WorldWideScience

Sample records for heart rate response

  1. Heart rate response to breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J; Pagh, K; Nielsen, J S

    1987-01-01

    Heart rate responses to stepwise and periodic changes in lung volume were studied in seven young healthy males. Stepwise inspiration and expiration both resulted in an increase in heart rate followed by a rapid decrease in heart rate. The fastest heart rate was reached in 1.6 +/- 0.5 s and in 3.......6 +/- 1.4 s in response to inspiration and expiration, respectively (P less than 0.01). The slowest heart rate was reached in 4.8 +/- 1.0 s and in 7.6 +/- 1.9 s in response to inspiration and expiration, respectively (P less than 0.01). Following this biphasic change the heart rate returned to a steady...... level. The difference between the fastest and the slowest heart rates was significantly larger in response to inspiration (21.7 +/- 7.3 beats per minute) than in response to expiration (12.0 +/- 7.3 beats per minute; P less than 0.01). Periodic changes in lung volume were performed with frequencies from...

  2. Heart rate response to hypoxic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, C; Møller, P; Kanstrup, I L

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the effects of dopamine D(2)-receptor blockade on the early decrease in maximal heart rate at high altitude (4559 m). We also attempted to clarify the time-dependent component of this reduction and the extent to which it is reversed by oxygen breathing. Twelve subjects performed...... progressively decreased the maximal heart rate from day 1 and onwards; also, hypoxia by itself increased plasma noradrenaline levels after maximal exercise. Domperidone further increased maximal noradrenaline concentrations, but had no effect on maximal heart rate. On each study day at altitude, oxygen...... breathing completely reversed the decrease in maximal heart rate to values not different from those at sea level. In conclusion, dopamine D(2)-receptor blockade with domperidone demonstrates that hypoxic exercise in humans activates D(2)-receptors, resulting in a decrease in circulating levels...

  3. Firefighter Incident Rehabilitation: Interpreting Heart Rate Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Denise L; Haller, Jeannie M; Benedict, Ron; Moore-Merrell, Lori

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective of this observational study was to document the heart rate (HR) responses of firefighters during incident rehabilitation following firefighting activity in a high-rise building with a simulated fire on the 10th floor. Additionally, the study investigated potential factors, including firefighting workload, ambient temperature, firefighter movement, and individual characteristics, that may have affected HR during recovery. Firefighters (n = 198) were assigned to perform a simulation of fire suppression, search and rescue, or material support during one of six firefighting trials that involved different crew sizes and ascent modes, and were performed in different environmental conditions. After completing the simulated firefighting activity, firefighters reported to a rehabilitation area on the 8th floor. The rehabilitation area was staffed by firefighter/paramedics. HR was monitored continuously during simulated firefighting activity and a 15-minute rehabilitation period. Average HR during rehabilitation (HRmean) was calculated and compared across trials. Simulated firefighting activity was performed in the summer in Virginia, USA, and ambient conditions varied among trials (mean ± SD: 31 ± 4°C; 46 ± 15% relative humidity; 32 ± 4°C heat index). Duration of simulated firefighting activity ranged from 12.0 to 20.3 minutes among trials (mean: 15.4 ± 5.2 minutes). Over all trials, mean peak HR during simulations was 173 ± 18 beats·min(-1). Mean HR over all trials at entry into rehabilitation was 149 ± 24 beats·min(-1). Following 15 minutes of recovery, mean HR over all trials was 126 ± 23 beats·min(-1). Exploratory analyses revealed that higher workload during firefighting (stair trials), higher ambient temperature (≥30°C), greater movement during rehabilitation (≥0.1 g-force), higher age (≥45 years), and higher BMI (≥30.0 kg·m(-2)) were associated with higher HR responses during rehabilitation. During complex emergency

  4. Heart Rate Responses to Synthesized Affective Spoken Words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirja Ilves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effects of brief synthesized spoken words with emotional content on the ratings of emotions and heart rate responses. Twenty participants' heart rate functioning was measured while they listened to a set of emotionally negative, neutral, and positive words produced by speech synthesizers. At the end of the experiment, ratings of emotional experiences were also collected. The results showed that the ratings of the words were in accordance with their valence. Heart rate deceleration was significantly the strongest and most prolonged to the negative stimuli. The findings are the first suggesting that brief spoken emotionally toned words evoke a similar heart rate response pattern found earlier for more sustained emotional stimuli.

  5. The effect of heart rate on the heart rate variability response to autonomic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billman, George E

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the beat-to-beat variation in either heart rate (HR) or heart period (R-R interval), has become a popular clinical and investigational tool to quantify cardiac autonomic regulation. However, it is not widely appreciated that, due to the inverse curvilinear relationship between HR and R-R interval, HR per se can profoundly influence HRV. It is, therefore, critical to correct HRV for the prevailing HR particularly, as HR changes in response to autonomic neural activation or inhibition. The present study evaluated the effects of HR on the HRV response to autonomic interventions that either increased (submaximal exercise, n = 25 or baroreceptor reflex activation, n = 20) or reduced (pharmacological blockade: β-adrenergic receptor, muscarinic receptor antagonists alone and in combination, n = 25, or bilateral cervical vagotomy, n = 9) autonomic neural activity in a canine model. Both total (RR interval standard deviation, RRSD) and the high frequency (HF) variability (HF, 0.24-1.04 Hz) were determined before and in response to an autonomic intervention. All interventions that reduced or abolished cardiac parasympathetic regulation provoked large reductions in HRV even after HR correction [division by mean RRsec or (mean RRsec)(2) for RRSD and HF, respectively] while interventions that reduced HR yielded mixed results. β-adrenergic receptor blockade reduced HRV (RRSD but not HF) while both RRSD and HF increased in response to increases in arterial blood (baroreceptor reflex activation) even after HR correction. These data suggest that the physiological basis for HRV is revealed after correction for prevailing HR and, further, that cardiac parasympathetic activity is responsible for a major portion of the HRV in the dog.

  6. The Effect of Heart Rate on the Heart Rate Variability Response to Autonomic Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E Billman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV, the beat-to-beat variation in either heart rate (HR or heart period (R-R interval, has become a popular clinical and investigational tool to quantify cardiac autonomic regulation. However, it is not widely appreciated that, due to the inverse curvilinear relationship between HR and R-R interval, HR per se can profoundly influence HRV. It is, therefore, critical to correct HRV for the prevailing HR particularly, as HR changes in response to autonomic neural activation or inhibition. The present study evaluated the effects of HR on the HRV response to autonomic interventions that either increased (submaximal exercise, n = 25 or baroreceptor reflex activation, n = 20 or reduced (pharmacological blockade: β-adrenergic receptor, muscarinic receptor antagonists alone and in combination, n = 25, or bilateral cervical vagotomy, n = 9 autonomic neural activity in a canine model. Both total (RR interval standard deviation, RRSD and the high frequency variability (HF, 0.2 to 1.04 Hz were determined before and in response to an autonomic intervention. All interventions that reduced or abolished cardiac parasympathetic regulation provoked large reductions in HRV even after HR correction [division by mean RRsec or (mean RRsec2 for RRSD and HF, respectively] while interventions that reduced HR yielded mixed results. β-adrenergic receptor blockade reduced HRV (RRSD but not HF while both RRSD and HF increased in response to increases in arterial blood (baroreceptor reflex activation even after HR correction. These data suggest that the physiological basis for HRV is revealed after correction for prevailing HR and, further, that cardiac parasympathetic activity is responsible for a major portion of the HRV in the dog.

  7. Heart Rate Variability: Effect of Exercise Intensity on Postexercise Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, David V. B.; Munson, Steven C.; Maldonado-Martin, Sara; De Ste Croix, Mark B. A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of two exercise intensities (moderate and severe) on heart rate variability (HRV) response in 16 runners 1 hr prior to (-1 hr) and at +1 hr, +24 hr, +48 hr, and +72 hr following each exercise session. Time domain indexes and a high frequency component showed a significant decrease…

  8. Cholesterol enhances classical conditioning of the rabbit heart rate response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Bernard G; Smith-Bell, Carrie A; Darwish, Deya S; Wang, Desheng; Burhans, Lauren B; Gonzales-Joekes, Jimena; Deci, Stephen; Stankovic, Goran; Sparks, D Larry

    2007-07-19

    The cholesterol-fed rabbit is a model of atherosclerosis and has been proposed as an animal model of Alzheimer's disease. Feeding rabbits cholesterol has been shown to increase the number of beta amyloid immunoreactive neurons in the cortex. Addition of copper to the drinking water of cholesterol-fed rabbits can increase this number still further and may lead to plaque-like structures. Classical conditioning of the nictitating membrane response in cholesterol-fed rabbits is retarded in the presence of these plaque-like structures but may be facilitated in their absence. In a factorial design, rabbits fed 2% cholesterol or a normal diet (0% cholesterol) for 8 weeks with or without copper added to the drinking water were given trace classical conditioning using a tone and periorbital electrodermal stimulation to study the effects of cholesterol and copper on classical conditioning of heart rate and the nictitating membrane response. Cholesterol-fed rabbits showed significant facilitation of heart rate conditioning and conditioning-specific modification of heart rate relative to normal diet controls. Consistent with previous research, cholesterol had minimal effects on classical conditioning of the nictitating membrane response when periorbital electrodermal stimulation was used as the unconditioned stimulus. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a significant increase in the number of beta amyloid positive neurons in the cortex, hippocampus and amygdala of the cholesterol-fed rabbits. Supplementation of drinking water with copper increased the number of beta amyloid positive neurons in the cortex of cholesterol-fed rabbits but did not produce plaque-like structures or have a significant effect on heart rate conditioning. The data provide additional support for our finding that, in the absence of plaques, dietary cholesterol may facilitate learning and memory.

  9. Decreased heart rate variability responses during early postoperative mobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jans, Øivind; Brinth, Louise; Kehlet, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intact orthostatic blood pressure regulation is essential for early mobilization after surgery. However, postoperative orthostatic hypotension and intolerance (OI) may delay early ambulation. The mechanisms of postoperative OI include impaired vasopressor responses relating to postope......BACKGROUND: Intact orthostatic blood pressure regulation is essential for early mobilization after surgery. However, postoperative orthostatic hypotension and intolerance (OI) may delay early ambulation. The mechanisms of postoperative OI include impaired vasopressor responses relating...... to postoperative autonomic dysfunction. Thus, based on a previous study on haemodynamic responses during mobilization before and after elective total hip arthroplasty (THA), we performed secondary analyses of heart rate variability (HRV) and aimed to identify possible abnormal postoperative autonomic responses...... in relation to postural change. METHODS: A standardized mobilization protocol before, 6 and 24 h after surgery was performed in 23 patients scheduled for elective THA. Beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure was measured by photoplethysmography and HRV was derived from pulse wave interbeat intervals and analysed...

  10. Heart rate responses to autonomic challenges in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Macey

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is accompanied by structural alterations and dysfunction in central autonomic regulatory regions, which may impair dynamic and static cardiovascular regulation, and contribute to other syndrome pathologies. Characterizing cardiovascular responses to autonomic challenges may provide insights into central nervous system impairments, including contributions by sex, since structural alterations are enhanced in OSA females over males. The objective was to assess heart rate responses in OSA versus healthy control subjects to autonomic challenges, and, separately, characterize female and male patterns. We studied 94 subjects, including 37 newly-diagnosed, untreated OSA patients (6 female, age mean ± std: 52.1 ± 8.1 years; 31 male aged 54.3 ± 8.4 years, and 57 healthy control subjects (20 female, 50.5 ± 8.1 years; 37 male, 45.6 ± 9.2 years. We measured instantaneous heart rate with pulse oximetry during cold pressor, hand grip, and Valsalva maneuver challenges. All challenges elicited significant heart rate differences between OSA and control groups during and after challenges (repeated measures ANOVA, p<0.05. In post-hoc analyses, OSA females showed greater impairments than OSA males, which included: for cold pressor, lower initial increase (OSA vs. control: 9.5 vs. 7.3 bpm in females, 7.6 vs. 3.7 bpm in males, OSA delay to initial peak (2.5 s females/0.9 s males, slower mid-challenge rate-of-increase (OSA vs. control: -0.11 vs. 0.09 bpm/s in females, 0.03 vs. 0.06 bpm/s in males; for hand grip, lower initial peak (OSA vs. control: 2.6 vs. 4.6 bpm in females, 5.3 vs. 6.0 bpm in males; for Valsalva maneuver, lower Valsalva ratio (OSA vs. control: 1.14 vs. 1.30 in females, 1.29 vs. 1.34 in males, and OSA delay during phase II (0.68 s females/1.31 s males. Heart rate responses showed lower amplitude, delayed onset, and slower rate changes in OSA patients over healthy controls, and impairments may be more pronounced in

  11. Heart Rate Response of Professional Musicians When Playing Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellers, Heather L; Irwin, Conor; Lightfoot, J T

    2015-06-01

    The primary aim was to determine the level of physiological stress evoked while playing music in a standing position as indicated by heart rate (HR) response. A secondary aim was to analyze the effect of music genre (classic rock, western, contemporary Christian, and metal rock) on the relative HR response. Lastly, we considered potential physiological initiators of the music-playing-induced HR response. HR response was monitored in 27 professional musicians (3 women, 24 men) between the ages of 21 and 67 yrs old during rehearsal and public performances. The percent maximal HR (%MHR) evoked was determined by taking a percentage of the age-predicted maximal HR for each musician and comparing the average %MHR in each genre during public and rehearsal events. The role of the potential initiators of these responses (e.g., number of years playing in public, event type, instrument type, tempo, etc.) was determined using multiple regression analyses. The overall average %MHR responses were 52 ± 5% and 59 ± 5% during rehearsal and public performances, respectively, with genre type having a significant effect on the HR response (p=0.01). Body mass index and tempo were each found to be significant contributors to the HR response while playing music (r²=0.506, p=0.001). Playing music professionally evokes considerable increases in HR response, with music genre influencing the level of the physiological response. We concluded that 50% of the HR response while playing music was associated with body mass index, music tempo, and instrument type.

  12. Venipuncture procedure affects heart rate variability and chronotropic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliszczewicz, Brian; Esco, Michael R; E Bechke, Emily; Feito, Yuri; M Williamson, Cassie; Brown, Danielle; Price, Brandi

    2017-10-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been shown to be influenced by several factors such as noise, sleep status, light, and emotional arousal; however, little evidence is available concerning autonomic responses to a venipuncture. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes of HRV indexes and heart rate (HR) during and following a venipuncture procedure among healthy individuals. 33 healthy individuals (22.8 ± 0.56 years, 167 ± 1.56 cm, 69.5 ± 2.61 kg) participated. Testing included 10-minute HRV analysis prior to the venipuncture, a 1-minute venipuncture procedure followed by a 10-minute analysis of HRV, and a total recording of 21 minutes. The first 5 minutes of the 21-minute recordings were discarded, and the remaining 5 minutes of the resting segment was analyzed (PRE), and the last 5 minutes of the 21-minute recording (POST). The log transformation of the time domain root mean squared of successive differences (lnRMSSD) and the frequency domains of high frequency (lnHF) and low frequency (lnLF) and LF/HF ratio (lnLF/HF) were used to quantify autonomic activity. HR was measured in 1-minute segments at 2 minutes prior (PRE), venipuncture (STICK), and post (P1-5). HR significantly increased at STICK (P = 0.002), and fell below resting at P-5 (P < 0.001). lnRMSSD and lnHF increased significantly by POST (P < 0.001, P = 0.005). lnLF/HF ratio significantly decreased at POST (P = 0.047), while no significant changes occurred for lnLF (P = 0.590). HRV and HR are influenced for 10 minutes following the venipuncture procedure. Practitioners and researchers who are interested in collecting blood and measuring HRV need to account for the influence of the venipuncture. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Gonadal hormones and heart rate as an emotional response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Loos, Wolter Statius

    1988-01-01

    Animai experiments may give information on the physiology of hormones under stress conditions. The model for the investigation of acute emotional stress in animals that has been chosen permits the study of heart rate in freely moving laboratory rats as a sensitive psychophysiological parameter, This

  14. Loss of lag-response curvilinearity of indices of heart rate variability in congestive heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakre, Tushar P; Smith, Michael L

    2006-01-01

    Background Heart rate variability (HRV) is known to be impaired in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). Time-domain analysis of ECG signals traditionally relies heavily on linear indices of an essentially non-linear phenomenon. Poincaré plots are commonly used to study non-linear behavior of physiologic signals. Lagged Poincaré plots incorporate autocovariance information and analysis of Poincaré plots for various lags can provide interesting insights into the autonomic control of the heart. Methods Using Poincaré plot analysis, we assessed whether the relation of the lag between heart beats and HRV is altered in CHF. We studied the influence of lag on estimates of Poincaré plot indices for various lengths of beat sequence in a public domain data set (PhysioNet) of 29 subjects with CHF and 54 subjects with normal sinus rhythm. Results A curvilinear association was observed between lag and Poincaré plot indices (SD1, SD2, SDLD and SD1/SD2 ratio) in normal subjects even for a small sequence of 50 beats (p value for quadratic term 3 × 10-5, 0.002, 3.5 × 10-5 and 0.0003, respectively). This curvilinearity was lost in patients with CHF even after exploring sequences up to 50,000 beats (p values for quadratic term > 0.5). Conclusion Since lagged Poincaré plots incorporate autocovariance information, these analyses provide insights into the autonomic control of heart rate that is influenced by the non-linearity of the signal. The differences in lag-response in CHF patients and normal subjects exist even in the face of the treatment received by the CHF patients. PMID:16768800

  15. Loss of lag-response curvilinearity of indices of heart rate variability in congestive heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Michael L

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart rate variability (HRV is known to be impaired in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF. Time-domain analysis of ECG signals traditionally relies heavily on linear indices of an essentially non-linear phenomenon. Poincaré plots are commonly used to study non-linear behavior of physiologic signals. Lagged Poincaré plots incorporate autocovariance information and analysis of Poincaré plots for various lags can provide interesting insights into the autonomic control of the heart. Methods Using Poincaré plot analysis, we assessed whether the relation of the lag between heart beats and HRV is altered in CHF. We studied the influence of lag on estimates of Poincaré plot indices for various lengths of beat sequence in a public domain data set (PhysioNet of 29 subjects with CHF and 54 subjects with normal sinus rhythm. Results A curvilinear association was observed between lag and Poincaré plot indices (SD1, SD2, SDLD and SD1/SD2 ratio in normal subjects even for a small sequence of 50 beats (p value for quadratic term 3 × 10-5, 0.002, 3.5 × 10-5 and 0.0003, respectively. This curvilinearity was lost in patients with CHF even after exploring sequences up to 50,000 beats (p values for quadratic term > 0.5. Conclusion Since lagged Poincaré plots incorporate autocovariance information, these analyses provide insights into the autonomic control of heart rate that is influenced by the non-linearity of the signal. The differences in lag-response in CHF patients and normal subjects exist even in the face of the treatment received by the CHF patients.

  16. Daily physical activity and heart rate response in people with a unilateral traumatic transtibial amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann, Johannes B; Schrauwen, Hannelore J; Stam, Henk J

    2008-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that people with a unilateral traumatic transtibial amputation are less active than people without an amputation, and to explore whether both groups have a similar heart rate response while walking. A case-comparison study. General community. Nine subjects with a unilateral traumatic transtibial amputation and 9 matched subjects without known impairments. Not applicable. Percentage of dynamic activities in 48 hours (expressing activity level). Additionally, we examined heart rate and percentage heart rate reserve during walking (expressing heart rate response) and body motility during walking (expressing walking speed). These parameters were objectively measured at participants' homes on 2 consecutive days. Subjects with an amputation showed a lower percentage of dynamic activities (6.0% vs 11.7% in a 48-h period, P=.02). No significant differences were found between the 2 groups in heart rate (91.1 bpm vs 89.5 bpm, P=.86) and percentage heart rate reserve during walking (28.2% vs 27.5%, P=1.0). Body motility during walking was lower in the amputation group (.14 g vs .18 g, Ptranstibial amputation are considerably less active than persons without known impairments. The results indicate that heart rate response during walking is similar in both groups, and is probably regulated by adapting one's walking speed.

  17. Minimal changes in heart rate of incubating American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) in response to human activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borneman, Tracy E.; Rose, Eli T.; Simons, Theodore R.

    2014-01-01

    An organism's heart rate is commonly used as an indicator of physiological stress due to environmental stimuli. We used heart rate to monitor the physiological response of American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) to human activity in their nesting environment. We placed artificial eggs with embedded microphones in 42 oystercatcher nests to record the heart rate of incubating oystercatchers continuously for up to 27 days. We used continuous video and audio recordings collected simultaneously at the nests to relate physiological response of birds (heart rate) to various types of human activity. We observed military and civilian aircraft, off-road vehicles, and pedestrians around nests. With the exception of high-speed, low-altitude military overflights, we found little evidence that oystercatcher heart rates were influenced by most types of human activity. The low-altitude flights were the only human activity to significantly increase average heart rates of incubating oystercatchers (12% above baseline). Although statistically significant, we do not consider the increase in heart rate during high-speed, low-altitude military overflights to be of biological significance. This noninvasive technique may be appropriate for other studies of stress in nesting birds.

  18. Serum testosterone and heart rate response to short-term intense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The serum testosterone and heart rate responses to short strenuous physical exercise were studied in twenty-one non-athletic male students. The body mass index was also determined. Serum testosterone rose significantly (p<0.05) from 0.8±0.2 ng/ml to 1.7±0.2 ng/ml (273.5±100.2%, p<0.05). Likewise, the heart rate rose ...

  19. Stuttered and Fluent Speakers' Heart Rate and Skin Conductance in Response to Fluent and Stuttered Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianliang; Kalinowski, Joseph; Saltuklaroglu, Tim; Hudock, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have found simultaneous increases in skin conductance response and decreases in heart rate when normally fluent speakers watched and listened to stuttered speech compared with fluent speech, suggesting that stuttering induces arousal and emotional unpleasantness in listeners. However, physiological responses of persons…

  20. Effects of Vibration and G-Loading on Heart Rate, Breathing Rate, and Response Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinez, Angelica; Ayzenberg, Ruthie; Liston, Dorian B.; Stone, Leland S.

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace and applied environments commonly expose pilots and astronauts to G-loading and vibration, alone and in combination, with well-known sensorimotor (Cohen, 1970) and performance consequences (Adelstein et al., 2008). Physiological variables such as heart rate (HR) and breathing rate (BR) have been shown to increase with G-loading (Yajima et al., 1994) and vibration (e.g. Guignard, 1965, 1985) alone. To examine the effects of G-loading and vibration, alone and in combination, we measured heart rate and breathing rate under aerospace-relevant conditions (G-loads of 1 Gx and 3.8 Gx; vibration of 0.5 gx at 8, 12, and 16 Hz).

  1. Rate of coronary flow adaptation in response to changes in heart rate before and during anesthesia for coronary artery surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wezel, H. B.; Kal, J. E.; Vergroesen, I.; Vroom, M. B.; de Graaf, R.; Dankelman, J.; Porsius, M.; Spaan, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The rate of adaptation of coronary blood flow in response to stepwise changes in heart rate (HR) has been extensively studied in dogs and goats to improve our understanding of the dynamics of coronary regulation processes and their pathophysiology and to obtain time constants for

  2. Heart rate turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death. © 2013.

  3. [Adequacy of of pacemakers responsive to the volume-minute ventilation rate in heart transplantation patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant'Anna, J R; Castro, I; Lima, L L; Reis, A; Kalil, R A; Prates, P R; Lucchese, F A; Halperin, C; Pereira, E; Rodrigues, R

    1995-06-01

    To evaluate in the late post-operative period (PO) the chronotropic response to exercise of patients submitted to orthotopic cardiac transplantation (CT) and the implant of a cardiac pacemaker (PM). A rate response ventricular PM (VVI+R) which uses minute ventilation (MV) as a sensor was implanted in five patients in the early PO of CT due to chronotropic incompetence. The patients were 31 to 64 years old and the indication to implant of PM was low ventricular escape rhythm following atrial taquicardia/bradycardia (one case) or sinus bradycardia (4 cases). The study was performed by means of paired exercise tests using Naughton protocol in order to compare the heart rate in VVI (prefixed heart rate) and VVIR+MV (rate response) mode. The duration of the exercise was compared between the two modes of stimulation. In VVI mode the heart rate was significantly lower than in VVIR+MV mode for comparable periods of exercise (101 +/- 12 ppm vs 132 +/- 4 ppm; p < 0.05); in VVIR+MV mode the patients had a prolonged time of exercise as compared to VVI mode (15 +/- 7 min vs 12 +/- 7 min; NS). The MV rate response PM provided patients with satisfactory heart during exercise and may be an adequate option to patients submitted to CT who present chronotropic incompetence.

  4. Heart rate response during sleep in elderly patients after fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Lene; Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Kehlet, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Variability in heart rate response (HRR) can be used as a measure for autonomic nervous system function, which may influence sleep disturbances and the recovery phase after major surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate autonomic function by assessment of HRR during sleep arousals in the po...

  5. The heartbrake of social rejection: heart rate deceleration in response to unexpected peer rejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunther Moor, B.; Crone, E.A.; van der Molen, M.W.

    2010-01-01

    Social relationships are vitally important in human life. Social rejection in particular has been conceptualized as a potent social cue resulting in feelings of hurt. Our study investigated the psychophysiological manifestation of hurt feelings by examining the beat-by-beat heart rate response

  6. Heart rate responses to agonistic encounters in greylag geese, Anser anser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wascher, Claudia A. F.; Scheiber, Isabella B. R.; Weiss, Brigitte M.; Kotrschal, Kurt

    As in most social groups, agonistic interactions of various intensities are common in a goose flock. This may cause social stress, modulating heart rate (HR), which may serve as a measure of energetic investment and also of individual emotional involvement. We investigated HR responses to social

  7. Chronic intermittent hypoxia-hypercapnia blunts heart rate responses and alters neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyavanapalli, Jhansi; Jameson, Heather; Dergacheva, Olga; Jain, Vivek; Alhusayyen, Mona; Mendelowitz, David

    2014-07-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnoea experience chronic intermittent hypoxia-hypercapnia (CIHH) during sleep that elicit sympathetic overactivity and diminished parasympathetic activity to the heart, leading to hypertension and depressed baroreflex sensitivity. The parasympathetic control of heart rate arises from pre-motor cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) located in nucleus ambiguus (NA) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMNX). The mechanisms underlying diminished vagal control of heart rate were investigated by studying the changes in blood pressure, heart rate, and neurotransmission to CVNs evoked by acute hypoxia-hypercapnia (H-H) and CIHH. In vivo telemetry recordings of blood pressure and heart rate were obtained in adult rats during 4 weeks of CIHH exposure. Retrogradely labelled CVNs were identified in an in vitro brainstem slice preparation obtained from adult rats exposed either to air or CIHH for 4 weeks. Postsynaptic inhibitory or excitatory currents were recorded using whole cell voltage clamp techniques. Rats exposed to CIHH had increases in blood pressure, leading to hypertension, and blunted heart rate responses to acute H-H. CIHH induced an increase in GABAergic and glycinergic neurotransmission to CVNs in NA and DMNX, respectively; and a reduction in glutamatergic neurotransmission to CVNs in both nuclei. CIHH blunted the bradycardia evoked by acute H-H and abolished the acute H-H evoked inhibition of GABAergic transmission while enhancing glycinergic neurotransmission to CVNs in NA. These changes with CIHH inhibit CVNs and vagal outflow to the heart, both in acute and chronic exposures to H-H, resulting in diminished levels of cardioprotective parasympathetic activity to the heart as seen in OSA patients. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  8. Attenuated heart rate response in REM sleep behavior disorder and Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Gertrud Laura; Kempfner, Jacob; Zoetmulder, Marielle

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether patients with Parkinson's disease with and without rapid‐eye‐movement sleep behavior disorder and patients with idiopathic rapid‐eye‐movement sleep behavior disorder have an attenuated heart rate response to arousals or to leg movements during...... associated with arousal or leg movement from all sleep stages was analyzed from 10 heartbeats before the onset of the sleep event to 15 heartbeats following onset of the sleep event. The heart rate reponse to arousals was significantly lower in both parkinsonian groups compared with the control group...

  9. Heart rate index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, C; Pedersen, F H; Svendsen, J H

    1992-01-01

    after the myocardial infarction. A significant correlation (Spearman's correlation coefficient rs, p less than 0.05) was found between LVEF at rest and the following variables assessed at exercise test: 1) the heart rate at rest, 2) rise in heart rate, 3) ratio between maximal heart rate and heart rate...... at rest, 4) rise in systolic blood pressure, 5) rate pressure product at rest, 6) rise in rate pressure product, 7) ratio (rHR) between maximal rate pressure product and rate pressure product at rest, 8) total exercise time. The heart rate was corrected for effects caused by age (heart index (HR...

  10. Heart Rate Responses of a Head Referee During a Football Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, D J; McClintock, S L

    1983-10-01

    In brief: To determine the heart rate responses of a football official to both physical and psychological stress during actual game conditions, a head referee was telemetered continuously from one- half hour before until the end of a college football game. The referee's cardiac system was stressed throughout the monitoring period: The highest average heart rate was 161 beats min(-1) (85% of maximum), and the lowest average heart rate was 140 beats min(-1) (74% of maximum). Because officiating is largely anaerobic, the sustained sinus tachycardia was probably caused by psychological stress. Football officials should have a maximal ECG stress test every year and participate in an aerobic conditioning program on a regular basis.

  11. Resting heart rate and the risk of hypertension and heart failure: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Wen; Liu, Xuejiao; Ping, Zhiguang; Li, Yu-Qian; Wang, Chongjian; Lu, Jie; Mao, Zhen-Xing; Zhao, Jingzhi; Yin, Lei; Zhang, Dongdong; Li, Linlin

    2017-11-25

    Studies on the relationship of resting heart rate to the risks of hypertension and heart failure have been inconsistent, and the question as to whether there is a linear association between them is unanswered. To evaluate this possible relationship, we carried out a dose-response meta-analysis of studies that looked at risks associated with resting heart rate and hypertension or heart failure. We searched PubMed, Embase, CNKI and WanFang databases for articles published before 15 June 2017. A random-effect model was used to pool relative risks and 95% confidence intervals. Restricted cubic spline analysis was used to model the resting heart rate-hypertension and heart failure risk association. We identified 13 and 17 cohort studies for hypertension and heart failure, respectively. The risk for each disease, respectively, increased by 11% relative risk: 1.11 (95% confidence interval: 1.07-1.15) and 19% relative risk: 1.19 (95% confidence interval: 1.13-1.25) for each 10 beats-per-minute increment in resting heart rate. The relationship between resting heart rate and hypertension or heart failure was consistent in most subgroup analyses except for gender subgroups, with no significant association observed in the women subgroup. The results provide no evidence of a nonlinear association of elevated resting heart rate with hypertension and heart failure risk. Resting heart rate shows a linear positive association with the incidence of hypertension and heart failure.

  12. Heart rate response to exercise in heart failure patients: The prognostic role of metabolic-chronotropic relation and heart rate recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdusek, Pavel; Kotrc, Martin; Kautzner, Josef; Melenovsky, Vojtech; Benesova, Eva; Jarolim, Petr; Benes, Jan

    2017-02-01

    The dynamics of the sinus node response to exercise is linked to functional capacity and outcome in heart failure (HF). The goal of the work was to analyze determinants and impacts of cardio-acceleration, described by the concept of metabolic-chronotropic relation (MCR) and of cardio-deceleration, described by heart rate recovery (HRR). A cohort of 25 healthy controls and 78 patients with advanced systolic HF and optimized medical and/or device therapy (97% receiving beta-blockers, 54% ICD) underwent maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test and were prospectively followed. HF patients had impaired exercise performance compared with controls (pVO2 15±4 vs. 29±7ml.kg-1.min-1, pslope (0.54±0.24 vs. 0.90±0.15, pslope was inversely associated with beta-blocker dose (r=-0.24), NYHA class (r=-0.28) and HF duration (r=-0.25), whereas HRR with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, r=0.39), age (r=-0.28) and BMI (r=-0.31, all pslope (p=0.02) but not HRR (p=0.19). MCR slope (but not HRR) was a significant outcome predictor (p=0.02 for Cox unadjusted model) even after adjustment for LVEF, serum natrium, systolic blood pressure, eGFR and NT-proBNP (p=0.04). MCR slope is associated with different clinical variables than HRR. Compared to HRR, MCR slope provides significant prognostic information in HF patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Heart rate responses provide an objective evaluation of human disturbance stimuli in breeding birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenberg, Ursula; Mattern, Thomas; Seddon, Philip J

    2013-01-01

    Intuition is a poor guide for evaluating the effects of human disturbance on wildlife. Using the endangered Yellow-eyed penguin, Megadyptes antipodes, as an example, we show that heart rate responses provide an objective tool to evaluate human disturbance stimuli and encourage the wider use of this simple and low-impact approach. Yellow-eyed penguins are a flagship species for New Zealand's wildlife tourism; however, unregulated visitor access has recently been associated with reduced breeding success and lower first year survival. We measured heart rate responses of Yellow-eyed penguins via artificial eggs to evaluate a range of human stimuli regularly occurring at their breeding sites. We found the duration of a stimulus to be the most important factor, with elevated heart rate being sustained while a person remained within sight. Human activity was the next important component; a simulated wildlife photographer, crawling slowly around during his stay, elicited a significantly higher heart rate response than an entirely motionless human spending the same time at the same distance. Stimuli we subjectively might perceive as low impact, such as the careful approach of a 'wildlife photographer', resulted in a stronger response than a routine nest-check that involved lifting a bird up to view nest contents. A single, slow-moving human spending 20 min within 2 m from the nest may provoke a response comparable to that of 10 min handling a bird for logger deployment. To reduce cumulative impact of disturbance, any human presence in the proximity of Yellow-eyed penguins needs to be kept at a minimum. Our results highlight the need for objective quantification of the effects of human disturbance in order to provide a sound basis for guidelines to manage human activity around breeding birds.

  14. Habituation of parasympathetic-mediated heart rate responses to recurring acoustic startle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Hua; Aksan, Nazan; Anderson, Steven W; Grafft, Amanda; Chapleau, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Startle habituation is a type of implicit and automatic emotion regulation. Diminished startle habituation is linked to several psychiatric or neurological disorders. Most previous studies quantified startle habituation by assessing skin conductance response (SCR; reflecting sympathetic-mediated sweating), eye-blink reflex, or motor response. The habituation of parasympathetic-mediated heart rate responses to recurrent startle stimuli is not well understood. A variety of methods and metrics have been used to quantify parasympathetic activity and its effects on the heart. We hypothesized that these different measures reflect unique psychological and physiological processes that may habituate differently during repeated startle stimuli. We measured cardiac inter-beat intervals (IBIs) to recurring acoustic startle probes in 75 eight year old children. Eight acoustic stimuli of 500 ms duration were introduced at intervals of 15-25 s. Indices of parasympathetic effect included: (1) the initial rapid decrease in IBI post-startle mediated by parasympathetic inhibition (PI); (2) the subsequent IBI recovery mediated by parasympathetic reactivation (PR); (3) rapid, beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV) measured from the first seven IBIs following each startle probe. SCR and motor responses to startle were also measured. Results showed that habituation of PR (IBI recovery and overshoot) and SCRs were rapid and robust. In addition, changes in PR and SCR were significantly correlated. In contrast, habituation of PI (the initial decrease in IBI) was slower and relatively modest. Measurement of rapid HRV provided an index reflecting the combination of PI and PR. We conclude that different measures of parasympathetic-mediated heart rate responses to repeated startle probes habituate in a differential manner.

  15. Modelling Heart Rate Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakynthinaki, Maria S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to formulate a simple and at the same time effective mathematical model of heart rate kinetics in response to movement (exercise). Based on an existing model, a system of two coupled differential equations which give the rate of change of heart rate and the rate of change of exercise intensity is used. The modifications introduced to the existing model are justified and discussed in detail, while models of blood lactate accumulation in respect to time and exercise intensity are also presented. The main modification is that the proposed model has now only one parameter which reflects the overall cardiovascular condition of the individual. The time elapsed after the beginning of the exercise, the intensity of the exercise, as well as blood lactate are also taken into account. Application of the model provides information regarding the individual’s cardiovascular condition and is able to detect possible changes in it, across the data recording periods. To demonstrate examples of successful numerical fit of the model, constant intensity experimental heart rate data sets of two individuals have been selected and numerical optimization was implemented. In addition, numerical simulations provided predictions for various exercise intensities and various cardiovascular condition levels. The proposed model can serve as a powerful tool for a complete means of heart rate analysis, not only in exercise physiology (for efficiently designing training sessions for healthy subjects) but also in the areas of cardiovascular health and rehabilitation (including application in population groups for which direct heart rate recordings at intense exercises are not possible or not allowed, such as elderly or pregnant women). PMID:25876164

  16. Attachment Status Affects Heart Rate Responses to Experimental Ostracism in Inpatients with Depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannika De Rubeis

    Full Text Available Depression is assumed to be both a risk factor for rejection and a result of it, and as such constitutes an important factor in rejection research. Attachment theory has been applied to understand psychological disorders, such as depression, and can explain individual differences in responses to rejection. Research on autonomic nervous system activity to rejection experiences has been contradictory, with opposing strings of argumentation (activating vs. numbing. We investigated autonomic nervous system-mediated peripheral physiological responses (heart rate to experimentally manipulated ostracism (Cyberball in 97 depressed patients with organized (n = 52 and disorganized attachment status (n = 45. Controlling for baseline mean heart rate levels, depressed patients with disorganized attachment status responded to ostracism with significantly higher increases in heart rate than depressed patients with organized attachment status (p = .029; ηp2 = .051. These results suggest that attachment status may be a useful indicator of autonomic responses to perceived social threat, which in turn may affect the therapeutic process and the patient-therapist relationship.

  17. Heart rate variability response to mental arithmetic stress in patients with schizophrenia Autonomic response to stress in schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castro, Mariana N.; Vigo, Daniel E.; Weidema, Hylke; Fahrer, Rodolfo D.; Chu, Elvina M.; De Achaval, Delfina; Nogues, Martin; Leiguarda, Ramon C.; Cardinali, Daniel P.; Guinjoan, Salvador N.

    Background: The vulnerability-stress hypothesis is an established model of schizophrenia symptom formation. We sought to characterise the pattern of the cardiac autonomic response to mental arithmetic stress in patients with stable schizophrenia. Methods: We performed heart rate variability (HRV)

  18. Clinical application of fluctuation dissipation theory - Prediction of heart rate response to spontaneous breathing trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niestemski, Liang R.; Chen, Man; Prevost, Robert; McRae, Michael; Cholleti, Sharath; Najarro, Gabriel; Buchman, Timothy G.; Deem, Michael W.

    2013-03-01

    Contrary to the traditional view of the healthy physiological state as being a single static state, variation in physiologic variables has more recently been suggested to be a key component of the healthy state. Indeed, aging and disease are characterized by a loss of such variability. We apply the conceptual framework of fluctuation-dissipation theory (FDT) to predict the response to a common clinical intervention from historical fluctuations in physiologic time series data. The non-equilibrium FDT relates the response of a system to a perturbation to natural fluctuations in the stationary state of the system. We seek to understand with the FDT a common clinical perturbation, the spontaneous breathing trial (SBT), in which mechanical ventilation is briefly suspended while the patient breathes freely for a period of time. As a stress upon the heart of the patient, the SBT can be characterized as a perturbation of heart rate dynamics. A non-equilibrium, but steady-state FDT allows us to predict the heart rate recovery after the SBT stress. We show that the responses of groups of similar patients to the spontaneous breathing trial can be predicted by this approach. This mathematical framework may serve as part of the basis for personalized critical care.

  19. HEART RATE AND BLOOD LACTATE RESPONSES TO CHANGQUAN AND DAOSHU FORMS OF MODERN WUSHU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerri Luiz Ribeiro

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of specific training designed to enhance physiological aspects of performance relies heavily on the availability of accurate and validity physiological data. In the combat sport of Wushu, katas are used to develop aerobic fitness. It is arguably important to assess and monitor heart rate (HR and lactate (La responses when designing effective training programs. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate heart rate and lactate responses to forms execution among Wushu combatants. Male elite modern Wushu athletes (n = 4 from a South Brazilian regional team participated in the study. Athletes were aged 22.5 ± 2.08 years old and had at least eight years of Wushu experience. Athletes carried out the Changquan and Daoshu forms in random order, HR and La were measured pre- and post-exercise. Results indicate that HR was 176 ± 3 and 176 ± 2 bpm and La was 4.38 ± 1.3 and 5.15 ± 1.07 mmol·l-1 for Changquan and Daoshu forms, respectively. There were no significantly differences in HR and La between the two forms. HR values represent 89.2 ± 1.1 and 89.1 ± 1.8% of age-predicted maximal heart rate and lactate was near of 4 mmol·l-1 point. In conclusion, training programs to Wushu combatants could target the range of physiological values cited above with no differences between two forms

  20. An exploration of heart rate response to differing music rhythm and tempos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ariany G; Guida, Heraldo L; Antônio, Ana Márcia Dos S; Marcomini, Renata S; Fontes, Anne M G G; Carlos de Abreu, Luiz; Roque, Adriano L; Silva, Sidney B; Raimundo, Rodrigo D; Ferreira, Celso; Valenti, Vitor E

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate acute cardiac response and heart rate variability (HRV) when listening to differing forms of music. Eleven healthy men aged between 18 and 25 years old were included in the study. HRV was recorded at rest for ten minutes with no music, then were asked to listen to classical baroque or heavy metal music for a period of 20 min. It was noted that heart rate variability did not affect HRV indices for time and frequency. In conclusion, music with different tempos does not influence cardiac autonomic regulation in men. However more studies are suggested to explore this topic in greater detail. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Heart Rate Profiles of Children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder in Response to Physical Play: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Casey M.; Rudisill, Mary E.; Wadsworth, Danielle W.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the heart rate response of children with and without autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exposed to outdoor free play sessions during preschool was examined. Participants (n = 7; four children with ASD and three children who show typical development) wore Actiheart heart rate monitors during 6 school days. Using a single-subject design,…

  2. Respiratory Muscle Training Improves Chemoreflex Response, Heart Rate Variability, and Respiratory Mechanics in Rats With Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenisch, Rodrigo B; Quagliotto, Edson; Chechi, Chalyne; Calegari, Leonardo; Dos Santos, Fernando; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Dal Lago, Pedro

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present report was to evaluate respiratory muscle training (RMT) effects on hemodynamic function, chemoreflex response, heart rate variability, and respiratory mechanics in rats with heart failure (HF rats). Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary-sham (Sed-Sham, n = 8), respiratory muscle trained-sham (RMT-Sham, n = 8), sedentary-HF (Sed-HF, n = 8) and respiratory muscle trained-HF (RMT-HF, n = 8). Animals were submitted to an RMT protocol performed 30 minutes per day, 5 days per week for 6 weeks, whereas the sedentary animals did not exercise. In HF rats, RMT promoted the reduction of left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, and pulmonary edema. Moreover, RMT produced a reduction in pressure response during chemoreflex activation, sympathetic modulation, and sympathetic vagal balance in addition to an increase in parasympathetic modulation. Also after RMT, HF rats demonstrated a reduction in respiratory system resistance, tissue resistance, Newtonian resistance, respiratory system compliance, and quasistatic compliance. These findings suggested that 6 weeks of RMT in HF rats promoted beneficial adaptations in hemodynamics, autonomic function, and respiratory mechanics and attenuated pressure response evoked by chemoreflex activation in HF rats. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Heart rate and lactate response of junior handball players (Under 18 during competitive match play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subir Gupta

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study highlights the heart rate (HR and blood lactate (La response of junior handball players of two positions – wings and backs, during competitive matches. Methods: Heart rate and blood lactate of twelve handball players – 6 Backs (B and 6 Wingers (W] – were recorded in quarter- and semifinal matches of the tournament. HR was recorded continuously by heart rate telemeter whereas La was measured at rest, after warm up and immediately after the end of first- and second halves of the matches. Results: Average HR and Maximum Heart Rate Reserve (MHRR of the players were similar in each half of play. No significant difference (p<0.05 in average HR and MHRR were observed between B (169±17.5 beats/min and 74.3±9.4% and W (169.5±16.3 beats/min and 74.1±8.5%. W and B played about 1/5th of their playing time above the Anerobic Threshold level. Average HR of the players in each 5 min of play could vary significantly but no such difference per 15 min of play was found. Lactate of W and B after the first half of play were 7.4±1.6 and 7.2±1.5 mM and after the end of the matches were 7.9±0.4 and 7.6±1.4 mM respectively. No significant difference in La was found between W and B. Conclusion: (a Handball play is a high intensity game, (b the workload does not vary between W and B, (c the intensity of play could vary in every 5 min of play but there is no difference in average intensity for each 15 min, and (d handball is played aerobically for majority of the time.

  4. Aggressiveness, family history of alcoholism, and the heart rate response to alcohol intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaad, Jean-Marc; Pihl, Robert O; Séguin, Jean R; Nagin, Daniel; Vitaro, Frank; Carbonneau, René; Tremblay, Richard E

    2003-05-01

    Some sons of male alcoholics (SOMAs) are characterized by an increased heart rate (HR) response to alcohol intoxication, which is thought to reflect increased sensitivity to alcohol-induced reward. Such a response has also been related to increased physical aggression. However, the confounding effect of aggression in SOMAs may be obscuring the interpretation of these findings. The HR response to alcohol was therefore assessed in 4 groups: high/low aggressive SOMAs and high/low aggressive non-SOMAs. Results indicate that aggressive SOMAs had the highest intoxicated HR response and that they reported the most alcohol consumption. This suggests that in some cases the high comorbidity between alcohol misuse and aggression is related to an increased sensitivity to alcohol-induced reward.

  5. Heart rate and heart rate variability in panic, social anxiety, obsessive-compulsive, and generalized anxiety disorders at baseline and in response to relaxation and hyperventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittig, Andre; Arch, Joanna J; Lam, Chi W R; Craske, Michelle G

    2013-01-01

    It remains unclear if diminished high frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) can be found across anxiety disorders. HF-HRV and heart rate (HR) were examined in panic (PD), generalized anxiety (GAD), social anxiety (SAD), and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) relative to healthy controls at baseline and during anxiety stressors. All disorders evidenced diminished baseline HF-HRV relative to controls. Baseline HRV differences were maintained throughout relaxation. For hyperventilation, PD and GAD demonstrated greater HR than controls. Psychotropic medication did not account for HF-HRV differences except in OCD. Age and sex evidenced multiple main effects. Findings suggest that low baseline HF-HRV represents a common index for inhibitory deficits across PD, GAD, and SAD, which is consistent with the notion of autonomic inflexibility in anxiety disorders. Elevated HR responses to hyperventilation, however, are specific to PD and GAD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evoked response of heart rate variability using short-duration white noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guo-She; Chen, Mei-Ling; Wang, Gin-You

    2010-06-24

    To investigate and to establish a model for evaluation of the instant cardiovascular responses to the noises of low-to-moderate intensity, sixteen healthy subjects were enrolled. The white noises were binaurally presented with a supra-aural earphone. The test intensities of noises were no noise, 50, 60, 70 and 80 dBA. Each noise was continued for 5 min and the electrocardiogram was simultaneously recorded. The cardiac autonomic responses were evaluated using power spectral analysis of the R-R contour obtained from digital signal processing of the ECG tracings. The result showed that the mean heart rate and mean blood pressure did not change significantly with the noises. However, the low-frequency power (LF) which represents cardiac autonomic modulations and the ratio (LHR) of LF to high-frequency power (HF) which reflects cardiac sympathetic modulations were significantly greater in the noise intensity of 50, 60, 70 and 80dBA (pnoise intensity (rho=0.90, pwhite noises can be detected using power spectral analysis of heart rate variability and the evoked responses may provide a sensitive way to evaluate the instant effect of noise to humans.

  7. Effects of autogenic training on stress response and heart rate variability in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seung-Joo; Kim, Chunmi

    2014-12-01

    This study was undertaken to confirm the effects of autogenic training (AT) on stress response and heart rate variability in nursing school students experiencing stress related to clinical training. The study was carried out from September 2012 to April 2013 in a quasi-experimental nonequivalent control group using a pretest-posttest design. The participants were 40 nursing students in their third year at either of two nursing colleges. All consented to participate. Nineteen nursing students at one college were assigned to the experimental group and underwent the 8-week AT program, and the other 21 were assigned to the control group and did not undergo any training. Stress response was assessed by questionnaire and HRV was measured three times, that is, before the program, at the end of the program, and 6 months after the end of the AT program. A significant time/group interaction was found for stress response (F = 4.68, p = .012), a subjective indicator. However, no significant interaction was found for the objective indicators of heart rate variability, normalized low frequency (F = 2.59, p = .090), normalized high frequency (F = 2.59, p = .090), or low frequency to high frequency ratio (F = 1.38, p = .257). The results suggest that AT provides an acceptable approach to stress reduction in nursing students. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Differential heart rate responses to social and monetary reinforcement in women with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kube, Jana; Schrimpf, Anne; García-García, Isabel; Villringer, Arno; Neumann, Jane; Horstmann, Annette

    2016-06-01

    Obesity is often accompanied by weight stigmatization; subsequently, individuals with obesity frequently face social rejection. It has been shown that recurrent negative social experiences can alter the perception of social cues. However, the way individuals with obesity process social stimuli is not well understood. This study aims to investigate obesity-related alterations in social compared to nonsocial information processing. Women with obesity (n = 14) and without obesity (n = 14) participated in a social and a monetary incentive delay task in which they anticipated and received positive, negative, and neutral outcomes in the form of faces or money. During the experiment, phasic heart rate changes and reaction times were measured. Women with obesity, compared to lean women, exhibited a stronger differentiation during the anticipation of monetary and social reinforcement, showing slower reaction times to social cues compared to monetary cues. During the outcome processing phase, women with obesity relative to controls demonstrated diminished heart rate responses particularly to negative social outcomes. Interestingly, differences in cardiac responses in participants with obesity were moderated by weight-related teasing experiences. In women with obesity, a higher BMI was associated with blunted cardiac responses to social cues relative to monetary cues only if they reported more emotional pain after weight-related teasing. Our results contribute to a better understanding of social information processing in obesity and give first evidence for the role of negative social experiences in reinforcement processing. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  9. The heartbrake of social rejection: heart rate deceleration in response to unexpected peer rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther Moor, Bregtje; Crone, Eveline A; van der Molen, Maurits W

    2010-09-01

    Social relationships are vitally important in human life. Social rejection in particular has been conceptualized as a potent social cue resulting in feelings of hurt. Our study investigated the psychophysiological manifestation of hurt feelings by examining the beat-by-beat heart rate response associated with the processing of social rejection. Study participants were presented with a series of unfamiliar faces and were asked to predict whether they would be liked by the other person. Following each judgment, participants were provided with feedback indicating that the person they had viewed had either accepted or rejected them. Feedback was associated with transient heart rate slowing and a return to baseline that was considerably delayed in response to unexpected social rejection. Our results reveal that the processing of unexpected social rejection is associated with a sizable response of the parasympathetic nervous system. These findings are interpreted in terms of a cardiovagal manifestation of a neural mechanism implicated in the central control of autonomic function during cognitive processes and affective regulation.

  10. Intrapericardial denervation - Radial artery blood flow and heart rate responses to LBNP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckeever, Kenneth H.; Skidmore, Michael G.; Keil, Lanny C.; Sandler, Harold

    1990-01-01

    The effects of intrapericardial denervation on the radial artery blood flow velocity (RABFV) and heart rate (HR) responses to LBNP in rhesus monkeys were investigated by measuring the RABFV transcutaneously by a continuous-wave Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter in order to derive an index of forearm blood flow response to low (0 to -20 mm Hg) and high (0 to -60 mm Hg) ramp exposures during supine LBNP. Four of the eight subjects were subjected to efferent and afferent cardiac denervation. It was found that, during low levels of LBNP, monkeys with cardiac denervation exhibited no cardiopulmonary baroreceptor-mediated change in the RABFV or HR, unlike the intact animals, which showed steady decreases in RABFV during both high- and low-pressure protocols. It is suggested that forearm blood flow and HR responses to low-level LBNP, along with pharmacological challenge, are viable physiological tests for verifying the completeness of atrial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptor denervation.

  11. Skeletal muscle signaling and the heart rate and blood pressure response to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Svendsen, Jesper H; Ersbøll, Mads

    2013-01-01

    -extensor training and 2 weeks of deconditioning of the other leg (leg cast). Hemodynamics and muscle interstitial nucleotides were determined during exercise with the (1) deconditioned leg, (2) trained leg, and (3) trained leg with atrial pacing to the heart rate obtained with the deconditioned leg. Heart rate...

  12. Autonomic heart-rate control in response to standing in toxemic and normotensive primigravid pregnancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WJ Jaspers; PA de Jong; PJ Kurver; MD E.J.M. Wouters

    1984-01-01

    Heart-rate changes after transition from a supine to a standing posture were measured in 12 hypertensive and 12 normotensive primigravid women, in their last trimester of gestation. The subjects beat-to-beat heart-rate (HR) changes were recorded on both an ordinary cardiotocograph and on magnetic

  13. Tag-based Heart Rate Measurements of Harbor Porpoises During Normal and Noise-exposed Dives to Study Stress Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    nitrogen management and can provide information on the level of stress the animals routinely experience. Here we examine the dive heart rate...ventilation rate and activity in both captive and wild porpoise to better understand the dive response and how it may be overruled by noise exposure. We...acoustic data in captive and wild harbor porpoises. The specific objectives are 1) Quantify the physiological (heart and ventilation rates) and behavioral

  14. Heart rate variability and inflammatory response in rats with lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zila, I; Mokra, D; Kopincova, J; Kolomaznik, M; Javorka, M; Calkovska, A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate short-term heart rate variability (HRV) as an index of cardiac autonomic control in rats with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia. Animals were injected intraperitoneally with LPS (100 microg/kg b.w.) and control group with an equivalent volume of saline. ECG recordings were done before (base) and 60, 120, 180, 240 and 300 min after LPS or saline administration. HRV magnitude was quantified by time and frequency-domain analysis (mean RR interval, SDRR, RMSSD, spectral powers in low (LF) and high frequency (HF) bands. Heart tissue homogenates and plasma were analyzed to determine interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and oxidative stress level (TBARS). Administration of lipopolysaccharide was followed by continuous rise in colonic body temperature compared to saline-treated controls. Endotoxemia in rats was accompanied by significant decrease in HRV spectral activity in high-frequency range at maximal body temperature (logHFpower: 1.2+/-0.5 vs. 1.9+/-0.6 ms(2), P<0.01). Increased IL-6 was found in heart tissue homogenates of LPS rats (8.0+/-0.6 vs. 26.4+/-4.8 pg/ml, (P<0.05). In conclusions, reduced HRV in HF band may indicate a decreased parasympathetic activity in LPS-induced endotoxemia as basic characteristics of altered cardiac control during response to endotoxemia.

  15. Profile of match performance and heart rate response in Japanese amputee soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehana, Hirofumi; Miyamoto, Aya; Koshiyama, Kenichi; Tanaka Yanagiya, Toshio; Yoshimura, Masafumi

    2017-05-05

    The purpose of this study was to profile the match performance and heart rate response in Japanese amputee soccer. Twelve amputee soccer players participated in this study. Match data were collected 20 samples in 4 matches. Match performances data such as total distance, high-intensity running (HIR: ≥13km·h-1) were collected using a global positioning systems technology. Heart rate (HR) was recorded using short-range radio telemetry. In addition, the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was assessed immediately using Borg's original after the first half and the second half. This study showed that the distance covered over the 50 minutes of the match was 2984.2±56.1m, and it was significantly shorter in the second half than the first half (pamputee soccer. Results of this study indicated that the exercise intensity was high in amputee soccer. It would be considered that causes were amputee soccer own rules and exercise style. These findings would serve as the reference when advance the future studies of amputee soccer.

  16. Heart rate response and parasympathetic modulation during recovery from exercise in boys and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilkey, Justin P; Overstreet, Matthew; Fernhall, Bo; Mahon, Anthony D

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of postexercise parasympathetic modulation, measured by heart rate variability (HRV), on heart rate recovery (HRR) in boys (n = 13, 10.1 ± 0.8 years) and men (n = 13, 23.9 ± 1.5 years) following maximal and submaximal exercise. Subjects completed 10 min of supine rest, followed by graded exercise on a cycle ergometer to maximal effort. On a separate day, subjects exercised at an intensity equivalent to ventilatory threshold. Immediately following both exercise bouts, 1-min HRR was assessed in the supine position. HRV was analyzed under controlled breathing during the final 5 min of rest and recovery in the time and frequency domains and transformed to natural log (ln) values. Boys had a greater 1-min HRR than men following maximal (58 ± 8 vs. 47 ± 11 beats·min(-1)) and submaximal (59 ± 8 vs. 47 ± 15 beats·min(-1)) exercise (p 0.05). In conclusion, it appears that greater parasympathetic modulation accounts for greater HRR following maximal exercise in boys versus men. Although submaximal HRR was greater in boys, parasympathetic responses were similar between groups.

  17. Heart rate responses to standardized trauma-related pictures in acute posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Anke; Suendermann, Oliver; Boellinghaus, Inga; Vossbeck-Elsebusch, Anna; Gamer, Matthias; Briddon, Emma; Martin, Melanie Walwyn; Glucksman, Edward

    2010-10-01

    Physiological responses to trauma reminders are one of the core symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Nevertheless, screening measures for PTSD largely rely on symptom self-reports. It has been suggested that psychophysiological assessments may be useful in identifying trauma survivors with PTSD (Orr and Roth, 2000). This study investigated whether heart rate (HR) responses to standardized trauma-related pictures distinguish between trauma survivors with and without acute PTSD. Survivors of motor vehicle accidents or physical assaults (N=162) watched standardized trauma-related, generally threatening and neutral pictures at 1 month post-trauma while their ECG was recorded. At 1 and 6 months, structured clinical interviews assessed PTSD diagnoses. Participants completed self-report measures of PTSD severity and depression, peritraumatic responses, coping behaviors and appraisals. Trauma survivors with acute PTSD showed greater HR responses to trauma-related pictures than those without PTSD, as indicated by a less pronounced mean deceleration, greater peak responses, and a greater proportion showing HR acceleration of greater than 1 beat per minute. There were no group differences in HR responses to generally threatening or neutral pictures. HR responses to trauma-related pictures contributed to the prediction of PTSD diagnosis over and above what could be predicted from self-reports of PTSD and depression. HR responses to trauma-related pictures were related to fear and data-driven processing during the trauma, safety behaviors, suppression of trauma memories, and overgeneralized appraisals of danger. The results suggest that HR responses to standardized trauma-related pictures may help identify a subgroup of patients with acute PTSD who show generalized fear responses to trauma reminders. The early generalization of triggers of reexperiencing symptoms observed in this study is consistent with associative learning and cognitive models of PTSD. 2010

  18. Prognostic value of heart rate response during regadenoson stress myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with end stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJaroudi, Wael; Campagnoli, Tania; Fughhi, Ibtihaj; Wassouf, Marwan; Ali, Amjad; Doukky, Rami

    2016-06-01

    Blunted heart rate response (HRR) to vasodilator stress agents is associated with worse outcomes. There are limited data assessing the effect of impaired HRR to regadenoson among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). We prospectively followed patients with ESRD enrolled in the ASSUAGE and ASSUAGE-CKD trials. HRR was defined as 100*(peak stress heart rate-resting heart rate)/resting heart rate. Study cohort was dichotomized to blunted and normal HRR groups according to an established median HRR value 90 days) coronary revascularization. There were 303 patients followed for 35 ± 10 months. In the entire cohort, there was a stepwise increase in the rates of death and all secondary endpoints with worsening HRR (P values ≤.001). Blunted HRR (regadenoson is a strong and independent predictor of death and cardiovascular events in patients with ESRD and adds incremental prognostic value.

  19. Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Responses to Gear Weight Under a Controlled Workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derella, Cassandra C; Aichele, Kristin R; Oakman, Joyann E; Cromwell, Christina M; Hill, Jessica A; Chavis, Lauren N; Perez, Avery N; Getty, Allyson K; Wisdo, Tia R; Feairheller, Deborah L

    2017-04-01

    To compare the effects of personal protective equipment (PPE) weight on blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR), between volunteer firefighters (FF) and athletes. Athletes and FF were matched by body size and came to the lab twice for two treadmill tests. The "Regular" test was completed in normal fitness clothing, and PPE test was completed in full structural PPE with monitoring of HR assessment every minute and BP each stage. In the FF cohort, all submaximal HR and BP levels were different. HRmax and VO2max were also different (all P < 0.05). In athletes, HRmax was higher in Regular test than PPE. Future research should examine the effect of different PPE weights on HR and BP responses.

  20. Cross-over trial of fetal heart rate response to halogen light and vibroacoustic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolnick, Jay M; Garcia, Greg; Fletcher, Beverly G; Rayburn, William F

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of halogen light and vibroacoustic stimulation on fetal heart rate (FHR) responsiveness and on nonstress test (NST) results. Sixty consecutively-chosen patients between 33 and 39 weeks of gestation underwent an NST on at least three weekly occasions. Each received halogen light (Vector Compact Sport Spot, Ft Lauderdale, FL, USA), vibroacoustic (SolaTone Artificial Larynx, Temecula, CA, USA), and no stimulation in a randomized order. The transabdominal light or vibroacoustic stimulation lasted for 10 seconds. If no initial FHR acceleration occurred, then the stimulus was repeated 10 minutes later up to a maximum of three times. The investigators who interpreted the FHR patterns were blinded as to the type of stimulus used. Reactive results were present in 171 tests (vibroacoustic: 98.3%; light: 96.6%; none: 93.3%). Compared with no stimulation, the mean difference in time from the onset of recorded "stimulation" to the first FHR acceleration was shorter (p vibroacoustic stimulation (2.6 minutes, 95% CI 0.8-4.4 minutes). The mean time difference until a reactive result was also shorter (p vibroacoustic stimulation (2.4 minutes, 95% CI 0.1-4.7 minutes) than with no stimulation. The need for repeated stimulation during each test was infrequent (light: 5.0%; vibroacoustic: 3.3%). No adverse effect from external stimulation was noted on the FHR tracing. Halogen light stimulation is an acceptable alternative to vibroacoustic stimulation in provoking a more rapid fetal heart rate response and in shortening the time before a reactive nonstress test result.

  1. Manipulation of heart rate variability can modify response to anger-inducing stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Heather M; Penglis, Kathryn M; McDonald, Skye

    2016-10-01

    Research suggests that heart rate variability (HRV) is a physiological indicator of the flexibility of the autonomic nervous system and can provide an objective measure of an individual's ability to appropriately match emotional responses to environmental demands. The present study investigated whether angry response to emotional stimuli was related to HRV, and whether manipulation of HRV using biofeedback could change the anger response in a healthy adult population. Fifty-eight participants received HRV biofeedback (n = 29) or an active control condition (n = 29). HRV measures included standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN), low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) power, and was recorded across three sessions: baseline, training, and anger induction. The anger induction procedure resulted in increased subjective experience of anger, as well as physiological changes. The biofeedback group had higher HRV than active controls both during the training session (SDNN and LF HRV) and during anger induction (LF HRV). HRV during anger induction was significantly associated with self-reported emotional response for participants receiving biofeedback but not for active controls. Results provide support for HRV as an index of emotion regulation, specifically anger. Further research is needed to determine whether long-term HRV biofeedback can have a lasting effect on managing anger.

  2. Age affects exercise-induced improvements in heart rate response to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciolac, E G; Roberts, C K; da Silva, J M Rodrigues; Guimarães, G V

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of age on cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), muscle strength and heart rate (HR) response to exercise adaptation in women in response to a long-term twice-weekly combined aerobic and resistance exercise program. 85 sedentary women, divided into young (YG; n=22, 30.3 ± 6.2 years), early middle-aged (EMG; n=28, 44.1 ± 2.5 years), late middle-aged (LMG; n=20, 56.7 ± 3.5 years) and older (OG; n=15, 71.4 ± 6.9 years) groups, had their CRF, muscle strength (1-repetition maximum test) and HR response to exercise (graded exercise test) measured before and after 12 months of combined exercise training. Exercise training improved CRF and muscle strength in all age groups (Pdifferences were observed between groups. Exercise training also improved resting HR and recovery HR in YG and EMG (Pgroup. Combined aerobic and resistance training at a frequency of 2 days/week improves CRF and muscle strength throughout the lifespan. However, exercise-induced improvements in the HR recovery response to exercise may be impaired in late middle-aged and older women. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Caffeine Consumption and Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Response to Regadenoson.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bitar

    Full Text Available Current guidelines recommend that caffeinated products should be avoided for at least 12 hours prior to regadenoson administration. We intended to examine the effect of caffeine consumption and of timing of last dose on hemodynamic effects after regadenoson administration for cardiac stress testing.332 subjects undergoing regadenoson stress testing were enrolled. Baseline characteristics, habits of coffee/caffeine exposure, baseline vital signs and change in heart rate, blood pressure, percent of maximal predicted heart rate, and percent change in heart rate were prospectively collected.Non-coffee drinkers (group 1 (73 subjects and subjects who last drank coffee >24 hours (group 3 (139 subjects prior to regadenoson did not demonstrate any difference in systolic blood pressure, heart rate change, maximal predicted heart rate and percent change in heart rate. Systolic blood pressure change (15.2±17.1 vs. 7.2±10.2 mmHg, p = 0.001, heart rate change (32.2±14 vs. 27.3±9.6 bpm, p = 0.038 and maximal predicted heart rate (65.5±15.6 vs. 60.7±8.6%, p = 0.038 were significantly higher in non-coffee drinkers (group 1 compared to those who drank coffee 12-24 hours prior (group 2 (108 subjects. Subjects who drank coffee >24 hours prior (group 3 exhibited higher systolic blood pressure change (13±15.8 vs. 7±10.2, p = 0.007, and heart rate change (32.1±15.3 vs. 27.3±9.6, p = 0.017 as compared to those who drank coffee 12-24 hours prior to testing (group 2.Caffeine exposure 12-24 hours prior to regadenoson administration attenuates the vasoactive effects of regadenoson, as evidenced by a blunted rise in heart rate and systolic blood pressure. These results suggest that caffeine exposure within 24 hours may reduce the effects of regadenoson administered for vasodilatory cardiac stress testing.

