt pool wall, which agree with the experimental findings. The Gaussian distribution of the laser pulse intensity results in the maximum peak temperature and the maximum flow velocity inside the melt pool. In this case, the melt pool depth becomes the largest as compared to those corresponding to other laser pulse intensity distributions at the irradiated surface.

  14. Radial Pressure Pulse and Heart Rate Variability in Heat- and Cold-Stressed Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Ming Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to explore the effects of heat and cold stress on the radial pressure pulse (RPP and heart rate variability (HRV. The subjects immersed their left hand into 45°C and 7°C water for 2 minutes. Sixty healthy subjects (age 25±4 yr; 29 men and 31 women were enrolled in this study. All subjects underwent the supine temperature measurements of the bilateral forearms, brachial arterial blood pressure, HRV and RPP with a pulse analyzer in normothermic conditions, and thermal stresses. The power spectral low-frequency (LF and high-frequency (HF components of HRV decreased in the heat test and increased in the cold test. The heat stress significantly reduced radial augmentation index (AIr (P<.05, but the cold stress significantly increased AIr (P<.01. The spectral energy of RPP did not show any statistical difference in 0∼10 Hz region under both conditions, but in the region of 10∼50 Hz, there was a significant increase (P<.01 in the heat test and a significant decrease in the cold test (P<.01. The changes in AIr induced by heat and cold stress were significantly negatively correlated with the spectral energy in the region of 10∼50 Hz (SE10−50 Hz but not in the region of 0∼10 Hz (SE0−10 Hz. The results demonstrated that the SE10−50 Hz, which only possessed a small percentage in total pulse energy, presented more physiological characteristics than the SE0−10 Hz under the thermal stresses.

  15. Radial Pressure Pulse and Heart Rate Variability in Heat- and Cold-Stressed Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chin-Ming; Chang, Hsien-Cheh; Kao, Shung-Te; Li, Tsai-Chung; Wei, Ching-Chuan; Chen, Chiachung; Liao, Yin-Tzu; Chen, Fun-Jou

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of heat and cold stress on the radial pressure pulse (RPP) and heart rate variability (HRV). The subjects immersed their left hand into 45°C and 7°C water for 2 minutes. Sixty healthy subjects (age 25 ± 4 yr; 29 men and 31 women) were enrolled in this study. All subjects underwent the supine temperature measurements of the bilateral forearms, brachial arterial blood pressure, HRV and RPP with a pulse analyzer in normothermic conditions, and thermal stresses. The power spectral low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components of HRV decreased in the heat test and increased in the cold test. The heat stress significantly reduced radial augmentation index (AIr) (P < .05), but the cold stress significantly increased AIr (P < .01). The spectral energy of RPP did not show any statistical difference in 0 ~ 10 Hz region under both conditions, but in the region of 10 ~ 50 Hz, there was a significant increase (P < .01) in the heat test and a significant decrease in the cold test (P < .01). The changes in AIr induced by heat and cold stress were significantly negatively correlated with the spectral energy in the region of 10 ~ 50 Hz (SE10−50 Hz) but not in the region of 0 ~ 10 Hz (SE0−10 Hz). The results demonstrated that the SE10−50 Hz, which only possessed a small percentage in total pulse energy, presented more physiological characteristics than the SE0−10 Hz under the thermal stresses. PMID:21113292

  16. Wilcoxon signed-rank-based technique for the pulse-shape analysis of HPGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martín, S., E-mail: sergiomr@usal.es; Quintana, B.; Barrientos, D.

    2016-07-01

    The characterization of the electric response of segmented-contact high-purity germanium detectors requires scanning systems capable of accurately associating each pulse with the position of the interaction that generated it. This process requires an algorithm sensitive to changes above the electronic noise in the pulse shapes produced at different positions, depending on the resolution of the Ge crystal. In this work, a pulse-shape comparison technique based on the Wilcoxon signed-rank test has been developed. It provides a method to distinguish pulses coming from different interaction points in the germanium crystal. Therefore, this technique is a necessary step for building a reliable pulse-shape database that can be used later for the determination of the position of interaction for γ-ray tracking spectrometry devices such as AGATA, GRETA or GERDA. The method was validated by comparison with a χ{sup 2} test using simulated and experimental pulses corresponding to a Broad Energy germanium detector (BEGe).

  17. Heat transfer in the lithium-cooled blanket of a pulsed fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cort, G.E.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    The transient temperature distribution in the lithium-cooled blanket of a pulsed fusion reactor has been calculated using a finite-element heat-conduction computer program. An auxiliary program was used to predict the coolant transient velocity in a network of parallel and series flow passages with constant driving pressure and varying magnetic field. The coolant velocity was calculated by a Runge-Kutta numerical integration of the conservation equations. The lithium coolant was part of the finite-element heat-conduction mesh with the velocity terms included in the total matrix. The matrix was solved implicitly at each time step for the nodal point temperatures. Slug flow was assumed in the coolant passages and the Boussinesq analogy was used to calculate turbulent heat transfer when the magnetic field was not present

  18. Heating of multi-layered samples by a Nd: YAG pulsed laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diniz Neto, O.O.

    1998-01-01

    In the work we examine the heating of multi-layered samples by a powerful Nd-YAG pulsed laser. The samples are made of two and three layers, conductor-isolator (Al-Al 2 O 3 ). conductor-conductor (Al-Ag: Al-Au) an conductor-conductor-conductor (Al-Au-Ag:Ag-Au-Al). The transient behaviour of the temperature distribution throughout the samples is computed. We carry out three dimensional model calculations for the heating process in which we consider not only the temperature dependence of the sample thermal and optical parameters but also the space and time characteristics of the laser beams as the heating source. We showed the influence of the substrate in the thermal profile, in space and time, and maximum temperature on the multi-layered samples. (Author) 11 refs

  19. Calculation of cracking under pulsed heat loads in tungsten manufactured according to ITER specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakcheev, A.S.; Skovorodin, D.I.; Burdakov, A.V.; Shoshin, A.A.; Polosatkin, S.V.; Vasilyev, A.A.; Postupaev, V.V.; Vyacheslavov, L.N.; Kasatov, A.A.; Huber, A.; Mertens, Ph; Wirtz, M.; Linsmeier, Ch; Kreter, A.; Löwenhoff, Th; Begrambekov, L.; Grunin, A.; Sadovskiy, Ya

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model of surface cracking under pulsed heat load was developed. The model correctly describes a smooth brittle–ductile transition. The elastic deformation is described in a thin-heated-layer approximation. The plastic deformation is described with the Hollomon equation. The time dependence of the deformation and stresses is described for one heating–cooling cycle for a material without initial plastic deformation. The model can be applied to tungsten manufactured according to ITER specifications. The model shows that the stability of stress-relieved tungsten deteriorates when the base temperature increases. This proved to be a result of the close ultimate tensile and yield strengths. For a heat load of arbitrary magnitude a stability criterion was obtained in the form of condition on the relation of the ultimate tensile and yield strengths.

  20. Estimate of thermoelastic heat production from superconducting composites in pulsed poloidal coil systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballou, J.K.; Gray, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    In the design of the cryogenic system and superconducting magnets for the poloidal field system in a tokamak, it is important to have an accurate estimate of the heat produced in superconducting magnets as a result of rapidly changing magnetic fields. A computer code, PLASS (Pulsed Losses in Axisymmetric Superconducting Solenoids), was written to estimate the contributions to the heat production from superconductor hysteresis losses, superconductor coupling losses, stabilizing material eddy current losses, and structural material eddy current losses. Recently, it has been shown that thermoelastic dissipation in superconducting composites can contribute as much to heat production as the other loss mechanisms mentioned above. A modification of PLASS which takes into consideration thermoelastic dissipation in superconducting composites is discussed. A comparison between superconductor thermoelastic dissipation and the other superconductor loss mechanisms is presented in terms of the poloidal coil system of the ORNL Experimental Power Reactor design

  1. Development of a coal fired pulse combustor for residential space heating. Phase I, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the results of the first phase of a program for the development of a coal-fired residential combustion system. This phase consisted of the design, fabrication, testing, and evaluation of an advanced pulse combustor sized for residential space heating requirements. The objective was to develop an advanced pulse coal combustor at the {approximately} 100,000 Btu/hr scale that can be integrated into a packaged space heating system for small residential applications. The strategy for the development effort included the scale down of the feasibility unit from 1-2 MMBtu/hr to 100,000 Btu/hr to establish a baseline for isolating the effect of scale-down and new chamber configurations separately. Initial focus at the residential scale was concentrated on methods of fuel injection and atomization in a bare metal unit. This was followed by incorporating changes to the advanced chamber designs and testing of refractory-lined units. Multi-fuel capability for firing oil or gas as a secondary fuel was also established. Upon completion of the configuration and component testing, an optimum configuration would be selected for integrated testing of the pulse combustor unit. The strategy also defined the use of Dry Ultrafine Coal (DUC) for Phases 1 and 2 of the development program with CWM firing to be a product improvement activity for a later phase of the program.

  2. Application of Quasi-Heat-Pulse Solutions for Luikov’s Equations of Heat and Moisture Transfer for Calibrating and Utilizing Thermal Properties Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Dietenberger; Charles R. Boardman

    2014-01-01

    Several years ago the Laplace transform solutions of Luikov’s differential equations were presented for one-dimensional heat and moisture transfer in porous hydroscopic orthotropic materials for the boundary condition of a gradual heat pulse applied to both surfaces of a flat slab. This paper presents calibration methods and data for the K-tester 637 (Lasercomp),...

  3. Efficient ion heating of tokamak plasma by application of positive and negative current pulse in TRIAM-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toi, Kazuo; Hiraki, Naoji; Nakamura, Kazuo; Mitarai, Osamu; Kawai, Yoshinobu

    1980-01-01

    The efficient heating of bulk ions of tokamak plasma is observed by application of the pulsed toroidal electric field much higher than the Dreicer field with the positive and negative polarities for the ohmic heating field. No deleterious effect on the confinement properties of tokamak plasma appears by the heating. The decay time of ion temperature raised by the heating pulse agrees well with the prediction by the neoclassical transport theory. The magnitude of the current induced by the pulsed electric field with the positive polarity is limited by the violent current disruption. In the case of the negative polarity, this is limited by lack of the MHD equilibrium due to vanishing the total plasma current. The ratio of drift velocity to electron thermal one / attains around 0.5, which suggests that the efficient ion heating may be due to the current-driven turbulence. (author)

  4. Efficient ion heating of tokamak plasma by application of positive and negative current pulse in TRIAM-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toi, K; Hiraki, N; Nakamura, K; Mitarai, O; Kawai, Y [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1980-02-01

    The efficient heating of bulk ions of tokamak plasma is observed by application of the pulsed toroidal electric field much higher than the Dreicer field with the positive and negative polarities for the ohmic heating field. No deleterious effect on the confinement properties of tokamak plasma appears by the heating. The decay time of ion temperature raised by the heating pulse agrees well with the prediction by the neoclassical transport theory. The magnitude of the current induced by the pulsed electric field with the positive polarity is limited by the violent current disruption. In the case of the negative polarity, this is limited by lack of the MHD equilibrium due to vanishing the total plasma current. The ratio of drift velocity to electron thermal one / attains around 0.5, which suggests that the efficient ion heating may be due to the current-driven turbulence.

  5. Study of pulse stretching in high current power supplies using multipulse techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trendler, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    Considerable interest exists at Fermilab to increase the pulse width of the Neutrino Focusing Horn to permit an increase in beam spill length from twenty (20) microseconds to one (1) millisecond. Two techniques to do this were examined: (1) a high current transformer, and (2) increased bank capacitance using the multi-power supply technique. The transformer is the most straightforward conceptually; it is, however, a complicated device requiring sizable changes to the existing horn power supply. This alternative is briefly reviewed. The second scheme involves pulsing a 20 kv 200 ka power supply to establish the required load current and then maintaining this current by the sequential pulsing of a number of low voltage high current power supplies. This alternative is discussed in detail with the results of tests performed on the Fermilab Focusing Horn System

  6. Enhancement of High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Heating by Short-Pulse Generated Cavitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Yoshizawa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A target tissue can be thermally coagulated in high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU treatment noninvasively. HIFU thermal treatments have been clinically applied to various solid tumors. One of the problems in HIFU treatments is a long treatment time. Acoustically driven microbubbles can accelerate the ultrasonic heating, resulting in the significant reduction of the treatment time. In this paper, a method named “trigger HIFU exposure” which employs cavitation microbubbles is introduced and its results are reviewed. A trigger HIFU sequence consists of high-intensity short pulses followed by moderate-intensity long bursts. Cavitation bubbles induced in a multiple focal regions by rapidly scanning the focus of high-intensity pulses enhanced the temperature increase significantly and produced a large coagulation region with high efficiency.

  7. Extreme degree of ionization in homogenous micro-capillary plasma columns heated by ultrafast current pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avaria, G; Grisham, M; Li, J; Tomasel, F G; Shlyaptsev, V N; Busquet, M; Woolston, M; Rocca, J J

    2015-03-06

    Homogeneous plasma columns with ionization levels typical of megaampere discharges are created by rapidly heating gas-filled 520-μm-diameter channels with nanosecond rise time current pulses of 40 kA. Current densities of up to 0.3  GA cm^{-2} greatly increase Joule heating with respect to conventional capillary discharge Z pinches, reaching unprecedented degrees of ionization for a high-Z plasma column heated by a current pulse of remarkably low amplitude. Dense xenon plasmas are ionized to Xe^{28+}, while xenon impurities in hydrogen discharges reach Xe^{30+}. The unique characteristics of these hot, ∼300:1 length-to-diameter aspect ratio plasmas allow the observation of unexpected spectroscopic phenomena. Axial spectra show the unusual dominance of the intercombination line over the resonance line of He-like Al by nearly an order of magnitude, caused by differences in opacities in the axial and radial directions. These plasma columns could enable the development of sub-10-nm x-ray lasers.

  8. Pulse*Star Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor: heat transfer loop and balance of plant considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, M.W.; Murray, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    A conceptual heat transfer loop and balance of plant design for the Pulse*Star Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor has been investigated and results are presented. The Pulse*Star reaction vessel, a perforated steel bell jar approximately 11 m in diameter, is immersed in Li 17 Pb 83 coolant which flows through the perforations and forms a 1.5 m thick plenum of droplets around an 8 m diameter inner chamber. The reactor and associated pumps, piping, and steam generators are contained within a 17 m diameter pool of Li 17 Pb 83 coolant to minimize structural requirements and occupied space, resulting in reduced cost. Four parallel heat transfer loops with flow rates of 5.5 m 3 /s each are necessary to transfer 3300 MWt of power. The steam generator design was optimized by finding the most cost-effective combination of heat exchanger area and pumping power. Power balance calculations based on an improved electrical conversion efficiency revealed a net electrical output of 1260 MWe to the bus bar and a resulting net efficiency of 39%. Suggested balance-of-plant layouts are also presented

  9. Multiple-output all-optical header processing technique based on two-pulse correlation principle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calabretta, N.; Liu, Y.; Waardt, de H.; Hill, M.T.; Khoe, G.D.; Dorren, H.J.S.

    2001-01-01

    A serial all-optical header processing technique based on a two-pulse correlation principle in a semiconductor laser amplifier in a loop mirror (SLALOM) configuration that can have a large number of output ports is presented. The operation is demonstrated experimentally at a 10Gbit/s Manchester

  10. Water in Brain Edema : Observations by the Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GO, KG; Edzes, HT

    The state of water in three types of brain edema and in normal brain of the rat was studied by the pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique. In cold-induced edema and in osmotic edema both in cortex and in white matter, the water protons have longer nuclear magnetic relaxation times than in

  11. Pulse Star Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor: Heat transfer loop and balance-of-plant considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, M.W.; Blink, J.A.; Curlander, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    A conceptual heat transfer loop and balance-of-plant design for the Pulse Star Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor has been investigated and the results are presented. The Pulse Star reaction vessel, a perforated steel bell jar about11 m in diameter, is immersed in Li 17 Pb 83 coolant, which flows through the perforations and forms a 1.5-m-thick plenum of droplets around a 8-m-diameter inner chamber. The bell jar and associated pumps, piping, and steam generators are contained within a 17-m-diameter pool of Li 17 Pb 83 coolant to minimize structural requirements and occupied space, resulting in reduced cost. Four parallel heat transfer loops, each with a flow rate of 5.5 m 3 /s, are necessary to transfer 3300 MWt of power. Liquid metal is pumped to the top of the pool, where it flows downward through eight vertical steam generators. Double-walled tubes are used in the steam generators to assure tritium containment without intermediate heat transfer loops. Each pump is a mixed flow type and has a required NPSH of 3.4 m, a speed of 278 rpm, and an impeller diameter of 1.2 m. The steam generator design was optimized by finding the most cost-effective combination of heat exchanger area and pumping power. The design minimizes the total cost (heat exchanger area plus pumping) for the plant lifetime. The power required for the pumps is 36 MWe. Each resulting steam generator is 12 m high and 1.6 m in diameter, with 2360 tubes. The steam generators and pumps fit easily in the pool between the reactor chamber and the pool wall

  12. Fast neutron detection using a new pulse shape discrimination technique: Charge sensitive integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, M.; Tsoupas, N.; Karwowski, H.; Castaneda, C.; Nimnual, S.; Porter, R.; Ward, T.

    1988-01-01

    A new electronic technique that depends on charge sensitive integration (CSI) has been developed and tested using a CAMAC based pulse shape discrimination system. Neutrons are well separated from γ-ray signals in the 0.1-100 MeV energy range. The new method was compared with the old zero-crossing time-to-amplitude differentiating technique and was found to be comparable in count rate and superior in noise suppression

  13. Refractive index sensor based on optical fiber end face using pulse reference-based compensation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Qiang; Song, Zhangqi; Zhang, Xueliang; Yu, Yang; Chen, Yuzhong

    2018-03-01

    We proposed a refractive index sensor based on optical fiber end face using pulse reference-based compensation technique. With good compensation effect of this compensation technique, the power fluctuation of light source, the change of optic components transmission loss and coupler splitting ratio can be compensated, which largely reduces the background noise. The refractive index resolutions can achieve 3.8 × 10-6 RIU and1.6 × 10-6 RIU in different refractive index regions.

  14. Technique for long and absolute distance measurement based on laser pulse repetition frequency sweeping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Alves, D.; Abreu, Manuel; Cabral, A.; Jost, Michael; Rebordão, J. M.

    2017-11-01

    In this work we present a technique to perform long and absolute distance measurements based on mode-locked diode lasers. Using a Michelson interferometer, it is possible to produce an optical cross-correlation between laser pulses of the reference arm with the pulses from the measurement arm, adjusting externally their degree of overlap either changing the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) or the position of the reference arm mirror for two (or more) fixed frequencies. The correlation of the travelling pulses for precision distance measurements relies on ultra-short pulse durations, as the uncertainty associated to the method is dependent on the laser pulse width as well as on a highly stable PRF. Mode-locked Diode lasers are a very appealing technology for its inherent characteristics, associated to compactness, size and efficiency, constituting a positive trade-off with regard to other mode-locked laser sources. Nevertheless, main current drawback is the non-availability of frequency-stable laser diodes. The laser used is a monolithic mode-locked semiconductor quantum-dot (QD) laser. The laser PRF is locked to an external stabilized RF reference. In this work we will present some of the preliminary results and discuss the importance of the requirements related to laser PRF stability in the final metrology system accuracy.

  15. Pulse Sign Separation Technique for the Received Bits in Wireless Ultra-Wideband Combination Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid A. Fayadh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When receiving high data rate in ultra-wideband (UWB technology, many users have experienced multiple-user interference and intersymbol interference in the multipath reception technique. Structures have been proposed for implementing rake receivers to enhance their capabilities by reducing the bit error probability (Pe, thereby providing better performances by indoor and outdoor multipath receivers. As a result, several rake structures have been proposed in the past to reduce the number of resolvable paths that must be estimated and combined. To achieve this aim, we suggest two maximal ratio combiners based on the pulse sign separation technique, such as the pulse sign separation selective combiner (PSS-SC and the pulse sign separation partial combiner (PSS-PC to reduce complexity with fewer fingers and to improve the system performance. In the combiners, a comparator was added to compare the positive quantity of positive pulses and negative quantities of negative pulses to decide whether the transmitted bit was 1 or 0. The Pe was driven by simulation for multipath environments for impulse radio time-hopping binary phase shift keying (TH-BPSK modulation, and the results were compared with those of conventional selective combiners (C-SCs and conventional partial combiners (C-PCs.

  16. Structural and phase transformations in zinc and brass wires under heating with high-density current pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pervikov, A. V. [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Ultrafine Materials, Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, 2/4, pr. Akademicheskii, 634021 Tomsk, Russia and Department of High Voltage Electrophysics and High Current Electronics, Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Avenue, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    The work is focused on revealing the mechanism of structure and phase transformations in the metal wires under heating with a high-density current pulse (the electric explosion of wires, EEWs). It has been demonstrated on the example of brass and zinc wires that the transition of a current pulse with the density of j ≈ 3.3 × 10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2} results in homogeneous heating of the crystalline structure of the metal/alloy. It has been determined that under heating with a pulse of high-density current pulse, the electric resistance of the liquid phases of zinc and brass decreases as the temperature increases. The results obtained allow for a conclusion that the presence of the particles of the condensed phase in the expanding products of EEW is the result of overheating instabilities in the liquid metal.

  17. Ion energy spectrum just after the application of current pulse for turbulent heating in the TRIAM-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Yukio; Hiraki, Naoji; Itoh, Satoshi

    1981-01-01

    Temporal evolution and spatial profile of ion energy spectrum just after the application of current pulse for turbulent heating are investigated experimentally in TRIAM-1 and numerically with a Fokker-Planck equation. Two-component ion energy spectrum formed by turbulent heating relaxes to single one within tau sub(i) (ion collision time). (author)

  18. Thermophysical data for various transition metals at high temperatures obtained by a submicrosecond-pulse-heating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seydel, U.; Bauhof, H.; Fucke, W.; Wadle, H.

    1979-01-01

    Thermophysical data for several transition metals are reported including enthalpies, electric resistivities, and specific volumes at the melting transition, and volume expansion coefficients and heat capacities in the liquid phase. Values for the critical temperatures, pressures, and volumes are given for molybdenum and tungsten. All data have been obtained by a submicrosecond-pulse-heating method. (author)

  19. Ion energy spectrum just after the application of current pulse for turbulent heating in the TRIAM-1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K; Nakamura, Y; Hiraki, N; Itoh, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1981-07-01

    Temporal evolution and spatial profile of ion energy spectrum just after the application of current pulse for turbulent heating are investigated experimentally in TRIAM-1 and numerically with a Fokker-Planck equation. Two-component ion energy spectrum formed by turbulent heating relaxes to single one within tau sub(i) (ion collision time).

  20. Accelerating action of stresses on crystallization kinetics in silicon ion-implanted layers during pulsed heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, L.N.

    1985-01-01

    Numerical simulation of the effect of stressed in ion-implanted layers on kinetics of amorphous phase transformations is performed. The suggested model of accounting stresses including concentration ones is based on the locality of action of interstitial addition atoms and on general structural inhomogeneity of amorphous semiconductor leading to the formation of areas of the facilitated phase transition. Accounting of effect of energy variation of silicon atoms interaction on probability of displacement events and atoms building in lattice points or atomic bonds disintegration allows one to trace the accelerating action of introduced by ion implantation stresses on the kinetics of layer crystallization during pulsed heating

  1. Self-diffusion measurements in heterogeneous systems using NMR pulsed field gradient technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heink, W.; Kaerger, J.; Walter, A.

    1978-01-01

    The experimental pecularities of the NMR pulsed field gradient technique are critical surveyed in its application to zeolite adsorbate adsorbent systems. After a presentation of the different transport parameters accessible by this technique, the consequences of the existence of inner field gradients being inherent to heterogeneous systems are analyzed. Experimental conditions and consequences of an application of pulsed field gradients of high intensity which are necessary for the measurement of small intracrystalline self-diffusion coefficients, are discussed. Gradient pulses of 0.15 Tcm -1 with pulse widths of 2 ms maximum and relative deviations of less than 0.01 per mille can be realized. Since for a number of adsorbate adsorbent systems a distinct dependence of the intracrystalline self-diffusion coeffcients on adsorbate concentration is observed, determination of zeolite pore fiiling factor is of considerable importance for the interpretation of the diffusivities obtained. It is demonstrated that also this information can be obtained by NMR technique in a straightforward way with a mean error of less than 5 to 10 %. Applying this new method and using an optimum experimental device as described, pore filling factor dependences of the self-diffusion coefficients of alkanes in NaX zeolites can be followed over more than two orders of magnitude. (author)

  2. A study of the ion species dependence of [chi][sub e] by heat pulse propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannone, L.; Mertens, V; Wagner, F [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Kraemer-Flecken, A; Waidmann, G [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik; Riedel, K [New York Univ., NY (United States). Courant Inst. of Mathematical Sciences

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of the isotope dependence of [chi][sub e] on Asdex revealed that the values of [chi][sub e] in hydrogen and deuterium were the same within the limits of experimental accuracy. This study in hydrogen, deuterium and helium has been continued on Textor. The 11 channel ECE diagnostic measures the temperature perturbations generated by sawtooth crashes in an ohmically heated plasma. Averaging over the one second flat top phase improves the signal to noise ratio to the extent that differences in the radial profile of [chi][sub e] are able to be inferred. Even though the values of [chi][sub e] found in each of the three gases are greater than the values calculated from power balance, the basic relationship between the energy confinement time and the value of [chi][sub e] deduced by heat pulse propagation can still be explored. (author) 7 refs. 4 figs.

  3. A study of the ion species dependence of χe by heat pulse propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannone, L.; Mertens, V.; Wagner, F.; Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Waidmann, G.; Riedel, K.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of the isotope dependence of χ ε on ASDEX revealed that the values of χ ε in hydrogen and deuterium were the same within the limits of experimental accuracy. This study in hydrogen, deuterium and helium has been continued on TEXTOR. The 11 channel ECE diagnostic measures the temperature perturbations generated by sawtooth crashes in an ohmically heated plasma. Averaging over the one second flat top phase improves the signal to noise ratio to the extent that differences in the radial profile of χ ε are able to be inferred. Even though the values of χ ε found in each of the three gases are greater than the values calculated from power balance, the basic relationship between the energy confinement time and the value of χ ε deduced by heat pulse propagation can still be explored. (orig.)

  4. A study of the ion species dependence of χe by heat pulse propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannone, L.; Mertens, V.; Wagner, F.; Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Waidmann, G.; Riedel, K.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of the isotope dependence of χ e on Asdex revealed that the values of χ e in hydrogen and deuterium were the same within the limits of experimental accuracy. This study in hydrogen, deuterium and helium has been continued on Textor. The 11 channel ECE diagnostic measures the temperature perturbations generated by sawtooth crashes in an ohmically heated plasma. Averaging over the one second flat top phase improves the signal to noise ratio to the extent that differences in the radial profile of χ e are able to be inferred. Even though the values of χ e found in each of the three gases are greater than the values calculated from power balance, the basic relationship between the energy confinement time and the value of χ e deduced by heat pulse propagation can still be explored. (author) 7 refs. 4 figs

  5. Numerical Analysis of a Pulse Detonation Cross Flow Heat Load Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Naples, Andrew .; Hoke, John L.; Schauer, Fred

    2011-01-01

    A comparison between experimentally measured and numerically simulated, time-averaged, point heat transfer rates in a pulse detonation (PDE) engine is presented. The comparison includes measurements and calculations for heat transfer to a cylinder in crossflow and to the tube wall itself using a novel spool design. Measurements are obtained at several locations and under several operating conditions. The measured and computed results are shown to be in substantial agreement, thereby validating the modeling approach. The model, which is based in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is then used to interpret the results. A preheating of the incoming fuel charge is predicted, which results in increased volumetric flow and subsequent overfilling. The effect is validated with additional measurements.

  6. Dynamic Deformation Behavior of Soft Material Using Shpb Technique and Pulse Shaper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ouk Sub; Cho, Kyu Sang; Kim, Sung Hyun; Han, Yong Hwan

    This paper presents a modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique to obtain compressive stress strain data for NBR rubber materials. An experimental technique with a modified the conventional SHPB has been developed for measuring the compressive stress strain responses of materials with low mechanical impedance and low compressive strengths, such as the rubber and the polymeric material. This paper uses an aluminum pressure bar to achieve a closer impedance match between the pressure bar and the specimen materials. In addition, a pulse shaper is utilized to lengthen the rising time of the incident pulse to ensure dynamic stress equilibrium and homogeneous deformation of NBR rubber materials. It is found that the modified technique can determine the dynamic deformation behavior of rubbers more accurately.

  7. Study of heterogeneous multiplying and non-multiplying media by the neutron pulsed source technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deniz, V.

    1969-01-01

    The pulsed neutron technique consists essentially in sending in the medium to be studied a short neutron pulse and in determining the asymptotic decay constant of the generated population. The variation of the decay constant as a function of the size of the medium allows the medium characteristics to be defined. This technique has been largely developed these last years and has been applied as well to moderator as to multiplying media, in most cases homogeneous ones. We considered of interest of apply this technique to lattices, to see if useful informations could be collected for lattice calculations. We present here a general theoretical study of the problem, and results and interpretation of a series of experiments made on graphite lattices. There is a good agreement for non-multiplying media. In the case of multiplying media, it is shown that the age value used until now in graphite lattices calculations is over-estimated by about 10 per cent [fr

  8. Investigation of Gas Heating by Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Glow Discharges Used for Actuation of a Laminar Methane-Air Flame

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna

    2017-05-24

    This paper reports on the quantification of the heating induced by nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) glow discharges on a lean premixed methane-air flame. The flame, obtained at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, has an M-shape morphology. The equivalence ratio is 0.95 and the thermal power released by the flame is 113 W. The NRP glow discharges are produced by high voltage pulses of 10 ns duration, 7 kV amplitude, applied at a repetition frequency of 10 kHz. The average power of the plasma, determined from current and voltage measurements, is 1 W, i.e. about 0.9 % of the thermal power of the flame. Broadband vibrational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy of nitrogen is used to determine the temperature of the flame with and without plasma enhancement. The temperature evolution in the flame area shows that the thermal impact of NRP glow discharges is in the uncertainty range of the technique, i.e., +/- 40 K.

  9. On the effects of quantization on mismatched pulse compression filters designed using L-p norm minimization techniques

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cilliers, Jacques E

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In [1] the authors introduced a technique for generating mismatched pulse compression filters for linear frequency chirp signals. The technique minimizes the sum of the pulse compression sidelobes in a p L –norm sense. It was shown that extremely...

  10. Simulating tokamak PFC performance using simultaneous dual beam particle loading with pulsed heat loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Gregory; Gonderman, Sean; Tripathi, Jitendra; Ray, Tyler; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2017-10-01

    The performance of plasma facing components (PFCs) in a fusion device are expected to change due to high flux particle loading during operation. Tungsten (W) is a promising PFC candidate material, due to its high melting point, high thermal conductivity, and low tritium retention. However, ion irradiation of D and He have each shown to diminish the thermal strength of W. This work investigates the synergistic effect between ion species, using dual beam irradiation, on the thermal response of W during ELM-like pulsed heat loading. Experiments studied three different loading conditions: laser, laser + He+, and laser + He+ + D+. 100 eV He+ and D+ exposures used a flux of 3.0-3.5 x 1020 m-2 s-1. ELM-like loading was applied using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at an energy density of 0.38-1.51 MJ m-2 (3600 1 ms pulses at 1 Hz). SEM imaging revealed that laser + He+ loading at 0.76 MJ m-2 caused surface melting, inhibiting fuzz formation. Increasing the laser fluence decreased grain size and increased surface pore density. Thermally-enhanced migration of trapped gases appear to reflect resultant molten morphology. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation PIRE project.

  11. An application of commercial data averaging techniques in pulsed photothermal experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grozescu, I.V.; Moksin, M.M.; Wahab, Z.A.; Yunus, W.M.M.

    1997-01-01

    We present an application of data averaging technique commonly implemented in many commercial digital oscilloscopes or waveform digitizers. The technique was used for transient data averaging in the pulsed photothermal radiometry experiments. Photothermal signals are surrounded by an important amount of noise which affect the precision of the measurements. The effect of the noise level on photothermal signal parameters in our particular case, fitted decay time, is shown. The results of the analysis can be used in choosing the most effective averaging technique and estimating the averaging parameter values. This would help to reduce the data acquisition time while improving the signal-to-noise ratio

  12. Recrystallization and grain growth behavior of rolled tungsten under VDE-like short pulse high heat flux loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y.; Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.; Krieger, K.; Luo, G.-N.; Xu, H. Y.; Fu, B. Q.; Li, M.; Liu, W.

    2013-02-01

    Short pulse heat loads expected for vertical displacement events (VDEs) in ITER were applied in the high heat flux (HHF) test facility GLADIS at IPP-Garching onto samples of rolled W. Pulsed neutral beams with the central heat flux of 23 MW/m2 were applied for 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 s, respectively. Rapid recrystallization of the adiabatically loaded 3 mm thick samples was observed when the pulse duration was up to 1.0 s. Grains grew markedly following recrystallization with increasing pulse length. The recrystallization temperature and temperature dependence of the recrystallized grain size were also investigated. The results showed that the recrystallization temperature of the W grade was around 2480 °C under the applied heat loading condition, which was nearly 1150 °C higher than the conventional recrystallization temperature, and the grains were much finer. A linear relationship between the logarithm of average grain size (ln d) and the inverse of maximum surface temperature (1/Tmax) was found and accordingly the activation energy for grain growth in temperature evolution up to Tmax in 1.5 s of the short pulse HHF load was deduced to be 4.1 eV. This provided an effective clue to predict the structure evolution under short pulse HHF loads.

  13. Near threshold pulse shape discrimination techniques in scintillating CsI(Tl) crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S.C.; Yue, Q.; Lai, W.P.; Li, H.B.; Li, J.; Lin, S.T.; Liu, Y.; Singh, V.; Wang, M.Z.; Wong, H.T.; Xin, B.; Zhou, Z.Y.

    2004-01-01

    There are recent interests with CsI(Tl) scintillating crystals for Dark Matter experiments. The key merit is the capability to differentiate nuclear recoil (nr) signatures from the background β/γ-events due to ambient radioactivity on the basis of their different pulse shapes. One of the major experimental challenges is to perform such pulse shape analysis in the statistics-limited domain where the light output is close to the detection threshold. Using data derived from measurements with low-energy γ's and nuclear recoils due to neutron elastic scatterings, it was verified that the pulse shapes between β/γ-events are different. Several methods of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) are studied, and their relative merits are compared. Full digitization of the pulse shapes is crucial to achieve good discrimination. Advanced software techniques with mean time, neural network and likelihood ratios give rise to satisfactory performance, and are superior to the conventional Double Charge method commonly applied at higher energies. PSD becomes effective starting at a light yield of about 20 photo-electrons. This corresponds to a detection threshold of about 5 keV electron-equivalence energy, or 40-50 keV recoil kinetic energy, in realistic experiments

  14. Characterization of ultrashort laser pulses employing self-phase modulation dispersion-scan technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharba, A. B.; Chekhlov, O.; Wyatt, A. S.; Pattathil, R.; Borghesi, M.; Sarri, G.

    2018-03-01

    We present a new phase characterization technique for ultrashort laser pulses that employs self-phase modulation (SPM) in the dispersion scan approach. The method can be implemented by recording a set of nonlinearly modulated spectra generated with a set of known chirp values. The unknown phase of the pulse is retrieved by linking the recorded spectra to the initial spectrum of the pulse via a phase function guessed by a function minimization iterative algorithm. This technique has many advantages over the dispersion scan techniques that use frequency conversion processes. Mainly, the use of SPM cancels out the phase and group velocity mismatch errors and dramatically widens the spectral acceptance of the nonlinear medium and the range of working wavelength. The robustness of the technique is demonstrated with smooth and complex phase retrievals using numerical examples. The method is shown to be not affected by the spatial distribution of the beam or the presence of nonlinear absorption process. In addition, we present an efficient method for phase representation based on a summation of a set of Gaussian functions. The independence of the functions from each other prevents phase coupling of any kind and facilitates a flexible phase representation.

  15. THE DIAGNOSIS TECHNIQUE OF ABNORMAL HEATING OF POWER CAPACITORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Zalizny

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The existing system of protection and diagnostics are not able to detect abnormal heating of the power capacitors caused by its internal malfunction formation. The paper contains a proposal of a technique that enables to detect such heat at its early study. This technique consists of a hardware and an algorithms. The hardware consists of a microprocessor-based instrument developed by the author, of measuring transformers of current and of temperature sensors. This equipment must be connected to the condenser unit with a rated voltage of 380 V. In operation, the device performs continuous measurement of the surface temperature of the casing of each condenser, the temperature of the external environment, voltage and current from the power source. The measured values are used in the mathematical model of thermal processes that enables to calculate the temperature of the hottest point of each capacitor in real-time. Then the calculation of the intrinsic difference ΔΘ1° between the average temperature values of the dielectric and the base average value of this temperatures during the second day from the start of the measurements. If the Dq1 value exceeds the value of the absolute error of simulation, diagnostic signals of abnormal levels of heating, viz. low, medium, high and very high, are generated. It is also necessary to calculate the rate of change of ΔΘ1° and to consider the values obtained in the formation of hazard levels. For the low level and the average level of hazard the operation of diagnostic system with a visual signal is recommended, while for the high level of hazard it is recommended to use both visual and sound signals, and for the very high hazard level the capacitor ought to be turned off from the source. The algorithms have been developed heuristically. The final formation of the algorithms is possible only after the long-term operation of the proposed diagnosis system on real objects. The implementation of the

  16. Embedded 32-bit Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV) Technique for 3-electrode Cell Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    N, Aqmar N. Z.; Abdullah, W. F. H.; Zain, Z. M.; Rani, S.

    2018-03-01

    This paper addresses the development of differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) embedded algorithm using an ARM cortex processor with new developed potentiostat circuit design for in-situ 3-electrode cell sensing. This project is mainly to design a low cost potentiostat for the researchers in laboratories. It is required to develop an embedded algorithm for analytical technique to be used with the designed potentiostat. DPV is one of the most familiar pulse technique method used with 3-electrode cell sensing in chemical studies. Experiment was conducted on 10mM solution of Ferricyanide using the designed potentiostat and the developed DPV algorithm. As a result, the device can generate an excitation signal of DPV from 0.4V to 1.2V and produced a peaked voltammogram with relatively small error compared to the commercial potentiostat; which is only 6.25% difference in peak potential reading. The design of potentiostat device and its DPV algorithm is verified.

  17. A study of trapped ion dynamics by photon-correlation and pulse-probe techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rink, J.; Dholakia, K.; Zs, G.; Horvath, K.; Hernandez-Pozos, J. L.; Power, W.; Segal, D. M.; Thompson, R. C.; Walker, T.

    1995-01-01

    We demonstrate non-evasive methods for observing ion and ion cloud oscillation frequencies in a quadrupole ion trap. These trap resonances are measured for small clouds using a photon correlation technique. For large clouds the rotation frequency can be detected with the help of an additional pulsed probe laser. We show applications of the photon correlation method such as estimating the dynamic properties of a combined trap and detecting ion crystals

  18. Recrystallization and grain growth behavior of rolled tungsten under VDE-like short pulse high heat flux loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Y.; Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.; Krieger, K.; Luo, G.-N.; Xu, H.Y.; Fu, B.Q.; Li, M.; Liu, W.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Recrystallization temperature of a rolled W was ∼2480 °C under applied HHF loads. ► Fine grains were obtained under HHF loads with appropriate short pulse length. ► With increasing pulse length, the recrystallized grains significantly grew larger. ► A linear relationship between ln d and 1/T max was found. ► Activation energy for grain growth in T evolution up to T max in 1.5 s was obtained. -- Abstract: Short pulse heat loads expected for vertical displacement events (VDEs) in ITER were applied in the high heat flux (HHF) test facility GLADIS at IPP-Garching onto samples of rolled W. Pulsed neutral beams with the central heat flux of 23 MW/m 2 were applied for 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 s, respectively. Rapid recrystallization of the adiabatically loaded 3 mm thick samples was observed when the pulse duration was up to 1.0 s. Grains grew markedly following recrystallization with increasing pulse length. The recrystallization temperature and temperature dependence of the recrystallized grain size were also investigated. The results showed that the recrystallization temperature of the W grade was around 2480 °C under the applied heat loading condition, which was nearly 1150 °C higher than the conventional recrystallization temperature, and the grains were much finer. A linear relationship between the logarithm of average grain size (ln d) and the inverse of maximum surface temperature (1/T max ) was found and accordingly the activation energy for grain growth in temperature evolution up to T max in 1.5 s of the short pulse HHF load was deduced to be 4.1 eV. This provided an effective clue to predict the structure evolution under short pulse HHF loads

  19. Towards convective heat transfer enhancement: surface modification, characterization and measurement techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.; Thakur, D.B.; van der Meer, Theodorus H.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, heat transfer surface modification and heat transfer measurement technique is developed. Heat transfer investigation was aimed to study the effect of carbon nano fibers (extremely high thermal conductive material) on the enhancement level in heat transfer. Synthesis of these carbon

  20. New autocorrelation technique for the IR FEL optical pulse width measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amirmadhi, F.; Brau, K.A.; Becker, C. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a new technique for the autocorrelation measurement of optical pulse width at the Vanderbilt University FEL center. This method is based on nonlinear absorption and transmission characteristics of semiconductors such as Ge, Te and InAs suitable for the wavelength range from 2 to over 6 microns. This approach, aside being simple and low cost, removes the phase matching condition that is generally required for the standard frequency doubling technique and covers a greater wavelength range per nonlinear material. In this paper we will describe the apparatus, explain the principal mechanism involved and compare data which have been acquired with both frequency doubling and two-photon absorption.

  1. Determination of the stochastic layer properties induced by magnetic perturbations via heat pulse experiments at ASDEX upgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Brida

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A heat pulse experiment was carried out in the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade to estimate the stochastic layer width of a deuterium L-mode discharge with externally applied Magnetic Perturbations. The method relies on the deposition of ECRH pulses in the plasma edge while measuring the divertor target heat flux with high temporal resolution IR thermography and Langmuir probes. The experimental results were compared to simulations of the time dependent heat pulse propagation on a constant plasma background with the EMC3-EIRENE code package, using an ad-hoc screening model. If no screening was taken into account in the simulations a decrease in the characteristic heat pulse propagation time was observed, which shows that the heat transport is enhanced compared to the screened cases. No such enhancement was found in the experiment, indicating strong screening. In further simulations the effect of screening on the target fluxes was investigated for varying densities. For low densities it was found that screening reduces the strike line splitting strongly, while for higher densities no strong strike line splitting was found, independent of the screening degree. For strongly detached L-mode conditions with MPs experiments at AUG indicate that the lobe structures vanish completely.

  2. Measurements of plasma termination in ICRF heated long pulse discharges with fast framing cameras in the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Mamoru; Kasahara, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hirohiko

    2015-01-01

    The termination process of long pulse plasma discharges in the Large Helical Device (LHD) have been observed with fast framing cameras, which shows that the reason for the termination of the discharged has been changed with increased plasma heating power, improvements of plasma heating systems and change of the divertor configuration, etc. For long pulse discharges in FYs2010-2012, the main reason triggering the plasma termination was reduction of ICRF heating power with rise of iron ion emission due to electric breakdown in an ICRF antenna. In the experimental campaign in FY2013, the duration time of ICRF heated long pulse plasma discharges has been extended to about 48 minutes with a plasma heating power of ∼1.2 MW and a line-averaged electron density of ∼1.2 × 10"1"9 m"-"3. The termination of the discharges was triggered by release of large amounts of carbon dusts from closed divertor regions, indicating that the control of dust formation in the divertor regions is indispensable for extending the duration time of long pulse discharges. (author)

  3. Heat treatable indium tin oxide films deposited with high power pulse magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horstmann, F.; Sittinger, V.; Szyszka, B.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, indium tin oxide (ITO) films were prepared by high power pulse magnetron sputtering [D. J. Christie, F. Tomasel, W. D. Sproul, D. C. Carter, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A, 22 (2004) 1415. ] without substrate heating. The ITO films were deposited from a ceramic target at a deposition rate of approx. 5.5 nm*m/min kW. Afterwards, the ITO films were covered with a siliconoxynitride film sputtered from a silicon alloy target in order to prevent oxidation of the ITO film during annealing at 650 deg. C for 10 min in air. The optical and electrical properties as well as the texture and morphology of these films were investigated before and after annealing. Mechanical durability of the annealed films was evaluated at different test conditions. The results were compared with state-of-the art ITO films which were obtained at optimized direct current magnetron sputtering conditions

  4. Simultaneous PIV and pulsed shadow technique in slug flow: a solution for optical problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, S. [Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussee de Waterloo 72, B-1640, Rhode Saint Genese (Belgium); Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, Departamento de Eng. Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465, Porto (Portugal); Sousa, R.G.; Pinto, A.M.F.R.; Campos, J.B.L.M. [Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, Departamento de Eng. Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465, Porto (Portugal); Riethmuller, M.L. [Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussee de Waterloo 72, B-1640, Rhode Saint Genese (Belgium)

    2003-12-01

    A recent technique of simultaneous particle image velocimetry (PIV) and pulsed shadow technique (PST) measurements, using only one black and white CCD camera, is successfully applied to the study of slug flow. The experimental facility and the operating principle are described. The technique is applied to study the liquid flow pattern around individual Taylor bubbles rising in an aqueous solution of glycerol with a dynamic viscosity of 113 x 10{sup -3} Pa s. With this technique the optical perturbations found in PIV measurements at the bubble interface are completely solved in the nose and in annular liquid film regions as well as in the rear of the bubble for cases in which the bottom is flat. However, for Taylor bubbles with concave oblate bottoms, some optical distortions appear and are discussed. The measurements achieved a spatial resolution of 0.0022 tube diameters. The results reported show high precision and are in agreement with theoretical and experimental published data. (orig.)

