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Sample records for heart rhythm society

  1. Heart Rhythm Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... importance of stroke prevention, in easy-to-understand language. Get the AF Patient Brochure Need help finding a specialist? Find physicians around the world who specialize in the treatment of arrhythmias using the Heart Rhythm Society’s searchable directory. Learn More Welcome to the Patient ...

  2. Executive Summary: European Heart Rhythm Association Consensus Document on the Management of Supraventricular Arrhythmias: Endorsed by Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardiaca y Electrofisiologia (SOLAECE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Boriani, Giuseppe; Cosio, Francisco G; Jais, Pierre; Hindricks, Gerhard; Josephson, Mark E; Keegan, Roberto; Knight, Bradley P; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Lane, Deirdre A; Lip, Gregory Yh; Malmborg, Helena; Oral, Hakan; Pappone, Carlo; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Wood, Kathryn A; Young-Hoon, Kim; Lundqvist, Carina Blomström

    2016-01-01

    This paper is an executive summary of the full European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) consensus document on the management of supraventricular arrhythmias, published in Europace . It summarises developments in the field and provides recommendations for patient management, with particular emphasis on new advances since the previous European Society of Cardiology guidelines. The EHRA consensus document is available to read in full at http://europace.oxfordjournals.org.

  3. 2016 Guidelines of the Taiwan Heart Rhythm Society and the Taiwan Society of Cardiology for the management of atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chern-En Chiang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common sustained arrhythmia. Both the incidence and prevalence of AF are increasing, and the burden of AF is becoming huge. Many innovative advances have emerged in the past decade for the diagnosis and management of AF, including a new scoring system for the prediction of stroke and bleeding events, the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and their special benefits in Asians, new rhythm- and rate-control concepts, optimal endpoints of rate control, upstream therapy, life-style modification to prevent AF recurrence, and new ablation techniques. The Taiwan Heart Rhythm Society and the Taiwan Society of Cardiology aimed to update the information and have appointed a jointed writing committee for new AF guidelines. The writing committee members comprehensively reviewed and summarized the literature, and completed the 2016 Guidelines of the Taiwan Heart Rhythm Society and the Taiwan Society of Cardiology for the Management of Atrial Fibrillation. This guideline presents the details of the updated recommendations, along with their background and rationale, focusing on data unique for Asians. The guidelines are not mandatory, and members of the writing committee fully realize that treatment of AF should be individualized. The physician's decision remains most important in AF management.

  4. 2017 consensus of the Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society on stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chern-En Chiang, MD, PhD

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common sustained arrhythmia, causing a 2-fold increase in mortality and a 5-fold increase in stroke. The Asian population is rapidly aging, and in 2050, the estimated population with AF will reach 72 million, of whom 2.9 million may suffer from AF-associated stroke. Therefore, stroke prevention in AF is an urgent issue in Asia. Many innovative advances in the management of AF-associated stroke have emerged recently, including new scoring systems for predicting stroke and bleeding risks, the development of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs, knowledge of their special benefits in Asians, and new techniques. The Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS aimed to update the available information, and appointed the Practice Guideline sub-committee to write a consensus statement regarding stroke prevention in AF. The Practice Guidelines sub-committee members comprehensively reviewed updated information on stroke prevention in AF, emphasizing data on NOACs from the Asia Pacific region, and summarized them in this 2017 Consensus of the Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society on Stroke Prevention in AF. This consensus includes details of the updated recommendations, along with their background and rationale, focusing on data from the Asia Pacific region. We hope this consensus can be a practical tool for cardiologists, neurologists, geriatricians, and general practitioners in this region. We fully realize that there are gaps, unaddressed questions, and many areas of uncertainty and debate in the current knowledge of AF, and the physician׳s decision remains the most important factor in the management of AF.

  5. Antithrombotic therapy in atrial fibrillation associated with valvular heart disease: a joint consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Thrombosis, endorsed by the ESC Working Group on Valvular Heart Disease, Cardiac Arrhythmia Society of Southern Africa (CASSA), Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), South African Heart (SA Heart) Association and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Collet, Jean Philippe; Caterina, Raffaele de; Fauchier, Laurent; Lane, Deirdre A; Larsen, Torben B; Marin, Francisco; Morais, Joao; Narasimhan, Calambur; Olshansky, Brian; Pierard, Luc; Potpara, Tatjana; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Sliwa, Karen; Varela, Gonzalo; Vilahur, Gemma; Weiss, Thomas; Boriani, Giuseppe; Rocca, Bianca

    2017-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a major worldwide public health problem, and AF in association with valvular heart disease (VHD) is also common. However, management strategies for this group of patients have been less informed by randomized trials, which have largely focused on 'non-valvular AF' patients. Thrombo-embolic risk also varies according to valve lesion and may also be associated with CHA2DS2VASc score risk factor components, rather than only the valve disease being causal. Given marked heterogeneity in the definition of valvular and non-valvular AF and variable management strategies, including non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in patients with VHD other than prosthetic heart valves or haemodynamically significant mitral valve disease, there is a need to provide expert recommendations for professionals participating in the care of patients presenting with AF and associated VHD. To address this topic, a Task Force was convened by the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Working Group on Thrombosis, with representation from the ESC Working Group on Valvular Heart Disease, Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), South African Heart (SA Heart) Association and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE) with the remit to comprehensively review the published evidence, and to publish a joint consensus document on the management of patients with AF and associated VHD, with up-to-date consensus recommendations for clinical practice for different forms of VHD. This consensus document proposes that the term 'valvular AF' is outdated and given that any definition ultimately relates to the evaluated practical use of oral anticoagulation (OAC) type, we propose a functional Evaluated Heartvalves, Rheumatic or Artificial (EHRA) categorization in relation to the type of OAC use in patients with AF, as follows: (i) EHRA Type 1 VHD, which refers

  6. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias: a consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS) and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas; Boriani, Giuseppe; Manolis, Antonis S; Olsen, Michael Hecht; Oto, Ali; Potpara, Tatjana S; Steffel, Jan; Marín, Francisco; de Oliveira Figueiredo, Márcio Jansen; de Simone, Giovanni; Tzou, Wendy S; Chiang, Chern-En; Williams, Bryan; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Gorenek, Bulent; Fauchier, Laurent; Savelieva, Irina; Hatala, Robert; van Gelder, Isabelle; Brguljan-Hitij, Jana; Erdine, Serap; Lovic, Dragan; Kim, Young-Hoon; Salinas-Arce, Jorge; Field, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Hypertension is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal insufficiency. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in hypertensive patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or HF. Also, some of the antihypertensive drugs commonly used to reduce blood pressure, such as thiazide diuretics, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia, hypomagnesemia), further contributing to arrhythmias, whereas effective control of blood pressure may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between hypertension and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit to comprehensively review the available evidence to publish a joint consensus document on hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias, and to provide up-to-date consensus recommendations for use in clinical practice. The ultimate judgment regarding care of a particular patient must be made by the healthcare provider and the patient in light of all of the circumstances presented by that patient. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias: executive summary of a consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas; Boriani, Giuseppe; Manolis, Antonis S; Olsen, Michael Hecht; Oto, Ali; Potpara, Tatjana S; Steffel, Jan; Marín, Francisco; de Oliveira Figueiredo, Márcio Jansen; de Simone, Giovanni; Tzou, Wendy S; En Chiang, Chern; Williams, Bryan

    2017-10-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal failure. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many types of cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in HTN patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), CAD, or HF. In addition, high doses of thiazide diuretics commonly used to treat HTN, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia, hypomagnesaemia), contributing further to arrhythmias, while effective blood pressure control may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between HTN and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit of comprehensively reviewing the available evidence and publishing a joint consensus document on HTN and cardiac arrhythmias, and providing up-to-date consensus recommendations for use in clinical practice. The ultimate judgment on the care of a specific patient must be made by the healthcare provider and the patient in light of all individual factors presented. This is an executive summary of the full document co-published by EHRA in EP-Europace. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Substances and Heart Rhythm Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... good” cholesterol (HDL cholesterol). But for some people, alcohol can cause heart rhythm disturbances. Alcohol abuse is a major risk factor for High Blood Pressure , cardiomyopathy (weak heart muscle), heart failure and stroke . Tobacco Tobacco (cigarettes) ...

  9. Antithrombotic Therapy in Atrial Fibrillation Associated with Valvular Heart Disease: Executive Summary of a Joint Consensus Document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Thrombosis, Endorsed by the ESC Working Group on Valvular Heart Disease, Cardiac Arrhythmia Society of Southern Africa (CASSA), Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), South African Heart (SA Heart) Association and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Collet, Jean Philippe; de Caterina, Raffaele; Fauchier, Laurent; Lane, Deirdre A; Larsen, Torben B; Marin, Francisco; Morais, Joao; Narasimhan, Calambur; Olshansky, Brian; Pierard, Luc; Potpara, Tatjana; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Sliwa, Karen; Varela, Gonzalo; Vilahur, Gemma; Weiss, Thomas; Boriani, Giuseppe; Rocca, Bianca

    2017-12-01

    Management strategies for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) in association with valvular heart disease (VHD) have been less informed by randomized trials, which have largely focused on ‘non-valvular AF’ patients. Thromboembolic risk also varies according to valve lesion and may also be associated with CHA2DS2-VASc score risk factor components, rather than only the valve disease being causal. Given the need to provide expert recommendations for professionals participating in the care of patients presenting with AF and associated VHD, a task force was convened by the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Working Group (WG) on Thrombosis, with representation from the ESC WG on Valvular Heart Disease, Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), South African Heart (SA Heart) Association and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE) with the remit to comprehensively review the published evidence, and to produce a consensus document on the management of patients with AF and associated VHD, with up-to-date consensus statements for clinical practice for different forms of VHD, based on the principles of evidence-based medicine. This is an executive summary of a consensus document which proposes that the term ‘valvular AF’ is outdated and given that any definition ultimately relates to the evaluated practical use of oral anticoagulation (OAC) type, we propose a functional EHRA (Evaluated Heartvalves, Rheumatic or Artificial) categorization in relation to the type of OAC use in patients with AF, as follows: (1) EHRA (Evaluated Heartvalves, Rheumatic or Artificial) type 1 VHD, which refers to AF patients with ‘VHD needing therapy with a vitamin K antagonist (VKA)’ and (2) EHRA (Evaluated Heartvalves, Rheumatic or Artificial) type 2 VHD, which refers to AF patients with ‘VHD needing therapy with a VKA or a non-VKA oral anticoagulant also taking

  10. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for Multimodality Imaging in Valvular Heart Disease: A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, John U; Kort, Smadar; Mehran, Roxana; Schoenhagen, Paul; Soman, Prem; Dehmer, Greg J; Doherty, John U; Schoenhagen, Paul; Amin, Zahid; Bashore, Thomas M; Boyle, Andrew; Calnon, Dennis A; Carabello, Blase; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Conte, John; Desai, Milind; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Ferrari, Victor A; Ghoshhajra, Brian; Mehrotra, Praveen; Nazarian, Saman; Reece, T Brett; Tamarappoo, Balaji; Tzou, Wendy S; Wong, John B; Doherty, John U; Dehmer, Gregory J; Bailey, Steven R; Bhave, Nicole M; Brown, Alan S; Daugherty, Stacie L; Dean, Larry S; Desai, Milind Y; Duvernoy, Claire S; Gillam, Linda D; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Lindsay, Bruce D; Manning, Warren J; Mehrotra, Praveen; Patel, Manesh R; Sachdeva, Ritu; Wann, L Samuel; Winchester, David E; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2017-10-20

    This document is 1 of 2 companion appropriate use criteria (AUC) documents developed by the American College of Cardiology, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons. This document addresses the evaluation and use of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis and management of valvular heart disease, whereas the second, companion document addresses this topic with regard to structural heart disease. Although there is clinical overlap, the documents addressing valvular and structural heart disease are published separately, albeit with a common structure. The goal of the companion AUC documents is to provide a comprehensive resource for multimodality imaging in the context of valvular and structural heart disease, encompassing multiple imaging modalities. Using standardized methodology, the clinical scenarios (indications) were developed by a diverse writing group to represent patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included common applications and anticipated uses. Where appropriate, the scenarios were developed on the basis of the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines. A separate, independent rating panel scored the 92 clinical scenarios in this document on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that a modality is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Midrange scores of 4 to 6 indicate that a modality may be appropriate for the clinical scenario, and scores of 1 to 3 indicate that a modality is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario. The primary objective of the AUC is to provide a framework for the assessment of these scenarios by practices that will

  11. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for Multimodality Imaging in Valvular Heart Disease : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, John U; Kort, Smadar; Mehran, Roxana; Schoenhagen, Paul; Soman, Prem

    2017-12-01

    This document is 1 of 2 companion appropriate use criteria (AUC) documents developed by the American College of Cardiology, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons. This document addresses the evaluation and use of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis and management of valvular heart disease, whereas the second, companion document addresses this topic with regard to structural heart disease. Although there is clinical overlap, the documents addressing valvular and structural heart disease are published separately, albeit with a common structure. The goal of the companion AUC documents is to provide a comprehensive resource for multimodality imaging in the context of valvular and structural heart disease, encompassing multiple imaging modalities.Using standardized methodology, the clinical scenarios (indications) were developed by a diverse writing group to represent patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included common applications and anticipated uses. Where appropriate, the scenarios were developed on the basis of the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines.A separate, independent rating panel scored the 92 clinical scenarios in this document on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that a modality is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Midrange scores of 4 to 6 indicate that a modality may be appropriate for the clinical scenario, and scores of 1 to 3 indicate that a modality is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario.The primary objective of the AUC is to provide a framework for the assessment of these scenarios by practices that will

  12. Statistics on the use of cardiac electronic devices and electrophysiological procedures in the European Society of Cardiology countries: 2014 report from the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raatikainen, M J Pekka; Arnar, David O; Zeppenfeld, Katja; Merino, Jose Luis; Levya, Francisco; Hindriks, Gerhardt; Kuck, Karl-Heinz

    2015-01-01

    There has been large variations in the use of invasive electrophysiological therapies in the member countries of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). The aim of this analysis was to provide comprehensive information on cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) and catheter ablation therapy trends in the ESC countries over the last five years. The European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) has collected data on CIED and catheter ablation therapy since 2008. Last year 49 of the 56 ESC member countries provided data for the EHRA White Book. This analysis is based on the current and previous editions of the EHRA White Book. Data on procedure rates together with information on economic aspects, local reimbursement systems and training activities are presented for each ESC country and the five geographical ESC regions. In 2013, the electrophysiological procedure rates per million population were highest in Western Europe followed by the Southern and Northern European countries. The CIED implantation and catheter ablation rate was lowest in the Eastern European and in the non-European ESC countries, respectively. However, in some Eastern European countries with relative low gross domestic product procedure rates exceeded those of some wealthier Western countries, suggesting that economic resources are not the only driver for utilization of arrhythmia therapies. These statistics indicate that despite significant improvements, there still is considerable heterogeneity in the availability of arrhythmia therapies across the ESC area. Hopefully, these data will help identify areas for improvement and guide future activities in cardiac arrhythmia management. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. The Canadian experience with Durata and Riata ST Optim defibrillator leads: a report from the Canadian Heart Rhythm Society Device Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Matthew T; Ha, Andrew C T; Exner, Derek V; Tung, Stanley K K; Parkash, Ratika; Connors, Sean; Coutu, Benoit; Crystal, Eugene; Champagne, Jean; Philippon, Francois; Yee, Raymond; Stephenson, Elizabeth A; Nery, Pablo B; Essebag, Vidal; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Redfearn, Damian; Krahn, Andrew D; Healey, Jeffrey S

    2013-10-01

    The St. Jude Medical Riata family of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) leads has demonstrated a high rate of externalized conductors and electrical failure. Given similar design elements of Durata to Riata, the purpose of this study was to assess the rates of failure of the Riata ST Optim and Durata lead families in Canada. All Canadian ICD-implanting centers were invited to submit follow-up information on all Optim-coated ICD leads implanted. Electrical failure was defined as a rapid change in impedance or pacing capture threshold leading to lead revision, or oversensing due to noise. Externalized conductors were defined as appearance of conductor wires outside the lead body. Systematic fluoroscopic screening for externalized conductors was not performed. As of December 1, 2012, 15 of 25 centers provided data on 3981 leads (44% of those sold in Canada during the same timeframe): 3477 Durata and 504 Riata ST Optim leads. The most common model numbers were 7122 (1516 leads [38%]), 7121 (707 leads [18%]), and 7120 (622 leads [16%]). Mean follow-up duration from implant to December 1, 2012, was 4.47 ± 0.48 years for Riata ST Optim leads and 2.00 ± 1.10 years for Durata leads. The annual rate of lead failure was 0.27% per year for Riata ST Optim leads and 0.24% per year for Durata leads. No instances of externalized conductors were identified in the failed leads. No deaths were attributed to lead failure; however, 2 patients experienced inappropriate shocks due to lead failure. The overall electrical failure rates of the Riata ST Optim and Durata leads appear to be low, and no instances of externalized conductors were observed. © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation and Concordance With the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology/Heart Rhythm Society Guidelines: Findings From ORBIT-AF (Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Adam S; Kim, Sunghee; Fonarow, Gregg C; Thomas, Laine E; Reiffel, James A; Allen, Larry A; Freeman, James V; Naccarelli, Gerald; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Go, Alan S; Kowey, Peter R; Ansell, Jack E; Gersh, Bernard J; Hylek, Elaine M; Peterson, Eric D; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2017-11-01

    It is unclear how frequently patients with atrial fibrillation receive guideline-concordant (GC) care and whether guideline concordance is associated with improved outcomes. Using data from ORBIT-AF (Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation), we determined how frequently patients received care that was concordant with 11 recommendations from the 2014 American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology/Heart Rhythm Society atrial fibrillation guidelines pertaining to antithrombotic therapy, rate control, and antiarrhythmic medications. We also analyzed the association between GC care and clinical outcomes at both the patient level and center level. A total of 9570 patients were included. The median age was 75 years (interquartile range, 67-82), and the median CHA2DS2-VASc score was 4 (interquartile range, 3-5). A total of 5977 patients (62.5%) received care that was concordant with all guideline recommendations for which they were eligible. Rates of GC care were higher in patients treated by providers with greater specialization in arrhythmias (60.0%, 62.4%, and 67.0% for primary care physicians, cardiologists, and electrophysiologists, respectively; Passociation between GC care and improved risk-adjusted outcomes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias : A consensus document fromthe European Heart RhythmAssociation (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart RhythmSociety (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart RhythmSociety (APHRS) and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulacion Cardiaca y Electrofisiologia (SOLEACE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas; Boriani, Giuseppe; Manolis, Antonis S.; Olsen, Michael Hecht; Oto, Ali; Potpara, Tatjana S.; Steffel, Jan; Marin, Francisco; de Oliveira Figueiredo, Marcio Jansen; de Simone, Giovanni; Tzou, Wendy S.; Chiang, Chern-En; Williams, Bryan; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Gorenek, Bulent; Fauchier, Laurent; Savelieva, Irina; Hatala, Robert; van Gelder, Isabelle; Brguljan-Hitij, Jana; Erdine, Serap; Lovic, Dragan; Kim, Young-Hoon; Salinas-Arce, Jorge; Field, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal insufficiency. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both

  16. ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronan, Grace; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Rosenbaum, Lisa; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M; Brindis, Ralph G; Kramer, Christopher M; Shaw, Leslee J; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Chen, Jersey; Dean, Larry S; Fazel, Reza; Hundley, W Gregory; Itchhaporia, Dipti; Kligfield, Paul; Lockwood, Richard; Marine, Joseph Edward; McCully, Robert Benjamin; Messer, Joseph V; O'Gara, Patrick T; Shemin, Richard J; Wann, L Samuel; Wong, John B; Patel, Manesh R; Kramer, Christopher M; Bailey, Steven R; Brown, Alan S; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Lindsay, Bruce D; Min, James K; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Wann, L Samuel; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2014-02-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical presentations for stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) to consider use of stress testing and anatomic diagnostic procedures. This document reflects an updating of the prior Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) published for radionuclide imaging (RNI), stress echocardiography (Echo), calcium scoring, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and invasive coronary angiography for SIHD. This is in keeping with the commitment to revise and refine the AUC on a frequent basis. A major innovation in this document is the rating of tests side by side for the same indication. The side-by-side rating removes any concerns about differences in indication or interpretation stemming from prior use of separate documents for each test. However, the ratings were explicitly not competitive rankings due to the limited availability of comparative evidence, patient variability, and range of capabilities available in any given local setting. The indications for this review are limited to the detection and risk assessment of SIHD and were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Eighty clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate rating panel on a scale of 1-9, to designate Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate use following a modified Delphi process following the recently updated AUC development methodology. The use of some modalities of testing in the initial evaluation of patients with symptoms representing ischemic equivalents, newly diagnosed heart failure, arrhythmias, and syncope was generally found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate, except in cases where low pre-test probability or low risk limited the benefit of most testing except exercise electrocardiogram (ECG

  17. Heart rate monitors and abnormal heart rhythm detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudet, G; Chamoux, A

    2000-10-01

    We test the accuracy of two third generation heart rate monitors (HRM), Accurex Plus and Vantage NV and compare these data with those of an older monitor, PE 4000. Then we investigate responses of the HRM's to abnormal heart rhythms (HR). Accurex Plus and Vantage NV, and PE 4000 were tested in the laboratory under both stable and transient conditions. The Phantom 320 HR simulator gave 7 stable heart rates, each lasting 3 min. The responses of the HRM's to abnormal heart rhythms were tested with an automatic arrhythmia program lasting 17 min. The new HRM's, Accurex Plus and Vantage NV, were more accurate (89 to 94% and over 98% at +/-3 beats per min) in the stable state than the PE 4000. They all showed a smoothing effect in transient measurements, which was stronger in decelerating HR (1st case) than in accelerating HR (2nd case). - 1st case: Accurex Plus =Vantage NV >PE 4000 -2nd case: PE 4000 >Accurex =Vantage. Most isolated heart rhythm disorders (missing beat, pause 4 s, important bradycardia or tachycardia.

  18. Access to and clinical use of cardiac implantable electronic devices and interventional electrophysiological procedures in the European Society of Cardiology Countries: 2016 Report from the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raatikainen, M J Pekka; Arnar, David O; Merkely, Bela; Camm, A John; Hindricks, Gerhardt

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this analysis was to provide comprehensive information on the access to and use of cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) and catheter ablation therapy in the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) area. The European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) has been collecting descriptive and quantitative data on invasive arrhythmia therapies since 2008. This year 50 of the 56 ESC member countries provided data for the EHRA White Book. Up-to-date information on procedure rates for the last 5 years together with information on demographics, economy, vital statistics, local healthcare systems, and training activities is presented for each country and the 5 geographical ESC regions. Our analysis indicated that considerable heterogeneity in the access to arrhythmia therapies still exists across the ESC area. In 2015, the CIED implantation rates per million population were highest in the Western followed by the Southern and Northern European countries. The catheter ablation activity was largest in the Western followed by the Northern and Southern areas. Overall, the procedure rates were 3-10 times higher in the European than in the non-European ESC countries. Economic resources were not the only driver for utilization of arrhythmia therapies as in some Eastern European countries with relative low gross domestic product the procedure rates exceeded the average values. These data will help the healthcare professionals and stakeholders to identify and to understand in more depth the trends, disparities, and gaps in cardiac arrhythmia care and thereby promote harmonization of cardiac arrhythmias therapies in the ESC area. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Guidelines for the diagnosis, prevention and management of implantable cardiac electronic device infection. Report of a joint Working Party project on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (BSAC, host organization), British Heart Rhythm Society (BHRS), British Cardiovascular Society (BCS), British Heart Valve Society (BHVS) and British Society for Echocardiography (BSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoe, Jonathan A T; Barlow, Gavin; Chambers, John B; Gammage, Michael; Guleri, Achyut; Howard, Philip; Olson, Ewan; Perry, John D; Prendergast, Bernard D; Spry, Michael J; Steeds, Richard P; Tayebjee, Muzahir H; Watkin, Richard

    2015-02-01

    Infections related to implantable cardiac electronic devices (ICEDs), including pacemakers, implantable cardiac defibrillators and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices, are increasing in incidence in the USA and are likely to increase in the UK, because more devices are being implanted. These devices have both intravascular and extravascular components and infection can involve the generator, device leads and native cardiac structures or various combinations. ICED infections can be life-threatening, particularly when associated with endocardial infection, and all-cause mortality of up to 35% has been reported. Like infective endocarditis, ICED infections can be difficult to diagnose and manage. This guideline aims to (i) improve the quality of care provided to patients with ICEDs, (ii) provide an educational resource for all relevant healthcare professionals, (iii) encourage a multidisciplinary approach to ICED infection management, (iv) promote a standardized approach to the diagnosis, management, surveillance and prevention of ICED infection through pragmatic evidence-rated recommendations, and (v) advise on future research projects/audit. The guideline is intended to assist in the clinical care of patients with suspected or confirmed ICED infection in the UK, to inform local infection prevention and treatment policies and guidelines and to be used in the development of educational and training material by the relevant professional societies. The questions covered by the guideline are presented at the beginning of each section. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Effects of atomoxetine on heart rhythm in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanidir, Ibrahim Cansaran; Tanidir, Canan; Ozturk, Erkut; Bahali, Kayhan; Gunes, Hatice; Ergul, Yakup; Uneri, Ozden Sukran; Akdeniz, Celal; Tuzcu, Volkan

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of atomoxetine on heart rhythm using 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) and 24 h Holter monitoring. Children and adolescents who were diagnosed with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder according to DSM-IV-TR were referred to a pediatric cardiology clinic for cardiologic examination before and after 4 or 5 weeks of atomoxetine treatment. Cardiac examination, complete blood count, biochemistry, thyroid function tests, 12-lead ECG and 24 h Holter monitoring were performed routinely in all patients. Each subject underwent 24 h Holter ECG monitoring before atomoxetine was started and after 4 or 5 weeks of effective dose atomoxetine treatment. Forty-one patients were included in this prospective study. No statistically significant change was found in QT, QTc or QT interval dispersion or blood pressure before and after 4 or 5 weeks of atomoxetine treatment. There was a statistically significant increase in heart rate (both during the day and at night) and QRS duration, and a statistically significant decrease in P wave dispersion. Three patients had rhythm disturbances. All of these three patients were asymptomatic and none of these arrhythmias reached clinical significance. Atomoxetine did not cause significant changes in ECG or Holter variables. In two patients, who had undiagnosed subclinical extrasystoles, extra beats were increased after 4th week of treatment, but still remained clinically insignificant. Before and after atomoxetine treatment, listening to the heart sounds for a longer time, may help clinicians to notice an extra beat. If an extra beat is identified then 24 Holter monitoring is recommended. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  1. [Heart rhythm abnormalities in middle-aged veteran elite athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharashdze, N S; Pagava, Z T; Saatashvili, G A; Agladze, R A

    2008-06-01

    Disrrhythmia is frequent finding in high competitive athletes. Majority of heart rhythm abnormalities in athletes, suggested being benign, however, prognostic value of it is not yet well established. Purpose of the present study was to investigate heart rhythm and relationship of heart rhythm abnormalities with LV mass in veteran elite athletes. 30 veteran elite athletes (16 soccer players and 14 water-polo players) aged 30-50 were studied. They formed main group. >10 years of active sports activity and >5 years after competitive sports cessation. All athletes were symptom free. Control group consists of 30 age - matched sedentary healthy individuals. In all study subjects ambulatory 24 hour ECG was recorded and, LV mass, dimensions and function by ultrasound-Doppler technique was evaluated. LV mass by Devereux formula was calculated and indexed to body surface area. Student's t-test for continuous variables, Descriptive statistics and Fisher's exact test for categorical variables were used. A P-value of conductivity abnormalities as well as complex arrhythmias were more frequent findings in athletes as compared with healthy sedentary subjects. Heart Rhythm abnormalities were associated with enhanced LV mass in Veteran athletes. Hence, veteran elite athletes may be at increased risk of life threatening arrhythmias. However, prognostic value of heart rhythm disturbances in veteran athletes has to be studied.

  2. Clinical trials update from Heart Rhythm 2008 and Heart Failure 2008: ATHENA, URGENT, INH study, HEART and CK-1827452.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, Alison P; Cleland, John G F; Cullington, Damien; Clark, Andrew L

    2008-09-01

    This article provides information and a commentary on trials relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of heart failure, presented at the Heart Rhythm Society meeting in San Francisco, USA and the Heart Failure Association meeting of the European Society of Cardiology which was held in Milan, Italy in June 2008. Unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary data, as analyses may change in the final publication. The ATHENA study showed that dronedarone reduced the incidence of the composite outcome of cardiovascular hospitalisation or death, in patients with atrial fibrillation or flutter, 29% of whom had a history of heart failure, compared with placebo. The URGENT study demonstrated that treatment of acute heart failure with standard therapy, including intravenous diuretics and nitrates, leads to a rapid resolution of breathlessness in the sitting position but that orthopnoea often persists. The INH study showed that a disease management programme could reduce mortality compared to usual care but not hospitalisation rates. The HEART study failed to recruit its planned number of patients, although it is the largest randomised trial of revascularisation in heart failure reported to date. At a median follow-up of 5 years no difference in mortality was observed but the study lacked power to provide a conclusive result. The selective myosin activator CK-1827452 produced a concentration dependent increase in systolic ejection time, stroke volume and fractional shortening in patients with heart failure compared to placebo.

  3. ACCF/SCAI/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCCM/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2012 appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society of Critical Care Medicine, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manesh R; Bailey, Steven R; Bonow, Robert O; Chambers, Charles E; Chan, Paul S; Dehmer, Gregory J; Kirtane, Ajay J; Wann, L Samuel; Ward, R Parker

    2012-05-29

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation, in collaboration with the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions and key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where diagnostic catheterization is frequently considered. The indications (clinical scenarios) were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of noninvasive imaging appropriate use criteria. The 166 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate appropriate use (median 7 to 9), uncertain use (median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). Diagnostic catheterization may include several different procedure components. The indications developed focused primarily on 2 aspects of diagnostic catheterization. Many indications focused on the performance of coronary angiography for the detection of coronary artery disease with other procedure components (e.g., hemodynamic measurements, ventriculography) at the discretion of the operator. The majority of the remaining indications focused on hemodynamic measurements to evaluate valvular heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathy, and other conditions, with the use of coronary angiography at the discretion of the operator. Seventy-five indications were rated as appropriate, 49 were rated as uncertain, and 42 were rated as inappropriate. The appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization have the potential to impact physician decision making, healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore, recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research.

  4. Proceedings from Heart Rhythm Society’s Emerging Technologies Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitler, Emily P.; Al-Khatib, Sana M.; Slotwiner, David; Kumar, Uday N.; Varosy, Paul; Van Wagoner, David R.; Marcus, Gregory M.; Kusumoto, Fred M.; Blum, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Physicians are in an excellent position to significantly contribute to medical device innovation, but the process of bringing an idea to the bedside is complex. To begin to address these perceived barriers, the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) convened a forum of stakeholders in medical device innovation in conjunction with the 2015 HRS Scientific Sessions. The forum facilitated open discussion about medical device innovation, including obstacles to physician involvement and possible solutions. This report is based on the themes that emerged. First, physician innovators must take an organized approach to identifying unmet clinical needs and potential solutions. Second, extensive funds, usually secured through solicitation for investment, are often required to achieve meaningful progress developing an idea into a device. Third, planning for regulatory requirements of the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is essential. In addition to these issues, intellectual property and overall trends in health care, including international markets, are critically relevant considerations for the physician innovator. Importantly, there are a number of ways in which professional societies can assist physician innovators to navigate the complex medical device innovation landscape, bring clinically meaningful devices to market more quickly, and ultimately improve patient care. These efforts include facilitating interaction between potential collaborators through scientific meetings and other gatherings; collecting, evaluating, and disseminating state-of-the-art scientific information; and representing the interests of members in interactions with regulators and policy makers. PMID:26801401

  5. Musical rhythms in heart period dynamics: a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary approach to cardiac rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettermann, H; Amponsah, D; Cysarz, D; van Leeuwen, P

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to expand classic heart period analysis methods by techniques from ethnomusicology that explicitly take complex musical rhythm principles into consideration. The methods used are based on the theory of African music, the theory of symbolic dynamics, and combinatorial theory. Heart period tachograms from 192 24-h electrocardiograms of 96 healthy subjects were transformed into binary symbol sequences that were interpretable as elementary rhythmic (percussive) patterns, the time lines in African music. Using a hierarchical rhythm pattern scheme closely related to the Derler Rhythm Classification (from jazz theory), we calculated the predominance and stability of pattern classes. The results show that during sleep certain classes, specific to individuals, occurred in a cyclically recurrent manner and many times more often than expected. Simultaneously, other classes disappeared more or less completely. Moreover, the most frequent classes obviously originate from phase-locking processes in autonomic regulation (e.g., between respiratory and cardiac cycles). In conclusion, the new interdisciplinary method presented here demonstrates that heart period patterns, in particular those occurring during night sleep, can be interpreted as musical rhythms. This method may be of great potential use in music therapy research.

  6. Canadian Cardiovascular Society atrial fibrillation guidelines 2010: rate and rhythm management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Anne M; Verma, Atul; Talajic, Mario; Nattel, Stanley; Dorian, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The goals of atrial fibrillation (AF) and atrial flutter (AFL) arrhythmia management are to alleviate patient symptoms, improve patient quality of life, and minimize the morbidity associated with AF and AFL. Arrhythmia management usually commences with drugs to slow the ventricular rate. The addition of class I or class III antiarrhythmic drugs for restoration or maintenance of sinus rhythm is largely determined by patient symptoms and preferences. For rate control, treatment of persistent or permanent AF and AFL should aim for a resting heart rate of myocardial infarction or left ventricular dysfunction. Digoxin is not recommended as monotherapy for rate control in active patients. Digoxin and dronedarone may be used in combination with other agents to optimize rate control. The first-choice antiarrhythmic drug for maintenance of sinus rhythm in patients with non structural heart disease can be any one of dronedarone, flecainide, propafenone, or sotalol. In patients with abnormal ventricular function but left ventricular ejection fraction >35%, dronedarone, sotalol, or amiodarone is recommended. In patients with left ventricular ejection fraction <35%, amiodarone is the only drug usually recommended. Intermittent antiarrhythmic drug therapy ("pill in the pocket") may be considered in symptomatic patients with infrequent, longer-lasting episodes of AF or AFL as an alternative to daily antiarrhythmic therapy. Referral for ablation of AF may be considered for patients who remain symptomatic after adequate trials of antiarrhythmic drug therapy and in whom a rhythm control strategy remains desired. Copyright © 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Frailty syndrome in patients with heart rhythm disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynarska, Agnieszka; Mlynarski, Rafal; Golba, Krzysztof S

    2017-09-01

    To assess the prevalence of frailty syndrome in patients with heart rhythm disorders that qualified for pacemaker implantation. The study included 171 patients (83 women, aged 73.9 ± 6.7 years) who qualified for pacemaker implantation as a result of sinus node dysfunction (81 patients) or atrio-ventricular blocks (AVB; 90 patients). A total of 60 patients (25 women, aged 72.40 ± 7.09 years) without heart rhythm disorders were included in the control group. Frailty syndrome was diagnosed using the Canadian Study of Health and Aging Clinical Frailty Scale test. Frailty syndrome was diagnosed in 25.15% of the patients, and pre-frailty in 36.84% of the patients. Frailty syndrome was diagnosed in 10% of the control group, and the average value of frailty was 3.35 ± 0.92. Frailty occurred significantly more often among patients with AVB (33.34%) compared with patients who were diagnosed with sinus node dysfunction (16.05%); P = 0.0081. The average score of frailty for sinus node dysfunction was 3.71 ± 0.89, and for AVB it was 4.14 ± 0.93; P = 0.0152. In the case of AVB, the women had a statistically more intense level of frailty of 4.54 ± 0.90 as compared with the men 3.87 ± 0.85; P = 0.0294. In the multiple logistic analysis, the presence of any arrhythmia was strongly associated with frailty syndrome (OR 2.1286, 95% CI 1.4594 - 3.1049; P = 0.0001). Frailty syndrome was diagnosed in one-quarter of patients with cardiac arrhythmias, whereas a further 40% were at a higher risk of frailty syndrome, and its occurrence was significantly higher if compared with the control group. Frailty occurred significantly more often among patients with atrio-ventricular blocks, especially in women. The results of the present research showed that there is a statistical association between frailty and arrhythmias. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1313-1318. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  8. Dynamic correlations between heart and brain rhythm during Autogenic meditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daekeun eKim

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to determine significant physiological parameters of brain and heart under meditative state, both in each activities and their dynamic correlations. Electrophysiological changes in response to meditation were explored in 12 healthy volunteers who completed 8 weeks of a basic training course in autogenic meditation. Heart coherence, representing the degree of ordering in oscillation of heart rhythm intervals, increased significantly during meditation. Relative EEG alpha power and alpha lagged coherence also increased. A significant slowing of parietal peak alpha frequency was observed. Parietal peak alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but no such relationship was observed during baseline. Average alpha lagged coherence also increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but, again, no significant relationship was observed at baseline. Relative alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during both meditation and baseline periods. Heart coherence can be a cardiac marker for the meditative state and also may be a general marker for the meditative state since heart coherence is strongly correlated with EEG alpha activities. It is expected that increasing heart coherence and the accompanying EEG alpha activations, heart brain synchronicity, would help recover physiological synchrony following a period of homeostatic depletion.

  9. Heart Failure Society of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Regurgitation Resource Page Patient Clinical Trials Learn About Heart Failure Patient Tools Patient Resources Patient Webinar Series Patient Upcoming Events Research Heart Failure Research Resources and Guidelines Research General Information HFSA ...

  10. Pacing as a Treatment for Reflex-Mediated (Vasovagal, Situational, or Carotid Sinus Hypersensitivity) Syncope: A Systematic Review for the 2017 ACC/AHA/HRS Guideline for the Evaluation and Management of Patients With Syncope: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines and the Heart Rhythm Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varosy, Paul D; Chen, Lin Y; Miller, Amy L; Noseworthy, Peter A; Slotwiner, David J; Thiruganasambandamoorthy, Venkatesh

    2017-08-01

    , Inc., and Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. History of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Williams, William G

    2015-10-01

    The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society is a group of over 100 pediatric heart surgeons representing 72 institutions that specialize in the treatment of patients with congenital heart defects. The Society began in 1972 and incorporated as a not-for-profit charitable organization in 2004. It has become the face and voice of congenital heart surgery in North America. In 1985, the Society established a data center for multicenter clinical research studies to encourage congenital heart professionals to participate in improving outcomes for our patients. The goals of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society are to stimulate the study of congenital cardiac physiology, pathology, and management options which are instantiated in data collection, multi-institutional studies, and scientific meetings. Honest and open discussion of problems with possible solutions to the challenges facing congenital heart professionals have been the strength of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. It is imperative for the growth of an organization to know from where it came in order to know to where it is going. The purpose of this article is to review the history of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Resonance of about-weekly human heart rate rhythm with solar activity change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, G; Halberg, F; Wendt, H W; Bingham, C; Sothern, R B; Haus, E; Kleitman, E; Kleitman, N; Revilla, M A; Revilla, M; Breus, T K; Pimenov, K; Grigoriev, A E; Mitish, M D; Yatsyk, G V; Syutkina, E V

    1996-12-01

    In several human adults, certain solar activity rhythms may influence an about 7-day rhythm in heart rate. When no about-weekly feature was found in the rate of change in sunspot area, a measure of solar activity, the double amplitude of a circadian heart rate rhythm, approximated by the fit of a 7-day cosine curve, was lower, as was heart rate corresponds to about-weekly features in solar activity and/or relates to a sunspot cycle.

  13. Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology Specialist Heart Failure Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDonagh, Theresa A; Gardner, Roy S; Lainscak, Mitja

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that organized care of heart failure patients, including specialist management by cardiologists, improves patient outcomes. In response to this, other national training bodies (the UK and the USA) have developed heart failure subspecialty curricula within their Cardiology...... Training Curricula. In addition, European Society of Cardiology (ESC) subspecialty curricula exist for Interventional Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Management. The purpose of this heart failure curriculum is to provide a framework which can be used as a blueprint for training across Europe. This blueprint...... mirrors other ESC curricula. Each section has three components: the knowledge required, the skills which are necessary, and the professionalism (attitudes and behaviours) which should be attained. The programme is designed to last 2 years. The first year is devoted to the specialist heart failure module...

  14. Risk stratification for arrhythmic events in patients with asymptomatic pre-excitation: A systematic review for the 2015 ACC/AHA/HRS guideline for the management of adult patients with supraventricular tachycardia: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines and the Heart Rhythm Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khatib, Sana M; Arshad, Aysha; Balk, Ethan M; Das, Sandeep R; Hsu, Jonathan C; Joglar, Josè A; Page, Richard L

    2016-04-01

    To review the literature systematically to determine whether noninvasive or invasive risk stratification, such as with an electrophysiological study of patients with asymptomatic pre-excitation, reduces the risk of arrhythmic events and improves patient outcomes. PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (all January 1, 1970, through August 31, 2014) were searched for randomized controlled trials and cohort studies examining noninvasive or invasive risk stratification in patients with asymptomatic pre-excitation. Studies were rejected for low-quality design or the lack of an outcome, population, intervention, or comparator of interest or if they were written in a language other than English. Of 778 citations found, 9 studies met all the eligibility criteria and were included in this paper. Of the 9 studies, 1 had a dual design-a randomized controlled trial of ablation versus no ablation in 76 patients and an uncontrolled prospective cohort of 148 additional patients-and 8 were uncontrolled prospective cohort studies (n=1,594). In studies reporting a mean age, the range was 32 to 50 years, and in studies reporting a median age, the range was 19 to 36 years. The majority of patients were male (range, 50% to 74%), and 250 ms) developed in 0% to 16%, malignant atrial fibrillation (shortest RR interval ≤250 ms) in 0% to 9%, and ventricular fibrillation in 0% to 2%, most of whom were children in the last case. The existing evidence suggests risk stratification with an electrophysiological study of patients with asymptomatic pre-excitation may be beneficial, along with consideration of accessory-pathway ablation in those deemed to be at high risk of future arrhythmias. Given the limitations of the existing data, well-designed and well-conducted studies are needed. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Heart rhythm complexity impairment in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Hung; Lin, Chen; Ho, Yi-Heng; Wu, Vin-Cent; Lo, Men-Tzung; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Liu, Li-Yu Daisy; Lin, Lian-Yu; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death in patients with advanced renal disease. The objective of this study was to investigate impairments in heart rhythm complexity in patients with end-stage renal disease. We prospectively analyzed 65 patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) without prior cardiovascular disease and 72 individuals with normal renal function as the control group. Heart rhythm analysis including complexity analysis by including detrended fractal analysis (DFA) and multiscale entropy (MSE) were performed. In linear analysis, the PD patients had a significantly lower standard deviation of normal RR intervals (SDRR) and percentage of absolute differences in normal RR intervals greater than 20 ms (pNN20). Of the nonlinear analysis indicators, scale 5, area under the MSE curve for scale 1 to 5 (area 1-5) and 6 to 20 (area 6-20) were significantly lower than those in the control group. In DFA anaylsis, both DFA α1 and DFA α2 were comparable in both groups. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, scale 5 had the greatest discriminatory power for two groups. In both net reclassification improvement model and integrated discrimination improvement models, MSE parameters significantly improved the discriminatory power of SDRR, pNN20, and pNN50. In conclusion, PD patients had worse cardiac complexity parameters. MSE parameters are useful to discriminate PD patients from patients with normal renal function.

  16. [Semi-automatic defibrillators does not always interpret heart rhythms correctly. Five patients were defibrillated despite non-shockable rhythms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangenheim, Burkard; Israelsson, Johan; Lindstaedt, Michael; Carlsson, Jörg

    2015-08-04

    Automated external defibrillators (AED) have become an important part of the »the chain of survival« in case of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), where early defibrillation is lifesaving. The American Heart Association demands that AEDs have a specificity of >99 % to recognize normal sinus rhythm and >95 % for the other non-shockable rhythms. Reports on their performance in the field are scarce. We present five cases in which AED recommended shock for apparently non-shockable rhythms. This indicates the necessity to systematically reevaluate AED performance.

  17. Health economics and the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardas, Panos; Boriani, Giuseppe

    2011-05-01

    The management of healthcare is becoming extremely complex in developed countries, as a result of increasing age of the population and increasing costs of care, coupled with diminishing resources due to global financial crisis. This situation threatens access to appropriate care, and a more or less explicit rationing of some types of treatment may occur in 'real world' clinical practice. This is particularly true for those treatments or interventions with a relatively high up-front cost, such as cardioverter defibrillators, devices for cardiac resynchronization therapy or ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation. The European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) is strongly convinced that the skills of electrophysiologists and cardiologists responsible for the management of rhythm disorders have to evolve, also embracing the knowledge of health economics, clinical epidemiology, health-care management and outcome research. These disciplines do not belong to what is considered as the conventional cultural background of physicians, but knowledge of comparative cost effectiveness and of other economic approaches nowadays appears fundamental for a dialogue with a series of stakeholders, such as policy makers, politicians, and administrators, involved in budgeting the activity of hospitals and health-care services, as well as in approaching health technology assessment.

  18. Influence of diuretic therapy on the features of heart rhythm variability changes in chronic heart failure patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K R Alyeva

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study comparative influence of furosemide and torasemide on heart rhythm variability in patients with chronic heart failure of ischemic origin. Methods. The study included 48 patients (29 males and 19 females with ischemic heart disease complicated by chronic heart failure, NYHA functional classes II-IV. All patients were randomized into two groups: group 1 (25 patients received furosemide as diuretic therapy, and group 2 (23 patients received torasemide. All patient underwent clinical examination including assessment of complaints and physical examination, laboratory and instrumental tests (electrocardiography, echocardiography, 6-minute walk test, 24 Hour Holter ECG monitoring before and 30 days after starting diuretic therapy. Results. Against the background of one-month diuretic therapy, positive dynamics of clinical parameters was registered in both main groups of patients receiving both furosemide and torasemide. In furosemide group deterioration of heart rhythm variability was observed. Torasemide treatment resulted in considerable improvement of vegetative regulation of heart activity. Conclusion. Diuretic therapy with furosemide is characterized by changes of time and spectral parameters of vegetative regulation of heart rhythm towards strengthening of sympathetic and attenuation of parasympathetic influence; diuretic therapy with torasemide resulted in considerable improvement of heart rhythm variability parameters, attenuation of sympathetic and strengthening of parasympathetic influence on heart rhythm that provides additional cardioprotection in the treatment of patients with chronic heart failure of ischemic origin.

  19. Deciphering the Function of the Blunt Circadian Rhythm of Melatonin in the Newborn Lamb: Impact on Adrenal and Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seron-Ferre, Maria; Torres-Farfan, Claudia; Valenzuela, Francisco J; Castillo-Galan, Sebastian; Rojas, Auristela; Mendez, Natalia; Reynolds, Henry; Valenzuela, Guillermo J; Llanos, Anibal J

    2017-09-01

    Neonatal lambs, as with human and other neonates, have low arrhythmic endogenous levels of melatonin for several weeks until they start their own pineal rhythm of melatonin production at approximately 2 weeks of life. During pregnancy, daily rhythmic transfer of maternal melatonin to the fetus has important physiological roles in sheep, nonhuman primates, and rats. This melatonin rhythm provides a circadian signal and also participates in adjusting the physiology of several organs in preparation for extrauterine life. We propose that the ensuing absence of a melatonin rhythm plays a role in neonatal adaptation. To test this hypothesis, we studied the effects of imposing a high-amplitude melatonin rhythm in the newborn lamb on (1) clock time-related changes in cortisol and plasma variables and (2) clock time-related changes of gene expression of clock genes and selected functional genes in the adrenal gland and heart. We treated newborn lambs with a daily oral dose of melatonin (0.25 mg/kg) from birth to 5 days of age, recreating a high-amplitude melatonin rhythm. This treatment suppressed clock time-related changes of plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone, cortisol, clock gene expression, and functional genes in the newborn adrenal gland. In the heart, it decreased heart/body weight ratio, increased expression of Anp and Bnp, and resulted in different heart gene expression from control newborns. The interference of this postnatal melatonin treatment with the normal postnatal pattern of adrenocortical function and heart development support a physiological role for the window of flat postnatal melatonin levels during the neonatal transition. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  20. Modeling the aging heart: from local respiratory defects to global rhythm disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrapko, Konstantin; Trayanova, Natalia; Nattel, Stanley

    2015-05-05

    In this issue, Baris et al. (2015) describe cardiac rhythm abnormalities in a mouse model of mitochondrial dysfunction in widely distributed cells of the aging human heart. How do a few metabolically challenged cells disrupt cardiac rhythm? We suggest that these cells provide "crystallization centers" for latent dysfunctional zones to allow arrhythmia emergence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Atrial Fibrillation: When the heart is not in rhythm | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: When the heart is not in rhythm Past Issues / Winter ... problem. What were your first thoughts upon getting the diagnosis? At first I didn't think there ...

  2. Heart rhythm analysis using ECG recorded with a novel sternum based patch technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saadi, Dorthe Bodholt; Fauerskov, Inge; Osmanagic, Armin

    2013-01-01

    , reliable long-term ECG recordings. The device is designed for high compliance and low patient burden. This novel patch technology is CE approved for ambulatory ECG recording of two ECG channels on the sternum. This paper describes a clinical pilot study regarding the usefulness of these ECG signals...... for heart rhythm analysis. A clinical technician with experience in ECG interpretation selected 200 noise-free 7 seconds ECG segments from 25 different patients. These 200 ECG segments were evaluated by two medical doctors according to their usefulness for heart rhythm analysis. The first doctor considered...... 98.5% of the segments useful for rhythm analysis, whereas the second doctor considered 99.5% of the segments useful for rhythm analysis. The conclusion of this pilot study indicates that two channel ECG recorded on the sternum is useful for rhythm analysis and could be used as input to diagnosis...

  3. Influence of diuretic therapy on the features of heart rhythm variability changes in chronic heart failure patients

    OpenAIRE

    K R Alyeva; A B Bakhshaliev; S M Kakhramanova

    2018-01-01

    Aim. To study comparative influence of furosemide and torasemide on heart rhythm variability in patients with chronic heart failure of ischemic origin. Methods. The study included 48 patients (29 males and 19 females) with ischemic heart disease complicated by chronic heart failure, NYHA functional classes II-IV. All patients were randomized into two groups: group 1 (25 patients) received furosemide as diuretic therapy, and group 2 (23 patients) received torasemide. All patient underwen...

  4. Alterations in the heart rate and activity rhythms of three orbital astronauts on a space mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhizhen; Wan, Yufeng; Zhang, Lin; Tian, Yu; Lv, Ke; Li, Yinghui; Wang, Chunhui; Chen, Xiaoping; Chen, Shanguang; Guo, Jinhu

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors in space are dramatically different from those on Earth. The spaceflight environment has been known to influence human physiology and behavior on orbital missions. In this study, we investigated alterations in the diurnal rhythms of activity and heart rate of three Chinese astronauts on a space mission. An analysis of the heart rate data showed a significant decrease in heart rate amplitudes during flight in all three subjects. The heart rate amplitudes of all the three astronauts were significantly dampened during flight, and the minimum as well as the maximum value of heart rate increased after flight. A phase shift in heart rate was observed in one of the three astronauts after flight. These results demonstrate the influence of spaceflight on heart physiology and function. In addition, a significant decrease in body trunk activity and rhythmicity occurred during flight, demonstrating that the spaceflight environment disturbs motion adaptation and diurnal activity rhythms.

  5. Estimation of Circadian Body Temperature Rhythm Based on Heart Rate in Healthy, Ambulatory Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Soo Young; Joo, Kwang Min; Kim, Han Byul; Jang, Seungjin; Kim, Beomoh; Hong, Seungbum; Kim, Sungwan; Park, Kwang Suk

    2017-03-01

    Core body temperature is a reliable marker for circadian rhythm. As characteristics of the circadian body temperature rhythm change during diverse health problems, such as sleep disorder and depression, body temperature monitoring is often used in clinical diagnosis and treatment. However, the use of current thermometers in circadian rhythm monitoring is impractical in daily life. As heart rate is a physiological signal relevant to thermoregulation, we investigated the feasibility of heart rate monitoring in estimating circadian body temperature rhythm. Various heart rate parameters and core body temperature were simultaneously acquired in 21 healthy, ambulatory subjects during their routine life. The performance of regression analysis and the extended Kalman filter on daily body temperature and circadian indicator (mesor, amplitude, and acrophase) estimation were evaluated. For daily body temperature estimation, mean R-R interval (RRI), mean heart rate (MHR), or normalized MHR provided a mean root mean square error of approximately 0.40 °C in both techniques. The mesor estimation regression analysis showed better performance than the extended Kalman filter. However, the extended Kalman filter, combined with RRI or MHR, provided better accuracy in terms of amplitude and acrophase estimation. We suggest that this noninvasive and convenient method for estimating the circadian body temperature rhythm could reduce discomfort during body temperature monitoring in daily life. This, in turn, could facilitate more clinical studies based on circadian body temperature rhythm.

  6. Value of digoxin in heart failure and sinus rhythm : New features of an old drug?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanVeldhuisen, DJ; deGraeff, PA; Remme, WJ

    1996-01-01

    Digoxin has been a controversial drug since its introduction >200 years ago. Although its efficacy in patients with heart failure and atrial fibrillation is clear, its value in patients with heart failure and sinus rhythm has often been questioned. In the 1980s, reports of some large-scale trials

  7. Thromboembolic risk stratification of patients hospitalized with heart failure in sinus rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolsk, Emil; Lamberts, Morten; Hansen, Morten L

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Patients with heart failure in sinus rhythm are at an increased risk of thromboembolic complications. So far, validated risk stratification tools are lacking for such patients, which makes the decision to initiate anti-thrombotic treatment difficult. METHODS AND RESULTS: We included 136......,545 patients admitted with heart failure in sinus rhythm from national registries from 1999 to 2012. Patients receiving oral anticoagulants were omitted from the study. First, we investigated if the CHA2DS2-VASc score could identify heart failure patients in sinus rhythm with high rates of thromboembolic...... with those with heart failure alone. The incidence rates of thromboembolism were clinically significant, averaging 6.0 (95% confidence interval 5.98-6.02) events per 100 patient years during the first year following diagnosis. Risk factors such as diabetes, age, vascular disease, and especially previous...

  8. Non-sinus rhythm after heart surgery: permanent or not? A simple method can tell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Quansheng; Wu, Qin

    2012-08-01

    We introduce a simple method to distinguish permanent from transient non-sinus rhythm immediately after resuscitation in cardiac operations. An ice slush of normal saline is sprayed on the surface of the right atrium around the sinus node. If the arrhythmia is transient, the heart usually regains sinus rhythm; if not, the arrhythmia will most likely be permanent. Although we do not know the mechanism, this technique is easy and has worked well in 162 patients.

  9. Heart rhythm disturbances associated with rupatadine: a case series from the Spanish and Portuguese pharmacovigilance systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, A; Macías, D; Salado, I; Sáinz, M; Ortega, S; Campo, C; García del Pozo, J; Martín Arias, L H; Velasco, A; Gonçalves, S; Pombal, R; Carmona, R

    2009-05-01

    We searched the Spanish and Portuguese pharmacovigilance databases for spontaneous case reports of heart rhythm disturbances associated with rupatadine and other new H1 antihistamines. Five cases were found involving patients treated with rupatadine (13.9% of all reports relating to this drug). In all five cases, the reaction started after exposure and resolved when the drug was discontinued. In two cases, rupatadine was the only medication being taken by the patient, and no other condition that could explain the heart rhythm disturbances was diagnosed. The reporting odds ratio was 3.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.0-10.5). The reporting rate was 2 cases per 100,000 patients treated per year (95% confidence interval, 0.4-6.0). These results suggest a causal relationship between rupatadine and heart rhythm disturbances.

  10. Heart rhythm analysis using ECG recorded with a novel sternum based patch technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saadi, Dorthe B.; Fauerskov, Inge; Osmanagic, Armin

    2013-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death globally. Early diagnosis and treatment of many of these patients depend on ambulatory electrocardiography recordings. Therefore a novel wireless patch technology has been designed for easy...... for heart rhythm analysis. A clinical technician with experience in ECG interpretation selected 200 noise-free 7 seconds ECG segments from 25 different patients. These 200 ECG segments were evaluated by two medical doctors according to their usefulness for heart rhythm analysis. The first doctor considered...

  11. Altered Heart Rhythm Dynamics in Very Low Birth Weight Infants With Impending Intraventricular Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzcu, Volkan; Nas, Selman; Ulusar, Umit; Ugur, Ahmet; Kaiser, Jeffrey R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Intraventricular hemorrhage remains an important problem among very low birth weight infants and may result in long-term neurodevelopmental disabilities. Neonatologists have been unable to accurately predict impending intraventricular hemorrhage. Because alterations in the autonomic nervous system’s control of heart rhythm have been associated with intraventricular hemorrhage after its development, we sought to determine if early subtle alterations of heart rhythm could be predictive of impending intraventricular hemorrhage in very low birth weight infants. METHODS This case-control study included 10 newborn very low birth weight infants with intraventricular hemorrhage (5 grade IV, 4 grade III, and 1 grade II) and 14 control infants without intraventricular hemorrhage. Heart rhythm data from the first day of life before the development of intraventricular hemorrhage were evaluated. Detrended fluctuation analysis, a nonlinear fractal heart rate variability method, was used to assess the fractal dynamics of the heart rhythm. Fractal scaling exponents were calculated by using this analysis. RESULTS Twenty-four infants (mean ± SD, birth weight: 845 ± 213g: gestational age: 26.1 ± 1.9 weeks) participated in the study. The short-term scaling exponent was significantly larger in infants who later developed intraventricular hemorrhage compared with those who did not (0.60 ± 0.1 vs 0.45 ± 0.1). A value of 0.52 resulted in 70% sensitivity and positive predictive value and 79% specificity and negative predictive value. The short-term scaling exponent was the only significant predictor of intraventricular hemorrhage. CONCLUSIONS Fractal dynamics of the heart rhythm is significantly altered in very low birth weight infants before developing intraventricular hemorrhage and may be predictive of impending intraventricular hemorrhage. PMID:19255007

  12. EFFECT OF FUROSEMIDE AND TORASEMIDE ON HEART RATE VARIABILITY AND VENTRICULAR RHYTHM DISORDERS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE COMPLICATING ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE: COMPARATIVE NONRANDOMIZED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. H. Shugushev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study effect of diuretic therapy with furosemide and torasemide on heart rate variability (HRV and frequency of ventriclar rhythm disorders in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF complicating ischemic heart disease (IHD.Material and methods. Patients (n=107 with CHF III-IV functional class (NYHA complicating IHD were examined. The first group of patients received furosemide, 20-60 mg QD (n=52, the second group received torasemide, 5-20 mg QD (n=55. Analysis of heart rhythm disorders and the basic HRV indicators was performed by ECG 10-minute recordings initially and after 10 days of therapy.Results. Decrease in time and spectral HRV parameters and increase in daily number of ventricular extrasystoles was found in furosemide treated patients. Improvement of HRV parameters and reduction of daily number of ventricular rhythm disorders was found torasemide treated patients.Conclusion. Torasemide therapy improves an autonomic regulation of heart rhythm and leads to the reduction of ventricular heart rhythm disorders in patients with CHF complicating IHD.

  13. Reorganization of the Brain and Heart Rhythm During Autogenic Meditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Keun eKim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The underlying changes in heart coherence that are associated with reported EEG changes in response to meditation have been explored. We measured EEG and heart rate variability (HRV before and during autogenic meditation. Fourteen subjects participated in the study. Heart coherence scores were significantly increased during meditation compared to the baseline. We found near significant decrease in high beta absolute power, increase in alpha relative power and significant increases in lower(alpha and higher(above beta band coherence during 3 minute epochs of heart coherent meditation compared to 3 minute epochs of heart noncoherence at baseline. The coherence and relative power increase in alpha band and absolute power decrease in high beta band could reflect relaxation state during the heart coherent meditation. The coherence increase in the higher(above beta band could reflect cortico-cortical local integration and thereby affect cognitive reorganization, simultaneously with relaxation. Further research is still needed for a confirmation of heart coherence as a simple window for the meditative state.

  14. Ivabradine, coronary artery disease, and heart failure: beyond rhythm control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scicchitano P

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pietro Scicchitano,1 Francesca Cortese,1 Gabriella Ricci,1 Santa Carbonara,1 Michele Moncelli,1 Massimo Iacoviello,1 Annagrazia Cecere,1 Michele Gesualdo,1 Annapaola Zito,1 Pasquale Caldarola,2 Domenico Scrutinio,3 Rocco Lagioia,3 Graziano Riccioni,4 Marco Matteo Ciccone1 1Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, University of Bari, School of Medicine, Policlinico, Bari, Italy; 2Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Policlinic, San Paolo Hospital, Bari, Italy; 3Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Fondazione Maugeri, Cassano Murge, Italy; 4Intensive Cardiology Care Unit, San Camillo de Lellis Hospital, Manfredonia, Foggia, Italy Abstract: Elevated heart rate could negatively influence cardiovascular risk in the general population. It can induce and promote the atherosclerotic process by means of several mechanisms involving endothelial shear stress and biochemical activities. Furthermore, elevated heart rate can directly increase heart ischemic conditions because of its skill in unbalancing demand/supply of oxygen and decreasing the diastolic period. Thus, many pharmacological treatments have been proposed in order to reduce heart rate and ameliorate the cardiovascular risk profile of individuals, especially those suffering from coronary artery diseases (CAD and chronic heart failure (CHF. Ivabradine is the first pure heart rate reductive drug approved and currently used in humans, created in order to selectively reduce sinus node function and to overcome the many side effects of similar pharmacological tools (ie, β-blockers or calcium channel antagonists. The aim of our review is to evaluate the role and the safety of this molecule on CAD and CHF therapeutic strategies. Keywords: chronic heart failure, heart rate reduction, cardiac ischemic disease, heart-rate lowering drugs, funny current

  15. Alterations in the heart rate and activity rhythms of three orbital astronauts on a space mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhizhen; Wan, Yufeng; Zhang, Lin; Tian, Yu; Lv, Ke; Li, Yinghui; Wang, Chunhui; Chen, Xiaoping; Chen, Shanguang; Guo, Jinhu

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors in space are dramatically different from those on Earth. The spaceflight environment has been known to influence human physiology and behavior on orbital missions. In this study, we investigated alterations in the diurnal rhythms of activity and heart rate of three Chinese astronauts on a space mission. An analysis of the heart rate data showed a significant decrease in heart rate amplitudes during flight in all three subjects. The heart rate amplitudes of all the three astronauts were significantly dampened during flight, and the minimum as well as the maximum value of heart rate increased after flight. A phase shift in heart rate was observed in one of the three astronauts after flight. These results demonstrate the influence of spaceflight on heart physiology and function. In addition, a significant decrease in body trunk activity and rhythmicity occurred during flight, demonstrating that the spaceflight environment disturbs motion adaptation and diurnal activity rhythms. Copyright © 2015 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Working Too Much Might Tip Heart into Irregular Rhythm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caution." "However, it adds evidence to the ongoing theme that lifestyle can play a role in promoting atrial fibrillation," Dr. Apoor Patel added. He's a cardiac electrophysiologist at Northwell Health's Bass Heart Hospital in Manhasset, N.Y. In the new study, ...

  17. Changes in Heart Rhythm and Breathing in Acute Systemic Injury Due to Cold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Konnov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal the patterns of a change in heart rhythm and breathing in patients with acute systemic injury due to cold in hypothermic and early posthypothermic periods.Subjects and methods. Thirty patients aged 18 to 60 years (3 groups of 10 patients with mild, moderate, and severe cold injury were examined in hypothermic and posthypothermic periods. The patient groups did not differ in gender, age, and weight. Within the first 24 hours after admission, all the patients underwent high-resolution Holter electrocardiographic monitoring that recorded cardiac arrhythmias and breathing disorders.Results. During the therapy performed, as the degree of acute systemic cold injury increased, the patients were found to have a heart rate reduction (from 102 [90; 122] beats/min in Group 1 to 49 [38; 58] beats/min in Group 3 and a circadian index increase (from 105 [88; 125]% in Group 1 to 210 [185; 223]% in Group 3. With increased hypothermia, the victims were detected to have progressive cardiac rhythm and cardiac electrical conduction disturbances, such as supraventricular pacemaker migration, single and paired supraventricular premature beats, paroxysmal atrial tachycardia, atrial fibrillations, and ventricular premature beats. There was decreased heart rhythm variability in all the study groups, to the greatest extent in the patents with severe systemic cold injury. Late ventricular potentials were found in 2 and 7 patients with moderate and severe cold injury, respectively. Breathing disorders were recorded in all the study groups, the greatest increase in the frequency and duration of apnea/hypopnea episodes was noted in the patients with severe hypothermia. A fatal outcome occurred in 4 of the 10 patients with critical hypothermia due to the occurrence of idioventricular rhythm with transition to asystole.Conclusion. Systemic hypothermia is accompanied by cardiac rhythm and cardiac electrical conduction disturbances and respiratory depression

  18. Heart rhythm risturbances associated with rupatadine: a case series from the Spanish and Portuguese Pharmacovigilance Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Carvajal García-Pando, Alfonso; Macías, D.; Salado, Inés; Sáinz, M.; Ortega, Sara; Campo, C.; García del Pozo, Javier; Martín Arias, Luis; Velasco Martín, Alfonso; R Gonçalves; Pombal, R.; Carmona, R

    2009-01-01

    Producción Científica We searched the Spanish and Portuguese pharmacovigilance databases for spontaneous case reports of heart rhythm disturbances associated with rupatadine and other new H1 antihistamines. Five cases were found involving patients treated with rupatadine (13.9% of all reports relating to this drug). In all five cases, the reaction started after exposure and resolved when the drug was discontinued. In two cases, rupatadine was the only medication being taken by the patient,...