  4. Caffeine Consumption and Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Response to Regadenoson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Abbas; Mastouri, Ronald; Kreutz, Rolf P

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines recommend that caffeinated products should be avoided for at least 12 hours prior to regadenoson administration. We intended to examine the effect of caffeine consumption and of timing of last dose on hemodynamic effects after regadenoson administration for cardiac stress testing. 332 subjects undergoing regadenoson stress testing were enrolled. Baseline characteristics, habits of coffee/caffeine exposure, baseline vital signs and change in heart rate, blood pressure, percent of maximal predicted heart rate, and percent change in heart rate were prospectively collected. Non-coffee drinkers (group 1) (73 subjects) and subjects who last drank coffee >24 hours (group 3) (139 subjects) prior to regadenoson did not demonstrate any difference in systolic blood pressure, heart rate change, maximal predicted heart rate and percent change in heart rate. Systolic blood pressure change (15.2±17.1 vs. 7.2±10.2 mmHg, p = 0.001), heart rate change (32.2±14 vs. 27.3±9.6 bpm, p = 0.038) and maximal predicted heart rate (65.5±15.6 vs. 60.7±8.6%, p = 0.038) were significantly higher in non-coffee drinkers (group 1) compared to those who drank coffee 12-24 hours prior (group 2) (108 subjects). Subjects who drank coffee >24 hours prior (group 3) exhibited higher systolic blood pressure change (13±15.8 vs. 7±10.2, p = 0.007), and heart rate change (32.1±15.3 vs. 27.3±9.6, p = 0.017) as compared to those who drank coffee 12-24 hours prior to testing (group 2). Caffeine exposure 12-24 hours prior to regadenoson administration attenuates the vasoactive effects of regadenoson, as evidenced by a blunted rise in heart rate and systolic blood pressure. These results suggest that caffeine exposure within 24 hours may reduce the effects of regadenoson administered for vasodilatory cardiac stress testing.

  5. Anger responses to psychosocial stress predict heart rate and cortisol stress responses in men but not women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupis, Sarah B; Lerman, Michelle; Wolf, Jutta M

    2014-11-01

    While previous research has suggested that anger and fear responses to stress are linked to distinct sympathetic nervous system (SNS) stress responses, little is known about how these emotions predict hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis reactivity. Further, earlier research primarily relied on retrospective self-report of emotion. The current study aimed at addressing both issues in male and female individuals by assessing the role of anger and fear in predicting heart rate and cortisol stress responses using both self-report and facial coding analysis to assess emotion responses. We exposed 32 healthy students (18 female; 19.6±1.7 yr) to an acute psychosocial stress paradigm (TSST) and measured heart rate and salivary cortisol levels throughout the protocol. Anger and fear before and after stress exposure was assessed by self-report, and video recordings of the TSST were assessed by a certified facial coder to determine emotion expression (FACS). Self-reported emotions and emotion expressions did not correlate (all p>.23). Increases in self-reported fear predicted blunted cortisol responses in men (β=0.41, p=.04). Also for men, longer durations of anger expression predicted exaggerated cortisol responses (β=0.67 p=.004), and more anger incidences predicted exaggerated cortisol and heart rate responses (β=0.51, p=.033; β=0.46, p=.066, resp.). Anger and fear did not predict SNS or HPA activity for females (all p>.23). The current differential self-report and facial coding findings support the use of multiple modes of emotion assessment. Particularly, FACS but not self-report revealed a robust anger-stress association that could have important downstream health effects for men. For women, future research may clarify the role of other emotions, such as self-conscious expressions of shame, for physiological stress responses. A better understanding of the emotion-stress link may contribute to behavioral interventions targeting health-promoting ways of

  6. Differences in heart rate response to adenosine and regadenoson in patients with and without diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage, Fadi G; Heo, Jaekyeong; Franks, Billy; Belardinelli, Luiz; Blackburn, Brent; Wang, Whedy; Iskandrian, Ami E

    2009-04-01

    Adenosine and regadenoson increase heart rate (HR) when used as stress agents to produce coronary hyperemia due to direct sympathetic stimulation. We hypothesized that the HR response will be lower in patients with than in those without diabetes mellitus (DM). We studied the HR response (percentage maximal increase) in 2,000 patients in The ADenoscan Versus regAdenosoN Comparative Evaluation for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging (ADVANCE MPI 1 and 2) Trials with known DM status. There were 643 patients with a history of DM (65.4 +/- 0.4 years, 32% women) and 1,357 patients with no DM (65.5 +/- 0.3 years, 29% women). Compared with non-DM, the DM group had higher HR at baseline (68.4 +/- 0.48 vs 65.2 +/- 0.31 beat/min, P adenosine or regadenoson administration (29.4% +/- 0.64% vs 36.1% +/- 0.54%, P adenosine and regadenoson in patients with DM is blunted. If additional studies confer an agreement between traditional tests for determination of autonomic neuropathy and this measure, then examination of HR response to these agents during myocardial perfusion imaging might add prognostic power.

  7. Dissociation of temporal dynamics of heart rate and blood pressure responses elicited by conditioned fear but not acoustic startle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tovote, P.; Meyer, M.; Pilz, P.K.D.; Ronnenberg, A.; Ögren, S.O.; Stiedl, O.

    2005-01-01

    Fear-inducing stimuli were hypothesized to elicit fast heart rate (HR) responses but slow mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) responses and thus were studied in auditory fear conditioning and acoustic startle at high temporal resolution in freely moving mice and rats. Fear-induced instantaneous

  8. Intratesticular and subcutaneous lidocaine alters the intraoperative haemodynamic responses and heart rate variability in male cats undergoing castration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moldal, E.R.; Eriksen, T.; Kirpensteijn, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/189846992; Nødtvedt, A.; Kristensen, A.T.; Sparta, F.M.; Haga, H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the usefulness of intratesticular and subcutaneous lidocaine in alleviating the intraoperative nociceptive response to castration, measured by pulse rate (PR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), and to test the applicability of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis in

  9. Physiological demands of women's rugby union: time-motion analysis and heart rate response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virr, Jody Lynn; Game, Alex; Bell, Gordon John; Syrotuik, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the physical demands of women's rugby union match play using time-motion analysis and heart rate (HR) response. Thirty-eight premier club level female rugby players, ages 18-34 years were videotaped and HRs monitored for a full match. Performances were coded into 12 different movement categories: 5 speeds of locomotion (standing, walking, jogging, striding, sprinting), 4 forms of intensive non-running exertion (ruck/maul/tackle, pack down, scrum, lift) and 3 discrete activities (kick, jump, open field tackle). The main results revealed that backs spend significantly more time sprinting and walking whereas forwards spend more time in intensive non-running exertion and jogging. Forwards also had a significantly higher total work frequency compared to the backs, but a higher total rest frequency compared to the backs. In terms of HR responses, forwards displayed higher mean HRs throughout the match and more time above 80% of their maximum HR than backs. In summary, women's rugby union is characterised by intermittent bursts of high-intensity activity, where forwards and backs have similar anaerobic energy demands, but different specific match demands.

  10. A radiotelemetry system for analyzing heart rate responses during playback experiments in blackbirds (Turdus merula ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, P; Helb, H W; Koch, U T; Lösch, M

    1986-12-01

    In acoustical stimulus-response tests on European blackbirds (Turdus merula ) in cages and an outdoor aviary, alteration in heart rate (HR) was used to measure reaction strenght. HR was measured by radiotelemetry. The miniature transmitters newly developed for this task had to fulfill the following requirements: Simultaneous recordings of HR in several interacting animals; uninterrupted transmission of HR signals, sufficient range and battery life combined with low weight and easy handling properties. The miniature transmitters successfully used in this experiment had a quartz-stabilized oscillator. They weighed between 4.1 and 5.2 g and had a range of 3 m and a lifetime of 72 hrs (circuit diagram, Fig.1). The transmitted signal corresponded to a unitary impulse representing the S-wave of the ECG (Fig. 4b). Implanted electrodes were used to record ECG potentials. The transmitter was carried by the birds like a small rucksack tied to their backs. Electrode implantation and transmitter installation are described in detail. HR signals stored on audio tape were later transformed to frequency curves on a chart recorder (Fig. 3, 4a). Typical HR response curves are shown (Fig. 5). Statistical analysis of the data was performed on a DEC-PDP-11 computer using a special set of programs. The system has been successfully used to provide answers to experimental questions not previously obtainable with classical methods. Copyright © 1986. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Evaluation of Stress Response During Mesiodens Extraction Under General Anesthesia Using Heart Rate Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hye-Won; Hyun, Hong-Keun; Kim, Young-Jae; Kim, Jung-Wook; Shin, Teo Jeon

    2017-05-01

    Stress related to dental treatment can be associated with negative outcomes. Heart rate variability (HRV) is an objective measurement of autonomic nervous system activity. Therefore, HRV was used to identify autonomic nervous system reactions during mesiodens extraction under general anesthesia in children. Electrocardiography was performed with customized software during treatment. HRV parameters were analyzed according to time and frequency domains during each dental procedure (local anesthesia, incision, flap, bone removal, extraction of mesiodens, and suturing). The relations of HRV parameters to age also were determined. Total autonomic nervous system activity decreased markedly after local anesthesia injection. Depending on the responses of sympathetic nerve activity, patients were categorized in a stress group and a nonstress group. The ratio of low-frequency power (LF) to high-frequency power (HF), an indication of sympathetic and parasympathetic balance, increased in the stress group after incision and flap formation. Conversely, the LF/HF ratio decreased during treatment in the nonstress group. However, HR, widely used to evaluate stress responses, did not change statistically during mesiodens extraction in either group. HRV parameters did not differ statistically according to age. The internal stress related to mesiodens extraction can be evaluated more objectively with HRV parameters than with conventional methods. Sympathetic nerve activity in the stress group differed from that in the nonstress group during the treatment procedures. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Heart rate and heart rate variability assessment identifies individual differences in fear response magnitudes to earthquake, free fall, and air puff in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    Full Text Available Fear behaviors and fear memories in rodents have been traditionally assessed by the amount of freezing upon the presentation of conditioned cues or unconditioned stimuli. However, many experiences, such as encountering earthquakes or accidental fall from tree branches, may produce long-lasting fear memories but are behaviorally difficult to measure using freezing parameters. Here, we have examined changes in heartbeat interval dynamics as physiological readout for assessing fearful reactions as mice were subjected to sudden air puff, free-fall drop inside a small elevator, and a laboratory-version earthquake. We showed that these fearful events rapidly increased heart rate (HR with simultaneous reduction of heart rate variability (HRV. Cardiac changes can be further analyzed in details by measuring three distinct phases: namely, the rapid rising phase in HR, the maximum plateau phase during which HRV is greatly decreased, and the recovery phase during which HR gradually recovers to baseline values. We showed that durations of the maximum plateau phase and HR recovery speed were quite sensitive to habituation over repeated trials. Moreover, we have developed the fear resistance index based on specific cardiac response features. We demonstrated that the fear resistance index remained largely consistent across distinct fearful events in a given animal, thereby enabling us to compare and rank individual mouse's fear responsiveness among the group. Therefore, the fear resistance index described here can represent a useful parameter for measuring personality traits or individual differences in stress-susceptibility in both wild-type mice and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD models.

  13. Blunted heart rate recovery is associated with exaggerated blood pressure response during exercise testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Umuttan; Duzenli, Mehmet Akif; Ozdemir, Kurtulus; Gok, Hasan

    2013-11-01

    Increased sympathetic activity and endothelial dysfunction are the proposed mechanisms underlying exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise (EBPR). However, data regarding heart rate behavior in patients with EBPR are lacking. We hypothesized that heart rate recovery (HRR) could be impaired in patients with EBPR. A total of 75 normotensive subjects who were referred for exercise treadmill test examination and experienced EBPR were included to this cross-sectional case-control study. The control group consisted of 75 age- and gender-matched normotensive subjects without EBPR. EBPR was defined as a peak exercise systolic blood pressure (BP) ≥210 mmHg in men and ≥190 mmHg in women. HRR was defined as the difference in HR from peak exercise to 1 min in recovery; abnormal HRR was defined as ≤12 beats/min. These parameters were compared with respect to occurrence of EBPR. Mean values of systolic and diastolic BP at baseline, peak exercise, and the first minute of the recovery were significantly higher in the subjects with EBPR. Mean HRR values were significantly lower (P < 0.001) in subjects with EBPR when compared with those without. Pearson's correlation analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between the decrease in systolic BP during the recovery and degree of HRR in individuals without EBPR (r = 0.42, P < 0.001). Such a correlation was not observed in subjects with EBPR (r = 0.11, P = 0.34). The percentage of abnormal HRR indicating impaired parasympathetic reactivation was higher in subjects with EBPR (29 % vs 13 %, P = 0.02). In logistic regression analyses, HRR and resting systolic BP were the only determinants associated with the occurrence of EBPR (P = 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). Decreased HRR was observed in normotensive individuals with EBPR. In subjects with normal BP response to exercise, a linear correlation existed between the degree of HRR and decrease in systolic BP during the recovery period. However, such a correlation

  14. Fetal heart rate monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageotte, Michael P

    2015-06-01

    Electronic fetal heart rate monitoring is a widely utilized means of assessment of fetal status during labor. Whereas little evidence exists regarding efficacy, this modality continues to be used extensively in every modern labor and delivery unit in developed countries. It is of importance that all providers of health care to the woman in labor and her newborn have a clear understanding of the basic pathophysiology of fetal heart rate monitoring and an appreciation for labor course and concerns as they arise in order to optimize outcomes and patient safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Blood Pressure vs. Heart Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Blood Pressure vs. Heart Rate (Pulse) Updated:Sep 15,2017 Understanding the difference ... your blood moving through your blood vessels, your heart rate is the number of times your heart beats ...

  16. For gold, heart rate matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmely, Jean-François; Mohacsi, Paul; Schmid, Jean-Paul; Carrel, Thierry; Delacretaz, Etienne

    2005-08-01

    A 19-year-old woman presented with decreased exercise tolerance 3 years after orthotopic heart transplantation. Exercise capacity was severely reduced, with a maximal workload of 84 W, corresponding to 56% of the predicted value. After exclusion of other causes, insufficient heart rate response to exercise was considered as the major contributor to her decreased exercise tolerance. Correction of this problem with the implantation of an AAIR pacemaker dramatically improved her physical performance, allowing her to win 5 gold medals at the European Heart and Lung Transplant Games. This case report illustrates how pacemaker therapy can dramatically improve the symptoms and performance of patients with chronotropic incompetence.

  17. Oxygen consumption and heart rate responses to isolated ballet exercise sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Krause, Josianne; Dos Santos Cunha, Giovani; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Follmer, Bruno; Krause, Mauricio; Reischak-Oliveira, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Ballet stage performances are associated with higher cardiorespiratory demand than rehearsals and classes. Hence, new interest is emerging to create periodized training that enhances dancers' fitness while minimizing delayed exercise-induced fatigue and possible injuries. Finding out in what zones of intensity dancers work during different ballet movements may support the use of supplemental training adjusted to the needs of the individual dancer. Therefore, the main purpose of this study was to describe dancers' oxygen consumption (VO2) and heart rate (HR) responses during the performance of nine isolated ballet exercise sets, as correlated with their first and second ventilatory thresholds (VT1 and VT2). Twelve female ballet dancers volunteered for the study. Their maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max), VT1, and VT2 were determined by use of an incremental treadmill test. Nine sets of ballet movements were assessed: pliés, tendus, jetés, rond de jambes, fondus, grand adage (adage), grand battements, temps levés, and sautés. The sets were randomly executed and separated by 5 minute rest periods. ANOVA for repeated measurements followed by the Bonferroni Post-hoc test were applied (p ballet sets. This stratification followed closely, but not exactly, the variation in HR. For example, rond de jambes (156.8 ± 19 b·min(-1)) did not show any significant difference from all the other ballet sets, nor VT1 or VT2. It is concluded that the workloads of isolated ballet sets, based on VO2 responses, vary between low and moderate aerobic intensity in relation to dancers' VT1 and VT2. However, ballet set workloads may be higher when based on HR responses, due to the intermittent and isometric components of dance.

  18. Heart rate and lactate responses to taekwondo fight in elite women performers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Cardinale

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine heart rate (HR and blood lactate (LA concentration before, during and after a competitive Tae kwon do (TKD fight performed by elite women performers. Specifically, we were interested to see weather HR and LA responses to competitive fight were greater than to TKD or karate exercises published in scientific literature. Seven international-standard women TKD fighters participated in the study. HR was recorded continuously throughout the fight using Polar Vantage telemetric HR monitors. LA samples were taken before and 3 min after the fight and analysed using an Accusport portable lactate analyzer. At the beginning of the fight, HR significantly increased (p<0.01 from pre-fight values of 91.6±9.9 beats min-1 to 144.1±13.6 beats min-1. During the whole fight the HRmean was 186.6±2.5 beats min-1 and remained significantly elevated (p<0.01 at 3 min into recovery. HR values expressed as a percentage of HRmax averaged during the whole fight at 91.7±2.6% respectively. LA concentration significantly increased (p<0.01 3 min after the fight and averaged 82% of LApeak values measured after the VO2max test. Results of the present study indicate that physiological demands of competitive TKD fight in women, measured by HR and LA responses, are considerably higher than the physiological demands of TKD or karate training exercises. The observed HR and LA responses suggest to us that conditioning for TKD should generally emphasise high-intensity anaerobic exercise.

  19. Maternal blood pressure and heart rate response to pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Cristine H; Naldoni, Luciane M V; Ribeiro, Juliana Dos Santos; Meirelles, Maria Cristina C C; Cavalli, Ricardo de Carvalho; Bø, Kari

    2014-07-01

    To assess whether maternal blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) change significantly in response to pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy. Longitudinal exploratory study with repeated measurements. Twenty-seven nulliparous healthy women of mean age 23.3 years (range 18-36) and mean body mass index 23.4 (range 23.1-29.5). Individual supervised pelvic floor muscle training from gestational week 20 till 36 with assessment of BP and HR at gestational weeks 20, 24, 28, 32 and 36. Systolic and diastolic BP was measured before and after each training session and HR was monitored during each session. Pelvic floor muscle training did not change BP. 77% (n = 21) of participants exceeded 70% of estimated maximum HR during at least one session. The time for exceeding 70% of estimated maximum HR was between 2.2 and 3.2 % of the total exercise session. Increases in BP and HR from gestational weeks 20 till 36 were within normal limits for pregnant women. Pelvic floor muscle training in nulliparous sedentary pregnant women does not increase BP. It significantly increases HR during the exercise sessions, but only for a limited period of time and with no negative long-term effect on BP or HR. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  20. Target Heart Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is your level of intensity? When is the best time of day to work out? Target Heart Rates Warm Up, Cool Down See More >> Getting Active Getting Started - Tips for Long-term Exercise Success Get Moving: Easy Tips to Get Active! ...

  1. Infants with univentricular heart have reduced heart rate and blood pressure responses to side motion and altered responses to head-up tilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirjavainen, Turkka; Viskari, Suvi; Pitkänen, Olli; Jokinen, Eero

    2005-02-01

    Cardiovascular control was studied in infants with univentricular heart (UVH). Side motion tests and 45-s 45 degrees head-up tilt tests were performed in 11 control and 9 UVH infants at the age of 13 +/- 3.2 wk. In addition, heart rate (HR) reactions to spontaneous arousals and HR variability during slow-wave sleep (SWS) were determined. All UVH infants had been hypoxic for several weeks, and during the sleep study the mean arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation was 82 +/- 5%. Tests were done at night during SWS, confirmed by polysomnographic recording. Continuous beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP) was measured. In the side-motion tests, control infants consistently showed a transient increase in HR and BP. This response was markedly reduced in all of the UVH infants (P < 0.0001). In tilt tests, the UVH infants showed normal BP responses, but, although a sustained 2.0% decrease in HR was observed in the controls, the UVH infants presented with a sustained 2.6% mean HR increase (P = 0.005). The UVH infants also showed attenuated HR acceleration during spontaneous arousals (P = 0.01), but HR variability did not differ significantly from the controls. In conclusion, UVH infants with chronic hypoxia exhibit defective vestibulosympathetic pathways, as expressed by an absence of acute HR and BP reactivity to side motion. HR reactions to postural challenge and spontaneous arousal are also altered. Autonomic function abnormalities in these infants are suggested to be secondary to hypoxia.

  2. Musical Auditory Stimulation Influences Heart Rate Autonomic Responses to Endodontic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milana Drumond Ramos Santana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the acute effect of musical auditory stimulation on heart rate autonomic regulation during endodontic treatment. The study included 50 subjects from either gender between 18 and 40 years old, diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis or pulp necrosis of the upper front teeth and endodontic treatment indication. HRV was recorded 10 minutes before (T1, during (T2, and immediately (T3 and T4 after endodontic treatment. The volunteers were randomly divided into two equal groups: exposed to music (during T2, T3, and T4 or not. We found no difference regarding salivary cortisol and anxiety score. In the group with musical stimulation heart rate decreased in T3 compared to T1 and mean RR interval increased in T2 and T3 compared to T1. SDNN and TINN indices decreased in T3 compared to T4, the RMSSD and SD1 increased in T4 compared to T1, the SD2 increased compared to T3, and LF (low frequency band increased in T4 compared to T1 and T3. In the control group, only RMSSD and SD1 increased in T3 compared to T1. Musical auditory stimulation enhanced heart rate autonomic modulation during endodontic treatment.

  3. Barometric pressure change and heart rate response during sleeping at 3000 m altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Masahiro; Endo, Junko; Handa, Yoko; Nose, Hiroshi

    2017-12-01

    We investigated effects of change in barometric pressure (P B) with climate change on heart rate (HR) during sleep at 3000 m altitude. Nineteen healthy adults (15 males and four females; mean age 32 years) participated in this study. We measured P B (barometry) and HR (electrocardiography) every minute during their overnight stay in a mountain lodge at 3000 m. We also measured resting arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) and evaluated symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS) by using the Lake Louise Questionnaire at 2305 and 3000 m, respectively. P B gradually decreased during the night at the speed of approximately - 0.5 hPa/h. We found that HR during sleep decreased linearly as P B decreased in all subjects, with significance (r = 0.492-0.893; all, P < 0.001). Moreover, cross correlation analysis revealed that HR started to decrease after 15 min following the decrease in P B, on average. SpO2 was 93.8 ± 1.7% at 2305 m before climbing, then decreased significantly to 90.2 ± 2.2% at the lodge before going to bed, and further decreased to 87.5 ± 2.7% after waking (all, P < 0.05). Four of the 19 subjects showed a symptom of AMS after waking (21%). Further, the decrease in HR in response to a given decrease in P B (ΔHR/ΔPB) was negatively related with a decrease in SpO2 from before going to bed to after waking at 3000 m (r = - 0.579, P = 0.009) and with total AMS scores after waking (r = 0.489, P = 0.033).

  4. Exposure-response analyses of blood pressure and heart rate changes for methylphenidate in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Wang, Yaning; Uppoor, Ramana S; Mehta, Mehul U; Farchione, Tiffany; Mathis, Mitchell V; Zhu, Hao

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the exposure-response (E-R) relationships of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) changes in healthy adults taking methylphenidate (MPH). Intensive time profiles of BP and HR from healthy adults in placebo and MPH treatment arms of seven clinical trials from the FDA internal database were utilized for this analysis. The analysis model contains a circadian component for placebo effect and an E-R component to describe drug effect. Internal validation was performed using goodness-of-fit plots and visual predictive check. A meta-database based on a systemic literature search was constructed and used for external validation of the developed models. We found that circadian models could quantify the time profiles of BP/HR in placebo arms. Linear models could describe the correlations between MPH concentrations, and BP/HR changes. The BP and HR changes were highly dependent on the shapes of MPH pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles without an apparent time delay. MPH has the greatest effect on HR, followed by systolic BP, and diastolic BP. Internal validation revealed that the developed models could adequately describe the circadian rhythms of HR and BP in placebo arms and the E-R relationships of MPH. External validation showed the models had good predictive capability of the literature data. In conclusion, the developed models adequately characterized the circadian rhythm and the MPH induced effects on BP and HR. The changes in BP and HR were highly correlated with MPH blood levels with no apparent delay. The time courses of BP and HR are similar to the MPH PK profiles. As a result, the immediate-release formulation may yield larger maximum BP and HR effect than the extended-release formulation under similar dose.

  5. [Resting heart rate and cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito Díaz, Buenaventura; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Cabrera de León, Antonio

    2014-07-07

    Heart rate reflects autonomic nervous system activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated that an increased heart rate at rest is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as an independent risk factor. It has been shown a link between cardiac autonomic balance and inflammation. Thus, an elevated heart rate produces a micro-inflammatory response and is involved in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction. In turn, decrease in heart rate produces benefits in congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. Alteration of other heart rate-related parameters, such as their variability and recovery after exercise, is associated with risk of cardiovascular events. Drugs reducing the heart rate (beta-blockers, calcium antagonists and inhibitors of If channels) have the potential to reduce cardiovascular events. Although not recommended in healthy subjects, interventions for reducing heart rate constitute a reasonable therapeutic goal in certain pathologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Changes in extracellular muscle volume affect heart rate and blood pressure responses to static exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, K.; Essfeld, D.; Stegemann, J.

    To investigate the effect of μg-induced peripheral extracellular fluid reductions on heart rate and blood pressure during isometric exercise, six healthy male subjects performed three calf ergometer test with different extracellular volumes of working muscles. In all tests, body positions during exercise were identical (supine with the knee joint flexed to 900). After a pre-exercise period of 25 min, during which calf volumes were manipulated, subjects had to counteract an external force of 180 N for 5 min. During the pre-exercise period three different protocols were applied. Test A: Subjects rested in the exercise position; test B: Body position was the same as in A but calf volume was increased by venous congestion (cuffs inflated to 80 mm Hg); test C: Calf volumes were decreased by a negative hydrostatic pressure (calves about 40 cm above heart level with the subjects supine). To clamp the changed calf volumes in tests B and C, cuffs were inflated to 300 mm Hg 5 min before the onset of exercise. This occlusion was maintained until termination of exercise. Compared to tests A and B, the reduced volume of test C led to significant increases in heart rate and blood pressure during exercise. Oxygen uptake did not exceed resting levels in B and C until cuffs were deflated, indicating that exclusively calf muscles contributed to the neurogenic peripheral drive. It is concluded that changes in extracellular muscle volume have to be taken into account when comparing heart rate and blood pressure during lg- and μg- exercise.

  7. Buccal telomere length and its associations with cortisol, heart rate variability, heart rate, and blood pressure responses to an acute social evaluative stressor in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Alex; Hamilton, Katrina; Livitz, Irina E; Figueroa, Wilson S; Zoccola, Peggy M

    2017-05-01

    Understanding the relationship between stress and telomere length (a marker of cellular aging) is of great interest for reducing aging-related disease and death. One important aspect of acute stress exposure that may underlie detrimental effects on health is physiological reactivity to the stressor. This study tested the relationship between buccal telomere length and physiological reactivity (salivary cortisol reactivity and total output, heart rate (HR) variability, blood pressure, and HR) to an acute psychosocial stressor in a sample of 77 (53% male) healthy young adults. Consistent with predictions, greater reductions in HR variability (HRV) in response to a stressor and greater cortisol output during the study session were associated with shorter relative buccal telomere length (i.e. greater cellular aging). However, the relationship between cortisol output and buccal telomere length became non-significant when adjusting for medication use. Contrary to past findings and study hypotheses, associations between cortisol, blood pressure, and HR reactivity and relative buccal telomere length were not significant. Overall, these findings may indicate there are limited and mixed associations between stress reactivity and telomere length across physiological systems.

  8. Of larks and hearts--morningness/eveningness, heart rate variability and cardiovascular stress response at different times of day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeser, Karolin; Obergfell, Friederike; Meule, Adrian; Vögele, Claus; Schlarb, Angelika A; Kübler, Andrea

    2012-05-15

    Inter-individual differences in the circadian period of physical and mental functions can be described on the dimension of morningness/eveningness. Previous findings support the assumption that eveningness is related to greater impulsivity and susceptibility to stress than morningness. Heart rate variability (HRV) serves as a physiological correlate of self- and emotional regulation and has not yet been investigated in relation to chronotypes. The study explores differences in HRV and other cardiovascular measures in morning- and evening-types at rest and under stress at different times of day (8-11 a.m. or 4-7 p.m.). Students (N=471) were screened for chronotype and n=55 females (27 morning- and 28 evening-types) were recruited for testing. These participants performed a mental arithmetic task while heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were recorded. Spectral components and a time-domain measure of HRV were calculated on HR data from resting and mental stress periods. Evening-types had significantly higher HR and systolic BP, but lower HRV than morning-types both at baseline and during stress. Stress induced in the evening had a significantly stronger impact on absolute and baseline corrected physiological measures in both chronotypes. The interaction of chronotype and testing time did not reach the level of significance for any of the dependent variables. The enhanced physiological arousal in evening-types might contribute to increased vulnerability to psychological distress. Hence, previous behavioral findings are supported by the physiological data of this study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of heart rate response to exercise and recovery during treadmill testing in arsenic-exposed workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakulak, Ugur Nadir; Gunduzoz, Meside; Ayturk, Mehmet; Tek Ozturk, Mujgan; Tutkun, Engin; Yilmaz, Omer Hinc

    2017-09-01

    Arsenic exposure is associated with various cardiovascular diseases. The aim of the present study was to assess cardiac autonomic function via heart rate response to exercise and recovery period of treadmill testing in arsenic-exposed workers. Sixty-five (65) occupationally arsenic-exposed workers and 35 healthy controls were enrolled. Blood and urinary arsenic levels were analyzed and symptom limited maximal treadmill exercise test were performed. Chronotropic response to exercise including age-predicted maximal heart rate (APMHR), heart rate reserve (HRreserve ), age-predicted HRreserve (APHRreserve ) and adjusted HRreserve and 1st-, 2nd-and 3rd-min heart rate recovery (HRR) indices were calculated. Baseline clinical and echocardiographic parameters, exercise test duration, resting and maximal heart rate, peak exercise capacity, HRreserve , APMHR, APHRreserve , and adjusted HRreserve were found to be similar between groups. HRR1 (22.0 ± 4.3 vs. 24.3 ± 3.1 bpm, p = .003) and HRR2 (43.2 ± 6.2 vs. 46.7 ± 6.4 bpm, p = .012) were significantly lower in arsenic-exposed workers compared to controls. Blood and urinary arsenic levels negatively correlated with HRR1 (r = -.477, p < .001 and r = -.438, p < .001, respectively) and HRR2 (r = -.507, p < .001 and r = -.412, p < .001 respectively). Arsenic-exposed workers had lower HRR indices than normal subjects but chronotropic response were similar. Cardiac autonomic dysregulation may be one of the cardiovascular consequences of arsenic exposure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Heart Rate Response and Variability Following Maximal Exercise in Overweight Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilkey, Justin P; Dykstra, Brandon; Erichsen, Jennifer; Mahon, Anthony D

    2017-08-01

    This study examined heart rate recovery (HRR) and heart rate variability (HRV) following maximal exercise in lean (exercise test to maximal effort. HRV, in the time and frequency domains, was assessed during rest and recovery. Also during recovery, one-minute HRR and the time constant of a monoexponential line of best fit (HRRt) were determined. There were no significant differences in one-minute HRR and HRRt between the lean (56 ± 7 beats∙min-1 and 160.4 ± 80.1 s, respectively) and overweight (51 ± 16 beats∙min-1 and 141.1 ± 58.1 s, respectively) groups. There also were no significant interactions between groups from rest to recovery for any HRV variables. Root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) and high frequency power (HF) during recovery was 2.05 ± 0.49 ms and 3.30 ± 1.02 ms2 in the lean children, respectively. In the overweight children, RMSSD and HF were 1.88 ± 0.65 ms and 2.94 ± 1.27 ms2, respectively. HRR and HRV findings suggest there are no differences in autonomic function during recovery from maximal exercise in lean and obese 8- to 12-year old children.

  11. Auditory stimulation with music influences the geometric indices of heart rate variability in response to the postural change maneuver

    OpenAIRE

    Bianca C. R. de Castro; Heraldo L Guida; Adriano L Roque; Luiz Carlos de Abreu; Celso Ferreira; Renata S Marcomini; Carlos B. M. Monteiro; Fernando Adami; Viviane F Ribeiro; Fernando L. A. Fonseca; Vilma N. S. Santos; Vitor E Valenti

    2014-01-01

    It is poor in the literature the behavior of the geometric indices of heart rate variability (HRV) during the musical auditory stimulation. The objective is to investigate the acute effects of classic musical auditory stimulation on the geometric indexes of HRV in women in response to the postural change maneuver (PCM). We evaluated 11 healthy women between 18 and 25 years old. We analyzed the following indices: Triangular index, Triangular interpolation of RR intervals and Poincarι plot (sta...

  12. POWER, HEART RATE AND PERCEIVED EXERTION RESPONSES TO 3X3 AND 4X4 BASKETBALL SMALL-SIDED GAMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Sampaio

    2009-01-01

    significant increase in the countermovement jump posttest jump results could suggest that the 4x4 were not played as quickly nor intensely as the 3x3. Decreases of the space and number of players in game allow greater self-recreation of players and greater intervention in game. Therefore, the heart rate response during the series displays a higher physiologic impact in 3x3 than in 4x4.

  13. Arm vs. Combined Leg and Arm Exercise: Blood Pressure Responses and Ratings of Perceived Exertion at the Same Indirectly Determined Heart Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Di Blasio; Andrea Sablone; Paola Civino; Emanuele D'Angelo; Sabina Gallina; Patrizio Ripari

    2009-01-01

    Pre-participation screening is very important for prescribing and practising exercise safely. The aim of this study was to investigate both ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and blood pressure responses in two different types of exercises with matching duration and indirectly determined working heart rate (HR). Participants were 23 male students, who were generally healthy but sedentary. The time course of their RPE and blood pressure during a 50- minute work-out session on an arm crank erg...

  14. Social dominance is associated with individual differences in heart rate and energetic response to food restriction in female red deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turbill, Christopher; Ruf, Thomas; Rothmann, Angela; Arnold, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Energy expenditure is a key mechanism underlying animal ecology, yet why individuals often differ in metabolic rate even under identical conditions remains largely unexplained. Individual variation in metabolism might be explained by correlations with other behavioral and physiological traits, with individual syndromes having environment- or state-dependent costs and benefits to fitness. We tested whether social rank within herds of female red deer is associated with individual differences in resting heart rate, an index of metabolic rate, and energetic response to monthly periods of food restriction during winter in a large outdoor enclosure near Vienna, Austria. Social rank had a strong positive effect on average daily heart rate, independent of the effects of food intake, air temperature, body temperature, and body mass. Subordinate individuals had lower heart rates than dominants, and consequently they suffered lower rates of body mass loss during periods of restricted pellet food supply. A greater capacity to minimize energy requirements might benefit the survival of subdominant female red deer during periods of negative energy balance in winter. Our study provides empirical support in a large mammal for linkages in behavior and metabolism within individuals that have environment-dependent consequences to the energy budget.

  15. Blood lactate, heart rate and rating of perceived exertion responses of elite surf lifesavers to high-performance competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Wade H; Kerr, Rebecca M; Spinks, Warwick L; Leicht, Anthony S

    2009-01-01

    A paucity of empirical research exists into surf lifesaving competition from which coaches and athletes may formulate training and recovery strategies. Seventeen (male=9; female=8) high-performance surf lifesavers (21.2+/-3.9 years) contested multiple rounds of team and individual events at a 2-day surf lifesaving competition. Individual events consisted of the multi-discipline ironman (IRON), paddle board (BOARD) and surf swim (SWIM). Blood lactate (BLa), rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and heart rate (HR) were determined following heats, semi-finals and final. IRON HR and RPE following semi-finals (153.0+/-21.6beatsmin(-1) and 14.4+/-1.5) and final (171.0+/-9.1beatsmin(-1) and 19.1+/-0.2) were greater than heats (141.8+/-17.2beatsmin(-1) and 12.0+/-1.9; psurf lifesavers employ race strategies with all-out maximal exercise limited to semi-finals and finals.

  16. Heart Rate Responses to Unaided Orion Side Hatch Egress in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Kirk L.; Hwang Emma Y.; Ryder, Jeffrey W.; Kelly, Cody; Walker, Thomas; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is developing the Orion capsule as a vehicle for transporting crewmembers to and from the International Space Station (ISS) and for future human space exploration missions. Orion and other commercial vehicles are designed to splash down in the ocean where nominally support personnel will assist crewmembers in egressing the vehicle. However, off-nominal scenarios will require crewmembers to egress the vehicle unaided, deploy survival equipment, and ingress a life raft. PURPOSE: To determine the heart rate (HR) responses to unaided Orion side hatch egress and raft ingress as a part of the NASA Crew Survival Engineering Team's evaluation of the PORT Orion mockup in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL). METHODS: Nineteen test subjects, including four astronauts (N=19, 14 males/5 females, 38.6+/-8.4 y, 174.4+/-9.6 cm, 75.7+/-13.1 kg), completed a graded maximal test on a cycle ergometer to determine VO2peak and HRpeak and were divided into five crews of four members each; one subject served on two crews. Each crew was required to deploy a life raft, egress the Orion vehicle from the side hatch, and ingress the life raft with two 8 kg emergency packs per crew. Each crew performed this activity one to three times; a total of ten full egresses were completed. Subjects wore a suit that was similar in form, mass, and function to the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES) including helmet, gloves, boots, supplemental O2 bottles, and a CO2-inflated life preserver (approx.18 kg); subjects began each trial seated supine in the PORT Orion mockup with seat belts and mockup O2 and communication connections and ended each trial with all four crewmembers inside the life raft. RESULTS: VO2peak was 40.8+/-6.8 mL/kg/min (3.1+/-0.7 L/min); HRpeak was 181+/-10 bpm. Total egress time across trials was 5.0+/-1.6 min (range: 2.8-8.0 min); all subjects were able to successfully complete all trials. Average maximum HR at activity start, at the hatch opening, in the water, and in the

  17. The effects of maternal depression on fetal heart rate response to vibroacoustic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allister, L; Lester, B M; Carr, S; Liu, J

    2001-01-01

    To better understand the effects of untreated maternal depression on the fetus, this study examined fetal heart rate (FHR) and FHR reactivity to vibroacoustic stimulation in pregnant women with untreated depression. The 20 participants were 32- to 36-week pregnant women divided into groups with depression (N = 10) and without depression (N = 10) based on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; Beck, 1977; Beck & Steer, 1987). Participants were attached to a fetal heart monitor, and 10 min of baseline FHR were recorded. A vibroacoustic stimulus (VAS) was presented, and an additional 10 min of FHR were recorded. Fetuses of mothers with depression had an elevated baseline FHR and a 3.5-fold delay in return to baseline FHR after VAS presentation. Additionally, mothers with depression had significantly higher anxiety levels and took fewer prenatal vitamins during pregnancy. Delayed habituation of FHR in the fetuses of mothers with depression may be due to alterations in the internal hormonal environment and could have implications for postnatal information processing.

  18. A novel 'splice site' HCN4 Gene mutation, c.1737+1 G>T, causes familial bradycardia, reduced heart rate response, impaired chronotropic competence and increased short-term heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hategan, Lidia; Csányi, Beáta; Ördög, Balázs; Kákonyi, Kornél; Tringer, Annamária; Kiss, Orsolya; Orosz, Andrea; Sághy, László; Nagy, István; Hegedűs, Zoltán; Rudas, László; Széll, Márta; Varró, András; Forster, Tamás; Sepp, Róbert

    2017-08-15

    The most important molecular determinant of heart rate regulation in sino-atrial pacemaker cells includes hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels, the major isoform of which is encoded by the HCN4 gene. Mutations affecting the HCN4 gene are associated primarily with sick sinus syndrome. A novel c.1737+1 G>T 'splice-site' HCN4 mutation was identified in a large family with familial bradycardia which co-segregated with the disease providing a two-point LOD score of 4.87. Twelve out of the 22 investigated family members [4 males, 8 females average age 36 (SD 6) years] were considered as clinically affected (heart ratesite' HCN4 gene mutation, c.1737+1 G>T, causes familial bradycardia and leads to reduced heart rate response, impaired chronotropic competence and increased short-term heart rate variability in the mutation carriers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Salivary cortisol, heart rate, and blood lactate responses during elite downhill mountain bike racing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperlich, Billy; Achtzehn, Silvia; Buhr, Mirijam; Zinner, Christoph; Zelle, Stefan; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to quantify the intensity profile of elite downhill mountain bike races during competitions. Seventeen male downhill racers (22 ± 5 y; 185.1 ± 5.3 cm; 68.0 ± 3.9 kg; VO2peak: 59.4 ± 4.1 mL·min·kg-1) participated in the International German Downhill Championships in 2010. The racers' peak oxygen uptake and heart rate (HR) at 2 and 4 mmol·L-1 blood lactate (HR2 and HR4), were assessed during an incremental laboratory step test (100 W, increase 40 W every 5 min). During the races, the HR was recorded and pre- and postrace blood lactate concentrations as well as salivary cortisol levels were obtained. During the race, the absolute time spent in the "easy" intensity zone was 23.3 ± 6.8 s, 24.2 ± 12.8 s (HR2-HR4) in the "moderate" zone, and 151.6 ± 18.3 s (>HR4) in the "hard" zone. Eighty percent of the entire race was accomplished at intensities >90% HRpeak. Blood lactate concentrations postrace were higher than those obtained after the qualification heat (8.0 ± 2.5 mmol·L-1 vs 6.7 ± 1.8 mmol·L-1, P bike downhill races are conducted at high heart rates and levels of blood lactate as well as increased concentration of salivary cortisol as marker for psycho-physiological stress.

  20. Water ingestion affects orthostatic challenge-induced blood pressure and heart rate responses in young healthy subjects: gender implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, L A; Aaron, A O; Micheal, O S; Oyeyipo, I P

    2011-11-23

    Evidence exists that women have lower orthostatic tolerance than men during quiescent standing. Water ingestion has been demonstrated to improve orthostatic tolerance in patients with severe autonomic dysfunction. We therefore sought to test the hypothesis that water ingestion would improve orthostatic tolerance in healthy young women more than in aged-matched men. Thirty seven (22 men and 15 women) healthy subjects aged 22.5± 1.7 and 21.5±1.4 (means±SD) respectively, ingested 50ml (control) and 500ml of water 40min before orthostatic challenge on two separate days of appointment in a randomized controlled, cross-over design. Seated and standing blood pressure and heart rate were determined. Orthostatic tolerance was assessed as the time to presyncope during standing. Ingesting 500ml of water significantly improves orthostatic tolerance by 22% (32.0 ± 5.2 vs 26.2 ± 2.4min; pwater, seated systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure rose significantly in men while only systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure rose significantly in women. However ingesting 500ml of water did not have significant effect on seated heart rate in both men and women. Ingestion of 500ml of water significantly attenuated both the orthostatic challenge-induced increased heart rate and decreased pulse pressure responses especially in women. Diastolic blood pressure tended to be positively correlated with orthostatic tolerance strongly in men than in women. Pulse pressure correlated positively while heart rate correlated negatively to orthostatic tolerance in women but not in men independent of other correlates. Water ingestion is associated with orthostatic tolerance strongly in women but weakly in men independent of other correlates. In conclusion, the findings in the present study demonstrated that water ingestion caused improvement strongly in young women than in young men. This improvement is associated with increased pulse pressure

  1. Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tachycardia occurs less commonly with: Heart attack Serious mitral valve disease Symptoms and Complications of Atrial or SVT Some ... tachycardia occurs less commonly with: Heart attack Serious mitral valve disease Symptoms and Complications of Atrial or SVT Some ...

  2. Comparison of heart rate response to an epinephrine test dose and painful stimulus in children during sevoflurane anesthesia: heart rate variability and beat-to-beat analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodey, Eric; Senhadji, Lotfi; Bansard, Jean Yves; Terrier, Anne; Carré, François; Ecoffey, Claude

    2003-01-01

    During regional anesthesia, various stimuli leading to an adrenergic response can occur. However, simulation of an epidural test dose by using intravenous administration of epinephrine (EPI) has always been compared with an intravenous saline infusion as the control. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of distinguishing in children the effect on HR by an intravascular epinephrine infusion and a painful stimulus, using heart rate variability (HRV) and beat-to-beat analysis of HR. Thirty American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status P I children who required elective surgery were studied. At 1 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane, electrocardiogram was recorded continuously. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured every minute. Measurements were performed after an intravenous administration of 0.5 microg/kg of epinephrine and during a small skin surgical incision (SI). Time-varying auto-regressive modeling of the interpolated RR sequences was performed for estimating power spectrum (msec(2)). The HF bands were defined by (0.15-0.4 Hz). Median (range) age and weight of all children were 3.5 (1-10) years and 16 (9-30) kg. EPI produced a lower increase in HR than did SI. SBP increased significantly more than did after SI. T-wave amplitude increased significantly after EPI but not after SI. Sixty seconds after the first change in HR, a secondary decrease (in comparison to control value) can be detected with EPI in contrast to SI. HF spectral power increased significantly after EPI administration but decreased after SI. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value were respectively for DeltaHR >10 beats per minuteof 56%, 26%, 43%, and 38%; for DeltaSBP >15 mm Hg of 60%, 86%, 81%, and 67%; and for DeltaT-wave amplitude >25% of 86%, 73%, 76%, and 84%. Using detection of the secondary decrease of HR, 60 seconds after the first change in HR, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and a negative predictive

  3. Effects of heart rate variability biofeedback on cardiovascular responses and autonomic sympathovagal modulation following stressor tasks in prehypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S; Sun, P; Wang, S; Lin, G; Wang, T

    2016-02-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is implicated in prehypertension, and previous studies have suggested that therapies that improve modulation of sympathovagal balance, such as biofeedback and slow abdominal breathing, are effective in patients with prehypertension at rest. However, considering that psychophysiological stressors may be associated with greater cardiovascular risk in prehypertensives, it is important to investigate whether heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) results in equivalent effects on autonomic cardiovascular responses control during stressful conditions in prehypertensives. A total of 32 college students with prehypertension were enrolled and randomly assigned to HRV-BF (n=12), slow abdominal breathing (SAB, n=10) or no treatment (control, n=10) groups. Then, a training experiment consisting of 15 sessions was employed to compare the effect of each intervention on the following cardiovascular response indicators before and after intervention: heart rate (HR); heart rate variability (HRV) components; blood volume pulse amplitude (BVPamp); galvanic skin response; respiration rate (RSP); and blood pressure. In addition, the cold pressor test and the mental arithmetic challenge test were also performed over two successive days before and after the invention as well as after 3 months of follow-up. A significant decrease in HR and RSP and a significant increase in BVPamp were observed after the HRV-BF intervention (Peffects on RSP, BVPamp, LF/HF and HFnm were observed in the HRV-BF group compared with the SAB group. HRV-BF training contributes to the beneficial effect of reducing the stress-related cardiovascular response in prehypertensives by improving autonomic sympathovagal modulation.

  4. Effects of the Sports Level, Format of the Game and Task Condition on Heart Rate Responses, Technical and Tactical Performance of Youth Basketball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemente Filipe Manuel

    2017-08-01

    increased the heart rate, volume of play, efficiency index and collective density during attacking plays. The SSCG with attacking content statistically increased the heart rate, efficiency index and performance score. Therefore, this study revealed that different SSCGs with tactical content influenced the physiological responses of youth players.

  5. Influence of menstrual cycle on thermoregulatory, metabolic, and heart rate responses to exercise at night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessemer, V; Brück, K

    1985-12-01

    Ten women [mean maximal O2 uptake (VO2max), 2.81 l X min-1] exercised for 15 min on a cycle ergometer in the middle of the luteal phase (L) and in the early follicular phase (F) of the menstrual cycle at the same constant work rates (mean 122 W) and an ambient temperature of 18 degrees C. Serum progesterone averaged 44.7 nmol X l-1 in L and 0.7 nmol X l-1 in F. After a 4-h resting period, exercise was performed between 3 and 4 A.M., when the L-F core temperature difference is maximal. Preexercise esophageal (Tes), tympanic (Tty), and rectal (Tre) temperatures averaged 0.6 degrees C higher in L. During exercise Tes, Tty, and Tre averaged 0.5 degrees C higher. The thresholds for chest sweating and cutaneous vasodilation (heat clearance technique) at the thumb and forearm were elevated in L by an average of 0.47 degrees C, related to mean body temperature (Tb(es) = 0.87Tes + 0.13Tskin), Tes, Tty, or Tre. The above-threshold chest sweat rate and cutaneous heat clearances were also increased in L. The mean exercise heart rate was 170.0 beats X min-1 in L and 163.8 beats X min-1 in F. The mean exercise VO2 in L (2.21 l X min-1) was 5.2% higher than in F (2.10 l X min-1), the metabolic rate was increased in L by 5.6%, but the net efficiency was 5.3% lower. No significant L-F differences in the respiratory exchange ratio and postexercise plasma lactate were demonstrated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Heart rate variability and cognitive processing: The autonomic response to task demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Casado, Antonio; Perales, José C; Cárdenas, David; Sanabria, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated variations in heart rate variability (HRV) as a function of cognitive demands. Participants completed an execution condition including the psychomotor vigilance task, a working memory task and a duration discrimination task. The control condition consisted of oddball versions (participants had to detect the rare event) of the tasks from the execution condition, designed to control for the effect of the task parameters (stimulus duration and stimulus rate) on HRV. The NASA-TLX questionnaire was used as a subjective measure of cognitive workload across tasks and conditions. Three major findings emerged from this study. First, HRV varied as a function of task demands (with the lowest values in the working memory task). Second, and crucially, we found similar HRV values when comparing each of the tasks with its oddball control equivalent, and a significant decrement in HRV as a function of time-on-task. Finally, the NASA-TLX results showed larger cognitive workload in the execution condition than in the oddball control condition, and scores variations as a function of task. Taken together, our results suggest that HRV is highly sensitive to overall demands of sustained attention over and above the influence of other cognitive processes suggested by previous literature. In addition, our study highlights a potential dissociation between objective and subjective measures of mental workload, with important implications in applied settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. F-22 Pilot Heart Rate Response to +Gz and Relationship to Pilot Fitness Using U.S. Air Force Fitness Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-19

    AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2015-0024 F-22 Pilot Heart Rate Response to +Gz and Relationship to Pilot Fitness Using U.S. Air Force Fitness Test Scores...To) July 2013 – June 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE F-22 Pilot Heart Rate Response to +Gz and Relationship to Pilot Fitness Using U.S. Air Force...ABSTRACT Previous works show heart rate (HR) increases in response to +Gz exposure due to baroreceptor reflex, the physical work of the anti-G

  8. Effect of sleep quality on hemodynamic response to exercise and heart rate recovery in apparently healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Murat; Yildiz, Abdulkadir; Demir, Melike; Bilik, Mehmet Z; Ozaydogdu, Necdet; Aktan, Adem; Isik, Ferhat; Demir, Suleyman; Yazgan, Umit C; Toprak, Nizamettin

    2014-12-01

    Poor sleep quality has an unfavorable impact on autonomic nervous system activity, especially that of the cardiovascular (CV) system. The heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) at rest and during exercise, along with the heart rate recovery (HRR), were examined in poor sleepers and compared with individuals with good sleep quality. A total of 113 healthy individuals were enrolled to the study. All participants performed treadmill stress testing. Sleep quality of participants was assessed by using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire: 48 subjects were categorized as ‘poor sleepers’ (PSQI score > 6 points), and the rest were grouped as ‘good sleepers’. The poor sleepers showed higher resting HR (p exercise (p=0.046) and less HR increase with exercise (chronotropic incompetence) (p=0.002) compared with individuals who reported good sleep quality. In addition, the poor sleepers demonstrated reduced heart rate recovery at the 1st and 3rd minute of recovery (p=0.005 and 0.037, respectively) compared with good sleepers. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that only resting diastolic BP was the independent predictor of HRE. The PSQI score was positively correlated with resting HR; while it was negatively correlated with HR response to exercise, HRR1 and HRR index-1. This cross-sectional study emphasizes the effect of poor sleep quality on unfavorable cardiovascular outcome indicators of the treadmill stress test.

  9. Non-linear Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Interaction in Response to Lower-Body Negative Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay K. Verma

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of hemorrhage remains an open problem. In this regard, blood pressure has been an ineffective measure of blood loss due to numerous compensatory mechanisms sustaining arterial blood pressure homeostasis. Here, we investigate the feasibility of causality detection in the heart rate and blood pressure interaction, a closed-loop control system, for early detection of hemorrhage. The hemorrhage was simulated via graded lower-body negative pressure (LBNP from 0 to −40 mmHg. The research hypothesis was that a significant elevation of causal control in the direction of blood pressure to heart rate (i.e., baroreflex response is an early indicator of central hypovolemia. Five minutes of continuous blood pressure and electrocardiogram (ECG signals were acquired simultaneously from young, healthy participants (27 ± 1 years, N = 27 during each LBNP stage, from which heart rate (represented by RR interval, systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, and mean arterial pressure (MAP were derived. The heart rate and blood pressure causal interaction (RR↔SBP and RR↔MAP was studied during the last 3 min of each LBNP stage. At supine rest, the non-baroreflex arm (RR→SBP and RR→MAP showed a significantly (p < 0.001 higher causal drive toward blood pressure regulation compared to the baroreflex arm (SBP→RR and MAP→RR. In response to moderate category hemorrhage (−30 mmHg LBNP, no change was observed in the traditional marker of blood loss i.e., pulse pressure (p = 0.10 along with the RR→SBP (p = 0.76, RR→MAP (p = 0.60, and SBP→RR (p = 0.07 causality compared to the resting stage. Contrarily, a significant elevation in the MAP→RR (p = 0.004 causality was observed. In accordance with our hypothesis, the outcomes of the research underscored the potential of compensatory baroreflex arm (MAP→RR of the heart rate and blood pressure interaction toward differentiating a simulated moderate category hemorrhage from

  10. Heart rate and heart rate variability response to the transpiration of vortex-water by Begonia Eliator plants to the air in an office during visual display terminal work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Benny

    2008-10-01

    This study explores the effects of vortex-water transpired from indoor greenery to office air, in relation to heart rate and heart rate variability during exposure to an electromagnetic field (EMF) from a visual display terminal (VDT). The study followed a randomized prospective single group cross-over design. Fifty (50) healthy volunteers, seated in any ordinary working posture in front of a VDT. Electrocardiography was measured in five 10-minute sequential tests. The VDT was turned off during the first test and switched on for the subsequent four tests. During tests 3 and 4, one of two Begonia Eliator plants, irrigated with either tap water or vortex-rotated (active) tap water during growth, was placed adjacent to the VDT. Heart rate, heart rate variability (HRV) and power spectral density (PSD) were analyzed. The heart rate was unchanged at the start of EMF exposure. The time domain measurements indicated a significant decrease in heart rate and a significant increase in HRV, accompanied by higher vagal tone in the presence, and finally in the absence, of the active plant. PSD parameters revealed significantly higher total power, as well as an increase in low frequencies (LF) and high frequencies (HF) in the condition induced by the active plant as well as after its removal. Very low frequencies (VLF) increased at EMF exposure whereas normally HF power decreased, accompanied by a rise in LF power and LF/HF ratio. HF power was higher at exposure to the active compared to the control plant. Spectral power density diagrams revealed an intensified spectral power band at frequencies of around 0.1 Hz at the condition of both plants, indicating systemic autonomic stability. The findings suggest that the parasympathetic response was associated with reduced heart rate, implicating restoration and maintenance of metabolic energy resources mediated by an involuntary adaptation to active plant-related stimuli.

  11. EMG and Heart Rate Responses Decline within 5 Days of Daily Whole-Body Vibration Training with Squatting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, André; Liphardt, Anna-Maria; Bargmann, Arne; Müller, Klaus; Beck, Luis; Mester, Joachim; Zange, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined the acute effects of a 5-day daily whole-body vibration (WBV) training on electromyography (EMG) responses of the m. rectus femoris and m. gastrocnemius lateralis, heart rate (HR, continuously recorded), and blood lactate levels. The purpose of the study was to investigate the adaptation of muscle activity, heart rate and blood lactate levels during 5 days of daily training. Two groups of healthy male subjects performed either squat exercises with vibration at 20 Hz on a side alternating platform (SE+V, n = 20, age  = 31.9±7.5 yrs., height  = 178.8±6.2 cm, body mass  = 79.2±11.4 kg) or squat exercises alone (SE, n = 21, age  = 28.4±7.3 years, height  = 178.9±7.4 cm, body mass  = 77.2±9.7 kg). On training day 1, EMG amplitudes of the m. rectus femoris were significantly higher (P<0.05) during SE+V than during SE. However, this difference was no longer statistically significant on training days 3 and 5. The heart rate (HR) response was significantly higher (P<0.05) during SE+V than during SE on all training days, but showed a constant decline throughout the training days. On training day 1, blood lactate increased significantly more after SE+V than after SE (P<0.05). On the following training days, this difference became much smaller but remained significantly different. The specific physiological responses to WBV were largest on the initial training day and most of them declined during subsequent training days, showing a rapid neuromuscular and cardiovascular adaptation to the vibration stimulus. PMID:24905721

  12. Autonomic Response to the Cold Pressor Test : Through the Analysis of the Power Spectrum of the Heart Rate Variability

    OpenAIRE

    藤岩, 秀樹; 石尾, 潤; 中村, 貢治

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to clarify the autonomic response to the cold pressor test (CPT) by analyzing the power spectrum of the heart rate variability (HRV). The subjects of this investigation were 10 males who were aged 16-17 years. The results of this investigation are summarized as follows: 1)The parasympathetic nerve activity of the subjects decreased significantly in CPT. 2)The sympathetic nerve activity of the subjects increased significantly in CPT. 3)It is...

  13. The reproducibility and prognostic value of serial measurements of heart rate response to regadenoson during myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrikopoulou, Efstathia; AlJaroudi, Wael A; Farag, Ayman; Lester, Davis; Patel, Hiren; Iskandrian, Ami E; Hage, Fadi G

    2016-07-01

    The heart rate response (HRR, percentage change from baseline) to regadenoson during myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) can provide incremental prognostic value in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. Our purpose was to evaluate the variability and prognostic value of HRR on serial measurements. We studied 648 consecutive patients (61 ± 11 years, 48 % with diabetes) who underwent two regadenoson MPI studies (16 ± 9 months between studies). HRR regadenoson on serial measurements without systematic or proportional biases. Patients with consistently normal HRR had the best prognosis.

  14. Heart rate response and fitness effects of various types of physical education for 8- to 9-year-old schoolchildren

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendiksen, Mads; Williams, Craig A; Hornstrup, Therese

    2014-01-01

    -to-moderate aerobic intensity. HR was recorded during small-sided indoor soccer (SO), basketball (BB), unihockey (UH), circuit training (CT), walking (W) and Nintendo Wii Boxing (NWB) and Nintendo Wii Tennis (NWT). Maximal HR (HRmax) and physical fitness was determined by the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1......Abstract The present study investigated the heart rate (HR) response to various types of physical education (PE) activities for 8- to 9-year-olds (five school classes, n = 93) and the fitness effects of a short-term PE training programme (three of the five classes, n = 59) with high compared to low...

  15. Exercise-induced improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness and heart rate response to exercise are impaired in overweight/obese postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Gomes Ciolac

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare the heart rate response to exercise and the exercise-induced improvements in muscle strength, cardiorespiratory fitness and heart rate response between normal-weight and overweight/obese postmenopausal women. METHODS: Sedentary women (n = 155 were divided into normal-weight (n = 79; BMI 25 kg/m²; 58.3 + 8.6 years groups, and have their 1-repetition maximum strength (adjusted for body mass, cardiorespiratory fitness and heart rate response to a graded exercise test compared before and after 12 months of a three times-per-week exercise-training program. RESULTS: Overweight/obese women displayed decreased upper and lower extremity muscle strengths, decreased cardiorespiratory fitness, and lower peak and reserve heart rates compared to normal-weight women. After follow-up, both groups improved their upper (32.9% and 41.5% in normal-weight and overweight/obese women, respectively and lower extremity(49.5% and 47.8% in normal-weight and overweight/obese women, respectively muscle strength. However, only normal-weight women improved their cardiorespiratory fitness (6.6% and recovery heart rate (5 bpm. Resting, reserve and peak heart rates did not change in either group. CONCLUSIONS: Overweight/obese women displayed impaired heart rate response to exercise. Both groups improved muscle strength, but only normal-weight women improved cardiorespiratory fitness and heart rate response to exercise. These results suggest that exercise-induced improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness and heart rate response to exercise may be impaired in overweight/obese postmenopausal women.

  16. Effects of Liraglutide on Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumarathurai, Preman; Anholm, Christian; Larsen, Bjørn Strøier

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Reduced heart rate variability (HRV) and increased heart rate (HR) have been associated with cardiovascular mortality. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) increase HR, and studies have suggested that they may reduce HRV. We examined the effect of the GLP-1 RA...

  17. Cortisol, blood pressure, and heart rate responses to food intake were independent of physical fitness levels in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Sisitha U; Torres, Susan J; Fraser, Steve F; Turner, Anne I

    2015-11-01

    This research tested the hypothesis that women who had higher levels of physical fitness will have lower hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis (cortisol) and sympatho-adrenal medullary system (blood pressure and heart rate) responses to food intake compared with women who had low levels of physical fitness. Lower fitness (n = 22; maximal oxygen consumption = 27.4 ± 1.0 mL∙kg(-1)·min(-1)) and higher fitness (n = 22; maximal oxygen consumption = 41.9 ± 1.6 mL∙kg(-1)·min(-1)) women (aged 30-50 years; in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle) who participated in levels of physical activity that met (lower fitness = 2.7 ± 0.5 h/week) or considerably exceeded (higher fitness = 7.1 ± 1.4 h/week) physical activity guidelines made their own lunch using standardised ingredients at 1200 h. Concentrations of cortisol were measured in blood samples collected every 15 min from 1145-1400 h. Blood pressures and heart rate were also measured every 15 min between 1145 h and 1400 h. The meal consumed by the participants consisted of 20% protein, 61% carbohydrates, and 19% fat. There was a significant overall response to lunch in all of the parameters measured (time effect for all, p women. Results suggest that the physiological response to food intake in women is quite resistant to modification by elevated physical fitness levels.

  18. Decrease in heart rate variability response to task is related to anxiety and depressiveness in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinba, Toshikazu; Kariya, Nobutoshi; Matsui, Yasue; Ozawa, Nobuyuki; Matsuda, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Ken-Ichi

    2008-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that heart rate variability (HRV) measurement is useful in investigating the pathophysiology of various psychiatric disorders. The present study further examined its usefulness in evaluating the mental health of normal subjects with respect to anxiety and depressiveness. Heart rate (HR) and HRV were measured tonometrically at the wrist in 43 normal subjects not only in the resting condition but also during a task (random number generation) to assess the responsiveness. For HRV measurement, high-frequency (HF; 0.15-0.4 Hz) and low-frequency (LF; 0.04-0.15 Hz) components of HRV were obtained using MemCalc, a time series analysis technique that combines a non-linear least square method with maximum entropy method. For psychological evaluation of anxiety and depressiveness, two self-report questionnaires were used: State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS). No significant relation was observed between HR and HRV indices, and the psychological scores both in the resting and task conditions. By task application, HF decreased, and LF/HF and HR increased, and significant correlation with psychological scores was found in the responsiveness to task measured by the ratio of HRV and HR indices during the task to that at rest (task/rest ratio). A positive relationship was found between task/rest ratio for HF, and STAI and SDS scores. Task/rest ratio of HR was negatively correlated with STAI-state score. Decreased HRV response to task application is related to anxiety and depressiveness. Decreased autonomic responsiveness could serve as a sign of psychological dysfunction.

