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Sample records for heart imaging mr-herzbildgebung

  1. Heart Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Johnson Space Flight Center's device to test astronauts' heart function in microgravity has led to the MultiWire Gamma Camera, which images heart conditions six times faster than conventional devices. Dr. Jeffrey Lacy, who developed the technology as a NASA researcher, later formed Proportional Technologies, Inc. to develop a commercially viable process that would enable use of Tantalum-178 (Ta-178), a radio-pharmaceutical. His company supplies the generator for the radioactive Ta-178 to Xenos Medical Systems, which markets the camera. Ta-178 can only be optimally imaged with the camera. Because the body is subjected to it for only nine minutes, the radiation dose is significantly reduced and the technique can be used more frequently. Ta-178 also enables the camera to be used on pediatric patients who are rarely studied with conventional isotopes because of the high radiation dosage.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolorz, J.; Linden, A.; Schicha, H.; Sechtem, U.

    1988-01-01

    NMR imaging is a noninvasive technique that has been shown to provide high-quality images of the heart. Due to the signal characteristics of flowing blood, inherent contrast between blood pool and myocardium is achieved without the use of contrast media. This paper briefly describes technical aspects of NMR imaging of the heart, normal cardiovascular anatomy, applications of the technique in patients with ischemic heart disease, and the potential of NMR imaging for functional studies in various forms of heart disease. (orig.)

  3. Imaging of ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipton, Martin J.; Reba, Richard C.; Bogaert, Jan; Boxt, Larry M.

    2002-01-01

    Despite advances in the understanding and treatment of ischemic cardiomyopathy, characterized by extensive coronary artery disease and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, the prognosis remains poor with only a 50-60% 5-year survival rate. The composition of atherosclerotic lesions is currently regarded as being more important than the degree of stenosis in determining acute events. If imaging techniques could distinguish vulnerable from stable plaques, then high-risk patient subgroups could be identified. Another important concept is that LV dysfunction may be the result of either scarring due to necrosis or to the presence of myocardial hibernation, in which there is sufficient blood flow to sustain viable myocytes, but insufficient to maintain systolic contraction. This concept of myocardial viability is critical for making optimal clinical management decisions. This review describes how noninvasive imaging methods can be used to distinguish regions of irreversibly injured myocardium from viable but hibernating segments. Technical advances in CT and MR have made imaging of the beating heart possible. Considerable clinical progress has already been made and further cardiac applications are expected. Radiologists therefore have new opportunities for involvement in cardiac imaging but must recognize the political implications as well as the diagnostic potential of these modalities not only for the heart, but also for the whole vascular system. This review focuses on imaging myocardial injury. It compares state-of-the-art CT and MR with more established yet contemporary echocardiography and nuclear scintigraphy. (orig.)

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jacobstein, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Focusing primarily on MR imaging of the heart, this book covers other diagnostic imaging modalities as well. The authors review new technologies and diagnostic procedures pertinent to congenital heat disease and present each congenital heat abnormality as a separate entity

  5. Infant open heart surgery (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    During open-heart surgery an incision is made through the breastbone (sternum) while the child is under general anesthesia. ... During open-heart surgery an incision is made through the breastbone (sternum) while the child is under general anesthesia.

  6. Cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, W S; Steeds, R P

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a perspective on the relative importance and contribution of different imaging modalities in patients with valvular heart disease. Valvular heart disease is increasing in prevalence across Europe, at a time when the clinical ability of physicians to diagnose and assess severity is declining. Increasing reliance is placed on echocardiography, which is the mainstay of cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease. This article outlines the techniques used in this context and their limitations, identifying areas in which dynamic imaging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance and multislice CT are expanding. PMID:22723532

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... in an integrated approach to gain qualitative and quantitative information on valvular heart disease as well as ventricular dimensions and functions. Thus, MRI may be advantageous to the established diagnostic tools in assessing the severity of valvular heart disease as well as monitoring the lesion and predicting...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  8. Holography for imaging in structural heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckheimer, Elchanan; Rotschild, Carmel

    2016-05-17

    Three-dimensional imaging modalities for structural heart disease interventions have become a common feature in the procedural workflow. The images acquired are usually presented on 2D displays, thereby restricting their usefulness and the ability to interact with them. Holographic images created in real time from the volumetric data which float in the air during the procedure, in front of the operator and above the patient, could provide an intuitive and interactive display for the interventionalist and improve procedure outcomes.

  9. MR imaging of the heart: functional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croisille, P.; Revel, D.

    2000-01-01

    To date, most applications of cardiovascular MRI relate to the evaluation of major vessels rather than the heart itself. However, MRI plays a major role in the evaluation of specific types of cardiovascular pathology, namely intracardiac and paracardiac masses, pericardial disease, and congenital heart disease. In addition, because the visualization of cardiovascular anatomy with MR is non-invasive and permits three-dimensional analysis but also allows functional assessment of the cardiac pump, it is clear that MRI will have a growing and significant impact over the next years. We review some of the technical aspect of cardiac MRI and describe the current and potential clinical and investigative applications of this new methodology. (orig.)

  10. Multimodality Imaging of Heart Valve Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajani, Ronak; Khattar, Rajdeep; Chiribiri, Amedeo; Victor, Kelly; Chambers, John

    2014-01-01

    Unidentified heart valve disease is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. It has therefore become important to accurately identify, assess and monitor patients with this condition in order that appropriate and timely intervention can occur. Although echocardiography has emerged as the predominant imaging modality for this purpose, recent advances in cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography indicate that they may have an important contribution to make. The current review describes the assessment of regurgitant and stenotic heart valves by multimodality imaging (echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance) and discusses their relative strengths and weaknesses

  11. Multimodality Imaging of Heart Valve Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajani, Ronak, E-mail: Dr.R.Rajani@gmail.com [Department of Cardiology, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Khattar, Rajdeep [Department of Cardiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Chiribiri, Amedeo [Divisions of Imaging Sciences, The Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Victor, Kelly; Chambers, John [Department of Cardiology, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    Unidentified heart valve disease is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. It has therefore become important to accurately identify, assess and monitor patients with this condition in order that appropriate and timely intervention can occur. Although echocardiography has emerged as the predominant imaging modality for this purpose, recent advances in cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography indicate that they may have an important contribution to make. The current review describes the assessment of regurgitant and stenotic heart valves by multimodality imaging (echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance) and discusses their relative strengths and weaknesses.

  12. MR imaging of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kersting-Sommerhoff, B.A.; Diethelm, L.; Teitel, D.F.; Sommerhoff, C.P.; Higgins, C.B.

    1988-01-01

    Sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging for the evaluation of congenital heart disease was assessed in 51 patients (31 male and 20 female, aged 3-69 years), with a total of 115 congenital heart lesions. The true diagnosis was established by angiocardiography, catheterization, or surgery. Sensitivity at a specificity level of 90% was determined by means of receiver operating characteristic curves for great vessel relationships (100%), thoracic aorta anomalies (94%), atrial (91%) and ventricular (100%) septal defects, visceroatrial situs (100%), loop (100%), right ventricular outflow obstructions (95%), aortic valve (52%), mitral valve (62%), and tricuspid valve (76%). Spin-echo MR imaging is a reliable method for the noninvasive evaluation of congenital heart disease but is limited in the assessment of some valvular anomalies

  13. Imaging of the heart using metaiodobenzylguanidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dae, M.W.; Botvinick, E.H.

    1990-01-01

    Catecholamines have profound influences on cardiac function. Mechanisms relating abnormalities in sympathetic innervation to myocardial dysfunction are poorly understood, however. Recent studies have demonstrated the feasibility of noninvasively imaging the sympathetic nerves of the heart using radiolabeled MIBG. This article examines some of the experimental evidence to support the neuronal localization of MIBG. In addition, the early clinical experience is reviewed.42 references

  14. Multimodality Imaging Assessment of Prosthetic Heart Valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suchá, D.; Symersky, Petr; Tanis, W; Mali, Willem P Th M; Leiner, Tim; van Herwerden, LA; Budde, Ricardo P J

    Echocardiography and fluoroscopy are the main techniques for prosthetic heart valve (PHV) evaluation, but because of specific limitations they may not identify the morphological substrate or the extent of PHV pathology. Cardiac computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have

  15. Cine MR imaging in valvular heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Yamada, Naoaki; Itoh, Akira; Miyatake, Kunio

    1989-01-01

    Cine MR Imaging was carried out using FLASH (fast low angle shot) which employes TE of 16 msec and TR of 30/similar to/40 msec. Regurgitant jet was visible as discrete area of low signal intensity extending from the incompetent valve into the respective cardiac chamber. In 20 patients with mitral regurgitation, the correlation of the length and area of mitral jet by cine MR and color doppler mapping was 0.74 and 0.71, respectively. Cine MR imaging is a promising modality for detection and quantification of valvular heart disease.

  16. 3D confocal imaging in CUBIC-cleared mouse heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nehrhoff, I.; Bocancea, D.; Vaquero, J.; Vaquero, J.J.; Lorrio, M.T.; Ripoll, J.; Desco, M.; Gomez-Gaviro, M.V.

    2016-07-01

    Acquiring high resolution 3D images of the heart enables the ability to study heart diseases more in detail. Here, the CUBIC (clear, unobstructed brain imaging cocktails and computational analysis) clearing protocol was adapted for thick mouse heart sections to increase the penetration depth of the confocal microscope lasers into the tissue. The adapted CUBIC clearing of the heart lets the antibody penetrate deeper into the tissue by a factor of five. The here shown protocol enables deep 3D highresolution image acquisition in the heart. This allows a much more accurate assessment of the cellular and structural changes that underlie heart diseases. (Author)

  17. 3D confocal imaging in CUBIC-cleared mouse heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nehrhoff, I.; Bocancea, D.; Vaquero, J.; Vaquero, J.J.; Lorrio, M.T.; Ripoll, J.; Desco, M.; Gomez-Gaviro, M.V.

    2016-01-01

    Acquiring high resolution 3D images of the heart enables the ability to study heart diseases more in detail. Here, the CUBIC (clear, unobstructed brain imaging cocktails and computational analysis) clearing protocol was adapted for thick mouse heart sections to increase the penetration depth of the confocal microscope lasers into the tissue. The adapted CUBIC clearing of the heart lets the antibody penetrate deeper into the tissue by a factor of five. The here shown protocol enables deep 3D highresolution image acquisition in the heart. This allows a much more accurate assessment of the cellular and structural changes that underlie heart diseases. (Author)

  18. Images of the Heart: Archetypal Imagery in Therapeutic Artwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Judith; Wix, Linney

    1996-01-01

    Explores the "heart" image in art, myth, literature, and religion. Examines an archetypal art therapy approach to the use of the heart in the artmaking processes of two child clients seen in individual and group art therapy. Uses the historical exploration of the heart as a background against which to view personal use of the heart image…

  19. Reconstructed image of human heart for total artificial heart implantation, based on MR image and cast silicone model of heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komoda, Takashi; Maeta, Hajime; Uyama, Chikao.

    1991-01-01

    Based on transverse (TRN) and LV long axis (LAX) MR images of two cadaver hearts, three-dimensional (3-D) computer models of the connecting interface between remaining heart and total artificial heart, i.e., mitral and tricuspid valvular annuli (MVA and TVA), ascending aorta (Ao) and pulmonary artery (PA), were reconstructed to compare the shape and the size of MVA and those of TVA, the distance between the center of MVA and TVA (D G ), the angle between the plane of MVA and that of TVA (R T ), and the angles of Ao and PA, respectively, to the plane of MVA (R A , R P ), with those obtained in cast silicone models. It was found that based on LAX rather than TRN MR image, MVA and TVA might be more precisely reconstructed. The data obtained in 3-D images of MVA, TVA, Ao and PA based on silicone models of 32 hearts were as follows: D G (cm): 4.17±0.43, R T (degrees): 22.1±11.3, R A (degrees): 54.9±15.3, R P (degrees): 30.8±17.1. (author)

  20. Embryonic Heart Morphogenesis from Confocal Microscopy Imaging and Automatic Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongda Mao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic heart morphogenesis (EHM is a complex and dynamic process where the heart transforms from a single tube into a four-chambered pump. This process is of great biological and clinical interest but is still poorly understood for two main reasons. On the one hand, the existing imaging modalities for investigating EHM suffered from either limited penetration depth or limited spatial resolution. On the other hand, current works typically adopted manual segmentation, which was tedious, subjective, and time consuming considering the complexity of developing heart geometry and the large size of images. In this paper, we propose to utilize confocal microscopy imaging with tissue optical immersion clearing technique to image the heart at different stages of development for EHM study. The imaging method is able to produce high spatial resolution images and achieve large penetration depth at the same time. Furthermore, we propose a novel convex active contour model for automatic image segmentation. The model has the ability to deal with intensity fall-off in depth which is characterized by confocal microscopy images. We acquired the images of embryonic quail hearts from day 6 to day 14 of incubation for EHM study. The experimental results were promising and provided us with an insight view of early heart growth pattern and also paved the road for data-driven heart growth modeling.

  1. Whole heart cine MR imaging of pulmonary veins in patients with congenital heart disease. Comparison with Spin Echo MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, Hideaki; Saito, Haruo; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Takahashi, Shoki; Zuguchi, Masayuki; Yamada, Shogo

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the accuracy of Whole Heart Cine (WHC) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the depiction of pulmonary veins (PVs) in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) compared to that of spin echo (SE) MR imaging. Among our 35 patients, 4 patients had anomalous PV return. Detectability of four PVs on each MR examination images were evaluated. MR imaging is an effective modality for the clarification of PVs, and WHC MR imaging is more useful in delineating PV anomalies than SE MR imaging. (author)

  2. Autonomic innervation of the heart. Role of molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slart, Riemer H.J.A; Elsinga, Philip H. [Univ. Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Tio, Rene A. [Univ. Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Thorax Center Cardiology; Schwaiger, Markus (ed.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen Klinikum Rechts der Isar (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik

    2015-03-01

    Reviews in detail the value of SPECT-CT and PET-CT in the imaging of cardiac innervation. Details the role of imaging in a range of conditions and diseases. Includes important background on pathophysiology, tracers, radiopharmaceutical production, and kinetic modeling software. This book explains in detail the potential value of the hybrid modalities, SPECT-CT and PET-CT, in the imaging of cardiac innervation in a wide range of conditions and diseases, including ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, heart failure, amyloidosis, heart transplantation, and ventricular arrhythmias. Imaging of the brain-heart axis in neurodegenerative disease and stress and of cardiotoxicity is also discussed. The roles of the various available tracers are fully considered, and individual chapters address radiopharmaceutical development under GMP, imaging physics, and kinetic modeling software. Highly relevant background information is included on the autonomic nervous system of the heart and its pathophysiology, and in addition future perspectives are discussed. Awareness of the importance of autonomic innervation of the heart for the optimal management of cardiac patients is growing, and there is an evident need for objective measurement techniques or imaging modalities. In this context, Autonomic Innervation of the Heart will be of wide interest to clinicians, researchers, and industry.

  3. Autonomic innervation of the heart. Role of molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slart, Riemer H.J.A; Elsinga, Philip H.; Tio, Rene A.; Schwaiger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Reviews in detail the value of SPECT-CT and PET-CT in the imaging of cardiac innervation. Details the role of imaging in a range of conditions and diseases. Includes important background on pathophysiology, tracers, radiopharmaceutical production, and kinetic modeling software. This book explains in detail the potential value of the hybrid modalities, SPECT-CT and PET-CT, in the imaging of cardiac innervation in a wide range of conditions and diseases, including ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, heart failure, amyloidosis, heart transplantation, and ventricular arrhythmias. Imaging of the brain-heart axis in neurodegenerative disease and stress and of cardiotoxicity is also discussed. The roles of the various available tracers are fully considered, and individual chapters address radiopharmaceutical development under GMP, imaging physics, and kinetic modeling software. Highly relevant background information is included on the autonomic nervous system of the heart and its pathophysiology, and in addition future perspectives are discussed. Awareness of the importance of autonomic innervation of the heart for the optimal management of cardiac patients is growing, and there is an evident need for objective measurement techniques or imaging modalities. In this context, Autonomic Innervation of the Heart will be of wide interest to clinicians, researchers, and industry.

  4. Basic imaging in congenital heart disease. 3rd Ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swischuk, L.E.; Sapire, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    The book retains its previous format with chapters on embryology, plain film interpretation, classification of pulmonary vascular patterns, cardiac malpositions and vascular anomalies, and illustrative cases. The book is organized with an abundance of illustrative figures, diagrams, and image reproductions. These include plain chest radiographs, angiograms, echocardiograms, and MR images. The authors present the pathophysiology and imaging of congenital heart lesions

  5. Creating a panorama of the heart with digital images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosebrock, L

    2000-01-01

    Digital imaging offers new opportunities still being discovered by users. This article describes a technique that was created using a digital camera to photograph the entire surface of a rat heart. The technique may have other applications as well.

  6. The year 2012 in the European Heart Journal-Cardiovascular Imaging. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plein, Sven; Knuuti, Juhani; Edvardsen, Thor; Saraste, Antti; Piérard, Luc A; Maurer, Gerald; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2013-07-01

    The part II of the best of the European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging in 2012 specifically focuses on studies of valvular heart diseases, heart failure, cardiomyopathies, and congenital heart diseases.

  7. Significance of MR imaging in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayr, H.; Globits, S.; Frank, H.; Glogar, D.; Nouhold, A.; Imhof, H.

    1989-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic impact of MR imaging in congenital heart disease, the authors used a 0.5- or 1.5-T magnet to examine 85 patients. Multisection spin-echo images were obtained in three planes. Diagnoses included atrial septal defect, trilogy and tetralogy of Fallot, ventricular septal defect, transposition (seven), single ventricle, and other complex disorders. Compared with other noninvasive techniques, MR imaging allowed a much better visualization of anatomic structures and the relationship of great vessels to shunt lesions in complex congenital heart disease. In 53 (63%) of 85 patients, MR imaging made a major contribution to establishing or modifying diagnoses

  8. Evaluation of congenital heart disease by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, A. de; Roest, A.A.W.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has proven to be useful in the assessment of patients with complex congenital heart disease and in the post-surgical follow-up of patients with corrected congenital heart disease. A thorough understanding of the congenital cardiac malformations that can be encountered is needed and the use of the sequential segmental analysis helps to standardize the evaluation and diagnosis of (complex) congenital heart disease. After surgical correction of congenital heart defects, patients must be followed over extended periods of time, because morphological and functional abnormalities may still be present or may develop. The use of echocardiography may be hampered in these patients as scar tissue and thorax deformities limit the acoustic window. Magnetic resonance imaging has proven to be advantageous in the follow-up of these post-surgical patients and with the use of several different techniques the morphological as well as functional abnormalities can be evaluated and followed over time. (orig.)

  9. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  10. Fluorine-18 heart dosimetry in myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toledo, Janine M.; Trindade, Bruno; Campos, Tarcísio P.R., E-mail: janine.toledo@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências e Técnicas Nucleares

    2017-07-01

    This paper conducts a recalling in myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) followed by a spatial dosimetric investigation of the Fluorine-18 distributed at the myocardium by self-absorption of the heart uptake. Methods and Results: Radiological data manipulation was prepared and a computational heart voxelized model was assembled. A set of images from the abdominal aorta and angiotomography of the thorax was set up providing anatomic and functional information for heart modeling in SISCODES code. A homogeneous distribution of fluorine-18 was assumed into the heart myocardial wall. MCNP – Monte Carlo Code was used to provide the photon transport into the heart model taken in consideration the interactions into the tissues. The spatial dose distribution and histogram dose versus volume are presented. An analytical alternative model was addressed to the data validation. The present developed tools can produce spatial dose distribution in MPI at heart. Specially, the dosimetry performed elucidates imparted dose in the myocardial muscle per unit of injected Fluorine-18 activity by self-absorption of the heart uptake, which can contribute to future deterministic effect investigations. (author)

  11. Fluorine-18 heart dosimetry in myocardial perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo, Janine M.; Trindade, Bruno; Campos, Tarcísio P.R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper conducts a recalling in myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) followed by a spatial dosimetric investigation of the Fluorine-18 distributed at the myocardium by self-absorption of the heart uptake. Methods and Results: Radiological data manipulation was prepared and a computational heart voxelized model was assembled. A set of images from the abdominal aorta and angiotomography of the thorax was set up providing anatomic and functional information for heart modeling in SISCODES code. A homogeneous distribution of fluorine-18 was assumed into the heart myocardial wall. MCNP – Monte Carlo Code was used to provide the photon transport into the heart model taken in consideration the interactions into the tissues. The spatial dose distribution and histogram dose versus volume are presented. An analytical alternative model was addressed to the data validation. The present developed tools can produce spatial dose distribution in MPI at heart. Specially, the dosimetry performed elucidates imparted dose in the myocardial muscle per unit of injected Fluorine-18 activity by self-absorption of the heart uptake, which can contribute to future deterministic effect investigations. (author)

  12. Three-dimensional MR imaging of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laschinger, J.C.; Vannier, M.W.; Knapp, R.H.; Gutierrez, F.R.; Cox, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Contiguous 5-mm thick ECG-gated MR images of the thorax were edited using surface reconstruction techniques to produce three-dimensional (3D) images of the heart and great vessels in four healthy individuals and 25 patients with congenital heart disease (aged 3 months-30 years). Anomalies studied include atrial and ventricular septal defects, aortic coarctation, AV canal defects, double outlet ventricles, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and a wide spectrum of patients with tetralogy of Fallot. The results were correlated with echocardiographic and cineradiographic studies, and with surgical findings or pathologic specimens. Three-dimensional reconstructions accurately localized the dimensions and locations of all cardiac and great vessel anomalies and often displayed anatomic findings not diagnosed or visualized with other forms of diagnostic imaging

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sechtem, U.; Welslau, R.; Hilger, H.H.; Theissen, P.; Jungehuelsing, M.; Schicha, H.

    1989-01-01

    In spite of the great number of imaging procedures available, it is still difficult to quantify the severity of valvular heart disease. Dynamic MRI offers new approaches to visualize the turbulent blood flow through stenosed or insufficient heart valves. In addition, it is possible to assess the severity of valvular insufficiency based on precise measurements of rigth- and left-ventricular stroke volumes or of systemic and pulmonary flow. Valvular stenoses are difficult to quantify by MRI because flow velocity measurements based on phase analysis can only be made at low flow rates at present. Some progress may be achieved by further shortening of echo times. In patients with cardiac valve replacement MRI is often superior to other imaging procedures because variable imaging planes facilitate differentiation between transvalvular and paravalvular leaks. Additionally, the severity of valvular incompetence can be assessed in such cases in the same way as in patients with insufficiency of the native heart valve. (orig.) [de

  14. Cine MR imaging of valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, S.R.; Firmin, D.N.; Mohiaddin, R.H.; Klipstein, R.H.; Bogren, H.G.; Rees, R.S.O.; Longmore, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    Cine MR imaging shows details of cardiac valve motion and the turbulence caused by regurgitation and stenosis. In 30 patients, the area of turbulence proximal to regurgitant valves correlated well with the regurgitant fraction measured from right and left ventricular stroke volumes. Turbulence distal to stenotic valves did not correlate with the pressure gradient because abnormal valves that were not stenosed produced turbulence. Valve motion and the presence of thrombus were easier to assess than in conventional images. Cine MR imaging provides an important addition to conventional imaging in valvular regurgitation, but pressure gradients cannot be assessed in valvular stenosis

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the heart and great vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitoh, Hiroaki; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Takamiya, Makoto; Kozuka, Takahiro.

    1985-01-01

    About sixty subjects with normal heart or various cardiovascular diseases were examined with 0.35 or 1.5 T superconductive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, and ECG-gated spin-echo multislice technique was used to evaluate cardiovascular anatomy. MRI accurately demonstrated ventricular wall thinning caused by myocardial infarction and asymmetric ventricular hypertrophy owing to cardiomyopathy. Rheumatic valvular thickening, congenital cardiac malformations, aortic aneurysm and dissection were also clearly demonstrated by gated MRI without the use of any contrast media. MRI was shown to be an excellent non-invasive imaging modality for evaluation of pathoanatomy of the heart and great vessels. (author)

  16. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driessen, Mieke M.P. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (ICIN) - Netherlands Heart Institute, PO Box 19258, Utrecht (Netherlands); Breur, Johannes M.P.J. [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Oorschot, Joep W.M. van; Leiner, Tim [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kimmenade, Roland R.J. van; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijboom, Folkert J. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. (orig.)

  17. Uptake of myocardial imaging agents by rejected hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergsland, J.; Carr, E.A.; Carroll, M.; Wright, J.W.; Feldman, M.J.; Massucci, J.; Bhayana, J.N.; Gona, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate, Gallium 67 and Thallium 201 uptakes were measured in heterotopically transplanted rat hearts. Five days after transplantation, Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate, and Gallium 67 uptakes were significantly higher in allogeneic grafts than in syngeneic grafts. At an early stage of rejection (three days after transplantation), only Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate uptake in the left ventricle of allogeneic grafts showed a significant difference (p less than 0.04). At five days, Thallium 201 uptake was significantly lower in allo- than syngeneic grafts. There was a positive correlation between radionuclide uptake and histologic degree of rejection for Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate and Gallium 67 while Thallium 201 uptake correlated negatively. Analysis of variance revealed that hearts with no or minimal rejection had statistically different uptakes than hearts with mild to moderate rejection. These results suggest that uptake of imaging agents might be useful in the diagnosis of rejection of the transplanted heart

  18. Computer-assisted instruction; MR imaging of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Hi; Yu, Pil Mun; Lee, Sang Hoon; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Kim, Yang Min

    1996-01-01

    To develop a software program for computer-assisted instruction on MR imaging of congenital heart disease for medical students and residents to achieve repetitive and effective self-learning. We used a film scanner(Scan Maker 35t) and IBM-PC(486 DX-2, 60 MHz) for acquisition and storage of image data. The accessories attached to the main processor were CD-ROM drive(Sony), sound card(Soundblaster-Pro), and speaker. We used software of Adobe Photoshop(v 3.0) and paint shop-pro(v 3.0) for preprocessing image data, and paintbrush from microsoft windows 3.1 for labelling. The language used for programming was visual basic(v 3.0) from microsoft corporation. We developed a software program for computer-assisted instruction on MR imaging of congenital heart disease as an effective educational tool

  19. Technetium SPECT agents for imaging heart and brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linder, K.E.

    1990-01-01

    One major goal of radiopharmaceutical research has been the development of technetium-based perfusion tracers for SPECT imaging of the heart and brain. The recent clinical introduction of the technetium complexes HM-PAO, ECD and DMG-2MP for brain imaging, and of CDO-MEB and MIBI for heart imaging promises to revolutionize the field of nuclear medicine. All of these agents appear to localize in the target tissue in proportion to blood flow, but their mechanisms of localization and/or retention may differ quite widely. In this talk, a survey of the new technetium SPECT agents will be presented. The inorganic and biological chemistry of these complexes, mechanisms of uptake and retention, QSAR studies, and potential clinical applications are discussed

  20. Imaging diagnosis of congenital heart disease with single coronary artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Ming; Li Yuhua; Zhong Yumin; Sun Aimin

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To report 56 cases of congenital heart disease with congenital single coronary artery and to evaluate the imaging diagnostic techniques. Methods: All 56 patients with congenital single coronary artery underwent angiocardiography. Contrast enhancement magnetic resonance angiography (CE MRA) was performed in 4 cases. 48 cases were confirmed by operation. Results: In these 56 cases, single left coronary artery was found in 44 cases and single right coronary artery was found in 12. Conclusion: Congenital heart disease with congenital single coronary artery is not rare and correct diagnosis is very important for surgery

  1. Helping Your Heart with Nuclear Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, Michael Amdi

    2014-01-01

    The IAEA is helping in the fight against cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) by assisting its Member States in using nuclear science and technology to track and monitor CVDs. Nuclear imaging techniques allow doctors to look inside a patient’s body and see how organs function without running the risk of surgery. CVDs kill more people than just about anything else on the planet. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that roughly 30 per cent of all deaths in 2008 were caused by CVDs. That number is increasing, and by 2030 the WHO estimates that more than 23 million people will die annually from CVDs. For comparison, that is equivalent to roughly the entire population of a medium-sized country

  2. Myocardial perfusion imaging for the detection of coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, H.W.; Cook, D.J.; Bailey, I.; Rouleau, J.; Pitt, B.

    1976-01-01

    A method of myocardial perfusion imaging using 201 Tl is described. Thallium is able to substitute for potassium in biological systems including transport by the sodium--potassium ATP-ase system. The high extraction efficiency of the heart for 201 Tl offers a method whereby a tracer may be administered intravenously and is concentrated to a significant degree by the heart. However, only about 3 to 4 percent of the dose administered lodges in the myocardium. Experiments with dogs indicated that the regional distribution of Tl in the heart reflects the regional distribution of blood flow. The goal is to develop a procedure that can detect those patients with significant disease prior to the onset of a catastrophic event and studies are being undertaken to improve the sensitivity of the method for the detection of smaller lesions in the myocardium

  3. Development of MIBI kit for heart imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamis, S.B.; Ab-Wahid, M.

    1998-01-01

    99m Tc-isonitriles have been shown to be a very promising substitute for Thallium-201 ( 201 TI) for myocardial perfusion imaging. In this study, the lyophilized kit of Methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) was prepared and labeled with 99m Tc. Several factors affecting the labeling yield such as the kit's stannous content, boiling time during labeling, and the volume of 99m Tc used during reconstitution were also investigated. The radiochemical purity (RCP) determination of the labeled product was analyzed by HPLC, solvent-extraction, TLC and ITLC-SG chromatographic methods in various systems. Animal biodistribution study performed in rats indicated the 99m Tc-MIBI accumulation in the myocardial is up to 3 hours with little or no redistribution. Toxicity studies performed indicate no clinical signs of abnormality in mice at injected dose equivalent in amount of 100 times the human dose in proportion to body weight. Stability studies of the labeled complex performed at room temperature showed no change in radiochemical purity (> 95%) 6 hours post-preparation. Compatibility and comparative studies were done using both MINT and commercially available MIBI kits and 99m Tc generator eluates. From the results obtained the MINT produced MIBI kits were found to be comparable in quality to that of commercials. (author)

  4. Imaging of congenital heart disease in adults: choice of modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orwat, Stefan; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Baumgartner, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Major advances in noninvasive imaging of adult congenital heart disease have been accomplished. These tools play now a key role in comprehensive diagnostic work-up, decision for intervention, evaluation for the suitability of specific therapeutic options, monitoring of interventions and regular follow-up. Besides echocardiography, magnetic resonance (CMR) and computed tomography (CT) have gained particular importance. The choice of imaging modality has thus become a critical issue. This review summarizes strengths and limitations of the different imaging modalities and how they may be used in a complementary fashion. Echocardiography obviously remains the workhorse of imaging routinely used in all patients. However, in complex disease and after surgery echocardiography alone frequently remains insufficient. CMR is particularly useful in this setting and allows reproducible and accurate quantification of ventricular function and comprehensive assessment of cardiac anatomy, aorta, pulmonary arteries and venous return including complex flow measurements. CT is preferred when CMR is contraindicated, when superior spatial resolution is required or when "metallic" artefacts limit CMR imaging. In conclusion, the use of currently available imaging modalities in adult congenital heart disease needs to be complementary. Echocardiography remains the basis tool, CMR and CT should be added considering specific open questions and the ability to answer them, availability and economic issues.

  5. The Role of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterzan, Mark A; Rider, Oliver J; Anderson, Lisa J

    2016-11-01

    Cardiovascular imaging is key for the assessment of patients with heart failure. Today, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging plays an established role in the assessment of patients with suspected and confirmed heart failure syndromes, in particular identifying aetiology. Its role in informing prognosis and guiding decisions around therapy are evolving. Key strengths include its accuracy; reproducibility; unrestricted field of view; lack of radiation; multiple abilities to characterise myocardial tissue, thrombus and scar; as well as unparalleled assessment of left and right ventricular volumes. T2* has an established role in the assessment and follow-up of iron overload cardiomyopathy and a role for T1 in specific therapies for cardiac amyloid and Anderson-Fabry disease is emerging.

  6. Role of strain imaging in right heart disease: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Arun; Poongkunran, Chithra; Jayaraj, Mahendran; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2014-10-01

    Advances in the imaging techniques of the heart have fueled the interest in understanding of right heart pathology. Recently, speckle tracking echocardiography has shown to aid in understanding various right heart diseases and better management. Its role is well established in diagnosing right heart failure, pulmonary artery hypertension, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia and congenital heart disease. We review the basic mechanics of speckle tracking and analyze its role in various right heart conditions.

  7. Cine magnetic resonance imaging in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagi, Teiji; Kiyomatsu, Yumi; Kato, Hirohisa; Abe, Toushi; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Ohtake, Hisashi; Eto, Takaharu.

    1989-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 33 patients aged 19 days to 18 years (mean 5.1 years), who had congenital heart disease comfirmed at echocardiography or angiography. Prior to cine MRI, gated MRI with spin echo (SE) sequence was perfomed to evaluate cardiac structure. Cine MRI was demonstrated by fast low fip angle shot imaging technique with a 30 deg flip angle, 15 msec echo time, 30∼40 msec pulse repetition time, and 128X128 acquisition matrix. Abnormalities of cardiac structure were extremely well defined in all patients. Intracardiac and intravasucular blood flow were visualized with high signal intensity area, whereas ventricular filling flow and left to right shunt flow through ventricular septal defect and atrial septal defect were visualized with low signal intensity area. However, in the patients who had severe congestive heart failure or respiratory arrhythmia, the good recording of cine MRI was not obtained because of artifacts. Gated MRI with SE sequence provides excellent visualization of fine structures, and cine MRI can provide high spatial resolution imaging of flow dynamic in a variety of congenital heart disease, noninvasively. (author)

  8. MR imaging of congenital heart diseases in adolescents and adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Kang, I Seok; Park, Seung Woo; Lee, Heung Jae [Sungkwunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-09-01

    Echocardiography and catheterization angiography suffer certain limitations in the evaluation of congenital heart diseases in adults, though these are overcome by MRI, in which a wide field-of view, unlimited multiplanar imaging capability and three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography techniques are used. In adults, recently introduced fast imaging techniques provide cardiac MR images of sufficient quality and with less artifacts. Ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and vascular flow measurements, including pressure gradients and pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio, can be calculated or obtained using fast cine MRI, phase-contrast MR flow-velocity mapping, and semiautomatic analysis software. MRI is superior to echocardiography in diagnosing partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection, unroofed coronary sinus, anomalies of the pulmonary arteries, aorta and systemic veins, complex heart diseases, and postsurgical sequelae. Biventricular function is reliably evaluated with cine MRI after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, and Senning's and Mustard's operations. MRI has an important and growing role in the morphologic and functional assessment of congenital heart diseases in adolescents and adults.

  9. MR imaging of congenital heart diseases in adolescents and adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Kang, I Seok; Park, Seung Woo; Lee, Heung Jae

    2001-01-01

    Echocardiography and catheterization angiography suffer certain limitations in the evaluation of congenital heart diseases in adults, though these are overcome by MRI, in which a wide field-of view, unlimited multiplanar imaging capability and three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography techniques are used. In adults, recently introduced fast imaging techniques provide cardiac MR images of sufficient quality and with less artifacts. Ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and vascular flow measurements, including pressure gradients and pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio, can be calculated or obtained using fast cine MRI, phase-contrast MR flow-velocity mapping, and semiautomatic analysis software. MRI is superior to echocardiography in diagnosing partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection, unroofed coronary sinus, anomalies of the pulmonary arteries, aorta and systemic veins, complex heart diseases, and postsurgical sequelae. Biventricular function is reliably evaluated with cine MRI after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, and Senning's and Mustard's operations. MRI has an important and growing role in the morphologic and functional assessment of congenital heart diseases in adolescents and adults

  10. Current status of radionuclide imaging in valvular heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucher, C.A.; Okada, R.D.; Pohost, G.M.

    1980-12-18

    The current state-of-the-art in radionuclide imaging of valvular heart disease is based on different angiographic patterns in three left-sided valve abnormalities: pressure overload, volume overload, and inflow obstruction. In pressure overload, the left ventricle has normal dimensions or is minimally dilated the volume overload involves a left ventricular dilatation with a normal or reduced ejection fraction at rest the left ventricular function in inflow obstruction is normal, but in some cases may be depressed. Radionuclide angiography evaluates the effect of a valve abnormality on cardiac chamber and function thallium-201 imaging diagnoses regional myocardial blood flow and cell integrity and can evaluate the associated coronary artery disease.

  11. Current status of radionuclide imaging in valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucher, C.A.; Okada, R.D.; Pohost, G.M.

    1980-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art in radionuclide imaging of valvular heart disease is based on different angiographic patterns in three left-sided valve abnormalities: pressure overload, volume overload, and inflow obstruction. In pressure overload, the left ventricle has normal dimensions or is minimally dilated the volume overload involves a left ventricular dilatation with a normal or reduced ejection fraction at rest the left ventricular function in inflow obstruction is normal, but in some cases may be depressed. Radionuclide angiography evaluates the effect of a valve abnormality on cardiac chamber and function thallium-201 imaging diagnoses regional myocardial blood flow and cell integrity and can evaluate the associated coronary artery disease

  12. Myocardial images in nonacute coronary and noncoronary heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poe, N.D.; Eber, L.M.; Norman, A.S.; Selin, C.E.; Terao, E.N.

    1977-01-01

    To determine the variables that might affect interpretability of myocardial perfusion images in patients with acute myocardial infarctions, images obtained following intravenous administration of potassium-43 or cesium-129 were evaluated in 68 patients with nonacute coronary or noncoronary heart diseases, who were undergoing cardiac catheterization. Severe coronary arterial disease usually produces no distinctive perfusion defects in the resting state. Remote infarcts likewise tend to remain undetectable unless accompanied by wall-motion disturbances that can be detected by ventriculography. Left ventricular hypertrophy or cardiac dilatation can produce perfusion patterns indistinguishable from the ischemic defects of infarction. Right ventricular hypertrophy can cause image alterations that mimic infarcts in the left ventricle. In patients with acute myocardial infarction, sequential imaging studies with perfusion indicators should be of value in determining the effects of various therapeutic maneuvers on regional myocardial perfusion, but variations caused by conditions other than acute vascular occlusion limit the usefulness of perfusion imaging for diagnosing acute infarction. In suspected acute infarction, perfusion imaging will be used most effectively in conjunction with other imaging or nonimaging procedures that show the presence of damaged or necrotic myocardium. The information derived from this study should be generally applicable to the interpretation of imaging results obtained with the newer indicators of myocardial perfusion now in use or under development

  13. [sup 123]I-iodobenzoylglucosamines: glucose analogues for heart imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, T [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences; Dougan, H [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Rihela, T; Vo, C V [Vancouver General Hospital (Canada). Div. of Nuclear Medicine; Lyster, D M [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences Vancouver General Hospital (Canada). Div. of Nuclear Medicine

    1993-01-01

    The ortho-, meta- and para-[[sup 123]I]-2-deoxy-2-N-(iodobenzoyl)-D-glucosamine (BGA) derivatives were investigated to determine the effect of iodine position and lipophilicity on tissue distribution. There was no correlation between tissue uptake and lipophilicity. Maximum uptake was observed for o-BGA displaying a heart:blood ratio of 36.0 at 18 hours post injection. Yeast hexokinase phosphorylation studies in vitro and an in vivo insulin experiment were carried out on o-BGA. No phosphorylation was detected, but the insulin study indicated that o-BGA uses the glucose transporter. o-BGA showed maximum tissue uptake in mice at an optimal specific activity of 0.004mg/[mu]Ci. Mouse biodistribution studies of o-[[sup 123]I]-iodobenzamide(o-[sup 123]IBA) indicated that the glucose moiety of o-BGA may be involved in the heart accumulation process in mice. Heart tissue extraction studies showed unmetabolized o-[[sup 123]I]BGA was the predominant species. A rabbit image of o-[[sup 123]I]BGA, recorded at 14 hours post injection, showed significant heart uptake. (author).