  19. Computation of Nonlinear Parameters of Heart Rhythm Using Short Time ECG Segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berik Koichubekov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose the method to compute the nonlinear parameters of heart rhythm (correlation dimension D2 and correlation entropy K2 using 5-minute ECG recordings preferred for screening of population. Conversion of RR intervals’ time series into continuous function x(t allows getting the new time series with different sampling rate dt. It has been shown that for all dt (250, 200, 125, and 100 ms the cross-plots of D2 and K2 against embedding dimension m for phase-space reconstruction start to level off at m=9. The sample size N at different sampling rates varied from 1200 at dt = 250 ms to 3000 at dt = 100 ms. Along with, the D2 and K2 means were not statistically different; that is, the sampling rate did not influence the results. We tested the feasibility of the method in two models: nonlinear heart rhythm dynamics in different states of autonomous nervous system and age-related characteristics of nonlinear parameters. According to the acquired data, the heart rhythm is more complex in childhood and adolescence with more influential parasympathetic influence against the background of elevated activity of sympathetic autonomous nervous system.

  20. Pharmacologic Rhythm Control versus Rate Control in Heart Failure and Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Gladys

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF with atrial fibrillation (AF is correlated with worse prognosis requiring special approach.Rate control has been the first line of treatment in cases of HF and HF. On the other hand, rhythm controlhas been proven to be effective in returning sinus rhythm resulting in better prognosis for patients with HFbut not HF. Its role in cocurring cases of HF and AF is not fully understood. Thus, this study aims to analysewhether pharmacologic rhythm control can be applied to cases of HF and AF to reduce mortality. A searchwas conducted via PubMed, Medline, ProQuest, and Cochrane Database on January 2016. One study wasselected after filtering process by inclusion and exclusion criteria and critical appraisal was performed. It wasfound that there was rhythm control and rate control do no have favouring effect towards mortality shown byRR 1.03 (95% CI 0.90-1.17, p=0.69. Rate control has protective effect towards hospitalizations by RR of 0.92(95% CI 0.86 – 0.98, p=0.008, NNT=19. To conclude, rhythm control is not superior to rate control in reducingmortality and rate control should be still be considered as first line treatment of HF and AF. Keywords: heart failure, pharmacologic rhythm control, rate control, atrial fibrillation   Farmakologis Rhythm Control Dibandingkan dengan Rate Control padaKasus Gagal Jantung dan Atrial Fibrilasi Abstrak Gagal jantung dengan atrial fibrilasi berhubungan dengan prognosis yang lebih buruk dan membutuhkanpenanganan khusus. Saat ini strategi rate control merupakan terapi lini pertama pada kasus gagal jantungdan atrial fibrilasi. Rhythm control memberikan prognosis yang lebih baik pada pasien gagal jantung denganmengembalikan sinus ritme. Kegunaan rhythm control pada kasus gagal jantung dan atrial fibrilasi sampaisaat ini belum sepenuhnya dimengerti. Tujuan studi ini adalah menelaah apakah terapi farmakologis rhythmcontrol dapat menurunkan mortalitas gagal jantung dan atrial fibrilasi. Pencarian data

  1. Heart rate and outcome in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction: Differences between atrial fibrillation and sinus rhythm-A CIBIS II analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Bart A; Damman, Kevin; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Van Gelder, Isabelle C; Rienstra, Michiel

    2017-09-01

    Heart rate has been associated with prognosis in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFREF) and sinus rhythm; whether this also holds true in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is unknown. To evaluate cardiac rhythm and baseline heart rate and the influence of outcome in patients with HFREF enrolled in the Cardiac Insufficiency Bisoprolol Study II. In total, 2539 patients were stratified according to their baseline heart rhythm (AF or sinus rhythm) and into quartiles of heart rate (≤70 bpm, 71-78 bpm, 79-90 bpm, and >90 bpm). The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Mean follow-up was 1.3 years. Mean age was 61 years, mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 28%, and 80% were male. A total of 521 (21%) patients had AF at baseline. The risk associated with all-cause mortality for each 5 bpm increase in heart rate in patients with sinus rhythm (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.06, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-1.11, P = 0.012) was significantly different from those with AF (HR: 1.00, 95% CI: 0.94-1.07, P = 0.90, P for interaction = 0.041). The risk associated with higher heart rate in sinus rhythm was primarily attributable to excess risk in the highest quartile (HR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.18-2.30, P = 0.003). Allocation to bisoprolol did not modify the interaction between heart rate, rhythm and outcome. In HFREF patients with AF, a higher heart rate is not associated with increased event rates in contrast to HFREF patients with sinus rhythm. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Black Holes Are The Rhythm at The Heart of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    The powerful black holes at the center of massive galaxies and galaxy clusters act as hearts to the systems, pumping energy out at regular intervals to regulate the growth of the black holes themselves, as well as star formation, according to new data from NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory. People Who Read This Also Read... Milky Way’s Giant Black Hole Awoke from Slumber 300 Years Ago A New Way To Weigh Giant Black Holes Discovery of Most Recent Supernova in Our Galaxy NASA Unveils Cosmic Images Book in Braille for Blind Readers Scientists from the University of Michigan, the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany, the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and Jacobs University in Germany contributed to the results. The gravitational pull of black holes is so strong that not even light can escape from them. Supermassive black holes with masses of more than a billion suns have been detected at the center of large galaxies. The material falling on the black holes causes sporadic or isolated bursts of energy, by which black holes are capable of influencing the fate of their host galaxies. The insight gained by this new research shows that black holes can pump energy in a gentler and rhythmic fashion, rather then violently. The scientists observed and simulated how the black hole at the center of elliptical galaxy M84 dependably sends bubbles of hot plasma into space, heating up interstellar space. This heat is believed to slow both the formation of new stars and the growth of the black hole itself, helping the galaxy remain stable. Interstellar gases only coalesce into new stars when the gas is cool enough. The heating is more efficient at the sites where it is most needed, the scientists say. Alexis Finoguenov, of UMBC and the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany, compares the central black hole to a heart muscle. "Just like our hearts periodically pump our

  3. Current practices in the monitoring of cardiac rhythm devices in pediatrics and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Stacey L; Silka, Michael J; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv

    2015-04-01

    Although guidelines for routine follow-up of pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are available for adults, minimal data supports their appropriateness in pediatrics and congenital heart disease. This study aimed to define current practices of cardiac rhythm device (CRD) follow-up among pediatric electrophysiologists. Pediatric and Congenital EP Society (PACES) members were surveyed regarding frequency of CRD in-person follow-up as well as transtelephonic monitoring (TTM) and remote monitoring (RM) practices. If home monitoring was used, the effect on in-person follow-up was also evaluated. A total of 106 PACES members responded to the survey. Uncomplicated pacemaker and ICD patients were both followed in-person at a median interval of 6 months (range 1-12 months). TTM was utilized by 67 % of responders (median interval 3 months; range 1-6 months), while RM was used by 87 % for pacemakers (median interval 3 months; range 1-6 months) and 92 % for ICDs (median interval 3 months; range 2 weeks-6 months). When TTM was used, 21 % of responders reduced their frequency of pacemaker clinic visits. In comparison, RM reduced the frequency of clinic visits for pacemakers and ICDs in 32 and 31 % of responders, respectively. Patient age was an independent factor in determining CRD follow-up for 49 % of responders. While CRD follow-up by pediatric electrophysiologists in general follows adult guidelines, individual practices widely vary. In contrast to published recommendations in adults, TTM and RM utilization does not reduce the frequency of in-person visits for the majority of pediatric electrophysiologists.

  4. HEART RHYTHM DISORDERS IN NEW-BORNS AND INFANTS: CLINICAL COURSE AND PERINATAL RISK FACTORS OF ARRHYTHMIAS APPEARANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kovalyov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical course, prognosis and mechanisms of separate forms of heart rhythm disorders in children differ from those in adults. Especially, it refers to new-borns and infants whose conduction system differs by functional and morphologic immaturity. In connection with it, the assessment of natural history of heart rhythm disorders, occurred in a perinatal period, and determination of risk factors of arrhythmia appearance in infants are of some interest. 88 newborns took part in the study. The patients were involved by continuous sampling technique. Risk factors, occurred in a perinatal period and potentially influenced on development of heart rhythm disorders, were assessed. In our study we took biological, gynecologic and obstetric history, data of gestation and delivery course, early and late neonatal period, early infancy, Echo, neurosonography, Holter monitoring with determination of heart rhythm variability, and determined thyroid hormonal status. Maximum specific gravity had extrasystoles – 32.4% – in the structure of idiopathic arrhythmias in infants. Heart rhythm disorders with natural history were kept at six months of life only in 5,4% of children. Persistence of arrhythmias was marked during one year only for WPW syndrome. Heart rhythm disorders are often marked significantly in children whose mothers had acute respiratory disease during the pregnancy, or if the children were born from the first pregnancy, had the signs of central nervous system damage syndromes in an early perinatal period (arrest, intracranial hypertension, convulsive disorder. Disorders of autonomic imbalance of cardiac function and peculiarities of hemodynamics of pulmonary circulation contribute significantly into appearance and persistence of all types of arrhythmias. On the whole, the prognosis of heart rhythm disorders, occurred in the perinatal period, without organic and structural changes of myocardium is favorable. The exclusion can be made for

  5. A marked decrease in heart rate variability associated with junctional rhythm during anesthesia with sevoflurane and fentanyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Y; Asakura, Y; Shibata, Y; Nishiwaki, K; Komatsu, T

    2006-04-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) was investigated using a new technique for time series analysis combining the maximum entropy method and non-linear least squares method -- the 'MemCalc method' -- in patients undergoing general anesthesia with sevoflurane and fentanyl for elective surgery. As the occurrence of junctional rhythm coincided with the measurement of these variables in two patients, we successfully evaluated the entropy, low (LF) and high (HF) frequency component of the HRV during junctional rhythm and found that the occurrence of junctional rhythm is associated with marked decreases in the entropy, LF and HF of HRV. When evaluating autonomic control of the heart using HRV analysis, the decrease in HRV caused by the occurrence of junctional rhythm must be taken into account.

  6. Cryoablation for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Lenarczyk, Radoslaw; Boveda, Serge; Richard Tilz, Roland; Hernandez-Madrid, Antonio; Ptaszynski, Pawel; Pudulis, Janis; Dagres, Nikolaos

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this survey was to assess the current practice in Europe regarding cryoablation for treatment of different cardiac arrhythmias. The data are based on an electronic questionnaire sent to members of the European Heart Rhythm Association Research Network. Responses were received from 49 centres in 18 countries. The results show that cryoablation for supraventricular tachycardia in European centres is an alternative to radiofrequency ablation, which is in accordance with guidelines. There is reasonable consensus regarding clinical results and complications of cryoablation procedure. Some inter-centre variability with respect to patient selection and ablation strategy in cryoablation of atrial fibrillation was demonstrated, underscoring the need for further research.

  7. Value of digoxin in heart failure and sinus rhythm: new features of an old drug?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veldhuisen, D J; de Graeff, P A; Remme, W J; Lie, K I

    1996-10-01

    Digoxin has been a controversial drug since its introduction >200 years ago. Although its efficacy in patients with heart failure and atrial fibrillation is clear, its value in patients with heart failure and sinus rhythm has often been questioned. In the 1980s, reports of some large-scale trials indicated that digoxin, with or without vasodilators or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, reduced signs and symptoms of congestive heart failure and improved exercise tolerance. This beneficial influence was mainly found in patients with more advanced heart failure and dilated ventricles, whereas the effect in those with mild disease appeared to be less pronounced. In the last few years, new data have shown that digoxin may also have clinical value in mild heart failure, either when used in combination with other drugs or when administered alone. As neurohumoral activation has increasingly been recognized to be a contributing factor in the disease progression of chronic heart failure, the modulating effects of digoxin on neurohumoral and autonomic status have received more attention. Also, there is evidence that relatively low doses of digoxin may be at least as effective as higher doses and have a lower incidence of side effects. Further, the recognition that the use of digoxin too early after myocardial infarction may be harmful and the development of other drugs, in particular angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, have obviously changed the place of digoxin in the treatment of chronic heart failure. The large-scale survival trial by the Digitalis Investigators Group (DIG), whose preliminary results have recently been presented, has shown that although digoxin has a neutral effect on total mortality during long-term treatment, it reduces the number of hospital admissions and deaths due to worsening heart failure. The potentially new features of the old drug digoxin are discussed in this review.

  8. Maternal obesity disrupts circadian rhythms of clock and metabolic genes in the offspring heart and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Danfeng; Chen, Siyu; Liu, Mei; Liu, Chang

    2015-06-01

    Early life nutritional adversity is tightly associated with the development of long-term metabolic disorders. Particularly, maternal obesity and high-fat diets cause high risk of obesity in the offspring. Those offspring are also prone to develop hyperinsulinemia, hepatic steatosis and cardiovascular diseases. However, the precise underlying mechanisms leading to these metabolic dysregulation in the offspring remain unclear. On the other hand, disruptions of diurnal circadian rhythms are known to impair metabolic homeostasis in various tissues including the heart and liver. Therefore, we investigated that whether maternal obesity perturbs the circadian expression rhythms of clock, metabolic and inflammatory genes in offspring heart and liver by using RT-qPCR and Western blotting analysis. Offspring from lean and obese dams were examined on postnatal day 17 and 35, when pups were nursed by their mothers or took food independently. On P17, genes examined in the heart either showed anti-phase oscillations (Cpt1b, Pparα, Per2) or had greater oscillation amplitudes (Bmal1, Tnf-α, Il-6). Such phase abnormalities of these genes were improved on P35, while defects in amplitudes still existed. In the liver of 17-day-old pups exposed to maternal obesity, the oscillation amplitudes of most rhythmic genes examined (except Bmal1) were strongly suppressed. On P35, the oscillations of circadian and inflammatory genes became more robust in the liver, while metabolic genes were still kept non-rhythmic. Maternal obesity also had a profound influence in the protein expression levels of examined genes in offspring heart and liver. Our observations indicate that the circadian clock undergoes nutritional programing, which may contribute to the alternations in energy metabolism associated with the development of metabolic disorders in early life and adulthood.

  9. Serial heart rhythm complexity changes in patients with anterior wall ST segment elevation myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Lin, Chen; Lo, Men-Tzung; Lin, Lian-Yu; Wu, Cho-Kai; Chiang, Jiun-Yang; Lee, Jen-Kuang; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Daisy Liu, Li-Yu; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Lin, Yen-Hung; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2017-03-01

    Heart rhythm complexity analysis has been shown to have good prognostic power in patients with cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to analyze serial changes in heart rhythm complexity from the acute to chronic phase of acute myocardial infarction (MI). We prospectively enrolled 27 patients with anterior wall ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and 42 control subjects. In detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), the patients had significantly lower DFAα2 in the acute stage (within 72 hours) and lower DFAα1 at 3 months and 12 months after MI. In multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis, the patients had a lower slope 5 in the acute stage, which then gradually increased during the follow-up period. The areas under the MSE curves for scale 1 to 5 (area 1-5) and 6 to 20 (area 6-20) were lower throughout the chronic stage. Area 6-20 had the greatest discriminatory power to differentiate the post-MI patients (at 1 year) from the controls. In both the net reclassification improvement and integrated discrimination improvement models, MSE parameters significantly improved the discriminatory power of the linear parameters to differentiate the post-MI patients from the controls. In conclusion, the patients with STEMI had serial changes in cardiac complexity.

  10. Evaluation of the prognostic value of electrocardiography parameters and heart rhythm in patients with pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandorski, Dirk; Bogossian, Harilaos; Ecke, Anja; Wiedenroth, Christoph; Gruenig, Ekkehard; Benjamin, Nicola; Arlt, Matthias; Seeger, Werner; Mayer, Eckhard; Ghofrani, Ardeschir; Hoeltgen, Reinhard; Gall, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have analyzed arrhythmias in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) and increased P-wave duration was identified as a risk factor for development of atrial fibrillation (AF). We retrospectively analyzed the incidence of arrhythmias in patients with an initial diagnosis of PH during long-term follow-up and assessed the prognostic value of electrocardiography (ECG) data. Data from 167 patients were analyzed (Dana Point Classification: Group 1: 59 patients, Group 2: 28 patients, Group 3: 39 patients, Group 4: 41 patients). Clinical, 6-min-ute walk distance test, echocardiography and right heart catheterization data were collected, and baseline/follow-up ECGs were analyzed. Baseline ECGs revealed sinus rhythm in 137 patients. Thirteen patients had newly onset AF during follow-up. In 30 patients, baseline ECG showed AF. Patients with baseline AF showed higher atrial diameters and higher right atrial pressure. Patients with P-wave du-ration > 0.11 s had shorter survival. Other ECG parameters (PQ-interval, QRS-width, QT-/ /QTc-interval) were not associated with survival. Mean survival times were 79.4 ± 5.4 months (sinus rhythm), 64.4 ± 12.9 months (baseline AF) and 58.8 ± 8.9 months (newly onset AF during follow-up) (p = 0.565). Atrial fibrillation predict adverse prognosis in patients with PH and a longer P-wave (> 0.11 s) is associated with shorter survival time.

  11. Improvement of Circadian Rhythm of Heart Rate Variability by Eurythmy Therapy Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Seifert

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Impairment of circadian rhythm is associated with various clinical problems. It not only has a negative impact on quality of life but can also be associated with a significantly poorer prognosis. Eurythmy therapy (EYT is an anthroposophic movement therapy aimed at reducing fatigue symptoms and stress levels. Objective. This analysis of healthy subjects was conducted to examine whether the improvement in fatigue symptoms was accompanied by improvements in the circadian rhythm of heart rate variability (HRV. Design. Twenty-three women performed 10 hours of EYT over six weeks. Electrocardiograms (ECGs were recorded before and after the EYT trial. HRV was quantified by parameters of the frequency and time domains and the nonlinear parameters of symbolic dynamics. Results. The day-night contrast with predominance of vagal activity at night becomes more pronounced after the EYT training, and with decreased Ultralow and very low frequencies, the HRV shows evidence of calmer sleep. During the night, the complexity of the HRV is significantly increased indicated by nonlinear parameters. Conclusion. The analysis of the circadian patterns of cardiophysiological parameters before and after EYT shows significant improvements in HRV in terms of greater day-night contrast caused by an increase of vagal activity and calmer and more complex HRV patterns during sleep.

  12. Updated European Heart Rhythm Association practical guide on the use of non-vitamin-K antagonist anticoagulants in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation: Executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidbuchel, Hein; Verhamme, Peter; Alings, Marco; Antz, Matthias; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Hacke, Werner; Oldgren, Jonas; Sinnaeve, Peter; Camm, A John; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2017-07-14

    acute management of coronary interventions, step-down schemes for long-term combined antiplatelet-anticoagulant management in coronary heart disease, management of bleeding, and cardioversion under NOAC therapy. The Updated Guide is available in full in EP Europace (Heidbuchel H, Verhamme P, Alings M, Antz M, Diener HC, Hacke W, Oldgren J, Sinnaeve P, Camm AJ, Kirchhof P, Advisors. Updated European Heart Rhythm Association Practical Guide on the use of non-vitamin K antagonist anticoagulants in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Europace 2015;17:1467-1507), while additional resources can be found at the related ESC/EHRA website (www.NOACforAF.eu). Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Incidence and survival outcome according to heart rhythm during resuscitation attempt in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients with presumed cardiac etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Folke, Fredrik; Hansen, Steen Møller; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Kragholm, Kristian; Gerds, Thomas A; Lippert, Freddy K; Karlsson, Lena; Møller, Sidsel; Køber, Lars; Gislason, Gunnar H; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Wissenberg, Mads

    2017-05-01

    Knowledge about heart rhythm conversion from non-shockable to shockable rhythm during resuscitation attempt after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and following chance of survival is limited and inconsistent. We studied 13,860 patients with presumed cardiac-caused OHCA not witnessed by the emergency medical services from the Danish Cardiac Arrest Register (2005-2012). Patients were stratified according to rhythm: shockable, converted shockable (based on receipt of subsequent defibrillation) and sustained non-shockable rhythm. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify predictors of rhythm conversion and to compute 30-day survival chances. Twenty-five percent of patients who received pre-hospital defibrillation by ambulance personnel were initially found in non-shockable rhythms. Younger age, males, witnessed arrest, shorter response time, and heart disease were significantly associated with conversion to shockable rhythm, while psychiatric- and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were significantly associated with sustained non-shockable rhythm. Compared to sustained non-shockable rhythms, converted shockable rhythms and initial shockable rhythms were significantly associated with increased 30-day survival (Adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.8-3.8; and OR 16.4, 95% CI 12.7-21.2, respectively). From 2005 to 2012, 30-day survival chances increased significantly for all three groups: shockable rhythms, from 16.3% (CI: 14.2%-18.7%) to 35.7% (CI: 32.5%-38.9%); converted rhythms, from 2.1% (CI: 1.6%-2.9%) to 5.8% (CI: 4.4%-7.6%); and sustained non-shockable rhythms, from 0.6% (CI: 0.5%-0.8%) to 1.8% (CI: 1.4%-2.2%). Converting to shockable rhythm during resuscitation attempt was common and associated with nearly a three-fold higher odds of 30-day survival compared to sustained non-shockable rhythms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Effect of change in levels of motor activity and innervation on basic and secondary rhythms of rat heart rate and respiration in ontogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursian, A V; Dmitrieva, L E; Sizonov, V A

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the heart basic rhythm, its rhythmical variations on periodograms, and level of spontaneos motor activity were studied on offspring of white rats from newborn to 3-week age at transition from the state of active wakefulness to narcosis as well as under conditions of blockade of M-cholinoreceptors with atropine. It is shown that the endogenous rhythmical activity can be regulated not only by a change in frequency of basic rhythms, but also by action on all parameters and properties of their rhythmical variations and secondary rhythms. The changes in power of the heart secondary rhythms exceed considerably the frequency oscillations of basic rhythms during blockade of cholinergic innervation or a change in the motor activity level that affects both the basic rhythm circulation and respiration and their variations--secondary rhythms. The atropine blockade of M-cholinoreceptors at the studied ages changes the heart beating rhythm within the limits of 10% of bradicardia in newborns to tachycardia in the 3-week old animals. At the same time, power of the cardiac rhythm secondary oscillations changes several times. These data indicate that the cholinergic mechanisms play the key role in formation of the secondary rhythms and their correlation with motor activity.

  15. Management of malfunctioning and recalled pacemaker and defibrillator leads: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazia Bongiorni, Maria; Dagres, Nikolaos; Estner, Heidi; Pison, Laurent; Todd, Derick; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this survey was to describe the different strategies regarding the management of malfunctioning and recalled pacemaker and defibrillator leads across Europe. A questionnaire has been designed to assess the current practice and physician's approach to the management of leads which are faulty, unnecessary, and/or recalled. Responses to the questionnaire were received from 34 hospitals-members of the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) electrophysiology (EP) research network. The survey involved both very high and low volume implanting centres, with 85% of the responding centres performing lead extraction. The survey provides a panoramic view of operator's decision making in the field of malfunctioning, recalled, and redundant leads and outlines a common point of view on lead abandonment and factors influencing the decision about lead extraction. The main factors strongly influencing the decision making were patient's age (59%), the presence of the damaged leads (44%), and the lead dwelling time (44%). Regarding the lead abandonment, the main concern (61%) was the potential greater difficulty associated with lead extraction in the future. High volume extracting centres showed a greater propensity to removing the malfunctioning or recalled leads compared with low volume or non-extracting centres. This EP Wire survey gives a snapshot of the operators' approaches and options regarding redundant, malfunctioning, and recalled lead management and may form the basis for future prospective research on this topic. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Incidence and survival outcome according to heart rhythm during resuscitation attempt in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients with presumed cardiac etiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Folke, Fredrik; Hansen, Steen Møller

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge about heart rhythm conversion from non-shockable to shockable rhythm during resuscitation attempt after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and following chance of survival is limited and inconsistent. METHODS: We studied 13,860 patients with presumed cardiac-caused OHCA...... not witnessed by the emergency medical services from the Danish Cardiac Arrest Register (2005-2012). Patients were stratified according to rhythm: shockable, converted shockable (based on receipt of subsequent defibrillation) and sustained non-shockable rhythm. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify...... predictors of rhythm conversion and to compute 30-day survival chances. RESULTS: Twenty-five percent of patients who received pre-hospital defibrillation by ambulance personnel were initially found in non-shockable rhythms. Younger age, males, witnessed arrest, shorter response time, and heart disease were...

  17. The effect of the number of consecutive night shifts on diurnal rhythms in cortisol, melatonin and heart rate variability (HRV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Aarrebo; Garde, Anne Helene; Kristiansen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this review is to summarize the current knowledge from field studies on how many consecutive night shifts are required for adaptation of diurnal rhythms in cortisol, melatonin and heart rate variability (HRV) to night work. METHODS: A systematic search of the databases Pub......Med and Web of Science resulted in 18 studies selected for review. RESULTS: Cortisol was measured in five studies, melatonin in 11 studies and HRV in four studies. Diurnal rhythms were assessed by use of several different measures based on three to eight samples per day for cortisol and melatonin and 24-h...... to night work had not occurred after two consecutive night shifts, whereas a small number found evidence for full adaptation after seven consecutive night shifts based on diurnal rhythms in cortisol and melatonin. CONCLUSION: There are methodological differences in the field studies analyzing diurnal...

  18. Heart Rhythm Monitoring in the Constellation Lunar and Launch/Landing EVA Suit: Recommendations from an Expert Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Hamilton, Doug; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Alexander, David

    2009-01-01

    There are currently several physiological monitoring requirements for EVA in the Human-Systems Interface Requirements (HSIR) document. There are questions as to whether the capability to monitor heart rhythm in the lunar surface space suit is a necessary capability for lunar surface operations. Similarly, there are questions as to whether the capability to monitor heart rhythm during a cabin depressurization scenario in the launch/landing space suit is necessary. This presentation seeks to inform space medicine personnel of recommendations made by an expert panel of cardiovascular medicine specialists regarding in-suit ECG heart rhythm monitoring requirements during lunar surface operations. After a review of demographic information and clinical cases and panel discussion, the panel recommended that ECG monitoring capability as a clinical tool was not essential in the lunar space suit; ECG monitoring was not essential in the launch/landing space suit for contingency scenarios; the current hear rate monitoring capability requirement for both launch/landing and lunar space suits should be maintained; lunar vehicles should be required to have ECG monitoring capability with a minimum of 5-lead ECG for IVA medical assessments; and, exercise stress testing for astronaut selection and retention should be changed from the current 85% maximum heart rate limit to maximal, exhaustive 'symptom-limited' testing to maximize diagnostic utility as a screening tool for evaluating the functional capacity of astronauts and their cardiovascular health.

  19. European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure Association Standards for delivering heart failure care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDonagh, Theresa A.; Blue, Lynda; Clark, Andrew L.; Dahlstroem, Ulf; Ekman, Inger; Lainscak, Mitja; McDonald, Kenneth; Ryder, Mary; Stroemberg, Anna; Jaarsma, Tiny

    The management of heart failure (HF) is complex. As a consequence, most cardiology society guidelines now state that HF care should be delivered in a multiprofessional manner. The evidence base for this approach now means that the establishment of HF management programmes is a priority. This

  20. Heart rate is associated with progression of atrial fibrillation, independent of rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmqvist, Fredrik; Kim, Sunghee; Steinberg, Benjamin A; Reiffel, James A; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Gersh, Bernard J; Fonarow, Gregg C; Naccarelli, Gerald V; Chang, Paul; Freeman, James V; Kowey, Peter R; Thomas, Laine; Peterson, Eric D; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2015-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) often progresses from paroxysmal or persistent to more sustained forms, but the rate and predictors of AF progression in clinical practice are not well described. Using the Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of AF, we analysed the incidence and predictors of progression and tested the discrimination and calibration of the HATCH (hypertension, age, TIA/stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure) and CHA₂DS₂VASc scores for identifying AF progression. Among 6235 patients with paroxysmal or persistent AF at baseline, 1479 progressed, during follow-up (median 18 (IQR 12-24) months). These patients were older and had more comorbidities than patients who did not progress (CHADS₂ 2.3±1.3 vs 2.1±1.3, prate control as opposed to a rhythm control strategy (66 vs 56%, pheart rate (72(64-80) vs 68(60-76) bpm, pheart rate (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.79 to 0.89, pheart rate (p=0.71). The HATCH and CHA₂DS₂VASc scores had modest discriminatory power for AF progression (C-indices 0.55 (95% CI 0.53 to 0.58) and 0.55 (95% CI 0.52 to 0.57)). Within 1.5 years, almost a quarter of the patients with paroxysmal or persistent AF progress to a more sustained form. Progression is strongly associated with heart rate, and age. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Effects of garlic (Allium sativum) extract on the heart rate, rhythm and force of contraction in frog: a dose-dependent study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Raj Kumar; Verma, Nar Singh

    2004-06-01

    Garlic juice (dose equivalent to 3.3 g to 33 g garlic) mainly caused bradycardia in frog Rana tigerina. The disturbance in ventricular rhythm was observed prior to than that of atria. Rhythm was specially disturbed at higher doses causing bizarre pattern. Force of contraction of the heart also decreased with higher dose of the garlic extract. The results suggest that garlic extract has some beneficial effect on heart rate modulating the rate, rhythm and force of contraction positively but very high doses may exert non-desirable effects as well.

  2. Updated European Heart Rhythm Association Practical Guide on the use of non-vitamin K antagonist anticoagulants in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidbuchel, Hein; Verhamme, Peter; Alings, Marco; Antz, Matthias; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Hacke, Werner; Oldgren, Jonas; Sinnaeve, Peter; Camm, A John; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2015-10-01

    ; (xiii) cardioversion in a NOAC-treated patient; (xiv) patients presenting with acute stroke while on NOACs; and (xv) NOACs vs. VKAs in AF patients with a malignancy. Additional information and downloads of the text and anticoagulation cards in >16 languages can be found on an European Heart Rhythm Association web site (www.NOACforAF.eu). Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. [The specific nature of vagus influences on the heart rhythm under the action of humoral regulators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchiĭ, O E; Pokrovskiĭ, V M; Sheĭkh-zade, Iu R; Balagurov, E M

    1992-10-01

    Effects of taurin, somatostatin, serotonin and noradrenaline upon the vagal chronotropic action and its components were studied in anesthetised cats. The data obtained suggests the existence of a specific transmitter link for vagal tonic and synchronizing effects upon cardiac rhythm.

  4. Biological rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halberg, F.

    1975-01-01

    An overview is given of basic features of biological rhythms. The classification of periodic behavior of physical and psychological characteristics as circadian, circannual, diurnal, and ultradian is discussed, and the notion of relativistic time as it applies in biology is examined. Special attention is given to circadian rhythms which are dependent on the adrenocortical cycle. The need for adequate understanding of circadian variations in the basic physiological indicators of an individual (heart rate, body temperature, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, etc.) to ensure the effectiveness of prophylactic and therapeutic measures is stressed.

  5. [The daily rhythm of heart attack morbidity and mortality may be influenced by the time of sunrise].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriszbacher, Ildikó; Csoboth, Ildikó; Boncz, Imre; Bódis, József

    2008-11-16

    The morbidity and mortality of a myocardial infarction show characteristic seasonal and diurnal changes that may be influenced by the time of sunrise and the number of hours with daylight during the day. We wish to study whether the time of sunrise and the number of hours with daylight influence the seasonality of heart attack morbidity and mortality, and whether these have an effect on the diurnal rhythm of a heart attack. We have carried out the retrospective analysis of patients received at Hungarian hospitals with the diagnose of an acute heart attack ( n = 32,329) and those deceased due to a heart attack ( n = 5,142) between 2004 and 2005. Data were gained from the data-base of the National Health Insurance Fund according to the International Classification of Diseases. Positive correlation showed between the time of sunrise and both the incidence of an acute myocardial infarction and related mortality ( p heart attack morbidity and mortality, however, other factors are assumed to take a role as well.

  6. Lower Body Weight in Men, an Epidemiological Predictor of Enlarged Left Atrium in Sinus Rhythm Patients with Dilated Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalli, Aurora; Georgievska-Ismail, Ljubica; Musliu, Nebi; Koçinaj, Dardan

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The source of thrombi in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy is not necessarily from the dilated left ventricle. Left atrium (LA) and left atrial appendage (LAA) might be in charge for relatively high rate of systemic embolizations in these patients. The main aim of our study was to identify epidemiological predictors in sinus rhythm patients with dilated heart for LA and LAA dilation and/or dysfunction. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective cross-sectional study conducted from 2009 to 2014 in 101 sinus rhythm patients with dilated heart. We excluded patients with swallowing problems, acute myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation/flutter, severe systolic dysfunction, mechanical valves, oral anticoagulation therapy, and/or patients with a history of stroke/systemic thromboembolic event. Results: Mean patient age was 58.13 ± 12.66 years and 69.3% were men. Hypertension was encountered in 51% of our patients, 56% of them had a history of coronary artery disease, 30% had diabetes, 25% had dyslipidemia, 30% were smokers, whereas 10% were alcoholics. Mean LA dimensions resulted higher than reference values, whereas 86% of our patients had LAA dysfunction. Male gender was an independent predictor for LA diameter dilation (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.765–9.078, P = 0.005), while lower body weight was a predictor for enlargement of LA area (95% CI: 0.044–0.351, P = 0.014) and LA volume (95% CI: 0.160–2.067, P = 0.024). Conclusion: Male patients with dilated cardiomyopathy at sinus rhythm with lower body weight tend to have larger LA and consequently might be at higher risk of developing atrial thrombus and its subsequent consequences. PMID:28465968

  7. A comparative analysis of preprocessing techniques of cardiac event series for the study of heart rhythm variability using simulated signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimarães H.N.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, using noise-free simulated signals, we performed a comparative examination of several preprocessing techniques that are used to transform the cardiac event series in a regularly sampled time series, appropriate for spectral analysis of heart rhythm variability (HRV. First, a group of noise-free simulated point event series, which represents a time series of heartbeats, was generated by an integral pulse frequency modulation model. In order to evaluate the performance of the preprocessing methods, the differences between the spectra of the preprocessed simulated signals and the true spectrum (spectrum of the model input modulating signals were surveyed by visual analysis and by contrasting merit indices. It is desired that estimated spectra match the true spectrum as close as possible, showing a minimum of harmonic components and other artifacts. The merit indices proposed to quantify these mismatches were the leakage rate, defined as a measure of leakage components (located outside some narrow windows centered at frequencies of model input modulating signals with respect to the whole spectral components, and the numbers of leakage components with amplitudes greater than 1%, 5% and 10% of the total spectral components. Our data, obtained from a noise-free simulation, indicate that the utilization of heart rate values instead of heart period values in the derivation of signals representative of heart rhythm results in more accurate spectra. Furthermore, our data support the efficiency of the widely used preprocessing technique based on the convolution of inverse interval function values with a rectangular window, and suggest the preprocessing technique based on a cubic polynomial interpolation of inverse interval function values and succeeding spectral analysis as another efficient and fast method for the analysis of HRV signals

  8. Review of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation Practice guidelines for management of heart failure in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colan, Steven D

    2015-08-01

    In 2004, practice guidelines for the management of heart failure in children by Rosenthal and colleagues were published in conjunction with the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. These guidelines have not been updated or reviewed since that time. In general, there has been considerable controversy as to the utility and purpose of clinical practice guidelines, but there is general recognition that the relentless progress of medicine leads to the progressive irrelevance of clinical practice guidelines that do not undergo periodic review and updating. Paediatrics and paediatric cardiology, in particular, have had comparatively minimal participation in the clinical practice guidelines realm. As a result, most clinical practice guidelines either specifically exclude paediatrics from consideration, as has been the case for the guidelines related to cardiac failure in adults, or else involve clinical practice guidelines committees that include one or two paediatric cardiologists and produce guidelines that cannot reasonably be considered a consensus paediatric opinion. These circumstances raise a legitimate question as to whether the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation paediatric heart failure guidelines should be re-reviewed. The time, effort, and expense involved in producing clinical practice guidelines should be considered before recommending an update to the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation Paediatric Heart Failure guidelines. There are specific areas of rapid change in the evaluation and management of heart failure in children that are undoubtedly worthy of updating. These domains include areas such as use of serum and imaging biomarkers, wearable and implantable monitoring devices, and acute heart failure management and mechanical circulatory support. At the time the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation guidelines were published, echocardiographic tissue Doppler, 3 dimensional

  9. A roadmap to improve the quality of atrial fibrillation management: proceedings from the fifth Atrial Fibrillation Network/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Günter; Bax, Jeroen; Benninger, Gerlinde; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Boriani, Giuseppe; Brandes, Axel; Brown, Helen; Brueckmann, Martina; Calkins, Hugh; Calvert, Melanie; Christoffels, Vincent; Crijns, Harry; Dobrev, Dobromir; Ellinor, Patrick; Fabritz, Larissa; Fetsch, Thomas; Freedman, S Ben; Gerth, Andrea; Goette, Andreas; Guasch, Eduard; Hack, Guido; Haegeli, Laurent; Hatem, Stephane; Haeusler, Karl Georg; Heidbüchel, Hein; Heinrich-Nols, Jutta; Hidden-Lucet, Francoise; Hindricks, Gerd; Juul-Möller, Steen; Kääb, Stefan; Kappenberger, Lukas; Kespohl, Stefanie; Kotecha, Dipak; Lane, Deirdre A; Leute, Angelika; Lewalter, Thorsten; Meyer, Ralf; Mont, Lluis; Münzel, Felix; Nabauer, Michael; Nielsen, Jens C; Oeff, Michael; Oldgren, Jonas; Oto, Ali; Piccini, Jonathan P; Pilmeyer, Art; Potpara, Tatjana; Ravens, Ursula; Reinecke, Holger; Rostock, Thomas; Rustige, Joerg; Savelieva, Irene; Schnabel, Renate; Schotten, Ulrich; Schwichtenberg, Lars; Sinner, Moritz F; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Stoll, Monika; Tavazzi, Luigi; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Tse, Hung Fat; Van Gelder, Isabelle C; Vardas, Panagiotis E; Varpula, Timo; Vincent, Alphons; Werring, David; Willems, Stephan; Ziegler, André; Lip, Gregory Y H; Camm, A John

    2016-01-01

    At least 30 million people worldwide carry a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF), and many more suffer from undiagnosed, subclinical, or 'silent' AF. Atrial fibrillation-related cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, including cardiovascular deaths, heart failure, stroke, and hospitalizations, remain unacceptably high, even when evidence-based therapies such as anticoagulation and rate control are used. Furthermore, it is still necessary to define how best to prevent AF, largely due to a lack of clinical measures that would allow identification of treatable causes of AF in any given patient. Hence, there are important unmet clinical and research needs in the evaluation and management of AF patients. The ensuing needs and opportunities for improving the quality of AF care were discussed during the fifth Atrial Fibrillation Network/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference in Nice, France, on 22 and 23 January 2015. Here, we report the outcome of this conference, with a focus on (i) learning from our 'neighbours' to improve AF care, (ii) patient-centred approaches to AF management, (iii) structured care of AF patients, (iv) improving the quality of AF treatment, and (v) personalization of AF management. This report ends with a list of priorities for research in AF patients. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The role of the Arrhythmia Team, an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to treatment of patients with cardiac arrhythmias: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Stefano; Chen, Jian; Dobreanu, Dan; Madrid, Antonio Hernandez; Tilz, Roland; Dagres, Nikolaos

    2016-04-01

    Management of patients with cardiac arrhythmias is increasingly complex because of continuous technological advance and multifaceted clinical conditions associated with ageing of the population, the presence of co-morbidities and the need for polypharmacy. The aim of this European Heart Rhythm Association Scientific Initiatives Committee survey was to provide an insight into the role of the Arrhythmia Team, an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to management of patients with cardiac arrhythmias. Forty-eight centres from 18 European countries replied to the Web-based questionnaire. The presence of an Arrhythmia Team was reported by 44% of the respondents, whereas 17% were not familiar with this term. Apart from the electrophysiologist, health professionals who should belong to such teams, according to the majority of the respondents, include a clinical cardiologist, a nurse, a cardiac surgeon, a heart failure specialist, a geneticist, and a geriatrician. Its main activity should be dedicated to the management of patients with complex clinical conditions or refractory or inherited forms of arrhythmias. When present, the Arrhythmia Team was considered helpful by 95% of respondents; the majority of centres (79%) agreed that it should be implemented. The Arrhythmia Team seems to be connected to important expectations in the management of cardiac arrhythmias. The efficacy of such an integrated and multidisciplinary approach should be encouraged and tested in clinical practice. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Identification of heart rate-associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hoed, Marcel; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Esko, Tõnu; Brundel, Bianca J J M; Peal, David S; Evans, David M; Nolte, Ilja M; Segrè, Ayellet V; Holm, Hilma; Handsaker, Robert E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Johnson, Toby; Isaacs, Aaron; Yang, Jian; Lundby, Alicia; Zhao, Jing Hua; Kim, Young Jin; Go, Min Jin; Almgren, Peter; Bochud, Murielle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Hadley, David; van der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; den Heijer, Martin; Igl, Wilmar; Jackson, Anne U; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian'an; Kemp, John P; Kristiansson, Kati; Ladenvall, Claes; Lorentzon, Mattias; Montasser, May E; Njajou, Omer T; O'Reilly, Paul F; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; St Pourcain, Beate; Rankinen, Tuomo; Salo, Perttu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Timpson, Nicholas J; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Weihua; Draisma, Harmen H M; Feitosa, Mary F; Kerr, Kathleen F; Lind, Penelope A; Mihailov, Evelin; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Song, Ci; Weedon, Michael N; Xie, Weijia; Yengo, Loic; Absher, Devin; Albert, Christine M; Alonso, Alvaro; Arking, Dan E; de Bakker, Paul I W; Balkau, Beverley; Barlassina, Cristina; Benaglio, Paola; Bis, Joshua C; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Brage, Søren; Chanock, Stephen J; Chines, Peter S; Chung, Mina; Darbar, Dawood; Dina, Christian; Dörr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Felix, Stephan B; Fischer, Krista; Fuchsberger, Christian; de Geus, Eco J C; Goyette, Philippe; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Havulinna, Aki S; Heckbert, Susan R; Hicks, Andrew A; Hofman, Albert; Holewijn, Suzanne; Hoogstra-Berends, Femke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jensen, Majken K; Johansson, Asa; Junttila, Juhani; Kääb, Stefan; Kanon, Bart; Ketkar, Shamika; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W; Kooner, Angrad S; Kors, Jan A; Kumari, Meena; Milani, Lili; Laiho, Päivi; Lakatta, Edward G; Langenberg, Claudia; Leusink, Maarten; Liu, Yongmei; Luben, Robert N; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Lynch, Stacey N; Markus, Marcello R P; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Mateo Leach, Irene; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarroll, Steven A; Medland, Sarah E; Miller, Kathryn A; Montgomery, Grant W; Morrison, Alanna C; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Ong, Ken K; Newman, Anne B; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Rao, Dabeeru C; Ring, Susan M; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Rudan, Diana; Sanna, Serena; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Jaban S; Sharp, Stephen; Shin, Jordan T; Singleton, Andrew B; Smith, Albert V; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D; Stewart, Chip; Stringham, Heather M; Tarasov, Kirill V; Uitterlinden, André G; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Whitfield, John B; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Andrew; Wong, Quenna; Jamshidi, Yalda; Zitting, Paavo; Boer, Jolanda M A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ekelund, Ulf; Forouhi, Nita G; Froguel, Philippe; Hingorani, Aroon; Ingelsson, Erik; Kivimaki, Mika; Kronmal, Richard A; Kuh, Diana; Lind, Lars; Martin, Nicholas G; Oostra, Ben A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Quertermous, Thomas; Rotter, Jerome I; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Verschuren, W M Monique; Walker, Mark; Albanes, Demetrius; Arnar, David O; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Boehnke, Michael; de Boer, Rudolf A; Bouchard, Claude; Caulfield, W L Mark; Chambers, John C; Curhan, Gary; Cusi, Daniele; Eriksson, Johan; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Gilst, Wiek H; Glorioso, Nicola; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Groop, Leif; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Hu, Frank B; Huikuri, Heikki V; Hunter, David J; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kraft, Peter; Iacoviello, Licia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lokki, Marja-Liisa L; Mitchell, Braxton D; Navis, Gerjan; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Poulter, Neil R; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rimm, Eric B; Rioux, John D; Rizzi, Federica; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Sever, Peter S; Shields, Denis C; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Stanton, Alice V; Stolk, Ronald P; Strachan, David P; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tuomilehto, Jaako; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Viikari, Jorma; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Widen, Elisabeth; Cho, Yoon Shin; Olsen, Jesper V; Visscher, Peter M; Willer, Cristen; Franke, Lude; Erdmann, Jeanette; Thompson, John R; Pfeufer, Arne; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Ellinor, Patrick T; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Metspalu, Andres; Perola, Markus; Beckmann, Jacques S; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Wareham, Nicholas J; Munroe, Patricia B; Sibon, Ody C M; Milan, David J; Snieder, Harold; Samani, Nilesh J; Loos, Ruth J F

    2013-06-01

    Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. In a 2-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in up to 181,171 individuals, we identified 14 new loci associated with heart rate and confirmed associations with all 7 previously established loci. Experimental downregulation of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio identified 20 genes at 11 loci that are relevant for heart rate regulation and highlight a role for genes involved in signal transmission, embryonic cardiac development and the pathophysiology of dilated cardiomyopathy, congenital heart failure and/or sudden cardiac death. In addition, genetic susceptibility to increased heart rate is associated with altered cardiac conduction and reduced risk of sick sinus syndrome, and both heart rate-increasing and heart rate-decreasing variants associate with risk of atrial fibrillation. Our findings provide fresh insights into the mechanisms regulating heart rate and identify new therapeutic targets.

  12. Identification of heart rate–associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hoed, Marcel; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Esko, Tõnu; Brundel, Bianca J J M; Peal, David S; Evans, David M; Nolte, Ilja M; Segrè, Ayellet V; Holm, Hilma; Handsaker, Robert E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Johnson, Toby; Isaacs, Aaron; Yang, Jian; Lundby, Alicia; Zhao, Jing Hua; Kim, Young Jin; Go, Min Jin; Almgren, Peter; Bochud, Murielle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Hadley, David; Van Der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Heijer, Martin Den; Igl, Wilmar; Jackson, Anne U; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian’an; Kemp, John P; Kristiansson, Kati; Ladenvall, Claes; Lorentzon, Mattias; Montasser, May E; Njajou, Omer T; O’Reilly, Paul F; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pourcain, Beate St.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Salo, Perttu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Timpson, Nicholas J; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Weihua; Draisma, Harmen H M; Feitosa, Mary F; Kerr, Kathleen F; Lind, Penelope A; Mihailov, Evelin; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Song, Ci; Weedon, Michael N; Xie, Weijia; Yengo, Loic; Absher, Devin; Albert, Christine M; Alonso, Alvaro; Arking, Dan E; de Bakker, Paul I W; Balkau, Beverley; Barlassina, Cristina; Benaglio, Paola; Bis, Joshua C; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Brage, Søren; Chanock, Stephen J; Chines, Peter S; Chung, Mina; Darbar, Dawood; Dina, Christian; Dörr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Felix, Stephan B; Fischer, Krista; Fuchsberger, Christian; de Geus, Eco J C; Goyette, Philippe; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Hartikainen, Anna-liisa; Havulinna, Aki S; Heckbert, Susan R; Hicks, Andrew A; Hofman, Albert; Holewijn, Suzanne; Hoogstra-Berends, Femke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jensen, Majken K; Johansson, Åsa; Junttila, Juhani; Kääb, Stefan; Kanon, Bart; Ketkar, Shamika; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W; Kooner, Angrad S; Kors, Jan A; Kumari, Meena; Milani, Lili; Laiho, Päivi; Lakatta, Edward G; Langenberg, Claudia; Leusink, Maarten; Liu, Yongmei; Luben, Robert N; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Lynch, Stacey N; Markus, Marcello R P; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Leach, Irene Mateo; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarroll, Steven A; Medland, Sarah E; Miller, Kathryn A; Montgomery, Grant W; Morrison, Alanna C; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Ong, Ken K; Newman, Anne B; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Rao, Dabeeru C; Ring, Susan M; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Rudan, Diana; Sanna, Serena; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Jaban S; Sharp, Stephen; Shin, Jordan T; Singleton, Andrew B; Smith, Albert V; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D; Stewart, Chip; Stringham, Heather M; Tarasov, Kirill V; Uitterlinden, André G; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Whitfield, John B; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Andrew; Wong, Quenna; Jamshidi, Yalda; Zitting, Paavo; Boer, Jolanda M A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ekelund, Ulf; Forouhi, Nita G; Froguel, Philippe; Hingorani, Aroon; Ingelsson, Erik; Kivimaki, Mika; Kronmal, Richard A; Kuh, Diana; Lind, Lars; Martin, Nicholas G; Oostra, Ben A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Quertermous, Thomas; Rotter, Jerome I; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Verschuren, W M Monique; Walker, Mark; Albanes, Demetrius; Arnar, David O; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Boehnke, Michael; de Boer, Rudolf A; Bouchard, Claude; Caulfield, W L Mark; Chambers, John C; Curhan, Gary; Cusi, Daniele; Eriksson, Johan; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Gilst, Wiek H; Glorioso, Nicola; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Groop, Leif; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Hu, Frank B; Huikuri, Heikki V; Hunter, David J; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kraft, Peter; Iacoviello, Licia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lokki, Marja-Liisa L; Mitchell, Braxton D; Navis, Gerjan; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Poulter, Neil R; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rimm, Eric B; Rioux, John D; Rizzi, Federica; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Sever, Peter S; Shields, Denis C; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Stanton, Alice V; Stolk, Ronald P; Strachan, David P; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tuomilehto, Jaako; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Viikari, Jorma; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Widen, Elisabeth; Cho, Yoon Shin; Olsen, Jesper V; Visscher, Peter M; Willer, Cristen; Franke, Lude; Erdmann, Jeanette; Thompson, John R; Pfeufer, Arne; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Ellinor, Patrick T; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Metspalu, Andres; Perola, Markus; Beckmann, Jacques S; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Wareham, Nicholas J; Munroe, Patricia B; Sibon, Ody C M; Milan, David J; Snieder, Harold; Samani, Nilesh J; Loos, Ruth J F

    2013-01-01

    Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. In a 2-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in up to 181,171 individuals, we identified 14 new loci associated with heart rate and confirmed associations with all 7 previously established loci. Experimental downregulation of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio identified 20 genes at 11 loci that are relevant for heart rate regulation and highlight a role for genes involved in signal transmission, embryonic cardiac development and the pathophysiology of dilated cardiomyopathy, congenital heart failure and/or sudden cardiac death. In addition, genetic susceptibility to increased heart rate is associated with altered cardiac conduction and reduced risk of sick sinus syndrome, and both heart rate–increasing and heart rate–decreasing variants associate with risk of atrial fibrillation. Our findings provide fresh insights into the mechanisms regulating heart rate and identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:23583979

  13. Impairment of heart rhythm complexity in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy: An assessment with multiscale entropy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongyun; Yang, Zhao; Meng, Fangang; Guan, Yuguang; Ma, Yanshan; Liang, Shuli; Lin, Jiuluan; Pan, Longsheng; Zhao, Mingming; Qu, Wei; Hao, Hongwei; Luan, Guoming; Zhang, Jianguo; Li, Luming

    2017-10-05

    Epilepsy and seizures can have dramatic effects on the cardiac function. The aim of this study was to investigate the heart rhythm complexity in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE). Ambulatory 24-h electrocardiograms (ECG) from 70 DRE patients and 50 healthy control subjects were analyzed using conventional heart rate variability (HRV) and multiscale entropy (MSE) methods The variation of complexity indices (CI), which was calculated from MSE profile, was determined. DRE patients had significantly lower time domain (Mean RR, SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50) and frequency domain (VLF, LF, HF, TP) HRV measurements than healthy controls. Of the MSE analysis, MSE profile, CI including Slope 5, Area 1-5, Area 6-15 and Area 6-20 were significantly lower than those in the healthy control group. In receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, VLF had the greatest discriminatory power for the two groups. In both net reclassification improvement (NRI) model and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) models, CI derived from MSE profiles significantly improved the discriminatory power of Mean RR, SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50, VLF, LF, HF and TP. The heart rate complexity is impaired for DRE patients. CI are useful to discriminate DRE patients from subjects with normal cardiac complexity. These findings indicate that MSE method may serve as a complementary approach for characterizing and understanding abnormal heart rate dynamics in epilepsy. Furthermore, the CI may potentially be used as a biomarker in monitoring epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of simulated microgravity on circadian rhythm of caudal arterial pressure and heart rate in rats and their underlying mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li CHEN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the effects of simulated microgravity on the circadian rhythm of rats' caudal arterial pressure and heart rate, and their underlying mechanism. Methods  Eighteen male SD rats (aged 8 weeks were randomly assigned to control (CON and tail suspension (SUS group (9 each. Rats with tail suspension for 28 days were adopted as the animal model to simulate microgravity. Caudal arterial pressure and heart rate of rats were measured every 3 hours. The circadian difference of abdominal aorta contraction was measured by aortic ring test. Western blotting was performed to determine and compare the protein expression level of clock genes such as Per2 (Period2, Bmal1 (Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocatorlike and dbp (D element binding protein in suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN and abdominal aorta of rats in CON and SUS group at different time points. Results  Compared with CON group, the caudal arterial pressure, both systolic and diastolic pressure, decreased significantly and the diurnal variability disappeared, meanwhile the heart rate increased obviously and also the diurnal variability disappeared in rats of SUS group. Compared with CON group, the contraction reactivity of abdominal aorta decreased with disappearence of the diurnal variability, and also the clock genes expression in SCN and abdominal aorta showed no diurnal variability in rats of SUS group. Conclusion  Simulated microgravity may lead to circadian rhythm disorders in rats' cardiovascular system, which may be associated with the changes of the clock genes expression. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.04.06

  15. The effect of the number of consecutive night shifts on diurnal rhythms in cortisol, melatonin and heart rate variability (HRV): a systematic review of field studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Marie Aarrebo; Garde, Anne Helene; Kristiansen, Jesper; Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the current knowledge from field studies on how many consecutive night shifts are required for adaptation of diurnal rhythms in cortisol, melatonin and heart rate variability (HRV) to night work. A systematic search of the databases PubMed and Web of Science resulted in 18 studies selected for review. Cortisol was measured in five studies, melatonin in 11 studies and HRV in four studies. Diurnal rhythms were assessed by use of several different measures based on three to eight samples per day for cortisol and melatonin and 24-h recordings for HRV. Most of the studies in the review were small studies with less than 30 participants, and most studies evaluated diurnal rhythms after only two consecutive night shifts whereas only six studies used seven or more consecutive night shifts. The majority of studies found that adaptation to night work had not occurred after two consecutive night shifts, whereas a small number found evidence for full adaptation after seven consecutive night shifts based on diurnal rhythms in cortisol and melatonin. There are methodological differences in the field studies analyzing diurnal rhythms and large diversity in the occupational fields studied. Nevertheless, we conclude that diurnal rhythms in cortisol, melatonin and HRV are not adapted to night work after 1-3 consecutive night shifts. Studies are needed to establish how many consecutive night shifts are needed for full adaptation of diurnal rhythms to night work.

  16. Left atrial thrombus formation and resolution during dabigatran therapy: A Japanese Heart Rhythm Society report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Mitamura, MD

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: LA thrombus developed in 4% of patients with AF receiving Dabi. Older patients with a higher CHADS2 score receiving a lower Dabi dosage were more likely to develop LA thrombus, which was resolved with a prolonged or increased dosage. A higher Dabi dosage may be more beneficial before ECV but prospective randomized studies would be needed to confirm these results.

  17. The prognostic significance of heart rate in patients hospitalized for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction in sinus rhythm: insights from the EVEREST (Efficacy of Vasopressin Antagonism in Heart Failure: Outcome Study With Tolvaptan) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Stephen J; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Wilcox, Jane E; Harinstein, Matthew E; Maggioni, Aldo P; Subacius, Haris; Zannad, Faiez; Konstam, Marvin A; Chioncel, Ovidiu; Yancy, Clyde W; Swedberg, Karl; Butler, Javed; Bonow, Robert O; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the relationship between heart rate and post-discharge outcomes in patients with hospitalization for heart failure (HHF) with reduced ejection fraction (EF) in sinus rhythm. A reduction in heart rate improves clinical outcomes in patients with chronic heart failure and in sinus rhythm, but the association between heart rate and post-discharge outcomes in patients with HHF is presently unclear. This post-hoc analysis of the EVEREST (Efficacy of Vasopressin Antagonism in Heart Failure: Outcome Study With Tolvaptan) trial examined 1,947 patients with HHF and EF ≤40% not in atrial fibrillation/flutter or pacemaker dependent. The median follow-up period was 9.9 months. At baseline, patients with a higher heart rate tended to be younger with lower EF and were more likely to have worse New York Heart Association functional class and higher natriuretic peptide levels. After adjustment for clinical risk factors, baseline heart rate was not predictive of all-cause mortality (p ≥ 0.066). However, at ≥70 beats/min, every 5-beat increase in 1-week post-discharge heart rate was independently associated with increased all-cause mortality (hazard ratio: 1.13 [95% confidence interval: 1.05 to 1.22]; p = 0.002). Similarly, every 5-beat increase ≥70 beats/min in 4-week post-discharge heart rate was predictive of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio: 1.12 [95% confidence interval: 1.05 to 1.19]; p = 0.001). In this large cohort of patients with HHF with reduced EF and in sinus rhythm, baseline heart rate did not correlate with all-cause mortality. In contrast, at ≥70 beats/min, higher heart rate in the early post-discharge period was independently predictive of death during subsequent follow-up. Further study of post-discharge heart rate as a potential therapeutic target in this high-risk population is encouraged. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Treatment Failure With Rhythm and Rate Control Strategies in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Congestive Heart Failure: An AF-CHF Substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrda, Katia; Roy, Denis; Leduc, Hugues; Talajic, Mario; Stevenson, Lynne Warner; Guerra, Peter G; Andrade, Jason; Dubuc, Marc; Macle, Laurent; Thibault, Bernard; Rivard, Lena; Khairy, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Rate and rhythm control strategies for atrial fibrillation (AF) are not always effective or well tolerated in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). We assessed reasons for treatment failure, associated characteristics, and effects on survival. A total of 1,376 patients enrolled in the AF-CHF trial were followed for 37  ±  19 months, 206 (15.0%) of whom failed initial therapy leading to crossover. Rhythm control was abandoned more frequently than rate control (21.0% vs. 9.1%, P CHF. The most common reasons for treatment failure are inefficacy for rhythm control and worsening heart failure for rate control. Changing strategies does not impact survival. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The importance of sleep apnea index determination using 24h ECG analysis in patients with heart rhythm disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grdinić Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. A possible cause of malignant heart rhythm disorders is the syndrome of sleep apnea (periodic cessation of breathing during sleep longer than 10 seconds. Recent 24h ECG software systems have the option of determination ECG apnea index (AI based on the change in voltage of QRS complexes. The aim of the study was to determine the significance of AI evaluation in routine 24-hour Holter ECG on a group of 12 patients. Methods. We presented a total of 12 consecutive patients with previously documented arrhythmias and the history of breathing disorders during night. They were analyzed by 24 h ECG (Medilog AR 12 plus Darwin, that is able to determine AI. Results. We presented a case series of 12 patients, 8 men and 4 women, mean age 58.75 years and the average AI 5.78. In the whole group there was a trend of increasing prevalence of complex rhythm disorders with increasing of AI and increased frequency of arrhythmias in the night phase vs day phase. Conclusion. Determination of AI using routine long term (24 h ECG analysis is important because sleep apnea can be successfully treated as an etiological or contributing factor of arrhythmias.

  20. Updated European Heart Rhythm Association Practical Guide on the use of non-vitamin K antagonist anticoagulants in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heidbuchel, Hein; Verhamme, Peter; Alings, Marco; Antz, Matthias; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Hacke, Werner; Oldgren, Jonas; Sinnaeve, Peter; Camm, A John; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2015-01-01

    ...[Heidbuchel H, Verhamme P, Alings M, Antz M, Hacke W, Oldgren J, et al. European Heart Rhythm Association Practical Guide on the use of new oral anticoagulants in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Europace 2013;15:625-51...

  1. Identification of heart rate-associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hoed, M.A.H.; Eijgelsheim, M.; Esko, T.; Brundel, B.J.; Peal, D.S.; Evans, D.M.; Nolte, I.M.; Segrè, A.V.; Holm, H.; Handsaker, R.E.; Westra, H.J.; Johnson, T.; Isaacs, A.; Yang, L.; Lundby, A.; Zhao, J.H.; Kim, Y.J.; Go, M.J.; Almgren, P.; Bochud, M.; Boucher, G.; Cornelis, M.C.; Gudbjartsson, D.F.; Hadley, D.; van der Harst, P.; Hayward, C.; den Heijer, M.; Igl, W.; Jackson, A.U.; Kutalik, Z.; Luan, J.; Kemp, J.P.; Kristiansson, K.; Ladenvall, C.; Lorentzon, M.; Montasser, M.E.; Njajou, O.T.; O'Reilly, P.F.; Padmanabhan, S.; St Pourcain, B.; Rankinen, T.; Salo, P.; Tanaka, T.; Timpson, N.J.; Vitart, V.; Waite, L.; Wheeler, W.; Zhang, W.; Draisma, H.H.M.; Feitosa, M.F.; Kerr, K.F.; Lind, P.A.; Mihailov, E.; Onland-Moret, N.C.; Song, C.; Weedon, M.N.; Xie, W.; Yengo, L.; Absher, D.; Albert, C.M.; Alonso, A.; Arking, D.E.; de Bakker, P.I.; Balkau, B.; Barlassina, C.; Benaglio, P.; Bis, J.C.; Bouatia-Naji, N.; Brage, S.; Chanock, S.J.; Chines, P.S.; Chung, M.; Darbar, D.; Dina, C.; Dörr, M.; Elliott, P.; Felix, S.B.; Fischer, K.; Fuchsberger, C.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Goyette, P.; Gudnason, V.; Harris, T.B.; Hartikainen, A.L.; Havulinna, A.S.; Heckbert, S.R.; Hicks, A.A.; Hofman, A.; Holewijn, S.; Hoogstra-Berends, F.; Hottenga, J.J.; Jensen, M.K.; Johansson, A.; Junttila, J.; Kääb, S.; Kanon, B.; Ketkar, S.; Khaw, K.T.; Knowles, J.W.; Kooner, A.S.; Kors, J.A.; Kumari, M.; Milani, L.; Laiho, P.; Lakatta, E.G.; Langenberg, C.; Leusink, M.; Liu, Y.; Luben, R.N.; Lunetta, K.L.; Lynch, S.N.; Markus, M.R.; Marques-Vidal, P.; Mateo Leach, I.; McArdle, W.L.; McCarroll, S.A.; Medland, S.E.; Miller, K.A.; Montgomery, G.W.; Morrison, A.C.; Müller-Nurasyid, M.; Navarro, P.; Nelis, M.; O'Connell, J.R.; O'Donnell, C.J.; Ong, K.K.; Newman, A.B.; Peters, A.; Polasek, O.; Pouta, A.; Pramstaller, P.P.; Psaty, B.M.; Rao, D.C.; Ring, S.M.; Rossin, E.J.; Rudan, D.; Sanna, S.; Scott, R.A.; Sehmi, J.S.; Sharp, S.; Shin, J.T.; Singleton, A.B.; Smith, A.V.; Soranzo, N.; Spector, T.D.; Stewart, C.; Stringham, H.M.; Tarasov, K.V.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Vandenput, L.; Hwang, S.J.; Whitfield, J.B.; Wijmenga, C.; Wild, S.H.; Willemsen, G.; Wilson, J.F.; Witteman, J.C.; Wong, A.; Wong, Q.; Jamshidi, Y.; Zitting, P.; Boer, J.M.; Boomsma, D.I.; Borecki, I.B.; van Duijn, C.M.; Ekelund, U.; Forouhi, N.G.; Froguel, P.; Hingorani, A.D.; Ingelsson, E.; Kivimaki, M.; Kronmal, R.A.; Kuh, D; Lind, L.; Martin, N.G.; Oostra, B.A.; Pedersen, N.L.; Quertermous, T.; Rotter, J.I.; van der Schouw, Y.T.; Verschuren, W.M.; Walker, M.; Albanes, D.; Arnar, D.O.; Assimes, T.L.; Bandinelli, S.; Boehnke, M.; de Boer, R.A.; Bouchard, C.; Caulfield, W.L.; Chambers, J.C.; Curhan, G.; Cusi, D.; Eriksson, J.; Ferrucci, L.; van Gilst, W.H.; Glorioso, N.; de Graaf, J.; Groop, L.; Gyllensten, U.; Hsueh, W.C.; Hu, F.B.; Huikuri, H.V.; Hunter, D.J.; Iribarren, C.; Isomaa, B.; Järvelin, M.R.; Jula, A.; Kähönen, M.; Kiemeney, L.A.; van der Klauw, M.M.; Kooner, J.S.; Kraft, P.; Iacoviello, L.; Lehtimäki, T.; Lokki, M.L.; Mitchell, B.D.; Navis, G.; Nieminen, M.S.; Ohlsson, C.; Poulter, N.R.; Qi, L.; Raitakari, O.T.; Rimm, E.B.; Rioux, J.D.; Rizzi, F.; Rudan, I.; Salomaa, V.; Sever, P.S.; Shields, D.C.; Shuldiner, A.R.; Sinisalo, J.; Stanton, A.V.; Stolk, R.P.; Strachan, D.P.; Tardif, J.C.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Tuomilehto, J.; van Veldhuisen, D.J.; Virtamo, J.; Viikari, J.; Vollenweider, P.; Waeber, G.; Widen, E.; Cho, Y.S.; Olsen, J.V.; Visscher, P.M.; Willer, C.J.; Franke, L; Erdmann, J.; Thompson, J.R.; Pfeufer, A.; Sotoodehnia, N.; Newton-Cheh, C.; Ellinor, P.T.; Stricker, B.H.C.; Metspalu, A.; Perola, M.; Beckmann, J.S.; Smith, G.D.; Stefansson, K.; Wareham, N.J.; Munroe, P.B.; Sibon, O.C.M.; Milan, D.J.; Snieder, H.; Samani, N.J.; Loos, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. In a 2-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in up to 181,171 individuals, we identified 14 new loci associated with heart rate and confirmed associations with all 7 previously

  2. Identification of heart rate-associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    den Hoed, Marcel; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Esko, Tõnu

    2013-01-01

    Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. In a 2-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in up to 181,171 individuals, we identified 14 new loci associated with heart rate and confirmed associations with all 7 previously es...