  19. Stress vulnerability in adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome: experimental study investigating heart rate variability and skin conductance responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimes, Katharine A; Lievesley, Kate; Chalder, Trudie

    2017-07-01

    Stress vulnerability has been implicated in adolescent chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), but has rarely been investigated directly. This study compared psychological and physiological responses to a laboratory social performance task in adolescents with CFS with chronic illness (asthma) and healthy control groups. Adolescents with CFS (n = 60), adolescents with asthma (n = 31) and healthy adolescents (n = 78) completed questionnaires before and after a social performance task. Skin conductance responses (SCR; mean SCR and Max-Min) and heart rate variability (low frequency/high frequency; LF/HF and root mean square difference of successive RR intervals; RMSSD) was measured before, during and after the task. Baseline heart rate variability (HRV) (RMSSD) was significantly lower in the CFS and Asthma groups than the HC. During the speech, the CFS and Asthma groups had higher HRV (LF/HF) than the HC, adjusting for baseline LF/HF. Although the asthma group showed a subsequent reduction in HRV during recovery, the CFS group did not. Similarly, during recovery after the task, the CFS group showed a continued increase in skin conductance (Min-Max), unlike the Asthma and HC groups. Compared to control groups, adolescents with CFS expected to find the task more difficult, were more anxious beforehand and afterwards, rated it as more difficult, evaluated their performance more negatively and had lower observer ratings of performance. Parents of adolescents with CFS expected that their child would perform less well in the task than parents of control participants. Adolescents with CFS showed autonomic nervous system responses that are consistent with chronic stress vulnerability, difficulty coping with acute stress and slower recovery after acute stress. Self-report measures also indicated greater trait, pre- and posttask anxiety in the CFS group. © 2017 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  20. Heart Rate Response During Mission-Critical Tasks After Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzeno, Natalia M.; Lee, S. M. C.; Stenger, M. B.; Lawrence, E. L.; Platts, S. H.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    Adaptation to microgravity could impair crewmembers? ability to perform required tasks upon entry into a gravity environment, such as return to Earth, or during extraterrestrial exploration. Historically, data have been collected in a controlled testing environment, but it is unclear whether these physiologic measures result in changes in functional performance. NASA?s Functional Task Test (FTT) aims to investigate whether adaptation to microgravity increases physiologic stress and impairs performance during mission-critical tasks. PURPOSE: To determine whether the well-accepted postflight tachycardia observed during standard laboratory tests also would be observed during simulations of mission-critical tasks during and after recovery from short-duration spaceflight. METHODS: Five astronauts participated in the FTT 30 days before launch, on landing day, and 1, 6, and 30 days after landing. Mean heart rate (HR) was measured during 5 simulations of mission-critical tasks: rising from (1) a chair or (2) recumbent seated position followed by walking through an obstacle course (egress from a space vehicle), (3) translating graduated masses from one location to another (geological sample collection), (4) walking on a treadmill at 6.4 km/h (ambulation on planetary surface), and (5) climbing 40 steps on a passive treadmill ladder (ingress to lander). For tasks 1, 2, 3, and 5, astronauts were encouraged to complete the task as quickly as possible. Time to complete tasks and mean HR during each task were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and ANCOVA respectively, in which task duration was a covariate. RESULTS: Landing day HR was higher (P < 0.05) than preflight during the upright seat egress (7%+/-3), treadmill walk (13%+/-3) and ladder climb (10%+/-4), and HR remained elevated during the treadmill walk 1 day after landing. During tasks in which HR was not elevated on landing day, task duration was significantly greater on landing day (recumbent seat egress: 25

  1. Effects of Tai Chi rehabilitation on heart rate responses in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Rei-Yeuh; Koo, Malcolm; Kan, Chung-Ben; Yu, Zer-Ran; Chu, I-Tseng; Hsu, Chen-Tung; Chen, Cheng-Yun

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a six-month Tai Chi (TC) exercise cardiac rehabilitation program on two prognostic factors of cardiac events, rate-pressure product and rate-pressure product reserve, in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Patients (N = 54) with CAD were recruited from the clinics of cardiology and cardiovascular surgery at a regional hospital in Taiwan. Twenty-two of them enrolled in the TC rehabilitation program which consisted of weekly 90-min sessions of Yang's style TC for six months in addition to receiving usual care. The remaining 32 patients received usual care only. Modified Bruce treadmill exercise test was performed to evaluate their exercise test responses at baseline and at six months. The change over time was significantly different between the TC and control group in peak rate-pressure product (RPP) (interaction between group and time, p = 0.029) and in RPP reserve (interaction between group and time p = 0.009) over the six-month period, there was a decrease in peak RPP of 32.0 mmHg x bpm x 10(-2) and in RPP reserve of 37.4 mmHg x bpm x 10(-2) in the TC group. In conclusion, participating in a six-month TC exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation program was associated with improved peak RPP and RPP reserve during exercise testing in patients with CAD. TC exercise program may lead to a better prognosis for cardiac events in patients with CAD.

  2. Modulation of heart rate response to acute stressors throughout the breeding season in the king penguin Aptenodytes patagonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viblanc, Vincent A; Smith, Andrew D; Gineste, Benoit; Kauffmann, Marion; Groscolas, René

    2015-06-01

    'Fight-or-flight' stress responses allow animals to cope adaptively to sudden threats by mobilizing energy resources and priming the body for action. Because such responses can be costly and redirect behavior and energy from reproduction to survival, they are likely to be shaped by specific life-history stages, depending on the available energy resources and the commitment to reproduction. Here, we consider how heart rate (HR) responses to acute stressors are affected by the advancing breeding season in a colonial seabird, the king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus). We subjected 77 birds (44 males, 33 females) at various stages of incubation and chick-rearing to three experimental stressors (metal sound, distant approach and capture) known to vary both in their intensity and associated risk, and monitored their HR responses. Our results show that HR increase in response to acute stressors was progressively attenuated with the stage of breeding from incubation to chick-rearing. Stress responses did not vary according to nutritional status or seasonal timing (whether breeding was initiated early or late in the season), but were markedly lower during chick-rearing than during incubation. This pattern was obvious for all three stressors. We discuss how 'fight-or-flight' responses may be modulated by considering the energy commitment to breeding, nutritional status and reproductive value of the brood in breeding seabirds. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Target Heart Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Educator CPR & ECC Shop Causes Advocate Giving Media Healthy Eating Nutrition The American Heart Association's Diet and Lifestyle ... Keep It Off Recognizing Roadblocks in Weight Loss Eating When Not Hungry Keeping the Weight ... Stress With Healthy Habits Take Action to Control Stress 3 Tips to ...

  4. Heart rate in professional musicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Daniel

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Very few studies have analysed heart rate (HR with regard to music playing, and the scarce evidence available is controversial. The purpose of this study was to analyse the HR response of professional musicians during their real-work activity. Methods Sixty-two voluntary professional musicians (20 women, 42 men, whose ages ranged between 15 and 71 years old, underwent the test while playing their instruments in real life scenarios, i.e. rehearsals, practice and public concerts. The musicians carried Sport Tester PE4000 (Polar®, Finland pulsometers to record their HR. In order to compare data from differently aged subjects we calculated their Maximum Theoretical Heart Rate (MTHR. Later on we found out the MTHR percentages (%MTHR corresponding to the registered HR of each subject in different situations. The value of the MTHR for every musician was obtained by means of the 220 – age (in years formula. Results Throughout the HR recordings, we have observed that musicians present a heightened HR while playing (in soloists, mean and maximum HR were 72% and 85%MTHR, respectively. Cardiac demand is significantly higher in concerts than in rehearsals while performing the same musical piece. The HR curves corresponding to the same musician playing in repeated concerts (with the same programme were similar. Conclusion The cardiac demand of a professional instrument player is higher than previously described, much greater than what would be expected from a supposedly sedentary activity.

  5. Heart rate in professional musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñesta, Claudia; Terrados, Nicolás; García, Daniel; Pérez, José A

    2008-07-25

    Very few studies have analysed heart rate (HR) with regard to music playing, and the scarce evidence available is controversial. The purpose of this study was to analyse the HR response of professional musicians during their real-work activity. Sixty-two voluntary professional musicians (20 women, 42 men), whose ages ranged between 15 and 71 years old, underwent the test while playing their instruments in real life scenarios, i.e. rehearsals, practice and public concerts. The musicians carried Sport Tester PE4000 (Polar(R), Finland) pulsometers to record their HR.In order to compare data from differently aged subjects we calculated their Maximum Theoretical Heart Rate (MTHR). Later on we found out the MTHR percentages (%MTHR) corresponding to the registered HR of each subject in different situations. The value of the MTHR for every musician was obtained by means of the 220 - age (in years) formula. Throughout the HR recordings, we have observed that musicians present a heightened HR while playing (in soloists, mean and maximum HR were 72% and 85%MTHR, respectively). Cardiac demand is significantly higher in concerts than in rehearsals while performing the same musical piece. The HR curves corresponding to the same musician playing in repeated concerts (with the same programme) were similar. The cardiac demand of a professional instrument player is higher than previously described, much greater than what would be expected from a supposedly sedentary activity.

  6. All about Heart Rate (Pulse)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... result of taking a drug such as a beta blocker . A lower heart rate is also common for ... 100. Medication use: Meds that block your adrenaline (beta blockers) tend to slow your pulse, while too much ...

  7. Auditory stimulation with music influences the geometric indices of heart rate variability in response to the postural change maneuver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca C. R. de Castro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is poor in the literature the behavior of the geometric indices of heart rate variability (HRV during the musical auditory stimulation. The objective is to investigate the acute effects of classic musical auditory stimulation on the geometric indexes of HRV in women in response to the postural change maneuver (PCM. We evaluated 11 healthy women between 18 and 25 years old. We analyzed the following indices: Triangular index, Triangular interpolation of RR intervals and Poincarι plot (standard deviation of the instantaneous variability of the beat-to beat heart rate [SD1], standard deviation of long-term continuous RR interval variability and Ratio between the short - and long-term variations of RR intervals [SD1/SD2] ratio. HRV was recorded at seated rest for 10 min. The women quickly stood up from a seated position in up to 3 s and remained standing still for 15 min. HRV was recorded at the following periods: Rest, 0-5 min, 5-10 min and 10-15 min during standing. In the second protocol, the subject was exposed to auditory musical stimulation (Pachelbel-Canon in D for 10 min at seated position before standing position. Shapiro-Wilk to verify normality of data and ANOVA for repeated measures followed by the Bonferroni test for parametric variables and Friedman′s followed by the Dunn′s posttest for non-parametric distributions. In the first protocol, all indices were reduced at 10-15 min after the volunteers stood up. In the protocol musical auditory stimulation, the SD1 index was reduced at 5-10 min after the volunteers stood up compared with the music period. The SD1/SD2 ratio was decreased at control and music period compared with 5-10 min after the volunteers stood up. Musical auditory stimulation attenuates the cardiac autonomic responses to the PCM.

  8. Auditory stimulation with music influences the geometric indices of heart rate variability in response to the postural change maneuver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Bianca C R; Guida, Heraldo L; Roque, Adriano L; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Ferreira, Celso; Marcomini, Renata S; Monteiro, Carlos B M; Adami, Fernando; Ribeiro, Viviane F; Fonseca, Fernando L A; Santos, Vilma N S; Valenti, Vitor E

    2014-01-01

    It is poor in the literature the behavior of the geometric indices of heart rate variability (HRV) during the musical auditory stimulation. The objective is to investigate the acute effects of classic musical auditory stimulation on the geometric indexes of HRV in women in response to the postural change maneuver (PCM). We evaluated 11 healthy women between 18 and 25 years old. We analyzed the following indices: Triangular index, Triangular interpolation of RR intervals and Poincarι plot (standard deviation of the instantaneous variability of the beat-to beat heart rate [SD1], standard deviation of long-term continuous RR interval variability and Ratio between the short - and long-term variations of RR intervals [SD1/SD2] ratio). HRV was recorded at seated rest for 10 min. The women quickly stood up from a seated position in up to 3 s and remained standing still for 15 min. HRV was recorded at the following periods: Rest, 0-5 min, 5-10 min and 10-15 min during standing. In the second protocol, the subject was exposed to auditory musical stimulation (Pachelbel-Canon in D) for 10 min at seated position before standing position. Shapiro-Wilk to verify normality of data and ANOVA for repeated measures followed by the Bonferroni test for parametric variables and Friedman's followed by the Dunn's posttest for non-parametric distributions. In the first protocol, all indices were reduced at 10-15 min after the volunteers stood up. In the protocol musical auditory stimulation, the SD1 index was reduced at 5-10 min after the volunteers stood up compared with the music period. The SD1/SD2 ratio was decreased at control and music period compared with 5-10 min after the volunteers stood up. Musical auditory stimulation attenuates the cardiac autonomic responses to the PCM.

  9. Salivary cortisol, heart rate, electrodermal activity and subjective stress responses to the Mannheim Multicomponent Stress Test (MMST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Tatyana; Schmahl, Christian; Wüst, Stefan; Bohus, Martin

    2012-06-30

    The availability of effective laboratory paradigms for inducing psychological stress is an important requirement for experimental stress research. Reliable protocols are scarce, usually laborious and manpower-intensive. In order to develop an economical, easily applicable standardized stress protocol, we have recently tailored the Mannheim Multicomponent Stress Test (MMST). This test has been shown to induce relatively high stress responses without focusing on social-evaluative components. In this study we evaluated changes in electrodermal activity and salivary cortisol in response to the MMST. The MMST simultaneously combines cognitive (mental arithmetic), emotional (affective pictures), acoustic (white noise) and motivational stressors (loss of money). This study comprised two independent experiments. For experiment 1, 80 female subjects were recruited; 30 subjects (15 females) participated in experiment 2. Significant changes in electrodermal activity and salivary cortisol levels in response to MMST exposure were found. Subjective stress and heart rate responses were significantly increased in both experiments. These results indicate that the MMST is an economical stress paradigm which is also applicable in larger cohorts or multicenter studies for investigating stress reactions. As social-evaluative threat is not the main stress component of the MMST, this procedure represents a useful and complementary alternative to other established stress protocols. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of electromyographic activity and heart rate responses to isometric exercise. The role played by muscular mass and type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Silva

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between the electromyographic (EMG activity and heart rate (HR responses induced by isometric exercise performed by knee extension (KE and flexion (KF in men. Fifteen healthy male subjects, 21 ± 1.3 years (mean ± SD, were submitted to KE and KF isometric exercise tests at 100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC. The exercises were performed with one leg (right or left and with two legs simultaneously, for 10 s in the sitting position with the hip and knee flexed at 90o. EMG activity (root mean square values and HR (beats/min were recorded simultaneously both at rest and throughout the sustained contraction. The HR responses to isometric exercise in KE and KF were similar when performed with one and two legs. However, the HR increase was always significantly higher in KE than KF (P0.05 and KF (r = 0.15, P>0.05 contractions were not significant. These results suggest that the predominant mechanism responsible for the larger increase in HR response to KE as compared to KF in our study could be dependent on qualitative and quantitative differences in the fiber type composition found in each muscle group. This mechanism seems to demand a higher activation of motor units with a corresponding increase in central command to the cardiovascular centers that modulate HR control.

  11. Onset and Maturation of Fetal Heart Rate Response to the Mother's Voice over Late Gestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisilevsky, Barbara S.; Hains, Sylvia M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Term fetuses discriminate their mother's voice from a female stranger's, suggesting recognition/learning of some property of her voice. Identification of the onset and maturation of the response would increase our understanding of the influence of environmental sounds on the development of sensory abilities and identify the period when…

  12. Amygdala and heart rate variability responses from listening to emotionally intense parts of a story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallentin, Mikkel; Nielsen, Andreas Højlund; Vuust, Peter

    2011-01-01

    correspondence across participants between intensity ratings and HRV measurements obtained during fMRI. With this ecologically valid stimulus we found that narrative intensity was accompanied by activation in temporal cortices, medial geniculate nuclei in the thalamus and amygdala, brain regions that are all...

  13. Blunting of the heart rate response to adenosine and regadenoson in relation to hyperglycemia and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage, Fadi G; Perry, Gilbert; Heo, Jaekyeong; Iskandrian, Ami E

    2010-03-15

    Adenosine and regadenoson cause an increase in heart rate (HR) during myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). It has been shown that patients with diabetes mellitus have a blunted HR response due to cardiac autonomic dysfunction. It is not known whether the HR response is related to hyperglycemia and the metabolic syndrome (MS). HR changes were assessed in 2,000 patients (643 with diabetes mellitus [DM]) in the Adenoscan Versus Regadenoson Comparative Evaluation for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging (ADVANCE MPI 1 and ADVANCE MPI 2) trials in relation to MS status and blood sugar level on the day of MPI. The HR response was lower in patients with MS (32.43 +/- 0.52% vs 36.15 +/- 0.71%, p adenosine and regadenoson is blunted in patients with hyperglycemia and in those with MS. These results suggest that factors that precede the development of DM may be associated with cardiac autonomic neuropathy and may help explain the contribution of hyperglycemia and MS to cardiovascular risk. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of blood pressure and heart rate responses to isometric exercise and passive muscle stretch in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, K; Selle, K; Leyk, D; Essfeld, D

    1995-01-01

    The responses of mean arterial blood pressure (BPa) and heart rate (fc) to isometric contraction and passive stretch were compared in seven healthy male subjects at identical external forces. They were investigated in the sitting position with the hip and knee joint flexed to 90 degrees. Each subject performed two tests, separated by a day, in which the stimuli were applied in random order. After 5 min of rest they performed either 10-min static plantar flexion of one calf (200 N) or 10 min of passive calf muscle stretch at the same load. After 5-min rest, the second stimulus was applied for a further 10 min followed by 5-min rest. The second test was identical except for the sequence of the stimuli. The BPa was measured by a noninvasive and continuous method. Contraction of the vastus lateralis, gastrocnemius lateralis, and soleus muscles were determined by the myo-electric activity (electromyogram, EMG) by means of surface electrodes. The EMG activity of the vastus lateralis muscle remained at resting values throughout the experiments. Increases in EMG activity could only be detected for the triceps surae muscles during isometric contraction. During the initial 2 min of stimulation the BPa and fc responses to active contraction and passive stretch were comparable. Thereafter, both parameters showed significantly higher values during contraction. It was concluded that mechanical stress may have contributed to the early response of BPa during both passive stretch and voluntary contraction but that chemical stimuli were needed to maintain the peripheral cardiovascular drive.

  15. Human Analogue Safe Haven Effect of the Owner: Behavioural and Heart Rate Response to Stressful Social Stimuli in Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gácsi, Márta; Maros, Katalin; Sernkvist, Sofie; Faragó, Tamás; Miklósi, Ádám

    2013-01-01

    The secure base and safe haven effects of the attachment figure are central features of the human attachment theory. Recently, conclusive evidence for human analogue attachment behaviours in dogs has been provided, however, the owner’s security-providing role in danger has not been directly supported. We investigated the relationship between the behavioural and cardiac response in dogs (N = 30) while being approached by a threatening stranger in separation vs. in the presence of the owner, presented in a balanced order. Non-invasive telemetric measures of heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) data during the threatening approaches was compared to periods before and after the encounters. Dogs that showed distress vocalisation during separation (N = 18) and that growled or barked at the stranger during the threatening approach (N = 17) were defined as behaviourally reactive in the given situation. While characteristic stress vocalisations were emitted during separations, the absence of the owner did not have an effect on dogs’ mean HR, but significantly increased the HRV. The threatening approach increased dogs’ mean HR, with a parallel decrease in the HRV, particularly in dogs that were behaviourally reactive to the encounter. Importantly, the HR increase was significantly less pronounced when dogs faced the stranger in the presence of the owner. Moreover, the test order, whether the dog encountered the stranger first with or without its owner, also proved important: HR increase associated with the encounter in separation seemed to be attenuated in dogs that faced the stranger first in the presence of their owner. We provided evidence for human analogue safe haven effect of the owner in a potentially dangerous situation. Similarly to parents of infants, owners can provide a buffer against stress in dogs, which can even reduce the effect of a subsequent encounter with the same threatening stimuli later when the owner is not present. PMID

  16. Non-expert listeners show decreased heart rate and increased blood pressure (fear bradycardia) in response to atonal music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proverbio, Alice M; Manfrin, Luigi; Arcari, Laura A; De Benedetto, Francesco; Gazzola, Martina; Guardamagna, Matteo; Lozano Nasi, Valentina; Zani, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that listening to different types of music may modulate differently psychological mood and physiological responses associated with the induced emotions. In this study the effect of listening to instrumental classical vs. atonal contemporary music was examined in a group of 50 non-expert listeners. The subjects' heart rate and diastolic and systolic blood pressure values were measured while they listened to music of different style and emotional typologies. Pieces were selected by asking a group of composers and conservatory professors to suggest a list of the most emotional music pieces (from Renaissance to present time). A total of 214 suggestions from 20 respondents were received. Then it was asked them to identify which pieces best induced in the listener feelings of agitation, joy or pathos and the number of suggested pieces per style was computed. Atonal pieces were more frequently indicated as agitating, and tonal pieces as joyful. The presence/absence of tonality in a musical piece did not affect the affective dimension of pathos (being touching). Among the most frequently cited six pieces were selected that were comparable for structure and style, to represent each emotion and style. They were equally evaluated as unfamiliar by an independent group of 10 students of the same cohort) and were then used as stimuli for the experimental session in which autonomic parameters were recorded. Overall, listening to atonal music (independent of the pieces' emotional characteristics) was associated with a reduced heart rate (fear bradycardia) and increased blood pressure (both diastolic and systolic), possibly reflecting an increase in alertness and attention, psychological tension, and anxiety. This evidence fits with the results of the esthetical assessment showing how, overall, atonal music is perceived as more agitating and less joyful than tonal one.

  17. Non-expert listeners show decreased heart rate and increased blood pressure (fear bradycardia) in response to atonal music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proverbio, Alice M.; Manfrin, Luigi; Arcari, Laura A.; De Benedetto, Francesco; Gazzola, Martina; Guardamagna, Matteo; Lozano Nasi, Valentina; Zani, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that listening to different types of music may modulate differently psychological mood and physiological responses associated with the induced emotions. In this study the effect of listening to instrumental classical vs. atonal contemporary music was examined in a group of 50 non-expert listeners. The subjects’ heart rate and diastolic and systolic blood pressure values were measured while they listened to music of different style and emotional typologies. Pieces were selected by asking a group of composers and conservatory professors to suggest a list of the most emotional music pieces (from Renaissance to present time). A total of 214 suggestions from 20 respondents were received. Then it was asked them to identify which pieces best induced in the listener feelings of agitation, joy or pathos and the number of suggested pieces per style was computed. Atonal pieces were more frequently indicated as agitating, and tonal pieces as joyful. The presence/absence of tonality in a musical piece did not affect the affective dimension of pathos (being touching). Among the most frequently cited six pieces were selected that were comparable for structure and style, to represent each emotion and style. They were equally evaluated as unfamiliar by an independent group of 10 students of the same cohort) and were then used as stimuli for the experimental session in which autonomic parameters were recorded. Overall, listening to atonal music (independent of the pieces’ emotional characteristics) was associated with a reduced heart rate (fear bradycardia) and increased blood pressure (both diastolic and systolic), possibly reflecting an increase in alertness and attention, psychological tension, and anxiety. This evidence fits with the results of the esthetical assessment showing how, overall, atonal music is perceived as more agitating and less joyful than tonal one. PMID:26579029

  18. Non-expert listeners show decreased heart rate and increased blood pressure (fear bradycardia in response to atonal music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Mado eProverbio

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies suggested that listening to different types of music may modulate differently psychological mood and physiological responses associated with the induced emotions. In this study the effect of listening to instrumental classical vs. atonal contemporary music was examined in a group of 50 non-expert listeners. The subjects’ heart rate and diastolic and systolic blood pressure values were measured while they listened to music of different style and emotional typologies. Pieces were selected by asking a group of composers and conservatory professors to suggest a list of the most emotional music pieces (from Renaissance to present time. A total of 214 suggestions from 20 respondents was received. Then it was asked them to identify which pieces best induced in the listener feelings of agitation, joy or pathos and the number of suggested pieces per style was computed. Atonal pieces were more frequently indicated as agitating, and tonal pieces as joyful. The presence/absence of tonality in a musical piece did not affect the affective dimension of pathos (being touching. Among the most frequently cited six pieces were selected that were comparable for structure and style, to represent each emotion and style. They were equally evaluated as unfamiliar by an independent group of 10 students of the same cohort and were then used as stimuli for the experimental session in which autonomic parameters were recorded. Overall, listening to atonal music (independent of the pieces’ emotional characteristics was associated with a reduced heart rate (fear bradycardia and increased blood pressure (both diastolic and systolic, possibly reflecting an increase in alertness and attention, psychological tension, and anxiety. This evidence fits with the results of the aesthetical assessment showing how, overall, atonal music is perceived as more agitating and less joyful than tonal one.

  19. Heart rate and reinforcement sensitivity in ADHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luman, M.; Oosterlaan, J.; Hyde, C.; van Meel, C.S.; Sergeant, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Both theoretical and clinical accounts of attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) implicate a dysfunctional reinforcement system. This study investigated heart rate parameters in response to feedback associated with reward and response cost in ADHD children and controls aged 8

  20. Safety and feasibility of regadenoson use for suboptimal heart rate response during symptom-limited standard Bruce exercise stress test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partington, Sara L; Lanka, Viswanatha; Hainer, Jon; Blankstein, Ron; Skali, Hicham; Forman, Daniel E; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Dorbala, Sharmila

    2012-10-01

    Regadenoson during exercise stress test (ETT) can provide maximal hyperemia for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), along with exercise information. Our aim was to study the feasibility and safety of regadenoson injection at peak ETT for submaximal heart rate (HR) response. Consecutive patients who underwent SPECT MPI with standard Bruce ETT or supine-regadenoson (Supine-Reg) were analyzed. ETT patients were grouped as ETT-Max [maximal HR > 0.85 * (220 - age), N = 1,522], ETT-Submax (submaximal HR no regadenoson, N = 504), ETT-Reg (submaximal HR and regadenoson, N = 211). The HR during ETT was submaximal in 715 (32%) patients. Of these, 211 patients (30%) underwent ETT-Reg (mean exercise duration: 5.5 ± 2.5 minutes). ETT-Reg patients had a higher frequency of hypertension, diabetes, smoking and beta-blocker use, similar rest systolic blood pressure (SBP), but lower rest and peak HR and peak SBP compared to ETT-Max patients. There were no serious complications with regadenoson. Side effects (49% vs 6%, P < .0001) were fewer and aminophylline use was lower with ETT-Reg compared to Supine-Reg (0.5% vs 8.1%, P = .001). Submaximal HR response to ETT is common. ETT-Reg is safe, feasible, and well-tolerated. ETT-Reg facilitates a diagnostic MPI with reporting of functional capacity, exercise ECG/hemodynamic changes and MPI at maximal hyperemia.

  1. The impact of sleep restriction while performing simulated physical firefighting work on cortisol and heart rate responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkow, Alexander; Aisbett, Brad; Reynolds, John; Ferguson, Sally A; Main, Luana C

    2016-04-01

    Physical work and sleep restriction are two stressors faced by firefighters, yet the combined impact these demands have on firefighters' acute stress responses is poorly understood. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect firefighting work and sleep restriction have on firefighters' acute cortisol and heart rate (HR) responses during a simulated 3-day and 2-night fire-ground deployment. Firefighters completed multiple days of simulated physical work separated by either an 8-h (control condition; n = 18) or 4-h sleep opportunity (sleep restriction condition; n = 17). Salivary cortisol was sampled every 2 h, and HR was measured continuously each day. On day 2 and day 3 of the deployment, the sleep restriction condition exhibited a significantly higher daily area under the curve cortisol level and an elevated cortisol profile in the afternoon and evening when compared with the control condition. Firefighters' HR decreased across the simulation, but there were no significant differences found between conditions. Findings highlight the protective role an 8-h sleep opportunity between shifts of firefighting work has on preserving normal cortisol levels when compared to a 4-h sleep opportunity which resulted in elevated afternoon and evening cortisol. Given the adverse health outcomes associated with chronically high cortisol, especially later in the day, future research should examine how prolonged exposure to firefighting work (including restricted sleep) affects firefighters' cortisol levels long term. Furthermore, monitoring cortisol levels post-deployment will determine the minimum recovery time firefighters need to safely return to the fire-ground.

  2. Energy expenditure and heart rate response to breaking up sedentary time with three different physical activity interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, S E; Jones, M; Gladwell, V F

    2015-05-01

    Prolonged sedentary behaviour is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk and decreased energy expenditure (EE). Workplace interventions breaking up sedentary time have increased EE but the cardiovascular responses are unknown. The practicalities of these interventions, such as required costs and workplace adaptations, are questioned. Calisthenics exercises overcome such limitations, but have not been assessed. The aim of this study was to assess the EE and heart rate (HR) response when breaking up sedentary time with a short bout of standing, walking or calisthenics. Twenty healthy participants (15 male) completed four 30 min conditions: a) 30 min sitting, or breaking up this period with two minutes of b) standing, c) treadmill walking (4 km·h(-1)) or d) a set of calisthenics exercises (including squats and lunges). HR and EE (indirect calorimetry) were assessed throughout. During the activity break, calisthenics caused the highest HR (90 ± 12 bpm) compared to all other conditions (Sit: 70 ± 12 bpm; Stand:72 ± 13 bpm; Walk:84 ± 10 bpm; p cardiovascular health and assist in weight management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of Vildagliptin and Metformin on Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Responses to Small Intestinal Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tongzhi; Trahair, Laurence G; Little, Tanya J; Bound, Michelle J; Zhang, Xiang; Wu, Hang; Sun, Zilin; Horowitz, Michael; Rayner, Christopher K; Jones, Karen L

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate effects of vildagliptin and metformin on blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) responses to intraduodenal (ID) glucose in diet-controlled type 2 diabetes. Study A compared vildagliptin (50 mg) and placebo, given 60 min before a 120-min ID glucose infusion at 2 or 4 kcal/min (ID2 or ID4) in 16 patients. Study B compared metformin (850 mg) and placebo, given 30 min before ID2 over 120 min in 9 patients. Systolic (P = 0.002) and diastolic (P < 0.001) BP were lower and HR greater (P = 0.005) after vildagliptin compared with placebo, without interaction between vildagliptin and the glucose infusion rate. In contrast, HR was greater after metformin than placebo (P < 0.001), without any difference in systolic or diastolic BP. Vildagliptin reduces BP and increases HR, whereas metformin increases HR without affecting BP during ID glucose infusion in type 2 diabetes. These distinct cardiovascular profiles during enteral nutrient exposure may have implications for postprandial hypotension. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  4. ARM VS. COMBINED LEG AND ARM EXERCISE: BLOOD PRESSURE RESPONSES AND RATINGS OF PERCEIVED EXERTION AT THE SAME INDIRECTLY DETERMINED HEART RATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Di Blasio

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Pre-participation screening is very important for prescribing and practising exercise safely. The aim of this study was to investigate both ratings of perceived exertion (RPE and blood pressure responses in two different types of exercises with matching duration and indirectly determined working heart rate (HR. Participants were 23 male students, who were generally healthy but sedentary. The time course of their RPE and blood pressure during a 50- minute work-out session on an arm crank ergometer and a cross trainer were compared. RM-ANOVA showed both a higher RPE (p < 0.001 and diastolic blood pressure (DBP (p < 0.001 response to the arm exercise that were shown significantly correlated (r = 0.883; p = 0.008. Linear regression analysis (p = 0.001 confirmed the ability to predict the time course of DBP by knowing the RPE on the arm crank ergometer. Even if people use the recommended relative intensity, the HR method is not always safe for health without pre-participation screening because exercise characteristics can negatively influence physiological responses. The HR method could be substituted by the RPE method.

  5. Heart rate response during a simulated Olympic boxing match is predominantly above ventilatory threshold 2: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Lira CA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Claudio Andre Barbosa de Lira,1 Luiz Fernando Peixinho-Pena,2 Rodrigo Luiz Vancini1,2 Rafael Júlio de Freitas Guina Fachina,3,4 Alexandre Aparecido de Almeida,2 Marília dos Santos Andrade,2 Antonio Carlos da Silva2 1Setor de Fisiologia Humana e do Exercício, Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG, Câmpus Jataí, Jataí, GO, Brazil; 2Departamento de Fisiologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP, São Paulo, SP, Brazil; 3Departamento de Ciência do Esporte, Faculdade de Educação Física (FEF, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP, Campinas, Brazil; 4Confederação Brasileira de Basketball (CBB, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Abstract: The present study aimed to describe heart rate (HR responses during a simulated Olympic boxing match and examine physiological parameters of boxing athletes. Ten highly trained Olympic boxing athletes (six men and four women performed a maximal graded exercise test on a motorized treadmill to determine maximal oxygen uptake (52.2 mL · kg-1 · min-1 ± 7.2 mL · kg-1 · min-1 and ventilatory thresholds 1 and 2. Ventilatory thresholds 1 and 2 were used to classify the intensity of exercise based on respective HR during a boxing match. In addition, oxygen uptake (VO2 was estimated during the match based on the HR response and the HR-VO2 relationship obtained from a maximal graded exercise test for each participant. On a separate day, participants performed a boxing match lasting three rounds, 2 minutes each, with a 1-minute recovery period between each round, during which HR was measured. In this context, HR and VO2 were above ventilatory threshold 2 during 219.8 seconds ± 67.4 seconds. There was an increase in HR and VO2 as a function of round (round 3 < round 2 < round 1, P < 0.0001.These findings may direct individual training programs for boxing practitioners and other athletes. Keywords: heart rate, physiological profile, intermittent exercise, combat sports, boxing

  6. The effect of pitch dimensions on heart rate responses and technical demands of small-sided soccer games in elite players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, David M; Drust, Barry

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of changes in pitch size on heart rate responses and technical requirements of small-sided soccer games. Eight male soccer players participated in the study (mean+/-S.D.; age 18+/-1 years, height 1.80+/-0.1 m, weight 73.3+/-6.2 kg, estimated VO2peak 50.0+/-3.2 ml kg(-1) min(-1)). All players participated in small-sided games on three different pitch sizes (SSG1, 30 m x 20 m; SSG2, 40 m x 30 m; SSG3, 50 m x 40 m). Games consisted of 4 x 4 min of game play, interspersed by 2 min of active recovery. Heart rate measurements were made using a team-based monitoring system. Each game was also filmed to evaluate the technical actions. These tapes were analysed using a hand notation system. Mean+/-S.D. heart rates for the three games were not significantly different between conditions (SSG1, 175+/-9; SSG2, 173+/-11; SSG3, 169+/-6). The technical actions that changed as a result of changes in pitch size were the number of tackles (SSG1, 45+/-10; SSG2, 15+/-4; Pgame play indicated significant differences for both heart rate responses and the technical demands. These results demonstrate that changes in pitch size do not alter heart rate or the majority of technical requirements observed within small-sided games.

  7. Changes in the heart rate variability in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and its response to acute CPAP treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Kufoy

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The goal of this study was to demonstrate whether the use of CPAP produces significant changes in the heart rate or in the heart rate variability of patients with OSA in the first night of treatment and whether gender and obesity play a role in these differences. METHODS: Single-center transversal study including patients with severe OSA corrected with CPAP. Only patients with total correction after CPAP were included. Patients underwent two sleep studies on consecutive nights: the first night a basal study, and the second with CPAP. We also analyzed the heart rate changes and their relationship with CPAP treatment, sleep stages, sex and body mass index. Twenty-minute segments of the ECG were selected from the sleep periods of REM, no-REM and awake. Heart rate (HR and heart rate variability (HRV were studied by comparing the R-R interval in the different conditions. We also compared samples from the basal study and CPAP nights. RESULTS: 39 patients (15 females, 24 males were studied. The mean age was 50.67 years old, the mean AHI was 48.54, and mean body mass index was 33.41 kg/m(2 (31.83 males, 35.95 females. Our results showed that HRV (SDNN decreased after the use of CPAP during the first night of treatment, especially in non-REM sleep. Gender and obesity did not have any influence on our results. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support that cardiac variability improves as an acute effect, independently of gender or weight, in the first night of CPAP use in severe OSA patients, supporting the idea of continuous use and emphasizing that noncompliance of CPAP treatment should be avoided even if it is just once.

  8. Modality of fear cues affects acoustic startle potentiation but not heart-rate response in patients with dental phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannemüller, André; Sartory, Gudrun; Elsesser, Karin; Lohrmann, Thomas; Jöhren, Hans P.

    2015-01-01

    The acoustic startle response (SR) has consistently been shown to be enhanced by fear-arousing cross-modal background stimuli in phobics. Intra-modal fear-potentiation of acoustic SR was rarely investigated and generated inconsistent results. The present study compared the acoustic SR to phobia-related sounds with that to phobia-related pictures in 104 dental phobic patients and 22 controls. Acoustic background stimuli were dental treatment noises and birdsong and visual stimuli were dental treatment and neutral control pictures. Background stimuli were presented for 4 s, randomly followed by the administration of the startle stimulus. In addition to SR, heart-rate (HR) was recorded throughout the trials. Irrespective of their content, background pictures elicited greater SR than noises in both groups with a trend for phobic participants to show startle potentiation to phobia-related pictures but not noises. Unlike controls, phobics showed HR acceleration to both dental pictures and noises. HR acceleration of the phobia group was significantly positively correlated with SR in the noise condition only. The acoustic SR to phobia-related noises is likely to be inhibited by prolonged sensorimotor gating. PMID:25774142

  9. Heart Rate Dynamics after Combined Strength and Endurance Training in Middle-Aged Women: Heterogeneity of Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberger, Ary L.; Tulppo, Mikko P.; Laaksonen, David E.; Nyman, Kai; Keskitalo, Marko; Häkkinen, Arja; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2013-01-01

    The loss of complexity in physiological systems may be a dynamical biomarker of aging and disease. In this study the effects of combined strength and endurance training compared with those of endurance training or strength training alone on heart rate (HR) complexity and traditional HR variability indices were examined in middle-aged women. 90 previously untrained female volunteers between the age of 40 and 65 years completed a 21 week progressive training period of either strength training, endurance training or their combination, or served as controls. Continuous HR time series were obtained during supine rest and submaximal steady state exercise. The complexity of HR dynamics was assessed using multiscale entropy analysis. In addition, standard time and frequency domain measures were also computed. Endurance training led to increases in HR complexity and selected time and frequency domain measures of HR variability (Pendurance training or strength training alone did not produce significant changes in HR dynamics. Inter-subject heterogeneity of responses was particularly noticeable in the combined training group. At supine rest, no training-induced changes in HR parameters were observed in any of the groups. The present findings emphasize the potential utility of endurance training in increasing the complex variability of HR in middle-aged women. Further studies are needed to explore the combined endurance and strength training adaptations and possible gender and age related factors, as well as other mechanisms, that may mediate the effects of different training regimens on HR dynamics. PMID:24013586

  10. Heart rate response and fitness effects of various types of physical education for 8- to 9-year-old schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendiksen, Mads; Williams, Craig A; Hornstrup, Therese; Clausen, Helle; Kloppenborg, Jesper; Shumikhin, Dmitriy; Brito, João; Horton, Joshua; Barene, Svein; Jackman, Sarah R; Krustrup, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the heart rate (HR) response to various types of physical education (PE) activities for 8- to 9-year-olds (five school classes, n = 93) and the fitness effects of a short-term PE training programme (three of the five classes, n = 59) with high compared to low-to-moderate aerobic intensity. HR was recorded during small-sided indoor soccer (SO), basketball (BB), unihockey (UH), circuit training (CT), walking (W) and Nintendo Wii Boxing (NWB) and Nintendo Wii Tennis (NWT). Maximal HR (HRmax) and physical fitness was determined by the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 Children's test (YYIR1C) test. Following cluster randomisation, three classes were tested before and after 6 wks with 2 × 30 min/wk SO and UH lessons [high-intensity (HI), 2 classes, n = 39] or low-to-moderate intensity PE lessons (CON, 1 class, n = 20). Average HR in SO (76 ± 1% HRmax), BA (77 ± 1% HRmax) and UH (74 ± 1% HRmax) was higher (P 80% and 90% HRmax, respectively, was higher (P 80% HRmax being higher (P intermittent exercise performance.

  11. Potassium supplementation and heart rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, L.; Molenberg, Famke; Bakker, S.J.L.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Increasing the intake of potassium has been shown to lower blood pressure, but whether it also affects heart rate (HR) is largely unknown. We therefore assessed the effect of potassium supplementation on HR in a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Methods and

  12. The relationship between event-related brain potential, heart rate, and blood pressure responses in an S1-S2 paradigm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, L.J.; Gaillard, A.W.K.; Wientjes, C.J.E.

    1995-01-01

    Event-related brain potential (ERP), heart rate (HR), and blood pressure (BP) responses were examined during the 6s foreperiod of a choice-reaction task. Low and high trait-anxious males were required to make same/different judgements based on the similarity of two successively presented visual

  13. Differing Developmental Trajectories in Heart Rate Responses to Speech Stimuli in Infants at High and Low Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdue, Katherine L.; Edwards, Laura A.; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Nelson, Charles A.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated heart rate (HR) in infants at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of age, at high (HRA) and low (LRC) familial risk for ASD, to identify potential endophenotypes of ASD risk related to attentional responses. HR was extracted from functional near-infrared spectroscopy recordings while infants listened to speech stimuli. Longitudinal analysis…

  14. Coping with continuous human disturbance in the wild: insights from penguin heart rate response to various stressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viblanc Vincent A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A central question for ecologists is the extent to which anthropogenic disturbances (e.g. tourism might impact wildlife and affect the systems under study. From a research perspective, identifying the effects of human disturbance caused by research-related activities is crucial in order to understand and account for potential biases and derive appropriate conclusions from the data. Results Here, we document a case of biological adjustment to chronic human disturbance in a colonial seabird, the king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus, breeding on remote and protected islands of the Southern ocean. Using heart rate (HR as a measure of the stress response, we show that, in a colony with areas exposed to the continuous presence of humans (including scientists for over 50 years, penguins have adjusted to human disturbance and habituated to certain, but not all, types of stressors. When compared to birds breeding in relatively undisturbed areas, birds in areas of high chronic human disturbance were found to exhibit attenuated HR responses to acute anthropogenic stressors of low-intensity (i.e. sounds or human approaches to which they had been subjected intensely over the years. However, such attenuation was not apparent for high-intensity stressors (i.e. captures for scientific research which only a few individuals experience each year. Conclusions Habituation to anthropogenic sounds/approaches could be an adaptation to deal with chronic innocuous stressors, and beneficial from a research perspective. Alternately, whether penguins have actually habituated to anthropogenic disturbances over time or whether human presence has driven the directional selection of human-tolerant phenotypes, remains an open question with profound ecological and conservation implications, and emphasizes the need for more knowledge on the effects of human disturbance on long-term studied populations.

  15. Heart rate responses and technical comparison between small- vs. large-sided games in elite professional soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Adam L; Wong, Del P; McKenna, Michael; Dellal, Alexandre

    2011-08-01

    This study aims to examine the difference in heart rate (HR) responses and technical activities placed upon European elite players when exposed to 2-sided games differing in the number of players and playing area. Fifteen male soccer players from a Scottish Premier League team (26.3 ± 4.85 years, 182.4 ± 6.99 cm, 79.5 ± 8.05 kg, VO2max of 54.36 ± 5.45 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) performed both small (3 vs. 3 plus goalkeepers) and large (9 vs. 9 plus goalkeepers) sided games each lasting for 3 × 5 minutes interspersed with 4-minute passive recovery during the 2009-2010 season. The HR responses and players' technical actions were recorded throughout all sided games. Results show that small-sided games (SSG) induced significantly (p games. Furthermore, during SSGs, players spent significantly longer time in the >85% maximal HR zone (p games. Technical analysis revealed a large practical difference (effect size ranged from 1.5 to 21.2) between small- and large-sided games: less number of blocks, headers, interceptions, passes, and receives but more dribbles, shots, and tackles in SSG. Furthermore, SSG induced significantly lesser total ball contacts per game (p games. The different technical requirements also enable coaches to carry out training games more suitable to specific playing positions such as SSG for midfielders (more dribbles, tackles, and ball contacts per player) strikers (more shots), and large-sided games for defender (more blocks, headers, and interceptions).

  16. Differential heart rate response to magnetic seizure therapy (MST) relative to electroconvulsive therapy: a nonhuman primate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowny, Stefan B; Cycowicz, Yael M; McClintock, Shawn M; Truesdale, Matthew D; Luber, Bruce; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2009-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment for severe depression; however, the induced therapeutic seizure acts on the autonomic nervous system and results in significant cardiac effects. This is an important consideration particularly in the elderly. Magnetic seizure therapy (MST) is in development as a less invasive alternative, but its effects on cardiac function have not been studied. We sought to model those effects in nonhuman primates to inform the development of safer neurostimulation interventions. Twenty four rhesus monkeys were randomly assigned to receive 6 weeks of daily treatment with electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS), magnetic seizure therapy (MST) or anesthesia-alone sham. Digitally acquired ECG and an automated R-wave and inter-R interval (IRI) sampling were used to measure intervention effects on heart rate (HR). Significant differences between experimental conditions were found in the HR as evidenced by changes in the immediate post-stimulus, ictal and postictal epochs. Immediate post-stimulus bradycardia was seen with ECS but not with MST. ECS induced significantly more tachycardia than MST or sham in both the ictal and postictal periods. MST resulted in a small, but statistically significant increase in HR during the postictal period relative to baseline. HR was found to increase by 25% and 8% in the ECS and MST conditions, respectively. MST resulted in significantly less marked sympathetic and parasympathetic response than did ECS. This differential physiological response is consistent with MST having a more superficial cortical site of action with less impact on deeper brain structures implicated in cardiac control relative to ECT. The clinical relevance of the topographical seizure spread of MST and its associated effects on the autonomic nervous system remain to be determined in human clinical trials.

  17. Heart rate monitors and abnormal heart rhythm detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudet, G; Chamoux, A

    2000-10-01

    We test the accuracy of two third generation heart rate monitors (HRM), Accurex Plus and Vantage NV and compare these data with those of an older monitor, PE 4000. Then we investigate responses of the HRM's to abnormal heart rhythms (HR). Accurex Plus and Vantage NV, and PE 4000 were tested in the laboratory under both stable and transient conditions. The Phantom 320 HR simulator gave 7 stable heart rates, each lasting 3 min. The responses of the HRM's to abnormal heart rhythms were tested with an automatic arrhythmia program lasting 17 min. The new HRM's, Accurex Plus and Vantage NV, were more accurate (89 to 94% and over 98% at +/-3 beats per min) in the stable state than the PE 4000. They all showed a smoothing effect in transient measurements, which was stronger in decelerating HR (1st case) than in accelerating HR (2nd case). - 1st case: Accurex Plus =Vantage NV >PE 4000 -2nd case: PE 4000 >Accurex =Vantage. Most isolated heart rhythm disorders (missing beat, pause 4 s, important bradycardia or tachycardia.

  18. Acute Effects of Different Formats of Small-Sided and Conditioned Handball Games on Heart Rate Responses in Female Students During PE Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Manuel Clemente

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of different formats (2-a-side, 3-a-side and 4-a-side on heart rate responses of female students during small-sided and conditioned handball games. The heart rate responses were measured using heart rate monitors during physical education classes. Eight female students participated in the study (15 ± 0.0 years. The one-way ANOVA showed statistical differences with moderate effect between the three different formats (F(2, 1674 = 86.538; p-value ˂ 0.001;  = 0.094; Power = 1.0. The results showed that smaller formats (2-a-side and 3-a-side increased the heart rate responses of female students during small-sided and conditioned handball games during physical education (PE classes. The results also suggested that 2-a-side games can be used for anaerobic workouts and the 3-a-side and 4-a-side games can be better used to reach lactate-threshold and for aerobic workouts of high intensity.

  19. Effects of the Sports Level, Format of the Game and Task Condition on Heart Rate Responses, Technical and Tactical Performance of Youth Basketball Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Filipe Manuel; González-Víllora, Sixto; Delextrat, Anne; Martins, Fernando Manuel Lourenço; Vicedo, Juan Carlos Pastor

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of different small-sided and conditioning games (SSCG) with different tactical contents on heart rate responses, technical performance and collective organization of youth basketball players of different performance levels. Twenty male basketball players from U14 (13.7 ± 0.8 years old; 4.2 ± 1.4 years of practice) and U16 (15.3 ± 1.1 years old; 6.4 ± 2.1 years of practice) participated in this research study. The two-way MANOVA revealed that the sports level (p = 0.009; ηp2 = 0.151), format (p = 0.001; ηp2 = 0.246) and task condition (p = 0.023; ηp2 = 0.104; small effect size) had significant main effects on heart rate responses. It was also found that the format (p = 0.001; ηp2 = 0.182) had significant main effects on technical performance. A smaller format significantly increased the heart rate, volume of play, efficiency index and collective density during attacking plays. The SSCG with attacking content statistically increased the heart rate, efficiency index and performance score. Therefore, this study revealed that different SSCGs with tactical content influenced the physiological responses of youth players. PMID:28828085

  20. Effects of the Sports Level, Format of the Game and Task Condition on Heart Rate Responses, Technical and Tactical Performance of Youth Basketball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Filipe Manuel; González-Víllora, Sixto; Delextrat, Anne; Martins, Fernando Manuel Lourenço; Vicedo, Juan Carlos Pastor

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of different small-sided and conditioning games (SSCG) with different tactical contents on heart rate responses, technical performance and collective organization of youth basketball players of different performance levels. Twenty male basketball players from U14 (13.7 ± 0.8 years old; 4.2 ± 1.4 years of practice) and U16 (15.3 ± 1.1 years old; 6.4 ± 2.1 years of practice) participated in this research study. The two-way MANOVA revealed that the sports level (p = 0.009; [Formula: see text] = 0.151), format (p = 0.001; [Formula: see text] = 0.246) and task condition (p = 0.023; [Formula: see text] = 0.104; small effect size) had significant main effects on heart rate responses. It was also found that the format (p = 0.001; [Formula: see text] = 0.182) had significant main effects on technical performance. A smaller format significantly increased the heart rate, volume of play, efficiency index and collective density during attacking plays. The SSCG with attacking content statistically increased the heart rate, efficiency index and performance score. Therefore, this study revealed that different SSCGs with tactical content influenced the physiological responses of youth players.

  1. Evaluation of heat stress response in crossbred dairy cows under tropical climate by analysis of heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bun, Chan; Watanabe, Youki; Uenoyama, Yoshihisa; Inoue, Naoko; Ieda, Nahoko; Matsuda, Fuko; Tsukamura, Hiroko; Kuwahara, Masayoshi; Maeda, Kei-Ichiro; Ohkura, Satoshi; Pheng, Vutha

    2017-12-11

    The present study aims to examine the effect of tropical temperatures on autonomic nervous activity in Cambodian dairy cattle by analyzing heart rate variability (HRV). Holter-type electrocardiograms were recorded in adult crossbred cows (Cambodian native × Holstein) either in a sheltered area or under direct sunlight. Rectal temperatures and heart rates increased in animals under direct sunlight as compared to those in the shelter. The power spectral analysis of HRV revealed that three out of the five cows studied underwent a decrease in parasympathetic nervous activity under direct sunlight with the remaining two cows showing no apparent change. The HRV analysis would prove to be a useful tool to reveal information about heat tolerance in dairy cows.

  2. Recognition and response to electronic fetal heart rate patterns: impact on newborn outcomes and primary cesarean delivery rate in women undergoing induction of labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Steven L; Meyers, Janet A; Frye, Donna K; Garthwaite, Thomas; Lee, Alan J; Perlin, Jonathan B

    2015-04-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the clinical impact of specific fetal monitoring-related practices during induced labor. This was a prospective, nonrandomized study. We studied 14,398 women undergoing oxytocin induction of labor. A decrease in the infusion rate of oxytocin in the face of specified category II fetal heart rate tracings was associated with a significantly reduced rate of neonatal intensive care unit admission (3.8% vs 5.2%, P = .01) and Apgar score less than 7 at 1 and 5 minutes (4.9% vs 6.4%, P = .01, 0.6% vs 1.1%, P = .04). Compliance with an in-use checklist was associated with both a reduction in the rate of neonatal intensive care unit admission (2.9 vs 4.4, P = .00) and a reduction in the cesarean delivery rate (15.8% vs 18.8%, P = .00). Electronic fetal heart rate monitoring improves neonatal outcomes when unambiguous definitions of abnormal fetal heart rate and tachysystole are coupled with specific interventions. Utilization of a checklist for oxytocin monitoring is associated with improved neonatal outcomes and a reduction in the cesarean delivery rate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Heart rate dynamics after combined strength and endurance training in middle-aged women: heterogeneity of responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Karavirta

    Full Text Available The loss of complexity in physiological systems may be a dynamical biomarker of aging and disease. In this study the effects of combined strength and endurance training compared with those of endurance training or strength training alone on heart rate (HR complexity and traditional HR variability indices were examined in middle-aged women. 90 previously untrained female volunteers between the age of 40 and 65 years completed a 21 week progressive training period of either strength training, endurance training or their combination, or served as controls. Continuous HR time series were obtained during supine rest and submaximal steady state exercise. The complexity of HR dynamics was assessed using multiscale entropy analysis. In addition, standard time and frequency domain measures were also computed. Endurance training led to increases in HR complexity and selected time and frequency domain measures of HR variability (P<0.01 when measured during exercise. Combined strength and endurance training or strength training alone did not produce significant changes in HR dynamics. Inter-subject heterogeneity of responses was particularly noticeable in the combined training group. At supine rest, no training-induced changes in HR parameters were observed in any of the groups. The present findings emphasize the potential utility of endurance training in increasing the complex variability of HR in middle-aged women. Further studies are needed to explore the combined endurance and strength training adaptations and possible gender and age related factors, as well as other mechanisms, that may mediate the effects of different training regimens on HR dynamics.

  4. Heart rate responses during small-sided games and short intermittent running training in elite soccer players: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellal, Alexandre; Chamari, Karim; Pintus, Antonio; Girard, Olivier; Cotte, Thierry; Keller, Dominique

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare heart rate (HR) responses within and between physical controlled (short-duration intermittent running) and physical integrated (sided games) training methods in elite soccer players. Ten adult male elite soccer players (age, 26 +/- 2.9 years; body mass, 78.3 +/- 4.4 kg; maximum HR [HRmax], 195.4 +/- 4.9 b x min(-1) and velocity at maximal aerobic speed (MAS), 17.1 +/- 0.8 km x h(-1)) performed different short-duration intermittent runs, e.g., 30-30 (30 seconds of exercise interspersed with 30 seconds of recovery) with active recovery, and 30-30, 15-15, 10-10, and 5-20 seconds with passive recovery, and different sided games (1 versus 1, 2 versus 2, 4 versus 4, 8 versus 8 with and without a goalkeeper, and 10 versus 10). In both training methods, HR was measured and expressed as a mean percentage of HR reserve (%HRres). The %HRres in the 30-30-second intermittent run at 100% MAS with active recovery (at 9 km.h with corresponding distance) was significantly higher than that with passive recovery (85.7% versus 77.2% HRres, respectively, p intermittent running (intersubjects coefficient of variation [CV] = 11.8% versus 5.9%, respectively). During the 8 versus 8 sided game, the presence of goalkeepers induced an approximately 11% increase in %HRres and reduced homogeneity when compared to games without goalkeepers (intersubject CV = 15.6% versus 8.8%). In conclusion, these findings showed that some small-sided games allow the HR to increase to the same level as that in short-duration intermittent running. The sided game method can be used to bring more variety during training, mixing physical, technical, and tactical training approaching the intensity of short-duration intermittent running but with higher intersubject variability.

  5. A model of blood pressure, heart rate, and vaso-vagal responses produced by vestibulo-sympathetic activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore eRaphan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Blood Pressure (BP, comprised of recurrent systoles and diastoles, is controlled by central mechanisms to maintain blood flow. Periodic behavior of BP was modeled to study how peak amplitudes and frequencies of the systoles are modulated by vestibular activation. The model was implemented as a relaxation oscillator, driven by a central signal related to Desired BP. Relaxation oscillations were maintained by a second order system comprising two integrators and a threshold element in the feedback loop. The output signal related to BP was generated as a nonlinear function of the derivative of the first state variable, which is a summation of an input related to desired BP, feedback from the states, and an input from the vestibular system into one of one of the feedback loops. This nonlinear function was structured to best simulate the shapes of systoles and diastoles, the relationship between BP and Heart Rate (HR as well as the amplitude modulations of BP and Pulse Pressure. Increases in threshold in one of the feedback loops produced lower frequencies of HR, but generated large pulse pressures to maintain orthostasis, without generating a VasoVagal Response (VVR. Pulse pressures were considerably smaller in the anesthetized rats than during the simulations, but simulated pulse pressures were lowered by including saturation in the feedback loop. Stochastic changes in Threshold maintained the compensatory Baroreflex Sensitivity. Sudden decreases in Desired BP elicited non-compensatory VVRs with smaller pulse pressures, consistent with experimental data. The model suggests that the Vestibular Sympathetic Reflex modulates BP and HR of an oscillating system by manipulating parameters of the baroreflex feedback and the signals that maintain the oscillations. It also shows that a VVR is generated when the vestibular input triggers a marked reduction in Desired BP.

  6. Callous-unemotional, impulsive-irresponsible, and grandiose-manipulative traits: Distinct associations with heart rate, skin conductance, and startle responses to violent and erotic scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanti, Kostas A; Kyranides, Melina N; Georgiou, Giorgos; Petridou, Maria; Colins, Olivier F; Tuvblad, Catherine; Andershed, Henrik

    2017-05-01

    The present study aimed to examine whether callous-unemotional, grandiose-manipulative, and impulsive-irresponsible dimensions of psychopathy are differentially related to various affective and physiological measures, assessed at baseline and in response to violent and erotic movie scenes. Data were collected from young adults (N = 101) at differential risk for psychopathic traits. Findings from regression analyses revealed a unique predictive contribution of grandiose-manipulative traits in particular to higher ratings of positive valence for violent scenes. Callous-unemotional traits were uniquely associated with lower levels of sympathy toward victims and lower ratings of fear and sadness during violent scenes. All three psychopathy dimensions and the total psychopathy scale showed negative zero-order correlations with heart rate at baseline, but regression analyses revealed that only grandiose manipulation was uniquely predictive of lower baseline heart rate. Grandiose manipulation was also significantly associated with lower baseline skin conductance. Regarding autonomic activity, findings resulted in a unique negative association between grandiose manipulation and heart rate activity in response to violent scenes. In contrast, the impulsive-irresponsible dimension was positively related with heart rate activity to violent scenes. Finally, findings revealed that only callous-unemotional traits were negatively associated with startle potentiation in response to violent scenes. No associations during erotic scenes were identified. These findings point to unique associations between the three assessed dimensions of psychopathy with physiological measures, indicating that grandiose manipulation is associated with hypoarousal, impulsive irresponsibility with hyperarousal, and callous-unemotional traits with low emotional and fear responses to violent scenes. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  7. Cardiac Autonomic Modulation and the Kinetics of Heart Rate Responses in the On- and Off-Transient during Exercise in Women with Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas R. B. E. Silva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To test whether women with metabolic syndrome (MS have impairments in the on- and off-transients during an incremental test and to study whether any of the MS components are independently associated with the observed responses.Research Design and Methods: Thirty-six women aged 35–55 years were divided into a group with MS (MSG, n = 19 and a control group (CG, n = 17. R-R intervals (RRi and heart rate variability (HRV were calculated on a beat-to-beat basis and the heart rate (HR at the on- and off-transient were analyzed during an incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET.Results: MSG showed lower aerobic capacity and lower parasympathetic cardiac modulation at rest compared with CG. HR values in on-transient phase were significantly lower in MSG compared with CG. The exponential amplitudes “amp” and the parameters “τ” [speed of heart rate recovery (HRR] were lower in MSG. MSG exhibited higher HR values in comparison to CG during the off-transient indicating a slower HRR. In MSG, there was an inverse and significant correlation between fasting plasma vs. ΔF and glucose vs. exponential “τ” of HRR dynamics.Conclusion: MS is associated with poor heart rate kinetics. The altered HR kinetics seems to be related to alterations in cardiac parasympathetic modulation, and glucose metabolism seems to be the major determinant.

  8. Cardiac Autonomic Modulation and the Kinetics of Heart Rate Responses in the On- and Off-Transient during Exercise in Women with Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lucas R. B. E.; Zamunér, Antonio R.; Gentil, Paulo; Alves, Fagner M.; Leal, Acácia G. F.; Soares, Viviane; Silva, Maria S.; Vieira, Marcus F.; Simões, Karina; Pedrino, Gustavo R.; Rebelo, Ana C. S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To test whether women with metabolic syndrome (MS) have impairments in the on- and off-transients during an incremental test and to study whether any of the MS components are independently associated with the observed responses. Research Design and Methods: Thirty-six women aged 35–55 years were divided into a group with MS (MSG, n = 19) and a control group (CG, n = 17). R-R intervals (RRi) and heart rate variability (HRV) were calculated on a beat-to-beat basis and the heart rate (HR) at the on- and off-transient were analyzed during an incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET). Results: MSG showed lower aerobic capacity and lower parasympathetic cardiac modulation at rest compared with CG. HR values in on-transient phase were significantly lower in MSG compared with CG. The exponential amplitudes “amp” and the parameters “τ” [speed of heart rate recovery (HRR)] were lower in MSG. MSG exhibited higher HR values in comparison to CG during the off-transient indicating a slower HRR. In MSG, there was an inverse and significant correlation between fasting plasma vs. ΔF and glucose vs. exponential “τ” of HRR dynamics. Conclusion: MS is associated with poor heart rate kinetics. The altered HR kinetics seems to be related to alterations in cardiac parasympathetic modulation, and glucose metabolism seems to be the major determinant. PMID:28798697

  9. Reduced Dietary Sodium Intake Increases Heart Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, Niels A; Hubeck-Graudal, Thorbjørn; Jürgens, Gesche

    2016-01-01

    Reduced dietary sodium intake (sodium reduction) increases heart rate in some studies of animals and humans. As heart rate is independently associated with the development of heart failure and increased risk of premature death a potential increase in heart rate could be a harmful side......-effect of sodium reduction. The purpose of the present meta-analysis was to investigate the effect of sodium reduction on heart rate. Relevant studies were retrieved from an updated pool of 176 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in the period 1973-2014. Sixty-three of the RCTs including 72 study...... populations reported data on heart rate. In a meta-analysis of these data sodium reduction increased heart rate with 1.65 beats per minute [95% CI: 1.19, 2.11], p heart rate. This effect was independent of baseline blood pressure. In conclusion sodium reduction...

  10. Benchmarking heart rate variability toolboxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Adriana N; Li, Qiao; Liu, Chengyu; Nemati, Shamim; Shah, Amit; Clifford, Gari D

    Heart rate variability (HRV) metrics hold promise as potential indicators for autonomic function, prediction of adverse cardiovascular outcomes, psychophysiological status, and general wellness. Although the investigation of HRV has been prevalent for several decades, the methods used for preprocessing, windowing, and choosing appropriate parameters lack consensus among academic and clinical investigators. A comprehensive and open-source modular program is presented for calculating HRV implemented in Matlab with evidence-based algorithms and output formats. We compare our software with another widely used HRV toolbox written in C and available through PhysioNet.org. Our findings show substantially similar results when using high quality electrocardiograms (ECG) free from arrhythmias. Our software shows equivalent performance alongside an established predecessor and includes validated tools for performing preprocessing, signal quality, and arrhythmia detection to help provide standardization and repeatability in the field, leading to fewer errors in the presence of noise or arrhythmias. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Malaria on Blood Pressure, Heart Rate, Electrocardiogram ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of malaria on blood pressure, heart rate, electrocardiogram and the cardiovascular responses to postural change were studied in malaria patients. Blood pressure was measured by the sphygmomanometric-auscultatory method. Standard ECG machine was used to record the electrocardiogram. Heart rate was ...

  12. Changes in heart rate variability with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, M; Malik, M

    1996-11-01

    Depressed heart rate variability (HRV) after a myocardial infarction is associated with increased mortality. This is thought to be due to reduced parasympathetic activity and heightened sympathetic activity. Aging is associated with depressed HRV, but little is known of the affect of aging on parasympathetic activity. This study examined 56 healthy subjects (age range 40-102 years; 39 women). None had a history of heart disease or were on medication that would affect cardiac function. All had normal resting ECGs, normal heart size on chest X ray, and normal electrolytes. In all subjects, 24-hour Holter recordings were performed and used to measure HRV. In particular, the study examined the affect of age on HRV triangular index, which gives an estimate of overall HRV, and on RMSSD (square root of the mean squared differences of successive normal-to-normal RR intervals), which gives an estimate of short-term components of HRV and is thought to reflect the overall extent of vagal modulations of heart rates. Both these parameters were compared in patients younger and older than 70 years. Each recording lasted at least 17 hours; the majority of recordings were longer than 20 hours. There was a significant decrease in HRV triangular index with age (r = -0.4, P 70 years compared with those < 70 years (38.0 +/- 9.3 vs 31.0 +/- 11, respectively, P < 0.02). There was no significant difference in RMSSD between the two age groups (26.7 +/- 8.2 ms vs 28.4 +/- 11.3 ms, respectively, P = NS). Thus, the study concludes that aging reduces the global measure of HRV and may reflect reduced responsiveness of autonomic activity to external environmental stimuli with age. However, the time-domain short-term components of HRV are not affected by age and, therefore, the fast and presumably vagal modulations of heart rate appear to be maintained.

  13. Heart rate and heart rate variability in normal young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coumel, P; Maison-Blanche, P; Catuli, D

    1994-11-01

    The relationships between heart rate (HR) and HR variability (HRV) are not simple. Because both depend on the autonomic nervous system (ANS), they are not independent variables. Technically, the quantification of HRV is influenced by the duration of the cardiac cycles. The complexity of these relationships does not justify ignoring HR when studying HRV, as frequently occurs. Using spectral and nonspectral methods, the HR and various normalized and non-normalized indices of HRV were studied in 24-hour recordings of a homogeneous cohort of seventeen 20-year-old healthy males. The HR-HRV relationships were appraised by analyzing the same data in two different ways. The 24 mean hourly values provide consistent information on the circadian behavior of the indices, while the average 24-hour individual data show a wide spectrum of normality. Combined approaches allow assessment of the direct impact of RR interval on HRV evaluation. The correlations between HR and normalized indices of HRV are weaker in 24-hour individual data than in pooled hourly data of the same individuals. These correlations are close to 1 in the latter case, which does not mean that measuring HRV is simply another method of evaluating HR, but that normal physiology supposes a harmonious behavior of the various indices. When considered individually without normalization, the specific indices of vagal modulation (high-frequency band of the spectrum, short-term HR oscillations of the nonspectral analysis) consistently increase at night and diminish during the day. However, the low-frequency power, which supposedly reflects sympathetic influences, also increases at night, whereas more logically the longer HR oscillations would predominate during the day. Moreover, the selective analysis of HR oscillations during HR acceleration or decrease indicates that their behavior differs accordingly. We recommend that closer attention be paid to the complex relationships between HR and HRV. The strong correlations

  14. Resting heart rate, heart rate variability and functional decline in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogliari, Giulia; Mahinrad, Simin; Stott, David J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart rate and heart rate variability, markers of cardiac autonomic function, have been linked with cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether heart rate and heart rate variability are associated with functional status in older adults, independent of cardiovascular disease. METHODS......: We obtained data from the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER). A total of 5042 participants were included in the present study, and mean followup was 3.2 years. Heart rate and heart rate variability were derived from baseline 10-second electrocardiograms. Heart rate.......3 years. At baseline, higher heart rate was associated with worse ADL and IADL, and lower SDNN was related to worse IADL (all p values heart rate (range 71-117 beats/min) had a 1.79-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.45-2.22) and 1.35-fold (95% CI 1...