  5. A cement channel-detection technique using the pulsed-neutron log

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, G.D.

    1991-01-01

    A channel-detection technique has been developed using boron solutions and pulsed-neutron logging (PNL) tools. This technique relies on the extremely high-neutron-absorption cross section that boron exhibits relative to other common elements, including chlorine. The PNL tool is used to detect movement of a boron solution in a log-inject-log procedure. The technique has identified channels in such difficult applications as logging through two strings of pipe and in highly deviated wellbores. Logging procedures are simple and cement channels can be readily identified. The boron solutions are relatively inexpensive, safe to handle, and nonradioactive. Additional PNL information for reservoir performance evaluation is collected simultaneously during channel-detection logging. This paper describes the theory, development, field application, and limitations of this channel-detection logging technique

  6. High heat flux experiment on isotropic graphite using pulsed laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizaki, Hiroshi; Tokunaga, Kazutoshi; Fukuda, Shigehisa; Yoshida, Naoaki; Muroga, Takeo.

    1989-01-01

    In order to examine the plasma-withstanding behavior of isotropic graphite which is the leading favorite material for the first wall of nuclear fusion reactors, the pulsed thermal loading experiment was carried out by using a laser. As the result of analyzing the gas which was emitted during the pulsed thermal loading, together with the formation and release of various hydrocarbon gases, also the formation of carbon clusters due to the sublimation of carbon was observed. The vacuum characteristics and the dependence on thermal loading condition and surface treatment condition of these released gases were determined, and the problems and the way of improvement in its application to nuclear fusion reactors were elucidated. Since the isotropic graphite is of low atomic number, the radiation loss in plasma is small, and the improvement of the plasma parameters can be expected. Besides, the heat resistance and high temperature stability in vacuum are good, and the induced radioactivity is low. On the other hand, the quantity of gas occlusion is much, various hydrocarbon gases are formed at high temperature, and the wear due to sublimation arises by very high thermal loading. The experimental method, the observation of graphite surface by SEM, and the effect of carbon coating due to thermal decomposition are reported. (K.I.)

  7. Pulsed IR Heating Studies of Single-Molecule DNA Duplex Dissociation Kinetics and Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Erik D.; Dupuis, Nicholas F.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful technique that makes it possible to observe the conformational dynamics associated with biomolecular processes. The addition of precise temperature control to these experiments can yield valuable thermodynamic information about equilibrium and kinetic rate constants. To accomplish this, we have developed a microscopy technique based on infrared laser overtone/combination band absorption to heat small (≈10−11 liter) volumes of water. Detailed experimental characterization of this technique reveals three major advantages over conventional stage heating methods: 1), a larger range of steady-state temperatures (20–100°C); 2), substantially superior spatial (≤20 μm) control; and 3), substantially superior temporal (≈1 ms) control. The flexibility and breadth of this spatial and temporally resolved laser-heating approach is demonstrated in single-molecule fluorescence assays designed to probe the dissociation of a 21 bp DNA duplex. These studies are used to support a kinetic model based on nucleic acid end fraying that describes dissociation for both short (10 bp) DNA duplexes. These measurements have been extended to explore temperature-dependent kinetics for the 21 bp construct, which permit determination of single-molecule activation enthalpies and entropies for DNA duplex dissociation. PMID:24411254

  8. Modified Dual Three-Pulse Modulation technique for single-phase inverter topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sree Harsha, N. R.; Anitha, G. S.; Sreedevi, A.

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper, a new modulation technique called Dual Three Pulse Modulation (DTPM) was proposed to improve the efficiency of the power converters of the Electric/Hybrid/Fuel-cell vehicles. It was simulated in PSIM 9.0.4 and uses analog multiplexers to generate the modulating signals for the DC/DC converter and inverter. The circuit used is complex and many other simulation softwares do not support the analog multiplexers as well. Also, the DTPM technique produces modulating signals for the converter, which are essentially needed to produce the modulating signals for the inverter. Hence, it cannot be used efficiently to switch the valves of a stand-alone inverter. We propose a new method to generate the modulating signals to switch MOSFETs of a single phase Dual-Three pulse Modulation based stand-alone inverter. The circuits proposed are simulated in Multisim 12.0. We also show an alternate way to switch a DC/DC converter in a way depicted by DTPM technique both in simulation (MATLAB/Simulink) and hardware. The circuitry is relatively simple and can be used for the further investigations of DTPM technique.

  9. Detection of rebars in concrete using advanced ultrasonic pulse compression techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureti, S; Ricci, M; Mohamed, M N I B; Senni, L; Davis, L A J; Hutchins, D A

    2018-04-01

    A pulse compression technique has been developed for the non-destructive testing of concrete samples. Scattering of signals from aggregate has historically been a problem in such measurements. Here, it is shown that a combination of piezocomposite transducers, pulse compression and post processing can lead to good images of a reinforcement bar at a cover depth of 55 mm. This has been achieved using a combination of wide bandwidth operation over the 150-450 kHz range, and processing based on measuring the cumulative energy scattered back to the receiver. Results are presented in the form of images of a 20 mm rebar embedded within a sample containing 10 mm aggregate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of the performance of different radar pulse compression techniques in an incoherent scatter radar measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Damtie

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Improving an estimate of an incoherent scatter radar signal is vital to provide reliable and unbiased information about the Earth's ionosphere. Thus optimizing the measurement spatial and temporal resolutions has attracted considerable attention. The optimization usually relies on employing different kinds of pulse compression filters in the analysis and a matched filter is perhaps the most widely used one. A mismatched filter has also been used in order to suppress the undesirable sidelobes that appear in the case of matched filtering. Moreover, recently an adaptive pulse compression method, which can be derived based on the minimum mean-square error estimate, has been proposed. In this paper we have investigated the performance of matched, mismatched and adaptive pulse compression methods in terms of the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and the variance and bias of the estimator. This is done by using different types of optimal radar waveforms. It is shown that for the case of low SNR the signal degradation associated to an adaptive filtering is less than that of the mismatched filtering. The SNR loss of both matched and adaptive pulse compression techniques was found to be nearly the same for most of the investigated codes for the case of high SNR. We have shown that the adaptive filtering technique is a compromise between matched and mismatched filtering method when one evaluates its performance in terms of the variance and the bias of the estimator. All the three analysis methods were found to have the same performance when a sidelobe-free matched filter code is employed.

  11. Comparison of the performance of different radar pulse compression techniques in an incoherent scatter radar measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Damtie

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Improving an estimate of an incoherent scatter radar signal is vital to provide reliable and unbiased information about the Earth's ionosphere. Thus optimizing the measurement spatial and temporal resolutions has attracted considerable attention. The optimization usually relies on employing different kinds of pulse compression filters in the analysis and a matched filter is perhaps the most widely used one. A mismatched filter has also been used in order to suppress the undesirable sidelobes that appear in the case of matched filtering. Moreover, recently an adaptive pulse compression method, which can be derived based on the minimum mean-square error estimate, has been proposed. In this paper we have investigated the performance of matched, mismatched and adaptive pulse compression methods in terms of the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and the variance and bias of the estimator. This is done by using different types of optimal radar waveforms. It is shown that for the case of low SNR the signal degradation associated to an adaptive filtering is less than that of the mismatched filtering. The SNR loss of both matched and adaptive pulse compression techniques was found to be nearly the same for most of the investigated codes for the case of high SNR. We have shown that the adaptive filtering technique is a compromise between matched and mismatched filtering method when one evaluates its performance in terms of the variance and the bias of the estimator. All the three analysis methods were found to have the same performance when a sidelobe-free matched filter code is employed.

  12. Thermal Response of Tritiated Codeposits from JET and TFTR to Transient Heat Pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Bekrisl, N.; Coad, J.P.; Gentile, C.A.; Hassanein, A.; Reiswig, R.; Willms, S.

    2002-01-01

    High heat flux interactions with plasma-facing components have been studied at microscopic scales. The beam from a continuous wave neodymium laser was scanned at high speed over the surface of graphite and carbon fiber composite tiles that had been retrieved from TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) and JET (Joint European Torus) after D-T plasma operations. The tiles have a surface layer of amorphous hydrogenated carbon that was co-deposited during plasma operations, and laser scanning has released more than 80% of the co-deposited tritium. The temperature rise of the co-deposit was much higher than that of the manufactured material and showed an extended time history. The peak temperature varied dramatically (e.g., 1,436 C compared to >2,300 C), indicating strong variations in the thermal conductivity to the substrate. A digital microscope imaged the co-deposit before, during, and after the interaction with the laser and revealed 100-micron scale hot spots during the interaction. Heat pulse durations of order 100 ms resulted in brittle destruction and material loss from the surface, whilst a duration of =10 ms showed minimal changes to the co-deposit. These results show that reliable predictions for the response of deposition areas to off-normal events such as ELMs (edge-localized modes) and disruptions in next-step devices need to be based on experiments with tokamak generated co-deposits

  13. Pulse heating tests on two reference Belgian clay formations. Laboratory experiments and numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, A.; Romero, E.; Vaunat, J.; Gens, A.; Li, X.L.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Two deep clay formations are being investigated in Belgium in connection with the design of a repository for 'High-Level Radioactive Waste': Boom clay at Mol (located between 160 and 270 m depths), considered the reference host formation, and Ypresian clay at Kallo (located between 300 and 450 m depths) as an alternative one. Thermal impact may play an important role on the behaviour of these low-permeability clayey formations. In this context, heating pulse tests on intact borehole samples retrieved in vertical and horizontal directions were carried out on both clays using an axisymmetric heating cell. Heating tests under nearly constant volume conditions and different target temperatures (maximum 85 C) were performed under controlled hydraulic boundary conditions. Attention is focused on the time evolution of temperature and pore water pressure changes during heating and cooling paths -i.e., pore pressure build-up during quasi-undrained heating and later dissipation to the applied hydraulic boundary conditions-. The finite element program CODE-BRIGHT was used to determine thermal parameters by back-analysis and to simulate the experimental results. Table 1 summarises the main properties of these clays. The experimental programme was carried out on a fully-instrumented cell (sample 75 mm diameter and 100 mm high) with a controlled-power heater housed inside the cell. Two miniature pore water pressure transducers located at different heights of the lateral wall of the cell and three thermocouples were used to monitor the sample response. The cell has top and bottom valves to control hydraulic conditions. The protocol of the tests included three main phases: hydration, heating and cooling. Throughout the heating and cooling phases, the bottom drainage was maintained open at a constant water pressure using an automatic pressure/volume controller, while the upper valve was kept closed. Figures 1a and 1c show the time

  14. Design of a large heat lift 40 K to 80 K pulse tube cryocooler for space applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trollier, T.; Tanchon, J.; Buquet, J.; Ravex, A.; Charles, I.; Coynel, A.; Duband, L.; Ercolani, E.; Guillemet, L.; Mullié, J.; Dam, J.A.M.; Benschop, T.; Linder, M.; Miller, S.D.; Ross, Jr. R.G.

    2007-01-01

    A Large heat lift Pulse Tube Cooler (LPTC) is under development in partnership with AL/ DTA, CEA/SBT and THALES Cryogenics. The engineering model is expected to provide 2.3 W at 50 K at a 10 °C rejection temperature and 160 watts of electrical input power to the compressor. The split coaxial design

  15. Experimental investigations of micro-scale flow and heat transfer phenomena by using molecular tagging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Hui; Jin, Zheyan; Lum, Chee; Nocera, Daniel; Koochesfahani, Manoochehr

    2010-01-01

    Recent progress made in the development of novel molecule-based flow diagnostic techniques, including molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) and lifetime-based molecular tagging thermometry (MTT), to achieve simultaneous measurements of multiple important flow variables for micro-flows and micro-scale heat transfer studies is reported in this study. The focus of the work described here is the particular class of molecular tagging tracers that relies on phosphorescence. Instead of using tiny particles, especially designed phosphorescent molecules, which can be turned into long-lasting glowing marks upon excitation by photons of appropriate wavelength, are used as tracers for both flow velocity and temperature measurements. A pulsed laser is used to 'tag' the tracer molecules in the regions of interest, and the tagged molecules are imaged at two successive times within the photoluminescence lifetime of the tracer molecules. The measured Lagrangian displacement of the tagged molecules provides the estimate of the fluid velocity. The simultaneous temperature measurement is achieved by taking advantage of the temperature dependence of phosphorescence lifetime, which is estimated from the intensity ratio of the tagged molecules in the acquired two phosphorescence images. The implementation and application of the molecular tagging approach for micro-scale thermal flow studies are demonstrated by two examples. The first example is to conduct simultaneous flow velocity and temperature measurements inside a microchannel to quantify the transient behavior of electroosmotic flow (EOF) to elucidate underlying physics associated with the effects of Joule heating on electrokinematically driven flows. The second example is to examine the time evolution of the unsteady heat transfer and phase changing process inside micro-sized, icing water droplets, which is pertinent to the ice formation and accretion processes as water droplets impinge onto cold wind turbine blades

  16. Anomalous heating and plasmoid formation in pulsed power driven magnetic reconnection experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Jack

    2017-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection is an important process occurring in various plasma environments, including high energy density plasmas. In this talk we will present results from a recently developed magnetic reconnection platform driven by the MAGPIE pulsed power generator (1 MA, 250 ns) at Imperial College London. In these experiments, supersonic, sub-Alfvénic plasma flows collide, bringing anti-parallel magnetic fields into contact and producing a well-defined, elongated reconnection layer. This layer is long-lasting (>200 ns, > 10 hydrodynamic flow times) and is diagnosed using a suite of high resolution, spatially and temporally resolved diagnostics which include laser interferometry, Thomson scattering and Faraday rotation imaging. We observe significant heating of the electrons and ions inside the reconnection layer, and calculate that the heating must occur on time-scales far faster than can be explained by classical mechanisms. Possible anomalous mechanisms include in-plane electric fields caused by two-fluid effects, and enhanced resistivity and viscosity caused by kinetic turbulence. We also observe the repeated formation of plasmoids in the reconnection layer, which are ejected outwards along the layer at super-Alfvénic velocities. The O-point magnetic field structure of these plasmoids is determined using in situ magnetic probes, and these plasmoids could also play a role in the anomalous heating of the electrons and ions. In addition, we present further modifications to this experimental platform which enable us to study asymmetric reconnection or measure the out-of-plane magnetic field inside the plasmoids. This work was supported in part by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Grant No. EP/N013379/1, and by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Awards No. DE-F03-02NA00057 and No. DE-SC-0001063.

  17. Influence of heat processing on the bioaccessibility of zinc and iron from cereals and pulses consumed in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemalatha, Sreeramaiah; Platel, Kalpana; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2007-01-01

    Influence of heat processing on the bioaccessibility of zinc and iron from food grains consumed in India was evaluated. Cereals - rice (Oryza sativa), finger millet (Eleusine coracana), sorghum (Sorghum vulgare), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and maize (Zea mays), and pulses - chickpea (Cicer arietinum) - whole and decorticated, green gram (Phaseolus aureus) - whole and decorticated, decorticated black gram (Phaseolus mungo), decorticated red gram (Cajanus cajan), cowpea (Vigna catjang), and French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) were examined for zinc and iron bioaccessibility by employing an in vitro dialysability procedure. Both pressure-cooking and microwave heating were tested for their influence on mineral bioaccessibility. Zinc bioaccessibility from food grains was considerably reduced upon pressure-cooking, especially in pulses. Among cereals, pressure-cooking decreased zinc bioaccessibility by 63% and 57% in finger millet and rice, respectively. All the pressure-cooked cereals showed similar percent zinc bioaccessibility with the exception of finger millet. Bioaccessibility of zinc from pulses was generally lower as a result of pressure-cooking or microwave heating. The decrease in bioaccessibility of zinc caused by microwave heating ranged from 11.4% in chickpea (whole) to 63% in cowpea. Decrease in zinc bioaccessibility was 48% in pressure-cooked whole chickpea, 45% and 55% in pressure-cooked or microwave-heated whole green gram, 32% and 22% in pressure-cooked or microwave-heated decorticated green gram, and 45% in microwave-heated black gram. Iron bioaccessibility, on the other hand, was significantly enhanced generally from all the food grains studied upon heat treatment. Thus, heat treatment of grains produced contrasting effect on zinc and iron bioaccessibility.

  18. Real-time lossless data compression techniques for long-pulse operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, J.; Ruiz, M.; Sanchez, E.; Pereira, A.; Portas, A.; Barrera, E.

    2007-01-01

    Data logging and data distribution will be two main tasks connected with data handling in ITER. Data logging refers to the recovery and ultimate storage of all data, independent of the data source. Data distribution is related, on the one hand, to the on-line data broadcasting for immediate data availability and, on the other hand, to the off-line data access. Due to the large data volume expected, data compression is a useful candidate to prevent the waste of resources in communication and storage systems. On-line data distribution in a long-pulse environment requires the use of a deterministic approach to be able to ensure a proper response time for data availability. However, an essential feature for all the above purposes is to apply lossless compression techniques. This article reviews different lossless data compression techniques based on delta compression. In addition, the concept of cyclic delta transformation is introduced. Furthermore, comparative results concerning compression rates on different databases (TJ-II and JET) and computation times for compression/decompression are shown. Finally, the validity and implementation of these techniques for long-pulse operation and real-time requirements is also discussed

  19. Real-time lossless data compression techniques for long-pulse operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, J. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jesus.vega@ciemat.es; Ruiz, M. [Dpto. de Sistemas Electronicos y de Control, UPM, Campus Sur. Ctra., Valencia km 7, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez, E.; Pereira, A.; Portas, A. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Barrera, E. [Dpto. de Sistemas Electronicos y de Control, UPM, Campus Sur. Ctra., Valencia km 7, 28031 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-10-15

    Data logging and data distribution will be two main tasks connected with data handling in ITER. Data logging refers to the recovery and ultimate storage of all data, independent of the data source. Data distribution is related, on the one hand, to the on-line data broadcasting for immediate data availability and, on the other hand, to the off-line data access. Due to the large data volume expected, data compression is a useful candidate to prevent the waste of resources in communication and storage systems. On-line data distribution in a long-pulse environment requires the use of a deterministic approach to be able to ensure a proper response time for data availability. However, an essential feature for all the above purposes is to apply lossless compression techniques. This article reviews different lossless data compression techniques based on delta compression. In addition, the concept of cyclic delta transformation is introduced. Furthermore, comparative results concerning compression rates on different databases (TJ-II and JET) and computation times for compression/decompression are shown. Finally, the validity and implementation of these techniques for long-pulse operation and real-time requirements is also discussed.

  20. Influence of Pulse Shaping Filters on PAPR Performance of Underwater 5G Communication System Technique: GFDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinqiu Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized frequency division multiplexing (GFDM is a new candidate technique for the fifth generation (5G standard based on multibranch multicarrier filter bank. Unlike OFDM, it enables the frequency and time domain multiuser scheduling and can be implemented digitally. It is the generalization of traditional OFDM with several added advantages like the low PAPR (peak to average power ratio. In this paper, the influence of the pulse shaping filter on PAPR performance of the GFDM system is investigated and the comparison of PAPR in OFDM and GFDM is also demonstrated. The PAPR is restrained by selecting proper parameters and filters to make the underwater acoustic communication more efficient.

  1. Synthesis of nanostructured SiC using the pulsed laser deposition technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H.X.; Feng, P.X.; Makarov, V.; Weiner, B.R.; Morell, G.

    2009-01-01

    We report the new results on the direct synthesis of nanostructured silicon carbide (SiC) materials using the pulsed laser deposition technique. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed that SiC nanoholes, nanosprouts, nanowires, and nanoneedles were obtained. The crystallographic structure, chemical composition, and bond structure of the nanoscale SiC materials were investigated using X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman scattering spectroscopy. The transverse optical mode and longitudinal optical mode in Raman spectra were found to become sharper as the substrate temperature was increased, while the material structure evolved from amorphous to crystalline

  2. Electron-volt spectroscopy at a pulsed neutron source using a resonance detector technique

    CERN Document Server

    Andreani, C; Senesi, R; Gorini, G; Tardocchi, M; Bracco, A; Rhodes, N; Schooneveld, E M

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of the neutron resonance detector spectrometer for deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements has been assessed by measuring the Pb scattering on the eVS spectrometer at ISIS pulsed neutron source and natural U foils as (n,gamma) resonance converters. A conventional NaI scintillator with massive shielding has been used as gamma detector. A neutron energy window up to 90 eV, including four distinct resonance peaks, has been assessed. A net decrease of the intrinsic width of the 6.6 eV resonance peak has also been demonstrated employing the double difference spectrum technique, with two uranium foils of different thickness.

  3. Time resolved high frequency spectrum of Br2 molecules using pulsed photoacoustic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehya, Fahem; Chaudhary, A K

    2013-11-01

    The paper reports the time resolved spectral distribution of higher order acoustic modes generated in Br2 molecules using pulsed Photoacoustic (PA) technique. New time resolved vibrational spectrum of Br2 molecules are recorded using a single 532nm, pulses of 7ns duration at 10Hz repetition rate obtained from Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Frank-Condon principle based assignments confirms the presence of 12 numbers of (ν″-ν') vibrational transitions covered by a single 532+2nm pulse profile. Inclusions of higher order zeroth modes in Bassel's function expansion series shows the probability of overlapping of different types of acoustic modes in the designed PA cells. These modes appear in the form of clusters which occupies higher frequency range. The study of decay behavior of PA signal with respect to time confirms the photolysis of Br2 at 532nm wavelength. In addition, the shifting and clustering effect of cavity eigen modes in Br2 molecules have been studied between 1 and 10ms time scale. The estimated Q-factor of PA cell (l=16cm, R=1.4cm) is 145±4 at 27kHz frequency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Digital pulse processing techniques for high resolution amplitude measurement of radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singhai, P.; Roy, A.; Dhara, P.; Chatterjee, S.

    2012-01-01

    The digital pulse processing techniques for high resolution amplitude measurement of radiation detector pulse is an effective replacement of expensive and bulky analog processing as the digital domain offers higher channel density and at the same time it is cheaper. We have demonstrated a prototype digital setup with highspeed sampling ADC with sampling frequency of 80-125 MHz followed by series of IIR filters for pulse shaping in a trigger-less acquisition mode. The IIR filters, peak detection algorithm and the data write-out logic was written on VHDL and implemented on FPGA. We used CAMAC as the read out platform. In conjunction with the full hardware implementation we also used a mixed platform with VME digitizer card with raw-sample read out using C code. The rationale behind this mixed platform is to test out various filter algorithms quickly on C and also to benchmark the performance of the chip level ADCs against the standard commercial digitizer in terms of noise or resolution. The paper describes implementation of both the methods with performance obtained in both the methods. (author)

  5. Techniques for measurement of heat flux in furnace waterwalls of boilers and prediction of heat flux – A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, G.; Chandrasekhara Rao, A.; Seshadri, P.S.; Balasubramanian, K.R.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Heat flux measurement techniques applicable to boiler water wall are elaborated. • Applications involving heat flux measurement in boiler water wall are discussed. • Appropriate technique for usage in high ash Indian coal fired boilers is required. • Usage of chordal thermocouple is suggested for large scale heat flux measurements. - Abstract: Computation of metal temperatures in a furnace waterwall of a boiler is necessary for the proper selection of tube material and thickness. An adequate knowledge of the heat flux distribution in the furnace walls is a prerequisite for the computation of metal temperatures. Hence, the measurement of heat flux in a boiler waterwall is necessary to arrive at an optimum furnace design, especially for high ash Indian coal fired boilers. Also, a thoroughly validated furnace model will result in a considerable reduction of the quantum of experimentation to be carried out. In view of the above mentioned scenario, this paper reviews the research work carried out by various researchers by experimentation and numerical simulation in the below mentioned areas: (i) furnace modeling and heat flux prediction, (ii) heat flux measurement techniques and (iii) applications of heat flux measurements.

  6. Novel Laser Ignition Technique Using Dual-Pulse Pre-Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrache, Ciprian

    Recent advances in the development of compact high power laser sources and fiber optic delivery of giant pulses have generated a renewed interest in laser ignition. The non-intrusive nature of laser ignition gives it a set of unique characteristics over the well-established capacitive discharge devices (or spark plugs) that are currently used as ignition sources in engines. Overall, the use of laser ignition has been shown to have a positive impact on engine operation leading to a reduction in NOx emission, fuel saving and an increased operational envelope of current engines. Conventionally, laser ignition is achieved by tightly focusing a high-power q-switched laser pulse until the optical intensity at the focus is high enough to breakdown the gas molecules. This leads to the formation of a spark that serves as the ignition source in engines. However, there are certain disadvantages associated with this ignition method. This ionization approach is energetically inefficient as the medium is transparent to the laser radiation until the laser intensity is high enough to cause gas breakdown. As a consequence, very high energies are required for ignition (about an order of magnitude higher energy than capacitive plugs at stoichiometric conditions). Additionally, the fluid flow induced during the plasma recombination generates high vorticity leading to high rates of flame stretching. In this work, we are addressing some of the aforementioned disadvantages of laser ignition by developing a novel approach based on a dual-pulse pre-ionization scheme. The new technique works by decoupling the effect of the two ionization mechanisms governing plasma formation: multiphoton ionization (MPI) and electron avalanche ionization (EAI). An UV nanosecond pulse (lambda = 266 nm) is used to generate initial ionization through MPI. This is followed by an overlapped NIR nanosecond pulse (lambda = 1064 nm) that adds energy into the pre-ionized mixture into a controlled manner until the

  7. Sapflow+: a four-needle heat-pulse sap flow sensor enabling nonempirical sap flux density and water content measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegehuchte, Maurits W; Steppe, Kathy

    2012-10-01

    • To our knowledge, to date, no nonempirical method exists to measure reverse, low or high sap flux density. Moreover, existing sap flow methods require destructive wood core measurements to determine sapwood water content, necessary to convert heat velocity to sap flux density, not only damaging the tree, but also neglecting seasonal variability in sapwood water content. • Here, we present a nonempirical heat-pulse-based method and coupled sensor which measure temperature changes around a linear heater in both axial and tangential directions after application of a heat pulse. By fitting the correct heat conduction-convection equation to the measured temperature profiles, the heat velocity and water content of the sapwood can be determined. • An identifiability analysis and validation tests on artificial and real stem segments of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) confirm the applicability of the method, leading to accurate determinations of heat velocity, water content and hence sap flux density. • The proposed method enables sap flux density measurements to be made across the entire natural occurring sap flux density range of woody plants. Moreover, the water content during low flows can be determined accurately, enabling a correct conversion from heat velocity to sap flux density without destructive core measurements. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of suspensions and nanoemulsions of citral in combination with heat or pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagán, E; Berdejo, D; Espina, L; García-Gonzalo, D; Pagán, R

    2018-01-01

    The application of essential oils in form of nanoemulsions has been proposed as a method to improve their solubility in aqueous solutions, and hence their antimicrobial activity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of citral, applied directly or in combined treatments with heat or pulsed electric fields (PEF), as a function of the inoculation procedure assayed: (i) a simple, vigorous shaking method by vortex agitation (suspension of citral; s-citral) or (ii) the previous preparation of nanoemulsions by the emulsion phase inversion (EPI) method (nanoemulsion of citral; n-citral). n-Citral was more effective in either inhibiting or inactivating Escherichia coli O157:H7 Sakai than s-citral. However, when combined with heat, a greater synergistic effect was observed with s-citral rather than with n-citral, either in lab media (pH 7·0 and 4·0) or apple juice. For instance, while almost 5 log 10 cell cycles were inactivated in apple juice after 15 min at 53°C in the presence of 0·1 μl ml -1 of s-citral, the use of n-citral required 30 min. The use of nanoemulsions did not modify the slight synergism observed when citral and mild PEF were combined (150 μs, 30 kV cm -1 ). The exploration of different delivery systems of antimicrobial compounds such as citral in aqueous food products aids in the establishment of successful combined treatments for food preservation. While at room temperature, citral in form of a nanoemulsion shows a higher antimicrobial activity; its combination with heat would imply a partial loss of the outstanding synergistic lethal effect achieved when added in suspension form. Therefore, the most suitable procedure to magnify the synergism between heat and citral when processing juices would merely require an intense homogenization step prior to the combined treatment. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Limitations of the pulse-shape technique for particle discrimination in planar Si detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pausch, G.; Seidel, W.; Lampert, M.O.; Rohr, P.

    1996-11-01

    Limitations of the pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) technique - a promising method to identify the charged particles stopped in planar Si-detectors - have been investigated. The particle resolution turned out to be basically determined by resistivity fluctuations in the bulk silicon which cause the charge-collection time to depend on the point of impact. Detector maps showing these fluctuations have been measured and are discussed. Furthermore we present a simple method to test the performance of detectors with respect to PSD. Another limitation of the PSD technique is the finite energy threshold for particle identification. This threshold is caused by an unexpected decrease of the total charge-collection time for ions with a short range, in spite of the fact that the particle tracks are located in a region of very low electric field. (orig.)

  10. Recurrent potential pulse technique for improvement of glucose sensing ability of 3D polypyrrole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cysewska, Karolina; Karczewski, Jakub; Jasiński, Piotr

    2017-07-01

    In this work, a new approach for using a 3D polypyrrole (PPy) conducting polymer as a sensing material for glucose detection is proposed. Polypyrrole is electrochemically polymerized on a platinum screen-printed electrode in an aqueous solution of lithium perchlorate and pyrrole. PPy exhibits a high electroactive surface area and high electrochemical stability, which results in it having excellent electrocatalytic properties. The studies show that using the recurrent potential pulse technique results in an increase in PPy sensing stability, compared to the amperometric approach. This is due to the fact that the technique, under certain parameters, allows the PPy redox properties to be fully utilized, whilst preventing its anodic degradation. Because of this, the 3D PPy presented here has become a very good candidate as a sensing material for glucose detection, and can work without any additional dopants, mediators or enzymes.

  11. Myocardial tagging by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance: evolution of techniques--pulse sequences, analysis algorithms, and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim El-Sayed H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR tagging has been established as an essential technique for measuring regional myocardial function. It allows quantification of local intramyocardial motion measures, e.g. strain and strain rate. The invention of CMR tagging came in the late eighties, where the technique allowed for the first time for visualizing transmural myocardial movement without having to implant physical markers. This new idea opened the door for a series of developments and improvements that continue up to the present time. Different tagging techniques are currently available that are more extensive, improved, and sophisticated than they were twenty years ago. Each of these techniques has different versions for improved resolution, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, scan time, anatomical coverage, three-dimensional capability, and image quality. The tagging techniques covered in this article can be broadly divided into two main categories: 1 Basic techniques, which include magnetization saturation, spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM, delay alternating with nutations for tailored excitation (DANTE, and complementary SPAMM (CSPAMM; and 2 Advanced techniques, which include harmonic phase (HARP, displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE, and strain encoding (SENC. Although most of these techniques were developed by separate groups and evolved from different backgrounds, they are in fact closely related to each other, and they can be interpreted from more than one perspective. Some of these techniques even followed parallel paths of developments, as illustrated in the article. As each technique has its own advantages, some efforts have been made to combine different techniques together for improved image quality or composite information acquisition. In this review, different developments in pulse sequences and related image processing techniques are described along with the necessities that led to their invention

  12. Pulse Double-Resonance EPR Techniques for the Study of Metallobiomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Nicholas; Nalepa, Anna; Pandelia, Maria-Eirini; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Savitsky, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy exploits an intrinsic property of matter, namely the electron spin and its related magnetic moment. This can be oriented in a magnetic field and thus, in the classical limit, acts like a little bar magnet. Its moment will align either parallel or antiparallel to the field, giving rise to different energies (termed Zeeman splitting). Transitions between these two quantized states can be driven by incident microwave frequency radiation, analogous to NMR experiments, where radiofrequency radiation is used. However, the electron Zeeman interaction alone provides only limited information. Instead, much of the usefulness of EPR is derived from the fact that the electron spin also interacts with its local magnetic environment and thus can be used to probe structure via detection of nearby spins, e.g., NMR-active magnetic nuclei and/or other electron spin(s). The latter is exploited in spin labeling techniques, an exciting new area in the development of noncrystallographic protein structure determination. Although these interactions are often smaller than the linewidth of the EPR experiment, sophisticated pulse EPR methods allow their detection. A number of such techniques are well established today and can be broadly described as double-resonance methods, in which the electron spin is used as a reporter. Below we give a brief description of pulse EPR methods, particularly their implementation at higher magnetic fields, and how to best exploit them for studying metallobiomolecules. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of gap measurement technique in-vessel corium retention using ultrasonic pulse echo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Kil Mo; Kim, Jong Hwan; Kang, Kyung Ho; Kim, Sang Baik; Sim, Cheul Muu

    1999-03-01

    A gap between a molten material and a lower vessel is formed in the LAVA experiment, a phase 1 study of Sonata-IV program. In this technical report, quantitative results of the gap measurement using an off-line ultrasonic pulse echo method are presented. This report aims at development of an appropriate ultrasonics test method, by analyzing the problems from the external environmental reason and the internal characteristic reason. The signal analyzing methods to improve the S/N ratio in these problems are divided into the time variant synthesized signal analyzing method and the time invariant synthesized signal analyzing method. In this report, the possibility of the application of these two methods to the gap signal and the noise is considered. In this test, the signal of the propagational direction and reflectional direction through solid-liquid-solid specimen was analyzed to understand the behavior of the reflectional signal in a multi-layered structure by filling the gap with water between the melt and the lower head vessel. The quantitative gap measurement using the off-line ultrasonic pulse echo method was available for a little of the scanned region. But furtherly using DSP technique and imaging technique, the better results will be obtained. Some of the measured signals are presented as 2-dimensional spherical mapping method using distance and amplitude. Other signals difficult in quantitative measurement are saved for a new signal processing method. (author). 11 refs., 4 tabs., 54 figs

  14. Electron transport measurements in methane using an improved pulsed Townsend technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, S.R.; Carter, J.G.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1986-01-01

    An improved pulsed Townsend technique for the measurement of electron transport parameters in gases is described. The accuracy and sensitivity of the technique have been investigated by performing, respectively, electron attachment coefficient measurements in pure O 2 over a wide range of E/N at selected O 2 pressures and by determining the electron attachment and ionization coefficients and electron drift velocity in CH 4 over a wide E/N range. Good agreement has been obtained between the present and the previously published electron attachment coefficients in O 2 and for the drift velocity measurements in CH 4 . The data on the electron attachment coefficient in CH 4 (measured for the first time) showed that with the present improved pulsed Townsend method, electron attachment coefficients up to 10 times smaller than the ionization coefficients at a given E/N value can be accurately measured. Our measurements of the electron attachment and ionization coefficients in CH 4 are in good agreement with a Boltzmann equation analysis of the electron gain and loss processes in CH 4 using published electron scattering cross sections for this molecule

  15. Measurement techniques using ultrashort optical pulses. Final report, February 9-September 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegman, A.E.

    1983-12-01

    The very great potential contactless, very high speed, very flexible, on-chip testing, diagnostics and measurement of very fast semiconductor circuits and devices has led us to initiate a small program to investigate such applications, using our own familiarity with picosecond pulse techniques, in conjunction with the integrated circuits skills present in Stanford's Integrated Circuit Laboratory (ICL), Solid State Laboratory (SSL), and the newly established Center for Integrated Systems. We plan to carry out first a rather straightforward set of picosecond pulse measurements on polysilicon photodetectors or photoswitches, such as can be very conveniently fabricated onto silicon integrated circuits using standard IC techniques, to serve as on-chip, optically addressable test or diagnostic points. (Such test points may in fact be fabricated directly into the active portion of the IC, or as test points in the disposable Kerr region between chips, for access during initial fabrication only). We are therefore assembling the necessary laser system for these measurements, and in addition beginning the fabrication of silicon test devices in collaboration with Professor Robert Dutton of the Integrated Circuit Laboratory and CIS. While making these preparations we have also carried out a literature review of the current state-of-the-art in such electrooptic devices. Some of the results of this study are summarized

  16. Gas-solid heat exchange in a fibrous metallic material measured by a heat regenerator technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golombok, M.; Jariwala, H.; Shirvill, C.

    1990-01-01

    The convective heat transfer properties of a porous metallic fibre material used in gas surface combustion burners are studied. The important parameter governing the heat transfer between hot gas and metal fibre—the heat transfer coefficient—is measured using a non-steady-state method based on

  17. Numerical investigation of energy transfer for fast gas heating in an atmospheric nanosecond-pulsed DBD under different negative slopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Yifei; Wu, Yun; Cui, Wei; Li, Yinghong; Jia, Min

    2013-01-01

    A validated one-dimensional air plasma kinetics model (13 species and 37 processes) for a nanosecond discharge under atmospheric pressure was developed to reveal the energy transfer mechanism for fast gas heating of a plane-to-plane dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). Calculations for voltage profiles with three different negative slopes were performed. Results have shown that 72% of the total heating energy goes to quench heating, which results in a temperature rise across the gap, the remaining 28% goes to ion collisions, thus heating the cathode sheath in a higher power density. The relationships between ion collision heating, quench heating and reduced electric field are given as two functions, which indicates that 10 13  W m −3 is the peak magnitude of power density produced by ion collisions in the nanosecond-pulsed DBD under atmospheric pressure, and a further increase in E/N does not increase the higher quench heating power. The steepness of the negative slope mainly affects the energy transfer efficiency, and the percentage of two heating sources in the total heating power. A short pulse will couple positive and negative slopes and provide a higher transient total heating power but lower energy transfer efficiency. By uncoupling the positive slope, steady stage and negative slope, the energy transfer efficiency under a certain voltage amplitude (20 kV in this paper) is found to have a maximum value of 68.5%. Two wave crests of temperature rise near the cathode sheath are observed, one is caused by a positive slope and the other by a negative slope. (paper)

  18. Effect of high intensity pulsed electric fields and heat treatments on vitamins of milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendicho, Silvia; Espachs, Alexandre; Arántegui, Javier; Martín, Olga

    2002-02-01

    The effects of high intensity pulsed electric field (HIPEF) treatments at room or moderate temperature on water-soluble (thiamine, riboflavin, ascorbic acid) and fat-soluble vitamins (cholecalciferol and tocopherol) were evaluated and compared with conventional thermal treatments. Vitamin retention was determined in two different substrates, milk and simulated skim milk ultrafiltrate (SMUF). Samples were subjected to HIPEF treatments of up to 400 micros at field strengths from 18.3 to 27.1 kV/cm and to heat treatments of up to 60 min at temperatures from 50 to 90 degrees C. No changes in vitamin content were observed after HIPEF or thermal treatments except for ascorbic acid. Milk retained more ascorbic acid after a 400 microstreatment at 22.6 kV/cm (93.4%) than after low (63 degrees C-30 min; 49.7% retained) or high (75 degrees C-15s; 86.7% retained) heat pasteurisation treatments. Retention of ascorbic acid fitted a first-order kinetic model for both HIPEF and thermal processes. First-order constant values varied from 1.8 x 10.4 to 1.27 x 10(-3) micros(-1) for the HIPEF treatments (18.3-27.1 kV/cm) and, for thermal processing ranged from 5 x 10(-3) to 8 x 10(-2) min(-1) (50-90 degrees C). No significant differences were found between the results obtained after applying HIPEF treatments at room or moderate temperature. However, results depended on the treatment media. A beneficial effect of natural skim milk components, mainly proteins, was observed on the preservation of ascorbic acid, since skim milk retained more ascorbic acid than SMUF after HIPEF treatments.

  19. Rapid thermal pulse annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.G.; Koehn, B.W.; Chaplin, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    Characteristics of recovery processes have been investigated for cases of heating a sample to successively higher temperatures by means of isochronal annealing or by using a rapid pulse annealing. A recovery spectra shows the same features independent of which annealing procedure is used. In order to determine which technique provides the best resolution, a study was made of how two independent first-order processes are separated for different heating rates and time increments of the annealing pulses. It is shown that the pulse anneal method offers definite advantages over isochronal annealing when annealing for short time increments. Experimental data by means of the pulse anneal techniques are given for the various substages of stage I of aluminium. (author)

  20. Energy-Saving Sintering of Electrically Conductive Powders by Modified Pulsed Electric Current Heating Using an Electrically Nonconductive Die

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Mikio; Kawahara, Kenta; Araki, Keita

    2014-04-01

    Sintering of Cu and thermoelectric Ca3Co4O9 was tried using a modified pulsed electric current sintering (PECS) process, where an electrically nonconductive die was used instead of a conventional graphite die. The pulsed electric current flowed through graphite punches and sample powder, which caused the Joule heating of the powder compact itself, resulting in sintering under smaller power consumption. Especially for the Ca3Co4O9 powder, densification during sintering was also accelerated by this modified PECS process.

  1. Performance of the JT-60SA cryogenic system under pulsed heat loads during acceptance tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoa, C.; Bonne, F.; Roussel, P.; Lamaison, V.; Girard, S.; Fejoz, P.; Goncalves, R.; Vallet, J. C.; Legrand, J.; Fabre, Y.; Pudys, V.; Wanner, M.; Cardella, A.; Di Pietro, E.; Kamiya, K.; Natsume, K.; Ohtsu, K.; Oishi, M.; Honda, A.; Kashiwa, Y.; Kizu, K.

    2017-12-01

    The JT-60SA cryogenic system a superconducting tokamak currently under assembly at Naka, Japan. After one year of commissioning, the acceptance tests were successfully completed in October 2016 in close collaboration with Air Liquide Advanced Technologies (ALaT), the French atomic and alternative energies commission (CEA), Fusion for Energy (F4E) and the Quantum Radiological Science and Technology (QST). The cryogenic system has several cryogenic users at various temperatures: the superconducting magnets at 4.4 K, the current leads at 50 K, the thermal shields at 80 K and the divertor cryo-pumps at 3.7 K. The cryogenic system has an equivalent refrigeration power of about 9.5 kW at 4.5 K, with peak loads caused by the nuclear heating, the eddy currents in the structures and the AC losses in the magnets during cyclic plasma operation. The main results of the acceptance tests will be reported, with emphasis on the management of the challenging pulsed load operation using a liquid helium volume of 7 m3 as a thermal damper.

  2. Determining the water use of rambutan and longkong during phenological development by heat-pulse method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sdoodee, S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The water use of two species of tropical fruit trees: rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum and longkong (Aglaia dookkoo Griff. were investigated by heat-pulse method. The sapflow rate of both species were determined during phenological development. An experiment was established at Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla Province. Characteristics of sapwood in each species and optimum depth for probe implanting on the trunk were investigated. During the measurement period, diurnal changes of photon flux density, leaf water potential and stomatal conductance were recorded. It was found that sapwood of rambutan and longkong were homogeneous. An appropriate probe depth to implant on the trunk was 25 mm from bark. It was found that diurnal changes of sapflow rates of each species varied with the changes of radiation, leaf water potential and stomata conductance. The results of measurement showed that water use decreased at pre-flowering stage, and fruit maturity stage. In rambutan, water use increased during vegetative growth stage followed by flowering stage. The marked increase of water use in rambutan was during fruit development. In longkong, water use increased at the flowering stage followed by vegetative growth stage, and the peak of water use was during fruit development.

  3. Optical technique to measure distortion on heat treated parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, Federico Mariano

    The use of aluminum for structural applications grows with the continual improvement of their physical properties. Through the various amounts of heat treatments that are available, aluminum can vary in properties for all different types of applications. The automotive industry has benefited the most from the use of aluminum and they continue to seek more uses. The heat treatments of these parts are very vital in providing the properties needed for their particular applications. Moreover understanding the effects of heat treatments that may cause distortion to a part is critical. Most of the work carried out in this field is a pre and post measurement after part has experienced its treatment. In this study, we carry out in-situ measurements of the distortions that a heat-treated part undergoes when subjected to temperatures near melting followed by a slow cooling. In order to confirm the experimental measurements we used HOTPOINT to simulate the experiment and compare results. This study will provide much needed insight to the complex occurrences that aluminum parts undergo during heat treatment.

  4. Heating of multi-layered samples by a Nd: YAG pulsed laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diniz Neto, O. O.

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available In the work we examine the heating of multi-layered samples by a powerful Nd - YAG pulsed láser. The samples are made of two and three layers, conductor-isolator (Al-Al2O3, conductor-conductor (Al-Ag; Al-Au and conductor-conductor-conductor (Al-Au-Ag; Ag-Au-Al. The transient behaviour of the temperature distribution throughout the sample is computed. We carry out three dimensional model calculations for the heating process in which we consider not only the temperature dependence of the sample thermal and optical parameters but also the space and time characteristics of the laser beam as the heating source. We showed the influence of the substrate in the thermal profile, in space and time, and máximum temperature on the multi-layered samples.

    Em nosso trabalho examinamos o aquecimento de amostras compostas de duas e três camadas, condutor- isolante e condutor-condutor, com um pulso potente de láser. O comportamento transiente da distribuição de temperatura através da amostra foi calculado. Em nosso modelo de calculo para o processo de aquecimento levamos em conta a dependência com a temperatura dos parâmetros térmicos (difusividade, capacidade e condutividade térmica, óticos (refletividade e coeficiente de absorção, bem como a dependência das condições de contorno com o tempo e consequentemente com a temperatura. Aplicamos nossa metodología para calcular o aquecimento amostras compostas: Al-Au, Al-Ag, Al-Al2O3, Al-Au-Ag e Ag-Au-Al. Concluimos que o substrato influencia as temperaturas máximas nas superfície exposta ao láser e a forma com que a frente de calor se propaga nas amostras termicamente finas.

  5. Development of silicon growth techniques from melt with surface heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, Anatoly

    2018-05-01

    The paper contains literary and personal data on the development history of silicon-growing technology with volumetric and surface melt heating. It discusses the advantages and disadvantages of surface-heating technology. Examples are given of the implementation of such processes in the 60s-70s of the last century, and the reasons for the discontinuation of the relevant work. It describes the main solutions for the implementation of crystal growth process with the electron-beam heating of the melt surface, implemented by KEPP EU (Latvia). It discusses differences in the management of the growth process for the crystals with constant diameters compared to the Czochralski method. It lists geometrical and electro-physical properties of the obtained crystals. It describes the possible use of such crystals and the immediate challenges of technology development.