  14. Gender and images of heart disease in Scandinavian drug advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riska, Elianne; Heikell, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the construction of the "heart disease candidate" in advertisements for cardiovascular drugs in Scandinavian medical journals. All advertisements for cardiovascular drugs (n = 603) in Scandinavian medical journals (Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden) in 2005 were collected. Only advertisements that portray users (n = 289, 48% of the advertisements) were analyzed. The results show that coronary candidacy is constructed as a male condition in half of the advertisements for cardiovascular drugs. The advertisements suggest a gendering of heart disease: men are the major victims of heart failure and cardiac insufficiency, and women are in need of cholesterol-lowering drugs. The cardiovascular drug advertisements portray a restoration of men's hyperactive agency, valorized by means of sporty images, by drawing on masculinity as a fixed trait and behavior. Hypercholesterolemia as a woman's disease reproduces the tyranny of slimness for women: Only women's stoutness is medicalized, and there are no pictures of heavy men. The findings point to the public health implications of gendered images of coronary candidacy in medical advertising.

  15. PET-CMR in heart failure - synergistic or redundant imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quail, Michael A; Sinusas, Albert J

    2017-07-01

    Imaging in heart failure (HF) provides data for diagnosis, prognosis and disease monitoring. Both MRI and nuclear imaging techniques have been successfully used for this purpose in HF. Positron Emission Tomography-Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (PET-CMR) is an example of a new multimodality diagnostic imaging technique with potential applications in HF. The threshold for adopting a new diagnostic tool to clinical practice must necessarily be high, lest they exacerbate costs without improving care. New modalities must demonstrate clinical superiority, or at least equivalence, combined with another important advantage, such as lower cost or improved patient safety. The purpose of this review is to outline the current status of multimodality PET-CMR with regard to HF applications, and determine whether the clinical utility of this new technology justifies the cost.

  16. Assessment of the interface of beating heart with total artificial heart using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komoda, Tsuyoshi; Maeta, Hajime; Uyama, Chikao; Sanou, Kazuo.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied three-dimensionally (3-D) reconstructed images of atrioventricular (AV) annuli based on four-chamber magnetic resonance (MR) images for total artificial heart (TAH) implantation. To assess the interrelationship among the AV annuli and the thorax, we applied the frame of reference of the vertebral canal to these images. The Z-axis was along the vertebral canal, the Y-axis in the anteroposterior direction. The angle alpha was defined as the angle between the X-axis and the intersection between the plane of the annulus and the X-Y plane. The angle beta was defined as the angle between the Z-axis and the intersection between the plane of annulus and X-Z plane. The angle gamma was defined as the angle between the plane of the annulus and the anterior thoracic wall. We determined each angle for the mitral annulus (MVA) and tricuspid annulus (TVA) in four normal subjects to be as follows: alpha-MVA, 20.5-39.5 degrees; alpha-TVA, 26.1-43.5 degrees; beta-MVA, 4.7-49.4 degrees; beta-TVA, 4.4-40.9 degrees; and gamma-TVA, 35.2-44.1 degrees. It is suggested that reconstruction of the thoracic wall and AV annuli using the frame of reference of the diaphragmatic surface of the heart would facilitate evaluation of the spacial requirements for TAH implantation. Research to define this new frame of reference is in progress. (author)

  17. Formulation of MIBI Kit as a heart imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widyastuti; A, Hanafiah; Yunilda; A, Laksmi; Setyowati, Sri; Y Veronika

    1999-01-01

    9 9 m Tc labelled 2-methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile(MIBI) has been known as an imaging agent for myocardial perfusion. This radiopharmaceutical preparation gives the same satisfactory result as Thallium- 2 10TI, and presumably could replace 2 01TI because of same advantages. MIBI kit was formulated from MIBI ligand produced by RPC-BATAN which has been characterized and tested for quality. The formula used in this research referred to the formula of imported product(Cardiolite, MIBI kit produced by Dupont), and the quality control testing was performed by comparing some parameters to the imported product. The parameters used for QC testing were radiochemical purity, biodistribution in nice and heart imaging in human volunteer using gamma camera. The result of the experiment showed that the radiochemical purity was 95 % in average, biodistribution in heart to liver gave the ratio of 0.67, 1.5, and 2.53 respectively at 10, 30 and 60 minutes after injection. The result of clinical testing in some volunteers gave contrast images as good as given by Cardiolite. The optimum condition of freeze drying has been found, and the kit can be used for more than 6 months

  18. Parametric images evaluation of selected phases of the heart cycle with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just, U.; Will, E.; Beuthien Baumann, B.; Bredow, J.

    2002-01-01

    The standard evaluation of dynamic heart acquisitions with PET uses image data not corrected for heart wall movement. The evaluation of parametric data sets (Patlak Plot) was investigated for gated studies of selected heart phases (diastolic, systolic) and compared to the standard evaluation. Parametric images of selected heart phases have improved resolution. The values for metabolic rate are different for a ''normal'' and gated evaluation, up to 50% more for the systole compared to the normal one. (orig.)

  19. Imaging techniques for visualizing and phenotyping congenital heart defects in murine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Tobita, Kimimasa; Francis, Richard J B; Lo, Cecilia W

    2013-06-01

    Mouse model is ideal for investigating the genetic and developmental etiology of congenital heart disease. However, cardiovascular phenotyping for the precise diagnosis of structural heart defects in mice remain challenging. With rapid advances in imaging techniques, there are now high throughput phenotyping tools available for the diagnosis of structural heart defects. In this review, we discuss the efficacy of four different imaging modalities for congenital heart disease diagnosis in fetal/neonatal mice, including noninvasive fetal echocardiography, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), micro-magnetic resonance imaging (micro-MRI), and episcopic fluorescence image capture (EFIC) histopathology. The experience we have gained in the use of these imaging modalities in a large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen have validated their efficacy for congenital heart defect diagnosis in the tiny hearts of fetal and newborn mice. These cutting edge phenotyping tools will be invaluable for furthering our understanding of the developmental etiology of congenital heart disease. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Dual-source CT coronary imaging in heart transplant recipients: image quality and optimal reconstruction interval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastarrika, Gorka; Arraiza, Maria; Pueyo, Jesus C.; Cecco, Carlo N. de; Ubilla, Matias; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; Rabago, Gregorio

    2008-01-01

    The image quality and optimal reconstruction interval for coronary arteries in heart transplant recipients undergoing non-invasive dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) coronary angiography was evaluated. Twenty consecutive heart transplant recipients who underwent DSCT coronary angiography were included (19 male, one female; mean age 63.1±10.7 years). Data sets were reconstructed in 5% steps from 30% to 80% of the R-R interval. Two blinded independent observers assessed the image quality of each coronary segments using a five-point scale (from 0 = not evaluative to 4=excellent quality). A total of 289 coronary segments in 20 heart transplant recipients were evaluated. Mean heart rate during the scan was 89.1±10.4 bpm. At the best reconstruction interval, diagnostic image quality (score ≥2) was obtained in 93.4% of the coronary segments (270/289) with a mean image quality score of 3.04± 0.63. Systolic reconstruction intervals provided better image quality scores than diastolic reconstruction intervals (overall mean quality scores obtained with the systolic and diastolic reconstructions 3.03±1.06 and 2.73±1.11, respectively; P<0.001). Different systolic reconstruction intervals (35%, 40%, 45% of RR interval) did not yield to significant differences in image quality scores for the coronary segments (P=0.74). Reconstructions obtained at the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle allowed excellent diagnostic image quality coronary angiograms in heart transplant recipients undergoing DSCT coronary angiography. (orig.)

  1. Cine-MR imaging of valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan; Kim, Dae Jin; Kim, Woo Sung; Park, Hyun Wuk; Cho, Zang Hee

    1989-01-01

    Cine-MR imaging was done in 2 normal persons and 9 patients of valvular heart disease with 2.0 T superconducting MR system (Spectro-2000; GoldStar, Korea). The MRI was undertaken using gradient echo technique with small flip angle. Repetition time (TR) was 34 msec, and echo time (TE), 18 msec. In most cases, 20 to 30 frames could be obtained during one cardiac cycle. With normal heart, high signal intensity was identified in the blood filled cardiac chambers. Transient signal void was observed near tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves due to the turbulences induced by valve opening or closure. In 6 cases of mitral valvular disease, mitral valve was identified in all cases. The valvular motion was limited revealing doming toward cardiac apex during diastole. Signal void was evident in pansystolic phase of left ventricle in all cases. Evidence of combined aortic or tricuspid valve disease were also demonstrated, revealing signal void in the corresponding cardiac chambers. Cine-MRI seemed to be not only a good non-invasive diagnostic modality for the valvular heart disease, but also an accurate modality for cardiac functional evaluation

  2. Cine-MR imaging of valvular heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Jin; Kim, Woo Sung; Park, Hyun Wuk; Cho, Zang Hee [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-04-15

    Cine-MR imaging was done in 2 normal persons and 9 patients of valvular heart disease with 2.0 T superconducting MR system (Spectro-2000; GoldStar, Korea). The MRI was undertaken using gradient echo technique with small flip angle. Repetition time (TR) was 34 msec, and echo time (TE), 18 msec. In most cases, 20 to 30 frames could be obtained during one cardiac cycle. With normal heart, high signal intensity was identified in the blood filled cardiac chambers. Transient signal void was observed near tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves due to the turbulences induced by valve opening or closure. In 6 cases of mitral valvular disease, mitral valve was identified in all cases. The valvular motion was limited revealing doming toward cardiac apex during diastole. Signal void was evident in pansystolic phase of left ventricle in all cases. Evidence of combined aortic or tricuspid valve disease were also demonstrated, revealing signal void in the corresponding cardiac chambers. Cine-MRI seemed to be not only a good non-invasive diagnostic modality for the valvular heart disease, but also an accurate modality for cardiac functional evaluation.

  3. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Sorantin, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is around 10 per 1000 live births in Germany. More than 90 % of these patients will survive into adulthood due to improvements in therapy. The classification of CHD may be based according to the anatomic structures involved, to the presence of an intracardiac shunt, the presence of a cyanosis and the intensity of therapy and complexity of the disease. Nearly half of all patients with CHD suffer from an intracardiac shunt, whereas complex cases such as patients with a tetralogy of Fallot or transposition of the great arteries are much more rare. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the work-up and follow-up of patients with CHD, especially after infancy and childhood. Depending on the abnormality in question, a multiparametric examination protocol is mandatory. Knowledge of operative procedures and findings of other imaging modalities help to optimize examination and time needed for it.

  4. Magnetic resonance (MR) cine imaging of the human heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waterton, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    A novel approach has been developed for MR cine imaging of the human heart by a modified ECG-gated 2DFT method. A pulse sequence has been devised to minimise the effects of saturation which can be anticipated in sequences that require rapid pulsing. Five frames are produced at the same anatomical level at predetermined intervals during the cardiac cycle. The total time taken to achieve this data is 8 minutes. Additional frames can be interleaved by repeating the sequence with an ECG-gated delay. The anatomical sections, which can be in any orthogonal plane, are then displayed as a cine loop. Cine display in the coronal plane has been used to examine 10 volunteers and 12 patients. In addition to the morphological feature displayed in single slice ECG-gated imaging, areas of dyskinesia can be detected and subjective estimates have been made of left ventricular function. (author)

  5. Smartphone-based photoplethysmographic imaging for heart rate monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alafeef, Maha

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to make use of visible light reflected mode photoplethysmographic (PPG) imaging for heart rate (HR) monitoring via smartphones. The system uses the built-in camera feature in mobile phones to capture video from the subject's index fingertip. The video is processed, and then the PPG signal resulting from the video stream processing is used to calculate the subject's heart rate. Records from 19 subjects were used to evaluate the system's performance. The HR values obtained by the proposed method were compared with the actual HR. The obtained results show an accuracy of 99.7% and a maximum absolute error of 0.4 beats/min where most of the absolute errors lay in the range of 0.04-0.3 beats/min. Given the encouraging results, this type of HR measurement can be adopted with great benefit, especially in the conditions of personal use or home-based care. The proposed method represents an efficient portable solution for HR accurate detection and recording.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Koichiro; Uchishiba, Mika; Tateno, Shigeru; Aotsuka, Hiroyuki; Nakatani, Hayao; Matsuo, Kozo; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Tashima, Kazuyuki.

    1992-01-01

    We applied the segmental analysis of cardiac MR images for evaluation of congenital heart diseases (CHD). One hundred and ninety-three patients with CHD, ranging in age from 20 days to 18 years old, were studied by MRI. This study compared the effectiveness of MRI with cardiac angiography and echocardiography for the evaluation of major diagnosis of CHD and all components of cardiovascular anatomy. ECG-gated MRI was performed by spin echo and gradient refocused imaging techniques operating at 0.5 tesla. In all the patients not only cardiovascular anatomies of CHD but all structures relevant to the identification of arrangement of organs were displayed. In diagnosing a total of 193 of major cardiac anomalies and 741 segments of the vein, the atrium, the ventricle and the great vessels by MRI and angiocardiogram and/or echocardiogram, descrepancies were found in 6 patients (3.1%), and only 18 segments (2.4%), respectively. For vascular and complex cardiac anatomies MRI was able to provide good anatomical details. Based on these findings, the segmental analysis of cardiac MR images was found useful for achieving a systematic diagnosis of CHD. (author)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with heart valve prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, R.; Juengehuelsing, M.; Schicha, H.; Deutsch, H.J.; Sechtem, U.; Hilger, H.H.

    1991-01-01

    Artifical valve prostheses are often regarded as a contraindication for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), although preliminary in vitro studies suggested, that patients with these metallic implants might safely undergo MR examination. This study reports on the experience with a group of 89 patients with 100 heart valve prostheses who were examined by spin-echo MR and gradient-echo MR. MR examination was performed in all patients without complications. The spin-echo sequence showed advantages in the depiction of anatomical structures like paravalvular abcesses. Anatomical structures adjacent to the artificial valve were clearly visivle and the metal components of the valves showes no or only small artifacts. Artifacts were accentuated when using gradient-echo sequences. Gradient-echo sequences provided valuable information regarding the presence of valvular insufficiency. Physiological valvular regurgitation was easy to differentiate from pathological paravalvular or transvalvular regurgitation. These results demonstrate that patients with artificial valve prostheses can be imaged by MR without risk and that prosthesis-induced artifacts do no interfere with image interpretation. (orig.) [de

  8. The year 2013 in the European Heart Journal--Cardiovascular Imaging. Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsen, Thor; Plein, Sven; Saraste, Antti; Pierard, Luc A; Knuuti, Juhani; Maurer, Gerald; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2014-07-01

    The new multimodality cardiovascular imaging journal, European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging, was created in 2012. Here, we summarize the most important studies from the journal's second year in two articles. Part I of the review will focus on studies in myocardial function, myocardial ischaemia, and emerging techniques in cardiovascular imaging, and Part II will focus on valvular heart diseases, heart failure, cardiomyopathies, and congenital heart diseases. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The year 2014 in the European Heart Journal – Cardiovascular Imaging. Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsen, Thor; Bucciarelli-Ducci, Chiara; Saraste, Antti; Pierard, Luc A; Knuuti, Juhani; Maurer, Gerald; Habib, Gilbert; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2015-07-01

    The new multimodality cardiovascular imaging journal, European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging, was created in 2012. It has already gained an impressive impact factor of 3.669 during its first 2 years. In two articles, we will summarize the most important studies from the journal's third year. Part I of the review will focus on studies in myocardial function, myocardial ischaemia, and emerging techniques in cardiovascular imaging, and Part II will focus on valvular heart diseases, heart failure, cardiomyopathies, and congenital heart diseases. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The year 2013 in the European Heart Journal--Cardiovascular Imaging: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plein, Sven; Edvardsen, Thor; Pierard, Luc A; Saraste, Antti; Knuuti, Juhani; Maurer, Gerald; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2014-08-01

    The new multi-modality cardiovascular imaging journal, European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging, was created in 2012. Here we summarize the most important studies from the journal's second year in two articles. Part I of the review has summarized studies in myocardial function, myocardial ischaemia, and emerging techniques in cardiovascular imaging. Part II is focussed on valvular heart diseases, heart failure, cardiomyopathies, and congenital heart diseases. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. White matter injury in newborns with congenital heart disease: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkey, Sarah B; Ou, Xiawei; Ramakrishnaiah, Raghu H; Glasier, Charles M; Swearingen, Christopher J; Melguizo, Maria S; Yap, Vivien L; Schmitz, Michael L; Bhutta, Adnan T

    2014-09-01

    Brain injury is observed on cranial magnetic resonance imaging preoperatively in up to 50% of newborns with congenital heart disease. Newer imaging techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging provide sensitive measures of the white matter integrity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diffusion tensor imaging analysis technique of tract-based spatial statistics in newborns with congenital heart disease. Term newborns with congenital heart disease who would require surgery at less than 1 month of age were prospectively enrolled (n = 19). Infants underwent preoperative and postoperative brain magnetic resonance imaging with diffusion tensor imaging. Tract-based spatial statistics, an objective whole-brain diffusion tensor imaging analysis technique, was used to determine differences in white matter fractional anisotropy between infant groups. Term control infants were also compared with congenital heart disease infants. Postmenstrual age was equivalent between congenital heart disease infant groups and between congenital heart disease and control infants. Ten infants had preoperative brain injury, either infarct or white matter injury, by conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging. The technique of tract-based spatial statistics showed significantly lower fractional anisotropy (P tensor imaging analysis technique that may have better sensitivity in detecting white matter injury compared with conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging in term newborns with congenital heart disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Postmortem magnetic resonance imaging: Reproducing typical autopsy heart measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Hatch, Gary M; Flach, Patricia M; Thali, Michael J; Ruder, Thomas D

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of cardiac postmortem magnetic resonance (PMMR) to perform routine measurements of the ventricular wall thicknesses and the heart valves and to assess if imaging measurements are consistent with traditional autopsy measurements. In this retrospective study, 25 cases with cardiac PMMR and subsequent autopsy were included. The thicknesses of the myocardial walls as well as the circumferences of all heart valves were measured on cardiac PMMR and compared to autopsy measurements. Paired samples T-test and the Wilcoxon-Signed rank test, were used to compare autopsy and cardiac PMMR measurements. For exploring correlations, the Pearson's Correlation coefficient and the Spearman's Rho test were used. Cardiac PMMR measurements of the aortic and pulmonary valve circumferences showed no significant differences from autopsy measurements. The mitral and tricuspid valves circumferences differed significantly from autopsy measurements. Left myocardial and right myocardial wall thickness also differed significantly from autopsy measurements. Left and right myocardial wall thickness, and tricuspid valve circumference measurements on cardiac PMMR and autopsy, correlated strongly and significantly. Several PMMR measurements of cardiac parameters differ significantly from corresponding autopsy measurements. However, there is a strong correlation between cardiac PMMR measurements and autopsy measurements in the majority of these parameters. It is important to note that myocardial walls are thicker when measured in situ on cardiac PMMR than when measured at autopsy. Investigators using post-mortem MR should be aware of these differences in order to avoid false diagnoses of cardiac pathology based on cardiac PMMR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the heart and great vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aviram, G.; Fishman, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in the potential of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to perform a 'one-stop' global cardiac MRI examination in as little as 1 hour. This possibility is enhanced by advances in MR hardware, particularly gradient field strength and specialized coils, as well as software advances, including the availability of a wide array of new fast cardiac-triggered MR pulse sequences and improvements in MR signal use, electrocardiogram (ECG) triggering and post-processing software. MRI is an evolving technology. Currently, cardiac MRI examination provides more than just high-quality information on cardiac chamber morphological anatomy. Cardiac function including ejection fraction can also be determined by fast cine MRI studies. Velocity-encoded techniques permit measurements of blood flow, which are useful for quantifying the function of both ventricles and the severity of valvular lesions. Contrast-enhanced myocardial perfusion and functional studies with pharmaceutical stress may help determine myocardial tissue viability and offer an alternative to nuclear cardiology and stress echocardiography. Coronary MR angiography is also in progress. Nevertheless, some of these new applications have not yet achieved full maturity. Cardiac MRI already has many proven clinical indications in the study of acquired heart disease, congenital heart disease, the quantification of cardiac function, and vascular disease of the thoracic aorta and pulmonary arteries. The aim of this review is to present the main applications of currently available cardiac MR technology with a brief look into recent developments that are still not widely available for daily clinical use. (author)

  14. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging in children with heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitomori, Toshihiro; Ono, Yasuo; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Kozuka, Takahiro; Kohata, Tohru; Tanimoto, Takeshi.

    1985-01-01

    201-TlCl myocardial imaging studies were performed to evaluate systolic pressure of right ventricle on 107 patients including 89 patients with congenital cardiac disease, patients with primary pulmonary hypertension and 13 patients with history of MCLS with the age range of 2 months to 17 years. The congenital cardiac disease group included 30 patients with tetralogy of Fallot, 8 patients with pulmonary stenosis (included 1 patient with double chambered right ventricle), 20 patients with ventricular septal defect, 10 patients with patent ductus arteriosus, 9 patients with atrial septal defect and 12 patients with complete transposition of greate arteries. None of the patients with history of MCLS had coronary involvement. 50 μCi/kg of 201-TlCl was infused intravenously and after 15 minutes the images were obtained from 5 directions (anterior, LAO 30, LAO 45, LAO 60 and lateral). The angle was determined to demonstrate the intraventricular septum and ventricular free walls cleary separated. The image of end-diastolic phase was obtained with ECG syncronized gated method from that direction. The ROI (region of interest) was defined as a slice line by drawing two lines perpendicular to the septum and the counts of the left and right ventricular free wall (Cl and Cr) were analized to evaluate the pressure of right ventricle. The pressure of ventricles were obtained by cardiac catheterization performed at the same time with myocardial imaging. The ratio of Cl and Cr (Cr/Cl) had good correlation with the ratio of peak systolic pressure of left ventricle and right ventricle (regression equation Y=0.84X+0.08, r=0.87). In each congenital heart disease group, very good corelation was also demonstrated (Y=1.46X-0.30, r=0.96 in PS ; Y=0.70X0.20, r=0.91 in VSD ; Y=0.86X+0.15, r=0.78 in ASD and Y=0.72X+0.24, r=0.80 in PDA). Thus 201-TlCl myocardial imaging was useful method to evaluate right ventricular pressure noninvasively in congenital cardiac disease. (author)

  15. Imaging the developing heart: synchronized time-lapse microscopy during developmental changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Carl J.; Buckley, Charlotte; Mullins, John J.; Denvir, Martin A.; Taylor, Jonathan

    2018-02-01

    How do you use imaging to analyse the development of the heart, which not only changes shape but also undergoes constant, high-speed, quasi-periodic changes? We have integrated ideas from prospective and retrospective optical gating to capture long-term, phase-locked developmental time-lapse videos. In this paper we demonstrate the success of this approach over a key developmental time period: heart looping, where large changes in heart shape prevent previous prospective gating approaches from capturing phase- locked videos. We use the comparison with other approaches to in vivo heart imaging to highlight the importance of collecting the most appropriate data for the biological question.

  16. Clinical significance of increased lung/heart ratio in 210Tl stress myocardial image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zaoli; Chang Fengqin; Zhang Fengge; Wang Xiaoyuan; Liu Liuhua

    1990-01-01

    230 cases were studied with 201 Tl stress image. The results showed that the lung/heart ratio closely correlated with the presence and severity of coronary heart disease (CHD). Among them, 18 cases (7.8%) showed significantly elevated lung/heart ratio (> 0.50). It was confirmed that all of the 18 cases have severe CHD with left ventricular insufficiency. The author emphasizes that measurement of the lung/heart ratio during 201 Tl stress myocardial image may be useful for the assessment of the severity, evalation of the left ventricular function and judgement of prognosis in CHD

  17. The year 2014 in the European Heart Journal--Cardiovascular Imaging: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Bernhard L; Edvardsen, Thor; Pierard, Luc A; Saraste, Antti; Knuuti, Juhani; Maurer, Gerald; Habib, Gilbert; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2015-11-01

    The European Heart Journal-Cardiovascular Imaging, created in 2012, has become a reference for publishing multimodality cardiovascular imaging scientific and review papers. The impressive 2014 impact factor of 4.105 confirms the important position of our journal. In this part, we summarize the most important studies from the journal's third year, with specific emphasis on cardiomyopathies, congenital heart diseases, valvular heart diseases, and heart failure. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in heart failure: where the alphabet begins!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljizeeri, Ahmed; Sulaiman, Abdulbaset; Alhulaimi, Naji; Alsaileek, Ahmed; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H

    2017-07-01

    Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging has become a cornerstone in the evaluation of heart failure. It provides a comprehensive evaluation by answering all the pertinent clinical questions across the full pathological spectrum of heart failure. Nowadays, CMR is considered the gold standard in evaluation of ventricular volumes, wall motion and systolic function. Through its unique ability of tissue characterization, it provides incremental diagnostic and prognostic information and thus has emerged as a comprehensive imaging modality in heart failure. This review outlines the role of main conventional CMR sequences in the evaluation of heart failure and their impact in the management and prognosis.

  19. [Present status and trend of heart fluid mechanics research based on medical image analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jianhong; Yin, Lixue; Xie, Shenghua; Li, Wenhua; Lu, Jing; Luo, Anguo

    2014-06-01

    With introduction of current main methods for heart fluid mechanics researches, we studied the characteristics and weakness for three primary analysis methods based on magnetic resonance imaging, color Doppler ultrasound and grayscale ultrasound image, respectively. It is pointed out that particle image velocity (PIV), speckle tracking and block match have the same nature, and three algorithms all adopt block correlation. The further analysis shows that, with the development of information technology and sensor, the research for cardiac function and fluid mechanics will focus on energy transfer process of heart fluid, characteristics of Chamber wall related to blood fluid and Fluid-structure interaction in the future heart fluid mechanics fields.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance zeugmatographic imaging of the heart: application to the study of ventricular septal defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heneghan, M.A.; Biancaniello, T.M.; Heidel, E.; Peterson, S.B.; Marsh, M.J.; Lauterbur, P.C.

    1982-01-01

    The present work was undertaken to determine the applicability of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging to the study of congenital heart disease. Three-dimensional proton density images of preserved lamb hearts with and without an artificially created ventricular septal defect were reconstructed and displayed in multiple planes. Sections obtained in the sagittal plane through the ventricular septum clearly showed the size, shape, and location of the defect. Results of these experiments suggest that NMR zeugmatography will become a valuable addition to existing imaging techniques for the study of congenital heart disease

  1. Direct myocardial perfusion imaging in valvular heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, R.C.; Durante, M.L.; Villacorta, E.V.; Torres, J.F.; Monzon, O.P.

    1981-02-01

    Twenty two patients with rheumatic valvular heart disease - 21 having a history of heart failure - were studied using direct coronary injection of /sup 99m/Tc labelled MAA particles during the course of hemodynamic and arteriographic studies. Myocardial perfusion deficit patterns have been shown to be consistent or indicative of either patchy, regional or gross ischemia. In patients with history of documented heart failure 90% (18 cases) had ischemic perfusion deficit in the involved ventricle. We conclude that diminished myocardial blood flow is an important mechanism contributing to the development of heart failure.

  2. Direct myocardial perfusion imaging in valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, R.C.; Durante, M.L.; Villacorta, E.V.; Torres, J.F.; Monzon, O.P.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty two patients with rheumatic valvular heart disease - 21 having a history of heart failure - were studied using direct coronary injection of sup(99m)Tc labelled MAA particles during the course of hemodynamic and arteriographic studies. Myocardial perfusion deficit patterns have been shown to be consistent or indicative of either patchy, regional or gross ischemia. In patients with history of documented heart failure 90% (18 cases) had ischemic perfusion deficit in the involved ventricle. We conclude that diminished myocardial blood flow is an important mechanism contributing to the development of heart failure. (orig.) [de

  3. Three-dimensional surface reconstruction imaging for evaluation of congenital heart disease from ECG-triggered MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannier, M.W.; Laschinger, J.; Knapp, R.H.; Gutierrez, F.R.; Gronnemeyer, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Three-dimensional surface reconstruction images of the heart and great vessels were produced from contiguous sequences of electrocardiographically triggered MR images in 25 patients with congenital heart disease and in three healthy subjects. The imaging data were semiautomatically processed to separate the epicardial and endocardial surfaces and to define the outline of the enclosed blood volumes on a section by section basis. Images were obtained at 5-mm intervals in patients aged 3 months to 30 years with anomalies of the great vessels, tetralogy of Fallot, septal defects, pulmonary atresia, and other congenital heart malformations. The results were used to facilitate the surgical treatment of these patients and were compared with echocardiographic and cineradiographic studies, and with surgical findings or pathologic specimens. These surface reconstruction images were useful for communicating the results of diagnostic examinations to cardiac surgeons, for sizing and location of intracardiac defects, for imaging the pulmonary venous drainage, and for assessing regional and global function

  4. An approach for extracting the vein and heart boundaries from raw NM images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitrovski, Cvetko D.; Kostov, Mitko B.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present our approach on prE.processing chest region dynamical NM images which enables anatomical data extraction of the vena cava and the heart. The aim of the method is developing sophisticated diagnostic software that could automatically offer the optimal positions and the shapes of the regions of interest needed for the heart studies. (Author)

  5. Self-gating MR imaging of the fetal heart: comparison with real cardiac triggering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Jin; Frisch, Michael; Ecker, Hannes; Adam, Gerhard; Wedegaertner, Ulrike; Graessner, Joachim; Hecher, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the self-gating technique for MR imaging of the fetal heart in a sheep model. MR images of 6 fetal sheep heart were obtained at 1.5T. For self-gating MRI of the fetal heart a cine SSFP in short axis, two and four chamber view was used. Self-gated images were compared with real cardiac triggered MR images (pulse-wave triggering). MRI of the fetal heart was performed using both techniques simultaneously. Image quality was assessed and the left ventricular volume and function were measured and compared. Compared with pulse-wave triggering, the self-gating technique produced slightly inferior images with artifacts. Especially the atrial septum could not be so clearly depicted. The contraction of the fetal heart was shown in cine sequences in both techniques. The average blood volumes could be measured with both techniques with no significant difference: at end-systole 3.1 ml (SD± 0.2), at end-diastole 4.9 ml (±0.2), with ejection fractions at 38.6%, respectively 39%. Both self-gating and pulse-wave triggered cardiac MRI of the fetal heart allowed the evaluation of anatomical structures and functional information. Images obtained by self-gating technique were slightly inferior than the pulse-wave triggered MRI. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease at 0.3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmgren, N

    1995-11-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the potential of static MR imaging in congenital heart disease. The diagnosis of vascular rings, causing significant respiratory morbidity, previously required invasive methods for diagnosis. In aberrant left pulmonary artery, an uncommon anomaly, MR imaging at 0.3 T provided complete anatomic information. Complex congenital heart malformation is a diagnostic challenge. MR imaging at 0.3 T was efficient in defining most of the components of complex disease. It is especially valuable for imaging of extracardiac structures, which can be difficult to evaluate using echocardiography. MR imaging is an important complement to echocardiography. Improved equipment with sophisticated dynamic applications using high magnetic field strength is now available. The anatomical evaluation of congenital heart anomalies is however still based on static images, and low field magnets will certainly be used even in the future. 141 refs, 11 figs, 8 tabs.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease at 0.3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmgren, N.

    1995-11-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the potential of static MR imaging in congenital heart disease. The diagnosis of vascular rings, causing significant respiratory morbidity, previously required invasive methods for diagnosis. In aberrant left pulmonary artery, an uncommon anomaly, MR imaging at 0.3 T provided complete anatomic information. Complex congenital heart malformation is a diagnostic challenge. MR imaging at 0.3 T was efficient in defining most of the components of complex disease. It is especially valuable for imaging of extracardiac structures, which can be difficult to evaluate using echocardiography. MR imaging is an important complement to echocardiography. Improved equipment with sophisticated dynamic applications using high magnetic field strength is now available. The anatomical evaluation of congenital heart anomalies is however still based on static images, and low field magnets will certainly be used even in the future. 141 refs, 11 figs, 8 tabs

  8. Local experience on radionuclide myocardial imaging in the Philippines at the Philippine Heart Center for Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villacorta, E.V.

    1977-01-01

    The Nuclear Medicine Department of the Philippine Heart Center has introduced the detection of coronary heart disease through myocardiac perfusion imaging. The cardiovascular procedures are availed of free-of-charge to registered PHCA patients excepting for the costly TI-201 imaging. In summary, coronary perfusion in imaging should be an integral part of coronary arteriography. Barring the expensive cost of TI-120, myocardial perfusion imaging is ideal for detection of coronary heart disease. Experience shows better sensitivity of TI-201 than exercise ECG for detection of ischemia. Another non-invasive procedure for the detection of acute infarction is the radionuclide imaging using a bone radiopharmaceutical Tc99m prophosphate. In conclusion, acute infarct imaging is a valuable adjunct to ECG and enzyme studies. (RTD)

  9. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging of hypoplastic left heart syndrome in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, Jonathan R.; Hernandez, Ramiro J.; Dorfman, Adam L.; Attili, Anil K.; Agarwal, Prachi P.; Mueller, Gisela C.; Bell, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) plays an important complementary role to echocardiography and conventional angiography in the evaluation of hypoplastic left heart syndrome. This imaging modality is particularly useful for assessing cardiovascular postsurgical changes, extracardiac vascular anatomy, ventricular and valvular function, and a variety of complications. The purpose of this article is to provide a contemporary review of the role of CMR in the management of untreated and surgically palliated hypoplastic left heart syndrome in children. (orig.)

  10. Segmentation of Drosophila Heart in Optical Coherence Microscopy Images Using Convolutional Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Lian; Qin, Xi; He, Yuanhao; Sang, Xialin; Pan, Jinda; Xu, Tao; Men, Jing; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Li, Airong; Ma, Yutao; Zhou, Chao

    2018-01-01

    Convolutional neural networks are powerful tools for image segmentation and classification. Here, we use this method to identify and mark the heart region of Drosophila at different developmental stages in the cross-sectional images acquired by a custom optical coherence microscopy (OCM) system. With our well-trained convolutional neural network model, the heart regions through multiple heartbeat cycles can be marked with an intersection over union (IOU) of ~86%. Various morphological and dyn...

  11. Association Between Echocardiography Laboratory Accreditation and the Quality of Imaging and Reporting for Valvular Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaden, Jeremy J; Tsang, Michael Y; Ayoub, Chadi; Padang, Ratnasari; Nkomo, Vuyisile T; Tucker, Stephen F; Cassidy, Cynthia S; Bremer, Merri; Kane, Garvan C; Pellikka, Patricia A

    2017-08-01

    It is presumed that echocardiographic laboratory accreditation leads to improved quality, but there are few data. We sought to compare the quality of echocardiographic examinations performed at accredited versus nonaccredited laboratories for the evaluation of valvular heart disease. We enrolled 335 consecutive valvular heart disease subjects who underwent echocardiography at our institution and an external accredited or nonaccredited institution within 6 months. Completeness and quality of echocardiographic reports and images were assessed by investigators blinded to the external laboratory accreditation status and echocardiographic results. Compared with nonaccredited laboratories, accredited sites more frequently reported patient sex (94% versus 78%; P heart disease. Future quality improvement initiatives should highlight the importance of high-quality color Doppler imaging and echocardiographic quantification to improve the accuracy, reproducibility, and quality of echocardiographic studies for valvular heart disease. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of regionally ischemic canine hearts: effects of paramagnetic proton signal enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, T.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Pykett, I.L.; Buonanno, F.S.; Kistler, J.P.; Newhouse, J.H.; Burt, C.T.; Hinshaw, W.S.; Pohost, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    In a study to evaluate the potential of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging with and without manganese contrast enhancement for detecting acute myocardial infarction, 12 dogs underwent 90-minute occlusion of the left circumflex coronary artery. Transverse-section NMR images of the excised, nonbeating heart were obtained at 1-cm intervals using the steady-state-free-precession (SSFP) technique. All NMR images revealed detailed structure of the heart. The three hearts without manganese showed no difference in intensity between the normal and the ischemic posterior regions, whereas those with manganese demonstrated a clearly demarcated zone of reduced signal intensity consistent with the ischemic zone. It is concluded that high-resolution tomograms of the excised canine myocardium can be obtained using proton NMR imaging. With the SSFP imaging technique, proton signal enhancement with manganese infusion is necessary to differentiate between ischemic and nonischemic myocardium after 90 minutes of coronary occlusion

  13. The year 2012 in the European Heart Journal-Cardiovascular Imaging: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsen, Thor; Plein, Sven; Saraste, Antti; Knuuti, Juhani; Maurer, Gerald; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2013-06-01

    The new multi-modality cardiovascular imaging journal, European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging, was started in 2012. During its first year, the new Journal has published an impressive collection of cardiovascular studies utilizing all cardiovascular imaging modalities. We will summarize the most important studies from its first year in two articles. The present 'Part I' of the review will focus on studies in myocardial function, myocardial ischaemia, and emerging techniques in cardiovascular imaging.