  15. Impact of Carbohydrate-Electrolyte Beverage Ingestion on Heart Rate Response While Climbing Mountain Fuji at ~3000 m

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Horiuchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We sought to investigate whether carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage ingestion reduced heart rate (HR in twenty-three healthy young adults while climbing Mount Fuji at a given exercise intensity. Twenty-three healthy adults were randomly divided into two groups: the tap water (11 males [M] and 1 female [F] and the carbohydrate-electrolyte group (10 M and 1 F. HR and activity energy expenditure (AEE were recorded every min. The HRs for the first 30 minutes of climbing were not significantly different between the groups [121 ± 2 beats per min (bpm in the tap water and 116 ± 3 bpm in the carbohydrate-electrolyte]; however, HR significantly increased with climbing in the tap water group (129 ± 2 bpm but showed no significant increase in the carbohydrate-electrolyte group (121 ± 3 bpm. In addition, body weight changes throughout two days ascending and descending on Mount Fuji were inversely related to changes in resting HR. Further, individual variation of body weight changes was suppressed by carbohydrate-electrolyte drink. Collectively, carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage intake may attenuate an increase in HR at a given AEE while mountaineering at ~3000 m compared with tap water intake.

  16. Impact of Carbohydrate-Electrolyte Beverage Ingestion on Heart Rate Response While Climbing Mountain Fuji at ~3000 m

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Junko; Kondo, Koichi; Uno, Tadashi; Morikawa, Mayuko; Nose, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    We sought to investigate whether carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage ingestion reduced heart rate (HR) in twenty-three healthy young adults while climbing Mount Fuji at a given exercise intensity. Twenty-three healthy adults were randomly divided into two groups: the tap water (11 males [M] and 1 female [F]) and the carbohydrate-electrolyte group (10 M and 1 F). HR and activity energy expenditure (AEE) were recorded every min. The HRs for the first 30 minutes of climbing were not significantly different between the groups [121 ± 2 beats per min (bpm) in the tap water and 116 ± 3 bpm in the carbohydrate-electrolyte]; however, HR significantly increased with climbing in the tap water group (129 ± 2 bpm) but showed no significant increase in the carbohydrate-electrolyte group (121 ± 3 bpm). In addition, body weight changes throughout two days ascending and descending on Mount Fuji were inversely related to changes in resting HR. Further, individual variation of body weight changes was suppressed by carbohydrate-electrolyte drink. Collectively, carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage intake may attenuate an increase in HR at a given AEE while mountaineering at ~3000 m compared with tap water intake. PMID:28770221

  17. The Effect of the Arg389Gly Beta-1 Adrenoceptor Polymorphism on Plasma Renin Activity and Heart Rate and the Genotype-Dependent Response to Metoprolol Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Morten; Andersen, Jon T; Jimenez-Solem, Espen

    2012-01-01

    A gene-drug interaction has been indicated between beta-1 selective beta-blockers and the Arg389Gly polymorphism (rs1801253) in the adrenergic beta-1 receptor gene (ADRB1). We studied the effect of the ADRB1 Arg389Gly polymorphism on plasma renin activity (PRA) and heart rate (HR) and the genotype......-dependent response to metoprolol and exercise. Twenty-nine healthy male subjects participated in 2 treatment periods (placebo and metoprolol). A 15-min submaximal exercise test was performed after each treatment period, and PRA and HR were measured before and after exercise. Before exercise, median PRA was lower...... with the other two genotypes. Gly/Gly heart failure patients might require lower doses of metoprolol than other patients to block neurohumoral hyperactivity. © 2012 The Authors Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd....

  18. Heart rate reduction and longevity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gent, Sabine; Kleinbongard, Petra; Dammann, Philip; Neuhäuser, Markus; Heusch, Gerd

    2015-03-01

    Heart rate correlates inversely with life span across all species, including humans. In patients with cardiovascular disease, higher heart rate is associated with increased mortality, and such patients benefit from pharmacological heart rate reduction. However, cause-and-effect relationships between heart rate and longevity, notably in healthy individuals, are not established. We therefore prospectively studied the effects of a life-long pharmacological heart rate reduction on longevity in mice. We hypothesized, that the total number of cardiac cycles is constant, and that a 15% heart rate reduction might translate into a 15% increase in life span. C57BL6/J mice received either placebo or ivabradine at a dose of 50 mg/kg/day in drinking water from 12 weeks to death. Heart rate and body weight were monitored. Autopsy was performed on all non-autolytic cadavers, and parenchymal organs were evaluated macroscopically. Ivabradine reduced heart rate by 14% (median, interquartile range 12-15%) throughout life, and median life span was increased by 6.2% (p = 0.01). Body weight and macroscopic findings were not different between placebo and ivabradine. Life span was not increased to the same extent as heart rate was reduced, but nevertheless significantly prolonged by 6.2%.

  19. Heart rate dependency of JT interval sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatkova, Katerina; Johannesen, Lars; Vicente, Jose; Malik, Marek

    2017-08-09

    Little experience exists with the heart rate correction of J-Tpeak and Tpeak-Tend intervals. In a population of 176 female and 176 male healthy subjects aged 32.3±9.8 and 33.1±8.4years, respectively, curve-linear and linear relationship to heart rate was investigated for different sections of the JT interval defined by the proportions of the area under the vector magnitude of the reconstructed 3D vectorcardiographic loop. The duration of the JT sub-section between approximately just before the T peak and almost the T end was found heart rate independent. Most of the JT heart rate dependency relates to the beginning of the interval. The duration of the terminal T wave tail is only weakly heart rate dependent. The Tpeak-Tend is only minimally heart rate dependent and in studies not showing substantial heart rate changes does not need to be heart rate corrected. For any correction formula that has linear additive properties, heart rate correction of JT and JTpeak intervals is practically the same as of the QT interval. However, this does not apply to the formulas in the form of Int/RR(a) since they do not have linear additive properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Elevated HbA1c Levels Are Associated with the Blunted Autonomic Response Assessed by Heart Rate Variability during Blood Volume Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakura, Miho; Maruyama, Ryoko

    2016-10-01

    A high glycemic status increases the risk for autonomic dysfunction and cardiovascular failure. The aim of this study was to investigate time-dependent changes in the autonomic response and cardiovascular dynamics and the association between the level of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and autonomic response during blood volume reduction. The study population consisted of 26 preoperative participants who were scheduled for autologous blood donation (200-400 mL of whole blood) for intraoperative or postoperative use. These participants without circulatory, respiratory, or brain disease and diabetes mellitus were grouped according to their HbA1c levels: heart rate variability (HRV) to quantify cardiac autonomic regulation throughout blood donation. During blood volume reduction, which was about 10% of the circulating blood volume, the BP and heart rate varied within normal ranges in both groups. The high-frequency (HF) component, an index of parasympathetic nerve activity, and the ratio of low-frequency (LF) to HF components (LF/HF), an index of sympathetic nerve activity, significantly decreased and increased with the progression of blood volume reduction, respectively, in the HbA1c levels are associated with the decrease in the autonomic response induced by blood volume reduction.

  1. Accelerometery and Heart Rate Responses of Professional Fast-Medium Bowlers in One-Day and Multi-Day Cricket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, James A.; Hughes, Gerwyn; Mitchell, Andrew C.; Ford, Paul A.; Watson, Tim; Duffield, Rob; Gordon, Dan; Roberts, Justin D.; Garrett, Andrew T.

    2017-01-01

    The physical demands of fast-medium bowling are increasingly being recognised, yet comparative exploration of the differing demands between competitive formats (i.e. one-day [OD] versus multi-day [MD] matches) remain minimal. The aim of this study was to describe in-match physiological profiles of professional fast-medium bowlers from England across different versions of competitive matches using a multivariable wearable monitoring device. Seven professional cricket fast-medium bowlers wore the BioharnessTM monitoring device during matches, over three seasons (>80 hours in-match). Heart Rate (HR) and Acceleromety (ACC) was compared across match types (OD, MD) and different in-match activity states (Bowling, Between over bowling, Fielding). Peak acceleration during OD bowling was significantly higher in comparison to MD cricket ([OD vs. MD] 234.1 ± 57.9 vs 226.6 ± 32.9 ct·episode-1, p technology and the findings provided give a valuable appreciation of the differences in match loads, and thus required physiological preparation and recovery in fast-medium bowlers. Key points One Day cricket has a greater overall physical strain on fast-medium bowlers providing shorter time for recovery between bowling episodes in comparison to Multi Day format. Wearable physiological monitoring technology can provide enhanced in-match workload monitoring replacing the need for simulated match-play environments. Adopting a standard global approach when defining bowling and between over episodes has been provided permitting comparative analysis to occur between teams/players enhancing coaches understanding of performance. PMID:28912647

  2. Post-exercise hypotension and heart rate variability response after water- and land-ergometry exercise in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocalini, Danilo Sales; Bergamin, Marco; Evangelista, Alexandre Lopes; Rica, Roberta Luksevicius; Pontes, Francisco Luciano; Figueira, Aylton; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Rossi, Emilly Martinelli; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Dos Santos, Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    systemic arterial hypertension is the most prevalent cardiovascular disease; physical activity for hypertensive patients is related to several beneficial cardiovascular adaptations. This paper evaluated the effect of water- and land-ergometry exercise sessions on post-exercise hypotension (PEH) of healthy normotensive subjects versus treated or untreated hypertensive patients. Forty-five older women composed three experimental groups: normotensive (N, n = 10), treated hypertensive (TH, n = 15) and untreated hypertensive (UH, n = 20). The physical exercise acute session protocol was performed at 75% of maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) for 45 minutes; systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) and mean (MBP) blood pressure were evaluated at rest, peak and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 minutes after exercise cessation. Additionally, the heart rate variability (HRV) was analyzed by R-R intervals in the frequency domain for the assessment of cardiac autonomic function. In both exercise modalities, equivalent increases in SBP were observed from rest to peak exercise for all groups, and during recovery, significant PEH was noted. At 90 minutes after the exercise session, the prevalence of hypotension was significantly higher in water- than in the land-based protocol. Moreover, more pronounced reductions in SBP and DBP were observed in the UH patients compared to TH and N subjects. Finally, exercise in the water was more effective in restoring HRV during recovery, with greater effects in the untreated hypertensive group. Our data demonstrated that water-ergometry exercise was able to induce expressive PEH and improve cardiac autonomic modulation in older normotensive, hypertensive treated or hypertensive untreated subjects when compared to conventional land-ergometry.

  3. Losartan improves heart rate variability and heart rate turbulence in heart failure due to ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Murat; Arslan, Uğur; Türkoğlu, Sedat; Balcioğlu, Serhat; Cengel, Atiye

    2007-12-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate turbulence are known to be disturbed and associated with excess mortality in heart failure. The aim of this study was to investigate whether losartan, when added on top of beta-blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) therapy, could improve these indices in patients with systolic heart failure. Seventy-seven patients (mean age 60.4 +/- 8.0, 80.5% male) with ischemic cardiomyopathy (mean ejection fraction 34.5 +/- 4.4%) and New York Heart Association Class II-III heart failure symptoms, already receiving a beta-blocker and an ACEI, were randomly assigned to either open-label losartan (losartan group) or no additional drug (control group) in a 2:1 ratio and the patients were followed for 12 weeks. The HRV and heart rate turbulence indices were calculated from 24-hour Holter recordings both at the beginning and at the end of follow-up. The baseline clinical characteristics, HRV, and heart rate turbulence indices were similar in the 2 groups. At 12 weeks of follow-up, all HRV parameters except pNN50 increased (SDNN: 113.2 +/- 34.2 versus 127.8 +/- 24.1, P = .001; SDANN: 101.5 +/- 31.7 versus 115.2 +/- 22.0, P = .001; triangular index: 29.9 +/- 11.1 versus 34.2 +/- 7.9, P = .008; RMSSD: 29.1 +/- 20.2 versus 34.3 +/- 23.0, P = .009; NN50: 5015.3 +/- 5554.9 versus 6446.7 +/- 6101.1, P = .024; NN50: 5.65 +/- 6.41 versus 7.24 +/- 6.99, P = .089; SDNNi: 45.1 +/- 13.3 versus 50.3 +/- 14.5, P = .004), turbulence onset decreased (-0. 61 +/- 1.70 versus -1.24 +/- 1.31, P = .003) and turbulence slope increased (4.107 +/- 3.881 versus 5.940 +/- 4.281, P = .004) significantly in the losartan group as compared with controls. A 12-week-long losartan therapy significantly improved HRV and heart rate turbulence in patients with Class II-III heart failure and ischemic cardiomyopathy already on beta-blockers and ACEI.

  4. Mental load, heart rate and heart rate variability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blitz, P.S.; Hoogstraten, J.; Mulder, G.

    1970-01-01

    "Several investigators have shown that diminished sinus arrhythmia can be seen as an indication of increased mental load. The present experiment deals with the influence of different levels of mental load, operationalized as the number of binary choices per minute, on the regularity of the heart

  5. Measuring heart rate with optical sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barachi, M. (Mitra)

    2014-01-01

    The problem addressed in this report is to verify the possibility of using an optical sensor in the SaxShirt in order to extract the heart rate. There are specifically three questions that we try to address. 1) How is it possible to extract heart rate (BPM) from the optical sensor? 2) Is it

  6. Using local scale exponent to characterize heart rate variability in response to postural changes in people with spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuyuan eLiao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV is a promising marker for evaluating the remaining autonomic function in people with spinal cord injury (SCI. HRV is commonly assessed by spectral analysis and detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA. This study aimed to investigate whether local scale exponent α(t can reveal new features of HRV that cannot be reflected by spectral measures and DFA coefficients. We studied 12 participants with SCI and 15 healthy able-bodied controls. ECG signals were continually recorded during 10 min sitting and 10 min prone postures. α(t was calculated for scales between 4 s and 60 s. Because α(t could be overestimated at small scales, we developed an approach for correcting α(t based on previous studies. The simulation results on simulated monofractal time series with α between 0.5 and 1.3 showed that the proposed method can yield improved estimation of α(t. We applied the proposed method to raw RR interval series. The results showed that α(t in healthy controls monotonically decreased with scale at scales between 4 s and 12 s (0.083-0.25 Hz in both the sitting and prone postures, whereas in participants with SCI, α(t slowly decreased at almost all scales. The sharp decreasing trend in α(t in controls suggests a more complex dynamics of HRV in controls. α(t at scales between 4 s (0.25 Hz and around 7 s (0.143 Hz was lower in subjects with SCI than in controls in the sitting posture; α(t at a narrow range of scales around 12 s (0.083 Hz was higher in participants with SCI than in controls in the prone posture. However, none of normalized low frequency (0.04-0.15 Hz power, the ratio of low frequency power to high frequency (0.15-0.4 Hz power and long-term (>11 beats DFA coefficient showed significant difference between healthy controls and subjects with SCI in the prone posture. Our results suggest that α(t can reveal more detailed information in comparison to spectral measures and the standard DFA parameters.

  7. Using local scale exponent to characterize heart rate variability in response to postural changes in people with spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Fuyuan; Liau, Ben-Yi; Rice, Ian M.; Elliott, Jeannette; Brooks, Ian; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a promising marker for evaluating the remaining autonomic function in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). HRV is commonly assessed by spectral analysis and detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). This study aimed to investigate whether local scale exponent α(t) can reveal new features of HRV that cannot be reflected by spectral measures and DFA coefficients. We studied 12 participants with SCI and 15 healthy able-bodied controls. ECG signals were continually recorded during 10 min sitting and 10 min prone postures. α(t) was calculated for scales between 4 and 60 s. Because α(t) could be overestimated at small scales, we developed an approach for correcting α(t) based on previous studies. The simulation results on simulated monofractal time series with α between 0.5 and 1.3 showed that the proposed method can yield improved estimation of α(t). We applied the proposed method to raw RR interval series. The results showed that α(t) in healthy controls monotonically decreased with scale at scales between 4 and 12 s (0.083–0.25 Hz) in both the sitting and prone postures, whereas in participants with SCI, α(t) slowly decreased at almost all scales. The sharp decreasing trend in α(t) in controls suggests a more complex dynamics of HRV in controls. α(t) at scales between 4 (0.25 Hz) and around 7 s (0.143 Hz) was lower in subjects with SCI than in controls in the sitting posture; α(t) at a narrow range of scales around 12 s (0.083 Hz) was higher in participants with SCI than in controls in the prone posture. However, none of normalized low frequency (0.04–0.15 Hz) power, the ratio of low frequency power to high frequency (0.15–0.4 Hz) power and long-term (>11 beats) DFA coefficient showed significant difference between healthy controls and subjects with SCI in the prone posture. Our results suggest that α(t) can reveal more detailed information in comparison to spectral measures and the standard DFA parameters. PMID:26029112

  8. 31P NMR 2D Mapping of Creatine Kinase Forward Flux Rate in Hearts with Postinfarction Left Ventricular Remodeling in Response to Cell Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Gao

    Full Text Available Utilizing a fast 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS 2-dimensional chemical shift imaging (2D-CSI method, this study examined the heterogeneity of creatine kinase (CK forward flux rate of hearts with postinfarction left ventricular (LV remodeling. Immunosuppressed Yorkshire pigs were assigned to 4 groups: 1 A sham-operated normal group (SHAM, n = 6; 2 A 60 minutes distal left anterior descending coronary artery ligation and reperfusion (MI, n = 6; 3 Open patch group; ligation injury plus open fibrin patch over the site of injury (Patch, n = 6; and 4 Cell group, hiPSCs-cardiomyocytes, -endothelial cells, and -smooth muscle cells (2 million, each were injected into the injured myocardium pass through a fibrin patch (Cell+Patch, n = 5. At 4 weeks, the creatine phosphate (PCr/ATP ratio, CK forward flux rate (Flux PCr→ATP, and k constant of CK forward flux rate (kPCr→ATP were severely decreased at border zone myocardium (BZ adjacent to MI. Cell treatment results in significantly increase of PCr/ATP ratio and improve the value of kPCr→ATP and Flux PCr→ATP in BZ myocardium. Moreover, the BZ myocardial CK total activity and protein expression of CK mitochondria isozyme and CK myocardial isozyme were significantly reduced, but recovered in response to cell treatment. Thus, cell therapy results in improvement of BZ bioenergetic abnormality in hearts with postinfarction LV remodeling, which is accompanied by significantly improvements in BZ CK activity and CK isozyme expression. The fast 2D 31P MR CSI mapping can reliably measure the heterogeneity of bioenergetics in hearts with post infarction LV remodeling.

  9. Heart rate variability and blood pressure during dynamic and static exercise at similar heart rate levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weippert, Matthias; Behrens, Kristin; Rieger, Annika; Stoll, Regina; Kreuzfeld, Steffi

    2013-01-01

    Aim was to elucidate autonomic responses to dynamic and static (isometric) exercise of the lower limbs eliciting the same moderate heart rate (HR) response. 23 males performed two kinds of voluntary exercise in a supine position at similar heart rates: static exercise (SE) of the lower limbs (static leg press) and dynamic exercise (DE) of the lower limbs (cycling). Subjective effort, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), rate pressure product (RPP) and the time between consecutive heart beats (RR-intervals) were measured. Time-domain (SDNN, RMSSD), frequency-domain (power in the low and high frequency band (LFP, HFP)) and geometric measures (SD1, SD2) as well as non-linear measures of regularity (approximate entropy (ApEn), sample entropy (SampEn) and correlation dimension D2) were calculated. Although HR was similar during both exercise conditions (88±10 bpm), subjective effort, SBP, DBP, MAP and RPP were significantly enhanced during SE. HRV indicators representing overall variability (SDNN, SD 2) and vagal modulated variability (RMSSD, HFP, SD 1) were increased. LFP, thought to be modulated by both autonomic branches, tended to be higher during SE. ApEn and SampEn were decreased whereas D2 was enhanced during SE. It can be concluded that autonomic control processes during SE and DE were qualitatively different despite similar heart rate levels. The differences were reflected by blood pressure and HRV indices. HRV-measures indicated a stronger vagal cardiac activity during SE, while blood pressure response indicated a stronger sympathetic efferent activity to the vessels. The elevated vagal cardiac activity during SE might be a response mechanism, compensating a possible co-activation of sympathetic cardiac efferents, as HR and LF/HF was similar and LFP tended to be higher. However, this conclusion must be drawn cautiously as there is no HRV-marker reflecting "pure" sympathetic cardiac activity.

  10. Resting heart rate estimation using PIR sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapu, Hemanth; Saraswat, Kavisha; Ozturk, Yusuf; Cetin, A. Enis

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we describe a non-invasive and non-contact system of estimating resting heart rate (RHR) using a pyroelectric infrared (PIR) sensor. This infrared system monitors and records the chest motion of a subject using the analog output signal of the PIR sensor. The analog output signal represents the composite motion due to inhale-exhale process with magnitude much larger than the minute vibrations of heartbeat. Since the acceleration of the heart activity is much faster than breathing the second derivative of the PIR sensor signal monitoring the chest of the subject is used to estimate the resting heart rate. Experimental results indicate that this ambient sensor can measure resting heart rate with a chi-square significance level of α = 0.05 compared to an industry standard PPG sensor. This new system provides a low cost and an effective way to estimate the resting heart rate, which is an important biological marker.

  11. Heart Rate Variability, Catecholamine and Hemodynamic Responses During Rest and Stress in Coronary Artery Disease Patients: The PIMI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-31

    system carries mostly vasoconstrictor fibers and only a few vasodilator fibers into the systemic vessels. Under normal conditions, all vessels are... vasoconstrictor nerves and excite the vagal innervations of the heart (Spallone & Menzinger, 1997). This, in return, causes vasodilation, and decrease in BP, HR...adaptation syndrome, and the role of stress and of the adaptive hormones in dental medicine. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol, 7(4), 355-367. Selye, H. (1975a

  12. Heart rate and respiratory rate influence on heart rate variability repeatability: effects of the correction for the prevailing heart rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Sławomir Gąsior

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since heart rate variability (HRV is associated with average heart rate (HR and respiratory rate (RespRate, alterations in these parameters may impose changes in HRV. Hence the repeatability of HRV measurements may be affected by differences in HR and RespRate. The study aimed to evaluate HRV repeatability and its association with changes in HR and RespRate.Methods: Forty healthy volunteers underwent two ECG examinations seven days apart. Standard HRV indices were calculated from 5-min ECG recordings. The ECG-derived respiration signal was estimated to assess RespRate. To investigate HR impact on HRV, HRV parameters were corrected for prevailing HR. Results: Differences in HRV parameters between the measurements were associated with the changes in HR and RespRate. However, in multiple regression analysis only HR alteration proved to be independent determinant of the HRV differences – every change in HR by 1 bpm changed HRV values by 16.5% on average. After overall removal of HR impact on HRV, coefficients of variation of the HRV parameters significantly dropped on average by 26.8% (p < 0.001, i.e. by the same extent HRV reproducibility improved. Additionally, the HRV correction for HR decreased association between RespRate and HRV. Conclusions: In stable conditions, HR but not RespRate is the most powerful factor determining HRV reproducibility and even a minimal change of HR may considerably alter HRV. However, the removal of HR impact may significantly improve HRV repeatability. The association between HRV and RespRate seems to be, at least in part, HR dependent.

  13. Peak heart rates at extreme altitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, C; Van Hall, Gerrit

    2001-01-01

    We have measured maximal heart rate during a graded maximal bicycle exercise test to exhaustion in five healthy climbers before and during an expedition to Mt. Everest. Maximal heart rates at sea level were 186 (177-204) beats/min(-1) at sea level and 170 (169-182) beats/min(-1) with acute hypoxia....... After 1, 4 and 6 weeks of acclimatization to 5400 m, maximal heart rates were 155 (135-182), 158 (144-182), and 155 (140-183) beats/min(-1), respectively. Heart rates of two of the climbers were measured during their attempt to reach the summit of Mt. Everest without the use of supplemental oxygen....... The peak heart rates at 8,750 m for the two climbers were 142 and 144 beats/min(-1), which were similar to their maximal heart rates during exhaustive bicycle exercise at 5,400 m, the values being 144 and 148 beats/min(-1), respectively. The peak heart rates at 8,750 m are in agreement with other field...

  14. FPGA Implementation of Heart Rate Monitoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahy, D; Rakshit, M; Sahu, P K

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a field programmable gate array (FPGA) implementation of a system that calculates the heart rate from Electrocardiogram (ECG) signal. After heart rate calculation, tachycardia, bradycardia or normal heart rate can easily be detected. ECG is a diagnosis tool routinely used to access the electrical activities and muscular function of the heart. Heart rate is calculated by detecting the R peaks from the ECG signal. To provide a portable and the continuous heart rate monitoring system for patients using ECG, needs a dedicated hardware. FPGA provides easy testability, allows faster implementation and verification option for implementing a new design. We have proposed a five-stage based methodology by using basic VHDL blocks like addition, multiplication and data conversion (real to the fixed point and vice-versa). Our proposed heart rate calculation (R-peak detection) method has been validated, using 48 first channel ECG records of the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. It shows an accuracy of 99.84%, the sensitivity of 99.94% and the positive predictive value of 99.89%. Our proposed method outperforms other well-known methods in case of pathological ECG signals and successfully implemented in FPGA.

  15. Self-compassion training modulates alpha-amylase, heart rate variability, and subjective responses to social evaluative threat in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arch, Joanna J; Brown, Kirk Warren; Dean, Derek J; Landy, Lauren N; Brown, Kimberley D; Laudenslager, Mark L

    2014-04-01

    A growing body of research has revealed that social evaluative stressors trigger biological and psychological responses that in chronic forms have been linked to aging and disease. Recent research suggests that self-compassion may protect the self from typical defensive responses to evaluation. We investigated whether brief training in self-compassion moderated biopsychological responses to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) in women. Compared to attention (placebo) and no-training control conditions, brief self-compassion training diminished sympathetic (salivary alpha-amylase), cardiac parasympathetic, and subjective anxiety responses, though not HPA-axis (salivary cortisol) responses to the TSST. Self-compassion training also led to greater self-compassion under threat relative to the control groups. In that social stress pervades modern life, self-compassion represents a promising approach to diminishing its potentially negative psychological and biological effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Heart rate response to a standardized walking exercise in the Arctic circumpolar region in morning vs. evening during the polar night and midnight sun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calogiuri, G; Weydahl, A; Sothern, R B

    2011-09-01

    Awareness of daytime and/or seasonal variation in performance and exercise efficiency can be important for athletes and coaches in order to suitably plan training sessions and avoid over-training. The study goal was to evaluate and compare walking-speed and time-related heart rate (HR) responses to a walking task at two times of day and year. Five healthy females (age 21-35 years) performed 9 km outdoor walking at 09:00h and 18:00h on 4 consecutive days in a period without sunlight (January) and with continuous daylight (May). Walking speed, average-heart rate (HR) and peak-HR (as %HRmax) were compared across all exercise sessions. In January the subjects achieved a higher peak-HR when they trained in the evening vs. morning, while average-HR and walking speed were not modified significantly. In May they achieved a higher peak-HR and kept a higher average-HR when they trained in the morning, under the same walking speed. In both training-times carried out in May, average-HR and peak-HR were lower compared with January, while the walking speed was unvaried. A lower exercise average and peak HR, that could potentially be a favourable condition for exercise conditioning, was observed at both daily test times in May vs. January, with overall lowest HR observed in May when exercise occurred at 18:00 h. These findings support the presence of both seasonal and time of day effects on HR responses to a standardized exercise.

  17. Comparıson of the Heart Rate and Blood Lactate Responses of Different Small Sided Games in Young Soccer Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Köklü

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the percentage of maximum heart rate (%HRmax, blood lactate (La−, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE, CR-10 responses across different formats of small-sided games (SSG in elite young soccer players. Fourteen players (average age 16.7 ± 0.6 years; height 177.6 ± 4.1 cm; body mass 66.3 ± 4.7 kg; average training age 6.7 ± 1.6 years; percentage of body fat 8.4 ± 2.6% volunteered to perform the YoYo intermittent recovery test (level 1 and eight bouts of soccer drills including 2-a-side, 3-a-side, and 4-a-side games without goalkeepers in random order at two-day intervals. Heart rates were monitored throughout the SSGs, whereas the RPE and venous blood lactate were determined at the end of the last bout of each SSG. The differences in La−, %HRmax, and RPE either across the different SSGs or between the bouts were identified using 3 × 8 (games × exercise bouts two-way analysis of variance with repeated measures. Significant differences were found in terms of La−, RPE, and %HRmax among the different types of SSG (p ≤ 0.05. 3-a-side and 4-a-side games elicited significantly higher responses than 2-a-side games in terms of %HRmax (p ≤ 0.05, whereas 4-a-side games resulted in significantly lower La− and RPE responses compared to 2-a-side and 3-a-side games. The results of this study show that physiological responses differ according to the numbers of players involved in small-sided games. Therefore, it can be concluded that 3-a-side and 4-a-side games could be more effective in improving high intensity aerobic performance than 2-a-side games, which in turn are more appropriate for developing anaerobic performance.

  18. Upgrading to biventricular pacing/defibrillation systems in right ventricular paced congestive heart failure patients: prospective assessment of procedural parameters and response rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duray, Gabor Z; Israel, Carsten W; Pajitnev, Dimitrij; Hohnloser, Stefan H

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is indicated in patients with heart failure and bundle branch block. It is less clear whether this includes patients with pre-existing right ventricular pacemaker/defibrillator systems, particularly with respect to implantation success and clinical benefit. In consecutive patients scheduled for CRT, we prospectively compared implantation success, procedural parameters, and clinical response in 'de novo' vs. upgrade procedures of previously implanted right ventricular systems. CRT implantation was attempted in 79 consecutive patients (64 +/- 11 years, 63 male, 38 ischaemic, 41 non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy). De novo implantation was performed in 61 patients, upgrade procedures in 18 patients. Implant success (92 vs. 94%, P = 1.00), procedure duration (153 +/- 43 vs. 164 +/- 65 min, P = 0.51), fluoroscopy time (25 +/- 18 vs. 32 +/- 22 min, P = 0.18) or dose (40 +/- 31 vs. 52 +/- 49 Gy/cm(2), P = 0.35), and response rate (66 vs. 59%, P = 0.5) were comparable for both groups. Procedural aspects, implantation success, and clinical response to CRT were comparable for patients undergoing de-novo vs. upgrade procedures. Accordingly, patient selection for upgrading should be the same as for new CRT implantation.

  19. Impact of integrating heart rate response with perfusion imaging on the prognostic value of regadenoson SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Javier; Fughhi, Ibtihaj; Campagnoli, Tania; Ali, Amjad; Doukky, Rami

    2017-10-01

    We investigated whether integrating heart rate response (HRR) to regadenoson with myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) analysis can enhance risk prediction in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. We prospectively followed 303 ESRD patients after regadenoson stress MPI for a mean of 35 months. Normal HRR to regadenoson was defined as ≥28% increase from baseline. Normal MPI was defined as a summed stress score ≤3 and left ventricular ejection fraction ≥50%. The study cohort was divided in four groups based on various combinations of normal/abnormal HRR and MPI. There was a step-wise increase in the risk of primary endpoint of all-cause death and the composite secondary endpoint of cardiac death or myocardial infarction; patients with Normal MPI/Normal HRR had the lowest event rates and those with Abnormal MPI/Abnormal HRR had the highest, whereas subjects with Abnormal MPI/Normal HRR and Normal MPI/Abnormal HRR had intermediate event rates. This pattern was maintained after adjusting for important clinical covariates. In ESRD patients, integrating HRR to vasodilator stress with MPI interpretation improves risk stratification. Normal HRR/Normal MPI identify truly low-risk group, whereas abnormal MPI or abnormal HRR portrays elevated risk.

  20. Heart rate and heart rate variability in dogs with different degrees of myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Caroline Elisabeth; Falk, Bo Torkel; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    HEART RATE AND HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN DOGS WITH DIFFERENT DEGREES OF MYXOMATOUS MITRAL VALVE DISEASE. CE Rasmussen1, T Falk1, NE Zois1, SG Moesgaard1, HD Pedersen2, J Häggström3 and LH Olsen1. 1. Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenh......HEART RATE AND HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN DOGS WITH DIFFERENT DEGREES OF MYXOMATOUS MITRAL VALVE DISEASE. CE Rasmussen1, T Falk1, NE Zois1, SG Moesgaard1, HD Pedersen2, J Häggström3 and LH Olsen1. 1. Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University...

  1. WISE-2005 Protective Effect of Exercise within LBNP Countermeasure Detected by Heart Rate Response to Low Levels of LBNP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughson, R. L.; Shoemaker, J. K.; Hargens, A. R.; Mattar, L.; Edgell, H.; Kerbeci, P.; Arbeille, Ph.

    2006-01-01

    Sixteen women were studied before, during and after a 60 day, continu ous 6" head-down bed-rest (HDBR). Subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: Control (no countermeasures) and Exercise+LBNP (supine ru nning within an LBNP chamber for 40-min followed by 10-min passive L BNP for 3-4 days/week, plus flywheel resistive training of the legs e very third day). Cardiovascular responses were observed before bed re st, on day 50 of HDBR and R+8 after bed rest. Subjects were supine in the LBNP device with suction applied at 0, -10, -20 and -30 mmHg LBN P for 2-min per stage. In the pre-bed rest testing, there was no diff erence in HR between the groups at rest or at -30 mmHg. On HDBR day 50, HR was elevated at supine rest for the Con not the Ex group, whil e at -30 mmHg HR was elevated above pre-HDBR for both groups, but the magnitude of increase from Pre- to HDBR day 50 was less for the Ex g roup than for the Con group. The change in HR on HDBR day 50 is an im portant indicator as it was less than 24-hours after the Exercise+LBN P countermeasure on day 49. After bed rest, no specific countermeasu res were provided in the first week, so HR responses on day R+8 refle cted the effects of bed rest with or without countermeasure plus any recovery from simply returning to the upright posture. Relative to th e Pre-bed rest responses, HR on day R+8 had recovered in the Ex group but was still elevated in the Con group. These results indicate that the cardiovascular response to LBNP is preserved to a greater degre e during bed rest by the countermeasures, and further that the cardio vascular response returned to pre-bed rest much more rapidly in the E xercise+LBNP group than hi the group that received no cardiovascular countermeasures.

  2. Effect of number of touches and exercise duration on the kinematic profile and heart rate response during small-sided games in soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamichana, David; Suarez-Arrones, Luis; Castellano, Julen; Román-Quintana, Jaime San

    2014-06-28

    This study aimed to examine the effect of exercise duration and the number of touches allowed during possession on time-motion characteristics and the physiological responses of soccer players in 6 vs. 6 small-sided games (SSGs) lasting 12 minutes. The analysis divided each game into two 6-min periods and we compared two formats: free play (SSGFP) vs. a maximum of two touches per individual possession (SSG2T). Participants were 12 semi-professional players (age: 22.7±4.3 years; body height: 177.5±4.9 cm; body mass: 74.9±6.3 kg) and the following variables were measured by means of heart rate monitors and GPS devices: mean heart rate (HRmean), time spent in each exercise intensity zone, total distance covered, total distance covered in different speed zones, number of accelerations at different intensities, maximum speed reached, player load, and the work-to-rest ratio. The results showed that in SSGFP there was a decrease in the intensity of physical parameters during the second 6-min period (6-12 min), whereas this decrease was not observed when a maximum of two touches per individual possession was allowed. During the second period (6-12 min) of SSG2T there was an increase in HRmean and in the time spent in high exercise intensity zones, but these differences were not observed in SSGFP. The value of these findings for soccer coaches is that they illustrate how different technical, tactical or conditioning objectives could be addressed by altering the length and format of the SSG used in training.

  3. Effect of Number of Touches and Exercise Duration on the Kinematic Profile and Heart Rate Response During Small-Sided Games in Soccer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casamichana David

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the effect of exercise duration and the number of touches allowed during possession on time-motion characteristics and the physiological responses of soccer players in 6 vs. 6 small-sided games (SSGs lasting 12 minutes. The analysis divided each game into two 6-min periods and we compared two formats: free play (SSGfp vs. a maximum of two touches per individual possession (SSG 2T. Participants were 12 semi-professional players (age: 22.7±4.3 years; body height: 177.5+4.9 cm; body mass: 74.9±6.3 kg and the following variables were measured by means of heart rate monitors and GPS devices: mean heart rate (HRmean, time spent in each exercise intensity zone, total distance covered, total distance covered in different speed zones, number of accelerations at different intensities, maximum speed reached, player load, and the work-to-rest ratio. The results showed that in SSGFP there was a decrease in the intensity of physical parameters during the second 6-min period (6-12 min, whereas this decrease was not observed when a maximum of two touches per individual possession was allowed. During the second period (6-12 min of SSG2T there was an increase in HRmean and in the time spent in high exercise intensity zones, but these differences were not observed in SSGFP. The value of these findings for soccer coaches is that they illustrate how different technical, tactical or conditioning objectives could be addressed by altering the length and format of the SSG used in training.

  4. Improvement of the Dynamic Responses of Heart Rate Variability Patterns after Needle and Laser Acupuncture Treatment in Patients with Burnout Syndrome: A Transcontinental Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Litscher

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated manual needle and laser needle acupuncture as a complementary therapy for patients with burnout syndrome. Twenty patients with a mean age ± SD of 38.7 ± 8.4 years were assigned to two groups, each consisting of ten patients. One group was treated with manual needle acupuncture and the other with laser needle acupuncture. Heart rate, heart rate variability (HRV, and a new score called dynamic acupuncture treatment score (DATS served as evaluation parameters. The study documented significant effects on heart rate after needle acupuncture treatment and significant effects on HRV caused by both needle and laser needle acupuncture. Based on new neurovegetative acupuncture treatment evaluation scores, it can be stated that both noninvasive laser needle acupuncture and manual needle acupuncture have the potential to be a powerful approach for evidence-based complementary treatment of patients with burnout syndrome. Further transcontinental studies to verify or refute the preliminary findings are in progress.

  5. Heart Rate Variability - A Historical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E Billman

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV, the beat-to-beat variation in either heart rate or the duration of the R-R interval – the heart period, has become a popular clinical and investigational tool. The temporal fluctuations in heart rate exhibit a marked synchrony with respiration (increasing during inspiration and decreasing during expiration – the so called respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA and are widely believed to reflect changes in cardiac autonomic regulation. Although the exact contributions of the parasympathetic and the sympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system to this variability are controversial and remain the subject of active investigation and debate, a number of time and frequency domain techniques have been developed to provide insight into cardiac autonomic regulation in both health and disease. It is the purpose of this essay to provide an historical overview of the evolution in the concept of heart rate variability. Briefly, pulse rate was first measured by ancient Greek physicians and scientists. However, it was not until the invention of the Physician’s Pulse Watch (a watch with a second hand that could be stopped in 1707 that changes in pulse rate could be accurately assessed. The Rev. Stephen Hales (1733 was the first to note that pulse varied with respiration and in 1847 Carl Ludwig was the first to record RSA. With the measurement of the ECG (1895 and advent of digital signal processing techniques in the 1960’s, investigation of HRV and its relationship to health and disease has exploded. This essay will conclude with a brief description of time domain, frequency domain, and non-linear dynamic analysis techniques (and their limitations that are commonly used to measure heart rate variability.

  6. Resting Heart Rate and Auditory Evoked Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Fiuza Regaçone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between rest heart rate (HR and the components of the auditory evoked-related potentials (ERPs at rest in women. We investigated 21 healthy female university students between 18 and 24 years old. We performed complete audiological evaluation and measurement of heart rate for 10 minutes at rest (heart rate monitor Polar RS800CX and performed ERPs analysis (discrepancy in frequency and duration. There was a moderate negative correlation of the N1 and P3a with rest HR and a strong positive correlation of the P2 and N2 components with rest HR. Larger components of the ERP are associated with higher rest HR.

  7. Low Resting Heart Rate and Stalking Perpetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Danielle; Wells, Jessica; Armstrong, Todd; Lewis, Richard H; Woeckener, Matthias; Nobles, Matt R

    2017-04-01

    There is consistent evidence to suggest that individuals with low resting heart rate are more likely to engage in a variety of antisocial behaviors. The present study examines whether this finding can be extended to stalking perpetration. Drawing from fearlessness theory and stimulation-seeking theory, as well as conceptual work of Meloy and Fisher, we find that individuals with low resting heart rates had significantly greater odds of engaging in stalking behavior, net of controls for sex, age, race, self-control, parental affection, delinquent peers, attitudes/beliefs toward crime, and aggression. When disaggregated by sex, the heart rate-stalking relationship was found to be significant for males, but not for females. The implications of these findings are discussed from a biosocial perspective.

  8. Locomotor and Heart Rate Responses of Floaters During Small-Sided Games in Elite Soccer Players: Effect of Pitch Size and Inclusion of Goal Keepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacome, Mathieu; Simpson, Ben M; Cholley, Yannick; Buchheit, Martin

    2017-09-27

    To (1) compare the locomotor and heart rate responses between floaters and regular players during both small and large small sided games (SSGs) and (2) examine whether the type of game (i.e., game simulation vs possession game) affects the magnitude of the difference between floaters and regular players. Data were collected in 41 players belonging to an elite French football team during three consecutive seasons (2014-2017). 5-Hz GPS were used to collect all training data, with the Athletic Data Innovation analyser (v5.4.1.514, Sydney, Australia) used to derive total distance (m), high-speed distance (> 14.4 km.h(-1), m) and external mechanical load (MechL, a.u). All SSGs included exclusively one floater, and were divided into two main categories, according to the participation of goal-keepers (GK) (game simulation, GS) or not (possession games, PO) and then further divided into small and large (>100 m2/player) SSGs based on the area per player ratio. Locomotor activity and mechanical load performed were likely-to-most likely lower (moderate to large magnitude) in floaters compared with regular players, while differences in HR responses were unclear to possibly higher (small) in floaters. The magnitude of the difference in locomotor activity and MechL between floaters and regular players was substantially greater during GS compared with PO. Compared with regular players, floaters present decreased external load (both locomotor and MechL) despite unclear to possibly slightly higher HR responses during SSGs. Moreover, the responses of floaters compared with regular players are not consistent across different sizes of SSGs, with greater differences during GS than PO.

  9. Effects of social stress on heart rate and heart rate variability in growing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, IC; Sgoifo, A; Lambooij, E; Korte, SM; Blokhuis, HJ; Koolhaas, JM

    The effects of social stress on heart rate, heart rate variability and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias were studied in 12 growing pigs. Social stress was induced during a good competition test with a pen mate, and subsequently during a resident-intruder test with an unacquainted pig in which

  10. Effects of social stress on heart rate and heart rate variability in growing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de I.C.; Sgoifo, A.; Lambooij, E.; Korte, S.M.; Blokhuis, H.J.; Koolhaas, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of social stress on heart rate, heart rate variability and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias were studied in 12 growing pigs. Social stress was induced during a good competition test with a pen mate, and subsequently during a resident-intruder test with an unacquainted pig in which

  11. Comparison of Heart Rate Response to Tennis Activity between Persons with and without Spinal Cord Injuries: Implications for a Training Threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, J. P.; Malone, Laurie A.; Coleman, Tristica A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) to reach a training threshold during on-court sport activity. Monitors collected heart rate (HR) data every 5 s for 11 wheelchair tennis players (WCT) with low paraplegia and 11 able-bodied controls matched on experience and skill level (ABT).…

  12. HEART RATE AND INDIRECT BLOOD PRESSURE RESPONSES TO FOUR DIFFERENT FIELD ANESTHETIC PROTOCOLS IN WILD-BORN CAPTIVE CHIMPANZEES (PAN TROGLODYTES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atencia, Rebeca; Stöhr, Eric J; Drane, Aimee L; Stembridge, Mike; Howatson, Glyn; Del Rio, Pablo Rodriguez Lopez; Feltrer, Yedra; Tafon, Babila; Redrobe, Sharon; Peck, Bruce; Eng, Jaclyn; Unwin, Steve; Sanchez, Carlos R; Shave, Rob E

    2017-09-01

    Limited data are available on hemodynamic responses to anesthetic protocols in wild-born chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Accordingly, this study characterized the heart rate (HR) and blood pressure responses to four anesthetic protocols in 176 clinically healthy, wild-born chimpanzees undergoing routine health assessments. Animals were anesthetized with medetomidine-ketamine (MK) (n = 101), tiletamine-zolazepam (TZ) (n = 30), tiletamine-zolazepam-medetomidine (TZM) (n = 24), or medetomidine-ketamine (maintained with isoflurane) (MKI) (n = 21). During each procedure, HR, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were regularly recorded. Data were grouped according to anesthetic protocol, and mean HR, SBP, and DBP were calculated. Differences between mean HR, SBP, and DBP for each anesthetic protocol were assessed using the Kruskall-Wallis test and a Dunn multiple comparisons post hoc analysis. To assess the hemodynamic time course response to each anesthetic protocol, group mean data (±95% confidence interval [CI]) were plotted against time postanesthetic induction. Mean HR (beats/min [CI]) was significantly higher in TZ (86 [80-92]) compared to MKI (69 [61-78]) and MK (62 [60-64]) and in TZM (73 [68-78]) compared to MK. The average SBP and DBP values (mm Hg [CI]) were significantly higher in MK (130 [126-134] and 94 [91-97]) compared to TZ (104 [96-112] and 58 [53-93]) and MKI (113 [103-123] and 78 [69-87]) and in TZM (128 [120-135] and 88 [83-93]) compared to TZ. Time course data were markedly different between protocols, with MKI showing the greatest decline over time. Both the anesthetic protocol adopted and the timing of measurement after injection influence hemodynamic recordings in wild-born chimpanzees and need to be considered when monitoring or assessing cardiovascular health.

  13. Heart rate control via vagus nerve stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buschman, H.P.J.; Storm, Corstiaan J.; Duncker, Dirk J.; Verdouw, Pieter D.; van der Aa, Hans E.; van der Kemp, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: There is ample and well-established evidence that direct electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve can change heart rate in animals and humans. Since tachyarrhythmias cannot always be controlled through medication, we sought, in this pilot study, to elucidate whether a clinical

  14. Heart rate detection from an electronic weighing scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Landaeta, R; Casas, O; Pallàs-Areny, R

    2007-01-01

    We propose a novel technique for heart rate detection on a subject that stands on a common electronic weighing scale. The detection relies on sensing force variations related to the blood acceleration in the aorta, works even if wearing footwear, and does not require any sensors attached to the body. We have applied our method to three different weighing scales, and estimated whether their sensitivity and frequency response suited heart rate detection. Scale sensitivities were from 490 nV/V/N to 1670 nV/V/N, all had an underdamped transient response and their dynamic gain error was below 19% at 10 Hz, which are acceptable values for heart rate estimation. We also designed a pulse detection system based on off-the-shelf integrated circuits, whose gain was about 70x10(3) and able to sense force variations about 240 mN. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the main peaks of the pulse signal detected was higher than 48 dB, which is large enough to estimate the heart rate by simple signal processing methods. To validate the method, the ECG and the force signal were simultaneously recorded on 12 volunteers. The maximal error obtained from heart rates determined from these two signals was +/-0.6 beats/minute.

  15. Heart Rate Fragmentation: A Symbolic Dynamical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalena D. Costa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: We recently introduced the concept of heart rate fragmentation along with a set of metrics for its quantification. The term was coined to refer to an increase in the percentage of changes in heart rate acceleration sign, a dynamical marker of a type of anomalous variability. The effort was motivated by the observation that fragmentation, which is consistent with the breakdown of the neuroautonomic-electrophysiologic control system of the sino-atrial node, could confound traditional short-term analysis of heart rate variability.Objective: The objectives of this study were to: (1 introduce a symbolic dynamical approach to the problem of quantifying heart rate fragmentation; (2 evaluate how the distribution of the different dynamical patterns (“words” varied with the participants' age in a group of healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD; and (3 quantify the differences in the fragmentation patterns between the two sample populations.Methods: The symbolic dynamical method employed here was based on a ternary map of the increment NN interval time series and on the analysis of the relative frequency of symbolic sequences (words with a pre-defined set of features. We analyzed annotated, open-access Holter databases of healthy subjects and patients with CAD, provided by the University of Rochester Telemetric and Holter ECG Warehouse (THEW.Results: The degree of fragmentation was significantly higher in older individuals than in their younger counterparts. However, the fragmentation patterns were different in the two sample populations. In healthy subjects, older age was significantly associated with a higher percentage of transitions from acceleration/deceleration to zero acceleration and vice versa (termed “soft” inflection points. In patients with CAD, older age was also significantly associated with higher percentages of frank reversals in heart rate acceleration (transitions from acceleration to

  16. Heart Rate Fragmentation: A Symbolic Dynamical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Madalena D; Davis, Roger B; Goldberger, Ary L

    2017-01-01

    Background: We recently introduced the concept of heart rate fragmentation along with a set of metrics for its quantification. The term was coined to refer to an increase in the percentage of changes in heart rate acceleration sign, a dynamical marker of a type of anomalous variability. The effort was motivated by the observation that fragmentation, which is consistent with the breakdown of the neuroautonomic-electrophysiologic control system of the sino-atrial node, could confound traditional short-term analysis of heart rate variability. Objective: The objectives of this study were to: (1) introduce a symbolic dynamical approach to the problem of quantifying heart rate fragmentation; (2) evaluate how the distribution of the different dynamical patterns ("words") varied with the participants' age in a group of healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD); and (3) quantify the differences in the fragmentation patterns between the two sample populations. Methods: The symbolic dynamical method employed here was based on a ternary map of the increment NN interval time series and on the analysis of the relative frequency of symbolic sequences (words) with a pre-defined set of features. We analyzed annotated, open-access Holter databases of healthy subjects and patients with CAD, provided by the University of Rochester Telemetric and Holter ECG Warehouse (THEW). Results: The degree of fragmentation was significantly higher in older individuals than in their younger counterparts. However, the fragmentation patterns were different in the two sample populations. In healthy subjects, older age was significantly associated with a higher percentage of transitions from acceleration/deceleration to zero acceleration and vice versa (termed "soft" inflection points). In patients with CAD, older age was also significantly associated with higher percentages of frank reversals in heart rate acceleration (transitions from acceleration to deceleration and vice

  17. Behaviour, heart rate, and heart rate variability in pigs exposed to novelty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manja Zupan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the present study, we investigated behavioural responses and determined parameters of heart rate variability (HRV to elucidate a relative activation of autonomic nervous system (ANS during baseline (10 min and in response to potentially stressful situations (10 min in two pig breeds and sexes. Gilts (n = 21 and barrows (n = 9 of the Landrace × Yorkshire (LY; n = 15 and Landrace/Yorkshire × Landrace/Duroc (LYLD; n = 15 breeds were subjected to a novel object test (NOT and a novel arena test (NAT. Basal ANS state differed in pigs across breeds but not sexes. Landrace × Yorkshire pigs had a significantly lower basal heart rate (HR and low-frequency band (LF with a higher root mean square of successive interbeat intervals (RMSSD and high-frequency band (HF than LYLD pigs. In the NOT, despite having similar cardiac responses, gilts had a longer duration of contact with a novel object, higher lying and standing duration, and a lower duration of walking compared with barrows. In the NAT, we found similar behaviour across sexes but a different degree of ANS state, with barrows having a significantly higher increase in LF/HF (power of the low frequency component divided by the power of the high-frequency band compared with gilts. Landrace/Yorkshire × Landrace/Duroc pigs showed longer duration of contact with a novel object in the NOT accompanied by less lying and standing than LY pigs in both tests. No difference in ANS activation between breeds was found in the NOT. In the NAT, HR increased more from baseline to testing in LY pigs than in LYLD pigs. There is a complex and often contradictory nature of relationships between behaviour and cardiac responses to novelty in pigs of different breeds and sexes.

  18. Median maximal heart rate for heart rate calibration in different conditions: laboratory, field and competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudet, G; Garet, M; Bedu, M; Albuisson, E; Chamoux, A

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the variability of maximal heart rate in three different conditions: laboratory tests, field tests, and competitions. Sixteen male endurance volunteers were tested in five exhaustive tests for each condition. All exhaustive events were heart rate monitored (Accurex plus, Polar Electro, Finland) and true maximal heart rates were assessed and compared with each other and with predicted maximal heart rates. Results show that under the three conditions HR(peaks) were not statistically different (p = 0.62, NS, Friedman test). Mean HR(peaks) (SD) were: laboratory = 194.3 (7.8), field = 193.8 (11.8), competition = 192.3 (10.1) beats x min(-1). Conditions for reaching individual heart rate peak were in the laboratory (treadmill VO(2)max protocol) for 5 subjects, in field tests for 7 subjects and in competitions for 6 subjects (two circumstances for two subjects). A large intra-individual variation existed in the three circumstances (+/- 6 beats x min(-1)). Absolute median maximal heart rate was 190.0 bpm (9.32) i.e 7.6 bpm lower than heart rate peak. Both were highly related (rho = 0.89, z = 3.449, p = 0.0006, Spearman test). Median maximal heart rates inter-condition relationship were higher. Median maximal heart rate was more stable and took more information into account than an isolated peak. It gives a central value that minimizes the potential risk of under or over estimation when calibrating exercise intensities with HR.

  19. Gaussian mixture model of heart rate variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Costa

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV is an important measure of sympathetic and parasympathetic functions of the autonomic nervous system and a key indicator of cardiovascular condition. This paper proposes a novel method to investigate HRV, namely by modelling it as a linear combination of Gaussians. Results show that three Gaussians are enough to describe the stationary statistics of heart variability and to provide a straightforward interpretation of the HRV power spectrum. Comparisons have been made also with synthetic data generated from different physiologically based models showing the plausibility of the Gaussian mixture parameters.

  20. Longitudinal analysis of arterial blood pressure and heart rate response to acute behavioral stress in rats with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in age-matched controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Randall

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We recorded via telemetry the arterial blood pressure (BP and heart rate (HR response to classical conditioning following the spontaneous onset of autoimmune diabetes in BBDP/Wor rats versus age-matched, diabetes resistant control (BBDR/Wor rats. Our purpose was to evaluate the autonomic regulatory responses to an acute stress in a diabetic state of up to 12 months duration. The stress was a 15 sec. pulsed tone (CS+ followed by a 0.5 sec. tail shock. The initial, transient increase in BP (i.e., the ‘first component’, or C1, known to be derived from an orienting response and produced by a sympathetic increase in peripheral resistance, was similar in diabetic and control rats through ~9 months of diabetes; it was smaller in diabetic rats 10 months after diabetes onset. Weakening of the C1 BP increase in rats that were diabetic for > 10 months is consistent with the effects of sympathetic neuropathy. A longer-latency, smaller, but sustained ‘second component’ (C2 conditional increase in BP, that is acquired as a rat learns the association between CS+ and the shock, and which results from an increase in cardiac output, was smaller in the diabetic vs. control rats starting from the first month of diabetes. A concomitant HR slowing was also smaller in diabetic rats. The difference in the C2 BP increase, as observed already during the first month of diabetes, is probably secondary to the effects of hyperglycemia upon myocardial metabolism and contractile function, but it may also result from effects on cognition. The small HR slowing concomitant with the C2 pressor event is probably secondary to differences in baroreflex activation or function, though parasympathetic dysfunction may contribute later in the duration of diabetes. The nearly immediate deficit after disease onset in the C2 response indicates that diabetes alters BP and HR responses to external challenges prior to the development of structural changes in the vasculature or autonomic

  1. High-Frequency Heart Rate Variability Reactivity and Trait Worry Interact to Predict the Development of Sleep Disturbances in Response to a Naturalistic Stressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, Sasha; Deschênes, Sonya S; Caldwell, Warren; Brouillard, Melanie; Dang-Vu, Thien-Thanh; Gouin, Jean-Philippe

    2017-12-01

    High-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) reactivity was proposed as a vulnerability factor for stress-induced sleep disturbances. Its effect may be amplified among individuals with high trait worry or sleep reactivity. This study evaluated whether HF-HRV reactivity to a worry induction, sleep reactivity, and trait worry predict increases in sleep disturbances in response to academic stress, a naturalistic stressor. A longitudinal study following 102 undergraduate students during an academic semester with well-defined periods of lower and higher academic stress was conducted. HF-HRV reactivity to a worry induction, trait worry using the Penn State Worry Questionnaire, and sleep reactivity using the Ford Insomnia Stress Reactivity Test were measured during the low stress period. Sleep disturbances using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index were assessed twice during the lower stress period and three times during the higher stress period. Greater reductions in HF-HRV in response to the worry induction predicted increases in sleep disturbances from the lower to the higher academic stress period. Trait worry moderated this association: individuals with both higher trait worry and greater HF-HRV reactivity to worry had larger increases in stress-related sleep disturbances over time, compared to participants with lower trait worry and HF-HRV reactivity. A similar, but marginally significant effect was found for sleep reactivity. This study supports the role of HF-HRV reactivity as a vulnerability factor for stress-induced sleep disturbances. The combination of high trait worry and high HF-HRV reactivity to worry might identify a subgroup of individuals most vulnerable to stress-related sleep disturbances.

  2. Heart rate detection from plantar bioimpedance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Landaeta, R; Casas, O; Pallàs-Areny, R

    2006-01-01

    The heart rate is a basic health indicator, useful in both clinical measurements and home health care. Current home care systems often require the attachment of electrodes or other sensors to the body, which can be cumbersome to the patient. Moreover, some measurements are sensitive to movement artifacts, are not user-friendly and require a specialized supervision. In this paper, a novel technique for heart rate measurement for a standing subject is proposed, which is based on plantar bioimpedance measurements, such as those performed by some bathroom weighting scales for body composition analysis. Because of the low level of heart-related impedance variations, the measurement system has a gain of 1400. We have implemented a fully differential AC amplifier with a common-mode rejection ratio (CMRR) of 105 dB at 10 kHz. Coherent demodulation based on synchronous sampling yields a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 55 dB. The system has a sensitivity of 1.9 V/Omega. The technique has been demonstrated on 18 volunteers, whose bioimpedance signal and ECG were simultaneously measured to validate the results. The average cross-correlation coefficient between the heart rates determined from these two signals was 0.998 (std. dev. 0.001).

  3. Exploring the Relationship between Fetal Heart Rate and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisilevsky, Barbara S.; Hains, Sylvia M. J.

    2010-01-01

    A relationship between fetal heart rate (HR) and cognition is explored within the context of infant, child and adult studies where the association is well established. Lack of direct access to the fetus and maturational changes limit research paradigms and response measures for fetal studies. Nevertheless, neural regulation of HR shows a number of…

  4. Functionality of the baroreceptor nerves in heart rate regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.; Olufsen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    are a consequence of the memory encapsulated by the models, and the nonlinearity gives rise to sigmoidal response curves. The nonlinear afferent baroreceptor models are coupled with an effector model, and the coupled model has been used to predict baroreceptor feedback regulation of heart rate during postural...

  5. Influence of a CYP1A2 polymorphism on post-exercise heart rate variability in response to caffeine intake: a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R M; Algrain, H A; Ryan, E J; Popojas, A; Carrigan, P; Abdulrahman, A; Carrillo, A E

    2017-05-01

    Proposed differences in caffeine metabolism due to the CYP1A2*1F polymorphism have been linked to variations in cardiovascular disease risk. We examined the influence of a CYP1A2*1F polymorphism on post-exercise heart rate variability (HRV) in response to caffeine intake. Volunteers were identified as A/A homozygotes (A/A; 4 females and 7 males; age: 25.3 ± 4.1 years; BMI: 25.9 ± 4.4 kg/m2) or C allele carriers (C allele; 3 females and 6 males; age: 25.5 ± 2.8 years; BMI: 26.6 ± 5.0 kg/m2) for participation in a repeated measures, counterbalanced, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Participants chewed three pieces of gum containing either caffeine (CAF) (100 mg/piece) or placebo for 5 min. Thereafter, participants cycled for 15 min at 75 % of their peak oxygen consumption. Eight HRV indices computed during 5 min at baseline (BASE), 0-5 min after exercise (POST1), and 5-10 min after exercise (POST2) were used for analysis. No significant group differences were detected in HRV indices at BASE, POST1, or POST2 during both trials (p > 0.05). Rate of recovery (POST2-POST1) for the square root of the mean of squared differences between successive RR intervals (RMSSD) was significantly different between A/A (6.0 ± 2.5 ms) and C allele (3.6 ± 2.5 ms) groups during the CAF trial (p = 0.048). Rate of RMSSD recovery was the only variable influenced by the CYP1A2*IF polymorphism during post-exercise in response to caffeine intake. Thus, the CYP1A2*1F polymorphism did not overtly influence the effects of caffeine intake on post-exercise HRV.

  6. Music determines heart rate variability of singers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn eVickhoff

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Choir singing is known to promote wellbeing. One reason for this may be that singing demands a slower than normal respiration which may in turn affect heart activity. Coupling of heart rate variability (HRV to respiration is called Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA. This coupling has a subjective as well as a biologically soothing effect, and it is beneficial for cardiovascular function. RSA is seen to be more marked during slow-paced breathing and at lower respiration rates (0.1 Hz and below. In this study, we investigate how singing, which is a form of guided breathing, affects HRV and RSA. The study comprises a group of healthy 18 year olds of mixed gender. The subjects are asked to; (1 hum a single tone and breathe whenever they need to; (2 sing a hymn with free, unguided breathing; and (3 sing a slow mantra and breathe solely between phrases. Heart rate (HR is measured continuously during the study. The study design makes it possible to compare above three levels of song structure. In a separate case study, we examine five individuals performing singing tasks (1-(3. We collect data with more advanced equipment, simultaneously recording HR, respiration, skin conductance and finger temperature. We show how song structure, respiration and heart rate are connected. Unison singing of regular song structures makes the hearts of the singers accelerate and decelerate simultaneously. Implications concerning the effect on wellbeing and health are discussed as well as the question how this inner entrainment may affect perception and behavior.

  7. Lessons from the Heart: Individualizing Physical Education with Heart Rate Monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Beth; Birnbaum, Burton H.

    Learning about the relationship between heart rate and physical activity is an important aspect of fitness education. Use of a heart rate monitor (HRM) helps a student to understand how stretching and large muscle movements gradually increase the heart rate and blood flow, and enables students to measure their exercise heart rates and set goals…

  8. Individual differences in the cardiovascular responses to tonic muscle pain: parallel increases or decreases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure and heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazalbhoy, Azharuddin; Birznieks, Ingvars; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2012-10-01

    We recently showed that acute muscle pain, induced by bolus intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline, causes a sustained increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and a modest increase in blood pressure and heart rate. However, it is not known whether long-lasting (tonic) pain, which more closely resembles chronic pain, causes a sustained increase in MSNA and blood pressure. We tested this hypothesis by recording MSNA in 12 healthy subjects. Tonic pain was induced for ~60 min by slow intramuscular infusion of hypertonic saline (7%) into the ipsilateral tibialis anterior muscle. Pain was sustained at a tolerable level (5/10 to 6/10 on a visual analog scale). Seven subjects showed progressive increases in mean MSNA amplitude during tonic pain, increasing to 154 ± 17% (SEM) at 45 min and remaining essentially constant for the duration of the infusion. In these subjects, blood pressure and heart rate also increased. Conversely, for the other five subjects MSNA showed a progressive decline, with a peak fall of 67 ± 11% at 40 min; blood pressure and heart rate also fell in these subjects. We conclude that tonic muscle pain has long-lasting effects on the sympathetic control of blood pressure, causing a sustained increase in some subjects yet a sustained decrease in others. This may have implications for individual differences in the cardiovascular consequences of chronic pain.

  9. Sound and vibration : effects on infants' heart rate and heart rate variability during neonatal transport

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Björn-Markus; Lindkvist, Marie; Lindkvist, Markus; Karlsson, Marcus; Lundström, Ronnie; Håkansson, Stellan; Wiklund, Urban; van den Berg, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To measure the effect of sound and whole-body vibration on infants' heart rate and heart rate variability during ground and air ambulance transport. Methods: Sixteen infants were transported by air ambulance with ground ambulance transport to and from the airports. Whole-body vibration and sound levels were recorded and heart parameters were obtained by ECG signal. Results: Sound and whole-body vibration levels exceeded the recommended limits. Mean whole-body vibration and sound levels w...

  10. Short-term heart rate variability response to head-up tilt in young syncope patients and controls with respect to age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickhaus, Hartmut; Maier, Christoph; Khalil, Markus; Ulmer, Herbert

    2006-01-01

    This study aims at characterizing the short-term time-courses of time- and frequency-domain heart rate variability (HRV) parameters during head-up tilt test (HUTT). Data from 44 young patients with a history of syncope and 34 age-matched controls was analysed in two age-groups related to puberty ( or =14 years), and separately for gender, by extracting minute-by-minute progression of mean RR-interval, standard deviation of RR-intervals (SDNN) and their first difference (SDSD) as well as low-frequency (LF, 0.05-0.15 Hz) energy, high-frequency (HF, 0.15-0.4 Hz) energy and the LF/HF-ratio. Time-courses were individually normalized and averaged after synchronization to the events of tilt and tilt-back/syncope. We observed remarkable age-related differences not only with respect to response to tilting but also regarding the differentiation of patients with positive HUTT from controls with negative HUTT. ROC-analysis in three regions of interest (0-2 min after tilt, 2-5 min after tilt, 5-2 min before tilt-back) revealed generally much weaker and less persistent differences in younger subjects whereas in elders the differences were clearer and often most pronounced immediately before syncope. For both age-groups, the relative change of mean RR provided best separation, however in elders in the ROI just before syncope (sensitivity: 74%, specificity 80%) in young immediately after tilt (sens.: 71%, spec.: 74%). In elder subjects, the relative reduction of SDNN 2-5 minute after tilt achieved almost the same performance (sens.: 74%, spec. 80%) as in the ROI before syncope (sens. 78%, spec. 73%), indicating the existence of rather early precursors of syncope that might help to predict the outcome of the HUTT in subjects in or after puberty.

  11. Effects of aerobic exercise training on heart rate variability during wakefulness and sleep and cardiorespiratory responses of young and middle-aged healthy men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Catai

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of aerobic physical training (APT on heart rate variability (HRV and cardiorespiratory responses at peak condition and ventilatory anaerobic threshold. Ten young (Y: median = 21 years and seven middle-aged (MA = 53 years healthy sedentary men were studied. Dynamic exercise tests were performed on a cycloergometer using a continuous ramp protocol (12 to 20 W/min until exhaustion. A dynamic 24-h electrocardiogram was analyzed by time (TD (standard deviation of mean R-R intervals and frequency domain (FD methods. The power spectral components were expressed as absolute (a and normalized units (nu at low (LF and high (HF frequencies and as the LF/HF ratio. Control (C condition: HRV in TD (Y: 108, MA: 96 ms; P<0.05 and FD - LFa, HFa - was significantly higher in young (1030; 2589 ms²/Hz than in middle-aged men (357; 342 ms²/Hz only during sleep (P<0.05; post-training effects: resting bradycardia (P<0.05 in the awake condition in both groups; VO2 increased for both groups at anaerobic threshold (P<0.05, and at peak condition only in young men; HRV in TD and FD (a and nu was not significantly changed by training in either groups. The vagal predominance during sleep is reduced with aging. The resting bradycardia induced by short-term APT in both age groups suggests that this adaptation is much more related to intrinsic alterations in sinus node than in efferent vagal-sympathetic modulation. Furthermore, the greater alterations in VO2 than in HRV may be related to short-term APT.