  6. Controller tuning of district heating networks using experiment design techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobos, Laszlo; Abonyi, Janos

    2011-01-01

    There are various governmental policies aimed at reducing the dependence on fossil fuels for space heating and the reduction in its associated emission of greenhouse gases. DHNs (District heating networks) could provide an efficient method for house and space heating by utilizing residual industrial waste heat. In such systems, heat is produced and/or thermally upgraded in a central plant and then distributed to the end users through a pipeline network. The control strategies of these networks are rather difficult thanks to the non-linearity of the system and the strong interconnection between the controlled variables. That is why a NMPC (non-linear model predictive controller) could be applied to be able to fulfill the heat demand of the consumers. The main objective of this paper is to propose a tuning method for the applied NMPC to fulfill the control goal as soon as possible. The performance of the controller is characterized by an economic cost function based on pre-defined operation ranges. A methodology from the field of experiment design is applied to tune the model predictive controller to reach the best performance. The efficiency of the proposed methodology is proven throughout a case study of a simulated NMPC controlled DHN. -- Highlights: → To improve the energetic and economic efficiency of a DHN an appropriate control system is necessary. → The time consumption of transitions can be shortened with the proper control system. → A NLMPC is proposed as control system. → The NLMPC is tuned by utilization of simplex methodology, using an economic oriented cost function. → The proposed NLMPC needs a detailed model of the DHN based on the physical description.

  7. Testing and Measurement Techniques in Heat Transfer and Combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    fine brass gauze, which have initially been heated or cooled by passing air through copper spiral coils immersed in a bath of heated oil or alcohol and...par l’analyseur peut Ctre interpr~t~e soit cornie 6tant celle r~ellement presente dans la flamme, sojt canine r~sultant d’une oxydation de NO syant...pr~l ,vement et analyse provient d’one oxydation de NO en proportion variltle suivant le type de sonde utilis6. De plus ii apparalt que cette

  8. Comparison of heat flux measurement techniques during the DIII-D metal ring campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J. L.; Nygren, R. E.; Unterberg, E. A.; Watkins, J. G.; Makowski, M. A.; Moser, A.; Rudakov, D. L.; Buchenauer, D.

    2017-12-01

    The heat fluxes expected in the ITER divertor raise concerns about the damage tolerances of tungsten, especially due to thermal transients caused by edge localized modes (ELMs) as well as frequent temperature cycling from high to low extremes. Therefore we are motivated to understand the heat flux conditions that can cause not only enhanced erosion but also bulk thermo-mechanical damage to a tungsten divertor. For the metal ring campaign in DIII-D, tungsten-coated TZM tile inserts were installed making two toroidal arrays of metal tile inserts in the lower divertor. This study examines the deposited heat flux on these rings with embedded thermocouples (TCs) sampling at 10 kHz and compares them to Langmuir probe (LP) and infrared thermography (IRTV) heat flux measurements. We see agreement of the TC, LP, and IRTV data within 20% of the heat flux averaged over the entire discharge, and that all three diagnostics suggest parallel heat flux at the OSP location increases linearly with input heating power. The TC and LP heat flux time traces during the discharge trend together during large changes to the average heat flux. By subtracting the LP measured inter-ELM heat flux from TC data, using a rectangular ELM energy pulse shape, and taking the relative size and duration of each ELM from {{D}}α measurements, we extract the ELM heat fluxes from TC data. This over-estimates the IRTV measured ELM heat fluxes by a factor of 1.9, and could be due to the simplicity of the TC heat flux model and the assumed ELM energy pulse shape. ELM heat fluxes deposited on the inserts are used to model tungsten erosion in this campaign. These TC ELM heat flux estimates are used in addition to IRTV, especially in cases where the IRTV view to the metal ring is obstructed. We observe that some metal inserts were deformed due to exposed leading edges. The thermal conditions on these inserts are investigated with the thermal modeling code ABAQUS using our heat flux measurements when these edges

  9. Pulsed-laser heating: a tool for studying degradation of materials subjected to repeated high-temperature excursions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, A.; Cornell, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The use of pulsed-laser heating was evaluated as a means to obtain high cyclic peak temperatures with short rise times. A two-stage neodymium glass laser was used which produces a 600-μs pulse with energy outputs of up to 100 J. Small disk-shaped samples of AISI 4340 steel served as targets. Some of these were coated with a tungsten deposit. The rear face of some of the targets was instrumented for evaluation of temperature, strain, and stress response. Post-shot metallographic evaluations were made on a number of targets. We saw evidence of surface melting, cracking, and phase transformation. Surface damage was related to differences in the number of pulse cycles and input energy level, variables in the target materials, and the extent of strain-induced stresses. These experiments were performed in air at 1 atm and ambient laboratory temperature. 36 figures

  10. Heating of a dense plasma by an ultrashort laser pulse in the anomalous skin-effect regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, A.A.; Gamalii, E.G.; Novikov, V.N.; Semakhin, A.N.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.

    1992-01-01

    The absorption of laser light in an overdense plasma with a sharp boundary and the heating of the plasma under conditions corresponding to the anomalous skin effect are studied. Heat transfer from the absorption region near the surface into the interior of the plasma is studied in the kinetic approximation. At high intensities of the laser pulse, the electron distribution function is deformed, and the plasma is heated at a rate tens of times that predicted by classical heat-transfer theory, because of the severe limitation on thermal conductivity. The anisotropy of the electron distribution function in the skin layer leads to an increase in the absorption coefficient. The angular distribution and the polarization dependence of the absorption coefficient are discussed

  11. Tight comparison of Mg and Y thin film photocathodes obtained by the pulsed laser deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorusso, A. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, Università del Salento and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Gontad, F., E-mail: francisco.gontad@le.infn.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, Università del Salento and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Solombrino, L. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, Università del Salento and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Chiadroni, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Broitman, E. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Perrone, A. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, Università del Salento and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2016-11-11

    In this work Magnesium (Mg) and Yttrium (Y) thin films have been deposited on Copper (Cu) polycrystalline substrates by the pulsed laser ablation technique for photocathode application. Such metallic materials are studied for their interesting photoemission properties and are proposed as a good alternative to the Cu photocathode, which is generally used in radio-frequency guns. Mg and Y films were uniform with no substantial differences in morphology; a polycrystalline structure was found for both of them. Photoemission measurements of such cathodes based on thin films were performed, revealing a quantum efficiency higher than Cu bulk. Photoemission theory according to the three-step model of Spicer is invoked to explain the superior photoemission performance of Mg with respect to Y. - Highlights: • Mg and Y thin film photocathodes were successfully prepared by pulsed laser deposition. • Mg quantum efficiency is higher than Y, despite its higher work function. • The three-step model of Spicer justify the difference in quantum efficiency.

  12. Uniaxial Magnetization Performance of Textured Fe Nanowire Arrays Electrodeposited by a Pulsed Potential Deposition Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neetzel, C.; Ohgai, T.; Yanai, T.; Nakano, M.; Fukunaga, H.

    2017-11-01

    Textured ferromagnetic Fe nanowire arrays were electrodeposited using a rectangular-pulsed potential deposition technique into anodized aluminum oxide nanochannels. During the electrodeposition of Fe nanowire arrays at a cathodic potential of - 1.2 V, the growth rate of the nanowires was ca. 200 nm s-1. The aspect ratio of Fe nanowires with a diameter of 30 ± 5 nm reached ca. 2000. The long axis of Fe nanowires corresponded with the direction when a large overpotential during the on-time pulse was applied, whereas it orientated to the direction under the potentiostatic condition with a small overpotential. By shifting the on-time cathode potential up to - 1.8 V, the texture coefficient for the (200) plane, TC200, reached up to 1.94. Perpendicular magnetization performance was observed in Fe nanowire arrays. With increasing TC200, the squareness of Fe nanowire arrays increased up to 0.95 with the coercivity maintained at 1.4 kOe at room temperature. This research result has opened a novel possibility of Fe nanowire arrays that can be applied for a new permanent magnetic material without rare-earth metals.

  13. An Improved Clutter Suppression Method for Weather Radars Using Multiple Pulse Repetition Time Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjie Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the implementation of an improved clutter suppression method for the multiple pulse repetition time (PRT technique based on simulated radar data. The suppression method is constructed using maximum likelihood methodology in time domain and is called parametric time domain method (PTDM. The procedure relies on the assumption that precipitation and clutter signal spectra follow a Gaussian functional form. The multiple interleaved pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs that are used in this work are set to four PRFs (952, 833, 667, and 513 Hz. Based on radar simulation, it is shown that the new method can provide accurate retrieval of Doppler velocity even in the case of strong clutter contamination. The obtained velocity is nearly unbiased for all the range of Nyquist velocity interval. Also, the performance of the method is illustrated on simulated radar data for plan position indicator (PPI scan. Compared with staggered 2-PRT transmission schemes with PTDM, the proposed method presents better estimation accuracy under certain clutter situations.

  14. Glyphosate detection with ammonium nitrate and humic acids as potential interfering substances by pulsed voltammetry technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Gil, Pablo; Laguarda-Miro, Nicolas; Camino, Juan Soto; Peris, Rafael Masot

    2013-10-15

    Pulsed voltammetry has been used to detect and quantify glyphosate on buffered water in presence of ammonium nitrate and humic substances. Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide active ingredient in the world. It is a non-selective broad spectrum herbicide but some of its health and environmental effects are still being discussed. Nowadays, glyphosate pollution in water is being monitored but quantification techniques are slow and expensive. Glyphosate wastes are often detected in countryside water bodies where organic substances and fertilizers (commonly based on ammonium nitrate) may also be present. Glyphosate also forms complexes with humic acids so these compounds have also been taken into consideration. The objective of this research is to study the interference of these common pollutants in glyphosate measurements by pulsed voltammetry. The statistical treatment of the voltammetric data obtained lets us discriminate glyphosate from the other studied compounds and a mathematical model has been built to quantify glyphosate concentrations in a buffer despite the presence of humic substances and ammonium nitrate. In this model, the coefficient of determination (R(2)) is 0.977 and the RMSEP value is 2.96 × 10(-5) so the model is considered statistically valid. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Energy calibration of CsI(Tl) scintillator in pulse-shape identification technique

    CERN Document Server

    Avdeichikov, V; Golubev, P; Jakobsson, B; Colonna, N

    2003-01-01

    A batch of 16 CsI(Tl) scintillator crystals, supplied by the Bicron Company, has been studied with respect to precise energy calibration in pulse-shape identification technique. The light corresponding to pulse integration within the time interval 1.6-4.5 mu s (long gate) and 0.0-4.5 mu s (extra-long gate) exhibits a power law relation, L(E,Z,A)=a1(Z,A)E sup a sup 2 sup ( sup Z sup , sup A sup ) , for sup 1 sup , sup 2 sup , sup 3 H isotopes in the measured energy range 5-150 MeV. For the time interval 0.0-0.60 mu s (short gate), a significant deviation from the power law relation is observed, for energy greater than approx 30 MeV. The character of the a2(p)-a2(d) and a2(p)-a2(t) correlations for protons, deuterons and tritons, reveals 3 types of crystals in the batch. These subbatches differ in the value of the extracted parameter a2 for protons, and in the value of the spread of a2 for deuterons and tritons. This may be explained by the difference in the energy dependence of the fast decay time component an...

  16. Plasma characteristics of long-pulse discharges heated by neutral beam injection in the Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeiri, Y.; Nakamura, Y.; Noda, N.; Osakabe, M.; Kawahata, K.; Oka, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Tsumori, K.; Sato, M.; Mutoh, T.; Shimozuma, T.; Goto, M.; Ida, K.; Inagaki, S.; Kado, S.; Masuzaki, S.; Morita, S.; Nagayama, Y.; Narihara, K.; Peterson, B. J.; Sakakibara, S.; Sato, K.; Shoji, M.; Tanaka, K.; de Vries, P. C.; Sudo, S.; Ohyabu, N.; Motojima, O.

    2000-02-01

    Long-pulse neutral beam injection heating has been achieved in the large helical device (LHD). Two different confinement states are observed for different averaged densities in the long-pulse plasmas. A quasi-steady-state plasma was sustained for 21 s with an injection power of 0.6 MW, where the central plasma temperature was around 1 keV with a line-averaged electron density of 0.3 × 1019 m-3 . The discharge duration can be so extended as to keep the plasma properties in the short-pulse discharge. The energy confinement time is nearly the same as that of the short-pulse discharge, which is 1.3 times as long as the international stellarator scaling ISS95. At higher densities, a relaxation oscillation phenomenon, observed as if the plasma would breathe, lasted for 20 s with a period of 1-2 s. The phenomenon is characterized with profile expansion and contraction of the electron temperature. The density oscillation is out of phase with the temperature oscillation and is related to the density clamping phenomenon. The observed plasma properties are shown in detail for the `breathing' oscillation phenomenon. Possible mechanisms for the breathing oscillation are also discussed, with a view of the screening effect near the last closed magnetic surface and the power balance between the heating and the radiation powers. The long-pulse heating results indicate unique characteristics of the LHD where no special feedback stabilization is required due to absence of disruption and no need for current drive.

  17. Optimization of cathodic arc deposition and pulsed plasma melting techniques for growing smooth superconducting Pb photoemissive films for SRF injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nietubyć, Robert; Lorkiewicz, Jerzy; Sekutowicz, Jacek; Smedley, John; Kosińska, Anna

    2018-05-01

    Superconducting photoinjectors have a potential to be the optimal solution for moderate and high current cw operating free electron lasers. For this application, a superconducting lead (Pb) cathode has been proposed to simplify the cathode integration into a 1.3 GHz, TESLA-type, 1.6-cell long purely superconducting gun cavity. In the proposed design, a lead film several micrometres thick is deposited onto a niobium plug attached to the cavity back wall. Traditional lead deposition techniques usually produce very non-uniform emission surfaces and often result in a poor adhesion of the layer. A pulsed plasma melting procedure reducing the non-uniformity of the lead photocathodes is presented. In order to determine the parameters optimal for this procedure, heat transfer from plasma to the film was first modelled to evaluate melting front penetration range and liquid state duration. The obtained results were verified by surface inspection of witness samples. The optimal procedure was used to prepare a photocathode plug, which was then tested in an electron gun. The quantum efficiency and the value of cavity quality factor have been found to satisfy the requirements for an injector of the European-XFEL facility.

  18. Variation in resistance of natural isolates of Staphylococcus aureus to heat, pulsed electric field and ultrasound under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Calleja, J M; Cebrián, G; Condón, S; Mañas, P

    2006-05-01

    To study and compare the resistance of 15 Staphylococcus aureus isolates to heat, pulsed electric field (PEF) and ultrasound (UW) under pressure (manosonication, MS). Survival curves to heat (58 degrees C), to PEF (22 kV cm(-1), 2 micros square wave pulses) and to UW under pressure (117 microm, 20 kHz, 200 kPa) were obtained and inactivation parameters (decimal reduction times for heat and UW under pressure, and b-values for PEF) were calculated. A wide resistance variation to heat treatment, but not to PEF and MS, was observed amongst the 15 strains. There was no relationship between the resistances to the three physical agents studied. Staphylococcus aureus was relatively resistant to MS but sensitive to PEF. Heat resistance varied with strain and was positively correlated to carotenoid pigment content. Results would help in defining safe food preservation processes. Care should be taken to choose the most adequate strain of S. aureus to model food preservation processing.

  19. Real-time lossless data compression techniques for long-pulse operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus Vega, J.; Sanchez, E.; Portas, A.; Pereira, A.; Ruiz, M.

    2006-01-01

    Data logging and data distribution will be two main tasks connected with data handling in ITER. Data logging refers to the recovery and ultimate storage of all data, independent on the data source. Control data and physics data distribution is related, on the one hand, to the on-line data broadcasting for immediate data availability for both data analysis and data visualization. On the other hand, delayed analyses require off-line data access. Due to the large data volume expected, data compression will be mandatory in order to save storage and bandwidth. On-line data distribution in a long pulse environment requires the use of a deterministic approach to be able to ensure a proper response time for data availability. However, an essential feature for all the above purposes is to apply compression techniques that ensure the recovery of the initial signals without spectral distortion when compacted data are expanded (lossless techniques). Delta compression methods are independent on the analogue characteristics of waveforms and there exist a variety of implementations that have been applied to the databases of several fusion devices such as Alcator, JET and TJ-II among others. Delta compression techniques are carried out in a two step algorithm. The first step consists of a delta calculation, i.e. the computation of the differences between the digital codes of adjacent signal samples. The resultant deltas are then encoded according to constant- or variable-length bit allocation. Several encoding forms can be considered for the second step and they have to satisfy a prefix code property. However, and in order to meet the requirement of on-line data distribution, the encoding forms have to be defined prior to data capture. This article reviews different lossless data compression techniques based on delta compression. In addition, the concept of cyclic delta transformation is introduced. Furthermore, comparative results concerning compression rates on different

  20. Quantitative Evaluation of Defect in Stainless Steel 304 Tube Using Pulsed Eddy Current Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurul Ain Ahmad Latif; Ilham Mukriz Zainal Abidin; Nurul Ain Ahmad Latif; Nordin Jamaludin; Zaredah Hashim; Norhayati Ramli

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed eddy current (PEC) is an advanced non-destructive testing (NDT) technique that operates based on electromagnetic principle. The excitation consists of broad frequency spectrum leading to be a potential in detecting defects that are deeply buried inside the specimen. In this paper, the experiment and simulation were conducted on stainless steel plate 304 fabricated with open surface defects having a different defect depth as an investigation towards the correlation between extracted signal feature and defect depth. Two common features; time to peak and peak value that corresponds to the location depth of defect and size of defect were used for signals analysis and evaluation. The results that acquired through finite element method (FEM) simulation were compared with experimental results for the signals evaluation and defect quantification. (author)

  1. Amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film grown by pulse laser deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistry, Bhaumik V., E-mail: bhaumik-phy@yahoo.co.in; Joshi, U. S. [Department of Physics, University School of Sciences, Gujarat University, Ahmedabad-380 009 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Highly electrically conducting and transparent in visible light IGZO thin film were grown on glass substrate at substrate temperature of 400 C by a pulse laser deposition techniques. Structural, surface, electrical, and optical properties of IGZO thin films were investigated at room temperature. Smooth surface morphology and amorphous nature of the film has been confirmed from the AFM and GIXRD analysis. A resistivity down to 7.7×10{sup −3} V cm was reproducibly obtained while maintaining optical transmission exceeding 70% at wavelengths from 340 to 780 nm. The carrier densities of the film was obtain to the value 1.9×10{sup 18} cm{sup 3}, while the Hall mobility of the IGZO thin film was 16 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1}S{sup −1}.

  2. Progress of Space Charge Research on Oil-Paper Insulation Using Pulsed Electroacoustic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the space charge behavior in oil-paper insulation systems used in power transformers. It begins with the importance of understanding the space charge behavior in oil-paper insulation systems, followed by the introduction of the pulsed electrostatic technique (PEA. After that, the research progress on the space charge behavior of oil-paper insulation during the recent twenty years is critically reviewed. Some important aspects such as the environmental conditions and the acoustic wave recovery need to be addressed to acquire more accurate space charge measurement results. Some breakthroughs on the space charge behavior of oil-paper insulation materials by the research team at the University of Southampton are presented. Finally, future work on space charge measurement of oil-paper insulation materials is proposed.

  3. New techniques of time-resolved infrared and Raman spectroscopy using ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laubereau, A.

    1986-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in the field of spectroscopic applications of ultrashort laser pulses. This paper examines two approaches toward studying ultrafast relaxation processes in condensed matter: an IR technique which complements coherent Raman scattering; and a Fourier Raman method with high frequency resolution. The time domain IR spectroscopy technique has been applied to various vibration-rotation transitions of pure HCl gas and in mixtures with Ar buffer gas. The advantage of the time domain measurements instead of frequency spectroscopy is readily visualized when one recalls that a frequency resolution of 10 -3 cm -1 corresponds to time observations over 10 -8 , which are readily feasible. As a first demonstration of the FT-Raman technique the author presents experimental data on the Q-branch of the v 1 -vibrational mode of methane. An example for the experimental data obtained approximately 2 mm behind the nozzle is presented; the coherent anti-Stokes Raman signal is plotted versus delay time. A complicated beating structure and the decay of the signal envelope are readily seen. The desired spectroscopic information is obtained by numerical Fourier transformation of the experimental points presented

  4. Preparation and characterization of VOx nanorods using pulsed laser deposition technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rama, N.; Senthil Kumar, E.; Ramachandra Rao, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Vanadium oxide (VO x ) is one of the most functional oxides of the transition metal oxide family. This versatility comes because of the ability of Vanadium to exist as both monovalent and multivalent in these oxides. These oxides find potential usage in the field of thermochromism electrochromism catalysts, electrochemistry etc. especially in their nano-form because of their increased sensitivity to these applications. These nano-forms are usually prepared using conventional techniques such as solgel techniques, vapour phase transport, hydrothermal synthesis etc. In this work we have used pulsed laser deposition technique to fabricate vanadium oxide nanorods for the first time. The grown nanorods has a predominant VO 2 phase with a secondary phase of V 3 O 7 . The diameters of the rods were around 300 nm with Raman spectra showing all the group vibrations corresponding to VO x phase. The nanorods exhibited photoluminescence in the visible range due to the presence of oxygen defects. These results, including the mechanism of growth of these nanorods, will be discussed in detail. The existence of multivalence in these rods finds potential applications in electrochemistry while the visible photoluminescence in optical applications

  5. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Ge investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection technique and SEM analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaseen, Nazish; Bashir, Shazia; Shabbir, Muhammad Kaif; Jalil, Sohail Abdul; Akram, Mahreen; Hayat, Asma; Mahmood, Khaliq; Haq, Faizan-ul; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif

    2016-06-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation phenomena of single crystal Ge (100) has been investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection as well as SEM analysis techniques. Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns, 1–10 Hz) at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm{sup −2} is employed as pump beam to ablate Ge targets. In order to evaluate in-situe ablation threshold fluence of Ge by photoacoustic deflection technique, Continuous Wave (CW) He–Ne laser (632 nm, power 10 mW) is employed as a probe beam. It travels parallel to the target surface at a distance of 3 mm and after passing through Ge plasma it causes deflection due to density gradient of acoustic waves. The deflected signal is detected by photodiode and is recorded by oscilloscope. The threshold fluence of Ge, the velocity of ablated species and the amplitude of the deflected signal are evaluated. The threshold fluence of Ge comes out to be 0.5 J cm{sup −2} and is comparable with the analytical value. In order to compare the estimated value of threshold with ex-situe measurements, the quantitative analysis of laser irradiated Ge is performed by using SEM analysis. For this purpose Ge is exposed to single and multiple shots of 5, 10, 50 and 100 at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm{sup −2}. The threshold fluence for single and multiple shots as well as incubation coefficients are evaluated. It is observed that the value of incubation co-efficient decreases with increasing number of pulses and is therefore responsible for lowering the threshold fluence of Ge. SEM analysis also reveals the growth of various features such as porous structures, non-uniform ripples and blisters on the laser irradiated Ge. It is observed that both the fluence as well as number of laser shots plays a significant role for the growth of these structures.

  6. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Ge investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection technique and SEM analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaseen, Nazish; Bashir, Shazia; Shabbir, Muhammad Kaif; Jalil, Sohail Abdul; Akram, Mahreen; Hayat, Asma; Mahmood, Khaliq; Haq, Faizan-ul; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif

    2016-01-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation phenomena of single crystal Ge (100) has been investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection as well as SEM analysis techniques. Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns, 1–10 Hz) at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm"−"2 is employed as pump beam to ablate Ge targets. In order to evaluate in-situe ablation threshold fluence of Ge by photoacoustic deflection technique, Continuous Wave (CW) He–Ne laser (632 nm, power 10 mW) is employed as a probe beam. It travels parallel to the target surface at a distance of 3 mm and after passing through Ge plasma it causes deflection due to density gradient of acoustic waves. The deflected signal is detected by photodiode and is recorded by oscilloscope. The threshold fluence of Ge, the velocity of ablated species and the amplitude of the deflected signal are evaluated. The threshold fluence of Ge comes out to be 0.5 J cm"−"2 and is comparable with the analytical value. In order to compare the estimated value of threshold with ex-situe measurements, the quantitative analysis of laser irradiated Ge is performed by using SEM analysis. For this purpose Ge is exposed to single and multiple shots of 5, 10, 50 and 100 at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm"−"2. The threshold fluence for single and multiple shots as well as incubation coefficients are evaluated. It is observed that the value of incubation co-efficient decreases with increasing number of pulses and is therefore responsible for lowering the threshold fluence of Ge. SEM analysis also reveals the growth of various features such as porous structures, non-uniform ripples and blisters on the laser irradiated Ge. It is observed that both the fluence as well as number of laser shots plays a significant role for the growth of these structures.

  7. Compression and heating of a cladding target by a partially profiled laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, A.A.; Samsonov, A.G.; Solov'ev, N.A.

    1990-01-01

    The CLADDING-T semiempirical model and numerical calculations in accordance with the SPHERE program have been employed to show that the action of a partially profiled pulse on a simple cladding target raises the fuel compession degree and reduces the fuel temperature as compared to the action of a rectangular pulse (or a polynomial-shaped pulse) with the same energy. From the standpoint of the flash criterion the system composed of the profiled pulse and the simple (cladding) target is shown to be equivalent to that composed of a simple pulse and a dual-cascade (profiled) target. An analysis of the system composed of the laser and the simple target shows that the use of the partially profiled pulse and the simple target makes it possible to reduce requirements to the energy of laser systems

  8. Enhanced detection of nitrogen dioxide via combined heating and pulsed UV operation of indium oxide nano-octahedra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Oriol; Roso, Sergio; Vilanova, Xavier; Llobet, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    We report on the use of combined heating and pulsed UV light activation of indium oxide gas sensors for enhancing their performance in the detection of nitrogen dioxide in air. Indium oxide nano-octahedra were synthesized at high temperature (900 °C) via vapour-phase transport and screen-printed onto alumina transducers that comprised interdigitated electrodes and a heating resistor. Compared to the standard, constant temperature operation of the sensor, mild heating (e.g., 100 °C) together with pulsed UV light irradiation employing a commercially available, 325 nm UV diode (square, 1 min period, 15 mA drive current signal), results in an up to 80-fold enhancement in sensitivity to nitrogen dioxide. Furthermore, this combined operation method allows for making savings in power consumption that range from 35% to over 80%. These results are achieved by exploiting the dynamics of sensor response under pulsed UV light, which convey important information for the quantitative analysis of nitrogen dioxide.

  9. Enhanced detection of nitrogen dioxide via combined heating and pulsed UV operation of indium oxide nano-octahedra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriol Gonzalez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We report on the use of combined heating and pulsed UV light activation of indium oxide gas sensors for enhancing their performance in the detection of nitrogen dioxide in air. Indium oxide nano-octahedra were synthesized at high temperature (900 °C via vapour-phase transport and screen-printed onto alumina transducers that comprised interdigitated electrodes and a heating resistor. Compared to the standard, constant temperature operation of the sensor, mild heating (e.g., 100 °C together with pulsed UV light irradiation employing a commercially available, 325 nm UV diode (square, 1 min period, 15 mA drive current signal, results in an up to 80-fold enhancement in sensitivity to nitrogen dioxide. Furthermore, this combined operation method allows for making savings in power consumption that range from 35% to over 80%. These results are achieved by exploiting the dynamics of sensor response under pulsed UV light, which convey important information for the quantitative analysis of nitrogen dioxide.

  10. High intensity pulsed electric field as an innovative technique for extraction of bioactive compounds-A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liang-Gong; He, Lang; Xi, Jun

    2017-09-02

    How to extract bioactive compounds safely and efficiently is one of the problems for the food and pharmaceutical industry. In recent years, several novel extraction techniques have been proposed. To pursue a more efficient method for industrial production, high intensity pulsed electric field (HIPEF) extraction technique has been developed. HIPEF extraction technique, which is based on the conventional pulsed electric field (PEF), provided higher electric field intensity and a special continuous extraction system, and it has confirmed less extraction time, higher extraction yield, and mild processing temperature. So this innovative technique is promising for application of industrial production. This review was devoted to introducing the recent achievement of HIPEF extraction technique, including novel HIPEF continuous extraction system, principles and mechanisms; the critical process factors influencing its performance applications; and comparison of HIPEF extraction with other extraction techniques. In the end, the defects and future trends of HIPEF extraction were also discussed.

  11. Effect of gas heating on the generation of an ultrashort avalanche electron beam in the pulse-periodic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Sorokin, D. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2015-07-01

    The generation of an ultrashort avalanche electron beam (UAEB) in nitrogen in the pulse-periodic regime is investigated. The gas temperature in the discharge gap of the atmospheric-pressure nitrogen is measured from the intensity distribution of unresolved rotational transitions ( C 3Π u , v' = 0) → ( B 3Π g , v″ = 0) in the nitrogen molecule for an excitation pulse repetition rate of 2 kHz. It is shown that an increase in the UAEB current amplitude in the pulse-periodic regime is due to gas heating by a series of previous pulses, which leads to an increase in the reduced electric field strength as a result of a decrease in the gas density in the zone of the discharge formation. It is found that in the pulse-periodic regime and the formation of the diffuse discharge, the number of electrons in the beam increases by several times for a nitrogen pressure of 9 × 103 Pa. The dependences of the number of electrons in the UAEB on the time of operation of the generator are considered.

  12. A novel time-to-pulse height converter for fast-neutron time-of-flight techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, J.

    1962-01-01

    An electronic time-to-pulse height converter is described which uses a multiplicative method instead of the usual one of adding overlapping pulses. This is achieved by a coincidence of a linear sawtooth and a sharply clipped needle-pulse. The sawtooth is fed to the grid of a beam-deflecting tube (E80T) and the needle-pulse is applied to the deflecting plates and opens the tube only during a time-interval of about 5.10 -9 s. The plate gets a charge proportional to the time-difference between the start of the sawtooth and the needle pulse. The plate-pulse is stretched and amplified and its height represents a measurement of the time-difference. With this method we got a time resolution of 2τ = 7 x 10 -12 s with artificial pulses, 2τ = 3 x 10 -10 s with Co 60 γ-coincidences by using NE 102 plastic crystals and 2τ = 1.4 x 10 -9 s with 511-keV γ-coincidences using NaI(Te) crystals. The method was also used with pulsed beam techniques. In this case we got from the pulsing RF an 8-Mc, sharply-peaked pulse-sequence, which was fed to the E80T plates. We had a time-resolution of 2τ = 1.1 x 10 -9 s with 4-MeV neutrons using plastic crystals 0.7 in long. Normally the region of linear response was 30 ns but it was possible to go up to 120 ns. (author) [fr

  13. An appraisal of computational techniques for transient heat conduction equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kant, T.

    1983-01-01

    A semi-discretization procedure in which the ''space'' dimension is discretized by the finite element method is emphasized for transient problems. This standard methodology transforms the space-time partial differential equation (PDE) system into a set of ordinary differential equations (ODE) in time. Existing methods for transient heat conduction calculations are then reviewed. Existence of two general classes of time integration schemes- implicit and explicit is noted. Numerical stability characteristics of these two methods are elucidated. Implicit methods are noted to be numerically stable, permitting large time steps, but the cost per step is high. On the otherhand, explicit schemes are noted to be inexpensive per step, but small step size is required. Low computational cost of the explicit schemes make it very attractive for nonlinear problems. However, numerical stability considerations requiring use of very small time steps come in the way of its general adoption. Effectiveness of the fourth-order Runge-Kutta-Gill explicit integrator is then numerically evaluated. Finally we discuss some very recent works on development of computational algorithms which not only achieve unconditional stability, high accuracy and convergence but involve computations on matrix equations of elements only. This development is considered to be very significant in the light of our experience gained for simple heat conduction calculations. We conclude that such algorithms have the potential for further developments leading to development of economical methods for general transient analysis of complex physical systems. (orig.)

  14. Computational efficiency improvement with Wigner rotation technique in studying atoms in intense few-cycle circularly polarized pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Minghu; Feng, Liqiang; Lü, Rui; Chu, Tianshu

    2014-01-01

    We show that by introducing Wigner rotation technique into the solution of time-dependent Schrödinger equation in length gauge, computational efficiency can be greatly improved in describing atoms in intense few-cycle circularly polarized laser pulses. The methodology with Wigner rotation technique underlying our openMP parallel computational code for circularly polarized laser pulses is described. Results of test calculations to investigate the scaling property of the computational code with the number of the electronic angular basis function l as well as the strong field phenomena are presented and discussed for the hydrogen atom

  15. Pattern transformation of heat-shrinkable polymer by three-dimensional (3D) printing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan; Yan, Dong; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Gengkai

    2015-03-11

    A significant challenge in conventional heat-shrinkable polymers is to produce controllable microstructures. Here we report that the polymer material fabricated by three-dimensional (3D) printing technique has a heat-shrinkable property, whose initial microstructure can undergo a spontaneous pattern transformation under heating. The underlying mechanism is revealed by evaluating internal strain of the printed polymer from its fabricating process. It is shown that a uniform internal strain is stored in the polymer during the printing process and can be released when heated above its glass transition temperature. Furthermore, the internal strain can be used to trigger the pattern transformation of the heat-shrinkable polymer in a controllable way. Our work provides insightful ideas to understand a novel mechanism on the heat-shrinkable effect of printed material, but also to present a simple approach to fabricate heat-shrinkable polymer with a controllable thermo-structural response.

  16. Pulse-shape discrimination techniques for the COBRA double beta-decay experiment at LNGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatschler, S.; COBRA Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    In modern elementary particle physics several questions arise from the fact that neutrino oscillation experiments have found neutrinos to be massive. Among them is the so far unknown nature of neutrinos: either they act as so-called Majorana particles, where one cannot distinguish between particle and antiparticle, or they are Dirac particles like all the other fermions in the Standard Model. The study of neutrinoless double beta-decay (0νββ-decay), where the lepton number conservation is violated by two units, could answer the question regarding the underlying nature of neutrinos and might also shed light on the mechanism responsible for the mass generation. So far there is no experimental evidence for the existence of 0νββ-decay, hence, existing experiments have to be improved and novel techniques should be explored. One of the next-generation experiments dedicated to the search for this ultra-rare decay is the COBRA experiment. This article gives an overview of techniques to identify and reject background based on pulse-shape discrimination.

  17. Applications of pulsed Eddy Current (PEC) technique on defect and material assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurul A'in Ahmad Latif; Noorhazleena Azaman; Ilham Mukriz Zainal Abidin

    2014-01-01

    The pulsed eddy current (PEC) is an emerging electromagnetic method and widely used in multiple field including aerospace, petrochemical, industry and transportation. PEC mainly depends on the multiple variables such as peak value and rising time to detect and quantify the defects. Apart of its advantage as non contacting technique, it has ability on conducting surface and subsurface detection. Additionally, PEC is high sensitive to variety parameters that are inherent in the flaws. Compare to conventional eddy current, PEC allows deeper penetration as it is a combination from multiple frequencies. This paper demonstrates the abilities of PEC technique performing multiple testing in various fields such as conducting conductivity testing, measuring the material thickness and identifying depth of the defects. The conductivity testing will be performed on multiple materials such as aluminium, stainless steel, copper, austenitic steel and titanium. To measure the material thicknesses, PEC testing will be conducted on the multi layered specimen with the different thickness. Meanwhile to identify depth of defects, the testing will be carried out using a stainless steel calibration block contains multiple length of defect. For the validation purposes, all the results generate through the experiments will be compared with simulation results produced using dedicated software, COMSOL. (author)

  18. Development of an ultrasonic pulse-echo (UPE) technique for aircraft icing studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang; Hu, Hui [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, 2271 Howe Hall, Room 1200, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Chen, Wen-Li [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, 2271 Howe Hall, Room 1200, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); School of Civil Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150090 (China); Bond, Leonard J. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, 2271 Howe Hall, Room 1200, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, 1915 Scholl Road, 151 ASC II, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Aircraft operating in some cold weather conditions face the risk of icing. Icing poses a threat to flight safety and its management is expensive. Removing light frost on a clear day from a medium-size business jet can cost $300, heavy wet snow removal can cost $3,000 and removal of accumulated frozen/freezing rain can cost close to $10,000. Understanding conditions that lead to severe icing events is important and challenging. When an aircraft or rotorcraft flies in a cold climate, some of the super cooled droplets impinging on exposed aircraft surfaces may flow along the surface prior to freezing and give various forms and shapes of ice. The runback behavior of a water film on an aircraft affects the morphology of ice accretion and the rate of formation. In this study, we report the recent progress to develop an Ultrasonic Pulse-Echo (UPE) technique to provide real-time thickness distribution measurements of surface water flows driven by boundary layer airflows for aircraft icing studies. A series of initial experimental investigations are conducted in an ice wind tunnel employing an array of ultrasonic transducers placed underneath the surface of a flat plate. The water runback behavior on the plate is evaluated by measuring the thickness profile variation of the water film along the surface by using the UPE technique under various wind speed and flow rate conditions.

  19. Low level radioactivity measurements with phoswich detectors using coincident techniques and digital pulse processing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, R; de Celis, B; del Canto, V; Lumbreras, J M; de Celis Alonso, B; Martín-Martín, A; Gutierrez-Villanueva, J L

    2008-10-01

    A new system has been developed for the detection of low radioactivity levels of fission products and actinides using coincidence techniques. The device combines a phoswich detector for alpha/beta/gamma-ray recognition with a fast digital card for electronic pulse analysis. The phoswich can be used in a coincident mode by identifying the composed signal produced by the simultaneous detection of alpha/beta particles and X-rays/gamma particles. The technique of coincidences with phoswich detectors was proposed recently to verify the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (NTBT) which established the necessity of monitoring low levels of gaseous fission products produced by underground nuclear explosions. With the device proposed here it is possible to identify the coincidence events and determine the energy and type of coincident particles. The sensitivity of the system has been improved by employing liquid scintillators and a high resolution low energy germanium detector. In this case it is possible to identify simultaneously by alpha/gamma coincidence transuranic nuclides present in environmental samples without necessity of performing radiochemical separation. The minimum detectable activity was estimated to be 0.01 Bq kg(-1) for 0.1 kg of soil and 1000 min counting.

  20. Low level radioactivity measurements with phoswich detectors using coincident techniques and digital pulse processing analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuente, R. de la; Celis, B. de; Canto, V. del; Lumbreras, J.M.; Celis, Alonso B. de; Martin-Martin, A.; Gutierrez-Villanueva, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    A new system has been developed for the detection of low radioactivity levels of fission products and actinides using coincidence techniques. The device combines a phoswich detector for α/β/γ-ray recognition with a fast digital card for electronic pulse analysis. The phoswich can be used in a coincident mode by identifying the composed signal produced by the simultaneous detection of α/β particles and X-rays/γ particles. The technique of coincidences with phoswich detectors was proposed recently to verify the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (NTBT) which established the necessity of monitoring low levels of gaseous fission products produced by underground nuclear explosions. With the device proposed here it is possible to identify the coincidence events and determine the energy and type of coincident particles. The sensitivity of the system has been improved by employing liquid scintillators and a high resolution low energy germanium detector. In this case it is possible to identify simultaneously by α/γ coincidence transuranic nuclides present in environmental samples without necessity of performing radiochemical separation. The minimum detectable activity was estimated to be 0.01 Bq kg -1 for 0.1 kg of soil and 1000 min counting

  1. Influence of Actively Controlled Heat Release Timing on the Performance and Operational Characteristics of a Rotary Valve, Acoustically Resonant Pulse Combustor

    KAUST Repository

    Lisanti, Joel; Roberts, William L.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of heat release timing on the performance and operational characteristics of a rotary valve, acoustically resonant pulse combustor is investigated both experimentally and numerically. Simulation results are obtained by solving the quasi-1D Navier-Stokes equations with forced volumetric heat addition. Experimental efforts modify heat release timing through modulated fuel injection and modification of the fluid dynamic mixing. Results indicate that the heat release timing has a profound effect on the operation and efficiency of the pulse combustor and that this timing can be difficult to control experimentally.

  2. Influence of Actively Controlled Heat Release Timing on the Performance and Operational Characteristics of a Rotary Valve, Acoustically Resonant Pulse Combustor

    KAUST Repository

    Lisanti, Joel

    2017-01-05

    The influence of heat release timing on the performance and operational characteristics of a rotary valve, acoustically resonant pulse combustor is investigated both experimentally and numerically. Simulation results are obtained by solving the quasi-1D Navier-Stokes equations with forced volumetric heat addition. Experimental efforts modify heat release timing through modulated fuel injection and modification of the fluid dynamic mixing. Results indicate that the heat release timing has a profound effect on the operation and efficiency of the pulse combustor and that this timing can be difficult to control experimentally.

  3. Towards long pulse high performance discharges in Tore Supra: experimental knowledge and technological developments for heat exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This document deals with fusion heat exhaust experiments in Tore Supra tokamak. The purpose of the Tore Supra tokamak is to achieve and control long pulse powerful discharges. High input power is required to generate the non inductive current, approximately 25 MW . The conception and realisation of a Plasma Facing Component (PFC) scheme able to deal with this large amount of power is the main issue. A description of the water loop used for power removal and of the calorimetric system to determine the overall heat exhaust balance is provided. The infra-red measurements used during plasma operation are also described, together with several heat exhaust devices. The behaviour of ion cyclotron and lower hybrid wave launchers is addressed. Eventually, some information is provided on technological developments of PFC in Tore Supra. (TEC). 61 refs., 34 figs

  4. Phase-coded multi-pulse technique for ultrasonic high-order harmonic imaging of biological tissues in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Qingyu; Zhang Dong; Gong Xiufen; Ma Yong

    2007-01-01

    Second or higher order harmonic imaging shows significant improvement in image clarity but is degraded by low signal-noise ratio (SNR) compared with fundamental imaging. This paper presents a phase-coded multi-pulse technique to provide the enhancement of SNR for the desired high-order harmonic ultrasonic imaging. In this technique, with N phase-coded pulses excitation, the received Nth harmonic signal is enhanced by 20 log 10 N dB compared with that in the single-pulse mode, whereas the fundamental and other order harmonic components are efficiently suppressed to reduce image confusion. The principle of this technique is theoretically discussed based on the theory of the finite amplitude sound waves, and examined by measurements of the axial and lateral beam profiles as well as the phase shift of the harmonics. In the experimental imaging for two biological tissue specimens, a plane piston source at 2 MHz is used to transmit a sequence of multiple pulses with equidistant phase shift. The second to fifth harmonic images are obtained using this technique with N = 2 to 5, and compared with the images obtained at the fundamental frequency. Results demonstrate that this technique of relying on higher order harmonics seems to provide a better resolution and contrast of ultrasonic images

  5. Application of the pulsed neutron technique on the reactors ALIZE - AQUILON (1963); Application de la methode des neutrons pulses sur les piles ALIZE et AQUILON (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquemart, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    Different methods of measuring the ratio effective delayed fraction / prompt neutron lifetime, {alpha}{sub c}, are described. According to the classic pulsed neutron technique the negative reactivity due to a localized absorber is given by {rho} / {beta}{sub eff} = {alpha} / {alpha}{sub c} -1 Experiments are reported which show that in this case {alpha}{sub c} can not be considered constant for large reactivities. The absorber element distorts the flux in the system, increasing the importance of the reflector. An application of the pulsed neutron method to the measurement of critical distributed boron concentrations of various absorber elements is described. Less time is required than for the usual super-critical techniques, and the experimental analysis is simplified. It is interesting to note that the results are not influenced by the spectral sensitivity of the control element. A modified pulsed neutron method has been tried out. This procedure was used to determine by measurements at sub-critical the critical water level of uranium-heavy water lattices with a high precision. (author) [French] Differents modes operatoires pour definir la valeur du rapport pourcentage effectif de neutrons retardes / temps de vie, {alpha}{sub c}, sont exposes. La methode classique par neutrons pulses definit l'anti-reactivite d'un element absorbant a partir de la relation: {rho} / {beta}{sub eff} {alpha} / {alpha}{sub c} -1 Les manipulations effectuees montrent qu'on ne peut considerer dans ce cas {alpha}{sub c} constant pour de tres grandes anti-reactivites. L'absorbant introduit dans la pile deforme le flux et augmente l'importance du reflecteur. Une application de la methode des neutrons pulses pour mesurer le titre critique en mg de B/l de divers absorbants est signalee. Les operations sont effectuees en regime sous-critique avec un certain gain de temps et une grande facilite de depouillement. Il est interessant de noter que les resultats ne sont pas

  6. Application of the pulsed neutron technique on the reactors ALIZE - AQUILON (1963); Application de la methode des neutrons pulses sur les piles ALIZE et AQUILON (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquemart, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    Different methods of measuring the ratio effective delayed fraction / prompt neutron lifetime, {alpha}{sub c}, are described. According to the classic pulsed neutron technique the negative reactivity due to a localized absorber is given by {rho} / {beta}{sub eff} = {alpha} / {alpha}{sub c} -1 Experiments are reported which show that in this case {alpha}{sub c} can not be considered constant for large reactivities. The absorber element distorts the flux in the system, increasing the importance of the reflector. An application of the pulsed neutron method to the measurement of critical distributed boron concentrations of various absorber elements is described. Less time is required than for the usual super-critical techniques, and the experimental analysis is simplified. It is interesting to note that the results are not influenced by the spectral sensitivity of the control element. A modified pulsed neutron method has been tried out. This procedure was used to determine by measurements at sub-critical the critical water level of uranium-heavy water lattices with a high precision. (author) [French] Differents modes operatoires pour definir la valeur du rapport pourcentage effectif de neutrons retardes / temps de vie, {alpha}{sub c}, sont exposes. La methode classique par neutrons pulses definit l'anti-reactivite d'un element absorbant a partir de la relation: {rho} / {beta}{sub eff} {alpha} / {alpha}{sub c} -1 Les manipulations effectuees montrent qu'on ne peut considerer dans ce cas {alpha}{sub c} constant pour de tres grandes anti-reactivites. L'absorbant introduit dans la pile deforme le flux et augmente l'importance du reflecteur. Une application de la methode des neutrons pulses pour mesurer le titre critique en mg de B/l de divers absorbants est signalee. Les operations sont effectuees en regime sous-critique avec un certain gain de temps et une grande facilite de depouillement. Il est interessant de noter que les resultats ne sont pas affectes par la

  7. Thermophysical properties of 22 pure metals in the solid and liquid state - The pulse-heating data collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüpf, T.; Cagran, C.; Pottlacher, G.