  3. Identification of heart rate-associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hoed, Marcel; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Esko, Tonu; Brundel, Bianca J. J. M.; Peal, David S.; Evans, David M.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Segre, Ayellet V.; Holm, Hilma; Handsaker, Robert E.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Johnson, Toby; Isaacs, Aaron; Yang, Jian; Lundby, Alicia; Zhao, Jing Hua; Kim, Young Jin; Go, Min Jin; Almgren, Peter; Bochud, Murielle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Hadley, David; van der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; den Heijer, Martin; Igl, Wilmar; Jackson, Anne U.; Kutalik, Zoltan; Luan, Jian'an; Kemp, John P.; Kristiansson, Kati; Ladenvall, Claes; Lorentzon, Mattias; Montasser, May E.; Njajou, Omer T.; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pourcain, Beate St.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Salo, Perttu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Weihua; Draisma, Harmen H. M.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Lind, Penelope A.; Mihailov, Evelin; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Song, Ci; Weedon, Michael N.; Xie, Weijia; Yengo, Loic; Absher, Devin; Albert, Christine M.; Alonso, Alvaro; Arking, Dan E.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Balkau, Beverley; Barlassina, Cristina; Benaglio, Paola; Bis, Joshua C.; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Brage, Soren; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chines, Peter S.; Chung, Mina; Darbar, Dawood; Dina, Christian; Doerr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Felix, Stephan B.; Fischer, Krista; Fuchsberger, Christian; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Goyette, Philippe; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Havulinna, Aki S.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hofman, Albert; Holewijn, Suzanne; Hoogstra-Berends, Femke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jensen, Majken K.; Johansson, Asa; Junttila, Juhani; Kaeaeb, Stefan; Kanon, Bart; Ketkar, Shamika; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kooner, Angrad S.; Kors, Jan A.; Kumari, Meena; Milani, Lili; Laiho, Paeivi; Lakatta, Edward G.; Langenberg, Claudia; Leusink, Maarten; Liu, Yongmei; Luben, Robert N.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Lynch, Stacey N.; Markus, Marcello R. P.; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Mateo Leach, Irene; McArdle, Wendy L.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Medland, Sarah E.; Miller, Kathryn A.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Ong, Ken K.; Newman, Anne B.; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Ring, Susan M.; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Rudan, Diana; Sanna, Serena; Scott, Robert A.; Sehmi, Jaban S.; Sharp, Stephen; Shin, Jordan T.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Smith, Albert V.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D.; Stewart, Chip; Stringham, Heather M.; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Whitfield, John B.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Wong, Andrew; Wong, Quenna; Jamshidi, Yalda; Zitting, Paavo; Boer, Jolanda M. A.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Ekelund, Ulf; Forouhi, Nita G.; Froguel, Philippe; Hingorani, Aroon; Ingelsson, Erik; Kivimaki, Mika; Kronmal, Richard A.; Kuh, Diana; Lind, Lars; Martin, Nicholas G.; Oostra, Ben A.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rotter, Jerome I.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Walker, Mark; Albanes, Demetrius; Arnar, David O.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Boehnke, Michael; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Bouchard, Claude; Caulfield, W. L. Mark; Chambers, John C.; Curhan, Gary; Cusi, Daniele; Eriksson, Johan; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Glorioso, Nicola; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Groop, Leif; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Hu, Frank B.; Huikuri, Heikki V.; Hunter, David J.; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kahonen, Mika; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; van der Klauw, Melanie M.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kraft, Peter; Iacoviello, Licia; Lehtimaki, Terho; Lokki, Marja-Liisa L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Navis, Gerjan; Nieminen, Markku S.; Ohlsson, Claes; Poulter, Neil R.; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rimm, Eric B.; Rioux, John D.; Rizzi, Federica; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Sever, Peter S.; Shields, Denis C.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sinisalo, Juha; Stanton, Alice V.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Strachan, David P.; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tuomilehto, Jaako; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Viikari, Jorma; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Widen, Elisabeth; Cho, Yoon Shin; Olsen, Jesper V.; Visscher, Peter M.; Willer, Cristen; Franke, Lude; Erdmann, Jeanette; Thompson, John R.; Pfeufer, Arne; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Stricker, Bruno H. Ch; Metspalu, Andres; Perola, Markus; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Sibon, Ody C. M.; Milan, David J.; Snieder, Harold; Samani, Nilesh J.; Loos, Ruth J. F.

    Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. In a 2-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in up to 181,171 individuals, we identified 14 new loci associated with heart rate and confirmed associations with all 7 previously

  4. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database Mortality Risk Model: Part 1-Statistical Methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Brien, Sean M; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Pasquali, Sara K; Gaynor, J William; Karamlou, Tara; Welke, Karl F; Filardo, Giovanni; Han, Jane M; Kim, Sunghee; Shahian, David M; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2015-01-01

    ... after congenital cardiac operations. Included were patients of all ages undergoing cardiac operations, with or without cardiopulmonary bypass, at centers participating in The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Data...

  5. [Effect of the hypothalamus on the diurnal rhythm of heart rate in the Rana temporaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmanova, I G; Belich, A I; Shilling, N V

    1983-01-01

    Computer treatment of the continuous row of R-R intervals of the ECG revealed the general pattern and masked periodicity of the diurnal dynamics of the heart rate in the frog Rana temporaria. It was found that in day time intact frogs exhibit tonic decrease of the heart rate with a maximum at about 12 a.m. At night, there is a tendency to tachycardia with a maximum at about 4 a.m. This periodicity of the heart rate is monitored mainly by the anterior and posterior hypothalamus.

  6. Society for Research on Biological Rhythms (1st) Held on May 11-14, 1988 in Charleston, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-10

    INHIBITORS AFFECT THE CIRCA- Joseph Takahashi. Northwestern University DIAN RHYTHM IN FIRING RATE OF SUPRACHIAS- MATIC NUCLEUS (SCN) NEURONS IN VITRO. S. 11...NY 12866 and Marilyn Y. McGinnis Department of Anatomy,Mount Sinai School of Medicine CUNY , New York, NY Bilateral olfactory bulbectomy in SWR mice

  7. Detection of heart rate and rhythm with a smartphone-based electrocardiograph versus a reference standard electrocardiograph in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Marc S; Gelzer, Anna R; Rishniw, Mark

    2016-07-15

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the diagnostic utility of ECGs acquired with a smartphone-based device, compared with reference 6-lead ECGs, for identification of heart rate and rhythm in dogs and cats. DESIGN Prospective study. ANIMALS 51 client-owned dogs and 27 client-owned cats. PROCEDURES Patients examined by a small animal referral cardiology service between April 2012 and January 2013 were enrolled consecutively. In each patient, a 30-second ECG was simultaneously acquired with a smartphone-based device (a bipolar, single-lead recorder coupled to a smartphone with an ECG application) and a standard 6-lead ECG machine. Recordings were evaluated by 3 board-certified cardiologists, and intra- and interobserver agreement were evaluated for both rhythm diagnosis and QRS polarity identification. RESULTS Values for instantaneous and mean heart rates for the smartphone-acquired and reference ECGs were within 1 beat of each other when mean heart rates were calculated. Intraobserver agreement for rhythm assessment was very high, with maximum disagreement for any observer for only 2 of 51 dogs and only 4 of 27 cats. There was minimal disagreement in the polarity of depolarization between the smartphone-acquired and reference ECGs in dogs but frequent disagreement in cats. Interobserver agreement for smartphone-acquired ECGs was similar to that for reference ECGs. with all 3 observers agreeing on the rhythm analysis and minimal disagreement on polarity. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that ECGs acquired with the smartphone-based device accurately identified heart rate and rhythm in dogs and cats. Thus, the device may allow veterinarians to evaluate and manage cardiac arrhythmias relatively inexpensively at the cage side and could also allow clinicians to rapidly share information via email for further consultation, potentially enhancing patient care.

  8. Activity, sleep and ambient light have a different impact on circadian blood pressure, heart rate and body temperature rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubin, D G; Weinert, D; Rybina, S V; Danilova, L A; Solovieva, S V; Durov, A M; Prokopiev, N Y; Ushakov, P A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of endogenous and exogenous factors for the expression of the daily rhythms of body temperature (BT), blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). One hundred and seventy-three young adults (YA), 17-24 years old (y.o.), of both genders were studied under a modified constant-routine (CR) protocol for 26 h. Participants were assigned randomly to groups with different lighting regimens: CR-LD, n = 77, lights (>400 l×) on from 09:00 to 17:00 h and off (400 l×) during the whole experimental session; CR-DD, n = 15, constant dim light (rise. Besides, it had a prominent arousal effect on SBP both in the former light and dark phases, a moderate effect on DBP and no effect on HR. Darkness induced decline in BT. BP values were decreased during the former light time. No effects on HR were found. Altogether, the results of the present paper show that BT, BP and HR are affected by exogenous factors differently. Moreover, the effect was gender-specific. Especially, the response of BT and BP to ambient light was evident only in females. We suppose that the distinct, gender-specific responses of SBP, DBP and HR to activity, sleep and ambient light do reflect fundamental differences in the circadian control of various cardiovascular functions. Furthermore, the presented data are important for the elaboration of updated reference standards, the interpretation of rhythm disorders and for personalized chronotherapeutic approaches to prevent adverse cardiovascular events more effectively.

  9. Organization of heart failure management in European Society of Cardiology member countries: survey of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology in collaboration with the Heart Failure National Societies/Working Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferovic, Petar M; Stoerk, Stefan; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Mareev, Viacheslav; Kavoliuniene, Ausra; Ristic, Arsen D; Ponikowski, Piotr; McMurray, John; Maggioni, Aldo; Ruschitzka, Frank; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Coats, Andrew; Piepoli, Massimo; McDonagh, Theresa; Riley, Jillian; Hoes, Arno; Pieske, Burkert; Dobric, Milan; Papp, Zoltan; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Parissis, John; Ben Gal, Tuvia; Vinereanu, Dragos; Brito, Dulce; Altenberger, Johann; Gatzov, Plamen; Milinkovic, Ivan; Hradec, Jaromír; Trochu, Jean-Noel; Amir, Offer; Moura, Brenda; Lainscak, Mitja; Comin, Josep; Wikström, Gerhard; Anker, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this document was to obtain a real-life contemporary analysis of the demographics and heart failure (HF) statistics, as well as the organization and major activities of the Heart Failure National Societies (HFNS) in European Society of Cardiology (ESC) member countries. Data from 33 countries were collected from HFNS presidents/representatives during the first Heart Failure Association HFNS Summit (Belgrade, Serbia, 29 October 2011). Data on incidence and/or prevalence of HF were available for 22 countries, and the prevalence of HF ranged between 1% and 3%. In five European and one non-European ESC country, heart transplantation was reported as not available. Natriuretic peptides and echocardiography are routinely applied in the management of acute HF in the median of 80% and 90% of centres, respectively. Eastern European and Mediterranean countries have lower availability of natriuretic peptide testing for acute HF patients, compared with other European countries. Almost all countries have organizations dealing specifically with HF. HFNS societies for HF patients exist in only 12, while in 16 countries HF patient education programmes are active. Most HFNS reported that no national HF registry exists in their country. Fifteen HFNS produced national HF guidelines, while 19 have translated the ESC HF guidelines. Most HFNS (n = 23) participated in the organization of the European HF Awareness Day. This document demonstrated significant heterogeneity in the organization of HF management, and activities of the national HF working groups/associations. High availability of natriuretic peptide and echocardiographic measurements was revealed, with differences between developed countries and countries in transition.

  10. Activation and repolarization patterns in the ventricular epicardium under sinus rhythm in frog and rabbit hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarov, Jan E; Shmakov, Dmitry N; Vityazev, Vladimir A; Roshchevskaya, Irina M; Roshchevsky, Mikhail P

    2007-03-01

    Our study compared the contributions of activation sequence and local repolarization durations distribution in the organization of epicardial repolarization in animals with fast (rabbit) and slow (frog) myocardial activation under sinus rhythm. Activation times, repolarization times and activation-recovery intervals (ARI) were obtained from ventricular epicardial unipolar electrograms recorded in 13 Chinchilla rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and 10 frogs (Rana temporaria). In frogs, depolarization travels from the atrioventricular ring radially. ARIs increased progressively from the apex to the middle portion and finally to the base (502+/-75, 557+/-73, 606+/-79 ms, respectively; Pfrogs (17+/-3 vs. 44+/-18 ms; P<0.001). ARI durations were 120+/-37, 143+/-45, and 163+/-40 ms in the left ventricular apex, left, and right ventricular bases, respectively (P<0.05). In both species, repolarization sequence was directed from apex to base according to the ARI distribution with dispersion of repolarization being higher than that of activation (P<0.001). Thus, excitation spread sequence and velocity per se do not play a crucial role in the formation of ventricular epicardial repolarization pattern, but the chief factor governing repolarization sequences is the distribution of local repolarization durations.

  11. Animal care practices in experiments on biological rhythms and sleep: report of the Joint Task Force of the Society for Research on Biological Rhythms and the Sleep Research Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittman, Eric L; Kilduff, Thomas S; Kriegsfeld, Lance J; Szymusiak, Ronald; Toth, Linda A; Turek, Fred W

    2013-07-01

    Many physiological and molecular processes are strongly rhythmic and profoundly influenced by sleep. The continuing effort of biological, medical, and veterinary science to understand the temporal organization of cellular, physiological, behavioral and cognitive function holds great promise for the improvement of the welfare of animals and human beings. As a result, attending veterinarians and IACUC are often charged with the responsibility of evaluating experiments on such rhythms or the effects of sleep (or its deprivation) in vertebrate animals. To produce interpretable data, animals used in such research must often be maintained in carefully controlled (often constant) conditions with minimal disruption. The lighting environment must be strictly controlled, frequent changes of cages and bedding are undesirable, and daily visual checks are often not possible. Thus deviations from the standard housing procedures specified in the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals are often necessary. This report reviews requirements for experiments on biological rhythms and sleep and discusses how scientific considerations can be reconciled with the recommendations of the Guide.

  12. An exploration of heart rate response to differing music rhythm and tempos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ariany G; Guida, Heraldo L; Antônio, Ana Márcia Dos S; Marcomini, Renata S; Fontes, Anne M G G; Carlos de Abreu, Luiz; Roque, Adriano L; Silva, Sidney B; Raimundo, Rodrigo D; Ferreira, Celso; Valenti, Vitor E

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate acute cardiac response and heart rate variability (HRV) when listening to differing forms of music. Eleven healthy men aged between 18 and 25 years old were included in the study. HRV was recorded at rest for ten minutes with no music, then were asked to listen to classical baroque or heavy metal music for a period of 20 min. It was noted that heart rate variability did not affect HRV indices for time and frequency. In conclusion, music with different tempos does not influence cardiac autonomic regulation in men. However more studies are suggested to explore this topic in greater detail. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fibromyalgia beyond reductionism. Heart rhythm fractal analysis to assess autonomic nervous system resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerma, C; Martinez-Martinez, L-A; Ruiz, N; Vargas, A; Infante, O; Martinez-Lavin, M

    2016-01-01

    The prevailing linear reductionist medical model seems unable to explain complex multisymptomatic illnesses such as fibromyalgia (FM) and similar maladies. Paradigms derived from the complexity theory may provide a coherent framework for these elusive illnesses. Along these lines is the proposal that FM represents a degradation of our main complex adaptive system (the autonomic nervous system, ANS), in a failed effort to adjust to a hostile environment. Healthy complex systems have fractal structures. Heart rate fractal-like variability reflects resilient ANS performance. Our aim was to measure the heart rate variability (HRV) fractal scaling index in FM patients and to correlate this index with clinical symptoms. We studied 30 women with FM and 30 controls. All participants filled out questionnaires assessing the severity of FM. The HRV fractal scaling index was estimated during 24 h using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The fractal scaling index alpha-1 was higher in FM patients than in controls (mean ± sd: 1.22 ± 0.10 vs. 1.16 ± 0.09; p = 0.031). There was a positive correlation between the fractal scaling index alpha-1 and the visual analogue scale (VAS) for depression (Spearman's ρ = 0.36, p = 0.04). The heart rate fractal exponent alpha-1 is altered in FM patients, suggesting a rigid ANS performance. This tangible non-linear finding supports the notion that FM may represent a degradation of our main complex adaptive system, namely the ANS.

  14. Cardiac Rhythm Monitoring After Acute Decompensation for Heart Failure: Results from the CARRYING ON for HF Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanoli, Emilio; Mortara, Andrea; Diotallevi, Paolo; Gallone, Giuseppe; Mariconti, Barbara; Gronda, Edoardo; Gentili, Alessandra; Bisetti, Silvia; Botto, Giovanni Luca

    2016-04-26

    There's scarce evidence about cardiovascular events (CV) in patients with hospitalization for acute heart failure (HF) and no indication for immediate device implant. The CARdiac RhYthm monitorING after acute decompensatiON for Heart Failure study was designed to assess the incidence of prespecified clinical and arrhythmic events in this patient population. In this pilot study, 18 patients (12 (67%) male; age 72±10; 16 (89%) NYHA II-III), who were hospitalized for HF with low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (<40%) and no immediate indication for device implant received an implantable loop recorder (ILR) before hospital discharge. Follow-up visits were scheduled at 3 and 6 months, and at every 6 months until study closure; device data were remotely reviewed monthly. CV mortality, unplanned CV hospitalization, and major arrhythmic events during follow-up were analyzed. During a median follow-up of 593 days, major CV occurred in 13 patients (72%); of those, 7 patients had at least 1 cardiac arrhythmic event, 2 had at least a clinical event (CV hospitalization or CV death), and 4 had both an arrhythmic and a CV event. Six (33%) patients experienced 10 major clinical events, 5 of them (50%) were HF related. During follow-up, 2 (11%) patients died due to a CV cause and 3 (16%) patients received a permanent cardiac device. After an acute HF hospitalization, patients with LVEF<40% and who are not readily eligible for permanent cardiac device implant have a known high incidence of major CV event. In these patients, ILR allows early detection of major cardiac arrhythmias and the ability to react appropriately in a timely manner. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01216670; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01216670.

  15. Should digoxin be proscribed in elderly subjects in sinus rhythm free from heart failure? A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casiglia, E; Tikhonoff, V; Pizziol, A; Onesto, C; Ginocchio, G; Mazza, A; Pessina, A C

    1998-09-01

    Increased mortality in digoxin-treated subjects has been demonstrated in patients with recent myocardial infarction. Those with congestive heart failure (CHF) due to causes other than myocardial infarction seem to be free from this effect. No information is currently available concerning mortality in elderly people who are frequently prescribed digitalis even in the absence of CHF. The aim of this study was to investigate whether subjects improperly receiving digoxin were worse off than those not receiving this drug. This analysis is a part of CASTEL, a population-based prospective study that has enrolled a cohort of 2,254 subjects aged > or = 65 years. CHF was diagnosed in 187 subjects and atrial fibrillation (AF) in 90. The remaining 1,977 were free from CHF and in sinus rhythm, but 447 were treated with digitalis. Cumulative mortality and morbid events by digitalis treatment were calculated in all these categories. Among subjects free from CHF and AF (improper use), all-cause and cardiovascular mortality was significantly higher among those taking digitalis than in those who did not. Non-fatal events including CHF were also more apparent in the former than in the latter. Cox analysis confirmed digitalis as a predictor of mortality in these subjects. No effect of digitalis on survival was found in patients with CHF or AF (proper use). In elderly subjects without atrial fibrillation or CHF, the use of digitalis worsens morbidity and mortality.

  16. The World Society for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery: its mission and history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchervenkov, Christo I; Stellin, Giovanni; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Mavroudis, Constantine; Bernier, Pierre-Luc; Maruszewski, Bohdan; Kreutzer, Christian; Cicek, Sertac; Kinsley, Robin H; Nunn, Graham R; Jonas, Richard A

    2009-01-01

    The World Society for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery (WSPCHS) was established in 2006 to assemble pediatric and congenital heart surgeons from all continents and regions of the world and their colleagues from related specialties dealing with pediatric and congenital heart disease. Since its birth, it has held a highly successful inaugural scientific meeting in 2007 in Washington, DC, and a World Summit on Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery Services, Education, and Cardiac Care for Children and Adults with Congenital Heart Disease in 2008 in Montreal. It currently has 549 members from 71 countries and in a short period of time has become the largest organization in the world of pediatric and congenital heart surgeons. Its brief history already seems to be a guarantee of a promising future. Projects in the areas of research, training and education, patient care, and community service will allow the Society to reach its goals. By bringing together professionals from every region of the world, the WSPCHS should play a significant role in the improvement of care for children and adults with congenital heart disease around the world.

  17. Approach to cardio-oncologic patients with special focus on patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices planned for radiotherapy: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenarczyk, Radoslaw; Potpara, Tatjana S; Haugaa, Kristina H; Deharo, Jean-Claude; Hernandez-Madrid, Antonio; Del Carmen Exposito Pineda, Maria; Kiliszek, Marek; Dagres, Nikolaos

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to evaluate clinical practice regarding cardio-oncologic patients, with special focus on patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) planned for anticancer radiotherapy (RT), among members of the EHRA electrophysiology research network. Of the 36 responding centres, 89% managed patients who were diagnosed or treated oncologically, and this diagnosis affected 1-5% of cardiovascular patients in majority of centres (57%). The main side effects of anticancer therapy in patients treated by cardiologists were thromboembolic complications and left ventricular dysfunction (both reported as 'frequent' by 43% of the centres). The main agents associated with complications were anthracyclines, RT, and monoclonal antibodies. Echocardiography was the most common method of screening for cardiovascular complications (93%), and 10% of the centres did not routinely screen for treatment-induced cardiotoxicity. Opinions on the safe radiation dose, methods of device shielding, and risk calculation prior to RT in CIED patients differed among centres. Precaution measures in high-risk CIED patients were very heterogeneous among centres. Our survey has shown that the awareness of cardiac consequences of anticancer therapy is high, despite relatively low proportion of patients treated oncologically among all cardiovascular patients. There is a consensus of which screening methods should be used for cardiotoxicity of anticancer treatment, but the apprehension of screening necessity is low. Methods of risk assessment and safety measures in CIED patients undergoing RT are very heterogeneous among the European centres, underscoring the need for standardization of the approach to cardio-oncologic patients. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. [Clinico-economical aspects of application of trimetazidine MB in patients with chronic heart failure and cardiac rhythm disturbances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, T E; Ivanova, E P; Rykova, S M

    2011-01-01

    To study clinical and pharmacoeconomical aspects of trimetazidine MD as a component of complex therapy of chronic heart failure (CHF) in patients with cardiac rhythm disturbances. In 82 patients (67 men, 15 women, mean age 62.2+/-7.3 years) with II-III functional class (FC) of CHF we studied effect of addition of therapy with trimetazidine MB to standard therapy on CHF FC, parameters of Holter monitoring (HM) of ECG and treadmill test. In analysis of HM we considered number of isolated and paired ventricular extrasystoles (VE), episodes of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (VT), duration of episodes of ST segment depression on 24-hour ECG. Pharmacoeconomical analysis of 2 therapy regimes was conducted by the method of calculation of cost/efficacy ratio for each parameter. Stabilization of state was achieved before study in all patients at the background of standard therapy with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, cardiac glycosides, diuretics, beta-adrenoblockers. At the background of this therapy trimetazidine MB in the dose of 70 mg/day was added to 40 patients of group 1 while 42 patients of group 2 received standard therapy without trimetazidine MB. After 16 weeks of treatment CHF FC lowered 11% (0.05) and 6.9% (>0.05), respectively. Duration of episodes of ST depression decreased 55.5% (CHF FC was 2694 in group 1, 4095--in group 2; for maximal load power--2409 and 3667, respectively; for duration of episodes of ST segment depression--1665 and 1934, respectively; for dynamics of VE number--514 and 853, respectively. Supplementation of standard CHF therapy with therapy with metabolic cytoprotector trimetazidine MB allows to achieve more pronounced positive effect on CHF FC, exercise tolerance, and lowering of cardiac ectopic activity. Smallest cost efficacy ratio after addition of trimetazidine MB to standard therapy from pharmacoeconomical point of view evidence for advantages of this regime of therapy possessing smaller expenditures per unit of

  19. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of QRS-prolongation by flecainide: heart rate-dependent effects during sinus rhythm in conscious telemetered dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sällström, Johan; Al-Saffar, Ahmad; Pehrson, Rikard

    2014-01-01

    The duration of the QRS interval is determined by the ion currents involved in cardiac depolarization. Class I antiarrhythmic drugs reduce cardiac excitability and conduction by inhibiting Nav1.5 channels responsible for I(Na), thus increasing the QRS interval. Previous studies in humans as well as in animal models have demonstrated a more pronounced effect on QRS-prolongation during higher heart rates. In the present study, the effects of the Nav1.5 inhibitor flecainide on cardiovascular parameters, were studied in the telemetered beagle dog under normal autonomic control. The heart rate dependency of QRS prolongation was characterized using pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) modeling. Four male telemetered beagle dogs were administered placebo or flecainide (100, 150 and 200 mg) in a Latin square design. The QRS interval and heart rate were recorded, and blood samples were taken. Plasma concentrations of flecainide were fitted to a one compartment oral model and the intrapolated plasma concentrations were fitted to QRS and heart rate data sampled during 5 h after dosing. Flecainide increased the QRS interval in all dogs, whereas there were no effects on heart rate. Using the PKPD model, a statistically significant heart rate-dependent QRS prolongation was linked to individual concentration-time profiles of flecainide. PKPD analysis of QRS interval data from unrestrained dogs with sinus rhythm can elucidate mechanisms previously only described during controlled heart rhythm. Specific questions can therefore be addressed in generically designed cardiovascular telemetry safety studies and different types of relationships between parameters can be uncovered. In addition, the present approach can be used to better characterize drug-induced QRS effects in cardiovascular dog models. © 2013.

  20. Classification and Quality Standards of Heart Failure Units: Scientific Consensus of the Spanish Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguita Sánchez, Manuel; Lambert Rodríguez, José Luis; Bover Freire, Ramón; Comín Colet, Josep; Crespo Leiro, María G; González Vílchez, Francisco; Manito Lorite, Nicolás; Segovia Cubero, Javier; Ruiz Mateas, Francisco; Elola Somoza, Francisco Javier; Íñiguez Romo, Andrés

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence of heart failure remains high and represents the highest disease burden in Spain. Heart failure units have been developed to systematize the diagnosis, treatment, and clinical follow-up of heart failure patients, provide a structure to coordinate the actions of various entities and personnel involved in patient care, and improve prognosis and quality of life. There is ample evidence on the benefits of heart failure units or programs, which have become widespread in Spain. One of the challenges to the analysis of heart failure units is standardization of their classification, by determining which "programs" can be identified as heart failure "units" and by characterizing their complexity level. The aim of this article was to present the standards developed by the Spanish Society of Cardiology to classify and establish the requirements for heart failure units within the SEC-Excellence project. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of 24-h Rhythm in Ventricular Repolarization Identifies QT Diurnality As a Novel Clinical Parameter Associated with Previous Ventricular Arrhythmias in Heart Failure Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastiaan C. Du Pre

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiac repolarization abnormalities are among the major causes of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. In humans, cardiac repolarization duration has a 24-h rhythm. Animal studies show that this rhythm is regulated by 24-h rhythms in ion channel function and that disruption of this rhythm leads to ventricular arrhythmias. We hypothesized that 24-h rhythms in QT duration can be used as a predictor for sudden cardiac death and are associated with ventricular arrhythmias. Secondly, we assessed a possible mechanistic explanation by studying the putative role of hERG channel dysfunction.Materials and Methods: In 2 retrospective studies, measures of the 24-h variation in the QT and QTc intervals (QT and QTc diurnality, QTd and QTcd, respectively have been derived from Holter analyses and compared between groups: 1 39 post-infarct patients with systolic heart failure (CHF: EF < 35%, of which 14 with, and 25 without a history of ventricular arrhythmias and 2 five patients with proven (LQTS2 and 16 with potential (Sotalol-induced hERG channel dysfunction vs. 22 controls.Results: QTd was two-fold higher in CHF patients with a history of ventricular arrhythmias (38 ± 15 ms compared to CHF patients without VT (16 ± 9 ms, p = 0.001. QTd was significantly increased in LQT2 patients (43 ± 24 ms or those treated with Sotalol (30 ± 10 ms compared to controls (21 ± 8 ms, p < 0.05 for both.Discussion: QT diurnality presents a novel clinical parameter of repolarization that can be derived from Holter registrations and may be useful for identification of patients at risk for ventricular arrhythmias.

  2. Report and Research Agenda of the American Geriatrics Society and National Institute on Aging Bedside-to-Bench Conference on Sleep, Circadian Rhythms, and Aging: New Avenues for Improving Brain Health, Physical Health, and Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Constance H; Vitiello, Michael V; Alessi, Cathy A; Kuchel, George A

    2016-12-01

    The American Geriatrics Society, with support from the National Institute on Aging and other funders, held its eighth Bedside-to-Bench research conference, entitled "Sleep, Circadian Rhythms, and Aging: New Avenues for Improving Brain Health, Physical Health and Functioning," October 4 to 6, 2015, in Bethesda, Maryland. Part of a conference series addressing three common geriatric syndromes-delirium, sleep and circadian rhythm (SCR) disturbance, and voiding dysfunction-the series highlighted relationships and pertinent clinical and pathophysiological commonalities between these three geriatric syndromes. The conference provided a forum for discussing current sleep, circadian rhythm, and aging research; identifying gaps in knowledge; and developing a research agenda to inform future investigative efforts. The conference also promoted networking among developing researchers, leaders in the field of SCR and aging, and National Institutes of Health program personnel. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension: Guidelines From the American Heart Association and American Thoracic Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abman, Steven H; Hansmann, Georg; Archer, Stephen L; Ivy, D Dunbar; Adatia, Ian; Chung, Wendy K; Hanna, Brian D; Rosenzweig, Erika B; Raj, J Usha; Cornfield, David; Stenmark, Kurt R; Steinhorn, Robin; Thébaud, Bernard; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Kuehne, Titus; Feinstein, Jeffrey A; Friedberg, Mark K; Earing, Michael; Barst, Robyn J; Keller, Roberta L; Kinsella, John P; Mullen, Mary; Deterding, Robin; Kulik, Thomas; Mallory, George; Humpl, Tilman; Wessel, David L

    2015-11-24

    Pulmonary hypertension is associated with diverse cardiac, pulmonary, and systemic diseases in neonates, infants, and older children and contributes to significant morbidity and mortality. However, current approaches to caring for pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension have been limited by the lack of consensus guidelines from experts in the field. In a joint effort from the American Heart Association and American Thoracic Society, a panel of experienced clinicians and clinician-scientists was assembled to review the current literature and to make recommendations on the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of pediatric pulmonary hypertension. This publication presents the results of extensive literature reviews, discussions, and formal scoring of recommendations for the care of children with pulmonary hypertension. © 2015 by the American Heart Association, Inc., and the American Thoracic Society.

  4. Cardiac remodeling with rhythm versus rate control strategies for atrial fibrillation in patients with heart failure: insights from the AF-CHF echocardiographic sub-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrard, Valérie; Ducharme, Anique; Khairy, Paul; Gisbert, Alejandro; Roy, Denis; Levesque, Sylvie; Talajic, Mario; Thibault, Bernard; Racine, Normand; White, Michel; Guerra, Peter G; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2013-05-25

    In patients with heart failure and atrial fibrillation, the AF-CHF (Atrial Fibrillation and Congestive Heart Failure) trial did not demonstrate the superiority of rhythm control (RhyC) over a rate control (RaC) strategy on cardiovascular mortality. Nevertheless, deleterious hemodynamic effects of atrial fibrillation can lead to further decrease in left ventricular (LV) function and progression of symptoms. This echocardiographic sub-study was designed to compare the effects of the two treatment strategies on LV ejection fraction (LVEF), chamber volumes and dimensions, valvular regurgitation and functional status. A total of 59 patients (29 RhyC, 30 RaC) aged 67±8 years (14% women), enrolled in the AF-CHF trial at the Montreal Heart Institute underwent standardized echocardiograms at baseline and at 12 months. Mean LVEF at baseline was severely depressed (RhyC: 27.0±4.9% and RaC: 27.6±7.4%, p=0.73), and improved to a similar degree in both groups (RhyC: +8.0±10.4% and RaC: +4.5±10.6, both p<0.05; p=0.19 for RhyC versus RaC). Other echocardiographic parameters, such as LV end-systolic volume index and degree of mitral and tricuspid regurgitation, remained unchanged. New York Heart Association functional class and distance walked in 6 min improved significantly in both groups (RhyC: +48.9±78.7 m and RaC: +47.2±96.7 m, both p≤0.01), with no difference between RhyC and RaC strategies. Improvements in LVEF and functional status are observed after 12 months in patients with heart failure and atrial fibrillation, regardless of whether rate or rhythm control strategies are used. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Program and Abstracts of the Society for Research on Biological Rhythms (2nd) Held in Jacksonville, Florida on 9-13 May 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-15

    DOES NOT PHASE SHIFT THE and S.J. Tien. Neurocagnition Program. CUNY , City CIRCADIAN CLOCK OF OLD HAMSTERS. 0. Van College and Graduate School, NY...intake pattern than omnivores or carnivores. In addition it has a sophisticated system of retaining and, in a precise ciica- dian rhythm, recycling...biological rhythms. However, since most methods of period analysis were originally described for the detection of circa- dian rhythms, their applicability to

  6. Meeting of the Society for Research on Biological Rhythms (2nd) Held in Jacksonville, Florida on 9-13 May 1990. Programs and Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-30

    S.W. Yang, OR DARK PULSES DOES NOT PHASE SHIFT THE and S.J. Tien. Neurocognition Program. CUNY , City CIRCADIAN CLOCK OF OLD HAMSTERS. 0. Van College...it has a sophisticated system of retaining and, in a precise circa- dian rhythm, recycling highly digestible particles of caecal con- tents. The rabbit...most methods of period analysis were originally described for the detection of circa- dian rhythms, their applicability to ultradian rhythms (shorter

  7. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    range of animals. The study of circadian rhythms in animals revealed that individu- als display multiple rhythms. For example, mammals exhibit rhythms in locomotor activity, drinking, body temperature, blood sugar, liver glycogen, eosinophil count, adrenal activity, pineal melatonin and corticosteroid levels and sensitivity to ...

  8. Painted Rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Duane

    1985-01-01

    In this art activity gifted students, ages 10 to 13, learn about internal and external rhythms and make a painting of an internal rhythm. The lesson can be expanded with a discussion of Kandinsky, Pollock, and other painters who have painted sound or have demonstrated rhythms. (RM)

  9. The time of sunrise and the number of hours with daylight may influence the diurnal rhythm of acute heart attack mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriszbacher, Ildikó; Bódis, József; Boncz, Imre; Koppan, Agnes; Koppan, Miklós

    2010-04-01

    We investigated whether the time of sunrise and the number of daylight hours have an effect on the seasonality, or the daily rhythm of heart attack mortality. We analyzed retrospectively data of patients admitted to hospitals with the diagnosis of heart attack (n=32,329) and patients who deceased of a heart attack (n=5142) between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2005 in Hungary. Heart attack mortality was highest during winter, while lowest number of events was recorded during summer . The daily peak of diurnality was between 6:00 am and 12:00 pm (33.77%). A positive correlation was found between the time of sunrise, time of sunset and the mortality caused by myocardial infarction (pheart attack mortality we found a negative correlation (r=-0.105, pheart attack mortality. Our data suggest, that the occurrence and the mortality of heart attack may be related to the time of sunrise and the number of daylight hours. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. TREK-1 (K2P2.1) K+ channels are suppressed in patients with atrial fibrillation and heart failure and provide therapeutic targets for rhythm control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugenbiel, Patrick; Wenz, Fabian; Syren, Pascal; Geschwill, Pascal; Govorov, Katharina; Seyler, Claudia; Frank, Derk; Schweizer, Patrick A; Franke, Jennifer; Weis, Tanja; Bruehl, Claus; Schmack, Bastian; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Karck, Matthias; Frey, Norbert; Katus, Hugo A; Thomas, Dierk

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. Concomitant heart failure (HF) poses a particular therapeutic challenge and is associated with prolonged atrial electrical refractoriness compared with non-failing hearts. We hypothesized that downregulation of atrial repolarizing TREK-1 (K2P2.1) K+ channels contributes to electrical remodeling during AF with HF, and that TREK-1 gene transfer would provide rhythm control via normalization of atrial effective refractory periods in this AF subset. In patients with chronic AF and HF, atrial TREK-1 mRNA levels were reduced by 82% (left atrium) and 81% (right atrium) compared with sinus rhythm (SR) subjects. Human findings were recapitulated in a porcine model of atrial tachypacing-induced AF and reduced left ventricular function. TREK-1 mRNA (-66%) and protein (-61%) was suppressed in AF animals at 14-day follow-up compared with SR controls. Downregulation of repolarizing TREK-1 channels was associated with prolongation of atrial effective refractory periods versus baseline conditions, consistent with prior observations in humans with HF. In a preclinical therapeutic approach, pigs were randomized to either atrial Ad-TREK-1 gene therapy or sham treatment. Gene transfer effectively increased TREK-1 protein levels and attenuated atrial effective refractory period prolongation in the porcine AF model. Ad-TREK-1 increased the SR prevalence to 62% during follow-up in AF animals, compared to 35% in the untreated AF group. In conclusion, TREK-1 downregulation and rhythm control by Ad-TREK-1 transfer suggest mechanistic and potential therapeutic significance of TREK-1 channels in a subgroup of AF patients with HF and prolonged atrial effective refractory periods. Functional correction of ionic remodeling through TREK-1 gene therapy represents a novel paradigm to optimize and specify AF management.

  11. Circadian Rhythm Management System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The value of measuring sleep-wake cycles is significantly enhanced by measuring other physiological signals that depend on circadian rhythms (such as heart rate and...

  12. Linking the congenital heart surgery databases of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society: part 1--rationale and methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Pasquali, Sara K; Austin, Erle; Gaynor, J William; Backer, Carl; Hirsch-Romano, Jennifer C; Williams, William G; Caldarone, Christopher A; McCrindle, Brian W; Graham, Karen E; Dokholyan, Rachel S; Shook, Gregory J; Poteat, Jennifer; Baxi, Maulik V; Karamlou, Tara; Blackstone, Eugene H; Mavroudis, Constantine; Mayer, John E; Jonas, Richard A; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2014-04-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS-CHSD) is the largest Registry in the world of patients who have undergone congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical operations. The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society Database (CHSS-D) is an Academic Database designed for specialized detailed analyses of specific congenital cardiac malformations and related treatment strategies. The goal of this project was to create a link between the STS-CHSD and the CHSS-D in order to facilitate studies not possible using either individual database alone and to help identify patients who are potentially eligible for enrollment in CHSS studies. Centers were classified on the basis of participation in the STS-CHSD, the CHSS-D, or both. Five matrices, based on CHSS inclusionary criteria and STS-CHSD codes, were created to facilitate the automated identification of patients in the STS-CHSD who meet eligibility criteria for the five active CHSS studies. The matrices were evaluated with a manual adjudication process and were iteratively refined. The sensitivity and specificity of the original matrices and the refined matrices were assessed. In January 2012, a total of 100 centers participated in the STS-CHSD and 74 centers participated in the CHSS. A total of 70 centers participate in both and 40 of these 70 agreed to participate in this linkage project. The manual adjudication process and the refinement of the matrices resulted in an increase in the sensitivity of the matrices from 93% to 100% and an increase in the specificity of the matrices from 94% to 98%. Matrices were created to facilitate the automated identification of patients potentially eligible for the five active CHSS studies using the STS-CHSD. These matrices have a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 98%. In addition to facilitating identification of patients potentially eligible for enrollment in CHSS studies, these matrices will allow (1) estimation of the denominator of patients potentially

  13. Linking the congenital heart surgery databases of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society: part 2--lessons learned and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Pasquali, Sara K; Austin, Erle; Gaynor, J William; Backer, Carl; Hirsch-Romano, Jennifer C; Williams, William G; Caldarone, Christopher A; McCrindle, Brian W; Graham, Karen E; Dokholyan, Rachel S; Shook, Gregory J; Poteat, Jennifer; Baxi, Maulik V; Karamlou, Tara; Blackstone, Eugene H; Mavroudis, Constantine; Mayer, John E; Jonas, Richard A; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2014-04-01

    A link has been created between the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS-CHSD) and the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society Database (CHSS-D). Five matrices have been created that facilitate the automated identification of patients who are potentially eligible for the five active CHSS studies using the STS-CHSD. These matrices are now used to (1) estimate the denominator of patients eligible for CHSS studies and (2) compare "eligible and enrolled patients" to "potentially eligible and not enrolled patients" to assess the generalizability of CHSS studies. The matrices were applied to 40 consenting institutions that participate in both the STS-CHSD and the CHSS to (1) estimate the denominator of patients that are potentially eligible for CHSS studies, (2) estimate the completeness of enrollment of patients eligible for CHSS studies among all CHSS sites, (3) estimate the completeness of enrollment of patients eligible for CHSS studies among those CHSS institutions participating in each CHSS cohort study, and (4) compare "eligible and enrolled patients" to "potentially eligible and not enrolled patients" to assess the generalizability of CHSS studies. The matrices were applied to all participants in the STS-CHSD to identify patients who underwent frequently performed operations and compare "eligible and enrolled patients" to "potentially eligible and not enrolled patients" in following five domains: (1) age at surgery, (2) gender, (3) race, (4) discharge mortality, and (5) postoperative length of stay. Completeness of enrollment was defined as the number of actually enrolled patients divided by the number of patients identified as being potentially eligible for enrollment. For the CHSS Critical Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Study (LVOTO) study, for the Norwood procedure, completeness of enrollment at centers actively participating in the LVOTO study was 34%. For the Norwood operation, discharge mortality was 15% among 227 enrolled patients

  14. Linking the Congenital Heart Surgery Databases of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Congenital Heart Surgeons’ Society: Part 1—Rationale and Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P.; Pasquali, Sara K.; Austin, Erle; Gaynor, J. William; Backer, Carl; Hirsch-Romano, Jennifer C.; Williams, William G.; Caldarone, Christopher A.; McCrindle, Brian W.; Graham, Karen E.; Dokholyan, Rachel S.; Shook, Gregory J.; Poteat, Jennifer; Baxi, Maulik V.; Karamlou, Tara; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Mavroudis, Constantine; Mayer, John E.; Jonas, Richard A.; Jacobs, Marshall L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS-CHSD) is the largest Registry in the world of patients who have undergone congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical operations. The Congenital Heart Surgeons’ Society Database (CHSS-D) is an Academic Database designed for specialized detailed analyses of specific congenital cardiac malformations and related treatment strategies. The goal of this project was to create a link between the STS-CHSD and the CHSS-D in order to facilitate studies not possible using either individual database alone and to help identify patients who are potentially eligible for enrollment in CHSS studies. Methods Centers were classified on the basis of participation in the STS-CHSD, the CHSS-D, or both. Five matrices, based on CHSS inclusionary criteria and STS-CHSD codes, were created to facilitate the automated identification of patients in the STS-CHSD who meet eligibility criteria for the five active CHSS studies. The matrices were evaluated with a manual adjudication process and were iteratively refined. The sensitivity and specificity of the original matrices and the refined matrices were assessed. Results In January 2012, a total of 100 centers participated in the STS-CHSD and 74 centers participated in the CHSS. A total of 70 centers participate in both and 40 of these 70 agreed to participate in this linkage project. The manual adjudication process and the refinement of the matrices resulted in an increase in the sensitivity of the matrices from 93% to 100% and an increase in the specificity of the matrices from 94% to 98%. Conclusion Matrices were created to facilitate the automated identification of patients potentially eligible for the five active CHSS studies using the STS-CHSD. These matrices have a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 98%. In addition to facilitating identification of patients potentially eligible for enrollment in CHSS studies, these matrices will allow (1) estimation of

  15. Mortality Trends in Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery: An Analysis of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; He, Xia; Mayer, John E; Austin, Erle H; Quintessenza, James A; Karl, Tom R; Vricella, Luca; Mavroudis, Constantine; O'Brien, Sean M; Pasquali, Sara K; Hill, Kevin D; Husain, S Adil; Overman, David M; St Louis, James D; Han, Jane M; Shahian, David M; Cameron, Duke; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2016-10-01

    Previous analyses of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) Adult Cardiac Surgery Database have demonstrated a reduction over time of risk-adjusted operative mortality after coronary artery bypass grafting. The STS Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS CHSD) was queried to assess multiinstitutional trends over time in discharge mortality and postoperative length of stay (PLOS). Since 2009, operations in the STS CHSD have been classified according to STAT (The Society of Thoracic Surgeons-European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery) Congenital Heart Surgery Mortality Categories. The five STAT Mortality Categories were chosen to be optimal with respect to minimizing variation within categories and maximizing variation between categories. For this study, all index cardiac operations from 1998 to 2014, inclusive, were grouped by STAT Mortality Category (exclusions: patent ductus arteriosus ligation in patients weighing less than or equal to 2.5 kg and operations that could not be assigned to a STAT Mortality Category). End points were discharge mortality and PLOS in survivors for the entire period and for 4-year epochs. The Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to test the null hypothesis that the mortality was the same across epochs, by STAT Mortality Category. The analysis encompassed 202,895 index operations at 118 centers. The number of centers participating in STS CHSD increased in each epoch. Overall discharge mortality was 3.4% (6,959 of 202,895) for 1998 to 2014 and 3.1% (2,308 of 75,337) for 2011 to 2014. Statistically significant improvement in discharge mortality was seen in STAT Mortality Categories 2, 3, 4, and 5 (p values for STAT Mortality Categories 1 through 5 are 0.060, <0.001, 0.015, <0.001, and <0.001, respectively). PLOS in survivors was relatively unchanged over the same time intervals. Sensitivity analyses reveal that the finding of declining risk-stratified rates of discharge mortality over time is not simply attributable to the addition

  16. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database Mortality Risk Model: Part 2-Clinical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; O'Brien, Sean M; Pasquali, Sara K; Gaynor, J William; Mayer, John E; Karamlou, Tara; Welke, Karl F; Filardo, Giovanni; Han, Jane M; Kim, Sunghee; Quintessenza, James A; Pizarro, Christian; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Lacour-Gayet, Francois; Mavroudis, Constantine; Backer, Carl L; Austin, Erle H; Fraser, Charles D; Tweddell, James S; Jonas, Richard A; Edwards, Fred H; Grover, Frederick L; Prager, Richard L; Shahian, David M; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2015-09-01

    The empirically derived 2014 Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database Mortality Risk Model incorporates adjustment for procedure type and patient-specific factors. The purpose of this report is to describe this model and its application in the assessment of variation in outcomes across centers. All index cardiac operations in The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2013) were eligible for inclusion. Isolated patent ductus arteriosus closures in patients weighing less than or equal to 2.5 kg were excluded, as were centers with more than 10% missing data and patients with missing data for key variables. The model includes the following covariates: primary procedure, age, any prior cardiovascular operation, any noncardiac abnormality, any chromosomal abnormality or syndrome, important preoperative factors (mechanical circulatory support, shock persisting at time of operation, mechanical ventilation, renal failure requiring dialysis or renal dysfunction (or both), and neurological deficit), any other preoperative factor, prematurity (neonates and infants), and weight (neonates and infants). Variation across centers was assessed. Centers for which the 95% confidence interval for the observed-to-expected mortality ratio does not include unity are identified as lower-performing or higher-performing programs with respect to operative mortality. Included were 52,224 operations from 86 centers. Overall discharge mortality was 3.7% (1,931 of 52,224). Discharge mortality by age category was neonates, 10.1% (1,129 of 11,144); infants, 3.0% (564 of 18,554), children, 0.9% (167 of 18,407), and adults, 1.7% (71 of 4,119). For all patients, 12 of 86 centers (14%) were lower-performing programs, 67 (78%) were not outliers, and 7 (8%) were higher-performing programs. The 2014 Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database Mortality Risk Model facilitates description of outcomes

  17. Simultaneous recording of pulsed wave Doppler signals in the innominate vein and transverse aortic arch: a new technique to evaluate AV conduction and fetal heart rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howley, Lisa W; Schuchardt, Eleanor; Park, Dawn; Gilbert, Lisa; Gruenwald, Jeanine; Cuneo, Bettina F

    2018-02-02

    Fetal heart rhythm abnormalities are common. Simultaneous pulsed Doppler interrogation of the superior vena cava (SVC) and ascending aorta (AAo) is widely used to analyze fetal arrhythmias. However, the SVC/AAo Doppler technique can be limited by a suboptimal angle of interrogation and poor visualization of atrial systole in the SVC. We present our experience with a novel Doppler technique using simultaneously recorded pulsed wave Doppler signals in the innominate vein (InnV) and transverse aortic arch (Ao) from an axial view of the fetal thorax. Advantages of the InnV/Ao Doppler technique include improved acquisition feasibility and a near 0-degree angle of insonation of the InnV, improving visualization of atrial systolic events. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical presentation, management, and outcomes in the Indian Heart Rhythm Society-Atrial Fibrillation (IHRS-AF registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vora

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: In India, AF patients are younger and RHD is still the most frequent etiology. Almost two-third of the patients have persistent/permanent AF. At one-year follow-up, there is a significant mortality and morbidity in AF patients in India.

  19. Anxiety, age, education and activities of daily living as predictive factors of the occurrence of frailty syndrome in patients with heart rhythm disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynarska, Agnieszka; Mlynarski, Rafal; Golba, Krzysztof S

    2017-07-10

    Frailty is one of the geriatric syndromes that are caused by subclinical impairment of many organs, leading to the loss of reserves and the ability to maintain homeostasis. Aim of the study was to assess which factors including anxiety and depression can be predictive factors for the occurrence of frailty syndrome in patients with heart rhythm disorders. The study included 171 consecutive patients >64 years (73.91 ± 6.72; 48.5% W) with diagnosed cardiac arrhythmias who had been qualified for pacemaker implantation. The Tilburg Frailty Indicator scale as well as the Hospital Anxiety and Depresion Scale (HADS) were used. The average HADS results in the frailty group was significantly higher 7.42 ± 2.63 compared to the robust patients 6.33 ± 2.83; p =0.0019. Similar results were observed in patients with atrio-ventricular blocks (AVB): HADS-A: frail 8.23 ± 2.13 vs. robust 6.62 ± 2.27; p = 0.0036 and HADS-D: frail 8.84 ± 2.85 vs. robust 7.17 ± 2.48; p =0.0086. The multiple regression model showed that age (p =0.0023), education (p =0.0001), ADL (p =0.0001) and the severity of the anxiety (p = 0.0414) were important predictors of the dependent variable and predicted higher levels of frailty syndrome. Anxiety, age, education and the activities of daily living can be predictive factors of the occurrence of frailty syndrome in patients with heart rhythm disorders who have been qualified for pacemaker implantation.

  20. Shock advisory system for heart rhythm analysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation using a single ECG input of automated external defibrillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasteva, Vessela; Jekova, Irena; Dotsinsky, Ivan; Didon, Jean-Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Minimum "hands-off" intervals during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are required to improve the success rate of defibrillation. In support of such life-saving practice, a shock advisory system (SAS) for automatic analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG) contaminated by chest compression (CC) artefacts is presented. Ease of use for the automated external defibrillators (AEDs) is aimed and therefore only processing of ECG from usual defibrillation pads is required. The proposed SAS relies on assessment of outstanding components of ECG rhythms and CC artefacts in the time and frequency domain. For this purpose, three criteria are introduced to derive quantitative measures of band-pass filtered CC-contaminated ECGs, combined with three more criteria for frequency-band evaluation of reconstructed ECGs (rECG). The rECGs are derived by specific techniques for CC waves similarity assessment and are reproducing to some extent the underlying ECG rhythms. The rhythm classifier embedded in SAS takes a probabilistic decision designed by statistics on the training dataset. Both training and testing are fully performed on real CC-contaminated strips of 10 s extracted from human ECGs of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest interventions. The testing is done on 172 shockable strips (ventricular fibrillations VF), 371 non-shockable strips (NR) and 330 asystoles (ASYS). The achieved sensitivity of 90.1% meets the AHA performance goal for noise-free VF (>90%). The specificity of 88.5% for NR and 83.3% for ASYS are comparable or even better than accuracy reported in literature. It is important to note that, the aim of this SAS is not to recommend shock delivery but to advice the rescuers to "Continue CPR" or to "Stop CPR and Prepare for Shock" thus minimizing "hands-off" intervals.

  1. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database: 2017 Update on Outcomes and Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Mayer, John E; Mavroudis, Constantine; O'Brien, Sean M; Austin, Erle H; Pasquali, Sara K; Hill, Kevin D; Overman, David M; St Louis, James D; Karamlou, Tara; Pizarro, Christian; Hirsch-Romano, Jennifer C; McDonald, Donna; Han, Jane M; Becker, Susan; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Lacour-Gayet, Francois; Backer, Carl L; Fraser, Charles D; Tweddell, James S; Elliott, Martin J; Walters, Hal; Jonas, Richard A; Prager, Richard L; Shahian, David M; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2017-03-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database is the largest congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical clinical data registry in the world. It is the platform for all activities of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons related to the analysis of outcomes and the improvement of quality in this subspecialty. This report summarizes current aggregate national outcomes in congenital and pediatric cardiac surgery and reviews related activities in the areas of quality measurement, performance improvement, and transparency. The reported data about aggregate national outcomes are exemplified by an analysis of 10 benchmark operations performed from January 2012 to December 2015. This analysis documents the overall aggregate operative mortality (interquartile range among all participating programs) for the following procedural groups: off-bypass coarctation repair, 1.3% (0.0% to 1.8%); ventricular septal defect repair, 0.6% (0.0% to 0.9%); tetralogy of Fallot repair, 1.1% (0.0% to 1.4%); complete atrioventricular canal repair, 3.0% (0.0% to 4.7%); arterial switch operation, 2.7% (0.0% to 4.1%); arterial switch operation and ventricular septal defect repair, 5.3% (0.0% to 6.7%); Glenn/hemi-Fontan, 2.5% (0.0% to 4.5%); Fontan operation, 1.2% (0.0% to 1.2%); truncus arteriosus repair, 9.4% (0.0% to 16.7%); and Norwood procedure, 15.7% (8.9% to 25.0%). Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 11. Circadian Rhythms - Circadian Timing Systems: How are they Organized? Koustubh M Vaze Vijay Kumar Sharma. Series Article Volume 18 Issue 11 November 2013 pp 1032-1050 ...

  3. INDICATIONS FOR IMPLANTATION OF A PERMANENT DRIVER’S TRANSPLANTED HEART RHYTHM AND CHOICE OF A TREATMENT ELEKTROKARDIOSTIMULYATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Shemakin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents retrospective analysis of using artificial pacemaker in 16 heart transplanted patients because of developmented bradiarithmic disfunctions in the early and later posttransplanted periods. DDDR or SSIR regimens are recommended for persistened disfuncion of sinus node. DDDR regimen is recommened to prevent atrio-ventricular conduction. 

  4. Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Heart Rhythm Society joint position statement on the use of remote monitoring for cardiovascular implantable electronic device follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Raymond; Verma, Atul; Beardsall, Marianne; Fraser, Jennifer; Philippon, Francois; Exner, Derek V

    2013-06-01

    Remote monitoring (RM) is a form of telemedicine technology that permits implanted pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators to transmit diagnostic information for review by health care professionals without patients needing to visit the device follow-up clinic. A bedside transmitter in the patient's home conveys the device data using standard telecommunication protocol to a protected internet-accessible RM data server, which authorized health care professionals can access at any time using standard web browser software. Evidence indicates it can accelerate identification of clinical events and potential device problems. RM raises important medicolegal issues concerning the protection of a patient's rights and the safeguarding of patient health information related to the collection, storage, and use of patient device information that must be addressed by follow-up centres. This position statement recommends that remote monitoring be available at all device follow-up clinics as an integral part of the standard of care of device patients and also provides helpful advice to centres for the proper design, implementation, and integration of a remote monitoring system into the clinic. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Back to Patient Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Millions of people experience irregular or abnormal ... harmless and happen in healthy people free of heart disease. However, some abnormal heart rhythms can be serious ...

  6. Should digoxin be proscribed in elderly subjects in sinus rhythm free from heart failure? A population-based study.

    OpenAIRE

    Casiglia, E.; Tikhonoff, V.; Pizziol, A.; Onesto, C.; Ginocchio, G.; Mazza, A.; Pessina, A C

    1998-01-01

    Increased mortality in digoxin-treated subjects has been demonstrated in patients with recent myocardial infarction. Those with congestive heart failure (CHF) due to causes other than myocardial infarction seem to be free from this effect. No information is currently available concerning mortality in elderly people who are frequently prescribed digitalis even in the absence of CHF. The aim of this study was to investigate whether subjects improperly receiving digoxin were worse off than those...

  7. Highlights of the 2011 scientific sessions of the Congress of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, Frans H

    2011-11-01

    The Annual Scientific Sessions of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology was held in Gothenburg, Sweden, 21-24 May 2011. Over 700 abstracts, along with many invited programs and several satellite programs were presented. Some of the late-breaking clinical trials are summarized here.

  8. Analysis of regional congenital cardiac surgical outcomes in Florida using the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Quintessenza, James A; Burke, Redmond P; Bleiweis, Mark S; Byrne, Barry J; Ceithaml, Eric L; Decampli, William M; Giroud, Jorge M; Perryman, Richard A; Rosenkranz, Eliot R; Wolff, Grace; Posner, Vicki; Steverson, Sue; Blanchard, William B; Schiebler, Gerry L

    2009-08-01

    Florida is the fourth largest state in the United States of America. In 2004, 218,045 live babies were born in Florida, accounting for approximately 1744 new cases of congenital heart disease. We review the initial experience of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database with a regional outcomes report, namely the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Florida Regional Report. Eight centres in Florida provide services for congenital cardiac surgery. The Children's Medical Services of Florida provide a framework for quality improvement collaboration between centres. All congenital cardiac surgical centres in Florida have voluntarily agreed to submit data to the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons and Duke Clinical Research Institute prepared a Florida Regional Report to allow detailed regional analysis of outcomes for congenital cardiac surgery. The report of 2007 from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database includes details of 61,014 operations performed during the 4 year data harvest window, which extended from 2003 through 2006. Of these operations, 6,385 (10.5%) were performed in Florida. Discharge mortality in the data from Florida overall, and from each Florida site, with 95% confidence intervals, is not different from cumulative data from the entire Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database, both for all patients and for patients stratified by complexity. A regional consortium of congenital heart surgery centres in Florida under the framework of the Children's Medical Services has allowed for inter-institutional collaboration with the goal of quality improvement. This experience demonstrates, first, that the database maintained by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons can provide the framework for regional analysis of outcomes, and second, that voluntary regional collaborative efforts permit the pooling of data for such analysis.

  9. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelli, Ariane; Beauchesne, Luc; Mital, Seema; Therrien, Judith; Silversides, Candice K

    2010-03-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society consensus conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. The present introductory section is a summary of the epidemiology and scope of adult CHD in Canada, the structure of the Canadian health care system and adult congenital cardiac health services in Canada. The recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis and genetic evaluation in this population are included. The complete document consists of four manuscripts, which are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology, including sections on genetics, outcomes, diagnostic workups, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy and contraception risks, and follow-up recommendations. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org.

  10. Clinical trials update from the European Society of Cardiology-Heart Failure meeting 2015: AUGMENT-HF, TITRATION, STOP-HF, HARMONIZE, LION HEART, MOOD-HF, and renin-angiotensin inhibitors in patients with heart and renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicori, Pierpaolo; Clark, Andrew L

    2015-09-01

    This article provides an overview on the key trials relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of heart failure (HF) presented at the Heart Failure Association (HFA) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) annual meeting held in Seville, Spain in May 2015. Trials reported include AUGMENT-AF (myocardial injections of calcium-alginate hydrogel), a propensity score-matched study of renin-angiotensin system antagonists in patients with HF and severe renal dysfunction, HARMONIZE (sodium zirconium cyclosilicate used to bind potassium), TITRATION, comparing two regimes for introducing LCZ696, STOP-HF, a trial of intramyocardial stromal cell-derived factor-1, MOOD-HF (escitalopram for patients with heart failure and depression), and LION HEART, a trial of intermittent levosimendan therapy. Unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary, since analyses may change in the final publication. © 2015 The Authors European Journal of Heart Failure © 2015 European Society of Cardiology.

  11. Short-term exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2,5 and PM10 and the risk of heart rhythm abnormalities and stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Kowalska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Results of epidemiological studies suggest a significant impact of ambient particulate matter air pollution (PM10 and PM2,5 on the health of the population. Increased level of these pollutants is connected with increased rate of daily mortality and hospitalizations due to cardiovascular diseases. Among analyzed health effects, heart arrhythmias and stroke are mentioned most frequently. The aim of the study was to present the current knowledge of potential influence of the exposure to fine particulate matter on the presence of arrhythmias and strokes. Subject literature review suggests, that there is a link between short-term exposure to fine dust and the occurrence of arrhythmias. Results of previous studies indicates that this exposure may lead to significant electrophysiological changes in heart, resulting in higher susceptibility to cardiac rhythm abnormalities. In case of stroke, a stronger correlation between number of hospitalizations and death cases and exposure to fine dust was seen for ischaemic stroke than for haemorhhagic stroke. In addition, a significantly more harmful impact of the exposure to ultra particles (particles of aerodynamic diameter below 2,5 μm has been confirmed. Among important mechanisms responsible for observed health impact of particulate matter there are: induction and intensification of inflammation, increased oxidative stress, increased autonomic nervous system activity, vasoconstriction, rheological changes and endothelial dysfunction. Among people of higher susceptibility to fine dust negative health impact are: elderly (over 65 years old, obese people, patients with respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, patients with diabetes and those with coagulation disorders. For further improvement of general health status, actions aimed at reducing the risk associated with fine dust and at the same time at continuing studies to clarify the biological mechanisms explaining the influence of fine dust on human health

  12. The European Heart Rhythm Association Practical Guide on the Use of New Oral Anticoagulants in Patients with Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation – A Brief Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhof, Paulus

    2013-01-01

    New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are an alternative to vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) in the prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). The European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) has produced a practical guide to detail the use of NOACs in clinical practice. The guide includes a practical start-up and follow-up scheme, emphasising the importance of strict adherence to the regimen – the anticoagulant effect drops rapidly after 12–24 hours. There is also guidance on how to measure the anticoagulant effect of NOACs, switching between anticoagulant regimes and dealing with dosing errors. Physicians will have to consider the pharmacokinetic effect of drugs and co-morbidities when prescribing NOACs – plasma levels of NOACs may be affected by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrates, as well as cytochrome P450 (CYP3A4) inducers or inhibitors. In patients with chronic kidney disease, reduced doses of NOACs may be indicated. Guidance is also given on the management of bleeding complications, and the cessation and reinitiation of NOACs in patients undergoing surgical interventions. Finally, the use of NOACs in specific clinical situations is considered; these include patients with AF and coronary artery disease (CAD), patients presenting with acute stroke while taking NOACs and patients with cancer. PMID:26835051

  13. The European Heart Rhythm Association Practical Guide on the Use of New Oral Anticoagulants in Patients with Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation - A Brief Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhof, Paulus

    2013-11-01

    New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are an alternative to vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) in the prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). The European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) has produced a practical guide to detail the use of NOACs in clinical practice. The guide includes a practical start-up and follow-up scheme, emphasising the importance of strict adherence to the regimen - the anticoagulant effect drops rapidly after 12-24 hours. There is also guidance on how to measure the anticoagulant effect of NOACs, switching between anticoagulant regimes and dealing with dosing errors. Physicians will have to consider the pharmacokinetic effect of drugs and co-morbidities when prescribing NOACs - plasma levels of NOACs may be affected by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrates, as well as cytochrome P450 (CYP3A4) inducers or inhibitors. In patients with chronic kidney disease, reduced doses of NOACs may be indicated. Guidance is also given on the management of bleeding complications, and the cessation and reinitiation of NOACs in patients undergoing surgical interventions. Finally, the use of NOACs in specific clinical situations is considered; these include patients with AF and coronary artery disease (CAD), patients presenting with acute stroke while taking NOACs and patients with cancer.