  14. a New Approach to Physiologic Triggering in Medical Imaging Using Multiple Heart Sounds Alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groch, Mark Walter

    A new method for physiological synchronization of medical image acquisition using both the first and second heart sound has been developed. Heart sounds gating (HSG) circuitry has been developed which identifies, individually, both the first (S1) and second (S2) heart sounds from their timing relationship alone, and provides two synchronization points during the cardiac cycle. Identification of first and second heart sounds from their timing relationship alone and application to medical imaging has, heretofore, not been performed in radiology or nuclear medicine. The heart sounds are obtained as conditioned analog signals from a piezoelectric transducer microphone placed on the patient's chest. The timing relationships between the S1 to S2 pulses and the S2 to S1 pulses are determined using a logic scheme capable of distinguishing the S1 and S2 pulses from the heart sounds themselves, using their timing relationships, and the assumption that initially the S1-S2 interval will be shorter than the S2-S1 interval. Digital logic circuitry is utilized to continually track the timing intervals and extend the S1/S2 identification to heart rates up to 200 beats per minute (where the S1-S2 interval is not shorter than the S2-S1 interval). Clinically, first heart sound gating may be performed to assess the systolic ejection portion of the cardiac cycle, with S2 gating utilized for reproduction of the diastolic filling portion of the cycle. One application of HSG used for physiologic synchronization is in multigated blood pool (MGBP) imaging in nuclear medicine. Heart sounds gating has been applied to twenty patients who underwent analysis of ventricular function in Nuclear Medicine, and compared to conventional ECG gated MGBP. Left ventricular ejection fractions calculated from MGBP studies using a S1 and a S2 heart sound trigger correlated well with conventional ECG gated acquisitions in patients adequately gated by HSG and ECG. Heart sounds gating provided superior

  15. Understanding the physiology of complex congenital heart disease using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappanayil, Mahesh; Kannan, Rajesh; Kumar, Raman Krishna

    2011-01-01

    Complex congenital heart diseases are often associated with complex alterations in hemodynamics. Understanding these key hemodynamic changes is critical to making management decisions including surgery and postoperative management. Existing tools for imaging and hemodynamic assessment like echocardiography, computed tomography and cardiac catheterization have inherent limitations. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as a powerful bouquet of tools that allow not only excellent imaging, but also a unique insight into hemodynamics. This article introduces the reader to cardiac MRI and its utility through the clinical example of a child with a complex congenital cyanotic heart disease

  16. The clinical value of cardiac sympathetic imaging in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Emil; Kjaer, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the pathology of heart failure. The single-photon emission computed tomography tracer iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123) I-MIBG) can be used to investigate the activity of the predominant neurotransmitter of the sympathetic nervous...

  17. Novel Fingertip Image-Based Heart Rate Detection Methods for a Smartphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifat Zaman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesize that our fingertip image-based heart rate detection methods using smartphone reliably detect the heart rhythm and rate of subjects. We propose fingertip curve line movement-based and fingertip image intensity-based detection methods, which both use the movement of successive fingertip images obtained from smartphone cameras. To investigate the performance of the proposed methods, heart rhythm and rate of the proposed methods are compared to those of the conventional method, which is based on average image pixel intensity. Using a smartphone, we collected 120 s pulsatile time series data from each recruited subject. The results show that the proposed fingertip curve line movement-based method detects heart rate with a maximum deviation of 0.0832 Hz and 0.124 Hz using time- and frequency-domain based estimation, respectively, compared to the conventional method. Moreover, another proposed fingertip image intensity-based method detects heart rate with a maximum deviation of 0.125 Hz and 0.03 Hz using time- and frequency-based estimation, respectively.

  18. Development of Tc99m-Saccharic Acid for Heart Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafii Khamis; Mohd Azfar Adenan; Bohari Yaacob; Amir Fitri Shafii

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease especially the coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Coronary heart disease is a common term for the buildup of plaque in the heart coronary arteries that could block the blood supply to the myocardial and this could lead to heart attack. An estimated 17 million people died from cardiovascular disease in 2008 representing 30% of all global death. In United Kingdom, coronary heart disease killed as much as 82,000 people each year. Hence, early detection of the coronary heart disease is very important in reducing the mortality among the world population. One of the most sensitive detection methods is by radioimaging using Technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals. Several different radio imaging agents such as Tc99m radiopharmaceutical were developed as radiagnostic agent in determining the CHD especially in identifying the blockage of the coronary artery of the heart muscle. Despite the success of Tc99m-sestamibi and Tc99m-tetrofosmin as effective agents for myocardial perfusion study, the search for other Tc99m heart imaging agents has never been interrupted. This report described the formulation of the Tc99m-saccharic acid radiopharmaceutical kit, radiolabelling of the kit, radiochemical purity evaluation of the Tc99m labeled saccharaic acid, and animal study involving radio imaging using gamma camera. The animal are then sacrificed and the biological distribution of the Tc99m-saccharic acid in-vivo was determined. Comparative study was also conducted using commercially available Tc99m-tetrafosmin, a CHD radiopharmaceutical kit. The Tc99m-saccharic acid developed gave a very high labeling efficiency of >92% with Tc99m and good uptake in the heart muscle. The saccharic acid kit developed was also found to be comparable in quality to the commercially available Tc99-tetrafosmin kit. (author)

  19. Evaluation of congenital heart disease by three-dimensional MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannier, M.W.; Gutierrez, F.R.; Canter, C.E.; Yoffie, R.L.; Hildebolt, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    In an evaluation of the detectability of intra-and extracardiac morphologic defects with electrocardiographically gated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, 100 patients were studied, including ten without and 90 with abnormalities. The abnormalities included septal defects, tetrology of Fallot, pulmonary atresia, transposition of the great vessels, and others. The patients with abnormalities were studied angiographically and with echocardiographic analyses. Two radiologists with cardiac MR imaging experience evaluated the scans in a blinded fashion, and the results were analyzed by means of receiver operating characteristic analysis. The diagnostic value of routine two-dimensional cardiac MR imaging was compared with that of three-dimensional reconstruction imaging and with the results of cardiac catheterization and echocardiography. The reported sensitivity and specificity of echocardiography in the detection of congenital heart disease is comparable to that of MR imaging. The differences in diagnostic value between various modalities for the imaging of congenital heart disease may be determined from the results of the preliminary series

  20. Quantitative thallium-201 myocardial imaging in assessing right ventricular pressure in patients with congenital heart defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinovitch, M.; Fischer, K.C.; Treves, S.

    1981-01-01

    Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy was performed in patients with congenital heart defects to determine whether, by quantification of right ventricular isotope uptake, one could assess the degree of right ventricular hypertrophy and so predict the level of right ventricular pressure. It is shown that quantitative analysis of myocardial imaging with thallium-201 is of use clinically in patients with congenital heart defects, in assessing the severity of pulmonary stenosis or the presence of pulmonary artery hypertension. (author)

  1. Imaging of the human heart after administration of l-(N-13)glutamate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelbard, A.S.; Benua, R.S.; Reiman, R.E.; McDonald, J.M.; Vomero, J.J.; Laughlin, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    In normal volunteers and cancer patients, studies using L-(N-13)glutamate as an imaging agent showed localization of N-13 activity in the heart. Other organs that were well visualized include the liver, pancreas, and salivary glands. The concentration of N-13 activity in the human heart could not be predicted from previous studies involving myocardial uptake in dogs and rodents after administration of L-(N-13)glutamate

  2. The estimation diastolic properties of the right and left heart's ventricles by a magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myagkov, A.P.; Cherepok, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of comparison of data heart's catheterization nd magnetic resonance imaging the technique of determination initial and enddiastolic pressure in heart's ventricles is developed. It has allowed to determine a diastolic extensibility, hardness, initial and enddiastolic pressure gradients for right and left ventricle. All necessary formulas and calculations techniques, control data of the models, received at the research of healthy subjects are described

  3. Imaging technique and current status of valvular heart disease using cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotz, J.; Sohns, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    The main indications for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of valvular heart disease are pathologies of the aortic and pulmonary valve. For mitral and tricuspid valve pathologies MRI is not the first line modality as these are usually well visualized by echocardiography. The advantages of MRI in valvular heart disease are a high reliability in the evaluation of ventricular volumes and function as well as the assessment of the perivalvular arterial or atrial structures. This reliability and the limitless access to any imaging plane partially compensates for the lower temporal and spatial resolution in comparison to echocardiography. In patients with congenital heart disease, cardiac MRI is established as a valuable diagnostic tool in daily clinical management, especially for the evaluation of pulmonary valve defects. Nevertheless, echocardiography remains the first-line diagnostic imaging tool for the foreseeable future. (orig.) [de

  4. Preliminary study of single contrast enhanced dual energy heart imaging using dual-source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Jin; Zhang Longjiang; Zhou Changsheng; Lu Guangming; Ma Yan; Gu Haifeng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and preliminary applications of single contrast enhanced dual energy heart imaging using dual-source CT (DSCT). Methods: Thirty patients underwent dual energy heart imaging with DSCT, of which 6 cases underwent SPECT or DSA within one week. Two experienced radiologists assessed image quality of coronary arteries and iodine map of myocardium. and correlated the coronary artery stenosis with the perfusion distribution of iodine map. Results: l00% (300/300) segments reached diagnostic standards. The mean score of image for all patients was 4.68±0.57. Mural coronary artery was present in 10 segments in S cases, atherosclerotic plaques in 32 segments in 12 cases, of which 20 segments having ≥50% stenosis, 12 segments ≤50% stenosis; dual energy CT coronary angiography was consistent with the DSA in 3 patients. 37 segmental perfusion abnormalities on iodine map were found in 15 cases, including 28 coronary blood supply segment narrow segment and 9 no coronary stenosis (including three negative segments in SPECD. Conclusion: Single contrast enhanced dual energy heart imaging can provide good coronary artery and myocardium perfusion images in the patients with appropriate heart rate, which has a potential to be used in the clinic and further studies are needed. (authors)

  5. Choosing Between MRI and CT Imaging in the Adult with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnichsen, Crystal; Ammash, Naser

    2016-05-01

    Improvements in the outcomes of surgical and catheter-based interventions and medical therapy have led to a growing population of adult patients with congenital heart disease. Adult patients with previously undiagnosed congenital heart disease or those previously palliated or repaired may have challenging echocardiographic examinations. Understanding the distinct anatomic and hemodynamic features of the congenital anomaly and quantifying ventricular function and valvular dysfunction plays an important role in the management of these patients. Rapid advances in imaging technology with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) allow for improved visualization of complex cardiac anatomy in the evaluation of this unique patient population. Although echocardiography remains the most widely used imaging tool to evaluate congenital heart disease, alternative and, at times, complimentary imaging modalities should be considered. When caring for adults with congenital heart disease, it is important to choose the proper imaging study that can answer the clinical question with the highest quality images, lowest risk to the patient, and in a cost-efficient manner.

  6. Two-dimensional sonographic cine imaging improves confidence in the initial evaluation of the fetal heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Patricia Sims; Chung, Romy; Lacoursiere, Yvette; Palmieri, Carolina Rossi; Hull, Andrew; Engelkemier, Dawn; Rochelle, Michele; Trivedi, Neha; Pretorius, Dolores H

    2013-06-01

    Initial screening sonography of the fetal heart with static images is often inadequate, resulting in repeated imaging or failure to detect abnormalities. We hypothesized that the addition of short cine clips would reduce the need for repeated imaging. Two-dimensional (2D) static sonograms and short 2D cine clips of the 4-chamber view and left and right ventricular outflow tracts were obtained from 342 patients with gestational ages of greater than 16 weeks. A diagnostic radiologist and a perinatologist retrospectively reviewed the static and cine images independently and graded them as normal, abnormal, or suboptimal. A statistically significant increase in the number of structures called normal was seen when 2D cine clips were added to static imaging for both observers (P cine images versus 61.9% with static images alone, whereas the perinatologist recorded 68.1% as normal versus 58.8%, respectively. The radiologist called 77.8% of structures normal with cine images only versus 61.9% with static images only (P cine images alone (38.9%) versus static images alone (58.8%). The use of cine loops alone resulted in no significant increase in the ability to clear the heart as normal. The maternal body mass index was inversely associated with the ability to clear structures when 2D cine images were added to static images (P cine clips to standard 2D static imaging of the fetal heart significantly improves the number of structures cleared as normal. Two-dimensional cine clips are easily obtained, add little time to a study, and require minimal archival space.

  7. 3D imaging of the mitochondrial redox state of rat hearts under normal and fasting conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He N. Xu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The heart requires continuous ATP availability that is generated in the mitochondria. Although studies using the cell culture and perfused organ models have been carried out to investigate the biochemistry in the mitochondria in response to a change in substrate supply, mitochondrial bioenergetics of heart under normal feed or fasting conditions has not been studied at the tissue level with a sub-millimeter spatial resolution either in vivo or ex vivo. Oxidation of many food-derived metabolites to generate ATP in the mitochondria is realized through the NADH/NAD+ couple acting as a central electron carrier. We employed the Chance redox scanner — the low-temperature fluorescence scanner to image the three-dimensional (3D spatial distribution of the mitochondrial redox states in heart tissues of rats under normal feeding or an overnight starvation for 14.5 h. Multiple consecutive sections of each heart were imaged to map three redox indices, i.e., NADH, oxidized flavoproteins (Fp, including flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD and the redox ratio NADH/Fp. The imaging results revealed the micro-heterogeneity and the spatial distribution of these redox indices. The quantitative analysis showed that in the fasted hearts the standard deviation of both NADH and Fp, i.e., SD_NADH and SD_Fp, significantly decreased with a p value of 0.032 and 0.045, respectively, indicating that the hearts become relatively more homogeneous after fasting. The fasted hearts contained 28.6% less NADH (p = 0.038. No significant change in Fp was found (p = 0.4. The NADH/Fp ratio decreased with a marginal p value (0.076. The decreased NADH in the fasted hearts is consistent with the cardiac cells' reliance of fatty acids consumption for energy metabolism when glucose becomes scarce. The experimental observation of NADH decrease induced by dietary restriction in the heart at tissue level has not been reported to our best knowledge. The Chance redox scanner demonstrated the

  8. 3D IMAGING OF THE MITOCHONDRIAL REDOX STATE OF RAT HEARTS UNDER NORMAL AND FASTING CONDITIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He N; Zhou, Rong; Moon, Lily; Feng, Min; Li, Lin Z

    2014-03-01

    The heart requires continuous ATP availability that is generated in the mitochondria. Although studies using the cell culture and perfused organ models have been carried out to investigate the biochemistry in the mitochondria in response to a change in substrate supply, mitochondrial bioenergetics of heart under normal feed or fasting conditions has not been studied at the tissue level with a sub-millimeter spatial resolution either in vivo or ex vivo . Oxidation of many food-derived metabolites to generate ATP in the mitochondria is realized through the NADH/NAD + couple acting as a central electron carrier. We employed the Chance redox scanner - the low-temperature fluorescence scanner to image the three-dimensional (3D) spatial distribution of the mitochondrial redox states in heart tissues of rats under normal feeding or an overnight starvation for 14.5 h. Multiple consecutive sections of each heart were imaged to map three redox indices, i.e., NADH, oxidized flavoproteins (Fp, including flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)) and the redox ratio NADH/Fp. The imaging results revealed the micro-heterogeneity and the spatial distribution of these redox indices. The quantitative analysis showed that in the fasted hearts the standard deviation of both NADH and Fp, i.e., SD_NADH and SD_Fp, significantly decreased with a p value of 0.032 and 0.045, respectively, indicating that the hearts become relatively more homogeneous after fasting. The fasted hearts contained 28.6% less NADH ( p = 0.038). No significant change in Fp was found ( p = 0.4). The NADH/Fp ratio decreased with a marginal p value (0.076). The decreased NADH in the fasted hearts is consistent with the cardiac cells' reliance of fatty acids consumption for energy metabolism when glucose becomes scarce. The experimental observation of NADH decrease induced by dietary restriction in the heart at tissue level has not been reported to our best knowledge. The Chance redox scanner demonstrated the feasibility of 3D

  9. Ultrasound functional imaging in an ex vivo beating porcine heart platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petterson, Niels J.; Fixsen, Louis S.; Rutten, Marcel C. M.; Pijls, Nico H. J.; van de Vosse, Frans N.; Lopata, Richard G. P.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, novel ultrasound functional imaging (UFI) techniques have been introduced to assess cardiac function by measuring, e.g. cardiac output (CO) and/or myocardial strain. Verification and reproducibility assessment in a realistic setting remain major issues. Simulations and phantoms are often unrealistic, whereas in vivo measurements often lack crucial hemodynamic parameters or ground truth data, or suffer from the large physiological and clinical variation between patients when attempting clinical validation. Controlled validation in certain pathologies is cumbersome and often requires the use of lab animals. In this study, an isolated beating pig heart setup was adapted and used for performance assessment of UFI techniques such as volume assessment and ultrasound strain imaging. The potential of performing verification and reproducibility studies was demonstrated. For proof-of-principle, validation of UFI in pathological hearts was examined. Ex vivo porcine hearts (n  =  6, slaughterhouse waste) were resuscitated and attached to a mock circulatory system. Radio frequency ultrasound data of the left ventricle were acquired in five short axis views and one long axis view. Based on these slices, the CO was measured, where verification was performed using flow sensor measurements in the aorta. Strain imaging was performed providing radial, circumferential and longitudinal strain to assess reproducibility and inter-subject variability under steady conditions. Finally, strains in healthy hearts were compared to a heart with an implanted left ventricular assist device, simulating a failing, supported heart. Good agreement between ultrasound and flow sensor based CO measurements was found. Strains were highly reproducible (intraclass correlation coefficients  >0.8). Differences were found due to biological variation and condition of the hearts. Strain magnitude and patterns in the assisted heart were available for different pump action, revealing

  10. Evaluation of multi-gated myocardial perfusion imaging in various heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Uehara, Toshitake; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1980-01-01

    Multi-gated myocardial perfusion imaging were studied in a hundred cases of various heart diseases. In normal cases, ED ES images showed thinning and thickening of wall motion respectively to compare with static images. In the myocardial infarction cases, the dynamic changes of wall motion was decreased at infarcted areas in all cases. In congestive cardiomyopathy, the change of wall motion is smaller than normal cases in all cases, while in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the change is not so hyperdynamic to compare with normal cases and by multi-gated images, asymmetric hypertrophy was clearly detected in HCM than static images. In conclusion, these methods were useful to detect the myocardial contraction stage in various heart diseases. (author)

  11. Imaging of heart acoustic based on the sub-space methods using a microphone array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddasi, Hanie; Almasganj, Farshad; Zoroufian, Arezoo

    2017-07-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death around the world. Phonocardiogram (PCG) is an important bio-signal which represents the acoustic activity of heart, typically without any spatiotemporal information of the involved acoustic sources. The aim of this study is to analyze the PCG by employing a microphone array by which the heart internal sound sources could be localized, too. In this paper, it is intended to propose a modality by which the locations of the active sources in the heart could also be investigated, during a cardiac cycle. In this way, a microphone array with six microphones is employed as the recording set up to be put on the human chest. In the following, the Group Delay MUSIC algorithm which is a sub-space based localization method is used to estimate the location of the heart sources in different phases of the PCG. We achieved to 0.14cm mean error for the sources of first heart sound (S 1 ) simulator and 0.21cm mean error for the sources of second heart sound (S 2 ) simulator with Group Delay MUSIC algorithm. The acoustical diagrams created for human subjects show distinct patterns in various phases of the cardiac cycles such as the first and second heart sounds. Moreover, the evaluated source locations for the heart valves are matched with the ones that are obtained via the 4-dimensional (4D) echocardiography applied, to a real human case. Imaging of heart acoustic map presents a new outlook to indicate the acoustic properties of cardiovascular system and disorders of valves and thereby, in the future, could be used as a new diagnostic tool. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Imaging techniques in the diagnosis of coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, H.

    1997-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Coronary angiography makes it possible to visualize coronary artery stenosis and can be used for angioplasty and stent implantation; however, it does not allow the assessment of changes in myocardial microcirculation. The severity of an angiographically evaluated coronary stenosis does not always correspond to the extent of myocardial ischemia. Nonivasive techniques are needed to reexamine our reliance on coronary angiography and to explore the clinical value fo the physiological assessment of coronary artery stenoses. Such noninvasive techniques might become important tools in the future following an overal evaluation of coronary morphology, myocardial function and perfusion ascertained by all available methods. (orig.) [de

  13. Neuronal dysfunction and medical therapy in heart failure: can an imaging biomarker help to "personalize" therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessler, Benjamin S; Udelson, James E

    2015-06-01

    (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-MIBG) imaging is a tool for evaluating one of the fundamental pathophysiologic abnormalities seen in heart failure (HF), that of an upregulated sympathetic nervous system and its effect on the myocardium. Although this imaging technique offers information about prognosis for patients treated with contemporary guideline-based HF therapies and improves risk stratification, there are neither rigorous nor sufficient outcome data to suggest that this imaging tool can guide therapeutic decision making or better target subsets of patients with HF for particular therapies. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  14. Fast and ultrafast MR-imaging of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulthess, G.K. von; Davis, C.P.; Debatin, J.F.; McKinnon, G.C.

    1995-01-01

    MRI has been hampered by long image acquisition times. This combined with its non-realtime nature and the limited spatial resolution has made it difficult to extend MRT to the study of small cardiac structures. Recent technical improvements have made breath-held or realtime MRI feasible and thus laid the foundations for further applications in the field of cardiovascular imaging, notably MR coronary angiography, imaging of cardiac valve leaflets, as well as firstpass perfusion studies. Moreover ultrafast MR techniques may eventually replace conventional data acquisition strategies and thus drastically increase patient throughput by shortening acquisition time. This article provides an overview of the technical advances in MRI and their application to the cardiovascular system and discusses possibilities of combined ultrafast and interventional strategies. (orig.) [de

  15. Evaluation of therapy for dilated cardiomyopathy with heart failure by iodine-123 metaiodobenzyl-guanidine imaging. Comparison with heart rate variability power spectral analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shou-lin; Ikeda, Jun; Takita, Tamotsu; Sekiguchi, Yohei; Demachi, Jun; Chikama, Hisao; Goto, Atsushi; Shirato, Kunio [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-11-01

    The relationship between the myocardial uptake of iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine ({sup 123}I-MIBG) and heart rate variability parameters has not been determined. This study determined the relationship between the change in myocardial uptake of {sup 123}I-MIBG and improvement in left ventricular function after treatment, to determine the usefulness of {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging to assess the effect of therapy on heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability were performed before and after treatment in 17 patients with heart failure due to DCM. The following parameters were compared before and after treatment: New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, radiographic cardiothoracic ratio (CTR), blood pressure, echocardiographic data (left ventricular end-systolic (LVDs) and end-diastolic (LVDd) diameters, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)), plasma concentrations of norepinephrine and epinephrine, heart rate variability power spectral analysis data (mean low frequency (MLF) and high frequency power (MHF)) and the myocardium to mediastinum activity ratio (MYO/M) obtained in early and late images, and washout rate calculated by anterior planar imaging of {sup 123}I-MIBG. The NYHA functional class, LVEF, LVDs, CTR, MLF and MHF improved after treatment. Early MYO/M and late MYO/M improved after treatment. The rate of increase in late MYO/M was positively correlated with the rate of improvement of LVEF after treatment. Furthermore, the late MYO/M was negatively correlated with MLF. Washout rate revealed no correlation with hemodynamic parameters. These findings suggest that late MYO/M is more useful than washout rate to assess the effect of treatment on heart failure due to DCM. Furthermore, the {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging and heart rate variability parameters are useful to assess the autonomic tone in DCM with heart failure. (author)

  16. Evaluation of therapy for dilated cardiomyopathy with heart failure by iodine-123 metaiodobenzyl-guanidine imaging. Comparison with heart rate variability power spectral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shou-lin; Ikeda, Jun; Takita, Tamotsu; Sekiguchi, Yohei; Demachi, Jun; Chikama, Hisao; Goto, Atsushi; Shirato, Kunio

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between the myocardial uptake of iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine ( 123 I-MIBG) and heart rate variability parameters has not been determined. This study determined the relationship between the change in myocardial uptake of 123 I-MIBG and improvement in left ventricular function after treatment, to determine the usefulness of 123 I-MIBG imaging to assess the effect of therapy on heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). 123 I-MIBG imaging and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability were performed before and after treatment in 17 patients with heart failure due to DCM. The following parameters were compared before and after treatment: New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, radiographic cardiothoracic ratio (CTR), blood pressure, echocardiographic data (left ventricular end-systolic (LVDs) and end-diastolic (LVDd) diameters, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)), plasma concentrations of norepinephrine and epinephrine, heart rate variability power spectral analysis data (mean low frequency (MLF) and high frequency power (MHF)) and the myocardium to mediastinum activity ratio (MYO/M) obtained in early and late images, and washout rate calculated by anterior planar imaging of 123 I-MIBG. The NYHA functional class, LVEF, LVDs, CTR, MLF and MHF improved after treatment. Early MYO/M and late MYO/M improved after treatment. The rate of increase in late MYO/M was positively correlated with the rate of improvement of LVEF after treatment. Furthermore, the late MYO/M was negatively correlated with MLF. Washout rate revealed no correlation with hemodynamic parameters. These findings suggest that late MYO/M is more useful than washout rate to assess the effect of treatment on heart failure due to DCM. Furthermore, the 123 I-MIBG imaging and heart rate variability parameters are useful to assess the autonomic tone in DCM with heart failure. (author)

  17. Functional imaging of murine hearts using accelerated self-gated UTE cine MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Motaal, Abdallah G.; Noorman, Nils; de Graaf, Wolter L.; Hoerr, Verena; Florack, Luc M. J.; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a fast protocol for ultra-short echo time (UTE) Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the beating murine heart. The sequence involves a self-gated UTE with golden-angle radial acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction. The self-gated acquisition is performed asynchronously

  18. Ultrasonic two-dimensional imaging of the heart with multiscan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelandt, J.R.T.C.

    1980-01-01

    The aim of the author was to present the implementation into cardiology of the ultrasonic linear array scanner. The first clinical results, the progress in examination technique and potential applications are described. One method which complements the ultrasonic imaging capabilities is the use of the echo contrast. (Auth.)

  19. Perfusion MR imaging of the heart with TrueFISP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, W.G.; Schmitt, M.; Kalden, P.; Mohrs, O.; Kreitner, K.F.; Thelen, M.; Horstick, G.; Gumbrich, T.; Petersen, S.; Voigtlaender, T.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: Development and test of a saturation-recovery TrueFISP (SR-Trufi) pulse sequence for myocardial perfusion MR imaging (MRI) using improved gradient hardware. Material and methods: Measurements were performed on a 1.5 T scanner with prototype gradients (50 mT/m, minimum rise time 300 μs). T 1 -weighted first-pass MRI of Gd-DTPA (0.025 μmol/kg) kinetics in the myocardium was performed using an SR-Trufi pulse sequence (T R /T E /α=2.6 ms/1.4 ms/55 ) with a saturation preparation of TD-30 ms before the TrueFISP readout. Measurements were performed in volunteers (n=4) and in a pig model of chronic ischemia (n=1). Results: In phantoms, the signal intensity was linear with contrast concentration up to 0.9 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA. MR images obtained with SR-Trufi had a good image quality and high spatial resolution of 2.1 mmx2.1 mm. Differences of the contrast agent's kinetics between a subendocardial perfusion deficit and neighboring myocardium were well visible on both MR images and signal-time curves derived from the region-of-interest analysis. Conclusion: SR-Trufi appears to be an interesting new technique for the assessment of myocardial microcirculation using dedicated cardiovascular MR systems. (orig.) [de

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Heart Failure Using a Swine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    Suppl):I437-442. 36. McAlister FA, Teo KK, Taher M, Montague TJ, Humen D, Cheung L, Kiaii M, Yim R, Armstrong PW. Insights into the contemporary...Imaging 2001;13:714-721. 8. Ho VB, Meaney JF, Kent KC , Choyke PL, Watts R, Hood MN, Wang Y, Winchester P, Dong Q, Prince MR. Bolus-chase peripheral MR

  1. Computational high-resolution heart phantoms for medical imaging and dosimetry simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu Songxiang; Kyprianou, Iacovos [Center for Devices and Radiological Health, US Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Gupta, Rajiv, E-mail: songxiang.gu@fda.hhs.gov, E-mail: rgupta1@partners.org, E-mail: iacovos.kyprianou@fda.hhs.gov [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-09-21

    Cardiovascular disease in general and coronary artery disease (CAD) in particular, are the leading cause of death worldwide. They are principally diagnosed using either invasive percutaneous transluminal coronary angiograms or non-invasive computed tomography angiograms (CTA). Minimally invasive therapies for CAD such as angioplasty and stenting are rendered under fluoroscopic guidance. Both invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities employ ionizing radiation and there is concern for deterministic and stochastic effects of radiation. Accurate simulation to optimize image quality with minimal radiation dose requires detailed, gender-specific anthropomorphic phantoms with anatomically correct heart and associated vasculature. Such phantoms are currently unavailable. This paper describes an open source heart phantom development platform based on a graphical user interface. Using this platform, we have developed seven high-resolution cardiac/coronary artery phantoms for imaging and dosimetry from seven high-quality CTA datasets. To extract a phantom from a coronary CTA, the relationship between the intensity distribution of the myocardium, the ventricles and the coronary arteries is identified via histogram analysis of the CTA images. By further refining the segmentation using anatomy-specific criteria such as vesselness, connectivity criteria required by the coronary tree and image operations such as active contours, we are able to capture excellent detail within our phantoms. For example, in one of the female heart phantoms, as many as 100 coronary artery branches could be identified. Triangular meshes are fitted to segmented high-resolution CTA data. We have also developed a visualization tool for adding stenotic lesions to the coronaries. The male and female heart phantoms generated so far have been cross-registered and entered in the mesh-based Virtual Family of phantoms with matched age/gender information. Any phantom in this family, along with user

  2. Computational high-resolution heart phantoms for medical imaging and dosimetry simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Songxiang; Kyprianou, Iacovos; Gupta, Rajiv

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease in general and coronary artery disease (CAD) in particular, are the leading cause of death worldwide. They are principally diagnosed using either invasive percutaneous transluminal coronary angiograms or non-invasive computed tomography angiograms (CTA). Minimally invasive therapies for CAD such as angioplasty and stenting are rendered under fluoroscopic guidance. Both invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities employ ionizing radiation and there is concern for deterministic and stochastic effects of radiation. Accurate simulation to optimize image quality with minimal radiation dose requires detailed, gender-specific anthropomorphic phantoms with anatomically correct heart and associated vasculature. Such phantoms are currently unavailable. This paper describes an open source heart phantom development platform based on a graphical user interface. Using this platform, we have developed seven high-resolution cardiac/coronary artery phantoms for imaging and dosimetry from seven high-quality CTA datasets. To extract a phantom from a coronary CTA, the relationship between the intensity distribution of the myocardium, the ventricles and the coronary arteries is identified via histogram analysis of the CTA images. By further refining the segmentation using anatomy-specific criteria such as vesselness, connectivity criteria required by the coronary tree and image operations such as active contours, we are able to capture excellent detail within our phantoms. For example, in one of the female heart phantoms, as many as 100 coronary artery branches could be identified. Triangular meshes are fitted to segmented high-resolution CTA data. We have also developed a visualization tool for adding stenotic lesions to the coronaries. The male and female heart phantoms generated so far have been cross-registered and entered in the mesh-based Virtual Family of phantoms with matched age/gender information. Any phantom in this family, along with user

  3. Riociguat reduces infarct size and post-infarct heart failure in mouse hearts: insights from MRI/PET imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Methner

    Full Text Available Stimulation of the nitric oxide (NO--soluble guanylate (sGC--protein kinase G (PKG pathway confers protection against acute ischaemia/reperfusion injury, but more chronic effects in reducing post-myocardial infarction (MI heart failure are less defined. The aim of this study was to not only determine whether the sGC stimulator riociguat reduces infarct size but also whether it protects against the development of post-MI heart failure.Mice were subjected to 30 min ischaemia via ligation of the left main coronary artery to induce MI and either placebo or riociguat (1.2 µmol/l were given as a bolus 5 min before and 5 min after onset of reperfusion. After 24 hours, both, late gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (LGE-MRI and (18F-FDG-positron emission tomography (PET were performed to determine infarct size. In the riociguat-treated mice, the resulting infarct size was smaller (8.5 ± 2.5% of total LV mass vs. 21.8% ± 1.7%. in controls, p = 0.005 and LV systolic function analysed by MRI was better preserved (60.1% ± 3.4% of preischaemic vs. 44.2% ± 3.1% in controls, p = 0.005. After 28 days, LV systolic function by echocardiography treated group was still better preserved (63.5% ± 3.2% vs. 48.2% ± 2.2% in control, p = 0.004.Taken together, mice treated acutely at the onset of reperfusion with the sGC stimulator riociguat have smaller infarct size and better long-term preservation of LV systolic function. These findings suggest that sGC stimulation during reperfusion therapy may be a powerful therapeutic treatment strategy for preventing post-MI heart failure.

  4. Experimental and clinical studies of fast three-dimensional MR imaging of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shuhei

    1999-01-01

    MRI has been utilized since its inception to study the anatomy and physiology of the heart. However, the sensitivity of MRI to motion has always posed a major challenge in imaging this organ. The purpose of this study was to develop a 3D MP-RAGE technique for the heart, and to apply it clinically. In the experimental study, data acquisition timing was discussed by normal volunteers. Changes in magnetization recovery time affected imaging contrast very little in the phantom study. Fourteen adults and 21 children were examined. In the adults, MP-RAGE images were rated as high in quality in the visual estimation. In the quantitative estimation, the images provided almost the same anatomical information as those of cine MRI. In the children, MP-RAGE was useful for cases of partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage, particularly in the evaluation of abnormal pulmonary veins. The 3D MP-RAGE technique was useful in imaging the heart because it was possible to obtain continuous views in the same cardiac cycle and to reconstruct views from any direction after the examination. (author)

  5. Experimental and clinical studies of fast three-dimensional MR imaging of the heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Shuhei [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-07-01

    MRI has been utilized since its inception to study the anatomy and physiology of the heart. However, the sensitivity of MRI to motion has always posed a major challenge in imaging this organ. The purpose of this study was to develop a 3D MP-RAGE technique for the heart, and to apply it clinically. In the experimental study, data acquisition timing was discussed by normal volunteers. Changes in magnetization recovery time affected imaging contrast very little in the phantom study. Fourteen adults and 21 children were examined. In the adults, MP-RAGE images were rated as high in quality in the visual estimation. In the quantitative estimation, the images provided almost the same anatomical information as those of cine MRI. In the children, MP-RAGE was useful for cases of partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage, particularly in the evaluation of abnormal pulmonary veins. The 3D MP-RAGE technique was useful in imaging the heart because it was possible to obtain continuous views in the same cardiac cycle and to reconstruct views from any direction after the examination. (author)

  6. [11C]-Acetoacetate PET imaging: a potential early marker for cardiac heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croteau, Etienne; Tremblay, Sébastien; Gascon, Suzanne; Dumulon-Perreault, Véronique; Labbé, Sébastien M.; Rousseau, Jacques A.; Cunnane, Stephen C.; Carpentier, André C.; Bénard, François; Lecomte, Roger

    2014-01-01

    The ketone body acetoacetate could be used as an alternate nutrient for the heart, and it also has the potential to improve cardiac function in an ischemic–reperfusion model or reduce the mitochondrial production of oxidative stress involved in cardiotoxicity. In this study, [ 11 C]-acetoacetate was investigated as an early marker of intracellular damage in heart failure. Methods: A rat cardiotoxicity heart failure model was induced by doxorubicin, Dox(+). [ 14 C]-Acetoacetate, a non-positron (β −) emitting radiotracer, was used to characterize the arterial blood input function and myocardial mitochondrial uptake. Afterward, [ 11 C]-acetoacetate (β +) myocardial PET images were obtained for kinetic analysis and heart function assessment in control Dox(−) (n = 15) and treated Dox(+) (n = 6) rats. The uptake rate (K 1 ) and myocardial clearance rate (k 2 or k mono ) were extracted. Results: [ 14 C]-Acetoacetate in the blood was increased in Dox(+), from 2 min post-injection until the last withdrawal point when the heart was harvested, as well as the uptake in the heart and myocardial mitochondria (unpaired t-test, p < 0.05). PET kinetic analysis of [ 11 C]-acetoacetate showed that rate constants K 1 , k 2 and k mono were decreased in Dox(+) (p < 0.05) combined with a reduction of 24% of the left ventricular ejection fraction (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Radioactive acetoacetate ex vivo analysis [ 14 C], and in vivo kinetic [ 11 C] studies provided evidence that [ 11 C]-acetoacetate can assess heart failure Dox(+). Contrary to myocardial flow reserve (rest–stress protocol), [ 11 C]-acetoacetate can be used to assess reduced kinetic rate constants without requirement of hyperemic stress response. The proposed [ 11 C]-acetoacetate cardiac radiotracer in the investigation of heart disease is novel and paves the way to a potential role for [ 11 C]-acetoacetate in cardiac pathophysiology

  7. Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging of the heart in idiopathic congestive cardiomyopathy and cardiac transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glowniak, J.V.; Turner, F.E.; Gray, L.L.; Palac, R.T.; Lagunas-Solar, M.C.; Woodward, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine ([ 123 I]MIBG) is a norepinephrine analog which can be used to image the sympathetic innervation of the heart. In this study, cardiac imaging with [ 123 I]MIBG was performed in patients with idiopathic congestive cardiomyopathy and compared to normal controls. Initial uptake, half-time of tracer within the heart, and heart to lung ratios were all significantly reduced in patients compared to normals. Uptake in lungs, liver, salivary glands, and spleen was similar in controls and patients with cardiomyopathy indicating that decreased MIBG uptake was not a generalized abnormality in these patients. Iodine-123 MIBG imaging was also performed in cardiac transplant patients to determine cardiac nonneuronal uptake. Uptake in transplants was less than 10% of normals in the first 2 hr and nearly undetectable after 16 hr. The decreased uptake of MIBG suggests cardiac sympathetic nerve dysfunction while the rapid washout of MIBG from the heart suggests increased cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in idiopathic congestive cardiomyopathy

  8. Study of imaging time shortening in Whole Heart MRCA. Evaluation of slice thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Mitsuhiro; Tateishi, Toshiki; Takeda, Soji; Hayashi, Ryuji

    2005-01-01

    A series of examinations in cardiac MR imaging, such as cine, perfusion, MR coronary angiography (MRCA) and viability, is generally known as One Stop Cardiac Examination. It takes about 40 to 60 minutes to perform One Stop Cardiac Examination, and Whole Heart MRCA accounts for most of the examination time. Therefore, we aimed to shorten imaging time of Whole Heart MRCA, especially in a large imaging area such as that in the case of the postoperative evaluation of a bypass graft, by investigating the depiction of a diameter of mimic blood vessels as changing the slice thickness of Whole Heart MRCA. The results showed that the maximum slice thickness of about 1 mm was excellent considering the diameters of actual coronary arteries are about 3 mm. In this study, we could grasp the relationships among slice thickness of Whole Heart MRCA, the diameter of a blood vessel, and shortened examination time. We suggested that it was useful for selecting the suitable sequence depending on a patient's conditions. (author)

  9. Anatomic and functional imaging of congenital heart disease with digital subtraction angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonocore, E.; Pavlicek, W.; Modic, M.T.; Meaney, T.F.; O'Donovan, P.B.; Grossman, L.B.; Moodie, D.S.; Yiannikas, J.