    2011-05-01

    The workgroup of subsecond thermophysics in Graz has a long tradition in performing fast pulseheating experiments on metals and alloys. Thereby, wire-shaped specimens are rapidly heated (108 K/s) by a large current-pulse (104 A). This method provides thermophysical properties like volume-expansion, enthalpy and electrical resistivity up to the end of the liquid phase. Today, no more experiments on pure metals are to be expected, because almost all elements, which are suitable for pulse-heating so far, have been investigated. The requirements for pulse-heating are: a melting point which is high enough to enable pyrometric temperature measurements and the availability of wire-shaped specimens. These elements are: Co, Cu, Au, Hf, In, Ir, Fe, Pb, Mo, Ni, Nb, Pd, Pt, Re, Rh, Ag, Ta, Ti, W, V, Zn, and Zr. Hence, it is the correct time to present the results in a collected form. We provide data for the above mentioned quantities together with basic information on each material. The uniqueness of this compilation is the high temperature range covered and the homogeneity of the measurement conditions (the same method, the same laboratory, etc.). The latter makes it a good starting point for comparative analyses (e.g. a comparison of all 22 enthalpy traces is in first approximation conform with the rule of Dulong-Petit which states heat capacity - the slope of enthalpy traces - as a function of the number of atoms). The data is useful for input parameters in numerical simulations and it is a major purpose of our ongoing research to provide data for simulations of casting processes for the metal working industry. This work demonstrates some examples of how a data compilation like this can be utilized. Additionally, the latest completive measurement results on Ag, Ni, Ti, and Zr are described.

  8. Thermophysical properties of 22 pure metals in the solid and liquid state – The pulse-heating data collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pottlacher G.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The workgroup of subsecond thermophysics in Graz has a long tradition in performing fast pulseheating experiments on metals and alloys. Thereby, wire-shaped specimens are rapidly heated (108 K/s by a large current-pulse (104 A. This method provides thermophysical properties like volume-expansion, enthalpy and electrical resistivity up to the end of the liquid phase. Today, no more experiments on pure metals are to be expected, because almost all elements, which are suitable for pulse-heating so far, have been investigated. The requirements for pulse-heating are: a melting point which is high enough to enable pyrometric temperature measurements and the availability of wire-shaped specimens. These elements are: Co, Cu, Au, Hf, In, Ir, Fe, Pb, Mo, Ni, Nb, Pd, Pt, Re, Rh, Ag, Ta, Ti, W, V, Zn, and Zr. Hence, it is the correct time to present the results in a collected form. We provide data for the above mentioned quantities together with basic information on each material. The uniqueness of this compilation is the high temperature range covered and the homogeneity of the measurement conditions (the same method, the same laboratory, etc.. The latter makes it a good starting point for comparative analyses (e.g. a comparison of all 22 enthalpy traces is in first approximation conform with the rule of Dulong-Petit which states heat capacity – the slope of enthalpy traces – as a function of the number of atoms. The data is useful for input parameters in numerical simulations and it is a major purpose of our ongoing research to provide data for simulations of casting processes for the metal working industry. This work demonstrates some examples of how a data compilation like this can be utilized. Additionally, the latest completive measurement results on Ag, Ni, Ti, and Zr are described.

  9. Fuel Composition and Performance Analysis of Endothermically Heated Fuels for Pulse Detonation Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    exchanger was constructed on an inner 2 in Inconel 625 schedule 10 pipe and an outer 2 ½ in Inconel 600 schedule 40 pipe 0.91 m (36 in) in length. The...switched to positions two and three for the remainder of the experiments. 46 The detonation tubes are fabricated from inconel and include heat...and four. Fuel Heating System 47 The fuel heating system centers around two pairs of inconel heat exchangers. The first pair was developed in

  10. Sterilization techniques without heating (ultraviolet ray, radiation and ozone)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hitoshi

    1991-01-01

    The recent demand of consumers for processed foods is characterized by the intention for health and nature, besides, the demand for low sweetness, salt reduction, no additive and freshness becomes strong. In view of the control of microorganisms in products, all these become the negative factors. Accordingly, in order to overcome them, it is urgently desired to develop new technology or to improve conventional methods. As to heating sterilization, the uniform temperature treatment to the inside of foods is difficult, and it cannot be applied to perishables. The high temperature sterilization above 120degC causes the change in nutrition composition and physical properties. Ultraviolet ray and ozone can be used for the sterilization of food surface and powder and liquid foods. Radiation treatment can be applied to packed foods and frozen foods as well as food surface. The principle and the fields of application of ultraviolet ray sterilization, radiation sterilization and ozone sterilization are reported. In the mechanism of these methods, the action to DNA and oxidation are common. (K.I.)

  11. Studies of some elementary processes involving electrons in the gas phase by pulse-radiolysis microwave-cavity technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunagawa, Takeyoshi; Makita, Takeshi; Musasa, Hirofumi; Tatsumi, Yoshitsugu; Shimamori, Hiroshi

    1995-01-01

    The pulse radiolysis-microwave cavity technique has been employed for detection of free electrons in the gas phase. Presented are results of the observation of electron disappearance by attachment to molecules, the electron thermalization (energy loss) processes in the presence of an electron-attaching compound, and the formation of electrons by Penning ionization. (author)

  12. Principles and techniques of radiation hardening. Volume 3. Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) and system generated EMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudie, N.J.

    1976-01-01

    The three-volume book is intended to serve as a review of the effects of thermonuclear explosion induced radiation (x-rays, gamma rays, and beta particles) and the resulting electromagnetic pulse (EMP). Volume 3 deals with the following topics: selected fundamentals of electromagnetic theory; EMP induced currents on antennas and cables; the EMP response of electronics; EMP hardening; EMP testing; injection currents; internal electromagnetic pulse (IEMP); replacement currents; and system generated electromagnetic pulse (SGEMP) hardening

  13. Interaction with the lower ionosphere of electromagnetic pulses from lightning: Heating, attachment, and ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taranenko, Y.N.; Inan, U.S.; Bell, T.F.

    1993-01-01

    The authors model the interaction of lightning flashes with the lower ionosphere. They use a Boltzmann formulation of the electron distribution function, and use Maxwells equations for the electromagnetic fields. Electromagnetic pulses from lightning have pulse lengths of 50 to 150 μs and produce peak fields of 50 V/m at distances of 100 km from the discharges. Fields greater than 16 V/m can cause avalanche ionization of neutrals at elevations of 100 km, where typical mean free paths for electrons are at least a meter. Modeling the lightning flash as a 100 μs pulse of 10 kHz radiation emitted at 70km altitude, they find that in nighttime skies the pulse can affect the electron density in the range of 1 to 30%. A sequence of pulses can lead to substantial impact on the electron density. The propagation characteristics of the pulses are such as to result in a steepening of the boundary of the lower ionosphere

  14. Laser short-pulse heating of an aluminum thin film: Energy transfer in electron and lattice sub-systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bin Mansoor, Saad; Sami Yilbas, Bekir, E-mail: bsyilbas@kfupm.edu.sa

    2015-08-15

    Laser short-pulse heating of an aluminum thin film is considered and energy transfer in the film is formulated using the Boltzmann equation. Since the heating duration is short and the film thickness is considerably small, thermal separation of electron and lattice sub-systems is incorporated in the analysis. The electron–phonon coupling is used to formulate thermal communication of both sub-systems during the heating period. Equivalent equilibrium temperature is introduced to account for the average energy of all phonons around a local point when they redistribute adiabatically to an equilibrium state. Temperature predictions of the Boltzmann equation are compared with those obtained from the two-equation model. It is found that temperature predictions from the Boltzmann equation differ slightly from the two-equation model results. Temporal variation of equivalent equilibrium temperature does not follow the laser pulse intensity in the electron sub-system. The time occurrence of the peak equivalent equilibrium temperature differs for electron and lattice sub-systems, which is attributed to phonon scattering in the irradiated field in the lattice sub-system. In this case, time shift is observed for occurrence of the peak temperature in the lattice sub-system.

  15. Laser short-pulse heating of an aluminum thin film: Energy transfer in electron and lattice sub-systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bin Mansoor, Saad; Sami Yilbas, Bekir

    2015-01-01

    Laser short-pulse heating of an aluminum thin film is considered and energy transfer in the film is formulated using the Boltzmann equation. Since the heating duration is short and the film thickness is considerably small, thermal separation of electron and lattice sub-systems is incorporated in the analysis. The electron–phonon coupling is used to formulate thermal communication of both sub-systems during the heating period. Equivalent equilibrium temperature is introduced to account for the average energy of all phonons around a local point when they redistribute adiabatically to an equilibrium state. Temperature predictions of the Boltzmann equation are compared with those obtained from the two-equation model. It is found that temperature predictions from the Boltzmann equation differ slightly from the two-equation model results. Temporal variation of equivalent equilibrium temperature does not follow the laser pulse intensity in the electron sub-system. The time occurrence of the peak equivalent equilibrium temperature differs for electron and lattice sub-systems, which is attributed to phonon scattering in the irradiated field in the lattice sub-system. In this case, time shift is observed for occurrence of the peak temperature in the lattice sub-system

  16. Application of optimal estimation techniques to FFTF decay heat removal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutt, W.T.; Additon, S.L.; Parziale, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    The verification and adjustment of plant models for decay heat removal analysis using a mix of engineering judgment and formal techniques from control theory are discussed. The formal techniques facilitate dealing with typical test data which are noisy, redundant and do not measure all of the plant model state variables directly. Two pretest examples are presented. 5 refs

  17. Determination of alpha-naphthol by an oscillating chemical reaction using the analyte pulse perturbation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Wu; Sun Kanjun; Lv Weilian; Bo Lili; He Xiaoyan; Suo Nan; Gao Jinzhang

    2005-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of alpha-naphthol (α-NP) is proposed by the sequential perturbation caused by different amounts of alpha-naphthol on the oscillating chemical system involving the Cu(II)-catalyzed oscillating reaction between hydrogen peroxide and sodium thiocyanate in an alkaline medium with the aid of continuous-flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The method relies on the linear relationship between the changes in the oscillation amplitude of the chemical system and the concentration of alpha-naphthol. The use of the analyte pulse perturbation technique permits sequential determinations in the same oscillating system owing to the expeditiousness with which the steady state is regained after each perturbation. The calibration curve obeys a linear equation very well when the concentration of alpha-naphthol is over the range 0.034-530 umol/L (r = 0.9991). Influences of temperature, injection points, flow rate and reaction variables on the oscillating system are investigated in detail and the possible mechanism of action of alpha-naphthol to the chemical oscillating system is also discussed. The method has been successfully used for the determination of α-naphthol in carbaryl hydrolysates

  18. Synthesis of electrochromic vanadium oxide by pulsed spray pyrolysis technique and its properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, C E; Tarwal, N L; Shinde, P S; Patil, P S; Deshmukh, H P

    2009-01-01

    A new improved pulsed spray pyrolysis technique (PSPT) was employed to deposit a vanadium oxide (V 2 O 5 ) thin film from a methanolic vanadium chloride precursor onto glass and conducting F : SnO 2 coated glass substrates. The structural, morphological, electrical, optical and spectroscopic properties of the film deposited at 573 K were studied. Infrared spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction confirmed the presence of the V 2 O 5 phase. The V 2 O 5 film (thickness ∼118 nm) is polycrystalline with a tetragonal crystal structure. Scanning electron microscopy reveals compact granular morphology consisting of ∼80-100 nm size grains. The film is transparent in the visible region (average %T ∼70%) with an optical band gap energy of 2.47 eV involving both direct and indirect optical transitions. The room temperature electrical resistivity (conductivity) of the film is 1.6 x 10 8 Ω cm (6.25 x 10 -9 S cm -1 ) with an activation energy of 0.67 eV in the temperature range 300-550 K. It exhibited cathodic electrochromism in the lithium containing electrolyte (0.5 M LiClO 4 + propylene carbonate).

  19. Elastic Evaluation of Poly(Lactic Acid) Electrospun Membranes Using the Pulsed Photoacoustic Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, M.; Vera-Graziano, R.; Maciel-Cerda, A.; Sánchez-Arévalo, F. M.; Godínez, F. A.

    2017-08-01

    Fibrous membranes manufactured by electrospinning possess unique features such as a high porosity and large specific surface area, making them suitable for applications in tissue engineering. However, the determination of their mechanical behavior under different loading conditions remains one of the most difficult technical problems for researchers to overcome. While the tensile properties of this kind of membrane are commonly reported in the literature, few explorations of their properties in other directions have been reported. In this paper, the pulsed photoacoustic technique is employed to obtain the elastic constants of electrospun non-woven membranes, specifically in two directions ( L, T). The electrospun samples are hybrid fiber membranes of poly(lactic acid) and hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles at different concentrations. It is found that the concentration of HA nanoparticles determines the mechanical response of the membrane, where the nanoparticles act either as a reinforcement or as a mesh defect. The elastic constants (EL, ET, GL, GT, vL, ν T) are obtained through velocity waves related to the stress-strain equations, using samples with two different geometries and considering the electrospinning mats as a transversely isotropic material. These values are compared to those acquired using macro-tensile testing equipment according to the ASTM D1708 standard.

  20. The Measurement of cloud velocity using the pulsed laser and image tracking technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Seong-Ouk; Baik, Seung-Hoon; Park, Seung-Kyu; Park, Nak-Gyu; Kim, Dong-lyul; Ahn, Yong-Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The height of the clouds is also important for the three dimensional radiative interaction of aerosols and clouds, since the radiative effects vary strongly depending whether the cloud is above, below or even embedded in an aerosol layer. Clouds play an important role in climate change, in the prediction of local weather, and also in aviation safety when instrument assisted flying is unavailable. Presently, various ground-based instruments used for the measurements of the cloud base height or velocity. Lidar techniques are powerful and have many applications in climate studies, including the clouds' temperature measurement, the aerosol particle properties, etc. Otherwise, it is very circumscribed in cloud velocity measurements In this paper, we propose a new method to measure the cloud velocity. In this paper, we presented a method for the measurement of the cloud altitude and velocity using lidar's range detection and the tracking system. For the lidar system, we used an injection-seeded pulsed Nd:YAG laser as the transmitter to measure the distance to the target clouds. We used the DIC system to track the cloud image and calculate the actual displacement per unit time. The configured lidar system acquired the lidar signal of clouds at a distance of about 4 km. The developed fast correlation algorithm of the tracking, which is used to track the fast moving cloud relatively, was efficient for measuring the cloud velocity in real time. The measurement values had a linear distribution.

  1. Time-resolved plasma spectroscopy of thin foils heated by a relativistic-intensity short-pulse laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audebert, P.; Gauthier, J.-C.; Shepherd, R.; Fournier, K.B.; Price, D.; Lee, R.W.; Springer, P.; Peyrusse, O.; Klein, L.

    2002-01-01

    Time-resolved K-shell x-ray spectra are recorded from sub-100 nm aluminum foils irradiated by 150-fs laser pulses at relativistic intensities of Iλ 2 =2x10 18 W μm 2 /cm 2 . The thermal penetration depth is greater than the foil thickness in these targets so that uniform heating takes place at constant density before hydrodynamic motion occurs. The high-contrast, high-intensity laser pulse, broad spectral band, and short time resolution utilized in this experiment permit a simplified interpretation of the dynamical evolution of the radiating matter. The observed spectrum displays two distinct phases. At early time, ≤500 fs after detecting target emission, a broad quasicontinuous spectral feature with strong satellite emission from multiply excited levels is seen. At a later time, the He-like resonance line emission is dominant. The time-integrated data is in accord with previous studies with time resolution greater than 1 ps. The early time satellite emission is shown to be a signature of an initial large area, high density, low-temperature plasma created in the foil by fast electrons accelerated by the intense radiation field in the laser spot. We conclude that, because of this early time phenomenon and contrary to previous predictions, a short, high-intensity laser pulse incident on a thin foil does not create a uniform hot and dense plasma. The heating mechanism has been studied as a function of foil thickness, laser pulse length, and intensity. In addition, the spectra are found to be in broad agreement with a hydrodynamic expansion code postprocessed by a collisional-radiative model based on superconfiguration average rates and on the unresolved transition array formalism

  2. Multiparticle imaging technique for two-phase fluid flows using pulsed laser speckle velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    The practical use of Pulsed Laser Velocimetry (PLV) requires the use of fast, reliable computer-based methods for tracking numerous particles suspended in a fluid flow. Two methods for performing tracking are presented. One method tracks a particle through multiple sequential images (minimum of four required) by prediction and verification of particle displacement and direction. The other method, requiring only two sequential images uses a dynamic, binary, spatial, cross-correlation technique. The algorithms are tested on computer-generated synthetic data and experimental data which was obtained with traditional PLV methods. This allowed error analysis and testing of the algorithms on real engineering flows. A novel method is proposed which eliminates tedious, undersirable, manual, operator assistance in removing erroneous vectors. This method uses an iterative process involving an interpolated field produced from the most reliable vectors. Methods are developed to allow fast analysis and presentation of sets of PLV image data. Experimental investigation of a two-phase, horizontal, stratified, flow regime was performed to determine the interface drag force, and correspondingly, the drag coefficient. A horizontal, stratified flow test facility using water and air was constructed to allow interface shear measurements with PLV techniques. The experimentally obtained local drag measurements were compared with theoretical results given by conventional interfacial drag theory. Close agreement was shown when local conditions near the interface were similar to space-averaged conditions. However, theory based on macroscopic, space-averaged flow behavior was shown to give incorrect results if the local gas velocity near the interface as unstable, transient, and dissimilar from the average gas velocity through the test facility.

  3. Preparation of Gd2O3 Ultrafine Nanoparticles by Pulse Electrodeposition Followed by Heat-treatment Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Aghazadeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gd2O3 nanoparticles were prepared by a two–step process; cathodic electrodeposition followed by heat-treatment method. First, Gd(OH3 nanoparticles was galvanostatically deposited from nitrate bath on the steel substrate by pulse current (PC mode. The deposition experiments was conducted at a typical on-time and off-time (ton=1ms and toff=1ms for 60 min. The electrodeposited precursor was then heat-treated at 600 oC for 3h to obtain oxide product (i.e. Gd2O3. The morphological and structural analyses confirmed that the gadolinium hydroxynitrate nanoparticles with composition of [Gd(OH2.5(NO30.5 yH2O] and uniform size about 10 nm have been prepared during pulse cathodic electrodeposition process. Furthermore, mechanism of the gadolinium hydroxynitrate nanoparticles was explained based on the base (OH– electrogeneration process on the cathode surface. The morphological observations by SEM and TEM, and structural analyses via XRD and FT-IR revealed that the oxide product is composed of well-dispersed Gd2O3 nanoparticles with pure cubic crystalline structure. It was observed that the calcination process has no effect on the morphology of the Gd2O3 nanoparticles. Mechanism of oxide formation during heat-treatment step was investigated by DSC-TG analysis and discussed in detail. The results of this work showed that pulse current deposition followed by heat–treatment can be recognized as an easy and facile method for preparation of the Gd2O3 fine nanoparticles.

  4. Gas Furnace with Pulsed Feeding of the Heating Agent for Volume Precision Heat Treatment of CCM Rolls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, V. I.; Egorova, V. M.; Gusev, S. V.

    2001-05-01

    A standard chamber batch furnace of the Severstal' plant has been modified for precision heat treatment of CCM rolls. The certification tests of a charge of rolls from steel 24KhM1F have shown the technical and economical advantages of the new design.

  5. An investigation of pulsed phase thermography for detection of disbonds in HIP-bonded beryllium tiles in ITER normal heat flux first wall (NHF FW) components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushell, J., E-mail: joe.bushell@amec.com [AMEC Foster Wheeler, Booths Hall, Chelford Road, Knutsford, Cheshire WA16 8QZ, England (United Kingdom); Sherlock, P. [AMEC Foster Wheeler, Booths Hall, Chelford Road, Knutsford, Cheshire WA16 8QZ, England (United Kingdom); Mummery, P. [School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, England (United Kingdom); Bellin, B.; Zacchia, F. [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Pulsed phase thermography was trialled on Be-tiled plasma facing components. • Two components, one with known disbonds, one intact, were inspected and compared. • Finite element analysis was used to verify experimental observations. • PPT successfully detected disbonds in the failed component. • Good agreement found with ultrasonic test, though defect geometry was uncertain. - Abstract: Pulsed phase thermography (PPT) is a non destructive examination (NDE) technique, traditionally used in the Aerospace Industry for inspection of composite structures, which combines characteristics and benefits of flash thermography and lock-in thermography into a single, rapid inspection technique. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of PPT as a means of inspection for the bond between the beryllium (Be) tiles and the copper alloy (CuCrZr) heatsink of the ITER NHF FW components. This is a critical area dictating the functional integrity of these components, as single tile detachment in service could result in cascade failure. PPT has advantages over existing thermography techniques using heated water which stress the component, and the non-invasive, non-contact nature presents advantages over existing ultrasonic methods. The rapid and non-contact nature of PPT also gives potential for in-service inspections as well as a quality measure for as-manufactured components. The technique has been appraised via experimental trials using ITER first wall mockups with pre-existing disbonds confirmed via ultrasonic tests, partnered with finite element simulations to verify experimental observations. This paper will present the results of the investigation.

  6. An investigation of pulsed phase thermography for detection of disbonds in HIP-bonded beryllium tiles in ITER normal heat flux first wall (NHF FW) components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushell, J.; Sherlock, P.; Mummery, P.; Bellin, B.; Zacchia, F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pulsed phase thermography was trialled on Be-tiled plasma facing components. • Two components, one with known disbonds, one intact, were inspected and compared. • Finite element analysis was used to verify experimental observations. • PPT successfully detected disbonds in the failed component. • Good agreement found with ultrasonic test, though defect geometry was uncertain. - Abstract: Pulsed phase thermography (PPT) is a non destructive examination (NDE) technique, traditionally used in the Aerospace Industry for inspection of composite structures, which combines characteristics and benefits of flash thermography and lock-in thermography into a single, rapid inspection technique. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of PPT as a means of inspection for the bond between the beryllium (Be) tiles and the copper alloy (CuCrZr) heatsink of the ITER NHF FW components. This is a critical area dictating the functional integrity of these components, as single tile detachment in service could result in cascade failure. PPT has advantages over existing thermography techniques using heated water which stress the component, and the non-invasive, non-contact nature presents advantages over existing ultrasonic methods. The rapid and non-contact nature of PPT also gives potential for in-service inspections as well as a quality measure for as-manufactured components. The technique has been appraised via experimental trials using ITER first wall mockups with pre-existing disbonds confirmed via ultrasonic tests, partnered with finite element simulations to verify experimental observations. This paper will present the results of the investigation.

  7. Effect of high-intensity pulsed electric fields processing and conventional heat treatment on orange-carrot juice carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torregrosa, Francisco; Cortés, Clara; Esteve, María J; Frígola, Ana

    2005-11-30

    Liquid chromatography (LC) was the method of choice for quantification of carotenoids (including geometrical isomers) to evaluate the effects of high-intensity pulsed electric field (HIPEF), a nonthermal preservation method, with different parameters (electric field intensities and treatment times), on an orange-carrot juice mixture (80:20, v/v). In parallel, a conventional heat treatment (98 degrees C, 21 s) was applied to the juice. HIPEF processing generally caused a significant increase in the concentrations of the carotenoids identified as treatment time increased. HIPEF treatment at 25 and 30 kV/cm provided a vitamin A concentration higher than that found in the pasteurized juice.

  8. Technique for measuring charged particle distribution in a pulsed beam. Sposob izmereniya raspredeleniya zaryazhennykh chastits v impul'snom puchke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakutin, V V; Shenderovich, A M

    1988-11-07

    Technique for measuring charged particle distribution in a pulsed beam by producing beam imprint on a target is described. In order to measure beam particle distribution in longitudinal direction, all beam particles are deflected simultaneously to the target, located in parallel with initial direction of beam motion, by transverse pulse magnetic field, homogeneous in the field of trajectories of beam particle motion in the field. The invention enables to conduct measurements of longitudinal distribution of particle density in beams of 10{sup -9}-10{sup -11}s duration, this corresponds to longitudinal beam dimensions from 30 cm down to 3 mm. 1 fig.

  9. Forward voltage short-pulse technique for measuring high power laser array junction temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Byron L. (Inventor); Amzajerdian, Frazin (Inventor); Barnes, Bruce W. (Inventor); Baker, Nathaniel R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of measuring the temperature of the P-N junction within the light-emitting region of a quasi-continuous-wave or pulsed semiconductor laser diode device. A series of relatively short and low current monitor pulses are applied to the laser diode in the period between the main drive current pulses necessary to cause the semiconductor to lase. At the sufficiently low current level of the monitor pulses, the laser diode device does not lase and behaves similar to an electronic diode. The voltage across the laser diode resulting from each of these low current monitor pulses is measured with a high degree of precision. The junction temperature is then determined from the measured junction voltage using their known linear relationship.

  10. Sabots, Obturator and Gas-In-Launch Tube Techniques for Heat Flux Models in Ballistic Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanoff, David W.; Wilder, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    For thermal protection system (heat shield) design for space vehicle entry into earth and other planetary atmospheres, it is essential to know the augmentation of the heat flux due to vehicle surface roughness. At the NASA Ames Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF) ballistic range, a campaign of heat flux studies on rough models, using infrared camera techniques, has been initiated. Several phenomena can interfere with obtaining good heat flux data when using this measuring technique. These include leakage of the hot drive gas in the gun barrel through joints in the sabot (model carrier) to create spurious thermal imprints on the model forebody, deposition of sabot material on the model forebody, thereby changing the thermal properties of the model surface and unknown in-barrel heating of the model. This report presents developments in launch techniques to greatly reduce or eliminate these problems. The techniques include the use of obturator cups behind the launch package, enclosed versus open front sabot designs and the use of hydrogen gas in the launch tube. Attention also had to be paid to the problem of the obturator drafting behind the model and impacting the model. Of the techniques presented, the obturator cups and hydrogen in the launch tube were successful when properly implemented

  11. Production of oxide-metal P/M composites using pulsed plasma heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blinkov, I.V.; Manukhin, A.V.; Ostapovich, A.O.; Pavlov, IU.A.

    1987-08-01

    The possibility of producing oxide-metal P/M composites using plasma generated by a pulsed discharge is investigated experimentally for the system Al/sup 2/O/sub 3/-Ni. It is found that Al/sup 2/O/sub 3/ metallization in plasma is accompanied by spheroidization; changes in the physicomechanical properties of the Al/sup 2/O/sub 3/-Ni composite during plasma treatment are examined. The characteristic features of the process associated with the effect of pulsed energy on the disperse flow of the oxide-metal mixture are discussed. 7 references.

  12. Imaging of the magnetic field structure in megagauss plasmas by combining pulsed polarimetry with an optical Kerr effect shutter technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Pulsed polarimetry in combination with a high speed photographic technique based on the optical Kerr effect is described. The backscatter in a pulsed polarimeter is directed through a scattering cell and photographed using an ∼1 ps shutter, essentially freezing the intensity pattern. The image provides both the local electron density and magnetic field distributions along and transverse to the laser sightline. Submillimeter spatial resolution is possible for probing wavelengths in the visible due to the high densities and strong optical activity. Pulsed polarimetry is thereby extended to centimeter-sized plasmas with n e >10 19 -10 20 cm -3 and B>20-100 T (MG) produced by multiterawatt, multimega-ampere electrical drivers, wire Z pinches, and liner imploded magnetized plasmas.

  13. Review of current status of high flux heat transfer techniques. Volume I. Text + Appendix A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, W.H.; Gordon, H.S.; Lackner, H.; Mettling, J.R.; Miller, J.E.

    1980-09-01

    The scope of this work comprised two tasks. The first was to review high heat flux technology with consideration given to heat transfer panel configuration, diagnostics techniques and coolant supply. The second task was to prepare a report describing the findings of the review, to recommend the technology offering the least uncertainty for scale-up for the MFTF-B requirement and to recommend any new or perceived requirements for R and D effort

  14. Review of current status of high flux heat transfer techniques. Volume I. Text + Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, W.H.; Gordon, H.S.; Lackner, H.; Mettling, J.R.; Miller, J.E.

    1980-09-01

    The scope of this work comprised two tasks. The first was to review high heat flux technology with consideration given to heat transfer panel configuration, diagnostics techniques and coolant supply. The second task was to prepare a report describing the findings of the review, to recommend the technology offering the least uncertainty for scale-up for the MFTF-B requirement and to recommend any new or perceived requirements for R and D effort.

  15. Assessment of Haar Wavelet-Quasilinearization Technique in Heat Convection-Radiation Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umer Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We showed that solutions by the Haar wavelet-quasilinearization technique for the two problems, namely, (i temperature distribution equation in lumped system of combined convection-radiation in a slab made of materials with variable thermal conductivity and (ii cooling of a lumped system by combined convection and radiation are strongly reliable and also more accurate than the other numerical methods and are in good agreement with exact solution. According to the Haar wavelet-quasilinearization technique, we convert the nonlinear heat transfer equation to linear discretized equation with the help of quasilinearization technique and apply the Haar wavelet method at each iteration of quasilinearization technique to get the solution. The main aim of present work is to show the reliability of the Haar wavelet-quasilinearization technique for heat transfer equations.

  16. Measurements of electron drift velocity in isobutane using the pulsed Townsend technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivaldini, Tulio C.; Lima, Iara B.; Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Botelho, Suzana; Tobias, Carmen C.B.; Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R.; Fonte, Paulo; Mangiarotti, Alessio

    2010-01-01

    Full text. The electron drift velocity characterizes the electric conductivity of weakly ionized gases and is one of the most important transport parameters for simulation and modeling of radiation detectors and plasma discharges. This work presents the results of electron drift velocity as a function of the reduced electric field obtained in nitrogen and isobutane by the Pulsed Townsend technique. Due to its excellent timing properties, isobutane is a common component of standard mixtures used in RPCs (Resistive Plate Chambers), however, at moderate electric fields strength (50 Td 10 Ω·m). The fast electric signals generated is amplified and were digitalized in a 1 GHz bandwidth oscilloscope to measure the electrons transit time and to calculate the electron drift velocity in different gaps between anode and cathode. As the timing information presented in the fast electric signal originated in the anode is significant in our application, the amplifier circuit had to hold special features in order to preserve the signal shape. The linear amplifier used, based on the BGM1013 integrated circuit (Philips R), reaches up to 2.1 GHz bandwidth with 35.5 dB gain and was developed and built at Laboratory of Instrumentation and Experimental Particles Physics/Portugal. In order to validate this method, measurements were initially carried out in pure nitrogen, in reduced electric fields ranging from 148 to 194 Td. These results showed good agreement with those found in the literature for this largely investigated gas. The measurements of electron drift velocities in pure isobutane were performed as a function of reduced electric field from 190 to 211 Td. The results were concordant, within the experimental errors, with the values simulated by the Imonte (version 4.5) code and the data recently obtained by our group. (author)

  17. A laser driven pulsed X-ray backscatter technique for enhanced penetrative imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deas, R M; Wilson, L A; Rusby, D; Alejo, A; Allott, R; Black, P P; Black, S E; Borghesi, M; Brenner, C M; Bryant, J; Clarke, R J; Collier, J C; Edwards, B; Foster, P; Greenhalgh, J; Hernandez-Gomez, C; Kar, S; Lockley, D; Moss, R M; Najmudin, Z; Pattathil, R; Symes, D; Whittle, M D; Wood, J C; McKenna, P; Neely, D

    2015-01-01

    X-ray backscatter imaging can be used for a wide range of imaging applications, in particular for industrial inspection and portal security. Currently, the application of this imaging technique to the detection of landmines is limited due to the surrounding sand or soil strongly attenuating the 10s to 100s of keV X-rays required for backscatter imaging. Here, we introduce a new approach involving a 140 MeV short-pulse (< 100 fs) electron beam generated by laser wakefield acceleration to probe the sample, which produces Bremsstrahlung X-rays within the sample enabling greater depths to be imaged. A variety of detector and scintillator configurations are examined, with the best time response seen from an absorptive coated BaF2 scintillator with a bandpass filter to remove the slow scintillation emission components. An X-ray backscatter image of an array of different density and atomic number items is demonstrated. The use of a compact laser wakefield accelerator to generate the electron source, combined with the rapid development of more compact, efficient and higher repetition rate high power laser systems will make this system feasible for applications in the field. Content includes material subject to Dstl (c) Crown copyright (2014). Licensed under the terms of the Open Government Licence except where otherwise stated. To view this licence, visit http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/version/3 or write to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives, Kew, London TW9 4DU, or email: psi@ nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk.

  18. Extension and application of a scaling technique for duplication of in-flight aerodynamic heat flux in ground test facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veraar, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    To enable direct experimental duplication of the inflight heat flux distribution on supersonic and hypersonic vehicles, an aerodynamic heating scaling technique has been developed. The scaling technique is based on the analytical equations for convective heat transfer for laminar and turbulent

  19. Simulation of transformations of thin metal films heated by nanosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balandin, V. Yu.; Niedrig, R.; Bostanjoglo, O.

    1995-01-01

    The ablation of free-standing thin aluminum films by a nanosecond laser pulse was investigated by time-resolved transmission electron microscopy and numerical simulation. It was established that thin film geometry is particularly suited to furnish information on the mechanism of evaporation and the surface tension of the melt. In the case of aluminum the surface tension sigma as function of temperature can be approximated by two linear sections with a coefficient -0.3 x 10(exp -3) N/K m from the melting point 933 K up to 3000 K and -0.02 x 10(exp -3) N/K m above 3000 K, respectively, with sigma(993 K) = 0.9 N/m and sigma(8500 K) = 0. At lower pulse energies the films disintegrated predominantly by thermocapillary flow. Higher pulse energies produced volume evaporation, and a nonmonotonous flow, explained by recoil from evaporating atoms and thermocapillarity. The familiar equations of energy and motion, which presuppose separate and coherent vapor and liquid phases, were not adequate to describe the ablation of the hottest zone. Surface evaporation seemed to be marginal at all laser pulse energies used.

  20. Non-local model analysis of heat pulse propagation and simulation of experiments in W7-AS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Takuya; Itoh, Sanae-I.; Yagi, Masatoshi; Itoh, Kimitaka; Stroth, U.

    1999-01-01

    A new model equation which includes the non-local effect in the hear flux is introduced to study the transient transport phenomena. A non-local heat flux, which is expressed in terms of the integral equation, is superimposed on the conventional form of the heat flux. This model is applied to describe the experimental results from the power switching [U. Stroth et al.: Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 38 (1996) 1087] and the power modulation experiments [L. Giannone et al.: Nucl. Fusion 32 (1992) 1985] in the W7-AS stellarator. A small fraction of non-local component in the heat flux is found to be very effective in modifying the response against an external modulation. The transient feature of the transport property, which are observed in the response of heat pulse propagation, are qualitatively reproduced by the transport simulations based on this model. A possibility is discussed to estimate the correlation length of the non-local effect experimentally by use of the results of transport simulations. (author)

  1. Experimental and numerical thermohydraulic study of a supercritical helium loop in forced convection under pulsed heat loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagier, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Future fusion reactor devices such as ITER or JT-60SA will produce thermonuclear fusion reaction in plasmas at several millions of degrees. The confinement in the center of the chamber is achieved by very intense magnetic fields generated by superconducting magnets. These coils have to be cooled down to 4.4 K through a forced flow of supercritical helium. The cyclic behavior of the machines leads to pulsed thermal heat loads which will have to be handled by the refrigerator. The HELIOS experiment built in CEA Grenoble is a scaled down model of the helium distribution system of the tokamak JT-60SA composed of a saturated helium bath and a supercritical helium loop. The thesis work explores HELIOS capabilities for experimental and numerical investigations on three heat load smoothing strategies: the use of the saturated helium bath as an open thermal buffer, the rotation speed variation of the cold circulator and the bypassing of the heated section. The developed model describes well the physical evolutions of the helium loop (pressure, temperature, mass flow) submitted to heat loads observed during experiments. Advanced controls have been tested and validated to improve the stability of the refrigerator and to optimize the refrigeration power. (author) [fr

  2. Pulse sliced picosecond Ballistic Imaging and two planar elastic scattering: Development of the techniques and their application to diesel sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Sean Patrick Hynes

    A line of sight imaging technique was developed which utilized pulse slicing of laser pulses to shorten the duration of the parent laser pulse, thereby making time gating more effective at removing multiple scattered light. This included the development of an optical train which utilized a Kerr cell to selectively pass the initial part of the laser pulse while rejecting photons contained later within the pulse. This line of sight ballistic imaging technique was applied to image high-pressure fuel sprays injected into conditions typically encountered in a diesel combustion chamber. Varying the environmental conditions into which the fuel was injected revealed trends in spray behavior which depend on both temperature and pressure. Different fuel types were also studied in this experiment which demonstrated remarkably different shedding structures from one another. Additional experiments were performed to characterize the imaging technique at ambient conditions. The technique was modified to use two wavelengths to allow further rejection of scattered light. The roles of spatial, temporal and polarization filtration were examined by imaging an USAF 1951 line-pair target through a highly scattering field of polystyrene micro-spheres. The optical density of the scattering field was varied by both the optical path length and number densities of the spheres. The equal optical density, but with variable path length results demonstrated the need for an aggressively shorter pulse length to effectively image the distance scales typical encountered in the primary breakup regions of diesel sprays. Results indicate that the system performance improved via the use of two wavelengths. A final investigation was undertaken to image coherent light which has elastically scattered orthogonal to the direction of the laser pulse. Two wavelengths were focused into ˜150 micron sheets via a cylindrical lens and passed under the injector nozzle. The two sheets were adjustable spatially to

  3. Numerical investigation of heating of a gold nanoparticle and the surrounding microenvironment by nanosecond laser pulses for nanomedicine applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassaroli, E; Li, K C P; O' Neill, B E [Department of Radiology, Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX, 77030 (United States)], E-mail: beoneill@tmhs.org

    2009-09-21

    We have modeled, by finite element analysis, the process of heating of a spherical gold nanoparticle by nanosecond laser pulses and of heat transfer between the particle and the surrounding medium, with no mass transfer. In our analysis, we have included thermal conductivity changes, vapor formation, and changes of the dielectric properties as a function of temperature. We have shown that such changes significantly affect the temperature reached by the particle and surrounding microenvironment and therefore the thermal and dielectric properties of the medium need to be known for a correct determination of the temperature elevation. We have shown that for sufficiently low intensity and long pulses, it is possible to establish a quasi-steady temperature profile in the medium with no vapor formation. As the intensity is increased, a phase-change with vapor formation takes place around the gold nanoparticle. As phase-transition starts, an additional increase in the intensity does not significantly increase the temperature of the gold nanoparticle and surrounding environment. The temperature starts to rise again above a given intensity threshold which is particle and environment dependent. The aim of this study is to provide useful insights for the development of molecular targeting of gold nanoparticles for applications such as remote drug release of therapeutics and photothermal cancer therapy.

  4. Numerical investigation of heating of a gold nanoparticle and the surrounding microenvironment by nanosecond laser pulses for nanomedicine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sassaroli, E; Li, K C P; O'Neill, B E

    2009-01-01

    We have modeled, by finite element analysis, the process of heating of a spherical gold nanoparticle by nanosecond laser pulses and of heat transfer between the particle and the surrounding medium, with no mass transfer. In our analysis, we have included thermal conductivity changes, vapor formation, and changes of the dielectric properties as a function of temperature. We have shown that such changes significantly affect the temperature reached by the particle and surrounding microenvironment and therefore the thermal and dielectric properties of the medium need to be known for a correct determination of the temperature elevation. We have shown that for sufficiently low intensity and long pulses, it is possible to establish a quasi-steady temperature profile in the medium with no vapor formation. As the intensity is increased, a phase-change with vapor formation takes place around the gold nanoparticle. As phase-transition starts, an additional increase in the intensity does not significantly increase the temperature of the gold nanoparticle and surrounding environment. The temperature starts to rise again above a given intensity threshold which is particle and environment dependent. The aim of this study is to provide useful insights for the development of molecular targeting of gold nanoparticles for applications such as remote drug release of therapeutics and photothermal cancer therapy.

  5. Comparative study on shelf life of whole milk processed by high-intensity pulsed electric field or heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odriozola-Serrano, I; Bendicho-Porta, S; Martín-Belloso, O

    2006-03-01

    The effect of high-intensity pulsed electric fields (HI-PEF) processing (35.5 kV/cm for 1,000 or 300 micros with bipolar 7-micros pulses at 111 Hz; the temperature outside the chamber was always milk were investigated and compared with traditional heat pasteurization (75 degrees C for 15 s), and to raw milk during storage at 4 degrees C. A HIPEF treatment of 1,000 micros ensured the microbiological stability of whole milk stored for 5 d under refrigeration. Initial acidity values, pH, and free fatty acid content were not affected by the treatments; and no proteolysis and lipolysis were observed during 1 wk of storage in milk treated by HIPEF for 1,000 micros. The whey proteins (serum albumin, beta-lactoglobulin, and alpha-lactalbumin) in HIPEF-treated milk were retained at 75.5, 79.9, and 60%, respectively, similar to values for milk treated by traditional heat pasteurization.

  6. A simple pulse shape discrimination technique applied to a silicon strip detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figuera, P.; Lu, J.; Amorini, F.; Cardella, G.; DiPietro, A.; Papa, M.; Musumarra, A.; Pappalardo, G.; Rizzo, F.; Tudisco, S.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Since the early sixties, it has been known that the shape of signals from solid state detectors can be used for particle identification. Recently, this idea has been revised in a group of papers where it has been shown that the shape of current signals from solid state detectors is mainly governed by the combination of plasma erosion time and charge carrier collection time effects. We will present the results of a systematic study on a pulse shape identification method which, contrary to the techniques proposed, is based on the use of the same electronic chain normally used in the conventional time of flight technique. The method is based on the use of charge preamplifiers, low polarization voltages (i.e. just above full depletion ones), rear side injection of the incident particles, and on a proper setting of the constant fraction discriminators which enhances the dependence of the timing output on the rise time of the input signals (which depends on the charge and energy of the incident ions). The method has been applied to an annular Si strip detector with an inner radius of about 16 mm and an outer radius of about 88 mm. The detector, manufactured by Eurisys Measures (Type Ips.73.74.300.N9), is 300 microns thick and consists of 8 independent sectors each divided into 9 circular strips. On beam tests have been performed at the cyclotron of the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud in Catania using a 25.7 MeV/nucleon 58 Ni beam impinging on a 51 V and 45 Sc composite target. Excellent charge identification from H up to the Ni projectile has been observed and typical charge identification thresholds are: ∼ 1.7 MeV/nucleon for Z ≅ 6, ∼ 3.0 MeV/nucleon for Z ≅ 11, and ∼ 5.5 MeV/nucleon for Z ≅ 20. Isotope identification up to A ≅ 13 has been observed with an energy threshold of about 6 MeV/nucleon. The identification quality has been studied as a function of the constant fraction settings. The method has been applied to all the 72 independent strips

  7. Measuring aortic pulse wave velocity using high-field cardiovascular magnetic resonance: comparison of techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaffer Jean M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The assessment of arterial stiffness is increasingly used for evaluating patients with different cardiovascular diseases as the mechanical properties of major arteries are often altered. Aortic stiffness can be noninvasively estimated by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV. Several methods have been proposed for measuring PWV using velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR, including transit-time (TT, flow-area (QA, and cross-correlation (XC methods. However, assessment and comparison of these techniques at high field strength has not yet been performed. In this work, the TT, QA, and XC techniques were clinically tested at 3 Tesla and compared to each other. Methods Fifty cardiovascular patients and six volunteers were scanned to acquire the necessary images. The six volunteer scans were performed twice to test inter-scan reproducibility. Patient images were analyzed using the TT, XC, and QA methods to determine PWV. Two observers analyzed the images to determine inter-observer and intra-observer variabilities. The PWV measurements by the three methods were compared to each other to test inter-method variability. To illustrate the importance of PWV using CMR, the degree of aortic stiffness was assessed using PWV and related to LV dysfunction in five patients with diastolic heart failure patients and five matched volunteers. Results The inter-observer and intra-observer variability results showed no bias between the different techniques. The TT and XC results were more reproducible than the QA; the mean (SD inter-observer/intra-observer PWV differences were -0.12(1.3/-0.04(0.4 for TT, 0.2(1.3/0.09(0.9 for XC, and 0.6(1.6/0.2(1.4 m/s for QA methods, respectively. The correlation coefficients (r for the inter-observer/intra-observer comparisons were 0.94/0.99, 0.88/0.94, and 0.83/0.92 for the TT, XC, and QA methods, respectively. The inter-scan reproducibility results showed low variability between the repeated

  8. Study the Effect of the Flow on the Performance of a shell and Tube Type Heat Exchanger using Experimental Design Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuher Hassan Abdullah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the current research an experimental study was done to show the effect of pulse flow on the effectiveness of shell and tube type heat exchanger. the study was in the case of steady and pulse flows with a changing mass flow rate of hot water flowing inside the pipes of the heat exchanger for the range between (0.0273-0.0819 kg / s  at fix mass flow rate of cold water that flows through the shell and on the outer surface of the pipes when (0.0416 kg / s, to obtain pulsing a used was solenoid valve. The research aims to measure the percentage effect of independent factors which were presenting the mass flow rate of hot water, flow type and the surrounding environment conditions of the experimental side upon shell and tube type heat exchanger performance using experimental design technique at the significant level (0.05.The results derived from the experimental tests showed that pulse flow leads to increase internal heat transfer coefficient (hi comparing with its value in the steady flow and the highest increase was by (9.75% at a mass flow rate of hot water (0.0416 kg / s and increases the overall heat transfer coefficient (U, where the highest percentage was by 4.68% at a mass flow rate of hot water (0.0416kg/s. The results also showed increasing both the number of transmitted units (NTU and the effectiveness of the shell and tube type heat exchanger ( in the case of pulse flow of its value in the steady flow and the highest percentage of increase occurring was (4.75% and (1.85%, respectively, and at the mass flow rate of hot water (0.0416 kg / s. Percentage effect of mass flow rate of hot water was (97%, 97.42%, 95.5%, 99.48% and the percentage effect of each flow type and the errors were (2.8%, 2.25%, 2.44%, 0.4% and (0. 2, 0.33%, 2.06%, 0.12 respectively

  9. Fuel Composition Analysis of Endothermically Heated JP-8 Fuel for Use in a Pulse Detonation Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    FHS consisted of two concentric tube heat exchangers fabricated from inconel , a single seven-micron particulate filter, and instrumentation. In...zeolite structure is made from a silica-alumina, however the catalytic agent is proprietary information (Helfrich, 2007:5). Each inconel heat...exchanger was constructed of an inner 41 2 in. alloy 625 schedule 10 pipe and an outer 2 ½ in. alloy 600 schedule 40 pipe, 0.91 m (36 in.) in length

  10. Pulsed-laser time-resolved thermal mirror technique in low-absorbance homogeneous linear elastic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasievicz, Gustavo V B; Astrath, Nelson G C; Malacarne, Luis C; Herculano, Leandro S; Zanuto, Vitor S; Baesso, Mauro L; Bialkowski, Stephen E

    2013-10-01

    A theoretical model for a time-resolved photothermal mirror technique using pulsed-laser excitation was developed for low absorption samples. Analytical solutions to the temperature and thermoelastic deformation equations are found for three characteristic pulse profiles and are compared to finite element analysis methods results for finite samples. An analytical expression for the intensity of the center of a continuous probe laser at the detector plane is derived using the Fresnel diffraction theory, which allows modeling of experimental results. Experiments are performed in optical glasses, and the models are fitted to the data. The parameters of the fit are in good agreement with previous literature data for absorption, thermal diffusion, and thermal expansion of the materials tested. The combined modeling and experimental techniques are shown to be useful for quantitative determination of the physical properties of low absorption homogeneous linear elastic material samples.