  14. Prevalence and presentation of externalized conductors and electrical abnormalities in Riata defibrillator leads after fluoroscopic screening: report from the Netherlands Heart Rhythm Association Device Advisory Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theuns, Dominic A M J; Elvan, Arif; de Voogt, Willem; de Cock, Carel C; van Erven, Lieselot; Meine, Mathias

    2012-12-01

    The Riata family of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) leads is prone to a specific insulation abrasion characterized by externalization of conductor cables. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of externalized conductors and electrical abnormalities in Riata ICD leads by fluoroscopic screening and standard ICD interrogation. All ICD implantation centers were contacted by the Netherlands Heart Rhythm Association Device Advisory Committee to identify all patients with an active Riata ICD lead and to perform fluoroscopic screening of the lead. In addition, the electrical integrity of the lead was assessed. As of March 1, 2012, data for 1029 active Riata leads were available; 47% of these were 8-F Riata and 53% were 7-F Riata ST. Externalized conductors were observed in 147 leads (14.3%). Proportion of externalized conductors was higher in 8-F Riata compared with 7-F Riata ST (21.4% vs 8.0%; Pconductors was 65.3 months. The estimated rates of externalized conductors were 6.9% and 36.6% at 5 and 8 years after implantation, respectively. Of the 147 leads with externalized conductors, 10.9% had abnormal electrical parameters vs 3.5% in nonexternalized leads (Pconductors in Riata leads is significantly high (14.3%) using fluoroscopic screening. The majority of externalized conductors are not detectable with standard ICD interrogation. Screening with fluoroscopy is reasonable.

  15. Effects of acute exercise on hemorheological, endothelial, and platelet markers in patients with chronic heart failure in sinus rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, C R; Blann, A D; Edmunds, E; Watson, R D; Lip, G Y

    2001-11-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is associated with an increased risk of thrombosis and thromboembolic events, including stroke and venous thromboembolism. which may be related to a prothrombotic or hypercoagulable state. Acute vigorous exercise has been associated with activation of hemostasis, and this risk may well be particularly increased in patients with CHF. The study was undertaken to determine whether acute exercise would adversely affect abnormalities of hemorheological (fibrinogen, plasma viscosity, hematocrit), endothelial (von Willebrand factor), and platelet markers (soluble P selectin) in patients with CHF. We studied 22 ambulant outpatients (17 men; mean age 65+/-9 years) with stable CHF (New York Heart Association class II-III and a left ventricular ejection fraction of exercised to exhaustion on a treadmill. Results were compared with 20 hospital controls (patients with vascular disease, but free of CHF) and 20 healthy controls. Baseline von Willebrand factor (p = 0.01) and soluble P-selectin (p = 0.006) levels were significantly elevated in patients with CHF when compared with controls. In the patients with CHF who were exercised, plasma viscosity, fibrinogen, and hematocrit levels increased significantly, both immediately post exercise and at 20 min into the recovery period (repeated measures analysis of variance, all pexercise workload and the maximal changes in plasma viscosity in the patients with CHF (Spearman r = 0.5, p = 0.02). Plasma viscosity levels increased with exercise in the hospital control group, although no other exercise-induced changes were noted in this group. The present study indicates that the hemorheological indices. fibrinogen, and hematocrit specifically increase during acute exercise in patients with CHF. Although moderate exercise should be encouraged in patients with CHF, vigorous exercise should probably be avoided in view of its potential prothrombotic effects in this high-risk group of patients.

  16. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    conditions, i.e., in the absence of any zeitgeber, organisms continue to exhibit rhythmicity, albeit with near 24-h periodicities, indicating that these rhythms are generated from within the ... well known for his work on thermoregulation, raised mice for ... technical terminologies proposed by him is still being used. In honor of his ...

  17. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 9. Circadian Rhythms - The ... Box 6436 Bangalore 560064, India. Chronobiology Laboratory Evolutionary and Organismal Biology Unit Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research Jakkur, PO Box 6436 Bangalore 560064, India.

  18. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    pattern of behaviours could be a result of learning to be rhythmic under rhythmic environments during previous stages of that organism's life. However, experiments showing persistence of rhythms with a near 24 h period in organisms kept under constant environmental conditions for several generations clearly demon-.

  19. Effects of music composed by Mozart and Ligeti on blood pressure and heart rate circadian rhythms in normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmer, Björn

    2008-11-01

    There is continuing discussion on the effect of music ("Mozart effect") on numerous functions in man and experimental animals. Radiotelemetry now allows one to monitor cardiovascular functions in freely-moving unrestrained experimental animals. Radiotelemetry was used to monitor systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), heart rate (HR), and motor activity (MA) in male normotensive WKY and hypertensive SHR animals. Rats were synchronized to a 12 h light (L): 12 h dark (D) regimen in an isolated, ventilated, light-controlled, sound-isolated animal container. Music (Mozart, Symphony # 40; Ligeti, String Quartet # 2) were played for 2 h at 75 dB in the animal cabin starting at the onset of L or D in a cross-over design. Data were collected every 5 min for 24 h under control conditions and during and after music. In addition, plasma concentrations of norepinephrine (NE) were determined in unrestrained animals at 3 h intervals over 24 h. In both WKY and SHR, highly significant circadian rhythms were obtained in SBP, DBP, HR, and MA under control conditions; HR was lower and BP higher in SHR than in WKY. NE was circadian rhythmic in both strains with higher values in D; the increase in NE with immobilization was much more pronounced in SHR than in WKY. The music of Mozart had no effect on either parameter in WKY, neither in L nor in D. In contrast, in SHR, the music of Mozart presented in L significantly decreased HR and left BP unaffected, leading to a small decrease in cardiac output. The music of Ligeti significantly increased BP both in L and in D and reflexively reduced HR in L, the effects being long-lasting over 24 h. Interestingly, white noise at 75 dB had no effect at all on either function in both strains. The effects of both Mozart and Ligeti cannot be attributed to a stress reaction, as stress due to cage switch increased HR and BP both in WKY and SHR. The study clearly demonstrates that music of different character (tempo, rhythm, pitch, tonality) can

  20. Clinical outcome endpoints in heart failure trials : a European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure Association consensus document

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zannad, Faiez; Garcia, Angeles Alonso; Anker, Stefan D.; Armstrong, Paul W.; Calvo, Gonzalo; Cleland, John G. F.; Cohn, Jay N.; Dickstein, Kenneth; Domanski, Michael J.; Ekman, Inger; Filippatos, Gerasimos S.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Jaarsma, Tiny; Koglin, Joerg; Konstam, Marvin; Kupfer, Stuart; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Metra, Marco; Nowack, Christina; Pieske, Burkert; Pina, Ileana L.; Pocock, Stuart J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Rosano, Giuseppe; Ruilope, Luis M.; Ruschitzka, Frank; Severin, Thomas; Solomon, Scott; Stein, Kenneth; Stockbridge, Norman L.; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Swedberg, Karl; Tavazzi, Luigi; Voors, Adriaan A.; Wasserman, ScottM.; Woehrle, Holger; Zalewski, Andrew; McMurray, John J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Endpoint selection is a critically important step in clinical trial design. It poses major challenges for investigators, regulators, and study sponsors, and it also has important clinical and practical implications for physicians and patients. Clinical outcomes of interest in heart failure trials

  1. Speech rhythm: a metaphor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Francis; Jeon, Hae-Sung

    2014-12-19

    Is speech rhythmic? In the absence of evidence for a traditional view that languages strive to coordinate either syllables or stress-feet with regular time intervals, we consider the alternative that languages exhibit contrastive rhythm subsisting merely in the alternation of stronger and weaker elements. This is initially plausible, particularly for languages with a steep 'prominence gradient', i.e. a large disparity between stronger and weaker elements; but we point out that alternation is poorly achieved even by a 'stress-timed' language such as English, and, historically, languages have conspicuously failed to adopt simple phonological remedies that would ensure alternation. Languages seem more concerned to allow 'syntagmatic contrast' between successive units and to use durational effects to support linguistic functions than to facilitate rhythm. Furthermore, some languages (e.g. Tamil, Korean) lack the lexical prominence which would most straightforwardly underpin prominence of alternation. We conclude that speech is not incontestibly rhythmic, and may even be antirhythmic. However, its linguistic structure and patterning allow the metaphorical extension of rhythm in varying degrees and in different ways depending on the language, and it is this analogical process which allows speech to be matched to external rhythms. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Adherence of heart failure patients to exercise: barriers and possible solutions A position statement of the Study Group on Exercise Training in Heart Failure of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Conraads, Viviane M.; Deaton, Christi; Piotrowicz, Ewa; Santaularia, Nuria; Tierney, Stephanie; Piepoli, Massimo F.; Pieske, Burkert; Schmid, Jean-Paul; Dickstein, Kenneth; Ponikowski, Piotr P; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2012-01-01

    The practical management of heart failure remains a challenge. Not only are heart failure patients expected to adhere to a complicated pharmacological regimen, they are also asked to follow salt and fluid restriction, and to cope with various procedures and devices. Furthermore, physical training, whose benefits have been demonstrated, is highly recommended by the recent guidelines issued by the European Society of Cardiology, but it is still severely underutilized in this particular patient ...

  3. Diurnal 24-hour rhythm in ambulatory heart rate variability during the day shift in rotating shift workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizaki, Takahiro; Kawano, Yukari; Tada, Yuki; Hida, Azumi; Midorikawa, Toru; Hasegawa, Kohe; Mitani, Takeshi; Komatsu, Taiki; Togo, Fumiharu

    2013-06-01

    Circadian variation in cardiac autonomic nervous system activity and behavior during the day shifts of shift workers has not hitherto been clarified. This study examined diurnal 24-h variation in heart rate variability (HRV), sleep-wake cycle, physical activity, and food intake during the day shift in rotating shift workers. The subjects were female nurses and caregivers working at a health care facility (14 day workers and 13 rotating shift workers). Each subject was asked to undergo 24-h electrocardiograph and step count recordings. Coarse graining spectral analysis was used for approximately 10-min segments of HRV (600 beats) to derive the total power (TOT: >0.04 Hz), integrated power in the low-frequency (LF: 0.04-0.15 Hz) and high-frequency (HF: >0.15 Hz) ranges, the ratio of HF power to TOT (HF nu), and the ratio of LF power to HF power (LF/HF). Double cosinor analysis was used to obtain 24-h and 12-h period variations in variables of HRV and physical activity. While no difference was found in the acrophases of either period for step counts or in the 12-h period of HRV variables between the groups, the acrophases of the 24-h period for HRV variables were delayed by 1.3 to 5.5 h in rotating shift workers, and their differences in HF power, HF nu, and LF/HF reached a significant level (p < 0.05). On the days of the experiment, retiring time, waking up time, total time in bed, sleep efficiency, and mealtimes and energy intake for each diet did not differ between the groups. These results suggest that there is a possibility of an abnormal phase angle between circadian variation in cardiac autonomic nervous system activity and the sleep-wake cycle during the day shift in shift workers.

  4. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database Public Reporting Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2017-01-01

    Three basic principles provide the rationale for the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) Congenital Heart Surgery Database (CHSD) public reporting initiative: (1) Variation in congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical outcomes exist. (2) Patients and their families have the right to know the outcomes of the treatments that they will receive. (3). It is our professional responsibility to share this information with them in a format they can understand. The STS CHSD public reporting initiative facilitates the voluntary transparent public reporting of congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical outcomes using the STS CHSD Mortality Risk Model. The STS CHSD Mortality Risk Model is used to calculate risk-adjusted operative mortality and adjusts for the following variables: age, primary procedure, weight (neonates and infants), prior cardiothoracic operations, non-cardiac congenital anatomic abnormalities, chromosomal abnormalities or syndromes, prematurity (neonates and infants), and preoperative factors (including preoperative/preprocedural mechanical circulatory support [intraaortic balloon pump, ventricular assist device, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, or cardiopulmonary support], shock [persistent at time of surgery], mechanical ventilation to treat cardiorespiratory failure, renal failure requiring dialysis and/or renal dysfunction, preoperative neurological deficit, and other preoperative factors). Operative mortality is defined in all STS databases as (1) all deaths, regardless of cause, occurring during the hospitalization in which the operation was performed, even if after 30 days (including patients transferred to other acute care facilities); and (2) all deaths, regardless of cause, occurring after discharge from the hospital, but before the end of the 30th postoperative day. The STS CHSD Mortality Risk Model has good model fit and discrimination with an overall C statistics of 0.875 and 0.858 in the development sample and the validation sample

  5. Circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turek, F W

    1998-01-01

    1997 marks the 25th anniversary of the discovery of the master circadian pacemaker in mammals in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. Remarkable progress has been made over the last 25 years in elucidating the physiological mechanisms involved in the entrainment, generation and expression of circadian rhythms at the cellular and systems levels. The recent discovery and cloning of the first mammalian clock gene is expected to lead to rapid advances in the understanding of the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying circadian rhythmicity in mammals. Indeed, the impressive and extensive database on circadian rhythms in mammals obtained over the past 25 years provides a foundation for making rapid progress in utilizing future genetic and molecular findings for discovering the fundamental mechanisms controlling 24-hour temporal organization.

  6. Retransplant and Medical Therapy for Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy: International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation Registry Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldraich, L A; Stehlik, J; Kucheryavaya, A Y; Edwards, L B; Ross, H J

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac retransplantation for heart transplant recipients with advanced cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) remains controversial. The International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation Registry was used to examine survival in adult heart recipients with CAV who were retransplanted (ReTx) or managed medically (MM). Recipients transplanted between 1995 and 2010 who developed CAV and were either retransplanted within 2 years of CAV diagnosis (ReTx) or alive at ≥2 years after CAV diagnosis, managed medically (MM), without retransplant, constituted the study groups. Donor, recipient, transplant characteristics and long-term survival were compared. The population included 65 patients in ReTx and 4530 in MM. During a median follow-up of 4 years, there were 24 deaths in ReTx, and 1466 in MM. Survival was comparable at 9 years (55% in ReTx and 51% in MM; p = 0.88). Subgroup comparison suggested survival benefit for retransplant versus MM in patients who developed systolic graft dysfunction. Adjusted predictors for 2-year mortality were diagnosis of CAV in the early era and longer time since CAV diagnosis following primary transplant. Retransplant was not an independent predictor in the model. Challenges associated with retransplantation as well as improved CAV treatment options support the current consensus recommendation limiting retransplant to highly selected patients with CAV. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  7. Heart rhythm disorders and pacemakers: Pulmonary vein isolation combined with substrate modification for persistent atrial fibrillation treatment in patients with valvular heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Liu, X; Shi, H; Gu, J; Sun, Y; Zhou, L; Hu, W

    2009-11-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of pulmonary vein (PV) isolation combined with substrate modification for persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) treatment in patients with and without valvular heart disease (VHD). 111 patients with persistent AF were enrolled for catheter ablation: 51 with valvular heart disease (group I) and 60 without valve defect as controls (group II). Circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (CPVI) and complex fractionated atrial electrogram (CFAE) ablation were performed guided by the CARTO system. The end point was PV isolation and CFAE elimination, which was achieved in almost all patients. There was no significant difference in total procedure time, proportion of PV isolation between two groups. The proportion of AF termination was comparable between the two groups by CPVI, but was higher in group II than in group I by CFAE ablation. The fluoroscopic time was significantly longer in group I than in group II. Temporal catheter entrapment occurred in one patient in group I; one patient in group II developed major stroke. Atrial tachyarrhythmias recurred in 25 (49%) patients of group I and in 27 (45%) of group II at a mean (SD) 4 (2) months of follow-up (p = 0.67). Re-ablation was performed in 16 patients of group I and 18 of group II (p = 0.89). At 12 months' follow-up, 34 (66.7%) patients in group I and 43 (71.7%) in group II had no recurrence of atrial tachyarrhythmias (p = 0.56). CPVI combined with CFAE ablation was safe and efficacious for persistent AF treatment in patients with VHD. The outcome was comparable with that in patients without VHD. More x-ray exposure was needed to avoid valve prosthesis impairment.

  8. Associations between diurnal 24-hour rhythm in ambulatory heart rate variability and the timing and amount of meals during the day shift in rotating shift workers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Yoshizaki

    Full Text Available It has not hitherto been clarified whether there is an association between dietary behavior and circadian variation in autonomic nervous system activity among shift workers. This study examines diurnal 24-h rhythm in heart rate variability (HRV and dietary behavior among rotating shift workers, while taking into account the sleep-wake cycle and physical activity. The subjects were 11 female and 2 male nurses or caregivers working in a rotating 2-shift system at a health care facility. All the subjects were asked to undergo 24-h electrocardiograph and step count recordings, and to record the time of each meal and the amounts of each food and beverage consumed. Coarse graining spectral analysis was used for approximately 10-min segments of HRV to derive the total power (TOT: >0.04 Hz of the periodic components and the integrated power of periodic components in the low-frequency (LF: 0.04-0.15 Hz and high-frequency (HF: >0.15 Hz ranges. Then the ratio of HF power to TOT (HF nu and the ratio of LF power to HF power (LF/HF were calculated to assess cardiac vagal tone and cardiac sympathovagal balance, respectively. Single cosinor analysis was used to obtain 24-h period variations in both variables of HRV. Acrophases of HF nu and LF/HF expressed in time since awakening were significantly (p<0.05 delayed for subjects having breakfast at a later time after awakening. Multivariable regression analysis indicated that the timing of breakfast, the ratio of energy intake at dinner to total energy intake, and total energy intake were correlated to the acrophases of HF nu and/or LF/HF. These results suggest that the phase angle between circadian variation in cardiac autonomic nervous system activity and the sleep-wake cycle may be associated with dietary behavior in shift workers.

  9. European Heart Rhythm Association Practical Guide on the use of new oral anticoagulants in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidbuchel, Hein; Verhamme, Peter; Alings, Marco; Antz, Matthias; Hacke, Werner; Oldgren, Jonas; Sinnaeve, Peter; Camm, A John; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2013-05-01

    New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are an alternative for vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) to prevent stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). Both physicians and patients will have to learn how to use these drugs effectively and safely in clinical practice. Many unresolved questions on how to optimally use these drugs in specific clinical situations remain. The European Heart Rhythm Association set out to coordinate a unified way of informing physicians on the use of the different NOACs. A writing group listed 15 topics of concrete clinical scenarios and formulated as practical answers as possible based on available evidence. The 15 topics are: (1) Practical start-up and follow-up scheme for patients on NOACs; (2) How to measure the anticoagulant effect of NOACs; (3) Drug-drug interactions and pharmacokinetics of NOACs; (4) Switching between anticoagulant regimens; (5) Ensuring compliance of NOAC intake; (6) How to deal with dosing errors; (7) Patients with chronic kidney disease; (8) What to do if there is a (suspected) overdose without bleeding, or a clotting test is indicating a risk of bleeding? (9) Management of bleeding complications; (10) Patients undergoing a planned surgical intervention or ablation; (11) Patients undergoing an urgent surgical intervention; (12) Patients with AF and coronary artery disease; (13) Cardioversion in a NOAC-treated patient; (14) Patients presenting with acute stroke while on NOACs; (15) NOACs vs. VKAs in AF patients with a malignancy. Since new information is becoming available at a rapid pace, an EHRA Web site with the latest updated information accompanies this text (www.NOACforAF.eu).

  10. Right heart dysfunction and failure in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: mechanisms and management. Position statement on behalf of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorter, Thomas M; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Bauersachs, Johann; Borlaug, Barry A; Celutkiene, Jelena; Coats, Andrew J S; Crespo-Leiro, Marisa G; Guazzi, Marco; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Heymans, Stephane; Hill, Loreena; Lainscak, Mitja; Lam, Carolyn S P; Lund, Lars H; Lyon, Alexander R; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Mueller, Christian; Paulus, Walter J; Pieske, Burkert; Piepoli, Massimo F; Ruschitzka, Frank; Rutten, Frans H; Seferovic, Petar M; Solomon, Scott D; Shah, Sanjiv J; Triposkiadis, Filippos; Wachter, Rolf; Tschöpe, Carsten; de Boer, Rudolf A

    2017-10-16

    There is an unmet need for effective treatment strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Until recently, attention in patients with HFpEF was almost exclusively focused on the left side. However, it is now increasingly recognized that right heart dysfunction is common and contributes importantly to poor prognosis in HFpEF. More insights into the development of right heart dysfunction in HFpEF may aid to our knowledge about this complex disease and may eventually lead to better treatments to improve outcomes in these patients. In this position paper from the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology, the Committee on Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction reviews the prevalence, diagnosis, and pathophysiology of right heart dysfunction and failure in patients with HFpEF. Finally, potential treatment strategies, important knowledge gaps and future directions regarding the right side in HFpEF are discussed. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  11. Right atrial free wall conduction velocity and degree of anisotropy in patients with stable sinus rhythm studied during open heart surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hansson, A; Holm, M; Blomström, P; Johansson, R; Lührs, C; Brandt, J; Olsson, S B

    1998-01-01

    ... velocity and degree of anisotropy. In order to explore these factors further, we have measured conduction velocities at the right atrial free wall during sinus rhythm and during atrial pacing in four directions parallel...

  12. Leadership in a Global Society: Habits of Mind, of Heart, and of Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Elizabeth C.

    2007-01-01

    If the world is flat, what, then, are the implications for and obligations of educational leaders? Leaders in Bangalore, India offer habits of mind, of heart, and of action that can serve as the bases for a model of educational leadership for the twenty-first century.

  13. Spanish Heart Transplantation Registry. 24th official report of the Spanish Society of Cardiology Working Group on Heart Failure and Heart Transplantation (1984-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Vílchez, Francisco; Gómez-Bueno, Manuel; Almenar, Luis; Crespo-Leiro, María G; Arizón, José M; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Delgado, Juan; Roig, Eulalia; Lage, Ernesto; Manito, Nicolás

    2013-12-01

    The present article reports the characteristics and results of heart transplantation in Spain since this therapeutic modality was first used in May 1984. We summarize the main features of recipients, donors, and surgical procedures, as well as the results of all heart transplantations performed in Spain until December 31, 2012. A total of 247 heart transplantations were performed in 2012. The whole series consisted of 6775 procedures. Recent years have seen a progressive worsening in the clinical characteristics of recipients (34% aged over 60 years, 22% with severe kidney failure, 17% with insulin-dependent diabetes, 29% with previous heart surgery, 16% under mechanical ventilation) and donors (38% aged over 45 years, 26% with recipient: donor weight mismatch>20%), and in surgical conditions (29% of procedures at >4 h ischemia and 36% as emergency transplantations). The probability of survival at 1, 5, 10, and 15 years of follow-up was 78%, 67%, 53%, and 38%, respectively. These results have remained stable since 1995. In recent years, the number of heart transplantations/year in Spain has remained stable at around 250. Despite the worsening of recipient and donor clinical characteristics and of time-to-surgery, the results in terms of mortality have remained stable and compare favorably with those of other countries. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Comprehensive risk reduction in patients with atrial fibrillation: emerging diagnostic and therapeutic options--a report from the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation Competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Lip, Gregory Y H; Van Gelder, Isabelle C

    2012-01-01

    the proceedings of the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation NETwork (AFNET)/European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) consensus conference that convened over 60 scientists and representatives from industry to jointly discuss emerging therapeutic and diagnostic improvements to achieve better management of AF patients. The paper...... covers four chapters: (i) risk factors and risk markers for AF; (ii) pathophysiological classification of AF; (iii) relevance of monitored AF duration for AF-related outcomes; and (iv) perspectives and needs for implementing better antithrombotic therapy. Relevant published literature for each section...

  15. Bleeding Risk and Antithrombotic Strategy in Patients With Sinus Rhythm and Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction Treated With Warfarin or Aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Siqin; Cheng, Bin; Lip, Gregory Y H; Buchsbaum, Richard; Sacco, Ralph L; Levin, Bruce; Di Tullio, Marco R; Qian, Min; Mann, Douglas L; Pullicino, Patrick M; Freudenberger, Ronald S; Teerlink, John R; Mohr, J P; Graham, Susan; Labovitz, Arthur J; Estol, Conrado J; Lok, Dirk J; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D; Thompson, John L P; Homma, Shunichi

    2015-09-15

    We sought to assess the performance of existing bleeding risk scores, such as the Hypertension, Abnormal Renal/Liver Function, Stroke, Bleeding History or Predisposition, Labile INR, Elderly, Drugs/Alcohol Concomitantly (HAS-BLED) score or the Outpatient Bleeding Risk Index (OBRI), in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) in sinus rhythm (SR) treated with warfarin or aspirin. We calculated HAS-BLED and OBRI risk scores for 2,305 patients with HFrEF in SR enrolled in the Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction trial. Proportional hazards models were used to test whether each score predicted major bleeding, and comparison of different risk scores was performed using Harell C-statistic and net reclassification improvement index. For the warfarin arm, both scores predicted bleeding risk, with OBRI having significantly greater C-statistic (0.72 vs 0.61; p = 0.03) compared to HAS-BLED, although the net reclassification improvement for comparing OBRI to HAS-BLED was not significant (0.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.18 to 0.37). Performance of the OBRI and HAS-BLED risk scores was similar for the aspirin arm. For participants with OBRI scores of 0 to 1, warfarin compared with aspirin reduced ischemic stroke (hazard ratio [HR] 0.51, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.98, p = 0.042) without significantly increasing major bleeding (HR 1.24, 95% CI 0.66 to 2.30, p = 0.51). For those with OBRI score of ≥2, there was a trend for reduced ischemic stroke with warfarin compared to aspirin (HR 0.56, 95% CI 0.27 to 1.15, p = 0.12), but major bleeding was increased (HR 4.04, 95% CI 1.99 to 8.22, p <0.001). In conclusion, existing bleeding risk scores can identify bleeding risk in patients with HFrEF in SR and could be tested for potentially identifying patients with a favorable risk/benefit profile for antithrombotic therapy with warfarin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. ALCOHOL AND HEART RHYTHM DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Yusupova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol abuse and particularly extension of alcohol consumption in alcohol diseas increases the risk of cardiac arrhythmias development and aggravates existing arrhythmias. Patients do not always receive the necessary specific treatment due to lack of detection of the ethanol genesis of these arrhythmias. Management of patients with alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence, including its cardiac complications among other cardiac arrhythmias should use both antiarrhythmic and anti-alcohol drugs and antidepressants. Such issues as diagnosis and management of patients with alcohol-induced cardiac arrhythmias are presented.

  17. Find a Heart Rhythm Specialist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Netherlands New Zealand Norway Oman Pakistan Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Romania Russia Saudi Arabia Singapore Slovenia South ... History Jobs with HRS Donate Now Governance Corporate Relations & Support Membership Join HRS Benefits My HRS FHRS ...

  18. AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY, AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION AND EUROPEAN SOCIETY OF CARDIOLOGY GUIDELINES (2006 FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION (ENDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fuster

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A report of the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines and the European Society of Cardiology Committee for practice guidelines.

  19. AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY, AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION AND EUROPEAN SOCIETY OF CARDIOLOGY GUIDELINES (2006 FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION (ENDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fuster

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A report of the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines and the European Society of Cardiology Committee for practice guidelines.

  20. Integration of biological clocks and rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refinetti, Roberto

    2012-04-01

    Animals, plants, and microorganisms exhibit numerous biological rhythms that are generated by numerous biological clocks. This article summarizes experimental data pertinent to the often-ignored issue of integration of multiple rhythms. Five contexts of integration are discussed: (i) integration of circadian rhythms of multiple processes within an individual organism, (ii) integration of biological rhythms operating in different time scales (such as tidal, daily, and seasonal), (iii) integration of rhythms across multiple species, (iv) integration of rhythms of different members of a species, and (v) integration of rhythmicity and physiological homeostasis. Understanding of these multiple rhythmic interactions is an important first step in the eventual thorough understanding of how organisms arrange their vital functions temporally within and without their bodies. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1213-1239, 2012.

  1. Heart pacemaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rhythms Bleeding Punctured lung. This is rare. Infection Puncture of the heart, which can lead to bleeding ... Rinse your mouth with water if it feels dry, but be careful not to swallow. Take the ...

  2. The importance of patient-specific preoperative factors: an analysis of the society of thoracic surgeons congenital heart surgery database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip; O'Brien, Sean M; Pasquali, Sara K; Kim, Sunghee; Gaynor, J William; Tchervenkov, Christo Ivanov; Karamlou, Tara; Welke, Karl F; Lacour-Gayet, Francois; Mavroudis, Constantine; Mayer, John E; Jonas, Richard A; Edwards, Fred H; Grover, Frederick L; Shahian, David M; Jacobs, Marshall Lewis

    2014-11-01

    The most common forms of risk adjustment for pediatric and congenital heart surgery used today are based mainly on the estimated risk of mortality of the primary procedure of the operation. The goals of this analysis were to assess the association of patient-specific preoperative factors with mortality and to determine which of these preoperative factors to include in future pediatric and congenital cardiac surgical risk models. All index cardiac operations in The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS-CHSD) during 2010 through 2012 were eligible for inclusion. Patients weighing less than 2.5 kg undergoing patent ductus arteriosus closure were excluded. Centers with more than 10% missing data and patients with missing data for discharge mortality or other key variables were excluded. Rates of discharge mortality for patients with or without specific preoperative factors were assessed across age groups and were compared using Fisher's exact test. In all, 25,476 operations were included (overall discharge mortality 3.7%, n=943). The prevalence of common preoperative factors and their associations with discharge mortality were determined. Associations of the following preoperative factors with discharge mortality were all highly significant (psurgery could lead to increased precision in predicting risk of operative mortality and comparison of observed to expected outcomes. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Spanish Heart Transplantation Registry. 27th Official Report of the Spanish Society of Cardiology Working Group on Heart Failure and Heart Transplantation (1984-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Vílchez, Francisco; Segovia Cubero, Javier; Almenar, Luis; Crespo-Leiro, María G; Arizón, José M; Sousa, Iago; Delgado, Juan; Roig, Eulalia; Sobrino, José Manuel; González-Costello, José

    2016-11-01

    The present article reports the characteristics and results of heart transplants in Spain since this therapeutic modality was first used in May 1984. We describe the main features of recipients, donors, surgical procedures, and results of all heart transplants performed in Spain until December 31, 2015. A total of 299 cardiac transplants were performed in 2015, with the whole series comprising 7588 procedures. The main transplant features in 2015 were similar to those observed in recent years. A remarkably high percentage of transplants were performed under emergency conditions and there was widespread use of circulatory assist devices, particularly continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices prior to transplant (16% of all transplants). Survival has significantly improved in the last decade compared with previous time periods. During the last few years, between 250 and 300 heart transplants have consistently been performed each year in Spain. Despite a more complex clinical context, survival has increased in recent years. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Communication of genetic information to families with inherited rhythm disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Charlotte; James, Cynthia; Ingles, Jodie

    2017-11-23

    Given the dynamic nature of the electrical activity of the heart and ongoing challenges in the diagnostics of inherited heart rhythm disorders, genetic information can be a vital aspect of family management. Communication of genetic information is complex, and the responsibility to convey this information to the family lies with the proband. Current practice falls short, requiring additional support from the clinician and multidisciplinary team. Communication is a 2-part iterative process, reliant on both the understanding of the probands and their ability to effectively communicate with relatives. With the surge of high-throughput genetic testing, results generated are increasingly complex, making the task of communication more challenging. Here we discuss 3 key issues. First, the probabilistic nature of genetic test results means uncertainty is inherent to the practice. Second, secondary findings may arise. Third, personal preferences, values, and family dynamics also come into play and must be acknowledged when considering how best to support effective communication. Here we provide insight into the challenges and provide practical advice for clinicians to support effective family communication. These strategies include acknowledging and managing genetic uncertainty, genetic counseling and informed consent, and consideration of personal and familial barriers to effective communication. We will explore the potential for developing resources to assist clinicians in providing patients with sufficient knowledge and support to communicate complex information to their at-risk relatives. Specialized multidisciplinary clinics remain the best equipped to manage patients and families with inherited heart rhythm disorders given the need for a high level of information and support. Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Adherence of heart failure patients to exercise: barriers and possible solutions: a position statement of the Study Group on Exercise Training in Heart Failure of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conraads, Viviane M; Deaton, Christi; Piotrowicz, Ewa; Santaularia, Nuria; Tierney, Stephanie; Piepoli, Massimo F; Pieske, Burkert; Schmid, Jean-Paul; Dickstein, Kenneth; Ponikowski, Piotr P; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2012-05-01

    The practical management of heart failure remains a challenge. Not only are heart failure patients expected to adhere to a complicated pharmacological regimen, they are also asked to follow salt and fluid restriction, and to cope with various procedures and devices. Furthermore, physical training, whose benefits have been demonstrated, is highly recommended by the recent guidelines issued by the European Society of Cardiology, but it is still severely underutilized in this particular patient population. This position paper addresses the problem of non-adherence, currently recognized as a main obstacle to a wide implementation of physical training. Since the management of chronic heart failure and, even more, of training programmes is a multidisciplinary effort, the current manuscript intends to reach cardiologists, nurses, physiotherapists, as well as psychologists working in the field.

  6. The Perioperative Use of Dexmedetomidine in Pediatric Patients with Congenital Heart Disease: An Analysis from the Congenital Cardiac Anesthesia Society-Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Disease Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Lawrence I; Twite, Mark; Gulack, Brian; Hill, Kevin; Kim, Sunghee; Vener, David F

    2016-09-01

    Dexmedetomidine is a selective α-2 receptor agonist with a sedative and cardiopulmonary profile that makes it an attractive anesthetic for pediatric patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Although several smaller, single-center studies suggest that dexmedetomidine use is gaining traction in the perioperative setting in children with CHD, there are limited multicenter data, with little understanding of the variation in use across age ranges, procedural complexity, and centers. The aim of this study was to use the Congenital Cardiac Anesthesia Society-Society of Thoracic Surgeons (CCAS-STS) registry to describe patient- and center-level variability in the use of dexmedetomidine in the perioperative setting in children with heart disease. To describe the use of dexmedetomidine in patients for CHD surgery, we analyzed all index cardiopulmonary bypass operations entered in the CCAS-STS database from 2010 to 2013. Patient and operative characteristics were compared between those who received intraoperative dexmedetomidine and those who did not. Selective outcomes associated with dexmedetomidine use were also described. Of the 12,142 operations studied, 3600 (29.6%) received perioperative dexmedetomidine (DEX) and 8542 did not receive the drug (NoDEX). Patient characteristics were different between the 2 groups with the DEX group generally exhibiting both lower patient and procedural risk factors. Patients who received dexmedetomidine were more likely to have a lower level of Society of Thoracic Surgeons mortality complexity than patient who did not receive it. Consistent with their overall lower risk profile, children in the DEX group also demonstrated improved outcomes compared with patients who did not receive dexmedetomidine. We described the growing use of dexmedetomidine in children anesthetized for surgical repair of CHD. Dexmedetomidine appears to be preferentially given to older and larger children who are undergoing less complex CHD surgery. We believe

  7. Implementation and reimbursement of remote monitoring for cardiac implantable electronic devices in Europe: a survey from the health economics committee of the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairesse, Georges H; Braunschweig, Frieder; Klersy, Katherine; Cowie, Martin R; Leyva, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    Remote monitoring (RM) of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) permits early detection of arrhythmias, device, and lead failure and may also be useful in risk-predicting patient-related outcomes. Financial benefits for patients and healthcare organizations have also been shown. We sought to assess the implementation and funding of RM of CIEDs, including conventional pacemakers (PMs), implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices in Europe. Electronic survey from 43 centres in 15 European countries. In the study sample, RM was available in 22% of PM patients, 74% of ICD patients, and 69% of CRT patients. The most significant perceived benefits were the early detection of atrial arrhythmias in pacemaker patients, lead failure in ICD patients, and worsening heart failure in CRT patients. Remote monitoring was reported to lead a reduction of in-office follow-ups for all devices. The most important reported barrier to the implementation of RM for all CIEDs was lack of reimbursement (80% of centres). Physicians regard RM of CIEDs as a clinically useful technology that affords significant benefits for patients and healthcare organizations. Remote monitoring, however, is perceived as increasing workload. Reimbursement for RM is generally perceived as a major barrier to implementation. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Heart rate, heart rate variability, and arrhythmias in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Caroline Elisabeth; Falk, Bo Torkel; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Autonomic modulation of heart rhythm is thought to influence the pathophysiology of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD).......Autonomic modulation of heart rhythm is thought to influence the pathophysiology of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD)....

  9. The use of heart rate turbulence and heart rate variability in the assessment of autonomic regulation and circadian rhythm in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus without apparent heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliwczak, A R; Waszczykowska, E; Dziankowska-Bartkowiak, B; Koziróg, M; Dworniak, K

    2018-03-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus is a progressive autoimmune disease. There are reports suggesting that patients even without overt signs of cardiovascular complications have impaired autonomic function. The aim of this study was to assess autonomic function using heart rate turbulence and heart rate variability parameters indicated in 24-hour ECG Holter monitoring. Methods Twenty-six women with systemic lupus erythematosus and 30 healthy women were included. Twenty-four hour ambulatory ECG-Holter was performed in home conditions. The basic parameters of heart rate turbulence and heart rate variability were calculated. The analyses were performed for the entire day and separately for daytime activity and night time rest. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the basic anthropometric parameters. The mean duration of disease was 11.52 ± 7.42. There was a statistically significant higher turbulence onset (To) value in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, median To = -0.17% (minimum -1.47, maximum 3.0) versus To = -1.36% (minimum -4.53, maximum -0.41), P lupus erythematosus group than in the healthy controls, including SDANN and r-MSSD and p50NN. Concerning the morning activity and night resting periods, the results were similar as for the whole day. In the control group, higher values in morning activity were noted for parameters that characterise sympathetic activity, especially SDANN, and were significantly lower for parasympathetic parameters, including r-MSSD and p50NN, which prevailed at night. There were no statistically significant changes for systemic lupus erythematosus patients for p50NN and low and very low frequency. There was a positive correlation between disease duration and SDNN, R = 0.417; P < 0.05 and SDANN, R = 0.464; P < 0.05, a negative correlation between low/high frequency ratio and r-MSSD, R = -0.454; P < 0.05; p50NN, R = -0.435; P < 0.05 and high frequency

  10. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silversides, Candice K; Bradley, Timothy; Colman, Jack; Connelly, Michael; Harris, Louise; Khairy, Paul; Mital, Seema; Niwa, Koichiro; Oechslin, Erwin; Poirier, Nancy; Schwerzmann, Markus; Taylor, Dylan; Muhll, Isabelle Vonder; Baumgartner, Helmut; Benson, Lee; Celermajer, David; Greutmann, Matthias; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Mike; Meijboom, Folkert; Mulder, Barbara; Warnes, Carole; Webb, Gary; Therrien, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure, and their cardiac disease can be associated with pulmonary hypertension, thromboemboli, complex arrhythmias and sudden death. Medical aspects that need to be considered relate to the long-term and multisystemic effects of single-ventricle physiology, cyanosis, systemic right ventricles, complex intracardiac baffles and failing subpulmonary right ventricles. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the understanding of the late outcomes, genetics, medical therapy and interventional approaches in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. The present executive summary is a brief overview of the new guidelines and includes the recommendations for interventions. The complete document consists of four manuscripts that are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology, including sections on genetics, clinical outcomes, recommended diagnostic workup, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy and contraception risks, and follow-up requirements. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org. PMID:20352134

  11. American Thoracic Society and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Implementation Research Workshop Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Bruce G; Krishnan, Jerry A; Chambers, David A; Cloutier, Michelle M; Riekert, Kristin A; Rand, Cynthia S; Schatz, Michael; Thomson, Carey C; Wilson, Sandra R; Apter, Andrea; Carson, Shannon S; George, Maureen; Gerald, Joe K; Gerald, Lynn; Goss, Christopher H; Okelo, Sande O; Mularski, Richard A; Nguyen, Huong Q; Patel, Minal R; Szefler, Stanley J; Weiss, Curtis H; Wilson, Kevin C; Freemer, Michelle

    2015-12-01

    To advance implementation research (IR) in respiratory, sleep, and critical care medicine, the American Thoracic Society and the Division of Lung Diseases from the NHLBI cosponsored an Implementation Research Workshop on May 17, 2014. The goals of IR are to understand the barriers and facilitators of integrating new evidence into healthcare practices and to develop and test strategies that systematically target these factors to accelerate the adoption of evidence-based care. Throughout the workshop, presenters provided examples of IR that focused on the rate of adoption of evidence-based practices, the feasibility and acceptability of interventions to patients and other stakeholders who make healthcare decisions, the fidelity with which practitioners use specific interventions, the effects of specific barriers on the sustainability of an intervention, and the implications of their research to inform policies to improve patients' access to high-quality care. During the discussions that ensued, investigators' experience led to recommendations underscoring the importance of identifying and involving key stakeholders throughout the research process, ensuring that those who serve as reviewers understand the tenets of IR, managing staff motivation and turnover, and tackling the challenges of scaling up interventions across multiple settings.

  12. A novel pathophysiologic phenomenon in cachexic patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the relationship between the circadian rhythm of circulating leptin and the very low-frequency component of heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabatake, N; Nakamura, H; Minamihaba, O; Inage, M; Inoue, S; Kagaya, S; Yamaki, M; Tomoike, H

    2001-05-01

    Cachexic patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) show abnormalities of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), neuroendocrine function, and energy expenditure. Leptin has been implicated in the regulation of ANS, neuroendocine function, and thermogenesis in humans. We assessed the physiologic significance of the circadian rhythm of circulating leptin using power spectrum analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) in nine cachexic male patients with COPD, eight noncachexic patients with COPD, and seven healthy control subjects. A diurnal pattern of 24-h leptin levels was present in both the control subjects (analysis of variance [ANOVA]; F = 7.80, p COPD patients (F = 9.29, p COPD patients (F = 2.09, p = NS). Analysis of HRV demonstrated that the diurnal rhythm of 24-h very low frequency (VLF; 0.003 to 0.04 Hz) showed significantly identical fluctuations with those of 24-h leptin levels, in all of the three groups (r = 0.388, p leptin has clinical importance in the pathophysiologic features in cachexic patients with COPD.

  13. Early management of patients with acute heart failure: state of the art and future directions. A consensus document from the society for academic emergency medicine/heart failure society of America acute heart failure working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sean; Storrow, Alan B; Albert, Nancy M; Butler, Javed; Ezekowitz, Justin; Felker, G Michael; Fermann, Gregory J; Fonarow, Gregg C; Givertz, Michael M; Hiestand, Brian; Hollander, Judd E; Lanfear, David E; Levy, Phillip D; Pang, Peter S; Peacock, W Frank; Sawyer, Douglas B; Teerlink, John R; Lenihan, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) afflicts nearly 6 million Americans, resulting in one million emergency department (ED) visits and over one million annual hospital discharges. An aging population and improved survival from cardiovascular diseases is expected to further increase HF prevalence. Emergency providers play a significant role in the management of patients with acute heart failure (AHF). It is crucial that emergency physicians and other providers involved in early management understand the latest developments in diagnostic testing, therapeutics and alternatives to hospitalization. Further, clinical trials must be conducted in the ED in order to improve the evidence base and drive optimal initial therapy for AHF. Should ongoing and future studies suggest early phenotype-driven therapy improves in-hospital and post-discharge outcomes, ED treatment decisions will need to evolve accordingly. The potential impact of future studies which incorporate risk-stratification into ED disposition decisions cannot be underestimated. Predictive instruments that identify a cohort of patients safe for ED discharge, while simultaneously addressing barriers to successful outpatient management, have the potential to significantly impact quality of life and resource expenditures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pacemakers and Implantable Defibrillators: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Rhythm Specialist (Heart Rhythm Society) Heart Rhythm Society National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Children My Child Needs or Has an Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator: What Should ...

  15. Comparison of the rhythm control treatment strategy versus the rate control strategy in patients with permanent or long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation and heart failure treated with cardiac resynchronization therapy - a pilot study of Cardiac Resynchronization in Atrial Fibrillation Trial (Pilot-CRAfT): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszewski, Jan; Maciag, Aleksander; Kowalik, Ilona; Syska, Pawel; Lewandowski, Michal; Farkowski, Michal M; Borowiec, Anna; Chwyczko, Tomasz; Pytkowski, Mariusz; Szwed, Hanna; Sterlinski, Maciej

    2014-10-04

    The only subgroups of patients with heart failure and atrial fibrillation in which the efficacy of cardiac resynchronization therapy has been scientifically proven are patients with indications for right ventricular pacing and patients after atrioventricular junction ablation. However it is unlikely that atrioventricular junction ablation would be a standard procedure in the majority of the heart failure patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy and concomitant atrial fibrillation due to the irreversible character of the procedure and a spontaneous sinus rhythm resumption that occurs in about 10% of these patients. Pilot-CRAfT is the first randomized controlled trial evaluating the efficacy of a rhythm control strategy in atrial fibrillation patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy devices. The aim of this prospective, single center randomized controlled pilot study is to answer the question whether the patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy and permanent atrial fibrillation would benefit from a strategy to restore and maintain sinus rhythm (that is 'rhythm control' strategy) in comparison to rate control strategy. The study population consists of 60 patients with heart failure and concomitant long-standing persistent or permanent atrial fibrillation who underwent a cardiac resynchronization therapy device implantation at least 3 months before qualification. Study participants are randomly assigned to the rhythm control strategy (including electrical cardioversion and pharmacotherapy) or to the rate control group whose goal is to control ventricular rate. The follow-up time is 12 months. The primary endpoint is the ratio of effectively captured biventricular beats. The secondary endpoints include peak oxygen consumption, six-minute walk test distance, heart failure symptom escalation, reverse remodelling of the heart on echo and quality of life. NCT01850277 registered on 22 April 2013 (ClinicalTrials.gov).

  16. Palliative care in heart failure : a position statement from the palliative care workshop of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, Tiny; Beattie, James M.; Ryder, Mary; Rutten, Frans H.; McDonagh, Theresa; Mohacsi, Paul; Murray, Scott A.; Grodzicki, Thomas; Bergh, Ingrid; Metra, Marco; Ekman, Inger; Angermann, Christiane; Leventhal, Marcia; Pitsis, Antonis; Anker, Stefan D.; Gavazzi, Antonello; Ponikowski, Piotr; Dickstein, Kenneth; Delacretaz, Etienne; Blue, Lynda; Strasser, Florian; McMurray, John

    Heart failure is a serious condition and equivalent to malignant disease in terms of symptom burden and mortality. At this moment only a comparatively small number of heart failure patients receive specialist palliative care. Heart failure patients may have generic palliative care needs, such as

  17. Outcomes of adolescent recipients after lung transplantation: An analysis of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskeva, Miranda A; Edwards, Leah B; Levvey, Bronwyn; Stehlik, Josef; Goldfarb, Samuel; Yusen, Roger D; Westall, Glen P; Snell, Greg I

    2017-02-17

    Recipient adolescent age for non-lung solid-organ transplantation is associated with higher rates of rejection, graft loss and mortality. Although there have been no studies specifically examining adolescent outcomes after lung transplantation (LTx), limited data from the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) Registry suggest that a similar association may exist. Recently, adolescence has been defined as 10 to 24 years of age, taking into account the biologic and sociologic transitions that occur during this age interval. The ISHLT Registry was used to examine the survival outcomes of LTx recipients 10 to 24 years of age between 2005 and 2013. Given the developmental changes that occur in adolescence, survival outcomes for the tertiles of adolescence (10 to 14, 15 to 19 and 20 to 24 years old) were also examined. Adolescents made up 9% (n = 2,319) of the 24,730 LTxs undertaken during the study period. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates at 3 years showed lower adolescent survival (65%) when compared with younger children (73%, p = 0.006) and adults 25 to 34 (75%, p < 0.00001) and 35 to 49 (71%, p < 0.00001) years of age, without a significant survival difference compared with those 50 to 65 years old. Critically, 15- to 19-year-old recipients had the poorest outcomes, with reduced 1-year survival (82%) compared with those 10 to 14 years old (88%, p = 0.02), and reduced 3-year survival (59%) compared with those 10 to 14 (73%, p < 0.00001) and 20 to 24 (66%, p < 0.0001) years old. Adolescent LTx recipients have poorer overall survival when compared with younger children and adults, with those 15 to 19 years old having the highest risk of death. This survival disparity among age groups likely reflects the difficult period of adolescence and its biologic and social transitions, which may influence both immunologic function and adherence. Copyright © 2017 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  18. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/EACTS/HVS/SCA/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for the Treatment of Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis: A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, Heart Valve Society, Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonow, Robert O; Brown, Alan S; Gillam, Linda D; Kapadia, Samir R; Kavinsky, Clifford J; Lindman, Brian R; Mack, Michael J; Thourani, Vinod H; Dehmer, Gregory J; Bonow, Robert O; Lindman, Brian R; Beaver, Thomas M; Bradley, Steven M; Carabello, Blase A; Desai, Milind Y; George, Isaac; Green, Philip; Holmes, David R; Johnston, Douglas; Leipsic, Jonathon; Mick, Stephanie L; Passeri, Jonathan J; Piana, Robert N; Reichek, Nathaniel; Ruiz, Carlos E; Taub, Cynthia C; Thomas, James D; Turi, Zoltan G; Doherty, John U; Dehmer, Gregory J; Bailey, Steven R; Bhave, Nicole M; Brown, Alan S; Daugherty, Stacie L; Dean, Larry S; Desai, Milind Y; Duvernoy, Claire S; Gillam, Linda D; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Lindsay, Bruce D; Manning, Warren J; Mehrotra, Praveen; Patel, Manesh R; Sachdeva, Ritu; Wann, L Samuel; Winchester, David E; Allen, Joseph M

    2018-02-01

    The American College of Cardiology collaborated with the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, Heart Valve Society, Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons to develop and evaluate Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for the treatment of patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). This is the first AUC to address the topic of AS and its treatment options, including surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). A number of common patient scenarios experienced in daily practice were developed along with assumptions and definitions for those scenarios, which were all created using guidelines, clinical trial data, and expert opinion in the field of AS. The 2014 AHA/ACC guideline for the management of patients with valvular heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines(1) and its 2017 focused update paper (2) were used as the primary guiding references in developing these indications. The writing group identified 95 clinical scenarios based on patient symptoms and clinical presentation, and up to 6 potential treatment options for those patients. A separate, independent rating panel was asked to score each indication from 1 to 9, with 1-3 categorized as "Rarely Appropriate," 4-6 as "May Be Appropriate," and 7-9 as "Appropriate." After considering factors such as symptom status, left ventricular (LV) function, surgical risk, and the presence of concomitant coronary or other valve disease, the rating panel determined that either SAVR or TAVR is Appropriate in most patients with symptomatic AS at intermediate or high surgical risk; however, situations

  19. Organ dysfunction, injury and failure in acute heart failure: from pathophysiology to diagnosis and management. A review on behalf of the Acute Heart Failure Committee of the Heart Failure Association (HFA) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Mullens, Wilfried; Banaszewski, Marek; Bauersachs, Johann; Brunner-La Rocca, Hans-Peter; Chioncel, Ovidiu; Collins, Sean P; Doehner, Wolfram; Filippatos, Gerasimos S; Flammer, Andreas J; Fuhrmann, Valentin; Lainscak, Mitja; Lassus, Johan; Legrand, Matthieu; Masip, Josep; Mueller, Christian; Papp, Zoltán; Parissis, John; Platz, Elke; Rudiger, Alain; Ruschitzka, Frank; Schäfer, Andreas; Seferovic, Petar M; Skouri, Hadi; Yilmaz, Mehmet Birhan; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2017-07-01

    Organ injury and impairment are commonly observed in patients with acute heart failure (AHF), and congestion is an essential pathophysiological mechanism of impaired organ function. Congestion is the predominant clinical profile in most patients with AHF; a smaller proportion presents with peripheral hypoperfusion or cardiogenic shock. Hypoperfusion further deteriorates organ function. The injury and dysfunction of target organs (i.e. heart, lungs, kidneys, liver, intestine, brain) in the setting of AHF are associated with increased risk for mortality. Improvement in organ function after decongestive therapies has been associated with a lower risk for post-discharge mortality. Thus, the prevention and correction of organ dysfunction represent a therapeutic target of interest in AHF and should be evaluated in clinical trials. Treatment strategies that specifically prevent, reduce or reverse organ dysfunction remain to be identified and evaluated to determine if such interventions impact mortality, morbidity and patient-centred outcomes. This paper reflects current understanding among experts of the presentation and management of organ impairment in AHF and suggests priorities for future research to advance the field. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  20. A roadmap to improve the quality of atrial fibrillation management : proceedings from the fifth Atrial Fibrillation Network/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Guenter; Bax, Jeroen; Benninger, Gerlinde; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Boriani, Giuseppe; Brandes, Axel; Brown, Helen; Brueckmann, Martina; Calkins, Hugh; Calvert, Melanie; Christoffels, Vincent; Crijns, Harry; Dobrev, Dobromir; Ellinor, Patrick; Fabritz, Larissa; Fetsch, Thomas; Freedman, S. Ben; Gerth, Andrea; Goette, Andreas; Guasch, Eduard; Hack, Guido; Haegeli, Laurent; Hatem, Stephane; Haeusler, Karl Georg; Heidbuechel, Hein; Heinrich-Nols, Jutta; Hidden-Lucet, Francoise; Hindricks, Gerd; Juul-Moeller, Steen; Kaeaeb, Stefan; Kappenberger, Lukas; Kespohl, Stefanie; Kotecha, Dipak; Lane, Deirdre A.; Leute, Angelika; Lewalter, Thorsten; Meyer, Ralf; Mont, Lluis; Muenzel, Felix; Nabauer, Michael; Nielsen, Jens C.; Oeff, Michael; Oldgren, Jonas; Oto, Ali; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Pilmeyer, Art; Potpara, Tatjana; Ravens, Ursula; Reinecke, Holger; Rostock, Thomas; Rustige, Joerg; Savelieva, Irene; Schnabel, Renate; Schotten, Ulrich; Schwichtenberg, Lars; Sinner, Moritz F.; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Stoll, Monika; Tavazzi, Luigi; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Tse, Hung Fat; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Vardas, Panagiotis E.; Varpula, Timo; Vincent, Alphons; Werring, David; Willems, Stephan; Ziegler, Andre; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Camm, A. John

    2016-01-01

    At least 30 million people worldwide carry a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF), and many more suffer from undiagnosed, subclinical, or 'silent' AF. Atrial fibrillation-related cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, including cardiovascular deaths, heart failure, stroke, and hospitalizations,

  1. Current state of knowledge on Takotsubo syndrome: a Position Statement from the Taskforce on Takotsubo Syndrome of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Alexander R; Bossone, Eduardo; Schneider, Birke; Sechtem, Udo; Citro, Rodolfo; Underwood, S Richard; Sheppard, Mary N; Figtree, Gemma A; Parodi, Guido; Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Ruschitzka, Frank; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Omerovic, Elmir

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo syndrome is an acute reversible heart failure syndrome that is increasingly recognized in modern cardiology practice. This Position Statement from the European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure Association provides a comprehensive review of the various clinical and pathophysiological facets of Takotsubo syndrome, including nomenclature, definition, and diagnosis, primary and secondary clinical subtypes, anatomical variants, triggers, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, complications, prognosis, clinical investigations, and treatment approaches. Novel structured approaches to diagnosis, risk stratification, and management are presented, with new algorithms to aid decision-making by practising clinicians. These also cover more complex areas (e.g. uncertain diagnosis and delayed presentation) and the management of complex cases with ongoing symptoms after recovery, recurrent episodes, or spontaneous presentation. The unmet needs and future directions for research in this syndrome are also discussed. © 2015 The Authors European Journal of Heart Failure © 2015 European Society of Cardiology.

  2. Clinical trials update from the Heart Failure Society of America and the American Heart Association meetings in 2008: SADHART-CHF, COMPARE, MOMENTUM, thyroid hormone analogue study, HF-ACTION, I-PRESERVE, beta-interferon study, BACH, and ATHENA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, Alison P; Clark, Andrew L; Cleland, John G F

    2009-02-01

    This article provides information and a commentary on trials relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of heart failure presented at the Heart Failure Society of America and the American Heart Association meetings in 2008. Unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary, as analyses may change in the final publication. (i) SADHART-CHF showed no difference in outcome for heart failure patients with depression treated with sertraline compared with placebo. (ii) A controlled release carvedilol formulation showed similar LV haemodynamic effects to the standard carvedilol formulation in the COMPARE study. (iii) A post hoc analysis of the MOMENTUM study suggested that patients with less severe heart failure may be more likely to benefit from a continuous aortic flow augmentation device. (iv) A thyroid hormone analogue was poorly tolerated in patients with heart failure. (v) HF-ACTION showed that exercise training is safe and offers modest clinical benefits in patients with heart failure. (vi) Irbesartan failed to improve outcomes in patients with preserved ejection fraction in the I-PRESERVE study. (vii) A phase II study of beta-interferon administration in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy showed encouraging results. (viii) The BACH study showed that mid-regional pro-adrenomedullin was more accurate than BNP or NT-proBNP at predicting outcome at 90 days in patients with acute heart failure. (ix) A secondary analysis from ATHENA showed a reduction in cardiovascular hospitalizations and strokes for patients with atrial fibrillation receiving dronedarone compared with placebo.

  3. Clinical trials update from the Heart Failure Society of America and the American Heart Association meetings in 2008: SADHART-CHF, COMPARE, MOMENTUM, thyroid hormone analogue study, HF-ACTION, I-PRESERVE, β-interferon study, BACH, and ATHENA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, Alison P.; Clark, Andrew L.; Cleland, John G.F.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides information and a commentary on trials relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of heart failure presented at the Heart Failure Society of America and the American Heart Association meetings in 2008. Unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary, as analyses may change in the final publication. (i) SADHART-CHF showed no difference in outcome for heart failure patients with depression treated with sertraline compared with placebo. (ii) A controlled release carvedilol formulation showed similar LV haemodynamic effects to the standard carvedilol formulation in the COMPARE study. (iii) A post hoc analysis of the MOMENTUM study suggested that patients with less severe heart failure may be more likely to benefit from a continuous aortic flow augmentation device. (iv) A thyroid hormone analogue was poorly tolerated in patients with heart failure. (v) HF-ACTION showed that exercise training is safe and offers modest clinical benefits in patients with heart failure. (vi) Irbesartan failed to improve outcomes in patients with preserved ejection fraction in the I-PRESERVE study. (vii) A phase II study of beta-interferon administration in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy showed encouraging results. (viii) The BACH study showed that mid-regional pro-adrenomedullin was more accurate than BNP or NT-proBNP at predicting outcome at 90 days in patients with acute heart failure. (ix) A secondary analysis from ATHENA showed a reduction in cardiovascular hospitalizations and strokes for patients with atrial fibrillation receiving dronedarone compared with placebo. PMID:19168521

  4. Circadian rhythm and cardiovascular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang L

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lilei Zhang,1–3 Mohamed Khaled Sabeh,2,3 Mukesh K Jain2,31Department of Genetics and Genome Sciences, 2Case Cardiovascular Research Institute, Case Western Reserve University, 3Harrington Heart and Vascular Institute, Department of Medicine, University Hospitals at Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Circadian rhythmicity affects all living organisms on earth. Central and peripheral cellular clocks have the ability to oscillate and be entrained to environmental cues, thus allowing organisms to anticipate and synchronize their physiologic processes and behavior to recurring daily environmental alterations. Disruption of the circadian rhythm in modern life, such as by shift work and jet travel, leads to dyssynchrony of the central and peripheral clocks, and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome. Aging has also been associated with attenuated cellular rhythmicity. Here we summarize the clinical observations linking cardiovascular health to circadian rhythm. In addition, we discuss recent advances in experimental models for understanding the clock machinery in terms of a variety of physiologic processes within the cardiovascular system. Together, these studies build the foundation for applying our knowledge of circadian biology to the development of novel therapy for cardiovascular disorders.Keywords: circadian rhythm, diurnal variation, cardiovascular

  5. [Evolution and scientific impact of research grants from the spanish society of cardiology and spanish heart foundation (2000-2006)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleixandre Benavent, Rafael; Alonso Arroyo, Adolfo; Anguita Sánchez, Manuel; Bolaños Pizarro, Máxima; Heras, Magda; González Alcalde, Gregorio; Macaya Miguel, Carlos; Navarro Molina, Carolina; Castelló Cogollos, Lourdes; Valderrama Zurián, Juan Carlos; Chorro Gascó, Francisco Javier; Bertomeu Martínez, Vicente; Salvador Taboada, María Jesús; Plaza Celemín, Leandro; Pérez-Villacastín, Julián; Cequier Fillat, Angel; Varela Román, Alfonso; Laraudogoitia Zaldumbide, Eva; Morell Cabedo, Salvador

    2011-10-01

    The Sociedad Española de Cardiología (Spanish Society of Cardiology) every year awards grants to finance research in the field of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study is to identify the impact of these investments during the period 2000-2006 from the subsequently published articles in scientific journals. Using the identifying data of each project as search terms, all articles that resulted from these grants were located in the Spanish Índice Médico Español and Índice Bibliográfico Español en Ciencias de la Salud databases, and in Science Citation Index-Expanded and Scopus. Descriptive statistical analysis of these articles included type of grant, number and amount awarded per year, and the recipient's sex and institutional affiliation. The Sociedad Española de Cardiología awarded €3,270,877 to 207 recipients, an average annual total of €467,268. We identified 231 publications that resulted from 123 (59.42%) of these grants. The average number of articles per grant awarded was 1.12, and 1.9 when taking into account only the awards that led to publication. During the period 2000 to 2006, the Sociedad Española de Cardiología/ Fundación Española del Corazón (Spanish Heart Foundation) provided about €500,000 per year to fund research grants, thereby contributing to the fight against cardiovascular diseases. Almost 60% of grants have led to publications, 73% of which were published in international journals, and 91.34% in national or international journals with an impact factor in the Journal Citation Reports. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Morgenthaler TI; Auger RR; Kolla BP

    2012-01-01

    Bhanu P Kolla,1,2 R Robert Auger,1,2 Timothy I Morgenthaler11Mayo Center for Sleep Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Misalignment between endogenous circadian rhythms and the light/dark cycle can result in pathological disturbances in the form of erratic sleep timing (irregular sleep–wake rhythm), complete dissociation from the light/dark cycle (circadian rhythm sleep disorder, free-running type), delayed...

  7. The improvement of care for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease across the World: a challenge for the World Society for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchervenkov, Christo I; Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip; Bernier, Pierre-Luc; Stellin, Giovanni; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Mavroudis, Constantine; Jonas, Richard A; Cicek, Sertac M; Al-Halees, Zohair; Elliott, Martin J; Jatene, Marcelo B; Kinsley, Robin H; Kreutzer, Christian; Leon-Wyss, Juan; Liu, Jinfen; Maruszewski, Bohdan; Nunn, Graham R; Ramirez-Marroquin, Samuel; Sandoval, Nestor; Sano, Shunji; Sarris, George E; Sharma, Rajesh; Shoeb, Ayman; Spray, Thomas L; Ungerleider, Ross M; Yangni-Angate, Hervé; Ziemer, Gerhard

    2008-12-01

    The diagnosis and treatment for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease has undergone remarkable progress over the last 60 years. Unfortunately, this progress has been largely limited to the developed world. Yet every year approximately 90% of the more than 1,000,000 children who are born with congenital cardiac disease across the world receive either suboptimal care or are totally denied care.While in the developed world the focus has changed from an effort to decrease post-operative mortality to now improving quality of life and decreasing morbidity, which is the focus of this Supplement, the rest of the world still needs to develop basic access to congenital cardiac care. The World Society for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery [http://www.wspchs.org/] was established in 2006. The Vision of the World Society is that every child born anywhere in the world with a congenital heart defect should have access to appropriate medical and surgical care. The Mission of the World Society is to promote the highest quality comprehensive care to all patients with pediatric and/or congenital heart disease, from the fetus to the adult, regardless of the patient's economic means, with emphasis on excellence in education, research and community service.We present in this article an overview of the epidemiology of congenital cardiac disease, the current and future challenges to improve care in the developed and developing world, the impact of the globalization of cardiac surgery, and the role that the World Society should play. The World Society for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery is in a unique position to influence and truly improve the global care of children and adults with congenital cardiac disease throughout the world [http://www.wspchs.org/].

  8. Joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Obesity and the European Society of Hypertension: obesity and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jens; Toplak, Hermann; Grassi, Guido; Yumuk, Volkan; Kotsis, Vasilios; Engeli, Stefan; Cuspidi, Cesare; Nilsson, Peter M; Finer, Nick; Doehner, Wolfram

    2016-09-01

    Obese individuals are more likely to develop heart failure. Yet, once heart failure is established, the impact of overweight and obesity on prognosis and survival is unclear. The purpose of this joint scientific statement of the European Association for the Study of Obesity and the European Society of Hypertension is to provide an overview on the current scientific literature on obesity and heart failure in terms of prognosis, mechanisms, and clinical management implications. Moreover, the document identifies open questions that ought to be addressed. The need for more tailored weight management recommendations in heart failure will be emphasized and, in line with the emerging evidence, aims to distinguish between primary disease and secondary outcome prevention. In the primary prevention of heart failure, it appears prudent advising obese individuals to lose or achieve a healthy body weight, especially in those with risk factors such as hypertension or type 2 diabetes. However, there is no evidence from clinical trials to guide weight management in overweight or obese patients with established heart failure. Prospective clinical trials are strongly encouraged.