  12. [Music and heart rate variability. Study of the effect of music on heart rate variability in healthy adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, J; Evéquoz, D

    1999-05-20

    The effect of trophotropic (relaxing) music on heart rate and heart rate variability has been investigated in 23 healthy young individuals by means of 24-hour Holter-ECG. Relaxing music (Bach, Vivaldi, Mozart) resulted in significant reduction of heart rate and also significant reduction of heart rate variability. The significance of these results for the use of music in coronary heart disease is discussed.

  13. Bluetooth Heart Rate Monitors For Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, R. E.; West, M. R.; Kalogera, K. L.; Hanson, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate monitoring is required for crewmembers during exercise aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and will be for future exploration missions. The cardiovascular system must be sufficiently stressed throughout a mission to maintain the ability to perform nominal and contingency/emergency tasks. High quality heart rate data are required to accurately determine the intensity of exercise performed by the crewmembers and show maintenance of VO2max. The quality of the data collected on ISS is subject to multiple limitations and is insufficient to meet current requirements. PURPOSE: To evaluate the performance of commercially available Bluetooth heart rate monitors (BT_HRM) and their ability to provide high quality heart rate data to monitor crew health aboard the ISS and during future exploration missions. METHODS: Nineteen subjects completed 30 data collection sessions of various intensities on the treadmill and/or cycle. Subjects wore several BT_HRM technologies for each testing session. One electrode-based chest strap (CS) was worn, while one or more optical sensors (OS) were worn. Subjects were instrumented with a 12-lead ECG to compare the heart rate data from the Bluetooth sensors. Each BT_HRM data set was time matched to the ECG data and a +/-5bpm threshold was applied to the difference between the 2 data sets. Percent error was calculated based on the number of data points outside the threshold and the total number of data points. RESULTS: The electrode-based chest straps performed better than the optical sensors. The best performing CS was CS1 (1.6% error), followed by CS4 (3.3% error), CS3 (6.4% error), and CS2 (9.2% error). The OS resulted in 10.4% error for OS1 and 14.9% error for OS2. CONCLUSIONS: The highest quality data came from CS1, but unfortunately it has been discontinued by the manufacturer. The optical sensors have not been ruled out for use, but more investigation is needed to determine how to obtain the best quality data. CS2 will be

  14. Optically Remote Noncontact Heart Rates Sensing Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongkongoum, W.; Boonduang, S.; Limsuwan, P.

    2017-09-01

    Heart rate monitoring via optically remote noncontact technique was reported in this research. A green laser (5 mW, 532±10 nm) was projected onto the left carotid artery. The reflected laser light on the screen carried the deviation of the interference patterns. The interference patterns were recorded by the digital camera. The recorded videos of the interference patterns were frame by frame analysed by 2 standard digital image processing (DIP) techniques, block matching (BM) and optical flow (OF) techniques. The region of interest (ROI) pixels within the interference patterns were analysed for periodically changes of the interference patterns due to the heart pumping action. Both results of BM and OF techniques were compared with the reference medical heart rate monitoring device by which a contact measurement using pulse transit technique. The results obtained from BM technique was 74.67 bpm (beats per minute) and OF technique was 75.95 bpm. Those results when compared with the reference value of 75.43±1 bpm, the errors were found to be 1.01% and 0.69%, respectively.

  15. The mitochondrial uniporter controls fight or flight heart rate increases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuejin; Rasmussen, Tyler P; Koval, Olha M; Joiner, Mei-Ling A; Hall, Duane D; Chen, Biyi; Luczak, Elizabeth D; Wang, Qiongling; Rokita, Adam G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Song, Long-Sheng; Anderson, Mark E

    2015-01-20

    Heart rate increases are a fundamental adaptation to physiological stress, while inappropriate heart rate increases are resistant to current therapies. However, the metabolic mechanisms driving heart rate acceleration in cardiac pacemaker cells remain incompletely understood. The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) facilitates calcium entry into the mitochondrial matrix to stimulate metabolism. We developed mice with myocardial MCU inhibition by transgenic expression of a dominant-negative (DN) MCU. Here, we show that DN-MCU mice had normal resting heart rates but were incapable of physiological fight or flight heart rate acceleration. We found that MCU function was essential for rapidly increasing mitochondrial calcium in pacemaker cells and that MCU-enhanced oxidative phoshorylation was required to accelerate reloading of an intracellular calcium compartment before each heartbeat. Our findings show that MCU is necessary for complete physiological heart rate acceleration and suggest that MCU inhibition could reduce inappropriate heart rate increases without affecting resting heart rate.

  16. Case Studies in Electronic Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Yee, J.; Parboosingh, I.J.

    1986-01-01

    Subtle changes in the characteristics of the fetal heart rate are currently used to assess the condition of the fetus in late pregnancy and during labour. The authors present three case studies of fetal heart rate monitoring.

  17. Effect of uterine contractions on fetal heart rate in pregnancy: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sletten, Julie; Kiserud, Torvid; Kessler, Jörg

    2016-10-01

    The new Holter monitoring technology enables long-term electrocardiographic recording of the fetal heart rate without discomfort for the mother. The aim of the study was to assess the feasibility of a fetal Holter monitor. This technology was further used to study fetal heart rate outside the hospital setting during normal daily activities and to test the hypothesis that uterine activity during pregnancy influences fetal heart rate. Prospective observational study including 12 healthy pregnant women at 20-40 weeks of gestation. Data were collected using the Monica AN24 system. Outcome measures were fetal heart rate, maternal heart rate, and uterine activity categorized according to the strength of the electrohysterographic signal. The recordings had a median length of 18.8 h, and fetal heart rate and maternal heart rate were obtained with success rates of 73.1 and 99.9%, respectively. Uterine activity was found to affect fetal heart rate in all participants. Compared with the basal tone and mild levels of uterine activity, moderate and strong levels of uterine activity were associated with increases in fetal heart rate of 4.0 and 5.7 beats/min, respectively. At night, the corresponding increases were 4.9 and 7.6 beats/min. Linear correlations were found between maternal heart rate and fetal heart rate in 11 of the 12 cases, with a mean coefficient beta of 0.189. Both maternal heart rate and fetal heart rate exhibited a diurnal pattern, with lower heart rates being recorded at night. Uterine activity during pregnancy is associated with a graded response in fetal heart rate and may represent a physiological challenge for the development and adaptation of the fetal cardiovascular system. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  18. BIOPHYSICAL CHARACTERISATION OF THE UNDER-APPRECIATED AND IMPORTANT RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HEART RATE VARIABILITY AND HEART RATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfredi, Oliver; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Johnsen, Anne-Berit; Inada, Shin; Schneider, Heiko; Wang, Ruoxi; Nirmalan, Mahesh; Wisloff, Ulrik; Maltsev, Victor A; Lakatta, Edward G; Zhang, Henggui; Boyett, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (beat-to-beat changes in the RR interval) has attracted considerable attention over the last 30+ years (PubMed currently lists >17,000 publications). Clinically, a decrease in heart rate variability is correlated to higher morbidity and mortality in diverse conditions, from heart disease to foetal distress. It is usually attributed to fluctuation in cardiac autonomic nerve activity. We calculated heart rate variability parameters from a variety of cardiac preparations (including humans, living animals, Langendorff-perfused heart and single sinoatrial nodal cell) in diverse species, combining this with data from previously published papers. We show that regardless of conditions, there is a universal exponential decay-like relationship between heart rate variability and heart rate. Using two biophysical models, we develop a theory for this, and confirm that heart rate variability is primarily dependent on heart rate and cannot be used in any simple way to assess autonomic nerve activity to the heart. We suggest that the correlation between a change in heart rate variability and altered morbidity and mortality is substantially attributable to the concurrent change in heart rate. This calls for re-evaluation of the findings from many papers that have not adjusted properly or at all for heart rate differences when comparing heart rate variability in multiple circumstances. PMID:25225208

  19. Heart Rates of Elementary Physical Education Students during the Dancing Classrooms Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Larry; Evans, Melissa; Guess, Wendy; Morris, Mary; Olson, Terry; Buckwalter, John

    2011-01-01

    We examined how different types of dance activities, along with their duration, influenced heart rate responses among fifth-grade physical education students (N = 96) who participated in the Dancing Classrooms program. Results indicated that the overall Dancing Classrooms program elicits a moderate cardiovascular heart rate response (M = 124.4…

  20. Distinctive Steady-State Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Responses to Passive Robotic Leg Exercise and Functional Electrical Stimulation During Head-up Tilt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirehsan Sarabadani Tafreshi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tilt tables enable early mobilization of patients by providing verticalization. But there is a high risk of orthostatic hypotension provoked by verticalization, especially after neurological diseases such as spinal cord injury. Robot-assisted tilt tables might be an alternative as they add passive robotic leg exercise (PE that can be enhanced with functional electrical stimulation (FES to the verticalization, thus reducing the risk of orthostatic hypotension. We hypothesized that the influence of PE on the cardiovascular system during verticalization depends on the verticalization angle, and FES strengthens the PE influence. To test our hypotheses, we investigated the PE effects on the cardiovascular parameters heart rate (HR, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures (sBP, dBP at different angles of verticalization in a healthy population. Ten healthy subjects on a robot-assisted tilt table underwent four different study protocols while HR, sBP and dBP were measured: (1 head-up tilt to 60° and 71° without PE; (2 PE at 20°, 40°, and 60° of head-up tilt; (3 PE while constant FES intensity was applied to the leg muscles, at 20°, 40°, and 60° of head-up tilt; (4 PE with variation of the applied FES intensity at 0°, 20°, 40°, and 60° of head-up tilt. Linear mixed models were used to model changes in HR, sBP, and dBP responses. The models show that: (1 head-up tilt alone resulted in statistically significant increases in HR and dBP, but no change in sBP. (2 PE during head-up tilt resulted in statistically significant changes in HR, sBP, and dBP, but not at each angle and not always in the same direction (i.e., increase or decrease of cardiovascular parameters. Neither adding (3 FES at constant intensity to PE nor (4 variation of FES intensity during PE had any statistically significant effects on the cardiovascular parameters.The effect of PE on the cardiovascular system during head-up tilt is strongly dependent on the verticalization

  1. Heart Rate During Sleep: Implications for Monitoring Training Status

    OpenAIRE

    Waldeck, Miriam R.; Lambert, Michael I.

    2003-01-01

    Resting heart rate has sometimes been used as a marker of training status. It is reasonable to assume that the relationship between heart rate and training status should be more evident during sleep when extraneous factors that may influence heart rate are reduced. Therefore the aim of the study was to assess the repeatability of monitoring heart rate during sleep when training status remained unchanged, to determine if this measurement had sufficient precision to be used as a marker of train...

  2. Heart rate response and rating of perceived exertion in novice subjects during Indoor Cycling Session Respuesta de la frecuencia cardiaca y percepción subjetiva del esfuerzo en principiantes, durante la práctica de ciclismo Indoor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. López

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Indoor Cycling has become a popular cardio-vascular activity for group exercise classes in the fitness centers. The purposes of this study were to measure the heart rate response and rating of perceived exertion in novice subjects performing a 45-min indoor cycling session. Fifty-nine subjects volunteered ranged from 13 to 48 years (mean ± SD, age: 32.1 ± 10.2 years old were recruited from the clients of a private fitness club. They participated in a 45-min Spinning cycle indoor session. Heart rate was measured during the session and the overall rating of perceived exertion (overall-RPE was measured to finish the session. The indoor cycling session was comprised of a warm-up (10 min, followed by a 25 min trial (cardiovascular phase of flat, run, seated climb and standing climb activities, followed by a cool down (10 min. The mean values of percentage of heart rate reserve (%HRR and overall-RPE in the session were 62.1% ± 10.5% and 14.2 ± 1.8 point, respectively. The most time of the session was associated to moderate and hard intensities. The intensity during indoor cycling class in novice adults ranged from moderate to hard values. These data suggest that indoor cycling must be considered a high-intensity exercise mode of exercise for novice subjects.

    Key Words: indoor cycling; RPE; cardiovascular exercise; fitness.

    El Ciclismo Indoor es una actividad para practicar ejercicio físico de manera colectiva muy popular en los centros de fitness. El propósito de este estudio fue evaluar la respuesta de la frecuencia cardiaca, las intensidades alcanzadas y la percepción de esfuerzo percibida en sujetos principiantes durante una sesión de ciclismo indoor. Cincuenta y nueve sujetos voluntarios, de un centro deportivo privado, con edades de 13 a 48 años (media ± desviación típica: 32,1 ± 10,2 años participaron en este estudio. La frecuencia cardiaca fue registrada durante toda la sesi

  3. Effects of pressure on the skin exerted by clothing on responses of urinary catecholamines and cortisol, heart rate and nocturnal urinary melatonin in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yuki; Kioka, Etsuko; Tokura, Hiromi

    2002-09-01

    The study investigated how the pressure exerted on the skin by clothing worn while working in the daytime affected the urinary excretion of adrenaline, noradrenaline and cortisol, heart rate, and also melatonin secretion at night. Nine young women (experiment I) and seven young women (experiment II) participated. Participants wore either a 100% cotton jacket (tight clothes, TC) or a 100% cotton T-shirt (loose clothes, LC). Loose-fitting, 100% cotton tank tops and panties were worn as underwear in both the TC and the LC groups. The main results can be summarized as follows: (1) urinary excretion of adrenaline, noradrenaline and cortisol was facilitated, and the amounts of urinary excretion were significantly higher when TC were worn. Heart rate was significantly higher in the TC group; (2) nocturnal urinary melatonin excretion was significantly greater in the TC group. These results are discussed in terms of an enhancement of diurnal sympathetic nervous system activity caused by pressure on the skin produced by tight clothing.

  4. Resting heart rate and cardiovascular events: risk factor or risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review: Resting heart rate and cardiovascular events: risk factor or risk marker? 128. Vol 52 No 2. SA Fam Pract 2010. SA Fam Pract 2010;52(2): 128-129. Heart rate in epidemiological studies. Over the last 25 years numerous reports demonstrated a significant association between resting heart rate and all- cause mortality ...

  5. The computation of evoked heart rate and blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koers, G.; Mulder, L.J.M.; van der Veen, F.M.

    1999-01-01

    For many years psychophysiologists have been interested in stimulus related changes in heart rate and blood pressure. To represent these evoked heart rate and blood pressure patterns, heart rate and blood pressure data have to be transformed into equidistant time series. This paper presents an

  6. Heart rate differences in small sided games in formative basketball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Gracia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine and learn the heart rate responses of basketball players in small-sided or modified games, in order to develop a more effective workout plan in the future. The study sample consisted of 19 basketball players from a National Championship Club, 12 of them in the U’14 category and the remaining 7 belonging to the U’16 category. Small-sided games were 3x3 and 4x4 with a duration of 4 minutes and an active break of 3 minutes. Significant differences (p<0.05 were found referring to the relations established between 3x3 without feedback and 3x3 with feedback in vigorous exercise; in 3x3 without feedback and 3x3 with feedback in moderate exercise; in 3x3 and 3x3 with average heart rate; in 4x4 and 4x4 with average heart rate and in 4x4 and 4x4 with average heart rate related to game categories.Keywords:

  7. Heart rates of elementary physical education students during the dancing classrooms program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Larry; Evans, Melissa; Guess, Wendy; Morris, Mary; Olson, Terry; Buckwalter, John

    2011-06-01

    We examined how different types of dance activities, along with their duration, influenced heart rate responses among fifth-grade physical education students (N = 96) who participated in the Dancing Classrooms program. Results indicated that the overall Dancing Classrooms program elicits a moderate cardiovascular heart rate response (M = 124.4 bpm), in which 47% of class time was spent above a 60% maximal heart rate threshold. The swing dance in particular (M = 143.4 bpm) stimulated a much higher heart rate level than all other dances in the program, with a mean heart rate change of 52.6 bpm. Girls (127.3 bpm) achieved marginally higher heart rates (p = .059) than boys (121.1 bpm).

  8. HEART-RATE-VARIABILITY SPECTRA BASED ON NONEQUIDISTANT SAMPLING - THE SPECTRUM OF COUNTS AND THE INSTANTANEOUS HEART-RATE SPECTRUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANSTEENIS, HG; TULEN, JHM; MULDER, LJM

    This paper compares two methods to estimate heart rate variability spectra i.e., the spectrum of counts and the instantaneous heart rate spectrum. Contrary to Fourier techniques based on equidistant sampling of the interbeat intervals, the spectrum of counts of the instantaneous heart rate spectrum

  9. Decomposition of heart rate variability by adaptive filtering for estimation of cardiac vagal tone

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Kedu; Nagel, Joachim H.; Hurwitz, Barry E.; Schneiderman, Neil

    1991-01-01

    Heart rate fluctuations resulting from respiration and other influences upon the cardiovascular system are encoded into the patterns of heart rate variability (HRV). The fluctuations due to respiration are called respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). Since RSA is primarily mediated through the autonomic nervous system (ANS), it is of interest to separate RSA from other influences to assess the underlying ANS function. On the other hand, the RSA may obscure heart rate responses to external manip...

  10. Heart rate monitoring during training and competition in cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeukendrup, A; VanDiemen, A

    1998-01-01

    To obtain optimal training effects and avoid overtraining, it is necessary to monitor the intensity of training. In cycling, speed is not an accurate indicator of exercise intensity, and therefore alternatives have to be found to monitor exercise intensity during training and competition. Power output may be the most direct indicator, but heart rate is easier to monitor and measure. There are, however, limitations that have to be taken into account when using a heart rate monitor. For example, the position on the bicycle may change heart rate at a given exercise intensity. More important, however, is the increase in heart rate over time, a phenomenon described as 'cardiac drift'. Cardiac drift can change the heart rate-power output relationship drastically, especially in hot environments or at altitude. It is important to determine whether one is interested in monitoring exercise intensity per se or measuring whole-body stress. Power output may be a better indicator of the former and heart rate may, under many conditions, be a better indicator of the latter. Heart rate can be used to evaluate a cyclist after training or competition, or to determine the exercise intensity during training. Heart rate monitoring is very useful in the detection of early overtraining, especially in combination with lactate curves and questionnaires. During overtraining, maximal heart rates as well as submaximal heart rates may be decreased, while resting and, in particular, sleeping - heart rates may be increased.

  11. Two separable mechanisms are responsible for mental stress effects on high frequency heart rate variability: an intra-individual approach in a healthy and a diabetic sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehl, Linn K; Deuter, Christian E; Richter, Steffen; Schulz, André; Rüddel, Heinz; Schächinger, Hartmut

    2015-03-01

    Central withdrawal of parasympathetic cardiac control and increased respiratory frequency represent two important determinants of reduced respiratory-related heart rate variability (HRV). However, studies are missing to disentangle their relative contribution during mental stress. Healthy subjects (n=10) and type 2 diabetic patients (n=8), the latter with evidence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy, participated in this study. Using an intra-individual approach, high-frequency (hf) HRV was assessed for spontaneous (during rest and mental stress) and paced breathing (0.15, 0.2, 0.25, 0.3, 0.35, 0.4 and 0.45 Hz; randomized sequence). Mental stress was induced by a challenging reaction time task. Effects of respiratory frequency on hf HRV were individually predicted by paced breathing data. Mental stress decreased hf HRV (phealthy subjects and in patients with evidence of diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Sub-maximal and maximal Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test level 2: heart rate response, reproducibility and application to elite soccer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradley, Paul S; Mohr, Magni; Bendiksen, Mads

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to (1) determine the reproducibility of sub-maximal and maximal versions of the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test level 2 (Yo-Yo IE2 test), (2) assess the relationship between the Yo-Yo IE2 test and match performance and (3) quantify the sensitivity of the Yo-Yo IE2 te......) in Yo-Yo IE2 test performance and heart rate after 6 min were 3.9% (n = 37) and 1.4% (n = 32), respectively. Elite male senior and youth U19 players Yo-Yo IE2 performances were better (P ...

  13. Heart rate awareness in patients with chronic stable heart failure. A multi-center observational study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, D

    2014-08-23

    We assessed adherence to European Society of Cardiology heart rate guidelines (i.e. heart rates less than 70bpm) in patients with chronic stable heart failure. We also investigated the percent of patients on target doses of rate controlling drugs.

  14. High readmission rate after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibilitz, K L; Berg, S K; Thygesen, Lau Caspar

    2015-01-01

    age (hazard ratio (95% CI): 1.3 (1.0-1.6)), male sex (1.2 (1.0-1.5)), mitral valve surgery (1.3 (1.0-1.6)), and infective endocarditis after surgery (1.8 (1.1-3.0), p: 0.01) predicted readmission, whereas higher age (2.3 (1.0-5.4)), higher comorbidity score (3.2 (1.8-6.0)), and infective endocarditis......BACKGROUND: After heart valve surgery, knowledge on long-term self-reported health status and readmission is lacking. Thus, the optimal strategy for out-patient management after surgery remains unclear. METHODS: Using a nationwide survey with linkage to Danish registers with one year follow-up, we...... included all adults 6-12 months after heart valve surgery irrespective of valve procedure, during Jan-June 2011 (n = 867). Participants completed a questionnaire regarding health-status (n = 742), and answers were compared with age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Readmission rates and mortality were...

  15. Catecholamine-Independent Heart Rate Increases Require CaMKII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhan; Singh, Madhu V; Hall, Duane D; Koval, Olha M.; Luczak, Elizabeth D.; Joiner, Mei-ling A.; Chen, Biyi; Wu, Yuejin; Chaudhary, Ashok K; Martins, James B; Hund, Thomas J; Mohler, Peter J; Song, Long-Sheng; Anderson, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Catecholamines increase heart rate by augmenting the cAMP responsive HCN4 ‘pacemaker current’ (If) and/or by promoting inward Na+/Ca2+ exchanger current (INCX), by a ‘Ca2+ clock’ mechanism in sinoatrial nodal cells (SANCs). The importance, identity and function of signals that connect If and Ca2+ clock mechanisms are uncertain and controversial, but the multifunctional Ca2+ and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is required for physiological heart rate responses to β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) stimulation. The aim of this stuy is to measure the contribution of the Ca2+ clock and CaMKII to cardiac pacing independent of β-AR agonist stimulation. Methods and Results We used the L-type Ca2+ channel agonist BayK 8644 (BayK) to activate the SANC Ca2+ clock. BayK and isoproterenol were similarly effective in increasing rates in SANCs and Langendorff-perfused hearts from WT control mice. In contrast, SANCs and isolated hearts from mice with CaMKII inhibition by transgenic expression of an inhibitory peptide (AC3-I) were resistant to rate increases by BayK. BayK only activated CaMKII in control SANCs, but increased ICa equally in all SANCs, indicating that increasing ICa was insufficient and suggesting CaMKII activation was required for heart rate increases by BayK. BayK did not increase If or protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of phospholamban (at Ser16), indicating that increased SANC Ca2+ by BayK did not augment cAMP/PKA signaling at these targets. Late diastolic intracellular Ca2+ release and INCX were significantly reduced in AC3-I SANCs and the response to BayK was eliminated by ryanodine in all groups. Conclusions The Ca2+ clock is capable of supporting physiological fight or flight responses, independent of β-AR stimulation or If increases. Complete Ca2+ clock and β-AR stimulation responses require CaMKII. PMID:21406683

  16. Fetal heart rate after vibroacoustic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoh, Jeong Kyu; Park, Young-Sun; Cha, Kyung-Joon; Park, Moon-Il

    2009-07-01

    To define reference ranges for fetal heart rate (FHR) parameters after vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS) according to gestational age by determining the relationship between FHR and gestational age using a computerized analysis system. Data were analyzed from 3453 women using 10-minute observational recordings during nonstress testing (NST) and VAS testing. FHR parameters were analyzed according to gestational age. All FHR parameters were related to gestational age except for mean baseline FHR, which did not vary significantly with gestational age. All other parameters followed trends similar to the NST results, except for decelerations. FHR parameters after VAS differed significantly according to gestational age. The results suggest that the gestational age of the fetus should be considered when interpreting FHR patterns after VAS.

  17. Heart rate variability in familial Mediterranean fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinovitch, Naomi; Livneh, Avi; Katz, Keren; Langevitz, Pnina; Feld, Olga; Nussinovitch, Moshe; Volovitz, Benjamin; Lidar, Merav; Nussinovitch, Udi

    2011-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a hereditary disease, characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and polyserositis. Heart rate variability (HRV) is a powerful, simple and reliable technique to evaluate autonomic nervous system function. Previous studies of physiologic parameters during tilt-test have suggested that patients with FMF have abnormal cardiovascular reactivity and occult dysautonomia. Prompted by these findings, the present study sought to evaluate HRV in patients with FMF, at rest and in the standing position. The study sample included 34 patients with FMF and 34 sex- and age-matched control subjects. All underwent electrocardiography according to strict criteria. HRV parameters were computed with custom-made software. There was no significant difference in HRV parameters, in either the supine or standing position, between the FMF and control groups. In both groups, the upright position was associated with a significant decrease, when compared with the supine position, in maximal RR interval, minimal RR, average RR, root square of successive differences in RR interval, number of intervals differing by >50 ms from preceding interval (NN50), NN50 divided by total number of intervals (pNN50) and high-frequency components as well as a significant increase in average heart rate, very low frequency or low-frequency components, low-frequency/high-frequency components ratio and total power. In conclusion, patients with FMF who are continuously treated with low-dose colchicine have not developed amyloidosis and have normal HRV parameters in the supine and upright position. Further investigation of occult dysautonomia in FMF is needed.

  18. Linear and Nonlinear Heart Rate Variability Indexes in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buccelletti Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological organisms have intrinsic control systems that act in response to internal and external stimuli maintaining homeostasis. Human heart rate is not regular and varies in time and such variability, also known as heart rate variability (HRV, is not random. HRV depends upon organism's physiologic and/or pathologic state. Physicians are always interested in predicting patient's risk of developing major and life-threatening complications. Understanding biological signals behavior helps to characterize patient's state and might represent a step toward a better care. The main advantage of signals such as HRV indexes is that it can be calculated in real time in noninvasive manner, while all current biomarkers used in clinical practice are discrete and imply blood sample analysis. In this paper HRV linear and nonlinear indexes are reviewed and data from real patients are provided to show how these indexes might be used in clinical practice.

  19. Biophysical characterization of the underappreciated and important relationship between heart rate variability and heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfredi, Oliver; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Johnsen, Anne-Berit; Inada, Shin; Schneider, Heiko; Wang, Ruoxi; Nirmalan, Mahesh; Wisloff, Ulrik; Maltsev, Victor A; Lakatta, Edward G; Zhang, Henggui; Boyett, Mark R

    2014-12-01

    Heart rate (HR) variability (HRV; beat-to-beat changes in the R-wave to R-wave interval) has attracted considerable attention during the past 30+ years (PubMed currently lists >17 000 publications). Clinically, a decrease in HRV is correlated to higher morbidity and mortality in diverse conditions, from heart disease to fetal distress. It is usually attributed to fluctuation in cardiac autonomic nerve activity. We calculated HRV parameters from a variety of cardiac preparations (including humans, living animals, Langendorff-perfused heart, and single sinoatrial nodal cell) in diverse species, combining this with data from previously published articles. We show that regardless of conditions, there is a universal exponential decay-like relationship between HRV and HR. Using 2 biophysical models, we develop a theory for this and confirm that HRV is primarily dependent on HR and cannot be used in any simple way to assess autonomic nerve activity to the heart. We suggest that the correlation between a change in HRV and altered morbidity and mortality is substantially attributable to the concurrent change in HR. This calls for re-evaluation of the findings from many articles that have not adjusted properly or at all for HR differences when comparing HRV in multiple circumstances. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Electroencephalogram and Heart Rate Regulation to Familiar and Unfamiliar People in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hecke, Amy Vaughan; Lebow, Jocelyn; Bal, Elgiz; Lamb, Damon; Harden, Emily; Kramer, Alexis; Denver, John; Bazhenova, Olga; Porges, Stephen W.

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have examined whether familiarity of partner affects social responses in children with autism. This study investigated heart rate regulation (respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA]: The myelinated vagus nerve's regulation of heart rate) and temporal-parietal electroencephalogram (EEG) activity while nineteen 8- to 12-year-old children with…

  1. Neighborhood blight, stress, and health: a walking trial of urban greening and ambulatory heart rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugenia C. South; Michelle C. Kondo; Rose A. Cheney; Charles C. Branas

    2015-01-01

    We measured dynamic stress responses using ambulatory heart rate monitoring as participants in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania walked past vacant lots before and after a greening remediation treatment of randomly selected lots. Being in view of a greened vacant lot decreased heart rate significantly more than did being in view of a nongreened vacant lot or not in view of...

  2. Influence of heavy cigarette smoking on heart rate variability and heart rate turbulence parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagirci, Goksel; Cay, Serkan; Karakurt, Ozlem

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking increases the risk of cardiovascular events related with several mechanisms. The most suggested mechanism is increased activity of sympathetic nervous system. Heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate turbulence (HRT) has been shown to be independent and powerful...... predictors of mortality in a specific group of cardiac patients. The goal of this study was to assess the effect of heavy cigarette smoking on cardiac autonomic function using HRV and HRT analyses. METHODS: Heavy cigarette smoking was defined as more than 20 cigarettes smoked per day. Heavy cigarette smokers......, 69 subjects and nonsmokers 74 subjects (control group) were enrolled in this study. HRV and HRT analyses [turbulence onset (TO) and turbulence slope (TS)] were assessed from 24-hour Holter recordings. RESULTS: The values of TO were significantly higher in heavy cigarette smokers than control group...

  3. Genome-wide association studies and resting heart rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskari Kilpeläinen, Tuomas

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revolutionized the search for genetic variants regulating resting heart rate. In the last 10 years, GWASs have led to the identification of at least 21 novel heart rate loci. These discoveries have provided valuable insights into the mechanisms...... and pathways that regulate heart rate and link heart rate to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. GWASs capture majority of genetic variation in a population sample by utilizing high-throughput genotyping chips measuring genotypes for up to several millions of SNPs across the genome in thousands...... of individuals. This allows the identification of the strongest heart rate associated signals at genome-wide level. While GWASs provide robust statistical evidence of the association of a given genetic locus with heart rate, they are only the starting point for detailed follow-up studies to locate the causal...

  4. Resting heart rate and the risk of heart failure in healthy adults: the Rotterdam Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanchen, David; Leening, Maarten J G; Locatelli, Isabella; Cornuz, Jacques; Kors, Jan A; Heeringa, Jan; Deckers, Jaap W; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Dehghan, Abbas

    2013-05-01

    An elevated resting heart rate is associated with rehospitalization for heart failure and is a modifiable risk factor in heart failure patients. We aimed to examine the association between resting heart rate and incident heart failure in a population-based cohort study of healthy adults without pre-existing overt heart disease. We studied 4768 men and women aged ≥55 years from the population-based Rotterdam Study. We excluded participants with prevalent heart failure, coronary heart disease, pacemaker, atrial fibrillation, atrioventricular block, and those using β-blockers or calcium channel blockers. We used extended Cox models allowing for time-dependent variation of resting heart rate along follow-up. During a median of 14.6 years of follow-up, 656 participants developed heart failure. The risk of heart failure was higher in men with higher resting heart rate. For each increment of 10 beats per minute, the multivariable adjusted hazard ratios in men were 1.16 (95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.28; P=0.005) in the time-fixed heart rate model and 1.13 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.25; P=0.017) in the time-dependent heart rate model. The association could not be demonstrated in women (P for interaction=0.004). Censoring participants for incident coronary heart disease or using time-dependent models to account for the use of β-blockers or calcium channel blockers during follow-up did not alter the results. Baseline or persistent higher resting heart rate is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure in healthy older men in the general population.

  5. The use of combined heart rate response and accelerometry to assess the level and predictors of physical activity in tuberculosis patients in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, M; Faurholt-Jepsen, D; Range, N

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We assessed the role of tuberculosis (TB) disease and HIV infection on the level of physical activity. A combined heart rate and movement sensor was used to assess habitual physical activity in TB patients and non-TB controls. The association between sputum-negative TB, sputum-positive TB......, HIV and physical activity estimates were assessed in multivariable linear regression models adjusted for age, sex, haemoglobin and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP). Sputum-positive [eB 0·43, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·29-0·64] and sputum-negative (eB 0·67, 95% CI 0·47-0·94) TB as well as HIV...... infection (eB 0·59, 95% CI 0·46-0·75) were associated with reduced activity compared to controls. Anaemia accounted for a substantial part of the effects of HIV, while elevated AGP primarily mediated the TB effect. The level of physical activity is highly influenced by TB and HIV, and mainly mediated...

  6. Heart Rate, Life Expectancy and the Cardiovascular System: Therapeutic Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudoulas, Konstantinos Dean; Borer, Jeffrey S; Boudoulas, Harisios

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that life span is inversely related to resting heart rate in most organisms. This association between heart rate and survival has been attributed to the metabolic rate, which is greater in smaller animals and is directly associated with heart rate. Studies have shown that heart rate is related to survival in apparently healthy individuals and in patients with different underlying cardiovascular diseases. A decrease in heart rate due to therapeutic interventions may result in an increase in survival. However, there are many factors regulating heart rate, and it is quite plausible that these may independently affect life expectancy. Nonetheless, a fast heart rate itself affects the cardiovascular system in multiple ways (it increases ventricular work, myocardial oxygen consumption, endothelial stress, aortic/arterial stiffness, decreases myocardial oxygen supply, other) which, in turn, may affect survival. In this brief review, the effects of heart rate on the heart, arterial system and survival will be discussed. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Accuracy of smartphone apps for heart rate measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppetti, Thomas; Brauchlin, Andreas; Müggler, Simon; Attinger-Toller, Adrian; Templin, Christian; Schönrath, Felix; Hellermann, Jens; Lüscher, Thomas F; Biaggi, Patric; Wyss, Christophe A

    2017-08-01

    Background Smartphone manufacturers offer mobile health monitoring technology to their customers, including apps using the built-in camera for heart rate assessment. This study aimed to test the diagnostic accuracy of such heart rate measuring apps in clinical practice. Methods The feasibility and accuracy of measuring heart rate was tested on four commercially available apps using both iPhone 4 and iPhone 5. 'Instant Heart Rate' (IHR) and 'Heart Fitness' (HF) work with contact photoplethysmography (contact of fingertip to built-in camera), while 'Whats My Heart Rate' (WMH) and 'Cardiio Version' (CAR) work with non-contact photoplethysmography. The measurements were compared to electrocardiogram and pulse oximetry-derived heart rate. Results Heart rate measurement using app-based photoplethysmography was performed on 108 randomly selected patients. The electrocardiogram-derived heart rate correlated well with pulse oximetry ( r = 0.92), IHR ( r = 0.83) and HF ( r = 0.96), but somewhat less with WMH ( r = 0.62) and CAR ( r = 0.60). The accuracy of app-measured heart rate as compared to electrocardiogram, reported as mean absolute error (in bpm ± standard error) was 2 ± 0.35 (pulse oximetry), 4.5 ± 1.1 (IHR), 2 ± 0.5 (HF), 7.1 ± 1.4 (WMH) and 8.1 ± 1.4 (CAR). Conclusions We found substantial performance differences between the four studied heart rate measuring apps. The two contact photoplethysmography-based apps had higher feasibility and better accuracy for heart rate measurement than the two non-contact photoplethysmography-based apps.

  8. Influence of the Numbers of Players in the Heart Rate Responses of Youth Soccer Players Within 2 vs. 2, 3 vs. 3 and 4 vs. 4 Small-sided Games

    OpenAIRE

    Dellal, A; Jannault, R; Lopez-Segovia, M; Pialoux, V

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare heart rate (HR) responses within and between small-sided games (SSG) training methods in elite young soccer players. Twenty-seven youth soccer players (age: 16.5 ? 0.5 years, height: 174.5 ? 5.5 cm, weight: 62.9 ? 8.3, velocity at maximal aerobic speed (MAS): 15.9 ? 0.9 km.h?1) performed 3 different SSG (2 vs. 2, 3 vs. 3, 4 vs. 4 without goalkeeper). In each SSG, HR was continuously measured and expressed as a mean percentage of HR reserve (%HRreserve)...

  9. Increased heart rate is associated with a prothrombotic state: The Framingham Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofler, Geoffrey H; Massaro, Joseph; Levy, Daniel A; Sutherland, Patrice A; Buckley, Thomas; D'Agostino, Ralph B

    2017-03-01

    Background Although a higher heart rate is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, the mechanism is not well understood. As thrombosis has an important role in plaque development and acute coronary syndromes, the increase related to heart rate may result from a prothrombotic imbalance. Methods We investigated the relation between heart rate and thrombotic potential in 3451 participants from the Offspring Cohort of the Framingham Heart Study (mean age 54 years, 55% women). Participants were divided into quintiles based on heart rate derived from a resting electrocardiogram. Results Higher heart rates were associated with significant age-adjusted increases in fibrinogen, viscosity, factor VII antigen, and impaired fibrinolytic potential (plasminogen activator inhibitor and tissue plasminogen activator antigen) among men and women, and von Willebrand factor antigen among men. Fibrinogen levels were 9% higher among men with a heart rate of 80.9 ± 8.1 beats/min (quintile 5) vs. 50.0 ± 3.9 beats/min (quintile 1) (314 vs. 287 mg/dl, p heart rates are associated with a prothrombotic state. Because these factors are also associated with endothelial dysfunction and inflammation, these findings are consistent with an injurious effect of higher heart rates on the endothelium. Measures to reduce thrombotic potential may be of particular value in people with higher heart rates.

  10. Association between atrial fibrillatory rate and heart rate variability in patients with atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corino, Valentina D A; Cygankiewicz, Iwona; Mainardi, Luca T; Stridh, Martin; Vasquez, Rafael; Bayes de Luna, Antonio; Holmqvist, Fredrik; Zareba, Wojciech; Platonov, Pyotr G

    2013-01-01

    Even if atrial fibrillatory rate (AFR) has been related to clinical outcome in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), its relation with ventricular response has not been deeply studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between AFR and RR series variability in patients with AF. Twenty-minute electrocardiograms in orthogonal leads were processed to extract AFR, using spatiotemporal QRST cancellation and time frequency analysis, and RR series in 127 patients (age 69 ± 11 years) with congestive heart failure (NYHA II-III) enrolled in the MUSIC study (MUerte Subita en Insufficiencia Cardiaca). Heart rate variability and irregularity were assessed by time domain parameters and entropy-based indices, respectively and their correlation with AFR investigated. Variability measures seem not to be related to AFR, while irregularity measures do. A significant correlation between AFR and variability parameters of heart rate variability during AF was found only in patients not treated with antiarrhythmics drugs (correlation = 0.56 P < 0.05 for pNN50), while this correlation was lost in patients taking rate- or rhythm-control drugs. A significant positive correlation between AFR and indices of RR irregularity was found, showing that a higher AFR is related to a less organized RR series (correlation = 0.33 P < 0.05 for regularity index for all patients, correlation increased in subgroups of patients treated with the same drug). These results suggest that a higher AFR is associated with a higher degree of irregularity of ventricular response that is observed regardless of the use of rate-controlling drugs. ©2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. HEART RATE DURING SLEEP: IMPLICATIONS FOR MONITORING TRAINING STATUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam R. Waldeck

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Resting heart rate has sometimes been used as a marker of training status. It is reasonable to assume that the relationship between heart rate and training status should be more evident during sleep when extraneous factors that may influence heart rate are reduced. Therefore the aim of the study was to assess the repeatability of monitoring heart rate during sleep when training status remained unchanged, to determine if this measurement had sufficient precision to be used as a marker of training status. The heart rate of ten female subjects was monitored for 24 hours on three occasions over three weeks whilst training status remained unchanged. Average, minimum and maximum heart rate during sleep was calculated. The average heart rate of the group during sleep was similar on each of the three tests (65 ± 9, 63 ± 6 and 67 ± 7 beats·min-1 respectively. The range in minimum heart rate variation during sleep for all subjects over the three testing sessions was from 0 to 10 beats·min-1 (mean = 5 ± 3 beats·min-1 and for maximum heart rate variation was 2 to 31 beats·min-1 (mean = 13 ± 9 beats·min-1. In summary it was found that on an individual basis the minimum heart rate during sleep varied by about 8 beats·min-1. This amount of intrinsic day-to-day variation needs to be considered when changes in heart rate that may occur with changes in training status are interpreted

  12. Heart rate during sleep: implications for monitoring training status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldeck, Miriam R; Lambert, Michael I

    2003-12-01

    Resting heart rate has sometimes been used as a marker of training status. It is reasonable to assume that the relationship between heart rate and training status should be more evident during sleep when extraneous factors that may influence heart rate are reduced. Therefore the aim of the study was to assess the repeatability of monitoring heart rate during sleep when training status remained unchanged, to determine if this measurement had sufficient precision to be used as a marker of training status. The heart rate of ten female subjects was monitored for 24 hours on three occasions over three weeks whilst training status remained unchanged. Average, minimum and maximum heart rate during sleep was calculated. The average heart rate of the group during sleep was similar on each of the three tests (65 ± 9, 63 ± 6 and 67 ± 7 beats·min(-1) respectively). The range in minimum heart rate variation during sleep for all subjects over the three testing sessions was from 0 to 10 beats·min(-1) (mean = 5 ± 3 beats·min(-1)) and for maximum heart rate variation was 2 to 31 beats·min(-1) (mean = 13 ± 9 beats·min(-1)). In summary it was found that on an individual basis the minimum heart rate during sleep varied by about 8 beats·min(-1). This amount of intrinsic day-to-day variation needs to be considered when changes in heart rate that may occur with changes in training status are interpreted.

  13. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate as a marker for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayan, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Patients with angina pectoris or myocardial infarction frequently present without evidence of cardiac-specific heart enzymes by laboratory analysis or specific pathologic electro-cardiogram findings. The current study analyzed the efficacy of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate as an additional potential indicator for coronary heart disease, the aim being to enable quicker identification of patients with angina pectoris or myocardial infarction so that they can be more rapidly treated. Patients with angina pectoris or myocardial infarction who had undergone a heart catheter examination were included in the study. The diagnosis of acute coronary heart disease was made by the physician who performed coronary angiography. Patients without coronary heart disease were used as a control group. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was measured in all patients. Patients with angina pectoris or myocardial infarction and an inflammatory or tumor disease were excluded. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was prolonged in 79 (58.09%) of 136 patients; 69 (50.74%) patients (95% confidence interval ±8.4%, 42.34%-59.14%) had coronary heart disease and a prolonged erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was prolonged in ten (7.35%) patients (95% confidence interval ±4.39%, 2.96%-11.74%) without coronary heart disease by coronary angiography. The specificity of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate for coronary heart disease was 70.59% and the sensitivity was 67.65%. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate may be a useful additional diagnostic criterion for coronary heart disease.

  14. Reduced intrinsic heart rate is associated with reduced arrhythmic susceptibility in guinea-pig heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchii, Oleg E

    2014-12-01

    In the clinical setting, patients with slower resting heart rate are less prone to cardiovascular death compared with those with elevated heart rate. However, electrophysiological adaptations associated with reduced cardiac rhythm have not been thoroughly explored. In this study, relationships between intrinsic heart rate and arrhythmic susceptibility were examined by assessments of action potential duration (APD) rate adaptation and inducibility of repolarization alternans in sinoatrial node (SAN)-driven and atrioventricular (AV)-blocked guinea-pig hearts perfused with Langendorff apparatus. Electrocardiograms, epicardial monophasic action potentials, and effective refractory periods (ERP) were assessed in normokalemic and hypokalemic conditions. Slower basal heart rate in AV-blocked hearts was associated with prolonged ventricular repolarization during spontaneous beating, and with attenuated APD shortening at increased cardiac activation rates during dynamic pacing, when compared with SAN-driven hearts. During hypokalemic perfusion, the inducibility of repolarization alternans and tachyarrhythmia by rapid pacing was found to be lower in AV-blocked hearts. This difference was ascribed to prolonged ERP in the setting of reduced basal heart rate, which prevented ventricular capture at critically short pacing intervals required to induce arrhythmia. Reduced basal heart rate is associated with electrophysiological changes that prevent electrical instability upon an abrupt cardiac acceleration.

  15. Modeling baroreflex regulation of heart rate during orthostatic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olufsen, Mette; Tran, Hien T.; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2006-01-01

    in healthy and hypertensive elderly people the hysteresis loop shifts to higher blood pressure values and its area is diminished. Finally, for hypertensive elderly people the hysteresis loop is generally not closed indicating that during postural change from sitting to standing, the blood pressure resettles....... The model uses blood pressure measured in the finger as an input to model heart rate dynamics in response to changes in baroreceptor nerve firing rate, sympathetic and parasympathetic responses, vestibulo-sympathetic reflex, and concentrations of norepinephrine and acetylcholine. We formulate an inverse...... validate our model against clinical data it is necessary to include the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex. Furthermore our model reveals that the transfer between the nerve firing and blood pressure is non-linear and follows a hysteresis curve. In healthy young people, the hysteresis loop is wide, while...

  16. Pathogen-induced heart rate changes associated with cholinergic nervous system activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Karen D; Srinivasan, Varadamurthy; Moorman, J Randall; Gaykema, Ronald P A; Goehler, Lisa E

    2011-02-01

    The autonomic nervous system plays a central role in regulation of host defense and in physiological responses to sepsis, including changes in heart rate and heart rate variability. The cholinergic anti-inflammatory response, whereby infection triggers vagal efferent signals that dampen production of proinflammatory cytokines, would be predicted to result in increased vagal signaling to the heart and increased heart rate variability. In fact, decreased heart rate variability is widely described in humans with sepsis. Our studies elucidate this apparent paradox by showing that mice injected with pathogens demonstrate transient bradyarrhythmias of vagal origin in a background of decreased heart rate variability (HRV). Intraperitoneal injection of a large inoculum of Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria or Candida albicans rapidly induced bradyarrhythmias of sinus and AV nodal block, characteristic of cardiac vagal firing and dramatically increased short-term HRV. These pathogen-induced bradycardias were immediately terminated by atropine, an antagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors, demonstrating the role of vagal efferent signaling in this response. Vagal afferent signaling following pathogen injection was demonstrated by intense nuclear c-Fos activity in neurons of the vagal sensory ganglia and brain stem. Surprisingly, pathogen-induced bradycardia demonstrated rapid and prolonged desensitization and did not recur on repeat injection of the same organism 3 h or 3 days after the initial exposure. After recovery from the initial bradycardia, depressed heart rate variability developed in some mice and was correlated with elevated plasma cytokine levels and mortality. Our findings of decreased HRV and transient heart rate decelerations in infected mice are similar to heart rate changes described by our group in preterm neonates with sepsis. Pathogen sensing and signaling via the vagus nerve, and the desensitization of this response, may account for periods of

  17. Maternal Psychopathology Influences Infant Heart Rate Variability: Generation R Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Dierckx (Bram); J.H.M. Tulen (Joke); M.P. Lambregtse-van den Berg (Mijke); A. Tharner (Anne); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte); A. Hofman (Albert); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAbstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the determinants of heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) in children. The autonomic nervous system as measured by HR and HRV is considered a biological marker of psychopathology in children. METHODS: We examined the relationship of maternal

  18. Using photoplethysmography in heart rate monitoring of patients with epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Andel, Judith; Ungureanu, Constantin; Aarts, Ronald; Leijten, Frans; Arends, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate is a useful neurophysiological sign when monitoring seizures in patients with epilepsy. In an ambulatory setting, heart rate is measured with ECG involving electrodes on the skin. This method is uncomfortable which is burdensome for patients and is sensitive to motion artifacts, which

  19. Do high fetal catecholamine levels affect heart rate variability and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To deternrine the relationship between Umbilical arterial catecholamine levels and fetal heart rate variability and meconium passage. Study design. A prospective descriptive study was perfonned. Umbilical artery catecholamine levels were measured in 55 newborns and correlated with fetal heart rate before ...

  20. The Correlation Between Ultrasound-Measured Fetal Heart Rate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 400 apparently healthy pregnant women with singleton fetuses from Enugu, Southeast Nigeria were randomly selected for the study. The aims of the study are to establish: a normogram for fetal heart rate (FHR) and the relationship between fetal heart rate and gestational age (GA) by 2–D ultrasound. Crown rump ...

  1. Retrospective low heart rate variability overview in Jos, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Heart Rate Variability (HRV) describes the variations of both instantaneous heart rate and R-R intervals in an electrocardiogram. Low HRV is considered to be a non-invasive measurement of autonomic inactivity and propensity lethal arrhythmias. Methodology: This was a retrospective study of patients with ...

  2. A comparison between heart rate and heart rate variability as indicators of cardiac health and fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharina Cornelia Grant

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of cardiac autonomic activity and control via heart rate (HR and heart rate variability (HRV is known to provide prognostic information in clinical populations. Issues with regard to standardisation and interpretation of HRV data make the use of the more easily accessible HR on its own as an indicator of autonomic cardiac control very appealing. The aim of this study was to investigate the strength of associations between an important cardio vascular health metric such as VO2max and the following: HR, HRV indicators and heart rate normalised HRV indicators. A cross sectional descriptive study was done including 145 healthy volunteers aged between 18 and 22 years. HRV was quantified by time domain, frequency domain and Poincaré plot analysis. Indirect VO2max was determined using the Multistage Coopers test. The Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated to quantify the strength of the associations. Both simple linear and multiple stepwise regressions were performed to be able to discriminate between the role of the individual indicators as well as their combined association with VO2max. Only HR, RR interval and pNN50 showed significant (p<0.01, p<0.01 and p=0.03 correlations with VO2max. Stepwise multiple regression indicated that, when combining all HRV indicators the most important predictor of cardio vascular fitness as represented by VO2max, is HR. HR explains 17% of the variation, while the inclusion of HF (high frequency HRV indicator added only an additional 3.1% to the coefficient of determination. Results also showed when testing the normalised indicators, HR explained of the largest percentage of the changes in VO2max (16.5%. Thus HR on its own is the most important predictor of changes in an important cardiac health metric such as VO2max. These results may indicate that during investigation of exercise ability (VO2max phenomena, quantification of HRV may not add significant value.

  3. Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring from Phonocardiograph Signal Using Repetition Frequency of Heart Sounds

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Tang; Ting Li; Tianshuang Qiu; Yongwan Park

    2016-01-01

    As a passive, harmless, and low-cost diagnosis tool, fetal heart rate (FHR) monitoring based on fetal phonocardiography (fPCG) signal is alternative to ultrasonographic cardiotocography. Previous fPCG-based methods commonly relied on the time difference of detected heart sound bursts. However, the performance is unavoidable to degrade due to missed heart sounds in very low signal-to-noise ratio environments. This paper proposes a FHR monitoring method using repetition frequency of heart sound...

  4. Impact of sleep-disordered breathing on heart rate turbulence in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihisa, Akiomi; Suzuki, Satoshi; Takiguchi, Mai; Shimizu, Takeshi; Abe, Satoshi; Sato, Takamasa; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Sugimoto, Koichi; Kunii, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Shu-ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2014-01-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is associated with adverse outcomes in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Additionally, heart rate turbulence (HRT) reflects changes in the sinus cycle length of baroreceptor in response to hemodynamic fluctuations after ventricular premature beat. Recent studies have suggested that HRT as a marker of vagal activity has a predictive value of poor prognosis in CHF patients. However, little is known about the relationship between SDB and HRT in CHF patients. In this study, 75 patients with CHF were enrolled. We simultaneously performed Holter ECG during a 24-hr period and portable sleep monitoring at nighttime, and determined the respiratory disturbance index (RDI), HRT (turbulence onset (TO) and turbulence slope (TS)) during that 24-hr period. These patients were divided into two groups based on the presence of severe SDB: Group A (RDI≥30, n = 17) and Group B (RDICHF patients.

  5. Assessing Heart Rate in Physical Education. Assessment Series: K-12 Physical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Marilyn M.

    This guide discusses the assessment of heart rate and, in particular, the assessment of heart rate using a heart monitor. Part 1, "Foundation for the Use of Heart Rate," reviews literature about heart rate assessment and heart rate monitors, offering an overview of national guidelines for physical activity. It focuses on the importance…

  6. The clinical significance of detection to heart rate deceleration capacity and heart rate variability in patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-rong Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the change of heart rate deceleration capacity ( DC and heart rate variability in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF and its relationship with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF. Methods: DC, LVEF, time and frequency domain parameters of HRV were measured in 66 patients with CHF and 34 healthy adults (control group by using 24h Holter recordings and Echocardiography. The standard deviation of normal R-R intervals( SDNN, squares of differences between adjacent NN intervals ( RMSSD,low frequency power( LFn and high frequency power( HFn and the changes of LVEF were compared between  the two groups,the relationship between DC,LVEF and HRV were studied in patients with CHF. Results: The median value of DC in the patients with CHF was significantly lower than that in control group( 3.1 ± 2.4 ms vs 7.2 ± 1.3 ms,P <0.01.Incidence of abnormal DC in the CHF group was 57.5%,which was significantly higher than that in the control group (P <0.01.The HRV index, including SDNN、RMSSD、LFn、HFn, in the CHF group was significantly lower than that in normal control group (P < 0.01. Significant positive correlation between HRV index and LVEF were confirmed (P < 0.01. Conclusions: DC and HRV index are lower in patients with CHF and have a good correlation with the left ventricular ejection fraction.

  7. Long‐term Cardiovascular Risks Associated With an Elevated Heart Rate: The Framingham Heart Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jennifer E.; Larson, Martin G.; Ghorbani, Anahita; Cheng, Susan; Coglianese, Erin E.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Wang, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Higher heart rate has been associated with an adverse prognosis, but most prior studies focused on individuals with known cardiovascular disease or examined a limited number of outcomes. We sought to examine the association of baseline heart rate with both fatal and nonfatal outcomes during 2 decades of follow‐up. Methods and Results Our study included 4058 Framingham Heart Study participants (mean age 55 years, 56% women). Cox models were performed with multivariable adjustment for clinical risk factors and physical activity. A total of 708 participants developed incident cardiovascular disease (303 heart failure, 343 coronary heart disease, and 216 stroke events), 48 received a permanent pacemaker, and 1186 died. Baseline heart rate was associated with incident cardiovascular disease (hazard ratio [HR] 1.15 per 1 SD [11 bpm] increase in heart rate, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.24, P=0.0002), particularly heart failure (HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.48, Pheart rate was also associated with higher all‐cause (HR 1.17, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.24, Pheart rate abated or increased. In contrast, individuals with a higher heart rate had a lower risk of requiring permanent pacemaker placement (HR 0.55, 95% CI 0.38 to 0.79, P=0.001). Conclusions Individuals with a higher heart rate are at elevated long‐term risk for cardiovascular events, in particular, heart failure, and all‐cause death. On the other hand, a higher heart rate is associated with a lower risk of future permanent pacemaker implantation. PMID:24811610

  8. Fetal Heart Rate Pattern Notification Guidelines and Suggested Management Algorithm for Intrapartum Electronic Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Downs, Thomas; Zlomke, Evelyn

    2007-01-01

    Context: Numerous randomized controlled trials have demonstrated limited efficacy of intrapartum fetal heart rate monitoring in improving fetal outcome. A potential reason is the wide variability in clinical decision making seen with its use. Standardizing management of variant intrapartum fetal heart rate tracings may reduce this variability and lead to improvement in fetal outcome.

  9. Predictive value of casual ECG-based resting heart rate compared with resting heart rate obtained from Holter recording

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Nicholas; Dixen, Ulrik; Marott, Jacob L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is associated with cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Assessment of heart rate (HR) from Holter recording may afford a more precise estimate of the effect of RHR on cardiovascular risk, as compared to casual RHR. Comparative analysis was carried ...

  10. Heart rate and heart rate variability during a novel object test and a handling test in young horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, E.K.; Reenen, van C.G.; Werf, van der J.T.N.; Schilder, M.B.H.; Knaap, J.H.; Barneveld, A.; Blokhuis, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    Forty-one Dutch Warmblood immature horses were used in a study to quantify temperamental traits on the basis of heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) measures. Half of the horses received additional training from the age of 5 months onwards; the other half did not. Horses were tested at

  11. Job strain in relation to ambulatory blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability among female nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riese, H.; Doornen, L.J.P. van; Houtman, I.L.D.; Geus, E.J.C. de

    2004-01-01

    Objective. This study examined the effects of exposure to job strain on independent predictors of cardiovascular disease (ambulatory blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability). Methods. The participants comprised a homogeneous group of 159 healthy female nurses [mean age 35.9 (SD 8.5)

  12. Heart rate variability during cycloergometric exercise or judo wrestling eliciting the same heart rate level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottin, François; Durbin, François; Papelier, Yves

    2004-03-01

    This study compared heart rate variability (HRV) in ten male judokas between two types of exercise eliciting the same near-maximal average heart rate (HR): judo wrestling vs. cycloergometric bout. Beat-to-beat RR intervals were recorded during (1) a 4-min judo randori (wrestling); (2) a 4-min cycloergometric exercise eliciting maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2MAX)). Time series were analyzed both by short term Fourier transform (STFT) and Poincaré plot (PP). The main results are as follows. First, despite the fact that the same maximal HR was reached during the two exercises, the spectral energy computed from the judo recordings was significantly higher than that recorded from the cycloergometric exercise. Second, according to the PP index of rapid HRV (SD1), the high-frequency spectral energy (HF) was significantly higher during judo than cycloergometric exercise as well. Third, judo spectra show chaotic harmonics in place of the precise HF peak observed during cycloergometric exercise. Fourth, the respective parts of normalized LFn and HFn are not different between the two exercise modes, suggesting that autonomic control during severe exercise cannot depend on the type of exercise. In conclusion, this study shows that it is possible, according to the observed kind of variability from RR time series, to differentiate between two types of effort: steady-state dynamic exercise or conversely exercise made of both isometric and irregular dynamic efforts (wrestling, collective sports, and others).

  13. Heart rate and heart rate variability modification in chronic insomnia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Benedetto; Dittoni, Serena; Colicchio, Salvatore; Testani, Elisa; Losurdo, Anna; Gnoni, Valentina; Di Blasi, Chiara; Brunetti, Riccardo; Contardi, Anna; Mazza, Salvatore; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Chronic insomnia is highly prevalent in the general population, provoking personal distress and increased risk for psychiatric and medical disorders. Autonomic hyper-arousal could be a pathogenic mechanism of chronic primary insomnia. The aim of this study was to investigate autonomic activity in patients with chronic primary insomnia by means of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. Eighty-five consecutive patients affected by chronic primary insomnia were enrolled (38 men and 47 women; mean age: 53.2 ± 13.6). Patients were compared with a control group composed of 55 healthy participants matched for age and gender (23 men and 32 women; mean age: 54.2 ± 13.9). Patients underwent an insomnia study protocol that included subjective sleep evaluation, psychometric measures, and home-based polysomnography with evaluation of HRV in wake before sleep, in all sleep stages, and in wake after final awakening. Patients showed modifications of heart rate and HRV parameters, consistent with increased sympathetic activity, while awake before sleep and during Stage-2 non-REM sleep. No significant differences between insomniacs and controls could be detected during slow-wave sleep, REM sleep, and post-sleep wake. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that autonomic hyper-arousal is a major pathogenic mechanism in primary insomnia, and confirm that this condition is associated with an increased cardiovascular risk.

  14. Heart rate, heart rate variability and inflammatory biomarkers among young and healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeschbacher, Stefanie; Schoen, Tobias; Dörig, Laura; Kreuzmann, Rahel; Neuhauser, Charlotte; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Risch, Martin; Risch, Lorenz; Conen, David

    2017-02-01

    Heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), and inflammation are all associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to assess potential interrelationships between these parameters in a young and healthy population. Healthy individuals aged 25-41 years were included in a prospective population-based study. All participants underwent 24-h electrocardiography using a validated device. The standard deviation of all normal RR intervals (SDNN) was pre-defined as the main HRV outcome variable. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), total leukocyte (LC) count and LC subtypes were obtained from venous blood samples. A total of 2064 participants (47% men, 37 years) were included in this analysis. In multivariable linear regression analyses using SDNN as the outcome variable, β-coefficients (95% confidence intervals) per 1 standard deviation (SD) increase on the log-scale were -0.11 (-0.16; -0.07), p healthy adults, inflammatory parameters were strongly associated with increased HR and decreased HRV, suggesting an important interaction between inflammatory pathways and the autonomic nervous system. Key message Inflammatory biomarkers, such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and leukocyte cell count with its subtypes were inversely associated with HRV and positively associated with HR. Our findings suggest important interrelationships between inflammatory pathways and the ANS.

  15. Heart rate differentiates urgency and emergency in hypertensive crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bannay, Rashed; Böhm, Michael; Husain, Aysha

    2013-08-01

    To study the clinical significance of presenting blood pressure parameters and heart rate in patients with hypertensive crisis. In patients admitted with hypertensive crisis between January 2011 and May 2011, demography, mode of presentation, co-morbidities, blood pressure readings, and heart rate at presentation were documented. Further clustering of hypertensive crisis into emergency or urgency was based on the presence or absence of target organ involvement. The relationship between blood pressure parameters, heart rate, and other variables was analyzed. 189 patients in sinus rhythm were enrolled in this pilot study. The rate of hypertensive urgency was 56 %, whereas the rate of hypertensive emergency was 44 %, respectively. Subjects with hypertensive emergency had a higher mean heart rate (93 ± 22.7 bpm) than those with urgency (81 ± 11.5 bpm) (P = 0.015). Women had higher heart rates (92 ± 18.5 bpm) than men (86 ± 17.6 bpm) (P = 0.014). Heart rates below 100 bpm had a specificity of 94 %, classifying patients as hypertensive urgency. Tachycardia had a powerful statistical association with hypertensive left ventricular failure (P pulse pressure, and mean blood pressure relates neither to urgency nor to emergency. Diabetic patients with HBA1c levels of more than 53 mmol/mol had a heart rate of more than 100 bpm (P = 0.015) during hypertensive crisis. Normal heart rate is characteristic of hypertensive urgency. Tachycardia in this setting is an ominous sign and denotes hypertensive complications in particular left ventricular failure. Among diabetics, elevated heart rate is associated with poor glycemic control.

  16. Adapting workload improves the measurement of heart rate recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberts, R P; Maskell, S; Borresen, J; Lambert, M I

    2011-09-01

    Heart rate after a standardized test varies with a change in training status, possibly compromising the accuracy of measuring changes in heart rate recovery (HRR). The aim of this study was to determine if a change in the exercise intensity would result in a change in heart rate recovery and/or the accuracy of the heart rate recovery measurement. 31 subjects performed 4 submaximal running tests (HIMS). Based on the heart rate after the first HIMS, subjects either completed 4 identical HIMS (SAME (n=9)), 2 standard and 2 faster HIMS (FASTER (n=10)) or 2 standard and 2 slower HIMS (SLOWER (n=12)). Although no changes in heart rate recovery were found when the HIMS protocol was adapted, lower coefficients of variation (CV) and typical errors of measurement (TEM) were found in the SLOWER (CV: 11 ± 7 to 5 ± 3% ( P=0.025)), TEM: 6 to 3 beats and FASTER group (CV: 11 ± 7 to 4 ± 3% ( P=0.048), TEM: 7 to 3 beats). To ensure the highest level of sensitivity in detecting meaningful changes in HRR over time, submaximal testing protocols should target exercise intensities ranging in-between 86-93% of heart rate maximum. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring from Phonocardiograph Signal Using Repetition Frequency of Heart Sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As a passive, harmless, and low-cost diagnosis tool, fetal heart rate (FHR monitoring based on fetal phonocardiography (fPCG signal is alternative to ultrasonographic cardiotocography. Previous fPCG-based methods commonly relied on the time difference of detected heart sound bursts. However, the performance is unavoidable to degrade due to missed heart sounds in very low signal-to-noise ratio environments. This paper proposes a FHR monitoring method using repetition frequency of heart sounds. The proposed method can track time-varying heart rate without both heart sound burst identification and denoising. The average accuracy rate comparison to benchmark is 88.3% as the SNR ranges from −4.4 dB to −26.7 dB.

  18. Heart rate regulation in diving sea lions: the vagus nerve rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponganis, Paul J; McDonald, Birgitte I; Tift, Michael S; Williams, Cassondra L

    2017-04-15

    Recent publications have emphasized the potential generation of morbid cardiac arrhythmias secondary to autonomic conflict in diving marine mammals. Such conflict, as typified by cardiovascular responses to cold water immersion in humans, has been proposed to result from exercise-related activation of cardiac sympathetic fibers to increase heart rate, combined with depth-related changes in parasympathetic tone to decrease heart rate. After reviewing the marine mammal literature and evaluating heart rate profiles of diving California sea lions (Zalophus californianus), we present an alternative interpretation of heart rate regulation that de-emphasizes the concept of autonomic conflict and the risk of morbid arrhythmias in marine mammals. We hypothesize that: (1) both the sympathetic cardiac accelerator fibers and the peripheral sympathetic vasomotor fibers are activated during dives even without exercise, and their activities are elevated at the lowest heart rates in a dive when vasoconstriction is maximal, (2) in diving animals, parasympathetic cardiac tone via the vagus nerve dominates over sympathetic cardiac tone during all phases of the dive, thus producing the bradycardia, (3) adjustment in vagal activity, which may be affected by many inputs, including exercise, is the primary regulator of heart rate and heart rate fluctuations during diving, and (4) heart beat fluctuations (benign arrhythmias) are common in marine mammals. Consistent with the literature and with these hypotheses, we believe that the generation of morbid arrhythmias because of exercise or stress during dives is unlikely in marine mammals. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Behavioral correlates of heart rates of free-living Greater White-fronted Geese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, C.R.; Ward, D.H.; Bollinger, K.S.