  11. Effects of shape and size of agar gels on heating uniformity during pulsed microwave treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Reyes, Nohemí; Temis-Pérez, Ana L; López-Malo, Aurelio; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; Sosa-Morales, María Elena

    2015-05-01

    Model gel systems with different shape (sphere, cylinder, and slab) and size (180 and 290 g) were prepared with agar (5%) and sucrose (5%). Dielectric constant (ε'), loss factor (ε"), thermophysical properties, and temperature distribution of the model system were measured. Each agar model system was immersed and suspended in water, and then, heated in a microwave oven with intermittent heating until the core temperature reached 50 °C. The ε' and ε" of agar gels decreased when frequency increased. The density and thermal conductivity values of the agar gels were 1033 kg/m(3) and 0.55 W/m °C, respectively. The temperature distribution of sphere, cylinder, and slab was different when similar power doses were applied. The slab reached 50 °C in less time (10 min) and showed a more uniform heating than spheres and cylinders in both sizes. Agar model systems of 180 g heated faster than those of 290 g. The coldest point was the center of the model systems in all studied cases. Shape and size are critical food factors that affect the heating uniformity during microwave heating processes. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. Plasma heating by ultrashort laser pulse in the regime of anomalous skin-effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamaly, E.G.; Kiselev, A.E.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of interaction of short laser pulse (light frequency ω 0 pulse duration, τ s /V Ti ; 1 s , skin depth, V Ti , ion velocity) with dense (ω 0 much-lt ω pe ) semi-infinite plasm was solved. The authors formulated the self-consistent problem of obtaining the electron distribution function and space dependence of electric field in skin layer, and solved the problem for the case of absence of the energy losses from the skin layer. The authors found self-similar nonstationary electron distribution function and space dependence of electric field in this case, and basing on these solutions, have calculated mean electron energy, absorption coefficient, bremsstrahlung radiation, time dependent skin depth. This paper discusses the limitations of our theory

  13. Dynamic View on Nanostructures: A Technique for Time Resolved Optical Luminescence Using Synchrotron Light Pulses at SRC, APS, and CLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heigl, F.; Jurgensen, A.; Zhou, X.-T.; Lam, S.; Murphy, M.; Ko, J.Y.P.; Sham, T.K.; Rosenberg, R.A.; Gordon, R.; Brewe, D.; Regier, T.; Armelao, L.

    2007-01-01

    We present an experimental technique using the time structure of synchrotron radiation to study time resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence. In particular we are taking advantage of the bunched distribution of electrons in a synchrotron storage ring, giving short x-ray pulses (10-10 2 picoseconds) which are separated by non-radiating gaps on the nano- to tens of nanosecond scale - sufficiently wide to study a broad range of optical decay channels observed in advanced nanostructured materials.

  14. Calculation code of mass and heat transfer in a pulsed column for Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Takeshi; Takahashi, Keiki

    1993-01-01

    A calculation code for extraction behavior analysis in a pulsed column employed at an extraction process of a reprocessing plant was developed. This code was also combined with our previously developed calculation code for axial temperature profiles in a pulsed column. The one-dimensional dispersion model was employed for both of the extraction behavior analysis and the axial temperature profile analysis. The reported values of the fluid characteristics coefficient, the transfer coefficient and the diffusivities in the pulsed column were used. The calculated concentration profiles of HNO 3 , U and Pu for the steady state have a good agreement with the reported experimental results. The concentration and temperature profiles were calculated under the operation conditions which induce the abnormal U extraction behavior, i.e. U extraction zone is moved to the bottom of the column. Thought there is slight difference between calculated and experimental value, it is appeared that our developed code can be applied to the simulation under the normal operation condition and the relatively slowly transient condition. Pu accumulation phenomena was analyzed with this code and the accumulation tendency is similar to the reported analysis results. (author)

  15. Novel localized heating technique on centrifugal microfluidic disc with wireless temperature monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Karunan; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Cho, Jongman

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of centrifugal microfluidic disc suggest the need for electrical interface in the disc to perform active biomedical assays. In this paper, we have demonstrated an active application powered by the energy harvested from the rotation of the centrifugal microfluidic disc. A novel integration of power harvester disc onto centrifugal microfluidic disc to perform localized heating technique is the main idea of our paper. The power harvester disc utilizing electromagnetic induction mechanism generates electrical energy from the rotation of the disc. This contributes to the heat generation by the embedded heater on the localized heating disc. The main characteristic observed in our experiment is the heating pattern in relative to the rotation of the disc. The heating pattern is monitored wirelessly with a digital temperature sensing system also embedded on the disc. Maximum temperature achieved is 82 °C at rotational speed of 2000 RPM. The technique proves to be effective for continuous heating without the need to stop the centrifugal motion of the disc.

  16. Measurements of electron drift velocity in isobutane using the pulsed Townsend technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivaldini, Tulio C.; Lima, Iara B.; Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Botelho, Suzana; Tobias, Carmen C.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Lab. do Acelerador Linear; Fonte, Paulo; Mangiarotti, Alessio [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dept. de Fisica. Lab. de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas

    2010-07-01

    Full text. The electron drift velocity characterizes the electric conductivity of weakly ionized gases and is one of the most important transport parameters for simulation and modeling of radiation detectors and plasma discharges. This work presents the results of electron drift velocity as a function of the reduced electric field obtained in nitrogen and isobutane by the Pulsed Townsend technique. Due to its excellent timing properties, isobutane is a common component of standard mixtures used in RPCs (Resistive Plate Chambers), however, at moderate electric fields strength (50 Td <= E/N <= 200 Td), there are insufficient data available in literature for this gas. In our experimental apparatus, electrons are liberated from an aluminum cathode (40mm diameter) due to the incidence of a nitrogen laser beam (MNL202-LD LTB) and are accelerated by the applied electric field toward the anode, made of a high resistivity glass (2 x 10{sup 10} {Omega}{center_dot}m). The fast electric signals generated is amplified and were digitalized in a 1 GHz bandwidth oscilloscope to measure the electrons transit time and to calculate the electron drift velocity in different gaps between anode and cathode. As the timing information presented in the fast electric signal originated in the anode is significant in our application, the amplifier circuit had to hold special features in order to preserve the signal shape. The linear amplifier used, based on the BGM1013 integrated circuit (Philips R), reaches up to 2.1 GHz bandwidth with 35.5 dB gain and was developed and built at Laboratory of Instrumentation and Experimental Particles Physics/Portugal. In order to validate this method, measurements were initially carried out in pure nitrogen, in reduced electric fields ranging from 148 to 194 Td. These results showed good agreement with those found in the literature for this largely investigated gas. The measurements of electron drift velocities in pure isobutane were performed as a function

  17. Heat transfer monitoring by means of the hot wire technique and finite element analysis software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Wong, J; Suarez, V; Guarachi, J; Calderón, A; Rojas-Trigos, J B; Juárez, A G; Marín, E

    2014-01-01

    It is reported the study of the radial heat transfer in a homogeneous and isotropic substance with a heat linear source in its axial axis. For this purpose, the hot wire characterization technique has been used, in order to obtain the temperature distribution as a function of radial distance from the axial axis and time exposure. Also, the solution of the transient heat transport equation for this problem was obtained under appropriate boundary conditions, by means of finite element technique. A comparison between experimental, conventional theoretical model and numerical simulated results is done to demonstrate the utility of the finite element analysis simulation methodology in the investigation of the thermal response of substances. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Yeast cell inactivation related to local heating induced by low-intensity electric fields with long-duration pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyot, Stéphane; Ferret, Eric; Boehm, Jean-Baptiste; Gervais, Patrick

    2007-01-25

    The effects of electric field (EF) treatments on Saccharomyces cerevisiae viability were investigated using a PG200 electroporator (Hoefer Scientific Instrument, San Fransisco, CA, USA) with specific attention to induced thermal effects on cell death. Lethal electric fields (1.5 kV cm(-1) for 5 s) were shown to cause heat variations in the cell suspension medium (water+glycerol), while corresponding classical thermal treatments at equivalent temperatures had no effect on the cells viability. Variations of the electrical conductivity of the intra- and extracellular matrix caused by ions and solutes transfer across the membrane were shown to be involved in the observed heating. The results permitted to build a theoretical model for the temperature variations induced by electric fields. Using this model and the electrical conductivity of the different media, a plausible explanation of the cell death induced by low-intensity electric fields with long-duration pulses has been proposed. Indeed, cell mortality could in part be caused by direct and indirect effects of electric fields. Direct effects are related to well known electromechanical phenomena, whereas indirect effects are related to secondary thermal stress caused by plasma membrane thermoporation. This thermoporation was attributed to electrical conductivity variations and the corresponding intracellular heating.

  19. Effect of Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Inconel 625 Alloy Fabricated by Pulsed Plasma Arc Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fujia; Lv, Yaohui; Liu, Yuxin; Xu, Binshi; He, Peng

    Pulsed plasma arc deposition (PPAD) was successfully used to fabricate the Ni-based superalloy Inconel 625 samples. The effects of three heat treatment technologies on microstructure and mechanical properties of the as-deposited material were investigated. It was found that the as-deposited structure exhibited homogenous cellular dendrite structure, which grew epitaxially along the deposition direction. Moreover, some intermetallic phases including Laves phase and MC carbides were precipitated in the interdendritic region as a result of Nb segregation. Compared with the as-deposited microstructure, the direct aged (DA) microstructure changed little except the precipitation of hardening phases γ' and γ" (Ni3Nb), which enhanced the hardness and tensile strength. But the plastic property was inferior due to the existence of brittle Laves phase. After solution and aging heat treatment (STA), a large amount of Laves particles in the interdendritic regions were dissolved, resulting in the reduction of Nb segregation and the precipitation of needle-like δ (Ni3Nb) in the interdendritic regions and grain boundaries. The hardness and tensile strength were improved without sacrificing the ductility. By homogenization and STA heat treatment (HSTA), Laves particles were dissolved into the matrix completely and resulted in recrystallized large grains with bands of annealing twins. The primary MC particles and remaining phase still appeared in the matrix and grain boundaries. Compared with the as-deposited sample, the mechanical properties decreased severely as a result of the grain growth coarsening. The failure modes of all the tensile specimens were analyzed with fractography.

  20. Crystalline nanostructured Cu doped ZnO thin films grown at room temperature by pulsed laser deposition technique and their characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drmosh, Qasem A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Rao, Saleem G.; Yamani, Zain H. [Laser Research Group, Department of Physics, Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Gondal, Mohammed A., E-mail: magondal@kfupm.edu.sa [Laser Research Group, Department of Physics, Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-04-01

    We report structural and optical properties of Cu doped ZnO (ZnO:Cu) thin films deposited on glass substrate at room temperature by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method without pre and post annealing contrary to all previous reports. For preparation of (ZnO:Cu) composites pure Zn and Cu targets in special geometrical arrangements were exposed to 248 nm radiations generated by KrF exciter laser. The laser energy was 200 mJ with 10 Hz frequency and 20 ns pulse width. The effect of Cu concentration on crystal structure, morphology, and optical properties were investigated by XRD, FESEM and photoluminescence spectrometer respectively. A systematic shift in ZnO (0 0 2) peak with Cu concentration observed in XRD spectra demonstrated that Cu ion has been incorporated in ZnO lattice. Uniform film with narrow size range grains were observed in FESEM images. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra measured at room temperature revealed a systematic red shift in ZnO emission peak and decrease in the band gap with the increase in Cu concentration. These results entail that PLD technique can be realized to deposit high quality crystalline ZnO and ZnO:Cu thin films without pre and post heat treatment which is normally practiced worldwide for such structures.

  1. Design and Simulation of Control Technique for Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor Using Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mansoor; Yong, Wang; Mustafa, Ehtasham

    2017-07-01

    After the rapid advancement in the field of power electronics devices and drives for last few decades, there are different kinds of Pulse Width Modulation techniques which have been brought to the market. The applications ranging from industrial appliances to military equipment including the home appliances. The vey common application for the PWM is three phase voltage source inverter, which is used to convert DC to AC in the homes to supply the power to the house in case electricity failure, usually named as Un-interrupted Power Supply. In this paper Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation techniques is discussed and analysed under the control technique named as Field Oriented Control. The working and implementation of this technique has been studied by implementing on the three phase bridge inverter. The technique is used to control the Permanente Magnet Synchronous Motor. The drive system is successfully implemented in MATLAB/Simulink using the mathematical equation and algorithm to achieve the satisfactory results. PI type of controller is used to tuned ers of the motothe parametr i.e. torque and current.

  2. A hybrid body technique: does the pulse diagnostic cun guan chi method have Chinese-Tibetan origins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the medieval origins of the main pulse diagnostic method in contemporary Chinese medicine, sometimes known as san bu (three sectors) method, which requires physicians to examine the mai (vessels, vessel movements or pulse) on the wrist at the three locations cun guan chi (inch, gate, foot). The article provides evidence to suggest that this body technique grew out of an earlier Chinese one, the cun chi (inch-foot) method, which appears to have aimed at investigating the qualities of yin and yang in order to determine the condition of a patient by means of exploring fairly large areas of the patient's body surface with the palms. The article furthermore posits that the cun chi method was decisively transformed in medieval times, presumably due to the impact of early Tibetan pulse diagnostic practices: it became framed in a numerology of three and started advocating the use of the fingertips for sensing the pulse beats. The article, which draws on detailed textual analyses of medieval manuscripts, on visual evidence and also on psychophysical research, furthermore highlights how misunderstandings can constructively contribute to cultural communication.

  3. Nondestructive analysis of the natural uranium mass through the measurement of delayed neutrons using the technique of pulsed neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, Paulo Rogerio Pinto

    1979-01-01

    This work presents results of non destructive mass analysis of natural uranium by the pulsed source technique. Fissioning is produced by irradiating the test sample with pulses of 14 MeV neutrons and the uranium mass is calculated on a relative scale from the measured emission of delayed neutrons. Individual measurements were normalised against the integral counts of a scintillation detector measuring the 14 MeV neutron intensity. Delayed neutrons were measured using a specially constructed slab detector operated in anti synchronism with the fast pulsed source. The 14 MeV neutrons were produced via the T(d,n) 4 He reaction using a 400 kV Van de Graaff accelerated operated at 200 kV in the pulsed source mode. Three types of sample were analysed, namely: discs of metallic uranium, pellets of sintered uranium oxide and plates of uranium aluminium alloy sandwiched between aluminium. These plates simulated those of Material Testing Reactor fuel elements. Results of measurements were reproducible to within an overall error in the range 1.6 to 3.9%; the specific error depending on the shape, size and mass of the sample. (author)

  4. Combined treatment with mild heat, manothermosonication and pulsed electric fields reduces microbial growth in milk

    OpenAIRE

    Halpin, R. M.; Cregenzan-Alberti, O.; Whyte, P.; Lyng, J. G.; Noci, F.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in non-thermal milk processing. The objective of the present study was to assess the efficacy of two non-thermal technologies (manothermosonication; MTS, and pulsed electric fields; PEF) in comparison to thermal pasteurisation, by assessing the microbial levels of each of these milk samples post-processing. Homogenised milk was subjected to MTS (frequency; 20 kHz, amplitude; 27.9 μm, pressure; 225 kPa) at two temperatures (37 °C or 55 °C),...

  5. Heat treatment of long pulse operation for the JAERI ERL-FEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawamura, Masaru; Nagai, Ryoji; Kikuzawa, Nobuhiro; Hajima, Ryoichi; Minehara, Eisuke

    2005-01-01

    RF power sources are replaced from all-solid-state amplifiers to IOT amplifiers for the superconducting accelerators (SCAs) and a vacuum tube amplifier for the SHB of the JAERI ERL-FEL. A long pulse operation increased the pressure in the cryostat of the SCA. The single-cell SCA can be operated in 9% duty according to the time constant of the pressure decay in the cryostat. SHB can be operated in 4% duty which is limited by the frequency range of the tuners. The result of the ABAQUS calculation shows the more duty operation. (author)

  6. Feasibility Study of SSTO Base Heating Simulation in Pulsed-Type Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chung Sik; Sharma, Surendra; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A laboratory simulation of the base heating environment of the proposed reusable Single-Stage-To-Orbit vehicle during its ascent flight was proposed. The rocket engine produces CO2 and H2, which are the main combustible components of the exhaust effluent. The burning of these species, known as afterburning, enhances the base region gas temperature as well as the base heating. To determine the heat flux on the SSTO vehicle, current simulation focuses on the thermochemistry of the afterburning, thermophysical properties of the base region gas, and ensuing radiation from the gas. By extrapolating from the Saturn flight data, the Damkohler number for the afterburning of SSTO vehicle is estimated to be of the order of 10. The limitations on the material strengths limit the laboratory simulation of the flight Damkohler number as well as other flow parameters. A plan is presented in impulse facilities using miniature rocket engines which generate the simulated rocket plume by electric ally-heating a H2/CO2 mixture.

  7. Assessment of the effectiveness of two heat removal techniques for permafrost protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders Stuhr; Doré, Guy; Voyer, Érika

    2008-01-01

    Two mitigation techniques, an air convection embankment and an embankment of a granular material with an integrated heat drain, have been tested for the implementation in the shoulders of road and airfield embankments in permafrost regions. Both techniques will allow cold air to penetrate...... and calibrated on the SSE to verify the effects on the thermal regime of full-scale embankments. The results have shown that both techniques will cause a decrease in temperature, which will minimize or even possibly avoid permafrost degradation underneath the embankments. The laboratory results have also shown...

  8. Optimization of armour geometry and bonding techniques for tungsten-armoured high heat flux components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giniyatulin, R.N.; Komarov, V.L.; Kuzmin, E.G.; Makhankov, A.N.; Mazul, I.V.; Yablokov, N.A.; Zhuk, A.N.

    2002-01-01

    Joining of tungsten with copper-based cooling structure and armour geometry optimization are the major aspects in development of the tungsten-armoured plasma facing components (PFC). Fabrication techniques and high heat flux (HHF) tests of tungsten-armoured components have to reflect different PFC designs and acceptable manufacturing cost. The authors present the recent results of tungsten-armoured mock-ups development based on manufacturing and HHF tests. Two aspects were investigated--selection of armour geometry and examination of tungsten-copper bonding techniques. Brazing and casting tungsten-copper bonding techniques were used in small mock-ups. The mock-ups with armour tiles (20x5x10, 10x10x10, 20x20x10, 27x27x10) mm 3 in dimensions were tested by cyclic heat fluxes in the range of (5-20) MW/m 2 , the number of thermal cycles varied from hundreds to several thousands for each mock-up. The results of the tests show the applicability of different geometry and different bonding technique to corresponding heat loading. A medium-scale mock-up 0.6-m in length was manufactured and tested. HHF tests of the medium-scale mock-up have demonstrated the applicability of the applied bonding techniques and armour geometry for full-scale PFC's manufacturing

  9. Experiences with the ASDEX neutralizer plates and construction of water-cooled plates for long-pulse heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp, H.; Niedermeyer, H.; Kornherr, M.

    1987-01-01

    After dismantling of the titanium neutralizer plates inspection yielded satisfactory status of flat areas whereas edges and curved shapes were heavily melted. At the inner plates of the lower divertor strongly focused melting and cutting was found which is caused by fast electrons. These electrons are continuously produced. The production mechanism is not yet clear but runaway processes can be excluded. With long-pulse additional heating of 6 MW/10s as planned for ASDEX in 1987, the total energy delivered to the plasma will increase by a factor of 30. Therefore new water-cooled neutralizer plates have been constructed which consist of a copper-steel compound. The construction principle and the topology of the cooling circuits is presented

  10. Speckle noise reduction technique for Lidar echo signal based on self-adaptive pulse-matching independent component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fan; Wang, Jiaxing; Zhu, Daiyin; Tu, Qi

    2018-04-01

    Speckle noise has always been a particularly tricky problem in improving the ranging capability and accuracy of Lidar system especially in harsh environment. Currently, effective speckle de-noising techniques are extremely scarce and should be further developed. In this study, a speckle noise reduction technique has been proposed based on independent component analysis (ICA). Since normally few changes happen in the shape of laser pulse itself, the authors employed the laser source as a reference pulse and executed the ICA decomposition to find the optimal matching position. In order to achieve the self-adaptability of algorithm, local Mean Square Error (MSE) has been defined as an appropriate criterion for investigating the iteration results. The obtained experimental results demonstrated that the self-adaptive pulse-matching ICA (PM-ICA) method could effectively decrease the speckle noise and recover the useful Lidar echo signal component with high quality. Especially, the proposed method achieves 4 dB more improvement of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than a traditional homomorphic wavelet method.

  11. Inactivation of Escherichia coli in a tropical fruit smoothie by a combination of heat and pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkling-Ribeiro, M; Noci, F; Cronin, D A; Lyng, J G; Morgan, D J

    2008-10-01

    Moderate heat in combination with pulsed electric fields (PEF) was investigated as a potential alternative to thermal pasteurization of a tropical fruit smoothie based on pineapple, banana, and coconut milk, inoculated with Escherichia coli K12. The smoothie was heated from 25 degrees C to either 45 or 55 degrees C over 60 s and subsequently cooled to 10 degrees C. PEF was applied at electric field strengths of 24 and 34 kV/cm with specific energy inputs of 350, 500, and 650 kJ/L. Both processing technologies were combined using heat (45 or 55 degrees C) and the most effective set of PEF conditions. Bacterial inactivation was estimated on standard and NaCl-supplemented tryptone soy agar (TSA) to enumerate sublethally injured cells. By increasing the temperature from 45 to 55 degrees C, a higher reduction in E. coli numbers (1 compared with 1.7 log(10) colony forming units {CFU} per milliliter, P field strength was increased during stand-alone PEF treatment from 24 to 34 kV/cm, a greater number of E. coli cells were inactivated (2.8 compared with 4.2 log(10) CFU/mL, P or = 0.05) achieved by thermal pasteurization (72 degrees C, 15 s). A reversed hurdle processing sequence did not affect bacterial inactivation (P> or = 0.05). No differences were observed (P> or = 0.05) between the bacterial counts estimated on nonselective and selective TSA, suggesting that sublethal cell injury did not occur during single PEF treatments or combined heat/PEF treatments.

  12. Analyses of Effects of Cutting Parameters on Cutting Edge Temperature Using Inverse Heat Conduction Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Ribeiro dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During machining energy is transformed into heat due to plastic deformation of the workpiece surface and friction between tool and workpiece. High temperatures are generated in the region of the cutting edge, which have a very important influence on wear rate of the cutting tool and on tool life. This work proposes the estimation of heat flux at the chip-tool interface using inverse techniques. Factors which influence the temperature distribution at the AISI M32C high speed steel tool rake face during machining of a ABNT 12L14 steel workpiece were also investigated. The temperature distribution was predicted using finite volume elements. A transient 3D numerical code using irregular and nonstaggered mesh was developed to solve the nonlinear heat diffusion equation. To validate the software, experimental tests were made. The inverse problem was solved using the function specification method. Heat fluxes at the tool-workpiece interface were estimated using inverse problems techniques and experimental temperatures. Tests were performed to study the effect of cutting parameters on cutting edge temperature. The results were compared with those of the tool-work thermocouple technique and a fair agreement was obtained.

  13. Prediction technique for minimum-heat-flux (MHF)- point condition of saturated pool boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Shigefumi

    1987-01-01

    The temperature-controlled hypothesis for the minimum-heat-flux (MHF)-point condition, in which the MHF-point temperature is regarded as the controlling factor and is expected to be independent of surface configuration and dimensions, is inductively investigated for saturated pool-boiling. In this paper such features of the MHF-point condition are experimentally proved first. Secondly, a correlation of the MHF-point temperature is developed for the effect of system pressure. Finally, a simple technique based on this correlation is presented to estimate the effects of surface configuration, dimensions and system pressure on the minimum heat flux. (author)

  14. Full melting of a two-dimensional complex plasma crystal triggered by localized pulsed laser heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couëdel, L.; Nosenko, V.; Rubin-Zuzic, M.; Zhdanov, S.; Elskens, Y.; Hall, T.; Ivlev, A. V.

    2018-04-01

    The full melting of a two-dimensional plasma crystal was induced in a principally stable monolayer by localized laser stimulation. Two distinct behaviors of the crystal after laser stimulation were observed depending on the amount of injected energy: (i) below a well-defined threshold, the laser melted area recrystallized; (ii) above the threshold, it expanded outwards in a similar fashion to mode-coupling instability-induced melting, rapidly destroying the crystalline order of the whole complex plasma monolayer. The reported experimental observations are due to the fluid mode-coupling instability, which can pump energy into the particle monolayer at a rate surpassing the heat transport and damping rates in the energetic localized melted spot, resulting in its further growth. This behavior exhibits remarkable similarities with impulsive spot heating in ordinary reactive matter.

  15. Excess heat production in Pd/D during periodic pulse discharge current in various conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karabut, A.B. [FSUE ' LUCH' , 24 Zheleznodorozhnaya St., Podolsk, Moscow Region 142100 (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    Experimental date from low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR) in condensed media are presented. The nuclear reactions products were found in solid cathode media used in glow discharge. Apparently, the nuclear reactions were initiated when bombarding the cathode surface by plasma ions with the energy of 1.0 - 2.0 keV. Excess heat from a high current glow discharge reaction in D{sub 2}, Xe, and Kr using cathodes already charged with preliminary deuterium-charged Pd and Ti cathode samples are given. Excess heat up to 10-15 W and efficiency up to 130% were recorded under the experiments for Pd cathode samples in D{sub 2} discharge. Excess heat up to 5 W and efficiency up to 150% were recorded for Pd cathodes that were charged with deuterium before the run, in Xe and Kr discharges. At the same time excess heat was not observed for pure Pd cathode samples in Xe and Kr discharges. The formation of impurity nuclides ({sup 7}Li, {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, {sup 20}Ne, {sup 29}Si, {sup 44}Ca, {sup 48}Ca, {sup 56}Fe, {sup 57}Fe, {sup 59}Co, {sup 64}Zn, {sup 66}Zn, {sup 75}As, {sup 107}Ag, {sup 109}Ag, {sup 110}Cd, {sup 111}Cd, {sup 112}Cd, {sup 114}Cd and {sup 115}In) with 'the efficiency up to 10{sup 13} at./s was recorded. The isotopic ratios of these new nuclides were quite different from the natural ratios. Soft X-ray radiation from the solid-state cathode with the intensity up to 0.01 Gy/s was recorded in experiments with discharges in H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, Ar, Xe, and Kr. The X-ray radiation was observed in bursts of up to 10{sup 6} photons, with up to 10{sup 5} bursts per second while the discharge was formed and within 100 ms after turning off the discharge current. The results of the X-ray radiation registration showed that the excited energy levels have a lifetime up to 100 ms or more, and the energy of 1.2 - 2.5 keV. A possible mechanism for producing excess heat and nuclear transmutation reactions in the solid medium with the excited energy levels is considered.

  16. Excess heat production in Pd/D during periodic pulse discharge current in various conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karabut, A.B.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental date from low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR) in condensed media are presented. The nuclear reactions products were found in solid cathode media used in glow discharge. Apparently, the nuclear reactions were initiated when bombarding the cathode surface by plasma ions with the energy of 1.0 - 2.0 keV. Excess heat from a high current glow discharge reaction in D 2 , Xe, and Kr using cathodes already charged with preliminary deuterium-charged Pd and Ti cathode samples are given. Excess heat up to 10-15 W and efficiency up to 130% were recorded under the experiments for Pd cathode samples in D 2 discharge. Excess heat up to 5 W and efficiency up to 150% were recorded for Pd cathodes that were charged with deuterium before the run, in Xe and Kr discharges. At the same time excess heat was not observed for pure Pd cathode samples in Xe and Kr discharges. The formation of impurity nuclides ( 7 Li, 13 C, 15 N, 20 Ne, 29 Si, 44 Ca, 48 Ca, 56 Fe, 57 Fe, 59 Co, 64 Zn, 66 Zn, 75 As, 107 Ag, 109 Ag, 110 Cd, 111 Cd, 112 Cd, 114 Cd and 115 In) with 'the efficiency up to 10 13 at./s was recorded. The isotopic ratios of these new nuclides were quite different from the natural ratios. Soft X-ray radiation from the solid-state cathode with the intensity up to 0.01 Gy/s was recorded in experiments with discharges in H 2 , D 2 , Ar, Xe, and Kr. The X-ray radiation was observed in bursts of up to 10 6 photons, with up to 10 5 bursts per second while the discharge was formed and within 100 ms after turning off the discharge current. The results of the X-ray radiation registration showed that the excited energy levels have a lifetime up to 100 ms or more, and the energy of 1.2 - 2.5 keV. A possible mechanism for producing excess heat and nuclear transmutation reactions in the solid medium with the excited energy levels is considered

  17. Effect of Simplifying Drilling Technique on Heat Generation During Osteotomy Preparation for Dental Implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kholey, Khalid E; Ramasamy, Saravanan; Kumar R, Sheetal; Elkomy, Aamna

    2017-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that there would be no difference in heat production by reducing the number of drills during the implant site preparation relative to conventional drilling sequence. A total of 120 implant site preparations with 3 different diameters (3.6, 4.3, and 4.6 mm) were performed on bovine ribs. Within the same diameter group, half of the preparations were performed by a simplified drilling procedure (pilot drill + final diameter drill) and other half using the conventional drilling protocol (pilot drill followed by graduated series of drills to widen the site). Heat production by different drilling techniques was evaluated by measuring the bone temperature using k-type thermocouple and a sensitive thermometer before and after each drill. Mean for maximum temperature increase during site preparation of the 3.6, 4.3, and 4.6-mm implants was 2.45, 2.60, and 2.95° when the site was prepared by the simplified procedure, whereas it was 2.85, 3.10, and 3.60° for the sites prepared by the conventional technique, respectively. No significant difference in temperature increase was found when implants of the 3 different diameters were prepared either by the conventional or simplified drilling procedure. The simplified drilling technique produced similar amount of heat comparable to the conventional technique that proved the initial hypothesis.

  18. Detection of wall thinning of carbon steel pipe covered with insulation using Pulsed Eddy Current technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Duckgun; Kishore, M. B.; Lee, D. H.

    2013-01-01

    The test sample is a ferromagnetic carbon steel pipe having different thickness, covered with a 10 cm plastic insulation laminated by 0.4 mm Al plate to simulate the pipelines in NPPs. The PEC Probe used for the wall thinning detection consists of an excitation coil and a Hall sensor. The excitation coils in the probe is driven by a rectangular bipolar current pulse and the Hall-sensor will detects the resultant field. The Hall sensor output is considered as PEC signal. Results shows that the PEC system can detect wall thinning in an insulated pipeline of the NPPs. Local wall thinning in pipelines affects the structural integrity of industries like nuclear power plants (NPPs). In the present study a pulsed eddy current (PEC) technology to detect the wall thing of carbon steel pipe covered with insulation is developed

  19. Experimental determination of the thermal contact conductance between two solid surfaces by the energy pulse technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, Gerson Antonio

    1979-01-01

    An experimental procedure for the determination of the thermal contact conductance between two solid surfaces as a function of the contact pressure and the energy of the laser radiation has been developed using the laser pulse method. A rubi laser with variable energy levels was employed as a radiating pulse energy source. The laser beam was allowed to impinge perpendicularly on the front face of a electrolytic iron 73 4 . The temperature fluctuations resulting on the back surface of the sample was detected by a thermocouple, which Is coupled to a PDP-11/45 Computer 32 Kbytes of memory, through a Analog-Digital Converter. A theoretical function, derived exclusively for the problem mentioned in this work, was adjusted by a method of least square fitting of experimental results. This adjustment yielded the value of a parameter related to the contact conductance between two surfaces. The experimental error obtained for the thermal contact conductance was +- 4.9%. (author)

  20. Pulse-echo ultrasonic inspection system for in-situ nondestructive inspection of Space Shuttle RCC heat shields.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Walkington, Phillip D.; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2005-06-01

    The reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) heat shield components on the Space Shuttle's wings must withstand harsh atmospheric reentry environments where the wing leading edge can reach temperatures of 3,000 F. Potential damage includes impact damage, micro cracks, oxidation in the silicon carbide-to-carbon-carbon layers, and interlaminar disbonds. Since accumulated damage in the thick, carbon-carbon and silicon-carbide layers of the heat shields can lead to catastrophic failure of the Shuttle's heat protection system, it was essential for NASA to institute an accurate health monitoring program. NASA's goal was to obtain turnkey inspection systems that could certify the integrity of the Shuttle heat shields prior to each mission. Because of the possibility of damaging the heat shields during removal, the NDI devices must be deployed without removing the leading edge panels from the wing. Recently, NASA selected a multi-method approach for inspecting the wing leading edge which includes eddy current, thermography, and ultrasonics. The complementary superposition of these three inspection techniques produces a rigorous Orbiter certification process that can reliably detect the array of flaws expected in the Shuttle's heat shields. Sandia Labs produced an in-situ ultrasonic inspection method while NASA Langley developed the eddy current and thermographic techniques. An extensive validation process, including blind inspections monitored by NASA officials, demonstrated the ability of these inspection systems to meet the accuracy, sensitivity, and reliability requirements. This report presents the ultrasonic NDI development process and the final hardware configuration. The work included the use of flight hardware and scrap heat shield panels to discover and overcome the obstacles associated with damage detection in the RCC material. Optimum combinations of custom ultrasonic probes and data analyses were merged with the inspection procedures needed to

  1. Electrooxidation of aliphatic alcohols on palladium oxide catalyst prepared by pulsed electrodeposition technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casella, Innocenzo G.

    2009-01-01

    Palladium film can be deposited on gold polycrystalline electrodes, from a deoxygenated alkaline solution containing 50 mM NaOH plus 0.5 mM K 2 Pd(CN) 4 . A multipulse sequence of potentials of equal amplitude and duration was used for the palladium deposition process. In particular, an optimized waveform of potentials of E 1 = 1.0 V vs. SCE and E 2 = -1.0 V vs. SCE for the relevant pulse duration of t 1 = 0.05 s and t 2 = 0.05 s, for 30 s, was used. Cyclic voltammetry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to characterize the gold-palladium modified electrode (Au-Pd) towards the electrooxidation of aliphatic alcohols in alkaline solutions. The voltammetric study suggests that the kinetics involved in the alcohol electrooxidation at the Pd-Au electrode are sensibly higher than those observed on the bare Pd and Au electrodes. In addition, the most interesting aspect of the electrooxidation of aliphatic alcohols at the Au-Pd electrode was that as the number of methylene groups on the homologous series of aliphatic alcohols increased, the molar response also increased. Under pulsed chronoamerometric conditions (PCC), using an optimized triple pulse waveform of potentials the modified electrode exhibits interesting catalytic currents without any apparent poisoning effects during the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols.

  2. Optimizing the Thermoacoustic Pulse Tube Refrigerator Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Blagin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with research and optimization of the thermoacoustic pulse tube refrigerator to reach a cryogenic temperature level. The refrigerator is considered as a thermoacoustic converter based on the modified Stirling cycle with helium working fluid. A sound pressure generator runs as a compressor. Plant model comprises an inner heat exchanger, a regenerative heat exchanger, a pulse tube, hot and cold heat exchangers at its ends, an inertial tube with the throttle, and a reservoir. A model to calculate the pulse tube thermoacoustic refrigerator using the DeltaEC software package has been developed to be a basis for calculation techniques of the pulse tube refrigerator. Momentum, continuity, and energy equations for helium refrigerant are solved according to calculation algorithm taking into account the porosity of regenerator and heat exchangers. Optimization of the main geometric parameters resulted in decreasing temperature of cold heat exchanger by 41,7 K. After optimization this value became equal to 115,01 K. The following parameters have been optimized: diameters of the feeding and pulse tube and heat exchangers, regenerator, lengths of the regenerator and pulse and inertial tubes, as well as initial pressure. Besides, global minimum of temperatures has been searched at a point of local minima corresponding to the optimal values of abovementioned parameters. A global-local minima difference is 0,1%. Optimized geometric and working parameters of the thermoacoustic pulse tube refrigerator are presented.

  3. Improvement of the yield of highly charged ions by a gas-pulsing technique and the current status of the NIRS Penning source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Tomohiro; Miyoshi, Tomohiro; Sakuma, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Mitsugu; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Sato, Yukio

    2004-01-01

    The yields of highly charged ions have been improved by using a gas-pulsing technique in the pulsed Penning-ionized-gauge ion source (PIGIS) in the heavy-ion medical accelerator in Chiba. So far, this pulsed PIGIS has been operated under a low-duty factor (10 -2 -10 -3 ), in which the gas flow is not being pulsed. A solenoid-type gas valve, having a simple structure compared to the piezo-electric type, was attached to the outside of the PIGIS chamber in order to control the gas flow into the PIGIS chimney. Beam tests for Ne with gas pulsing showed that the pressure response time should actually be a few tens ms, and the intensity of Ne 6+ was increased by ten times, from 20 to 200 eμA. The gas pulsing also improved the average vacuum in the low energy beam transport (LEBT) line by a factor of 4. When producing H 2 + , H 3 + , and He 1+ by PIGIS with gas pulsing, the beam loss of highly charged ions from electron cyclotron resonance ion sources in the LEBT was reduced to be negligible; meanwhile, it was around 30% without gas pulsing. This paper describes the gas-pulsing technique and the preliminary results, as well as some recent developments in the NIRS-PIGIS

  4. Application of the pulse-shape technique to proton-alpha discrimination in Si-detector arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pausch, G.; Moszynski, M.; Wolski, D.; Bohne, W.; Grawe, H.; Hilscher, D.; Schubart, R.; De Angelis, G.; De Poli, M.

    1995-04-01

    The capability of the pulse-shape technique with reversed n-type Si detectors for discrimination of protons and alphas produced in fusion-evaporation reactions was tested at the VICKSI cyclotron in Berlin. We applied a zero-crossing technique which does not need any external time reference, and which can therefore be exploited at DC accelerators. Excellent proton-alpha discrimination in the full energy range of the evaporation spectra, but also charge and even isotope resolution for heavier ions produced in projectile fragmentation, was obtained with detectors of an existing Si ball. There is no doubt that the pulse-shape discrimination works well with detectors from serial production and under experimental conditions which are typical for nuclear structure studies. An application of this technique in Si detector arrays is obvious, but some special features must be considered in the design of the electronics. The particle discrimination depends strongly on the electric field distribution inside the detector. Stabilization of the bias voltage at the detector is therefore recommended. A consequence of the rear-side injection mode is a strong variation of the charge-collection time with energy, charge, and mass number of the detected ion. To obtain a precise energy signal it is indispensable to correct for the ballistic deficit. (orig.)

  5. Observation of bulk-ion heating in a tokamak plasma by application of positive and negative current pulses in TRIAM-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toi, K; Hiraki, N; Nakamura, K; Mitarai, O; Kawai, Y; Itoh, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1980-09-01

    A positive of negative current pulse induced by a pulsed toroidal electric field much higher than the Dreicer field increases the bulk-ion temperature of the plasma centre two to three times, without macroscopic plasma destruction. The decay time of the raised ion temperature agrees well with the prediction from neoclassical transport theory. The magnitude of the positive current pulse is limited by violent current disruption, and that of the negative current by a lack of MHD equilibrium which is due to a marked reduction of the total plasma current. The relevant current-driven instabilities in the turbulent heating of a tokamak plasma, skin heating and inward transfer of the energy deposition in the skin layer are briefly discussed.

  6. Development of technique to apply induction heating stress improvement to recirculation inlet nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Kunihiko; Nihei, Kenichi; Ootaka, Minoru

    2009-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) have been found in the primary loop recirculation (PLR) systems of boiling water reactors (BWR). Residual stress in welding heat-affected zone is one of the factors of SCC, and the residual stress improvement is one of the most effective methods to prevent SCC. Induction heating stress improvement (IHSI) is one of the techniques to improve reduce residual stress. However, it is difficult to apply IHSI to the place such as the recirculation inlet nozzle where the flow stagnates. In this present study, the technique to apply IHSI to the recirculation inlet nozzle was developed using water jet which blowed into the crevice between the nozzle safe end and the thermal sleeve. (author)

  7. Liquid metal targets for high-power applications : pulsed heating and shock hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.

    2000-01-01

    Significant interest has recently focused on the use of liquid-metal targets flowing with high velocities for various high-power nuclear and high-energy physics applications such as fusion reactor first-walls, the Spallation Neutron Source, Isotope Separation On Line, and Muon Collider projects. This is because the heat generated in solid targets due to beam or plasma bombardment cannot be removed easily and the resulting thermal shock damage could be a serious lifetime problem for long-term operation. More recently, the use of free or open flying-liquid jets has been proposed for higher-power-density applications. The behavior of a free-moving liquid mercury or gallium jet subjected to proton beam deposition in a strong magnetic field has been modeled and analyzed for the Muon Collider project. Free-liquid-metal jets can offer significant advantages over conventional solid targets, particularly for the more demanding and challenging high-power applications. However, the use of free-moving liquid-metal targets raises a number of new and challenging problems such as instabilities of the jet in a strong magnetic field, induced eddy-current effects on jet shape, thermal-shock formation, and possible jet fragmentation. Problems associated with shock heating of liquid jets in a strong magnetic field are analyzed in this study

  8. Pulse simulations and heat flow measurements for the ATLAS Forward Calorimeter under high-luminosity conditions

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)758133; Zuber, Kai

    The high luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN is an important step for further and more detailed studies of the Standard Model of particle physics as well as searches for new physics. The necessary upgrade of the ATLAS detector is a challenging task as the increased luminosity entails many problems for the different detector parts. The liquid-argon Forward Calorimeter suffers signal-degradation effects and a high voltage drop of the supply potential under high-luminosity conditions. It is possible that the argon starts to boil due to the large energy depositions. The effect of the high-luminosity environment on the liquid-argon Forward Calorimeter has been simulated in order to investigate the level of signal degradation. The results show a curvature of the triangular pulse shape that appears prolonged when increasing the energy deposit. This effect is caused by the drop in the electric potential that produces a decrease in the electric field across the liquid-argon gap in the Forward Calorim...

  9. Determination of base-line levels of trace amounts in pulses and spices using neutron activation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, J.H.; Arif, M.; Fatima, I.; Qureshi, I.H.

    1993-01-01

    It has been established that essential trace elements are vitally important for biochemical systems, whereas toxic elements if present in relatively higher amounts adversely affect these systems. Trace elements reach the human body mainly through foodstuffs. The different articles contain varying amount of toxic and essential elements. It is therefore necessary to asses the adequacy and safety of the diet by determining the base-line levels of these elements. In continuation of our previous work, some varieties of pulses and spices were analyzed using neutron activation technique. Among the four varieties of pulses lentil (lens esculenta) was found to contain higher amounts of essential elements and lower amounts of toxic elements. The daily intake of essential and toxic elements through pulses was estimated and compared with the suggested values. The estimated intake of essential elements is adequate and that of toxic elements is well below the tolerance limit. In spices cumin and caraway seeds were found to contain relatively higher amounts of essential as well as toxic elements. The studies showed that food spices were additional source of trace element intake. (author)

  10. A spatial model with pulsed releases to compare strategies for the sterile insect technique applied to the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oléron Evans, Thomas P; Bishop, Steven R

    2014-08-01

    We present a simple mathematical model to replicate the key features of the sterile insect technique (SIT) for controlling pest species, with particular reference to the mosquito Aedes aegypti, the main vector of dengue fever. The model differs from the majority of those studied previously in that it is simultaneously spatially explicit and involves pulsed, rather than continuous, sterile insect releases. The spatially uniform equilibria of the model are identified and analysed. Simulations are performed to analyse the impact of varying the number of release sites, the interval between pulsed releases and the overall volume of sterile insect releases on the effectiveness of SIT programmes. Results show that, given a fixed volume of available sterile insects, increasing the number of release sites and the frequency of releases increases the effectiveness of SIT programmes. It is also observed that programmes may become completely ineffective if the interval between pulsed releases is greater that a certain threshold value and that, beyond a certain point, increasing the overall volume of sterile insects released does not improve the effectiveness of SIT. It is also noted that insect dispersal drives a rapid recolonisation of areas in which the species has been eradicated and we argue that understanding the density dependent mortality of released insects is necessary to develop efficient, cost-effective SIT programmes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysis and Minimization of Output Current Ripple for Discontinuous Pulse-Width Modulation Techniques in Three-Phase Inverters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Grandi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives the complete analysis of the output current ripple in three-phase voltage source inverters considering the different discontinuous pulse-width modulation (DPWM strategies. In particular, peak-to-peak current ripple amplitude is analytically evaluated over the fundamental period and compared among the most used DPWMs, including positive and negative clamped (DPWM+ and DPWM−, and the four possible combinations between them, usually named as DPWM0, DPWM1, DPWM2, and DPWM3. The maximum and the average values of peak-to-peak current ripple are estimated, and a simple method to correlate the ripple envelope with the ripple rms is proposed and verified. Furthermore, all the results obtained by DPWMs are compared to the centered pulse-width modulation (CPWM, equivalent to the space vector modulation to identify the optimal pulse-width modulation (PWM strategy as a function of the modulation index, taking into account the different average switching frequency. In this way, the PWM technique providing for the minimum output current ripple is identified over the whole modulation range. The analytical developments and the main results are experimentally verified by current ripple measurements with a three-phase PWM inverter prototype supplying an induction motor load.