  9. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: executive summary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silversides, Candice K.; Marelli, Ariane; Beauchesne, Luc; Dore, Annie; Kiess, Marla; Salehian, Omid; Bradley, Timothy; Colman, Jack; Connelly, Michael; Harris, Louise; Khairy, Paul; Mital, Seema; Niwa, Koichiro; Oechslin, Erwin; Poirier, Nancy; Schwerzmann, Markus; Taylor, Dylan; Vonder Muhll, Isabelle; Baumgartner, Helmut; Benson, Lee; Celermajer, David; Greutmann, Matthias; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Mike; Meijboom, Folkert; Mulder, Barbara; Warnes, Carole; Webb, Gary; Therrien, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure, and

  10. Inflammation as a therapeutic target in heart failure? A scientific statement from the Translational Research Committee of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Heymans, Stephane; Hirsch, Emilio; Anker, Stefan D.; Aukrust, Pal; Balligand, Jean-Luc; Cohen-Tervaert, Jan W.; Drexler, Helmut; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Felix, Stephan B.; Gullestad, Lars; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Janssens, Stefan; Latini, Roberto; Neubauer, Gitte; Paulus, Walter J.

    2009-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of heart failure poses enormous challenges for health care systems worldwide. Despite effective medical interventions that target neurohumoral activation, mortality and morbidity remain substantial. Evidence for inflammatory activation as an important pathway in disease progression in chronic heart failure has emerged in the last two decades. However, clinical trials of ‘anti-inflammatory’ therapies (such as anti-tumor necrosis factor-α approaches) have to date faile...

  11. Outdoor Air Pollution, Heart Attack and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevated outdoor ambient air particle pollution triggers heart attacks, strokes, and abnormal heart rhythms and worsens heart failure in individuals at high risk due to underlying medical conditions. Emergency Medical Services in communities are the first responders to these eme...

  12. What Are Heart Disease and Stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More What Are Heart Disease and Stroke? Updated:Dec 8,2015 There are ... include: High blood pressure Smoking Diabetes High cholesterol Heart disease Atrial fibrillation (Abnormal heart rhythm) Call 9-1- ...

  13. Rhythm Training through Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveire, Janine H.

    1995-01-01

    Maintains that string playing, rhythm, pitch, and tone quality are all dependent on the movement and coordination of the player. Presents a rhythmic focus lesson plan for students who need improvement in rhythm skills. Includes a lesson plan diagram and suggested teacher resources. (CFR)

  14. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/SCAI/SCCT/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for Coronary Revascularization in Patients With Stable Ischemic Heart Disease : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manesh R; Calhoon, John H; Dehmer, Gregory J; Grantham, James Aaron; Maddox, Thomas M; Maron, David J; Smith, Peter K

    2017-10-01

    The American College of Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, have completed a 2-part revision of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization. In prior coronary revascularization AUC documents, indications for revascularization in acute coronary syndromes and stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) were combined into 1 document. To address the expanding clinical indications for coronary revascularization, and to align the subject matter with the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, the new AUC for coronary artery revascularization were separated into 2 documents addressing SIHD and acute coronary syndromes individually. This document presents the AUC for SIHD.Clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice. These scenarios included information on symptom status; risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing; coronary disease burden; and, in some scenarios, fractional flow reserve testing, presence or absence of diabetes, and SYNTAX score. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios that the writing group felt were affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document but employs the recent modifications in the methods for developing AUC, most notably, alterations in the nomenclature for appropriate use categorization.A separate, independent rating panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate that revascularization is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario, whereas scores in the mid-range of 4 to 6 indicate that

  15. Markets, Bodies, Rhythms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Christian; Bondo Hansen, Kristian; Lange, Ann-Christina

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between bodily rhythms and market rhythms in two distinctly different financial market configurations, namely the open-outcry pit (prevalent especially in the early 20th century) and present-day high-frequency trading. Drawing on Henri Lefebvre's rhythmanaly......This article explores the relationship between bodily rhythms and market rhythms in two distinctly different financial market configurations, namely the open-outcry pit (prevalent especially in the early 20th century) and present-day high-frequency trading. Drawing on Henri Lefebvre...... of financial markets, it also suggests that high-frequency trading in particular might produce new types of market rhythms that, contra Lefebvre, do not revolve around traders' bodies....

  16. EURObservational Research Programme: a worldwide registry on peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) in conjunction with the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on PPCM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, Karen; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Petrie, Mark C; Maggioni, Aldo P; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Schaufelberger, Maria; Tavazzi, Luigi; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Roos-Hesslink, Jolien W; Shah, Ajay J; Seferovic, Petar M; Elkayam, Uri; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin; Bachelier-Walenta, Katrin; Mouquet, Frederic; Kraigher-Krainer, Elisabeth; Hall, Roger; Ponikowski, Piotr; McMurray, John J V; Pieske, Burkert

    2014-05-01

    The EURObservational Research Programme is a rolling programme of cardiovascular registries and surveys of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). These registries will provide information on the nature of cardiovascular disease and its management. This manuscript provides an update on new literature on peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM), published since the 2010 Position Statement from the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on PPCM, and describes a new registry on this under-recognized condition. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is an idiopathic cardiomyopathy presenting with heart failure secondary to left ventricular systolic dysfunction towards the end of the pregnancy, or in the months following delivery, where no other cause for heart failure is found. The PPCM Registry aims to describe disease presentation, comorbidities, diagnostic and therapeutic management of patients with PPCM, as well as information on their offspring. Centres not only from ESC and ESC-affiliated countries, but from around the world, are encouraged to participate. A prospective registry on patients presenting with PPCM. At the time of writing, approximately 100 patients have been enrolled from 20 countries. All data entry is online via secure passwords and is supported by well-trained information technology personnel. The EURObservational Research Programme will allow a comparison of women from around the world, from different ethnic backgrounds, presenting with PPCM and will report on their 6 month and 12 month outcomes. The study aims to include 1000 patients and follow them for 1 year. New centres volunteering to participate in the study will be welcomed. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2014 European Society of Cardiology.

  17. Rhythm in language acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langus, Alan; Mehler, Jacques; Nespor, Marina

    2017-10-01

    Spoken language is governed by rhythm. Linguistic rhythm is hierarchical and the rhythmic hierarchy partially mimics the prosodic as well as the morpho-syntactic hierarchy of spoken language. It can thus provide learners with cues about the structure of the language they are acquiring. We identify three universal levels of linguistic rhythm - the segmental level, the level of the metrical feet and the phonological phrase level - and discuss why primary lexical stress is not rhythmic. We survey experimental evidence on rhythm perception in young infants and native speakers of various languages to determine the properties of linguistic rhythm that are present at birth, those that mature during the first year of life and those that are shaped by the linguistic environment of language learners. We conclude with a discussion of the major gaps in current knowledge on linguistic rhythm and highlight areas of interest for future research that are most likely to yield significant insights into the nature, the perception, and the usefulness of linguistic rhythm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Relation between achieved heart rate and outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation (from the Atrial Fibrillation Follow-up Investigation of Rhythm Management [AFFIRM] Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Howard A; Bloomfield, Dennis A; Bush, David E; Katcher, Michael S; Rawlins, Michele; Sacco, Joseph D; Chandler, Mary

    2004-05-15

    Many patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) are treated with rate control and anticoagulation. However, the relation between the degree of heart rate (HR) control and clinical outcome is uncertain. We assessed whether lower achieved HR at rest and/or lower achieved exercise HR was associated with improved prognosis, quality of life (QoL), and functional status among patients in the AFFIRM study. Patients in the rate control arm and who were in AF at baseline and 2 months were included. Patients were grouped by quartile of achieved HR at rest (44 to 69, 70 to 78, 79 to 87, 88 to 148 beats/min) and achieved exercise HR following a 6-minute walk (53 to 82, 83 to 92, 93 to 106, 107 to 220 beats/min). QoL measurements and functional status were also analyzed. Complete data were available for 680 patients for achieved HR at rest, 349 patients for achieved exercise HR, and 118 patients for QoL. Survival free from cardiac hospitalization and overall survival were not significantly different among quartiles of achieved HR at rest (p = 0.19 and p = 0.8, respectively) or achieved exercise HR (p = 0.77 and p = 0.14, respectively). After controlling for covariates, there remained no significant relation between either achieved HR at rest or achieved exercise HR and event-free survival (hazard ratio 0.95, p = 0.35 and hazard ratio 0.98, p = 0.81) or overall survival (hazard ratio 1.03, p = 0.70 and hazard ratio 1.22, p = 0.13). Furthermore, there was no significant association between achieved HR and QoL measurements, New York Heart Association functional class, or 6-minute walking distance. After 2 months of drug titration, neither achieved HR at rest nor achieved exercise HR predicted survival free from cardiovascular hospitalization, overall survival, QoL, or functional status among patients with AF.

  19. Self-care management of heart failure : practical recommendations from the Patient Care Committee of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lainscak, Mitja; Blue, Lynda; Clark, Andrew L.; Dahlstrom, Ulf; Dickstein, Kenneth; Ekman, Inger; McDonagh, Theresa; McMurray, John J.; Ryder, Mary; Stewart, Simon; Stromberg, Anna; Jaarsma, Tiny

    Guidelines on heart failure (HF) stress the importance of lifestyle advice, although there is little evidence that such recommendations improve symptoms or prognosis. Patients experience symptoms of different intensities which impair their daily activities and reduce the quality-of-life. To cope

  20. Enteral Feeding Practices in Infants With Congenital Heart Disease Across European PICUs: A European Society of Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tume, Lyvonne N; Balmaks, Reinis; da Cruz, Eduardo; Latten, Lynne; Verbruggen, Sascha; Valla, Frédéric V

    2018-02-01

    To describe enteral feeding practices in pre and postoperative infants with congenital heart disease in European PICUs. Cross-sectional electronic survey. European PICUs that admit infants with congenital heart disease pre- and postoperatively. One senior PICU physician or designated person per unit. None. Fifty-nine PICUs from 18 European countries responded to the survey. PICU physicians were involved in the nutritional care of children with congenital heart disease in most (76%) PICUs, but less than 60% of units had a dedicated dietician. Infants with congenital heart disease were routinely fed preoperatively in only 63% of the PICUs, due to ongoing concerns around prostaglandin E1 infusion, the presence of umbilical venous and/or arterial catheters, and the use of vasoactive drugs. In three quarters of the PICUs (76%), infants were routinely fed during the first 24 hours postoperatively. Units cited, the most common feeding method, both pre and postoperatively, was intermittent bolus feeds via the gastric route. Importantly, 69% of European PICUs still did not have written guidelines for feeding, but this varied for pre and postoperative patients. Wide variations in practices exist in the nutritional care between European PICUs, which reflects the absence of local protocols and scientific society-endorsed guidelines. This is likely to contribute to suboptimal energy delivery in this particularly vulnerable group.

  1. Heart rate and adverse outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation: A combined AFFIRM and AF-CHF substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Jason G; Roy, Denis; Wyse, D George; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Talajic, Mario; Leduc, Hugues; Tourigny, Julia-Cadrin; Shohoudi, Azadeh; Dubuc, Marc; Rivard, Léna; Guerra, Peter G; Thibault, Bernard; Dyrda, Katia; Macle, Laurent; Khairy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    An elevated resting heart rate has been associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Its prognostic value has not specifically been examined in patients with atrial fibrillation. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between resting heart rate measured in sinus rhythm and in atrial fibrillation and subsequent hospitalizations and death. An analysis of individual patient-level data from subjects enrolled in the AFFIRM and AF-CHF trials was conducted to determine the impact of resting heart rate on hospitalizations and mortality. Separate analyses were performed in atrial fibrillation and sinus rhythm. A total of 7159 baseline ECGs (4848 in atrial fibrillation, 2311 in sinus rhythm) were analyzed in 5164 patients (34.8% female, age 68.2 ± 8.3 years). During mean follow-up of 40.8 ± 16.3 months, 1016 patients died (668 cardiovascular deaths), and 3150 required at least 1 hospitalization (2215 cardiovascular). An elevated baseline heart rate in sinus rhythm was associated with increased all-cause mortality [hazard ratio (HR) 1.24 per 10 bpm increase, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14-1.36, P 114 bpm was independently associated with all-cause (HR 1.18, 95% CI 1.06-1.31, P = .0018) and cardiovascular (HR 1.25, 95% CI 1.10-1.42, P = .0005) hospitalizations. In patients with a history of atrial fibrillation, an elevated baseline heart rate in sinus rhythm is independently associated with mortality. In contrast, the baseline heart rate in atrial fibrillation is not associated with mortality but predicts hospitalizations. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Appropriateness of Prescriptions of Recommended Treatments in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Health Systems: Findings Based on the Long-Term Registry of the European Society of Cardiology on Heart Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maggioni, Aldo P.; van Gool, Kees; Biondi, Nelly; Urso, Renato; Klazinga, Niek; Ferrari, Roberto; Maniadakis, Nikolaos; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    This observational study aimed to identify clinical variables and health system characteristics associated with incomplete guideline application in drug treatment of patients with chronic heart failure (HF) across 15 countries. Three data sets were used: European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure

  3. Association of recipient age and causes of heart transplant mortality: Implications for personalization of post-transplant management-An analysis of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wever-Pinzon, Omar; Edwards, Leah B; Taylor, David O; Kfoury, Abdallah G; Drakos, Stavros G; Selzman, Craig H; Fang, James C; Lund, Lars H; Stehlik, Josef

    2017-04-01

    Survival beyond 1 year after heart transplantation has remained without significant improvement for the last 2 decades. A more individualized approach to post-transplant care could result in a reduction of long-term mortality. Although recipient age has been associated with an increased incidence of certain post-transplant morbidities, its effect on cause-specific mortality has not been established. We analyzed overall and cause-specific mortality of heart transplant recipients registered in the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation Registry between 1995 and 2011. Patients were grouped by recipient age: 18 to 29, 30 to 39, 40 to 49, 50 to 59, 60 to 69, and ≥ 70 years. Multivariable regression models were used to examine the association between recipient age and leading causes of post-transplant mortality. We also compared immunosuppression (IS) use among the different recipient age groups. There were 52,995 recipients (78% male; median age [5th, 95th percentile]: 54 [27, 66] years). Survival through 10 years after transplant was lower in heart transplant recipients in the 2 more advanced age groups: 49% for 60 to 69 years and 36% for ≥ 70 years (p personalized approach, possibly including different IS strategies according to recipient age, might result in improved post-transplant survival. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Daily rhythm of cerebral blood flow velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spielman Arthur J

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CBFV (cerebral blood flow velocity is lower in the morning than in the afternoon and evening. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the time of day changes in CBFV: 1 CBFV changes are due to sleep-associated processes or 2 time of day changes in CBFV are due to an endogenous circadian rhythm independent of sleep. The aim of this study was to examine CBFV over 30 hours of sustained wakefulness to determine whether CBFV exhibits fluctuations associated with time of day. Methods Eleven subjects underwent a modified constant routine protocol. CBFV from the middle cerebral artery was monitored by chronic recording of Transcranial Doppler (TCD ultrasonography. Other variables included core body temperature (CBT, end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2, blood pressure, and heart rate. Salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO served as a measure of endogenous circadian phase position. Results A non-linear multiple regression, cosine fit analysis revealed that both the CBT and CBFV rhythm fit a 24 hour rhythm (R2 = 0.62 and R2 = 0.68, respectively. Circadian phase position of CBT occurred at 6:05 am while CBFV occurred at 12:02 pm, revealing a six hour, or 90 degree difference between these two rhythms (t = 4.9, df = 10, p Conclusion In conclusion, time of day variations in CBFV have an approximately 24 hour rhythm under constant conditions, suggesting regulation by a circadian oscillator. The 90 degree-phase angle difference between the CBT and CBFV rhythms may help explain previous findings of lower CBFV values in the morning. The phase difference occurs at a time period during which cognitive performance decrements have been observed and when both cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events occur more frequently. The mechanisms underlying this phase angle difference require further exploration.

  5. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgenthaler TI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Bhanu P Kolla,1,2 R Robert Auger,1,2 Timothy I Morgenthaler11Mayo Center for Sleep Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Misalignment between endogenous circadian rhythms and the light/dark cycle can result in pathological disturbances in the form of erratic sleep timing (irregular sleep–wake rhythm, complete dissociation from the light/dark cycle (circadian rhythm sleep disorder, free-running type, delayed sleep timing (delayed sleep phase disorder, or advanced sleep timing (advanced sleep phase disorder. Whereas these four conditions are thought to involve predominantly intrinsic mechanisms, circadian dysrhythmias can also be induced by exogenous challenges, such as those imposed by extreme work schedules or rapid transmeridian travel, which overwhelm the ability of the master clock to entrain with commensurate rapidity, and in turn impair approximation to a desired sleep schedule, as evidenced by the shift work and jet lag sleep disorders. This review will focus on etiological underpinnings, clinical assessments, and evidence-based treatment options for circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Topics are subcategorized when applicable, and if sufficient data exist. The length of text associated with each disorder reflects the abundance of associated literature, complexity of management, overlap of methods for assessment and treatment, and the expected prevalence of each condition within general medical practice.Keywords: circadian rhythm sleep disorders, assessment, treatment

  6. Validity of the European society of cardiology's psychosocial screening interview in patients with coronary heart disease : The THORESCI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Montfort, E.M.J.; Denollet, J.; Widdershoven, J.W.M.G.; Kupper, N.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to examine the validity of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) psychosocial screening instrument. Methods: A total of 508 acute (67%) or elective (33%) percutaneous coronary intervention patients (mean [standard deviation]age = 63 [10] years, 81% male)

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid sodium rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF sodium levels have been reported to rise during episodic migraine. Since migraine frequently starts in early morning or late afternoon, we hypothesized that natural sodium chronobiology may predispose susceptible persons when extracellular CSF sodium increases. Since no mammalian brain sodium rhythms are known, we designed a study of healthy humans to test if cation rhythms exist in CSF. Methods Lumbar CSF was collected every ten minutes at 0.1 mL/min for 24 h from six healthy participants. CSF sodium and potassium concentrations were measured by ion chromatography, total protein by fluorescent spectrometry, and osmolarity by freezing point depression. We analyzed cation and protein distributions over the 24 h period and spectral and permutation tests to identify significant rhythms. We applied the False Discovery Rate method to adjust significance levels for multiple tests and Spearman correlations to compare sodium fluctuations with potassium, protein, and osmolarity. Results The distribution of sodium varied much more than potassium, and there were statistically significant rhythms at 12 and 1.65 h periods. Curve fitting to the average time course of the mean sodium of all six subjects revealed the lowest sodium levels at 03.20 h and highest at 08.00 h, a second nadir at 09.50 h and a second peak at 18.10 h. Sodium levels were not correlated with potassium or protein concentration, or with osmolarity. Conclusion These CSF rhythms are the first reports of sodium chronobiology in the human nervous system. The results are consistent with our hypothesis that rising levels of extracellular sodium may contribute to the timing of migraine onset. The physiological importance of sodium in the nervous system suggests that these rhythms may have additional repercussions on ultradian functions.

  8. Society's Constitution and Corporate Legitimacy or Why it Might be Unethical for Business Leaders to Think with Their Heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrøm, Susanne Maria

    2010-01-01

    Is the perspective of ethics sensitive to the social complexity of the changes within the legitimating notions which determine the role and responsibility of economy and business companies within contemporary society? On the scientific dimension, taking the human being as ultimate reference...... decision-makers and those influenced by the decisions, and consequently to the call for responsibility, transparency and sustainability; 3) the growing independence of society’s functional spheres (economics, politics, science, education etc.) which paradoxically increases their interdependence...... and consequently their reciprocal sensitivity, expressed for instance in partnerships and stakeholder models; 4) the overload of conventional politics and law, leading to political initiatives which aim at internalising society as horizon for the business community’s sense of responsibility; 5) globalisation which...

  9. RHYTHM STRUCTURE IN NEWS READING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Mas Manchón

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rhythm is central to news reading in radio and television programs. This paper proposes a three level structure for rhythm in news discourse. It gives a comprehensive definition of rhythm and types of rhythm. Firstly, the Base Rhythm Structure consists of semantic and pragmatic rhythmic accents, coincident with very specific words. Secondly, these accents are grouped together according to type, frequency and order, thereby configuring three types of “rhythmic units” (the Internal Rhythm Structure: starting, main and end units. A last structure level presents four discursive factors that are very important in integrating the overall time structure of news announcing (the Melodic Rhythm Structure. This integral structure for news announcing rhythm should be further tested in acoustic-experimental studies under the criterion of information transmission efficacy.

  10. Rhythm structure in news reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Mas Manchón

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhythm is central to news reading in radio and television programs. This paper proposes a three level structure for rhythm in news discourse. It gives a comprehensive definition of rhythm and types of rhythm. Firstly, the Base Rhythm Structure consists of semantic and pragmatic rhythmic accents, coincident with very specific words. Secondly, these accents are grouped together according to type, frequency and order, thereby configuring three types of “rhythmic units” (the Internal Rhythm Structure: starting, main and end units. A last structure level presents four discursive factors that are very important in integrating the overall time structure of news announcing (the Melodic Rhythm Structure. This integral structure for news announcing rhythm should be further tested in acoustic-experimental studies under the criterion of information transmission efficacy.

  11. Characterisation of circadian rhythms of various duckweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranaka, T; Okada, M; Yomo, J; Kubota, S; Oyama, T

    2015-01-01

    The plant circadian clock controls various physiological phenomena that are important for adaptation to natural day-night cycles. Many components of the circadian clock have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, the model plant for molecular genetic studies. Recent studies revealed evolutionary conservation of clock components in green plants. Homologues of clock-related genes have been isolated from Lemna gibba and Lemna aequinoctialis, and it has been demonstrated that these homologues function in the clock system in a manner similar to their functioning in Arabidopsis. While clock components are widely conserved, circadian phenomena display diversity even within the Lemna genus. In order to survey the full extent of diversity in circadian rhythms among duckweed plants, we characterised the circadian rhythms of duckweed by employing a semi-transient bioluminescent reporter system. Using a particle bombardment method, circadian bioluminescent reporters were introduced into nine strains representing five duckweed species: Spirodela polyrhiza, Landoltia punctata, Lemna gibba, L. aequinoctialis and Wolffia columbiana. We then monitored luciferase (luc+) reporter activities driven by AtCCA1, ZmUBQ1 or CaMV35S promoters under entrainment and free-running conditions. Under entrainment, AtCCA1::luc+ showed similar diurnal rhythms in all strains. This suggests that the mechanism of biological timing under day-night cycles is conserved throughout the evolution of duckweeds. Under free-running conditions, we observed circadian rhythms of AtCCA1::luc+, ZmUBQ1::luc+ and CaMV35S::luc+. These circadian rhythms showed diversity in period length and sustainability, suggesting that circadian clock mechanisms are somewhat diversified among duckweeds. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  12. Rhythm quantization for transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cemgil, A.T.; Desain, P.W.M.; Kappen, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    Automatic Music Transcription is the extraction of an acceptable notation from performed music. One important task in this problem is rhythm quantization which refers to categorization of note durations. Although quantization of a pure mechanical performance is rather straightforward, the task

  13. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  14. Biological and physiological rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strughold, H.; Hale, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    Circadian rhythms, particularly that of sleep and wakefulness, are discussed. The sleep-wakefulness experiences of astronauts during several space missions are described, and predictions are made for future space activities, including Mars missions, interstellar flight, and life on permanent space stations.

  15. Rhythm Sticks without Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackin, Rosemary

    2000-01-01

    Provides 11 specific rhythm stick activities for preschoolers and kindergartners to increase children's awareness of basic music theory. Lessons incorporated in these activities include tempo, dynamics, intensity, laterality, and directionality. Lessons also address children's awareness of personal space and improved listening skills. Instructions…

  16. Visible Battle Rhythm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Rhythm tools and methods. 3. Related Work VBR uses the basic principles of Gantt chart design to organize events along a horizontal timeline. This...Coalition operations • Involvement of Civilian Orgs / NGO’s Increased Situational Awareness required © 2006 Oculus Info Inc. COP21 TD 5 Commander’s

  17. Abnormalities of heart rhythm in newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrido García Luis Martín

    2014-07-01

    The natural history of arrhythmias in the neonatal period differs impor- tantly from arrhythmias presented in other pediatric age groups. They can be classified as: sinus arrhythmia, tachyarrhythmias, long QT syndrome and bradyarrhythmias. It is important that the physicians responsible for the management of these patients recognize the causes for the development of arrhythmias as well as the diagnostic and therapeutic options available.

  18. Perioperative mechanical circulatory support in children: an analysis of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascio, Christopher E; Austin, Erle H; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Jacobs, Marshall L; Wallace, Amelia S; He, Xia; Pasquali, Sara K

    2014-02-01

    Analyses of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) in pediatric heart surgery have primarily focused on single-center outcomes or narrow applications. We describe the patterns of use, patient characteristics, and MCS-associated outcomes across a large multicenter cohort. Patients (aged institutions. Of 96,596 operations (80 centers), MCS was used in 2.4%. The MCS patients were younger (13 vs 195 days, P vs 32.7%, P vs 2.9% of non-MCS patients; P institutions, with both high- and low-volume hospitals having substantial variation in MCS rates. Perioperative MCS use varied widely across centers. The MCS rates were greatest overall for the Norwood procedure and complex biventricular repairs. Although MCS can be a life-saving therapy, more than one half of MCS patients will not survive to hospital discharge, with mortality >70% for some operations. Future studies aimed at better understanding the appropriate indications, optimal timing, and management of MCS could help to reduce the variation in MCS use across hospitals and improve outcomes. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hypothyroidism and the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udovcic, Maja; Pena, Raul Herrera; Patham, Bhargavi; Tabatabai, Laila; Kansara, Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a commonly encountered clinical condition with variable prevalence. It has profound effects on cardiac function that can impact cardiac contractility, vascular resistance, blood pressure, and heart rhythm. With this review, we aim to describe the effects of hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism on the heart. Additionally, we attempt to briefly describe how hypothyroid treatment affects cardiovascular parameters.

  20. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/SCAI/SCCT/STS 2016 Appropriate Use Criteria for Coronary Revascularization in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manesh R; Calhoon, John H; Dehmer, Gregory J; Grantham, James Aaron; Maddox, Thomas M; Maron, David J; Smith, Peter K

    2017-04-01

    The American College of Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, have completed a 2-part revision of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization. In prior coronary revascularization AUC documents, indications for revascularization in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and stable ischemic heart disease were combined into 1 document. To address the expanding clinical indications for coronary revascularization, and in an effort to align the subject matter with the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, the new AUC for coronary artery revascularization were separated into 2 documents addressing ACS and stable ischemic heart disease individually. This document presents the AUC for ACS. Clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, presence of clinical instability or ongoing ischemic symptoms, prior reperfusion therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, fractional flow reserve testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios that the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document but employs the recent modifications in the methods for developing AUC, most notably, alterations in the nomenclature for appropriate use categorization. A separate, independent rating panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate that revascularization is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario, whereas scores in the mid-range (4 to 6

  1. Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Pediatric Cardiology Association Position Statement on Pulse Oximetry Screening in Newborns to Enhance Detection of Critical Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kenny K; Fournier, Anne; Fruitman, Deborah S; Graves, Lisa; Human, Derek G; Narvey, Michael; Russell, Jennifer L

    2017-02-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital malformation and approximately 3 in 1000 newborns have critical congenital heart disease (CCHD). Timely diagnosis affects morbidity, mortality, and disability, and newborn pulse oximetry screening has been studied to enhance detection of CCHD. In this position statement we present an evaluation of the literature for pulse oximetry screening. Current detection strategies including prenatal ultrasound examination and newborn physical examination are limited by low diagnostic sensitivity. Pulse oximetry screening is safe, noninvasive, easy to perform, and widely available with a high specificity (99.9%) and moderately high sensitivity (76.5%). When an abnormal saturation is obtained, the likelihood of having CCHD is 5.5 times greater than when a normal result is obtained. The use of pulse oximetry combined with current strategies has shown sensitivities of up to 92% for detecting CCHD. False positive results can be minimized by screening after 24 hours, and testing the right hand and either foot might further increase sensitivity. Newborns with abnormal screening results should undergo a comprehensive assessment and echocardiography performed if a cardiac cause cannot be excluded. Screening has been studied to be cost neutral to cost effective. We recommend that pulse oximetry screening should be routinely performed in all healthy newborns to enhance the detection of CCHD in Canada. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. American Thoracic Society/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Asthma-Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Overlap Workshop Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Prescott G; van den Berge, Maarten; Boucher, Richard C; Brightling, Christopher; Burchard, Esteban G; Christenson, Stephanie A; Han, MeiLan K; Holtzman, Michael J; Kraft, Monica; Lynch, David A; Martinez, Fernando D; Reddel, Helen K; Sin, Don D; Washko, George R; Wenzel, Sally E; Punturieri, Antonello; Freemer, Michelle M; Wise, Robert A

    2017-08-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are highly prevalent chronic obstructive lung diseases with an associated high burden of disease. Asthma, which is often allergic in origin, frequently begins in infancy or childhood with variable airflow obstruction and intermittent wheezing, cough, and dyspnea. Patients with COPD, in contrast, are usually current or former smokers who present after the age of 40 years with symptoms (often persistent) including dyspnea and a productive cough. On the basis of age and smoking history, it is often easy to distinguish between asthma and COPD. However, some patients have features compatible with both diseases. Because clinical studies typically exclude these patients, their underlying disease mechanisms and appropriate treatment remain largely uncertain. To explore the status of and opportunities for research in this area, the NHLBI, in partnership with the American Thoracic Society, convened a workshop of investigators in San Francisco, California on May 14, 2016. At the workshop, current understanding of asthma-COPD overlap was discussed among clinicians, pathologists, radiologists, epidemiologists, and investigators with expertise in asthma and COPD. They considered knowledge gaps in our understanding of asthma-COPD overlap and identified strategies and research priorities that will advance its understanding. This report summarizes those discussions.

  3. Circadian Rhythms in Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Life on earth is subject to daily and predictable fluctuations in light intensity, temperature, and humidity created by rotation of the earth. Circadian rhythms, generated by a circadian clock, control temporal programs of cellular physiology to facilitate adaptation to daily environmental changes. Circadian rhythms are nearly ubiquitous and are found in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Here we introduce the molecular mechanism of the circadian clock in the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. We review the current understanding of the cyanobacterial clock, emphasizing recent work that has generated a more comprehensive understanding of how the circadian oscillator becomes synchronized with the external environment and how information from the oscillator is transmitted to generate rhythms of biological activity. These results have changed how we think about the clock, shifting away from a linear model to one in which the clock is viewed as an interactive network of multifunctional components that are integrated into the context of the cell in order to pace and reset the oscillator. We conclude with a discussion of how this basic timekeeping mechanism differs in other cyanobacterial species and how information gleaned from work in cyanobacteria can be translated to understanding rhythmic phenomena in other prokaryotic systems. PMID:26335718

  4. The care of adults with congenital heart disease across the globe: Current assessment and future perspective: A position statement from the International Society for Adult Congenital Heart Disease (ISACHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Gary; Mulder, Barbara J; Aboulhosn, Jamil; Daniels, Curt J; Elizari, Maria Amalia; Hong, Gu; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Michael J; Marelli, Ariane J; O'Donnell, Clare P; Oechslin, Erwin N; Pearson, Dorothy D; Pieper, Els P G; Saxena, Anita; Schwerzmann, Markus; Stout, Karen K; Warnes, Carole A; Khairy, Paul

    2015-09-15

    The number of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased markedly over the past few decades as a result of astounding successes in pediatric cardiac care. Nevertheless, it is now well understood that CHD is not cured but palliated, such that life-long expert care is required to optimize outcomes. All countries in the world that experience improved survival in CHD must face new challenges inherent to the emergence of a growing and aging CHD population with changing needs and medical and psychosocial issues. Founded in 1992, the International Society for Adult Congenital Heart Disease (ISACHD) is the leading global organization of professionals dedicated to pursuing excellence in the care of adults with CHD worldwide. Recognizing the unique and varied issues involved in caring for adults with CHD, ISACHD established a task force to assess the current status of care for adults with CHD across the globe, highlight major challenges and priorities, and provide future direction. The writing committee consisted of experts from North America, South America, Europe, South Asia, East Asia, and Oceania. The committee was divided into subgroups to review key aspects of adult CHD (ACHD) care. Regional representatives were tasked with investigating and reporting on relevant local issues as accurately as possible, within the constraints of available data. The resulting ISACHD position statement addresses changing patterns of worldwide epidemiology, models of care and organization of care, education and training, and the global research landscape in ACHD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Posttranscriptional mechanisms in controlling eukaryotic circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Weng, Wenya; Guo, Jinhu

    2011-05-20

    The circadian clock is essential in almost all living organisms to synchronise biochemical, metabolic, physiological and behavioural cycles to daily changing environmental factors. In a highly conserved fashion, the circadian clock is primarily controlled by multiple positive and negative molecular circuitries that control gene expression. More recently, research in Neurospora and other eukaryotes has uncovered the involvement of additional regulatory components that operate at the posttranslational level to fine tune the circadian system. Though it remains poorly understood, a growing body of evidence has shown that posttranscriptional regulation controls the expression of both circadian oscillator and output gene transcripts at a number of different steps. This regulation is crucial for driving and maintaining robust circadian rhythms. Here we review recent advances in circadian rhythm research at the RNA level. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Affective disorders and biological rhythms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Strat, Y; Ramoz, N; Gorwood, P

    2008-06-01

    Disruptions of circadian rhythms are described in affective disorders, including unipolar and bipolar disorder, but also seasonal affective disorder. Sleep-wake and hormone circadian rhythms are among the most quoted examples. Depression could be conceptualized as a desynchronization between the endogenous circadian pacemaker and the exogenous stimuli, such as sunlight and social rhythms. Accordingly, Clock genes have been studied and the literature suggests that variants in these genes confer a higher risk of relapse, more sleep disturbances associated with depression, as well as incomplete treatment response. Most of therapeutic interventions in depression have an impact on biological rhythms. Some of them exclusively act via a biological pathway, such as sleep deprivation or light therapy. Some psychosocial interventions are specifically focusing on social rhythms, particularly in bipolar disorder, in which the promotion of stabilization is emphasized. Finally, all antidepressant medications could improve biological rhythms, but some new agents are now totally focusing this novel approach for the treatment of depression.

  7. Light Rhythms in Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Katja

    2013-01-01

    formation and rhythm. When integrated into an architectural concept, electrical lighting non-intended for poetic composition has the ability to contribute to place, time, and function-telling aspects of places in urban contexts. Urban environments are information wise challenging to pre-historic human......On one hand, urban lighting expresses itself in a complex visual environment made by the interplay by between many separate lighting schemes, as street lighting, shop lighting, luminous commercials etc. On the other, a noticeable order of patterns occurs, when lighting is observed as luminous...

  8. Implications of disturbances in circadian rhythms for cardiovascular health: A new frontier in free radical biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaper, Neelam; Bailey, Craig D C; Ghugre, Nilesh R; Reitz, Cristine; Awosanmi, Zikra; Waines, Ryan; Martino, Tami A

    2017-11-13

    Cell autonomous circadian "clock" mechanisms are present in virtually every organ, and generate daily rhythms that are important for normal physiology. This is especially relevant to the cardiovascular system, for example the circadian mechanism orchestrates rhythms in heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac contractility, metabolism, gene and protein abundance over the 24-h day and night cycles. Conversely, disturbing circadian rhythms (e.g. via shift work, sleep disorders) increases cardiovascular disease risk, and exacerbates cardiac remodelling and worsens outcome. Notably, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important contributors to heart disease, especially the pathophysiologic damage that occurs after myocardial infarction (MI, heart attack). However, little is known about how the circadian mechanism, or rhythm desynchrony, is involved in these key pathologic stress responses. This review summarizes the current knowledge on circadian rhythms in the cardiovascular system, and the implications of rhythm disturbances for cardiovascular health. Furthermore, we highlight how free radical biology coincides with the pathogenesis of myocardial repair and remodelling after MI, and indicate a role for the circadian system in the oxidative stress pathways in the heart and brain after MI. This fusion of circadian biology with cardiac oxidative stress pathways is novel, and offers enormous potential for improving our understanding and treatment of heart disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Comparison between European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines for initial management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puymirat, E; Ducrocq, G

    2013-08-01

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) have recently updated guidelines for management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The aim of this study is to compare the both recommendations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: outflow tract obstruction, coarctation of the aorta, tetralogy of Fallot, Ebstein anomaly and Marfan's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silversides, Candice K.; Kiess, Marla; Beauchesne, Luc; Bradley, Timothy; Connelly, Michael; Niwa, Koichiro; Mulder, Barbara; Webb, Gary; Colman, Jack; Therrien, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society

  11. ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 appropriate use criteria for cardiac computed tomography. A report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taylor, Allen J; Cerqueira, Manuel; Hodgson, John McB; Mark, Daniel; Min, James; O'Gara, Patrick; Rubin, Geoffrey D; Kramer, Christopher M; Berman, Daniel; Brown, Alan; Chaudhry, Farooq A; Cury, Ricardo C; Desai, Milind Y; Einstein, Andrew J; Gomes, Antoinette S; Harrington, Robert; Hoffmann, Udo; Khare, Rahul; Lesser, John; McGann, Christopher; Rosenberg, Alan; Schwartz, Robert; Shelton, Marc; Smetana, Gerald W; Smith, Jr, Sidney C

    2010-01-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac computed tomography (CCT...

  12. Clinical characteristics of patients from the worldwide registry on peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM): EURObservational Research Programme in conjunction with the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology Study Group on PPCM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, Karen; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Petrie, Mark C; Maggioni, Aldo P; Laroche, Cecile; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Schaufelberger, Maria; Tavazzi, Luigi; van der Meer, Peter; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; Seferovic, Petar; van Spandonck-Zwarts, Karin; Mbakwem, Amam; Böhm, Michael; Mouquet, Frederic; Pieske, Burkert; Hall, Roger; Ponikowski, Piotre; Bauersachs, Johann

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe disease presentation, co-morbidities, diagnosis and initial therapeutic management of patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) living in countries belonging to the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) vs. non-ESC countries. Out of 500 patients with PPCM entered by 31 March 2016, we report on data of the first 411 patients with completed case record forms (from 43 countries) entered into this ongoing registry. There were marked differences in socio-demographic parameters such as Human Development Index, GINI index on inequality, and Health Expenditure in PPCM patients from ESC vs. non-ESC countries (P heart failure after 1 month (92.3% vs. 81.3%, P heart failure were common within 1 month post-diagnosis and required intensive, multidisciplinary management. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  13. Strange musical rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentinuzzi, Max E; Hortt, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Music, along with its attached rhythm, has been with man for centuries, developing and evolving along with him. Its influence on human behavior and mood can reach levels whose limits are still unknown, especially in everything related to perception, where the whole nervous system is involved. Thus, physiology and psychology become strongly connected areas, while technology, through, for example, the production of music by electronic means, appears as a new unexpected ingredient that traditional composers and musicians of older times could not imagine. Obviously, bioengineering and its multiple branches are not absent either [1]?[4]. The literature is enormous with several specialized journals. When one looks back in time at the evolution of this complex area, the appearance of some kind of sudden jump (as a step function), which took place within a relatively recent short interval, is evident: music is now much more than what it used to be, and rhythm has made a step forward as if resurrecting and renewing the ancient Indian or African drums.

  14. Biological rhythms and preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnès eDitisheim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The impact of impaired circadian rhythm on health has been widely studied in shift workers and trans-meridian travelers. A part from its correlation with sleep and mood disorders, biological rhythm impairment is a recognized risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and breast cancer.Preeclampsia is a major public health issue, associated with a significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality worldwide. While the risks factors for this condition such as obesity, diabetes, pre-existing hypertension have been identified, the underlying mechanism of this multi-factorial disease is yet not fully understood.The disruption of the light/dark cycle in pregnancy has been associated with adverse outcomes. Slightly increased risk for small for gestational age babies, low birth weight babies and preterm deliveries has been reported in shift working women. Whether altered circadian cycle represents a risk factor for preeclampsia or preeclampsia is itself linked with an abnormal circadian cycle is less clear. There are only few reports available, showing conflicting results. In this review, we will discuss recent observations concerning circadian pattern of blood pressure in normotensive and hypertensive pregnancies. We explore the hypothesis that circadian misalignments may represent a risk factor for preeclampsia. Unraveling potential link between circadian clock gene and preeclampsia could offer a novel approach to our understanding of this multi-system disease specific to pregnancy.

  15. Adult congenital heart disease nurse coordination: Essential skills and role in optimizing team-based care a position statement from the International Society for Adult Congenital Heart Disease (ISACHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillman, Christina; Morin, Joanne; Thomet, Corina; Barber, Deena; Mizuno, Yoshiko; Yang, Hsiao-Ling; Malpas, Theresa; Flocco, Serena Francesca; Finlay, Clare; Chen, Chi-Wen; Balon, Yvonne; Fernandes, Susan M

    2017-02-15

    Founded in 1992, the International Society for Adult Congenital Heart Disease (ISACHD) is the leading global organization of professionals dedicated to pursuing excellence in the care of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) worldwide. Among ISACHD's objectives is to "promote a holistic team-based approach to the care of the adult with CHD that is comprehensive, patient-centered, and interdisciplinary" (http://www.isachd.org). This emphasis on team-based care reflects the fact that adults with CHD constitute a heterogeneous population with a wide spectrum of disease complexity, frequent association with other organ involvement, and varied co-morbidities and psychosocial issues. Recognizing the vital role of the adult CHD (ACHD) nurse coordinator (ACHD-NC) in optimizing team-based care, ISACHD established a task force to elucidate and provide guidance on the roles and responsibilities of the ACHD-NC. Acknowledging that nursing roles can vary widely from region to region based on factors such as credentials, scopes of practice, regulations, and local culture and tradition, an international panel was assembled with experts from North America, Europe, East Asia, and Oceania. The writing committee was tasked with reviewing key aspects of the ACHD-NC's role in team-based ACHD care. The resulting ISACHD position statement addresses the ACHD-NC's role and skills required in organizing, coordinating, and facilitating the care of adults with CHD, holistic assessment of the ACHD patient, patient education and counseling, and support for self-care management and self-advocacy. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Novel targets and future strategies for acute cardioprotection : Position Paper of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cellular Biology of the Heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Hausenloy, Derek; Garcia-Dorado, David; Bøtker, Hans Erik; M. Davidson, Sean; Downey, James; B. Engel, Felix; Jennings, Robert; Lecour, Sandrine; Leor, Jonathan; Madonna, Rosalinda; Ovize, Michel; Perrino, Cinzia; Prunier, Fabrice; Schulz, Rainer; Sluijter, Joost P.G.; Van Laake, Linda W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304077356; Vinten-Johansen, Jakob; M. Yellon, Derek; Ytrehus, Kirsti; Heusch, Gerd; Ferdinandy, Péter

    2017-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease and the heart failure that often results, remain the leading causes of death and disability in Europe and worldwide. As such, in order to prevent heart failure and improve clinical outcomes in patients presenting with an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and

  17. Safe magnetic resonance imaging scanning of patients with cardiac rhythm devices: a role for computer modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkoff, Bruce L; Albert, Timothy; Lazebnik, Mariya; Park, Sung-Min; Edmonson, Jonathan; Herberg, Ben; Golnitz, John; Wixon, Sandy; Peltier, Joel; Yoon, Hyun; Willey, Sarah; Safriel, Yair

    2013-12-01

    Although there are several hazards for patients with implanted pacemakers and defibrillators in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment, evaluation of lead electrode heating is the most complex because of the many influencing variables: patient size, anatomy, body composition, patient position in the bore, scan sequence (radiofrequency power level), lead routing, and lead design. Although clinical studies are an important step in demonstrating efficacy, demonstrating safety through clinical trials alone is not practical because of this complexity. The purpose of this study was to develop a comprehensive modeling framework to predict the probability of pacing capture threshold (PCT) change due to lead electrode heating in the MRI environment and thus provide a robust safety evaluation. The lead heating risk was assessed via PCT change because this parameter is the most clinically relevant measure of lead heating. The probability for PCT change was obtained by combining the prediction for power at the electrode-tissue interface obtained via simulations with a prediction for PCT change as a function of radiofrequency power obtained via an in vivo canine study. The human modeling framework predicted that the probability of a 0.5-V PCT change due to an MRI scan for the Medtronic CapSureFix MRI SureScan model 5086 MRI leads is <1/70,000 for chest scans and <1/10,000,000 for either head scans or lower torso scans. The framework efficiently models millions of combinations, delivering a robust evaluation of the lead electrode heating hazard. This modeling approach provides a comprehensive safety evaluation that is impossible to achieve using phantom testing, animal studies, or clinical trials alone. © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society Published by Heart Rhythm Society All rights reserved.

  18. Serial binary interval ratios improve rhythm reproduction

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang eWu; Anders eWestanmo; Liang eZhou; Junhao ePan

    2013-01-01

    Musical rhythm perception is a natural human ability that involves complex cognitive processes. Rhythm refers to the organization of events in time, and musical rhythms have an underlying hierarchical metrical structure. The metrical structure induces the feeling of a beat and the extent to which a rhythm induces the feeling of a beat is referred to as its metrical strength. Binary ratios are the most frequent interval ratio in musical rhythms. Rhythms with hierarchical binary ratios are bett...

  19. Music and rhythm in physiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Císařová, Romana

    2010-01-01

    This bachelor work is analyzing use of music and rhythm in physiotherapy practice. It describes effects of music on somatic functions and psychology of a man. It emphasizes significance of rhythm and rhythmical activities during the therapy. Focuses on therapy application in to the neurology, pediatrics and for patients suffering psychical problems.

  20. An official American Thoracic Society/International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation/Society of Critical Care Medicine/Association of Organ and Procurement Organizations/United Network of Organ Sharing Statement: ethical and policy considerations in organ donation after circulatory determination of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gries, Cynthia J; White, Douglas B; Truog, Robert D; Dubois, James; Cosio, Carmen C; Dhanani, Sonny; Chan, Kevin M; Corris, Paul; Dark, John; Fulda, Gerald; Glazier, Alexandra K; Higgins, Robert; Love, Robert; Mason, David P; Nakagawa, Thomas A; Shapiro, Ron; Shemie, Sam; Tracy, Mary Fran; Travaline, John M; Valapour, Maryam; West, Lori; Zaas, David; Halpern, Scott D

    2013-07-01

    Donation after circulatory determination of death (DCDD) has the potential to increase the number of organs available for transplantation. Because consent and management of potential donors must occur before death, DCDD raises unique ethical and policy issues. To develop an ethics and health policy statement on adult and pediatric DCDD relevant to critical care and transplantation stakeholders. A multidisciplinary panel of stakeholders was convened to develop an ethics and health policy statement. The panel consisted of representatives from the American Thoracic Society, Society of Critical Care Medicine, International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation, Association of Organ Procurement Organizations, and the United Network of Organ Sharing. The panel reviewed the literature, discussed important ethics and health policy considerations, and developed a guiding framework for decision making by stakeholders. A framework to guide ethics and health policy statement was established, which addressed the consent process, pre- and post mortem interventions, the determination of death, provisions of end-of-life care, and pediatric DCDD. The information presented in this Statement is based on the current evidence, experience, and clinical rationale. New clinical research and the development and dissemination of new technologies will eventually necessitate an update of this Statement.

  1. Neural mechanisms of rhythm perception: current findings and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahn, Jessica A

    2012-10-01

    Perception of temporal patterns is fundamental to normal hearing, speech, motor control, and music. Certain types of pattern understanding are unique to humans, such as musical rhythm. Although human responses to musical rhythm are universal, there is much we do not understand about how rhythm is processed in the brain. Here, I consider findings from research into basic timing mechanisms and models through to the neuroscience of rhythm and meter. A network of neural areas, including motor regions, is regularly implicated in basic timing as well as processing of musical rhythm. However, fractionating the specific roles of individual areas in this network has remained a challenge. Distinctions in activity patterns appear between "automatic" and "cognitively controlled" timing processes, but the perception of musical rhythm requires features of both automatic and controlled processes. In addition, many experimental manipulations rely on participants directing their attention toward or away from certain stimulus features, and measuring corresponding differences in neural activity. Many temporal features, however, are implicitly processed whether attended to or not, making it difficult to create controlled baseline conditions for experimental comparisons. The variety of stimuli, paradigms, and definitions can further complicate comparisons across domains or methodologies. Despite these challenges, the high level of interest and multitude of methodological approaches from different cognitive domains (including music, language, and motor learning) have yielded new insights and hold promise for future progress. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  2. Systems biology of cellular rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbeter, A; Gérard, C; Gonze, D; Leloup, J-C; Dupont, G

    2012-08-31

    Rhythms abound in biological systems, particularly at the cellular level where they originate from the feedback loops present in regulatory networks. Cellular rhythms can be investigated both by experimental and modeling approaches, and thus represent a prototypic field of research for systems biology. They have also become a major topic in synthetic biology. We review advances in the study of cellular rhythms of biochemical rather than electrical origin by considering a variety of oscillatory processes such as Ca++ oscillations, circadian rhythms, the segmentation clock, oscillations in p53 and NF-κB, synthetic oscillators, and the oscillatory dynamics of cyclin-dependent kinases driving the cell cycle. Finally we discuss the coupling between cellular rhythms and their robustness with respect to molecular noise.

  3. [Circadian rhythms and systems biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbeter, Albert; Gérard, Claude; Leloup, Jean-Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Cellular rhythms represent a field of choice for studies in system biology. The examples of circadian rhythms and of the cell cycle show how the experimental and modeling approaches contribute to clarify the conditions in which periodic behavior spontaneously arises in regulatory networks at the cellular level. Circadian rhythms originate from intertwined positive and negative feedback loops controlling the expression of several clock genes. Models can be used to address the dynamical bases of physiological disorders related to dysfunctions of the mammalian circadian clock. The cell cycle is driven by a network of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). Modeled in the form of four modules coupled through multiple regulatory interactions, the Cdk network operates in an oscillatory manner in the presence of sufficient amounts of growth factor. For circadian rhythms and the cell cycle, as for other recently observed cellular rhythms, periodic behavior represents an emergent property of biological systems related to their regulatory structure.

  4. Correlations between first documented cardiac rhythms and preceding telemetry in patients with code blue events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalala, Utpal S; Bonafide, Christopher P; Coletti, Christian M; Rathmanner, Penny E; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Berg, Robert A; Witzke, Anita K; Kasprzak, Melody S; Zubrow, Marc T

    2013-04-01

    Among in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) patients, the first cardiac rhythm documented on resuscitation records (FDR) is often used as a surrogate for arrest etiology. Although the FDR generally represents the electrical activity at the time of cardiopulmonary resuscitation initiation, it may not be the ideal rhythm to infer the arrest etiology. We hypothesized that a rhythm present earlier-at the time of the code blue call-would frequently differ from the FDR, because the FDR might represent the later stage of a progressive cardiopulmonary process. To evaluate agreement between FDR and telemetry rhythm at the time of code blue call. Cross-sectional study. A 750-bed adult tertiary care hospital and a 240-bed adult inner city community hospital. Adult general ward patients monitored on the hospital's telemetry system during the 2 minutes prior to a code blue call for IHCA. None. Agreement between FDR and telemetry rhythm. Among 69 IHCAs, agreement between FDR and telemetry was 65% (kappa = 0.37). Among 17 events with FDRs of ventricular tachyarrhythmia (VTA), telemetry showed VTA in 12 (71%) and other organized rhythms in 5 (29%). Among 12 events with first documented rhythms of asystole, telemetry showed asystole in 3 (25%), VTA in 1 (8%), and other organized rhythms in 8 (67%). The FDR had only fair agreement with the telemetry rhythm at the time of code blue call. The telemetry rhythm may be a useful adjunct to the FDR when investigating arrest etiology. Copyright © 2013 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  5. Knowledge Gaps in Cardiovascular Care of the Older Adult Population: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Geriatrics Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Michael W; Chyun, Deborah A; Skolnick, Adam H; Alexander, Karen P; Forman, Daniel E; Kitzman, Dalane W; Maurer, Mathew S; McClurken, James B; Resnick, Barbara M; Shen, Win K; Tirschwell, David L

    2016-05-24

    results of these studies will provide the foundation for future evidence-based guidelines applicable to older patients, thereby enhancing patient-centered evidence-based care of older people with cardiovascular disease in the United States and around the world. © 2016 by the American Heart Association, Inc., the American College of Cardiology Foundation, and the American Geriatrics Society.

  6. Adherence to the European Society of Cardiology (ESC guidelines for chronic heart failure - A national survey of the cardiologists in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoukat Sana

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of this study were to evaluate the awareness of and attitudes towards the 2005 European Society of Cardiology (ESC guidelines for Heart Failure (HF of the cardiologists in Pakistan and assess barriers to adherence to guidelines. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in person from March to July 2009 to all cardiologists practicing in 4 major cities in Pakistan (Karachi, Lahore, Quetta and Peshawar. A validated, semi-structured questionnaire assessing ESC 2005 Guidelines for HF was used to obtain information from cardiologists. It included questions about awareness and relevance of HF guidelines (See Additional File 1. Respondents' management choices were compared with those of an expert panel based on the guidelines for three fictitious patient cases. Cardiologists were also asked about major barriers to adherence to guidelines. Additional file 1 Questionnaire. Description: Questionnaire that was administered to participants. Click here for file Results A total of 372 cardiologists were approached; 305 consented to participate (overall response rate, 82.0%. The survey showed a very high awareness of CHF guidelines; 97.4% aware of any guideline. About 13.8% considered ESC guidelines as relevant or very relevant for guiding treatment decisions while 92.8% chose AHA guidelines in relevance. 87.2% of respondents perceived that they adhered to the HF guidelines. For the patient cases, the proportions of respondents who made recommendations that completely matched those of the guidelines were 7% (Scenario 1, 0% (Scenario 2 and 20% (Scenario 3. Respondents considered patient compliance (59% and cost/health economics (50% as major barriers to guideline implementation. Conclusion We found important self reported departures from recommended HF management guidelines among cardiologists of Pakistan.

  7. Adherence to the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for chronic heart failure - A national survey of the cardiologists in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to evaluate the awareness of and attitudes towards the 2005 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for Heart Failure (HF) of the cardiologists in Pakistan and assess barriers to adherence to guidelines. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in person from March to July 2009 to all cardiologists practicing in 4 major cities in Pakistan (Karachi, Lahore, Quetta and Peshawar). A validated, semi-structured questionnaire assessing ESC 2005 Guidelines for HF was used to obtain information from cardiologists. It included questions about awareness and relevance of HF guidelines (See Additional File 1). Respondents' management choices were compared with those of an expert panel based on the guidelines for three fictitious patient cases. Cardiologists were also asked about major barriers to adherence to guidelines. Results A total of 372 cardiologists were approached; 305 consented to participate (overall response rate, 82.0%). The survey showed a very high awareness of CHF guidelines; 97.4% aware of any guideline. About 13.8% considered ESC guidelines as relevant or very relevant for guiding treatment decisions while 92.8% chose AHA guidelines in relevance. 87.2% of respondents perceived that they adhered to the HF guidelines. For the patient cases, the proportions of respondents who made recommendations that completely matched those of the guidelines were 7% (Scenario 1), 0% (Scenario 2) and 20% (Scenario 3). Respondents considered patient compliance (59%) and cost/health economics (50%) as major barriers to guideline implementation. Conclusion We found important self reported departures from recommended HF management guidelines among cardiologists of Pakistan. PMID:22093082

  8. Dissipative structures and biological rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbeter, Albert

    2017-10-01

    Sustained oscillations abound in biological systems. They occur at all levels of biological organization over a wide range of periods, from a fraction of a second to years, and with a variety of underlying mechanisms. They control major physiological functions, and their dysfunction is associated with a variety of physiological disorders. The goal of this review is (i) to give an overview of the main rhythms observed at the cellular and supracellular levels, (ii) to briefly describe how the study of biological rhythms unfolded in the course of time, in parallel with studies on chemical oscillations, (iii) to present the major roles of biological rhythms in the control of physiological functions, and (iv) the pathologies associated with the alteration, disappearance, or spurious occurrence of biological rhythms. Two tables present the main examples of cellular and supracellular rhythms ordered according to their period, and their role in physiology and pathophysiology. Among the rhythms discussed are neural and cardiac rhythms, metabolic oscillations such as those occurring in glycolysis in yeast, intracellular Ca++ oscillations, cyclic AMP oscillations in Dictyostelium amoebae, the segmentation clock that controls somitogenesis, pulsatile hormone secretion, circadian rhythms which occur in all eukaryotes and some bacteria with a period close to 24 h, the oscillatory dynamics of the enzymatic network driving the cell cycle, and oscillations in transcription factors such as NF-ΚB and tumor suppressors such as p53. Ilya Prigogine's concept of dissipative structures applies to temporal oscillations and allows us to unify within a common framework the various rhythms observed at different levels of biological organization, regardless of their period and underlying mechanism.

  9. Frequency Characteristics of Rhythm Non-Assimilation in Canine Ventricular Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Guryanov

    2010-01-01

    ventricular fibrillation stages in automated defibrillators. Key words: canine heart, ventricular fibrillation, rhythm non-assimilation.

  10. Gamma Rhythms and Beta Rhythms Have Different Synchronization Properties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    N. Kopell; G. B. Ermentrout; M. A. Whittington; R. D. Traub

    2000-01-01

    ...) have a different dynamical structure than that of gamma (30-70 Hz). We use a simplified model to show that the different rhythms employ different dynamical mechanisms to synchronize, based on different ionic currents...

  11. Looking for Rhythm in Speech

    OpenAIRE

    Fred Cummins

    2012-01-01

    A brief review is provided of the study of rhythm in speech. Much of that activity has focused on looking for empirical measures that would support the categorization of languages into discrete rhythm ‘types’. That activity has had little success, and has used the term ‘rhythm’ in increasingly unmusical and unintuitive ways. Recent approaches to conversation that regard speech as a whole-body activity are found to provide considerations of rhythm that are closer to the central, musical, sense...

  12. Looking for Rhythm in Speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Cummins

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A brief review is provided of the study of rhythm in speech. Much of that activity has focused on looking for empirical measures that would support the categorization of languages into discrete rhythm ‘types’. That activity has had little success, and has used the term ‘rhythm’ in increasingly unmusical and unintuitive ways. Recent approaches to conversation that regard speech as a whole-body activity are found to provide considerations of rhythm that are closer to the central, musical, sense of the term.

  13. Nonlinear Control of Heart Rate Variability in Human Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, George; Allan, Walter; Sobel, Daniel; Allan, Kenneth D.

    1996-03-01

    Nonlinear analyses of infant heart rhythms reveal a marked rise in the complexity of the electrocardiogram with maturation. We find that normal mature infants (gestation >= 35 weeks) have complex and distinctly nonlinear heart rhythms (consistent with recent reports for healthy adults) but that such nonlinearity is lacking in preterm infants (gestation physiological states.

  14. Other Rhythm Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) Healthy Living for Heart.org ... and Live Our Interactive Cardiovascular Library has detailed animations and illustrations to help you learn about conditions, ...

  15. Learning by joining the Rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to explore how a joint rhythm is learned. The exploration is based on a combination of a case study of training in elite rowing and theoretical considerations concerning mutual incorporation of skills in learning. In 2009 Juliane and Anne start to row the double scull together....... The two rowers’ aim is to be among the exclusive group of teams that qualify for the Olympic Games three years later. However, Anne is not a rower, and has to be apprenticed by Juliane, who is an experienced elite rower. One important learning goal in the apprenticeship is to find a good joint rhythm......, which will enable the rowers to put optimal effort into the rowing. Thus the apprenticeship is about developing a sense for a good rhythm in Anne which corresponds to Juliane’s finely tuned sense of what a good rhythm should feel like. Our study suggests that apprenticeship learning has to be understood...

  16. Learning by joining the Rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole

    2012-01-01

    . The two rowers’ aim is to be among the exclusive group of teams that qualify for the Olympic Games three years later. However, Anne is not a rower, and has to be apprenticed by Juliane, who is an experienced elite rower. One important learning goal in the apprenticeship is to find a good joint rhythm......, which will enable the rowers to put optimal effort into the rowing. Thus the apprenticeship is about developing a sense for a good rhythm in Anne which corresponds to Juliane’s finely tuned sense of what a good rhythm should feel like. Our study suggests that apprenticeship learning has to be understood......This article aims to explore how a joint rhythm is learned. The exploration is based on a combination of a case study of training in elite rowing and theoretical considerations concerning mutual incorporation of skills in learning. In 2009 Juliane and Anne start to row the double scull together...

  17. Learning by joining the Rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to explore how a joint rhythm is learned. The exploration is based on a combination of a case study of training in elite rowing and theoretical considerations concerning mutual incorporation of skills in learning. In 2009 Juliane and Anne start to row the double scull together......, which will enable the rowers to put optimal effort into the rowing. Thus the apprenticeship is about developing a sense for a good rhythm in Anne which corresponds to Juliane’s finely tuned sense of what a good rhythm should feel like. Our study suggests that apprenticeship learning has to be understood....... The two rowers’ aim is to be among the exclusive group of teams that qualify for the Olympic Games three years later. However, Anne is not a rower, and has to be apprenticed by Juliane, who is an experienced elite rower. One important learning goal in the apprenticeship is to find a good joint rhythm...

  18. Learning by joining the rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Ravn, Susanne; Christensen, Mette Krogh

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to explore how a joint rhythm is learned. The exploration is based on a combination of a case study of training in elite rowing and theoretical considerations concerning mutual incorporation of skills in learning. In 2009 Juliane and Anne start to row the double sculler together......, to be able to put optimal effort into the rowing. Thus the apprenticeship is about developing a sense for a good rhythm in Anne which corresponds to Juliane’s fine-grained sense of what a good rhythm should feel like. Our study suggests that apprenticeship learning has to be understood as an embodied....... The two rowers’ aim is to be among the exclusive group of teams that qualify for the Olympic Games three years later. However Anne is not a rower, and has to be apprenticed by Juliane, who is an experienced elite rower. One important learning goal in the apprenticeship is to find a good joint rhythm...

  19. Delirium - A Dysfunctional Circadian Rhythm

    OpenAIRE

    Eckle T

    2016-01-01

    Critical care units are a major cause of a disrupted circadian rhythm in patients [1, 2]. Light, noise, treatments, sedatives and mechanical ventilation throughout a 24 h time period are the major offenders of circadian rhythm disruption in the intensive care unit [ICU] [2]. Interestingly, circadian disruption is frequently associated with the occurrence of delirium having a high impact on outcome and mortality in the critically ill [3-5]. Endogenous melatonin, a mirror of our circadian rhyth...

  20. Are hospitalized or ambulatory patients with heart failure treated in accordance with European Society of Cardiology guidelines? Evidence from 12,440 patients of the ESC Heart Failure Long-Term Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggioni, Aldo P; Anker, Stefan D; Dahlström, Ulf; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Ponikowski, Piotr; Zannad, Faiez; Amir, Offer; Chioncel, Ovidiu; Leiro, Marisa Crespo; Drozdz, Jaroslaw; Erglis, Andrejs; Fazlibegovic, Emir; Fonseca, Candida; Fruhwald, Friedrich; Gatzov, Plamen; Goncalvesova, Eva; Hassanein, Mahmoud; Hradec, Jaromir; Kavoliuniene, Ausra; Lainscak, Mitja; Logeart, Damien; Merkely, Bela; Metra, Marco; Persson, Hans; Seferovic, Petar; Temizhan, Ahmet; Tousoulis, Dimitris; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate how recommendations of European guidelines regarding pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for heart failure (HF) are adopted in clinical practice. The ESC-HF Long-Term Registry is a prospective, observational study conducted in 211 Cardiology Centres of 21 European and Mediterranean countries, members of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). From May 2011 to April 2013, a total of 12,440 patients were enrolled, 40.5% with acute HF and 59.5% with chronic HF. Intravenous treatments for acute HF were heterogeneously administered, irrespective of guideline recommendations. In chronic HF, with reduced EF, renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers, beta-blockers, and mineralocorticoid antagonists (MRAs) were used in 92.2, 92.7, and 67.0% of patients, respectively. When reasons for non-adherence were considered, the real rate of undertreatment accounted for 3.2, 2.3, and 5.4% of the cases, respectively. About 30% of patients received the target dosage of these drugs, but a documented reason for not achieving the target dosage was reported in almost two-thirds of them. The more relevant reasons for non-implantation of a device, when clinically indicated, were related to doctor uncertainties on the indication, patient refusal, or logistical/cost issues. This pan-European registry shows that, while in patients with acute HF, a large heterogeneity of treatments exists, drug treatment of chronic HF can be considered largely adherent to recommendations of current guidelines, when the reasons for non-adherence are taken into account. Observations regarding the real possibility to adhere fully to current guidelines in daily clinical practice should be seriously considered when clinical practice guidelines have to be written.

  1. Stochastic feedback and the regulation of biological rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes Amaral, L. A.; Goldberger, A. L.; Stanley, H. E.

    1998-01-01

    We propose a general approach to the question of how biological rhythms spontaneously self-regulate, based on the concept of "stochastic feedback". We illustrate this approach by considering at a coarse-grained level the neuroautonomic regulation of the heart rate. The model generates complex dynamics and successfully acounts for key characteristics of cardiac variability, including the l/f power spectrum, the functional form and scaling of the distribution of variations, and correlations in the Fourier phases indicating nonlinear dynamics.