    1983-01-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) of the heart was performed in 54 patients for the evaluation of congenital heart diagnostic images and accurate physiologic shunt data that compared favorably with catheter angiography and nuclear medicine studies. Retrospective analysis of this series of patients indicated that DSA studies contributed sufficient informantion to shorten significantly or modify cardiac catheterization in 85% (79/93) of the defects that were identified. Interatrial septal defects were particularly well diagnosed, with identification occurring in 10 of 10 cases, wheseas intraventricular septal defects were identified in only 6 of 9 patients. Evaluation of postsurgical patients was accurate in 19 of 20 cases

  10. Exercise and Cardiac Function by Tissue Doppler Imaging. The Copenhagen City Heart Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joseph, Gowsini; Sogaard, Peter; Nielsen, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    diastolic (e') and late diastolic (a') velocities were measured by color TDI. Longitudinal displacement (LD) was calculated from the velocity curve during ejection. Statistical tests were performed by linear univariate and multivariable regression analyses, in relation to age groups (lt;50years, 50-65 years......Introduction: TDI (Tissue Doppler Imaging) is a sensitive marker of myocardial dysfunction and mortality in heart disease and in the general population. Regular physical activity is associated with risk reduction in coronary heart disease and mortality. There is a need for studies to clarify...

  11. Exercise and Cardiac Function by Tissue Doppler Imaging. The Copenhagen City Heart Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joseph, Gowsini; Sogaard, Peter; Nielsen, Gitte

    diastolic (e') and late diastolic (a') velocities were measured by color TDI. Longitudinal displacement (LD) was calculated from the velocity curve during ejection. Statistical tests were performed by linear univariate and multivariable regression analyses, in relation to age groups (lt;50years, 50-65 years......Introduction: TDI (Tissue Doppler Imaging) is a sensitive marker of myocardial dysfunction and mortality in heart disease and in the general population. Regular physical activity is associated with risk reduction in coronary heart disease and mortality. There is a need for studies to clarify...

  12. The evaluation of dobutamine 99mTc-MIBI myocardial perfusion imaging in the diagnosis of coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Qing; Qu Wanying; Gong Junhui; Zhou Ying

    1996-01-01

    The method and the clinical value of dobutamine stress test as a substitute for exercise test in 99m Tc-MIBI myocardial perfusion imaging was investigated. 40 Patients were intravenously infused with dobutamine through IVAC syringe pumps by incremental doses, and 99m Tc-MIBI was injected at the peak dobutamine heart rate. The myocardial imaging was then performed. The rest myocardial imaging was done after 48 hours. 30 of the 31 patients with coronary heart disease showed reversible perfusion defects in dobutamine 99m Tc-MIBI myocardial perfusion images and 7 of the 9 patients without coronary heart disease showed normal images. The sensitivity of this test was 96.8% and the specificity 77.8%. None of the studies was discontinued due to dobutamine side effect. Dobutamine 99m Tc-MIBI myocardial perfusion imaging is a safe and sensitive method in the diagnosis of coronary heart disease

  13. Thallium-201 for myocardial imaging: appearance of the normal heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.J.; Bailey, I.; Strauss, H.W.; Rouleau, J.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Pitt, B.

    1976-01-01

    Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion images were obtained from 13 healthy adults after tracer administration both at rest and at maximal stress. On the rest-injected scan, tracer was seen in left ventricular myocardium, liver, and spleen. In two subjects with resting tachycardia, the right ventricular myocardium was slightly visualized after tracer injection at rest. When tracer was administered at stress, the left ventricular activity was more nearly homogeneous and the left ventricle was better defined on the scan. The left-ventricle-to-lung-background activity ratio increased from 2.4 at rest to 3.4 at stress. The right ventricular myocardium was seen on the stress-injected scan. Phantom studies, performed to define the optimum position for visualization of lesions, showed that small lesions were best defined when seen either en face or in tangent. Scans should be performed at stress whenever possible and multiple views are essential

  14. Dynamic and gated PET. Quantitative imaging of the heart revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nekolla, S.G.

    2005-01-01

    This short overview focuses on the basic implementation as well as applications of cardiac PET studies acquired in dynamic and ECG triggered modes. Both acquisition modes are well suited for quantitative analysis and the advantages of such an approach are discussed. An outlook on the measurement of respiratory triggered studies and the new challenges this data presents is provided. In the context of modern PET/CT tomographs with the combination of high sensitivity and morphologic resolution, the promise of list mode acquisition is investigated. The before mentioned acquisition modes are ideal candidates for this technology the utility of which in a clinical setting is briefly discussed. The retrospective generation of dynamic and gated image data (and any combinations) is greatly facilitated with this approach. Finally, a novel presentation mode for the wealth of quantitative information generated by these systems is presented. (orig.)

  15. The imaging features of tsutsugamushi disease complicated with heart and pulmonary impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Zhan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To sum up the imaging features of tsutsugamushi disease complicated with combination of heart and pulmonary changes. Methods: 63 cases of tsutsugamushi disease with chest X-ray from 1994 to 2007 in our hospital were collected and analyzed. Results: Roughly no abnormal findings of heart and lungs were found in 21 cases, increased lung-markings in 11 cases; bronchitis and pneumonia in 31 cases. Among them, 7 cases showed small amount of hydrothorax. 15 cases revealed some abnormality of cardiac silhouette with impairment of myocardium shown in ECG. Medical check-up of the patients after treatment found them thoroughly recovered. Conclusion: Despite of few cases in this report, yet the frequency of impairment of the lungs, pleural cavity and heart was in coincidence with medical literature reported. Increased lung-markings were prominent in the first week of the disease. Pleural exudation and impairment of myocardium could be frequently found in the second week. (authors)

  16. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of carcinoid heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandmann, H.; Pakkal, M. [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Steeds, R. [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom)], E-mail: rick.steeds@uhb.nhs.uk

    2009-08-15

    Carcinoid disease arises from a low-grade neuroendocrine tumour derived from serotonin-producing enterochromaffin cells. It is the most common tumour affecting the small bowel. The majority of patients who progress to carcinoid syndrome develop cardiac disease selectively involving the right side of the heart, whereas left heart disease is unusual. The most common cause of death is dilatation and dysfunction of the right ventricle. Right ventricular dysfunction is largely secondary to pathological endocardial fibrosis of the tricuspid and pulmonary valves, presenting with regurgitation and stenosis. Average survival falls to only 11 months with the onset of symptoms, but recent evidence suggests that survival can be improved by early surgery in selected individuals. This article reviews the particular role that cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has in the management of carcinoid heart disease.

  17. 123I-BMIPP delayed scintigraphic imaging in patients with chronic heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kida, Keisuke; Akashi, Yoshihiro J.; Yoneyama, Kihei; Shimokawa, Mitsuhiro; Musha, Haruki

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to clarify the ability of 123 I-beta-methyl-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid ( 123 I-BMIPP) to evaluate the heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratio and myocardial global washout rate (WR) in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). The severity of CHF was evaluated on the basis of the New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification. Twenty patients with CHF (13 with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and 7 with ischemic cardiomyopathy) and 11 age-matched controls underwent myocardial radionuclide imaging. Scintigraphic images were obtained from each participant at the early (30 min following radio-isotope injection) and late (4 h) phases using 123 I-BMIPP. The H/M ratio and WR were calculated from planar images. Concentrations of plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were measured prior to the scintigraphic study. The 123 I-BMIPP uptake of early H/M and global WR did not significantly differ among groups, but uptake of delayed H/M was significantly lower in patients with NYHA class III than in controls (control 2.47±0.39; class III 1.78±0.28 P 123 I-BMIPP uptake of delayed H/M enhances the image of CHF severity. The myocardial WR of 123 I-BMIPP also effectively depicted the severity of CHF. (author)

  18. Usefulness of cardiac 123I-MIBG imaging for the evaluation of diastolic heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Haruki; Kozai, Toshiyuki; Urabe, Yoshitoshi

    2007-01-01

    Significance of 123 I-MIBG (metaiodobenzylguanidine) scintigraphy in diagnosis of cardiac sympathetic nerve function is not yet elucidated in chronic heart failure derived from left ventricular diastolic defect despite its established importance in evaluation of severity and prognosis of chronic systolic heart failure. This study was performed to elucidate the usefulness of the imaging for chronic diastolic heart failure. Comparison was made of 47 hospitalized patients with chronic diastolic heart failure (D-group; left ejection fraction, 50% or more), 45 with chronic systolic failure (S-group; the fraction 123 I-MIBG with 2-detector gamma camera (Toshiba E.CAM), of which images were analyzed by Toshiba GMS-7000. Cardiac sympathetic nerve function in D-group was found stimulated to be impaired, in a similar extent to that in S-group; severity in NYHA classification was significantly correlated with late H/M ratio and WR; WR in cases with atrial fibrillation complication showed a significant correlation with plasma BNP level; and 123 I-MIBG scintigraphic evaluation of the nerve function in D-group was concluded to be useful for severity assessment. (T.I.)

  19. Consistent reconstruction of 4D fetal heart ultrasound images to cope with fetal motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Christine; Flach, Barbara; Eggenberger, Céline; Mattausch, Oliver; Bajka, Michael; Goksel, Orcun

    2017-08-01

    4D ultrasound imaging of the fetal heart relies on reconstructions from B-mode images. In the presence of fetal motion, current approaches suffer from artifacts, which are unrecoverable for single sweeps. We propose to use many sweeps and exploit the resulting redundancy to automatically recover from motion by reconstructing a 4D image which is consistent in phase, space, and time. An interactive visualization framework to view animated ultrasound slices from 4D reconstructions on arbitrary planes was developed using a magnetically tracked mock probe. We first quantified the performance of 10 4D reconstruction formulations on simulated data. Reconstructions of 14 in vivo sequences by a baseline, the current state-of-the-art, and the proposed approach were then visually ranked with respect to temporal quality on orthogonal views. Rankings from 5 observers showed that the proposed 4D reconstruction approach significantly improves temporal image quality in comparison with the baseline. The 4D reconstructions of the baseline and the proposed methods were then inspected interactively for accessibility to clinically important views and rated for their clinical usefulness by an ultrasound specialist in obstetrics and gynecology. The reconstructions by the proposed method were rated as 'very useful' in 71% and were statistically significantly more useful than the baseline reconstructions. Multi-sweep fetal heart ultrasound acquisitions in combination with consistent 4D image reconstruction improves quality as well as clinical usefulness of the resulting 4D images in the presence of fetal motion.

  20. Mid-level image representations for real-time heart view plane classification of echocardiograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penatti, Otávio A B; Werneck, Rafael de O; de Almeida, Waldir R; Stein, Bernardo V; Pazinato, Daniel V; Mendes Júnior, Pedro R; Torres, Ricardo da S; Rocha, Anderson

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we explore mid-level image representations for real-time heart view plane classification of 2D echocardiogram ultrasound images. The proposed representations rely on bags of visual words, successfully used by the computer vision community in visual recognition problems. An important element of the proposed representations is the image sampling with large regions, drastically reducing the execution time of the image characterization procedure. Throughout an extensive set of experiments, we evaluate the proposed approach against different image descriptors for classifying four heart view planes. The results show that our approach is effective and efficient for the target problem, making it suitable for use in real-time setups. The proposed representations are also robust to different image transformations, e.g., downsampling, noise filtering, and different machine learning classifiers, keeping classification accuracy above 90%. Feature extraction can be performed in 30 fps or 60 fps in some cases. This paper also includes an in-depth review of the literature in the area of automatic echocardiogram view classification giving the reader a through comprehension of this field of study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Postoperative evaluation of surgical procedures in congenital heart disease with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seelos, K.C.; Kersting-Sommerhoff, B.; Higgins, C.B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a study in which electrocardiographically gated spin-echo MR imaging was used to evaluate 23 patients with congenital heart disease who had undergone Waterston (n = 3), Potts (n = 2), Senning (n = 3), Fontan (n = 3), Rastelli (n = 4), Damus (n = 1) and Jatene (n = 7) procedures. Surgical shunts, conduits, or baffles were identified correctly in all patients. Patency, atresia and hypoplasia of central pulmonary arteries (PAs) as well as postoperative complications (focal stenosis of PAs, thrombosed pseudoaneurysm, intramural abscess) were diagnosed. MR findings were corroborated with angiography, echocardiography, and surgery. Narrowing of the right ventricular outflow tract and focal compression of the proximal PAs were recognized as specific complications of the Jatene procedure. MR imaging appears to be effective for the postoperative evaluation of surgical procedures used for congenital heart disease

  2. Evaluation of Hydatid Disease of the Heart with Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotoulas, Grigoris K.; Magoufis, George L.; Gouliamos, Athanasios D.; Athanassopoulou, Alexandra K.; Roussakis, Arcadios C.; Koulocheri, Dimitra P.; Kalovidouris, Angelos; Vlahos, Labros

    1996-01-01

    Two patients with cardiac involvement of hydatid disease are presented: one with hydatid cyst of the interventricular septum and pulmonary arteries and the other with multiple pulmonary cysts associated with intracardiac and pericardial cysts. The ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to provide a global view of cardiac anatomy in any plane with high contrast between flowing blood and soft tissue ensures it an important role in the diagnosis and preoperative assessment of hydatid disease of the heart

  3. Digital imaging of regional glucose metabolism of the heart with a MWPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellazzini, R.; Camici, P.; Coppini, G.; Del Guerra, A.; Massai, M.M.; Ragadini, M.; Spandre, G.; Tonelli, G.

    1983-01-01

    The digital imaging of carbohydrate consumption in myocardial tissue has been performed by using a deposit tracer of glucose metabolism ( 3 H-deoxyglucose) and a specially designed Multiwire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) that acts as a position sensitive radioactivity detector. The resolving power (approx. =1.5 mm FWHM), sensitivity (approx. =10 -1 Bq/cm 2 ), efficiency (approx. =10%) and uniformity (+ or -4%) of the system are shown and MWPC digital autoradiographs of canine heart in different pathophysiological conditions are presented

  4. Multi-modality Imaging: Bird's eye view from the 2015 American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Andrew J; Lloyd, Steven G; Chaudhry, Farooq A; AlJaroudi, Wael A; Hage, Fadi G

    2016-04-01

    Multiple novel studies were presented at the 2015 American Heart Association Scientific Sessions which was considered a successful conference at many levels. In this review, we will summarize key studies in nuclear cardiology, cardiac magnetic resonance, echocardiography, and cardiac computed tomography that were presented at the Sessions. We hope that this bird's eye view will keep readers updated on the newest imaging studies presented at the meeting whether or not they were able to attend the meeting.

  5. Search for a non-metabolizable PET tracer for heart neuronal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, D.M.; Rosenspire, K.C.; Van Dort, M.E.; Haka, M.S.; Jung, Y.W.; Gildersleeve, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The tracer (1R,2S)-(-)-[ 11 C]-meta-hydroxyephedrine (MHED) is used successfully at the authors' institution to study neuronal heart diseases and neuroendocrine tumors. However, MHED is rapidly metabolized in humans, most likely to alpha-methylepinephrine and its 3-O-methyl ether by the initial action of liver microsomal hydroxylase. This presentation will describe efforts to develop a [ 11 C]-labelled neuronal tracer that is completely resistant to metabolism on the PET-imaging time scale

  6. Cine magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of cardiac structure and flow dynamics in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagi, Teiji; Kiyomatsu, Yumi; Ohara, Nobutoshi; Takagi, Junichi; Sato, Noboru; Kato, Hirohisa; Eto, Takaharu.

    1989-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging (Cine MRI) was performed in 20 patients aged 19 days to 13 years (mean 4.0 years), who had congenital heart disease confirmed at echocardiography or angiography. Prior to cine MRI, gated MRI was performed to evaluate for cardiac structure. Cine MRI was demonstrated by fast low fip angle shot imaging technique with a 30deg flip angle, 15 msec echo time, 30-40 msec pulse repetition time, and 128 x 128 acquisition matrix. Abnormalities of cardiac structure were extremely well defined in all patients by gated MRI. Intracardiac or intravascular blood flow were visualized in 17 (85%) of 20 patients by cine MRI. Left to right shunt flow through ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, and endocardial cushion defect were visualized with low signal intensity area. Low intensity jets flow through the site of re-coarctation of the aorta were also visualized. However, the good recording of cine MRI was not obtained because of artifacts in 3 of 20 patients (15%) who had severe congestive heart failure or respiratory arrhythmia. Gated MRI provides excellent visualization of fine structure, and cine MRI can provide high spatial resolution imaging of flow dynamic in a variety of congenital heart disease, noninvasively. (author)

  7. Should MR imaging be used as the first line of investigation in adult congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivananthan, M.U. Jr.; Rees, M.R.; Verma, S.P.; Gundroo, G.M.; Ridgway, J.; Bann, K. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper investigates the adequacy of MR imaging in the display of anatomy and flow in adult congenital heart disease. Seventeen adult patients with congenital heart disease were studied with a 1-T Siemens Magnatom imager. Gated spin-echo images in three orthogonal as well as selected oblique planes and gradient cine angiographic images were obtained. The results were compared with the results of echocardiography and conventional angiography. There were 9 patients with coarctation of the aorta, 3 of which were postoperative studies. MR images were adequate in the postoperative cases, and the need for angiography was avoided. Seven additional lesions (2 atrial septal defects (ASD), 2 ventricular septal defects (VSD), and 3 bicuspid aortic valves) were demonstrated that were not demonstrated with echocardiography. Four postoperative Blalock shunts were evaluated, which could not be catheterized with echocardiography (2 occlusions, 2 stenoses), and additional flow and anatomic information of the pulmonary vasculature was obtained. In the other 5 cases, 5 additional lesions were demonstrated compared with echocardiography

  8. Evaluation and comparison of signal to noise ratio according to histogram equalization of heart shadow on chest image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Won [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gang-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eul Kyu [Inje Paik University Hospital at Jeo-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hoi Woun [The Baekseok Culture University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Byung Sam; Kim, Hyun Soo; Min, Jung Whan; Son, Jin Hyun [The Shingu University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to measure signal to noise ratio (SNR) according to change of equalization from region of interest (ROI) of heart shadow in chest image. We examined images of chest image of 87 patients in a University-affiliated hospital, Seoul, Korea. Chest images of each patient were calculated by using Image. We have analysis socio-demographical variables, SNR according to images, 95% confidence according to SNR of difference in a mean of SNR. Differences of SNR among change of equalization were tested by SPSS Statistics21 ANOVA test for there was statistical significance 95%(p < 0.05). In SNR results, with the quality of distributions in the order of original chest image, original chest image heart shadow and equalization chest image, equalization chest image heart shadow(p < 0.001). In conclusion, this study would be that quantitative evaluation of heart shadow on chest image can be used as an adjunct to the histogram equalization chest image.

  9. Evaluation and comparison of signal to noise ratio according to histogram equalization of heart shadow on chest image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Won; Lee, Eul Kyu; Jeong, Hoi Woun; Kang, Byung Sam; Kim, Hyun Soo; Min, Jung Whan; Son, Jin Hyun

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure signal to noise ratio (SNR) according to change of equalization from region of interest (ROI) of heart shadow in chest image. We examined images of chest image of 87 patients in a University-affiliated hospital, Seoul, Korea. Chest images of each patient were calculated by using Image. We have analysis socio-demographical variables, SNR according to images, 95% confidence according to SNR of difference in a mean of SNR. Differences of SNR among change of equalization were tested by SPSS Statistics21 ANOVA test for there was statistical significance 95%(p < 0.05). In SNR results, with the quality of distributions in the order of original chest image, original chest image heart shadow and equalization chest image, equalization chest image heart shadow(p < 0.001). In conclusion, this study would be that quantitative evaluation of heart shadow on chest image can be used as an adjunct to the histogram equalization chest image

  10. Radiation dose management for pediatric cardiac computed tomography: a report from the Image Gently 'Have-A-Heart' campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigsby, Cynthia K; McKenney, Sarah E; Hill, Kevin D; Chelliah, Anjali; Einstein, Andrew J; Han, B Kelly; Robinson, Joshua D; Sammet, Christina L; Slesnick, Timothy C; Frush, Donald P

    2018-01-01

    Children with congenital or acquired heart disease can be exposed to relatively high lifetime cumulative doses of ionizing radiation from necessary medical imaging procedures including radiography, fluoroscopic procedures including diagnostic and interventional cardiac catheterizations, electrophysiology examinations, cardiac computed tomography (CT) studies, and nuclear cardiology examinations. Despite the clinical necessity of these imaging studies, the related ionizing radiation exposure could pose an increased lifetime attributable cancer risk. The Image Gently "Have-A-Heart" campaign is promoting the appropriate use of medical imaging studies in children with congenital or acquired heart disease while minimizing radiation exposure. The focus of this manuscript is to provide a comprehensive review of radiation dose management and CT performance in children with congenital or acquired heart disease.

  11. Application of 99mTc-MIBI myocardial tomography imaging for the diagnosis of coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Kegui; Chen Daguang; Chen Jinshui

    1992-01-01

    99m Tc-MIBI myocardial tomography imaging was obtained from 119 cases with Sopha Medical SPECT system. 38 cases of coronary heart diseases, 33 cases of coronary heart diseases combined with hypertension and 48 cases of myocardial infarction were diagnosed according to clinical symptoms and signs, ECG, exercise ECG (treadmill test) and other laboratory studies. The results showed that positive rate of myocardial thermography imaging for detecting coronary heart disease was 70.21% at rest, and the positivity can be further increased by myocardial tomography imaging with exercise test. On the contrary the positivity of exercise ECG was only 63.8%. It was concluded that radionuclide myocardial tomography imaging was noninvasive and more sensitive and specific than the exercise ECG in detecting coronary heart disease

  12. 256-slice CT coronary angiography in atrial fibrillation: The impact of mean heart rate and heart rate variability on image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Liang-Kuang [Department of Radiology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); College of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Shih-Ming [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Mok, Greta S.P. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau (China); Law, Wei-Yip; Lu, Kun-Mu [Department of Radiology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yang, Ching-Ching, E-mail: g39220003@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiological Technology, Tzu Chi College of Technology, 880, Sec.2, Chien-kuo Rd. Hualien 970, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tung-Hsin, E-mail: tung@ym.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, 155 Li-Nong St., Sec. 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)

    2011-08-21

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality of 256-MDCT in atrial fibrillation and to compare the findings with those among patients in sinus rhythm. Materials: All reconstructed images were evaluated by two independent experienced readers blinded to patient information, heart rate, and ECG results to assess the diagnostic quality of images of the coronary artery segments using axial images, multi-planar reformations, maximum intensity projections, and volume rendering technique. Results: No statistical significance was detected in terms of the overall image quality between patients in sinus rhythm and with atrial fibrillation. Pearson's correlation analysis showed no significant association between image quality and mean heart rate no matter for patients in sinus rhythm or with atrial fibrillation. Similarly, there was no correlation between image quality and heart rate variability for either patients in sinus rhythm or with atrial fibrillation. Our results showed that the optimal reconstruction window depends on patient's HR, and the pattern for patients in atrial fibrillation is similar to that obtained from non-atrial fibrillation patients. Conclusion: This study shows the potential of using 256-MDCT coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation. Our results suggest that when appropriate reconstruction timing window is applied, patients with atrial fibrillation do not have to be excluded from MDCT coronary angiographic examinations.

  13. 256-slice CT coronary angiography in atrial fibrillation: The impact of mean heart rate and heart rate variability on image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Liang-Kuang; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Mok, Greta S.P.; Law, Wei-Yip; Lu, Kun-Mu; Yang, Ching-Ching; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality of 256-MDCT in atrial fibrillation and to compare the findings with those among patients in sinus rhythm. Materials: All reconstructed images were evaluated by two independent experienced readers blinded to patient information, heart rate, and ECG results to assess the diagnostic quality of images of the coronary artery segments using axial images, multi-planar reformations, maximum intensity projections, and volume rendering technique. Results: No statistical significance was detected in terms of the overall image quality between patients in sinus rhythm and with atrial fibrillation. Pearson's correlation analysis showed no significant association between image quality and mean heart rate no matter for patients in sinus rhythm or with atrial fibrillation. Similarly, there was no correlation between image quality and heart rate variability for either patients in sinus rhythm or with atrial fibrillation. Our results showed that the optimal reconstruction window depends on patient's HR, and the pattern for patients in atrial fibrillation is similar to that obtained from non-atrial fibrillation patients. Conclusion: This study shows the potential of using 256-MDCT coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation. Our results suggest that when appropriate reconstruction timing window is applied, patients with atrial fibrillation do not have to be excluded from MDCT coronary angiographic examinations.

  14. Technical Note: A 3-D rendering algorithm for electromechanical wave imaging of a beating heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauleau, Pierre; Melki, Lea; Wan, Elaine; Konofagou, Elisa

    2017-09-01

    Arrhythmias can be treated by ablating the heart tissue in the regions of abnormal contraction. The current clinical standard provides electroanatomic 3-D maps to visualize the electrical activation and locate the arrhythmogenic sources. However, the procedure is time-consuming and invasive. Electromechanical wave imaging is an ultrasound-based noninvasive technique that can provide 2-D maps of the electromechanical activation of the heart. In order to fully visualize the complex 3-D pattern of activation, several 2-D views are acquired and processed separately. They are then manually registered with a 3-D rendering software to generate a pseudo-3-D map. However, this last step is operator-dependent and time-consuming. This paper presents a method to generate a full 3-D map of the electromechanical activation using multiple 2-D images. Two canine models were considered to illustrate the method: one in normal sinus rhythm and one paced from the lateral region of the heart. Four standard echographic views of each canine heart were acquired. Electromechanical wave imaging was applied to generate four 2-D activation maps of the left ventricle. The radial positions and activation timings of the walls were automatically extracted from those maps. In each slice, from apex to base, these values were interpolated around the circumference to generate a full 3-D map. In both cases, a 3-D activation map and a cine-loop of the propagation of the electromechanical wave were automatically generated. The 3-D map showing the electromechanical activation timings overlaid on realistic anatomy assists with the visualization of the sources of earlier activation (which are potential arrhythmogenic sources). The earliest sources of activation corresponded to the expected ones: septum for the normal rhythm and lateral for the pacing case. The proposed technique provides, automatically, a 3-D electromechanical activation map with a realistic anatomy. This represents a step towards a

  15. Defining Quality in Cardiovascular Imaging: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Leslee J; Blankstein, Ron; Jacobs, Jill E; Leipsic, Jonathon A; Kwong, Raymond Y; Taqueti, Viviany R; Beanlands, Rob S B; Mieres, Jennifer H; Flamm, Scott D; Gerber, Thomas C; Spertus, John; Di Carli, Marcelo F

    2017-12-01

    The aims of the current statement are to refine the definition of quality in cardiovascular imaging and to propose novel methodological approaches to inform the demonstration of quality in imaging in future clinical trials and registries. We propose defining quality in cardiovascular imaging using an analytical framework put forth by the Institute of Medicine whereby quality was defined as testing being safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, equitable, and efficient. The implications of each of these components of quality health care are as essential for cardiovascular imaging as they are for other areas within health care. Our proposed statement may serve as the foundation for integrating these quality indicators into establishing designations of quality laboratory practices and developing standards for value-based payment reform for imaging services. We also include recommendations for future clinical research to fulfill quality aims within cardiovascular imaging, including clinical hypotheses of improving patient outcomes, the importance of health status as an end point, and deferred testing options. Future research should evolve to define novel methods optimized for the role of cardiovascular imaging for detecting disease and guiding treatment and to demonstrate the role of cardiovascular imaging in facilitating healthcare quality. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Assessment of congenital heart disease (CHD): Is there a role for fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manganaro, L. [Department of Radiological Sciences, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Savelli, S. [Department of Radiological Sciences, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: sarasavelli@hotmail.it; Di Maurizio, M.; Perrone, A.; Francioso, A.; La Barbera, L.; Totaro, P.; Fierro, F.; Tomei, A.; Coratella, F. [Department of Radiological Sciences, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Giancotti, A. [Department of Gynaecological Sciences, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Ballesio, L. [Department of Radiological Sciences, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Ventriglia, F. [Department of Pediatric Cardiology, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: To review our experience with fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate congenital heart disease (CHD). Methods: We performed fetal MRI in 32 fetuses with an echocardiographically assessed CHD. Both direct and indirect signs of CHD were investigated. Direct signs considered were: morpho-volumetric abnormalities of the heart; malrotations; ventricular and atrial septal defects; anomalies of the origin, size and course of the great arteries. Indirect signs considered were: difficulty to recognize a 'normal' anatomical structures in the reference projections; increase of the vascular size before a stenosis; hypertrophy of the papillary muscles; cardiomegaly and pericardial effusion. All MRI findings were compared with postnatal or autoptic findings. Results: MRI allowed the CHD to be visualised by direct signs in 17 fetuses, indirect signs in 5 and both direct and indirect signs in 9 fetuses, excluding the prenatal echocardiographic suspect of hypoplastic left heart syndrome in 1 fetus. Postnatal echocardiograms or autoptic findings confirmed a normal heart in 1 fetus and CHD in 31 fetuses including a single cardiac anomaly or syndrome in 19 fetuses, 2 associated cardiac abnormalities in 11 and 3 cardiac anomalies in 1 fetus. However, in 2 fetuses MRI detected a ventricular septal defect successively disclosed by gold standard. Conclusions: MRI is a promising method for further assessment of the cardiovascular pathologies diagnosed by echocardiography, and may be a valuable tool in assessing associated extracardiac anomalies.

  17. Convolutional neural networks for the detection of diseased hearts using CT images and left atrium patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormer, James D.; Halicek, Martin; Ma, Ling; Reilly, Carolyn M.; Schreibmann, Eduard; Fei, Baowei

    2018-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in the United States. The identification of cardiac diseases on conventional three-dimensional (3D) CT can have many clinical applications. An automated method that can distinguish between healthy and diseased hearts could improve diagnostic speed and accuracy when the only modality available is conventional 3D CT. In this work, we proposed and implemented convolutional neural networks (CNNs) to identify diseased hears on CT images. Six patients with healthy hearts and six with previous cardiovascular disease events received chest CT. After the left atrium for each heart was segmented, 2D and 3D patches were created. A subset of the patches were then used to train separate convolutional neural networks using leave-one-out cross-validation of patient pairs. The results of the two neural networks were compared, with 3D patches producing the higher testing accuracy. The full list of 3D patches from the left atrium was then classified using the optimal 3D CNN model, and the receiver operating curves (ROCs) were produced. The final average area under the curve (AUC) from the ROC curves was 0.840 +/- 0.065 and the average accuracy was 78.9% +/- 5.9%. This demonstrates that the CNN-based method is capable of distinguishing healthy hearts from those with previous cardiovascular disease.

  18. Uptake of perfusion imaging agents by transplanted hearts: an experimental study in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergsland, J.; Carr, E.A. Jr.; Carroll, M.; Feldman, M.J.; Kung, H.; Wright, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    There is a need for a reliable noninvasive marker of rejection in transplanted hearts. Endomyocardial biopsy is now the universally accepted diagnostic method of choice, but the invasiveness of the procedure and the limited size of the sample obtained makes this method far from ideal. As coronary blood flow may be expected to decrease during acute rejection, there has been interest in thallium-201 chloride (T1), a perfusion marker, as an imaging agent for diagnosing cardiac rejection. Hexakis(t-butylisonitrile)-technetium (Tc-TBI) is a representative of a new class of radiopharmaceuticals proposed as perfusion markers. We have compared the uptake of these imaging agents in a rat model of cardiac transplantation. Uptake of Tc-TBI as well as of T1 was significantly lower in rejecting than in nonrejecting hearts. This change was found in both left (LV) and right (RV) ventricles. Allografts in animals treated with cyclosporine (CyA) showed less severe rejection and higher uptakes of both imaging agents as compared to unmodified rejection. Our results suggest that perfusion imaging with these radionuclides is a potentially useful approach to the problem of detecting allograft rejection

  19. Gallium-67 imaging in human heart transplantation: correlation with endomyocardial biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneguetti, J.C.; Camargo, E.E.; Soares, J. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Endomyocardial biopsy seems to be the most accurate method to use for diagnosis and follow-up of acute rejection of the transplanted heart. This investigation compared a noninvasive procedure, gallium-67 imaging, with endomyocardial biopsy in the detection of acute rejection in heart transplantation. Seven male patients (aged 41 to 54 years) sequentially had 46 gallium-67 scintigrams and 46 endomyocardial biopsies between 1 week and 8 months after transplantation. Both studies were obtained in the same day, 48 hours after the administration of an intravenous injection of gallium-67 citrate. Cardiac uptake was graded as negative, mild, moderate, and marked according to an increasing count ratio with rib and sternal uptakes. Histologic findings were graded as negative, mild acute rejection, moderate acute rejection, severe acute rejection, resolving rejection, and nonspecific reaction. Negative biopsies were not found with moderate uptake, and neither moderate nor severe acute rejection were found with negative scintigrams. Imaging sensitivity was 83% with 17% false negatives and 9% false positives. Of seven studies with moderate uptake, five showed moderate acute rejection, and the patients had specific therapy with a decline in uptake, which correlated with resolving rejection. It is conceivable that in the future this technique may be used as a screening procedure for sequential endomyocardial biopsies in the follow-up of heart transplant patients

  20. 67Ga imaging in the patients with infective endocarditis after surgery for congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohata, Tohru; Ono, Yasuo; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Takamiya, Makoto; Yagihara, Toshikatsu

    1991-01-01

    67 Ga imaging was performed in sixteen patients (age: 8 m.-18 y.) who had persistent fever and positive acute phase reactants after surgery for congenital heart disease. Abnormal uptake of 67 Ga over the heart and the lungs was evaluated with a computer. Abnormal uptake of 67 Ga was observed in seven patients. Of them, three showed it in the area of peripheral pulmonary artery and the other four showed it in the area of artificial vessels for pulmonary artery reconstruction. In six patients with positive blood cultures, five showed abnormal uptake of 67 Ga and in ten patients with negative blood cultures, two showed it. Vegetation was detected with 2D-echocardiography in four patients and all of them showed abnormal uptake of 67 Ga, while in 12 patients without vegetation three showed it. In conclusion, 67 Ga imaging was useful to detect the foci of infective endocarditis or pulmonary embolism caused by the vegetation in infective endocarditis in the patients after surgery for congenital heart disease, especially in the peripheral pulmonary arteries and artificial vessels which could not be detected with 2D-echo. (author)

  1. sup 67 Ga imaging in the patients with infective endocarditis after surgery for congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohata, Tohru; Ono, Yasuo; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Takamiya, Makoto; Yagihara, Toshikatsu [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1991-11-01

    {sup 67}Ga imaging was performed in sixteen patients (age: 8 m.-18 y.) who had persistent fever and positive acute phase reactants after surgery for congenital heart disease. Abnormal uptake of {sup 67}Ga over the heart and the lungs was evaluated with a computer. Abnormal uptake of {sup 67}Ga was observed in seven patients. Of them, three showed it in the area of peripheral pulmonary artery and the other four showed it in the area of artificial vessels for pulmonary artery reconstruction. In six patients with positive blood cultures, five showed abnormal uptake of {sup 67}Ga and in ten patients with negative blood cultures, two showed it. Vegetation was detected with 2D-echocardiography in four patients and all of them showed abnormal uptake of {sup 67}Ga, while in 12 patients without vegetation three showed it. In conclusion, {sup 67}Ga imaging was useful to detect the foci of infective endocarditis or pulmonary embolism caused by the vegetation in infective endocarditis in the patients after surgery for congenital heart disease, especially in the peripheral pulmonary arteries and artificial vessels which could not be detected with 2D-echo. (author).

  2. A new automated method for analysis of gated-SPECT images based on a three-dimensional heart shaped model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomsky, Milan; Richter, Jens; Johansson, Lena

    2005-01-01

    A new automated method for quantification of left ventricular function from gated-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images has been developed. The method for quantification of cardiac function (CAFU) is based on a heart shaped model and the active shape algorithm. The model....... The maximal differences between the CAFU estimations and the true left ventricular volumes of the digital phantoms were 11 ml for the end-diastolic volume (EDV), 3 ml for the end-systolic volume (ESV) and 3% for the ejection fraction (EF). The largest differences were seen in the smallest heart....... In the patient group the EDV calculated using QGS and CAFU showed good agreement for large hearts and higher CAFU values compared with QGS for the smaller hearts. In the larger hearts, ESV was much larger for QGS than for CAFU both in the phantom and patient studies. In the smallest hearts there was good...

  3. 123I-BMIPP delayed scintigraphic imaging in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Keisuke; Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Yoneyama, Kihei; Shimokawa, Mitsuhiro; Musha, Haruki

    2008-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to clarify the ability of 123I-beta-methyl-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (123I-BMIPP) to evaluate the heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratio and myocardial global washout rate (WR) in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). The severity of CHF was evaluated on the basis of the New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification. Twenty patients with CHF (13 with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and 7 with ischemic cardiomyopathy) and 11 age-matched controls underwent myocardial radionuclide imaging. Scintigraphic images were obtained from each participant at the early (30 min following radio-isotope injection) and late (4 h) phases using 123I-BMIPP. The H/M ratio and WR were calculated from planar images. Concentrations of plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were measured prior to the scintigraphic study. The 123I-BMIPP uptake of early H/M and global WR did not significantly differ among groups, but uptake of delayed H/M was significantly lower in patients with NYHA class III than in controls (control 2.47 +/- 0.39; class III 1.78 +/- 0.28, P < 0.05). The uptake of delayed H/M and global WR correlated with plasma log BNP in all participants (r = -0.38, P < 0.05; 0.43, P < 0.05, respectively). These data suggest that 123I-BMIPP uptake of delayed H/M enhances the image of CHF severity. The myocardial WR of 123I-BMIPP also effectively depicted the severity of CHF.

  4. SU-F-I-50: Finite Element-Based Deformable Image Registration of Lung and Heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penjweini, R [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kim, M [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Zhu, T [University Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used after surgical resection to treat the microscopic disease for malignant pleural mesothelioma and to increase survival rates. Although accurate light delivery is imperative to PDT efficacy, the deformation of the pleural volume during the surgery impacts the delivered light dose. To facilitate treatment planning, we use a finite-element-based (FEM) deformable image registration to quantify the anatomical variation of lung and heart volumes between CT pre-(or post-) surgery and surface contours obtained during PDT using an infrared camera-based navigation system (NDI). Methods: NDI is used during PDT to obtain the information of the cumulative light fluence on every cavity surface point that is being treated. A wand, comprised of a modified endotrachial tube filled with Intralipid and an optical fiber inside the tube, is used to deliver the light during PDT. The position of the treatment is tracked using an attachment with nine reflective passive markers that are seen by the NDI system. Then, the position points are plotted as three-dimensional volume of the pleural cavity using Matlab and Meshlab. A series of computed tomography (CT) scans of the lungs and heart, in the same patient, are also acquired before and after the surgery. The NDI and CT contours are imported into COMSOL Multiphysics, where the FEM-based deformable image registration is obtained. The NDI and CT contours acquired during and post-PDT are considered as the reference, and the Pre-PDT CT contours are used as the target, which will be deformed. Results: Anatomical variation of the lung and heart volumes, taken at different times from different imaging devices, was determined by using our model. The resulting three-dimensional deformation map along x, y and z-axes was obtained. Conclusion: Our model fuses images acquired by different modalities and provides insights into the variation in anatomical structures over time.