    1999-01-01

    We simultaneously monitored the heart rate and behavior of nine free-living Greater White-fronted Geese (Anser albifrons) on their wintering grounds in northern California. Heart rates of wild geese were monitored via abdominally-implanted radio transmitters with electrodes that received electrical impulses of the heart and emitted a radio signal with each ventricular contraction. Post-operative birds appeared to behave normally, readily rejoining flocks and flying up to 15 km daily from night-time roost sites to feed in surrounding agricultural fields. Heart rates varied significantly among individuals and among behaviors, and ranged from less than 100 beats per minute (BPM) during resting, to over 400 BPM during flight. Heart rates varied from 80 to 140 BPM during non-strenuous activities such as walking, feeding, and maintenance activities, to about 180 BPM when birds became alert, and over 400 BPM when birds were startled, even if they did not take flight. Postflight heart rate recovery time averaged postures, as heart rates were context-dependent, and were highest in initial encounters among individuals. Instantaneous measures of physiological parameters, such as heart rate, are often better indicators of the degree of response to external stimuli than visual observations and can be used to improve estimates of energy expenditure based solely on activity data.

  20. Effect of Selective Heart Rate Slowing in Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Nikhil; Sivaswamy, Nadiya; Mahmod, Masliza; Yavari, Arash; Rudd, Amelia; Singh, Satnam; Dawson, Dana K; Francis, Jane M; Dwight, Jeremy S; Watkins, Hugh; Neubauer, Stefan; Frenneaux, Michael; Ashrafian, Houman

    2015-11-03

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality but is currently refractory to therapy. Despite limited evidence, heart rate reduction has been advocated, on the basis of physiological considerations, as a therapeutic strategy in HFpEF. We tested the hypothesis that heart rate reduction improves exercise capacity in HFpEF. We conducted a randomized, crossover study comparing selective heart rate reduction with the If blocker ivabradine at 7.5 mg twice daily versus placebo for 2 weeks each in 22 symptomatic patients with HFpEF who had objective evidence of exercise limitation (peak oxygen consumption at maximal exercise [o2 peak] heart rate compared with placebo in the HFpEF (107 versus 129 bpm; Pheart rate reduction with ivabradine for improving symptoms in a HFpEF population characterized by exercise limitation. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02354573. © 2015 The Authors.

  1. Assesment of Autonomic Function in Metabolic Syndrome using Combination Heart Rate Variability and Heart Rate Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Aydın

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Metabolic syndrome (MetS is described as a group of various abnormal metabolic risk factors such as obesity, dyslipidemia, increased blood pressure, increased plasma glucose levels, prothrombotic condition and proinflammatory state. These parameters are related to decreased parasympathetic and increased sympathetic activity. We aimed to evaluate autonomic function using a combination with heart rate variability (HRV and heart rate turbulence (HRT in metabolic syndrome to compare non-metabolic syndrome(non-MetS. METHODS: We selected consecutive 50 patients with MetS and 50 patients with healthy non-MetS individuals. All patients underwent 24 hours holter monitoring to evaluate HRT and HRV parameters. RESULTS: Age of patients was not different in two groups. Mean age of MetS patients was 57,50±12,13 and 54,6±10,25 in non- MetS individuals. Sex of patients was non different in MetS compared to non-MetS (37 female and 13 male vs. 22 female, 28 male p<0,05 respectively. SDNN and RMSSD was lower in MetS compared to those without MetS (131,96±49,12 vs 179,59±85,83 p=0,03 and 78,64±35,22 vs 112,73±81,24 p=0,08 respectively. SDANN, pNN50,Mean RR, mean heart rate, count of ventricular premature complex(VPC were not different between two groups. Turbulence Slope(TS was not different in two groups. Turbulence Onset(TO was higher in MetS compared to non-MetS (2,01±15,29 and -6,21±13,5 p=0,005. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: We showed that autonomic function in MetS was impaired using a combination with HRT and HRV. These patients should be followed closely for adverse cardiovascular outcome especially including cardiac arrhythmia.

  2. Electronic fetal heart rate monitoring: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chez, Bonnie Flood; Baird, Suzanne McMurtry

    2011-01-01

    Electronic fetal heart rate monitoring (EFM) continues to be the primary method utilized for fetal assessment in the United States. Standardization of nomenclature associated with this perinatal technology has evolved over the past 40 years such that the current nomenclature recommended by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) has been adopted by professional perinatal organizations as the agreed-upon method for professional communication and documentation. Current research continues to focus on the optimal management of intrapartum fetal heart rate tracings. The clinical controversies and challenges related to electronic fetal heart rate monitoring continue to evolve.

  3. Facets of psychopathy, heart rate variability and cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anita Lill; Johnsen, Bjørn Helge; Thornton, David; Waage, Leif; Thayer, Julian F

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the four facets of Hare's Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R; Hare, 1991; Bolt, Hare, Vitale, & Newman, 2004) were related to physiological and cognitive mechanisms. Fifty-three male prisoners participated in this study. Physiological responses were measured as heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate (HR). Cognitive functions were measured using a continuous performance test (CPT; California Computerized Assessment Package, Abbreviated version) and a working memory test (WMT); based on Baddeley & Hitch (1974). The regression analysis of the HRV revealed that the interpersonal facet explained most of the variance during baseline (28%), CPT (16%), and WMT (12%). This was also true for the HR data during baseline (28%), CPT (20%), WMT (10%), and recovery (13%). The antisocial facet explained 10% of the variance only during baseline. Subjects scoring high compared to low on the interpersonal facet also showed better cognitive functioning. The study suggests that the different facets were differently associated with both physiological and cognitive functions.

  4. Human heart rate variability relation is unchanged during motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, T. J.; Berger, R. D.; Oman, C. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    In a study of 18 human subjects, we applied a new technique, estimation of the transfer function between instantaneous lung volume (ILV) and instantaneous heart rate (HR), to assess autonomic activity during motion sickness. Two control recordings of ILV and electrocardiogram (ECG) were made prior to the development of motion sickness. During the first, subjects were seated motionless, and during the second they were seated rotating sinusoidally about an earth vertical axis. Subjects then wore prism goggles that reverse the left-right visual field and performed manual tasks until they developed moderate motion sickness. Finally, ILV and ECG were recorded while subjects maintained a relatively constant level of sickness by intermittent eye closure during rotation with the goggles. Based on analyses of ILV to HR transfer functions from the three conditions, we were unable to demonstrate a change in autonomic control of heart rate due to rotation alone or due to motion sickness. These findings do not support the notion that moderate motion sickness is manifested as a generalized autonomic response.

  5. Importance of heart rate analysis in exercise tolerance test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Haddad Herdy

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available After many years away from the limelights, at the beginning of this century, exercise tolerance testing has earned back an important position in international medical journals. The different sorts of information derived from a variety of studies based on it have shown us that this propedeutic method has a highly valuable prognostic impact. Because of its low cost and easy applicability, the exercise testing reinforces its position in the clinical practice of the cardiologist. In the early 70's, research relating the influence of the autonomic nervous system in heart rate behavior in all phases of an exercise tolerance testing began. Ever since, a number of hypotheses tried to clarify which would be the mechanisms related to the chronotropic response during effort and its performance in the recovery period. In this updating article the authors deal with an important data referring to the chronotropic deficit and the abnormal heart rate recovery, commenting on the prognostic implication of keeping the focus on the potential of its clinical impact. In other words, approaches that can be used whenever there is someone performing a monitored exercise tolerance testing.

  6. Heart rate, heart rate variability, and arrhythmias in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Caroline Elisabeth; Falk, Bo Torkel; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Autonomic modulation of heart rhythm is thought to influence the pathophysiology of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD).......Autonomic modulation of heart rhythm is thought to influence the pathophysiology of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD)....

  7. Factors underlying the perception of effort during constant heart rate running above and below the critical heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, Haley C; Housh, Terry J; Cochrane, Kristen C; Jenkins, Nathaniel D M; Zuniga, Jorge M; Buckner, Samuel L; Goldsmith, Jacob A; Schmidt, Richard J; Johnson, Glen O; Cramer, Joel T

    2015-10-01

    This study examined: (1) the sustainability of the critical heart rate (CHR) minus 5 b min(-1) (CHR - 5) and CHR plus 5 b min(-1) (CHR + 5); (2) the ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), velocity, [Formula: see text], minute ventilation ([Formula: see text]), breathing frequency (f b ), and electromyographic amplitude (EMG AMP) and EMG mean power frequency (MPF) responses during treadmill running at CHR - 5 and CHR + 5 to determine what factors underlie the perception of effort when heart rate (HR) is held constant; and (3) the relationships among RPE, [Formula: see text], and HR, to determine which variable(s) reflect exhaustion during exercise performed at a constant HR. The CHR was determined in eight runners (mean ± SD; age = 24 ± 3 years) from a series of four exhaustive, constant velocity runs. The RPE, velocity, [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], f b , EMG AMP, and EMG MPF responses were recorded during runs at the CHR - 5 and CHR + 5. At CHR - 5, RPE, f b, and EMG MPF increased, while velocity, [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and EMG AMP decreased. At CHR + 5, RPE and f b increased, velocity, [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and EMG AMP decreased, and EMG MPF remained constant. The close association between f b and RPE throughout the run at CHR - 5 and during the last 50 % of the run at CHR + 5 indicated that muscle afferents may have provided feedback from metabolic and mechanical stimuli that contributed to the perceptual responses. In addition, only RPE consistently indicated exhaustion and the current findings supported its use to monitor exercise performed at a constant HR.

  8. Guided imagery, anxiety, heart rate, and heart rate variability during centrifuge training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiaolu; Wu, Ping; Liu, Fang; Wu, Bin; Miao, Danmin

    2011-02-01

    Centrifuge training is an important method of improving the hypergravity tolerance of pilots, cosmonauts, and Chinese astronauts. However, the concomitants of tension or anxiety often impede training. Guided imagery (GI), a mind-body relaxation technique, provides a behavioral and cognitive means whereby individuals are able to exert control over the focus of attention. This study aims to investigate the immediate effects of GI for reducing stress in centrifuge training. There were 12 healthy young men who were randomly assigned to a GI group or music group. We measured changes in heart rate during centrifuge training, in heart rate variability before and after centrifuge training, and also evaluated relaxation and anxiety in three phases: before intervention, after intervention, and following centrifuge training. The change in the pattern of anxiety was different in the two groups over the three phases. Anxiety (measured by State Anxiety Inventory) in the GI group changed from 31.7 +/- 5.9 to 26.8 +/- 2.6 and 27.8 +/- 4.1, whereas for the music group this changed from 32.2 +/- 7.6 to 31.2 +/- 8.3 and 26.8 +/- 6.8. During centrifuge training, the maximal HR for the GI group (101.2 +/- 8.8) was lower than that of the music group (123.0 +/- 19.1). In addition GI showed a decrease in low frequency (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz) components and an increase in high frequency (HF, 0.15-0.4 Hz) components before and after centrifuge training. GI was capable of decreasing tension, anxiety, and sympathetic nervous system activity pre- or post-centrifugation.

  9. Comparison of Polar M600 Optical Heart Rate and ECG Heart Rate during Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, John F; Stergiou, Pro; Fung, Tak S; Katz, Larry

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the Polar M600 optical heart rate (OHR) sensor compared with ECG heart rate (HR) measurement during various physical activities. Thirty-six subjects participated in a continuous 76-min testing session, which included rest, cycling warm-up, cycling intervals, circuit weight training, treadmill intervals, and recovery. HR was measured using a three-lead ECG configuration and a Polar M600 Sport Watch on the left wrist. Statistical analyses included OHR percent accuracy, mean difference, mean absolute error, Bland-Altman plots, and a repeated-measures generalized estimating equation design. OHR percent accuracy was calculated as the percentage of occurrences where OHR measurement was within and including ±5 bpm from the ECG HR value. Of the four exercise phases performed, the highest OHR percent accuracy was found during cycle intervals (91.8%), and the lowest OHR percent accuracy occurred during circuit weight training (34.5%). OHR percent accuracy improved steadily within exercise transitions during cycle intervals to a maximum of 98.5% and during treadmill intervals to a maximum of 89.0%. Lags in HR calculated by the Polar M600 OHR sensor existed in comparison to ECG HR, when exercise intensity changed until steady state occurred. There was a tendency for OHR underestimation during intensity increases and overestimation during intensity decreases. No statistically significant interaction effect with device was found in this sample on the basis of sex, body mass index, V˙O2max, skin type, or wrist size. The Polar M600 was accurate during periods of steady-state cycling, walking, jogging, and running, but less accurate during some exercise intensity changes, which may be attributed to factors related to total peripheral resistance changes and pulse pressure.

  10. CAFFEINE IMPROVES HEART RATE WITHOUT IMPROVING SEPSIS SURVIVAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauzá, Gustavo; Remick, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Caffeine is consumed on a daily basis for its nervous system stimulant properties and is a global adenosine receptor antagonist. Since adenosine receptors have been found to play a major role in regulating the immune response to a septic insult, we investigated if caffeine consumption prior to a septic insult would alter immunological and physiological responses, as well as survival. Methods Two separate experimental designs were employed, both using outbred female ICR mice. In the first experiment mice were administered 20mg/kg of caffeine (equal to 2–3 cups of coffee for a human) or normal saline intraperitoneally at the time of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Immunological parameters including cytokines and local cell recruitment measured. In the second experiment caffeine (10mg/kg/hr) was delivered continuously for 24 hours via a subcutaneous infusion pump placed the day prior to CLP and hemodynamic parameters were examined. In both experiments survival was followed for five days. Results A single dose of caffeine at the initiation of sepsis did not alter survival. This single dose of caffeine did significantly increase in plasma levels of the chemokine KC six hours after the onset of sepsis compared to septic mice given normal saline. There were no changes in IL-6 or IL-10 levels in the caffeine groups. Peritoneal lavages performed 24 hours post-CLP showed no difference in the levels of IL-6, TNF, KC, MIP-1, IL-10 or the IL-1 receptor antagonist between caffeine and normal saline treated mice. Additionally, the lavages yielded similar numbers of cells (4.1×106 vehicle vs. 6.9×106 caffeine) and bacterial colony forming units (CFU, 4.1 million CFU vehicle vs. 2.8 million CFU caffeine). In the infusion group, caffeine also did not alter survival. However, caffeine infusion did increase heart rate prior to CLP, and prevented the decline in heart rate after CLP. Conclusion Caffeine increased heart rate in mice but does not impact cytokine

  11. Increased heart rate variability but normal resting metabolic rate in hypocretin/orexin-deficient human narcolepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronczek, R.; Overeem, S.; Reijntjes, R.; Lammers, G.J.; Dijk, J.G.M.; Pijl, H.

    2008-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: We investigated autonomic balance and resting metabolic rate to explore their possible involvement in obesity in hypocretin/orexin-deficient narcoleptic subjects. METHODS: Resting metabolic rate (using indirect calorimetry) and variability in heart rate and blood pressure were

  12. Summary The effect of pregnancy on the heart rate, respiratory rate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary. The effect of pregnancy on the heart rate, respiratory rate,. QRS axis and QRS complex duration of the ECG was investigated in 41 pregnant compared to 39 non pregnant age and height matched Nigerian subjects. Results obtained show that pregnancy had no significant effect (p>0.05) on heart rate, respiratory ...

  13. Arduino-based noise robust online heart-rate detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sangita; Pal, Saurabh; Mitra, Madhuchhanda

    2017-04-01

    This paper introduces a noise robust real time heart rate detection system from electrocardiogram (ECG) data. An online data acquisition system is developed to collect ECG signals from human subjects. Heart rate is detected using window-based autocorrelation peak localisation technique. A low-cost Arduino UNO board is used to implement the complete automated process. The performance of the system is compared with PC-based heart rate detection technique. Accuracy of the system is validated through simulated noisy ECG data with various levels of signal to noise ratio (SNR). The mean percentage error of detected heart rate is found to be 0.72% for the noisy database with five different noise levels.

  14. Signal processing methodologies for an acoustic fetal heart rate monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretlow, Robert A., III; Stoughton, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Research and development is presented of real time signal processing methodologies for the detection of fetal heart tones within a noise-contaminated signal from a passive acoustic sensor. A linear predictor algorithm is utilized for detection of the heart tone event and additional processing derives heart rate. The linear predictor is adaptively 'trained' in a least mean square error sense on generic fetal heart tones recorded from patients. A real time monitor system is described which outputs to a strip chart recorder for plotting the time history of the fetal heart rate. The system is validated in the context of the fetal nonstress test. Comparisons are made with ultrasonic nonstress tests on a series of patients. Comparative data provides favorable indications of the feasibility of the acoustic monitor for clinical use.

  15. Heart rate changes during the Valsalva maneuver in patients with isolated aortic insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navarro A.E.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the possible relationship between left ventricular dilatation and heart rate changes provoked by the Valsalva maneuver (Valsalva ratio, we studied 9 patients with isolated chronic aortic insufficiency. Left ventricular systolic function was assessed by two-dimensional echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. All patients were asymptomatic (functional class I of the New York Heart Association. The left ventricular internal diameters and volumes were significantly increased in all patients. The asymptomatic patients had either normal or slightly depressed ejection fraction (EF>0.40. The Valsalva ratio of these asymptomatic patients showed no significant correlation with the left ventricular volumes or with the left ventricular ejection fraction. In other words, parasympathetic heart rate control, as expressed by the Valsalva ratio, was normal in the asymptomatic patients with left ventricular dilatation and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. Therefore, left ventricular dilatation may not be the major mechanism responsible for the abnormal parasympathetic heart rate control of patients with acquired heart disease

  16. Prognostic significance of heart rate turbulence parameters in patients with chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, De-Chun; Wang, Zhao-Jun; Guo, Shuai; Xie, Hong-Yu; Sun, Lin; Feng, Wei; Qiu, Wei; Qu, Xiu-Fen

    2014-01-01

    Background This study is aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of heart rate turbulence (HRT) parameters in predicting the prognosis in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Methods From June 2011 to December 2012, a total of 104 CHF patients and 30 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. We obtained a 24-hour Holter ECG recording to assess the HRT parameters, included turbulence onset (TO), turbulence slope (TS), standard deviation of N-N intervals (SDNN), and resting heart ...

  17. Disentangling Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia in Heart Rate Variability Records

    OpenAIRE

    Topçu, Çağdaş; Frühwirth, Matthias; Moser, Maximilian; Rosenblum, Michael; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2018-01-01

    Different measures of heart rate variability and particularly of respiratory sinus arrhythmia are widely used in research and clinical applications. Inspired by the ideas from the theory of coupled oscillators, we use simultaneous measurements of respiratory and cardiac activity to perform a nonlinear decomposition of the heart rate variability into the respiratory-related component and the rest. We suggest to exploit the technique as a universal preprocessing tool, both for the analysis of r...

  18. Accuracy of Heart Rate Watches: Implications for Weight Management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Wallen

    Full Text Available Wrist-worn monitors claim to provide accurate measures of heart rate and energy expenditure. People wishing to lose weight use these devices to monitor energy balance, however the accuracy of these devices to measure such parameters has not been established.To determine the accuracy of four wrist-worn devices (Apple Watch, Fitbit Charge HR, Samsung Gear S and Mio Alpha to measure heart rate and energy expenditure at rest and during exercise.Twenty-two healthy volunteers (50% female; aged 24 ± 5.6 years completed ~1-hr protocols involving supine and seated rest, walking and running on a treadmill and cycling on an ergometer. Data from the devices collected during the protocol were compared with reference methods: electrocardiography (heart rate and indirect calorimetry (energy expenditure.None of the devices performed significantly better overall, however heart rate was consistently more accurate than energy expenditure across all four devices. Correlations between the devices and reference methods were moderate to strong for heart rate (0.67-0.95 [0.35 to 0.98] and weak to strong for energy expenditure (0.16-0.86 [-0.25 to 0.95]. All devices underestimated both outcomes compared to reference methods. The percentage error for heart rate was small across the devices (range: 1-9% but greater for energy expenditure (9-43%. Similarly, limits of agreement were considerably narrower for heart rate (ranging from -27.3 to 13.1 bpm than energy expenditure (ranging from -266.7 to 65.7 kcals across devices.These devices accurately measure heart rate. However, estimates of energy expenditure are poor and would have implications for people using these devices for weight loss.

  19. Individual differences in heart rate variability predict the degree of slowing during response inhibition and initiation in the presence of emotional stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krypotos, A.M.; Jahfari, S.; Ast, V.A. van; Kindt, M.; Forstmann, B.U.

    2011-01-01

    Response inhibition is a hallmark of executive control and crucial to support flexible behavior in a constantly changing environment. Recently, it has been shown that response inhibition is influenced by the presentation of emotional stimuli (Verbruggen and De Houwer, 2007). Healthy individuals

  20. Heart Rate at Hospital Discharge in Patients With Heart Failure Is Associated With Mortality and Rehospitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskey, Warren K.; Alomari, Ihab; Cox, Margueritte; Schulte, Phillip J.; Zhao, Xin; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Heidenreich, Paul A.; Eapen, Zubin J.; Yancy, Clyde; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether heart rate upon discharge following hospitalization for heart failure is associated with long‐term adverse outcomes and whether this association differs between patients with sinus rhythm (SR) and atrial fibrillation (AF) have not been well studied. Methods and Results We conducted a retrospective cohort study from clinical registry data linked to Medicare claims for 46 217 patients participating in Get With The Guidelines®–Heart Failure. Cox proportional‐hazards models were used to estimate the association between discharge heart rate and all‐cause mortality, all‐cause readmission, and the composite outcome of mortality/readmission through 1 year. For SR and AF patients with heart rate ≥75, the association between heart rate and mortality (expressed as hazard ratio [HR] per 10 beats‐per‐minute increment) was significant at 0 to 30 days (SR: HR 1.30, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.39; AF: HR 1.23, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.29) and 31 to 365 days (SR: HR 1.15, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.20; AF: HR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08). Similar associations between heart rate and all‐cause readmission and the composite outcome were obtained for SR and AF patients from 0 to 30 days but only in the composite outcome for SR patients over the longer term. The HR from 0 to 30 days exceeded that from 31 to 365 days for both SR and AF patients. At heart rates heart failure, higher discharge heart rate was associated with increased risks of death and rehospitalization, with higher risk in the first 30 days and for SR compared with AF. PMID:25904590

  1. Probability of detection of clinical seizures using heart rate changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Ivan; Manly, B F J

    2015-08-01

    Heart rate-based seizure detection is a viable complement or alternative to ECoG/EEG. This study investigates the role of various biological factors on the probability of clinical seizure detection using heart rate. Regression models were applied to 266 clinical seizures recorded from 72 subjects to investigate if factors such as age, gender, years with epilepsy, etiology, seizure site origin, seizure class, and data collection centers, among others, shape the probability of EKG-based seizure detection. Clinical seizure detection probability based on heart rate changes, is significantly (pprobability of detecting clinical seizures (>0.8 in the majority of subjects) using heart rate is highest for complex partial seizures, increases with a patient's years with epilepsy, is lower for females than for males and is unrelated to the side of hemisphere origin. Clinical seizure detection probability using heart rate is multi-factorially dependent and sufficiently high (>0.8) in most cases to be clinically useful. Knowledge of the role that these factors play in shaping said probability will enhance its applicability and usefulness. Heart rate is a reliable and practical signal for extra-cerebral detection of clinical seizures originating from or spreading to central autonomic network structures. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Control on Return from International Space Station (CCISS)- Heart Rate and Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughson, R. L.; Shoemaker, J. K.; Blaber, A. P.; Arbeille, Ph.; Zuj, K. A.; Greaves, D. K.

    2008-06-01

    CCISS is a project to study the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses of astronauts before, during and after long-duration (>60-day) stays on the International Space Station. The CCISS experiments consist of three phases that are designed to achieve an integrated examination of components responsible for return of blood to the heart, the pumping of blood from the heart and the distribution to the vascular territories including the brain. In this report the data are obtained from the 24-h monitoring of physical activity (Actiwatch on wrist and ankle) and of heart rate (Holter monitor). The data show clear patterns of change in physical activity from predominantly leg-based on Earth to relatively little activity of the ankles with maintained or increased activity of the wrists on ISS. Both on Earth and on ISS the largest changes in heart rate occur during the periods of leg activity. Average heart rate was changed little during the periods of minimal activity or of sleep in comparisons of Earth with in-flight recording both within the first two weeks of flight and the last two weeks. These data clearly show the importance of monitoring heart rate and physical activity simultaneously and show that attempts to derive indicators of autonomic activity from spectral analysis of heart rate variability should not be performed in the absence of knowledge of both variables.

  3. Heart rate as a sublethal indicator of thermal stress in juvenile freshwater mussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfo, Tamara J; Cope, W Gregory; Arellano, Consuelo

    2009-11-01

    Freshwater mussels (Unionoida) are one of the most sensitive and rapidly declining faunal groups in the world. Rising water temperatures, caused by industrial discharges, land development, or climate change can further challenge threatened unionid communities. The direct relationship between heart rate and temperature in ectotherms enables the use of heart rate as an indicator of whole-animal thermal stress. The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of heart rate as an indicator of thermal stress in freshwater mussels. Seven species of juvenile mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea, Potamilus alatus, Ligumia recta, Ellipsaria lineolata, Megalonaias nervosa, Alasmidonta varicosa, and Villosa delumbis) were evaluated in response to a range of experimental temperatures (20-36 degrees C) at three acclimation temperatures (17, 22, and 27 degrees C). Heart rate was measured by direct visual observation through transparent mussel shells. The average heart rate for all 7 species at 20 degrees C was 55bpm, with a range from 38bpm (L. recta) to 65bpm (P. alatus). L. recta and V. delumbis exhibited significant changes in heart rate with increasing temperature at each of the three acclimation temperatures. The use of heart rate appears to be a suitable indicator of thermal stress in some unionid mussels.

  4. Inadequate control of heart rate in patients with stable angina: results from the European heart survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daly, C.A.; Clemens, F.; Sendon, J.L.; Tavazzi, L.; Boersma, E.; Danchin, N.; Delahaye, F.; Gitt, A.; Julian, D.; Mulcahy, D.; Ruzyllo, W.; Thygesen, K.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Fox, K.M.

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: To examine resting heart rate (HR) in a population presenting with stable angina in relation to prior and subsequent pharmacological treatment, comorbid conditions and clinical outcome. METHODS AND RESULTS: The European Heart Survey was a prospective, observational, cohort study of 3779

  5. Relationship between obesity, negative affect and basal heart rate in predicting heart rate reactivity to psychological stress among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Andres E; Huynh, Pauline; Schell, Anne M; Baker, Laura A

    2015-08-01

    Reduced cardiovascular responses to psychological stressors have been found to be associated with both obesity and negative affect in adults, but have been less well studied in children and adolescent populations. These findings have most often been interpreted as reflecting reduced sympathetic nervous system response, perhaps associated with heightened baseline sympathetic activation among the obese and those manifesting negative affect. However, obesity and negative affect may themselves be correlated, raising the question of whether they both independently affect cardiovascular reactivity. The present study thus examined the separate effects of obesity and negative affect on both cardiovascular and skin conductance responses to stress (e.g., during a serial subtraction math task) in adolescents, while controlling for baseline levels of autonomic activity during rest. Both obesity and negative affect had independent and negative associations with cardiovascular reactivity, such that reduced stress responses were apparent for obese adolescents and those with high levels of negative affect. In contrast, neither obesity nor negative affect was related to skin conductance responses to stress, implicating specifically noradrenergic mechanisms rather than sympathetic mechanisms generally as being deficient. Moreover, baseline heart rate was unrelated to obesity in this sample, which suggests that heightened baseline of sympathetic activity is not necessary for the reduced cardiovascular reactivity to stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. No Associations Between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Corticoid Receptor Genes and Heart Rate and Cortisol Responses to a Standardized Social Stress Test in Adolescents : The TRAILS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Esther M. C.; Riese, Harriette; Nolte, Ilja M.; Oosterom, Elvira; Verhulst, Frank C.; Ormel, Johan; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.

    Previously, sequence variation in the glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid (MR) receptor genes (NR3C1 and NR3C2, respectively) have been found to be associated with physiological stress responses to social stress tests in small samples of adult men and oral contraceptives (OC) using women.

  7. Sensitivity of primary phasic heart rate deceleration to stimulus repetition in an habituation procedure: influence of a subjective measure of activation/arousal on the evoked cardiac response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Marek; Barry, Robert J; Kaiser, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The post-stimulus primary bradycardia--sometimes labelled as the first evoked cardiac response, ECR1--is regarded as a response which is independent of the stimulus novelty factor. Despite this however, in our previous research we have observed a noticeable variation of this response, which made us suspect that there could be some additional factor influencing it. To test this, we designed a habituation procedure to measure susceptibility of the ECR1 to stimulus repetition. In our experimental design, we also included a measure of the level of activation (arousal) as a possible additional factor influencing the time-course of the cardiac response. The level of arousal over the study was measured by the Activation-Deactivation Adjective Check List (AD ACL). Our results show that mere stimulus repetition does not influence the time-course of ECR1. However, another pattern of results appeared when one of the dimensions of AD ACL, namely Tense Arousal, was taken into account. We observed different ECR time-courses during the initial stimulus presentations for subjects with high and low levels of Tense Arousal. These results are interpreted within the framework of Preliminary Process Theory in terms of the different attentional patterns in subjects with high and low levels of Tense Arousal.

  8. Vascular Response to Graded Angiotensin II Infusion in Offspring Subjected to High-Salt Drinking Water during Pregnancy: The Effect of Blood Pressure, Heart Rate, Urine Output, Endothelial Permeability, and Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Pezeshki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Rennin-angiotensin system and salt diet play important roles in blood pressure control. We hypothesized that the high-salt intake during pregnancy influences the degree of angiotensin-dependent control of the blood pressure in adult offspring. Methods. Female Wistar rats in two groups (A and B were subjected to drink tap and salt water, respectively, during pregnancy. The offspring were divided into four groups as male and female offspring from group A (groups 1 and 2 and from group B (groups 3 and 4. In anesthetized matured offspring mean arterial pressure (MAP, heart rate and urine output were measured in response to angiotensin II (AngII (0-1000 ng/kg/min, iv infusion. Results. An increase in MAP was detected in mothers with salt drinking water (P<0.05. The body weight increased and kidney weight decreased significantly in male offspring from group 3 in comparison to group 1 (P<0.05. MAP and urine volume in response to AngII infusion increased in group 3 (P<0.05. These findings were not observed in female rats. Conclusion. Salt overloading during pregnancy had long-term effects on kidney weight and increased sex-dependent response to AngII infusion in offspring (adult that may reveal the important role of diet during pregnancy in AngII receptors.

  9. Evaluation of the metabolic rate based on the recording of the heart rate

    OpenAIRE

    MALCHAIRE, Jacques; ALFANO, Francesca Romana d?AMBROSIO; PALELLA, Boris Igor

    2017-01-01

    The assessment of harsh working conditions requires a correct evaluation of the metabolic rate. This paper revises the basis described in the ISO 8996 standard for the evaluation of the metabolic rate at a work station from the recording of the heart rate of a worker during a representative period of time. From a review of the literature, formulas different from those given in the standard are proposed to estimate the maximum working capacity, the maximum heart rate, the heart rate and the me...

  10. Heart rate variability and heart rate turbulence in mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Ugur; Ozdemir, Murat; Kocaman, Sinan Altan; Balcioglu, Serhat; Cemri, Mustafa; Cengel, Atiye

    2008-12-01

    To study heart rate (HR) variability and HR turbulence parameters in mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis (AS) and to disclose whether any relationship exists between these parameters and echocardiographic findings. Forty-three asymptomatic patients with mild-to-moderate AS (AS group) were studied. Echocardiographic parameters and HR variability and HR turbulence indices obtained over 24 Holter ECG recordings were compared with those of an age and sex matched control population free of cardiovascular disease. Correlation between echocardiographic findings and HR variability and HR turbulence indices was also studied in the AS group. All HR variability parameters except mean RR interval, RMSSD, and pNN50 and one HR turbulence parameter, turbulence onset, were significantly disturbed in the AS group. Echocardiographic findings of diastolic dysfunction had significant correlations with HR variability and HR turbulence parameters in AS patients. Symphatovagal imbalance as shown by disturbed HR variability and HR turbulence parameters was demonstrated for the first time in patients with mild-to-moderate AS. This imbalance, which was shown to be correlated with echocardiographic findings of diastolic dysfunction, may lead to arrhythmic complications in this seemingly low-risk patient population.

  11. Decrease Heart Rate Variability But Preserve Postural Blood Pressure Change in Type 2 Diabetes with Microalbuminuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harn-Shen Chen

    2006-06-01

    Conclusion: Type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria have diminished heart rate variability in response to deep breathing, change of position and the Valsalva maneuver, but they preserve BP response to postural change. Therefore, microalbuminuria seems to be associated with early DAN, but not with advanced DAN.

  12. Quantification of fetal heart rate regularity using symbolic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, P.; Cysarz, D.; Lange, S.; Geue, D.; Groenemeyer, D.

    2007-03-01

    Fetal heart rate complexity was examined on the basis of RR interval time series obtained in the second and third trimester of pregnancy. In each fetal RR interval time series, short term beat-to-beat heart rate changes were coded in 8bit binary sequences. Redundancies of the 28 different binary patterns were reduced by two different procedures. The complexity of these sequences was quantified using the approximate entropy (ApEn), resulting in discrete ApEn values which were used for classifying the sequences into 17 pattern sets. Also, the sequences were grouped into 20 pattern classes with respect to identity after rotation or inversion of the binary value. There was a specific, nonuniform distribution of the sequences in the pattern sets and this differed from the distribution found in surrogate data. In the course of gestation, the number of sequences increased in seven pattern sets, decreased in four and remained unchanged in six. Sequences that occurred less often over time, both regular and irregular, were characterized by patterns reflecting frequent beat-to-beat reversals in heart rate. They were also predominant in the surrogate data, suggesting that these patterns are associated with stochastic heart beat trains. Sequences that occurred more frequently over time were relatively rare in the surrogate data. Some of these sequences had a high degree of regularity and corresponded to prolonged heart rate accelerations or decelerations which may be associated with directed fetal activity or movement or baroreflex activity. Application of the pattern classes revealed that those sequences with a high degree of irregularity correspond to heart rate patterns resulting from complex physiological activity such as fetal breathing movements. The results suggest that the development of the autonomic nervous system and the emergence of fetal behavioral states lead to increases in not only irregular but also regular heart rate patterns. Using symbolic dynamics to

  13. HEART-RATE-VARIABILITY IN LEFT-VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION AND HEART-FAILURE - EFFECTS AND IMPLICATIONS OF DRUG-TREATMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TUININGA, YS; VANVELDHUISEN, DJ; BROUWER, J; HAAKSMA, J; CRIJNS, HJGM; MANINTVELD, AJ; LIE, KI

    1994-01-01

    Objective-To review the importance of heart rate variability analysis in left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure and to assess the effects of drug treatment. In patients with left: ventricular dysfunction or heart failure, a low heart rate variability is a strong predictor of a low

  14. Resting and postexercise heart rate variability in professional handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayacan, Yildirim; Yildiz, Sedat

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate heart rate variability (HRV) in professional handball players during rest and following a 5 min mild jogging exercise. For that purpose, electrocardiogram (ECG) of male handball players (N.=12, mean age 25±3.95 years) and sedentary controls (N.=14, mean age 23.5±2.95 years) were recorded for 5 min at rest and just after 5 min of mild jogging. ECGs were recorded and following HRV parameters were calculated: time-domain variables such as heart rate (HR), average normal-to-normal RR intervals, standard deviation of normal-to-normal RR intervals, square root of the mean of the squares of differences between adjacent NN intervals, percentage of differences between adjacent NN intervals that are greater than 50 milliseconds (pNN50), and frequency-domain variables such as very low frequency, low (LF) and high frequency (HF) of the power and LF/HF ratio. Unpaired t-test was used to find out differences among groups while paired t-test was used for comparison of each group for pre- and postjogging HRV. Pearson correlations were carried out to find out the relationships between the parameters. Blood pressures were not different between handball players and sedentary controls but exercise increased systolic blood pressure (Phandball players (Phandball players (Phandball players in response to a mild, short-time (5 min) jogging exercise. However, in sedentary subjects, either the sympathetic regulation of the autonomous nervous system increased or vagal withdrawal occurred.

  15. Cognitive strategies, perception of effort and heart rate in endurance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A light-weight micro-cassette recorder was used to document the subjects' verbalised thoughts while training. Effort was measured by the rate of perceived exertion (RPE) at the completion of each ride, and through the recording of heart rate every 60 seconds. A cycling-specific sub-category of thought ";equipment ...

  16. The Use of Heart Rate Monitors in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Randall; Davis, Kathryn L.; McCord, Tim; Schmidt, Dave; Slezak, Alex M.

    2009-01-01

    The ever-rising rate of obesity and the need for increased physical activity for young children is well documented. Data suggests that today's youth are not participating in enough quality health-enhancing physical activity either in or outside of school. Heart rate monitors have been used by adult exercisers for many years to monitor and assess…

  17. Heart rate-based lactate minimum test: a reproducible method.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strupler, M.; Muller, G.; Perret, C.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To find the individual intensity for aerobic endurance training, the lactate minimum test (LMT) seems to be a promising method. LMTs described in the literature consist of speed or work rate-based protocols, but for training prescription in daily practice mostly heart rate is used. The

  18. Impact of training load on the heart rate of horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Mlyneková

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In our work, we analyzed the effect of training load on the heart rate of horses in a simulated load by the loading regulator for horse motion Horse Gym 2000. In the experiment were observed 8 Slovak Warmblood horses (3 mares, 4 geldings, 1 stallion aged 6-10 years. The experiment was divided into two parts after three weeks. The speed of the tested horses was 4.9 km/h in the first part of experiment, in the second part was the speed 5.2 km/h with a gradual uphill up to 7 %. The tested horses achieved during the experiment an average heart rate level below 70 beats a minute, which is a light load. The maximum values of heart rate were recorded at 120 to 147 beats/min. Differences between tested horses in the values of heart rate were not statistically significant. After three weeks we recorded in the values of average and maximum heart rate onset of bradycardia, which is documented the adaptation of body to the specified load.

  19. Steep Trendelenburg position during robotic sacrocolpopexy and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstein, Lior; Mustafa, Mona; Burke, Yechiel Z; Mustafa, Susana; Segal, Dror; Weissman, Amir

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate heart rate variability and hemodynamic parameters following steep Trendelenburg positioning during robotic sacrocolpopexy. For 19 women, median age 57 (range: 45-72), blood pressure and ECG were recorded during surgery. From the ECG signals interbeat intervals were used to assess heart rate variability, analyzed in time and frequency domains using the Fast Fourier transform. The low frequency and high frequency spectral bands were used to assess sympathetic and parasympathetic pathways respectively. All women underwent robotic supracervical hysterectomy and sacrocolpopexy. A statistically significant decrease in the mean values of the low-frequency and high-frequency spectral bands, representing sympathetic and parasympathetic activity, respectively were demonstrated 5min following Trendelenburg positioning of the patients (from 3.6±1.4 to 2.9±0.8ms(2)/Hz, and from 3.5±1.4 to 2.9±1ms(2)/Hz, Pchanges correlated with a mean 20% decrease in heart rate, which lasted for 30min, and with a second drop in sympathetic and parasympathetic activity and heart rate, commencing 2h from the start of surgery, and lasting until the end of the operation. Steep Tredelenburg positioning during robotic urogynecology surgery results in significant changes in the autonomic nervous system modulation of heart rate variability and in other hemodynamic parameters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Heart rate measurement based on face video sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fang; Zhou, Qin-Wu; Wu, Peng; Chen, Xing; Yang, Xiaofeng; Yan, Hong-jian

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes a new non-contact heart rate measurement method based on photoplethysmography (PPG) theory. With this method we can measure heart rate remotely with a camera and ambient light. We collected video sequences of subjects, and detected remote PPG signals through video sequences. Remote PPG signals were analyzed with two methods, Blind Source Separation Technology (BSST) and Cross Spectral Power Technology (CSPT). BSST is a commonly used method, and CSPT is used for the first time in the study of remote PPG signals in this paper. Both of the methods can acquire heart rate, but compared with BSST, CSPT has clearer physical meaning, and the computational complexity of CSPT is lower than that of BSST. Our work shows that heart rates detected by CSPT method have good consistency with the heart rates measured by a finger clip oximeter. With good accuracy and low computational complexity, the CSPT method has a good prospect for the application in the field of home medical devices and mobile health devices.

  1. Cold-hearted bats: uncoupling of heart rate and metabolism during torpor at subzero temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Shannon E; Stawski, Clare; Geiser, Fritz

    2017-11-07

    Many hibernating animals thermoregulate during torpor and defend their body temperature (Tb) below 10°C by an increase in metabolic rate. Above a critical temperature (Tcrit) animals usually thermoconform. We investigated the physiological responses above and below Tcrit for a small tree dwelling bat (Chalinolobus gouldii, ∼14 g) that is often exposed to subzero temperatures during winter. Through simultaneous measurement of heart rate (HR) and oxygen consumption (V̇O2) we show that the relationship between oxygen transport and cardiac function is substantially altered in thermoregulating torpid bats between 1 and -2°C, compared with thermoconforming torpid bats at mild ambient temperatures (Ta 5-20°C). Tcrit for this species was Ta 0.7±0.4°C, with a corresponding Tb of 1.8±1.2°C. Below Tcrit animals began to thermoregulate, indicated by a considerable but disproportionate increase in both HR and V̇O2 The maximum increase in HR was only 4-fold greater than the average thermoconforming minimum, compared to a 46-fold increase in V̇O2 The differential response of HR and V̇O2 to low Ta was reflected in a 15-fold increase in oxygen delivery per heart beat (cardiac oxygen pulse). During torpor at low Ta, thermoregulating bats maintained a relatively slow HR and compensated for increased metabolic demands by significantly increasing stroke volume and tissue oxygen extraction. Our study provides new information on the relationship between metabolism and HR in an unstudied physiological state that may occur frequently in the wild and can be extremely costly for heterothermic animals. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Cognitive function, stress hormones, heart rate and nutritional status during simulated captivity in military survival training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Harris R; Farina, Emily K; Caldwell, John; Williams, Kelly W; Thompson, Lauren A; Niro, Philip J; Grohmann, Kyle A; McClung, James P

    2016-10-15

    Stress influences numerous psychological and physiological processes, and its effects have practical implications in a variety of professions and real-world activities. However, few studies have concurrently assessed multiple behavioral, hormonal, nutritional and heart-rate responses of humans to acute, severe stress. This investigation simultaneously assessed cognitive, affective, hormonal, and heart-rate responses induced by an intensely stressful real-world environment designed to simulate wartime captivity. Sixty males were evaluated during and immediately following participation in U.S. Army Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape (SERE) school, three weeks of intense but standardized training for Soldiers at risk of capture. Simulated captivity and intense mock interrogations degraded grammatical reasoning (pworking memory (pnutritional status and heart rate are simultaneously altered, and each of these subsequently recovers at different rates. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Is the normal heart rate ``chaotic'' due to respiration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Niels; Riedl, Maik; Kurths, Jürgen

    2009-06-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular diseases increases with the growth of the human population and an aging society, leading to very high expenses in the public health system. Therefore, it is challenging to develop sophisticated methods in order to improve medical diagnostics. The question whether the normal heart rate is chaotic or not is an attempt to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of cardiovascular dynamics and therefore a highly controversial topical challenge. In this contribution we demonstrate that linear and nonlinear parameters allow us to separate completely the data sets of the three groups provided for this controversial topic in nonlinear dynamics. The question whether these time series are chaotic or not cannot be answered satisfactorily without investigating the underlying mechanisms leading to them. We give an example of the dominant influence of respiration on heart beat dynamics, which shows that observed fluctuations can be mostly explained by respiratory modulations of heart rate and blood pressure (coefficient of determination: 96%). Therefore, we recommend reformulating the following initial question: "Is the normal heart rate chaotic?" We rather ask the following: "Is the normal heart rate `chaotic' due to respiration?"

  4. QRS peak detection for heart rate monitoring on Android smartphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pambudi Utomo, Trio; Nuryani, Nuryani; Darmanto

    2017-11-01

    In this study, Android smartphone is used for heart rate monitoring and displaying electrocardiogram (ECG) graph. Heart rate determination is based on QRS peak detection. Two methods are studied to detect the QRS complex peak; they are Peak Threshold and Peak Filter. The acquisition of ECG data is utilized by AD8232 module from Analog Devices, three electrodes, and Microcontroller Arduino UNO R3. To record the ECG data from a patient, three electrodes are attached to particular body’s surface of a patient. Patient’s heart activity which is recorded by AD8232 module is decoded by Arduino UNO R3 into analog data. Then, the analog data is converted into a voltage value (mV) and is processed to get the QRS complex peak. Heart rate value is calculated by Microcontroller Arduino UNO R3 uses the QRS complex peak. Voltage, heart rate, and the QRS complex peak are sent to Android smartphone by Bluetooth HC-05. ECG data is displayed as the graph by Android smartphone. To evaluate the performance of QRS complex peak detection method, three parameters are used; they are positive predictive, accuracy and sensitivity. Positive predictive, accuracy, and sensitivity of Peak Threshold method is 92.39%, 70.30%, 74.62% and for Peak Filter method are 98.38%, 82.47%, 83.61%, respectively.

  5. Effect of Smoking on Blood Pressure and Resting Heart Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Jacobsen, Rikke K; Skaaby, Tea

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Smoking is an important cardiovascular disease risk factor, but the mechanisms linking smoking to blood pressure are poorly understood. METHODS AND RESULTS: -Data on 141,317 participants (62,666 never, 40,669 former, 37,982 current smokers) from 23 population-based studies were...... included in observational and Mendelian randomisation (MR) meta-analyses of the associations of smoking status and smoking heaviness with systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), hypertension, and resting heart rate. For the MR analyses, a genetic variant rs16969968/rs1051730 was used as a proxy...... association of smoking heaviness with higher level of resting heart rate, but not with blood pressure. These findings suggest that part of the cardiovascular risk of smoking may operate through increasing resting heart rate....

  6. Effect of oxygen treatment on heart rate after abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg-Adamsen, S; Lie, C; Bernhard, A

    1999-01-01

    . METHODS: The authors studied the effect of oxygen therapy on arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate in 100 consecutive unselected patients randomly and double blindly allocated to receive air or oxygen therapy between the first and fourth day after major abdominal surgery. RESULTS: The median arterial...... supplementation were found between patients with or without an epidural catheter or between the postoperative day studied. CONCLUSION: Postoperative oxygen therapy increased arterial oxygen saturation and decreased heart rate after uncomplicated abdominal surgery in a consecutive unselected group of patients who......BACKGROUND: Cardiac complications are common during the postoperative period and may be associated with hypoxemia and tachycardia. Preliminary studies in high-risk patients after operation have shown a possible beneficial effect of oxygen therapy on arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate...

  7. Effects of subchronic exposures to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) in mice. III. Acute and chronic effects of CAPs on heart rate, heart-rate fluctuation, and body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Nadziejko, Christine; Chen, Lung Chi

    2005-04-01

    Normal mice (C57) and mice prone to develop atherosclerosis (ApoE-/-) were implanted with electrocardiograph (EKG), core body temperature, and motion transmitters were exposed daily for 6 h to Tuxedo, NY, concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) for 5 day/wk during the spring and summer of 2003. The series of 5-min EKG monitoring and body-temperature measurements were obtained for each animal in the CAPs and filtered air sham exposure groups. Our hypothesis was that chronic exposure could cause cumulative health effects. We used our recently developed nonparametric method to estimate the daily time periods that mean heart rates (HR), body temperature, and physical activity differed significantly between the CAPs and sham exposed group. CAPs exposure most affected heart rate between 1:30 a.m. and 4:30 a.m. With the response variables being the average heart rate, body temperature, and physical activity, we adopted a two-stage modeling approach to obtain the estimates of chronic and acute effects on the changes of these three response variables. In the first stage, a time-varying model estimated daily crude effects. In the second stage, the true means of the estimated crude effects were modeled with a polynominal function of time for chronic effects, a linear term of daily CAPs exposure concentrations for acute effects, and a random component for unknown noise. A Bayesian framework combined these two stages. There were significant decreasing patterns of HR, body temperature, and physical activity for the ApoE-/- mice over the 5 mo of CAPs exposure, with smaller and nonsignificant changes for the C57 mice. The chronic effect changes of the three response variables for ApoE-/- mice were maximal in the last few weeks. There was also a significant relationship between CAPs exposure concentration and short-term changes of heart rate in ApoE-/- mice during exposure. Response variables were also defined for examining fluctuations of 5-min heart rates within long (i.e., 3-6 h

  8. Heart rate recovery predicts memory performance in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearman, Ann; Lachman, Margie E

    2010-06-01

    The current study examined cardiovascular reactivity and recovery during memory testing in a sample of 28 younger and 28 older adults. Heart rate (HR) levels were measured before, during, and after a memory test (word list recall). Contrary to prediction, older adults did not have a blunted cardiovascular response to memory tasks compared to younger adults. Word list recall performance was predicted by both Age and an Age x HR recovery interaction. As expected, younger adults performed better on the word list task than older adults. In addition, older adults with better posttest HR recovery performed significantly better than older adults with poor posttest HR recovery, whereas HR recovery differences in younger adults were inconsequential. These relationships were not affected by subjective appraisals of anxiety and task difficulty. Overall, cardiac dysregulation, seen here as low HR recovery, represents an important, potentially modifiable, factor in memory performance in older adults. In addition to being beneficial to overall health, interventions designed to help older adults regulate their HR responses may help offset certain memory declines.

  9. Peak heart rate decreases with increasing severity of acute hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, C; Araoz, M; Van Hall, Gerrit

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the degree to which peak heart rate is reduced during exhaustive exercise in acute hypoxia. Five sea-level lowlanders performed maximal exercise at normobaric normoxia and at three different levels of hypobaric hypoxia (barometric pressures of 518......, 459, and 404 mmHg) in a hypobaric chamber and while breathing 9% O(2) in N(2). These conditions were equivalent to altitudes of 3300, 4300, 5300, and 6300 m above sea level, respectively. At 4300 m, maximal exercise was also repeated after 4 and 8 h. Peak heart rate (HR) decreased from 191 (182...

  10. Heart rate recovery in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Karaşen, Rıza Murat; ÇİFTÇİ, Bülent; Acar, Baran; YALÇIN, Ahmet Arif; GÜVEN, Selma FIRAT

    2014-01-01

    To demonstrate the effects of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) on baroregulatory function by using heart rate recovery (HRR) parameters. Materials and methods: Fifty-four moderate and severe OSAS patients were included in the study. HRR was defined as the difference in heart rate between peak exercise and 1 min later; a value of 18 beats/min was considered abnormal. OSAS patients were enrolled in the study as group 1 (normal HRR; n = 12) and group 2 (abnormal HRR, n = 42). Left ventr...

  11. Electronic fetal heart rate monitoring: applying principles of patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David A; Miller, Lisa A

    2012-04-01

    In 1999, a highly publicized report from the Institute of Medicine identified major deficiencies in the United States health care system, which fueled the rapid growth of the modern patient safety movement. One of the greatest risks to patient safety in obstetrics is poor communication of electronic fetal heart rate monitoring findings. Standardization and elimination of unnecessary complexity are 2 of the cornerstones of improved patient safety. This article describes a standardized, simplified approach to the definition, interpretation, and management of electronic fetal heart rate monitoring that is evidence-based and reflects consensus in the literature. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Heart rate variability as determinism with jump stochastic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiongxuan; Skufca, Joseph D; Bollt, Erik M

    2013-08-01

    We use measured heart rate information (RR intervals) to develop a one-dimensional nonlinear map that describes short term deterministic behavior in the data. Our study suggests that there is a stochastic parameter with persistence which causes the heart rate and rhythm system to wander about a bifurcation point. We propose a modified circle map with a jump process noise term as a model which can qualitatively capture such this behavior of low dimensional transient determinism with occasional (stochastically defined) jumps from one deterministic system to another within a one parameter family of deterministic systems.

  13. Heart rate regulation at different levels of convulsive readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamalyga, M L

    2013-08-01

    Heart rate variability parameters and the level of convulsive readiness during pentylenetetrazole-induced kindling in rats were analyzed using telemetric ECG and EEG monitoring. Analysis of ECG recorded over many days showed that heart rate variability was equally reduced after 7 and 27 days of kindling irrespective of the level of convulsive readiness. Reduced sympathovagal index after 7 days of kindling showed the compensatory character of changes. However, compensatory mechanisms cannot prevent high risk of life-threatening arrhythmias. High convulsive readiness after 27 days of kindling was accompanied by a shift of autonomic balance towards the increase in sympathetic tone, which may lead to decompensation and transition to a prenosological state.

  14. Dopamine and noradrenaline are unrelated to renalase, heart rate, and blood pressure in heart transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, G; Przybyłowski, P; Janik, L; Nowak, E; Sadowski, J; Małyszko, J

    2014-10-01

    Renalase may degrade catecholamines and regulate sympathetic tone and blood pressure. The aim of this study was to assess dopamine, norepinephrine, and renalase in 80 heart transplant recipients and 22 healthy volunteers and their correlations with heart rate, blood pressure control, type of hypotensive therapy, and renal function. Renalase, dopamine, and norepinephrine were studied by using commercially available assays. Renalase levels were higher in heart transplant recipients compared with healthy volunteers, and noradrenaline levels were lower in the studied cohort patients than in the healthy volunteers. Noradrenaline was correlated with white blood cell count (r = -0.21, P noradrenaline nor dopamine was correlated with heart rate, blood pressure, kidney function, or New York Heart Association class. Noradrenaline was significantly higher in patients with elevated diastolic blood pressure (>90 mm Hg) compared with those with normal diastolic blood pressure (P < .05). Renalase was related to kidney function but was unrelated to catecholamines. Elevated renalase levels in heart transplant patients were related to kidney function but not linked to the sympathetic nervous system activity in this study population. In heart transplant recipients, these findings might suggest that sympathetic denervation and the modulation of β-receptors persist.

  15. When heart goes “BOOM” to fast. Heart rate greater than 80 as mortality predictor in acute myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Davidovic, Goran; Iric-Cupic, Violeta; Milanov, Srdjan; Dimitijevic, Aleksandra; Petrovic-Janicijevic, Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Many prospective studies established association between high heart rate and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, independently of other risk factors. Heart rate over 80 beats per minute more often leads to atherosclerotic plaque disruption, the main step in developing acute coronary syndrome. Purpose was to investigate the incidence of higher heart rate levels in patients with anterior wall acute myocardial infarction with ST-segment elevation and the influence of heart rate on ...

  16. Evaluation of the metabolic rate based on the recording of the heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malchaire, Jacques; d'AMBROSIO Alfano, Francesca Romana; Palella, Boris Igor

    2017-06-08

    The assessment of harsh working conditions requires a correct evaluation of the metabolic rate. This paper revises the basis described in the ISO 8996 standard for the evaluation of the metabolic rate at a work station from the recording of the heart rate of a worker during a representative period of time. From a review of the literature, formulas different from those given in the standard are proposed to estimate the maximum working capacity, the maximum heart rate, the heart rate and the metabolic rate at rest and the relation (HR vs. M) at the basis of the estimation of the equivalent metabolic rate, as a function of the age, height and weight of the person. A Monte Carlo simulation is used to determine, from the approximations of these parameters and formulas, the imprecision of the estimated equivalent metabolic rate. The results show that the standard deviation of this estimate varies from 10 to 15%.

  17. [Bundle-branch block depending on the heart rate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolov, L

    1975-01-01

    Five patients are reported, admitted to the hospital, with diseases predominantly of the cardio-vascular system. During the electrocardiographic examinations bundle branch block was established, depending on heart rate. It fluctuated within the physiological limits from 50 to 90/min. In three of the patients, the bundle branch block appeared with the quickening of the heart rate (tachycardia-depending bundle branch block) and in two of the patients--the bundle branch block appeared during the slowing down of the heart action and disappeared with its quickening (bradicardia-depending bundle branch block). A brief literature review is presented and attention is paid to the possible diagnostic errors and the treatment mode of those patients with cardiac tonic and antiarrhythmic medicaments.

  18. Inhalation of ultrafine carbon particles alters heart rate and heart rate variability in people with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Rathin; Zareba, Wojciech; Utell, Mark J; Pietropaoli, Anthony P; Chalupa, David; Little, Erika L; Oakes, David; Bausch, Jan; Wiltshire, Jelani; Frampton, Mark W

    2014-07-16

    Diabetes may confer an increased risk for the cardiovascular health effects of particulate air pollution, but few human clinical studies of air pollution have included people with diabetes. Ultrafine particles (UFP, ≤100 nm in diameter) have been hypothesized to be an important component of particulate air pollution with regard to cardiovascular health effects. 17 never-smoker subjects 30-60 years of age, with stable type 2 diabetes but otherwise healthy, inhaled either filtered air (0-10 particles/cm3) or elemental carbon UFP (~107 particles/cm3, ~50 ug/m3, count median diameter 32 nm) by mouthpiece, for 2 hours at rest, in a double-blind, randomized, crossover study design. A digital 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded continuously for 48 hours, beginning 1 hour prior to exposure. Analysis of 5-minute segments of the ECG during quiet rest showed reduced high-frequency heart rate variability with UFP relative to air exposure (p = 0.014), paralleled by non-significant reductions in time-domain heart rate variability parameters. In the analysis of longer durations of the ECG, we found that UFP exposure increased the heart rate relative to air exposure. During the 21- to 45-hour interval after exposure, the average heart rate increased approximately 8 beats per minute with UFP, compared to 5 beats per minute with air (p = 0.045). There were no UFP effects on cardiac rhythm or repolarization. Inhalation of elemental carbon ultrafine particles alters heart rate and heart rate variability in people with type 2 diabetes. Our findings suggest that effects may occur and persist hours after a single 2-hour exposure.

  19. Blood pressure and heart rate response to posteriorly directed pressure applied to the cervical spine in young, pain-free individuals: a randomized, repeated-measures, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Emmanuel; Wong, Michael; Williams, Haddie; Mache, Kyle

    2014-08-01

    Randomized clinical trial. Objectives To compare the blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) response of healthy volunteers to posteriorly directed (anterior-to-posterior [AP]) pressure applied to the cervical spine versus placebo. Manual therapists employ cervical spine AP mobilizations for various cervical-shoulder pain conditions. However, there is a paucity of literature describing the procedure, cardiovascular response, and safety profile. Thirty-nine (25 female) healthy participants (mean ± SD age, 24.7 ± 1.9 years) were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups. Group 1 received a placebo, consisting of light touch applied to the right C6 costal process. Group 2 received AP pressure at the same location. Blood pressure and HR were measured prior to, during, and after the application of AP pressure. One-way analysis of variance and paired-difference statistics were used for data analysis. There was no statistically significant difference between groups for mean systolic BP, mean diastolic BP, and mean HR (P >.05) for all time points. Within-group comparisons indicated statistically significant differences between baseline and post-AP pressure HR (-2.8 bpm; 95% confidence interval: -4.6, -1.1) and between baseline and post-AP pressure systolic BP (-2.4 mmHg; 95% confidence interval: -3.7, -1.0) in the AP group, and between baseline and postplacebo systolic BP (-2.6 mmHg; 95% confidence interval: -4.2, -1.0) in the placebo group. No participants reported any adverse reactions or side effects within 24 hours of testing. AP pressure caused a statistically significant physiologic response that resulted in a minor drop in HR (without causing asystole or vasodepression) after the procedure, whereas this cardiovascular change did not occur for those in the placebo group. Within both groups, there was a small but statistically significant reduction in systolic BP following the procedure.

  20. Comparison of cardiac time intervals between echocardiography and impedance cardiography at various heart rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen A.J.M. van Eijnatten

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The non-invasively measured Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI reflects a time difference between the electrical and pumping activity of the heart and depends on cardiac preload, afterload, autonomic nervous control and training level. However, the duration of the ISTI has not yet been compared to other time markers of the heart cycle. The present study gauges the duration of the ISTI by comparing the end point of this interval, the C-point, with heart cycle markers obtained by echocardiography. The heart rate of 16 healthy subjects was varied by means of an exercise stimulus. It was found that the C-point, and therefore the end point of ISTI, occurred around the moment of the maximum diameter of the aortic arch in all subjects and at all heart rates. However, while the time difference between the opening of the aortic valves and the maximum diameter of the aortic arch decreased significantly with decreasing RR-interval, the time difference with respect to the moment of the C-point remained constant within the subjects. This means that the shortening of the ISTI with increasing heart rate in response to an exercise stimulus was caused by a shortening of the pre-ejection period (PEP. It is concluded that the ISTI can be used as a non-invasive parameter indicating the time difference between the electrical and mechanical pumping activity of the heart, both inside and outside the clinic.

  1. Simplifying cardiovascular risk estimation using resting heart rate.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooney, Marie Therese

    2010-09-01

    Elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is a known, independent cardiovascular (CV) risk factor, but is not included in risk estimation systems, including Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE). We aimed to derive risk estimation systems including RHR as an extra variable and assess the value of this addition.

  2. Fetal heart rate variation after corticosteroids for fetal maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knaven, Olga; Ganzevoort, Wessel; de Boer, Marjon; Wolf, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Several studies report a decrease of fetal heart rate (FHR) short-term variation (STV) after corticosteroids for improvement of fetal maturity and advice not to deliver a fetus for low STV within 2-3 days after corticosteroids. However, literature is not unanimous in this respect. This

  3. Noradrenaline: Central inhibitory control of blood pressure and heart rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Wybren de

    1974-01-01

    Noradrenaline injected bilaterally into the brainstem in the area of the nucleus tractus solitarii decreased systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate of anesthetized rats. The effect of noradrenaline was prevented by a preceding injection of the α-adrenergic blocking agent phentolamine, at

  4. Allostatic load and heart rate variability as health risk indicators.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Uncertainty often exists about the comparability of results obtained by different health risk indicator systems. Objectives: To compare two health risk indicator systems, i.e, allostatic load and heart rate variability (HRV). Additionally, to investigate the feasibility of inclusion of HRV indicators into allostatic ...

  5. Heart Rate Variability and Drawing Impairment in Hypoxemic COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli; Corsonello, Andrea; Trojano, Luigi; Pedone, Claudio; Acanfora, Domenico; Spada, Aldo; D'Addio, Gianni; Maestri, Roberto; Rengo, Franco; Rengo, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    We studied 54 patients with hypoxemic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The Mini Mental State Examination and the Mental Deterioration Battery were used for neuropsychological assessment. Heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed based on 24-h Holter ECG recording. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare HRV parameters of patients…

  6. [Analysing heart rate variability to improve the monitoring of pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butruille, Laura; De Jonckheere, Julien; Jeanne, Mathieu; Tavernier, Benoît; Logier, Régis

    2016-12-01

    An innovative technique based on the analysis of instantaneous heart rate variability helps to improve the prevention and management of pain and discomfort. Simple to implement, this non-invasive technique is based on the continuous recording of the electrocardiograph signal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Heart rate variability and sustained attention in ADHD children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börger, N.A.; Van der Meere, J.J.; Ronner, A.; Alberts, E.; Geuze, R.H.; Bogte, H

    The major goal of the current study was to investigate the association between continuous performance tests (CPTs) and the heart rate variability (HRV) of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) children. The HRV, specifically the 0.10-Hz component, may be considered to be a

  8. Heart Rate Variability Interventions for Concussion and Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Lake Conder

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of Heart Rate Variability (HRV has emerged as an essential component of cardiovascular health, as well as a physiological mechanism by which one can increase the interactive communication between the cardiac and the neurocognitive systems (i.e., the body and the brain. It is well-established that lack of heart rate variability implies cardiopathology, morbidity, reduced quality-of-life, and precipitous mortality. On the positive, optimal heart rate variability has been associated with good cardiovascular health, autonomic nervous system (ANS control, emotional regulation, and enhanced neurocognitive processing. In addition to health benefits, optimal HRV has been shown to improve neurocognitive performance by enhancing focus, visual acuity and readiness, and by promoting emotional regulation needed for peak performance. In concussed athletes and soldiers, concussions not only alter brain connectivity, but also alter cardiac functioning and impair cardiovascular performance upon exertion. Altered sympathetic and parasympathetic balance in the ANS has been postulated as a critical factor in refractory Post Concussive Syndrome (PCS. This article will review both the pathological aspects of reduced heart rate variability on athletic performance, as well as the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular components of concussion and PCS. Additionally, this article will review interventions with HRV biofeedback (HRV BFB training as a promising and underutilized treatment for sports and military-related concussion. Finally, this article will review research and promising case studies pertaining to use of HRV BFB for enhancement of cognition and performance, with applicability to concussion rehabilitation.

  9. Continuous measurement of heart rate variability following carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-07-16

    Jul 16, 2010 ... Power spectral analysis of the electrocardiographic R-R interval [heart rate variability: (HRV)] is a well known, non- invasive method for assessing autonomic nervous activity.1. Studies using HRV analysis during positive-pressure pneumoperitoneum (PPP) have demonstrated increased sympathetic ...

  10. Continuous measurement of heart rate variability following carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Previous studies of autonomic nervous system activity through analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) have demonstrated increased sympathetic activity during positive-pressure pneumoperitoneum. We employed an online, continuous method for rapid HRV analysis (MemCalc™, Tarawa, Suwa Trust, Tokyo, ...

  11. Applicability and performance of heart rate variability methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaksma, J; Brouwer, J; Dijk, WA; van den Berg, M; Takens, F; Dassen, WRM; Murray, A

    2003-01-01

    Heart Rate Variability (HRV) may be measured using different measurement techniques. Almost all of these techniques deal with ectopic beats. Either these beats are excluded from the analysis or they are required. To access the functional character and easiness of use of several HRV techniques we

  12. Heart Rate and Stress in a College Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwess, Nancy L.; Vogt, F. Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Conditions producing stress are present in all colleges and universities. In this paper we report on an investigation utilizing heart rate as an indicator of stress in students when participating in activities encountered in a college classroom or laboratory. The activities included presenting an oral report, taking an exam, and participating in a…

  13. Decreased heart rate variability in surgeons during night shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Toftegård Andersen, Lærke; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used as a measure of stress and mental strain in surgeons. Low HRV has been associated with death and increased risk of cardiac events in the general population. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of a 17-hour night shift on surgeons'...