  2. Knowledge Gaps in Cardiovascular Care of Older Adults: A Scientific Statement from the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Geriatrics Society: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Michael W; Chyun, Deborah A; Skolnick, Adam H; Alexander, Karen P; Forman, Daniel E; Kitzman, Dalane W; Maurer, Mathew S; McClurken, James B; Resnick, Barbara M; Shen, Win K; Tirschwell, David L

    2016-11-01

    The incidence and prevalence of most cardiovascular disorders increase with age, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death and major disability in adults aged 75 and older. Despite the effect of CVD on quality of life, morbidity, and mortality in older adults, individuals aged 75 and older have been markedly underrepresented in most major cardiovascular trials, and virtually all trials have excluded older adults with complex comorbidities, significant physical or cognitive disabilities, frailty, or residence in nursing homes and assisted living facilities. As a result, current guidelines are unable to provide evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of older adults typical of those encountered in routine clinical practice. The objectives of this scientific statement are to summarize current guideline recommendations as they apply to older adults, identify critical gaps in knowledge that preclude informed evidence-based decision-making, and recommend future research to close existing knowledge gaps. To achieve these objectives, a detailed review was conducted of current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) and American Stroke Association (ASA) guidelines to identify content and recommendations that explicitly targeted older adults. A pervasive lack of evidence to guide clinical decision-making in older adults with CVD was found, as well as a paucity of data on the effect of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions on outcomes that are particularly important to older adults, such as quality of life, physical function, and maintenance of independence. Accordingly, there is a critical need for a multitude of large population-based studies and clinical trials that include a broad spectrum of older adults representative of those seen in clinical practice and that incorporate relevant outcomes important to older adults in the study design. The results of these studies will provide the foundation for

  3. Report from the international society for nomenclature of paediatric and congenital heart disease: creation of a visual encyclopedia illustrating the terms and definitions of the international pediatric and congenital cardiac code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroud, Jorge M; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Spicer, Diane; Backer, Carl; Martin, Gerard R; Franklin, Rodney C G; Béland, Marie J; Krogmann, Otto N; Aiello, Vera D; Colan, Steven D; Everett, Allen D; William Gaynor, J; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Maruszewski, Bohdan; Stellin, Giovanni; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Walters, Henry L; Weinberg, Paul; Anderson, Robert H; Elliott, Martin J

    2010-10-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in the field of pediatric heart disease over the past 30 years. Although survival after heart surgery in children has improved dramatically, complications still occur, and optimization of outcomes for all patients remains a challenge. To improve outcomes, collaborative efforts are required and ultimately depend on the possibility of using a common language when discussing pediatric and congenital heart disease. Such a universal language has been developed and named the International Pediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code (IPCCC). To make the IPCCC more universally understood, efforts are under way to link the IPCCC to pictures and videos. The Archiving Working Group is an organization composed of leaders within the international pediatric cardiac medical community and part of the International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease (www.ipccc.net). Its purpose is to illustrate, with representative images of all types and formats, the pertinent aspects of cardiac diseases that affect neonates, infants, children, and adults with congenital heart disease, using the codes and definitions associated with the IPCCC as the organizational backbone. The Archiving Working Group certifies and links images and videos to the appropriate term and definition in the IPCCC. These images and videos are then displayed in an electronic format on the Internet. The purpose of this publication is to report the recent progress made by the Archiving Working Group in establishing an Internet-based, image encyclopedia that is based on the standards of the IPCCC.

  4. Diagnosis of stable ischemic heart disease: summary of a clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians/American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association/American Association for Thoracic Surgery/Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association/Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaseem, Amir; Fihn, Stephan D; Williams, Sankey; Dallas, Paul; Owens, Douglas K; Shekelle, Paul

    2012-11-20

    The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline in collaboration with the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), American Heart Association (AHA), American Association for Thoracic Surgery, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons to help clinicians diagnose known or suspected stable ischemic heart disease. Literature on this topic published before November 2011 was identified by using MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, PsychINFO, AMED, and SCOPUS. Searches were limited to human studies published in English. This guideline grades the evidence and recommendations according to a translation of the ACCF/AHA grading system into ACP's clinical practice guidelines grading system. This guideline includes 28 recommendations that address the following issues: the initial diagnosis of the patient who might have stable ischemic heart disease, cardiac stress testing to assess the risk for death or myocardial infarction in patients diagnosed with stable ischemic heart disease, and coronary angiography for risk assessment.

  5. Bleeding risk assessment and management in atrial fibrillation patients: a position document from the European Heart Rhythm Association, endorsed by the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Andreotti, Felicita; Fauchier, Laurent; Huber, Kurt; Hylek, Elaine; Knight, Eve; Lane, Deirdre A.; Levi, Marcel; Marin, Francisco; Palareti, Gualtiero; Kirchhof, Paulus; Collet, Jean-Philippe; Rubboli, Andrea; Poli, Daniela; Camm, John

    2011-01-01

    Despite the clear net clinical benefit of oral anticoagulation (OAC) in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients at risk for stroke, major bleeding events (especially intra-cranial bleeds) may be devastating events when they do occur. The decision for OAC is often based on a careful assessment of both

  6. Analysis and classification of ECG-waves and rhythms using circular statistics and vector strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janßen Jan-Dirk

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The most common way to analyse heart rhythm is to calculate the RR-interval and the heart rate variability. For further evaluation, descriptive statistics are often used. Here we introduce a new and more natural heart rhythm analysis tool that is based on circular statistics and vector strength. Vector strength is a tool to measure the periodicity or lack of periodicity of a signal. We divide the signal into non-overlapping window segments and project the detected R-waves around the unit circle using the complex exponential function and the median RR-interval. In addition, we calculate the vector strength and apply circular statistics as wells as an angular histogram on the R-wave vectors. This approach enables an intuitive visualization and analysis of rhythmicity. Our results show that ECG-waves and rhythms can be easily visualized, analysed and classified by circular statistics and vector strength.

  7. Cardiac implantable electronic device remote monitoring surveillance in pediatric and congenital heart disease: Utility relative to frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechert, Brynn E; Serwer, Gerald A; Bradley, David J; Dick, Macdonald; LaPage, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Heart Rhythm Society expert consensus provides recommendations for surveillance monitoring of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), but limited data are available for the pediatric and congenital heart disease population. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of actionable events during CIED surveillance in this population, assess the utility of routine CIED remote monitoring, and assess the potential benefit from more frequent monitoring. This was a retrospective cohort study of all CIED patients followed at a pediatric and congenital heart center and enrolled in the Medtronic Carelink system with either (1) a chronic (implanted for >6 months) CIED followed between July 1, 2010, and July 1, 2012, on a bimonthly schedule; or (2) a new CIED (implanted pediatric and congenital heart disease patients, the rate of actionable events was low, especially on asymptomatic interrogations. Most actionable events were due to tachyarrhythmia. A more frequent than every 90-day monitoring schedule does not appear to be of significant benefit. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Stable isotope ratios in hair and teeth reflect biologic rhythms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Appenzeller

    Full Text Available Biologic rhythms give insight into normal physiology and disease. They can be used as biomarkers for neuronal degenerations. We present a diverse data set to show that hair and teeth contain an extended record of biologic rhythms, and that analysis of these tissues could yield signals of neurodegenerations. We examined hair from mummified humans from South America, extinct mammals and modern animals and people, both healthy and diseased, and teeth of hominins. We also monitored heart-rate variability, a measure of a biologic rhythm, in some living subjects and analyzed it using power spectra. The samples were examined to determine variations in stable isotope ratios along the length of the hair and across growth-lines of the enamel in teeth. We found recurring circa-annual periods of slow and fast rhythms in hydrogen isotope ratios in hair and carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in teeth. The power spectra contained slow and fast frequency power, matching, in terms of normalized frequency, the spectra of heart rate variability found in our living subjects. Analysis of the power spectra of hydrogen isotope ratios in hair from a patient with neurodegeneration revealed the same spectral features seen in the patient's heart-rate variability. Our study shows that spectral analysis of stable isotope ratios in readily available tissues such as hair could become a powerful diagnostic tool when effective treatments and neuroprotective drugs for neurodegenerative diseases become available. It also suggests that similar analyses of archaeological specimens could give insight into the physiology of ancient people and animals.

  9. Integration of metabolic and cardiovascular diurnal rhythms by circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohsaka, Akira; Waki, Hidefumi; Cui, He; Gouraud, Sabine S; Maeda, Masanobu

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how the 24-hour blood-pressure rhythm is programmed has been one of the most challenging questions in cardiovascular research. The 24-hour blood-pressure rhythm is primarily driven by the circadian clock system, in which the master circadian pacemaker within the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus is first entrained to the light/dark cycle and then transmits synchronizing signals to the peripheral clocks common to most tissues, including the heart and blood vessels. However, the circadian system is more complex than this basic hierarchical structure, as indicated by the discovery that peripheral clocks are either influenced to some degree or fully driven by temporal changes in energy homeostasis, independent of the light entrainment pathway. Through various comparative genomic approaches and through studies exploiting mouse genetics and transgenics, we now appreciate that cardiovascular tissues possess a large number of metabolic genes whose expression cycle and reciprocally affect the transcriptional control of major circadian clock genes. These findings indicate that metabolic cycles can directly or indirectly affect the diurnal rhythm of cardiovascular function. Here, we discuss a framework for understanding how the 24-hour blood-pressure rhythm is driven by the circadian system that integrates cardiovascular and metabolic function.

  10. Comparison of English Language Rhythm and Kalhori Kurdish Language Rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafiseh Taghva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigating on quantitative features of languages rhythm is a recent issue that attracts the attention of linguists. Interval-based method is a method of studying the rhythmic quantitative features of languages. This method use Pairwise Variability Index (PVI to consider the variability of vocalic duration and inter-vocalic duration of sentences which leads to classification of languages rhythm into stress-timed languages and syllable-timed ones. This study aims to consider the rhythm of British English and Kalhori Kurdish, which is spoken in some part of west of Iran, based on interval-based method. In order to reach this aim the duration variability of vocalic interval and inter-vocalic interval of English and Kalhori Kurdish are measured by PVI. Afterward the outcomes of this study were compared to the existed results of other languages. The results of this research demonstrated that the rhythmic quantitative features of these two languages are placed among stress-timed languages.   Keywords: Rhythm, interval-based method, syllable-timed, stress-timed

  11. Patient’s Behaviour with Coronary heart desease Viewed from Socio-Cultural aspect of Aceh Society in Zainoel Abidin Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marniati

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CHD is a chronic inability of heart to draw an adequate blood on myocardium due to specific problem in coronary artery. When the artery that supplies myocardium is interrupted, thus the heart is unable pumping the blood effectively to fill up an adequate blood perfusion to vital organs and other peripheral tissues. If the perfusion is impaired in time of oxygenation, the patient will threatened by a sudden death. This is a quantitative, analytical and observational research with a design of case study control, in which the subject is CHD patients and the control is non-CHD patients. The research populations were 2318 outpatients with CHD who visited Heart Polyclinic at Zainoel Abidin Hospital Banda Aceh. The sample studied were 92 patients with CHD and 92 patients with non-CHD (control. We used primary and secondary data that processed through editing, coding, entry, cleaning and tabulating. The data was analyzed using univariate, bivariate and multivariate analysis. The results showed that the CHD occurrences are significantly influenced by eating behavior (p = 0,000, smoking habit (p = 0,000 and sporting habit (p = 0,000. Therefore, health workers are expected to increase health promotion in order to improve the quality of life of people, especially in elderly people, by adopting a healthy lifestyle and avoiding CHD risk factors. Moreover, people are also suggested to take regular lipid profile check up and keep off smoking habit in order to do early prevention of CHD.

  12. Genotypic and phenotypic predictors of complete heart block and recovery of conduction after surgical repair of congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Laura E; Smith, Andrew H; Flack, English C; Crum, Kim; Owen, Jill; Kannankeril, Prince J

    2017-03-01

    Complete heart block (CHB) is a major complication that occurs after congenital heart surgery. We hypothesized that genetic and clinical factors are associated with the development of postoperative CHB and recovery of atrioventricular (AV) conduction. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of CHB and recovery after congenital heart surgery. Patients undergoing congenital heart surgery at our institution from September 2007 through June 2015 were prospectively enrolled in a parent study of postoperative arrhythmias. Patients with onset of CHB within 48 hours postoperatively were included in the study. Daily rhythm assessment was performed until demonstration of 1:1 conduction or pacemaker implantation. Of 1199 subjects enrolled, 56 (4.7%) developed postoperative CHB. In multivariate analysis, preoperative digoxin exposure (odds ratio [OR] 2.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-4.4), aortic cross-clamp time (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.04-1.11), ventricular septal defect closure (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.1), and a common polymorphism in the gene encoding connexin-40 (GJA5 rs10465885 TT genotype; OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2-3.8) were independently associated with postoperative CHB. Junctional acceleration (JA) (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.1-15.1) and intermittent conduction noted during complete AV block (OR 9.1, 95% CI 1.0-80) were independently associated with 1:1 AV conduction recovery. Use of a multivariate model including both JA and intermittent conduction demonstrated good discrimination with a positive predictive value of 86% (95% CI 67%-96%) in predicting 1:1 conduction recovery. Preoperative factors, including a missense polymorphism in GJA5, are independently associated with increased risk for CHB. JA and intermittent conduction may prove useful in predicting recovery of AV conduction among patients with CHB after congenital heart surgery. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of 24-hour shift work with nighttime napping on circadian rhythm characteristics in ambulance personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Y; Takano, T

    1993-12-01

    Forty-two ambulance personnel engaged in a 24-h shift system participated in a chronobiological field study to study the effects of 24-h shift work on circadian rhythm characteristics. Autorhythmometry of circadian rhythms of oral temperature, right and left grip strengths, and heart rate plus subjective assessment of drowsiness, fatigue, and attention was performed every approximately 4 h except during sleep for 7 days. Cosinor and power spectral analyses were applied to the longitudinal data of each individual. Changes in circadian period different from 24 h of oral temperature, grip strengths, and heart rate plus subjective drowsiness, fatigue, and attention were observed in ambulance personnel. The incidence of circadian periodicity different from 24 h in oral temperature and right and left grip strength was 28.6%, 35.7%, and 47.6%, respectively. The incidence was relatively lower than that of shift workers engaged in a discontinuous 8-h shift system we reported on previously. Working conditions allowing ambulance personnel to nap when not called for emergency (for > 4 h) might contribute to a stabilization of circadian rhythms. Furthermore, long nighttime ambulance service amounting to > 100 min was significantly associated with a high incidence of at least one prominent circadian period among oral temperature and right and left grip strength rhythms different from 24 h. In conclusion, 24-h shift work altered the characteristics of circadian rhythms of ambulance personnel; nighttime naps seemed to have a favorable effect on averting changes in circadian rhythms.

  14. Rhythms and Dance. Games of Low Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD.

    This guide provides activities, resources, and ideas for elementary physical education and classroom teachers. The activities in the basic rhythms program are divided into five classifications: movement patterns, dramatic activities, singing games, creative rhythms-dance, and rhythmic gymnastics. At the beginning of the basic rhythms sections is a…

  15. ADHD, circadian rhythms and seasonality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wynchank, Dora S.; Bijlenga, Denise; Lamers, Femke; Bron, Tannetje I.; Winthorst, Wim H.; Vogel, Suzan W.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Beekman, Aartjan T.; Kooij, J. Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated whether the association between Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) was mediated by the circadian rhythm. Method: Data of 2239 persons from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) were used. Two groups

  16. Circadian rhythms in mitochondrial respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goede, Paul; Wefers, Jakob; Brombacher, Eline Constance; Schrauwen, P.; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2018-01-01

    Many physiological processes are regulated with a 24h periodicity to anticipate the environmental changes of day to nighttime and vice versa. These 24h regulations, commonly termed circadian rhythms, amongst others control the sleep-wake cycle, locomotor activity and preparation for food

  17. Management of tricuspid valve regurgitation: Position statement of the European Society of Cardiology Working Groups of Cardiovascular Surgery and Valvular Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Manuel J; Rodríguez-Palomares, José; Prendergast, Bernard; De Bonis, Michele; Rosenhek, Raphael; Al-Attar, Nawwar; Barili, Fabio; Casselman, Filip; Folliguet, Thierry; Iung, Bernard; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Muneretto, Claudio; Obadia, Jean-François; Pierard, Luc; Suwalski, Piotr; Zamorano, Pepe

    2017-12-01

    Tricuspid regurgitation (TR) is a very frequent manifestation of valvular heart disease. It may be due to the primary involvement of the valve or secondary to pulmonary hypertension or to the left-sided heart valve disease (most commonly rheumatic and involving the mitral valve). The pathophysiology of secondary TR is complex and is intrinsically connected to the anatomy and function of the right ventricle. A systematic multimodality approach to diagnosis and assessment (based not only on the severity of the TR but also on the assessment of annular size, RV function and degree of pulmonary hypertension) is, therefore, essential. Once considered non-important, treatment of secondary TR is currently viewed as an essential concomitant procedure at the time of mitral (and, less frequently, aortic valve) surgery. Although the indications for surgical management of severe TR are now generally accepted (Class I), controversy persists concerning the role of intervention for moderate TR. However, there is a trend for intervention in this setting, especially at the time of surgery for left-sided heart valve disease and/or in patients with significant tricuspid annular dilatation (Class IIa). Currently, surgery remains the best approach for the interventional treatment of TR. Percutaneous tricuspid valve intervention (both repair and replacement) is still in its infancy but may become a reliable option in future, especially for high-risk patients with isolated primary TR or with secondary TR related to advanced left-sided heart valve disease. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  18. Variabilidad de la frecuencia cardiaca y alteraciones del ritmo cardiaco asociados a la terapia con células progenitoras en enfermedad cardiovascular Heart rate variability and cardiac rhythm alterations associated with stem cell therapy in cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M Orrego

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: en los pacientes con falla cardiaca y cardiopatía isquémica elegibles para la terapia de células progenitoras derivadas de la médula ósea, se ha demostrado la disminución de la variabilidad de la frecuencia cardiaca [medida por la desviación estándar del intervalo RR (NN SDNN, siglas en inglés], situación que se relaciona con un aumento del riesgo cardiovascular y de eventos arrítmicos, como consecuencia de una disfunción del sistema nervioso autónomo. Métodos: se analizaron los pacientes que recibieron trasplante autólogo derivado de la médula ósea y que tenían enfermedad cardiaca isquémica aguda o crónica con fracción de eyección menor del 45%, susceptibles o no de revascularización quirúrgica y zonas de tejido miocárdico necrótico y viable. Se les realizó monitoreo Holter de 24 horas pre-trasplante, a los dos, seis y doce meses posteriores a la intervención. Resultados: se analizaron los datos de 16 pacientes, en lo referente al promedio de la frecuencia cardiaca máxima, mínima y media, la variabilidad de la frecuencia cardiaca y la aparición de arritmias ventriculares malignas. La terapia con células progenitoras derivadas de la médula ósea, se asoció con una mejoría estadísticamente significativa en la variabilidad de la frecuencia cardiaca (SDNN pasando de 65,44 ± 27 ms a 102,12 ± 37,88 ms (p= 0,004 y 100,23 ± 42,88 ms (p= 0,013 a los dos y seis meses respectivamente. En cuanto a la clasificación de riesgo cardiovascular de acuerdo con la variabilidad de la frecuencia cardiaca (SDNN, todos los pacientes considerados de alto riesgo (SDNN Introduction: in patients with chronic heart failure and ischemic cardiopathy eligible for therapy with stem cells derived from bone marrow, it has been demonstrated that there is a decrease in Heart Rate Variability (HRV, measured by the standard deviation of RR interval (NN SDNN, situation related to an increase of cardiovascular risk and arrhythmic

  19. Circadian Rest-Activity Rhythm in Pediatric Type 1 Narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filardi, Marco; Pizza, Fabio; Bruni, Oliviero; Natale, Vincenzo; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Pediatric type 1 narcolepsy is often challenging to diagnose and remains largely undiagnosed. Excessive daytime sleepiness, disrupted nocturnal sleep, and a peculiar phenotype of cataplexy are the prominent features. The knowledge available about the regulation of circadian rhythms in affected children is scarce. This study compared circadian rest-activity rhythm and actigraphic estimated sleep measures of children with type 1 narcolepsy versus healthy controls. Twenty-two drug-naïve type 1 narcolepsy children and 21 age- and sex- matched controls were monitored for seven days during the school week by actigraphy. Circadian activity rhythms were analyzed through functional linear modeling; nocturnal and diurnal sleep measures were estimated from activity using a validated algorithm. Children with type 1 narcolepsy presented an altered rest-activity rhythm characterized by enhanced motor activity throughout the night and blunted activity in the first afternoon. No difference was found between children with type 1 narcolepsy and controls in the timing of the circadian phase. Actigraphic sleep measures showed good discriminant capabilities in assessing type 1 narcolepsy nycthemeral disruption. Actigraphy reliably renders the nycthemeral disruption typical of narcolepsy type 1 in drug-naïve children with recent disease onset, indicating the sensibility of actigraphic assessment in the diagnostic work-up of childhood narcolepsy type 1. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  20. Physiological basis for human autonomic rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckberg, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    Oscillations of arterial pressures, heart periods, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity have been studied intensively in recent years to explore otherwise obscure human neurophysiological mechanisms. The best-studied rhythms are those occurring at breathing frequencies. Published evidence indicates that respiratory fluctuations of muscle sympathetic nerve activity and electrocardiographic R-R intervals result primarily from the action of a central 'gate' that opens during expiration and closes during inspiration. Parallel respiratory fluctuations of arterial pressures and R-R intervals are thought to be secondary to arterial baroreflex physiology: changes in systolic pressure provoke changes in the R-R interval. However, growing evidence suggests that these parallel oscillations result from the influence of respiration on sympathetic and vagal-cardiac motoneurones rather than from baroreflex physiology. There is a rapidly growing literature on the use of mathematical models of low- and high-frequency (respiratory) R-R interval fluctuations in characterizing instantaneous 'sympathovagal balance'. The case for this approach is based primarily on measurements made with patients in upright tilt. However, the strong linear relation between such measures as the ratio of low- to high-frequency R-R interval oscillations and the angle of the tilt reflects exclusively the reductions of the vagal (high-frequency) component. As the sympathetic component does not change in tilt, the low- to high-frequency R-R interval ratio provides no proof that sympathetic activity increases. Moreover, the validity of extrapolating from measurements performed during upright tilt to measurements during supine rest has not been established. Nonetheless, it is clear that measures of heart rate variability provide important prognostic information in patients with cardiovascular diseases. It is not known whether reduced heart rate variability is merely a marker for the severity of disease or a

  1. Are different rhythms good for different functions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Kopell

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This essay discusses the relationship between the physiology of rhythmsand potential functional roles. We focus on how the biophysics underlyingdifferent rhythms can give rise to different abilities of a network toform and manipulate cell assemblies. We also discuss how changes in themodulatory setting of the rhythms can change the flow of informationthrough cortical circuits, again tying physiology to computation. Wesuggest that diverse rhythms, or variations of a rhythm, can supportdifferent components of a cognitive act, with multiple rhythms potentiallyplaying multiple roles.

  2. How Two Players Negotiate Rhythm in a Shared Rhythm Game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne-Marie; Andersen, Hans Jørgen; Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    2012-01-01

    In a design and working prototype of a shared music interface eleven teams of two people were to collaborate about filling in holes with tones and beats in an evolving ground rhythm. The hypothesis was that users would tune into each other and have sections of characteristic rhythmical relationsh......In a design and working prototype of a shared music interface eleven teams of two people were to collaborate about filling in holes with tones and beats in an evolving ground rhythm. The hypothesis was that users would tune into each other and have sections of characteristic rhythmical...... from each other. Video analysis of user interaction shines light upon how users engaged in a rhythmical relationship, and interviews give information about the user experience in terms of the game play and user collaboration. Based on the findings in this paper we propose design guidelines...... for collaborative rhythmical game play....

  3. Endocrine and cardiovascular rhythms differentially adapt to chronic phase-delay shifts in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Michal; Molcan, Lubos; Herichova, Iveta; Okuliarova, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in regular circadian oscillations can have negative effects on cardiovascular function, but epidemiological data are inconclusive and new data from animal experiments elucidating critical biological mechanisms are needed. To evaluate the consequences of chronic phase shifts of the light/dark (LD) cycle on hormonal and cardiovascular rhythms, two experiments were performed. In Experiment 1, male rats were exposed to either a regular 12:12 LD cycle (CONT) or rotating 8-h phase-delay shifts of LD every second day (SHIFT) for 10 weeks. During this period, blood pressure (BP) was monitored weekly, and daily rhythms of melatonin, corticosterone, leptin and testosterone were evaluated at the end of the experiment. In Experiment 2, female rats were exposed to the identical shifted LD schedule for 12 weeks, and daily rhythms of BP, heart rate (HR) and locomotor activity were recorded using telemetry. Preserved melatonin rhythms were found in the pineal gland, plasma, heart and kidney of SHIFT rats with damped amplitude in the plasma and heart, suggesting that the central oscillator can adapt to chronic phase-delay shifts. In contrast, daily rhythms of corticosterone, testosterone and leptin were eliminated in SHIFT rats. Exposure to phase shifts did not lead to increased body weight and elevated BP. However, a shifted LD schedule substantially decreased the amplitude and suppressed the circadian power of the daily rhythms of BP and HR, implying weakened circadian control of physiological and behavioural processes. The results demonstrate that endocrine and cardiovascular rhythms can differentially adapt to chronic phase-delay shifts, promoting internal desynchronization between central and peripheral oscillators, which in combination with other negative environmental stimuli may result in negative health effects.

  4. Analysing Biological Rhythms in Fibromyalgia Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, M; Sarp, Ü; Gül, A I; Tanik, N; Yetisgin, A; Arik, H O; Nas, O; Yılmaz, Y K

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated biological rhythm disorders in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). The study enrolled 82 patients with FMS and 82 controls. Pain intensity was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The psychological conditions of the patients were evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The Biological Rhythms Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (BRIAN) was used to assess disturbances in biological rhythms (ie sleep, activity, social and eating patterns). There was no difference between the two groups at baseline (all p > 0.05). The BDI, BRIAN total, sleep, activity, social, and eating scores were higher in patients with FMS than in the controls (all p biological rhythms and BDI scores (p biological rhythm disturbances in FMS. There is an important relationship between rhythm disorders and FMS. The disturbances in sleep, functional activities, social participation, and disordered rhythms like eating patterns show the need for a multidisciplinary approach to treating patients with FMS.

  5. [Biological rhythms for anaesthesia and intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dispersyn, G; Chassard, D; Pain, L

    2010-06-01

    Knowledge of biological rhythms has led to better understanding of the time-of-day dependent effects of anaesthetic drugs. These chronopharmacological effects are currently explained by the biological rhythms modulating the pharmacokinetic, toxic and pharmacodynamic parameters of these substances. Such effect has been described for general anesthetics, local anaesthetics, analgesics as well as for antibiotics. But recent data also highlight that general anaesthetics, probably part of their brain effects, also alter the regulation of biological rhythms, including the sleep-wake or the endogenous circadian temperature rhythms. This desynchronization of biological rhythms can led to disturbance of the circadian secretion of many substances, including hormones. Finally, biological rhythms have been also described with regard to physiology of pain and cardiovascular physiopathology. The concept of biological rhythm should be present in mind not only for the clinical management of patients but also for setting studies in the field of anaesthesia, pain and intensive care. 2010. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  6. Consensus Document of the Italian Association of Hospital Cardiologists (ANMCO), Italian Society of Pediatric Cardiology (SICP), and Italian Society of Gynaecologists and Obstetrics (SIGO): pregnancy and congenital heart diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianca, Innocenzo; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Egidy Assenza, Gabriele; Barone, Chiara; Campisi, Marcello; Alaimo, Annalisa; Adorisio, Rachele; Comoglio, Francesca; Favilli, Silvia; Agnoletti, Gabriella; Carmina, Maria Gabriella; Chessa, Massimo; Sarubbi, Berardo; Mongiovì, Maurizio; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Bianca, Sebastiano; Canzone, Giuseppe; Bonvicini, Marco; Viora, Elsa; Poli, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The success of cardiac surgery over the past 50 years has increased numbers and median age of survivors with congenital heart disease (CHD). Adults now represent two-thirds of patients with CHD; in the USA alone the number is estimated to exceed 1 million. In this population, many affected women reach reproductive age and wish to have children. While in many CHD patients pregnancy can be accomplished successfully, some special situations with complex anatomy, iatrogenic or residual pathology are associated with an increased risk of severe maternal and fetal complications. Pre-conception counselling allows women to come to truly informed choices. Risk stratification tools can also help high-risk women to eventually renounce to pregnancy and to adopt safe contraception options. Once pregnant, women identified as intermediate or high risk should receive multidisciplinary care involving a cardiologist, an obstetrician and an anesthesiologist with specific expertise in managing this peculiar medical challenge. This document is intended to provide cardiologists working in hospitals where an Obstetrics and Gynecology Department is available with a streamlined and practical tool, useful for them to select the best management strategies to deal with a woman affected by CHD who desires to plan pregnancy or is already pregnant. PMID:28751846

  7. QT interval variability in body surface ECG: measurement, physiological basis, and clinical value: position statement and consensus guidance endorsed by the European Heart Rhythm Association jointly with the ESC Working Group on Cardiac Cellular Electrophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumert, Mathias; Porta, Alberto; Vos, Marc A.; Malik, Marek; Couderc, Jean-Philippe; Laguna, Pablo; Piccirillo, Gianfranco; Smith, Godfrey L.; Tereshchenko, Larisa G.; Volders, Paul G.A.

    2016-01-01

    This consensus guideline discusses the electrocardiographic phenomenon of beat-to-beat QT interval variability (QTV) on surface electrocardiograms. The text covers measurement principles, physiological basis, and clinical value of QTV. Technical considerations include QT interval measurement and the relation between QTV and heart rate variability. Research frontiers of QTV include understanding of QTV physiology, systematic evaluation of the link between QTV and direct measures of neural activity, modelling of the QTV dependence on the variability of other physiological variables, distinction between QTV and general T wave shape variability, and assessing of the QTV utility for guiding therapy. Increased QTV appears to be a risk marker of arrhythmic and cardiovascular death. It remains to be established whether it can guide therapy alone or in combination with other risk factors. QT interval variability has a possible role in non-invasive assessment of tonic sympathetic activity. PMID:26823389

  8. EURObservational Research Programme: a worldwide registry on peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) in conjunction with the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on PPCM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sliwa, Karen; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Petrie, Mark C.; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Schaufelberger, Maria; Tavazzi, Luigi; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Roos-Hesslink, Jolien W.; Shah, Ajay J.; Seferovic, Petar M.; Elkayam, Uri; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin; Bachelier-Walenta, Katrin; Mouquet, Frederic; Kraigher-Krainer, Elisabeth; Hall, Roger; Ponikowski, Piotr; McMurray, John J. V.; Pieske, Burkert

    2014-01-01

    The EURObservational Research Programme is a rolling programme of cardiovascular registries and surveys of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). These registries will provide information on the nature of cardiovascular disease and its management. This manuscript provides an update on new

  9. "We Teach All Hearts to Break": On the Incompatibility of Education with Schooling at All Levels, and the Renewed Need for a De-Schooling of Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Education is for anarchism, and what can very broadly be termed "autonomism"--that is, the many different schools of non-Leninist Marxism--of paramount importance in creating a society worthy of humanity, but this is not a simple formula of countering the dominant mode of institutional indoctrination known as schooling with libertarian…

  10. EURObservational Research Programme : a worldwide registry on peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) in conjunction with the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on PPCM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sliwa, Karen; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Petrie, Mark C.; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Schaufelberger, Maria; Tavazzi, Luigi; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Roos-Hesslink, Jolien W.; Shah, Ajay J.; Seferovic, Petar M.; Elkayam, Uri; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin; Bachelier-Walenta, Katrin; Mouquet, Frederic; Kraigher-Krainer, Elisabeth; Hall, Roger; Ponikowski, Piotr; McMurray, John J. V.; Pieske, Burkert

    Background The EURObservational Research Programme is a rolling programme of cardiovascular registries and surveys of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). These registries will provide information on the nature of cardiovascular disease and its management. This manuscript provides an update on

  11. Circadian rhythms, sleep, and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenyu; Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan; Marcheva, Biliana; Bass, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    The discovery of the genetic basis for circadian rhythms has expanded our knowledge of the temporal organization of behavior and physiology. The observations that the circadian gene network is present in most living organisms from eubacteria to humans, that most cells and tissues express autonomous clocks, and that disruption of clock genes results in metabolic dysregulation have revealed interactions between metabolism and circadian rhythms at neural, molecular, and cellular levels. A major challenge remains in understanding the interplay between brain and peripheral clocks and in determining how these interactions promote energy homeostasis across the sleep-wake cycle. In this Review, we evaluate how investigation of molecular timing may create new opportunities to understand and develop therapies for obesity and diabetes.

  12. Temporal interactions between cortical rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita K Roopun

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple local neuronal circuits support different, discrete frequencies of network rhythm in neocortex. Relationships between different frequencies correspond to mechanisms designed to minimise interference, couple activity via stable phase interactions, and control the amplitude of one frequency relative to the phase of another. These mechanisms are proposed to form a framework for spectral information processing. Individual local circuits can also transform their frequency through changes in intrinsic neuronal properties and interactions with other oscillating microcircuits. Here we discuss a frequency transformation in which activity in two coactive local circuits may combine sequentially to generate a third frequency whose period is the concatenation sum of the original two. With such an interaction, the intrinsic periodicity in each component local circuit is preserved – alternate, single periods of each original rhythm form one period of a new frequency - suggesting a robust mechanism for combining information processed on multiple concurrent spatiotemporal scales.

  13. Computed Tomography Imaging in Patients with Congenital Heart Disease Part I: Rationale and Utility. An Expert Consensus Document of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT): Endorsed by the Society of Pediatric Radiology (SPR) and the North American Society of Cardiac Imaging (NASCI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, B Kelly; Rigsby, Cynthia K; Hlavacek, Anthony; Leipsic, Jonathon; Nicol, Edward D; Siegel, Marilyn J; Bardo, Dianna; Abbara, Suhny; Ghoshhajra, Brian; Lesser, John R; Raman, Subha; Crean, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    This is an expert consensus document created to provide information about the current use of cardiovascular computed tomography (CT) in patients of all ages with proven or suspected congenital heart disease (CHD). The discussion and recommendations are based on available literature and the judgment of a diverse group of subspecialists with extensive experience in the use of CT imaging in CHD. The field of CHD CT imaging is evolving rapidly with the availability of new scanner technology. In addition, the prevalence of palliated CHD has increased with marked improvements in patient survival. We believe it is important to review the clinical indications, strengths, limitations, and risks of cardiovascular CT in this patient population. This is the first of two complementary documents. It will concentrate on the disease entities and circumstances in which CT may be used. The second document will focus on recommendations for the technical performance of cardiovascular CT in patients with CHD. Successful cardiovascular CT imaging of CHD requires an in depth understanding of the core teaching elements of both cardiology and radiology. The ability to perform and interpret high quality congenital cardiovascular CT in a clinical context requires focused time and effort regardless of the previous background of the cardiac imager. This is reflected by a writing committee that consists of pediatric and adult radiologists and cardiologists, all whom have extensive experience in performing CT in this patient population. Cardiovascular CT is complementary to other imaging modalities and its optimal use will be in centers where all diagnostic modalities are available. The choice of modality for an individual patient should be determined by age, diagnosis, clinical condition, clinical question and patient preference.(1-4) Use of CT in CHD should be reserved for situations in which it is expected to provide unique diagnostic information for the individual patient or clinical

  14. Autism Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the nation's leading grassroots ... more Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the nation's leading grassroots ...

  15. Recommendations for cardiovascular magnetic resonance in adults with congenital heart disease from the respective working groups of the European Society of Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilner, Philip J.; Geva, Tal; Kaemmerer, Harald; Trindade, Pedro T.; Schwitter, Juerg; Webb, Gary D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to provide information and explanations regarding the clinically relevant options, strengths, and limitations of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in relation to adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). Cardiovascular magnetic resonance can provide assessments of anatomical connections, biventricular function, myocardial viability, measurements of flow, angiography, and more, without ionizing radiation. It should be regarded as a necessary facility in a centre specializing in the care of adults with CHD. Also, those using CMR to investigate acquired heart disease should be able to recognize and evaluate previously unsuspected CHD such as septal defects, anomalously connected pulmonary veins, or double-chambered right ventricle. To realize its full potential and to avoid pitfalls, however, CMR of CHD requires training and experience. Appropriate pathophysiological understanding is needed to evaluate cardiovascular function after surgery for tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, and after Fontan operations. For these and other complex CHD, CMR should be undertaken by specialists committed to long-term collaboration with the clinicians and surgeons managing the patients. We provide a table of CMR acquisition protocols in relation to CHD categories as a guide towards appropriate use of this uniquely versatile imaging modality. PMID:20067914

  16. Framing the Life-Rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Anders V.

    2011-01-01

    Tracing of the notion 'rhytm' among the neo classicist architect in Denmark around 1920 that tried to vitalize the pure forms of architecture. Several of the project contributed to the artistic competions being part of the Olympic Games in that period.Both the gymnastic programme of Niels Bukh an...... and the music training of Jacques-Dalcroze based on rhythm can be seen as background, and there are elements of this vitalism developing further into modernistic architecture....

  17. Remission of congenital complete heart block without anti-Ro/La antibodies: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvik Mitra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-Ro/La negative congenital heart block (CHB is uncommon. We report one such case of CHB, with no associated structural heart disease or maternal autoantibodies. The heart block reverted to sinus rhythm spontaneously at two weeks of age, and the patient remains in sinus rhythm at a one year followup. Whether patients with antibody negative complete heart block have a different clinical course is conjectural.

  18. Biological Rhythms in the Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Mary S; Pelle, Edward; Dong, Kelly; Pernodet, Nadine

    2016-05-24

    Circadian rhythms, ≈24 h oscillations in behavior and physiology, are reflected in all cells of the body and function to optimize cellular functions and meet environmental challenges associated with the solar day. This multi-oscillatory network is entrained by the master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, which directs an organism's rhythmic expression of physiological functions and behavior via a hierarchical system. This system has been highly conserved throughout evolution and uses transcriptional-translational autoregulatory loops. This master clock, following environmental cues, regulates an organism's sleep pattern, body temperature, cardiac activity and blood pressure, hormone secretion, oxygen consumption and metabolic rate. Mammalian peripheral clocks and clock gene expression have recently been discovered and are present in all nucleated cells in our body. Like other essential organ of the body, the skin also has cycles that are informed by this master regulator. In addition, skin cells have peripheral clocks that can function autonomously. First described in 2000 for skin, this review summarizes some important aspects of a rapidly growing body of research in circadian and ultradian (an oscillation that repeats multiple times during a 24 h period) cutaneous rhythms, including clock mechanisms, functional manifestations, and stimuli that entrain or disrupt normal cycling. Some specific relationships between disrupted clock signaling and consequences to skin health are discussed in more depth in the other invited articles in this IJMS issue on Sleep, Circadian Rhythm and Skin.

  19. Serial binary interval ratios improve rhythm reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang eWu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Musical rhythm perception is a natural human ability that involves complex cognitive processes. Rhythm refers to the organization of events in time, and musical rhythms have an underlying hierarchical metrical structure. The metrical structure induces the feeling of a beat and the extent to which a rhythm induces the feeling of a beat is referred to as its metrical strength. Binary ratios are the most frequent interval ratio in musical rhythms. Rhythms with hierarchical binary ratios are better discriminated and reproduced than rhythms with hierarchical non-binary ratios. However, it remains unclear whether a superiority of serial binary over non-binary ratios in rhythm perception and reproduction exists. In addition, how different types of serial ratios influence the metrical strength of rhythms remains to be elucidated. The present study investigated serial binary vs. non-binary ratios in a reproduction task. Rhythms formed with exclusively binary (1:2:4:8, non-binary integer (1:3:5:6, and non-integer (1:2.3:5.3:6.4 ratios were examined within a constant meter. The results showed that the 1:2:4:8 rhythm type was more accurately reproduced than the 1:3:5:6 and 1:2.3:5.3:6.4 rhythm types, and the 1:2.3:5.3:6.4 rhythm type was more accurately reproduced than the 1:3:5:6 rhythm type. Further analyses showed that reproduction performance was better predicted by the distribution pattern of event occurrences within an inter-beat interval, than by the coincidence of events with beats, or the magnitude and complexity of interval ratios. Whereas rhythm theories and empirical data emphasize the role of the coincidence of events with beats in determining metrical strength and predicting rhythm performance, the present results suggest that rhythm processing may be better understood when the distribution pattern of event occurrences is taken into account. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms underlining musical rhythm perception.

  20. Serial binary interval ratios improve rhythm reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiang; Westanmo, Anders; Zhou, Liang; Pan, Junhao

    2013-01-01

    Musical rhythm perception is a natural human ability that involves complex cognitive processes. Rhythm refers to the organization of events in time, and musical rhythms have an underlying hierarchical metrical structure. The metrical structure induces the feeling of a beat and the extent to which a rhythm induces the feeling of a beat is referred to as its metrical strength. Binary ratios are the most frequent interval ratio in musical rhythms. Rhythms with hierarchical binary ratios are better discriminated and reproduced than rhythms with hierarchical non-binary ratios. However, it remains unclear whether a superiority of serial binary over non-binary ratios in rhythm perception and reproduction exists. In addition, how different types of serial ratios influence the metrical strength of rhythms remains to be elucidated. The present study investigated serial binary vs. non-binary ratios in a reproduction task. Rhythms formed with exclusively binary (1:2:4:8), non-binary integer (1:3:5:6), and non-integer (1:2.3:5.3:6.4) ratios were examined within a constant meter. The results showed that the 1:2:4:8 rhythm type was more accurately reproduced than the 1:3:5:6 and 1:2.3:5.3:6.4 rhythm types, and the 1:2.3:5.3:6.4 rhythm type was more accurately reproduced than the 1:3:5:6 rhythm type. Further analyses showed that reproduction performance was better predicted by the distribution pattern of event occurrences within an inter-beat interval, than by the coincidence of events with beats, or the magnitude and complexity of interval ratios. Whereas rhythm theories and empirical data emphasize the role of the coincidence of events with beats in determining metrical strength and predicting rhythm performance, the present results suggest that rhythm processing may be better understood when the distribution pattern of event occurrences is taken into account. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms underlining musical rhythm perception.

  1. Socio-Cultural Animation as Inspiration for the Life of the Society- Linking of the Social and Cultural in the Heart of the New Civilization

    OpenAIRE

    Dušana Findeisen

    2009-01-01

    Initially, the author discusses the formats of passing on culture and knowledge that were used in the past, the formats of the times of creation of national States, the formats belonging to the enlightenment initiatives. Dušana Findeisen goes on to emphasize that all national States had their »englighteners« involved in inspiring, bonding and educating people of various professions, from various social groups, thus rendering the society alive and dynamic. Socio-cultural animation is a French ...

  2. Effect of Obesity and Underweight Status on Perioperative Outcomes of Congenital Heart Operations in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults: An Analysis of Data From the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Byrne, Michael L; Kim, Sunghee; Hornik, Christoph P; Yerokun, Babatunde A; Matsouaka, Roland A; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Jacobs, Marshall L; Jonas, Richard A

    2017-08-22

    Extreme body mass index (BMI; either very high or very low) has been associated with increased risk of adverse perioperative outcome in adults undergoing cardiac surgery. The effect of BMI on perioperative outcomes in congenital heart disease patients has not been evaluated. A multicenter retrospective cohort study was performed studying patients 10 to 35 years of age undergoing a congenital heart disease operation in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2015. The primary outcomes were operative mortality and a composite outcome (1 or more of operative mortality, major adverse event, prolonged hospital length of stay, and wound infection/dehiscence). The associations between age- and sex-adjusted BMI percentiles and these outcomes were assessed, with adjustment for patient-level risk factors, with multivariate logistic regression. Of 18 337 patients (118 centers), 16% were obese, 15% were overweight, 53% were normal weight, 7% were underweight, and 9% were severely underweight. Observed risks of operative mortality (P=0.04) and composite outcome (Pobese subjects. Severely underweight BMI was associated with increased unplanned cardiac operation and reoperation for bleeding. Obesity was associated with increased risk of wound infection. In multivariable analysis, the association between BMI and operative mortality was no longer significant. Obese (odds ratio, 1.28; P=0.008), severely underweight (odds ratio, 1.29; PObesity and underweight BMI were associated with increased risk of composite adverse outcome independently of other risk factors. Further research is necessary to determine whether BMI represents a modifiable risk factor for perioperative outcome. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Comparing maximum rate and sustainability of pacing by mechanical vs. electrical stimulation in the Langendorff-perfused rabbit heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, T Alexander; Kohl, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Mechanical stimulation (MS) represents a readily available, non-invasive means of pacing the asystolic or bradycardic heart in patients, but benefits of MS at higher heart rates are unclear. Our aim was to assess the maximum rate and sustainability of excitation by MS vs. electrical stimulation (ES) in the isolated heart under normal physiological conditions. Trains of local MS or ES at rates exceeding intrinsic sinus rhythm (overdrive pacing; lowest pacing rates 2.5±0.5 Hz) were applied to the same mid-left ventricular free-wall site on the epicardium of Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts. Stimulation rates were progressively increased, with a recovery period of normal sinus rhythm between each stimulation period. Trains of MS caused repeated focal ventricular excitation from the site of stimulation. The maximum rate at which MS achieved 1:1 capture was lower than during ES (4.2±0.2 vs. 5.9±0.2 Hz, respectively). At all overdrive pacing rates for which repetitive MS was possible, 1:1 capture was reversibly lost after a finite number of cycles, even though same-site capture by ES remained possible. The number of MS cycles until loss of capture decreased with rising stimulation rate. If interspersed with ES, the number of MS to failure of capture was lower than for MS only. In this study, we demonstrate that the maximum pacing rate at which MS can be sustained is lower than that for same-site ES in isolated heart, and that, in contrast to ES, the sustainability of successful 1:1 capture by MS is limited. The mechanism(s) of differences in MS vs. ES pacing ability, potentially important for emergency heart rhythm management, are currently unknown, thus warranting further investigation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  4. From beat rate variability in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived pacemaker cells to heart rate variability in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Meital; Schick, Revital; Barad, Lili; Novak, Atara; Ben-Ari, Erez; Lorber, Avraham; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Rosen, Michael R; Weissman, Amir; Binah, Ofer

    2014-10-01

    We previously reported that induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes manifest beat rate variability (BRV) resembling heart rate variability (HRV) in the human sinoatrial node. We now hypothesized the BRV-HRV continuum originates in pacemaker cells. To investigate whether cellular BRV is a source of HRV dynamics, we hypothesized 3 levels of interaction among different cardiomyocyte entities: (1) single pacemaker cells, (2) networks of electrically coupled pacemaker cells, and (3) the in situ sinoatrial node. We measured BRV/HRV properties in single pacemaker cells, induced pluripotent stem cell-derived contracting embryoid bodies (EBs), and electrocardiograms from the same individual. Pronounced BRV/HRV was present at all 3 levels. The coefficient of variance of interbeat intervals and Poincaré plot indices SD1 and SD2 for single cells were 20 times greater than those for EBs (P heart (the latter two were similar; P > .05). We also compared BRV magnitude among single cells, small EBs (~5-10 cells), and larger EBs (>10 cells): BRV indices progressively increased with the decrease in the cell number (P heart rhythm. The decreased BRV magnitude in transitioning from the single cell to the EB suggests that the HRV of in situ hearts originates from the summation and integration of multiple cell-based oscillators. Hence, complex interactions among multiple pacemaker cells and intracellular Ca(2+) handling determine HRV in humans and cardiomyocyte networks. Copyright © 2014 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of pre-exercise listening to slow and fast rhythm music on supramaximal cycle performance and selected metabolic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, T; Ohkuwa, T; Itoh, H; Kitoh, M; Terasawa, J; Tsuda, T; Kitagawa, S; Sato, Y

    2003-07-01

    We examined the effect of listening to two different types of music (with slow and fast rhythm), prior to supramaximal cycle exercise, on performance, heart rate, the concentration of lactate and ammonia in blood, and the concentration of catecholamines in plasma. Six male students participated in this study. After listening to slow rhythm or fast rhythm music for 20 min, the subjects performed supramaximal exercise for 45 s using a cycle ergometer. Listening to slow and fast rhythm music prior to supramaximal exercise did not significantly affect the mean power output. The plasma norepinephrine concentration immediately before the end of listening to slow rhythm music was significantly lower than before listening (p concentration immediately before the end of listening to fast rhythm music was significantly higher than before listening (p music had no effect on blood lactate and ammonia levels or on plasma catecholamine levels following exercise. In conclusion, listening to slow rhythm music decreases the plasma norepinephrine level, and listening to fast rhythm music increases the plasma epinephrine level. The type of music has no impact on power output during exercise.

  6. Statistics for Sleep and Biological Rhythms Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerman, Elizabeth B; Wang, Wei; Phillips, Andrew J K; Bianchi, Matt T

    2017-02-01

    This article is part of a Journal of Biological Rhythms series exploring analysis and statistical topics relevant to researchers in biological rhythms and sleep research. The goal is to provide an overview of the most common issues that arise in the analysis and interpretation of data in these fields. In this article, we address issues related to the collection of multiple data points from the same organism or system at different times, since such longitudinal data collection is fundamental to the assessment of biological rhythms. Rhythmic longitudinal data require additional specific statistical considerations, ranging from curve fitting to threshold definitions to accounting for correlation structure. We discuss statistical analyses of longitudinal data including issues of correlational structure and stationarity, markers of biological rhythms, demasking of biological rhythms, and determining phase, waveform, and amplitude of biological rhythms.

  7. Socio-Cultural Animation as Inspiration for the Life of the Society- Linking of the Social and Cultural in the Heart of the New Civilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušana Findeisen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Initially, the author discusses the formats of passing on culture and knowledge that were used in the past, the formats of the times of creation of national States, the formats belonging to the enlightenment initiatives. Dušana Findeisen goes on to emphasize that all national States had their »englighteners« involved in inspiring, bonding and educating people of various professions, from various social groups, thus rendering the society alive and dynamic. Socio-cultural animation is a French concept, not as new as it may seem, stemming from popular education. After the Second World War the adjective popular started being omitted and the term socio-cultural animation slowly replaced it. Socio-cultural animation can be found wherever people are, regardless of their educational or social background, striving to bring improvement to individuals and society. Next, the author presents and discusses several definitions of socio-cultural animation, occasionally illustrating them by presenting examples of good practice. In addition to that, she identifies the prevailing criteria used when classifying formats of socio cultural animation, drawing the reader's attention to the great variety of actors in this field. Dušana Findeisen presents various functions of this subsystem of the French national cultural policy. Owing to them, socio-cultural animation can be clearly differentiated from community education.

  8. Mass Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Christian

    2017-01-01

    the negative features usually ascribed by late nineteenth-century crowd psychology to spontaneous crowds, and attributes these to the entire social fabric. However, in contrast to crowd psychology, theorists of mass society often place greater emphasis on how capitalism, technological advances, or demographic......Mass society is a societal diagnosis that emphasizes – usually in a pejorative, modernity critical manner – a series of traits allegedly associated with modern society, such as the leveling of individuality, moral decay, alienation, and isolation. As such, the notion of mass society generalizes...... developments condition such negative features, and some theorists argue that mass society produces a propensity to totalitarianism. Discussions of mass society culminated in the early and mid-twentieth century....

  9. Communication: Effect of diperoxovandate on isolated rat heart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... also produced marked disturbances in the rhythm indicating cardiac toxicity. This was further confirmed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity determination. Keywords: diperoxovanadate, reperfusion, isolated rat heart, hydrogen peroxide, lactate dehydrogenase. Ethiopian Pharmaceutical Journal, vol. 22 (2004): 47-52 ...

  10. The role of religious faith, spirituality and existential considerations among heart patients in a secular society: relation to depressive symptoms 6 months post acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekke-Hansen, Sidsel; Pedersen, Christina G; Thygesen, Kristian; Christensen, Søren; Waelde, Lynn C; Zachariae, Robert

    2014-06-01

    We explored the significance of religious faith/coping and spirituality and existential considerations reported during hospitalisation on depressive symptoms at 6-month follow-up and addressed patients' perceived influence of their faith among 97 consecutive acute coronary syndrome patients (72.2% male patients; mean age, 60.6 years) in a secular society. All faith variables were found unrelated to depressive symptoms. Having unambiguous religious or spiritual faith at follow-up was associated with a perceived positive influence of this faith on quality of life and the disease itself compared to patients with ambiguous faith. These findings underscore the importance of examining degrees of faith in secular settings. © The Author(s) 2013.

  11. Stratification of complexity in congenital heart surgery: comparative study of the Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS-1) method, Aristotle basic score and Society of Thoracic Surgeons-European Association for Cardio- Thoracic Surgery (STS-EACTS) mortality score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Paulo Ernando Ferraz; Sá, Michel Pompeu Barros de Oliveira; dos Santos, Cecília Andrade; Esmeraldo, Isaac Melo; Chaves, Mariana Leal; Lins, Ricardo Felipe de Albuquerque; Lima, Ricardo de Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether stratification of complexity models in congenital heart surgery (RACHS-1, Aristotle basic score and STS-EACTS mortality score) fit to our center and determine the best method of discriminating hospital mortality. Methods Surgical procedures in congenital heart diseases in patients under 18 years of age were allocated to the categories proposed by the stratification of complexity methods currently available. The outcome hospital mortality was calculated for each category from the three models. Statistical analysis was performed to verify whether the categories presented different mortalities. The discriminatory ability of the models was determined by calculating the area under the ROC curve and a comparison between the curves of the three models was performed. Results 360 patients were allocated according to the three methods. There was a statistically significant difference between the mortality categories: RACHS-1 (1) - 1.3%, (2) - 11.4%, (3)-27.3%, (4) - 50 %, (P<0.001); Aristotle basic score (1) - 1.1%, (2) - 12.2%, (3) - 34%, (4) - 64.7%, (P<0.001); and STS-EACTS mortality score (1) - 5.5 %, (2) - 13.6%, (3) - 18.7%, (4) - 35.8%, (P<0.001). The three models had similar accuracy by calculating the area under the ROC curve: RACHS-1- 0.738; STS-EACTS-0.739; Aristotle- 0.766. Conclusion The three models of stratification of complexity currently available in the literature are useful with different mortalities between the proposed categories with similar discriminatory capacity for hospital mortality. PMID:26107445

  12. Biological rhythms during residence in polar regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Josephine

    2012-05-01

    At Arctic and Antarctic latitudes, personnel are deprived of natural sunlight in winter and have continuous daylight in summer: light of sufficient intensity and suitable spectral composition is the main factor that maintains the 24-h period of human circadian rhythms. Thus, the status of the circadian system is of interest. Moreover, the relatively controlled artificial light conditions in winter are conducive to experimentation with different types of light treatment. The hormone melatonin and/or its metabolite 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) provide probably the best index of circadian (and seasonal) timing. A frequent observation has been a delay of the circadian system in winter. A skeleton photoperiod (2 × 1-h, bright white light, morning and evening) can restore summer timing. A single 1-h pulse of light in the morning may be sufficient. A few people desynchronize from the 24-h day (free-run) and show their intrinsic circadian period, usually >24 h. With regard to general health in polar regions, intermittent reports describe abnormalities in various physiological processes from the point of view of daily and seasonal rhythms, but positive health outcomes are also published. True winter depression (SAD) appears to be rare, although subsyndromal SAD is reported. Probably of most concern are the numerous reports of sleep problems. These have prompted investigations of the underlying mechanisms and treatment interventions. A delay of the circadian system with "normal" working hours implies sleep is attempted at a suboptimal phase. Decrements in sleep efficiency, latency, duration, and quality are also seen in winter. Increasing the intensity of ambient light exposure throughout the day advanced circadian phase and was associated with benefits for sleep: blue-enriched light was slightly more effective than standard white light. Effects on performance remain to be fully investigated. At 75°S, base personnel adapt the circadian system to night work within a week

  13. Clinical trials update from the Heart Failure Society of America Meeting 2009: FAST, IMPROVE-HF, COACH galectin-3 substudy, HF-ACTION nuclear substudy, DAD-HF, and MARVEL-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainscak, Mitja; Coletta, Alison P; Sherwi, Nasser; Cleland, John G F

    2010-02-01

    This article presents findings and a commentary on late-breaking trials presented during the meeting of the Heart Failure Society of America in September 2009. Unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary, since analyses may change in the final publication. The FAST trial showed somewhat better performance of intrathoracic impedance for prediction of deterioration in patients with heart failure (HF) when compared with daily weighing. The IMPROVE-HF study reported the benefits of education on the management of patients with systolic HF. Galectin-3 appeared a useful method for improving risk stratification of patients with chronic HF in a substudy of the COACH trial. A nuclear substudy of the HF-ACTION trial failed to demonstrate that resting myocardial perfusion imaging, a measure of myocardial scar and viability, was clinically useful. A small randomized controlled trial (DAD-HF) suggested that the use of low-dose dopamine in patients with acutely decompensated HF was associated with less deterioration in renal function and less hypokalaemia. The MARVEL-1 trial raises further concerns about the safety of myoblast transplantation in ischaemic HF.

  14. Clinical predictors of shockable versus non-shockable rhythms in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granfeldt, Asger; Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Steen Møller; Lippert, Freddy K; Lang-Jensen, Torsten; Hendriksen, Ole Mazur; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo

    2016-11-01

    To identify factors associated with a non-shockable rhythm as first recorded heart rhythm. Patients ≥18 years old suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between 2001 and 2012 were identified in the population-based Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Danish administrative registries were used to identify chronic diseases (within 10 years) and drug prescriptions (within 180 days). A multivariable logistic regression model, including patient related and cardiac arrest related characteristics, was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) for factors associated with non-shockable rhythm. A total of 29,863 patients were included: 6600 (22.1%) patients with a shockable rhythm and 23,263 (77.9%) patients with a non-shockable rhythm. A non-shockable rhythm was associated with female gender, arrest in private home, unwitnessed arrest, no bystander CPR, and longer time to first rhythm analysis compared to patients with shockable rhythm. In the adjusted multivariable regression model, pre-existing non-cardiovascular disease and drug prescription were associated with a non-shockable rhythm e.g. chronic obstructive lung disease (OR 1.44 [95% CI: 1.32-1.58]); and the prescription for antidepressants (OR 1.49 [95% CI: 1.35-1.65]), antipsychotics (OR 2.30 [95% CI: 1.96-2.69]) analgesics (OR 1.32 [95% CI: 1.23-1.41]), corticosteroids (OR 1.64 [95% CI: 1.44-1.85]), and antibiotics (OR 1.59 [95% CI: 1.40-1.81]). In contrast, the prescription of cardiovascular drugs and a history of cardiovascular disease e.g. ischemic heart disease was associated with a lower risk of non-shockable rhythm (OR 0.66 [95% CI: 0.60-0.71]). This study demonstrate that non-cardiovascular disease and medication prescription are associated with a non-shockable rhythm while cardiovascular disease and medication prescription are associated with a shockable rhythm as first recorded rhythm in patients with OHCA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Rhythms of ghrelin, leptin, and sleep in rats: effects of the normal diurnal cycle, restricted feeding, and sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodosi, B; Gardi, J; Hajdu, I; Szentirmai, E; Obal, F; Krueger, J M

    2004-11-01

    To determine the relationships among plasma ghrelin and leptin concentrations and hypothalamic ghrelin contents, and sleep, cortical brain temperature (Tcrt), and feeding, we determined these parameters in rats in three experimental conditions: in free-feeding rats with normal diurnal rhythms, in rats with feeding restricted to the 12-h light period (RF), and in rats subjected to 5-h of sleep deprivation (SD) at the beginning of the light cycle. Plasma ghrelin and leptin displayed diurnal rhythms with the ghrelin peak preceding and the leptin peak following the major daily feeding peak in hour 1 after dark onset. RF reversed the diurnal rhythm of these hormones and the rhythm of rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) and significantly altered the rhythm of Tcrt. In contrast, the duration and intensity of non-REMS (NREMS) were hardly responsive to RF. SD failed to change leptin concentrations, but it promptly stimulated plasma ghrelin and induced eating. SD elicited biphasic variations in the hypothalamic ghrelin contents. SD increased plasma corticosterone, but corticosterone did not seem to influence either leptin or ghrelin. The results suggest a strong relationship between feeding and the diurnal rhythm of leptin and that feeding also fundamentally modulates the diurnal rhythm of ghrelin. The variations in hypothalamic ghrelin contents might be associated with sleep-wake activity in rats, but, unlike the previous observations in humans, obvious links could not be detected between sleep and the diurnal rhythms of plasma concentrations of either ghrelin or leptin in the rat. Copyright 2004 American Physiological Society

  16. Development of cortisol circadian rhythm in infancy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerth, C. de; Zijl, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Cortisol is the final product of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. It is secreted in a pulsatile fashion that displays a circadian rhythm. Infants are born without a circadian rhythm in cortisol and they acquire it during their first year of life. Studies do not

  17. The Essential Connection between Rhythm and Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlmutter, Adam

    2009-01-01

    It is the most fundamental aspect of music, yet so many students struggle with rhythm. How does one effectively teach budding young musicians to properly feel and read the rhythms all around them? Eileen Benedict, vocal music specialist at the Edith L. Slocum School in Ronkonkoma, New York, finds it best to start teaching her young students not…

  18. The Incarnate Rhythm of Geometrical Knowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Alfredo; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2012-01-01

    Rhythm is a fundamental dimension of human nature at both biological and social levels. However, existing research literature has not sufficiently investigated its role in mathematical cognition and behavior. The purpose of this article is to bring the concept of "incarnate rhythm" into current discourses in the field of mathematical learning and…

  19. Quantifying Speech Rhythm Abnormalities in the Dysarthrias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Julie M.; White, Laurence; Mattys, Sven L.; Lansford, Kaitlin; Lotto, Andrew J.; Spitzer, Stephanie M.; Caviness, John N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors examined whether rhythm metrics capable of distinguishing languages with high and low temporal stress contrast also can distinguish among control and dysarthric speakers of American English with perceptually distinct rhythm patterns. Methods: Acoustic measures of vocalic and consonantal segment durations were…

  20. Accelerated idioventricular rhythm during flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgeat, A.; Chiolero, R.; Mosimann, B.; Freeman, J.

    1987-03-01

    We report the case of a patient who developed severe hypoxemia and an unusual arrhythmia, accelerated idioventricular rhythm, during flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Coronary artery disease was subsequently suspected despite an unremarkable history and physical examination, and confirmed by a thallium 201 imaging. The appearance of accelerated idioventricular rhythm during fiberoptic bronchoscopy should raise the possibility of underlying coronary artery disease.

  1. Measurement of the occipital alpha rhythm and temporal tau rhythm by using magnetoencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. E.; Gohel, Bakul; Kim, K.; Kwon, H.; An, Kyung Min [Center for Biosignals, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science(KRISS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Developing Magnetoencephalography (MEG) based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) facilitates to observe the human brain functions in non-invasively and high temporal and high spatial resolution. By using this MEG, we studied alpha rhythm (8-13 Hz) that is one of the most predominant spontaneous rhythm in human brain. The 8–13 Hz rhythm is observed in several sensory region in the brain. In visual related region of occipital, we call to alpha rhythm, and auditory related region of temporal call to tau rhythm, sensorimotor related region of parietal call to mu rhythm. These rhythms are decreased in task related region and increased in task irrelevant regions. This means that these rhythms play a pivotal role of inhibition in task irrelevant region. It may be helpful to attention to the task. In several literature about the alpha-band inhibition in multi-sensory modality experiment, they observed this effect in the occipital and somatosensory region. In this study, we hypothesized that we can also observe the alpha-band inhibition in the auditory cortex, mediated by the tau rhythm. Before that, we first investigated the existence of the alpha and tau rhythm in occipital and temporal region, respectively. To see these rhythms, we applied the visual and auditory stimulation, in turns, suppressed in task relevant regions, respectively.

  2. Circadian rhythms and circadian rhythm disorders in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, J; Rosen, G; Mahowald, M

    2001-12-01

    A clinically applicable review of circadian rhythm physiology is presented, including a detailed examination of the interaction of circadian and homeostatic systems and the maturation of the circadian system from preconception through adolescence. Emphasis is placed on the clinical evaluation gathering information through the history, sleep log, and if necessary, actigraphy and polysomnography. Circadian disorders, including advanced sleep phase syndrome, circadian disorders seen in blind children, delayed sleep phase syndrome, and non-24-hour sleep phase are described. Case descriptions of each are provided. Treatment and interventions for these disorders are described, including the importance of education, light therapy, sleep-wake schedule adjustments, and the occasional use of medications, such as sedative hypnotics and melatonin.