  5. Morphological evaluation of complex congenital heart disease by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Osahiro

    1993-01-01

    Ninety infants and children with complex congenital heart disease were examined with magnetic resonance imaging and the accuracy of morphological diagnoses by MRI was tested by comparison to the final diagnoses primarily based on angiocardiography. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI diagnoses were generally excellent in evaluating vena caval and atrial morphology, type of AV connection, ventricular morphology, type of VA connection and great vessel morphology. Although some difficulty with evaluating the detailed anatomy of the AV valve and its suspension system and fine vascular structures, MRI could demonstrate the entire cardiac structures clearly and provide the 3-dimensional information regarding the intracardiac structures, and it was extremely valuable in morphological assessment of complex congenital heart disease. (author)

  6. Extracting cardiac shapes and motion of the chick embryo heart outflow tract from four-dimensional optical coherence tomography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xin; Liu, Aiping; Thornburg, Kent L.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2012-09-01

    Recent advances in optical coherence tomography (OCT), and the development of image reconstruction algorithms, enabled four-dimensional (4-D) (three-dimensional imaging over time) imaging of the embryonic heart. To further analyze and quantify the dynamics of cardiac beating, segmentation procedures that can extract the shape of the heart and its motion are needed. Most previous studies analyzed cardiac image sequences using manually extracted shapes and measurements. However, this is time consuming and subject to inter-operator variability. Automated or semi-automated analyses of 4-D cardiac OCT images, although very desirable, are also extremely challenging. This work proposes a robust algorithm to semi automatically detect and track cardiac tissue layers from 4-D OCT images of early (tubular) embryonic hearts. Our algorithm uses a two-dimensional (2-D) deformable double-line model (DLM) to detect target cardiac tissues. The detection algorithm uses a maximum-likelihood estimator and was successfully applied to 4-D in vivo OCT images of the heart outflow tract of day three chicken embryos. The extracted shapes captured the dynamics of the chick embryonic heart outflow tract wall, enabling further analysis of cardiac motion.

  7. Multidetector-row computed tomography coronary angiography. Optimization of image reconstruction phase according to the heart rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatani, Yukihiro; Takahashi, Masashi; Takazakura, Ryutaro; Nitta, Norihisa; Murata, Kiyoshi; Ushio, Noritoshi; Matsuo, Shinro; Yamamoto, Takashi; Horie, Minoru

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize the image reconstruction phase of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) coronary angiography according to the heart rate is crucial. Scan data were reconstructed for 10 different phases in 58 sequential patients who under went 8-row cardiac MDCT. The obtained images were scored and compared in terms of motion artifacts and visibility of the vessels, and moreover, electrocardiogram (ECG) record-based evaluations were added for clarification of the temporal relationships among these 10 phases. In the cases with lower heart rates ( 65 beats/mm), they were obtained in the late systolic period. As the heart rate increased, the optimal image reconstruction phase changed from mid diastole to late systole. However, it is recommended to try to decrease the heart rate of patients before data acquisition. (author)

  8. Low-Cost Optical Mapping Systems for Panoramic Imaging of Complex Arrhythmias and Drug-Action in Translational Heart Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peter; Calvo, Conrado J.; Alfonso-Almazán, José M.; Quintanilla, Jorge G.; Chorro, Francisco J.; Yan, Ping; Loew, Leslie M.; Filgueiras-Rama, David; Millet, José

    2017-02-01

    Panoramic optical mapping is the primary method for imaging electrophysiological activity from the entire outer surface of Langendorff-perfused hearts. To date, it is the only method of simultaneously measuring multiple key electrophysiological parameters, such as transmembrane voltage and intracellular free calcium, at high spatial and temporal resolution. Despite the impact it has already had on the fields of cardiac arrhythmias and whole-heart computational modeling, present-day system designs precludes its adoption by the broader cardiovascular research community because of their high costs. Taking advantage of recent technological advances, we developed and validated low-cost optical mapping systems for panoramic imaging using Langendorff-perfused pig hearts, a clinically-relevant model in basic research and bioengineering. By significantly lowering financial thresholds, this powerful cardiac electrophysiology imaging modality may gain wider use in research and, even, teaching laboratories, which we substantiated using the lower-cost Langendorff-perfused rabbit heart model.

  9. Segmentation of multiple heart cavities in 3-D transesophageal ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haak, Alexander; Vegas-Sánchez-Ferrero, Gonzalo; Mulder, Harriët W; Ren, Ben; Kirişli, Hortense A; Metz, Coert; van Burken, Gerard; van Stralen, Marijn; Pluim, Josien P W; van der Steen, Antonius F W; van Walsum, Theo; Bosch, Johannes G

    2015-06-01

    Three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is an excellent modality for real-time visualization of the heart and monitoring of interventions. To improve the usability of 3-D TEE for intervention monitoring and catheter guidance, automated segmentation is desired. However, 3-D TEE segmentation is still a challenging task due to the complex anatomy with multiple cavities, the limited TEE field of view, and typical ultrasound artifacts. We propose to segment all cavities within the TEE view with a multi-cavity active shape model (ASM) in conjunction with a tissue/blood classification based on a gamma mixture model (GMM). 3-D TEE image data of twenty patients were acquired with a Philips X7-2t matrix TEE probe. Tissue probability maps were estimated by a two-class (blood/tissue) GMM. A statistical shape model containing the left ventricle, right ventricle, left atrium, right atrium, and aorta was derived from computed tomography angiography (CTA) segmentations by principal component analysis. ASMs of the whole heart and individual cavities were generated and consecutively fitted to tissue probability maps. First, an average whole-heart model was aligned with the 3-D TEE based on three manually indicated anatomical landmarks. Second, pose and shape of the whole-heart ASM were fitted by a weighted update scheme excluding parts outside of the image sector. Third, pose and shape of ASM for individual heart cavities were initialized by the previous whole heart ASM and updated in a regularized manner to fit the tissue probability maps. The ASM segmentations were validated against manual outlines by two observers and CTA derived segmentations. Dice coefficients and point-to-surface distances were used to determine segmentation accuracy. ASM segmentations were successful in 19 of 20 cases. The median Dice coefficient for all successful segmentations versus the average observer ranged from 90% to 71% compared with an inter-observer range of 95% to 84%. The

  10. Clinical significance of power spectral analysis of heart rate variability and {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial imaging for assessing the severity of heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Yoshio; Fukuoka, Shuji; Shimotsu, Yoriko; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Kamakura, Shiro; Yasumura, Yoshio; Miyatake, Kunio; Shimomura, Katsuro [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Tani, Akihiro

    1997-04-01

    The significance of power spectral analysis of heart rate variability and of MIBG myocardial imaging to see the sympathetic nervous function was evaluated in patients with congestive heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy. Subjects were 10 normal volunteers and 8 patients with severity NYHA II; 10 normals and 25 patients with NYHA II and III; and 17 patients treated with a beta-blocker (metoprolol 5-40 mg). ECG was recorded with a portable ECG recorder for measuring RR intervals for 24 hr, which were applied for power spectral analysis. Early and delayed imagings with 111 MBq of {sup 123}I-MIBG were performed at 15 min and 4 hr, respectively, after its intravenous administration for acquisition of anterior planar and SPECT images. Myocardial blood flow SPECT was also done with 111 MBq of {sup 201}Tl given intravenously, and difference of total defect scores between MIBG and Tl images was computed. MIBG myocardial sympathetic nerve imaging in those patients was found useful to assess the severity of heart failure, to predict the risk patients for beta-blocker treatment and to assess the risk in complicated ventricular tachycardia. (K.H.)

  11. Assessment of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in children with chronic heart failure using quantitative iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Kensuke; Ayusawa, Mamoru; Noto, Nobutaka; Sumitomo, Naokata; Okada, Tomoo; Harada, Kensuke

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in children with chronic heart failure was examined by quantitative iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial imaging in 33 patients aged 7.5±6.1 years (range 0-18 years), including 8 with cardiomyopathy, 15 with congenital heart disease, 3 with anthracycrine cardiotoxicity, 3 with myocarditis, 3 with primary pulmonary hypertension and 1 with Pompe's disease. Anterior planar images were obtained 15 min and 3 hr after the injection of iodine-123 MIBG. The cardiac iodine-123 MIBG uptake was assessed as the heart to upper mediastinum uptake activity ratio of the delayed image (H/M) and the cardiac percentage washout rate (%WR). The severity of chronic heart failure was class I (no medication) in 8 patients, class II (no symptom with medication) in 9, class III (symptom even with medication) in 10 and class IV (late cardiac death) in 6. H/M was 2.33±0.22 in chronic heart failure class I, 2.50±0.34 in class II, 1.95±0.61 in class III, and 1.39±0.29 in class IV (p<0.05). %WR was 24.8±12.8% in chronic heart failure class I, 23.3±10.2% in class II, 49.2±24.5% in class III, and 66.3±26.5% in class IV (p<0.05). The low H/M and high %WR were proportionate to the severity of chronic heart failure. Cardiac iodine-123 MIBG showed cardiac adrenergic neuronal dysfunction in children with severe chronic heart failure. Quantitative iodine-123 MIBG myocardial imaging is clinically useful as a predictor of therapeutic outcome and mortality in children with chronic heart failure. (author)

  12. Assessment of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in children with chronic heart failure using quantitative iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasawa, Kensuke; Ayusawa, Mamoru; Noto, Nobutaka; Sumitomo, Naokata; Okada, Tomoo; Harada, Kensuke [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-12-01

    Cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in children with chronic heart failure was examined by quantitative iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial imaging in 33 patients aged 7.5{+-}6.1 years (range 0-18 years), including 8 with cardiomyopathy, 15 with congenital heart disease, 3 with anthracycrine cardiotoxicity, 3 with myocarditis, 3 with primary pulmonary hypertension and 1 with Pompe's disease. Anterior planar images were obtained 15 min and 3 hr after the injection of iodine-123 MIBG. The cardiac iodine-123 MIBG uptake was assessed as the heart to upper mediastinum uptake activity ratio of the delayed image (H/M) and the cardiac percentage washout rate (%WR). The severity of chronic heart failure was class I (no medication) in 8 patients, class II (no symptom with medication) in 9, class III (symptom even with medication) in 10 and class IV (late cardiac death) in 6. H/M was 2.33{+-}0.22 in chronic heart failure class I, 2.50{+-}0.34 in class II, 1.95{+-}0.61 in class III, and 1.39{+-}0.29 in class IV (p<0.05). %WR was 24.8{+-}12.8% in chronic heart failure class I, 23.3{+-}10.2% in class II, 49.2{+-}24.5% in class III, and 66.3{+-}26.5% in class IV (p<0.05). The low H/M and high %WR were proportionate to the severity of chronic heart failure. Cardiac iodine-123 MIBG showed cardiac adrenergic neuronal dysfunction in children with severe chronic heart failure. Quantitative iodine-123 MIBG myocardial imaging is clinically useful as a predictor of therapeutic outcome and mortality in children with chronic heart failure. (author)

  13. Young community of EACVI: the transition from EACVI Club 35 to Heart Imagers of Tomorrow: a promising yet challenging step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapsa, Julia; Cameli, Matteo; Granier, Camille; Muraru, Denisa; Ernande, Laura; Popescu, Bogdan A; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Habib, Gilbert

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the activity and potential of the young community of European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging and to highlight the transition from Club 35 to 'Heart Imagers of tomorrow'. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Synthetic imaging diagnosis of valvular heart diseases (especially, mytral valve), for the most part of angled projections in cineangiocardiographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katabuchi, Tetsuro; Wakamatsu, Takashi; Nakayama, Kazuhiko

    1981-01-01

    Recently, owing to developments of high output X-ray tube, high resolution image intensifier and mobile U or C arm, increasing remarkably, has been application of cinegraphy to angiocardiographic study. Surgical treatments for heart diseases have been very advanced in this few years, so that before operation, is demanded to precise anatomically and functionally diagnosis of them. In this paper, are discussed cineangiocardiography, echocardiography, in regard to the most useful investigation of valvelar heart diseases and some problems of imaging techniques, finally, introduced the newest examination method of diagnostic imaging. (author)

  15. Localised photoplethysmography imaging for heart rate estimation of pre-term infants in the clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaichulee, Sitthichok; Villarroel, Mauricio; Jorge, João.; Arteta, Carlos; Green, Gabrielle; McCormick, Kenny; Zisserman, Andrew; Tarassenko, Lionel

    2018-02-01

    Non-contact vital-sign estimation allows the monitoring of physiological parameters (such as heart rate, respiratory rate, and peripheral oxygen saturation) without contact electrodes or sensors. Our recent work has demonstrated that a convolutional neural network (CNN) can be used to detect the presence of a patient and segment the patient's skin area for vital-sign estimation, thus enabling the automatic continuous monitoring of vital signs in a hospital environment. In a study approved by the local Research Ethical Committee, we made video recordings of pre-term infants nursed in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford, UK. We extended the CNN model to detect the head, torso and diaper of the infants. We extracted multiple photoplethysmographic imaging (PPGi) signals from each body part, analysed their signal quality, and compared them with the PPGi signal derived from the entire skin area. Our results demonstrated the benefits of estimating heart rate combined from multiple regions of interest using data fusion. In the test dataset, we achieved a mean absolute error of 2.4 beats per minute for 80% (31.1 hours) from a total recording time of 38.5 hours for which both reference heart rate and video data were valid.

  16. Evaluation of methods for MR imaging of human right ventricular heart volumes and mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jauhiainen, T.; Jaervinen, V.M.; Hekali, P.E.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the utility of two different imaging directions in the evaluation of human right ventricular (RV) heart volumes and mass with MR imaging; to compare breath-hold vs. non-breath-hold imaging in volume analysis; and to compare turbo inversion recovery imaging (TIR) with gradient echo imaging in RV mass measurement. Material and Methods: We examined 12 healthy volunteers (age 27-59 years). Breath-hold gradient echo MR imaging was performed in two imaging planes: 1) perpendicular to the RV inflow tract (RVIT view), and 2) in the transaxial view (TA view). The imaging was repeated in the TA view while the subjects were breathing freely. To analyze RV mass using TIR images, the RV was again imaged at end-diastole using the two views. The RV end-diastolic cavity (RVEDV) and muscle volume as well as end-systolic cavity volume (RVESV) were determined with the method of discs. All measurements were done blindly twice to assess repeatability of image analysis. To assess reproducibility of the measurements, 6 of the subjects were imaged twice at an interval of 5-9 weeks. Results: RVEDV averaged 133.2 ml, RVESV 61.5 ml and the RVmass 46.2 g in the RVIT view and 119.9 ml, 56.9 ml and 38.3 g in the TA view, respectively. The volumes obtained with breath-holding were slightly but not significantly smaller than the volumes obtained during normal breathing. There were no marked differences in the RV muscle mass obtained with gradient echo imaging compared to TIR imaging in either views. Repeatability of volume analysis was better in TA than RVIT view: the mean differences were 0.7±4.0 ml and 5.4±14.0 ml in end-diastole and 1.6±3.1 ml and 1.5±13.9 ml in end-systole, respectively. Repeatability of mass analysis was good in both TIR and cine images in the RVIT view but slightly better in TIR images: 0.5±2.4 g compared to 0.8±2.9 g in cine images. Reproducibility of imaging was good, mean differences for RVEDV and RVESV were 1.0±4.8 ml and 0.8±2.8 ml

  17. Autoradiography study and SPECT imaging of reporter gene HSV1-tk expression in heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan Xiaoli [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430022 (China)], E-mail: LXL730724@hotmail.com; Liu Ying; He Yong; Wu Tao; Zhang Binqing; Gao Zairong; An Rui [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430022 (China); Zhang Yongxue [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430022 (China)], E-mail: zhyx1229@163.com

    2010-04-15

    Aim: To demonstrate the feasibility and optimal conditions of imaging herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene transferred into hearts with {sup 131}I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ({sup 131}I-FIAU) using autoradiography (ARG) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in animal models. Methods: HSV1-tk inserted into adenovirus vector (Ad5-tk) and adenovirus (Ad5-null) was prepared. Rats or rabbits were divided into a study group receiving intramyocardial injection of Ad5-tk, and a control group receiving Ad-null injection. In the study group of rats, two sets of experiments, time-course study and dose-dependence study, were performed. In time-course experiments, rats were injected with {sup 131}I-FIAU on Days 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7, after transfection of 1x10{sup 8} pfu Ad5-tk, to study the feasibility and suitable time course for reporter gene imaging. In dose-dependence study, various titers of Ad5-tk (5x10{sup 8}, 1x10{sup 8}, 5x10{sup 7} and 1x10{sup 7} pfu) were used to determine the threshold and optimal viral titer needed for detection of gene expression. The gamma counts of hearts were measured. The rat myocardium was analyzed by ARG and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). SPECT whole-body planar imaging and cardiac tomographic imaging were performed in the rabbit models. Results: From the ARG images, rats injected with Ad5-tk showed significant {sup 131}I-FIAU activity in the anterolateral wall compared with background signals seen in the control Ad5-null rats. In time-course study, the highest radioactivity in the focal myocardium could be seen on Day 1, and then progressively declined with time. In dose-dependence study, the level of {sup 131}I-FIAU accumulation in the transfected myocardium declined with the decrease of Ad viral titers. From the ARG analysis and gamma counting, the threshold viral titer was 5x10{sup 7} pfu, and the optimal Ad titer was 1x10{sup 8} pfu

  18. Dual gated PET/CT imaging of small targets of the heart: method description and testing with a dynamic heart phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokki, Tommi; Sipilä, Hannu T; Teräs, Mika; Noponen, Tommi; Durand-Schaefer, Nicolas; Klén, Riku; Knuuti, Juhani

    2010-01-01

    In PET imaging respiratory and cardiac contraction motions interfere the imaging of heart. The aim was to develop and evaluate dual gating method for improving the detection of small targets of the heart. The method utilizes two independent triggers which are sent periodically into list mode data based on respiratory and ECG cycles. An algorithm for generating dual gated segments from list mode data was developed. The test measurements showed that rotational and axial movements of point source can be separated spatially to different segments with well-defined borders. The effect of dual gating on detection of small moving targets was tested with a moving heart phantom. Dual gated images showed 51% elimination (3.6 mm out of 7.0 mm) of contraction motion of hot spot (diameter 3 mm) and 70% elimination (14 mm out of 20 mm) of respiratory motion. Averaged activity value of hot spot increases by 89% when comparing to non-gated images. Patient study of suspected cardiac sarcoidosis shows sharper spatial myocardial uptake profile and improved detection of small myocardial structures such as papillary muscles. The dual gating method improves detection of small moving targets in a phantom and it is feasible in clinical situations.

  19. The right atrium: gateway to the heart--anatomic and pathologic imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sachin B; Kwan, Damon; Shah, Amar B; Hsu, Joe Y

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of right atrial anatomic and pathologic imaging findings and associated clinical symptoms is important to avoid false-positive diagnoses and missed findings. Complete evaluation of the heart often requires a multimodality approach that includes radiography, echocardiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and invasive angiography. In general, CT provides the highest spatial resolution of these modalities at the cost of radiation exposure to the patient. Echocardiography and MR imaging offer complementary and detailed information for functional evaluation without added radiation exposure. The advantages and disadvantages of each modality for the evaluation of right atrial anatomic structure, size, and pathologic findings are discussed. Cardiac MR imaging is the reference standard for evaluation of right atrial size and volume but often is too time consuming and resource intensive to perform in routine clinical practice. Therefore, established reference ranges for two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography are often used. Right atrial pathologic findings can be broadly categorized into (a) congenital anomalies (cor triatriatum dexter, Ebstein anomaly, and aneurysm), (b) disorders of volume (tricuspid regurgitation, pathologic mimics such as a pseudoaneurysm, and atrial septal defect), (c) disorders of pressure (tricuspid stenosis, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and constrictive pericarditis), and (d) masses (pseudomasses, thrombus, lipomatous hypertrophy of the interatrial septum, lipoma, myxoma, sarcoma, and metastatic disease). Familiarity with each pathologic entity and its treatment options is essential to ensure that appropriate imaging modalities are selected. Online supplemental material is available for this article. RSNA, 2015

  20. Myocardial perfusion imaging with thalium 201 during and after exercise in patients with coronary heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, P B; Villacorta, E V; Monzon, O P; Torres, Jr, J F; Guzman, S V

    1977-07-01

    A unique, non-invasive technique for the evaluation of the regional myocardial perfusion of patients with coronary heart disease has been developed. This entails the use of radionuclide, like thallium (Tl-201), which concentrates in the normal myocardium, leaving areas of ischemia or scarring or ''cold'' perfusion defects. Myocardial perfusion imaging in conjunction with graded exercise testing significantly increases the positivity of the stress test alone among patients with classic angina from 80% to 95%. It gives invaluable information as to the site and extent of the lesion and its reversibility. Among the patients with ECG Q waves indicative of previous infarction, image defects were detected in 93.7%; reversible ischemia co-existing with the infarction was also demonstrated.

  1. Noninvasive imaging in the assessment and prevention of coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llerena Rojas, Luis Roberto; Peix Gonzalez, Amalia; Valiente Mustelier, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Echocardiography, multidetector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear cardiology can all help prevent coronary heart disease. Echocardiography can identify asymptomatic individuals who are at risk of coronary disease and who should receive aggressive preventative therapy by providing data on the carotid intima-media thickness, arterial stiffness and flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery. The calcium score is an independent predictor of cardiac events that influences clinical risk scores such as the Framingham risk score. By using multidetector computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging for coronary angiography, it is possible to visualize both the lumen and vessel walls of coronary arteries and to discriminate between calcified and noncalcified atherosclerotic plaque before invasive coronary angiography is performed. With nuclear cardiology, the functional effects of atherosclerotic lesions can be evaluated by assessing perfusion and ventricular function simultaneously

  2. Four-dimensional ultrasonography of the fetal heart with spatiotemporal image correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Luís F; Lee, Wesley; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Espinoza, Jimmy; Schoen, Mary Lou; Falkensammer, Peter; Treadwell, Marjorie; Romero, Roberto

    2003-12-01

    This study was undertaken to describe a new technique for the examination of the fetal heart using four-dimensional ultrasonography with spatiotemporal image correlation (STIC). Volume data sets of the fetal heart were acquired with a new cardiac gating technique (STIC), which uses automated transverse and longitudinal sweeps of the anterior chest wall. These volumes were obtained from 69 fetuses: 35 normal, 16 with congenital anomalies not affecting the cardiovascular system, and 18 with cardiac abnormalities. Dynamic multiplanar slicing and surface rendering of cardiac structures were performed. To illustrate the STIC technique, two representative volumes from a normal fetus were compared with volumes obtained from fetuses with the following congenital heart anomalies: atrioventricular septal defect, tricuspid stenosis, tricuspid atresia, and interrupted inferior vena cava with abnormal venous drainage. Volume datasets obtained with a transverse sweep were utilized to demonstrate the cardiac chambers, moderator band, interatrial and interventricular septae, atrioventricular valves, pulmonary veins, and outflow tracts. With the use of a reference dot to navigate the four-chamber view, intracardiac structures could be simultaneously studied in three orthogonal planes. The same volume dataset was used for surface rendering of the atrioventricular valves. The aortic and ductal arches were best visualized when the original plane of acquisition was sagittal. Volumes could be interactively manipulated to simultaneously visualize both outflow tracts, in addition to the aortic and ductal arches. Novel views of specific structures were generated. For example, the location and extent of a ventricular septal defect was imaged in a sagittal view of the interventricular septum. Furthermore, surface-rendered images of the atrioventricular valves were employed to distinguish between normal and pathologic conditions. Representative video clips were posted on the Journal's Web

  3. High-frequency dual mode pulsed wave Doppler imaging for monitoring the functional regeneration of adult zebrafish hearts

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Bong Jin; Park, Jinhyoung; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Hyung Ham; Lee, Changyang; Hwang, Jae Youn; Lien, Ching-Ling; Shung, K. Kirk

    2015-01-01

    Adult zebrafish is a well-known small animal model for studying heart regeneration. Although the regeneration of scars made by resecting the ventricular apex has been visualized with histological methods, there is no adequate imaging tool for tracking the functional recovery of the damaged heart. For this reason, high-frequency Doppler echocardiography using dual mode pulsed wave Doppler, which provides both tissue Doppler (TD) and Doppler flow in a same cardiac cycle, is developed with a 30 ...

  4. Extracardiac 18F-florbetapir imaging in patients with systemic amyloidosis: more than hearts and minds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, T; Page, J; Burniston, M; Skillen, A; Ross, J C; Manwani, R; McCool, D; Hawkins, P N; Wechalekar, Ashutosh D

    2018-07-01

    18 F-Florbetapir has been reported to show cardiac uptake in patients with systemic light-chain amyloidosis (AL). This study systematically assessed uptake of 18 F-florbetapir in patients with proven systemic amyloidosis at sites outside the heart. Seventeen patients with proven cardiac amyloidosis underwent 18 F-florbetapir PET/CT imaging, 15 with AL and 2 with transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR). Three patients had repeat scans. All patients had protocolized assessment at the UK National Amyloidosis Centre including imaging with 123 I-serum amyloid P component (SAP). 18 F-Florbetapir images were assessed for areas of increased tracer accumulation and time-uptake curves in terms of standardized uptake values (SUV mean ) were produced. All 17 patients showed 18 F-florbetapir uptake at one or more extracardiac sites. Uptake was seen in the spleen in 6 patients (35%; 6 of 9, 67%, with splenic involvement on 123 I-SAP scintigraphy), in the fat in 11 (65%), in the tongue in 8 (47%), in the parotids in 8 (47%), in the masticatory muscles in 7 (41%), in the lungs in 3 (18%), and in the kidney in 2 (12%) on the late half-body images. The 18 F-florbetapir spleen retention index (SRI) was calculated. SRI >0.045 had 100% sensitivity/sensitivity (in relation to 123 I-SAP splenic uptake, the current standard) in detecting splenic amyloid on dynamic imaging and a sensitivity of 66.7% and a specificity of 100% on the late half-body images. Intense lung uptake was seen in three patients, one of whom had lung interstitial infiltration suggestive of amyloid deposition on previous high-resolution CT. Repeat imaging showed a stable appearance in all three patients suggesting no early impact of treatment response. 18 F-Florbetapir PET/CT is a promising tool for the detection of extracardiac sites of amyloid deposition. The combination of uptake in the heart and uptake in the spleen on 18 F-florbetapir PET/CT, a hallmark of AL, suggests that this tracer holds promise as a screening tool

  5. Experimental Assessment of Flow Fields Associated with Heart Valve Prostheses Using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV): Recommendations for Best Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghav, Vrishank; Sastry, Sudeep; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan

    2018-03-12

    Experimental flow field characterization is a critical component of the assessment of the hemolytic and thrombogenic potential of heart valve substitutes, thus it is important to identify best practices for these experimental techniques. This paper presents a brief review of commonly used flow assessment techniques such as Particle image velocimetry (PIV), Laser doppler velocimetry, and Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging and a comparison of these methodologies. In particular, recommendations for setting up planar PIV experiments such as recommended imaging instrumentation, acquisition and data processing are discussed in the context of heart valve flows. Multiple metrics such as residence time, local velocity and shear stress that have been identified in the literature as being relevant to hemolysis and thrombosis in heart valves are discussed. Additionally, a framework for uncertainty analysis and data reporting for PIV studies of heart valves is presented in this paper. It is anticipated that this paper will provide useful information for heart valve device manufacturers and researchers to assess heart valve flow fields for the potential for hemolysis and thrombosis.

  6. Myocardial imaging in the noninvasive evaluation of patients with suspected ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitt, B.; Strauss, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    Three noninvasive radioactive tracer techniques for evaluating patients with ischemic heart disease are described: (1) myocardial perfusion imaging, (2) acute infarct imaging, and (3) the gated blood pool scan. Myocardial perfusion imaging with tracers that distribute in the myocardium in relation to regional blood flow allows detection of patients with transmural and nontransmural infarction by the finding of decreased tracer concentration in the affected region of the myocardium. If these tracers are injected at the time of maximal stress to patients with significant coronary arterial stenosis but without infarction, areas of transient ischemia can be identified as zones of decreased tracer concentration not found when an examination is performed at rest. Acute infarct imaging with tracers that localize in acutely damaged tissue permits separation of patients with acute myocardial necrosis from those without infarction and those with more chronic damage. The gated blood pool scan permits assessment of left ventricular function and regional wall motion. The measurement of ventricular volumes, ejection fraction and regional wall motion adds significantly to the determination of hemodynamic variables in assessing patients with acute infarction. The technique also permits detection of right ventricular dysfunction. Performance of a combination of these radioactive tracer techniques is often advantageous, particularly in patients with suspected infarction. The techniques can establish whether infarction is present, whether it is acute, where the damage is located and how extensive it is; they can also provide a measure of the effect of this damage on left ventricular function

  7. Evaluation of three-dimensional navigator-gated whole heart MR coronary angiography: The importance of systolic imaging in subjects with high heart rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yenwen; Tadamura, Eiji; Yamamuro, Masaki; Kanao, Shotaro; Nakayama, Kazuki; Togashi, Kaori

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of heart rate (HR) on magnetic resonance coronary angiography (MRCA) image quality in diastolic and systolic phases. Materials and methods: Twenty-seven healthy volunteers (9 men; 33 ± 9 years, HR 53-110 bpm), were evaluated with the electrocardiography and three-dimensional navigator-gating MRCA in a 1.5-T MR scanner (Avanto, Siemens) in diastolic and systolic phases (steady-state free precession; TR/TE/flip angle = 3.2 ms/1.6 ms/90 o ). The timing of scanning was individually adapted to the cardiac rest periods obtained in the prescanning, by visually identifying when the movement of right coronary artery was minimized during diastole and systole. Images of two phases were side-by-side compared on a four-point scale (from 1 = poor to 4 = excellent visibility; score of 3 or 4 as diagnostic). Results: Of 13 subjects with HR ≤65 bpm (low HR group, mean 59.8 ± 4.9 bpm, range 53-65), the image quality scores were significantly better than that with higher heart rates (73.9 ± 9.0 bpm, range 68-110) in diastolic MRCA. The image quality was significantly improved during systole in high HR group. Overall, 91.3% of low HR group had MRCA image of diagnostic quality acquired at diastole, while 88.3% of high HR group had diagnostic images at systole by segmental analysis (p = NS). Conclusions: MRCA at systole offered superior quality in patients with high heart rates

  8. Multi-slice spiral CT coronary angiography: influence of heart rate and reconstruction window on image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Dingbiao; Hua Yanqing; Wang Mingpeng; Zhang Guozhen; Wu Weilan; Hu Fei; Ge Xiaojun; Ding Qiyong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of heart rate and reconstruction window on image quality of multi-slice spiral CT coronary angiography. Methods: Retrospectively ECG-gated MSCT coronary angiography were performed in 80 healthy cases. Results: Four coronary (RCA, LM, LAD, LCX) segments were analyzed in each patient with regard to image quality. 82.1% (46/56) of the coronary segments were sufficient for analysis in patients with heart rate ≤60 bpm, 63.4% (104/164) with 61-70 bpm, 41.2%(28/68) with 71-80 bpm, and 31.2%(10/32) with>80 bpm, respectively. The left anterior descending artery, left circumflex artery, and the right coronary artery were best visualized when the reconstruction window was 60%-70%, 50%-60%, and 50%-70%, respectively. Conclusion: Image quality of MSCT coronary angiography is highly dependent on heart rate and reconstruction window

  9. Investigation of influence of 16-slice spiral CT electrocardiogram-controlled dose modulation on exposure dosage and image quality of cardiac CT imaging under simulated fluctuant heart rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Yan; Chen Jie; Chai Weiming; Hua Jia; Gao Na; Xu Jianrong; Shen Yun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of electrocardiogram (ECG)-controlled dose modulation on exposure dosage and image quality of cardiac CT imaging in a cardiac phantom with simulated fluctuant heart rate. Methods: The basal heart rate of the cardiac pulsating phantom was set as 60 bpm, the experimental situations were divided as 6 groups according to different heart rates. The cardiac imaging was performed on the cardiac phantom when the ECG-controlled dose modulation was firstly turned off. The exposure dosage of each scan sequence was documented. The standard deviation of the CT values of the phantom was measured on the central slice after coronal reformation of the raw data. The quality of 2D and 3D images were scored. Then cardiac imaging was performed when ECG modulation was on and set as four groups according to different modulation parameters. All the data were documented as before. The results from the five groups with and without ECG modulation current were analyzed by F test and comparative rank sum test using the statistical software SPSS 10.0. Results: Statistical analysis showed no significant difference (P>0.05) between the SNR of images (SD value was 27.78 and 26.30) from the groups that full mA output at wide reconstruction phase (69%-99%) when the heart rate was fluctuant(≥7.5 bpm). There was also no significant difference (P>0.05) between the quality of the 2D and 3D images. But there was a significant difference (P 12.5 bpm, the exposure dosage would increase obviously (from 0.6 to 1.7 mSv). Conclusion: For cardiac imaging with 16-slice row CT, the application of ECG modulated current can effectively reduce the exposure dosage without compromising the image quality even if heart rate was fluctuant. (authors)

  10. Assessment of Cardiovascular Apoptosis in the Isolated Rat Heart by Magnetic Resonance Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Heinz Hiller

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis, an active process of cell self-destruction, is associated with myocardial ischemia. The redistribution of phosphatidylserine (PS from the inner to the outer leaflet of the cell membrane is an early event in apoptosis. Annexin V, a protein with high specificity and tight binding to PS, was used to identify and localize apoptosis in the ischemic heart. Fluorescein-labeled annexin V has been used routinely for the assessment of apoptosis in vitro. For the detection of apoptosis in vivo, positron emission tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography have been shown to be suitable tools. In view of the relatively low spatial resolution of nuclear imaging techniques, we developed a high-resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI method that allows rapid and noninvasive monitoring of apoptosis in intact organs. Instead of employing superparamagnetic iron oxide particles linked to annexin V, a new T1 contrast agent was used. To this effect, annexin V was linked to gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (Gd-DTPA-coated liposomes. The left coronary artery of perfused isolated rat hearts was ligated for 30 min followed by reperfusion. T1 and T2* images were acquired by using an 11.7-T magnet before and after intracoronary injection of Gd-DTP-labeled annexin V to visualize apoptotic cells. A significant increase in signal intensity was visible in those regions containing cardiomyocytes in the early stage of apoptosis. Because labeling of early apoptotic cell death in intact organs by histological and immunohistochemical methods remains challenging, the use of Gd-DTPA-labeled annexin V in MRI is clearly an improvement in rapid targeting of apoptotic cells in the ischemic and reperfused myocardium.

  11. Imaging of metabolism and autonomic innervation of the heart by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melon, P.; Schwaiger, M.

    1992-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows, in combination with multiple radiopharmaceuticals, unique physiological and biochemical tissue characterization. Tracers of blood flow, metabolism and neuronal function have been employed with this technique for research application. More recently, PET has emerged in cardiology as useful for the detection of coronary artery disease and the evaluation of tissue viability. Metabolic tracers such as flourine-18 deoxyglucose (FDG) permit the specific delineation of ischaemically compromised myocardium. Clinical studies have indicated that the metabolic imaging is helpful in selecting patients for coronary artery bypass surgery or coronary angioplasty. More recent research work has concentrated on the use of carbon-11 acetate as a marker of myocardial oxygen consumption. Together with measurements of left ventricular performance, estimates of cardiac efficiency can be derived from dynamic 11 C-acetate studies. The non-invasive evaluation of the autonomic nervous system of the heart was limited in the past. With the introduction of radiopharmaceuticals which specifically bind to neuronal structures, the regional integrity of the autonomic nervous system of the heart can be evaluated with PET. Numerous tracers for pre- and postsynaptic binding sites have been synthesized. 11 C-Hydroxyephedrine represent a new catecholamine analogne which is stored in cardiac presynaptic sympathetic nerve terminals. Initial clinical studies with it suggest a promising role for PET in the study of the sympathetic nervous system in various cardiac diseases such as cardiomyopathy, ischaemic heart disease and diabetes mellitus. The specificity of the radiopharmaceuticals and the quantitative measurements of tissue tracer distribution provided by PET make this technology a very attractive research tool in the cardiovascular sciences with great promise in the area of cardiac metabolism and neurocardiology. (orig.)

  12. Evaluation on the influence of electrocardiograph modulated milliampere on image quality and exposure dosage of volume CT heart scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Sen; Du Xiangke; Li Jianyin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To find out whether the use of ECG modulated current (mA) will influence image quality and to decide whether the electrocardiograph (ECG) modulated mA will effectively reduce the exposure dosage. Methods: The cardiac pulsating phantom was set at three speed levels, i.e. high, medium, and low speed so as to simulate different heart rates. The phantom was scanned with ECG modulated mA turned on and off, and the exposure dosage of each scan sequence was documented. The images were reconstructed with reconstruction algorithm that matched the different levels of heart rate. CT values and their corresponding standard deviations at uniform areas on the images and the variation of the CT values at different locations were measured. The results from the two groups with and without ECG modulated mA were analyzed. Results: Under the same level of heart rate, the exposure dosage was remarkably reduced when the ECG modulated mA was on than when it was off. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference (P>0.05) between the images from the two groups. Conclusion: When scanning the heart with volume CT (VCT), the application of ECG modulated mA can effectively reduce the exposure dosage without sacrificing the image quality. (authors)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of complex congenital heart disease in aduits; Magnetresonanztomographie komplexer kongenitaler Herzerkrankungen beim Erwachsenen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bremerich, J. [San Francisco Univ, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology]|[Universitaetsklinik Basel (Switzerland). Abt. fuer Medizinische Radiologie; Wyttenbach, R.; Higgins, C.B. [San Francisco Univ, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Buser, P. [Universitaetsklinik Basel (Switzerland). Abt. fuer Kardiologie; Steinbrich, W. [Universitaetsklinik Basel (Switzerland). Abt. fuer Medizinische Radiologie

    1999-04-01

    An increasing number of patients with complex congenital heart disease reaches adulthood, because treatment and patient outcome have improved considerably in recent years. Monitoring of these patients requires both definition of cardiac anatomy and assessment of function with good reproducibility. Complications after surgical repair such as restenoses of pulmonary arteries after surgical repair of Tetralogy of Fallot, ventricular hypertrophy, stenoses or leakage of baffles, or stenosis and aneurysms of anastomoses have to be detected at an early stage. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an excellent tool to monitor these patients because of its noninvasive nature, its good interstudy and interobserver reproducibility, and because it allows assessment of both cardiac anatomy and function. This paper reviews the current applications of MRI in complex congenital heart disease in adults. (orig.) [Deutsch] Durch Verbesserungen in der Diagnose und Therapie komplexer kongenitaler Herzerkrankungen kann eine zunehmende Anzahl von betroffenen Patienten das Erwachsenenalter erreichen. Diese Patienten benoetigen regelmaessige postoperative Verlaufskontrollen, um Komplikationen wie z.B. Restenosen der grossen Arterien, Stenosen, Lecks und Aneurysmata von Anastomosen, Ventrikelhypertrophie und -dilatation oder Klappendysfunktionen fruehzeitig zu erkennen und zu behandeln. Fuer nichtinvasive regelmaessige Verlaufskontrollen bietet sich die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) des Herzens an, da sie eine umfassende Untersuchung sowohl der Morphologie als auch der Funktion des Herzens mit guter Reproduzierbarkeit erlaubt. Die gegenwaertigen klinischen Anwendungen der MRT bei komplexen kongenitalen Herzerkrankungen beim Erwachsenen werden in dieser Uebersicht beschrieben. (orig.)