  12. Heat Exchanger Tube Inspection of Nuclear Power Plants using IRIS Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Byung Sik; Yang, Seung Han; Song, Seok Yoon; Kim, Yong Sik; Lee, Hee Jong

    2005-01-01

    Inspection of heat exchange tubing include steam generator of nuclear power plant mostly performed with eddy current method. Recently, various inspection technique is available such as remote field eddy current, flux leakage and ultrasonic methods. Each of these techniques has its merits and limitations. Electromagnetic techniques are very useful to locate areas of concern but sizing is hard because of the difficult interpretation of an electric signature. On the other hand, ultrasonic methods are very accurate in measuring wall loss damage, and are reliable for detecting cracks. Additionally ultrasound methods is not affected by support plates or tube sheets and variation of electrical conductivity or permeability. Ultrasound data is also easier to analyze since the data displayed is generally the remaining wall thickness. It should be emphasized that ultrasound is an important tool for sizing defects in tubing. In addition, it can be used in situations where eddy current or remote field eddy current is not reliable, or as a flaw assessment tool to supplement the electromagnetic data. The need to develop specialized ultrasonic tools for tubing inspection was necessary considering the limitations of electromagnetic techniques to some common inspection problems. These problems the sizing of wall loss in carbon steel tubes near the tube sheet or support plate, sizing internal erosion damage, and crack detection. This paper will present an IRIS(Internal Rotating Inspection System) ultrasonic tube inspection technique for heat exchanger tubing in nuclear power plant and verify inspection reliability for artificial flaw embedded to condenser tube

  13. A unified approach to assess performance of different techniques for recovering exhaust heat from gas turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carapellucci, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Exhaust heat from gas turbines can be recovered externally or internally to the cycle itself. Of the technology options for external recovery, the combined gas-steam power plant is by far the most effective and commonly used worldwide. For internal recovery conventional solutions are based on thermodynamic regeneration and steam injection, while innovative solutions rely on humid air regeneration and steam reforming of fuel. In this paper a unified approach for analysing different exhaust heat recovery techniques is proposed. It has been possible to define a characteristic internal heat recovery plane, based on a few meaningful parameters and to identify an innovative scheme for repowering existing combined cycles. The characteristic plane indicates directly the performance obtainable with the different recovery techniques, showing that performances close to combined cycle plants (external recovery) can only be achieved with combined recovery techniques (humid air regeneration, steam reforming of fuel). The innovative repowering scheme, which requires the addition of a gas turbine and one-pressure level HRSG to an existing combined gas-steam power plant, significantly increases power output with fairly high marginal efficiency.

  14. Influence of Bipolar Pulse Poling Technique for Piezoelectric Vibration Energy Harvesters using Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 Films on 200 mm SOI Wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriwaki, N; Fujimoto, K; Suzuki, K; Kobayashi, T; Itoh, T; Maeda, R; Suzuki, Y; Makimoto, N

    2013-01-01

    Piezoelectric vibration energy harvester arrays using Pb(Zr,Ti)O 3 thin films on 200 mm SOI wafers were fabricated. In-plane distribution of influence of bipolar pulse poling technique on direct current (DC) power output from the harvesters was investigated. The results indicate that combination poling treatment of DC and bipolar pulse poling increases a piezoelectric property and reduces a dielectric constant. It means that this poling technique improves the figure of merit of sensors and harvesters. Maximum DC power from a harvester treated by DC poling after bipolar pulse poling is about five times larger than a one treated by DC poling only

  15. Flight test techniques for validating simulated nuclear electromagnetic pulse aircraft responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, R. M.; Neely, W. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt has been made to determine the effects of nuclear EM pulses (NEMPs) on aircraft systems, using a highly instrumented NASA F-106B to document the simulated NEMP environment at the Kirtland Air Force Base's Vertically Polarized Dipole test facility. Several test positions were selected so that aircraft orientation relative to the test facility would be the same in flight as when on the stationary dielectric stand, in order to validate the dielectric stand's use in flight configuration simulations. Attention is given to the flight test portions of the documentation program.

  16. Study of two-zone reactor system using a pulsed neutron technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishin, B P; Platovskikh, Yu A; Didejkin, T S

    1977-05-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations of a neutron flux time dependence after a sport fast neutron pulse in a reactor core - neutron reflector multiplying system have been conducted. A correlation between eigenvalues governing neutron flux decrease at t..-->..infinity for the two-zone system and eigenvalues for each zone has been established in terms of the one-group diffusion approximation. Experiments have been performed in an experimental subcritical assembly comprising a cylindrical uranium core surrounded by a radial water reflector with different boric acid concentrations.

  17. Depth profiling of laser-heated chromophores in biological tissues by pulsed photothermal radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milner, T.E.; Goodman, D.M.; Tanenbaum, B.S.; Nelson, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    A solution method is proposed to the inverse problem of determining the unknown initial temperature distribution in a laser-exposed test material from measurements provided by infrared radiometry. A Fredholm integral equation of the first kind is derived that relates the temporal evolution of the infrared signal amplitude to the unknown initial temperature distribution in the exposed test material. The singular-value decomposition is used to demonstrate the severely ill-posed nature of the derived inverse problem. Three inversion methods are used to estimate solutions for the initial temperature distribution. A nonnegatively constrained conjugate-gradient algorithm using early termination is found superior to unconstrained inversion methods and is applied to image the depth of laser-heated chromophores in human skin. Key words: constrained conjugate gradients, ill-posed problem, infrared radiometry, laser surgery, nonnegative, singular-value decomposition

  18. CFD simulation of the pulsed neutron activation technique for water flow measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattsson, H.; Nordlund, A.

    2005-01-01

    A pulse neutron activation (PNA) flowmeter uses a radioactive substance to measure water flow in pipes. The water in the pipe is bombarded with neutron pulses, thus introducing activity into the pipe. The activity is then transported and mixed with the flow. Gamma radiation emitted from the activity is measured with one or two detectors downstream from the activation point. The average velocity of the water is calculated using the time-resolved signal from the detector. The CFD program FLUENT was used to simulate the transport and mixing of the activity induced in the pipe. The turbulence of the flow is described with the k-ε model. Some parameters affecting a PNA measurement have been investigated. From the calculations it was possible to quantify how much the average initial velocity of the activity differs from the average velocity of the water. Results also show that activity initially produced far away from the wall has a substantial effect on the detector signal. To accurately simulate the detector signal it is necessary to include activity produced in a large part of the pipe. The results also indicate that the collimation of the detectors have a significant impact on the data and should be included when evaluating simulated data. Three different response functions were also tested. (authors)

  19. High pressure does not counterbalance the advantages of open techniques over closed techniques during heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy with oxaliplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facy, Olivier; Combier, Christophe; Poussier, Matthieu; Magnin, Guy; Ladoire, Sylvain; Ghiringhelli, François; Chauffert, B; Rat, Patrick; Ortega-Deballon, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) treats residual microscopic disease after cytoreductive surgery. In experimental models, the open HIPEC technique has shown a higher and more homogenous concentration of platinum in the peritoneum than achieved using the closed technique. A 25-cm H2O pressure enhances the penetration of oxaliplatin. Because pressure is easier to set up with the closed technique, high pressure may counterbalance the drawbacks of this technique versus open HIPEC, and a higher pressure may induce a higher penetration. Because higher concentration does not mean deeper penetration, a study of tissues beneath the peritoneum is required. Finally, achieving a deeper penetration (and a higher concentration) raises the question of the passage of drugs through the surgical glove and the surgeon's safety. Four groups of pigs underwent HIPEC with oxaliplatin (150 mg/L) for 30 minutes in open isobaric pressure and pressure at 25 cm H2O, and closed pressure at 25 and 40 cm H2O. Systemic absorption and peritoneal mapping of the concentration of platinum were analyzed, as well as in the retroperitoneal tissue and the surgical gloves. Blood concentrations were higher in open groups. In the parietal surfaces, the concentrations were not different between the isobaric and the closed groups (47.08, 56.39, and 48.57 mg/kg, respectively), but were higher in the open high-pressure group (85.93 mg/kg). In the visceral surfaces, they were lower in the closed groups (3.2 and 3.05 mg/kg) than in the open groups (7.03 and 9.56 mg/kg). Platinum concentrations were similar in the deep retroperitoneal tissue when compared between isobaric and high-pressure procedures. No platin was detected in the internal aspect of the gloves. The use of high pressure during HIPEC does not counterbalance the drawbacks of closed techniques. The tissue concentration of oxaliplatin achieved with the open techniques is higher, even if high pressure is applied during a closed technique

  20. Paediatric pelvic imaging: optimisation of dose and technique using digital grid-controlled pulsed fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, R.; McCarty, M. [Div. of Radiology, South Cleveland Hospital, South Tees Acute Hospitals NHS Trust, Marton Road, Middlesbrough, Cleveland (United Kingdom); McCallum, H.M. [Regional Medical Physics Dept., South Cleveland Hospital, Middlesbrough (United Kingdom); Montgomery, R. [Dept. of Orthopaedics, South Tees Hospitals NITS Trust, Middlesbrough (United Kingdom); Aszkenasy, M. [Tees and North East Yorkshire NHS Trust, West Lane Hospital, Middlesbrough (United Kingdom)

    2001-05-01

    Background. An audit of paediatric pelvic radiographs identified deficiencies in gonad shield placement and radiographic technique. Objective. A technique using grid-controlled fluoroscopy (GCF), with hard copy images in frame grab and digital spot image (DSI) format was evaluated to optimise gonad shield placement and reduce the dose given to children with Perthes disease and Developmental Hip Dysplasia (DDH) attending for pelvic radiography. Materials and methods. Phantom and patient dose surveys of conventional and fluoroscopic techniques were carried out. Image quality and radiation dose were compared for the frame grab and DSI techniques. Retrospective evaluation was undertaken to compare their clinical acceptability. Results. Both fluoroscopic techniques gave considerably less radiation than conventional non-grid radiography (67-83 %, P < 0.05). The frame grab technique gave less radiation than DSI (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the clinical acceptability scores of the DSI and frame grab images. Conclusion. Fluoroscopy acquired images are now used since the fluoroscopic techniques give much less dose than conventional radiography and provide images of sufficient quality for clinical assessment. Indeed, as there was no significant difference in clinical usefulness between the frame grab and DSI techniques, it is planned to use frame grab alone, thus gaining additional dose saving. (orig.)

  1. Paediatric pelvic imaging: optimisation of dose and technique using digital grid-controlled pulsed fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, R; McCallum, H M; McCarty, M; Montgomery, R; Aszkenasy, M

    2001-05-01

    An audit of paediatric pelvic radiographs identified deficiencies in gonad shield placement and radiographic technique. A technique using grid-controlled fluoroscopy (GCF), with hard copy images in frame grab and digital spot image (DSI) format was evaluated to optimise gonad shield placement and reduce the dose given to children with Perthes disease and Developmental Hip Dysplasia (DDH) attending for pelvic radiography. Phantom and patient dose surveys of conventional and fluoroscopic techniques were carried out. Image quality and radiation dose were compared for the frame grab and DSI techniques. Retrospective evaluation was undertaken to compare their clinical acceptability. Both fluoroscopic techniques gave considerably less radiation than conventional non-grid radiography (67-83%, P < 0.05). The frame grab technique gave less radiation than DSI (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the clinical acceptability scores of the DSI and frame grab images. Fluoroscopy acquired images are now used since the fluoroscopic techniques give much less dose than conventional radiography and provide images of sufficient quality for clinical assessment. Indeed, as there was no significant difference in clinical usefulness between the frame grab and DSI techniques, it is planned to use frame grab alone, thus gaining additional dose saving.

  2. Paediatric pelvic imaging: optimisation of dose and technique using digital grid-controlled pulsed fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waugh, R.; McCarty, M.; McCallum, H.M.; Montgomery, R.; Aszkenasy, M.

    2001-01-01

    Background. An audit of paediatric pelvic radiographs identified deficiencies in gonad shield placement and radiographic technique. Objective. A technique using grid-controlled fluoroscopy (GCF), with hard copy images in frame grab and digital spot image (DSI) format was evaluated to optimise gonad shield placement and reduce the dose given to children with Perthes disease and Developmental Hip Dysplasia (DDH) attending for pelvic radiography. Materials and methods. Phantom and patient dose surveys of conventional and fluoroscopic techniques were carried out. Image quality and radiation dose were compared for the frame grab and DSI techniques. Retrospective evaluation was undertaken to compare their clinical acceptability. Results. Both fluoroscopic techniques gave considerably less radiation than conventional non-grid radiography (67-83 %, P < 0.05). The frame grab technique gave less radiation than DSI (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the clinical acceptability scores of the DSI and frame grab images. Conclusion. Fluoroscopy acquired images are now used since the fluoroscopic techniques give much less dose than conventional radiography and provide images of sufficient quality for clinical assessment. Indeed, as there was no significant difference in clinical usefulness between the frame grab and DSI techniques, it is planned to use frame grab alone, thus gaining additional dose saving. (orig.)

  3. The use of linear programming techniques to design optimal digital filters for pulse shaping and channel equalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, R. C.; Burlage, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    A time domain technique is developed to design finite-duration impulse response digital filters using linear programming. Two related applications of this technique in data transmission systems are considered. The first is the design of pulse shaping digital filters to generate or detect signaling waveforms transmitted over bandlimited channels that are assumed to have ideal low pass or bandpass characteristics. The second is the design of digital filters to be used as preset equalizers in cascade with channels that have known impulse response characteristics. Example designs are presented which illustrate that excellent waveforms can be generated with frequency-sampling filters and the ease with which digital transversal filters can be designed for preset equalization.

  4. Hysteresis in Lanthanide Zirconium Oxides Observed Using a Pulse CV Technique and including the Effect of High Temperature Annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qifeng; Zhao, Chun; Mu, Yifei; Zhao, Ce Zhou; Taylor, Stephen; Chalker, Paul R

    2015-07-29

    A powerful characterization technique, pulse capacitance-voltage (CV) technique, was used to investigate oxide traps before and after annealing for lanthanide zirconium oxide thin films deposited on n-type Si (111) substrates at 300 °C by liquid injection Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). The results indicated that: (1) more traps were observed compared to the conventional capacitance-voltage characterization method in LaZrO x ; (2) the time-dependent trapping/de-trapping was influenced by the edge time, width and peak-to-peak voltage of a gate voltage pulse. Post deposition annealing was performed at 700 °C, 800 °C and 900 °C in N₂ ambient for 15 s to the samples with 200 ALD cycles. The effect of the high temperature annealing on oxide traps and leakage current were subsequently explored. It showed that more traps were generated after annealing with the trap density increasing from 1.41 × 10 12 cm -2 for as-deposited sample to 4.55 × 10 12 cm -2 for the 800 °C annealed one. In addition, the leakage current density increase from about 10 - ⁶ A/cm² at V g = +0.5 V for the as-deposited sample to 10 -3 A/cm² at V g = +0.5 V for the 900 °C annealed one.

  5. Discrimination of the glucose and the white sugar based on the pulsed laser-induced photoacoustic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhong; Liu, Guodong

    2017-08-01

    In this study, to discriminate the glucose and the white sugar gradient in the food, a noninvasive optical detection system based on pulsed laser-induced photoacoustic technique was developed. Meanwhile, the Nd: YAG 532nm pumped OPO pulsed laser was used as the excitation light source to generate of the photoacoustic signals of the glucose and white sugar. The focused ultrasonic transducer with central detection frequency of 1MHz was used to capture the photoacoustic signals. In experiments, the real-time photoacoustic signals of the glucose and the white sugar aqueous solutions were gotten and compared with each other. In addition, to discriminate the difference of the characteristic photoacoustic signals between both of them, the difference spectrum and the first order derivative technique between the peak-to-peak photoacoustic signals of the water and that of the glucose and white sugar were employed. The difference characteristic photoacoustic wavelengths between the glucose and the white sugar were found based on the established photoacoustic detection system. This study provides the potential possibility for the discrimination of the glucose and the white sugar by using the photoacoustic detection method.

  6. Hysteresis in Lanthanide Zirconium Oxides Observed Using a Pulse CV Technique and including the Effect of High Temperature Annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifeng Lu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A powerful characterization technique, pulse capacitance-voltage (CV technique, was used to investigate oxide traps before and after annealing for lanthanide zirconium oxide thin films deposited on n-type Si (111 substrates at 300 °C by liquid injection Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD. The results indicated that: (1 more traps were observed compared to the conventional capacitance-voltage characterization method in LaZrOx; (2 the time-dependent trapping/de-trapping was influenced by the edge time, width and peak-to-peak voltage of a gate voltage pulse. Post deposition annealing was performed at 700 °C, 800 °C and 900 °C in N2 ambient for 15 s to the samples with 200 ALD cycles. The effect of the high temperature annealing on oxide traps and leakage current were subsequently explored. It showed that more traps were generated after annealing with the trap density increasing from 1.41 × 1012 cm−2 for as-deposited sample to 4.55 × 1012 cm−2 for the 800 °C annealed one. In addition, the leakage current density increase from about 10−6 A/cm2 at Vg = +0.5 V for the as-deposited sample to 10−3 A/cm2 at Vg = +0.5 V for the 900 °C annealed one.

  7. ITER-W monoblocks under high pulse number transient heat loads at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenhoff, Th.; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; Pitts, R.A.; Riccardi, B.

    2015-01-01

    In the context of using a full-tungsten (W) divertor for ITER, thermal shock resistance has become even more important as an issue that may potentially influence the long term performance. To address this issue a unique series of experiments has been performed on ITER-W monoblock mock ups in three EU high heat flux facilities: GLADIS (neutral beam), JUDITH 2 (electron beam) and Magnum-PSI (plasma beam). This paper discusses the JUDITH 2 experiments. Two different base temperatures, 1200 °C and 1500 °C, were chosen superimposed by ∼18,000/100,000 transient events (Δt = 0.48 ms) of 0.2 and 0.6 GW/m 2 . Results showed a stronger surface deterioration at higher base temperature, quantified by an increase in roughening. This is intensified if the same test is done after preloading (exposure to high temperature without transients), especially at higher base temperature when the material recrystallizes

  8. Nondestructive examination of irradiated fuel rods by pulsed eddy current techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, W.C.; Quapp, W.J.; Martin, M.R.; Gibson, G.W.

    1976-02-01

    A number of fuel rods and unfueled zircaloy cladding tubes which had been irradiated in the Saxton reactor have undergone extensive nondestructive and corroborative destructive examinations by Aerojet Nuclear Company as part of the Water Reactor Safety Research Program, Irradiation Effects Test Series. This report discusses the pulsed eddy current (PEC) nondestructive examinations on the fuel rods and tubing and the metallography results on two fuel rods and one irradiated zircaloy tube. The PEC equipment, designed jointly by Argonne National Laboratory and Aerojet, performed very satisfactorily the functions of diameter, profile, and wall thickness measurements and OD and ID surface defect detection. The destructive examination provided reasonably good confirmation of ''defects'' detected in the nondestructive examination

  9. Photoelectric properties of GaAs materials studied by pulsed laser techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguir, Khalifa

    1981-01-01

    This research thesis addressed the photoelectric properties of single-crystal or epitaxial GaAs (N doped or P doped) materials. The objective is to characterize and to improve the electric quality of these materials and associated components, notably for the production of high performance solar cells for ground-based or space-based applications. More particularly, this research aimed at using an excitation by a pulsed laser to analyse recombination and trapping properties of carriers created by photo-excitation, and also at studying the effect of low doses of particle irradiation on the carrier properties. Thus, the author describes conduction characteristics of two different N-type epitaxial layers, discusses carrier excitation and recombination processes which may occur in semiconductors, and proposes an overview of trapping phenomena. Photoelectric properties of the considered epitaxial layers are then studied and discussed

  10. Techniques for fabricating an infrared optical pyrometry system for pulsed electron beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouellette, A.L.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of an infrared optical pyrometry system which was designed to make fast time resolved temperature measurements. The purpose of this equipment is to determine the amount of energy from an electron beam or some other type of pulsed energy deposition that is absorbed in a target. The system is capable of measuring energy deposition levels up to 4000 J/g in carbon, which corresponds to a graphite target temperature of 2200 0 C. Methods of fabrication, alignment, and calibration are presented. The measurement of absorbed energy in a target as a function of position and depth is discussed as a possible application, and several measurements are described which permit a comparison of results from this system with those taken by other methods

  11. Study of two-zone reactor system using a pulsed neutron technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishin, B.P.; Platovskikh, Yu.A.; Didejkin, T.S.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations of a neutron flux time dependence after a sport fast neutron pulse in a reactor core - neutron reflector multiplying system have been conducted. A correlation between eigenvalues governing neutron flux decrease at t→infinity for the two-zone system and eigenvalues for each zone has been established in terms of the one-group diffusion approximation. Experiments have been performed in an experimental subcritical assembly comprising a cylindrical uranium core surrounded by a radial water reflector with different boric acid concentrations. The experiments show that the observed neutron flux decrease in the core is governed by an exponent exp(-Λ 1 t), whereas in the reflector by a sum of two exponents exp(-Λ 1 t) and exp(-Λ 2 t). The eigenvalue Λ 1 reflects multiplying properties of the reactor, and Λ 2 is determined by the reflector absorption cross section

  12. Wideband simulation of earthquake ground motion by a spectrum-matching, multiple-pulse technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, A.; Pavlov, V.

    2006-04-01

    To simulate earthquake ground motion, we combine a multiple-point stochastic earthquake fault model and a suite of Green functions. Conceptually, our source model generalizes the classic one of Haskell (1966). At any time instant, slip occurs over a narrow strip that sweeps the fault area at a (spatially variable) velocity. This behavior defines seismic signals at lower frequencies (LF), and describes directivity effects. High-frequency (HF) behavior of source signal is defined by local slip history, assumed to be a short segment of pulsed noise. For calculations, this model is discretized as a grid of point subsources. Subsource moment rate time histories, in their LF part, are smooth pulses whose duration equals to the rise time. In their HF part, they are segments of non-Gaussian noise of similar duration. The spectral content of subsource time histories is adjusted so that the summary far-field signal follows certain predetermined spectral scaling law. The results of simulation depend on random seeds, and on particular values of such parameters as: stress drop; average and dispersion parameter for rupture velocity; rupture nucleation point; slip zone width/rise time, wavenumber-spectrum parameter defining final slip function; the degrees of non-Gaussianity for random slip rate in time, and for random final slip in space, and more. To calculate ground motion at a site, Green functions are calculated for each subsource-site pair, then convolved with subsource time functions and at last summed over subsources. The original Green function calculator for layered weakly inelastic medium is of discrete wavenumber kind, with no intrinsic limitations with respect to layer thickness or bandwidth. The simulation package can generate example motions, or used to study uncertainties of the predicted motion. As a test, realistic analogues of recorded motions in the epicentral zone of the 1994 Northridge, California earthquake were synthesized, and related uncertainties were

  13. Study on Natural Convection around a vertical heated rod using PIV/LIF technique,

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szijarto, R.; Yamaji, B.; Aszodi, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Nuclear Training Reactor of the Institute of Nuclear Techniques (Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary) is a pool-type reactor with light water moderator and with a maximum thermal power of 100 kW. The fuel elements are cooled by natural convection. An experimental setup was built to analyse the nature of the natural convection around a heated rod. The flow field was investigated using an electrically heated rod, which models the geometry of a fuel pin in the training reactor. The electric power of the model rod is variable between 0-500 W. The rod was placed in a square-based glass tank. Particle Image Velocimetry and Laser Induced Fluorescence measurement techniques were used to study the velocity and temperature field in a two-dimensional area. The thermal and the hydraulic boundary layers were detected near a rod in a lower section of the aquarium. The laminar-turbulent transition of the flow regime was observed, the maximum velocity of the up-flow was 0.025-0.05 m/s. From the temperature measurements the local heat transfer coefficient was estimated. (Authors)

  14. Modelling of Evaporator in Waste Heat Recovery System using Finite Volume Method and Fuzzy Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahedul Islam Chowdhury

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The evaporator is an important component in the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC-based Waste Heat Recovery (WHR system since the effective heat transfer of this device reflects on the efficiency of the system. When the WHR system operates under supercritical conditions, the heat transfer mechanism in the evaporator is unpredictable due to the change of thermo-physical properties of the fluid with temperature. Although the conventional finite volume model can successfully capture those changes in the evaporator of the WHR process, the computation time for this method is high. To reduce the computation time, this paper develops a new fuzzy based evaporator model and compares its performance with the finite volume method. The results show that the fuzzy technique can be applied to predict the output of the supercritical evaporator in the waste heat recovery system and can significantly reduce the required computation time. The proposed model, therefore, has the potential to be used in real time control applications.

  15. Determination of the liquidus temperature of tin using the heat pulse-based melting and comparison with traditional methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Wukchul; Park, Jihye; Pearce, Jonathan V.

    2018-06-01

    In this work, the liquidus temperature of tin was determined by melting the sample using the pressure-controlled loop heat pipe. Square wave-type pressure steps generated periodic 0.7 °C temperature steps in the isothermal region in the vicinity of the tin sample, and the tin was melted with controllable heat pulses from the generated temperature changes. The melting temperatures at specific melted fractions were measured, and they were extrapolated to the melted fraction of unity to determine the liquidus temperature of tin. To investigate the influence of the impurity distribution on the melting behavior, a molten tin sample was solidified by an outward slow freezing or by quenching to segregate the impurities inside the sample with concentrations increasing outwards or to spread the impurities uniformly, respectively. The measured melting temperatures followed the local solidus temperature variations well in the case of the segregated sample and stayed near the solidus temperature in the quenched sample due to the microscopic melting behavior. The extrapolated melting temperatures of the segregated and quenched samples were 0.95 mK and 0.49 mK higher than the outside-nucleated freezing temperature of tin (with uncertainties of 0.15 mK and 0.16 mK, at approximately 95% level of confidence), respectively. The extrapolated melting temperature of the segregated sample was supposed to be a closer approximation to the liquidus temperature of tin, whereas the quenched sample yielded the possibility of a misleading extrapolation to the solidus temperature. Therefore, the determination of the liquidus temperature could result in different extrapolated melting temperatures depending on the way the impurities were distributed within the sample, which has implications for the contemporary methodology for realizing temperature fixed points of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90).

  16. Application of the Guided Wave Technique to the Heat Exchanger Tube in NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Dong Soon; Kim, Hyung Nam; Yoo, Hyun Joo

    2005-01-01

    The heat exchanger tube is examined by the method of eddy current test(ECT) to identify the integrity of the nuclear power plant. Because ECT probe is moved through the tube inside to identify flaws, the ECT probe should be exchanged periodically due to the wear of probe surface in order to remove the noise form the ECT signal. Moreover, it is impossible to examine the tube by ECT method because the ECT probe can not move through the inside due to the deformation such as dent. Recently, the theory of guided wave was established and the equipment applying the theory has been actively developed so as to overcome the limitation of ECT method for the tube inspection of heater exchanger in nuclear power plant. The object of this study is to know the application of the guided wave technique to heat exchanger tube in NPP

  17. Highly textured fresnoite thin films synthesized in situ by pulsed laser deposition with CO2 laser direct heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, Michael; Stölzel, Marko; Brachwitz, Kerstin; Hochmuth, Holger; Grundmann, Marius; De Pablos-Martin, Araceli; Patzig, Christian; Höche, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Fresnoite Ba 2 TiSi 2 O 8 (BTS) thin films were grown and crystallized in situ using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with CO 2 laser direct heating of the a-plane sapphire (1 1 0) substrates up to 1250 °C. Starting with 775 °C growth temperature, (0 0 1)- and (1 1 0)-textured BTS and BaTiO 3 phases, respectively, could be assigned in the films, and the typical fern-like BTS crystallization patterns appear. For higher process temperatures of 1100 to 1250 °C, atomically smooth, terraced surface of the films was found, accompanied by crystalline high-temperature phases of Ba–Ti–Si oxides. HAADF micrographs taken in both scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry mode show details of morphology and elemental distribution inside the films and at the interface. To balance the inherent Si deficiency of the BTS films, growth from glassy BTS × 2 SiO 2 and BTS × 2.5 SiO 2 targets was considered as well. The latter targets are ideal for PLD since the employed glasses possess 100% of the theoretical density and are homogeneous at the atomic scale. (paper)

  18. Limitations on the use of the pulsed-wire field-measuring technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, R.W.

    1987-09-01

    As wigglers become longer and the wavelength of the light they produce becomes shorter, the requirements for magnetic field uniformity and precision of wiggler construction become more severe. Techniques used to measure magnetic fields and to estimate the performance of wigglers are now being pushed to their limits in precision and are generally awkward and time consuming in practice. A new field-error measurement technique has been developed that has the usual advantages of a null technique, demonstrates high sensitivity to field errors, and is rapid and simple to employ. With this technique, it appears practical to use computer control to both measure and correct field errors. In a particularly attractive application, these measuring and correcting steps could be carried out on a daily basis for an operational wiggler, which is mounted under vacuum in its optical cavity. In this way, changes in the fields caused by aging or by thermal or radiation-induced deterioration effects could be rapidly identified and corrections could be instituted without significant interruption to normal operations. The principles and limitations of ths technique will be described and examples given of various implementations that have been examined experimentally. 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Heating and thermal control of brazing technique to break contamination path for potential Mars sample return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Campos, Sergio

    2017-04-01

    The potential return of Mars sample material is of great interest to the planetary science community, as it would enable extensive analysis of samples with highly sensitive laboratory instruments. It is important to make sure such a mission concept would not bring any living microbes, which may possibly exist on Mars, back to Earth's environment. In order to ensure the isolation of Mars microbes from Earth's Atmosphere, a brazing sealing and sterilizing technique was proposed to break the Mars-to-Earth contamination path. Effectively, heating the brazing zone in high vacuum space and controlling the sample temperature for integrity are key challenges to the implementation of this technique. The break-thechain procedures for container configurations, which are being considered, were simulated by multi-physics finite element models. Different heating methods including induction and resistive/radiation were evaluated. The temperature profiles of Martian samples in a proposed container structure were predicted. The results show that the sealing and sterilizing process can be controlled such that the samples temperature is maintained below the level that may cause damage, and that the brazing technique is a feasible approach to breaking the contamination path.

  20. Transport Properties of LCMO Granular Films Deposited by the Pulsed Electron Deposition Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Leiming; XU Bin; ZHANG Yan; CHEN Zhenping

    2011-01-01

    By finely controlling the deposition parameters in the pulsed electron deposition process,granular La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 (LCMO) film was grown on silicon substrates.The substrate temperature,ambient pressure in the deposition chamber and acceleration potential for the electron beam were all found to affect the grain size of the film,resulting in different morphologies of the samples.Transport properties of the obtained granular films,especially the magnetoresistance (MR),were studied.Prominent low-field MR was observed in all samples,indicating the forming of grain boundaries in the sample.The low-field MR show great sensitive to the morphology evolution,which reaches the highest value of about 40% for the sample with the grain size of about 250 nm.More interestingly,positive-MR (p-MR) was also detected above 300 K when low magnetic field applying,whereas it disappeared with higher magnetic field applied up to 1.5 and 2 Tesla.Instead of the spinpolarized tunneling process being commonly regarded as a responsible reason,lattice mismatch between LCMO film and silicon substrate appears to be the origin of the p-MR

  1. A new technique to treat facet joint pain with pulsed radiofrequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schianchi, Pietro Martino

    2015-02-01

    Facet joint pain affects 5% to 15% of the population with low back pain and the prevalence increases with age due to progression of arthritis. While conservative treatments are often unsuccessful, the scientific evidence on minimally invasive therapies such as intra-articular steroid infiltration and continuous and pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) of the medial branches is contradictory. Since PRF has recently been reported to successfully treat joint pain, a new application of this method is proposed for facetogenic lumbar pain via an intra-articular subcapsular approach. Here we reported two cases with successful treatment. A 71-year-old patient presented because of persisting pain in the left gluteal region radiating to the lateral thigh and calf when standing. Anti-inflammatory drugs produced only short-lasting insufficient relief. A 52-year-old employee was admitted in June 2012 because of axial lower lumbar pain with intermittent diffuse radiation to the right lower extremity that worsened during walking and lying down despite receiving analgesics and physiotherapy. A new approach to treat lumbar facet joint pain with PRF is simple to perform and without serious complications. In view of the good long-lasting results obtained with the two reported cases, randomized control trials are necessary to validate this new approach.

  2. Digital pulse-timing technique for the neutron detector array NEDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modamio, V., E-mail: victor.modamio@lnl.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Valiente-Dobón, J.J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Jaworski, G. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland); Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Hüyük, T. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46980 Valencia (Spain); Triossi, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Egea, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46980 Valencia (Spain); Department of Electronic Engineering, Universitat de València, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain); Di Nitto, A. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Söderström, P.-A. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Agramunt Ros, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46980 Valencia (Spain); Angelis, G. de [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); France, G. de [GANIL, CEA/DSAM and CNRS/IN2P3, F-14076 Caen (France); Erduran, M.N. [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim University, 34303 Istanbul (Turkey); and others

    2015-03-01

    A new digital pulse-timing algorithm, to be used with the future neutron detector array NEDA, has been developed and tested. The time resolution of four 5 in. diameter photomultiplier tubes (XP4512, R4144, R11833-100, and ET9390-kb), coupled to a cylindrical 5 in. by 5 in. BC501A liquid scintillator detector was measured by employing digital sampling electronics and a constant fraction discriminator (CFD) algorithm. The zero crossing of the CFD algorithm was obtained with a cubic spline interpolation, which was continuous up to the second derivative. The performance of the algorithm was studied at sampling rates of 500 MS/s and 200 MS/s. The time resolution obtained with the digital electronics was compared to the values acquired with a standard analog CFD. The result of this comparison shows that the time resolution from the analog and the digital measurements at 500 MS/s and at 200 MS/s are within 15% for all the tested photomultiplier tubes.

  3. Preparation, characterization and optical properties of Gadolinium doped ceria thin films by pulsed laser deposition technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaraju, P.; Vijaya Kumar, Y.; Vishnuvardhan Reddy, C.; Ramana Reddy, M.V.; Phase, D.M; Raghavendra Reddy, V.

    2013-01-01

    The growth of Gadolinium doped ceria thin films with controlled surface structure for device quality applications presents a significant problem for experimental investigation. In the present study gadolinium doped cerium oxide thin films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and were studied for their surface structure evaluation in relation to the optimized operating conditions during the stage of film preparation. The deposition was made with gadolinium concentration of 10 mole% to ceria pellets. The films were deposited on quartz substrate in the presence of oxygen partial pressure of 1.5 x 10 -3 torr using KrF Excimer laser with laser energy 220 mJ at a substrate temperature 700℃. The effect of annealing temperature on 10 mole% GDC thin film was investigated. The film thickness was measured by using AMBIOS make XP-l stylus profiler. As prepared and annealed thin films were characterized for crystallinity, particle size and orientation by using G.I.XRD. The films were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM results gave a consistent picture of the evolution of GDC film surface morphologies and microstructures in terms of surface roughness, grain distribution and mean grain size. The optical transmittance spectra was used to determine the optical constants such as optical band gap, refractive index, extinction coefficient of as prepared and annealed thin films. (author)

  4. An experimental investigation of heat transfer enhancement in minichannel: Combination of nanofluid and micro fin structure techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ji; Diao, Yanhua; Zhao, Yaohua

    2017-01-01

    This work experimentally studied the single-phase heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics by using two heat transfer enhancement techniques (micro fin structure and nanofluids) in multiport minichannel flat tube (MMFT). MMFT consisted of numerous parallel rectangular minichannels...... and is widely used in industry as the heat transfer unit of a heat exchanger. Firstly, the enhanced heat transfer performances by individually using one enhancement technique were investigated by testing Nusselt number, friction factor and performance evaluation criterion (PEC). In this section, five MMFTs...... with different micro fin numbers (N = 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4) and nanofluids with three volume concentrations (φ = 0.005%, 0.01% and 0.1%) were used as test sections and working fluids respectively. Secondly, the experiments using two combined enhancement technique were performed. By using conjunctively two...

  5. Determination of the diffusion coefficient of oxygen in sodium chloride solutions with a transient pulse technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Stroe, A.J.; Janssen, L.J.J.

    1993-01-01

    An accurate and rapid method for detg. the diffusion coeffs. of electrochem. active gases in electrolytes is described. The technique is based on chronoamperometry where transient currents are measured and interpreted with a Cottrell-related equation. The diffusion coeffs. of oxygen were detd. for

  6. Characterization of hydroxyapatite coating by pulse laser deposition technique on stainless steel 316 L by varying laser energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khandelwal, Himanshu; Singh, Gurbhinder; Agrawal, Khelendra; Prakash, Satya; Agarwal, R.D.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hydroxyapatite coating was successfully deposited on stainless steel substrate by pulse laser deposition at different energy levels (i.e. 300 mJ and 500 mJ, respectively). ► Variation in laser energy affects the surface characteristic of hydroxyapatite coating (particle size, surface roughness, uniformity, Ca/P ratio). ► Laser energy between 300 mJ and 500 mJ is the optimal choice for obtaining ideal Ca/P ratio. - Abstract: Hydroxyapatite is an attractive biomaterial mainly used in bone and tooth implants because it closely resembles human tooth and bone mineral and has proven to be biologically compatible with these tissues. In spite of this advantage of hydroxyapatite it has also certain limitation like inferior mechanical properties which do not make it suitable for long term load bearing applications; hence a lot of research is going on in the development of hydroxyapatite coating over various metallic implants. These metallic implants have good biocompatibility and mechanical properties. The aim of the present work is to deposit hydroxyapatite coating over stainless steel grade 316 L by pulse laser deposition technique by varying laser energy. To know the effect of this variation, the coatings were than characterized in detail by X-ray diffraction, finite emission-scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  7. Zinc (Zn Analysis in Milk by Microwave Oven Digestion and Differential Pulse Anodic Stripping Voltametry (DPASV Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohineesh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Milk is very important component of human diet. The presence of over limit of heavy metal in milk may create significant health problems. In the present study, the direct determination of Zinc (Zn heavy metal in milk samples of different brands was carried out by differential pulse anodic stripping Voltammetric technique at Hanging Mercury Drop Electrode (HMDE. Milk samples were processed by microwave oven digestion using HP/VHP Vessels and TFM Liners and nitric acid (HNO3.Determination of Zn was made in acetate buffer (pH 4.6 with a sweep rate (scan rate of 59.5 mV/s and pulse amplitude 50mV by HMDE by standard addition method. The solution was stirred during pre-electrolysis at -1150mV (vs. Ag/AgCl for 90 seconds and the potential was scanned from -1150V to +100V (vs. Ag/AgCl. The zinc ions were deposited by reduction at -1150 mV on HMDE. The stripping current arising from the oxidation of metal was correlated with the concentration the metal in the sample. .As a result the minimum level of Zn observed in the milk sample of different brands was determined as 2.28 mgL−1.

  8. Thermomechanical and Photophysical Properties of Crystal-Violet-Dye/H2O Based Dissolutions via the Pulsed Laser Photoacoustic Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Torres-Zúñiga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Different thermoelastic parameters, for example, the acoustic attenuation and the speed of sound, are fundamental for instrumental calibration and quantitative characterization of organic-based dissolutions. In this work, these parameters as functions of the concentration of an organic dye (crystal-violet: CV in distillated water (H2O based dissolutions are investigated. The speed of sound was measured by the pulsed-laser photoacoustic technique (PLPA, which consists in the generation of acoustic-waves by the optical absorption of pulsed light in a given material (in this case a liquid sample. The thermally generated sound-waves traveling through a fluid are detected with two piezoelectric sensors separated by a known distance. An appropriate processing of the photoacoustic signals allows an adequate data analysis of the generated waves within the system, providing an accurate determination of the speed of sound as function of the dye-concentration. The acoustic attenuation was calculated based on the distance of the two PZT-microphones to an acoustic-source point and performing linear-fitting of the experimental data (RMS-amplitudes as function of the dye-concentration. An important advantage of the PLPA-method is that it can be implemented with poor or null optical transmitting materials permitting the characterization of the mechanical and concentration/aggregate properties of dissolved organic compounds.

  9. Study of plasma wall interactions in the long-pulse NB-heated discharges of JT-60U towards steady-state operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaga, H.; Asakura, N.; Higashijima, S.; Nakano, T.; Kubo, H.; Konoshima, S.; Oyama, N.; Isayama, A.; Ide, S.; Fujita, T.; Miura, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Long time scale variation of plasma-wall interactions and its impact on particle balance, main plasma performance and particle behavior have been investigated in ELMy H-mode plasmas by extending the discharge pulse and the neutral beam heating pulse to 65 s and 30 s, respectively. The wall pumping rate starts to decrease in the latter phase by repeating the long-pulse discharges with 60% of Greenwald density sustained by gas-puffing. After several discharges, the wall inventory is saturated in the latter phase and, consequently, the density increases with neutral beam fuelling only. The edge pressure in the main plasma is reduced and ELMs are close to the type III regime under conditions of wall saturation. The intensities of C II emission near the X-point and CD band emission in the inner divertor start to increase before the wall saturates and continue to increase after the wall is saturated

  10. Detection of Cavities by Inverse Heat Conduction Boundary Element Method Using Minimal Energy Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, C. Y.

    1997-01-01

    A geometrical inverse heat conduction problem is solved for the infrared scanning cavity detection by the boundary element method using minimal energy technique. By minimizing the kinetic energy of temperature field, boundary element equations are converted to the quadratic programming problem. A hypothetical inner boundary is defined such that the actual cavity is located interior to the domain. Temperatures at hypothetical inner boundary are determined to meet the constraints of measurement error of surface temperature obtained by infrared scanning, and then boundary element analysis is performed for the position of an unknown boundary (cavity). Cavity detection algorithm is provided, and the effects of minimal energy technique on the inverse solution method are investigated by means of numerical analysis

  11. Development of a Novel Method for the Exploration of the Thermal Response of Superfluid Helium Cooled Superconducting Cables to Pulse Heat Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, T.; Koettig, T.; van Weelderen, R.; Bremer, J.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    Management of transient heat deposition in superconducting magnets and its extraction from the aforementioned is becoming increasingly important to bring high energy particle accelerator performance to higher beam energies and intensities. Precise knowledge of transient heat deposition phenomena in the magnet cables will permit to push the operation of these magnets as close as possible to their current sharing limit, without unduly provoking magnet quenches. With the prospect of operating the Large Hadron Collider at CERN at higher beam energies and intensities an investigation into the response to transient heat loads of LHC magnets, operating in pressurized superfluid helium, is being performed. The more frequently used approach mimics the cable geometry by resistive wires and uses Joule-heating to deposit energy. Instead, to approximate as closely as possible the real magnet conditions, a novel method for depositing heat in cable stacks made out of superconducting magnet-cables has been developed. The goal is to measure the temperature difference as a function of time between the cable stack and the superfluid helium bath depending on heat load and heat pulse length. The heat generation in the superconducting cable and precise measurement of small temperature differences are major challenges. The functional principle and experimental set-up are presented together with proof of principle measurements.

  12. Low Power CMOS Circuit Techniques for Optical Interconnects and High Speed Pulse Compression Radar

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    High performance computing and high resolution range sensor motivates the intelligent system innovations such as smart car, smart home/community and 3D motion games. Most importantly, 3D graphics technique requires high performance computation to provide high quality and vivid real-time videos. Accurate motion sensing requires high resolution radar sensor. However, in general, data transmission limits the large scale computation while high resolution radar signal processor limits the detectio...

  13. Ultrasound evaluation of normal and abnormal fetuses: comparison of conventional, tissue harmonic, and pulse- inversion harmonic imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jeong Ah; Kim, Bohyun; Kim, Sooah; Yang, Soon Ha; Choi, Moon Hae; Ahn, Hyeong Sik

    2003-01-01

    To determine the usefulness of tissue harmonic imaging (THI) and pulse-inversion harmonic imaging (PIHI) in the evaluation of normal and abnormal fetuses. Forty-one pregnant women who bore a total of 31 normal and ten abnormal fetuses underwent conventional ultrasonography (CUS), and then THI and PIHI. US images of six organ systems, namely the brain, spine, heart, abdomen, extremities and face were compared between the three techniques in terms of overall conspicuity and the definition of borders and internal structures. For the brain, heart, abdomen and face, overall conspicuity at THI and PIHI was significantly better than at CUS (p < 0.05). There was, though, no significant difference between THI and PIHI. Affected organs in abnormal fetuses were more clearly depicted at THI and PIHI than at CUS. Both THI and PIHI appear to be superior to CUS for the evaluation of normal or abnormal structures, particularly the brain, heart, abdomen and face

  14. An Investigation of the Design Potential of Thermochromic Home Textiles Used with Electric Heating Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Jen Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermochromic colorants have been developed since before the 1900s. There are a large number of patents in different applications of thermochromic textiles, but many innovations leave the field of aesthetic and functional textile design unexplored in the area of smart materials. This study aims to develop thermochromic home textiles that change colors and patterns by integrating thermochromic pigments and electric conductive yarns into textile structures. Stainless steel conductive yarns were sewed on textile substrates to enable heat generation to increase fabric temperature. The heat generation and temperature rise could be controlled by monitoring the voltage applied. The experiments of this study focused on analyzing electric resistance and heating properties of the conductive yarns and observing color changing time and color changing effects of the thermochromic textiles. By using the technique in this research, an image of “tai chi” was designed and implemented in a backlighting thermochromic fabric. It illustrates a range of opportunities for thermochromic textiles in new design research directions of Chinese calligraphy and traditional Chinese painting.