  3. Sleep, Rhythms, and the Endocrine Brain: Influence of Sex and Gonadal Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mong, Jessica A.; Baker, Fiona C.; Mahoney, Megan M.; Paul, Ketema N.; Schwartz, Michael D.; Semba, Kazue; Silver, Rae

    2011-01-01

    While much is known about the mechanisms that underlie sleep and circadian rhythms, the investigation into sex differences and gonadal steroid modulation of sleep and biological rhythms is in its infancy. There is a growing recognition of sex disparities in sleep and rhythm disorders. Understanding how neuroendocrine mediators and sex differences influence sleep and biological rhythms is central to advancing our understanding of sleep-related disorders. While it is known that ovarian steroids affect circadian rhythms in rodents, the role of androgen is less understood. Surprising findings that androgens, acting via androgen receptors in the master “circadian clock” within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), modulate photic effects on activity in males points to novel mechanisms of circadian control. Work in aromatase deficient (ArKO) mice suggests that some sex differences in photic responsiveness are independent of gonadal hormone effects during development. In parallel, aspects of sex differences in sleep are also reported to be independent of gonadal steroids and may involve sex chromosome complement. This a summary of recent work illustrating how sex differences and gonadal hormones influence sleep and circadian rhythms that was presented at a mini-symposium at the 2011 annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience. PMID:22072663

  4. Kölliker-Fuse nuclei regulate respiratory rhythm variability via a gain-control mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Rishi R; Dutschmann, Mathias; Galán, Roberto F; Dick, Thomas E

    2017-02-01

    Respiration varies from breath to breath. On the millisecond timescale of spiking, neuronal circuits exhibit variability due to the stochastic properties of ion channels and synapses. Does this fast, microscopic source of variability contribute to the slower, macroscopic variability of the respiratory period? To address this question, we modeled a stochastic oscillator with forcing; then, we tested its predictions experimentally for the respiratory rhythm generated by the in situ perfused preparation during vagal nerve stimulation (VNS). Our simulations identified a relationship among the gain of the input, entrainment strength, and rhythm variability. Specifically, at high gain, the periodic input entrained the oscillator and reduced variability, whereas at low gain, the noise interacted with the input, causing events known as "phase slips", which increased variability on a slow timescale. Experimentally, the in situ preparation behaved like the low-gain model: VNS entrained respiration but exhibited phase slips that increased rhythm variability. Next, we used bilateral muscimol microinjections in discrete respiratory compartments to identify areas involved in VNS gain control. Suppression of activity in the nucleus tractus solitarii occluded both entrainment and amplification of rhythm variability by VNS, confirming that these effects were due to the activation of the Hering-Breuer reflex. Suppressing activity of the Kölliker-Fuse nuclei (KFn) enhanced entrainment and reduced rhythm variability during VNS, consistent with the predictions of the high-gain model. Together, the model and experiments suggest that the KFn regulates respiratory rhythm variability via a gain control mechanism. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Sleep, rhythms, and the endocrine brain: influence of sex and gonadal hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mong, Jessica A; Baker, Fiona C; Mahoney, Megan M; Paul, Ketema N; Schwartz, Michael D; Semba, Kazue; Silver, Rae

    2011-11-09

    While much is known about the mechanisms that underlie sleep and circadian rhythms, the investigation into sex differences and gonadal steroid modulation of sleep and biological rhythms is in its infancy. There is a growing recognition of sex disparities in sleep and rhythm disorders. Understanding how neuroendocrine mediators and sex differences influence sleep and biological rhythms is central to advancing our understanding of sleep-related disorders. While it is known that ovarian steroids affect circadian rhythms in rodents, the role of androgen is less understood. Surprising findings that androgens, acting via androgen receptors in the master "circadian clock" within the suprachiasmatic nucleus, modulate photic effects on activity in males point to novel mechanisms of circadian control. Work in aromatase-deficient mice suggests that some sex differences in photic responsiveness are independent of gonadal hormone effects during development. In parallel, aspects of sex differences in sleep are also reported to be independent of gonadal steroids and may involve sex chromosome complement. This a summary of recent work illustrating how sex differences and gonadal hormones influence sleep and circadian rhythms that was presented at a Mini-Symposium at the 2011 annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience.

  6. Circadian Rhythm of Glomerular Filtration and Solute Handling Related to Nocturnal Enuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossche, L; Raes, A; Hoebeke, P; De Bruyne, P; Vande Walle, J

    2016-01-01

    Although nocturnal polyuria in patients with monosymptomatic enuresis can largely be explained by the decreased nocturnal vasopressin secretion hypothesis, other circadian rhythms in the kidney also seem to have a role. We recently documented an absent day/night rhythm in a subgroup of desmopressin refractory cases. We explore the importance of abnormal circadian rhythm of glomerular filtration and tubular (sodium, potassium) parameters in patients with monosymptomatic enuresis. In this retrospective study of a tertiary enuresis population we collected data subsequent to a standardized screening (International Children's Continence Society questionnaire), 14-day diary for nocturnal enuresis and diuresis, and 24-hour concentration profile. The study population consisted of 139 children with nocturnal enuresis who were 5 years or older. Children with nonmonosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis were used as controls. There was a maintained circadian rhythm of glomerular filtration, sodium, osmotic excretion and diuresis rate in children with monosymptomatic and nonmonosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis, and there was no difference between the 2 groups. Secondary analysis revealed that in patients with nocturnal polyuria (with monosymptomatic or nonmonosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis) circadian rhythm of glomerular filtration, sodium and osmotic excretion, and diuresis rate was diminished in contrast to those without nocturnal polyuria (p enuresis. However, the subgroup with enuresis and nocturnal polyuria has a diminished circadian rhythm of nocturnal diuresis, sodium excretion and glomerular filtration in contrast to children without nocturnal polyuria. This observation cannot be explained by the vasopressin theory alone. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Biology and genetics of circadian rhythm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellivier, F

    2009-01-01

    In recent decades our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of biological clocks has grown expontentially. This has helped to guide the choice of genes studied to explain inter-individual variations seen in circadian rhythms. In recent years analysis of circadian rhythms has advanced considerably into the study of pathological circadian rhythms in human beings. These findings, combined with those obtained from studying mice whose circadian genes have been rendered incapable, have revealed the role of genetic factors in circadian rhythms. This literature review presents an overview of these findings. Beyond our understanding of the functioning of these biological clocks, this knowledge will be extremely useful to analyse genetic factors involved in morbid conditions involving circadian rhythm abnormalities.

  8. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  9. FOUNDING SOCIETIES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henry Petroski

    2008-01-01

      [...] with the development of the railroads, the telegraph, and other marvels of the Industrial Revolution, a civil engineering society did not provide a sufficiently broad umbrella under which mining...

  10. Daily and Seasonal Rhythms in Human Mucosa Phospholipid Fatty Acid Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, Thomas; Arnold, Walter

    2015-08-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) can exert important physiological effects: for example, as precursors of eicosanoids, as signaling molecules, and, in particular, as parts of phospholipids, the major constituents of cell membranes. Animals can remodel cell membranes in terms of their FA composition in response to environmental conditions, and even endothermic mammals exhibit seasonal cycles in the FA makeup of membranes. Previous evidence pointed to the existence of both seasonal and daily cycles in phospholipid composition of human cell membranes. Therefore, we used a noninvasive method to collect human mucosa cells over 1 year in 20 healthy subjects, and we determined seasonal and daily rhythmicity of phospholipid FA content. Our results show that significant daily rhythms were detectable in 11 of 13 FAs and were largely synchronous among subjects. Also, these daily rhythms showed stable phase relationships between different FAs within subjects. In contrast, yearly rhythms in phospholipid FA content were statistically significant in only ~50% of subjects and were asynchronous between subjects. These results support the view that while human physiology is still dominated by geophysical sunrise and sunset, resulting in strong daily cycles, seasonal rhythms are less well defined, at least in Western societies. We suggest that the main physiological function underlying rhythms in cell membrane composition is the regulation of the activity of transmembrane proteins, such as ion pumps, which can be strongly affected by the fatty acyl chains of phospholipids in the surrounding membrane bilayer. Hence, among a multitude of other functions, cycles in membrane FA composition may be involved in generating the daily rhythm of metabolic rate. Rhythms in certain membrane FAs, namely polyunsaturated and monounsaturated FAs that are known to affect health, could be also involved in daily and seasonal rhythms of diseases and death. © 2015 The Author(s).

  11. The Psychophysics of Brain Rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rufin eVanrullen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly apparent that brain oscillations in various frequency bands play important roles in perceptual and attentional processes. Understandably, most of the associated experimental evidence comes from human or animal electrophysiological studies, allowing direct access to the oscillatory activities. However, such periodicities in perception and attention should, in theory, also be observable using the proper psychophysical tools. Here, we review a number of psychophysical techniques that have been used by us and other authors, in successful and sometimes unsuccessful attempts, to reveal the rhythmic nature of perceptual and attentional processes. We argue that the two existing and largely distinct debates about discrete vs. continuous perception and parallel vs. sequential attention should in fact be regarded as two facets of the same question: how do brain rhythms shape the psychological operations of perception and attention?

  12. Circadian rhythms in a nutshell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edery, I

    2000-08-09

    Living organisms on this planet have adapted to the daily rotation of the earth on its axis. By means of endogenous circadian clocks that can be synchronized to the daily and seasonal changes in external time cues, most notably light and temperature, life forms anticipate environmental transitions, perform activities at biologically advantageous times during the day, and undergo characteristic seasonal responses. The effects of transmeridian flight and shift work are stark reminders that although modern technologies can create "cities that never sleep" we cannot escape the recalcitrance of endogenous clocks that regulate much of our physiology and behavior. Moreover, malfunctions in the human circadian timing system are implicated in several disorders, including chronic sleep disorders in the elderly, manic-depression, and seasonal affective disorders (SAD or winter depression). Recent progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms has been remarkable. In its most basic form, circadian clocks are comprised of a set of proteins that, by virtue of the design principles involved, generate a self-sustaining transcriptional-translational feedback loop with a free-running period of about 24 h. One or more of the clock components is acutely sensitive to light, resulting in an oscillator that can be synchronized to local time. This review provides an overview of the roles circadian clocks play in nature, how they might have arisen, human health concerns related to clock dysfunction, and mainly focuses on the clockworks found in Drosophila and mice, the two best studied animal model systems for understanding the biochemical and cellular bases of circadian rhythms.

  13. Increased sodium/calcium exchanger activity enhances beta-adrenergic-mediated increase in heart rate: Whole-heart study in a homozygous sodium/calcium exchanger overexpressor mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaese, Sven; Bögeholz, Nils; Pauls, Paul; Dechering, Dirk; Olligs, Jan; Kölker, Katharina; Badawi, Sascha; Frommeyer, Gerrit; Pott, Christian; Eckardt, Lars

    2017-08-01

    The cardiac sodium/calcium (Na(+)/Ca(2+)) exchanger (NCX) contributes to diastolic depolarization in cardiac pacemaker cells. Increased NCX activity has been found in heart failure and atrial fibrillation. The influence of increased NCX activity on resting heart rate, beta-adrenergic-mediated increase in heart rate, and cardiac conduction properties is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of NCX overexpression in a homozygous transgenic whole-heart mouse model (NCX-OE) on sinus and AV nodal function. Langendorff-perfused, beating whole hearts of NCX-OE and the corresponding wild-type (WT) were studied ± isoproterenol (ISO; 0.2 μM). Epicardial ECG, AV nodal Wenckebach cycle length (AVN-WCL), and retrograde AVN-WCL were obtained. At baseline, basal heart rate was unaltered between NCX-OE and WT (WT: cycle length [CL] 177.6 ± 40.0 ms, no. of hearts [n] = 20; NCX-OE: CL 185.9 ± 30.5 ms, n = 18; P = .21). In the presence of ISO, NCX-OE exhibited a significantly higher heart rate compared to WT (WT: CL 133.4 ± 13.4 ms, n = 20; NCX-OE: CL 117.7 ± 14.2 ms, n = 18; P heart rate. Mechanistically, increased NCX inward mode activity may promote acceleration of diastolic depolarization in sinus nodal pacemaker cells, thus enhancing chronotropy in NCX-OE. These findings suggest a novel potential therapeutic target for heart rate control in the presence of increased NCX activity, such as heart failure. Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Therapeutic applications of circadian rhythms for the cardiovascular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimakouridze, Elena V.; Alibhai, Faisal J.; Martino, Tami A.

    2015-01-01

    The cardiovascular system exhibits dramatic time-of-day dependent rhythms, for example the diurnal variation of heart rate, blood pressure, and timing of onset of adverse cardiovascular events such as heart attack and sudden cardiac death. Over the past decade, the circadian clock mechanism has emerged as a crucial factor regulating these daily fluctuations. Most recently, these studies have led to a growing clinical appreciation that targeting circadian biology offers a novel therapeutic approach toward cardiovascular (and other) diseases. Here we describe leading-edge therapeutic applications of circadian biology including (1) timing of therapy to maximize efficacy in treating heart disease (chronotherapy); (2) novel biomarkers discovered by testing for genomic, proteomic, metabolomic, or other factors at different times of day and night (chronobiomarkers); and (3) novel pharmacologic compounds that target the circadian mechanism with potential clinical applications (new chronobiology drugs). Cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death worldwide and new approaches in the management and treatment of heart disease are clearly warranted and can benefit patients clinically. PMID:25941487

  15. Sustained Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm in a Centrifuge-Simulated Suborbital Spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Rahul; Blue, Rebecca S; Mathers, Charles; Castleberry, Tarah L; Vanderploeg, James M

    2017-08-01

    Hypergravitational exposures during human centrifugation are known to provoke dysrhythmias, including sinus dysrhythmias/tachycardias, premature atrial/ventricular contractions, and even atrial fibrillations or flutter patterns. However, events are generally short-lived and resolve rapidly after cessation of acceleration. This case report describes a prolonged ectopic ventricular rhythm in response to high G exposure. A previously healthy 30-yr-old man voluntarily participated in centrifuge trials as a part of a larger study, experiencing a total of 7 centrifuge runs over 48 h. Day 1 consisted of two +Gz runs (peak +3.5 Gz, run 2) and two +Gx runs (peak +6.0 Gx, run 4). Day 2 consisted of three runs approximating suborbital spaceflight profiles (combined +Gx and +Gz). Hemodynamic data collected included blood pressure, heart rate, and continuous three-lead electrocardiogram. Following the final acceleration exposure of the last Day 2 run (peak +4.5 Gx and +4.0 Gz combined, resultant +6.0 G), during a period of idle resting centrifuge activity (resultant vector +1.4 G), the subject demonstrated a marked change in his three-lead electrocardiogram from normal sinus rhythm to a wide-complex ectopic ventricular rhythm at a rate of 91-95 bpm, consistent with an accelerated idioventricular rhythm (AIVR). This rhythm was sustained for 2 m, 24 s before reversion to normal sinus. The subject reported no adverse symptoms during this time. While prolonged, the dysrhythmia was asymptomatic and self-limited. AIVR is likely a physiological response to acceleration and can be managed conservatively. Vigilance is needed to ensure that AIVR is correctly distinguished from other, malignant rhythms to avoid inappropriate treatment and negative operational impacts.Suresh R, Blue RS, Mathers C, Castleberry TL, Vanderploeg JM. Sustained accelerated idioventricular rhythm in a centrifuge-simulated suborbital spaceflight. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(8):789-793.

  16. Appropriateness of Prescriptions of Recommended Treatments in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Health Systems: Findings Based on the Long-Term Registry of the European Society of Cardiology on Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggioni, Aldo P; Van Gool, Kees; Biondi, Nelly; Urso, Renato; Klazinga, Niek; Ferrari, Roberto; Maniadakis, Nikolaos; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    This observational study aimed to identify clinical variables and health system characteristics associated with incomplete guideline application in drug treatment of patients with chronic heart failure (HF) across 15 countries. Three data sets were used: European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure Registry, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's Health System Characteristics Survey, and Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Health Statistics 2013. Patient and country variables were examined by multilevel, multiple logistic regression. The study population consisted of ambulatory patients with chronic HF and reduced ejection fraction. Inappropriateness of prescription of pharmacological treatments was defined as patients not prescribed at least one of the two recommended treatments (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-receptor blockers and beta-blockers) or treated with both medications but at suboptimal dosage and in absence of documented contraindication/intolerance. Of 4605 patients, 1097 (23.8%) received inappropriate drug prescriptions with a large variation within and across countries, with 18.5% of the total variability accounted for by between-country health structure characteristics. Patient-level characteristics such as having mitral regurgitation (odds ratio 1.4; 95% confidence interval 1.1-1.7) was significantly associated with inappropriate prescription of recommended drugs, whereas chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (odds ratio 0.7; 95% confidence interval 0.5-0.9) was associated with more appropriate prescriptions. Among the country-level variables, incentives or obligation to comply with guidelines increased the probability of prescription appropriateness. Combining clinical variables with health system characteristics is a promising exercise to explain the appropriateness of recommended drug prescriptions. Such an understanding can help decision makers to design more effective policies to

  17. A timely review of state-of-the-art chronopharmaceuticals synchronized with biological rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewlall, Seshni; Pillay, Viness; Danckwerts, Michael P; Choonara, Yahya E; Ndesendo, Valence M K; du Toit, Lisa C

    2010-12-01

    Extensive research into circadian rhythms and their influence on biological systems has given rise to the science of chronobiology and subsequently chronotherapy, the science of delivering drugs in synchrony with biological rhythms. The field of chronotherapeutics paves the way for advances and complexities in current drug delivery technology. The ultimate goal of current chronopharmaceutical research strives to design ideal chronotherapeutic drug delivery systems that respond to such therapeutic needs. Considering the fact that physiological events such as heart rate, blood pressure, plasma concentration of hormones, plasma proteins and enzymes display constancy over time, drug delivery systems with constant release profiles have thus been favored. However, due to circadian rhythms, the conventional paradigm of constant drug delivery may not be what is needed. Instead, precisely timed drug delivery systems are required in order to correlate drug delivery with circadian rhythms to provide maximum therapeutic efficacy for chronotherapeutic diseases when most needed. The aim of this review paper is to outline the concepts in designing chronopharmaceuticals from a clinical viewpoint of major chronotherapeutic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, cardiovascular disorders, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer as well as relatively minor niche areas of interest such as in glaucoma, diabetes, immunity, pain, gastric ulcers, epilepsy and even HIV/AIDS that would require chronotherapy. In addition this review paper attempts to concisely assimilate and explicate the role of circadian rhythms in these various disease states and provide a focused overview of the current state-of-the-art in designing strategies for chronopharmaceutical formulations employed for treating chronotherapeutic diseases.

  18. [Efficacy of rate and rhythm control strategy in patients with atrial fibrillation: meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-jie; Yin, Yue-hui; Dong, Ying; Fan, Jin-qi; Su, Li

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of rate and rhythm control strategies for treating atrial fibrillation (AF) patients was analyzed in this meta-analysis. Eligible trials were searched in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, the Clinical Trials, the Chinese VIP database up to May 31, 2010. Ten prospective randomized control trials with 7876 patients (rate control n = 3932, rhythm control n = 3944) were included for final analysis. All cause mortality (5.3% vs. 5.0%; OR: 1.03; 95%CI: 0.84 - 1.26; I(2) control group than in rhythm control group in patients with age control and rate control groups while rehospitalization rate was significantly lower in rate control group than in rhythm control group (17.56% vs. 22.98%; OR: 0.37, 95%CI: 0.19 - 0.71). This meta-analysis shows that rhythm control strategy is superior to rate control strategy for AF patients with age < 65 years in terms of reducing all cause mortality and incidence of worsening heart failure.

  19. Blood pressure, pulse rate, and rhythm measurement using ionic polymer-metal composite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarzi, Amid; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Kim, Kwang J.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.

    1999-05-01

    The need for more enhanced blood pressure (BP), pulse rate and rhythm senors has given rise to the possibility of using ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) sensors. In this study we propose to use the IPMC sensors to measure systolic and diastolic BP, pulse rate and rhythm. The proposed IPMC sensors take advantage of the endo-ionic mobility within the polymer- metal composite by converting normal and shear load inputs into an induced voltage output across the thickness of the IPMC sensor. The fabricated IPMC sensors are suitable to be installed on the inner surface of a cuff and, therefore, both systolic and diastolic BP, pulse rate, and rhythm can be measured. An added benefit is the ability of measuring 'pulse rhythm' which give a more amplified look at heart irregularities which a typical pulse rate sensor is unable to show. Our data shows IPMC sensors can produce consistent and reliable BP readings, pulse rate, and rhythm. Typically, a linear relationship between applied maximum load and induced maximum voltage was obtained. This result can be easily translated into good BP reading.

  20. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  1. Taser X26 discharges in swine: ventricular rhythm capture is dependent on discharge vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, Daniel J; Walter, Robert J; Dennis, Andrew J; Margeta, Bosko; Starr, Frederic; Nagy, Kimberly K; Bokhari, Faran; Wiley, Dorion E; Joseph, Kimberly T; Roberts, Roxanne R

    2008-12-01

    Data from our previous studies indicate that Taser X26 stun devices can acutely alter cardiac function in swine. We hypothesized that most transcardiac discharge vectors would capture ventricular rhythm, but that other vectors, not traversing the heart, would fail to capture the ventricular rhythm. Using an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) approved protocol, four Yorkshire pigs (25-36 kg) were anesthetized, paralyzed with succinylcholine (2 mg/kg), and then exposed to 10 second discharges from a police-issue Taser X26. For most discharges, the barbed darts were pushed manually into the skin to their full depth (12 mm) and were arranged in either transcardiac (such that a straight line connecting the darts would cross the region of the heart) or non-transcardiac vectors. A total of 11 different vectors and 22 discharge conditions were studied. For each vector, by simply rotating the cartridge 180-degrees in the gun, the primary current-emitting dart was changed and the direction of current flow during the discharge was reversed without physically moving the darts. Echocardiography and electrocardiograms (ECGs) were performed before, during, and after all discharges. p values Taser X26 caused immediate ventricular rhythm capture. This usually reverted spontaneously to sinus rhythm but potentially fatal VF was seen with two vectors. For some non-transcardiac vectors, capture was also seen but with a significantly (p < 0.0001) decreased incidence.

  2. Network Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lars; Tække, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    the five strands of theory on the network society. Each theoretical position has its specific implications for acting toward strategic goals. In its entirety, the five perspectives give a thorough understanding of the conditions for successful strategic communication in the 21st century....

  3. Network Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lars; Tække, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    the five strands of theory on the network society. Each theoretical position has its specific implications for acting toward strategic goals. In its entirety, the five perspectives give a thorough understanding of the conditions for successful strategic communication in the 21st century....

  4. Circadian Rhythms and Sleep inDrosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubowy, Christine; Sehgal, Amita

    2017-04-01

    for identifying a large set of genes, molecules, and neuroanatomic loci important for regulating sleep amount. Conserved aspects of sleep regulation in flies and mammals include wake-promoting roles for catecholamine neurotransmitters and involvement of hypothalamus-like regions, although other neuroanatomic regions implicated in sleep in flies have less clear parallels. Sleep is also subject to regulation by factors such as food availability, stress, and social environment. We are beginning to understand how the identified molecules and neurons interact with each other, and with the environment, to regulate sleep. Drosophila researchers can also take advantage of increasing mechanistic understanding of other behaviors, such as learning and memory, courtship, and aggression, to understand how sleep loss impacts these behaviors. Flies thus remain a valuable tool for both discovery of novel molecules and deep mechanistic understanding of sleep and circadian rhythms. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  5. Molecular control of circadian metabolic rhythms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siming Li; Jiandie D. Lin

    2009-01-01

    Circadian metabolic rhythms are fundamental to the control of nutrient and energy homeostasis, as well as the pathogenesis of metabolic disease, such as obesity, lipid disorders, and type 2 diabetes...

  6. Daily rhythms in mobile telephone communication

    CERN Document Server

    Aledavood, Talayeh; Roberts, Sam G B; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Moro, Esteban; Dunbar, Robin I M; Saramäki, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are known to be important drivers of human activity and the recent availability of electronic records of human behaviour has provided fine-grained data of temporal patterns of activity on a large scale. Further, questionnaire studies have identified important individual differences in circadian rhythms, with people broadly categorised into morning-like or evening-like individuals. However, little is known about the social aspects of these circadian rhythms, or how they vary across individuals. In this study we use a unique 18-month dataset that combines mobile phone calls and questionnaire data to examine individual differences in the daily rhythms of mobile phone activity. We demonstrate clear individual differences in daily patterns of phone calls, and show that these individual differences are persistent despite a high degree of turnover in the individuals' social networks. Further, women's calls were longer than men's calls, especially during the evening and at night, and these calls wer...

  7. Strength of gamma rhythm depends on normalization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ray, Supratim; Ni, Amy M; Maunsell, John H R

    2013-01-01

    ...), whose magnitude depends on the attentional load. This has led to the suggestion that gamma rhythms form dynamic communication channels across cortical areas processing the features of behaviorally relevant stimuli...

  8. Circadian rhythms, athletic performance, and jet lag

    OpenAIRE

    Manfredini, R; Manfredini, F.; Fersini, C.; Conconi, F.

    1998-01-01

    Rapid air travel across several time zones exposes the traveller to a shift in his/her internal biological clock. The result is a transient desynchronisation of the circadian rhythm, called jet lag, lasting until the rhythm is rephased to the new environmental conditions. The most commonly experienced symptoms are sleep disorders, difficulties with concentrating, irritability, depression, fatigue, disorientation, loss of appetite, and gastrointestinal disturbance. Apart from the decreme...

  9. "Ritual Rhythms" - a collaborative WebDocumentary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møhl, Perle

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative web-based filmproject in 11 vignettes about the rituals and rhythms of daily life in various locations & settings in the city of Copenhagen. Created by Perle Møhl and the students on the 2014 courses in Visual Anthropology in Practice. We use the concepts of Ritual and Rhythm......, tuning in with all our senses to the details of daily life that often elude the attention of a wordy anthropology....

  10. [The differences between the guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology and the American College of Cardiology/ American Heart Association for oral P2Y12 inhibitor therapy in the management of patients with acute coronary syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebruany, V L; Pershukov, I V

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of the evidence that formed the basis for the current guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) on oral therapy by antithrombotic drugs for acute coronary syndromes (ACS), and a comparison with the U.S. guidelines. The ESC guidelines, published during 2011-2012, declared the superiority of prasugrel and ticagrelor over clopidogrel in patients with ACS without ST elevation and myocardial infarction (MI) with ST elevation. These guidelines are based in each case on a subgroup analysis of a single study using either prasugrel (TRITON), or ticagrelor (PLATO). In contrast, the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines, published in 2012-2013, are more balanced, conservative and present evidence-based outlook, suggesting no proven extra benefit of one P2Y12 antagonist over the other(s). The ESC guidelines regarding the findings of the superiority of prasugrel or ticagrelor over clopidogrel are overly optimistic and not always evidence-based. A small frequency of clinical use of prasugrel and ticagrelor in the world in general and Europe in particular, suggests a discrepancy between the traditionally appointed treatment and published ESC guidelines.

  11. Rate Control versus Rhythm Control for Atrial Fibrillation after Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillinov, A Marc; Bagiella, Emilia; Moskowitz, Alan J; Raiten, Jesse M; Groh, Mark A; Bowdish, Michael E; Ailawadi, Gorav; Kirkwood, Katherine A; Perrault, Louis P; Parides, Michael K; Smith, Robert L; Kern, John A; Dussault, Gladys; Hackmann, Amy E; Jeffries, Neal O; Miller, Marissa A; Taddei-Peters, Wendy C; Rose, Eric A; Weisel, Richard D; Williams, Deborah L; Mangusan, Ralph F; Argenziano, Michael; Moquete, Ellen G; O'Sullivan, Karen L; Pellerin, Michel; Shah, Kinjal J; Gammie, James S; Mayer, Mary Lou; Voisine, Pierre; Gelijns, Annetine C; O'Gara, Patrick T; Mack, Michael J

    2016-05-19

    Atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery is associated with increased rates of death, complications, and hospitalizations. In patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation who are in stable condition, the best initial treatment strategy--heart-rate control or rhythm control--remains controversial. Patients with new-onset postoperative atrial fibrillation were randomly assigned to undergo either rate control or rhythm control. The primary end point was the total number of days of hospitalization within 60 days after randomization, as assessed by the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Postoperative atrial fibrillation occurred in 695 of the 2109 patients (33.0%) who were enrolled preoperatively; of these patients, 523 underwent randomization. The total numbers of hospital days in the rate-control group and the rhythm-control group were similar (median, 5.1 days and 5.0 days, respectively; P=0.76). There were no significant between-group differences in the rates of death (P=0.64) or overall serious adverse events (24.8 per 100 patient-months in the rate-control group and 26.4 per 100 patient-months in the rhythm-control group, P=0.61), including thromboembolic and bleeding events. About 25% of the patients in each group deviated from the assigned therapy, mainly because of drug ineffectiveness (in the rate-control group) or amiodarone side effects or adverse drug reactions (in the rhythm-control group). At 60 days, 93.8% of the patients in the rate-control group and 97.9% of those in the rhythm-control group had had a stable heart rhythm without atrial fibrillation for the previous 30 days (P=0.02), and 84.2% and 86.9%, respectively, had been free from atrial fibrillation from discharge to 60 days (P=0.41). Strategies for rate control and rhythm control to treat postoperative atrial fibrillation were associated with equal numbers of days of hospitalization, similar complication rates, and similarly low rates of persistent atrial fibrillation 60 days after onset. Neither

  12. Effect of cortisol diurnal rhythm on emotional memory in healthy young adults

    OpenAIRE

    Nagamine, Mitsue; Noguchi, Hiroko; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Kim, Yoshiharu; Matsuoka, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the relationship between cortisol diurnal rhythm and cognitive function in healthy young adults, especially for emotional memory. To address this deficiency, this study examined the effect of diurnal cortisol slope (DCS) and heart rate variability (HRV) on emotional memory. Participants included healthy volunteers (44 men and 23 women; mean age 20.60 yrs). Participants were shown emotionally arousing slides and were asked to return to the laboratory one week late...

  13. Spontaneous Group Synchronization of Movements and Respiratory Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandoni, Matteo; Bernardi, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    We tested whether pre-assigned arm movements performed in a group setting spontaneously synchronized and whether synchronization extended to heart and respiratory rhythms. We monitored arm movements, respiration and electrocardiogram at rest and during spontaneous, music and metronome-associated arm-swinging. No directions were given on whether or how the arm swinging were to be synchronized between participants or with the external cues. Synchronization within 3 groups of 10 participants studied collectively was compared with pseudo-synchronization of 3 groups of 10 participants that underwent an identical protocol but in an individual setting. Motor synchronization was found to be higher in the collective groups than in the individuals for the metronome-associated condition. On a repetition of the protocol on the following day, motor synchronization in the collective groups extended to the spontaneous, un-cued condition. Breathing was also more synchronized in the collective groups than in the individuals, particularly at rest and in the music-associated condition. Group synchronization occurs without explicit instructions, and involves both movements and respiratory control rhythms. PMID:25216280

  14. Protecting the Melatonin Rhythm through Circadian Healthy Light Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonmati-Carrion, Maria Angeles; Arguelles-Prieto, Raquel; Martinez-Madrid, Maria Jose; Reiter, Russel; Hardeland, Ruediger; Rol, Maria Angeles; Madrid, Juan Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Currently, in developed countries, nights are excessively illuminated (light at night), whereas daytime is mainly spent indoors, and thus people are exposed to much lower light intensities than under natural conditions. In spite of the positive impact of artificial light, we pay a price for the easy access to light during the night: disorganization of our circadian system or chronodisruption (CD), including perturbations in melatonin rhythm. Epidemiological studies show that CD is associated with an increased incidence of diabetes, obesity, heart disease, cognitive and affective impairment, premature aging and some types of cancer. Knowledge of retinal photoreceptors and the discovery of melanopsin in some ganglion cells demonstrate that light intensity, timing and spectrum must be considered to keep the biological clock properly entrained. Importantly, not all wavelengths of light are equally chronodisrupting. Blue light, which is particularly beneficial during the daytime, seems to be more disruptive at night, and induces the strongest melatonin inhibition. Nocturnal blue light exposure is currently increasing, due to the proliferation of energy-efficient lighting (LEDs) and electronic devices. Thus, the development of lighting systems that preserve the melatonin rhythm could reduce the health risks induced by chronodisruption. This review addresses the state of the art regarding the crosstalk between light and the circadian system. PMID:25526564

  15. Protecting the Melatonin Rhythm through Circadian Healthy Light Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angeles Bonmati-Carrion

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, in developed countries, nights are excessively illuminated (light at night, whereas daytime is mainly spent indoors, and thus people are exposed to much lower light intensities than under natural conditions. In spite of the positive impact of artificial light, we pay a price for the easy access to light during the night: disorganization of our circadian system or chronodisruption (CD, including perturbations in melatonin rhythm. Epidemiological studies show that CD is associated with an increased incidence of diabetes, obesity, heart disease, cognitive and affective impairment, premature aging and some types of cancer. Knowledge of retinal photoreceptors and the discovery of melanopsin in some ganglion cells demonstrate that light intensity, timing and spectrum must be considered to keep the biological clock properly entrained. Importantly, not all wavelengths of light are equally chronodisrupting. Blue light, which is particularly beneficial during the daytime, seems to be more disruptive at night, and induces the strongest melatonin inhibition. Nocturnal blue light exposure is currently increasing, due to the proliferation of energy-efficient lighting (LEDs and electronic devices. Thus, the development of lighting systems that preserve the melatonin rhythm could reduce the health risks induced by chronodisruption. This review addresses the state of the art regarding the crosstalk between light and the circadian system.

  16. Biological Rhythms During Residence in Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    At Arctic and Antarctic latitudes, personnel are deprived of natural sunlight in winter and have continuous daylight in summer: light of sufficient intensity and suitable spectral composition is the main factor that maintains the 24-h period of human circadian rhythms. Thus, the status of the circadian system is of interest. Moreover, the relatively controlled artificial light conditions in winter are conducive to experimentation with different types of light treatment. The hormone melatonin and/or its metabolite 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) provide probably the best index of circadian (and seasonal) timing. A frequent observation has been a delay of the circadian system in winter. A skeleton photoperiod (2 × 1-h, bright white light, morning and evening) can restore summer timing. A single 1-h pulse of light in the morning may be sufficient. A few people desynchronize from the 24-h day (free-run) and show their intrinsic circadian period, usually >24 h. With regard to general health in polar regions, intermittent reports describe abnormalities in various physiological processes from the point of view of daily and seasonal rhythms, but positive health outcomes are also published. True winter depression (SAD) appears to be rare, although subsyndromal SAD is reported. Probably of most concern are the numerous reports of sleep problems. These have prompted investigations of the underlying mechanisms and treatment interventions. A delay of the circadian system with “normal” working hours implies sleep is attempted at a suboptimal phase. Decrements in sleep efficiency, latency, duration, and quality are also seen in winter. Increasing the intensity of ambient light exposure throughout the day advanced circadian phase and was associated with benefits for sleep: blue-enriched light was slightly more effective than standard white light. Effects on performance remain to be fully investigated. At 75°S, base personnel adapt the circadian system to night work within

  17. Management of stable ischemic heart disease: summary of a clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians/American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association/American Association for Thoracic Surgery/Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association/Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaseem, Amir; Fihn, Stephan D; Dallas, Paul; Williams, Sankey; Owens, Douglas K; Shekelle, Paul

    2012-11-20

    The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline with the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), American Heart Association (AHA), American Association for Thoracic Surgery, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons to present the available evidence on the management of stable known or suspected ischemic heart disease. Literature on this topic published before November 2011 was identified by using MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, PsychINFO, AMED, and SCOPUS. Searches were limited to human studies published in English. This guideline grades the evidence and recommendations according to a translation of the ACCF/AHA grading system into ACP's clinical practice guidelines grading system. The guideline includes 48 specific recommendations that address the following issues: patient education, management of proven risk factors (dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, physical activity body weight, and smoking), risk factor reduction strategies of unproven benefit, medical therapy to prevent myocardial infarction and death and to relieve symptoms, alternative therapy, revascularization to improve survival and symptoms, and patient follow-up.

  18. Heart murmurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest sounds - murmurs; Heart sounds - abnormal; Murmur - innocent; Innocent murmur; Systolic heart murmur; Diastolic heart murmur ... The heart has 4 chambers: Two upper chambers (atria) Two lower chambers (ventricles) The heart has valves that close ...

  19. Cryptozoology Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Reports of Loch Ness monsters, Bigfoot, and the Yeti spring u p from time to time, sparking scientific controversy about the veracity of these observations. Now an organization has been established to help cull, analyze, and disseminate information on the alleged creatures. The International Society of Cryptozoology, formed at a January meeting at the U.S. National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution, will serve as the focal point for the investigation, analysis, publication, and discussion of animals of unexpected form or size or of unexpected occurrences in time or space.

  20. Wet cupping therapy restores sympathovagal imbalances in cardiac rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Müzeyyen; Yeşilçam, Nesibe; Aydin, Duygu; Yüksel, Ramazan; Dane, Senol

    2014-04-01

    A recent study showed that cupping had therapeutic effects in rats with myocardial infarction and cardiac arrhythmias. The current studyaimed to investigate the possible useful effects of cupping therapy on cardiac rhythm in terms of heart rate variability (HRV). Forty healthy participants were included. Classic wet cupping therapy was applied on five points of the back. Recording electrocardiography (to determine HRV) was applied 1 hour before and 1 hour after cupping therapy. All HRV parameters increased after cupping therapy compared with before cupping therapy in healthy persons. These results indicate for the first time in humans that cupping might be cardioprotective. In this study, cupping therapy restored sympathovagal imbalances by stimulating the peripheral nervous system.

  1. [Impact of sleep debt on physiological rhythms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, K; Leproult, R; Van Cauter, E

    2003-11-01

    Sleep loss due to voluntary bedtime curtailment has become a hallmark of modern society. Even though sleep deprivation in rodents has been shown to result in death, it was until a few years ago thought that sleep loss results in increased sleepiness and decreased cognitive performance but has little or no adverse effects on human health. We measured sleep and 24-hour hormonal profiles in 11 healthy young males after 6 days of sleep restriction (4-hour bedtime) and after 6 days of sleep recovery (12-hour bedtime). At the end of sleep restriction, we observed reduced amounts of slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and an alteration in the temporal distribution of these sleep stages, i.e. an increased pressure for REM sleep at the beginning of the sleep period and a decrease in the amount of slow wave activity (SWA) during the first sleep cycle. These later abnormalities are usually observed in depression. In addition, numerous alterations in the 24-hour hormonal profiles were observed in the state of sleep debt. The amount of melatonin secreted was reduced because of a delay in the onset of the nocturnal secretion and a reduction in the value of the acrophase. If the overall 24-hour cortisol profile was preserved, sleep restriction was associated with increased cortisol levels in late afternoon and evening hours and the duration of the quiescent period was reduced. The 24-hour mean TSH levels were reduced and the nocturnal TSH elevation was markedly dampened, most likely as a result of elevated levels of thyroid hormones. The acrophase of the 24-hour leptin profile occurred earlier, the amplitude of the rhythm and the overall mean levels were reduced. The nocturnal elevation of prolactin levels was abrupt but of short duration and the 24-hour mean levels were decreased. A pulse of growth hormone occurred prior to sleep onset, therefore affecting SWA distribution at the beginning of the sleep period. Since these alterations are qualitatively and

  2. Timing of host feeding drives rhythms in parasite replication

    KAUST Repository

    Prior, Kimberley F

    2017-12-07

    Circadian rhythms enable organisms to synchronise the processes underpinning survival and reproduction to anticipate daily changes in the external environment. Recent work shows that daily (circadian) rhythms also enable parasites to maximise fitness in the context of ecological interactions with their hosts. Because parasite rhythms matter for their fitness, understanding how they are regulated could lead to innovative ways to reduce the severity and spread of diseases. Here, we examine how host circadian rhythms influence rhythms in the asexual replication of malaria parasites. Asexual replication is responsible for the severity of malaria and fuels transmission of the disease, yet, how parasite rhythms are driven remains a mystery. We perturbed feeding rhythms of hosts by 12 hours (i.e. diurnal feeding in nocturnal mice) to desynchronise the host\\'s peripheral oscillators from the central, light-entrained oscillator in the brain and their rhythmic outputs. We demonstrate that the rhythms of rodent malaria parasites in day-fed hosts become inverted relative to the rhythms of parasites in night-fed hosts. Our results reveal that the host\\'s peripheral rhythms (associated with the timing of feeding and metabolism), but not rhythms driven by the central, light-entrained circadian oscillator in the brain, determine the timing (phase) of parasite rhythms. Further investigation reveals that parasite rhythms correlate closely with blood glucose rhythms. In addition, we show that parasite rhythms resynchronise to the altered host feeding rhythms when food availability is shifted, which is not mediated through rhythms in the host immune system. Our observations suggest that parasites actively control their developmental rhythms. Finally, counter to expectation, the severity of disease symptoms expressed by hosts was not affected by desynchronisation of their central and peripheral rhythms. Our study at the intersection of disease ecology and chronobiology opens up a new

  3. Two hearts synchronized each other with a DDD pacemaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunacci, Michele; Valbusa, Alberto; Brunelli, Claudio; Bertero, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    : We describe the case of a patient with dyspnea and heterotopic cardiac transplant, ventricular fibrillation from the native heart and sinus rhythm from the transplanted one. The two hearts were synchronized with a pacemaker. Electric external cardioversion and a different type of pacemaker stimulation were successfully performed, with improving symptoms.

  4. Efficacy and safety of tolvaptan for pediatric patients with congestive heart failure. Multicenter survey in the working group of the Japanese Society of PEdiatric Circulation and Hemodynamics (J-SPECH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Kouji; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Itoi, Toshiyuki; Ohuchi, Hideo; Kodama, Yoshihiko; Honda, Takashi; Masutani, Satoshi; Yamazawa, Hirokuni; Senzaki, Hideaki; Ishikawa, Shiro

    2016-02-15

    Tolvaptan, a vasopressin V2-receptor antagonist, has been reported to improve congestion in adult patients with heart failure. However, it has not been fully clarified whether tolvaptan is also effective and safe for pediatric patients as well as adult. This trial was a multicenter, retrospective, observational study, and was led by the Japanese Society of PEdiatric Circulation and Hemodynamics (J-SPECH). Thirty-four pediatric patients who received tolvaptan to treat congestive heart failure were enrolled in this study. An increment in the urinary volume and decrease in the body weight from baseline were significant at day 1 (+106.7 ± 241.5%, p = 0.008 and -2.30 ± 4.17%, p = 0.01), day 3 (+113.5 ± 261.9%, p = 0.02 and -2.30 ± 4.17%, p = 0.01), week 1 (+56.3 ± 163.5%, p = 0.01 and -1.55 ± 4.09%, p = 0.03) and month 1 (+91.1 ± 171.6%, p = 0.01 and -2.95 ± 5.98, p = 0.03). The significant predictive factors in responders, who was defined as patients who achieved an increase in the urinary volume at day 1, were older age (p = 0.03), larger body weight before exacerbation (p = 0.04), higher weight at one day before the first administration of tolvaptan (p = 0.03), higher aspartate aminotransferase levels (p = 0.03) and higher urinary osmolality levels (p = 0.03). A logistic regression analysis showed that the urinary osmolality was the only significant predictive factor for responders to tolvaptan. Adverse drug reactions were observed in 7 patients (20.6%). Six patients had thirst and a dry month, and 1 had a mild increase in the alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase. Tolvaptan can be effectively and safely administered in pediatric patients. Because the kidneys in neonates and infants are resistant to arginine vasopressin, the efficacy of tolvaptan may be less effective compared to older children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Atrial fibrillation: what have recent trials taught us regarding pharmacologic management of rate and rhythm control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiffel, James A

    2011-02-01

    The management of atrial fibrillation (AF) focuses on control of heart rate, correction of rhythm disturbance, prophylaxis of thromboembolism, treatment of underlying disorders, and pathophysiologic mechanisms, and more recently on costs, hospitalizations, and other AF consequences. The goals of therapy are to reduce morbidity and mortality and improve quality of life (QOL). Several large studies have examined the relative efficacy of rhythm- versus rate-control strategies with respect to these outcomes, and have largely failed to demonstrate a survival advantage with either approach by intention-to-treat analysis--both in patients with and without heart failure (HF). However, the results do not support the hypothesis that rate control is preferable as first-line therapy for AF with respect to survival and do not disprove the hypothesis that maintenance of sinus rhythm is preferable to the continuation of AF, particularly if rate control fails to restore adequate QOL or if selective approaches are employed. Many post hoc analyses and substudies have assessed QOL, functional status, and exercise tolerance, with the majority demonstrating important benefits associated with achievement of rhythm control. Moreover, some subanalyses and additional trials have suggested that sinus rhythm can be associated with longer survival, including in patients with HF. In addition, ATHENA demonstrated that a drug, dronedarone, could improve the composite endpoint of cardiovascular hospitalizations and all-cause mortality in a carefully selected, high-risk, nonpermanent AF population, in addition to its recognized reduction in AF. This review examines the clinical outcomes of several important AF trials, discusses the limitations in applying the major morbidity/mortality findings to everyday clinical practice, and summarizes the lessons learned. ©2010, The Author. Journal compilation ©2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Circadian rhythms in airline pilots submitted to long-haul transmeridian flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariznavarreta, C; Cardinali, D P; Villanúa, M A; Granados, B; Martín, M; Chiesa, J J; Golombek, D A; Tresguerres, J A F

    2002-05-01

    Circadian rhythms shift out of phase after transmeridian flights. Desynchronization between body rhythms and the environment is linked to jet lag, which depends on age, flight direction, and number of time zones crossed. To investigate this problem in airline pilots, we performed a multivariate analysis of their circadian systems during Madrid-Mexico-Madrid flights (-7 time zones, n = 12) and Madrid-Tokyo-Madrid flights (+8 time zones, n = 21). Telemetry was used to record pilots' activity, skin temperature, and heart rate, obtaining 6 d of continuous data, including 2 d before the flight, the flights themselves, 2 d at the stopover, and 1 d after the return flight. Time series were analyzed by cosinor, and the resulting parameters of the rhythms were compared by ANOVA and Tukey contrasts in every category formed by the age groups (under and over 50 yr old) and flight direction groups. Subjective time estimation of short, intermediate, and long intervals was recorded. Other psychological variables were measured, including anxiety, tiredness, and performance. Activity/rest and heart rate rhythms appeared to be linked to a "weak oscillator." Temperature rhythms manifested a rigid response after the phase shifts of the light/dark cycle, closely related to the biological clock. Subjective time appreciation tended to be overestimated without exhibiting a clear circadian component, but attributable to fatigue and stress. Psychometric evaluation showed that desynchronization affected all the pilots. Some results showed an age-related variability with a more marked influence in younger pilots. No consistent effects regarding flight direction were found.

  7. Comparison of antiarrhythmics used in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: subanalysis of J-RHYTHM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Kohsaka, Shun; Suzuki, Shinya; Atarashi, Hirotsugu; Kamakura, Shiro; Sakurai, Masayuki; Nakaya, Haruaki; Fukatani, Masahiko; Mitamura, Hideo; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Yamashita, Takeshi; Ogawa, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    The J-RHYTHM (Japanese Rhythm Management Trial for Atrial Fibrillation) study demonstrated the benefit of rhythm-control compared with rate-control in Japanese patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF), according to AF-specific quality of life scores. However, detailed information on prescribed antiarrhythmic agents remains unclear. Data for 419 patients enrolled in the rhythm-control arm of J-RHYTHM were analyzed. The primary endpoint was defined as a composite of total mortality, cerebral infarction, embolism, bleeding, heart failure, and physical/psychological disability. The secondary endpoint was recurrence of AF. The clinical outcome according to choice of initial antiarrhythmic agent (AA) was assessed by Kaplan-Meier survival curve, and further adjusted by Cox-regression hazard model. The primary endpoint occurred in 16.9%, 6.7%, 15.8% and 23.3% of patients assigned to class Ia, Ib, Ic and III agents (P=0.359). The rate of AF recurrence was significantly higher in patients taking a class III drug (Ia, Ib, Ic, III=20.3, 23.3, 29.1, 50.0%; P=0.002). However, after adjustment for other clinical variables, the choice of AA was not associated with recurrence of AF (class I vs III, P=0.15). The incidence of each endpoint did not differ according to the choice of AA. The class III drugs seemed to lower the sinus rhythm maintenance rate, which might be confounded by other comorbid conditions. (Circ J 2010; 74: 71 - 76).

  8. Chronobiology and obesity: Interactions between circadian rhythms and energy regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Keith C; Turek, Fred W

    2014-05-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular, genetic, neural, and physiologic basis for the generation and organization of circadian clocks in mammals have revealed profound bidirectional interactions between the circadian clock system and pathways critical for the regulation of metabolism and energy balance. The discovery that mice harboring a mutation in the core circadian gene circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (Clock) develop obesity and evidence of the metabolic syndrome represented a seminal moment for the field, clearly establishing a link between circadian rhythms, energy balance, and metabolism at the genetic level. Subsequent studies have characterized in great detail the depth and magnitude of the circadian clock's crucial role in regulating body weight and other metabolic processes. Dietary nutrients have been shown to influence circadian rhythms at both molecular and behavioral levels; and many nuclear hormone receptors, which bind nutrients as well as other circulating ligands, have been observed to exhibit robust circadian rhythms of expression in peripheral metabolic tissues. Furthermore, the daily timing of food intake has itself been shown to affect body weight regulation in mammals, likely through, at least in part, regulation of the temporal expression patterns of metabolic genes. Taken together, these and other related findings have transformed our understanding of the important role of time, on a 24-h scale, in the complex physiologic processes of energy balance and coordinated regulation of metabolism. This research has implications for human metabolic disease and may provide unique and novel insights into the development of new therapeutic strategies to control and combat the epidemic of obesity. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care: Endorsed by the American Heart Assocation, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia Intervencion; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie d'intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-05-19

    Although historically the intra-aortic balloon pump has been the only mechanical circulatory support device available to clinicians, a number of new devices have become commercially available and have entered clinical practice. These include axial flow pumps, such as Impella(®); left atrial to femoral artery bypass pumps, specifically the TandemHeart; and new devices for institution of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. These devices differ significantly in their hemodynamic effects, insertion, monitoring, and clinical applicability. This document reviews the physiologic impact on the circulation of these devices and their use in specific clinical situations. These situations include patients undergoing high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention, those presenting with cardiogenic shock, and acute decompensated heart failure. Specialized uses for right-sided support and in pediatric populations are discussed and the clinical utility of mechanical circulatory support devices is reviewed, as are the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, The American College of Cardiology Foundation, The Heart Failure Society of America, and The Society for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care (Endorsed by the American Heart Association, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia Intervencion; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie D'intervention).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Although historically the intra-aortic balloon pump has been the only mechanical circulatory support device available to clinicians, a number of new devices have become commercially available and have entered clinical practice. These include axial flow pumps, such as Impella®; left atrial to femoral artery bypass pumps, specifically the TandemHeart; and new devices for institution of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. These devices differ significantly in their hemodynamic effects, insertion, monitoring, and clinical applicability. This document reviews the physiologic impact on the circulation of these devices and their use in specific clinical situations. These situations include patients undergoing high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention, those presenting with cardiogenic shock, and acute decompensated heart failure. Specialized uses for right-sided support and in pediatric populations are discussed and the clinical utility of mechanical circulatory support devices is reviewed, as are the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines. © 2015 by The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, The American College of Cardiology Foundation, The Heart Failure Society of America, and The Society for Thoracic Surgery.

  11. Application of the European Society of Cardiology, Adult Treatment Panel III and American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines for cardiovascular risk management in a French cohort of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournadre, Anne; Tatar, Zuzana; Pereira, Bruno; Chevreau, Maxime; Gossec, Laure; Gaudin, Philippe; Soubrier, Martin; Dougados, Maxime

    2015-03-15

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have greater rates of cardiovascular mortality and RA is an independent cardiovascular risk factor. For the management of cholesterol, the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) developed new guidelines for the general population. None of the European or American guidelines are specific to RA. The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommends applying a coefficient to cardiovascular risk equations based on the characteristics of RA. Our objective was to compare the three different sets of guidelines for the eligibility of statin therapy in RA-specific population with very high risk of cardiovascular disease. We calculated the proportion of patients eligible for statins according to the guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP-III) and the ACC/AHA in a French cohort of statin-naïve RA patients at least 40 years age. Of the 547 women and 130 men analyzed, statins would be recommended for 9.1% of the women and 26.4% of the men, 15.6% of the women and 53.1% of the men, 38.8% of the women and 78.5% of the men, according to the ESC, ATP-III and ACC/AHA guidelines respectively. In RA patients, as has been observed in the general population, discordance in risk assessment and cholesterol treatment was observed between the three sets of guidelines. The use of the new ACC/AHA guidelines would expand the eligibility for statins and may be applied to RA population a condition at very high risk of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. Biological clocks and rhythms in intertidal crustaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Iglesia, Horacio O; Hsu, Yun-Wei A

    2010-06-01

    Animals with habitats within the intertidal zone are exposed to environmental cycles that include the ebb and flow of tidal waters, changes in tidal levels associated with the lunar month, the light-dark cycle and the alternation of seasons. This intricate temporal environment results in the selection of biological timing systems with endogenous clocks that can oscillate with this wide range of periodicities. Whereas great progress has been made in our understanding of the molecular and neural bases of circadian rhythms, that is, endogenous rhythms synchronized to the solar day, there is little understanding on how circatidal rhythms, namely endogenous rhythms synchronized to tides, are generated. Intertidal crustaceans have been a pivotal group for the demonstration of the endogenous nature of circatidal rhythms and their mechanisms of entrainment. We review here some of the classic work using intertidal crustaceans to unmask basic properties of circatidal systems, as well as work from our laboratory that aims to identify putative chemical signals that could be involved in the circatidal systems of decapod crustaceans.

  13. Thyrotoxicosis and the Heart – A Review of the Literature | Ogbera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thyrotoxicosis is a common endocrine disorder affecting more females than males. It is well known that one of the main complications of thyrotoxicosis is heart disease, including heart rhythm abnormalities. Studies have clearly shown that patients with hyperthyroidism are more likely to die from heart disease or stroke, ...

  14. Circadian rhythms have broad implications for understanding brain and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Rae; Kriegsfeld, Lance J

    2014-06-01

    Circadian rhythms are generated by an endogenously organized timing system that drives daily rhythms in behavior, physiology and metabolism. In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is the locus of a master circadian clock. The SCN is synchronized to environmental changes in the light:dark cycle by direct, monosynaptic innervation via the retino-hypothalamic tract. In turn, the SCN coordinates the rhythmic activities of innumerable subordinate clocks in virtually all bodily tissues and organs. The core molecular clockwork is composed of a transcriptional/post-translational feedback loop in which clock genes and their protein products periodically suppress their own transcription. This primary loop connects to downstream output genes by additional, interlocked transcriptional feedback loops to create tissue-specific 'circadian transcriptomes'. Signals from peripheral tissues inform the SCN of the internal state of the organism and the brain's master clock is modified accordingly. A consequence of this hierarchical, multilevel feedback system is that there are ubiquitous effects of circadian timing on genetic and metabolic responses throughout the body. This overview examines landmark studies in the history of the study of circadian timing system, and highlights our current understanding of the operation of circadian clocks with a focus on topics of interest to the neuroscience community. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The effect of restraining on the heart rate in guinea pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikiskova, H.

    1980-01-01

    The emotional effect of different applications of electrodes and the fixation for cariographic examination was investigated using guinea pigs. The effect of the stress is discussed in terms of heart rhythm and behavior.

  16. Atrial fibrillation in heart failure: The sword of Damocles revisited.

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Muhammad A.; Ahmed, Fozia; Neyses, Ludwig; Mamas, Mamas A.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) and atrial fibrillation (AF) frequently coexist and have emerged as major cardiovascular epidemics. There is growing evidence that AF is an independent prognostic marker in HF and affects patients with both reduced as well as preserved LV systolic function. There has been a general move in clinical practice from a rhythm control to a rate control strategy in HF patients with AF, although recent data suggests that rhythm control strategies may provide better outcomes in sele...

  17. Analyzing biological rhythms in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkum, Naser B; Myles, James D; Kumar, Pranesh

    2008-09-01

    The human body exhibits a variety of biological rhythms. There are patterns that correspond, among others, to the daily wake / sleep cycle, a yearly seasonal cycle and, in women, the menstrual cycle. Sine/cosine functions are often used to model biological patterns for continuous data, but this model is not appropriate for analysis of biological rhythms in failure time data. We consider a method appropriate for analysis of biological rhythms in clinical trials. We present a method to provide an estimate and confidence interval of the time when the minimum hazard is achieved. A motivating example from a clinical trial of adjuvant of pre-menopausal breast cancer patients provides an important illustration of the methodology in practice. Adapting the Cosinor method to the Weibull proportional hazards model is proposed as useful way of modeling the biological rhythm data. It presents a method to estimate the time that achieves the minimum hazard along with its associated confidence interval. The application of this technique to the breast cancer data revealed that the optimal day for pre-resection incisional or excisional biopsy of 28-day cycle (i.e. the day associated with the lowest recurrence rate) is day 8 with 95% CI 5-10. We found that older age, fewer positive nodes, smaller tumor size, and experimental treatment are important prognostic factors of longer relapse-free survival. The analysis of biological/circadian rhythms is usually handled by Cosinor rhythmometry method. However, in FTD this is simply not possible. In this case, we propose to adapt the Cosinor method to the Weibull proportional hazard model. The advantage of the proposed method is its ability to model survival data. This method is not limited to breast cancer data, and may be applied to any biological rhythms linked to right censored data.

  18. The generation of respiratory rhythms in birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granada, A.; Gabitto, M.; García, G.; Alliende, J.; Méndez, J.; Trevisan, M. A.; Mindlin, G. B.

    2006-11-01

    The generation of precise respiratory rhythms is vital for birds, which must generate specific pressure patterns to perform several activities, song being one of the most demanding ones. These rhythms emerge as the interaction between a peripheral system and a set of neural nuclei which control the action of expiratory and inspiratory muscles. A computational model was proposed recently to account for this interaction. In this work, we describe the set of solutions that this model can display as its parameters are varied, and compare experimental records of air sac pressure patterns with the predictions of the model.

  19. Integer Ratio Priors on Musical Rhythm Revealed Cross-culturally by Iterated Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Nori; McDermott, Josh H

    2017-02-06

    Probability distributions over external states (priors) are essential to the interpretation of sensory signals. Priors for cultural artifacts such as music and language remain largely uncharacterized, but likely constrain cultural transmission, because only those signals with high probability under the prior can be reliably reproduced and communicated. We developed a method to estimate priors for simple rhythms via iterated reproduction of random temporal sequences. Listeners were asked to reproduce random "seed" rhythms; their reproductions were fed back as the stimulus and over time became dominated by internal biases, such that the prior could be estimated by applying the procedure multiple times. We validated that the measured prior was consistent across the modality of reproduction and that it correctly predicted perceptual discrimination. We then measured listeners' priors over the entire space of two- and three-interval rhythms. Priors in US participants showed peaks at rhythms with simple integer ratios and were similar for musicians and non-musicians. An analogous procedure produced qualitatively different results for spoken phrases, indicating some specificity to music. Priors measured in members of a native Amazonian society were distinct from those in US participants but also featured integer ratio peaks. The results do not preclude biological constraints favoring integer ratios, but they suggest that priors on musical rhythm are substantially modulated by experience and may simply reflect the empirical distribution of rhythm that listeners encounter. The proposed method can efficiently map out a high-resolution view of biases that shape transmission and stability of simple reproducible patterns within a culture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Echocardiographic factors predictive of restoration and maintenance of sinus rhythm after reduction of atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khalfallah, A; Sanaa, I

    2007-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. While the arrhythmia was initially thought to be little more than a nuisance, it is now clear that AF has a significant negative impact on quality of life and a corresponding increase in both morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to identify Doppler echographic patterns that allow prediction of atrial fibrillation reduction and maintenance of sinus rhythm within 12 months. One hundred and thirty patients having permanent atrial fibrillation, recent (51) or chronic (79) are included in the study, excepting those with valvular heart disease or thyroid dysfunction. The mean age was 63.5 +/- 11.3 years. Both transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography was performed using a Philips SONOS 5500 Echograph, before cardioversion. Were studied: end diastolic and systolic left ventricular diameters, left ventricular ejectionnal fraction, left atrial area (LAA), left atrial diameter, left atrial appendage area and peak emptying velocities of the left atrial appendage (PeV). Sinus rhythm was re-established in 102 patients (44 having recent and 58 chronic atrial fibrillation). Sinus rhythm was maintained for 12 months in 79 patients. Within the echographic parameters studied, the left atrial area (LAA) and peak emptying velocities of left atrial appendage (PeV) before cardioversion were the best predictors of restoration of sinus rhythm. On monovariate analysis, SOG is significantly lower and PicV is significantly higher in patients whose sinus rhythm had been restored in comparison with those with permanent atrial fibrillation. (Mean SOG: 27.7 +/- 7.62 vs. 34 +/- 7,6 cm2, ppredict on mono and multivariate analysis (p=0.05, OR=0.5, IC=0.36 à 3.56), re-establishing of sinus rhythm whereas in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation, peak emptying velocity of left atrial appendage predict better re-establishing of sinus rhythm (p=0.04, OR=1.29, IC=0.12 à 4.23). The threshold values of LAA and Pe

  1. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type of heart disease you have. Symptoms of heart disease in your blood vessels (atherosclerotic disease) Cardiovascular disease ... can sometimes be found early with regular evaluations. Heart disease symptoms caused by abnormal heartbeats (heart arrhythmias) A ...

  2. Ultradian rhythm unmasked in the Pdf clock mutant of Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A diverse range of organisms shows physiological and behavioural rhythms with various periods. Extensive studies have been performed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythms with an approximately 24 h period in both Drosophila and mammals, while less attention has been paid to ultradian rhythms ...

  3. The Features and Training of English Stress and Rhythm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Cui-yun

    2008-01-01

    In second language learning, to possess a perfect pronunciation, the importance of stress and rhythm should not be ignored. This articles explores the nature of sentence and word stress as well as rhythm, thus putting forward some feasible ways of training and acquiring a good English stress and rhythm in EFLT (English as Foreign Language…

  4. Monkey Lipsmacking Develops Like the Human Speech Rhythm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Ryan J.; Paukner, Annika; Ferrari, Pier F.; Ghazanfar, Asif A.

    2012-01-01

    Across all languages studied to date, audiovisual speech exhibits a consistent rhythmic structure. This rhythm is critical to speech perception. Some have suggested that the speech rhythm evolved "de novo" in humans. An alternative account--the one we explored here--is that the rhythm of speech evolved through the modification of rhythmic facial…

  5. An analysis of the Association of Society of Chest Pain Centers Accreditation to American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction guideline adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Abhinav; Glickman, Seth W; Ou, Fang-Shu; Peacock, W Frank; McCord, James K; Cairns, Charles B; Peterson, Eric D; Ohman, E Magnus; Gibler, W Brian; Roe, Matthew T

    2009-07-01

    Since 2003, the Society of Chest Pain Centers (SCPC) has provided hospital accreditation for acute coronary syndrome care processes. Our objective is to evaluate the association between SCPC accreditation and adherence to the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) evidence-based guidelines for non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). The secondary objective is to describe the clinical outcomes and the association with accreditation. We conducted a secondary analysis of data from patients with NSTEMI enrolled in the Can Rapid Risk Stratification of Unstable Angina Patients Suppress Adverse Outcomes With Early Implementation of the ACC/AHA Guidelines (CRUSADE) quality improvement initiative in 2005. The analysis explored differences between SCPC-accredited and nonaccredited hospitals in evidence-based therapy given within the first 24 hours (including aspirin, beta-blocker, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors, heparin, and ECG within 10 minutes). Of 33,238 patients treated at 21 accredited hospitals and 323 nonaccredited hospitals, those at SCPC-accredited centers (n=3,059) were more likely to receive aspirin (98.1% versus 95.8%; odds ratio [OR] 1.73; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06 to 2.83) and beta-blockers (93.4% versus 90.6%; OR 1.68; 95% CI 1.04 to 2.70) within 24 hours than patients at non-SCPC-accredited centers (n=30,179). No difference was observed in obtaining a timely ECG (40.4% versus 35.2%; OR 1.28; 95% CI 0.98 to 1.67), administering a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor (OR 1.30; 95% CI 0.93 to 1.80), or administering heparin (OR 1.12; 95% CI 0.74 to 1.70). Also, there was no significant difference in risk-adjusted mortality for patients treated at SCPC hospitals versus nonaccredited hospitals (3.4% versus 3.5%; adjusted OR 1.17; 95% CI 0.88 to 1.55). SCPC-accredited hospitals had higher NSTEMI ACC/AHA evidence-based guideline adherence in the first 24 hours of care on 2 of the 5 measures. No difference in

  6. EFFECTS OF CIRCADIAN RHYTHM ON BALANCE PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karagul Osman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of circadian rhythm on dynamic balance performance and to determine the role of physical activity level, body temperature, chronotype, and gender in this possible effect. Material and

  7. Ribosomes Dance to a Daily Rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Aishwarya; Grummt, Ingrid

    2017-08-01

    Sinturel et al. demonstrate that feeding-fasting rhythms and light-dark cycles direct daily changes in liver mass and cell size. These feeding-fasting- and light-dark-driven diurnal fluctuations are controlled by an unconventional mechanism that affects ribosome assembly and protein levels during the active phase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Neural Entrainment to Auditory Imagery of Rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruki Okawa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A method of reconstructing perceived or imagined music by analyzing brain activity has not yet been established. As a first step toward developing such a method, we aimed to reconstruct the imagery of rhythm, which is one element of music. It has been reported that a periodic electroencephalogram (EEG response is elicited while a human imagines a binary or ternary meter on a musical beat. However, it is not clear whether or not brain activity synchronizes with fully imagined beat and meter without auditory stimuli. To investigate neural entrainment to imagined rhythm during auditory imagery of beat and meter, we recorded EEG while nine participants (eight males and one female imagined three types of rhythm without auditory stimuli but with visual timing, and then we analyzed the amplitude spectra of the EEG. We also recorded EEG while the participants only gazed at the visual timing as a control condition to confirm the visual effect. Furthermore, we derived features of the EEG using canonical correlation analysis (CCA and conducted an experiment to individually classify the three types of imagined rhythm from the EEG. The results showed that classification accuracies exceeded the chance level in all participants. These results suggest that auditory imagery of meter elicits a periodic EEG response that changes at the imagined beat and meter frequency even in the fully imagined conditions. This study represents the first step toward the realization of a method for reconstructing the imagined music from brain activity.