  14. The influence of the perinatal environment on the heart: morphological, electrocardiographic, and multimodality imaging features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Mercuro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to review the studies performed to evaluate the influence of perinatal environment on neonatal heart, detected by electrocardiography, echocardiography, and other imaging techniques. Prenatal conditions (such as intrauterine growth retardation and prematurity at birth and some post-natal events (such as perinatal asphyxia and corticosteroids administration, may have early and late detrimental effects on the heart may predispose to a number of future cardiovascular adverse events. For example, subjects born preterm may be at potentially higher risk of developing malignant ventricular arrhythmias as well. Moreover, in individuals born with an extremely low birthweight atrial septal aneurysms are present in about one third of the subjects in the study. Thus, a long-life follow up is suggested in these subjects.Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  15. Big heart data: advancing health informatics through data sharing in cardiovascular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suinesiaputra, Avan; Medrano-Gracia, Pau; Cowan, Brett R; Young, Alistair A

    2015-07-01

    The burden of heart disease is rapidly worsening due to the increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes. Data sharing and open database resources for heart health informatics are important for advancing our understanding of cardiovascular function, disease progression and therapeutics. Data sharing enables valuable information, often obtained at considerable expense and effort, to be reused beyond the specific objectives of the original study. Many government funding agencies and journal publishers are requiring data reuse, and are providing mechanisms for data curation and archival. Tools and infrastructure are available to archive anonymous data from a wide range of studies, from descriptive epidemiological data to gigabytes of imaging data. Meta-analyses can be performed to combine raw data from disparate studies to obtain unique comparisons or to enhance statistical power. Open benchmark datasets are invaluable for validating data analysis algorithms and objectively comparing results. This review provides a rationale for increased data sharing and surveys recent progress in the cardiovascular domain. We also highlight the potential of recent large cardiovascular epidemiological studies enabling collaborative efforts to facilitate data sharing, algorithms benchmarking, disease modeling and statistical atlases.

  16. Diagnostic assessment of the heart after infarction: what is the role of magnetic resonance imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivelitz, D.E.; Taupitz, M.; Hamm, B.

    1999-01-01

    There have been considerable advances in the diagnostic assessment of the heart by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in recent years. Thus, MRI as a one-stop shop modality for the comprehensive noninvasive evaluation of coronary heart disease and myocardial infarction may soon become a reality. This article presents an overview of the present possibilities and future potential of evaluating myocardial anatomy, function, perfusion, and coronary anatomy after myocardial infarction. Cine MRI provides a reliable analysis of regional and global disturbances of cardiac wall motion with a high temporal and spatial resolution. Tagging techniques permit the noninvasive labelling of parts of the myocardium and the identification of three-dimensional patterns of contraction. Myocardial perfusion and disturbed wall motion under pharmacologic stress can be reliably assessed by MRI as well. What is unique is the visualization of myocardial edema, which is made possible by the high soft-tissue contrast resolution. The as yet limited potential to assess coronary arteries and coronary bypasses is likewise discussed. (orig.) [de

  17. Functional imaging of murine hearts using accelerated self-gated UTE cine MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaal, Abdallah G; Noorman, Nils; de Graaf, Wolter L; Hoerr, Verena; Florack, Luc M J; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a fast protocol for ultra-short echo time (UTE) Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the beating murine heart. The sequence involves a self-gated UTE with golden-angle radial acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction. The self-gated acquisition is performed asynchronously with the heartbeat, resulting in a randomly undersampled kt-space that facilitates compressed sensing reconstruction. The sequence was tested in 4 healthy rats and 4 rats with chronic myocardial infarction, approximately 2 months after surgery. As a control, a non-accelerated self-gated multi-slice FLASH sequence with an echo time (TE) of 2.76 ms, 4.5 signal averages, a matrix of 192 × 192, and an acquisition time of 2 min 34 s per slice was used to obtain Cine MRI with 15 frames per heartbeat. Non-accelerated UTE MRI was performed with TE = 0.29 ms, a reconstruction matrix of 192 × 192, and an acquisition time of 3 min 47 s per slice for 3.5 averages. Accelerated imaging with 2×, 4× and 5× undersampled kt-space data was performed with 1 min, 30 and 15 s acquisitions, respectively. UTE Cine images up to 5× undersampled kt-space data could be successfully reconstructed using a compressed sensing algorithm. In contrast to the FLASH Cine images, flow artifacts in the UTE images were nearly absent due to the short echo time, simplifying segmentation of the left ventricular (LV) lumen. LV functional parameters derived from the control and the accelerated Cine movies were statistically identical.

  18. Anterior mediastinal masses in the Framingham Heart Study: Prevalence and CT image characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Tetsuro; Nishino, Mizuki; Gao, Wei; Dupuis, Josée; Washko, George R.; Hunninghake, Gary M.; Murakami, Takamichi; O’Connor, George T.; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence and CT image characteristics of anterior mediastinal masses in a population-based cohort and their association with the demographics of the participants. Chest CT scans of 2571 Framingham Heart Study participants (mean age 58.9 years, 51% female) were evaluated by two board-certified radiologists with expertise in thoracic imaging for the presence of anterior mediastinal masses, their shape, contour, location, invasion of adjacent structures, fat content, and calcification. For participants with anterior mediastinal masses, a previous cardiac CT scan was reviewed for interval size change of the masses, when available. The demographics of the participants were studied for any association with the presence of anterior mediastinal masses. Of 2571, 23 participants (0.9%, 95% CI: 0.6–1.3) had anterior mediastinal masses on CT. The most common CT characteristics were oval shape, lobular contour, and midline location, showing soft tissue density (median 32.1 HU). Fat content was detected in a few cases (9%, 2/23). Six out of eight masses with available prior cardiac CT scans demonstrated an interval growth over a median period of 6.5 years. No risk factors for anterior mediastinal masses were detected among participants’ demographics, including age, sex, BMI, and cigarette smoking. The prevalence of anterior mediastinal masses is 0.9% in the Framingham Heart Study. Those masses may increase in size when observed over 5–7 years. Investigation of clinical significance in incidentally found anterior mediastinal masses with a longer period of follow-up would be necessary

  19. Influence of heart rate on image quality of 64-slice spiral computed coronary angiography and optimization on reconstruction of phase window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Xuemao; Lan Yong; Li Wei; Long Wansheng; Zhang Chaotong; Zhong Xiangyang; Yi Lan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of heart rate on the image quality of 64-slice spiral computed coronary angiography (MSCTCA) and optimize the image reconstruction window. Methods: According to the heart rate, 86 patients were classified into 5 groups: group A, the heart rate ≤60 beat per minute(BMP); group B,61-70BMP, group C,71-80BMP, and group D>80BMP. The image quality of MSCTCA was scored 5 grades from 1-5 according to heart motion artifact. The influences of heart rate and reconstruction phase on the image quality of MSCTCA were evaluated. Results: Average heart rate was 64.4 ±10.1BMP. Diagnostic image quality (score>3) was attained in 277 of 344 segments at the best reconstruction interval. There was a significant corxelation between average heart rate and image quality, but there was no difference between relative delay (%) reconstruction and absolute delay (ms) reconstruction on the image quality. Conclusion: Reducing average heart rate is beneficial for improving the image quality. (authors)

  20. Imaging cardiac activation sequence during ventricular tachycardia in a canine model of nonischemic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chengzong; Pogwizd, Steven M; Yu, Long; Zhou, Zhaoye; Killingsworth, Cheryl R; He, Bin

    2015-01-15

    Noninvasive cardiac activation imaging of ventricular tachycardia (VT) is important in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of arrhythmias in heart failure (HF) patients. This study investigated the ability of the three-dimensional cardiac electrical imaging (3DCEI) technique for characterizing the activation patterns of spontaneously occurring and norepinephrine (NE)-induced VTs in a newly developed arrhythmogenic canine model of nonischemic HF. HF was induced by aortic insufficiency followed by aortic constriction in three canines. Up to 128 body-surface ECGs were measured simultaneously with bipolar recordings from up to 232 intramural sites in a closed-chest condition. Data analysis was performed on the spontaneously occurring VTs (n=4) and the NE-induced nonsustained VTs (n=8) in HF canines. Both spontaneously occurring and NE-induced nonsustained VTs initiated by a focal mechanism primarily from the subendocardium, but occasionally from the subepicardium of left ventricle. Most focal initiation sites were located at apex, right ventricular outflow tract, and left lateral wall. The NE-induced VTs were longer, more rapid, and had more focal sites than the spontaneously occurring VTs. Good correlation was obtained between imaged activation sequence and direct measurements (averaged correlation coefficient of ∼0.70 over 135 VT beats). The reconstructed initiation sites were ∼10 mm from measured initiation sites, suggesting good localization in such a large animal model with cardiac size similar to a human. Both spontaneously occurring and NE-induced nonsustained VTs had focal initiation in this canine model of nonischemic HF. 3DCEI is feasible to image the activation sequence and help define arrhythmia mechanism of nonischemic HF-associated VTs. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Adult congenital heart disease imaging with second-generation dual-source computed tomography: initial experiences and findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshhajra, Brian B; Sidhu, Manavjot S; El-Sherief, Ahmed; Rojas, Carlos; Yeh, Doreen Defaria; Engel, Leif-Christopher; Liberthson, Richard; Abbara, Suhny; Bhatt, Ami

    2012-01-01

    Adult congenital heart disease patients present a unique challenge to the cardiac imager. Patients may present with both acute and chronic manifestations of their complex congenital heart disease and also require surveillance for sequelae of their medical and surgical interventions. Multimodality imaging is often required to clarify their anatomy and physiology. Radiation dose is of particular concern in these patients with lifelong imaging needs for their chronic disease. The second-generation dual-source scanner is a recently available advanced clinical cardiac computed tomography (CT) scanner. It offers a combination of the high-spatial resolution of modern CT, the high-temporal resolution of dual-source technology, and the wide z-axis coverage of modern cone-beam geometry CT scanners. These advances in technology allow novel protocols that markedly reduce scan time, significantly reduce radiation exposure, and expand the physiologic imaging capabilities of cardiac CT. We present a case series of complicated adult congenital heart disease patients imaged by the second-generation dual-source CT scanner with extremely low-radiation doses and excellent image quality. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Complex congenital heart malformation evaluated with MR imaging at 0.3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmgren, N.; Hochbergs, P.; Holmqvist, C.; Sandstroem, S.; Laurin, S.; Bjoerkhem, G.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of MR imaging at 0.3 T as the single modality in diagnosing complex congenital heart disease (CHD). Films from 45 cases were reviewed in two stages by four specialists and one fellow in pediatric radiology, who were unfamiliar with the patients. First a general review of CHD diagnosis was made, then a detailed study of anomalous venous return was performed. Regarding the general diagnosis of cardiovascular anomalies the results were good, with sensitivity of 80%, specificity of 96%, a positive predictive value of 88%, a negative predictive value of 93% and accuracy of 92%. As expected, the less experienced reviewer had somewhat lower figures. As for detailed evaluation of the anomalous veins, the diagnostic results were again good (sensitivity 85%), although less so when also the connection sites of the anomalous veins were considered (sensitivity 79%). The specificity of the findings was high at 97%. MR imaging at 0.3 T is valuable in the diagnosis of comples CHD, especially for anomalous vessels and their connections. (orig.)

  3. Novel imaging strategies for the detection of prosthetic heart valve obstruction and endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanis, W; Budde, R P J; van der Bilt, I A C; Delemarre, B; Hoohenkerk, G; van Rooden, J-K; Scholtens, A M; Habets, J; Chamuleau, S

    2016-02-01

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction remains difficult to recognise correctly by two-dimensional (2D) transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography (TTE/TEE). ECG-triggered multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT), 18-fluorine-fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography including low-dose CT (FDG-PET) and three-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography (3D-TEE) may have additional value. This paper reviews the role of these novel imaging tools in the field of PHV obstruction and endocarditis.For acquired PHV obstruction, MDCT is of additional value in mechanical PHVs to differentiate pannus from thrombus as well as to dynamically study leaflet motion and opening/closing angles. For biological PHV obstruction, additional imaging is not beneficial as it does not change patient management. When performed on top of 2D-TTE/TEE, MDCT has additional value for the detection of both vegetations and pseudoaneurysms/abscesses in PHV endocarditis. FDG-PET has no complementary value for the detection of vegetations; however, it appears more sensitive in the early detection of pseudoaneurysms/abscesses. Furthermore, FDG-PET enables the detection of metastatic and primary extra-cardiac infections. Evidence for the additional value of 3D-TEE is scarce.As clinical implications are major, clinicians should have a low threshold to perform additional MDCT in acquired mechanical PHV obstruction. For suspected PHV endocarditis, both FDG-PET and MDCT have complementary value.

  4. Value of 201-thallium serial myocardial imaging in coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, E.; Sebening, H.; Dressler, J.; Lutilsky, L.; Ulm, K.; Hoer, G.; Papst, H.W.; Bloemer, H.; Technische Univ. Muenchen; Technische Univ. Muenchen

    1979-01-01

    There has been clinical evidence that a perfusion defect on a stress image fills overtime. The diagnostic value of initial and 120 min post exercise redistribution thallium-201 myocardial images (RMI) was determined in 120 pts, with suspected coronary heart disease (CAD), all of whom had coronary arteriography. Significant (>= 75%) lesions were present in 88 pts. 30 pts. without CAD showed a normal tracer uptake immediately after exercise. Scintigrams taken 120 min after exercise revealed a decrease of 201-Tl concentration in every area of the myocardium. 80 pts. with CAD showed an area of decreased tracer uptake in the inital scans. 120 min RMI in 51 pts. revealed a significant increase (p > 0.01) of countrate time ratio in previous underperfused areas. In 37 pts. persistent defects were present, in every case the defect correlated with the site of a myocardial infarction as determined by the finding of an akinetic area in the left ventricular angiogram. Thus RMI following a single dose of 201 Tl can differentiate between scar- and exercise-induced transient ischemia. (orig.) 891 AJ/orig. 892 MB [de

  5. Performance limits of ICA-based heart rate identification techniques in imaging photoplethysmography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannapperuma, Kavan; Holton, Benjamin D; Lesniewski, Peter J; Thomas, John C

    2015-01-01

    Imaging photoplethysmography is a relatively new technique for extracting biometric information from video images of faces. This is useful in non-invasive monitoring of patients including neonates or the aged, with respect to sudden infant death syndrome, sleep apnoea, pulmonary disease, physical or mental stress and other cardio-vascular conditions. In this paper, we investigate the limits of detection of the heart rate (HR) while reducing the video quality. We compare the performance of three independent component analysis (ICA) methods (JADE, FastICA, RADICAL), autocorrelation with signal conditioning techniques and identify the most robust approach. We discuss sources of increasing error and other limiting conditions in three situations of reduced signal-to-noise ratio: one where the area of the analyzed face is decreased from 100 to 5%, another where the face area is progressively re-sampled down to a single RGB pixel and one where the HR signal is severely reduced with respect to the boundary noise. In most cases, the cardiac pulse rate can be reliably and accurately detected from videos containing only 5% facial area or from a face occupying just 4 pixels or containing only 5% of the facial HR modulation. (paper)

  6. The HEART score is useful to predict cardiovascular risks and reduces unnecessary cardiac imaging in low-risk patients with acute chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Siping; Huang, Bo; Zou, Yunliang; Guo, Jianbin; Liu, Ziyong; Pi, Dangyu; Qiu, Yunhong; Xiao, Chun

    2018-06-01

    The present study was to investigate whether the HEART score can be used to evaluate cardiovascular risks and reduce unnecessary cardiac imaging in China.Acute coronary syndrome patients with the thrombosis in myocardial infarction risk score risk HEART score group and 2 patients (1.5%) in the high risk HEART score group had cardiovascular events. The sensitivity of HEART score to predict cardiovascular events was 100% and the specificity was 46.7%. The potential unnecessary cardiac testing was 46.3%. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that per one category increase of the HEART score was associated with nearly 1.3-fold risk of cardiovascular events.In the low-risk acute chest pain patients, the HEART score is useful to physicians in evaluating the risk of cardiovascular events within the first 30 days. In addition, the HEART score is also useful in reducing the unnecessary cardiac imaging.

  7. Cardiothoracic ratio on chest radiograph in pediatric heart disease: How does it correlate with heart volumes at magnetic resonance imaging?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotenhuis, Heynric B. [The University of Toronto, Division of Cardiology, Department of Paediatrics, The Labatt Family Heart Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Zhou, Cheng; Isaac, Kathryn V. [The University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Tomlinson, George [University of Toronto, Department of Medicine, Toronto General Hospital and Mt. Sinai Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Seed, Mike; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars; Yoo, Shi-Joon [The University of Toronto, Division of Cardiology, Department of Paediatrics, The Labatt Family Heart Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); The University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    The cardiothoracic ratio by chest radiograph is widely used as a marker of cardiac size. The purpose of this study is to correlate cardiothoracic ratio and cardiac volumes as measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (MR) in common structural and myopathic heart disease with increased cardiac size due to volume overload or hypertrophy. A retrospective single center study was performed in all patients between 2007 and 2013 with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), aortic regurgitation, isolated left-to-right shunt and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) who underwent cardiovascular MR and chest radiograph within 6 months of each other. Cardiothoracic ratios by chest radiograph (frontal and lateral) were compared to cardiac volumes (indexed for body surface area) by cardiovascular MR. One hundred twenty-seven patients (mean age: 11.2 ± 5.5 years) were included in this study (76 with TOF, 23 with isolated left-to-right shunt, 16 with aortic regurgitation and 12 with HCM). Frontal cardiothoracic ratio of all groups correlated with indexed right ventricular (RV) end-diastolic volume (EDVI) (r = 0.40, P < 0.01) and indexed total heart volume (THVI) (r = 0.27, P < 0.01). In TOF patients, frontal cardiothoracic ratio correlated with RVEDVI (r = 0.34, P < 0.01; coefficient of variation = 27.6%), indexed RV end-systolic volume (ESVI) (r = 0.44, P < 0.01; coefficient of variation = 33.3%) and THVI (r = 0.35, P < 0.01; coefficient of variation = 19.6%), although RV volumes and THVI showed widespread variation given the high coefficients of variation. In patients with aortic regurgitation, frontal cardiothoracic ratio correlated with left ventricular (LV) EDVI (r = 0.50, P = 0.047), but not with THVI and aortic regurgitant fraction, and widespread variation for LV EDVI (coefficient of variation = 19.2%), LV ESVI (coefficient of variation = 32.5%) and THVI (coefficient of variation = 13.6%) was also observed. Frontal cardiothoracic ratio was not correlated with cardiac volumes

  8. Evaluation of long-term prognosis in patients with heart failure. Is cardiac imaging with iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine useful?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Michihiro; Kurihara, Tadashi

    1998-01-01

    The effect of cardiac sympathetic activity on long-term prognosis in patients with heart failure was evaluated by cardiac imaging with 123 I-MIBG in 46 patients admitted for the first episode of heart failure. Cardiac imaging was performed with 123 I-MIBG and 201 Tl at rest on separate days before discharge. Using whole body imaging, the ratio of cardiac uptake of the isotope to total injected dose was calculated (percentage uptake). The cardiac uptake ratio of 123 I-MIBG (percentage uptake of 123 I-MIBG divided by percentage uptake of 201 Tl) and percentage washout of 123 I-MIBG from the heart over 3 hours were calculated as scintigraphic parameters. Cardiac events were defined as cardiac death or deterioration of heart failure requiring readmission. Scintigraphic parameters, clinical parameters, left ventricular function obtained by echocardiography and neurohumoral parameters were compared between the event group and event-free group. During the follow-up period, cardiac events developed in 14 patients (30%). Univariate analysis showed uptake ratio and washout rate of 123 I-MIBG, percentage uptake of 201 Tl, New York Heart Association class at discharge, fractional shortening of the left ventricle, serum norepinephrine and atrial natriuretic peptide levels differed significantly between the two groups. Cox proportional-hazard analysis showed that the uptake ratio was an independent predictor of cardiac events. When a cut-off point in the uptake ratio equal to or less than 0.50 and age equal to or more than 65 years old were included in the Cox proportional-hazard analysis instead of actual numbers, relative risks of cardiac events by each index were 31.2 and 4.2, respectively. These data suggest that cardiac uptake of 123 I-MIBG is a strong and independent predictor of long-term prognosis in patients with heart failure. (K.H.)

  9. Evaluation of long-term prognosis in patients with heart failure. Is cardiac imaging with iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine useful?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, Michihiro; Kurihara, Tadashi [Sumitomo Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    The effect of cardiac sympathetic activity on long-term prognosis in patients with heart failure was evaluated by cardiac imaging with {sup 123}I-MIBG in 46 patients admitted for the first episode of heart failure. Cardiac imaging was performed with {sup 123}I-MIBG and {sup 201}Tl at rest on separate days before discharge. Using whole body imaging, the ratio of cardiac uptake of the isotope to total injected dose was calculated (percentage uptake). The cardiac uptake ratio of {sup 123}I-MIBG (percentage uptake of {sup 123}I-MIBG divided by percentage uptake of {sup 201}Tl) and percentage washout of {sup 123}I-MIBG from the heart over 3 hours were calculated as scintigraphic parameters. Cardiac events were defined as cardiac death or deterioration of heart failure requiring readmission. Scintigraphic parameters, clinical parameters, left ventricular function obtained by echocardiography and neurohumoral parameters were compared between the event group and event-free group. During the follow-up period, cardiac events developed in 14 patients (30%). Univariate analysis showed uptake ratio and washout rate of {sup 123}I-MIBG, percentage uptake of {sup 201}Tl, New York Heart Association class at discharge, fractional shortening of the left ventricle, serum norepinephrine and atrial natriuretic peptide levels differed significantly between the two groups. Cox proportional-hazard analysis showed that the uptake ratio was an independent predictor of cardiac events. When a cut-off point in the uptake ratio equal to or less than 0.50 and age equal to or more than 65 years old were included in the Cox proportional-hazard analysis instead of actual numbers, relative risks of cardiac events by each index were 31.2 and 4.2, respectively. These data suggest that cardiac uptake of {sup 123}I-MIBG is a strong and independent predictor of long-term prognosis in patients with heart failure. (K.H.)

  10. Effectiveness of Using Dual-source CT and the Upshot it creates on Both Heart Rate and Image Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Selçuk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early detection of coronary artery disease (CAD is important because of the high morbidity and mortality rates. As invasive coronary angiography (ICA is an invasive procedure, an alternative diagnostic method; coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA, has become more widely used by the improvements in detector technology. Aims: In this study, we aimed to examine the accuracy and image quality of high-pitch 128-slice dual-source CTA taking the ICA as reference technique. We also aimed to compare the accuracy and image quality between different heart rate groups of >70 beates per minute (bpm and ≤70 bpm. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: Among 450 patients who underwent coronary CTA with the FLASH spiral technique, performed with a second generation dual-source computed tomography device with a pitch value of 3.2, 102 patients without stent and/or bypass surgery history and clinically suspected coronary artery disease who underwent ICA within 15 days were enrolled. Image quality was assessed by two independent radiologists using a 4-point scale (1=absence of any artifacts- 4=non-evaluable. A stenosis >50% was considered significant on a per-segment, per-vessel, and per-patient basis and ICA was considered the reference method. Radiation doses were determined using dose length product (DLP values detected by the computed tomography (CT device. In addition, patients were classified into two groups according to their heart rates as ≤70 bpm (73 patients and >70 bpm (29 patients. The relation between the diagnostic accuracy and heart rate groups were evaluated. Results: Overall, 1495 (98% coronary segments were diagnostic in 102 patients (32 male, 70 female, mean heart rate: 65 bpm. There was a significant correlation between image quality and mean heart rate in the right coronary artery (RCA segments. The effective radiation dose was 0.98±0.09 mili Sievert (mSv. On a per-patient basis, sensitivity

  11. Evaluation of heart perfusion in patients with acute myocardial infarction using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gitte; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas; Dirks, Christina G

    2004-01-01

    with acute transmural myocardial infarction were studied using a Turbo-fast low angle shot (FLASH) MRI sequence to monitor the first pass of an extravascular contrast agent (CA), gadolinium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Quantitation of perfusion, expressed as Ki (mL/100 g/minute), in five......PURPOSE: To investigate the diagnostic ability of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) heart perfusion in acute heart patients, a fast, multislice dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI sequence was applied to patients with acute myocardial infarction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven patients...

  12. Rest thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging in a patient with leukaemic infiltration of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Civelek, A.C.; Camargo, E.E.; Links, J.M.; Brinker, J.A.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Despite the high incidence of leukaemic infiltration of the heart, only 8 cases of atrioventricular block due to leukemia have been reported in the literature. Improvement in the heart block associated with disappearance of the leukaemic infiltrate has not been reported. A rest thallium-201 study was used in a 65-year-old man to demonstrate leukaemic infiltration of the heart which was associated with complete heart block. After chemotherapy, when the tumour burden was reduced and the leukaemia in remission, his heart block resolved, and a follow-up thallium scan was normal. (orig.)

  13. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging in children with heart disease. Quantitative assessment of right ventricular pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitomori, Toshihiro; Ono, Yasuo; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Kozuka, Takahiro (National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)); Kohata, Tohru; Tanimoto, Takeshi

    1985-02-01

    201-TlCl myocardial imaging studies were performed to evaluate systolic pressure of right ventricle on 107 patients including 89 patients with congenital cardiac disease, patients with primary pulmonary hypertension and 13 patients with history of MCLS with the age range of 2 months to 17 years. The congenital cardiac disease group included 30 patients with tetralogy of Fallot, 8 patients with pulmonary stenosis (included 1 patient with double chambered right ventricle), 20 patients with ventricular septal defect, 10 patients with patent ductus arteriosus, 9 patients with atrial septal defect and 12 patients with complete transposition of great arteries. None of the patients with history of MCLS had coronary involvement. 50 ..mu..Ci/kg of 201-TlCl was infused intravenously and after 15 minutes the images were obtained from 5 directions (anterior, LAO 30, LAO 45, LAO 60 and lateral). The angle was determined to demonstrate the intraventricular septum and ventricular free walls cleary separated. The image of end-diastolic phase was obtained with ECG synchronized gated method from that direction. The ROI (region of interest) was defined as a slice line by drawing two lines perpendicular to the septum and the counts of the left and right ventricular free wall (Cl and Cr) were analyzed to evaluate the pressure of right ventricle. The pressure of ventricles were obtained by cardiac catheterization performed at the same time with myocardial imaging. The ratio of Cl and Cr (Cr/Cl) had good correlation with the ratio of peak systolic pressure of left ventricle and right ventricle (regression equation Y=0.84X + 0.08, r=0.87). In each congenital heart disease group, very good correlation was also demonstrated (Y=1.46X - 0.30, r=0.96 in PS; Y=0.70X0.20, r=0.91 in VSD; Y=0.86X + 0.15, r=0.78 in ASD and Y=0.72X + 0.24, r=0.80 in PDA). Thus 201-TlCl myocardial imaging was useful method to evaluate right ventricular pressure noninvasively in congenital cardiac disease.

  14. High-field MR imaging in pediatric congenital heart disease: Initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Kim-Lien; Khan, Sarah N.; Moriarty, John M.; Mohajer, Kiyarash; Renella, Pierangelo; Boechat, M.I.; Finn, J.P.; Satou, Gary; Ayad, Ihab; Patel, Swati

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive assessment of pediatric congenital heart disease (CHD) at any field strength mandates evaluation of both vascular and dynamic cardiac anatomy for which diagnostic quality contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) and cardiac cine are crucial. To determine whether high-resolution (HR) CEMRA and steady-state free precession (SSFP) cine can be performed reliably at 3.0 T in children with CHD and to compare the image quality to similar techniques performed at 1.5 T. Twenty-eight patients with a median age of 5 months and average weight 9.0 ± 7.8 kg with suspected or known CHD were evaluated at 3.0 T. SSFP cine (n = 86 series) and HR-CEMRA (n = 414 named vascular segments) were performed and images were scored for image quality and artifacts. The findings were compared to those of 28 patients with CHD of similar weight who were evaluated at 1.5 T. Overall image quality on HR-CEMRA was rated as excellent or good in 96% (397/414) of vascular segments at 3.0 T (k = 0.49) and in 94% (349/371) of vascular segments at 1.5 T (k = 0.36). Overall image quality of SSFP was rated excellent or good in 91% (78/86) of cine series at 3.0 T (k = 0.55) and in 81% (87/108) at 1.5 T (k = 0.47). Off-resonance artifact was common at both field strengths, varied over the cardiac cycle and was more prevalent at 3.0 T. At 3.0 T, off-resonance dark band artifact on SSFP cine was absent in 3% (3/86), mild in 69% (59/86), moderate in 27% (23/86) and severe in 1% (1/86) of images; at 1.5 T, dark band artifact was absent in 16% (17/108), mild in 69% (75/108), moderate in 12% (13/108) and severe in 3% (3/108) of cine images. The signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio of both SSFP cine and HR-CEMRA images were significantly higher at 3.0 T than at 1.5 T (P < 0.001). Signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio of high-resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and SSFP cine were higher at 3.0 T than at 1.5 T. Artifacts on SSFP cine were

  15. High-field MR imaging in pediatric congenital heart disease: Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Kim-Lien [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Division of Cardiology, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Khan, Sarah N.; Moriarty, John M.; Mohajer, Kiyarash; Renella, Pierangelo; Boechat, M.I.; Finn, J.P. [University of California at Los Angeles, Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Satou, Gary [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ayad, Ihab; Patel, Swati [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Anesthesia, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-08-03

    Comprehensive assessment of pediatric congenital heart disease (CHD) at any field strength mandates evaluation of both vascular and dynamic cardiac anatomy for which diagnostic quality contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) and cardiac cine are crucial. To determine whether high-resolution (HR) CEMRA and steady-state free precession (SSFP) cine can be performed reliably at 3.0 T in children with CHD and to compare the image quality to similar techniques performed at 1.5 T. Twenty-eight patients with a median age of 5 months and average weight 9.0 ± 7.8 kg with suspected or known CHD were evaluated at 3.0 T. SSFP cine (n = 86 series) and HR-CEMRA (n = 414 named vascular segments) were performed and images were scored for image quality and artifacts. The findings were compared to those of 28 patients with CHD of similar weight who were evaluated at 1.5 T. Overall image quality on HR-CEMRA was rated as excellent or good in 96% (397/414) of vascular segments at 3.0 T (k = 0.49) and in 94% (349/371) of vascular segments at 1.5 T (k = 0.36). Overall image quality of SSFP was rated excellent or good in 91% (78/86) of cine series at 3.0 T (k = 0.55) and in 81% (87/108) at 1.5 T (k = 0.47). Off-resonance artifact was common at both field strengths, varied over the cardiac cycle and was more prevalent at 3.0 T. At 3.0 T, off-resonance dark band artifact on SSFP cine was absent in 3% (3/86), mild in 69% (59/86), moderate in 27% (23/86) and severe in 1% (1/86) of images; at 1.5 T, dark band artifact was absent in 16% (17/108), mild in 69% (75/108), moderate in 12% (13/108) and severe in 3% (3/108) of cine images. The signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio of both SSFP cine and HR-CEMRA images were significantly higher at 3.0 T than at 1.5 T (P < 0.001). Signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio of high-resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and SSFP cine were higher at 3.0 T than at 1.5 T. Artifacts on SSFP cine were

  16. High resolution MR imaging of the fetal heart with cardiac triggering: a feasibility study in the sheep fetus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamura, Jin; Frisch, Michael; Adam, Gerhard; Wedegaertner, Ulrike [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Kooijmann, Hendrik [Philips Medical Systems, Hamburg (Germany); Hecher, Kurt [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Obstetrics and Fetal Medicine, Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    The aim of this study was to perform fetal cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with triggering of the fetal heart beat in utero in a sheep model. All experimental protocols were reviewed and the usage of ewes and fetuses was approved by the local animal protection authorities. Images of the hearts of six pregnant ewes were obtained by using a 1.5-T MR system (Philips Medical Systems, Best, Netherlands). The fetuses were chronically instrumented with a carotid catheter to measure the fetal heart frequency for the cardiac triggering. Pulse wave triggered, breath-hold cine-MRI with steady-state free precession (SSFP) was achieved in short axis, two-, four- and three-chamber views. The left ventricular volume and thus the function were measured from the short axis. The fetal heart frequencies ranged between 130 and 160 bpm. The mitral, tricuspid, aortic, and pulmonary valves could be clearly observed. The foramen ovale could be visualized. Myocardial contraction was shown in cine sequences. The average blood volume at the end systole was 3.4{+-}0.2 ml ({+-} SD). The average volume at end diastole was 5.2{+-}0.2 ml; thus the stroke volumes of the left ventricle in the systole were between 1.7 and 1.9 ml with ejection fractions of 38.6% and 39%, respectively. The pulse wave triggered cardiac MRI of the fetal heart allowed evaluation of anatomical structures and functional information. This feasibility study demonstrates the applicability of MRI for future evaluation of fetuses with complex congenital heart defects, once a noninvasive method has been developed to perform fetal cardiac triggering. (orig.)

  17. Diagnostic evaluation of ischemic heart disease by X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Yoshiaki; Kobayashi, Shiro; Takasu, Junichiro; Sakakibara, Makoto; Imai, Hitoshi; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Morooka, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Shigeru; Inagaki, Yoshiaki

    1987-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting and evaluating ischemic heart disease, conventional and enhanced CT were performed for 180 patients (150 with transmural infarction, 12 with subendocardial infarction, and 18 with angina pectoris). MRI examinations were performed for 38 patients (31 with transmural infarction, three with subendocardial infarction, and four with angina pectoris). With enhanced CT, two findings in the myocardium were direct evidence of myocardial infarction: 1) filling defects on the early scans, and 2) late enhancement of the myocardium on the delayed scans. The former were observed mainly at the sites of recent anterior myocardial infarction and the latter were seen in about half of the patients with recent and remote anterior myocardial infarctions. However, these findings were inadequately imaged in patients with inferoposterior infarction and subendocardial infarction. Among 137 patients with transmural infarction, enhanced CT revealed left ventricular aneurysms in 51 (37 %) and ventricular thrombi in 26 (19 %). ECG-gated MRI apparatus having a superconducting magnetic operating at 0.25 Tesla was used, and data for this study were collected using the single-slice spin echo technique. In eight of nine patients with acute myocardial infarction, gated MRI demonstrated the infarcted myocardium as regions of high signal intensity relative to that of the adjacent normal myocardium. Such a difference in MRI signal intensity was scarcely recognized in the chronic stage of myocardial infarction, but the indirect findings of infarction, such as regional wall thinning, wall motion disturbances, left ventricular aneurysms, and ventricular thrombi were easily detected using MRI. No characteristic finding was obtained by CT or MRI in patients with angina pectoris. (author)

  18. Free-breathing whole-heart 3D cine magnetic resonance imaging with prospective respiratory motion compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghari, Mehdi H; Barthur, Ashita; Amaral, Maria E; Geva, Tal; Powell, Andrew J

    2018-07-01

    To develop and validate a new prospective respiratory motion compensation algorithm for free-breathing whole-heart 3D cine steady-state free precession (SSFP) imaging. In a 3D cine SSFP sequence, 4 excitations per cardiac cycle are re-purposed to prospectively track heart position. Specifically, their 1D image is reconstructed and routed into the scanner's standard diaphragmatic navigator processing system. If all 4 signals are in end-expiration, cine image data from the entire cardiac cycle is accepted for image reconstruction. Prospective validation was carried out in patients (N = 17) by comparing in each a conventional breath-hold 2D cine ventricular short-axis stack and a free-breathing whole-heart 3D cine data set. All 3D cine SSFP acquisitions were successful and the mean scan time was 5.9 ± 2.7 min. Left and right ventricular end-diastolic, end-systolic, and stroke volumes by 3D cine SSFP were all larger than those from 2D cine SSFP. This bias was 3D cine images had a lower ventricular blood-to-myocardium contrast ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio, mass, and subjective quality score. The novel prospective respiratory motion compensation method for 3D cine SSFP imaging was robust and efficient and yielded slightly larger ventricular volumes and lower mass compared to breath-hold 2D cine imaging. Magn Reson Med 80:181-189, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. Computed tomography for imaging of pediatric congenital heart disease; Die Computertomographie bei der Bildgebung von Kindern mit kongenitalen Herzvitien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaser-Gallion, N.; Stinn, B.; Wildermuth, S.; Leschka, S. [Kantonsspital St.Gallen, Universitaet Zuerich, Institut fuer Radiologie, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Alkadhi, H. [Universitaetsspital Zuerich, Institut fuer Diagnostisch und Interventionelle Radiologie, Zuerich (Switzerland); Lell, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Institut fuer Radiologie, Erlangen (Germany); Goo, H.W. [University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paul, J.F. [Marie Lannelongue Hospital, Radiology Unit, Plessis Robinson (France)

    2011-01-15

    Congenital heart diseases are the most common congenital abnormalities of development. In general, echocardiography and cardiac catheter angiography are considered the gold standard for the evaluation of congenital heart disease. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging has become an important supplementary imaging modality because of its ability to provide an accurate morphological and functional evaluation. The role of cardiac computed tomography in the imaging of patients with congenital heart disease is becoming increasingly more important due to the development of low radiation dose protocols and improvements in the spatial and temporal resolution. In the preoperative depiction and follow-up after surgical repair of congenital heart diseases, cardiac computed tomography provides detailed information of the heart, the venous and arterial pulmonary circulation as well as systemic arteries. This article reviews the technical aspects of cardiac CT and the modification of examination protocols according to the expected pathology and patient age. The potentials and limitations of the various radiation dose reduction strategies are outlined. (orig.) [German] Kongenitale Herzfehler sind die haeufigsten kongenitalen Fehlbildungen. Echokardiographie und Katheterangiographie gelten allgemein als Goldstandard zur Abklaerung angeborener Herzerkrankungen. Die Magnetresonanztomographie ist aufgrund ihrer Faehigkeit, Herzvitien morphologisch und funktionell zu charakterisieren, als ein wichtiges ergaenzendes Verfahren anzusehen. Durch mehr und mehr dosissparende Untersuchungsprotokolle der neuesten Geraetegenerationen und eine gleichzeitig bessere zeitliche und raeumliche Aufloesung findet die Computertomographie zunehmend Eingang in die Abklaerung kongenitaler Herzfehler. In der praeoperativen Planung und der postoperativen Kontrolle erlaubt sie eine uebersichtliche Darstellung komplexer Fehlbildung nicht nur des Herzens, sondern auch der pulmonalvenoesen und -arteriellen

  20. Relationship between quantitative cardiac neuronal imaging with {sup 123}I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine and hospitalization in patients with heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Matthew W.; Sood, Nitesh [University of Connecticut, School of Medicine Department of Medicine, Farmington, CT (United States); Hartford Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Hartford, CT (United States); Ahlberg, Alan W. [Hartford Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Hartford, CT (United States); Jacobson, Arnold F. [GE Healthcare, Princeton, NJ (United States); Heller, Gary V. [The Intersocietal Accreditation Commission, Ellicott City, MD (United States); Lundbye, Justin B. [University of Connecticut, School of Medicine Department of Medicine, Farmington, CT (United States); The Hospital of Central Connecticut, Division of Cardiology, New Britain, CT (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Hospitalization in patients with systolic heart failure is associated with morbidity, mortality, and cost. Myocardial sympathetic innervation, imaged by {sup 123}I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine ({sup 123}I-mIBG), has been associated with cardiac events in a recent multicenter study. The present analysis explored the relationship between {sup 123}I-mIBG imaging findings and hospitalization. Source documents from the ADMIRE-HF trial were reviewed to identify hospitalization events in patients with systolic heart failure following cardiac neuronal imaging using {sup 123}I-mIBG. Time to hospitalization was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method and compared to the mIBG heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratio using multiple-failure Cox regression. During 1.4 years of median follow-up, 362 end-point hospitalizations occurred in 207 of 961 subjects, 79 % of whom had H/M ratio <1.6. Among subjects hospitalized for any cause, 88 % had H/M ratio <1.6 and subjects with H/M ratio <1.6 experienced hospitalization earlier than subjects with higher H/M ratios (log-rank p = 0.003). After adjusting for elevated brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and time since heart failure diagnosis, a low mIBG H/M ratio was associated with cardiac-related hospitalization (HR 1.48, 95 % CI 1.05 - 2.0; p = 0.02). The mIBG H/M ratio may risk-stratify patients with heart failure for cardiac-related hospitalization, especially when used in conjunction with BNP. Further studies are warranted to examine these relationships. (orig.)