  15. Numerical simulation of a TLD pulsed laser-heating scheme for determination of shallow dose and deep dose in low-LET radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kearfott, K.J.; Han, S.; Wagner, E.C.; Samei, E.; Wang, C.-K.C.

    2000-01-01

    A new method is described to determine the depth-dose distribution in low-LET radiation fields using a thick thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) with a pulsed laser-heating scheme to obtain TL glow output. The computational simulation entails heat conduction and glow curve production processes. An iterative algorithm is used to obtain the dose distribution in the detector. The simulation results indicate that the method can predict the shallow and deep dose in various radiation fields with relative errors less than 20%

  16. Dynamic behavior of detached recombining plasmas during ELM-like plasma heat pulses in the divertor plasma simulator NAGDIS-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesugi, Y.; Hattori, N.; Nishijima, D.; Ohno, N.; Takamura, S.

    2001-01-01

    It has been recognized that the ELMs associated with a good confinement at the edge, such as H-mode, must bring an enormous energy to the divertor target plate through SOL and detached plasmas. The understanding of the ELM energy transport through SOL to the divertor target is rather poor at the moment, which leads to an ambiguous estimation of the deposited heat load on the divertor target in ITER. In the present work the ELM-like plasma heat pulse is generated by rf heating in a linear divertor plasma simulator. Energetic electrons with an energy range 10-40 eV are effectively generated by rf heating in low temperature plasmas with (T e )< ∼1 eV. It is observed experimentally that the energetic electrons ionize the highly excited Rydberg atoms quickly, bringing a rapid increase of the ion particle flux to the target, and make the detached plasmas attached to the target. Detailed physical processes about the interaction between the heat pulse with conduction and convection, and detached recombining plasmas are discussed

  17. Quality assurance: recommended guidelines for safe heating by capacitive-type heating technique to treat patients with metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hirokazu; Kondo, Motoharu; Imada, Hajime; Kuroda, Masahiro; Kamimura, Yoshitsugu; Saito, Kazuyuki; Kuroda, Kagayaki; Ito, Koichi; Takahashi, Hideaki; Matsuki, Hidetoshi

    2013-05-01

    This article is a redissemination of the previous Japanese Quality Assurance Guide guidelines. Specific absorption rate and temperature distribution were investigated with respect to various aspects including metallic implant size and shape, insertion site, insertion direction, blood flow and heating power, and simulated results were compared with adverse reactions of patients treated by radio frequency capacitive-type heating. Recommended guidelines for safe heating methods for patients with metallic implants are presented based on our findings.

  18. Carbon allocation belowground in Pinus pinaster using stable carbon isotope pulse labeling technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannoura, M.; Bosc, A.; Chipeaux, C.; Sartore, M.; Lambrot, C.; Trichet, P.; Bakker, M.; Loustau, D.; Epron, D.

    2010-12-01

    Carbon allocation belowground competes with aboveground growth and biomass production. In the other hand, it contributes to resource acquisition such as nutrient, water and carbon sequestration in soil. Thus, a better characterization of carbon flow from plant to soil and its residence time within each compartment is an important issue for understanding and modeling forest ecosystem carbon budget. 13C pulse labeling of whole crown was conducted at 4 seasons to study the fate of assimilated carbon by photosynthesis into the root on 12 year old Pinus pinaster planted in the INRA domain of Pierroton. Maritime pine is the most widely planted species in South-West Europe. Stem, root and soil CO2 effluxes and their isotope composition were measured continuously by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy with a trace gas analyzer (TGA 100A; Campbell Scientific) coupled to flow-through chambers. 13CO2 recovery and peak were observed in respiration of each compartment after labeling. It appeared sequentially from top of stem to bottom, and to coarse root. The maximum velocity of carbon transfer was calculated as the difference in time lag of recovery between two positions on the trunk or on the root. It ranged between 0.08-0.2 m h-1 in stem and between 0.04-0.12 m h-1 in coarse root. This velocity was higher in warmer season, and the difference between time lag of recovery and peak increased after first frost. Photosynthates arrived underground 1.5 to 5 days after labeling, at similar time in soil CO2 effluxes and coarse root respiration. 0.08-1.4 g of carbon was respired per tree during first 20 days following labeling. It presented 0.6 -10% of 13C used for labeling and it is strongly related to seasons. The isotope signal was detected in fine root organs and microbial biomass by periodical core sampling. The peak was observed 6 days after labeling in early summer while it was delayed more than 10 days in autumn and winter with less amount of carbon allocated

  19. Predictive modeling, simulation, and optimization of laser processing techniques: UV nanosecond-pulsed laser micromachining of polymers and selective laser melting of powder metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criales Escobar, Luis Ernesto

    One of the most frequently evolving areas of research is the utilization of lasers for micro-manufacturing and additive manufacturing purposes. The use of laser beam as a tool for manufacturing arises from the need for flexible and rapid manufacturing at a low-to-mid cost. Laser micro-machining provides an advantage over mechanical micro-machining due to the faster production times of large batch sizes and the high costs associated with specific tools. Laser based additive manufacturing enables processing of powder metals for direct and rapid fabrication of products. Therefore, laser processing can be viewed as a fast, flexible, and cost-effective approach compared to traditional manufacturing processes. Two types of laser processing techniques are studied: laser ablation of polymers for micro-channel fabrication and selective laser melting of metal powders. Initially, a feasibility study for laser-based micro-channel fabrication of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) via experimentation is presented. In particular, the effectiveness of utilizing a nanosecond-pulsed laser as the energy source for laser ablation is studied. The results are analyzed statistically and a relationship between process parameters and micro-channel dimensions is established. Additionally, a process model is introduced for predicting channel depth. Model outputs are compared and analyzed to experimental results. The second part of this research focuses on a physics-based FEM approach for predicting the temperature profile and melt pool geometry in selective laser melting (SLM) of metal powders. Temperature profiles are calculated for a moving laser heat source to understand the temperature rise due to heating during SLM. Based on the predicted temperature distributions, melt pool geometry, i.e. the locations at which melting of the powder material occurs, is determined. Simulation results are compared against data obtained from experimental Inconel 625 test coupons fabricated at the National

  20. Modeling of electrodes and implantable pulse generator cases for the analysis of implant tip heating under MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acikel, Volkan; Atalar, Ergin; Uslubas, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The authors’ purpose is to model the case of an implantable pulse generator (IPG) and the electrode of an active implantable medical device using lumped circuit elements in order to analyze their effect on radio frequency induced tissue heating problem during a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. Methods: In this study, IPG case and electrode are modeled with a voltage source and impedance. Values of these parameters are found using the modified transmission line method (MoTLiM) and the method of moments (MoM) simulations. Once the parameter values of an electrode/IPG case model are determined, they can be connected to any lead, and tip heating can be analyzed. To validate these models, both MoM simulations and MR experiments were used. The induced currents on the leads with the IPG case or electrode connections were solved using the proposed models and the MoTLiM. These results were compared with the MoM simulations. In addition, an electrode was connected to a lead via an inductor. The dissipated power on the electrode was calculated using the MoTLiM by changing the inductance and the results were compared with the specific absorption rate results that were obtained using MoM. Then, MRI experiments were conducted to test the IPG case and the electrode models. To test the IPG case, a bare lead was connected to the case and placed inside a uniform phantom. During a MRI scan, the temperature rise at the lead was measured by changing the lead length. The power at the lead tip for the same scenario was also calculated using the IPG case model and MoTLiM. Then, an electrode was connected to a lead via an inductor and placed inside a uniform phantom. During a MRI scan, the temperature rise at the electrode was measured by changing the inductance and compared with the dissipated power on the electrode resistance. Results: The induced currents on leads with the IPG case or electrode connection were solved for using the combination of the MoTLiM and

  1. Experimental study of divertor plasma-facing components damage under a combination of pulsed and quasi-stationary heat loads relevant to expected transient events at ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimov, N S; Podkovyrov, V L; Kovalenko, D V; Zhitlukhin, A M; Barsuk, V A; Mazul, I V; Giniyatulin, R N; Kuznetsov, V Ye; Riccardi, B; Loarte, A; Merola, M; Koidan, V S; Linke, J; Landman, I S; Pestchanyi, S E; Bazylev, B N

    2011-01-01

    This paper concerns the experimental study of damage of ITER divertor plasma-facing components (PFCs) under a combination of pulsed plasma heat loads (representative of controlled ITER type I edge-localized modes (ELMs)) and quasi-stationary heat loads (representative of the high heat flux (HHF) thermal fatigue expected during ITER normal operations and slow transient events). The PFC's tungsten armor damage under pulsed plasma exposure was driven by (i) the melt layer motion, which leads to bridges formation between neighboring tiles and (ii) the W brittle failure giving rise to a stable crack pattern on the exposed surface. The crack width reaches a saturation value that does not exceed some tens of micrometers after several hundreds of ELM-like pulses. HHF thermal fatigue tests have shown (i) a peeling-off of the re-solidified material due to its brittle failure and (ii) a significant widening (up to 10 times) of the cracks and the formation of additional cracks.

  2. Impacts of pulsed electric field and heat treatment on quality and sensory properties and microbial inactivation of pomegranate juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrendilek, Gulsun A

    2017-12-01

    Synergistic effects of pulsed electric field+mild heat on quality properties of pomegranate juice were modeled using the best-fit multiple (non-) linear regression models with inactivation kinetics parameters of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Staphylococcus aureus. No significant difference was detected between the control and the treated samples in terms of pH; °Brix; total antioxidant capacity; total monomeric anthocyanin content; total ascorbic acid concentration; and the sensory properties of flavor, taste, aftertaste, and overall acceptance ( p > 0.05). An exposure of 65.3 J and 40 ℃ caused an increase on conductivity; titratable acidity; L*, a*, and b* values; and a decrease of browning index, total phenolic content, total antioxidant capacity, total monomeric anthocyanin content, total ascorbic acid concentration, and in the sensory properties of color and sourness in pomegranate juice. The goodness-of-fit for the best-fit multiple (non-) linear regression models in descending order belonged to E. coli O157:H7 (92.98%), S. aureus (84.06%), color a* (83.9%), titratable acidity (81.3%), color L* (78.5%), color b* (78.3%), conductivity (74.8%), total phenolic content (74.1%), and total ascorbic acid concentration (64.74%), respectively. D e and z e values for E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus ranged from 105.64 to 1093.25 and from 79.18 to 1057.73 µs with 27.39 and 30.80 J, consequently.

  3. Conceptual design of pulsed high voltage and high precision power supply for a cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM) for plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zito, Pietro; Maffia, Giuseppe; Lampasi, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • ENEA started a project to develop a cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM). • This facility requires an advanced pulsed high voltage power supply (HVPS). • The conceptual design answers to the performances requested for CARM HVPS. • The pulse transformer parameters were estimated according to IEEE standards. • PWM PID-based controller has been optimized to follow very fast rectangular pulses. - Abstract: Due to the high electron temperature during the plasma burning, both a higher power (>1 MW) and a higher frequency (up to 300 GHz) are required for plasma heating in future fusion experiments like DEMO. For this task, ENEA started a project to develop a cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM) able to produce an electron radiation in synchronism with the electromagnetic field and to transfer the electron beam kinetic energy to the plasma. This facility requires an advanced pulsed high voltage power supply (HVPS) with the following technical characteristics: variable output voltage up to 700 kV; variable pulse length in the range 5–50 μs; overshoot < 2%; rise time < 1 μs; voltage accuracy (including drop, ripple and stability) <0.1%. This paper describes the conceptual design and the technical solutions adopted to achieve the performance requested for the CARM HVPS.

  4. Conceptual design of pulsed high voltage and high precision power supply for a cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM) for plasma heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zito, Pietro, E-mail: pietro.zito@enea.it; Maffia, Giuseppe; Lampasi, Alessandro

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • ENEA started a project to develop a cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM). • This facility requires an advanced pulsed high voltage power supply (HVPS). • The conceptual design answers to the performances requested for CARM HVPS. • The pulse transformer parameters were estimated according to IEEE standards. • PWM PID-based controller has been optimized to follow very fast rectangular pulses. - Abstract: Due to the high electron temperature during the plasma burning, both a higher power (>1 MW) and a higher frequency (up to 300 GHz) are required for plasma heating in future fusion experiments like DEMO. For this task, ENEA started a project to develop a cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM) able to produce an electron radiation in synchronism with the electromagnetic field and to transfer the electron beam kinetic energy to the plasma. This facility requires an advanced pulsed high voltage power supply (HVPS) with the following technical characteristics: variable output voltage up to 700 kV; variable pulse length in the range 5–50 μs; overshoot < 2%; rise time < 1 μs; voltage accuracy (including drop, ripple and stability) <0.1%. This paper describes the conceptual design and the technical solutions adopted to achieve the performance requested for the CARM HVPS.

  5. Economics of long distance transmission, storage and distribution of heat from nuclear plants with existing and newer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margen, Peter

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear plants can provide heat for district heating in mainly two ways. Central nuclear power plants sufficiently large to be economic as electricity producers could instead be designed for heat extraction at temperatures useful for district heating. The second promising way is to design simple low temperature reactors, so simple and safe that near urban location becomes feasible. The manner of transport distribution and storage of heat is discussed in this paper which are very important especially in the cost calculations. The economic objectives can often be attained already with conventional technigues even when transport distances are large. But newer techniques of transport promise to make even cities at greater distances from major nuclear power plants economically connectible whilst new techniques for small distribution pipes help to extend the economic distribution area to the less dense one-family house districts. (M.S.)

  6. Les écoulements par RMN à gradient pulsé Pulsed Gradient Nmr Techniques for Studying Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebon L.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Nous présentons ici les techniques de RMN à gradient pulsé qui permettent d'étudier les écoulements multiphasiques en canalisation ou en milieu poreux. Les principaux avantages sont de pouvoir travailler sur des milieux non transparents et d'accéder à des échelles de longueurs faibles. On montre qu'il est possible d'obtenir des informations locales sur l'écoulement, telles que le profil de vitesse et ses fluctuations dans les écoulements diphasiques, ou les cartes de distribution des probabilités de déplacement dans des échantillons poreux hétérogènes. Pulsed gradient NMR techniques are presented here. They allow the study of multiphase flow in pipes as well as porous media. The main advantages are the possibilities of studying non transparent media at small length scales. We show that it is possible to obtain local information on the fluid flow, such as velocity profiles in two phase systems, or maps of distribution of displacement probabilities in heterogeneous porous media.

  7. Direct measurements of sample heating by a laser-induced air plasma in pre-ablation spark dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Register, Janna; Scaffidi, Jonathan; Angel, S Michael

    2012-08-01

    Direct measurements of temperature changes were made using small thermocouples (TC), placed near a laser-induced air plasma. Temperature changes up to ~500 °C were observed. From the measured temperature changes, estimates were made of the amount of heat absorbed per unit area. This allowed calculations to be made of the surface temperature, as a function of time, of a sample heated by the air plasma that is generated during orthogonal pre-ablation spark dual-pulse (DP) LIBS measurements. In separate experiments, single-pulse (SP) LIBS emission and sample ablation rate measurements were performed on nickel at sample temperatures ranging from room temperature to the maximum surface temperature that was calculated using the TC measurement results (500 °C). A small, but real sample temperature-dependent increase in both SP LIBS emission and the rate of sample ablation was found for nickel samples heated up to 500 °C. Comparison of DP LIBS emission enhancement values for bulk nickel samples at room temperature versus the enhanced SP LIBS emission and sample ablation rates observed as a function of increasing sample temperature suggests that sample heating by the laser-induced air plasma plays only a minor role in DP LIBS emission enhancement.

  8. Application of low frequency pulsed ohmic heating for inactivation of foodborne pathogens and MS-2 phage in buffered peptone water and tomato juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Soon; Choi, Won; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to inactivate foodborne pathogens effectively by ohmic heating in buffered peptone water and tomato juice without causing electrode corrosion and quality degradation. Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes were used as representative foodborne pathogens and MS-2 phage was used as a norovirus surrogate. Buffered peptone water and tomato juice inoculated with pathogens were treated with pulsed ohmic heating at different frequencies (0.06-1 kHz). Propidium iodide uptake values of bacterial pathogens were significantly (p heating is applicable to inactivate foodborne pathogens effectively without causing electrode corrosion and quality degradation in tomato juice. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Studies on post weld heat treatment of dissimilar aluminum alloys by laser beam welding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, B.; Krishna, N. Murali; Cheepu, Muralimohan; Sivaprasad, K.; Muthupandi, V.

    2018-03-01

    The present study mainly focuses on post weld heat treatment (PWHT) of AA5083 and AA6061 alloys by joining these using laser beam welding at three different laser power and two different beam spot sizes and three different welding speeds. Effects of these parameters on microstructural and mechanical properties like hardness, tensile strength were studied at PWHT condition and significant changes had been observed. The PWHT used was artificial aging technique. The microstructural observations revealed that there was a appreciable changes were taken place in the grain size. The microhardness observations proven that the change in the hardness profile in AA6061 was appreciable than in the AA5083. The tensile strength of 246 MPa was recorded as highest. The fractured surfaces observed are predominantly ductile in nature.

  10. Evaluation of CFD Turbulent Heating Prediction Techniques and Comparison With Hypersonic Experimental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilley, Arthur D.; McClinton, Charles R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Results from a study to assess the accuracy of turbulent heating and skin friction prediction techniques for hypersonic applications are presented. The study uses the original and a modified Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model with a space marching code. Grid converged turbulent predictions using the wall damping formulation (original model) and local damping formulation (modified model) are compared with experimental data for several flat plates. The wall damping and local damping results are similar for hot wall conditions, but differ significantly for cold walls, i.e., T(sub w) / T(sub t) hypersonic vehicles. Based on the results of this study, it is recommended that the local damping formulation be used with the Baldwin-Lomax and Cebeci-Smith turbulence models in design and analysis of Hyper-X and future hypersonic vehicles.

  11. Automatic diameter control system applied to the laser heated pedestal growth technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreeta M.R.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We described an automatic diameter control system (ADC, for the laser heated pedestal growth technique, that reduces the diameter fluctuations in oxide fibers grown from unreacted and non-sinterized pedestals, to less than 2% of the average fiber diameter, and diminishes the average diameter fluctuation, over the entire length of the fiber, to less than 1%. The ADC apparatus is based on an artificial vision system that controls the pulling speed and the height of the molten zone within a precision of 30 mum. We also show that this system can be used for periodic in situ axial doping the fiber. Pure and Cr3+ doped LaAlO3 and pure LiNbO3 were usedas model materials.

  12. Post-Heat Treatment and Mechanical Assessment of Polyvinyl Alcohol Nanofiber Sheet Fabricated by Electrospinning Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahir Es-saheb

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA sheets based nanofibers were produced by electrospinning technique. Postheat treatment of the produced PVA sheets with temperatures both below and above Tg to improve the mechanical properties of this material is conducted. The morphology, microstructures, and thermal degradation of the nanofibers sheets produced were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA. Produced nanofibers are compact, and entangled with each other, with diameters from around 150 to 210. Some mechanical characteristics of the successfully produced PVA sheets, and heat-treated, are then conducted and assessed employing uniaxial tensile tests at different speeds ranging from 1 mm/min to 100 mm/min. The tensile test results obtained show that the PVA sheets are strain rate sensitive with increasing strength as the speed (i.e., strain rate increases. The yield tensile stress ranges from 2.411 to 6.981 MPa, the ductility (i.e., elongation percent from ∼21 to 60%, and Young modulus ranges from 103 to 0.137 KPa. However, for heat-treated samples, it is found that the yield strength increases almost by ∼35–40% more than the values of untreated cases with values reaching up to about 3.627–9.63 MPa.

  13. Experimental validation of energy parameters in parabolic trough collector with plain absorber and analysis of heat transfer enhancement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, F. R.; Arunachala, U. C.; Sandeep, H. M.

    2018-01-01

    The quantum of heat loss from the receiver of the Parabolic Trough Collector is considerable which results in lower thermal efficiency of the system. Hence heat transfer augmentation is essential which can be attained by various techniques. An analytical model to evaluate the system with bare receiver performance was developed using MATLAB. The experimental validation of the model resulted in less than 5.5% error in exit temperature using both water and thermic oil as heat transfer fluid. Further, heat transfer enhancement techniques were incorporated in the model which included the use of twisted tape inserts, nanofluid, and a combination of both for further enhancement. It was observed that the use of evacuated glass cover in the existing setup would increase the useful heat gain up to 5.3%. Fe3O4/H2O nanofluid showed a maximum enhancement of 56% in the Nusselt number for the volume concentration of 0.6% at highest Reynolds number. Similarly, twisted tape turbulators (with twist ratio of 2) taken alone with water exhibited 59% improvement in Nusselt number. Combining both the heat transfer augmentation techniques at their best values revealed the Nusselt number enhancement up to 87%. It is concluded that, use of twisted tape with water is the best method for heat transfer augmentation since it gives the maximum effective thermal efficiency amongst all for the range of Re considered. The first section in your paper

  14. Dry sliding wear behavior of heat treated hybrid metal matrix composite using Taguchi techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiran, T.S.; Prasanna Kumar, M.; Basavarajappa, S.; Viswanatha, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • ZA-27 alloy is used as matrix material and reinforced with SiC and Gr particles. • Heat treatment was carried out for all specimen. • Dry sliding wear test was done on pin-on-disc apparatus by Taguchi technique. • ZA-27/9SiC–3Gr showed superior wear resistance over the base alloy. • Ceramic mixed mechanical layer on contact surface of composite was formed. - Abstract: Dry sliding wear behavior of zinc based alloy and composite reinforced with SiCp (9 wt%) and Gr (3 wt%) fabricated by stir casting method was investigated. Heat treatment (HT) and aging of the specimen were carried out, followed by water quenching. Wear behavior was evaluated using pin on disc apparatus. Taguchi technique was used to estimate the parameters affecting the wear significantly. The effect of HT was that it reduced the microcracks, residual stresses and improved the distribution of microconstituents. The influence of various parameters like applied load, sliding speed and sliding distance on wear behavior was investigated by means and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Further, correlation between the parameters was determined by multiple linear regression equation for each response. It was observed that the applied load significantly influenced the wear volume loss (WVL), followed by sliding speed implying that increase in either applied load or sliding speed increases the WVL. Whereas for composites, sliding distance showed a negative influence on wear indicating that increase in sliding distance reduces WVL due to the presence of reinforcements. The wear mechanism of the worn out specimen was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The analysis shows that the formation and retention of ceramic mixed mechanical layer (CMML) plays a major role in the dry sliding wear resistance

  15. Experimental Study on the Molten Corium Interaction with Structure by Induction Heating Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Sang Mo; Ha, Kwang Soon; Min, Beong Tae; Hong, Seong Ho; Kim, Hwan Yeol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The corium compositions strongly depend on the accident scenarios, and thus the melt generation technique for various melt compositions is essential to investigate the corium-structural material interaction characteristics according to the accident scenarios. Since 1997, KAERI has several years of experiences with melt generation to investigate the material ablation characteristics and steam explosion phenomena. Based on the experiences of the TROI (Test for Real cOrium Interaction with water) facility for the steam explosion experiments, the VESTA (Verification of Ex-vessel corium STAbilization) test facility was designed and constructed in 2010 for the development of a core catcher under the APR+ project. At the same time, the VESTA-S (VESTA-Small) was established for small scale material ablation experiments. Some experimental results were reported for the interactions of metallic or oxidic melt with the structural materials such as special concrete or penetration weld. The objective of this paper is to provide the specific features of the VESTA and VESTA-S facilities including information on the melt generation technique adopted for the facilities. Some issues are also addressed in this paper for further facility improvement. In the present paper, the principles of induction heating adopted for the VESTA and VESTA-S facilities were summarized briefly and the system features for the melt-structural material interaction experiments were explained. As a major characteristic of the VESTA facility, up to 400 kg of corium melt is expected to be generated using the currently installed system. The jet impingement effect on the material ablation characteristics was demonstrated successfully in the VESTA facility. In the VESTA-S facility, the small scale material ablation experiments by long term melt interaction were performed properly by adopting the melt delivery method. However, for a more realistic severe accident simulation, we need to improve the melt temperature

  16. Development of the double-pulse technique to improve the analytical performance of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) on solids: Nuclear and geological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, C.

    2005-10-01

    The double-pulse technique has been developed to improve the analytical performance of Laser Ablation coupled to Optical Emission Spectroscopy (LA/OES). This approach relies on the addition of a second time-resolved laser pulse to the classical LA/OES system. It has been studied on aluminium alloys according to different geometries of the two laser beams (orthogonal and collinear geometries) before being applied to different materials (synthetic glass, rock, steel, sodium chloride). The increase in emission intensity depends on the temporal parameters, on the excitation energy level of the emission line, on the concentration of the studied element and on the analyzed matrix. The double-pulse LA/OES technique can be particularly interesting to improve the sensitivity towards vitreous matrices containing elements emitting lines with high excitation energy levels. (author)

  17. Heat and mass transfer are in the interaction of multi-pulsed spray with vertical surfaces in the regime of evaporative cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, P. N.; Nazarov, A. D.; Serov, A. F.; Terekhov, V. I.

    2017-10-01

    Sprays with a periodic supply drop phase have great opportunities to control the processes of heat transfer. We can achieve optimal evaporative modes of cooling by changing the pulse duration and the repetition frequency while minimizing flow of the liquid phase. Experimental data of investigation of local heat transfer for poorly heated large surface obtained on the original stand with multi nozzle managed the irrigation system impact of the gas-droplet flow present in this work. Researches on the contribution to the intensification of spray options were conducted. Also the growth rate was integral and local heat. Information instantaneous distribution of the heat flux in the description of the processes have helped us. Managed to describe two basic modes of heat transfer: Mode “insular” foil cooling and thick foil with forming of streams. Capacitive sensors allow to monitor the dynamics of the foil thickness, the birth-belt flow, forming and the evolution of waves generated by “bombing” the surface with the droplets.

  18. Investigation of Critical Heat Flux in Reduced Gravity Using Photomicrographic Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudawar, Issam; Zhang, Hui

    2003-01-01

    Experiments were performed to examine the effects of body force on flow boiling critical heat flux (CHF). FC-72 was boiled along one wall of a transparent rectangular flow channel that permitted photographic study of the vapor-liquid interface just prior to CHF. High-speed video imaging techniques were used to identify dominant CHF mechanisms corresponding to different flow orientations and liquid velocities. Six different CHF regimes were identified: Wavy Vapor Layer, Pool Boiling, Stratification, Vapor Counterflow, Vapor Stagnation, and Separated Concurrent Vapor Flow. CHF showed significant sensitivity to orientation for flow velocities below 0.2 m/s, where extremely low CHF values where measured, especially with downward-facing heated wall and downflow orientations. High flow velocities dampened the effects of orientation considerably. The CHF data were used to assess the suitability of previous CHF models and correlations. It is shown the Interfacial Lift-off Model is very effective at predicting CHF for high velocities at all orientations. The flooding limit, on the other hand, is useful at estimating CHF at low velocities and for downflow orientations. A new method consisting of three dimensionless criteria is developed for determining the minimum flow velocity required to overcome body force effects on near-saturated flow boiling CHF. Vertical upflow boiling experiments were performed in pursuit of identifying the trigger mechanism for subcooled flow boiling CHF. While virtually all prior studies on flow boiling CHF concern the prediction or measurement of conditions that lead to CHF, this study was focused on events that take place during the CHF transient. High-speed video imaging and photomicrographic techniques were used to record the transient behavior of interfacial features from the last steady-state power level before CHF until the moment of power cut-off following CHF. The video records show the development of a wavy vapor layer which propagates

  19. CFD modeling and experimental verification of oscillating flow and heat transfer processes in the micro coaxial Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler operating at 90-170 Hz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yibo; Yu, Guorui; Tan, Jun; Mao, Xiaochen; Li, Jiaqi; Zha, Rui; Li, Ning; Dang, Haizheng

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the CFD modeling and experimental verifications of oscillating flow and heat transfer processes in the micro coaxial Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler (MCSPTC) operating at 90-170 Hz. It uses neither double-inlet nor multi-bypass while the inertance tube with a gas reservoir becomes the only phase-shifter. The effects of the frequency on flow and heat transfer processes in the pulse tube are investigated, which indicates that a low enough frequency would lead to a strong mixing between warm and cold fluids, thereby significantly deteriorating the cooling performance, whereas a high enough frequency would produce the downward sloping streams flowing from the warm end to the axis and almost puncturing the gas displacer from the warm end, thereby creating larger temperature gradients in radial directions and thus undermining the cooling performance. The influence of the pulse tube length on the temperature and velocity when the frequencies are much higher than the optimal one are also discussed. A MCSPTC with an overall mass of 1.1 kg is worked out and tested. With an input electric power of 59 W and operating at 144 Hz, it achieves a no-load temperature of 61.4 K and a cooling capacity of 1.0 W at 77 K. The changing tendencies of tested results are in good agreement with the simulations. The above studies will help to thoroughly understand the underlying mechanism of the inertance MCSPTC operating at very high frequencies.

  20. Proportional counters for measuring plutonium-239 'in vivo' - The choice of counting gas and the use of pulse shape discrimination techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, R.A.; Ramsden, D.

    1969-08-01

    The system for determining insoluble plutonium 'in vivo', now in routine use at A.E.E-. Winfrith, has a limit of detection of the order of 4 nCi plutonium - 239. The method of reducing background by using pulse shape discrimination techniques whilst retaining a high detection efficiency is described. The choice of a counting gas mixture to obtain optimum performance is discussed as are the techniques of gas handling. (author)

  1. Development and contribution of rf heating and current drive systems to long pulse, high performance experiments in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Shinichi; Seki, Masami; Terakado, Masayuki; Shimono, Mitsugu; Ide, Shunsuke; Isayama, Akihiko; Suzuki, Takahiro; Fujii, Tsuneyuki

    2005-01-01

    To contribute to high performance long pulse (∼65 s) experiments in JT-60U, the target of the electron cyclotron (EC) operation in long pulse is 0.6 MW for 30 s with four gyrotrons, though 10 MJ (2.8 MW and 3.6 s) was achieved in high power operation before 2003. One of the critical issues for the long pulse operation is detuning due to decay in beam current of the gyrotron. This decay comes from the cathode cooling by continuous electron emission. As a countermeasure for this issue, active adjustments for the heater current and anode voltage during the pulse have successfully extended the duration of a good oscillation condition for the gyrotron. As a result, 0.4 MW for 16 s with one gyrotron to the dummy load and for 8.7 s to the plasma have been achieved up to now

  2. Optimal properties for coated titanium implants with the hydroxyapatite layer formed by the pulsed laser deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmlova, Lucia; Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinek, Miroslav; Bartova, Jirina; Pesakova, V.; Adam, M.

    1999-02-01

    Pulsed laser deposition technique allow to 'tailor' bioceramic coat for metal implants by the change of deposition conditions. Each attribute is influenced by the several deposition parameters and each parameter change several various properties. Problem caused that many parameters has an opposite function and improvement of one property is followed by deterioration of other attribute. This study monitor influence of each single deposition parameter and evaluate its importance form the point of view of coat properties. For deposition KrF excimer laser in stainless-steel deposition chamber was used. Deposition conditions (ambient composition and pressures, metallic substrate temperature, energy density and target-substrate distance) were changed according to the film properties. A non-coated titanium implant was used as a control. Films with promising mechanical quality underwent an in vitro biological tests -- measurement of proliferation activity, observing cell interactions with macrophages, fibroblasts, testing toxicity of percolates, observing a solubility of hydroxyapatite (HA) coat. Deposition conditions corresponding with the optimal mechanical and biochemical properties are: metal temperature 490 degrees Celsius, ambient-mixture of argon and water vapor, energy density 3 Jcm-2, target-substrate distance 7.5 cm.

  3. Pulsed and monoenergetic beams for neutron cross-section measurements using activation and scattering techniques at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutcheson, A. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)]. E-mail: hutch@tunl.duke.edu; Angell, C.T. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Becker, J.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Boswell, M. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Crowell, A.S. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Dashdorj, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Fallin, B. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Fotiades, N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Howell, C.R.; Karwowski, H.J.; Kelley, J.H.; Kiser, M. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Macri, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Nelson, R.O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Pedroni, R.S. [NC A and T State University, 1601 East Market Street, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Tonchev, A.P.; Tornow, W. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Vieira, D.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Weisel, G.J. [Penn State Altoona, 3000 Ivyside Park, Altoona, PA 16601 (United States); Wilhelmy, J.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    In support of the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances initiative, an experimental program has been developed at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) to measure (n,xn) cross-sections with both in-beam and activation techniques with the goal of improving the partial cross-section database for the NNSA Stockpile Stewardship Program. First experimental efforts include excitation function measurements on {sup 235,238}U and {sup 241}Am using pulsed and monoenergetic neutron beams with E {sub n} = 5-15 MeV. Neutron-induced partial cross-sections were measured by detecting prompt {gamma} rays from the residual nuclei using various combinations of clover and planar HPGe detectors in the TUNL shielded neutron source area. Complimentary activation measurements using DC neutron beams have also been performed in open geometry in our second target area. The neutron-induced activities were measured in the TUNL low-background counting area. In this presentation, we include detailed information about the irradiation procedures and facilities and preliminary data on first measurements using this capability.

  4. Microstructural, nanomechanical, and microtribological properties of Pb thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition and thermal evaporation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broitman, Esteban, E-mail: esbro@ifm.liu.se [Thin Film Physics Division, IFM, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Flores-Ruiz, Francisco J. [Thin Film Physics Division, IFM, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden and Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del I.P.N., Unidad Querétaro, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Di Giulio, Massimo [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Gontad, Francisco; Lorusso, Antonella; Perrone, Alessio [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, 73100 Lecce, Italy and INFN-Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    In this work, the authors compare the morphological, structural, nanomechanical, and microtribological properties of Pb films deposited by thermal evaporation (TE) and pulsed laser deposition (PLD) techniques onto Si (111) substrates. Films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, surface probe microscopy, and x-ray diffraction in θ-2θ geometry to determine their morphology, root-mean-square (RMS) roughness, and microstructure, respectively. TE films showed a percolated morphology with densely packed fibrous grains while PLD films had a granular morphology with a columnar and tightly packed structure in accordance with the zone growth model of Thornton. Moreover, PLD films presented a more polycrystalline structure with respect to TE films, with RMS roughness of 14 and 10 nm, respectively. Hardness and elastic modulus vary from 2.1 to 0.8 GPa and from 14 to 10 GPa for PLD and TE films, respectively. A reciprocal friction test has shown that PLD films have lower friction coefficient and wear rate than TE films. Our study has demonstrated for first time that, at the microscale, Pb films do not show the same simple lubricious properties measured at the macroscale.

  5. Multiparticle imaging technique for two-phase fluid flows using pulsed laser speckle velocimetry. Final report, September 1988--November 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    The practical use of Pulsed Laser Velocimetry (PLV) requires the use of fast, reliable computer-based methods for tracking numerous particles suspended in a fluid flow. Two methods for performing tracking are presented. One method tracks a particle through multiple sequential images (minimum of four required) by prediction and verification of particle displacement and direction. The other method, requiring only two sequential images uses a dynamic, binary, spatial, cross-correlation technique. The algorithms are tested on computer-generated synthetic data and experimental data which was obtained with traditional PLV methods. This allowed error analysis and testing of the algorithms on real engineering flows. A novel method is proposed which eliminates tedious, undersirable, manual, operator assistance in removing erroneous vectors. This method uses an iterative process involving an interpolated field produced from the most reliable vectors. Methods are developed to allow fast analysis and presentation of sets of PLV image data. Experimental investigation of a two-phase, horizontal, stratified, flow regime was performed to determine the interface drag force, and correspondingly, the drag coefficient. A horizontal, stratified flow test facility using water and air was constructed to allow interface shear measurements with PLV techniques. The experimentally obtained local drag measurements were compared with theoretical results given by conventional interfacial drag theory. Close agreement was shown when local conditions near the interface were similar to space-averaged conditions. However, theory based on macroscopic, space-averaged flow behavior was shown to give incorrect results if the local gas velocity near the interface as unstable, transient, and dissimilar from the average gas velocity through the test facility.

  6. Using a quasi-heat-pulse method to determine heat and moisture transfer properties for porous orthotropic wood products or cellular solid materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. A. Dietenberger

    2006-01-01

    Understanding heat and moisture transfer in a wood specimen as used in the K-tester has led to an unconventional numerical solution arid intriguing protocol to deriving the transfer properties. Laplace transform solutions of Luikov’s differential equations are derived for one-dimensional heat and moisture transfer in porous hygroscopic orthotropic materials and for a...

  7. Pulse neutron logging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bespalov, D.F.; Dylyuk, A.A.

    1975-01-01

    A new method of neutron-burst logging is proposed, residing in irradiating rocks with fast neutron bursts and registering the integrated flux burst of thermal and/or epithermal neutrons, from the moment of its initiation to that of full absorption. The obtaained value is representative of the rock properties (porosity, hydrogen content). The integrated flux in a burst of thermal and epithermal neutrons can be measured both by way of activation of a reference sample of a known chemical composition during the neutron burst and by recording the radiation of induced activity of the sample within an interval between two bursts. The proposed method features high informative value, accuracy and efficiency

  8. FY 1986 Report on research and development of super heat pump energy accumulation system. Part 2. Development of elementary techniques; 1986 nendo super heat pump energy shuseki system no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. 2. Yoso gijutsu no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1987-04-01

    Summarized in detail herein are R and D results of the chemical heat storage techniques and plant simulation, for R and D of the super heat pump energy accumulation system. For R and D of the chemical heat storage techniques, the R and D efforts are directed to the researches on the fundamental reactions and continuous exothermic reactions involved for the high temperature heat storage type (utilizing the metathesis reactions); researches on the physical properties, heat storage systems, solid-phase reactions, liquid-phase reactors, corrosion of the materials, and so on for the high temperature heat storage type (utilizing ammonia complex); collection of the data related to media and structural materials, tests of the elementary equipment for the absorption and hydration reactions, and so on for the high temperature heat storage type (chemical heat storage utilizing hydration); researches on the media properties and system performance, tests of equipment, and so on for the high temperature heat storage type (heat storage/heating utilizing solvation); researches on the heat storage media, heat storage techniques, corrosion of the materials, systems, and so on for the low temperature heat storage type (utilizing the hydration reactions by mixing solutes); and researches on the media, corrosion and elementary equipment, optimization of the system, and so on for the low temperature heat storage type (clathrate low temperature heat storage systems). (NEDO)

  9. Short pulse laser systems for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Kunal

    2017-01-01

    This book presents practical information on the clinical applications of short pulse laser systems and the techniques for optimizing these applications in a manner that will be relevant to a broad audience, including engineering and medical students as well as researchers, clinicians, and technicians. Short pulse laser systems are useful for both subsurface tissue imaging and laser induced thermal therapy (LITT), which hold great promise in cancer diagnostics and treatment. Such laser systems may be used alone or in combination with optically active nanoparticles specifically administered to the tissues of interest for enhanced contrast in imaging and precise heating during LITT. Mathematical and computational models of short pulse laser-tissue interactions that consider the transient radiative transport equation coupled with a bio-heat equation considering the initial transients of laser heating were developed to analyze the laser-tissue interaction during imaging and therapy. Experiments were first performe...

  10. Space-time evolution of the power absorbed by creating and heating a hydrogen plasma column by a pulsed laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pincosy, Philip; Dufresne, Daniel; Bournot, Philippe; Caressa, J.-P.; Autric, Michel

    1976-01-01

    Space-time measurements of light intensity are presented for the analysis of the processes involved in the creation and heating of an under-dense hydrogen plasma column by a pulsed CO 2 laser beam. The laser beam trapping due to the rapid development of a radial electron density gradient is specifically demonstrated. Time measurements of the changes in the laser power longitudinally transmitted through the plasma give evidence for a significant absorption of the incident power during the first 150 nanoseconds of the interaction [fr

  11. Estimates of error introduced when one-dimensional inverse heat transfer techniques are applied to multi-dimensional problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, C.; Koski, J.A.; Razani, A.

    2000-01-01

    A study of the errors introduced when one-dimensional inverse heat conduction techniques are applied to problems involving two-dimensional heat transfer effects was performed. The geometry used for the study was a cylinder with similar dimensions as a typical container used for the transportation of radioactive materials. The finite element analysis code MSC P/Thermal was used to generate synthetic test data that was then used as input for an inverse heat conduction code. Four different problems were considered including one with uniform flux around the outer surface of the cylinder and three with non-uniform flux applied over 360 deg C, 180 deg C, and 90 deg C sections of the outer surface of the cylinder. The Sandia One-Dimensional Direct and Inverse Thermal (SODDIT) code was used to estimate the surface heat flux of all four cases. The error analysis was performed by comparing the results from SODDIT and the heat flux calculated based on the temperature results obtained from P/Thermal. Results showed an increase in error of the surface heat flux estimates as the applied heat became more localized. For the uniform case, SODDIT provided heat flux estimates with a maximum error of 0.5% whereas for the non-uniform cases, the maximum errors were found to be about 3%, 7%, and 18% for the 360 deg C, 180 deg C, and 90 deg C cases, respectively

  12. Effect of heating rate and grain size on the melting behavior of the alloy Nb-47 mass % Ti in pulse-heating experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basak, D.; Boettinger, W.J.; Josell, D.; Coriell, S.R.; McClure, J.L.; Cezairliyan, A.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of heating rate and grain size on the melting behavior of Nb-47 mass% Ti is measured and modeled. The experimental method uses rapid resistive self-heating of wire specimens at rates between ∼10 2 and ∼10 4 K/s and simultaneous measurement of radiance temperature and normal spectral emissivity as functions of time until specimen collapse, typically between 0.4 and 0.9 fraction melted. During heating, a sharp drop in emissivity is observed at a temperature that is independent of heating rate and grain size. This drop is due to surface and grain boundary melting at the alloy solidus temperature even though there is very little deflection (limited melting) of the temperature-time curve from the imposed heating rate. Above the solidus temperature, the emissivity remains nearly constant with increasing temperature and the temperature vs time curve gradually reaches a sloped plateau over which the major fraction of the specimen melts. As the heating rate and/or grain size is increased, the onset temperature of the sloped plateau approaches the alloy liquidus temperature and the slope of the plateau approaches zero. This interpretation of the shapes of the temperature-time-curves is supported by a model that includes diffusion in the solid coupled with a heat balance during the melting process. There is no evidence of loss of local equilibrium at the melt front during melting in these experiments

  13. Reduced timing Sensitivity in all-optical switching using flat-top control pulses obtained by the optical fourier transform technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Galili, Michael; Mulvad, Hans Christian Hansen

    2006-01-01

    into the time domain, referred to as the optical Fourier transform technique. A 3 ps flat-top pulse derived from a 3 nm wide square filter is obtained, and used to gate an all-optical OTDM demultiplexer, yielding an error-free timing jitter tolerance of 3 ps for 80 Gb/s and 160 Gb/s data signals.......For high-speed serial data, timing tolerance is crucial for switching and regeneration. We propose a novel scheme to generate flat-top pulses, for use as gating control pulses. The scheme relies on spectral shaping by a square-shaped filter, followed by a linear transformation of the spectral shape...

  14. Pulse-width modulation for small heat pump installations - Phase 4; Pulsbreitenmodulation fuer Kleinwaermepumpenanlagen. Phase 4: Erweiterung der PBM-Regler fuer Kombianlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, M.; Shafai, E. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Institut fuer Mess- und Regeltechnik, Zuerich (Switzerland); Gabathuler, H.R.; Mayer, H. [Gabathuler AG, Beratende Ingenieure, Diessenhofen (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of the fourth phase of a project that investigated three types of pulse-width modulation (PWM) controllers that were developed during its first two phases. A third phase monitored the controllers when used in a simulated environment and for a real-life heat pump. The report discusses the fourth phase of the project, in which the controller was further developed and tested using the building emulation developed in the third phase. The functioning of the self-regulating controller and its use of meteorological data is described and the savings to be made in heating costs are discussed.

  15. Enhancement of downward-facing saturated boiling heat transfer by the cold spray technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohag, Frauk A.; Beck, Faith R.; Mohanta, Lokanath; Cheung, Fan Bill; Segall, Albert E.; Eden, Timothy J.; Potter, John K. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States)

    2017-02-15

    In-vessel retention by passive external reactor vessel cooling under severe accident conditions is a viable approach for retention of radioactive core melt within the reactor vessel. In this study, a new and versatile coating technique known as 'cold spray' that can readily be applied to operating and advanced reactors was developed to form a microporous coating on the outer surface of a simulated reactor lower head. Quenching experiments were performed under simulated in-vessel retention by passive external reactor vessel cooling conditions using test vessels with and without cold spray coatings. Quantitative measurements show that for all angular locations on the vessel outer surface, the local critical heat flux (CHF) values for the coated vessel were consistently higher than the corresponding CHF values for the bare vessel. However, it was also observed for both coated and uncoated surfaces that the local rate of boiling and local CHF limit vary appreciably along the outer surface of the test vessel. Nonetheless, results of this intriguing study clearly show that the use of cold spray coatings could enhance the local CHF limit for downward-facing boiling by > 88%.