  9. Structure and interpretation of rhythm and timing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    Rhythm, as it is performed and perceived, is only sparingly addressed in music theory. Existing theories of rhythmic structure are often restricted to music as notated in a score, and as a result are bound to refrain from making statements about music as it is perceived and appreciated by listeners.

  10. Ternary rhythm and the lapse constraint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elenbaas, N.; Kager, R.W.J.

    2004-01-01

    Ternary rhythmic systems differ from binary systems in stressing every third syllable in a word, rather than every second. Ternary rhythm is well-established for only a small group of languages, including Chugach Alutiiq, Cayuvava, and Estonian, and possibly Winnebago. Nevertheless the stress

  11. Makin' Music: Songs, Rhythm, and Creative Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberstein, Terry

    1996-01-01

    The power of music to create a coherent group is amazing. Music can be used to help focus attention, encourage group unity, involve everyone, and allow creative self-expression. Discusses different song styles, simple rhythm instruments, and song writing. Song-leading tips include song choice, teaching techniques, motions, song sheets, and three…

  12. Working night shifts affects surgeons' biological rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Andersen, Lærke T; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    prospectively for 4 days: pre call, on call, post call day 1 (PC1), and post call day 2 (PC2). The urinary metabolite of melatonin and cortisol in saliva were measured to assess the circadian rhythm. Sleep and activity were measured by actigraphy. Subjective measures were assessed by the Karolinska Sleepiness...

  13. Circadian rhythms: from genes to behaviour

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    while some researchers have used newly devised tools in molecular genetics to discover more elements of the core clock mechanism and to understand the circadian clockwork at molecular and physiological levels, others continued to probe the key characteristics of circadian rhythms at the whole organism level—a true.

  14. Circadian rhythms in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, Klaus W.; Lange, Katharina M.; Hauser, Joachim; Tucha, Lara; Tucha, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The etiopathology and neurobiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are not fully understood. As for altered circadian rhythms associated with OCD, hormonal dysregulation and a delayed sleep phase have come into the focus of research. The novel antidepressant agomelatine is able to

  15. [Circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromundt, Vivien

    2014-11-01

    Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are prevalent among psychiatric patients. This is most probable due to a close relationship between functional disturbances of the internal clock, sleep regulation and mental health. Mechanisms on molecular level of the circadian clock and neurotransmitter signalling are involved in the development of both disorders. Moreover, circadian disorders and psychiatric diseases favour each other by accessory symptoms such as stress or social isolation. Actimetry to objectively quantify the rest-activity cycle and salivary melatonin profiles as marker for the circadian phase help to diagnose circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric patients. Chronotherapeutics such as bright light therapy, dark therapy, melatonin administration, and wake therapy are used to synchronise and consolidate circadian rhythms and help in the treatment of depression and other psychiatric disorders, but are still neglected in medicine. More molecular to behavioural research is needed for the understanding of the development of circadian disorders and their relationship to psychiatric illnesses. This will help to boost the awareness and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatry.

  16. Egg-laying rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-12-31

    Dec 31, 2008 ... not exerted in the mushroom body, a site previously asso- ciated with PKA action on sleep. These results suggest the existence of a novel pathway by which octopamine might regulate circadian rhythms in sleep/wake and egg-laying be- haviour. The ability of octopamine to regulate oviduct con-.

  17. Antiarrhythmics for maintaining sinus rhythm after cardioversion of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente-Lafuente, Carmelo; Valembois, Lucie; Bergmann, Jean-François; Belmin, Joël

    2015-03-28

    -cause mortality. Other antiarrhythmics did not seem to modify mortality, but our data could be underpowered to detect mild increases in mortality for several of the drugs studied.Several class IA (disopyramide, quinidine), IC (flecainide, propafenone) and III (amiodarone, dofetilide, dronedarone, sotalol) drugs significantly reduced recurrence of atrial fibrillation (OR 0.19 to 0.70, number needed to treat to beneft (NNTB) 3 to 16). Beta-blockers (metoprolol) also significantly reduced atrial fibrillation recurrences (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.88, NNTB 9).All analysed drugs increased withdrawals due to adverse affects and all but amiodarone, dronedarone and propafenone increased pro-arrhythmia. Only 11 trials reported data on stroke. None of them found any significant difference with the exception of a single trial than found less strokes in the group treated with dronedarone compared to placebo. This finding was not confirmed in others studies on dronedarone.We could not analyse heart failure and use of anticoagulation because few original studies reported on these measures. Several class IA, IC and III drugs, as well as class II drugs (beta-blockers), are moderately effective in maintaining sinus rhythm after conversion of atrial fibrillation. However, they increase adverse events, including pro-arrhythmia, and some of them (disopyramide, quinidine and sotalol) may increase mortality. Possible benefits on clinically relevant outcomes (stroke, embolism, heart failure) remain to be established.

  18. Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension. 3. Recommendations on alcohol consumption. Canadian Hypertension Society, Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, N R; Ashley, M J; Carruthers, S G; Lacourcière, Y; McKay, D W

    1999-05-04

    low-risk drinking guidelines (i.e., healthy adults who choose to drink should limit alcohol consumption to 2 or fewer standard drinks per day, with consumption not exceeding 14 standard drinks per week for men and 9 standard drinks per week for women). (3) Hypertensive patients should also be advised to limit alcohol consumption to the levels set out in the Canadian low-risk drinking guidelines. These recommendations are similar to those of the World Hypertension League, the National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group on Primary Prevention of Hypertension and the previous recommendations of the Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control and the Canadian Hypertension Society. They have not been clinically tested. The low-risk drinking guidelines are those of the Addiction Research Foundation of Ontario and the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse. The Canadian Hypertension Society, the Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. The low-risk drinking guidelines have been endorsed by the College of Family Physicians of Canada and several provincial organizations.

  19. From Biological Rhythms to Social Rhythms: Physiological Precursors of Mother-Infant Synchrony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    Links between neonatal biological rhythms and the emergence of interaction rhythms were examined in 3 groups (N=71): high-risk preterms (HR; birth weight less than 1,000 g), low-risk preterms (LR; birth weight=1,700-1,850 g), and full-term (FT) infants. Once a week for premature infants and on the 2nd day for FT infants, sleep-wake cyclicity was…

  20. Sleep and circadian rhythms in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeisler, C A; Gooley, J J

    2007-01-01

    During the past 50 years, converging evidence reveals that the fundamental properties of the human circadian system are shared in common with those of other organisms. Concurrent data from multiple physiological rhythms in humans revealed that under some conditions, rhythms oscillated at different periods within the same individuals and led to the conclusion 30 years ago that the human circadian system was composed of multiple oscillators organized hierarchically; this inference has recently been confirmed using molecular techniques in species ranging from unicellular marine organisms to mammals. Although humans were once thought to be insensitive to the resetting effects of light, light is now recognized as the principal circadian synchronizer in humans, capable of eliciting weak (Type 1) or strong (Type 0) resetting, depending on stimulus strength and timing. Realization that circadian photoreception could be maintained in the absence of sight was first recognized in blind humans, as was the property of adaptation of the sensitivity of circadian photoreception to prior light history. In sighted humans, the intrinsic circadian period is very tightly distributed around approximately 24.2 hours and exhibits aftereffects of prior entrainment. Phase angle of entrainment is dependent on circadian period, at least in young adults. Circadian pacemakers in humans drive daily variations in many physiologic and behavioral variables, including circadian rhythms in alertness and sleep propensity. Under entrained conditions, these rhythms interact with homeostatic regulation of the sleep/wake cycle to determine the ability to sustain vigilance during the day and to sleep at night. Quantitative understanding of the fundamental properties of the multioscillator circadian system in humans and their interaction with sleep/wake homeostasis has many applications to health and disease, including the development of treatments for circadian rhythm and sleep disorders.

  1. Biologic rhythms derived from Siberian mammoths' hairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilde, Mike; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Qualls, Clifford; Phillips, Genevieve; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi; Agenbroad, Larry; Appenzeller, Otto

    2011-01-01

    Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was ∼31 cms/year and ∼16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios), which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna.

  2. Biologic rhythms derived from Siberian mammoths' hairs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Spilde

    Full Text Available Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was ∼31 cms/year and ∼16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios, which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna.

  3. New Procedure for Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Valvular Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Safaie

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available "nPatients with valvular heart disease suffer from atrial fibrillation for more than 12 months after valve surgery and have a low probability of remaining in sinus rhythm. We performed an intra-operative procedure similar to surgical maze ІІІ procedure for conversion of this arrhythmia to sinus rhythm. We did this study to evaluate the efficacy of this procedure to restore the sinus rhythm in patients with valvular heart disease. 28 patients with valvular heart disease and chronic persistent atrial fibrillation underwent different combinations of valve surgery and concomitant reduction of left and right atrial size and resection of both atrial auricles in Shahid Madani cardiothoracic center from September 2004 to October 2008. The procedure for atrial fibrillation treatment was performed with cardiopulmonary bypass and after mitral valve replacement. There was one in-hospital death postoperatively because of respiratory failure, but no other complication till 6 months after the operation. Out of 28 patients, 23 were in sinus rhythm one week after the operation, one patient had junctional rhythm after the operation that restored to sinus rhythm and 4 patients had persistent atrial fibrillation. During the 12-month follow up, atrial fibrillation was corrected in 82.14%. Doppler echocardiography in these patients with sinus rhythm demonstrated good atrial contractility. This procedure on both atria is effective and less invasive than the original maze procedure to eliminate the atrial fibrillation, and can be performed in patients with valvular heart disease without increasing the risk of operation.

  4. Prescribing patterns to optimize heart rate: analysis of 1,000 consecutive outpatient appointments to a single heart failure clinic over a 6-month period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierckx, Riet; Cleland, John G F; Parsons, Sunaina; Putzu, Paola; Pellicori, Pierpaolo; Dicken, Benjamin; Boyalla, Vennela; Clark, Andrew L

    2015-03-01

    This study sought to characterize patients attending a community heart failure (HF) clinic and identified those who were eligible for optimization of beta-blockers (BB) or ivabradine. Among patients with HF due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction in sinus rhythm, those with higher resting heart rate have a worse prognosis. Reducing sinus rate to 50 to 60 beats/min might improve outcomes. A total of 1,000 consecutively scheduled HF clinic follow-up appointments over a 6-month period were reviewed. Demographic, clinical, and echocardiographic data were collected for patients who attended (824 unique patients; 555 men). Mean age was 74 ± 11 years, median N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels were 1,002 ng/l (interquartile range: 367 to 2,151 ng/l), and the mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 44 ± 11%. A total of 202 (25%), 252 (31%), and 370 (45%) patients had LVEFs of ≤35%, 36% to 49%, and ≥50%, respectively. Of patients with LVEF ≤35%, 142 (70%) were in sinus rhythm. At 70 clinic visits, 58 patients with LVEFs of ≤35% were in sinus rhythm and had heart rates ≥70 beats/min. Of these, 13 patients had their BB dose increased, 20 were potentially eligible for, but did not have, BB uptitration, 15 were already taking target doses of BBs, and 10 patients were reported to be intolerant of higher doses. Thus, 25 patients were potentially eligible for ivabradine according to European Society of Cardiology guidelines; this number dropped to 14 when the United Kingdom National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines were applied. Among patients with LVEFs of ≤35%, most are treated with BBs and have a heart rate at rest of <70 beats/min; 12% of these patients might be eligible for ivabradine. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Wheel running improves REM sleep and attenuates stress-induced flattening of diurnal rhythms in F344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert S; Roller, Rachel; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Fleshner, Monika

    2016-05-01

    Regular physical activity produces resistance to the negative health consequences of stressor exposure. One way that exercise may confer stress resistance is by reducing the impact of stress on diurnal rhythms and sleep; disruptions of which contribute to stress-related disease including mood disorders. Given the link between diurnal rhythm disruptions and stress-related disorders and that exercise both promotes stress resistance and is a powerful non-photic biological entrainment cue, we tested if wheel running could reduce stress-induced disruptions of sleep/wake behavior and diurnal rhythms. Adult, male F344 rats with or without access to running wheels were instrumented for biotelemetric recording of diurnal rhythms of locomotor activity, heart rate, core body temperature (CBT), and sleep (i.e. REM, NREM, and WAKE) in the presence of a 12 h light/dark cycle. Following 6 weeks of sedentary or exercise conditions, rats were exposed to an acute stressor known to disrupt diurnal rhythms and produce behaviors associated with mood disorders. Prior to stressor exposure, exercise rats had higher CBT, more locomotor activity during the dark cycle, and greater %REM during the light cycle relative to sedentary rats. NREM and REM sleep were consolidated immediately following peak running to a greater extent in exercise, compared to sedentary rats. In response to stressor exposure, exercise rats expressed higher stress-induced hyperthermia than sedentary rats. Stressor exposure disrupted diurnal rhythms in sedentary rats; and wheel running reduced these effects. Improvements in sleep and reduced diurnal rhythm disruptions following stress could contribute to the health promoting and stress protective effects of exercise.

  6. Ambulant 24-h glucose rhythms mark calendar and biological age in apparently healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijsman, Carolien A; van Heemst, Diana; Hoogeveen, Evelien S; Slagboom, P Eline; Maier, Andrea B; de Craen, Anton J M; van der Ouderaa, Frans; Pijl, Hanno; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Mooijaart, Simon P

    2013-04-01

    Glucose metabolism marks health and disease and is causally inferred in the aging process. Ambulant continuous glucose monitoring provides 24-h glucose rhythms under daily life conditions. We aimed to describe ambulant 24-h glucose rhythms measured under daily life condition in relation to calendar and biological age in apparently healthy individuals. In the general population and families with propensity for longevity, we studied parameters from 24-h glucose rhythms; glucose levels; and its variability, obtained by continuous glucose monitoring. Participants were 21 young (aged 22-37 years), 37 middle-aged (aged 44-72 years) individuals from the general population, and 26 middle-aged (aged 52-74 years) individuals with propensity for longevity. All were free of diabetes. Compared with young individuals, middle-aged individuals from the general population had higher mean glucose levels (5.3 vs. 4.7 mmol L(-1) , P rhythms depending on calendar and biological age. © 2012 The Authors Aging Cell © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  7. Restoring sinus rhythm in patients with previous pacemaker implantation submitted to cardiac surgery and concomitant surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Marta P; Melo, João Q; Knaut, Michel; Alfieri, Ottavio; Benussi, Stefano; Williams, Mathew R; Hornero, Fernando

    2008-04-01

    Some patients submitted to cardiac surgery have concomitant atrial fibrillation and a previously implanted pacemaker. Because it is unknown if there is any potential for these patients to reassume a regular rate sinus rhythm after ablation of atrial fibrillation, we reviewed the results of all patients with pacemaker enrolled in the Registry of Atrial Fibrillation. Thirty-six patients were included in this study. Twenty-six had valve disease, seven had coronary disease and three had congenital heart disease. They were submitted concomitantly to ablation of atrial fibrillation using biatrial approaches (seven patients), left sided (27), or right sided (three patients). Thirty-three hospital survivors had a mean follow-up of 18 months, and a maximum of 25 months. At 1 year (n=21), patients' rhythm was sinus non-pacing dependent (52%), sinus pacing-dependent (14%), and atrial fibrillation (14%). At 2 years (n=14), patients' rhythm was sinus non-pacing dependent (57%) and atrial fibrillation (43%). The only factor that may have had impact on the recovery of sinus rhythm at 1 year was the small size of the left atrium (p=0.05). We conclude that in a significant number of patients, having a pacemaker before surgery does not preclude sinus rhythm recovery after a cardiac operation and ablation for concomitant atrial fibrillation.

  8. 24-hour rhythms of DNA methylation and their relation with rhythms of RNA expression in the human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Andrew S P; Srivastava, Gyan P; Yu, Lei; Chibnik, Lori B; Xu, Jishu; Buchman, Aron S; Schneider, Julie A; Myers, Amanda J; Bennett, David A; De Jager, Philip L

    2014-11-01

    Circadian rhythms modulate the biology of many human tissues, including brain tissues, and are driven by a near 24-hour transcriptional feedback loop. These rhythms are paralleled by 24-hour rhythms of large portions of the transcriptome. The role of dynamic DNA methylation in influencing these rhythms is uncertain. While recent work in Neurospora suggests that dynamic site-specific circadian rhythms of DNA methylation may play a role in modulating the fungal molecular clock, such rhythms and their relationship to RNA expression have not, to our knowledge, been elucidated in mammalian tissues, including human brain tissues. We hypothesized that 24-hour rhythms of DNA methylation exist in the human brain, and play a role in driving 24-hour rhythms of RNA expression. We analyzed DNA methylation levels in post-mortem human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex samples from 738 subjects. We assessed for 24-hour rhythmicity of 420,132 DNA methylation sites throughout the genome by considering methylation levels as a function of clock time of death and parameterizing these data using cosine functions. We determined global statistical significance by permutation. We then related rhythms of DNA methylation with rhythms of RNA expression determined by RNA sequencing. We found evidence of significant 24-hour rhythmicity of DNA methylation. Regions near transcription start sites were enriched for high-amplitude rhythmic DNA methylation sites, which were in turn time locked to 24-hour rhythms of RNA expression of nearby genes, with the nadir of methylation preceding peak transcript expression by 1-3 hours. Weak ante-mortem rest-activity rhythms were associated with lower amplitude DNA methylation rhythms as were older age and the presence of Alzheimer's disease. These findings support the hypothesis that 24-hour rhythms of DNA methylation, particularly near transcription start sites, may play a role in driving 24-hour rhythms of gene expression in the human dorsolateral prefrontal

  9. 24-hour rhythms of DNA methylation and their relation with rhythms of RNA expression in the human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S P Lim

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms modulate the biology of many human tissues, including brain tissues, and are driven by a near 24-hour transcriptional feedback loop. These rhythms are paralleled by 24-hour rhythms of large portions of the transcriptome. The role of dynamic DNA methylation in influencing these rhythms is uncertain. While recent work in Neurospora suggests that dynamic site-specific circadian rhythms of DNA methylation may play a role in modulating the fungal molecular clock, such rhythms and their relationship to RNA expression have not, to our knowledge, been elucidated in mammalian tissues, including human brain tissues. We hypothesized that 24-hour rhythms of DNA methylation exist in the human brain, and play a role in driving 24-hour rhythms of RNA expression. We analyzed DNA methylation levels in post-mortem human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex samples from 738 subjects. We assessed for 24-hour rhythmicity of 420,132 DNA methylation sites throughout the genome by considering methylation levels as a function of clock time of death and parameterizing these data using cosine functions. We determined global statistical significance by permutation. We then related rhythms of DNA methylation with rhythms of RNA expression determined by RNA sequencing. We found evidence of significant 24-hour rhythmicity of DNA methylation. Regions near transcription start sites were enriched for high-amplitude rhythmic DNA methylation sites, which were in turn time locked to 24-hour rhythms of RNA expression of nearby genes, with the nadir of methylation preceding peak transcript expression by 1-3 hours. Weak ante-mortem rest-activity rhythms were associated with lower amplitude DNA methylation rhythms as were older age and the presence of Alzheimer's disease. These findings support the hypothesis that 24-hour rhythms of DNA methylation, particularly near transcription start sites, may play a role in driving 24-hour rhythms of gene expression in the human

  10. An Overview of Monthly Rhythms and Clocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Raible

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Organisms have evolved to cope with geophysical cycles of different period lengths. In this review, we focus on the adaptations of animals to the lunar cycle, specifically, on the occurrence of biological rhythms with monthly (circalunar or semi-monthly (circasemilunar period lengths. Systematic experimental investigation, starting in the early twentieth century, has allowed scientists to distinguish between mythological belief and scientific facts concerning the influence of the lunar cycle on animals. These studies revealed that marine animals of various taxa exhibit circalunar or circasemilunar reproductive rhythms. Some of these rely on endogenous oscillators (circalunar or circasemilunar clocks, whereas others are directly driven by external cues, such as the changes in nocturnal illuminance. We review current insight in the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in circalunar rhythms, focusing on recent work in corals, annelid worms, midges, and fishes. In several of these model systems, the transcript levels of some core circadian clock genes are affected by both light and endogenous circalunar oscillations. How these and other molecular changes relate to the changes in physiology or behavior over the lunar cycle remains to be determined. We further review the possible relevance of circalunar rhythms for terrestrial species, with a particular focus on mammalian reproduction. Studies on circalunar rhythms of conception or birth rates extend to humans, where the lunar cycle was suggested to also affect sleep and mental health. While these reports remain controversial, factors like the increase in “light pollution” by artificial light might contribute to discrepancies between studies. We finally discuss the existence of circalunar oscillations in mammalian physiology. We speculate that these oscillations could be the remnant of ancient circalunar oscillators that were secondarily uncoupled from a natural entrainment mechanism, but

  11. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care (Endorsed by the American Heart Association, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiología Intervencionista; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie d'intervention).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    This article provides a brief summary of the relevant recommendations and references related to percutaneous mechanical circulatory support. The goal was to provide the clinician with concise, evidence-based contemporary recommendations, and the supporting documentation to encourage their application. The full text includes disclosure of all relevant relationships with industry for each writing committee member. A fundamental aspect of all expert consensus statements is that these carefully developed, evidence-based documents can neither encompass all clinical circumstances, nor replace the judgment of individual physicians in management of each patient. The science of medicine is rooted in evidence, and the art of medicine is based on the application of this evidence to the individual patient. This expert consensus statement has adhered to these principles for optimal management of patients requiring percutaneous mechanical circulatory support. © 2015 by The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, The American College of Cardiology Foundation, the Heart Failure Society of America, and The Society for Thoracic Surgery.

  12. Assessment of heart rate turbulence in hypertensive patients: rationale, perspectives, and insight into autonomic nervous system dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossaify, Antoine; Garcia, Annie; Ziade, Fouad

    2014-07-01

    Heart rhythm turbulence is classically impaired in patients with previous myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure and is poorly investigated in patients with essential hypertension. To evaluate heart rhythm turbulence parameters (turbulence onset, (TO); turbulence slope, (TS) in a series of hypertensive patients while gaining insight into autonomic nervous system dysfunction. University hospital, cross-sectional monocentric study. Heart rhythm turbulence was assessed in 50 hypertensive (case group) and 40 normotensive patients (control group). TO and TS were found independently correlated with hypertension. The mean TO was found at -1.64% ± 2.85% in the normotensive patients compared to 1.21% ± 1.95% in the hypertensive patients; the mean TS was found at 4.29 ± 3.18 ms/RR in the normotensive patients compared to 2.27 ± 0.93 ms/RR in the hypertensive patients. Hypertension has a predictive value on heart rhythm turbulence impairment (OR 4.99, 95% CI 1.28-19.41, P = 0.02). Insights into the role of autonomic nervous system dysfunction for the management of hypertensive patients and prevention of malignant ventricular arrhythmia are presented and discussed with regard to heart rhythm turbulence. Essential hypertension is correlated with blunted heart rhythm turbulence parameters.

  13. [Effect of ectopic excitation on pump function of the hen and dog right heart ventricle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibler, N A; Kharin, S N; Tsvetkova, A S; Azarov, Ia E; Shmakov, D N

    2009-01-01

    The pump function of the right heart ventricle has been studied in anesthetized dogs and hens at sinus rhythm, supraventricular rhythm, and subepicardial ectopic excitation of base and apex of the right and left ventricles. Dynamics of the ventricle intracavital pressure was recorded by transmural catheterization. The pump function of the right ventricle in hen (as compared with sinus rhythm) retained to the greater degree at stimulation of the left ventricle apex and deteriorated significantly at stimulation of the right ventricle, whereas in dog (as compared with supraventricular rhythm) it retained to the greater degree at stimulation of the left ventricle base and deteriorated at stimulation of the right ventricle apex. Changes of the pump function of the right heart ventricle at ectopic ventricle stimulation are similar in birds and mammals. Differences in changes of dog and hen pump functions under effect of location of the ectopic excitation seem to be due to morphofunctional peculiarities of heart ventricles.

  14. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  15. [Therapy of terminal heart failure using heart transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, M; Warnecke, H; Schüler, S; Hempel, B; Spiegelsberger, S; Hetzer, R

    1991-08-16

    Heart transplantation (HTx) has now become an accepted treatment modality for end-stage heart disease. The limited supply of suitable donor organs imposes constraints upon the decision of who should be selected for transplantation. Usually patients are candidates for HTx, who remain NYHA functional class III or IV despite maximal medical therapy. Further criteria are low left ventricular ejection fraction (less than 20%) with heart rhythm disturbances class IIIA-V (LOWN), which are associated with poor prognosis. Additionally, the suffering of the patient and also the course of heart failure are essential for judging the urgency of HTx. Contraindications are absolute in patients with untreated infections, fixed pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) above 8 WOOD-degrees, severe irreversible kidney and liver disease, active ventricular or duodenal ulcers and acute, psychiatric illness. HTx is relatively contraindicated in patients with diabetes mellitus, age over 60 years, PVR above 6 WOOD-degrees and an unstable psychosocial situation. To prevent rejection of the transplant heart, live-long immunosuppressive therapy is needed. Most immunosuppressive regimes consist of Cyclosporine A and Azathioprine (double drug therapy) or in combination (tripple drug therapy) with Prednisolone. For monitoring of this therapy, control of hole blood cyclosporine A level and white blood count is needed. Rejection episodes can be suspected if there is a greater than 20 mmHg decrease of systolic blood pressure, elevated body temperature, malaise, tachycardia or heart rhythm disturbance. The diagnosis of cardiac rejection can be established by endomyocardial biopsy. Measurement of the voltage of either the surface or intramyocardial ECG, echocardiography with special consideration to early left ventricular filling time as well as immunological methods are additionally used tools. Graft sclerosis as the main risk factor of the late transplant period remains an unsolved problem.

  16. Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension. 4. Recommendations on physical exercise training. Canadian Hypertension Society, Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cléroux, J; Feldman, R D; Petrella, R J

    1999-05-04

    of moderate rhythmic exercise of the lower limbs, such as brisk walking or cycling, 3 or 4 times per week to reduce blood pressure, (2) Exercise should be prescribed as an adjunctive therapy for people who require pharmacologic therapy for hypertension, especially those who are not receiving beta-blockers. (3) People who do not have hypertension should participate in regular exercise as it will decrease blood pressure and reduce the risk of coronary artery disease, although there is no direct evidence that it will prevent hypertension. These recommendations agree with those of the World Hypertension League, the American College of Sports Medicine, the report of the US Surgeon General on physical activity and health, and the US National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Panel on Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Health. These guidelines have not been clinically tested. The Canadian Hypertension Society, the Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

  17. Statistics for Sleep and Biological Rhythms Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Matt T; Phillips, Andrew J K; Wang, Wei; Klerman, Elizabeth B

    2017-02-01

    The Journal of Biological Rhythms will be publishing articles exploring analysis and statistical topics relevant to researchers in biological rhythms and sleep research. The goal is to provide an overview of the most common issues that arise in the analysis and interpretation of data in these fields. By using case examples and highlighting the pearls and pitfalls of statistical inference, the authors will identify and explain ways in which experimental scientists can avoid common analytical and statistical mistakes and use appropriate analytical and statistical methods in their research. In this first article, we address the first steps in analysis of data: understanding the underlying statistical distribution of the data and establishing associative versus causal relationships. These ideas are then applied to sample size, power calculations, correlation testing, differences between description and prediction, and the narrative fallacy.

  18. Sleep, circadian rhythms, and athletic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thun, Eirunn; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Flo, Elisabeth; Harris, Anette; Pallesen, Ståle

    2015-10-01

    Sleep deprivation and time of day are both known to influence performance. A growing body of research has focused on how sleep and circadian rhythms impact athletic performance. This review provides a systematic overview of this research. We searched three different databases for articles on these issues and inspected relevant reference lists. In all, 113 articles met our inclusion criteria. The most robust result is that athletic performance seems to be best in the evening around the time when the core body temperature typically is at its peak. Sleep deprivation was negatively associated with performance whereas sleep extension seems to improve performance. The effects of desynchronization of circadian rhythms depend on the local time at which performance occurs. The review includes a discussion of differences regarding types of skills involved as well as methodological issues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prospective heart tracking for whole-heart magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghari, Mehdi H; Geva, Tal; Powell, Andrew J

    2017-02-01

    To develop a prospective respiratory-gating technique (Heart-NAV) for use with contrast-enhanced three-dimensional (3D) inversion recovery (IR) whole-heart magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) acquisitions that directly tracks heart motion without creating image inflow artifact. With Heart-NAV, one of the startup pulses for the whole-heart steady-state free precession MRA sequence is used to collect the centerline of k-space, and its one-dimensional reconstruction is fed into the standard diaphragm-navigator (NAV) signal analysis process to prospectively gate and track respiratory-induced heart displacement. Ten healthy volunteers underwent non-contrast whole-heart MRA acquisitions using the conventional diaphragm-NAV and Heart-NAV with 5 and 10-mm acceptance windows in a 1.5T scanner. Five patients underwent contrast-enhanced IR whole-heart MRA using a diaphragm-NAV and Heart-NAV with a 5-mm acceptance window. For non-contrast whole-heart MRA with both the 5 and 10-mm acceptance windows, Heart-NAV yielded coronary artery vessel sharpness and subjective visual scores that were not significantly different than those using a conventional diaphragm-NAV. Scan time for Heart-NAV was 10% shorter (p heart MRA, inflow artifact was seen with the diaphragm-NAV but not with Heart-NAV. Compared with a conventional diaphragm-NAV, Heart-NAV achieves similar image quality in a slightly shorter scan time and eliminates inflow artifact. Magn Reson Med 77:759-765, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Biological Rhythms During Residence in Polar Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Arendt, Josephine

    2012-01-01

    At Arctic and Antarctic latitudes, personnel are deprived of natural sunlight in winter and have continuous daylight in summer: light of sufficient intensity and suitable spectral composition is the main factor that maintains the 24-h period of human circadian rhythms. Thus, the status of the circadian system is of interest. Moreover, the relatively controlled artificial light conditions in winter are conducive to experimentation with different types of light treatment. The hormone melatonin ...

  1. Circadian Rhythms, Sleep, and Disorders of Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Mattis, Joanna; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Sleep:wake cycles are known to be disrupted in people with neurodegenerative disorders. These findings are now supported by data from animal models for some of these disorders, raising the question of whether the disrupted sleep/circadian regulation contributes to the loss of neural function. As circadian rhythms and sleep consolidation also break down with normal aging, changes in these may be part of what makes aging a risk factor for disorders like Alzheimer's disease. Mechanisms underlyin...

  2. Circadian rhythms of women with fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerman, E. B.; Goldenberg, D. L.; Brown, E. N.; Maliszewski, A. M.; Adler, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic and debilitating disorder characterized by widespread nonarticular musculoskeletal pain whose etiology is unknown. Many of the symptoms of this syndrome, including difficulty sleeping, fatigue, malaise, myalgias, gastrointestinal complaints, and decreased cognitive function, are similar to those observed in individuals whose circadian pacemaker is abnormally aligned with their sleep-wake schedule or with local environmental time. Abnormalities in melatonin and cortisol, two hormones whose secretion is strongly influenced by the circadian pacemaker, have been reported in women with fibromyalgia. We studied the circadian rhythms of 10 women with fibromyalgia and 12 control healthy women. The protocol controlled factors known to affect markers of the circadian system, including light levels, posture, sleep-wake state, meals, and activity. The timing of the events in the protocol were calculated relative to the habitual sleep-wake schedule of each individual subject. Under these conditions, we found no significant difference between the women with fibromyalgia and control women in the circadian amplitude or phase of rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, and core body temperature. The average circadian phases expressed in hours posthabitual bedtime for women with and without fibromyalgia were 3:43 +/- 0:19 and 3:46 +/- 0:13, respectively, for melatonin; 10:13 +/- 0:23 and 10:32 +/- 0:20, respectively for cortisol; and 5:19 +/- 0:19 and 4:57 +/- 0:33, respectively, for core body temperature phases. Both groups of women had similar circadian rhythms in self-reported alertness. Although pain and stiffness were significantly increased in women with fibromyalgia compared with healthy women, there were no circadian rhythms in either parameter. We suggest that abnormalities in circadian rhythmicity are not a primary cause of fibromyalgia or its symptoms.

  3. Modeling biological rhythms in failure time data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myles James D

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human body exhibits a variety of biological rhythms. There are patterns that correspond, among others, to the daily wake/sleep cycle, a yearly seasonal cycle and, in women, the menstrual cycle. Sine/cosine functions are often used to model biological patterns for continuous data, but this model is not appropriate for analysis of biological rhythms in failure time data. Methods We adapt the cosinor method to the proportional hazards model and present a method to provide an estimate and confidence interval of the time when the minimum hazard is achieved. We then apply this model to data taken from a clinical trial of adjuvant of pre-menopausal breast cancer patients. Results The application of this technique to the breast cancer data revealed that the optimal day for pre-resection incisional or excisional biopsy of 28-day cycle (i. e. the day associated with the lowest recurrence rate is day 8 with 95% confidence interval of 4–12 days. We found that older age, fewer positive nodes, smaller tumor size, and experimental treatment were predictive of longer relapse-free survival. Conclusion In this paper we have described a method for modeling failure time data with an underlying biological rhythm. The advantage of adapting a cosinor model to proportional hazards model is its ability to model right censored data. We have presented a method to provide an estimate and confidence interval of the day in the menstrual cycle where the minimum hazard is achieved. This method is not limited to breast cancer data, and may be applied to any biological rhythms linked to right censored data.

  4. Pediatric cardiology. Clinical and practical experiences with heart diseases of children, juveniles and young adults; Kinderkardiologie. Klinik und Praxis der Herzerkrankungen bei Kindern, Jugendlichen und jungen Erwachsenen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, Nikolaus A. [Herz- und Diabeteszentrum NRW, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany). Klinik fuer angeborene Herzfehler; Kleideiter, Ulrich [Klinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Coesfeld (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The book on pediatric cardiology covers the following chapters: (I) Fundamentals and diagnostics: pediatric cardiologic anamnesis, electrocardiograms, thorax X-radiography, MRT and CT of the heart, nuclear medical diagnostics, exercise tests, heart catheter examination, electrophysiological tests. (II) Leading symptoms: Cyanosis, cardiac murmur, thorax pain, palpitation, syncopes. (III) Disease pictures: congenital heart defects, acquired heart defects, cardiomyopathies, heart rhythm disturbances, heart insufficiency, arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, other heart involving syndromes. (IV) Therapy: Catheter interventional therapy, post-surgical pediatric cardiac therapy, surgery involving the life-support machine, mechanical cardiovascular support systems, initial treatment of newborns with critical heart defects, heart transplantation, vaccination of children with heart diseases, medicinal therapy.

  5. Peroxiredoxins are conserved markers of circadian rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Rachel S.; Green, Edward W.; Zhao, Yuwei; van Ooijen, Gerben; Olmedo, Maria; Qin, Ximing; Xu, Yao; Pan, Min; Valekunja, Utham K.; Feeney, Kevin A.; Maywood, Elizabeth S.; Hastings, Michael H.; Baliga, Nitin S.; Merrow, Martha; Millar, Andrew J.; Johnson, Carl H.; Kyriacou, Charalambos P.; O’Neill, John S.; Reddy, Akhilesh B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Cellular life emerged ~3.7 billion years ago. With scant exception, terrestrial organisms have evolved under predictable daily cycles due to the Earth’s rotation. The advantage conferred upon organisms that anticipate such environmental cycles has driven the evolution of endogenous circadian rhythms that tune internal physiology to external conditions. The molecular phylogeny of mechanisms driving these rhythms has been difficult to dissect because identified clock genes and proteins are not conserved across the domains of life: Bacteria, Archaea and Eukaryota. Here we show that oxidation-reduction cycles of peroxiredoxin proteins constitute a universal marker for circadian rhythms in all domains of life, by characterising their oscillations in a variety of model organisms. Furthermore, we explore the interconnectivity between these metabolic cycles and transcription-translation feedback loops of the clockwork in each system. Our results suggest an intimate co-evolution of cellular time-keeping with redox homeostatic mechanisms following the Great Oxidation Event ~2.5 billion years ago. PMID:22622569

  6. Electroencephalogram base rhythm in AIDS patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Fernandes do Prado

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied the EEG of 73 patients diagnosed with HIV infection, with or without secondary complications. Sixty-eight belonged to CDC (Center for Disease Control group IV and 38 presented signs or symptoms of encephalic neurological impairment. Rhytms constituting base activity were alpha (65.75%, beta (13.70%, theta (12.33%, and delta (8.22%. The alpha rhythm presented two modes: slow (8 to 9 Hz in 25/48 or 52.08% of the cases and not-slow (>9 to 13 Hz in 23/48 or 47.92% of the cases. The alpha slow-mode has been observed in about 10 to 15% of the normal population, with the 8 Hz frequency being found in only 1% of the normal adult population, which suggests that in some manner HIV is implicated in the slowing-down of the EEG base rhythm in AIDS patients. The patients from CDC group IV with encephalic neurological involvement presented a base rhythm significantly lower than those with non-encephalic involvement or the absence of neurological impairment.

  7. Tonic neuromodulation of the inspiratory rhythm generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando ePeña-Ortega

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The generation of neural network dynamics relies on the interactions between the intrinsic and synaptic properties of their neural components. Moreover, neuromodulators allow networks to change these properties and adjust their activity to specific challenges. Endogenous continuous (tonic neuromodulation can regulate and sometimes be indispensible for networks to produce basal activity. This seems to be the case for the inspiratory rhythm generator located in the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC. This neural network is necessary and sufficient for generating inspiratory rhythms. The preBötC produces normal respiratory activity (eupnea as well as sighs under normoxic conditions, and it generates gasping under hypoxic conditions after a reconfiguration process. The reconfiguration leading to gasping generation involves changes of synaptic and intrinsic properties that can be mediated by several neuromodulators. Over the past years, it has been shown that endogenous continuous neuromodulation of the preBötC may involve the continuous action of amines and peptides on extrasynaptic receptors. I will summarize the findings supporting the role of endogenous continuous neuromodulation in the generation and regulation of different inspiratory rhythms, exploring the possibility that these neuromodulatory actions involve extrasynaptic receptors along with evidence of glial modulation of preBötC activity.

  8. Brain networks for integrative rhythm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H Thaut

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Performance of externally paced rhythmic movements requires brain and behavioral integration of sensory stimuli with motor commands. The underlying brain mechanisms to elaborate beat-synchronized rhythm and polyrhythms that musicians readily perform may differ. Given known roles in perceiving time and repetitive movements, we hypothesized that basal ganglia and cerebellar structures would have greater activation for polyrhythms than for on-the-beat rhythms.Using functional MRI methods, we investigated brain networks for performing rhythmic movements paced by auditory cues. Musically trained participants performed rhythmic movements at 2 and 3 Hz either at a 1:1 on-the-beat or with a 3:2 or a 2:3 stimulus-movement structure. Due to their prior musical experience, participants performed the 3:2 or 2:3 rhythmic movements automatically. Both the isorhythmic 1:1 and the polyrhythmic 3:2 or 2:3 movements yielded the expected activation in contralateral primary motor cortex and related motor areas and ipsilateral cerebellum. Direct comparison of functional MRI signals obtained during 3:2 or 2:3 and on-the-beat rhythms indicated activation differences bilaterally in the supplementary motor area, ipsilaterally in the supramarginal gyrus and caudate-putamen and contralaterally in the cerebellum.The activated brain areas suggest the existence of an interconnected brain network specific for complex sensory-motor rhythmic integration that might have specificity for elaboration of musical abilities.

  9. Circadian rhythm disruption in cancer biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savvidis, Christos; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2012-12-06

    Circadian rhythms show universally a 24-h oscillation pattern in metabolic, physiological and behavioral functions of almost all species. This pattern is due to a fundamental adaptation to the rotation of Earth around its own axis. Molecular mechanisms of generation of circadian rhythms organize a biochemical network in suprachiasmatic nucleus and peripheral tissues, building cell autonomous clock pacemakers. Rhythmicity is observed in transcriptional expression of a wide range of clock-controlled genes that regulate a variety of normal cell functions, such as cell division and proliferation. Desynchrony of this rhythmicity seems to be implicated in several pathologic conditions, including tumorigenesis and progression of cancer. In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) categorized "shiftwork that involves circadian disruption [as] probably carcinogenic to humans" (Group 2A in the IARC classification system of carcinogenic potency of an agentagent) (Painting, Firefighting, and Shiftwork; IARC; 2007). This review discusses the potential relation between disruptions of normal circadian rhythms with genetic driving machinery of cancer. Elucidation of the role of clockwork disruption, such as exposure to light at night and sleep disruption, in cancer biology could be important in developing new targeted anticancer therapies, optimizing individualized chronotherapy and modifying lighting environment in workplaces or homes.

  10. A comparison of low versus high heart rate in patients with atrial fibrillation and advanced chronic heart failure : Effects on clinical profile, neurohormones and survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rienstra, Michiel; Van Gelder, Isabelle C; Van den Berg, Maarten P; Boomsma, Frans; Hillege, Hans L; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation is common in chronic heart failure. Long-term restoration of sinus rhythm is generally unsuccessful. It may be speculated that higher heart rates are unfavorable, since this may lead to tachycardiomyopathy, but there are no data which have examined this. METHODS AND

  11. Heart Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kilometers), which is far enough to circle the earth more than twice! See also on other sites: ... For the Public Heart Information Center Project Heart Women’s Heart Health Clinical Trials 6770 Bertner Avenue Houston, ...

  12. Heart Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your transplanted heart. You should also have routine medical checkups to maintain overall health. Activity Restrictions Heart transplant recipients have no specific activity restrictions. Discuss activity ideas with your ... to some medical and dental procedures to prevent endocarditis, most heart ...

  13. Naturally occurring circadian rhythm and sleep duration are related to executive functions in early adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuula, Liisa; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Heinonen, Kati; Kajantie, Eero; Eriksson, Johan Gunnar; Andersson, Sture; Lano, Aulikki; Lahti, Jari; Wolke, Dieter; Räikkönen, Katri

    2017-07-20

    Experimental sleep deprivation studies suggest that insufficient sleep and circadian misalignment associates with poorer executive function. It is not known whether this association translates to naturally occurring sleep patterns. A total of 512 of full-term-born members of the Arvo Ylppö Longitudinal Study [mean age = 25.3, standard deviation (SD) = 0.65] (44.3% men) wore actigraphs to define sleep duration, its irregularity and circadian rhythm (sleep mid-point) during a 1-week period (mean 6.9 nights, SD = 1.7). Performance-based executive function was assessed with the Trail-Making Test, Conners' Continuous Performance Test and Stroop. The self-rated adult version of Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function was used to assess trait-like executive function. We found that performance-based and self-reported trait-like executive function correlated only modestly (all correlations ≤0.17). Shorter sleep duration associated with more commission errors. Later circadian rhythm associated with poorer trait-like executive function, as indicated by the Brief Metacognitive Index and the Behavior Regulation Index. Those belonging to the group with the most irregular sleep duration performed slower than others in the Trail-Making Test Part A. All associations were adjusted for sex, age, socioeconomic status and body mass index. In conclusion, naturally occurring insufficient sleep and later circadian rhythm showed modest associations with poorer executive function. Shorter habitual sleep duration was associated with lower scores of performance-based tests of executive function, and later circadian rhythm was associated mainly with poorer trait-like executive function characteristics. Our findings suggest additionally that sleep duration and circadian rhythm associate with different domains of executive function, and there are no additive effects between the two. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  14. Basic Principles of Interpersonal Social Rhythm Therapy in Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokben Hizli Sayar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal Social Rhythm Therapy is a psychotherapy modality that helps the patient recognize the relationship between disruptions in social rhythms and the onset of previous episodes of psychiatric disorders. It uses psychoeducation and behavioral techniques to maintain social rhythm and sleep/wake regularity. It is closely related to and ldquo;social zeitgeber theory and rdquo; that emphasizes the importance that social rhythm regularity may play in synchronization of circadian rhythms in individuals with or at risk for bipolar spectrum disorders. Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy have been shown to stabilize social rhythms and enhance course and outcome in bipolar disorder. This review focuses on the theoretical principles and the basic steps of interpersonal and social rhythm therapy as a psychotherapy approach in bipolar disorder. PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar databases were searched without temporal restriction. Search terms included interpersonal social rhythm therapy, bipolar, mood disorders. Abstracts were reviewed for relevance, and randomized controlled trials of interpersonal and social rhythm therapy in bipolar disorder selected. These researches also summarized on the final part of this review. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(4.000: 438-446

  15. Accelerated idioventricular rhythm requiring catheter ablation in a child: The dark side of a benign arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errahmouni, A; Bun, S-S; Latcu, D G; Tazi-Mezalek, A; Saoudi, N

    2017-11-01

    A 12 year-old boy, with no history of cardiac disease, was referred to our department for evaluation of an incessant accelerated idioventricular rhythm (AIVR) complicated with severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and cardiogenic shock. Extensive diagnostic work-up failed to reveal any structural heart disease. During electrophysiological study, AIVR originated from the right ventricular endocardial anterior wall and was successfully ablated using remote magnetic navigation. LV function showed complete recovery four weeks after the procedure. This case highlights a life-threatening evolution of an arrhythmia generally presented as a benign entity in children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Biologic Rhythms Derived from Siberian Mammoths Hairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Spilde; A Lanzirotti; C Qualls; G Phillips; A Ali; L Agenbroad; O Appenzeller

    2011-12-31

    Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was {approx}31 cms/year and {approx}16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios), which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna.

  17. Current state of knowledge on aetiology, diagnosis, management, and therapy of peripartum cardiomyopathy : a position statement from the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on peripartum cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sliwa, Karen; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Petrie, Mark C.; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Pieske, Burkert; Buchmann, Eckhart; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Schaufelberger, Maria; Tavazzi, Luigi; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Watkins, Hugh; Shah, Ajay J.; Seferovic, Petar M.; Elkayam, Uri; Pankuweit, Sabine; Papp, Zoltan; Mouquet, Frederic; McMurray, John J. V.

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a cause of pregnancy-associated heart failure. It typically develops during the last month of, and up to 6 months after, pregnancy in women without known cardiovascular disease. The present position statement offers a state-of-the-art summary of what is known

  18. Increased beta rhythm as an indicator of inhibitory mechanisms in tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niccolai, Valentina; van Dijk, Hanneke; Franzkowiak, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inhibitory oscillatory mechanisms subserving tic compensation have been put forward in Tourette syndrome. Modulation of the beta rhythm (15-25 Hz) as the well-established oscillatory movement execution-inhibition indicator was tested during a cognitive-motor task in patients with Tour......BACKGROUND: Inhibitory oscillatory mechanisms subserving tic compensation have been put forward in Tourette syndrome. Modulation of the beta rhythm (15-25 Hz) as the well-established oscillatory movement execution-inhibition indicator was tested during a cognitive-motor task in patients...... in parieto-occipital brain regions contralaterally to the response hand. Average beta power and power gain correlated negatively with tic severity. CONCLUSIONS: Increased motor inhibitory as well as visuomotor attentional processes are likely to subserve tic compensation. Correlational results suggest...... that stronger inhibitory compensation accompanies less tic severity. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society....

  19. Anesthetic drugs in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Robert H

    2014-12-01

    The structural defects associated with the various forms of congenital heart disease lead to pathological and functional changes that place patients at risk for adverse events, and in fact the perioperative incidence of morbidity and mortality has been documented to be increased in children with congenital heart disease. Patients with congenital heart disease can present to the anesthesiologist in a relatively precarious state of balance of several hemodynamic factors, including preload, ventricular contractility, systemic vascular resistance, pulmonary vascular resistance, heart rate, and cardiac rhythm. Anesthetic drugs can affect each of these, and an ideal anesthetic drug for such patients does not exist. The purpose of this article is to review the hemodynamic effects of anesthetic drugs and how they may contribute to the occurrence of adverse events in children with congenital heart disease. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Regularity of cardiac rhythm as a marker of sleepiness in sleep disordered breathing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Guaita

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to analyse the autonomic nervous system activity using heart rate variability (HRV to detect sleep disordered breathing (SDB patients with and without excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS before sleep onset.Two groups of 20 patients with different levels of daytime sleepiness -sleepy group, SG; alert group, AG- were selected consecutively from a Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT and Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT research protocol. The first waking 3-min window of RR signal at the beginning of each nap test was considered for the analysis. HRV was measured with traditional linear measures and with time-frequency representations. Non-linear measures -correntropy, CORR; auto-mutual-information function, AMIF- were used to describe the regularity of the RR rhythm. Statistical analysis was performed with non-parametric tests.Non-linear dynamic of the RR rhythm was more regular in the SG than in the AG during the first wakefulness period of MSLT, but not during MWT. AMIF (in high-frequency and in Total band and CORR (in Total band yielded sensitivity > 70%, specificity >75% and an area under ROC curve > 0.80 in classifying SG and AG patients.The regularity of the RR rhythm measured at the beginning of the MSLT could be used to detect SDB patients with and without EDS before the appearance of sleep onset.

  1. Nonlinear neurodynamics in representation of a rhythm of speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skljarov, O P

    1999-06-01

    The mathematical model is offered to describe an algorithm for functioning of a speech rhythm. The duration of a speech signal is divided into the numbered sequence of durations of voice and voiceless segments. All elements of this sequence will be considered as values normalized on the maximum element. We determine this sequence of the elements as a speech rhythm. 1) The model describes a speech rhythm as the recurrent relations between elements of a rhythm. 2) The model permits use of the concept of information entropy. 3) The model explains experimental findings obtained by our research group during comparative investigation of a rhythm in normal speech and stuttering. In particular, the model explains the existence of two classes of stutterers with various rhythms of speech.

  2. The influence of biological rhythms on host-parasite interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Bakker, Micaela; Helm, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    Biological rhythms, from circadian control of cellular processes to annual cycles in life history, are a main structural element of biology. Biological rhythms are considered adaptive because they enable organisms to partition activities to cope with, and take advantage of, predictable fluctuations in environmental conditions. A flourishing area of immunology is uncovering rhythms in the immune system of animals, including humans. Given the temporal structure of immunity, and rhythms in parasite activity and disease incidence, we propose that the intersection of chronobiology, disease ecology, and evolutionary biology holds the key to understanding host-parasite interactions. Here, we review host-parasite interactions while explicitly considering biological rhythms, and propose that rhythms: influence within-host infection dynamics and transmission between hosts, might account for diel and annual periodicity in host-parasite systems, and can lead to a host-parasite arms race in the temporal domain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Pecking and respiration rhythms of pigeons (Columba livia)

    OpenAIRE

    Hörster, Wolfgang; Xia, Li; Delius, Juan

    2003-01-01

    The production and coordination of rhythmic activities in birds is seldom investigated. Here we describe the pecking and breathing rhythms of pigeons under different conditions. When feeding from a heap of small grains, hungry pigeons pecked at regular intervals of about 0.3 s. The pecking rhythm was slightly slower in the afternoon. The pecking rhythm induced by the dopaminergic drug apomorphine was somewhat faster but some overt pecks were skipped. The mean respiratory cycle during a nonpec...

  4. Educating the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sherry

    2007-01-01

    Japan's elementary and junior high schools have a formal, nationally mandated moral curriculum called Kokoro-no-kyoiku--education of the heart. Japanese educators include moral growth as an integral part of one's intellectual growth and believe that democratic societies must promote virtuous decision making. Moral education in Japan nurtures the…

  5. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  6. Heart Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  7. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Each year almost 800,000 Americans have a heart attack. A heart attack happens when blood flow to the heart suddenly ... it's important to know the symptoms of a heart attack and call 9-1-1 if you or ...

  8. Tapped out: do people with aphasia have rhythm processing deficits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipse, Lauryn; Worek, Amanda; Guarino, Anthony J; Shattuck-Hufnagel, Stefanie

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the authors tested whether people with aphasia (PWAs) show an impaired ability to process rhythm, both in terms of perception and production. Two experiments were conducted. In Experiment 1, 16 PWAs and 15 age-matched control participants performed 3 rhythm tasks: tapping along to short rhythms, tapping these same rhythms from memory immediately after presentation, and making same-different judgments about pairs of tapped rhythms that they heard. Comparison tasks measured same-different judgment ability with visual stimuli and nonverbal working memory (Corsi blocks). In Experiment 2, 14 PWAs and 16 control participants made same-different judgments for pairs of auditory stimuli that differed in terms of rhythm or pitch (for comparison). In Experiment 1, PWAs performed worse than control participants across most measures of rhythm processing. In contrast, PWAs and control participants did not differ in their performance on the comparison tasks. In Experiment 2, the PWAs performed worse than control participants across all conditions but with a more marked deficit in stimulus pairs that differed in rhythm than in those that differed in pitch. The results support the hypothesis that at least some PWAs exhibit deficits of rhythm and timing. This may have implications for treatments involving tapping or other rhythmic cues.

  9. Experiment K-7-35: Circadian Rhythms and Temperature Regulation During Spaceflight. Part 1; Circadian Rhythms and Temperature Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C. A.; Alpatov, A. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Klimovitsky, V. Y.

    1994-01-01

    Mammals have developed the ability to adapt to most variations encountered in their everyday environment. For example, homeotherms have developed the ability to maintain the internal cellular environment at a relatively constant temperature. Also, in order to compensate for temporal variations in the terrestrial environment, the circadian timing system has evolved. However, throughout the evolution of life on earth, living organisms have been exposed to the influence of an unvarying level of earth's gravity. As a result changes in gravity produce adaptive responses which are not completely understood. In particular, spaceflight has pronounced effects on various physiological and behavioral systems. Such systems include body temperature regulation and circadian rhythms. This program has examined the influence of microgravity on temperature regulation and circadian timekeeping systems in Rhesus monkeys. Animals flown on the Soviet Biosatellite, COSMOS 2044, were exposed to 14 days of microgravity while constantly monitoring the circadian patterns temperature regulation, heart rate and activity. This experiment has extended our previous observations from COSMOS 1514, as well as providing insights into the physiological mechanisms that produce these changes.

  10. The multifunctional role of calcium in the heart: a tempting target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bourgonje, V.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    The sole purpose of the heart is to pump blood through the body. In order to achieve this, it is important that the rhythm is regular and controlled, that the contractile force of the muscle is sufficient, and that the macrostructure of the heart retains the right balance, between for example wall

  11. The future of telemedicine for the management of heart failure patients: a Consensus Document of the Italian Association of Hospital Cardiologists (A.N.M.C.O), the Italian Society of Cardiology (S.I.C.) and the Italian Society for Telemedicine and eHealth (Digital S.I.T.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lenarda, Andrea; Casolo, Giancarlo; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Aspromonte, Nadia; Scalvini, Simonetta; Mortara, Andrea; Alunni, Gianfranco; Ricci, Renato Pietro; Mantovan, Roberto; Russo, Giancarmine; Gensini, Gian Franco; Romeo, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    Telemedicine applied to heart failure patients is a tool for recording and providing remote transmission, storage and interpretation of cardiovascular parameters and/or useful diagnostic images to allow for intensive home monitoring of patients with advanced heart failure, or during the vulnerable post-acute phase, to improve patient's prognosis and quality of life. Recently, several meta-analyses have shown that telemedicine-supported care pathways are not only effective but also economically advantageous. Benefits seem to be substantial, with a 30-35% reduction in mortality and 15-20% decrease in hospitalizations. Patients implanted with cardiac devices can also benefit from an integrated remote clinical management since all modern devices can transmit technical and diagnostic data. However, telemedicine may provide benefits to heart failure patients only as part of a shared and integrated multi-disciplinary and multi-professional 'chronic care model'. Moreover, the future development of remote telemonitoring programs in Italy will require the primary use of products certified as medical devices, validated organizational solutions as well as legislative and administrative adoption of new care methods and the widespread growth of clinical care competence to remotely manage the complexity of chronicity. Through this consensus document, Italian Cardiology reaffirms its willingness to contribute promoting a new phase of qualitative assessment, standardization of processes and testing of telemedicine-based care models in heart failure. By recognizing the relevance of telemedicine for the care of non-hospitalized patients with heart failure, its strategic importance for the design of innovative models of care, and the many challenges and opportunities it raises, ANMCO and SIC through this document report a consensus on the main directions for its widespread and sustainable clinical implementation.

  12. The future of telemedicine for the management of heart failure patients: a Consensus Document of the Italian Association of Hospital Cardiologists (A.N.M.C.O), the Italian Society of Cardiology (S.I.C.) and the Italian Society for Telemedicine and eHealth (Digital S.I.T.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casolo, Giancarlo; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Aspromonte, Nadia; Scalvini, Simonetta; Mortara, Andrea; Alunni, Gianfranco; Ricci, Renato Pietro; Mantovan, Roberto; Russo, Giancarmine; Gensini, Gian Franco; Romeo, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Telemedicine applied to heart failure patients is a tool for recording and providing remote transmission, storage and interpretation of cardiovascular parameters and/or useful diagnostic images to allow for intensive home monitoring of patients with advanced heart failure, or during the vulnerable post-acute phase, to improve patient’s prognosis and quality of life. Recently, several meta-analyses have shown that telemedicine-supported care pathways are not only effective but also economically advantageous. Benefits seem to be substantial, with a 30–35% reduction in mortality and 15–20% decrease in hospitalizations. Patients implanted with cardiac devices can also benefit from an integrated remote clinical management since all modern devices can transmit technical and diagnostic data. However, telemedicine may provide benefits to heart failure patients only as part of a shared and integrated multi-disciplinary and multi-professional ‘chronic care model’. Moreover, the future development of remote telemonitoring programs in Italy will require the primary use of products certified as medical devices, validated organizational solutions as well as legislative and administrative adoption of new care methods and the widespread growth of clinical care competence to remotely manage the complexity of chronicity. Through this consensus document, Italian Cardiology reaffirms its willingness to contribute promoting a new phase of qualitative assessment, standardization of processes and testing of telemedicine-based care models in heart failure. By recognizing the relevance of telemedicine for the care of non-hospitalized patients with heart failure, its strategic importance for the design of innovative models of care, and the many challenges and opportunities it raises, ANMCO and SIC through this document report a consensus on the main directions for its widespread and sustainable clinical implementation PMID:28751839

  13. Keeping the Rhythm : Cardiac Pacemaker Cell Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burkhard, S.B.

    2017-01-01

    The heart is the first organ to form and function in the developing vertebrate embryo. Its proper morphogenesis and function is crucial for survival. Here we focus on the development and characterization of a highly specialized subset of cardiac cells, the pacemaker cells. In the mammalian heart,

  14. How does the brain create rhythms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szirmai, Imre

    2010-01-30

    Connection was found between rhythmic cortical activity and motor control. The 10 Hz micro-rhythm and the 20-30 Hz bursts represent two functional states of the somatomotor system. A correspondence of the central micro-rhythm of the motor cortex and the physiological hand tremor (8-12 Hz) is presumed. The precise tuning of the motor system can be estimated by the frequency of repetitive finger movements. In complex tapping exercise, the index finger is the most skillful, the 3rd, 4th and 5th fingers keep rhythm with less precision. It was found that the organization of mirror movements depends on the cortical representation of fingers. Mirror finger movements are more regular if the subject begins the motor action with the 5th (small) finger. Concerning cortical regulation of finger movements, it was suggested that there are two time-keeping systems in the brain; one with a sensitivity above and another with a sensitivity below the critical frequency of 3 Hz. The preferred meter which helps to maintain synchronous finger movements is the cadence of 4/4 and 8/8. We observed that the unlearned inward-outward sequential finger movement was equally impaired in nonmusician controls and patients with Parkinson-disease. In movement disorders, the ability of movement and the "clock-mechanism" are equally involved. The polyrhythmic finger movement is not our inborn ability, it has to be learned. The "timer" function, which regulates the rhythmic movement, is presumably localised in the basal ganglia or in the cerebellum. The meter of the music is built on the reciprocal values of 2 raised to the second to fifth power (1/1(2), 1/2(2), 1/2(3), 1/2(4), 1/2(5)). The EEG frequencies that we consider important in the regulation of conscious motor actions are approximately in the same domain (4, 8, 16, 32, 64 Hz). During music performance, an important neural process is the coupling of distant brain areas. Concerning melody, the musical taste of Europeans is octave-based. Musical

  15. Citizenship in civil society?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Marinus R.R.

    2007-01-01

    This article seeks to provide a conceptual framework to complement and guide the empirical analysis of civil society. The core argument is that civil society must be understood, not as a category of (post)industrialized society, but as one of individualized society. Civil society is characterized by

  16. [Evaluation of the principles of distribution of electrocardiographic R-R intervals for elaboration of methods of automated diagnosis of cardiac rhythm disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukerman, B M; Finkel'shteĭn, I E

    1987-07-01

    A statistical analysis of prolonged ECG records has been carried out in patients with various heart rhythm and conductivity disorders. The distribution of absolute R-R duration values and relationships between adjacent intervals have been examined. A two-step algorithm has been constructed that excludes anomalous and "suspicious" intervals from a sample of consecutively recorded R-R intervals, until only the intervals between contractions of veritably sinus origin remain in the sample. The algorithm has been developed into a programme for microcomputer Electronica NC-80. It operates reliably even in cases of complex combined rhythm and conductivity disorders.

  17. Management of atrial fibrillation in heart failure in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi Nasr, Imad; Mansencal, Nicolas; Dubourg, Olivier

    2008-04-10

    In elderly patients, atrial fibrillation prevalence exceeds 10% and is commonly associated with heart failure rendering their management even more challenging. Therapies to be considered for heart failure related atrial fibrillation include appropriate treatment of underlying disease, prevention of thromboembolism, rate or rhythm control. The debate regarding rate versus rhythm control in the management of this group of patients has yet to be resolved. For old patients, the management requires an individual approach, which largely depends on comorbid conditions, underlying cardiac disease, and patient and physician preferences. Use of antiarrhythmic drug therapy for maintenance of sinus rhythm carries concerns of risk and limited efficacy. Catheter ablation for rhythm control is feasible for some patients, but further studies are needed to define the risks and benefits especially in older patients. Atrioventricular nodal ablation associated with pacing therapy is an effective non-pharmacological therapy in selected patients with medically refractory permanent high heart rate atrial fibrillation and heart failure. Several studies are ongoing and will provide more insight into the management of such patients.

  18. Effects of 9-hour time zone changes on fatigue and circadian rhythms of sleep/wake and core temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gander, P. H.; Myhre, G.; Graeber, R. C.; Andersen, H. T.; Lauber, J. K.

    1985-01-01

    Physiological and psychological disruptions caused by transmeridian flights may affect the ability of flight crews to meet operational demands. To study these effects, 9 Royal Norwegian Airforces P3-Orion crewmembers flew from Norway to California (-9 hr), and back (+9 hr). Rectal temperature, heart rate and wrist activity were recorded every 2 min, fatigue and mood were rated every 2 hr during the waking day, and logs were kept of sleep times and ratings. Subjects also completed 4 personality inventories. The time-zone shifts produced negative changes in mood which persisted longer after westward flights. Sleep quality (subjective and objective) and duration were slightly disrupted (more after eastward flights). The circadian rhythms of sleep/wake and temperature both completed the 9-hr delay by day 5 in California, although temperature adjusted more slowly. The size of the delay shift was significantly correlated with scores on extraversion and achievement need personality scales. Response to the 9-hr advance were more variable. One subject exhibited a 15-hr delay in his temperature rhythm, and an atypical sleep/nap pattern. On average, the sleep/wake cycle (but not the temperature rhythm), completed the 9-hr advance by the end of the study. Both rhythms adapted more slowly after the eastward flight.

  19. Fragmentation and stability of circadian activity rhythms predict mortality : the rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, Lisette A; Luik, Annemarie I; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; Van Someren, Eus J W; Tiemeier, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms and sleep patterns change as people age. Little is known about the associations between circadian rhythms and mortality rates. We investigated whether 24-hour activity rhythms and sleep characteristics independently predicted mortality. Actigraphy was used to determine the

  20. Rhythms For Cognition: Communication Through Coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    I propose that synchronization affects communication between neuronal groups. Gamma-band (30-90 Hz) synchronization modulates excitation rapidly enough so it escapes the following inhibition and activates postsynaptic neurons effectively. Synchronization also ensures that a presynaptic activation pattern arrives at postsynaptic neurons in a temporally coordinated manner. At a postsynaptic neuron, multiple presynaptic groups converge, e.g. representing different stimuli. If a stimulus is selected by attention, its neuronal representation shows stronger and higher-frequency gamma-band synchronization. Thereby, the attended stimulus representation selectively entrains postsynaptic neurons. The entrainment creates sequences of short excitation and longer inhibition that are coordinated between pre- and postsynaptic groups to transmit the attended representation and shut out competing inputs. The predominantly bottom-up directed gamma-band influences are controlled by predominantly top-down directed alpha-beta band (8-20 Hz) influences. Attention itself samples stimuli at a 7-8 Hz theta rhythm. Thus, several rhythms and their interplay render neuronal communication effective, precise and selective. PMID:26447583