  1. Relationship between quantitative cardiac neuronal imaging with 123I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine and hospitalization in patients with heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, Matthew W.; Sood, Nitesh; Ahlberg, Alan W.; Jacobson, Arnold F.; Heller, Gary V.; Lundbye, Justin B.

    2014-01-01

    Hospitalization in patients with systolic heart failure is associated with morbidity, mortality, and cost. Myocardial sympathetic innervation, imaged by 123 I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine ( 123 I-mIBG), has been associated with cardiac events in a recent multicenter study. The present analysis explored the relationship between 123 I-mIBG imaging findings and hospitalization. Source documents from the ADMIRE-HF trial were reviewed to identify hospitalization events in patients with systolic heart failure following cardiac neuronal imaging using 123 I-mIBG. Time to hospitalization was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method and compared to the mIBG heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratio using multiple-failure Cox regression. During 1.4 years of median follow-up, 362 end-point hospitalizations occurred in 207 of 961 subjects, 79 % of whom had H/M ratio <1.6. Among subjects hospitalized for any cause, 88 % had H/M ratio <1.6 and subjects with H/M ratio <1.6 experienced hospitalization earlier than subjects with higher H/M ratios (log-rank p = 0.003). After adjusting for elevated brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and time since heart failure diagnosis, a low mIBG H/M ratio was associated with cardiac-related hospitalization (HR 1.48, 95 % CI 1.05 - 2.0; p = 0.02). The mIBG H/M ratio may risk-stratify patients with heart failure for cardiac-related hospitalization, especially when used in conjunction with BNP. Further studies are warranted to examine these relationships. (orig.)

  2. High-frequency dual mode pulsed wave Doppler imaging for monitoring the functional regeneration of adult zebrafish hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bong Jin; Park, Jinhyoung; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Hyung Ham; Lee, Changyang; Hwang, Jae Youn; Lien, Ching-Ling; Shung, K. Kirk

    2015-01-01

    Adult zebrafish is a well-known small animal model for studying heart regeneration. Although the regeneration of scars made by resecting the ventricular apex has been visualized with histological methods, there is no adequate imaging tool for tracking the functional recovery of the damaged heart. For this reason, high-frequency Doppler echocardiography using dual mode pulsed wave Doppler, which provides both tissue Doppler (TD) and Doppler flow in a same cardiac cycle, is developed with a 30 MHz high-frequency array ultrasound imaging system. Phantom studies show that the Doppler flow mode of the dual mode is capable of measuring the flow velocity from 0.1 to 15 cm s−1 with high accuracy (p-value = 0.974 > 0.05). In the in vivo study of zebrafish, both TD and Doppler flow signals were simultaneously obtained from the zebrafish heart for the first time, and the synchronized valve motions with the blood flow signals were identified. In the longitudinal study on the zebrafish heart regeneration, the parameters for diagnosing the diastolic dysfunction, for example, E/Em < 10, E/A < 0.14 for wild-type zebrafish, were measured, and the type of diastolic dysfunction caused by the amputation was found to be similar to the restrictive filling. The diastolic function was fully recovered within four weeks post-amputation. PMID:25505135

  3. Mount Etna, heart of the Mediterranean, in science, narrative, and images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behncke, Boris; Patanè, Domenico; Mirella, Turco; Turi, Caggegi; Marco, Aliotta; Alfio, Amantia; Massimo, Cantarero; Francesco, Ciancitto

    2015-04-01

    A keen urge, enticing and potent at the same time, as only real passion can be, had taken hold of our hearts. It was thanks to Etna that we met. It had helped bring together communication, photography and volcanology into one single project, namely to share our emotions and those of the volcano and pass them on to whoever might believe in similar values. Two men and one woman, two Sicilians and one German, on the slopes of the mountain. Chance is the grand master of science, events, coincidences, facts and illusions which come to a crossroads where the spirit may feel at liberty. So here we are then, to tell you of the pulsating heart of a body in constant evolution, about half a million years old, to tell of the red "blood" feeding it, its destructive power, its growth and its dimensions changing in time: all evidence that our planet is very much alive. Because Etna volcano, locally called "Mungibeddu" or "a Muntagna", embodies the vital force of the Earth, to which we owe our existence. We have sought to combine science, narrative and images to meet the tastes of our cultured compatriots, those living beyond the Alps as well as those from overseas. Rightly so, because Etna belongs to humanity, and we have the privilege of dwelling in its arms. We also have the duty and the pleasure to share its existence with the few who may not know it, with the many who would like to understand its unusual aspects in greater depth and with those who walk its paths and explore its precipices perhaps to find their inner selves. The volcano shares the fears of the farm workers and of the inhabitants; it diffuses the intoxicating scent of the earth, air, water and wind. It feeds on the melancholic lullabies of those who have lost a loved one, those who have challenged the laws of nature. And always, at each moment, it is close to us, even as far as the sea of salty air and tears that mothers sometimes weep.

  4. Cardiac muscle organization revealed in 3-D by imaging whole-mount mouse hearts using two-photon fluorescence and confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaguru, Mayandi; Fried, Glenn; Sivaguru, Barghav S; Sivaguru, Vignesh A; Lu, Xiaochen; Choi, Kyung Hwa; Saif, M Taher A; Lin, Brian; Sadayappan, Sakthivel

    2015-11-01

    The ability to image the entire adult mouse heart at high resolution in 3-D would provide enormous advantages in the study of heart disease. However, a technique for imaging nuclear/cellular detail as well as the overall structure of the entire heart in 3-D with minimal effort is lacking. To solve this problem, we modified the benzyl alcohol:benzyl benzoate (BABB) clearing technique by labeling mouse hearts with periodic acid Schiff (PAS) stain. We then imaged the hearts with a combination of two-photon fluorescence microscopy and automated tile-scan imaging/stitching. Utilizing the differential spectral properties of PAS, we could identify muscle and nuclear compartments in the heart. We were also able to visualize the differences between a 3-month-old normal mouse heart and a mouse heart that had undergone heart failure due to the expression of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) gene mutation (t/t). Using 2-D and 3-D morphometric analysis, we found that the t/t heart had anomalous ventricular shape, volume, and wall thickness, as well as a disrupted sarcomere pattern. We further validated our approach using decellularized hearts that had been cultured with 3T3 fibroblasts, which were tracked using a nuclear label. We were able to detect the 3T3 cells inside the decellularized intact heart tissue, achieving nuclear/cellular resolution in 3-D. The combination of labeling, clearing, and two-photon microscopy together with tiling eliminates laborious and time-consuming physical sectioning, alignment, and 3-D reconstruction.

  5. A system for rapid prototyping of hearts with congenital malformations based on the medical imaging interaction toolkit (MITK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Ivo; Böttger, Thomas; Rietdorf, Urte; Maleike, Daniel; Greil, Gerald; Sieverding, Ludger; Miller, Stephan; Mottl-Link, Sibylle; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2006-03-01

    Precise knowledge of the individual cardiac anatomy is essential for diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart disease. Complex malformations of the heart can best be comprehended not from images but from anatomic specimens. Physical models can be created from data using rapid prototyping techniques, e.g., lasersintering or 3D-printing. We have developed a system for obtaining data that show the relevant cardiac anatomy from high-resolution CT/MR images and are suitable for rapid prototyping. The challenge is to preserve all relevant details unaltered in the produced models. The main anatomical structures of interest are the four heart cavities (atria, ventricles), the valves and the septum separating the cavities, and the great vessels. These can be shown either by reproducing the morphology itself or by producing a model of the blood-pool, thus creating a negative of the morphology. Algorithmically the key issue is segmentation. Practically, possibilities allowing the cardiologist or cardiac surgeon to interactively check and correct the segmentation are even more important due to the complex, irregular anatomy and imaging artefacts. The paper presents the algorithmic and interactive processing steps implemented in the system, which is based on the open-source Medical Imaging Interaction Toolkit (MITK, www.mitk.org). It is shown how the principles used in MITK enable to assemble the system from modules (functionalities) developed independently from each other. The system allows to produce models of the heart (and other anatomic structures) of individual patients as well as to reproduce unique specimens from pathology collections for teaching purposes.

  6. Construction of 3D MR image-based computer models of pathologic hearts, augmented with histology and optical fluorescence imaging to characterize action potential propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, Mihaela; Sermesant, Maxime; Liu, Garry; Relan, Jatin; Mansi, Tommaso; Soong, Alan; Peyrat, Jean-Marc; Truong, Michael V; Fefer, Paul; McVeigh, Elliot R; Delingette, Herve; Dick, Alexander J; Ayache, Nicholas; Wright, Graham A

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac computer models can help us understand and predict the propagation of excitation waves (i.e., action potential, AP) in healthy and pathologic hearts. Our broad aim is to develop accurate 3D MR image-based computer models of electrophysiology in large hearts (translatable to clinical applications) and to validate them experimentally. The specific goals of this paper were to match models with maps of the propagation of optical AP on the epicardial surface using large porcine hearts with scars, estimating several parameters relevant to macroscopic reaction-diffusion electrophysiological models. We used voltage-sensitive dyes to image AP in large porcine hearts with scars (three specimens had chronic myocardial infarct, and three had radiofrequency RF acute scars). We first analyzed the main AP waves' characteristics: duration (APD) and propagation under controlled pacing locations and frequencies as recorded from 2D optical images. We further built 3D MR image-based computer models that have information derived from the optical measures, as well as morphologic MRI data (i.e., myocardial anatomy, fiber directions and scar definition). The scar morphology from MR images was validated against corresponding whole-mount histology. We also compared the measured 3D isochronal maps of depolarization to simulated isochrones (the latter replicating precisely the experimental conditions), performing model customization and 3D volumetric adjustments of the local conductivity. Our results demonstrated that mean APD in the border zone (BZ) of the infarct scars was reduced by ~13% (compared to ~318 ms measured in normal zone, NZ), but APD did not change significantly in the thin BZ of the ablation scars. A generic value for velocity ratio (1:2.7) in healthy myocardial tissue was derived from measured values of transverse and longitudinal conduction velocities relative to fibers direction (22 cm/s and 60 cm/s, respectively). The model customization and 3D volumetric

  7. Fast Gated EPR Imaging of the Beating Heart: Spatiotemporally-Resolved 3D Imaging of Free Radical Distribution during the Cardiac Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiyu; Reyes, Levy A.; Johnson, David H.; Velayutham, Murugesan; Yang, Changjun; Samouilov, Alexandre; Zweier, Jay L.

    2012-01-01

    In vivo or ex vivo electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is a powerful technique for determining the spatial distribution of free radicals and other paramagnetic species in living organs and tissues. However, applications of EPRI have been limited by long projection acquisition times and the consequent fact that rapid gated EPRI was not possible. Hence in vivo EPRI typically provided only time-averaged information. In order to achieve direct gated EPRI, a fast EPR acquisition scheme was developed to decrease EPR projection acquisition time down to 10 – 20 ms, along with corresponding software and instrumentation to achieve fast gated EPRI of the isolated beating heart with submillimeter spatial resolution in as little as 2 to 3 minutes. Reconstructed images display temporal and spatial variations of the free radical distribution, anatomical structure, and contractile function within the rat heart during the cardiac cycle. PMID:22473660

  8. Novel imaging strategies for the Detection of Prosthetic Heart Valve Obstruction and Endocarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanis, W.

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart disease is accompanied by a high mortality/morbidity and often requires prosthetic heart valve (PHV) replacement in order to improve quality of life and survival. The major drawback of both mechanical and biological PHV implantations is development of dysfunction, which is a life

  9. Imaging regional metabolic changes in the ischemic rat heart in vivo using hyperpolarized(1-13C)Pyruvate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Mette Hauge; Magnusson, Peter; Laustsen, Christoffer

    2017-01-01

    in the in vivo rat heart in an open-chest model of ischemia reperfusion. Hyperpolarized MRI enables new possibilities for evaluating changes in cardiac metabolism noninvasively and in real time, which potentially could be used for research to evaluate new treatments and metabolic interventions for myocardial......We evaluated the use of hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an open-chest rat model of myocardial infarction to image regional changes in myocardial metabolism. In total, 10 rats were examined before and after 30 minutes of occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary...

  10. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients: Geometrical Uncertainty of the Heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topolnjak, Rajko; Borst, Gerben R.; Nijkamp, Jasper; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the geometrical uncertainties for the heart during radiotherapy treatment of left-sided breast cancer patients and to determine and validate planning organ at risk volume (PRV) margins. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients treated in supine position in 28 fractions with regularly acquired cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans for offline setup correction were included. Retrospectively, the CBCT scans were reconstructed into 10-phase respiration correlated four-dimensional scans. The heart was registered in each breathing phase to the planning CT scan to establish the respiratory heart motion during the CBCT scan (σ resp ). The average of the respiratory motion was calculated as the heart displacement error for a fraction. Subsequently, the systematic (Σ), random (σ), and total random (σ tot =√(σ 2 +σ resp 2 )) errors of the heart position were calculated. Based on the errors a PRV margin for the heart was calculated to ensure that the maximum heart dose (D max ) is not underestimated in at least 90% of the cases (M heart = 1.3Σ-0.5σ tot ). All analysis were performed in left-right (LR), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) directions with respect to both online and offline bony anatomy setup corrections. The PRV margin was validated by accumulating the dose to the heart based on the heart registrations and comparing the planned PRV D max to the accumulated heart D max . Results: For online setup correction, the cardiac geometrical uncertainties and PRV margins were ∑ = 2.2/3.2/2.1 mm, σ = 2.1/2.9/1.4 mm, and M heart = 1.6/2.3/1.3 mm for LR/CC/AP, respectively. For offline setup correction these were ∑ = 2.4/3.7/2.2 mm, σ = 2.9/4.1/2.7 mm, and M heart = 1.6/2.1/1.4 mm. Cardiac motion induced by breathing was σ resp = 1.4/2.9/1.4 mm for LR/CC/AP. The PRV D max underestimated the accumulated heart D max for 9.1% patients using online and 13.6% patients using offline bony anatomy setup correction, which validated

  11. Whole-heart coronary MRA with 3D affine motion correction using 3D image-based navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsson, Markus; Prieto, Claudia; Chiribiri, Amedeo; Vaillant, Ghislain; Razavi, Reza; Botnar, René M

    2014-01-01

    Robust motion correction is necessary to minimize respiratory motion artefacts in coronary MR angiography (CMRA). The state-of-the-art method uses a 1D feet-head translational motion correction approach, and data acquisition is limited to a small window in the respiratory cycle, which prolongs the scan by a factor of 2-3. The purpose of this work was to implement 3D affine motion correction for Cartesian whole-heart CMRA using a 3D navigator (3D-NAV) to allow for data acquisition throughout the whole respiratory cycle. 3D affine transformations for different respiratory states (bins) were estimated by using 3D-NAV image acquisitions which were acquired during the startup profiles of a steady-state free precession sequence. The calculated 3D affine transformations were applied to the corresponding high-resolution Cartesian image acquisition which had been similarly binned, to correct for respiratory motion between bins. Quantitative and qualitative comparisons showed no statistical difference between images acquired with the proposed method and the reference method using a diaphragmatic navigator with a narrow gating window. We demonstrate that 3D-NAV and 3D affine correction can be used to acquire Cartesian whole-heart 3D coronary artery images with 100% scan efficiency with similar image quality as with the state-of-the-art gated and corrected method with approximately 50% scan efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging during adenosine-induced coronary vasodilation in patients with ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeishi, Yasuchika; Chiba, Junya; Abe, Shinya

    1992-01-01

    Thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) myocardial perfusion imaging during adenosine infusion was performed in consecutive 55 patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Adenosine was infused intravenously at a rate of 0.14 mg/kg/min for 6 minutes and a dose of 111 MBq of 201 Tl was administered in a separate vein at the end of third minutes of infusion. Myocardial SPECT imaging was begun 5 minutes and 3 hours after the end of adenosine infusion. For evaluating the presence of perfusion defects, 2 short axis images at the basal and spical levels and a vertical long axis image at the mid left ventricle were used. The regions with decreased 201 Tl uptake were assessed semi-quantitatively. Adenosine infusion caused a slight reduction in systolic blood pressure and an increase in heart rate. The rate pressure products increased slightly (9314±2377 vs. 10360±2148, p 201 Tl myocardial imaging during adenosine infusion was considered to be safe and useful for evaluating the patients with ischemic heart disease. (author)

  13. Technical Note: Evaluation of a 160-mm/256-row CT scanner for whole-heart quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Aaron, E-mail: aso@robarts.ca [Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Imai, Yasuhiro; Nett, Brian; Jackson, John; Nett, Liz; Hsieh, Jiang [CT Engineering, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Wisenberg, Gerald; Teefy, Patrick; Yadegari, Andrew [Cardiology, University Hospital, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario N6A 5A5 (Canada); Islam, Ali [Radiology, St. Joseph’s Hospital London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Lee, Ting-Yim [Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 4V2, Canada and Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: The authors investigated the performance of a recently introduced 160-mm/256-row CT system for low dose quantitative myocardial perfusion (MP) imaging of the whole heart. This platform is equipped with a gantry capable of rotating at 280 ms per full cycle, a second generation of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR-V) to correct for image noise arising from low tube voltage potential/tube current dynamic scanning, and image reconstruction algorithms to tackle beam-hardening, cone-beam, and partial-scan effects. Methods: Phantom studies were performed to investigate the effectiveness of image noise and artifact reduction with a GE Healthcare Revolution CT system for three acquisition protocols used in quantitative CT MP imaging: 100, 120, and 140 kVp/25 mAs. The heart chambers of an anthropomorphic chest phantom were filled with iodinated contrast solution at different concentrations (contrast levels) to simulate the circulation of contrast through the heart in quantitative CT MP imaging. To evaluate beam-hardening correction, the phantom was scanned at each contrast level to measure the changes in CT number (in Hounsfield unit or HU) in the water-filled region surrounding the heart chambers with respect to baseline. To evaluate cone-beam artifact correction, differences in mean water HU between the central and peripheral slices were compared. Partial-scan artifact correction was evaluated from the fluctuation of mean water HU in successive partial scans. To evaluate image noise reduction, a small hollow region adjacent to the heart chambers was filled with diluted contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio in the region before and after noise correction with ASiR-V was compared. The quality of MP maps acquired with the CT system was also evaluated in porcine CT MP studies. Myocardial infarct was induced in a farm pig from a transient occlusion of the distal left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a catheter-based interventional procedure. MP

  14. Technical Note: Evaluation of a 160-mm/256-row CT scanner for whole-heart quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, Aaron; Imai, Yasuhiro; Nett, Brian; Jackson, John; Nett, Liz; Hsieh, Jiang; Wisenberg, Gerald; Teefy, Patrick; Yadegari, Andrew; Islam, Ali; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated the performance of a recently introduced 160-mm/256-row CT system for low dose quantitative myocardial perfusion (MP) imaging of the whole heart. This platform is equipped with a gantry capable of rotating at 280 ms per full cycle, a second generation of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR-V) to correct for image noise arising from low tube voltage potential/tube current dynamic scanning, and image reconstruction algorithms to tackle beam-hardening, cone-beam, and partial-scan effects. Methods: Phantom studies were performed to investigate the effectiveness of image noise and artifact reduction with a GE Healthcare Revolution CT system for three acquisition protocols used in quantitative CT MP imaging: 100, 120, and 140 kVp/25 mAs. The heart chambers of an anthropomorphic chest phantom were filled with iodinated contrast solution at different concentrations (contrast levels) to simulate the circulation of contrast through the heart in quantitative CT MP imaging. To evaluate beam-hardening correction, the phantom was scanned at each contrast level to measure the changes in CT number (in Hounsfield unit or HU) in the water-filled region surrounding the heart chambers with respect to baseline. To evaluate cone-beam artifact correction, differences in mean water HU between the central and peripheral slices were compared. Partial-scan artifact correction was evaluated from the fluctuation of mean water HU in successive partial scans. To evaluate image noise reduction, a small hollow region adjacent to the heart chambers was filled with diluted contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio in the region before and after noise correction with ASiR-V was compared. The quality of MP maps acquired with the CT system was also evaluated in porcine CT MP studies. Myocardial infarct was induced in a farm pig from a transient occlusion of the distal left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a catheter-based interventional procedure. MP

  15. Technical Note: Evaluation of a 160-mm/256-row CT scanner for whole-heart quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Aaron; Imai, Yasuhiro; Nett, Brian; Jackson, John; Nett, Liz; Hsieh, Jiang; Wisenberg, Gerald; Teefy, Patrick; Yadegari, Andrew; Islam, Ali; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2016-08-01

    The authors investigated the performance of a recently introduced 160-mm/256-row CT system for low dose quantitative myocardial perfusion (MP) imaging of the whole heart. This platform is equipped with a gantry capable of rotating at 280 ms per full cycle, a second generation of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR-V) to correct for image noise arising from low tube voltage potential/tube current dynamic scanning, and image reconstruction algorithms to tackle beam-hardening, cone-beam, and partial-scan effects. Phantom studies were performed to investigate the effectiveness of image noise and artifact reduction with a GE Healthcare Revolution CT system for three acquisition protocols used in quantitative CT MP imaging: 100, 120, and 140 kVp/25 mAs. The heart chambers of an anthropomorphic chest phantom were filled with iodinated contrast solution at different concentrations (contrast levels) to simulate the circulation of contrast through the heart in quantitative CT MP imaging. To evaluate beam-hardening correction, the phantom was scanned at each contrast level to measure the changes in CT number (in Hounsfield unit or HU) in the water-filled region surrounding the heart chambers with respect to baseline. To evaluate cone-beam artifact correction, differences in mean water HU between the central and peripheral slices were compared. Partial-scan artifact correction was evaluated from the fluctuation of mean water HU in successive partial scans. To evaluate image noise reduction, a small hollow region adjacent to the heart chambers was filled with diluted contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio in the region before and after noise correction with ASiR-V was compared. The quality of MP maps acquired with the CT system was also evaluated in porcine CT MP studies. Myocardial infarct was induced in a farm pig from a transient occlusion of the distal left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a catheter-based interventional procedure. MP maps were generated

  16. Radiation dose management for pediatric cardiac computed tomography. A report from the Image Gently 'Have-A-Heart' campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigsby, Cynthia K.; Sammet, Christina L. [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Medical Imaging 9, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Departments of Radiology and Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); McKenney, Sarah E. [Children' s National Medical Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Hill, Kevin D. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Durham, NC (United States); Chelliah, Anjali [Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Einstein, Andrew J. [Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Departments of Medicine and Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Han, B.K. [Children' s Heart Clinic at The Children' s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, Department of Pediatrics, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Robinson, Joshua D. [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Departments of Pediatrics and Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Slesnick, Timothy C. [Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Frush, Donald P. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States)

    2018-01-15

    Children with congenital or acquired heart disease can be exposed to relatively high lifetime cumulative doses of ionizing radiation from necessary medical imaging procedures including radiography, fluoroscopic procedures including diagnostic and interventional cardiac catheterizations, electrophysiology examinations, cardiac computed tomography (CT) studies, and nuclear cardiology examinations. Despite the clinical necessity of these imaging studies, the related ionizing radiation exposure could pose an increased lifetime attributable cancer risk. The Image Gently ''Have-A-Heart'' campaign is promoting the appropriate use of medical imaging studies in children with congenital or acquired heart disease while minimizing radiation exposure. The focus of this manuscript is to provide a comprehensive review of radiation dose management and CT performance in children with congenital or acquired heart disease. (orig.)

  17. Radiation dose management for pediatric cardiac computed tomography. A report from the Image Gently 'Have-A-Heart' campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigsby, Cynthia K.; Sammet, Christina L.; McKenney, Sarah E.; Hill, Kevin D.; Chelliah, Anjali; Einstein, Andrew J.; Han, B.K.; Robinson, Joshua D.; Slesnick, Timothy C.; Frush, Donald P.

    2018-01-01

    Children with congenital or acquired heart disease can be exposed to relatively high lifetime cumulative doses of ionizing radiation from necessary medical imaging procedures including radiography, fluoroscopic procedures including diagnostic and interventional cardiac catheterizations, electrophysiology examinations, cardiac computed tomography (CT) studies, and nuclear cardiology examinations. Despite the clinical necessity of these imaging studies, the related ionizing radiation exposure could pose an increased lifetime attributable cancer risk. The Image Gently ''Have-A-Heart'' campaign is promoting the appropriate use of medical imaging studies in children with congenital or acquired heart disease while minimizing radiation exposure. The focus of this manuscript is to provide a comprehensive review of radiation dose management and CT performance in children with congenital or acquired heart disease. (orig.)

  18. [Non-destructive detection research for hollow heart of potato based on semi-transmission hyperspectral imaging and SVM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Li, Xiao-yu; Xu, Meng-ling; Jin, Rui; Ku, Jing; Xu, Sen-miao; Wu, Zhen-zhong

    2015-01-01

    The quality of potato is directly related to their edible value and industrial value. Hollow heart of potato, as a physiological disease occurred inside the tuber, is difficult to be detected. This paper put forward a non-destructive detection method by using semi-transmission hyperspectral imaging with support vector machine (SVM) to detect hollow heart of potato. Compared to reflection and transmission hyperspectral image, semi-transmission hyperspectral image can get clearer image which contains the internal quality information of agricultural products. In this study, 224 potato samples (149 normal samples and 75 hollow samples) were selected as the research object, and semi-transmission hyperspectral image acquisition system was constructed to acquire the hyperspectral images (390-1 040 nn) of the potato samples, and then the average spectrum of region of interest were extracted for spectral characteristics analysis. Normalize was used to preprocess the original spectrum, and prediction model were developed based on SVM using all wave bands, the accurate recognition rate of test set is only 87. 5%. In order to simplify the model competitive.adaptive reweighed sampling algorithm (CARS) and successive projection algorithm (SPA) were utilized to select important variables from the all 520 spectral variables and 8 variables were selected (454, 601, 639, 664, 748, 827, 874 and 936 nm). 94. 64% of the accurate recognition rate of test set was obtained by using the 8 variables to develop SVM model. Parameter optimization algorithms, including artificial fish swarm algorithm (AFSA), genetic algorithm (GA) and grid search algorithm, were used to optimize the SVM model parameters: penalty parameter c and kernel parameter g. After comparative analysis, AFSA, a new bionic optimization algorithm based on the foraging behavior of fish swarm, was proved to get the optimal model parameter (c=10. 659 1, g=0. 349 7), and the recognition accuracy of 10% were obtained for the AFSA

  19. Volume of myocardium perfused by coronary artery branches as estimated from 3D micro-CT images of rat hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Patricia E.; Naessens, Lauren C.; Seaman, Catherine A.; Reyes, Denise A.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2000-04-01

    Average myocardial perfusion is remarkably consistent throughout the heart wall under resting conditions and the velocity of blood flow is fairly reproducible from artery to artery. Based on these observations, and the fact that flow through an artery is the product of arterial cross-sectional area and blood flow velocity, we would expect the volume of myocardium perfused to be proportional to the cross-sectional area of the coronary artery perfusing that volume of myocardium. This relationship has been confirmed by others in pigs, dogs and humans. To test the body size-dependence of this relationship we used the hearts from rats, 3 through 25 weeks of age. The coronary arteries were infused with radiopaque microfil polymer and the hearts scanned in a micro- CT scanner. Using these 3D images we measured the volume of myocardium and the arterial cross-sectional area of the artery that perfused that volume of myocardium. The average constant of proportionality was found to be 0.15 +/- 0.08 cm3/mm2. Our data showed no statistically different estimates of the constant of proportionality in the rat hearts of different ages nor between the left and right coronary arteries. This constant is smaller than that observed in large animals and humans, but this difference is consistent with the body mass-dependence on metabolic rate.

  20. Reconstructions with identical filling (RIF) of the heart: a physiological approach to image reconstruction in coronary CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinartz, S.D.; Diefenbach, B.S.; Kuhl, C.K.; Mahnken, A.H.; Allmendinger, T.

    2012-01-01

    To compare image quality in coronary artery computed tomography angiography (cCTA) using reconstructions with automated phase detection and Reconstructions computed with Identical Filling of the heart (RIF). Seventy-four patients underwent ECG-gated dual source CT (DSCT) between November 2009 and July 2010 for suspected coronary heart disease (n = 35), planning of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (n = 34) or evaluation of ventricular function (n = 5). Image data sets by the RIF formula and automated phase detection were computed and evaluated with the AHA 15-segment model and a 5-grade Likert scale (1: poor, 5: excellent quality). Subgroups regarding rhythm (sinus rhythm = SR; arrhythmia = ARR) and potential premedication were evaluated by a per-segment, per-vessel and per-patient analysis. RIF significantly improved image quality in 10 of 15 coronary segments (P < 0.05). More diagnostic segments were provided by RIF regarding the entire cohort (n = 693 vs. 590, P < 0.001) and all of the subgroups (e.g. ARR: n = 143 vs. 72, P < 0.001). In arrhythmic patients (n = 19), more diagnostic vessels (e.g. LAD: n = 10 vs. 3; P < 0.014) and complete data sets (n = 7 vs. 1; P < 0.001) were produced. RIF reconstruction is superior to automatic diastolic non-edited reconstructions, especially in arrhythmic patients. RIF theory provides a physiological approach for determining the optimal image reconstruction point in ECG-gated CT angiography. (orig.)

  1. Brain-heart interactions: challenges and opportunities with functional magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Catie; Raven, Erika P; Duyn, Jeff H

    2016-05-13

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at ultra-high field (UHF) strengths (7 T and above) offers unique opportunities for studying the human brain with increased spatial resolution, contrast and sensitivity. However, its reliability can be compromised by factors such as head motion, image distortion and non-neural fluctuations of the functional MRI signal. The objective of this review is to provide a critical discussion of the advantages and trade-offs associated with UHF imaging, focusing on the application to studying brain-heart interactions. We describe how UHF MRI may provide contrast and resolution benefits for measuring neural activity of regions involved in the control and mediation of autonomic processes, and in delineating such regions based on anatomical MRI contrast. Limitations arising from confounding signals are discussed, including challenges with distinguishing non-neural physiological effects from the neural signals of interest that reflect cardiorespiratory function. We also consider how recently developed data analysis techniques may be applied to high-field imaging data to uncover novel information about brain-heart interactions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. Influence of heart rate on diagnostic accuracy and image quality of 16-slice CT coronary angiography: comparison of multisegment and halfscan reconstruction approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, Marc; Teige, Florian; Hamm, Bernd; Laule, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The lower the heart rate the better image quality in multislice computed tomography (MSCT) coronary angiography. We prospectively assessed the influence of heart rate on per-patient diagnostic accuracy and image quality of MSCT coronary angiography and compared adaptive multisegment and standard halfscan reconstruction. A consecutive cohort of 126 patients scheduled to undergo conventional coronary angiography was examined with 16-slice CT. For all heart rate groups, per-patient diagnostic accuracy was significantly higher for multisegment than halfscan reconstruction with values of 95 vs. 79% (p 74 bpm, 41 patients). Differences in diagnostic accuracy between adjacent heart rate groups were only significant for halfscan reconstruction for the comparison between the 65-74 and >74 bpm group (p < 0.05). The vessel lengths free of motion artifacts were significantly longer with multisegment reconstruction in all heart rate groups and for all coronary arteries (p < 0.005). For noninvasive MSCT coronary angiography, both per-patient diagnostic accuracy and image quality decline with increasing heart rate, and multisegment reconstruction at high heart rates yields similar results as standard halfscan reconstruction at low heart rates. (orig.)

  3. Influence of heart rate on diagnostic accuracy and image quality of 16-slice CT coronary angiography: comparison of multisegment and halfscan reconstruction approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc; Teige, Florian; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Radiology, Chariteplatz 1, P.O. Box 10098, Berlin (Germany); Laule, Michael [Department of Cardiology, Charite, Berlin (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    The lower the heart rate the better image quality in multislice computed tomography (MSCT) coronary angiography. We prospectively assessed the influence of heart rate on per-patient diagnostic accuracy and image quality of MSCT coronary angiography and compared adaptive multisegment and standard halfscan reconstruction. A consecutive cohort of 126 patients scheduled to undergo conventional coronary angiography was examined with 16-slice CT. For all heart rate groups, per-patient diagnostic accuracy was significantly higher for multisegment than halfscan reconstruction with values of 95 vs. 79% (p < 0.05, <65 bpm, 38 patients), 85 vs. 66% (p < 0.05, 65-74 bpm, 47 patients), and 78% vs. 41% (p < 0.001, >74 bpm, 41 patients). Differences in diagnostic accuracy between adjacent heart rate groups were only significant for halfscan reconstruction for the comparison between the 65-74 and >74 bpm group (p < 0.05). The vessel lengths free of motion artifacts were significantly longer with multisegment reconstruction in all heart rate groups and for all coronary arteries (p < 0.005). For noninvasive MSCT coronary angiography, both per-patient diagnostic accuracy and image quality decline with increasing heart rate, and multisegment reconstruction at high heart rates yields similar results as standard halfscan reconstruction at low heart rates. (orig.)

  4. Novel imaging strategies for the detection of prosthetic heart valve obstruction and endocarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Tanis (Wilco); R.P.J. Budde (Ricardo); I.A.C. van der Bilt (Ivo); B. Delemarre; G. Hoohenker; J.-K. Van Rooden; A.M. Scholtens (Asbjørn M.); J. Habets; S.A.J. Chamuleau (Steven)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractProsthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction remains difficult to recognise correctly by two-dimensional (2D) transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography (TTE/TEE). ECG-triggered multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT), 18-fluorine-fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission

  5. Novel imaging strategies for the detection of prosthetic heart valve obstruction and endocarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanis, W; Budde, R P J; van der Bilt, I A C; Delemarre, B; Hoohenkerk, G; van Rooden, J-K; Scholtens, A M; Habets, J; Chamuleau, S

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction remains difficult to recognise correctly by two-dimensional (2D) transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography (TTE/TEE). ECG-triggered multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT), 18-fluorine-fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography including

  6. Polyglucose nanoparticles with renal elimination and macrophage avidity facilitate PET imaging in ischaemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keliher, Edmund J.; Ye, Yu-Xiang; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R.; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Tricot, Benoit; Senders, Max L.; Groenen, Hannah; Fay, Francois; Perez-Medina, Carlos; Calcagno, Claudia; Carlucci, Giuseppe; Reiner, Thomas; Sun, Yuan; Courties, Gabriel; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Kim, Hye-Yeong; Wang, Cuihua; Chen, John W.; Swirski, Filip K.; Wey, Hsiao-Ying; Hooker, Jacob; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Tissue macrophage numbers vary during health versus disease. Abundant inflammatory macrophages destruct tissues, leading to atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction and heart failure. Emerging therapeutic options create interest in monitoring macrophages in patients. Here we describe positron emission

  7. Whole-heart 3D late gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. Investigation of optimal scan parameters and clinical usefulness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yorimitsu, Misako; Yokoyama, Kenichi; Nitatori, Toshiaki; Yoshino, Hideaki; Isono, Sachiko; Kuhara, Shigehide

    2012-01-01

    Whole-heart 3-dimensional (3D) late-gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (WH-LGE) uses respiratory gating combined with acquisition of 3D data for the entire heart in a single scan, which permits reconstruction of any plane with high resolution. We investigated the optimal scan parameters and compared WH-LGE with the conventional scanning method. We employed inversion recovery 3D fast field echo using a 1.5-tesla system and scan parameters: repetition time (TR), 6.6 ms; echo time (TE), 2.5 ms; number of segments, 2; parallel imaging factor, 1.8; matrix size, 128 x 256; field of view (FOV), 320 x 320 mm; and acquisition slice thickness, 3 mm (reconstruction slice thickness, 1.5 mm). Five healthy volunteers underwent scanning during free breathing with real-time motion correction, from which we determined optimal scan parameters. We then used those parameters to scan 25 patients with myocardial infarction to compare scan time and image quality between the WH-LGE and conventional 3D breath-holding methods (slice thickness, 10 mm; matrix size, 128 x 256). Results in volunteers showed optimal scan parameters of 12deg flip angle, fat suppression turned off in combination, and interleaved ordering. In clinical cases, scan times did not differ significantly. Sharpness of the margins of normal myocardium at the apex of the heart and contrast between enhanced and nonenhanced myocardium improved significantly with WH-LGE. WH-LGE yields high resolution images during free breathing and is considered useful for accurately estimating the area and transmural extent of myocardial infarction. (author)

  8. Introduction to cardiac imaging in infants and children: Techniques, potential, and role in the imaging work-up of various cardiac malformations and other pediatric heart conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailliard, Frederique [Centre for Cardiovascular MR, Cardiothoracic Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); North Carolina Children' s Heart Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States); Hughes, Marina L. [Centre for Cardiovascular MR, Cardiothoracic Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Taylor, Andrew M. [Centre for Cardiovascular MR, Cardiothoracic Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: a.taylor@ich.ucl.ac.uk

    2008-11-15

    The increasing prevalence of congenital heart disease (CHD) can be attributed to major improvements in diagnosis and treatment. Although echocardiography is the most commonly used imaging modality for diagnosis and follow-up of subjects with CHD, the evolution of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and increasingly computed tomography (CT) does offer new ways to visualize the heart and the great vessels. The development of cardiovascular MR techniques allows for a comprehensive assessment of cardiac anatomy and function. This provides information about the long-term sequlae of the underlying complex anatomy, hemodynamic assessment of residual post-operative lesions and complications of surgery. As much of the functional data in CHD patients is usually acquired with invasive X-ray angiography, non-invasive alternatives such as cardiovascular MR (and CT) are desirable. This review evaluates the role of MR imaging in the management of subjects with CHD, particularly detailing recent developments in imaging techniques as they relate to the various CHD diagnoses we commonly encounter in our practice.