  14. Blood pressure and heart rate adjustment following acute Frenkel's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood pressure and heart rate adjustment following acute Frenkel's ambulatory exercise in chronic hemiparetics stroke survivors: a comparative study. ... a pre, within and post-activity monitoring of stroke survivors while subjecting them to Frenkel's ambulatory activity. Keys words: cardiovascular, ambulatory activity, stroke ...

  15. Muscle metaboreflex and autonomic regulation of heart rate in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, James P; Adlan, Ahmed M; Shantsila, Alena

    2013-01-01

    We elucidated the autonomic mechanisms whereby heart rate (HR) is regulated by the muscle metaboreflex. Eight male participants (22 ± 3 years) performed three exercise protocols: (1) enhanced metaboreflex activation with partial flow restriction (bi-lateral thigh cuff inflation) during leg cycling...

  16. Early Embryonic Heart Rate in Normal Pregnancies In Memory of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the appearance and development of embryonic heart rate a total of n = 317 Nigerian pregnant women were studied in the very early pregnancy from 23 – 56 days from the onset of last menstrual period (LMP). All pregnancies had a subsequent successful outcome. Transvaginal ultrasonography was ...

  17. Allostatic load and heart rate variability as health risk indicators ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Uncertainty often exists about the comparability of results obtained by different health risk indicator systems. Objectives: To compare two health risk indicator systems, i.e, allostatic load and heart rate variability (HRV). Additionally, to investigate the feasibility of inclusion of HRV indicators into allostatic load ...

  18. The effect of exercise and lifestyle interventions on heart rate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of exercise and lifestyle interventions on heart rate variability in students at risk of cardiovascular disease –A pilot study. ... African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences ... Cardiovascular disease is a major public health concern and it can be modified by diet, exercise and health awareness. However ...

  19. QT measurement and heart rate correction during hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Toke Folke; Randløv, Jette; Christensen, Leif Engmann

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Several studies show that hypoglycemia causes QT interval prolongation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of QT measurement methodology, heart rate correction, and insulin types during hypoglycemia. Methods. Ten adult subjects with type 1 diabetes had hypoglycemia ...

  20. Assessing Metabolic Syndrome Through Increased Heart Rate During Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Gharipour, Mojgan; Nezafati, Pouya; Shafie, Davood; Aghababaei, Esmaeil; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal

    2016-11-01

    The present study aimed to assess changes in resting and maximum heart rates as primary indicators of cardiac autonomic function in metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients and to determine their value for discriminating MetS from non-MetS. 468 participants were enrolled in this cross-sectional study and assessed according to the updated adult treatment panel III (ATP-III) definition of MetS. Resting and maximum heart rates were recorded following the Bruce protocol during an exercise. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to identify the best cutoff point for discriminating MetS from the non-MetS state. 194 participants (41.5%) were diagnosed as MetS. The mean resting heart rate (RHR) was not statistically different between the two groups (P=0.078). However, the mean maximum heart (MHR) rate was considerably higher in participants with MetS (142.37±14.84 beats per min) compared to the non-MetS group (134.62±21.63 beats per min) (Pgroup, the MHR was positively correlated with the serum triglyceride level (β=0.185, P=0.033) and was inversely associated with age (β=-0.469, Page. Moreover, MHR can be used as a suspicious indicator for identifying MetS.

  1. Monitoring of fetal heart rate and uterine activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graatsma, E.M.

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis a renewed monitoring technique for fetal heart rate (FHR) and uterine activity has been investigated. Through non-invasive measurements of electrical signals as recorded from the maternal abdomen, both the fetal-electrocardiogram (fECG) and uterine electrohysterogram (EHG) can be

  2. Blood pressure and heart rate adjustment following acute Frenkel's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Procedure. This study is a comparative observational study of the pre/post test influence of Frenkel's ambulatory activity on heart rate and blood pressure in hemiparetic stroke survivors undergoing rehabilitation. The study was conducted in the gymnasium of the Department of Physiotherapy, Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital.

  3. Hydration status after exercise affect resting metabolic rate and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Sepulveda, Mauricio; Cerda-Kohler, Hugo; Pérez-Luco, Cristian; Monsalves, Matías; Andrade, David Cristobal; Zbinden-Foncea, Herman; Báez-San Martín, Eduardo; Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo

    2014-12-17

    Heart rate variability and resting metabolic rate are commonly to assess athlete's physiological status and energy requirements. Exercise-induced dehydration can reach up to 5% of body mass per hour. Consequently, dehydration may have a profound physiological effect on human's homeostasis. To compare the effects of dehydration and rehydration after exercise on heart rate variability and resting metabolic rate in college athletes. 14 college athletes were divided into a dehydration group (n=7) and a rehydration group (n=7), both submitted to basal (T1) heart rate variability and resting metabolic rate measurements. After basal measurements both groups were actively dehydrated (-3.4 ± 0.4% of body mass for both groups). Afterwards, dehydration group rested, while rehydration group receive a fluid intake (during a 3 h period) equivalent to 150% of body mass loss achieved during active dehydration. Four hours after active dehydration heart rate variability and resting metabolic rate were re-assessed (T2). At T2 both rehydration group (+13%) and dehydration group (+30%) achieve a significant (phydration state before resting metabolic rate and heart rate variability assessment. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  4. Pulse transit time measured by photoplethysmography improves the accuracy of heart rate as a surrogate measure of cardiac output, stroke volume and oxygen uptake in response to graded exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollonini, L; Padhye, N S; Re, R; Torricelli, A; Simpson, R J; Dacso, C C

    2015-05-01

    Heart rate (HR) is a valuable and widespread measure for physical training programs, although its description of conditioning is limited to the cardiac response to exercise. More comprehensive measures of exercise adaptation include cardiac output (Q̇), stroke volume (SV) and oxygen uptake (V̇O2), but these physiological parameters can be measured only with cumbersome equipment installed in clinical settings. In this work, we explore the ability of pulse transit time (PTT) to represent a valuable pairing with HR for indirectly estimating Q̇, SV and V̇O2 non-invasively. PTT was measured as the time interval between the peak of the electrocardiographic (ECG) R-wave and the onset of the photoplethysmography (PPG) waveform at the periphery (i.e. fingertip) with a portable sensor. Fifteen healthy young subjects underwent a graded incremental cycling protocol after which HR and PTT were correlated with Q̇, SV and V̇O2 using linear mixed models. The addition of PTT significantly improved the modeling of Q̇, SV and V̇O2 at the individual level ([Formula: see text] for SV, 0.548 for Q̇, and 0.771 for V̇O2) compared to predictive models based solely on HR ([Formula: see text] for SV, 0.503 for Q̇, and 0.745 for V̇O2). While challenges in sensitivity and artifact rejection exist, combining PTT with HR holds potential for development of novel wearable sensors that provide exercise assessment largely superior to HR monitors.

  5. Increased Efferent Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Defective Intrinsic Heart Rate Regulation in Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaung, H P Aye; Baldi, J Chris; Wang, Heng-Yu; Hughes, Gillian; Cook, Rosalind F; Bussey, Carol T; Sheard, Phil W; Bahn, Andrew; Jones, Peter P; Schwenke, Daryl O; Lamberts, Regis R

    2015-08-01

    Elevated sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) coupled with dysregulated β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) signaling is postulated as a major driving force for cardiac dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes; however, cardiac SNA has never been assessed directly in diabetes. Our aim was to measure the sympathetic input to and the β-AR responsiveness of the heart in the type 2 diabetic heart. In vivo recording of SNA of the left efferent cardiac sympathetic branch of the stellate ganglion in Zucker diabetic fatty rats revealed an elevated resting cardiac SNA and doubled firing rate compared with nondiabetic rats. Ex vivo, in isolated denervated hearts, the intrinsic heart rate was markedly reduced. Contractile and relaxation responses to β-AR stimulation with dobutamine were compromised in externally paced diabetic hearts, but not in diabetic hearts allowed to regulate their own heart rate. Protein levels of left ventricular β1-AR and Gs (guanine nucleotide binding protein stimulatory) were reduced, whereas left ventricular and right atrial β2-AR and Gi (guanine nucleotide binding protein inhibitory regulatory) levels were increased. The elevated resting cardiac SNA in type 2 diabetes, combined with the reduced cardiac β-AR responsiveness, suggests that the maintenance of normal cardiovascular function requires elevated cardiac sympathetic input to compensate for changes in the intrinsic properties of the diabetic heart. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  6. The role of inhibitory heterotrimeric G proteins in the control of in vivo heart rate dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuberi, Zia; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Tinker, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Multiple isoforms of inhibitory Gα-subunits (Gαi1,2,3, as well as Gαo) are present within the heart, and their role in modulating pacemaker function remains unresolved. Do inhibitory Gα-subunits selectively modulate parasympathetic heart rate responses? Published findings using a variety of experimental approaches have implicated roles for Gαi2, Gαi3, and Gαo in parasympathetic signal transduction. We have compared in vivo different groups of mice with global genetic deletion of Giα1/Gαi3, Gαi2, and Gαo against littermate controls using implanted ECG telemetry. Significant resting tachycardia was observed in Gαi2−/− and Gαo−/− mice compared with control and Gαi1−/−/Gαi3−/− mice (P heart rate variation was seen exclusively in Gαo−/− mice. Using heart rate variability (HRV) analysis, compared with littermate controls (4.02 ms2 ± 1.17; n = 6, Gαi2−/−) mice have a selective attenuation of high-frequency (HF) power (0.73 ms2 ± 0.31; n = 5, P heart rate was attenuated in Gαi2−/− mice (0.08 ± 0.04; n = 6) compared to control (0.27 ± 0.04; n = 7 P heart rate modulation in mice with Gαi2 deletion. Mice with Gαo deletion also have a defect in short-term heart rate dynamics, but this is qualitatively different to the effects of atropine, tertiapinQ, and Gαi2 deletion. In contrast, Gαi1 and Gαi3 do not appear to be essential for parasympathetic responses in vivo. PMID:18832081

  7. Effects of hot-iron branding on heart rate, breathing rate and behaviour of anaesthetised Steller sea lions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, K A; Mellish, J E; Weary, D M

    2011-10-01

    This study assessed the heart rate, breathing rate and behavioural responses of 12 juvenile Steller sea lions during hot-iron branding under isoflurane anaesthesia. Physiological and behavioural measures were recorded in four periods: baseline (five minutes), sham branding (one minute), branding (approximately 2.7 minutes) and postbranding (five minutes). No difference in heart rate was noted from baseline to sham branding, but heart rate increased from mean (sem) 78.3 (2.4) bpm in the baseline period to 85.6 (2.5) bpm in the branding period. Heart rate remained elevated in the postbranding period, averaging 84.7 (2.5) bpm. Breathing rate averaged 2.5 (1.0) breaths/minute in the baseline and sham branding periods increased to 8.9 (1.0) breaths/minute during branding, but returned to baseline by the postbranding period. Behaviourally, half of the sea lions exhibited trembling and head and shoulder movements during branding.

  8. Heart rate turbulence analysis in female patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Huseyin; Onrat, Ersel; Ercan, Emine; Demirdal, Umit Secil; Avsar, Alaettin; Dundar, Umit; Solak, Ozlem; Toktas, Hasan

    2015-04-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by diffuse musculoskeletal pain and discomfort. There are several reports regarding autonomic nervous system dysfunction in patients with fibromyalgia. Heart rate turbulence is expressed as ventriculophasic sinus arrhythmia and has been considered to reflect cardiac autonomic activity. Heart rate turbulence has been shown to be an independent and powerful predictor of sudden cardiac death in various cardiac abnormalities. The aim of this study is to determine whether heart rate turbulence is changed in female patients with fibromyalgia compared with healthy controls. Thirty-seven female patients (mean age, 40±11 years) with fibromyalgia, and 35 age- and sex-matched healthy female control subjects (mean age, 42±9 years) were included. Twenty-four hours of ambulatory electrocardiography recordings were collected for all subjects, and turbulence onset and turbulence slope values were automatically calculated. The baseline clinical characteristics of the two groups were similar. There were no significant differences in turbulence onset and turbulence slope measures between patients and control subjects (turbulence onset: -1.648±1.568% vs. -1.582±1.436%, p ϝ 0.853; turbulence slope: 12.933±5.693 ms/RR vs. 13.639±2.505 ms/RR, p ϝ 0.508). Although body mass index was negatively correlated with turbulence slope (r ϝ -0.258, p ϝ 0.046), no significant correlation was found between body mass index and turbulence onset (r ϝ 0.228, p ϝ 0.054). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate heart rate turbulence in patients with fibromyalgia. It appears that heart rate turbulence parameters reflecting cardiac autonomic activity are not changed in female patients with fibromyalgia.

  9. Heart rate changes during partial seizures: A study amongst Singaporean patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Shih-Hui

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Studies in Europe and America showed that tachycardia, less often bradycardia, frequently accompanied partial seizures in Caucasian patients. We determine frequency, magnitude and type of ictal heart rate changes during partial seizures in non-Caucasian patients in Singapore. Methods Partial seizures recorded during routine EEGs performed in a tertiary hospital between 1995 and 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. All routine EEGs had simultaneous ECG recording. Heart rate before and during seizures was determined and correlated with epileptogenic focus. Differences in heart rate before and during seizures were grouped into 4 types: (1 >10% decrease; (2 -10 to +20% change; (3 20–50% increase; (3 >50% increase. Results Of the total of 37 partial seizures, 18 were left hemisphere (LH, 13 were right hemisphere (RH and 6 were bilateral (BL in onset. 51% of all seizures showed no significant change in heart rate (type 2, 22% had moderate sinus tachycardia (type 3, 11% showed severe sinus tachycardia (type 4, while 16% had sinus bradycardia (type 1. Asystole was recorded in one seizure. Apart from having more tachycardia in bilateral onset seizures, there was no correlation between side of ictal discharge and heart rate response. Compared to Caucasian patients, sinus tachycardia was considerably less frequent. Frequency of bradycardia was similar to those recorded in the literature. Conclusions Significant heart rate changes during partial seizures were seen in half of Singaporean patients. Although sinus tachycardia was the most common heart rate change, the frequency was considerably lower compared to Caucasian patients. This might be due to methodological and ethnic differences. Rates of bradycardia are similar to those recorded in the literature.

  10. A healthy heart is not a metronome: an integrative review of the heart's anatomy and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Fred; McCraty, Rollin; Zerr, Christopher L

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the change in the time intervals between adjacent heartbeats, is an emergent property of interdependent regulatory systems that operate on different time scales to adapt to challenges and achieve optimal performance. This article briefly reviews neural regulation of the heart, and its basic anatomy, the cardiac cycle, and the sinoatrial and atrioventricular pacemakers. The cardiovascular regulation center in the medulla integrates sensory information and input from higher brain centers, and afferent cardiovascular system inputs to adjust heart rate and blood pressure via sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent pathways. This article reviews sympathetic and parasympathetic influences on the heart, and examines the interpretation of HRV and the association between reduced HRV, risk of disease and mortality, and the loss of regulatory capacity. This article also discusses the intrinsic cardiac nervous system and the heart-brain connection, through which afferent information can influence activity in the subcortical and frontocortical areas, and motor cortex. It also considers new perspectives on the putative underlying physiological mechanisms and properties of the ultra-low-frequency (ULF), very-low-frequency (VLF), low-frequency (LF), and high-frequency (HF) bands. Additionally, it reviews the most common time and frequency domain measurements as well as standardized data collection protocols. In its final section, this article integrates Porges' polyvagal theory, Thayer and colleagues' neurovisceral integration model, Lehrer et al.'s resonance frequency model, and the Institute of HeartMath's coherence model. The authors conclude that a coherent heart is not a metronome because its rhythms are characterized by both complexity and stability over longer time scales. Future research should expand understanding of how the heart and its intrinsic nervous system influence the brain.

  11. Ambient air pollution alters heart rate regulation in aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Bonilla, Juan P; Breysse, Patrick N; Dominici, Francesca; Geyh, Alison; Tankersley, Clarke G

    2010-03-01

    Heart rate alterations associated with exposure to particulate matter (PM) and gaseous pollutants have been observed in epidemiological studies and animal experiments. Nevertheless, the time-lag of these associations is still unclear. Determine the association at different time-lags between the complex mixture of ambient concentrations of PM, carbon monoxide (CO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)), and markers of cardiac function in a model of aged mice. AKR/J inbred mice were exposed to ambient air, 6 h daily for 40 weekdays. During this period, the animals' electrocardiogram (ECG), deep body temperature (Tdb), and body weight (BW) were registered, and concentrations of PM, CO, NO(2), as well as air temperature and relative humidity (RH) were measured. Data analysis included random effects models with lagged covariate methods. CO was significantly associated with declines in heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV), PM was significantly associated with declines in HRV and BW, and NO(2) was significantly associated with declines in HR. Some significant associations occurred in the same day (PM and HRV, PM and BW, CO and HR), whereas others were delayed by 1 to 3 days (CO and HR, CO and HRV, NO(2) and HR, PM and HRV). Finding significant declines in heart function in aged mice associated with the combined effects of air pollutants at ambient concentrations and at different time-lags is of great importance to public health. These results further implicate the potential short term and delayed effects of air pollution on HR alterations.

  12. Asymmetric acceleration/deceleration dynamics in heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Ramirez, J.; Echeverria, J. C.; Meraz, M.; Rodriguez, E.

    2017-08-01

    The heart rate variability (HRV) is an important physiological signal used either to assess the risk of cardiac death or to model the cardiovascular regulatory dynamics. Asymmetries in HRV data have been observed using 2D Poincare plots, which have been linked to a non-equilibrium operation of the cardiac autonomic system. This work further explores the presence of asymmetries but in the serial correlations of the dynamics of HRV data. To this end, detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) was used to estimate the Hurst exponent both when the heart rate is accelerating and when it is decelerating. The analysis is conducted using data collected from subjects under normal sinus rhythm (NSR), congestive heart failure (CHF) and atrial fibrillation (AF) . For the NSR cases, it was found that correlations are stronger (p behavior was detected for the CHF and AF patients. Possible links between asymmetric correlations in the dynamics and the mechanisms controlling the operation of the heart rate are discussed, as well as their implications for modeling the cardiovascular regulatory dynamics.

  13. Heart rate variability in neonates of type 1 diabetic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Noirin E; Higgins, Mary F; Kinsley, Brendan F; Foley, Michael E; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a common finding in offspring of pre-gestational type 1 diabetic pregnancy. Echocardiographic and biochemical evidence of fetal cardiac dysfunction have also been reported. Studies suggest that offspring of diabetic mothers (ODM) undergo a fetal programming effect due to the hyperglycaemic intrauterine milieu which increases their risk of cardiovascular morbidity in adult life. Decreased neonatal heart rate variability (HRV) has been described in association with in-utero growth restriction, prematurity, sudden infant death syndrome and congenital heart disease. The effect of in-utero exposure to hyperglycaemia in diabetic pregnancy on neonatal HRV is unknown. Our aim was to determine if neonatal HRV differs between normal and diabetic pregnancy. This was a prospective observational study of 38 patients with pregestational type 1 diabetes and 26 controls. HRV assessment was performed using Powerlab (ADI Instruments Ltd). Heart rate variability assessment and cord blood sampling for pH and glucose were performed for all neonates. Maternal glycaemic control was assessed via measurement of glycosylated haemoglobin in each trimester in the diabetic cohort. Neonates of diabetic mothers had evidence of altered heart rate variability, with increased low frequency to high frequency ratio (LF: HF), suggestive of a shift towards sympathetic predominance (pheart to fluctuations in maternal glycaemia with subsequent alterations in HRV may explain why infants of diabetic mothers are at greater risk of cardiovascular disease in later life. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. When heart goes "BOOM" to fast. Heart rate greater than 80 as mortality predictor in acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovic, Goran; Iric-Cupic, Violeta; Milanov, Srdjan; Dimitijevic, Aleksandra; Petrovic-Janicijevic, Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Many prospective studies established association between high heart rate and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, independently of other risk factors. Heart rate over 80 beats per minute more often leads to atherosclerotic plaque disruption, the main step in developing acute coronary syndrome. Purpose was to investigate the incidence of higher heart rate levels in patients with anterior wall acute myocardial infarction with ST-segment elevation and the influence of heart rate on mortality. Research included 140 patients with anterior wall acute myocardial infarction with ST-segment elevation treated in Coronary Unit, Clinical Center Kragujevac in the period from January 2001-June 2006. Heart rate was calculated as the mean value of baseline and heart rate in the first 30 minutes after admission. Other risk factors were also followed to determine their connection with elevated heart rate. Results showed that the majority of patients survived (over 70%). In a total number of patients, more than 75% had a heart rate levels greater than 80 beats per minute. There was a significant difference in heart rate on addmision between survivors and patients who died, with a greater levels in patients with fatal outcome. Both, univariate and multivariate regression analysis singled out heart rate greater than 80 beats per minute as independent mortality predictor in these patients. Heart rate greater than 80 beats per minute is a major, independent risk factor for morbidity and important predictor of mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  15. An experimental study of the job demand-control model with measures of heart rate variability and salivary alpha-amylase: Evidence of increased stress responses to increased break autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Emma; Landolt, Kathleen; Hazi, Agnes; Dragano, Nico; Wright, Bradley J

    2015-01-01

    We assessed in an experimental design whether the stress response towards a work task was moderated by the autonomy to choose a break during the assigned time to complete the task. This setting is defined in accordance with the theoretical framework of the job-demand-control (JDC) model of work related stress. The findings from naturalistic investigations of a stress-buffering effect of autonomy (or 'buffer hypothesis') are equivocal and the experimental evidence is limited, especially with relation to physiological indices of stress. Our objective was to investigate if increased autonomy in a particular domain (break time control) was related with adaptive physiology using objective physiological markers of stress; heart rate variability (HRV) and salivary alpha amylase (sAA). We used a within-subject design and the 60 female participants were randomly assigned to an autonomy (free timing of break) and standard conditions (fixed timing of break) of a word processing task in a simulated office environment in a random order. Participants reported increased perceptions of autonomy, no difference in demand and performed worse in the task in the break-time autonomy versus the standard condition. The results revealed support for the manipulation of increased autonomy, but in the opposing direction. Increased autonomy was related with dysregulated physiological reactivity, synonymous with typical increased stress responses. Potentially, our findings may indicate that autonomy is not necessary a resource but could become an additional stressor when it adds additional complexity while the amount of work (demands) remains unchanged. Further, our findings underscore the need to collect objective physiological evidence of stress to supplement self-reported information. Self-report biases may partially explain the inconsistent findings with the buffer hypothesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A comparison of heart rate response and frequencies of technical actions between half-court and full-court 3-a-side games in high school female basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlı, Halil; Köklü, Yusuf; Alemdaroğlu, Utku; Koçak, Fatma Ünver

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare heart rate (HR) response and frequency of technical actions between half-court and full-court 3-a-side games in female high school basketball players. Twelve young female basketball players (age 15.5 ± 0.5 years; height 165.1 ± 5.7 cm; body mass 57.3 ± 7.2 kg; training age 4.2 ± 0.7 years; HRmax 202.9 ± 5.6 b·min(-1)) participated in this study voluntarily. On the first day, anthropometric measurements (height and body mass) were taken for each player; this was followed by the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test (YIRT) level 1 for the subjects. Then, half-court and full-court 3-a-side games were organized in random order at 2-day intervals. The HRmax for each player was determined during the YIRT, after which the HR was measured during the 3-a-side games. In addition, the frequencies of different categories of technical actions were counted manually during the 3-a-side games. A paired t-test was calculated for each dependent variable, including HR, percentage of maximum HR (%HRmax), and the frequencies of different technical actions to compare half-court and full-court 3-a-side games. The study results indicate that the full-court 3-a-side games produced significantly higher responses than the half-court 3-a-side games in terms of HR and %HRmax (p basketball players should organize full-court 3-a-side games, whereas coaches who want to focus on technical actions should arrange half-court 3-a-side games.

  17. Effects of Exercise Training on Heart Rate Variability in Chagas Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Ramos Nascimento

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heart rate variability (HRV is a marker of autonomic dysfunction severity. The effects of physical training on HRV indexes in Chagas heart disease (CHD are not well established. Objective: To evaluate the changes in HRV indexes in response to physical training in CHD. Methods: Patients with CHD and left ventricular (LV dysfunction, physically inactive, were randomized either to the intervention (IG, N = 18 or control group (CG, N = 19. The IG participated in a 12-week exercise program consisting of 3 sessions/week. Results: Mean age was 49.5 ± 8 years, 59% males, mean LVEF was 36.3 ± 7.8%. Baseline HRV indexes were similar between groups. From baseline to follow-up, total power (TP: 1653 (IQ 625 - 3418 to 2794 (1617 - 4452 ms, p = 0.02 and very low frequency power: 586 (290 - 1565 to 815 (610 - 1425 ms, p = 0.047 increased in the IG, but not in the CG. The delta (post - pre HRV indexes were similar: SDNN 11.5 ± 30.0 vs. 3.7 ± 25.1 ms. p = 0.10; rMSSD 2 (6 - 17 vs. 1 (21 - 9 ms. p = 0.43; TP 943 (731 - 3130 vs. 1780 (921 - 2743 Hz. p = 0.46; low frequency power (LFP 1.0 (150 - 197 vs. 60 (111 - 146 Hz. p = 0.85; except for high frequency power, which tended to increase in the IG: 42 (133 - 92 vs. 79 (61 - 328 Hz. p = 0.08. Conclusion: In the studied population, the variation of HRV indexes was similar between the active and inactive groups. Clinical improvement with physical activity seems to be independent from autonomic dysfunction markers in CHD.

  18. Impact of sleep-disordered breathing on heart rate turbulence in heart failure patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiomi Yoshihisa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB is associated with adverse outcomes in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF. Additionally, heart rate turbulence (HRT reflects changes in the sinus cycle length of baroreceptor in response to hemodynamic fluctuations after ventricular premature beat. Recent studies have suggested that HRT as a marker of vagal activity has a predictive value of poor prognosis in CHF patients. However, little is known about the relationship between SDB and HRT in CHF patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this study, 75 patients with CHF were enrolled. We simultaneously performed Holter ECG during a 24-hr period and portable sleep monitoring at nighttime, and determined the respiratory disturbance index (RDI, HRT (turbulence onset (TO and turbulence slope (TS during that 24-hr period. These patients were divided into two groups based on the presence of severe SDB: Group A (RDI≥30, n = 17 and Group B (RDI<30, n = 58. TS was significantly lower in Group A than in Group B across the 24-hr period (nighttime: 3.6±1.1 vs. 6.9±1.3; daytime: 3.7±0.8 vs. 7.0±1.1; all-day: 3.5±0.7 vs. 6.7±0.9% ms/RR, P<0.05, respectively. TO did not differ between the two groups. Furthermore, there was a significant negative correlation between all-day TS and RDI (R = -0.257, P = 0.027. Moreover, in the multiple regression analysis, RDI was an independent factor to determine all-day TS. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with severe SDB, blunted TS was observed across 24 hours. These results suggest that SDB induce impairment of vagal activity across a 24-hour period and may be associated with poor prognosis in CHF patients.

  19. Resting heart rate, guilt, and sympathy: A developmental psychophysiological study of physical aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colasante, Tyler; Malti, Tina

    2017-11-01

    Although low resting heart rate has been linked to frequent aggressive conduct in childhood, little is known about the interaction of this biological risk with social emotions that protect against aggression across development. With a sample of 5-, 8-, and 12-year-olds (N = 110), we tested whether the negative link between resting heart rate and physical aggression was offset by high guilt and sympathy. Caregivers reported their children's physical aggression and sympathy. Children's electrocardiogram data were collected while they viewed a nondescript video, after which they reported their guilt-or lack thereof-in response to vignettes depicting social transgressions. Lower resting heart rate was significantly associated with higher physical aggression in 5-year-olds who reported low-but not medium and high-levels of guilt, and in 8-year-olds with low-but not medium and high-ratings of sympathy. Neither guilt nor sympathy moderated the resting heart rate-physical aggression link in 12-year-olds. We discuss how social emotions may help children with low resting heart rates navigate social conflicts and avoid aggressive physical confrontations. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  20. Hypoxia increases exercise heart rate despite combined inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebenmann, Christoph; Rasmussen, Peter; Sørensen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia increases the heart rate (HR) response to exercise but the mechanism(s) remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the tachycardic effect of hypoxia persists during separate but not combined inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors. Nine subjects performed incremental exercise...... combined β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptor inhibition....

  1. Diminution of Heart Rate Variability in Bipolar Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Hage

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic nervous system (ANS dysregulation in depression is associated with symptoms associated with the ANS. The beat-to-beat pattern of heart rate defined as heart rate variability (HRV provides a noninvasive portal to ANS function and has been proposed to represent a means of quantifying resting vagal tone. We quantified HRV in bipolar depressed (BDD patients as a measure of ANS dysregulation seeking to establish HRV as a potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for treatment outcome. Forty-seven BDD patients were enrolled. They were randomized to receive either escitalopram–celecoxib or escitalopram-placebo over 8 weeks in a double-blind study design. Thirty-five patients completed the HRV studies. Thirty-six healthy subjects served as controls. HRV was assessed at pretreatment and end of study and compared with that of controls. HRV was quantified and corrected for artifacts using an algorithm that incorporates time and frequency domains to address non-stationarity of the beat-to-beat heart rate pattern. Baseline high frequency-HRV (i.e., respiratory sinus arrhythmia was lower in BDD patients than controls, although the difference did not reach significance. Baseline low-frequency HRV was significantly lower in BDD patients (ln4.20 than controls (ln = 5.50 (p < 0.01. Baseline heart period was significantly shorter (i.e., faster heart rate in BDD patients than controls. No significant change in HRV parameters were detected over the course of the study with either treatment. These findings suggest that components of HRV may be diminished in BDD patients.

  2. Has electronic fetal heart rate monitoring made a difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Philip J

    2008-02-01

    Electronic fetal heart rate monitoring (EFHRM) has revolutionised our understanding of the function of the cardiovascular system of the fetus during labour, and how the fetus responds to hypoxia. However, although it is a sensitive technique for the detection of hypoxia during labour, it is relatively non-specific for detecting the development of acidosis. Moreover, it is highly dependent on accurate interpretation of fetal heart rate (FHR) patterns, which has been shown to be commonly of a low standard in everyday clinical practice. Use of EFHRM has probably reduced the incidence of birth asphyxia, but it has also contributed to the rise in the caesarean section rate. Ancillary techniques, such as pulse oximetry, have not proved useful, although ST-segment analysis of the ECG waveform shows some promise. Computerised expert systems for the analysis of FHR patterns may be more successful at avoiding poor outcomes.

  3. [Research on conditional fluctuation characteristics of CHF heart rate variation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Junfeng; Zhou, Lingling; Huang, Xiaoling; Bian, Chunhua

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we applied generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (GARCH) model to conditional fluctuation characteristics of heart rate variation (HRV) series (congestive heart failure, Normal), with all the data from PhysioNet ECG database. Research results proved the existence of condition fluctuation characteristic in the series of changing rate of HRV. In the GARCH model family, threshold GARCH (1,1)(TGARCH (1,1)) model performs best in fitting changing rate of HRV. Although the structure of ARCH (1) model is simple, its error is the closest to that of TGARCH (1, 1) model. The results also showed that the difference was obvious between disease group and normal group. All these results provide a new method to the research and clinical application of HRV.

  4. Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability in Dairy Cows with Different Temperament and Behavioural Reactivity to Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levente Kovács

    Full Text Available From the 1990s, extensive research was started on the physiological aspects of individual traits in animals. Previous research has established two extreme (proactive and reactive coping styles in several animal species, but the means of reactivity with the autonomic nervous system (ANS activity has not yet been investigated in cattle. The aim of this study was the characterization of cardiac autonomic activity under different conditions in cows with different individual characteristics. For this purpose, we investigated heart rate and ANS-related heart rate variability (HRV parameters of dairy cows (N = 282 on smaller- and larger-scale farms grouped by (1 temperament and (2 behavioural reactivity to humans (BRH. Animals with high BRH scores were defined as impulsive, while animals with low BRH scores were defined as reserved. Cardiac parameters were calculated for undisturbed lying (baseline and for milking bouts, the latter with the presence of an unfamiliar person (stressful situation. Sympathetic tone was higher, while vagal activity was lower in temperamental cows than in calm animals during rest both on smaller- and larger-scale farms. During milking, HRV parameters were indicative of a higher sympathetic and a lower vagal activity of temperamental cows as compared to calm ones in farms of both sizes. Basal heart rate did not differ between BRH groups either on smaller- or larger-scale farms. Differences between basal ANS activity of impulsive and reserved cows reflected a higher resting vagal and lower sympathetic activity of reserved animals compared to impulsive ones both on smaller- and larger-scale farms. There was no difference either in heart rate or in HRV parameters between groups during milking neither in smaller- nor in larger-scale farms. These two groupings allowed to draw possible parallels between personality and cardiac autonomic activity during both rest and milking in dairy cows. Heart rate and HRV seem to be useful for

  5. Improved ultrasound transducer positioning by fetal heart location estimation during Doppler based heart rate measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelmann, Paul; Vullings, Rik; Schmitt, Lars; Kolen, Alexander F; Mischi, Massimo; van Laar, Judith O E H; Bergmans, Jan W M

    2017-09-21

    Doppler ultrasound (US) is the most commonly applied method to measure the fetal heart rate (fHR). When the fetal heart is not properly located within the ultrasonic beam, fHR measurements often fail. As a consequence, clinical staff need to reposition the US transducer on the maternal abdomen, which can be a time consuming and tedious task. In this article, a method is presented to aid clinicians with the positioning of the US transducer to produce robust fHR measurements. A maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) algorithm is developed, which provides information on fetal heart location using the power of the Doppler signals received in the individual elements of a standard US transducer for fHR recordings. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated with simulations and in vitro experiments performed on a beating-heart setup. Both the experiments and the simulations show that the heart location can be accurately determined with an error of less than 7 mm within the measurement volume of the employed US transducer. The results show that the developed algorithm can be used to provide accurate feedback on fetal heart location for improved positioning of the US transducer, which may lead to improved measurements of the fHR.

  6. A new physiological method for heart rate correction of the QT interval

    OpenAIRE

    Davey, P.

    1999-01-01

    AIM—To reassess QT interval rate correction.
BACKGROUND—The QT interval is strongly and inversely related to heart rate. To compare QT intervals between different subjects with different heart rates requires the application of a QT interval rate correction formula. To date these formulae have inappropriately assumed a fixed relation between QT interval and heart rate. An alternative method of QT interval rate correction that makes no assumptions about the QT interval-heart rate relation is ne...

  7. General anesthesia suppresses normal heart rate variability in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchett, Gerald; Wood, Philip

    2014-06-01

    The human heart normally exhibits robust beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV). The loss of this variability is associated with pathology, including disease states such as congestive heart failure (CHF). The effect of general anesthesia on intrinsic HRV is unknown. In this prospective, observational study we enrolled 100 human subjects having elective major surgical procedures under general anesthesia. We recorded continuous heart rate data via continuous electrocardiogram before, during, and after anesthesia, and we assessed HRV of the R-R intervals. We assessed HRV using several common metrics including Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), Multifractal Analysis, and Multiscale Entropy Analysis. Each of these analyses was done in each of the four clinical phases for each study subject over the course of 24 h: Before anesthesia, during anesthesia, early recovery, and late recovery. On average, we observed a loss of variability on the aforementioned metrics that appeared to correspond to the state of general anesthesia. Following the conclusion of anesthesia, most study subjects appeared to regain their normal HRV, although this did not occur immediately. The resumption of normal HRV was especially delayed on DFA. Qualitatively, the reduction in HRV under anesthesia appears similar to the reduction in HRV observed in CHF. These observations will need to be validated in future studies, and the broader clinical implications of these observations, if any, are unknown.

  8. The progressive onset of cholinergic and adrenergic control of heart rate during development in the green iguana, Iguana iguana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Marina R; Leite, Cleo A C; Abe, Augusto S; Crossley, Dane A; Taylor, Edwin W

    2015-10-01

    The autonomic control of heart rate was studied throughout development in embryos of the green iguana, Iguana iguana by applying receptor agonists and antagonists of the parasympathetic and sympathetic systems. Acetylcholine (Ach) slowed or stopped the heart and atropine antagonized the response to Ach indicating the presence of muscarinic cholinoceptors on the heart of early embryos. However, atropine injections had no impact on heart rate until immediately before hatching, when it increased heart rate by 15%. This cholinergic tonus increased to 34% in hatchlings and dropped to 24% in adult iguanas. Although epinephrine was without effect, injection of propranolol slowed the heart throughout development, indicating the presence of β-adrenergic receptors on the heart of early embryos, possibly stimulated by high levels of circulating catecholamines. The calculated excitatory tonus varied between 33% and 68% until immediately before hatching when it fell to 25% and 29%, a level retained in hatchlings and adults. Hypoxia caused a bradycardia in early embryos that was unaffected by injection of atropine indicating that hypoxia has a direct effect upon the heart. In later embryos and hatchlings hypoxia caused a tachycardia that was unaffected by injection of atropine. Subsequent injection of propranolol reduced heart rate both uncovering a hypoxic bradycardia in late embryos and abolishing tachycardia in hatchlings. Hypercapnia was without effect on heart rate in late stage embryos and in hatchlings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Combining electroencephalographic activity and instantaneous heart rate for assessing brain-heart dynamics during visual emotional elicitation in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, G; Greco, A; Gentili, C; Lanata, A; Sebastiani, L; Menicucci, D; Gemignani, A; Scilingo, E P

    2016-05-13

    Emotion perception, occurring in brain areas such as the prefrontal cortex and amygdala, involves autonomic responses affecting cardiovascular dynamics. However, how such brain-heart dynamics is further modulated by emotional valence (pleasantness/unpleasantness), also considering different arousing levels (the intensity of the emotional stimuli), is still unknown. To this extent, we combined electroencephalographic (EEG) dynamics and instantaneous heart rate estimates to study emotional processing in healthy subjects. Twenty-two healthy volunteers were elicited through affective pictures gathered from the International Affective Picture System. The experimental protocol foresaw 110 pictures, each of which lasted 10 s, associated to 25 different combinations of arousal and valence levels, including neutral elicitations. EEG data were processed using short-time Fourier transforms to obtain time-varying maps of cortical activation, whereas the associated instantaneous cardiovascular dynamics was estimated in the time and frequency domains through inhomogeneous point-process models. Brain-heart linear and nonlinear coupling was estimated through the maximal information coefficient (MIC). Considering EEG oscillations in theθband (4-8 Hz), MIC highlighted significant arousal-dependent changes between positive and negative stimuli, especially occurring at intermediate arousing levels through the prefrontal cortex interplay. Moreover, high arousing elicitations seem to mitigate changes in brain-heart dynamics in response to pleasant/unpleasant visual elicitation. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. E-bra with nanosensors, smart electronics and smart phone communication network for heart rate monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Oh, Sechang; Mathur, Gyanesh N.; Rai, Pratyush; Kegley, Lauren

    2011-04-01

    Heart related ailments have been a major cause for deaths in both men and women in United States. Since 1985, more women than men have died due to cardiac or cardiovascular ailments for reasons that are not well understood as yet. Lack of a deterministic understanding of this phenomenon makes continuous real time monitoring of cardiovascular health the best approach for both early detection of pathophysiological changes and events indicative of chronic cardiovascular diseases in women. This approach requires sensor systems to be seamlessly mounted on day to day clothing for women. With this application in focus, this paper describes a e-bra platform for sensors towards heart rate monitoring. The sensors, nanomaterial or textile based dry electrodes, capture the heart activity signals in form Electrocardiograph (ECG) and relay it to a compact textile mountable amplifier-wireless transmitter module for relay to a smart phone. The ECG signal, acquired on the smart phone, can be transmitted to the cyber space for post processing. As an example, the paper discusses the heart rate estimation and heart rate variability. The data flow from sensor to smart phone to server (cyber infrastructure) has been discussed. The cyber infrastructure based signal post processing offers an opportunity for automated emergency response that can be initiated from the server or the smartphone itself. Detailed protocols for both the scenarios have been presented and their relevance to the present emergency healthcare response system has been discussed.

  11. Association between oral variables and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Milana Drumond Ramos; de Souza, Ana Cecilia Amorim; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Valenti, Vitor E

    2013-12-27

    The heart rate variability is a useful method to assess cardiac autonomic modulation in patients undergoing dental procedures, because knowledge of physiological conditions provides greater security to the professional as well as the possibility of a better plan treatment to patient benefit. The aim of our study was to describe the association between cardiac autonomic control and dental variables. We consulted the databases Medline, SciELO, Lilacs and Cochrane, using the terms "autonomic", "dentistry", "heart rate variability", "cardiovascular physiology." The selected studies indicated a strong relationship between dental variables and HRV. There was an association between malocclusion, TMD, dental procedures cirugia and low HRV. Thus, they become more studies that relate to HRV in dental science, especially in clinical practice.

  12. [Heart rate variability during sleep in children with multiple disabilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquier, L; Amand, M; Van Eecke, D

    2013-12-01

    To study heart rate variability during sleep in children with multiple disabilities in order to observe the behavior of the autonomic nervous system. The R-R interval variability of 4 to 12 years old children was recorded with a heart rate monitor during one night. Children with multiple disabilities (G1) and healthy children (G2) were compared in time, frequency, and non-linear domains. Temporal (P0.05). The diseases encountered are probably the reason for these findings, but the variety of disorders and medications of the children with multiple disabilities needs to be studied with a larger and more varied sample. Sympathetic predominance during sleep in children with multiple disabilities is associated with a decrease in adaptive abilities of these children's autonomic nervous system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of the Numbers of Players in the Heart Rate Responses of Youth Soccer Players Within 2 vs. 2, 3 vs. 3 and 4 vs. 4 Small-sided Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellal, A; Jannault, R; Lopez-Segovia, M; Pialoux, V

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare heart rate (HR) responses within and between small-sided games (SSG) training methods in elite young soccer players. Twenty-seven youth soccer players (age: 16.5 ± 0.5 years, height: 174.5 ± 5.5 cm, weight: 62.9 ± 8.3, velocity at maximal aerobic speed (MAS): 15.9 ± 0.9 km.h(-1)) performed 3 different SSG (2 vs. 2, 3 vs. 3, 4 vs. 4 without goalkeeper). In each SSG, HR was continuously measured and expressed as a mean percentage of HR reserve (%HRreserve). The mean %HRreserve calculated during the SSG was significantly lower during 4 vs. 4 (70.6 ± 5.9 %) compared to 2 vs. 2 (80.1 ± 3.6 %, pSSG. Regardless of the time spent above 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 85 and 90 % of HRreserve, 4 vs. 4 solicited lower percentage of time than 3 vs. 3 and 2 vs. 2. Intersubject coefficients of variation were significantly higher during 4 vs. 4 compared to 2 vs.2 and 3 vs. 3. The %HRreserve after 30s of recovery was significantly higher for 3 vs. 3 (70.6 ± 5.3 %) compared to 2 vs. 2 (65.2 ± 4.8 %, pyouth soccer players. This difference could be due to that young soccer players do not have the same technical ability and experience as adult players and thus, their activity during the 2 vs. 2 and 3 vs. 3 induces a greater physical demand due to their lack of experience. The age of the players could be linked with the physical demands within small-sided games.

  14. Assessing Metabolic Syndrome Through Increased Heart Rate During Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Sadeghi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to assess changes in resting and maximum heart rates as primary indicators of cardiac autonomic function in metabolic syndrome (MetS patients and to determine their value for discriminating MetS from non-MetS. 468 participants were enrolled in this cross-sectional study and assessed according to the updated adult treatment panel III (ATP-III definition of MetS. Resting and maximum heart rates were recorded following the Bruce protocol during an exercise. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to identify the best cutoff point for discriminating MetS from the non-MetS state. 194 participants (41.5% were diagnosed as MetS. The mean resting heart rate (RHR was not statistically different between the two groups (P=0.078. However, the mean maximum heart (MHR rate was considerably higher in participants with MetS (142.37±14.84 beats per min compared to the non-MetS group (134.62±21.63 beats per min (P<0.001. In the MetS group, the MHR was positively correlated with the serum triglyceride level (β=0.185, P=0.033 and was inversely associated with age (β=-0.469, P<0.001. The MHR had a moderate value for discriminating MetS from the non-MetS state (c=0.580, P=0.004 with the optimal cutoff point of 140 beats per min. In MetS patients, the MHR was significantly greater compared to non-MetS subjects and was directly correlated with serum triglyceride levels and inversely with advanced age. Moreover, MHR can be used as a suspicious indicator for identifying MetS.

  15. Applying Hyperspectral Imaging to Heart Rate Estimation for Adaptive Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Walker, G. H., Baber , C., & Jenkins, D. P. (2005). Human Factors Methods: A Practical Guide for Engineering and Design. Burlington, VT: Ashgate...the training, subjects were asked if they were ready to begin the experiment or if they wanted any extra time to practice . Test Sessions and Testing...intrusive and not practical for day-to-day operations. Several imaging techniques have been developed to remotely measure heart rate; however, each

  16. Self-Steem and changes in heart rate during laboratory-based stress.

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Brian M.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between self-esteem (SE), type of stressor, and fluctuations in heart rate was assessed in a sample of 59 college students (40 females, 19 males; with a mean age of 23.98 years (SEM = 1.0)). SE was measured using the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. The study assessed whether SE buffers the cardiovascular response to stress by comparing responses to two types of stressor: mental arithmetic and verbal memory. As predicted, an SE x stressor interaction...

  17. Classifying work rate from heart rate measurements using an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolus, Ahmet; Imbeau, Daniel; Dubé, Philippe-Antoine; Dubeau, Denise

    2016-05-01

    In a new approach based on adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS), field heart rate (HR) measurements were used to classify work rate into four categories: very light, light, moderate, and heavy. Inter-participant variability (physiological and physical differences) was considered. Twenty-eight participants performed Meyer and Flenghi's step-test and a maximal treadmill test, during which heart rate and oxygen consumption (VO2) were measured. Results indicated that heart rate monitoring (HR, HRmax, and HRrest) and body weight are significant variables for classifying work rate. The ANFIS classifier showed superior sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy compared to current practice using established work rate categories based on percent heart rate reserve (%HRR). The ANFIS classifier showed an overall 29.6% difference in classification accuracy and a good balance between sensitivity (90.7%) and specificity (95.2%) on average. With its ease of implementation and variable measurement, the ANFIS classifier shows potential for widespread use by practitioners for work rate assessment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Heating and cooling rates and their etTects upon heart rate in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1988-03-16

    Mar 16, 1988 ... have investigated aspects of thermoregulation, but the results obtained are contradictory, and no heart rate measurements were done. The purpose of this study was to investigate the heating and cooling rates of the angulate tortoise, Chersina angulata, in the eastern Cape Province,. South Africa.

  19. Heating and cooling rates and their effects upon heart rate in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... rates increase with increasing body temperature, and for all body temperatures heart rates were greater during heating than during cooling. This suggests that the cardiovascular system plays a role in the heat exchange of the tortoises, but further study is required to completely understand the thermoregulatory process.

  20. Emotions, heart rate and performance in archery. A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robazza, C; Bortoli, L; Nougier, V

    1999-06-01

    A case study of an elite female archer was conducted to gain insight into individual psychophysical reactions accompanying an athletic event, and to test predictions of pre-performance emotions effects upon performance. Good performance was expected when the actual pre-performance emotions resembled the recalled optimal emotion pattern. Conversely, poor performance was expected when the actual pre-performance emotions paralleled the recalled ineffective emotion pattern. the investigation comprised individual emotion profiling, emotions and heart rate monitoring, final interview and performance evaluation. The research was accomplished during the 1996 European Archery Championships, one of the most important international archery competitions. An 18-year-old female athlete of the Italian archery national team. Because of the exploratory nature of the study, no intervention was implemented. Emotion profiling was carried out using an idiographic approach based on recalled optimal and poor performances, according to the Individual Zones of Optimal Functioning (IZOF) model. Emotions, heart rate, and performance were monitored across the five days of practice and competition. Individual pre-performance optimal emotion pattern, heart rate deceleration during shooting, consistent shooting scores were revealed throughout practice and competition. The good performance predicted on the basis of pre-performance emotion assessments was met and was confirmed by the archer's interpretation.

  1. Assessing heart rate variability through wavelet-based statistical measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachowiak, Mark P; Hay, Dean C; Johnson, Michel J

    2016-10-01

    Because of its utility in the investigation and diagnosis of clinical abnormalities, heart rate variability (HRV) has been quantified with both time and frequency analysis tools. Recently, time-frequency methods, especially wavelet transforms, have been applied to HRV. In the current study, a complementary computational approach is proposed wherein continuous wavelet transforms are applied directly to ECG signals to quantify time-varying frequency changes in the lower bands. Such variations are compared for resting and lower body negative pressure (LBNP) conditions using statistical and information-theoretic measures, and compared with standard HRV metrics. The latter confirm the expected lower variability in the LBNP condition due to sympathetic nerve activity (e.g. RMSSD: p=0.023; SDSD: p=0.023; LF/HF: p=0.018). Conversely, using the standard Morlet wavelet and a new transform based on windowed complex sinusoids, wavelet analysis of the ECG within the observed range of heart rate (0.5-1.25Hz) exhibits significantly higher variability, as measured by frequency band roughness (Morlet CWT: p=0.041), entropy (Morlet CWT: p=0.001), and approximate entropy (Morlet CWT: p=0.004). Consequently, this paper proposes that, when used with well-established HRV approaches, time-frequency analysis of ECG can provide additional insights into the complex phenomenon of heart rate variability. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Stress Detection Using Low Cost Heart Rate Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Salai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The automated detection of stress is a central problem for ambient assisted living solutions. The paper presents the concepts and results of two studies targeted at stress detection with a low cost heart rate sensor, a chest belt. In the device validation study (n=5, we compared heart rate data and other features from the belt to those measured by a gold standard device to assess the reliability of the sensor. With simple synchronization and data cleaning algorithm, we were able to select highly (>97% correlated, low average error (2.2% data segments of considerable length from the chest data for further processing. The protocol for the clinical study (n=46 included a relax phase followed by a phase with provoked mental stress, 10 minutes each. We developed a simple method for the detection of the stress using only three time-domain features of the heart rate signal. The method produced accuracy of 74.6%, sensitivity of 75.0%, and specificity of 74.2%, which is impressive compared to the performance of two state-of-the-art methods run on the same data. Since the proposed method uses only time-domain features, it can be efficiently implemented on mobile devices.

  3. Practical remarks on the heart rate and saturation measurement methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, M.; Kubal, S.; Piotrowski, P.; Staniec, K.

    2017-05-01

    A surface reflection-based method for measuring heart rate and saturation has been introduced as one having a significant advantage over legacy methods in that it lends itself for use in special applications such as those where a person’s mobility is of prime importance (e.g. during a miner’s work) and excluding the use of traditional clips. Then, a complete ATmega1281-based microcontroller platform has been described for performing computational tasks of signal processing and wireless transmission. In the next section remarks have been provided regarding the basic signal processing rules beginning with raw voltage samples of converted optical signals, their acquisition, storage and smoothing. This chapter ends with practical remarks demonstrating an exponential dependence between the minimum measurable heart rate and the readout resolution at different sampling frequencies for different cases of averaging depth (in bits). The following section is devoted strictly to the heart rate and hemoglobin oxygenation (saturation) measurement with the use of the presented platform, referenced to measurements obtained with a stationary certified pulsoxymeter.

  4. Reduced contraction and altered frequency response of isolated ventricular myocytes from patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, C H; Davia, K; Bennett, J G; Pepper, J R; Poole-Wilson, P A; Harding, S E

    1995-11-01

    Previous work has failed to demonstrate reduced maximal contraction of isolated ventricular myocytes from failing human hearts compared with nonfailing control hearts. The effect of alterations in stimulation frequency and temperature on the contraction of isolated ventricular myocytes has been investigated. Left ventricular myocytes were isolated from the hearts of patients with severe heart failure undergoing heart transplantation and compared with myocytes isolated from myocardial biopsies from patients with coronary disease but preserved left ventricular systolic function or from myocytes from rejected donor hearts. Myocytes were exposed to either a maximally activating level of extracellular calcium at 37 degrees C or to 2 mmol/L calcium at 32 degrees C. There was no significant difference in the contraction amplitude between myocytes from failing and nonfailing hearts at 0.2 Hz. With increasing stimulation frequency, there was a reduction in contraction amplitude in cells from failing hearts relative to control hearts in both maximal calcium from 0.33 Hz (4.5% versus 6.6%) to 1.4 Hz (3.9% versus 8.8%) (ANCOVA, P contraction and the times to 50% and 90% relaxation were prolonged in myocytes from failing hearts at stimulation rate of 0.2 Hz (P contraction, slowed relaxation, and impaired frequency response occurring at the level of the individual ventricular myocyte can be demonstrated in human heart failure. This demonstrates that disruption of myocyte function can contribute to both the systolic and the diastolic abnormalities that occur in the failing human heart.

  5. Ivabradine reduces heart rate while preserving metabolic fluxes and energy status of healthy normoxic working hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauzier, Benjamin; Vaillant, Fanny; Gélinas, Roselle; Bouchard, Bertrand; Brownsey, Roger; Thorin, Eric; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Des Rosiers, Christine

    2011-03-01

    Heart rate reduction (HRR) is an important target in the management of patients with chronic stable angina. Most available drugs for HRR, such as β-blockers, have adverse effects, including on cardiac energy substrate metabolism, a well-recognized determinant of cardiac homeostasis. This study aimed at 1) testing whether HRR by ivabradine (IVA) alters substrate metabolism in the healthy normoxic working heart and 2) comparing the effect of IVA with that of the β-blocker metoprolol (METO). This was assessed using our well-established model of ex vivo mouse heart perfusion in the working mode, which enables concomitant evaluation of myocardial contractility and metabolic fluxes using (13)C-labeled substrates. Hearts were perfused in the absence (controls; n = 10) or presence of IVA (n = 10, 3 μM) with or without atrial pacing to abolish HRR in the IVA group. IVA significantly reduced HR (35 ± 5%) and increased stroke volume (39 ± 9%) while maintaining similar cardiac output, contractility, power, and efficiency. Effects of IVA on HR and stroke volume were reversed by atrial pacing. At the metabolic level, IVA did not impact on substrate selection to citrate formation, rates of glycolysis, or tissue levels of high-energy phosphates. In contrast, METO, at concentrations up to 40 μM, decreased markedly cardiac function (flow: 25 ± 6%; stroke volume: 30 ± 10%; contractility: 31 ± 9%) as well as glycolysis (2.9-fold) but marginally affected HR. Collectively, these results demonstrate that IVA selectively reduces HR while preserving energy substrate metabolism of normoxic healthy working mouse hearts perfused ex vivo, a model that mimics to some extent the denervated transplanted heart. Our results provide the impetus for testing selective HRR by IVA on cardiac substrate metabolism in pathological models.

  6. Isoflurane depresses baroreflex control of heart rate in decerebrate rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong S; Morrow, Don; Andresen, Michael C; Chang, Kyoung S K

    2002-05-01

    Isoflurane inhibits baroreflex control of heart rate (HR) by poorly understood mechanisms. The authors examined whether suprapontine central nervous system cardiovascular regulatory sites are required for anesthetic depression. The effects of isoflurane (1 and 2 rat minimum alveolar concentration [MAC]) on the baroreflex control of HR were determined in sham intact and midcollicular-transected decerebrate rats. Intravenous phenylephrine (0.2-12 microg/kg) and nitroprusside (1-60 microg/kg) were used to measure HR responses to peak changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP). Sigmoidal logistic curve fits to HR-MAP data assessed baroreflex sensitivity (HR/MAP), HR range, lower and upper HR plateau, and MAP at half the HR range (BP50). Four groups (two brain intact and two decerebrate) were studied before, during, and after isoflurane. To assess sympathetic and vagal contributions to HR baroreflex, beta-adrenoceptor (1 mg/kg atenolol) or muscarinic (0.5 mg/kg methyl atropine) antagonists were administered systemically. Decerebration did not alter resting MAP and HR or baroreflex parameters. Isoflurane depressed baroreflex slope and HR range in brain-intact and decerebrate rats. In both groups, 1 MAC reduced HR range by depressing peak reflex tachycardia. Maximal reflex bradycardia during increases in blood pressure was relatively preserved. Atenolol during 1 MAC did not alter maximum reflex tachycardia. In contrast, atropine during 1 MAC fully blocked reflex bradycardia. Therefore, 1 MAC predominantly depresses sympathetic components of HR baroreflex. Isoflurane at 2 MAC depressed both HR plateaus and decreased BP50 in both groups. Isoflurane depresses HR baroreflex control by actions that do not require suprapontine central nervous system sites. Isoflurane actions seem to inhibit HR baroreflex primarily by the sympathetic nervous system.

  7. Postural Heart Rate Changes in Young Patients With Vasovagal Syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medow, Marvin S; Merchant, Sana; Suggs, Melissa; Terilli, Courtney; O'Donnell-Smith, Breige; Stewart, Julian M

    2017-04-01

    Recurrent postural vasovagal syncope (VVS) is caused by transient cerebral hypoperfusion from episodic hypotension and bradycardia; diagnosis is made by medical history. VVS contrasts with postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS), defined by chronic daily symptoms of orthostatic intolerance with excessive upright tachycardia without hypotension. POTS has recently been conflated with VVS when excessive tachycardia is succeeded by hypotension during tilt testing. We hypothesize that excessive tachycardia preceding hypotension and bradycardia is part of the vasovagal response during tilt testing of patients with VVS. We prospectively performed head-up tilt (HUT) testing on patients with recurrent VVS (n = 47, 17.9 ± 1.1 y), who fainted at least 3 times within the last year, and control subjects (n = 15, 17.1 ± 1.0 y), from age and BMI-matched volunteers and measured blood pressure, heart rate (HR), cardiac output, total peripheral resistance, and end tidal carbon dioxide. Baseline parameters were the same in both groups. HR (supine versus 5 and 10 minutes HUT) significantly increased in control (65 ± 2.6 vs 83 ± 3.6 vs 85 ± 3.7, P < .001) and patients with VVS (69 ± 1.6 vs 103 ± 2.3 vs 109 ± 2.4, P < .001). HUT in controls maximally increased HR by 20.3 ± 2.9 beats per minute; the increase in patients with VVS of 39.8 ± 2.1 beats per minute was significantly greater (P < .001). An increase in HR of ≥40 beats per minute by 5 and 10 minutes or before faint with HUT, occurred in 26% and 44% of patients with VVS, respectively, but not in controls. Orthostasis in VVS is accompanied by large increases in HR that should not be construed as POTS. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Is there a relationship between obesity, heart rate variability and inflammatory parameters in heart failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taçoy, Gülten; Açikgöz, Kadri; Kocaman, Sinan Altan; Ozdemir, Murat; Cengel, Atiye

    2010-02-01

    To investigate the effect of body mass index (BMI) on heart rate variability (HRV) and inflammatory parameters in patients with heart failure. We analyzed 55 consecutive patients (mean age, 63.5 +/- 12.8 years; male/female, 39/16) with symptomatic left ventricular systolic (ejection fraction or= 30 kg/m2). The cause of heart failure was mainly ischemic heart disease (75%) with mean ejection fraction 30 +/- 7%. Plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and C-reactive protein levels were measured, and time-domain HRV indices were determined on Holter electrocardiogram. The relationship between HRV indices and laboratory, inflammatory and echocardiographic parameters was investigated with correlation analysis. Age, sex, clinical characteristics (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, family history, smoking) were similar between groups. BMI was inversely correlated with NT-pro BNP levels (P = 0.001). HRV indices did not differ between groups. Correlation analysis demonstrated the relationship between HRV indices and fasting blood glucose (SDNN, SDANN, SDNNI, root mean square successive differences, VTI), C-reactive protein (SDANN, SDNNI, VTI), pulmonary artery pressure (SDNN, SDANN, VTI) levels. In systolic heart failure patients a higher BMI is associated with decreased NT-proBNP levels. Although HRV indices were not different between groups, inflammatory parameters, fasting blood glucose and pulmonary artery pressure were correlated with them.

  9. Relationship between exercise heart rate and music tempo preference

    OpenAIRE

    Karageorghis, CI; Jones, L; Low, DC

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined the predicted positive and linear relationship (Iwanaga, 1995a,1995b) between exercise heart rate and music tempo preference. Initially, 128 undergraduates (M 3 age = 20.0 years, SD = 0.9 years) were surveyed to establish their three favorite music artists of all time. A separate experimental group of 29 undergraduates (M age = 20.3 years, SD = 1.2 years) selected the music of a single artist from a choice of the three highest-rated artists from the earlier survey. ...

  10. Bluetooth(Registered Trademark) Heart Rate Monitors for Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Roxanne E.; West, Michael R.; Kalogera, Kent L.; Hanson, Andrea M.

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate monitoring is required during exercise for crewmembers aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and will be for future exploration missions. The cardiovascular system must be sufficiently stressed throughout a mission to maintain the ability to perform nominal and contingency/emergency tasks. High quality heart rate data is required to accurately determine the intensity of exercise performed by the crewmembers and show maintenance of VO2max. The quality of the data collected on ISS is subject to multiple limitations and is insufficient to meet current requirements. PURPOSE: To evaluate the performance of commercially available Bluetooth® heart rate monitors (BT_HRM) and their ability to provide high quality heart rate data to monitor crew health on board ISS and during future exploration missions. METHODS: Nineteen subjects completed 30 data collection sessions of various intensities on the treadmill and/or cycle. Subjects wore several BT_HRM technologies for each testing session. One electrode-based chest strap (CS) was worn, while one or more optical sensors (OS) was worn. Subjects were instrumented with a 12-lead ECG to compare the heart rate data from the Bluetooth sensors. Each BT_RHM data set was time matched to the ECG data and a +/-5bpm threshold was applied to the difference between the two data sets. Percent error was calculated based on the number of data points outside the threshold and the total number of data points. REULTS: The electrode-based chest straps performed better than the optical sensors. The best performing CS was CS1 (1.6%error), followed by CS4 (3.3%error), CS3 (6.4%error), and CS2 (9.2%error). The OS resulted in 10.4% error for OS1 and 14.9% error for OS2. CONCLUSIONS: The highest quality data came from CS1, unfortunately it has been discontinued by the manufacturer. The optical sensors have not been ruled out for use, but more investigation is needed to determine how to get the best quality data. CS2 will be used in an

  11. HEART RATE RECOVERY AFTER EXERCISE AND NEURAL REGULATION OF HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN 30-40 YEAR OLD FEMALE MARATHON RUNNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Matsuoka

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of endurance training on heart rate (HR recovery after exercise and cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS modulation in female marathon runners by comparing with untrained controls. Six female marathon runners (M group aged 32-40 years and eight age-matched untrained females (C group performed a maximum-effort treadmill running exercise. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max was measured during the exercise with a gas analyzer connected to subjects through a face mask. Heart rate, blood pressure and blood lactate were measured before and after the exercise. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE to the exercise was obtained immediately after the exercise. Holter ECG was recorded and analyzed with power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV to investigate the cardiac ANS modulation. The M group had significantly higher VO2max, faster HR recovery after exercise, higher Mean RR, SDRR, HF power and lower LF/HF ratio at rest compared with the C group. The M group also presented greater percent decrease of blood pressure after exercise, although their blood pressure after exercise was higher than the C group. It is suggested that endurance training induced significant alterations in cardiac ANS modulation at rest and significant acceleration of HR recovery after exercise in female marathon runners. Faster HR recovery after exercise in the female marathon runners should result from their higher levels of HRV, higher aerobic capacity and exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise compared with untrained controls.

  12. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improve Heart Rate Variability and Baroreflex Sensitivity in Rats with Chronic Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Sharon Del Bem Velloso; da Silva, Luiz Eduardo Virgilio; Lataro, Renata Maria; Silva, Carlos Alberto Aguiar; de Oliveira, Luciano Fonseca Lemos; de Carvalho, Eduardo Elias Vieira; Simões, Marcus Vinicius; da Silva Meirelles, Lindolfo; Fazan, Rubens

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure induced by myocardial infarct (MI) attenuates the heart rate variability (HRV) and baroreflex sensitivity, which are important risk factors for life-threatening cardiovascular events. Therapies with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown promising results after MI. However, the effects of MSCs on hemodynamic (heart rate and arterial pressure) variability and baroreflex sensitivity in chronic heart failure (CHF) following MI have not been evaluated thus far. Male Wistar rats received MSCs or saline solution intravenously 1 week after ligation of the left coronary artery. Control (noninfarcted) rats were also evaluated. MI size was assessed using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was evaluated using radionuclide ventriculography. Four weeks after MSC injection, the animals were anesthetized and instrumented for chronic ECG recording and catheters were implanted in the femoral artery to record arterial pressure. Arterial pressure and HRVs were determined in time and frequency domain (spectral analysis) while HRV was also examined using nonlinear methods: DFA (detrended fluctuation analysis) and sample entropy. The initial MI size was the same among all infarcted rats but was reduced by MSCs. CHF rats exhibited increased myocardial interstitial collagen and sample entropy combined with the attenuation of the following cardiocirculatory parameters: DFA indices, LVEF, baroreflex sensitivity, and HRV. Nevertheless, MSCs hampered all these alterations, except the LVEF reduction. Therefore, 4 weeks after MSC therapy was applied to CHF rats, MI size and myocardial interstitial fibrosis decreased, while baroreflex sensitivity and HRV improved. PMID:26059001

  13. Assessment of post-laparotomy pain in laboratory mice by telemetric recording of heart rate and heart rate variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasermann Hans P

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain of mild to moderate grade is difficult to detect in laboratory mice because mice are prey animals that attempt to elude predators or man by hiding signs of weakness, injury or pain. In this study, we investigated the use of telemetry to identify indicators of mild-to-moderate post-laparotomy pain. Results Adult mice were subjected to laparotomy, either combined with pain treatment (carprofen or flunixin, 5 mg/kg s/c bid, for 1 day or without pain relief. Controls received anesthesia and analgesics or vehicle only. Telemetrically measured locomotor activity was undisturbed in all animals, thus confirming that any pain experienced was of the intended mild level. No symptoms of pain were registered in any of the groups by scoring the animals' outer appearance or spontaneous and provoked behavior. In contrast, the group receiving no analgesic treatment after laparotomy demonstrated significant changes in telemetry electrocardiogram recordings: increased heart rate and decreased heart rate variability parameters pointed to sympathetic activation and pain lasting for 24 hours. In addition, core body temperature was elevated. Body weight and food intake were reduced for 3 and 2 days, respectively. Moreover, unstructured cage territory and destroyed nests appeared for 1–2 days in an increased number of animals in this group only. In controls these parameters were not affected. Conclusion In conclusion, real-time telemetric recordings of heart rate and heart rate variability were indicative of mild-to-moderate post-laparotomy pain and could define its duration in our mouse model. This level of pain cannot easily be detected by direct observation.