  16. Development of a micro liquid-level sensor for harsh environments using a periodic heating technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jonggan; Kim, Dongsik; Chang, Young Soo

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of a novel micro thermal sensor for point sensing of lubrication oil level in industrial compressors. The results reported in this work can be applied to various harsh environments that feature high temperature/pressure, limited space and flow/vibration. The sensor employs an ac (alternating current) thermal technique with a single heating/sensing element. As the sensing scheme is based on the so-called three-omega method, the sensing signal is noise-resistant and hardly affected by flow in the liquid being measured. Experiments with DI water, ethanol and ethylene glycol confirm that the sensor performance is satisfactory under atmospheric pressure. Also, to mimic harsh conditions as in an industrial compressor, tests are performed in a pressure vessel containing R410A gas and polyvinylether lubrication oil under high temperatures and pressures. The results indicate that the sensitivity and response time of the developed sensor are appropriate for practical usage in harsh environments. As the sensor can be easily mass-produced at low cost using photolithography, it has strong potential for industrial applications

  17. Techniques for synchronization of X-Ray pulses to the pump laser in an ultrafast X-Ray facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corlett, J.N.; Doolittle, L.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Wilcox, R.; Zholents, A.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate timing of ultrafast x-ray probe pulses emitted from a synchrotron radiation source with respect to the signal initiating a process in the sample under study is critical for the investigation of structural dynamics in the femtosecond regime. We describe schemes for achieving accurate timing of femtosecond x-ray synchrotron radiation pulses relative to a pump laser, where x-rays pulses of <100 fs duration are generated from the proposed LUX source based on a recirculating superconducting linac. We present a description of the timing signal generation and distribution systems to minimize timing jitter of the x-rays relative to the experimental lasers

  18. Suitability of orthodontic brackets for rebonding and reworking following removal by air pressure pulses and conventional debracketing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knösel, Michael; Mattysek, Simone; Jung, Klaus; Kubein-Meesenburg, Dietmar; Sadat-Khonsari, Reza; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2010-07-01

    To test the null hypothesis that there are no significant differences in the reusability of debonded brackets with regard to debonding technique and adhesive used. Ninety-six osteotomed third molars were randomly assigned to two study groups (n = 48) for bonding of a 0.018-inch bracket (Ormesh, Ormco) with either a composite adhesive (Mono-Lok2; RMO) or a glass ionomer cement (GIC; Fuji Ortho LC;GC). Each of these two groups were then randomly divided into four subgroups (n = 12) according to the method of debonding using (1) bracket removal pliers (BRP; Dentaurum), (2) a side cutter (SC; Dentaurum), (3) a lift-off debracketing instrument (LODI; 3M-Unitek), or (4) an air pressure pulse device (CoronaFlex; KaVo). The brackets were subsequently assessed visually for reusability and reworkability with 2x magnification and by pull testing with a 0.017- x 0.025-inch steel archwire. The proportions of reusable brackets were individually compared in terms of mode of removal and with regard to adhesives using the Fisher exact test (alpha = 5%). The null hypothesis was rejected. Not taking into account the debonding method, brackets bonded with GIC were judged to a significant extent (81%; n = 39; P < .01) to be reworkable compared with those bonded with composite (56%; n = 27). All brackets in both adhesive groups removed with either the LODI or the CoronaFlex were found to be reusable, whereas 79% (46%) of the brackets removed with the BRP (SC) were not. The proportion of reusable brackets differed significantly between modes of removal (P < .01). With regard to bracket reusability, the SC and the BRP cannot be recommended for debonding brackets, especially in combination with a composite adhesive.

  19. Thermal Conductivity of EB-PVD Thermal Barrier Coatings Evaluated by a Steady-State Laser Heat Flux Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Nagaraj, Ben A.; Bruce, Robert W.

    2000-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) Zr02-8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined by a steady-state heat flux laser technique. Thermal conductivity change kinetics of the EB-PVD ceramic coatings were also obtained in real time, at high temperatures, under the laser high heat flux, long term test conditions. The thermal conductivity increase due to micro-pore sintering and the decrease due to coating micro-delaminations in the EB-PVD coatings were evaluated for grooved and non-grooved EB-PVD coating systems under isothermal and thermal cycling conditions. The coating failure modes under the high heat flux test conditions were also investigated. The test technique provides a viable means for obtaining coating thermal conductivity data for use in design, development, and life prediction for engine applications.

  20. Use of time history speckle pattern and pulsed photoacoustic techniques to detect the self-accommodating transformation in a Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Arevalo, F.M.; Aldama-Reyna, W.; Lara-Rodriguez, A.G.; Garcia-Fernandez, T.; Pulos, G.; Trivi, M.; Villagran-Muniz, M.

    2010-01-01

    Continuous and pulsed electromagnetic radiation was used to detect the self-accommodation mechanism on a polycrystalline Cu-13.83 wt.%Al-2.34 wt.%Ni shape memory alloy. Rectangular samples of this alloy were mechanically polished to observe the austenite and martensite phases. The samples were cooled in liquid nitrogen prior to the experiments to obtain the martensite phase. Using a dynamic speckle technique with a continuous wave laser we obtained the time history of the speckle pattern image and monitored the surface changes caused by the self-accommodation mechanism during the inverse (martensitic to austenitic) transformation. Using a photoacoustic technique based on a pulsed laser source it was also possible to detect the self-accommodation phenomena in a bulk sample. For comparison purposes, we used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to detect the critical temperatures of transformation and use these as reference to evaluate the performance of the optical and photoacoustical techniques. In all cases, the same range of temperature was obtained during the inverse transformation. From these results, we conclude that time history speckle pattern (THSP) and pulsed photoacoustic are complementary techniques; they are non-destructive and useful to detect surface and bulk martensitic transformation induced by a temperature change.

  1. Use of time history speckle pattern and pulsed photoacoustic techniques to detect the self-accommodating transformation in a Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Arevalo, F.M., E-mail: fsanchez@iim.unam.mx [CCADET - Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-186, Mexico D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Aldama-Reyna, W. [Departamento Academico de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Trujillo, Trujillo (Peru); Lara-Rodriguez, A.G. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico); Garcia-Fernandez, T. [Universidad Autonoma de la Ciudad de Mexico (UACM), Prolongacion San Isidro 151, Col. San Lorenzo Tezonco, Mexico DF, C.P. 09790 (Mexico); Pulos, G. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico); Trivi, M. [Centro de Investigaciones Opticas, Universidad de la Plata (Argentina); Villagran-Muniz, M. [CCADET - Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-186, Mexico D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico)

    2010-05-15

    Continuous and pulsed electromagnetic radiation was used to detect the self-accommodation mechanism on a polycrystalline Cu-13.83 wt.%Al-2.34 wt.%Ni shape memory alloy. Rectangular samples of this alloy were mechanically polished to observe the austenite and martensite phases. The samples were cooled in liquid nitrogen prior to the experiments to obtain the martensite phase. Using a dynamic speckle technique with a continuous wave laser we obtained the time history of the speckle pattern image and monitored the surface changes caused by the self-accommodation mechanism during the inverse (martensitic to austenitic) transformation. Using a photoacoustic technique based on a pulsed laser source it was also possible to detect the self-accommodation phenomena in a bulk sample. For comparison purposes, we used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to detect the critical temperatures of transformation and use these as reference to evaluate the performance of the optical and photoacoustical techniques. In all cases, the same range of temperature was obtained during the inverse transformation. From these results, we conclude that time history speckle pattern (THSP) and pulsed photoacoustic are complementary techniques; they are non-destructive and useful to detect surface and bulk martensitic transformation induced by a temperature change.

  2. Development of an integrated MOX-scrap recycling flow-sheet by dry and wet routes using microwave heating techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallik, G K; Malav, R K; Karande, A P; Bhargava, V K; Kamath, H S [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur (India)

    1999-01-01

    A simple, short and efficient scrap, recycling flow-sheet, which is exclusively based on microwave heating techniques and, includes both dry and wet routes, for (U,Pu)O{sub 2} fuel scrap recycling has been developed and evaluated. (author) 6 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Effect of intake on fasting heat production, respiratory quotient and plasma metabolites measured using the washed rumen technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective was to investigate the effect of intake prior to fasting on concentrations of metabolites and hormones, respiratory quotient (RQ) and fasting heat production (HP) using the washed rumen technique and to compare these values with those from the fed state. Six Holstein steers (360 ± 22 k...

  4. Cryosurgery with pulsed electric fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte S Daniels

    Full Text Available This study explores the hypothesis that combining the minimally invasive surgical techniques of cryosurgery and pulsed electric fields will eliminate some of the major disadvantages of these techniques while retaining their advantages. Cryosurgery, tissue ablation by freezing, is a well-established minimally invasive surgical technique. One disadvantage of cryosurgery concerns the mechanism of cell death; cells at high subzero temperature on the outer rim of the frozen lesion can survive. Pulsed electric fields (PEF are another minimally invasive surgical technique in which high strength and very rapid electric pulses are delivered across cells to permeabilize the cell membrane for applications such as gene delivery, electrochemotherapy and irreversible electroporation. The very short time scale of the electric pulses is disadvantageous because it does not facilitate real time control over the procedure. We hypothesize that applying the electric pulses during the cryosurgical procedure in such a way that the electric field vector is parallel to the heat flux vector will have the effect of confining the electric fields to the frozen/cold region of tissue, thereby ablating the cells that survive freezing while facilitating controlled use of the PEF in the cold confined region. A finite element analysis of the electric field and heat conduction equations during simultaneous tissue treatment with cryosurgery and PEF (cryosurgery/PEF was used to study the effect of tissue freezing on electric fields. The study yielded motivating results. Because of decreased electrical conductivity in the frozen/cooled tissue, it experienced temperature induced magnified electric fields in comparison to PEF delivered to the unfrozen tissue control. This suggests that freezing/cooling confines and magnifies the electric fields to those regions; a targeting capability unattainable in traditional PEF. This analysis shows how temperature induced magnified and focused

  5. Cryosurgery with Pulsed Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Charlotte S.; Rubinsky, Boris

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that combining the minimally invasive surgical techniques of cryosurgery and pulsed electric fields will eliminate some of the major disadvantages of these techniques while retaining their advantages. Cryosurgery, tissue ablation by freezing, is a well-established minimally invasive surgical technique. One disadvantage of cryosurgery concerns the mechanism of cell death; cells at high subzero temperature on the outer rim of the frozen lesion can survive. Pulsed electric fields (PEF) are another minimally invasive surgical technique in which high strength and very rapid electric pulses are delivered across cells to permeabilize the cell membrane for applications such as gene delivery, electrochemotherapy and irreversible electroporation. The very short time scale of the electric pulses is disadvantageous because it does not facilitate real time control over the procedure. We hypothesize that applying the electric pulses during the cryosurgical procedure in such a way that the electric field vector is parallel to the heat flux vector will have the effect of confining the electric fields to the frozen/cold region of tissue, thereby ablating the cells that survive freezing while facilitating controlled use of the PEF in the cold confined region. A finite element analysis of the electric field and heat conduction equations during simultaneous tissue treatment with cryosurgery and PEF (cryosurgery/PEF) was used to study the effect of tissue freezing on electric fields. The study yielded motivating results. Because of decreased electrical conductivity in the frozen/cooled tissue, it experienced temperature induced magnified electric fields in comparison to PEF delivered to the unfrozen tissue control. This suggests that freezing/cooling confines and magnifies the electric fields to those regions; a targeting capability unattainable in traditional PEF. This analysis shows how temperature induced magnified and focused PEFs could be used to

  6. Quantitative effects of rapid heating on soot-particle sizing through analysis of two-pulse LII

    KAUST Repository

    Cenker, Emre; Roberts, William L.

    2017-01-01

    particle size, respectively. Overall, effects of these two processes on soot and LII model-based particle sizing are investigated by measuring the two-color time-resolved (2C-TiRe) LII signal decay from in-flame soot after two consecutive laser pulses

  7. W-1% La2O3 Submitted to a Single Laser Pulse: Effect of Particles on Heat Transfer and Surface Morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Gaudio

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available W-1% La2O3 has been irradiated by a single laser pulse (λ = 1064 nm, pulse duration τ ≈ 15 ns, pulse energy Ep ≈ 4 J, spot size Φ = 200 μm, surface power density I = 8.5 × 1011 W·cm−2 to simulate the effects of transient thermal loads of high energy occurring in a tokamak under operative conditions. The samples have been then examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM observations to investigate erosion effects and surface morphological features. A surface depression forms in the spot central area surrounded by a ridge due to the movement of molten metal. Owing to the burst of gas bubbles, hemispherical cavities of about 10 μm and deposited droplets are observed in the ridge while the zones surrounding the ridge thermal stresses arising from fast heating and successive cooling produce an extended network of micro-cracks that often follow grain boundaries. The results are discussed and compared to those obtained in a previous work on pure bulk W.

  8. Volatile compounds and changes in flavour-related enzymes during cold storage of high-intensity pulsed electric field- and heat-processed tomato juices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiló-Aguayo, Ingrid; Soliva-Fortuny, Robert; Martín-Belloso, Olga

    2010-08-15

    The effects of high-intensity pulsed electric field (HIPEF) processing (35 kV cm(-1) for 1500 micros, using 4 micros bipolar pulses at 100 Hz) on the production of volatile compounds and flavour-related enzymes in tomato juice were investigated and compared with those of thermal processing (90 degrees C for 30 or 60 s). Tomato juice treated by HIPEF showed lower residual lipoxygenase (LOX) activity (70.2%) than juice heated at 90 degrees C for 60 s (80.1%) or 30 s (93.2%). In contrast, hydroperoxide lyase (HPL) was almost completely inactivated when the juice was subjected to 90 degrees C for 60 s, whereas roughly 50% of the control tomato juice was depleted after HIPEF treatment or thermal processing at 90 degrees C for 30 s. A slight decrease was observed in the initial LOX activity of treated and untreated samples during storage, whereas initial HPL activity was strongly affected over time. HIPEF-treated juice exhibited higher levels of compounds contributing to tomato aroma than untreated and heat-treated juices throughout storage. Thus HIPEF processing can preserve flavour quality and stability of tomato juice compared with conventional thermal treatments. Copyright (c) 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Thermal Stress Analysis of a Continuous and Pulsed End-Pumped Nd:YAG Rod Crystal Using Non-Classic Conduction Heat Transfer Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojahedi, Mahdi; Shekoohinejad, Hamidreza

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, temperature distribution in the continuous and pulsed end-pumped Nd:YAG rod crystal is determined using nonclassical and classical heat conduction theories. In order to find the temperature distribution in crystal, heat transfer differential equations of crystal with consideration of boundary conditions are derived based on non-Fourier's model and temperature distribution of the crystal is achieved by an analytical method. Then, by transferring non-Fourier differential equations to matrix equations, using finite element method, temperature and stress of every point of crystal are calculated in the time domain. According to the results, a comparison between classical and nonclassical theories is represented to investigate rupture power values. In continuous end pumping with equal input powers, non-Fourier theory predicts greater temperature and stress compared to Fourier theory. It also shows that with an increase in relaxation time, crystal rupture power decreases. Despite of these results, in single rectangular pulsed end-pumping condition, with an equal input power, Fourier theory indicates higher temperature and stress rather than non-Fourier theory. It is also observed that, when the relaxation time increases, maximum amounts of temperature and stress decrease.

  10. In-situ cyclic pulse annealing of InN on AlN/Si during IR-lamp-heated MBE growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Akira; Bungi, Yu; Araki, Tsutomu; Nanishi, Yasushi; Mori, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Harima, Hiroshi

    2009-05-01

    To improve crystal quality of InN, an in-situ cyclic rapid pulse annealing during growth was carried out using infrared-lamp-heated molecular beam epitaxy. A cycle of 4 min growth of InN at 400 °C and 3 s pulse annealing at a higher temperature was repeated 15 times on AlN on Si substrate. Annealing temperatures were 550, 590, 620, and 660 °C. The back of Si was directly heated by lamp irradiation through a quartz rod. A total InN film thickness was about 200 nm. With increasing annealing temperature up to 620 °C, crystal grain size by scanning electron microscope showed a tendency to increase, while widths of X-ray diffraction rocking curve of (0 0 0 2) reflection and E 2 (high) mode peak of Raman scattering spectra decreased. A peak of In (1 0 1) appeared in X-ray diffraction by annealing higher than 590 °C, and In droplets were found on the surface by annealing at 660 °C.

  11. Numerical investigation of drag and heat flux reduction mechanism of the pulsed counterflowing jet on a blunt body in supersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui-rui; Huang, Wei; Yan, Li; Li, Lang-quan; Li, Shi-bin; Moradi, R.

    2018-05-01

    To design a kind of aerospace vehicle, the drag and heat flux reduction are the most important factors. In the current study, the counterflowing jet, one of the effective drag and heat flux reduction concepts, is investigated numerically by the two-dimensional axisymmetric Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the SST k-ω turbulence model. An axisymmetric numerical simulation mode of the counterflowing jet on the supersonic vehicle nose-tip is established, and the numerical method employed is validated by the experimental schlieren images and experimental data in the open literature. A pulsed counterflowing jet scheme is proposed, and it uses a sinusoidal function to control the total and static pressures of the counterflowing jet. The obtained results show that the long penetration mode does not exist in the whole turnaround, even in a relatively small range of the jet total and static pressures, and this is different from the phenomenon obtained under the steady condition in the open literature. At the same time, it is observed that the variation of the physical parameters, such as the Stanton number induced by the pulsed jet, has an obvious periodicity and hysteresis phenomenon.

  12. Development of heat transfer enhancement techniques for external cooling of an advanced reactor vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun

    Nucleate boiling is a well-recognized means for passively removing high heat loads (up to ˜106 W/m2) generated by a molten reactor core under severe accident conditions while maintaining relatively low reactor vessel temperature (Critical Heat Flux (CHF), becomes the key to the success of external passive cooling of reactor vessel undergoing core disrupture accidents. In the present study, two boiling heat transfer enhancement methods have been proposed, experimentally investigated and theoretically modelled. The first method involves the use of a suitable surface coating to enhance downward-facing boiling rate and CHF limit so as to substantially increase the possibility of reactor vessel surviving high thermal load attack. The second method involves the use of an enhanced vessel/insulation design to facilitate the process of steam venting through the annular channel formed between the reactor vessel and the insulation structure, which in turn would further enhance both the boiling rate and CHF limit. Among the various available surface coating techniques, metallic micro-porous layer surface coating has been identified as an appropriate coating material for use in External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) based on the overall consideration of enhanced performance, durability, the ease of manufacturing and application. Since no previous research work had explored the feasibility of applying such a metallic micro-porous layer surface coating on a large, downward facing and curved surface such as the bottom head of a reactor vessel, a series of characterization tests and experiments were performed in the present study to determine a suitable coating material composition and application method. Using the optimized metallic micro-porous surface coatings, quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were conducted in the Sub-scale Boundary Layer Boiling (SBLB) test facility at Penn State to investigate the nucleate boiling and CHF enhancement effects of the surface

  13. Ultra-short pulse, ultra-high intensity laser improvement techniques for laser-driven quantum beam science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Kando, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Recent development activities of the Quantum Beam Research Team in JAEA are reported. The downsized, petawatt and femtosecond pulse laser is described at first. The process of the system development and utilization effort of so-called J-KAREN is explained with its time and space control system. For high contrast, OPCPA (Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification) preamplifier is adopted by using the titanium-sapphire laser system in which only the seed light pulses can be amplified. In addition, high contrast is obtained by adopting the high energy seed light to the amplifier. The system configuration of J-KAREN laser is illustrated. Typical spectra with and without OPCPA, as well as the spectra with OPCPA adjustment and without one are shown. The result of the recompressed pulses is shown in which the pulse width of 29.5 femtoseconds is close to the theoretical limit. Considering the throughput of the pulse compressor is 64 percent it is possible to generate high power laser beam of about 600 terawatts. In the supplementary budget of 2012, it has been approved to cope with the aging or obsoleteness of the system and at the same time to further sophisticate the laser using system. The upgraded laser system is named as J-KAREN-P in which the repetition rate is improved and another booster amplifier is added to increase the power. The system configuration of J-KAREN-P after the upgrading is illustrated. (S. Funahashi)

  14. An optical technique to measure distortion in heat-treated parts in-situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, Federico; Nash, Phillip

    2005-05-01

    Improvements in the properties of aluminum alloys have made them more popular for structural applications. Using the different heat treatments that are available, aluminum alloys can have a wide variation in properties for different types of applications. The appropriate heat treatments of these alloys are vital in providing the properties needed for their particular applications. Moreover, understanding the effects of heat treatments that may cause distortion to a part is critical. Most of the work carried out in this field is in the form of pre- and post-treatment analysis of a part. In this study, in-situ measurements of the distortions that a heat-treated part undergoes when subjected to rapid heating to temperatures near melting followed by slow cooling were carried out. A numerical model was built to simulate the experiment and the results are compared. This study will provide much-needed insight into the complex occurrences that aluminum parts undergo during heat treatment.

  15. X-ray spectroscopic technique for energetic electron transport studies in short-pulse laser/plasma interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tutt, T.E.

    1994-12-01

    When a solid target is irradiated by a laser beam, the material is locally heated to a high temperature and a plasma forms. The interaction of the laser with plasma can produce energetic electrons. By observing the behavior of these {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} electrons, we hope to obtain a better understanding of Laser/Plasma Interactions. In this work we employ a layered-fluorescer technique to study the transport, and therefore the energetics, of the electrons. The plasma forms on a thin foil of metallic Pd which is bonded to thin layer of metallic Sn. Electrons formed from the plasma penetrate first the Pd and then the Sn. In both layers the energetic electrons promote inner (K) shell ionization of the metallic atoms which leads to the emission of characteristic K{sub {alpha}} x-rays of the fluorescers. By recording the x-ray spectrum emitted by the two foils, we can estimate the energy-dependent range of the electrons and their numbers.

  16. Development of NDE Technique with Induction Heating and Thermography on Conductive Composite Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shepard, Steven M; Lhota, James R; Ahmed, Tasdiq; Kim, HeeJune; Yarlagadda, Shridhar

    2004-01-01

    .... Our expectation at the outset of the projects was that the combination of induction heating and thermography would outperform systems based exclusively on either electromagnetic induction or thermography...

  17. Study on uranium-water multiplicative means of the (RESUCO-Subcritical experimental reactor of uranium with oxygen) subcritical assembly by pulsed neutron technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus Barbosa, S. de.

    1987-01-01

    The effective multiplication factor and the nuclear parameters associated with the variation of (RESUCO- Subcritical Experimental Reactor of Uranium with Oxygen) Subcritical Assembly Configuration, using pulsed neutron technique are analysed. BF3 detectors were used to detect the variation of thermal neutrons in the system, positioned parallelly to fuel elements, and a proton recoil detector was used for monitoring the neutron generation. (M.C.K.) [pt

  18. Effect of polyvinylpyrrolidone on cerium oxide nanoparticle characteristics prepared by a facile heat treatment technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Ali Baqer

    Full Text Available An aqueous medium composed of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP and cerium nitrates at calcination temperature was utilised in the production of cerium oxide (CeO2 semiconductor nanoparticles. A variety of analytical approaches was utilized to examine the structural, morphological and optical characteristics of the resulting nanoparticles. Differential thermal (DTA and thermogravimetric (TGA analyses, indicated that the best calcination temperatures for achieving CeO2 nanoparticle production were more than 485 °C. The results from Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR verified the formation of a crystalline structure after calcination procedures were performed to remove residual organic compounds. Additionally, results from X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis confirmed the cubic fluorite structure of the CeO2 produced. Samples were also analysed by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDXA which indicated the existence of O and Ce in the samples. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM was used in the characterisation of nanoparticle morphological features. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM was employed to estimate typical nanoparticle and distribution within sample. This analysis indicated that mean particle sizes were inversely correlated with PVP concentration, with nanoparticle sizes ranging between 12 ± 7 nm at 0.03 g/mL PVP and 6 ± 2 nm at 0.05 g/mL PVP. These results corroborated those obtained by XRD analysis. A UV–vis spectrophotometer was utilised in the demonstration of optical properties and to examine the band gap energy of samples. The potential UV-shielding properties of the nanoparticles were demonstrated by the observed blue shift of the estimated optical energy band, i.e. from 3.35 to 3.43 eV, whilst PL spectra results indicated that decreasing particle size was associated with diminishing photoluminescence intensity. Keywords: Cerium oxide nanoparticles, Heat treatment technique, Structural properties, Optical

  19. An Experimentally Validated Numerical Modeling Technique for Perforated Plate Heat Exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M J; Nellis, G F; Kelin, S A; Zhu, W; Gianchandani, Y

    2010-11-01

    Cryogenic and high-temperature systems often require compact heat exchangers with a high resistance to axial conduction in order to control the heat transfer induced by axial temperature differences. One attractive design for such applications is a perforated plate heat exchanger that utilizes high conductivity perforated plates to provide the stream-to-stream heat transfer and low conductivity spacers to prevent axial conduction between the perforated plates. This paper presents a numerical model of a perforated plate heat exchanger that accounts for axial conduction, external parasitic heat loads, variable fluid and material properties, and conduction to and from the ends of the heat exchanger. The numerical model is validated by experimentally testing several perforated plate heat exchangers that are fabricated using microelectromechanical systems based manufacturing methods. This type of heat exchanger was investigated for potential use in a cryosurgical probe. One of these heat exchangers included perforated plates with integrated platinum resistance thermometers. These plates provided in situ measurements of the internal temperature distribution in addition to the temperature, pressure, and flow rate measured at the inlet and exit ports of the device. The platinum wires were deposited between the fluid passages on the perforated plate and are used to measure the temperature at the interface between the wall material and the flowing fluid. The experimental testing demonstrates the ability of the numerical model to accurately predict both the overall performance and the internal temperature distribution of perforated plate heat exchangers over a range of geometry and operating conditions. The parameters that were varied include the axial length, temperature range, mass flow rate, and working fluid.

  20. Change in Color and Volatile Composition of Skim Milk Processed with Pulsed Electric Field and Microfiltration Treatments or Heat Pasteurization

    OpenAIRE

    Chugh, Anupam; Khanal, Dipendra; Walkling-Ribeiro, Markus; Corredig, Milena; Duizer, Lisa; Griffiths, Mansel

    2014-01-01

    Non-thermal processing methods, such as pulsed electric field (PEF) and tangential-flow microfiltration (TFMF), are emerging processing technologies that can minimize the deleterious effects of high temperature short time (HTST) pasteurization on quality attributes of skim milk. The present study investigates the impact of PEF and TFMF, alone or in combination, on color and volatile compounds in skim milk. PEF was applied at 28 or 40 kV/cm for 1122 to 2805 µs, while microfiltration (MF) was c...

  1. Experimental data processing technique for nonstationary heat transfer on fuel rod simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonov, S.P.; Nikonov, A.P.; Belyukin, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    Non-stationary heat-transfer data processing is considered in connection with experimental studies of the emergency cooling whereat fuel rod imitators both with direct and indirect shell heating were used. The objective of data processing was obtaining the temperature distribution within the imitator, the heat flux removed by the coolant and the shell-coolant heat-transfer coefficient. The special attention was paid to the temperature distribution calculation at the data processing during the reflooding experiments. In this case two factors are assumed to be known: the time dependency of temperature variation at a certain point within the imitator cross-section and the heat flux at some point of the same cross-section. The initial data preparation for calculations, employing the procedure of smoothing by cubic spline functions, is considered as well, with application of an algorithm reported in the literature, which is efficient for the given functional dependency wherein the deviation in each point is known [ru

  2. Leak detection in a high-pressure heat exchanger system in a refinery using radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samantray, J.S.; Sunil Goswami; Sharma, V.K.; Jayashree Biswal; Pant, H.J.

    2014-01-01

    A radiotracer investigation was carried out in a diesel hydrotreater (DHDT) unit in a refinery for leak detection in a breech-lock heat exchanger system. The main objectives of the study were to identify the leaking heat exchanger in a system with six heat exchangers and estimate the leak rate. Bromine-82 as dibromobiphenyl was selected and used as radiotracer for the investigation. The radiotracer was instantaneously injected into the suction end of the feed pump line to the heat exchanger of the DHDT unit. The movement of the tracer was measured at strategically selected locations using NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors. Based upon the results of the radiotracer investigation, it was found that out of six heat exchangers, exchanger E-1F was leaking. (author)

  3. Experimental study and technique for calculation of critical heat fluxes in helium boiling in tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhipov, V.V.; Kvasnyuk, S.V.; Deev, V.I.; Andreev, V.K.

    1979-01-01

    Studied is the effect of regime parameters on critical heat loads in helium boiling in a vertical tube in the range of mass rates of 80 2 xc) and pressures of 100<=p<=200 kPa for the vapor content range corresponding to the heat exchange crisis of the first kind. The method for calculating critical heat fluxes describing experimental data with the error less than +-15% is proposed. The critical heat loads in helium boiling in tubes reduce with the growth of pressure and vapor content in the regime parameter ranges under investigation. Both positive and negative effects of the mass rate on the critical heat flux are observed. The calculation method proposed satisfactorily describes the experimental data

  4. Microcalorimetric measurements of heat production in human erythrocytes. IV. Comparison between different calorimetric techniques, suspension media, and preparation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, M; Wadsö, I

    1976-10-01

    Heat production in human erythrocytes from healthy subjects has been measured under different experimental conditions. Simultaneous measurements were made on the same samples using different types of microcalorimeters: a static ampoule calorimeter, an air perfusion calorimeter, and a flow calorimeter. Obtained heat effect values for specified standard conditions, P degrees, were within uncertainty limits the same for the different calorimeters. Cells were suspended either in autologous plasma or in a phosphate buffer. P degrees values for buffer suspensions were significantly higher than those for plasma suspensions. Erythrocyte samples prepared by the column adsorption technique gave higher P degrees values than those obtained by a conventional centrifugation procedure.

  5. Numerical analysis of high-power broad-area laser diode with improved heat sinking structure using epitaxial liftoff technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younghyun; Sung, Yunsu; Yang, Jung-Tack; Choi, Woo-Young

    2018-02-01

    The characteristics of high-power broad-area laser diodes with the improved heat sinking structure are numerically analyzed by a technology computer-aided design based self-consistent electro-thermal-optical simulation. The high-power laser diodes consist of a separate confinement heterostructure of a compressively strained InGaAsP quantum well and GaInP optical cavity layers, and a 100-μm-wide rib and a 2000-μm long cavity. In order to overcome the performance deteriorations of high-power laser diodes caused by self-heating such as thermal rollover and thermal blooming, we propose the high-power broad-area laser diode with improved heat-sinking structure, which another effective heat-sinking path toward the substrate side is added by removing a bulk substrate. It is possible to obtain by removing a 400-μm-thick GaAs substrate with an AlAs sacrificial layer utilizing well-known epitaxial liftoff techniques. In this study, we present the performance improvement of the high-power laser diode with the heat-sinking structure by suppressing thermal effects. It is found that the lateral far-field angle as well as quantum well temperature is expected to be improved by the proposed heat-sinking structure which is required for high beam quality and optical output power, respectively.

  6. Study of axial mixing, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase in a pulsed sieve plate extraction column using radiotracer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiyas Ud Din; Imran Rafiq Chughtai; Hameed Inayat, Mansoor; Hussain Khan, Iqbal

    2009-01-01

    Axial mixing, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase which are parameters of fundamental importance in the design and operation of liquid-liquid extraction pulsed sieve plate columns have been investigated. Experiments for residence time distribution (RTD) analysis have been carried out for a range of pulsation frequency and amplitude in a liquid-liquid extraction pulsed sieve plate column with water as dispersed and kerosene as continuous phase using radiotracer technique. The column was operated in emulsion region and (99m)Tc in the form of sodium pertechnetate eluted from a (99)Mo/(99m)Tc generator was used to trace the dispersed phase. Axial dispersed plug flow model with open-open boundary condition and two points measurement method was used to simulate the hydrodynamics of dispersed phase. It has been observed that the axial mixing and holdup of dispersed phase increases with increase in pulsation frequency and amplitude until a maximum value is achieved while slip velocity decreases with increase in pulsation frequency and amplitude until it approaches a minimum value. Short lived and low energy radiotracer (99m)Tc in the form of sodium pertechnetate was found to be a good water tracer to study the hydrodynamics of a liquid-liquid extraction pulsed sieve plate column operating with two immiscible liquids, water and kerosene. Axial dispersed plug flow model with open-open boundary condition was found to be a suitable model to describe the hydrodynamics of dispersed phase in the pulsed sieve plate extraction column.

  7. Study of axial mixing, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase in a pulsed sieve plate extraction column using radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiyas Ud Din; Imran Rafiq Chughtai; Mansoor Hameed Inayat; Iqbal Hussain Khan

    2009-01-01

    Axial mixing, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase which are parameters of fundamental importance in the design and operation of liquid-liquid extraction pulsed sieve plate columns have been investigated. Experiments for residence time distribution (RTD) analysis have been carried out for a range of pulsation frequency and amplitude in a liquid-liquid extraction pulsed sieve plate column with water as dispersed and kerosene as continuous phase using radiotracer technique. The column was operated in emulsion region and 99m Tc in the form of sodium pertechnetate eluted from a 99 Mo/ 99m Tc generator was used to trace the dispersed phase. Axial dispersed plug flow model with open-open boundary condition and two points measurement method was used to simulate the hydrodynamics of dispersed phase. It has been observed that the axial mixing and holdup of dispersed phase increases with increase in pulsation frequency and amplitude until a maximum value is achieved while slip velocity decreases with increase in pulsation frequency and amplitude until it approaches a minimum value. Short lived and low energy radiotracer 99m Tc in the form of sodium pertechnetate was found to be a good water tracer to study the hydrodynamics of a liquid-liquid extraction pulsed sieve plate column operating with two immiscible liquids, water and kerosene. Axial dispersed plug flow model with open-open boundary condition was found to be a suitable model to describe the hydrodynamics of dispersed phase in the pulsed sieve plate extraction column.

  8. Column carbon dioxide and water vapor measurements by an airborne triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption lidar: novel lidar technologies and techniques with path to space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, U. N.; Petros, M.; Refaat, T. F.; Yu, J.; Ismail, S.

    2017-09-01

    The 2-micron wavelength region is suitable for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements due to the existence of distinct absorption features for the gas at this wavelength region [1]. For more than 20 years, researchers at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have developed several high-energy and high repetition rate 2-micron pulsed lasers [2]. Currently, LaRC team is engaged in designing, developing and demonstrating a triple-pulsed 2-micron direct detection Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar to measure the weighted-average column dry-air mixing ratios of carbon dioxide (XCO2) and water vapor (XH2O) from an airborne platform [1, 3-5]. This novel technique allows measurement of the two most dominant greenhouse gases, simultaneously and independently, using a single instrument. This paper will provide status and details of the development of this airborne 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar. The presented work will focus on the advancement of critical IPDA lidar components. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of seed laser locking, wavelength control, receiver and detector upgrades, laser packaging and lidar integration. Future plans for IPDA lidar ground integration, testing and flight validation will also be discussed. This work enables new Earth observation measurements, while reducing risk, cost, size, volume, mass and development time of required instruments.

  9. Application of the modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry technique for the determination of the specific heat of copper nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Robertis, E.; Cosme, E.H.H.; Neves, R.S.; Kuznetsov, A.Yu.; Campos, A.P.C.; Landi, S.M.; Achete, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the applicability of the modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry technique to measure specific heat of copper nanofluids by using the ASTM E2719 standard procedure, which is generally applied to thermally stable solids and liquids. The one-step method of preparation of copper nanofluid samples is described. The synthesized nanoparticles were separated from the base fluid and examined by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy in order to evaluate their structure, morphology and chemical nature. The presence of copper nanoparticles in the base fluid alters the characteristics of crystallization and melting processes and reduces the specific heat values of nanofluids in the whole studied temperature range. - Highlights: ► Copper nanofluids prepared by one-step method. ► Methodology of synthesis improved nanofluid stability. ► Specific heat determinations using modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry. ► Good agreement between theoretical and experimental values.

  10. Production of very short electron, X or γ-ray pulses by means of laser and magnetic compression techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joly, S.

    1995-01-01

    The ELSA electron accelerator, initially developed for a free-electron laser, is under modification to deliver very short X and γ-ray pulses (10 to 20 ps). This paper describes the main characteristics of the accelerator as well as the physical processes used to generate these radiation bursts. (author). 5 refs., 3 figs

  11. NCSX Plasma Heating Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Spong, D.; Majeski, R.; Zarnstorff, M.

    2008-01-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) has been designed to accommodate a variety of heating systems, including ohmic heating, neutral beam injection, and radio-frequency (rf). Neutral beams will provide one of the primary heating methods for NCSX. In addition to plasma heating, neutral beams are also expected to provide a means for external control over the level of toroidal plasma rotation velocity and its profile. The experimental plan requires 3 MW of 50-keV balanced neutral beam tangential injection with pulse lengths of 500 ms for initial experiments, to be upgradeable to pulse lengths of 1.5 s. Subsequent upgrades will add 3MW of neutral beam injection (NBI). This paper discusses the NCSX NBI requirements and design issues and shows how these are provided by the candidate PBX-M NBI system. In addition, estimations are given for beam heating efficiencies, scaling of heating efficiency with machine size and magnetic field level, parameter studies of the optimum beam injection tangency radius and toroidal injection location, and loss patterns of beam ions on the vacuum chamber wall to assist placement of wall armor and for minimizing the generation of impurities by the energetic beam ions. Finally, subsequent upgrades could add an additional 6 MW of rf heating by mode conversion ion Bernstein wave (MCIBW) heating, and if desired as possible future upgrades, the design also will accommodate high-harmonic fast-wave and electron cyclotron heating. The initial MCIBW heating technique and the design of the rf system lend themselves to current drive, so if current drive became desirable for any reason, only minor modifications to the heating system described here would be needed. The rf system will also be capable of localized ion heating (bulk or tail), and possibly IBW-generated sheared flows

  12. NCSX Plasma Heating Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Spong, D.; Majeski, R.; Zarnstorff, M.

    2003-01-01

    The NCSX (National Compact Stellarator Experiment) has been designed to accommodate a variety of heating systems, including ohmic heating, neutral-beam injection, and radio-frequency. Neutral beams will provide one of the primary heating methods for NCSX. In addition to plasma heating, beams are also expected to provide a means for external control over the level of toroidal plasma rotation velocity and its profile. The plan is to provide 3 MW of 50 keV balanced neutral-beam tangential injection with pulse lengths of 500 msec for initial experiments, and to be upgradeable to pulse lengths of 1.5 sec. Subsequent upgrades will add 3 MW of neutral-beam injection. This Chapter discusses the NCSX neutral-beam injection requirements and design issues, and shows how these are provided by the candidate PBX-M (Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification) neutral-beam injection system. In addition, estimations are given for beam-heating efficiencies, scaling of heating efficiency with machine size an d magnetic field level, parameter studies of the optimum beam-injection tangency radius and toroidal injection location, and loss patterns of beam ions on the vacuum chamber wall to assist placement of wall armor and for minimizing the generation of impurities by the energetic beam ions. Finally, subsequent upgrades could add an additional 6 MW of radio-frequency heating by mode-conversion ion-Bernstein wave (MCIBW) heating, and if desired as possible future upgrades, the design also will accommodate high-harmonic fast-wave and electron-cyclotron heating. The initial MCIBW heating technique and the design of the radio-frequency system lend themselves to current drive, so that if current drive became desirable for any reason only minor modifications to the heating system described here would be needed. The radio-frequency system will also be capable of localized ion heating (bulk or tail), and possibly ion-Bernstein-wave-generated sheared flows

  13. Determination of the stochastic layer properties induced by magnetic perturbations via heat pulse experiments at ASDEX upgrade

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brida, D.; Lunt, T.; Wischmeier, M.; Birkenmeier, G.; Cahyna, Pavel; Carralero, D.; Faitsch, M.; Feng, Y.; Kurzan, B.; Schubert, M.; Sieglin, B.; Suttrop, W.; Wolfrum, E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, August (2017), s. 831-837 ISSN 2352-1791 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : ASDEX upgrade * Magnetic perturbations * Divertor heat flux Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352179116302150

  14. K-shell spectra from hot dense aluminum layers buried in carbon and heated by ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidmann, K.; Andiel, U.; Pisani, F.; Hakel, P.; Mancini, R.C.; Junkel-Vives, G.C.; Abdallah, J.; Witte, K.

    2003-01-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses allow for the generation of hot plasmas near solid state densities. For this purpose a Ti:Sapphire laser was used, which delivers after frequency doubling, pulses of high contrast with an energy of about 60 mJ and a duration of 150 fs at 395 nm. The typical intensity on the target was a few 10 17 W/cm 2 . To achieve a high degree of uniformity we used targets consisting of a 25 nm thin Al tracer layer buried at different depths up to 400 nm in solid carbon. Time-integrated Al K-shell spectra are presented. Characteristic features of the spectra are significant high-order satellite line emission, strong line broadening and a center-of-mass line shift to the red, which was observed in transitions from principal quantum number n=2 or 3 to 1. Accurate measurement of the shift was made possible by using the cold Si K α line as an absolute wavelength calibration. In addition to time-integrated measurements, we used an ultrafast X-ray streak camera to obtain time and spectrally resolved spectra. Typical durations of the Ly α and He α lines are in the range 2-4 ps. The experimental results are compared with a time-dependent model, which combines hydrodynamic simulations, time-dependent atomic kinetics, detailed spectral line shapes including line shifts, and radiation transport

  15. Microstructural examination of Zr-2.5%Nb alloy welds made by pulsed Nd:YAG laser and TIG welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, R.B.; Varma, P.V.S.; Panakkal, J.P.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G.K.

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes the weld microstructure of Zr-2.5%Nb alloy material. Bead on plate welds were made using pulsed Nd:YAG laser and TIG welding technique at different parameters. These welds were characterized at macro and microstructural level. Weld pools of Pulsed Laser and TIG welds were not resolved by optical microscopy. SEM too did not reveal much. Orientation imaging microscopy could reveal the presence of fine martensite. It was observed that microstructure is very sensitive to welding parameters. Microhardness studies suggested formation of martensite in the weld pool. It was also observed that laser welds had very sharp weld pool boundary as compared to TIG welds. Variation in microhardness of the weldment is seen and is influenced by overlapping of weld spots causing thermal treatment of previously deposited spots. (author)

  16. Technique of experimental measurements of the optical thickness of a pulse discharge plasma channel in water on a contour reabsorption lines of hydrogen Hα

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Fedorovich

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work the results of development and application of the technique of experimental definition of optical thickness (τ of the pulse discharge plasma channel in water which are based on the distribution of radiation intensities on contour reabsorption lines of hydrogen Ha (656.3 nm are given. Optical thickness of continues spectrum was defined by extrapolation of intensities in far wing of contour reabsorption lines of hydrogen Ha, where t value did not vary any more, and the line smoothly transferred in continuous spectrum. The atomic concentration Na, received on a method of definition of t on a contour reabsorption lines of hydrogen Ha., agreed with calculation obtained from the equation of the plasma state. The recommendations on the correct definition of optical thickness of plasma of pulse discharge in liquids are given.

  17. Triple-Pulse Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Carbon Dioxide Measurement - Novel Lidar Technologies and Techniques with Path to Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2017-01-01

    The societal benefits of understanding climate change through identification of global carbon dioxide sources and sinks led to the desired NASA's active sensing of carbon dioxide emissions over nights, days, and seasons (ASCENDS) space-based missions of global carbon dioxide measurements. For more than 15 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have developed several carbon dioxide active remote sensors using the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique operating at the two-micron wavelength. Currently, an airborne two-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is under development. This IPDA lidar measures carbon dioxide as well as water vapor, the dominant interfering molecule on carbon dioxide remote sensing. Advancement of this triple-pulse IPDA lidar development is presented.

  18. Development of techniques to dispose of the Windscale AGR heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossley, H.; Wakefield, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    In a gas-cooled nuclear power plant the gas side of the heat exchanger tubes becomes contaminated with radioactive deposits carried from the reactor in the coolant stream. In order to dispose of the heat exchangers in the safest and most cost-effective way during plant decommissioning, the deposits have to be removed. In situ chemical decontamination is considered to be the only viable method. This paper describes the research and development of chemical decontamination methods for the Windscale AGR heat exchangers, and the testing of a selected method on an in situ superheater. The research involved characterization of tube corrosion and radioactivity deposits, laboratory testing of chemical reagents on actual tube samples, and the provision and operation of a plant to apply the selected reagent. Disposal of radioactive effluent is an important consideration in chemical decontamination and in the present case was the major factor in determining the process

  19. Thermo-structural analysis of the rf-induced pulsed surface heating of the CLIC accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    Huopana, Jouni Juhani

    2006-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) is being studied at CERN as a potential multi-TeV e+e- collider. The acceleration of the particles is done by RF (Radio Frequency). The surfaces of the RF (radio frequency) accelerating cavities are exposed to high pulsed RF currents which induce cyclic thermal stresses. These cyclic stresses are crucial for the fatigue lifetime of the cavities. To study the fatigue phenomenon properly the induced stresses must be well known. ANSYS FEM simulations were made to study the thermo-structural behaviour of the CLIC accelerating structure in copper zirconium, bimetallic and diamond coated constructions. The simulations showed the existence of high thermal stresses and low stress level shockwaves. It was also shown that the bimetallic structure increases stress values due to the differences in material properties. Diamond coating was found to reduce the thermal stresses.

  20. Analysis of heat and mass transfers in two-phase flow by coupling optical diagnostic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaitre, P.; Porcheron, E.

    2008-01-01

    During the course of a hypothetical accident in a nuclear power plant, spraying might be actuated to reduce static pressure in the containment. To acquire a better understanding of the heat and mass transfers between a spray and the surrounding confined gas, non-intrusive optical measurements have to be carried out simultaneously on both phases. The coupling of global rainbow refractometry with out-of-focus imaging and spontaneous Raman scattering spectroscopy allows us to calculate the local Spalding parameter B M , which is useful in describing heat transfer associated with two-phase flow. (orig.)