  14. Assessment of post-laparotomy pain in laboratory mice by telemetric recording of heart rate and heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arras, Margarete; Rettich, Andreas; Cinelli, Paolo; Kasermann, Hans P; Burki, Kurt

    2007-01-01

    Background Pain of mild to moderate grade is difficult to detect in laboratory mice because mice are prey animals that attempt to elude predators or man by hiding signs of weakness, injury or pain. In this study, we investigated the use of telemetry to identify indicators of mild-to-moderate post-laparotomy pain. Results Adult mice were subjected to laparotomy, either combined with pain treatment (carprofen or flunixin, 5 mg/kg s/c bid, for 1 day) or without pain relief. Controls received anesthesia and analgesics or vehicle only. Telemetrically measured locomotor activity was undisturbed in all animals, thus confirming that any pain experienced was of the intended mild level. No symptoms of pain were registered in any of the groups by scoring the animals' outer appearance or spontaneous and provoked behavior. In contrast, the group receiving no analgesic treatment after laparotomy demonstrated significant changes in telemetry electrocardiogram recordings: increased heart rate and decreased heart rate variability parameters pointed to sympathetic activation and pain lasting for 24 hours. In addition, core body temperature was elevated. Body weight and food intake were reduced for 3 and 2 days, respectively. Moreover, unstructured cage territory and destroyed nests appeared for 1–2 days in an increased number of animals in this group only. In controls these parameters were not affected. Conclusion In conclusion, real-time telemetric recordings of heart rate and heart rate variability were indicative of mild-to-moderate post-laparotomy pain and could define its duration in our mouse model. This level of pain cannot easily be detected by direct observation. PMID:17683523

  15. Smartphone accelerometers for the detection of heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landreani, Federica; Caiani, Enrico Gianluca

    2017-12-01

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems technology, now embedded into smartphones, potentially allows measuring heart mechanical activity by positioning the phone on the body and acquiring vibrational signals, without the need for additional peripherals or interfaces. However, lack of standardization in experimental protocol, processing methodology and validation procedures, together with the wide range of available smartphones on the market, impact on the comparability of results and their general validity. The aim of this review is to provide information on the state-of-the art of research in this field, with current limitations and potentials, thus potentially serving as a basis for the creation of a standard based on current experiences. Areas covered: The review focused on studies relevant to the extraction of the heart rate using accelerometric technology, searching for relevant literature (papers or conference proceedings) both in Pubmed and IEEE eXplore engines. Expert commentary: From the results of this review, the smartphone can be considered a powerful device able to accurately measure the resting heart rate, thanks to embedded accelerometer technology. However, lack of a shared standard in the acquisition protocol and analysis procedure, thus affecting user-collected data reliability, could limit clinical acceptability and prevent recommending this approach as a self-tracking tool in patients.

  16. Heart rate turbulence and variability in patients with ventricular arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Tarricone

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate the changes in autonomic neural control mechanisms before malignant ventricular arrhythmias, we measured heart rate variability (HRV and heart rate turbulence (HRT in patients with ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (Group I; n=6, non sustained ventricular tachycardia (Group II; n=32, frequent premature ventricular beats (Group III; n=26 and with ICD implantation (Group IV; n=11. Methods: Time domain parameters of HRV and turbulence onset (TO and slope (TS were calculated on 24 hour Holter recordings. Normal values were: SDNN > 70 msec for HRV, TO <0% and TS >2.5 msec/RR-I for HRT. Results: Whereas SDNN was within normal range and similar in all study groups, HRT parameters were significantly different in patients who experienced VT/VF during Holter recording. Abnormal TO and/or TS were present in 100% of Group I patients and only in about 50% of Group II and IV. On the contrary, normal HRT parameters were present in 40-70% of Group II, III and IV patients and none of Group I. Conclusions: These data suggest that HRT analysis is more suitable than HRV to detect those transient alterations in autonomic control mechanisms that are likely to play a major trigger role in the genesis of malignant cardiac arrhythmias. (Heart International 2007; 3: 51-7

  17. Mosquito aging modulates the heart rate and the proportional directionality of heart contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Charlotte R; Estévez-Lao, Tania Y; Hillyer, Julián F

    2017-08-01

    Mosquito aging impacts a myriad of physiological processes, including digestion, flight, mating, reproductive success, and immunity. In the present study, we conducted intravital video imaging in 1, 3, 5, 10, 15 and 20-day-old Anopheles gambiae female adults to assess whether aging impacts mosquito heart physiology. We found that the heart contraction rate increases over the first 15days of adulthood and then decreases. These changes occur for both contraction directions, although aging results in a relative change in the anterograde versus retrograde contraction rates. That is, whereas for the first 5days of life the anterograde and retrograde contraction rates are similar, from day 10 to day 20 the retrograde contraction rate is higher than the anterograde contraction rate. Aging also biases the proportional directionality of heart contractions, from approximately two thirds of the time being spent contracting in the anterograde direction and two thirds of the contractions propagating anterograde during the first 5days of life to an approximately even split between anterograde and retrograde when the mosquitoes have reached 10 to 20days of age. Transcriptional analyses of crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP), FMRFamide, calcium-calmodulin dependent kinase II (CaMKII), pygopus, manganese-iron superoxide dismutase (MnSOD1) and vinculin by quantitative RT-PCR revealed age-associated changes in gene expression, with MnSOD1 and vinculin expression showing a declining trend with age. RNAi-based knockdown of MnSOD1 or vinculin resulted in heart physiology that trended toward the aging phenotype for every parameter that was measured, suggesting that these two genes are involved in cardiac aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Heritability of cardiac vagal control in 24-h heart rate variability recordings: influence of ceiling effects at low heart rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neijts, Melanie; Van Lien, Rene; Kupper, Nina; Boomsma, Dorret; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J C

    2014-10-01

    This study estimated the heritability of 24-h heart rate variability (HRV) measures, while considering ceiling effects on HRV at low heart rates during the night. HRV was indexed by the standard deviation of all valid interbeat intervals (SDNN), the root mean square of differences between valid, successive interbeat intervals (RMSSD), and peak-valley respiratory sinus arrhythmia (pvRSA). Sleep and waking levels of cardiac vagal control were assessed in 1,003 twins and 285 of their non-twin siblings. Comparable heritability estimates were found for SDNN (46%-53%), RMSSD (49%-54%), and pvRSA (48%-57%) during the day and night. A nighttime ceiling effect was revealed in 10.7% of participants by a quadratic relationship between mean pvRSA and the interbeat interval. Excluding these participants did not change the heritability estimates. The genetic factors influencing ambulatory pvRSA, RMSSD, and SDNN largely overlap. These results suggest that gene-finding studies may pool the different cardiac vagal indices and that exclusion of participants with low heart rates is not required. Copyright © 2014 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  19. Respiratory modulation and baroreflex control of heart rate in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheyden, Bart; Couckuyt, Kurt; Liu, Jiexin; Aubert, Andre

    During everyday life, gravity constantly stresses the human circulation by diminishing venous return in the upright position. This induces baroreflex-mediated cardiovascular adjustments that are aimed to prevent the blood pressure from falling. In weightlessness, gravitational pressure gradients do not arise in the circulation so that baroreflex function remains chronically unchallenged. This may contribute to the development of post spaceflight orthostatic intolerance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate respiratory modulation and baroreflex control of heart rate after a week of weightlessness in space. We tested the hypothesis that cardiovascular control in space will be similar to the baseline supine condition on Earth. We studied nine male cosmonauts during seven different space missions aboard the ISS (age 40 - 52 yrs, height 1.69 - 1.85 m, weight 67 - 90 kg). Data collection was performed between 30 and 45 days before launch in the standing and supine positions, and after 8 days in space. Cosmonauts were carefully trained to perform in-flight data collection by themselves. They were instructed to pace their breathing to a fixed rate of 12 breaths per minute (0.2 Hz) for a total duration of 3 minutes. The electrocardiogram and beat-by-beat finger arterial blood pressure were recorded at 1-kHz sample rate. Respiratory rate was evaluated using an abdominal pressure sensor. We used power spectral analysis to calculate respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) as well as the low-frequency (0.04 - 0.15 Hz) powers of spontaneous oscillations in heart rate and systolic blood pressure. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was estimated in the time domain using cross-correlation analysis. As expected, there was a rise in heart rate upon assuming the standing position before space- flight (59 ± 6 to 79 ± 11 beats per min; p ¡ 0.001). This was accompanied by an increase in mean arterial blood pressure (84 ± 6 to 93 ± 6 mmHg; p ¡ 0.001). Standing up further induced a marked

  20. The Relation of Arm Exercise Peak Heart Rate to Stress Test Results and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Hong; Liu, Weijian; Marshall, Cynthia; Chandiramani, Pooja; Bainter, Emily; Martin, Wade H

    2016-09-01

    Arm exercise is an alternative to pharmacologic stress testing for >50% of patients unable to perform treadmill exercise, but no data exist regarding the effect of attained peak arm exercise heart rate on test sensitivity. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to characterize the relationship of peak arm exercise heart rate responses to abnormal stress test findings, coronary revascularization, and mortality in patients unable to perform leg exercise. From 1997 until 2002, arm cycle ergometer stress tests were performed in 443 consecutive veterans age 64.1 yr (11.0 yr) (mean (SD)), of whom 253 also underwent myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Patients were categorized by frequency distributions of quartiles of percentage age-predicted peak heart rate (APPHR), heart rate reserve (HRR), and peak heart rate-systolic blood pressure product (PRPP). Exercise-induced ST-segment depression, abnormal MPI findings, coronary revascularization, and 12.0-yr (1.3 yr) Kaplan-Meier all-cause and cardiovascular mortality plots were then characterized by quartiles of APPHR, HRR, and PRPP. A reduced frequency of abnormal arm exercise ECG results was associated only with the lowest quartile of APPHR (≤69%) and HRR (≤43%), whereas higher frequency of abnormal MPI findings exhibited an inverse relationship trend with lower APPHR (P = 0.10) and HRR (P = 0.12). There was a strong inverse association of APPHR, HRR, and PRPP with all-cause (all P ≤ 0.01) and cardiovascular (P Arm exercise ECG stress test sensitivity is only reduced at ≤69% APPHR or ≤43% HRR, whereas arm exercise MPI sensitivity and referral for coronary revascularization after arm exercise stress testing are not adversely affected by even a severely blunted peak heart rate. However, both all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality are strongly and inversely related to APPHR and HRR.

  1. Impact of Narrative Expressive Writing on Heart Rate, Heart Rate Variability, and Blood Pressure After Marital Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, Kyle J; Allen, John J B; Mehl, Matthias R; Sbarra, David A

    Divorce is a common stressor that is associated with increased risk for poor long-term physical and mental health. Using an experimental design, the current study examined the impact of expressive writing (EW) on average heart rate (HR), HR variability (HRV), and blood pressure (BP) 7.5 months later. Participants from a community sample of recently separated adults (N = 109) were assigned to one of three conditions: traditional EW, narrative EW, or a control writing condition, and were assessed three times for an average of 7.5 months. Each study visit included 27 minutes of physiological assessment; the primary outcomes at each assessment were mean-level HR, HRV, BP scores averaged across six different tasks. Participants in the traditional EW condition did not significantly differ from control participants in their later HR, HRV, or BP. However, relative to control participants, those in the narrative EW condition had significantly lower HR (B = -3.41, 95% confidence interval = -5.76 to -1.06, p = .004) and higher HRV 7.5 months later (B = 0.41, 95% confidence interval = 0.16 to 0.74, p = .001). When comparing narrative EW participants to those in the traditional EW and control writing as a single group, these effects remained and were moderately sized, Cohen d values of -0.61 and 0.60, respectively, and durable across all task conditions when analyzed in independent models. The writing condition groups did not differ in their later BP. Narrative EW decreased HR and increased HRV after marital separation but did not affect BP. We discuss the possible disconnect between psychology and physiology in response to EW, as well as possible future clinical applications after marital separation.

  2. Newborn infant pain assessment using heart rate variability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, Papa M; De Jonckheere, Julien; Logier, Regis; Kuissi, Eliane; Jeanne, Mathieu; Rakza, Thameur; Storme, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Systems controlling cardiovascular function are closely coupled with the perception of pain. Heart rate variability (HRV) is a well-established noninvasive measure of cardiac autonomic control. We hypothesized that pain may alter HRV in the newborn infant and that HRV analysis could be used as an indicator of prolonged pain in the newborn infant. To test the hypothesis, we measured the magnitude of the heart rate high-frequency variations using an innovative High Frequency Variability Index (HFVI) in newborn infants at risk of postoperative pain. We investigated newborn infants with a gestational age (GA) more than 34 weeks, and who were admitted after a major surgical procedure. Inclusions ranged from 2 to 72 hours after the surgery. The postoperative pain was scored using EDIN scale (neonatal pain and discomfort scale) at the end of the 2 hours recording period. The infants were separated in: (1) Group "Low EDIN," when EDIN=5. Predictive positive and negative values of a threshold value of HFVI in assessing pain have been studied. Twenty-eight newborn infants were enrolled in the study (mean GA=37.8+/-1.5 wk) at a median delay between the surgery and the recording of 5 hours. Mean EDIN were 2+/-1 and 7+/-2 in respectively the groups "Low EDIN" and "High EDIN." The 2 groups were similar for GA, basal heart and respiratory rates, SpO2, mean arterial blood pressure, and morphine infusion rate. HFVI was significantly lower in the group "High EDIN" than in the group "Low EDIN" (0.7+/-0.2 vs. 1.2+/-0.3, respectively; P=5, with a sensitivity of 90%, and a specificity of 75%. The results of this study indicate that postoperative pain is associated with a decreased high-frequency HRV in full-term newborn infants. Our findings suggest that HRV could be used as an indicator to assess prolonged pain in the newborn infants.

  3. Altered force-frequency response in non-failing hearts with decreased SERCA pump-level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huke, Sabine; Liu, Lynne H; Biniakiewicz, Danuta; Abraham, William T; Periasamy, Muthu

    2003-09-01

    Decreased SERCA2 activity is considered to significantly contribute to the contractile dysfunction of failing hearts. However, it is now known how decreases in SERCA activity affect cardiac function in detail and also if a decrease alone is sufficient to cause heart failure. SERCA2 (+/-) gene-targeted mice (HET) were generated and heart function was analyzed using the isolated work-performing heart technique. Plasma and cardiac catecholamine levels were determined at three, six and nine months of age and heart sections from twelve months old mice subjected to standard histological analysis. We demonstrate that reduced expression of SERCA does not lead to cardiac hypertrophy or fibrosis and does not increase resting plasma-norepinephrine levels in HET mice. However, isolated perfused HET hearts exhibited decreased maximal rates of contraction and relaxation and prolonged time-parameters. The ability of the HET hearts to respond to increases in load (Starling) was not affected and they responded appropriately to beta-adrenergic stimulation. In contrast, the positive force-frequency response found in control hearts was not observed in the HET hearts. The response was flat and three out of five HET hearts failed to maintain work at 550 beats/min. We conclude that the SERCA2 pump level is a critical positive determinant of cardiac contractility and force-frequency relation.

  4. Heart rate turbulence predicts all-cause mortality and sudden death in congestive heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona; Zareba, Wojciech; Vazquez, Rafael; Vallverdu, Montserrat; Gonzalez-Juanatey, Jose R; Valdes, Mariano; Almendral, Jesus; Cinca, Juan; Caminal, Pere; de Luna, Antoni Bayes

    2008-08-01

    Abnormal heart rate turbulence (HRT) has been documented as a strong predictor of total mortality and sudden death in postinfarction patients, but data in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of HRT for predicting mortality in CHF patients in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II-III. In 651 CHF patients with sinus rhythm enrolled into the MUSIC (Muerte Subita en Insuficiencia Cardiaca) study, the standard HRT parameters turbulence onset (TO) and slope (TS), as well as HRT categories, were assessed for predicting total mortality and sudden death. HRT was analyzable in 607 patients, mean age 63 years (434 male), 50% of ischemic etiology. During a median follow up of 44 months, 129 patients died, 52 from sudden death. Abnormal TS and HRT category 2 (HRT2) were independently associated with increased all-cause mortality (HR: 2.10, CI: 1.41 to 3.12, P 120 ms. HRT is a potent risk predictor for both heart failure and arrhythmic death in patients with class II and III CHF.

  5. Comparison of heart rate and external performance at selected field tests for determining maximum heart rate for bicyclists and triathletes when cycling.

    OpenAIRE

    Podrazil, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Title: Comparison of the heart rate values and external performance is based on selected field tests determining maximal heart rate in cycling of cyclist and triathletes Objectives: Objective of thesis is to determine the values of maximal heart rate and external performance from selected field tests in cycling and compare them with one another. Methods: Three cyclist were measured in field tests and acquired results were used to create the graphs and tables. Data were obtained by cycling per...

  6. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Heart Rate Variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeppe Hagstrup Christensen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA may modulate autonomic control of the heart because omega-3 PUFA is abundant in the brain and other nervous tissue as well as in cardiac tissue. This might partly explain why omega-3 PUFA offer some protection against sudden cardiac death (SCD. The autonomic nervous system is involved in the pathogenesis of SCD. Heart rate variability (HRV can be used as a non-invasive marker of cardiac autonomic control and a low HRV is a predictor for SCD and arrhythmic events. Studies on HRV and omega-3 PUFA have been performed in several populations such as patients with ischemic heart disease, patients with diabetes mellitus, patients with chronic renal failure, and in healthy subjects as well as in children.. The studies have demonstrated a positive association between cellular content of omega-3 PUFA and HRV and supplementation with omega-3 PUFA seems to increase HRV which could be a possible explanation for decreased risk of arrhythmic events and SCD sometimes observed after omega-3 PUFA supplementation. However, the results are not consistent and further research is needed

  7. Optimum Heart Rate to Minimize Pulsatile External Cardiac Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlevan, Niema; Gharib, Morteza

    2011-11-01

    The workload on the left ventricle is composed of steady and pulsatile components. Clinical investigations have confirmed that an abnormal pulsatile load plays an important role in the pathogenesis of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and progression of LVH to congestive heart failure (CHF). The pulsatile load is the result of the complex dynamics of wave propagation and reflection in the compliant arterial vasculature. We hypothesize that aortic waves can be optimized to reduce the left ventricular (LV) pulsatile load. We used an in-vitro experimental approach to investigate our hypothesis. A unique hydraulic model was used for in-vitro experiments. This model has physical and dynamical properties similar to the heart-aorta system. Different compliant models of the artificial aorta were used to test the hypothesis under various aortic rigidities. Our results indicate that: i) there is an optimum heart rate that minimizes LV pulsatile power (this is in agreement with our previous computational study); ii) introducing an extra reflection site at the specific location along the aorta creates constructive wave conditions that reduce the LV pulsatile power.

  8. A novel modality for intrapartum fetal heart rate monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwal, Eran; Shinar, Shiri; Aviram, Amir; Orbach, Sharon; Yogev, Yariv; Hiersch, Liran

    2017-11-02

    Intrapartum fetal heart rate (FHR) monitoring is well recommended during labor to assess fetal wellbeing. Though commonly used, the external Doppler and fetal scalp electrode monitor have significant shortcomings. Lately, non-invasive technologies were developed as possible alternatives. The objective of this study is to compare the accuracy of FHR trace using novel Electronic Uterine Monitoring (EUM) to that of external Doppler and fetal scalp electrode monitor. A comparative study conducted in a single tertiary medical center. Intrapartum FHR trace was recorded simultaneously using three different methods: internal fetal scalp electrode, external Doppler, and EUM. The latter, a multichannel electromyogram (EMG) device acquires a uterine signal and maternal and fetal electrocardiograms. FHR traces obtained from all devices during the first and second stages of labor were analyzed. Positive percent of agreement (PPA) and accuracy (by measuring root means square error between observed and predicted values) of EUM and external Doppler were both compared to internal scalp electrode monitoring. A Bland-Altman agreement plot was used to compare the differences in FHR trace between all modalities. For momentary recordings of fetal heart rate 160 bpm level of agreement, sensitivity, and specificity were also evaluated. Overall, 712,800 FHR momentary recordings were obtained from 33 parturients. Although both EUM and external Doppler highly correlated with internal scalp electrode monitoring (r2 = 0.98, p fetal heart rate 160 bpm, the PPA, sensitivity, and specificity of EUM as compared with internal fetal scalp electrode, were significantly greater than those of external Doppler (p monitoring than external Doppler. As such, it may provide a good framework for non-invasive evaluation of intrapartum FHR.

  9. Fetal heart rate monitoring: from Doppler to computerized analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ji Young; Park, In Yang

    2016-03-01

    The monitoring of fetal heart rate (FHR) status is an important method to check well-being of the baby during labor. Since the electronic FHR monitoring was introduced 40 years ago, it has been expected to be an innovative screening test to detect fetuses who are becoming hypoxic and who may benefit from cesarean delivery or operative vaginal delivery. However, several randomized controlled trials have failed to prove that electronic FHR monitoring had any benefit of reducing the perinatal mortality and morbidity. Also it is now clear that the FHR monitoring had high intra- and interobserver disagreements and increased the rate of cesarean delivery. Despite such limitations, the FHR monitoring is still one of the most important obstetric procedures in clinical practice, and the cardiotocogram is the most-used equipment. To supplement cardiotocogram, new methods of computerized FHR analysis and electrocardiogram have been developed, and several clinical researches have been currently performed. Computerized equipment makes us to analyze beat-to-beat variability and short term heart rate patterns. Furthermore, researches about multiparameters of FHR variability will be ongoing.

  10. Caffeine Enhances Heart Rate Variability in Middle-Aged Healthy, But Not Heart Failure Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarius, Catherine F; Floras, John S

    2012-06-01

    In chronic heart failure (CHF) due to left ventricular dysfunction, diminished heart rate variability (HRV) is an independent predictor of poor prognosis. Caffeine has been shown to increase HRV in young healthy subjects. Such an increase may be of potential benefit to patients with CHF. We hypothesized that intravenous infusion of caffeine would increase HRV in CHF, and in age-matched healthy control subjects. On two separate days, 11 patients (1F) with CHF (age=51.3±4.6 years; left ventricular ejection fraction=18.6±2.7%; mean±standard error) and 10 healthy control subjects (age=48.0±4.0) according to a double-blind randomization design, received either saline or caffeine (4 mg/kg) infusion. We assessed HRV over 7 minutes of supine rest (fast Fourier Transform analysis) to determine total spectral power as well as its high-frequency (HF) (0.15-0.50 Hz) and low-frequency (LF) (0.05-0.15 Hz) components, and recorded muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) directly from the peroneal nerve (microneurography). In healthy control subjects, compared with saline, caffeine reduced both heart rate and sympathetic nerve traffic (p≤0.003) and increased the ratio of HF/total power (p≤0.05). Baseline LF power and the ratio LF/HF were significantly lower in CHF compared with controls (p=0.02), but caffeine had no effect on any element of HRV. Caffeine increases cardiac vagal heart rate modulation and reduces MSNA in middle-aged healthy subjects, but not in those with CHF.

  11. Heart rate variability biofeedback: how and why does it work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, Paul M; Gevirtz, Richard

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there has been substantial support for heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB) as a treatment for a variety of disorders and for performance enhancement (Gevirtz, 2013). Since conditions as widely varied as asthma and depression seem to respond to this form of cardiorespiratory feedback training, the issue of possible mechanisms becomes more salient. The most supported possible mechanism is the strengthening of homeostasis in the baroreceptor (Vaschillo et al., 2002; Lehrer et al., 2003). Recently, the effect on the vagal afferent pathway to the frontal cortical areas has been proposed. In this article, we review these and other possible mechanisms that might explain the positive effects of HRVB.

  12. Impact of training load on the heart rate of horses

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Mlyneková; Marko Halo; Miroslav Maršálek; Lucie Starostová

    2016-01-01

    In our work, we analyzed the effect of training load on the heart rate of horses in a simulated load by the loading regulator for horse motion Horse Gym 2000. In the experiment were observed 8 Slovak Warmblood horses (3 mares, 4 geldings, 1 stallion) aged 6-10 years. The experiment was divided into two parts after three weeks. The speed of the tested horses was 4.9 km/h in the first part of experiment, in the second part was the speed 5.2 km/h with a gradual uphill up to 7 %. The tested horse...

  13. Neural Network Analysis and Evaluation of the Fetal Heart Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuaki Noguchi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to obtain a highly objective automatic fetal heart rate (FHR diagnosis. The neural network software was composed of three layers with the back propagation, to which 8 FHR data, including sinusoidal FHR, were input and the system was educated by the data of 20 cases with a known outcome. The output was the probability of a normal, intermediate, or pathologic outcome. The neural index studied prolonged monitoring. The neonatal states and the FHR score strongly correlated with the outcome probability. The neural index diagnosis was correct. The completed software was transferred to other computers, where the system function was correct.

  14. Heart rate variability biofeedback: How and why does it work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Lehrer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been substantial support for Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback (HRVB as a treatment for a variety of disorders and for performance enhancement (Gevirtz, 2013. Since conditions as widely varied as asthma and depression seem to respond to this form of cardiorespiratory feedback training, the issue of possible mechanisms becomes more salient. The most supported possible mechanism is the strengthening of homeostasis in the barorecptor (Vashillo, et al, 2002; Lehrer, et al, 2003. Recently, the effect on the vagal afferent pathway to the frontal cortical areas has been proposed. In this article, we review these and other possible mechanisms that might explain the positive effects of HRVB.

  15. Simulation of heart rate variability model in a network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascaval, Radu C.; D'Apice, Ciro; D'Arienzo, Maria Pia

    2017-07-01

    We consider a 1-D model for the simulation of the blood flow in the cardiovascular system. As inflow condition we consider a model for the aortic valve. The opening and closing of the valve is dynamically determined by the pressure difference between the left ventricular and aortic pressures. At the outflow we impose a peripheral resistance model. To approximate the solution we use a numerical scheme based on the discontinuous Galerkin method. We also considering a variation in heart rate and terminal reflection coefficient due to monitoring of the pressure in the network.

  16. Heart rate and estimated energy expenditure during ballroom dancing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanksby, B A; Reidy, P W

    1988-01-01

    Ten competitive ballroom dance couples performed simulated competitive sequences of Modern and Latin American dance. Heart rate was telemetered during the dance sequences and related to direct measures of oxygen uptake and heart rate obtained while walking on a treadmill. Linear regression was employed to estimate gross and net energy expenditures of the dance sequences. A multivariate analysis of variance with repeated measures on the dance factor was applied to the data to test for interaction and main effects on the sex and dance factors. Overall mean heart rate values for the Modern dance sequence were 170 beats.min-1 and 173 beats.min-1 for males and females respectively. During the Latin American sequence mean overall heart rate for males was 168 beats.min-1 and 177 beats.min-1 for females. Predicted mean gross values of oxygen consumption for the males were 42.8 +/- 5.7 ml.kg-1 min-1 and 42.8 +/- 6.9 ml.kg-1 min-1 for the Modern and Latin American sequences respectively. Corresponding gross estimates of oxygen consumption for the females were 34.7 +/- 3.8 ml.kg-1 min-1 and 36.1 +/- 4.1 ml.kg-1 min-1. Males were estimated to expand 54.1 +/- 8.1 kJ.min-1 of energy during the Modern sequence and 54.0 +/- 9.6 kJ.min-1 during the Latin American sequence, while predicted energy expenditure for females was 34.7 +/- 3.8 kJ.min-1 and 36.1 +/- 4.1 kJ.min-1 for Modern and Latin American dance respectively. The results suggested that both males and females were dancing at greater than 80% of their maximum oxygen consumption. A significant difference between males and females was observed for predicted gross and net values of oxygen consumption (in L.min-1 and ml.kg-1 min-1). PMID:3167503

  17. Heart rate variability in children with cerebral palsy: review of the literature and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amichai, Taly; Katz-Leurer, Michal

    2014-01-01

    A systematic review which aims to assess the evidence regarding the function of the autonomic heart rate regulation system among children with cerebral palsy (CP). The target population included children with CP of diverse severity, aged 1.5 to 18 years. Databases searched for English language studies from 1960 to 2013: PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, The Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), and ClinicalTrials.gov site. Search terms included 'cerebral palsy' or 'spastic diplegia' or 'hemiplegia' or 'quadriplegia' and 'autonomic nervous system' or 'heart rate variability' or 'sympathetic' or 'para sympathetic'. Twenty five articles were identified and included if (1) participants were less than 18 years of age, (2) diagnosis of CP was made after the age of 18 months (3) more than 80% of cases had a diagnosis of CP and (4) autonomic cardiac heart rate regulation system state or response to a stimuli was described for all the participants. Six articles met the criteria for inclusion. Evidence suggests that reduced Heart Rate Variability (HRV) time domain parameters close to birth are associated with a CP diagnosis at the age of three years. In addition, HRV parameters' mean values, are significantly lower among children with CP compared to typically developed (TD) control. While performing head up, tilt or standing position, HRV was significantly reduced only among TD control, but no effect was seen in those variables among children with CP. Further studies are needed to assess the potential to predict CP by assessing HRV parameters among newborn children. In addition, assessing HRV among children with CP may improve our understanding of the heart rate autonomic system and its response to different stimulus such as muscle contraction, paced breathing and aerobic training.

  18. A comparative study of pulse rate variability and heart rate variability in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jih-Sen; Lu, Wan-An; Wu, Kung-Tai; Liu, Margaret; Chen, Gau-Yang; Kuo, Cheng-Deng

    2012-04-01

    Both heart rate variability (HRV) and pulse rate variability (PRV) are noninvasive means for the assessment of autonomic nervous control of the heart. However, it is not settled whether or not the PRV obtained from either hand can be the surrogate of HRV. The HRV measures obtained from electrocardiographic signals and the PRV measures obtained from the pulse waves recorded from the index fingers of both hands were compared in normal subjects by using linear regression analysis and Bland and Altman method. Highly significant correlations (P heart rate and ultra-low frequency power (ULFP). The PRV of either hand is close to, but not the same as the HRV in healthy subjects. The HRV, right PRV and left PRV are not surrogates of one another in normal subjects except heart rate and ULFP. Since HRV is generally accepted as the standard method for the assessment of the autonomic nervous modulation of a subject, the PRV of either hand may not be suitable for the assessment of the cardiac autonomic nervous modulation of the subject.

  19. Heart rate effects of intraosseous injections using slow and fast rates of anesthetic solution deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Louis; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike; Weaver, Joel; Drum, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    The authors, using a crossover design, randomly administered, in a single-blind manner, 3 primary intraosseous injections to 61 subjects using: the Wand local anesthetic system at a deposition rate of 45 seconds (fast injection); the Wand local anesthetic system at a deposition rate of 4 minutes and 45 seconds (slow injection); a conventional syringe injection at a deposition rate of 4 minutes and 45 seconds (slow injection), in 3 separate appointments spaced at least 3 weeks apart. A pulse oximeter measured heart rate (pulse). The results demonstrated the mean maximum heart rate was statistically higher with the fast intraosseous injection (average 21 to 28 beats/min increase) than either of the 2 slow intraosseous injections (average 10 to 12 beats/min increase). There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 slow injections. We concluded that an intraosseous injection of 1.4 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine with the Wand at a 45-second rate of anesthetic deposition resulted in a significantly higher heart rate when compared with a 4-minute and 45-second anesthetic solution deposition using either the Wand or traditional syringe.

  20. Heart rate level of golf swing in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease and in healthy controls

    OpenAIRE

    下村, 雅昭; Shimomura, Masaaki; 羽田, 龍彦; Hata, Tatsuhiko; 上村, 桂子; Uemura, Keiko; 廣瀬, 美嘉; Hirose, Mika; 浜崎, 博; Hamazaki, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of golf swing on the heart rate level in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease (IHD) and healthy adults. METHODS: Study subjects were 7 male patients with IHD (mean age 59.3±8.7 years) and 7 age-matched, healthy male golfers. AIl subjects underwent golf swing at driving range, during which heart rate and electrocardiogram were monitored via telemetry system. Blood pressure was taken immediately after each golf swing. RESULTS: The average heart rate value...

  1. Identification of heart rate-associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hoed, Marcel; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Esko, Tõnu; Brundel, Bianca J J M; Peal, David S; Evans, David M; Nolte, Ilja M; Segrè, Ayellet V; Holm, Hilma; Handsaker, Robert E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Johnson, Toby; Isaacs, Aaron; Yang, Jian; Lundby, Alicia; Zhao, Jing Hua; Kim, Young Jin; Go, Min Jin; Almgren, Peter; Bochud, Murielle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Hadley, David; van der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; den Heijer, Martin; Igl, Wilmar; Jackson, Anne U; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian'an; Kemp, John P; Kristiansson, Kati; Ladenvall, Claes; Lorentzon, Mattias; Montasser, May E; Njajou, Omer T; O'Reilly, Paul F; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; St Pourcain, Beate; Rankinen, Tuomo; Salo, Perttu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Timpson, Nicholas J; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Weihua; Draisma, Harmen H M; Feitosa, Mary F; Kerr, Kathleen F; Lind, Penelope A; Mihailov, Evelin; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Song, Ci; Weedon, Michael N; Xie, Weijia; Yengo, Loic; Absher, Devin; Albert, Christine M; Alonso, Alvaro; Arking, Dan E; de Bakker, Paul I W; Balkau, Beverley; Barlassina, Cristina; Benaglio, Paola; Bis, Joshua C; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Brage, Søren; Chanock, Stephen J; Chines, Peter S; Chung, Mina; Darbar, Dawood; Dina, Christian; Dörr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Felix, Stephan B; Fischer, Krista; Fuchsberger, Christian; de Geus, Eco J C; Goyette, Philippe; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Havulinna, Aki S; Heckbert, Susan R; Hicks, Andrew A; Hofman, Albert; Holewijn, Suzanne; Hoogstra-Berends, Femke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jensen, Majken K; Johansson, Asa; Junttila, Juhani; Kääb, Stefan; Kanon, Bart; Ketkar, Shamika; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W; Kooner, Angrad S; Kors, Jan A; Kumari, Meena; Milani, Lili; Laiho, Päivi; Lakatta, Edward G; Langenberg, Claudia; Leusink, Maarten; Liu, Yongmei; Luben, Robert N; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Lynch, Stacey N; Markus, Marcello R P; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Mateo Leach, Irene; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarroll, Steven A; Medland, Sarah E; Miller, Kathryn A; Montgomery, Grant W; Morrison, Alanna C; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Ong, Ken K; Newman, Anne B; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Rao, Dabeeru C; Ring, Susan M; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Rudan, Diana; Sanna, Serena; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Jaban S; Sharp, Stephen; Shin, Jordan T; Singleton, Andrew B; Smith, Albert V; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D; Stewart, Chip; Stringham, Heather M; Tarasov, Kirill V; Uitterlinden, André G; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Whitfield, John B; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Andrew; Wong, Quenna; Jamshidi, Yalda; Zitting, Paavo; Boer, Jolanda M A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ekelund, Ulf; Forouhi, Nita G; Froguel, Philippe; Hingorani, Aroon; Ingelsson, Erik; Kivimaki, Mika; Kronmal, Richard A; Kuh, Diana; Lind, Lars; Martin, Nicholas G; Oostra, Ben A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Quertermous, Thomas; Rotter, Jerome I; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Verschuren, W M Monique; Walker, Mark; Albanes, Demetrius; Arnar, David O; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Boehnke, Michael; de Boer, Rudolf A; Bouchard, Claude; Caulfield, W L Mark; Chambers, John C; Curhan, Gary; Cusi, Daniele; Eriksson, Johan; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Gilst, Wiek H; Glorioso, Nicola; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Groop, Leif; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Hu, Frank B; Huikuri, Heikki V; Hunter, David J; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kraft, Peter; Iacoviello, Licia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lokki, Marja-Liisa L; Mitchell, Braxton D; Navis, Gerjan; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Poulter, Neil R; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rimm, Eric B; Rioux, John D; Rizzi, Federica; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Sever, Peter S; Shields, Denis C; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Stanton, Alice V; Stolk, Ronald P; Strachan, David P; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tuomilehto, Jaako; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Viikari, Jorma; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Widen, Elisabeth; Cho, Yoon Shin; Olsen, Jesper V; Visscher, Peter M; Willer, Cristen; Franke, Lude; Erdmann, Jeanette; Thompson, John R; Pfeufer, Arne; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Ellinor, Patrick T; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Metspalu, Andres; Perola, Markus; Beckmann, Jacques S; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Wareham, Nicholas J; Munroe, Patricia B; Sibon, Ody C M; Milan, David J; Snieder, Harold; Samani, Nilesh J; Loos, Ruth J F

    2013-06-01

    Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. In a 2-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in up to 181,171 individuals, we identified 14 new loci associated with heart rate and confirmed associations with all 7 previously established loci. Experimental downregulation of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio identified 20 genes at 11 loci that are relevant for heart rate regulation and highlight a role for genes involved in signal transmission, embryonic cardiac development and the pathophysiology of dilated cardiomyopathy, congenital heart failure and/or sudden cardiac death. In addition, genetic susceptibility to increased heart rate is associated with altered cardiac conduction and reduced risk of sick sinus syndrome, and both heart rate-increasing and heart rate-decreasing variants associate with risk of atrial fibrillation. Our findings provide fresh insights into the mechanisms regulating heart rate and identify new therapeutic targets.

  2. Evaluation for Intensity of Stress in Lesson using Heart Rate Variability Detected by Simultaneously Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Ayaka; Takatsu, Hiroaki; Ohno, Wataru; Ozeki, Osamu

    We studied the evaluation for the intensity of stress of students in lesson using heart rate variability. Heart rate of many students were measured simultaneously by developed portable measurement systems. Heart rate variability data suggests that many students have more stress in normal dictation lesson then video lesson using difficult subject.

  3. Discovery of novel heart rate-associated loci using the Exome Chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Marten E.; Warren, Helen R; Cabrera, Claudia P; Verweij, Niek; Mifsud, Borbala; Haessler, Jeffrey; Bihlmeyer, Nathan A.; Fu, Yi-Ping; Weiss, Stefan; Lin, Henry J.; Grarup, Niels; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Pistis, Giorgio; Shah, Nabi; Brody, Jennifer A.; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lin, Honghuang; Mei, Hao; Smith, Albert V.; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Hall, Leanne M; van Setten, Jessica; Trompet, Stella; Prins, Bram P.; Isaacs, Aaron; Radmanesh, Farid; Marten, Jonathan; Entwistle, Aiman; Kors, Jan A.; Silva, Claudia T; Alonso, Alvaro; Bis, Joshua C.; de Boer, Rudolf; de Haan, Hugoline G; de Mutsert, Renee; Dedoussis, George; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Eppinga, Ruben N.; Felix, Stephan B.; Guo, Xiuqing; Hagemeijer, Yanick; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Huang, Paul L.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kahonen, Mika; Kanters, Jorgen K.; Kolcic, Ivana; Launer, Lenore J.; Li, Man; Yao, Jie; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Simin; MacFarlane, Peter W.; Mangino, Massimo; Morris, Andrew D.; Mulas, Antonella; Murray, Alison D.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Orru, Marco; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peters, Annette; Porteous, David J.; Poulter, Neil; Psaty, Bruce M.; Qi, Lihong; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Roselli, Carolina; Rudan, Igor; Sattar, Naveed; Sever, Peter; Sinner, Moritz F.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Spector, Timothy D.; Stanton, Alice V.; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Taylor, Kent D.; Tobin, Martin D.; Uitterlinden, Andre; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Hoes, Arno W.; van der Meer, Peter; Voelker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Xie, Zhijun; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Tinker, Andrew; Polasek, Ozren; Rosand, Jonathan; Jamshidi, Yalda; Duijn, Cornelia Mvan; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Jukema, Wouter J.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Lehtimaki, Terho; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Wilson, James G.; Lubitz, Steven A.; Kaeaeb, Stefan; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Caulfield, Mark J.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Sanna, Serena; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Deloukas, Panos; Pedersen, Oluf; Rotter, Jerome I.; Doerr, Marcus; O'Donnell, Chris J.; Hayward, Caroline; Arking, Dan E.; Kooperberg, Charles; van der Harst, Pim; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Stricker, Bruno H.; Munroe, Patricia B.

    2017-01-01

    Resting heart rate is a heritable trait, and an increase in heart rate is associated with increased mortality risk. Genome-wide association study analyses have found loci associated with resting heart rate, at the time of our study these loci explained 0.9% of the variation. This study aims to

  4. Discovery of novel heart rate-associated loci using the Exome Chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. van den Berg (Marten); H. Warren (Helen); Cabrera, C.P. (Claudia P.); Verweij, N. (Niek); Mifsud, B. (Borbala); J. Haessler (Jeff); N.A. Bihlmeyer (Nathan A.); Fu, Y.-P. (Yi-Ping); Weiss, S. (Stefan); Lin, H.J. (Henry J.); N. Grarup (Niels); Li-Gao, R. (Ruifang); G. Pistis (Giorgio); N. Shah (Nisha); J.A. Brody (Jennifer A.); Müller-Nurasyid, M. (Martina); H. Lin (Honghuang); H. Mei (Hao); A.V. Smith (Albert V.); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); L.M. Hall (Leanne M.); J. van Setten (Jessica); S. Trompet (Stella); Prins, B.P. (Bram P.); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); F. Radmanesh (Farid); J. Marten (Jonathan); Entwistle, A. (Aiman); J.A. Kors (Jan); C.T. Silva (Claudia Tamar); A. Alonso (Alvaro); J.C. Bis (Joshua); R.A. de Boer (Rudolf); H.G. De Haan (Hugoline G.); R. de Mutsert (Reneé); G.V. Dedoussis (George); A. Dominiczak (Anna); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); P.T. Ellinor (Patrick); Eppinga, R.N. (Ruben N.); S.B. Felix (Stephan); X. Guo (Xiuqing); Hagemeijer, Y. (Yanick); T. Hansen (T.); T.B. Harris (Tamara); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); Huang, P.L. (Paul L.); S.-J. Hwang (Shih-Jen); M. Kähönen (Mika); J.K. Kanters; I. Kolcic (Ivana); L.J. Launer (Lenore); M. Li (Man); J. Yao (Jiefen); A. Linneberg (Allan); Liu, S. (Simin); P.W. MacFarlane (Peter); M. Mangino (Massimo); Morris, A.D. (Andrew D.); Mulas, A. (Antonella); Murray, A.D. (Alison D.); C.P. Nelson (Christopher P.); M. Orrù (Marco); S. Padmanabhan (Sandosh); A. Peters (Annette); D.J. Porteous (David J.); N.R. Poulter (Neil); B.M. Psaty (Bruce M.); L. Qi (Lihong); Raitakari, O.T. (Olli T.); Rivadeneira, F. (Fernando); Roselli, C. (Carolina); I. Rudan (Igor); N. Sattar (Naveed); P. Sever (Peter); M.F. Sinner (Moritz); E.Z. Soliman (Elsayed); T.D. Spector (Timothy); A. Stanton (Alice); K. Stirrups (Kathy); K.D. Taylor (Kent); M.D. Tobin (Martin); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); I. Vaartjes (Ilonca); A.W. Hoes (Arno); van der Meer, P. (Peter); U. Völker (Uwe); Waldenberger, M. (Melanie); Xie, Z. (Zhijun); M. Zoledziewska (Magdalena); Tinker, A. (Andrew); O. Polasek (Ozren); J. Rosand (Jonathan); Jamshidi, Y. (Yalda); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); J.F. Wilson (James); Lubitz, S.A. (Steven A.); S. Kääb (Stefan); N. Sotoodehnia (Nona); M. Caulfield (Mark); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); S. Sanna (Serena); D.O. Mook-Kanamori (Dennis); Deloukas, P. (Panos); O. Pedersen (Oluf); J.I. Rotter (Jerome I.); M. Dörr (Marcus); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher J.); C. Hayward (Caroline); D.E. Arking (Dan); C. Kooperberg (Charles); van der Harst, P. (Pim); M. Eijgelsheim (Mark); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); P. Munroe (Patricia)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractResting heart rate is a heritable trait, and an increase in heart rate is associated with increased mortality risk. Genome-wide association study analyses have found loci associated with resting heart rate, at the time of our study these loci explained 0.9% of the variation. This

  5. Discovery of novel heart rate-associated loci using the Exome Chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Berg, Marten E; Warren, Helen R; Cabrera, Claudia P

    2017-01-01

    Resting heart rate is a heritable trait, and an increase in heart rate is associated with increased mortality risk. Genome-wide association study analyses have found loci associated with resting heart rate, at the time of our study these loci explained 0.9% of the variation. This study aims to di...

  6. Making the Most of the "Daphnia" Heart Rate Lab: Optimizing the Use of Ethanol, Nicotine & Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corotto, Frank; Ceballos, Darrel; Lee, Adam; Vinson, Lindsey

    2010-01-01

    Students commonly test the effects of chemical agents on the heart rate of the crustacean "Daphnia" magna, but the procedure has never been optimized. We determined the effects of three concentrations of ethanol, nicotine, and caffeine and of a control solution on heart rate in "Daphnia." Ethanol at 5% and 10% (v/v) reduced mean heart rate to…

  7. Heart Rate and Lactate Levels during Weight-Training Exercise in Trained and Untrained Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Michael H.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A study of effects of squatting exercise on heart rate and blood lactate levels in trained and untrained males indicated that trained subjects performed more work and had higher heart rates and lactate levels at exhaustion untrained subjects, though heart rate and lactate levels were lower for trained subjects at a given bar mass or submaximal…

  8. Heart Rates of High School Physical Education Students during Team Sports, Individual Sports, and Fitness Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurson, Kelly R.; Brown, Dale D.; Cullen, Robert W.; Dennis, Karen K.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined how activity type influenced heart rates and time spent in target heart rate zones of high school students participating in physical education classes. Significantly higher average heart rates existed for fitness (142 plus or minus 24 beats per minute [bpm]) compared to team (118 plus or minus 24 bpm) or individual (114 plus or…

  9. Using the heart rate variability for classifying patients with and without chronic heart failure and periodic breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Giraldo Giraldo, Beatriz; Téllez, Joan P.; Herrera, Sergio; Benito, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of the dynamic interactions between cardiovascular signals can provide valuable information that improves the understanding of cardiovascular control. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is known to provide information about the autonomic heart rate modulation mechanism. Using the HRV signal, we aimed to obtain parameters for classifying patients with and without chronic heart failure (CHF), and with periodic breathing (PB), non-periodic breathing (nPB), and Cheyne-Stokes respira...

  10. Analysis of heart rate variability in the presence of ectopic beats using the heart timing signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Javier; Laguna, Pablo

    2003-03-01

    The time-domain signals representing the heart rate variability (HRV) in the presence of an ectopic beat exhibit a sharp transient at the position of the ectopic beat, which corrupts the signal, particularly the power spectral density (PSD) of the HRV. Consequently, there is a need for correction of this type of beat prior to any HRV analysis. This paper deals with the PSD estimation of the HRV by means of the heart timing (HT) signal when ectopic beats are present. These beat occurrence times are modeled from a generalized, continuous time integral pulse frequency modulation model and, from this point of view, a specific method for minimizing the effect of the presence of ectopic beats is presented to work together with the HT signal. By using both, a white noise driven autoregressive model of the HRV signal with artificially introduced ectopic beats and actual heart rate series including ectopic beats, the more usual methods of HRV spectral estimation are compared. Results of the PSD estimation error function of the number of ectopic beats are presented. These results demonstrate that the proposed method has one order of magnitude lower error than usual ectopic beats removal strategies in preserving PSD, thus, this strategy better recovers the original clinical indexes of interest.

  11. Resting heart rate and incident heart failure in apparently healthy men and women in the EPIC-Norfolk study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Roman; Michels, Guido; Sharp, Stephen J; Luben, Robert; Wareham, Nick J; Khaw, Kay-Tee

    2012-10-01

    Increasing levels of resting heart rate are associated with increased risk of developing hypertension and cardiovascular disease, and seem to play a role in the progression of heart failure. The shape of the association between resting heart rate and risk of developing heart failure has not been examined in healthy individuals of the general population. Hazard ratios (HRs) of heart failure comparing categories of resting heart rate [51-60 b.p.m. (reference), 61-70 b.p.m., 71-80 b.p.m., 81-90 b.p.m., and 91-100 b.p.m.] were calculated in apparently healthy men (9805) and women (12 321) aged 39-79 participating in the 'European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition' (EPIC) study in Norfolk. During a mean follow-up of 12.9 years, 1356 incident cases of heart failure occurred. In participants without potential heart rate-modifying medication, age- and sex-adjusted incidence rates of heart failure were 3.3, 3.7, 4.0, 5.1, and 5.5 per 1000 person-years for increasing categories of resting heart rate; compared with the reference category, HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for increasing categories of resting heart rate were 1.08 (0.88-1.34), 1.17 (0.94-1.46), 1.39 (1.08-1.79), and 1.42 (1.00-2.03), respectively, in multivariable analysis adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, prevalent diabetes, cholesterol concentration, social class, educational level, smoking, and physical activity. Within the reference range of resting heart rate (50-100 b.p.m.) each 10 b.p.m. increase was associated with an 11% increase in hazard of heart failure in multivariable analysis. The results did not change materially after adjusting for myocardial infarction and coronary heart disease events during follow up (1.12, 1.06-1.18). Resting heart rate shows a graded association with hazard of heart failure in apparently healthy men and women which is not mediated by coronary heart disease. Further study is needed to examine the underlying mechanisms.

  12. Deterioration of heart rate recovery index in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogdu, Orhan; Yarlioglues, Mikail; Kaya, Mehmet Gungor; Ardic, Idris; Oguzhan, Nilufer; Akpek, Mahmut; Sahin, Omer; Akyol, Lutfi; Kelesoglu, Saban; Koc, Fatih; Ozdogru, Ibrahim; Oguzhan, Abdurrahman

    2010-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder resulting in multisystemic inflammatory damage. It is reported that cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are responsible for 20%-30% of deaths in patients with SLE. Heart rate recovery after exercise is a function of vagal reactivation, and its impairment is an independent prognostic indicator for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. The aim of our study was to evaluate the heart rate recovery index in patients with SLE. The study population included 48 patients with SLE (35 women, mean age 46.3 ± 12.8 yrs, mean disease duration 6.0 ± 2.3 yrs) and 44 healthy controls (30 women, mean age 45.7 ± 12.9 yrs). Basal electrocardiography, echocardiography, and treadmill exercise testing were performed on all patients and controls. The heart rate recovery index was defined as the reduction in the heart rate from the rate at peak exercise to the rate at the first minute (HRR(1)), second minute (HRR(2)), third minute (HRR(3)), and fifth minute (HRR(5)) after stopping exercise stress testing. There were significant differences in HRR(1) and HRR(2) indices between patients with SLE and the control group (24.1 ± 6.5 vs 33.3 ± 9.3; p < 0.001, and 44.6 ± 13.3 vs 53.7 ± 9.9; p < 0.001, respectively). Similarly, HRR(3) and HRR(5) indices of the recovery period were lower in patients with SLE, compared with indices in the control group (57.6 ± 13.0 vs 64.9 ± 11.7; p = 0.006, and 67.2 ± 12.3 vs 75.0 ± 15.4; p = 0.009, respectively). Effort capacity was markedly lower (9.0 ± 1.9 vs 11.1 ± 2.3 metabolic equivalents; p = 0.001, respectively) among the patients with SLE. The heart rate recovery index is deteriorated in patients with SLE. When the prognostic significance of the heart rate recovery index is considered, these results may contribute to explain the increased occurrence of cardiac death. It points to the importance of the heart rate recovery index in the identification of high-risk patients.

  13. Mercury Exposure and Heart Rate Variability: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Matthew O; Cheng, Alan; Berger, Ronald D; Rosman, Lori; Guallar, Eliseo

    2015-09-01

    Mercury affects the nervous system and has been implicated in altering heart rhythm and function. We sought to better define its role in modulating heart rate variability, a well-known marker of cardiac autonomic function. This is a systematic review study. We searched PubMed, Embase, TOXLINE, and DART databases without language restriction. We report findings as a qualitative systematic review because heterogeneity in study design and assessment of exposures and outcomes across studies, as well as other methodological limitations of the literature, precluded a quantitative meta-analysis. We identified 12 studies of mercury exposure and heart rate variability in human populations (ten studies involving primarily environmental methylmercury exposure and two studies involving occupational exposure to inorganic mercury) conducted in Japan, the Faroe Islands, Canada, Korea, French Polynesia, Finland, and Egypt. The association of prenatal mercury exposure with lower high-frequency band scores (thought to reflect parasympathetic activity) in several studies, in particular the inverse association of cord blood mercury levels with the coefficient of variation of the R-R intervals and with low-frequency and high-frequency bands at 14 years of age in the Faroe Islands birth cohort study, suggests that early mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity. Studies with later environmental exposures to mercury in children or in adults were heterogeneous and did not show consistent associations. The evidence was too limited to draw firm causal inferences. Additional research is needed to elucidate the effects of mercury on cardiac autonomic function, particularly as early-life exposures might have lasting impacts on cardiac parasympathetic function.

  14. Heart rate recovery after exercise and neural regulation of heart rate variability in 30-40 year old female marathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Na; Bai, Siqin; Oguri, Kazuo; Kato, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Ichie; Kawase, Harumi; Matsuoka, Toshio

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of endurance training on heart rate (HR) recovery after exercise and cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS) modulation in female marathon runners by comparing with untrained controls. Six female marathon runners (M group) aged 32-40 years and eight age-matched untrained females (C group) performed a maximum-effort treadmill running exercise. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) was measured during the exercise with a gas analyzer connected to subjects through a face mask. Heart rate, blood pressure and blood lactate were measured before and after the exercise. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) to the exercise was obtained immediately after the exercise. Holter ECG was recorded and analyzed with power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) to investigate the cardiac ANS modulation. The M group had significantly higher VO2max, faster HR recovery after exercise, higher Mean RR, SDRR, HF power and lower LF/HF ratio at rest compared with the C group. The M group also presented greater percent decrease of blood pressure after exercise, although their blood pressure after exercise was higher than the C group. It is suggested that endurance training induced significant alterations in cardiac ANS modulation at rest and significant acceleration of HR recovery after exercise in female marathon runners. Faster HR recovery after exercise in the female marathon runners should result from their higher levels of HRV, higher aerobic capacity and exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise compared with untrained controls. Key PointsThe effects of endurance training on HR recovery after exercise and cardiac ANS modulation were investigated in female marathon runners by comparing with untrained controls.Time and frequency domain analysis of HRV was used to investigate cardiac ANS modulation.As compared with untrained controls, the female marathon runners showed faster HR recovery after exercise, which should result

  15. Resting Bradycardia, Enhanced Postexercise Heart Rate Recovery and Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Recreational Ballroom Dancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Carlos Janssen Gomes; Molina, Guilherme Eckhardt; Porto, Luiz Guilherme Grossi; Junqueira, Luiz Fernando, Jr.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: In a cross-sectional study design, we evaluated the resting heart rate (HR[subscript baseline]) and exercise and postexercise stress test-related chronotropic responses in male practitioners of recreational ballroom dancing (BD; n = 25, M[subscript age] = 26.6 ± 6.1 years) compared to a control group of insufficiently active nondancers…

  16. Heart rate variability (HRV) during virtual reality immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malińska, Marzena; Zużewicz, Krystyna; Bugajska, Joanna; Grabowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was assessment of the hour-long training involving handling virtual environment (sVR) and watching a stereoscopic 3D movie on the mechanisms of autonomic heart rate (HR) regulation among the subjects who were not predisposed to motion sickness. In order to exclude predispositions to motion sickness, all the participants (n=19) underwent a Coriolis test. During an exposure to 3D and sVR the ECG signal was continuously recorded using the Holter method. For the twelve consecutive 5-min epochs of ECG signal, the analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) in time and frequency domains was conducted. After 30 min from the beginning of the training in handling the virtual workstation a significant increase in LF spectral power was noted. The values of the sympathovagal LF/HF index while sVR indicated a significant increase in sympathetic predominance in four time intervals, namely between the 5th and the 10th minute, between the 15th and the 20th minute, between the 35th and 40th minute and between the 55th and the 60th minute of exposure.

  17. Noisy fluctuation of heart rate indicates cardiovascular system instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortrat, Jacques-Olivier; Baum, Charlotte; Jeanguillaume, Christian; Custaud, Marc-Antoine

    2013-09-01

    Heart rate spontaneously fluctuates despite homeostatic regulatory mechanisms to stabilize it. Harmonic and fractal fluctuations have been described. Non-harmonic non-fractal fluctuation has not been studied because it is usually thought that it is caused by apparatus noise. We hypothesized that this fluctuation looking like apparatus noise (that we call "noisy fluctuation") is linked to challenged blood pressure stabilization and not to apparatus noise. We assessed noisy fluctuation by quantifying the small and fastest beat-to-beat fluctuation of RR-interval by means of spectral analysis (Nyquist power of heart rate variability: nyHRV) after filtering out its fractal component. We observed nyHRV in healthy supine subjects and in patients with vasovagal symptoms. We challenged stabilization of blood pressure by upright posture (by means of a head-up tilt table test). Head-up position on the tilt table dramatically decreased nyHRV (0.128 ± 0.063 vs. 0.004 ± 0.002, p cardiovascular system is challenged (upright posture). It also indicates cardiovascular instability because it does not disappear in upright patients before vasovagal syncope, a transient failure of cardiovascular regulation.

  18. Heart rate and sentiment experimental data with common timeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, Jaromír; Mouček, Roman

    2017-12-01

    Sentiment extraction and analysis using spoken utterances or written corpora as well as collection and analysis of human heart rate data using sensors are commonly used techniques and methods. On the other hand, these have been not combined yet. The collected data can be used e.g. to investigate the mutual dependence of human physical and emotional activity. The paper describes the procedure of parallel acquisition of heart rate sensor data and tweets expressing sentiment and difficulties related to this procedure. The obtained datasets are described in detail and further discussed to provide as much information as possible for subsequent analyses and conclusions. Analyses and conclusions are not included in this paper. The presented experiment and provided datasets serve as the first basis for further studies where all four presented data sources can be used independently, combined in a reasonable way or used all together. For instance, when the data is used all together, performing studies comparing human sensor data, acquired noninvasively from the surface of the human body and considered as more objective, and human written data expressing the sentiment, which is at least partly cognitively interpreted and thus considered as more subjective, could be beneficial.

  19. Correlation between electroencephalography and heart rate variability during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ako, Mina; Kawara, Tokuhiro; Uchida, Sunao; Miyazaki, Shinichi; Nishihara, Kyoko; Mukai, Junko; Hirao, Kenzo; Ako, Junya; Okubo, Yoshiro

    2003-02-01

    It is known that autonomic nervous activities change in correspondence with sleep stages. However, the characteristics of continuous fluctuations in nocturnal autonomic nerve tone have not been clarified in detail. The study aimed to determine the possible correlation between the electroencephalogram (EEG) and autonomic nervous activities, and to clarify in detail the nocturnal fluctuations in autonomic nerve activities. Overnight EEGs and electrocardiograms of seven healthy males were obtained. These EEGs were analyzed by fast Fourier transformation algorithm to extract delta, sigma and beta power. Heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) were calculated in consecutive 5-min epochs. The HRV indices of low frequency (LF), high frequency (HF) and LF/HF ratio were calculated from the spectral analysis of R-R intervals. The sleep stages were manually scored according to Rechtschaffen and Kales' criteria. Low frequency and LF/HF were significantly lower during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) than REM, and were lower in stages 3 and 4 than in stages 1 and 2. Furthermore, delta EEG showed inverse correlations with LF (r = - 0.44, P lightening.

  20. Smartphone-based photoplethysmographic imaging for heart rate monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alafeef, Maha

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to make use of visible light reflected mode photoplethysmographic (PPG) imaging for heart rate (HR) monitoring via smartphones. The system uses the built-in camera feature in mobile phones to capture video from the subject's index fingertip. The video is processed, and then the PPG signal resulting from the video stream processing is used to calculate the subject's heart rate. Records from 19 subjects were used to evaluate the system's performance. The HR values obtained by the proposed method were compared with the actual HR. The obtained results show an accuracy of 99.7% and a maximum absolute error of 0.4 beats/min where most of the absolute errors lay in the range of 0.04-0.3 beats/min. Given the encouraging results, this type of HR measurement can be adopted with great benefit, especially in the conditions of personal use or home-based care. The proposed method represents an efficient portable solution for HR accurate detection and recording.

  1. Healthy lifestyle and heart rate variability in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeschbacher, Stefanie; Bossard, Matthias; Ruperti Repilado, Francisco Javier; Good, Nathalie; Schoen, Tobias; Zimny, Matylda; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Risch, Martin; Risch, Lorenz; Conen, David

    2016-07-01

    We aimed to determine the association of a comprehensive healthy lifestyle with heart rate variability (HRV), a validated measure of autonomic function. This was a prospective cohort study. A population-based sample of 2079 individuals aged 25-41 years without prevalent cardiovascular disease was investigated. The standard deviation of all normal RR intervals (SDNN) during 24-hour electrocardiography was used as main HRV marker. Healthy lifestyle metrics were summed to a validated lifestyle-score ranging from 0 = most unhealthy to 7 = most healthy. One point was given for each of the following items: never smoking cigarettes; consuming a healthy diet; performing moderate (≥150 min/week) or vigorous (≥75 min/week) physical activity; body mass index (BMI)heart rate (HR) (β-estimate (95% CI) 0.07 (0.07-0.10), p healthy lifestyle in this large contemporary cohort of young adults from the general population. Adopting a healthy lifestyle has an important effect on autonomic function. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  2. Gas exchange and heart rate in the harbour porpoise, Phocoena phocoena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reed, J.Z.; Chambers, C.; Hunter, C.J.

    2000-01-01

    The respiratory physiology, heart rates and metabolic rates of two captive juvenile male harbour porpoises (both 28 kg) were measured using a rapid-response respiratory gas analysis system in the laboratory. Breath-hold durations in the laboratory (12 +/- 0.3 s, mean +/- SEM) were shorter than...... a comparatively high minute rate of gas exchange. Oxygen consumption under these experimental conditions (247 +/- 13.8 ml O-2. min(-1)) was 1.9- fold higher than predicted by standard scaling relations. These data together with an estimate of the total oxygen stores predicted an aerobic dive limit of 5.4 min...

  3. Assessment of cardiac autonomic functions by heart rate recovery, heart rate variability and QT dynamicity parameters in patients with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dural, Muhammet; Kabakcı, Giray; Cınar, Neşe; Erbaş, Tomris; Canpolat, Uğur; Gürses, Kadri Murat; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Oto, Ali; Kaya, Ergün Barış; Yorgun, Hikmet; Sahiner, Levent; Dağdelen, Selçuk; Aytemir, Kudret

    2014-04-01

    Cardiovascular complications are the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in acromegaly. However, there is little data regarding cardiac autonomic functions in these patients. Herein, we aimed to investigate several parameters of cardiac autonomic functions in patients with acromegaly compared to healthy subjects. We enrolled 20 newly diagnosed acromegalic patients (55% female, age:45.7 ± 12.6 years) and 32 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects. All participants underwent 24 h Holter recording. Heart rate recovery (HRR) indices were calculated by subtracting 1st, 2nd and 3rd minute heart rates from maximal heart rate. All patients underwent heart rate variability (HRV) and QT dynamicity analysis. Baseline characteristics were similar except diabetes mellitus and hypertension among groups. Mean HRR1 (29.2 ± 12.3 vs 42.6 ± 6.5, p = 0.001), HRR2 (43.5 ± 15.6 vs 61.1 ± 10.8, p = 0.001) and HRR3 (46.4 ± 16.2 vs 65.8 ± 9.8, p = 0.001) values were significantly higher in control group. HRV parameters as, SDNN [standard deviation of all NN intervals] (p = 0.001), SDANN [SD of the 5 min mean RR intervals] (p = 0.001), RMSSD [root square of successive differences in RR interval] (p = 0.001), PNN50 [proportion of differences in successive NN intervals >50 ms] (p = 0.001) and high-frequency [HF] (p = 0.001) were significantly decreased in patients with acromegaly; but low frequency [LF] (p = 0.046) and LF/HF (p = 0.001) were significantly higher in acromegaly patients. QTec (p = 0.009), QTac/RR slope (p = 0.017) and QTec/RR slope (p = 0.01) were significantly higher in patients with acromegaly. Additionally, there were significant negative correlation of disease duration with HRR2, HRR3, SDNN, PNN50, RMSSD, variability index. Our study results suggest that cardiac autonomic functions are impaired in patients with acromegaly. Further large scale studies are needed to exhibit the prognostic significance of impaired autonomic functions in patients with

  4. Fetal heart rate pattern recognition by the method of auscultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, F C; Pearse, K E; Paul, R H

    1984-09-01

    The thesis that obstetric health care personnel can discriminate characteristics of baseline fetal heart rate (FHR) and FHR patterns by auscultation needs to be tested. For this study, audiotones of the FHR signals were recorded for eight representative FHR patterns. Each recording was for three minutes and included one uterine contraction. Physicians and nurses who use continuous electronic FHR monitoring on a regular basis listened to the eight recordings and attempted to identify the baseline rate, variability, and periodic patterns, and then matched their perceptions with the eight corresponding FHR tracings (not in order). Baseline FHR and FHR without periodic patterns were most frequently identified correctly. Late decelerations with and without good baseline variability were misdiagnosed 18.4 and 33% of the time, respectively. Although the FHR characteristics and periodic patterns were correctly identified most of the time, failure to recognize significant periodic patterns by as many as one-third of the participants is unacceptable in modern obstetrics