  9. Prognostic value of myocardial 123I-BMIPP imaging in patients with congestive heart failure without coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Michihiro; Kurihara, Tadashi; Sindoh, Takashi; Sawada, Yoshihiro; Honda, Minoru

    1998-01-01

    We performed 123 I-BMIPP (BMIPP) imaging in order to clarify the characteristics of fatty acid metabolism and its effect on prognosis in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) without coronary artery disease. We studied 15 normal subjects and 42 patients with CHF (idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy; 24, hypertensive heart disease; 12, valvular heart disease; 6). We obtained cardiac imaging with BMIPP and 201 Tl at rest on separate days before discharge. Using whole body imaging, the ratio of cardiac uptake of the isotope to total injected dose was calculated (%Uptake). We calculated the cardiac uptake ratio of BMIPP (%Uptake of BMIPP divided by %Uptake of 201 Tl), percent washout of BMIPP from the heart over 3 hours and unhomogeneity of myocardial distribution of BMIPP (coefficient of variation of BMIPP, CV) as scintigraphic parameters. Cardiac events were defined as cardiac death or deterioration of CHF which requiring readmission. Uptake ratio (CHF; 0.91±0.17, normal; 1.10±0.09, p=0.0000) and CV (CHF; 20±5, normal; 16±5, p=0.0385) were different significantly between CHF and normal subjects. During the follow-up period of 27.2±14.4 months (4.5-53.5 months) cardiac events developed in 15 patients (cardiac death; 8, deterioration of CHF; 7). In univariate analysis, % uptake of 201 Tl, uptake ratio, % FS, serum norepinephrine level and serum renin activity were different significantly between event and event-free groups. Cox proportional hazard analysis showed that the uptake ratio (p=0.0000) and age (p=0.018) were independent predictors of cardiac events. In patients with uptake ratio less than 0.88, relative risks of cardiac events was 23.7 times greater than in patients with uptake ratio more than 0.89. These data suggested that in patients with CHF fatty acid metabolism was deteriorated and cardiac uptake of BMIPP was a strong and independent predictor of long-term prognosis in patients with heart failure. (author)

  10. Prognostic value of myocardial {sup 123}I-BMIPP imaging in patients with congestive heart failure without coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, Michihiro; Kurihara, Tadashi; Sindoh, Takashi; Sawada, Yoshihiro; Honda, Minoru [Sumitomo Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    1998-04-01

    We performed {sup 123}I-BMIPP (BMIPP) imaging in order to clarify the characteristics of fatty acid metabolism and its effect on prognosis in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) without coronary artery disease. We studied 15 normal subjects and 42 patients with CHF (idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy; 24, hypertensive heart disease; 12, valvular heart disease; 6). We obtained cardiac imaging with BMIPP and {sup 201}Tl at rest on separate days before discharge. Using whole body imaging, the ratio of cardiac uptake of the isotope to total injected dose was calculated (%Uptake). We calculated the cardiac uptake ratio of BMIPP (%Uptake of BMIPP divided by %Uptake of {sup 201}Tl), percent washout of BMIPP from the heart over 3 hours and unhomogeneity of myocardial distribution of BMIPP (coefficient of variation of BMIPP, CV) as scintigraphic parameters. Cardiac events were defined as cardiac death or deterioration of CHF which requiring readmission. Uptake ratio (CHF; 0.91{+-}0.17, normal; 1.10{+-}0.09, p=0.0000) and CV (CHF; 20{+-}5, normal; 16{+-}5, p=0.0385) were different significantly between CHF and normal subjects. During the follow-up period of 27.2{+-}14.4 months (4.5-53.5 months) cardiac events developed in 15 patients (cardiac death; 8, deterioration of CHF; 7). In univariate analysis, % uptake of {sup 201}Tl, uptake ratio, % FS, serum norepinephrine level and serum renin activity were different significantly between event and event-free groups. Cox proportional hazard analysis showed that the uptake ratio (p=0.0000) and age (p=0.018) were independent predictors of cardiac events. In patients with uptake ratio less than 0.88, relative risks of cardiac events was 23.7 times greater than in patients with uptake ratio more than 0.89. These data suggested that in patients with CHF fatty acid metabolism was deteriorated and cardiac uptake of BMIPP was a strong and independent predictor of long-term prognosis in patients with heart failure. (author)

  11. Maintained functionality of an implantable radiotelemetric blood pressure and heart rate sensor after magnetic resonance imaging in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nölte, I; Boll, H; Figueiredo, G; Groden, C; Brockmann, M A; Gorbey, S; Lemmer, B

    2011-01-01

    Radiotelemetric sensors for in vivo assessment of blood pressure and heart rate are widely used in animal research. MRI with implanted sensors is regarded as contraindicated as transmitter malfunction and injury of the animal may be caused. Moreover, artefacts are expected to compromise image evaluation. In vitro, the function of a radiotelemetric sensor (TA11PA-C10, Data Sciences International) after exposure to MRI up to 9.4 T was assessed. The magnetic force of the electromagnetic field on the sensor as well as radiofrequency (RF)-induced sensor heating was analysed. Finally, MRI with an implanted sensor was performed in a rat. Imaging artefacts were analysed at 3.0 and 9.4 T ex vivo and in vivo. Transmitted 24 h blood pressure and heart rate were compared before and after MRI to verify the integrity of the telemetric sensor. The function of the sensor was not altered by MRI up to 9.4 T. The maximum force exerted on the sensor was 273 ± 50 mN. RF-induced heating was ruled out. Artefacts impeded the assessment of the abdomen and thorax in a dead rat, but not of the head and neck. MRI with implanted radiotelemetric sensors is feasible in principal. The tested sensor maintains functionality up to 9.4 T. Artefacts hampered abdominal and throacic imaging in rats, while assessment of the head and neck is possible

  12. Comparative study of adenosine and exercise 201Tl myocardial perfusion tomographic imaging for detection of coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiong

    1997-01-01

    To compare diagnostic accuracy of adenosine and exercise 201 Tl myocardial perfusion tomographic imaging for detection of coronary heart disease (CHD) in patients with a normal rest ECG and no history of myocardial infarction, 81 patients with CHD and 10 normal control subjects underwent adenosine myocardial perfusion imaging, exercise nuclide myocardial perfusion imaging was performed in 117 patients with CHD and 16 normal control subjects, two groups also had coronary arteriography. Both exercise and adenosine testing parameters were analysed. It is shown: 1) The sensitivity and specificity for detection of CHD were 79% vs 80% for adenosine group and 81% vs 81% for exercise myocardial perfusion imaging group respectively. There was no significant difference in comparison with two matched groups (χ 2 = 1.13, χ 2 = 0.18, χ 2 = 0.12, P>0.05). 2) Side effects induced by adenosine accounted for 89% of patients, all symptoms were mild and disappeared quickly after the termination of the study except in 2 cases withdrawal of infusion needed because of severe angina pectoris. Adenosine myocardial perfusion imaging is a safe and sensitive method for detection of CHD. The diagnostic value of adenosine test is similar to that of exercise myocardial perfusion imaging and particularly useful in evaluating patients unable to perform exercise test or achieve adequate level of exercise

  13. Kymogram detection and kymogram-correlated image reconstruction from subsecond spiral computed tomography scans of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachelriess, Marc; Sennst, Dirk-Alexander; Maxlmoser, Wolfgang; Kalender, Willi A.

    2002-01-01

    Subsecond single-slice, multi-slice or cone-beam spiral computed tomography (SSCT, MSCT, CBCT) offer great potential for improving heart imaging. Together with the newly developed phase-correlated cardiac reconstruction algorithms 180 deg. MCD and 180 deg. MCI [Med. Phys. 27, 1881-1902 (2000)] or related algorithms provided by the CT manufacturers, high image quality can be achieved. These algorithms require information about the cardiac motion, i.e., typically the simultaneously recorded electrocardiogram (ECG), to synchronize the reconstruction with the cardiac motion. Neither data acquired without ECG information (standard patients) nor acquisitions with corrupted ECG information can be handled adequately. We developed a method to extract the appropriate information about cardiac motion directly from the measured raw data (projection data). The so-called kymogram function is a measure of the cardiac motion as a function of time t or as a function of the projection angle α. In contrast to the ECG which is a global measure of the heart's electric excitation, the kymogram is a local measure of the heart motion at the z-position z(α) at projection angle α. The patient's local heart rate as well as the necessary synchronization information to be used with phase-correlated algorithms can be extracted from the kymogram by using a series of signal processing steps. The kymogram information is shown to be adequate to substitute the ECG information. Computer simulations with simulated ECG and patient measurements with simultaneously acquired ECG were carried out for a multislice scanner providing M=4 slices to evaluate these new approaches. Both the ECG function and the kymogram function were used for reconstruction. Both were highly correlated regarding the periodicity information used for reconstruction. In 21 out of 25 consecutive cases the kymogram approach was equivalent to the ECG-correlated reconstruction; only minor differences in image quality between both

  14. Evaluation of postoperative follow-up of children's congenital heart disease with pulmonary hypertension by pulmonary imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Jinghao; Zhang Shantong; Zeng Jihua

    1994-01-01

    Pulmonary perfusion imaging with 99m Tc labelled macroaggregated albumin (MAA) was performed in 48 cases of congenital heart diseases of children, including 32 cases with pulmonary hypertension (PH). The change in the total count ratio of the right lung against the left lung between right and left lateral decubitus positions (rt/lt) was used to assess the pulmonary arterial pressure postoperatively. The results showed that rt/lt ratio could qualitatively evaluate the pulmonary arterial pressure. The reproducibility of rt/lt ratio was quite good in experiments with rabbits. Some factors which affected the recovery of PH after operation have been discussed

  15. Preparation, chromatographic evaluation and biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-procainamide as a radiopharmaceutical for heart imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motaleb, M.A.; Ibrahim, I.T.; Abo Rizq, R.S. [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Labeled Compound Dept.; Elzanfaly, E.S. [Cairo Univ. (Egypt). Analytical Dept.

    2017-06-01

    Procainamide (4-amino-N-[2-(diethylamino) ethyl] benzamide) is a sodium channel blocker, which acts as an effective antiarrhythmic agent used in the treatment of a variety of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. The aim of this study was to prepare {sup 99m}Tc-procainamide complex, apply different chromatographic techniques for the assay of radiolabeling yield and study its biodistribution as a novel radiopharmaceutical for heart imaging. {sup 99m}Tc-procainamide was obtained with a maximum labeling yield of 95.76±0.20% via direct labeling method under optimum conditions of 200 μg of procainamide, 300 μL of buffer (carbonate) at pH 11, 30 μg SnCl{sub 2} . 2H{sub 2}O at room temperature (25 C) for 15 min. In terms of in vitro stability, the complex was stable for 3 h. Chromatographic evaluation using paper chromatography, thin layer chromatography, gel chromatography, and high performance liquid chromatography showed reliable results for measuring the radiochemical yield. Biodistribution study of {sup 99m}Tc-procainamide showed ratios of heart/lung and heart/liver (6.38±1.50, 2.06±0.31, respectively at 30 min post injection) which was comparable to that of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi (7.4±2.00, 0.97±0.10, respectively at 60 min, P<0.05).

  16. Experimental investigations on the fluid-mechanics of an electrospun heart valve by means of particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Gaudio, Costantino; Gasbarroni, Pier Luca; Romano, Giovanni Paolo

    2016-12-01

    End-stage failing heart valves are currently replaced by mechanical or biological prostheses. Both types positively contribute to restore the physiological function of native valves, but a number of drawbacks limits the expected performances. In order to improve the outcome, tissue engineering can offer an alternative approach to design and fabricate innovative heart valves capable to support the requested function and to promote the formation of a novel, viable and correctly operating physiological structure. This potential result is particularly critical if referred to the aortic valve, being the one mainly exposed to structural and functional degeneration. In this regard, the here proposed study presents the fabrication and in vitro characterization of a bioresorbable electrospun heart valve prosthesis using the particle image velocimetry technique either in physiological and pathological fluid dynamic conditions. The scaffold was designed to reproduce the aortic valve geometry, also mimicking the fibrous structure of the natural extracellular matrix. To evaluate its performances for possible implantation, the flow fields downstream the valve were accurately investigated and compared. The experimental results showed a correct functionality of the device, supported by the formation of vortex structures at the edge of the three cusps, with Reynolds stress values below the threshold for the risk of hemolysis (which can be comprised in the range 400-4000N/m(2) depending on the exposure period), and a good structural resistance to the mechanical loads generated by the driving pressure difference. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Preparation, chromatographic evaluation and biodistribution of "9"9"mTc-procainamide as a radiopharmaceutical for heart imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motaleb, M.A.; Ibrahim, I.T.; Abo Rizq, R.S.; Elzanfaly, E.S.

    2017-01-01

    Procainamide (4-amino-N-[2-(diethylamino) ethyl] benzamide) is a sodium channel blocker, which acts as an effective antiarrhythmic agent used in the treatment of a variety of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. The aim of this study was to prepare "9"9"mTc-procainamide complex, apply different chromatographic techniques for the assay of radiolabeling yield and study its biodistribution as a novel radiopharmaceutical for heart imaging. "9"9"mTc-procainamide was obtained with a maximum labeling yield of 95.76±0.20% via direct labeling method under optimum conditions of 200 μg of procainamide, 300 μL of buffer (carbonate) at pH 11, 30 μg SnCl_2 . 2H_2O at room temperature (25 C) for 15 min. In terms of in vitro stability, the complex was stable for 3 h. Chromatographic evaluation using paper chromatography, thin layer chromatography, gel chromatography, and high performance liquid chromatography showed reliable results for measuring the radiochemical yield. Biodistribution study of "9"9"mTc-procainamide showed ratios of heart/lung and heart/liver (6.38±1.50, 2.06±0.31, respectively at 30 min post injection) which was comparable to that of "9"9"mTc-sestamibi (7.4±2.00, 0.97±0.10, respectively at 60 min, P<0.05).

  18. Synthesis and preliminary evaluation of carbon-11-meta-hydroxyephedrine: A false transmitter agent for heart neuronal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenspire, K.C.; Haka, M.S.; Van Dort, M.E.; Jewett, D.M.; Gildersleeve, D.L.; Schwaiger, M.; Wieland, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    Carbon-11-meta-hydroxyephedrine is a new radiotracer developed for mapping the sympathetic nerves of the heart. Carbon-11-meta-hydroxyephedrine is synthesized by direct N-methylation of metaraminol with [ 11 C]methyl iodide in dimethyl formamide/dimethyl sulfoxide and purified by semi-preparative reversed-phase HPLC. Total synthesis time is 45 min from end-of-bombardment. Carbon-11-meta-hydroxyephedrine is produced in 40%-50% corrected radiochemical yield with a specific activity of 900 Ci/mmol. Routine radiochemical and chemical purity are 95% and 98%, respectively. Biodistribution studies in rats show high myocardial uptake. Pretreatment with desipramine, a drug known to selectively block neuronal uptake, results in a 92% decrease in tracer accumulation in the myocardium. Metabolic studies in guinea pigs show less than 5% metabolites in heart tissue 30 min after intravenous injection suggesting that [ 11 C]meta-hydroxyephedrine is suitable for kinetic modeling. These preliminary results support this new tracer as a clinical agent for neuronal imaging of the heart

  19. Segmentation of multiple heart cavities in 3-D transesophageal ultrasound images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haak, A.; Vegas-Sanchez-Ferrero, G.; Mulder, H.W.; Ren, B.; Kirisli, H.A.; Metz, C.; van Burken, G.; van Stralen, M.; Pluim, J.P.W.; Steen, van der A.F.W.; Walsum, van T.; Bosch, J.G.

    Three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is an excellent modality for real-time visualization of the heart and monitoring of interventions. To improve the usability of 3-D TEE for intervention monitoring and catheter guidance, automated segmentation is desired. However, 3-D TEE

  20. Pericardial and congestive heart failure diagnostic with CT-and MR-imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rienmueller, R.; Seiderer, M.; Doliva, R.; Kemkes, B.; Lissner, J.

    1986-01-01

    Angiocardiography is still considered the gold standard in the estimation of functional parameters of the heart. However because of the inferior density resolution and the draw back of superimposition of cardiac structures angiocardiography provides only limited information about non cardiac and some cardiac structures for instance: The perimyo-, endocardium, the valves, the myocardial perfusion and metabolism or coronary blood flow. The present diagnostic and prognostic validity of CT and MR in visualizing the pericardium, the left ventricular myocardium, the heart chambers and the great heart vessels in the clinical work up of patients with pericardial and congestive heart failure is demonstrated. MR is more reliable in the diagnosis of left ventricular myocardial atrophy or fibrosis than CT. Disadvantages of MR include the failure to identify endo-, myo-and pericardial calcifications. The measurable improvement in the visualization of systolic and diastolic myocardial wall thickness using MR is of marked prognostic value in the preoperative exclusion of myocardial atrophy or fibrosis in patients with pericardial constriction

  1. Evaluation of obstructive airway lesions in complex congenital heart disease using composite volume-rendered images from multislice CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Ki Seok; Kim, Chang Won; Lee, Tae Hong; Kim, Suk; Kim, Kun Il; Lee, Hyoung Doo; Ban, Ji Eun; Sung, Si Chan; Chang, Yun Hee

    2006-01-01

    Multislice CT (MSCT) allows high-quality volume-rendered (VR) and composite volume-rendered images. To investigate the clinical usefulness of composite VR images in the evaluation of the relationship between cardiovascular structures and the airway in children with complex congenital heart disease (CHD). Four- or 16-slice MSCT scanning was performed consecutively in 77 children (mean age 6.4 months) with CHD and respiratory symptoms, a chest radiographic abnormality, or abnormal course of the pulmonary artery on ECHO. MSCT scanning was performed during breathing or after sedation. Contrast medium (2 ml/kg) was administered through a pedal venous route or arm vein in all patients. The VR technique was used to reconstruct the cardiovascular structures and airway, and then both VR images were composed using the commercial software (VoxelPlus 2 ; Daejeon, Korea). Stenoses were seen in the trachea in 1 patient and in the bronchi in 14 patients (19%). Other patients with complex CHD did not have significant airway stenoses. Composite VR images with MSCT can provide more exact airway images in relationship to the surrounding cardiovascular structures and thus help in optimizing management strategies in treating CHD. (orig.)

  2. Mirror-image duplication of the primary axis and heart in Xenopus embryos by the overexpression of Msx-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Solursh, M

    1995-10-01

    The Msx-1 gene (formerly known as Hox-7) is a member of a discrete subclass of homeobox-containing genes. Examination of the expression pattern of Msx-1 in murine and avian embryos suggests that this gene may be involved in the regionalization of the medio-lateral axis during earlier development. We have examined the possible functions of Xenopus Msx-1 during early Xenopus embryonic development by overexpression of the Msx-1 gene. Overexpression of Msx-1 causes a left-right mirror-image duplication of primary axial structures, including notochord, neural tube, somites, suckers, and foregut. The embryonic developing heart is also mirror-image duplicated, including looping directions and polarity. These results indicate that Msx-1 may be involved in the mesoderm formation as well as left-right patterning in the early Xenopus embryonic development.

  3. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with congenital heart disease; Kardiale MRT bei Patienten mit angeborenen Herzfehlern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich [Mainz Univ. Universitaetsmedizin Mainz (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Kaufmann, Lilly [Mainz Univ. (Germany); Sorantin, Erich [Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiologie, Graz (Austria). Klinische Abt. fuer Kinderradiologie

    2015-06-15

    The prevalence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is around 10 per 1000 live births in Germany. More than 90 % of these patients will survive into adulthood due to improvements in therapy. The classification of CHD may be based according to the anatomic structures involved, to the presence of an intracardiac shunt, the presence of a cyanosis and the intensity of therapy and complexity of the disease. Nearly half of all patients with CHD suffer from an intracardiac shunt, whereas complex cases such as patients with a tetralogy of Fallot or transposition of the great arteries are much more rare. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the work-up and follow-up of patients with CHD, especially after infancy and childhood. Depending on the abnormality in question, a multiparametric examination protocol is mandatory. Knowledge of operative procedures and findings of other imaging modalities help to optimize examination and time needed for it.

  4. A deep-learning classifier identifies patients with clinical heart failure using whole-slide images of H&E tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Nirschl

    Full Text Available Over 26 million people worldwide suffer from heart failure annually. When the cause of heart failure cannot be identified, endomyocardial biopsy (EMB represents the gold-standard for the evaluation of disease. However, manual EMB interpretation has high inter-rater variability. Deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs have been successfully applied to detect cancer, diabetic retinopathy, and dermatologic lesions from images. In this study, we develop a CNN classifier to detect clinical heart failure from H&E stained whole-slide images from a total of 209 patients, 104 patients were used for training and the remaining 105 patients for independent testing. The CNN was able to identify patients with heart failure or severe pathology with a 99% sensitivity and 94% specificity on the test set, outperforming conventional feature-engineering approaches. Importantly, the CNN outperformed two expert pathologists by nearly 20%. Our results suggest that deep learning analytics of EMB can be used to predict cardiac outcome.

  5. Cine viability magnetic resonance imaging of the heart without increased scan time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Azza S; Khalifa, Ayman M; Ibrahim, El-Sayed H

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides information about myocardial morphology, function, and viability from cine, tagged, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images, respectively. While the cine and tagged images are acquired in a time-resolved fashion, the LGE images are acquired at a single timeframe. The purpose of this work is to develop a method for generating cine LGE images without additional scan time. The motion field is extracted from the tagged images, and is then used to guide the deformation of the infarcted region from the acquired LGE image at the acquired timeframe to any other timeframe. Major techniques for motion estimation, including harmonic phase (HARP) and optical flow analysis, are tested in this work for motion estimation. The proposed method is tested on numerical phantom and images from four human subjects. The generated cine LGE images showed both viability and wall motion information in the same set of images without additional scan time or image misregistration problems. The band-pass optical flow analysis resulted in the most accurate motion estimation compared to other methods, especially HARP, which fails to track points at the myocardial boundary. Infarct transmurality from the generated images showed good agreement with myocardial strain, and wall thickening showed good agreement with that measured from conventional cine images. In conclusion, the developed technique allows for generating cine LGE images that enable simultaneous display of wall motion and viability information. The generated images could be useful for estimating myocardial contractility reserve and for treatment prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An automated multi-modal object analysis approach to coronary calcium scoring of adaptive heart isolated MSCT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Ferns, Gordon; Giles, John; Lewis, Emma

    2012-02-01

    Inter- and intra- observer variability is a problem often faced when an expert or observer is tasked with assessing the severity of a disease. This issue is keenly felt in coronary calcium scoring of patients suffering from atherosclerosis where in clinical practice, the observer must identify firstly the presence, followed by the location of candidate calcified plaques found within the coronary arteries that may prevent oxygenated blood flow to the heart muscle. This can be challenging for a human observer as it is difficult to differentiate calcified plaques that are located in the coronary arteries from those found in surrounding anatomy such as the mitral valve or pericardium. The inclusion or exclusion of false positive or true positive calcified plaques respectively will alter the patient calcium score incorrectly, thus leading to the possibility of incorrect treatment prescription. In addition to the benefits to scoring accuracy, the use of fast, low dose multi-slice CT imaging to perform the cardiac scan is capable of acquiring the entire heart within a single breath hold. Thus exposing the patient to lower radiation dose, which for a progressive disease such as atherosclerosis where multiple scans may be required, is beneficial to their health. Presented here is a fully automated method for calcium scoring using both the traditional Agatston method, as well as the Volume scoring method. Elimination of the unwanted regions of the cardiac image slices such as lungs, ribs, and vertebrae is carried out using adaptive heart isolation. Such regions cannot contain calcified plaques but can be of a similar intensity and their removal will aid detection. Removal of both the ascending and descending aortas, as they contain clinical insignificant plaques, is necessary before the final calcium scores are calculated and examined against ground truth scores of three averaged expert observer results. The results presented here are intended to show the requirement and

  7. Joint eigenvector estimation from mutually anisotropic tensors improves susceptibility tensor imaging of the brain, kidney, and heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibb, Russell; Liu, Chunlei

    2017-06-01

    To develop a susceptibility-based MRI technique for probing microstructure and fiber architecture of magnetically anisotropic tissues-such as central nervous system white matter, renal tubules, and myocardial fibers-in three dimensions using susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) tools. STI can probe tissue microstructure, but is limited by reconstruction artifacts because of absent phase information outside the tissue and noise. STI accuracy may be improved by estimating a joint eigenvector from mutually anisotropic susceptibility and relaxation tensors. Gradient-recalled echo image data were simulated using a numerical phantom and acquired from the ex vivo mouse brain, kidney, and heart. Susceptibility tensor data were reconstructed using STI, regularized STI, and the proposed algorithm of mutually anisotropic and joint eigenvector STI (MAJESTI). Fiber map and tractography results from each technique were compared with diffusion tensor data. MAJESTI reduced the estimated susceptibility tensor orientation error by 30% in the phantom, 36% in brain white matter, 40% in the inner medulla of the kidney, and 45% in myocardium. This improved the continuity and consistency of susceptibility-based fiber tractography in each tissue. MAJESTI estimation of the susceptibility tensors yields lower orientation errors for susceptibility-based fiber mapping and tractography in the intact brain, kidney, and heart. Magn Reson Med 77:2331-2346, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Semi-automated measurements of heart-to-mediastinum ratio on 123I-MIBG myocardial scintigrams by using image fusion method with chest X-ray images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Ryosuke; Hara, Takeshi; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Ishihara, Tadahiko; Zhou, Xiangrong; Muramatsu, Chisako; Abe, Yoshiteru; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    MIBG (iodine-123-meta-iodobenzylguanidine) is a radioactive medicine that is used to help diagnose not only myocardial diseases but also Parkinson's diseases (PD) and dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). The difficulty of the segmentation around the myocardium often reduces the consistency of measurement results. One of the most common measurement methods is the ratio of the uptake values of the heart to mediastinum (H/M). This ratio will be a stable independent of the operators when the uptake value in the myocardium region is clearly higher than that in background, however, it will be unreliable indices when the myocardium region is unclear because of the low uptake values. This study aims to develop a new measurement method by using the image fusion of three modalities of MIBG scintigrams, 201-Tl scintigrams, and chest radiograms, to increase the reliability of the H/M measurement results. Our automated method consists of the following steps: (1) construct left ventricular (LV) map from 201-Tl myocardium image database, (2) determine heart region in chest radiograms, (3) determine mediastinum region in chest radiograms, (4) perform image fusion of chest radiograms and MIBG scintigrams, and 5) perform H/M measurements on MIBG scintigrams by using the locations of heart and mediastinum determined on the chest radiograms. We collected 165 cases with 201-Tl scintigrams and chest radiograms to construct the LV map. Another 65 cases with MIBG scintigrams and chest radiograms were also collected for the measurements. Four radiological technologists (RTs) manually measured the H/M in the MIBG images. We compared the four RTs' results with our computer outputs by using Pearson's correlation, the Bland-Altman method, and the equivalency test method. As a result, the correlations of the H/M between four the RTs and the computer were 0.85 to 0.88. We confirmed systematic errors between the four RTs and the computer as well as among the four RTs. The variation range of the H

  9. Motion-Corrected Real-Time Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Heart: Initial Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahsepar, Amir Ali; Saybasili, Haris; Ghasemiesfe, Ahmadreza; Dolan, Ryan S; Shehata, Monda L; Botelho, Marcos P; Markl, Michael; Spottiswoode, Bruce; Collins, Jeremy D; Carr, James C

    2018-01-01

    Free-breathing real-time (RT) imaging can be used in patients with difficulty in breath-holding; however, RT cine imaging typically experiences poor image quality compared with segmented cine imaging because of low resolution. Here, we validate a novel unsupervised motion-corrected (MOCO) reconstruction technique for free-breathing RT cardiac images, called MOCO-RT. Motion-corrected RT uses elastic image registration to generate a single heartbeat of high-quality data from a free-breathing RT acquisition. Segmented balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) cine images and free-breathing RT images (Cartesian, TGRAPPA factor 4) were acquired with the same spatial/temporal resolution in 40 patients using clinical 1.5 T magnetic resonance scanners. The respiratory cycle was estimated using the reconstructed RT images, and nonrigid unsupervised motion correction was applied to eliminate breathing motion. Conventional segmented RT and MOCO-RT single-heartbeat cine images were analyzed to evaluate left ventricular (LV) function and volume measurements. Two radiologists scored images for overall image quality, artifact, noise, and wall motion abnormalities. Intraclass correlation coefficient was used to assess the reliability of MOCO-RT measurement. Intraclass correlation coefficient showed excellent reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient ≥ 0.95) of MOCO-RT with segmented cine in measuring LV function, mass, and volume. Comparison of the qualitative ratings indicated comparable image quality for MOCO-RT (4.80 ± 0.35) with segmented cine (4.45 ± 0.88, P = 0.215) and significantly higher than conventional RT techniques (3.51 ± 0.41, P cine (1.51 ± 0.90, P = 0.088 and 1.23 ± 0.45, P = 0.182) were not different. Wall motion abnormality ratings were comparable among different techniques (P = 0.96). The MOCO-RT technique can be used to process conventional free-breathing RT cine images and provides comparable quantitative assessment of LV function and volume

  10. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  11. Normal and abnormal electrical activation of the heart. Imaging patterns obtained by phase analysis of equilibrium cardiac studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavel, D.; Byrom, E.; Swiryn, S.; Meyer-Pavel, C.; Rosen, K.

    1981-01-01

    By using a temporal Fourier analysis of gated equilibrium cardiac studies, phase images were obtained. These functional images were analysed qualitatively and quantitatively to determine if specific patterns can be found for normal versus abnormal electrical activation of the heart. The study included eight subjects with normal cardiac function and 24 patients with abnormal electrical activation: eight with left bundle branch block (LBBB), two with right bundle branch block (RBBB), six with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW), one with junctional rhythm, one with spontaneous sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) (all with normal wall motion), two with chronic transvenous pacemakers, and four with induced sustained VT (all with regional wall motion abnormalities). The results show that the two ventricals have the same mean phase (within +-9 0 ) in normals, but significantly different mean phases in all patients with bundle branch blocks. Of the six WPW patients, three had a distinctive abnormal pattern. The patient with junctional rhythm, those with transvenous pacemakers, and those with VT all had abnormal patterns on the phase image. The phase image is capable of showing differences between patients with electrical activation and a variety of electrical abnormalities. Within the latter category distinct patterns can be associated with each type of abnormality. (author)

  12. Image-guided left ventricular lead placement in cardiac resynchronization therapy for patients with heart failure: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yan; Zhang, Qi; Mao, Jia-Liang; He, Ben

    2015-05-10

    Heart failure (HF) is a debilitating condition that affects millions of people worldwide. One means of treating HF is cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Recently, several studies have examined the use of echocardiography (ECHO) in the optimization of left ventricular (LV) lead placement to increase the response to CRT. The objective of this study was to synthesize the available data on the comparative efficacy of image-guided and standard CRT. We searched the PubMed, Cochrane, Embase, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases through April 2014 with the following combinations of search terms: left ventricular lead placement, cardiac resynchronization therapy, image-guided, and echocardiography-guided. Studies meeting all of the inclusion criteria and none of the exclusion criteria were eligible for inclusion. The primary outcome measures were CRT response rate, change in LV ejection fraction (LVEF), and change in LV end systolic volume (LVESV). Secondary outcomes included the rates of all-cause mortality and HF-related hospitalization. Our search identified 103 articles, 3 of which were included in the analysis. In total, 270 patients were randomized to the image-guided CRT and 241, to the standard CRT. The pooled estimates showed a significant benefit for image-guided CRT (CRT response: OR, 2.098, 95 % CI, 1.432-3.072; LVEF: difference in means, 3.457, 95 % CI, 1.910-5.005; LVESV: difference in means, -20.36, 95 % CI, -27.819 - -12.902). Image-guided CRT produced significantly better clinical outcomes than the standard CRT. Additional trials are warranted to validate the use of imaging in the prospective optimization of CRT.

  13. Valvular Heart Disease in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe MC Rosano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural valvular heart disease may be the cause of heart failure or may worsen the clinical status of patients with heart failure. Heart failure may also develop in patients treated with valve surgery. Patients with heart failure with valvular heart disease are at increased risk of events including sudden cardiac death. Before considering intervention (surgical or percutaneous all patients should receive appropriate medical and device therapy taking into account that vasodilators must be used with caution in patients with severe aortic stenosis. Numerous percutaneous and/or hybrid procedures have been introduced in the past few years and they are changing the management of valvular heart disease. In patients with heart failure and valvular heart disease, either primary or functional, the whole process of decision-making should be staged through a comprehensive evaluation of the risk– benefit ratio of different treatment strategies and should be made by a multidisciplinary ‘heart team’ with a particular expertise in valvular heart disease. The heart team should include heart failure cardiologists, cardiac surgeons/structural valve interventionists, imaging specialists, anaesthetists, geriatricians and intensive care specialists. This article will review recent developments and distill practical guidance in the management of this important heart failure co-morbidity.

  14. Rapid dynamic MR imaging of the heart in the evaluation of valvular function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utz, J.A.; Herfkens, R.J.; Heinsimer, J.; Glover, G.H.; Pelc, N.J.; Shimakawa, A.

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic MR images were obtained utilizing a repetition time of 21 msec, a 30-degree flip angle, and 12-msec gradient refocused echoes. Images were ECG-triggered and constructed at 16 images per cardiac cycle. To assess the sensitivity of dynamic MR imaging of valvular regurgitation, 17 patients were so examined and results were compared with results of echocardiography or cardiac catheterization. Mitral and tricuspid valves were well visualized in all patients. Regurgitation was demonstrated in 14 cases as an area of decreased signal extending from the valve into the regurgitant chamber, corresponding in time to ventricular systole for mitral and tricuspid regurgitation and diastole for aortic insufficiency. There were no false-negative MR imaging studies

  15. Pre-clinical functional magnetic resonance imaging. Pt. II. The heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messner, Nadja M.; Zoellner, Frank G.; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine

    2014-07-01

    One third of all deaths worldwide in 2008 were caused by cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and the incidence of CVD related deaths rises ever more. Thus, improved imaging techniques and modalities are needed for the evaluation of cardiac morphology and function. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) is a minimally invasive technique that is increasingly important due to its high spatial and temporal resolution, its high soft tissue contrast and its ability of functional and quantitative imaging. It is widely accepted as the gold standard of cardiac functional analysis. In the short period of small animal MRI, remarkable progress has been achieved concerning new, fast imaging schemes as well as purpose-built equipment. Dedicated small animal scanners allow for tapping the full potential of recently developed animal models of cardiac disease. In this paper, we review state-of-the-art cardiac magnetic resonance imaging techniques and applications in small animals at ultra-high fields (UHF).

  16. Heart Health Tests: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Institute) Also in Spanish Heart-Health Screenings (American Heart Association) Picturing the Heart (National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering) Related Issues EKGs and Exercise Stress Tests: When You Need Them for Heart Disease - ...

  17. How to Prevent Heart Disease: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and your heart (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get How to Prevent ... your heart Stress and your heart Related Health Topics Blood Thinners Cholesterol Heart Diseases Heart Health Tests ...

  18. Clinical methods for single-shot instant MR imaging of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.S.; Weisskoff, R.; Rzedzian, R.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have compared cardiac protocols for instant MR methods that acquire complete images in 32 msec. Four protocols are compared: continuous scanning at a fixed TR with retrospective reordering; pseudogating by using a TR 50 msec greater than the R-R interval; progressive time delay (PTD), in which the delay from the R wave is electronically advanced; and real-time (RT) imaging at 16 images/sec, which enabled complete movies to be obtained in a single heartbeat. Spin-echo techniques have been used for the first three protocols; the RT method used gradient echoes

  19. Bands, Chords, Tendons, and Membranes in the Heart: An Imaging Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxi, Ameya Jagdish; Tavakoli, Sina; Vargas, Daniel; Restrepo, Carlos S

    Crests, bands, chords, and membranes can be seen within the different cardiac chambers, with variable clinical significance. They can be incidental or can have clinical implications by causing hemodynamic disturbance. It is crucial to know the morphology and orientation of normal structures, aberrant or accessory muscles, and abnormal membranes to diagnose the hemodynamic disturbance associated with them. Newer generation computed tomographic scanners and faster magnetic resonance imaging sequences offer high spatial and temporal resolution allowing for acquisition of high resolution images of the cardiac chambers improving identification of small internal structures, such as papillary muscles, muscular bands, chords, and membranes. They also help in identification of other associated complications, malformations, and provide a road map for treatment. In this article, we review cross-sectional cardiac imaging findings of normal anatomical variants and distinctive imaging features of pathologic bands, chords, or membranes, which may produce significant hemodynamic changes and clinical symptomatology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Human torso phantom for imaging of heart with realistic modes of cardiac and respiratory motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Balakrishnan, Karthikayan; Gullberg, Grant T; O& #x27; Neil, James P

    2013-09-17

    A human torso phantom and its construction, wherein the phantom mimics respiratory and cardiac cycles in a human allowing acquisition of medical imaging data under conditions simulating patient cardiac and respiratory motion.

  1. Noninvasive cardiac activation imaging of ventricular arrhythmias during drug-induced QT prolongation in the rabbit heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chengzong; Pogwizd, Steven M; Killingsworth, Cheryl R; Zhou, Zhaoye; He, Bin

    2013-10-01

    Imaging myocardial activation from noninvasive body surface potentials promises to aid in both cardiovascular research and clinical medicine. To investigate the ability of a noninvasive 3-dimensional cardiac electrical imaging technique for characterizing the activation patterns of dynamically changing ventricular arrhythmias during drug-induced QT prolongation in rabbits. Simultaneous body surface potential mapping and 3-dimensional intracardiac mapping were performed in a closed-chest condition in 8 rabbits. Data analysis was performed on premature ventricular complexes, couplets, and torsades de pointes (TdP) induced during intravenous administration of clofilium and phenylephrine with combinations of various infusion rates. The drug infusion led to a significant increase in the QT interval (from 175 ± 7 to 274 ± 31 ms) and rate-corrected QT interval (from 183 ± 5 to 262 ± 21 ms) during the first dose cycle. All the ectopic beats initiated by a focal activation pattern. The initial beat of TdPs arose at the focal site, whereas the subsequent beats were due to focal activity from different sites or 2 competing focal sites. The imaged results captured the dynamic shift of activation patterns and were in good correlation with the simultaneous measurements, with a correlation coefficient of 0.65 ± 0.02 averaged over 111 ectopic beats. Sites of initial activation were localized to be ~5 mm from the directly measured initiation sites. The 3-dimensional cardiac electrical imaging technique could localize the origin of activation and image activation sequence of TdP during QT prolongation induced by clofilium and phenylephrine in rabbits. It offers the potential to noninvasively investigate the proarrhythmic effects of drug infusion and assess the mechanisms of arrhythmias on a beat-to-beat basis. © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Cross-sectional imaging of the Fontan circuit in adult congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, G.; Thorne, S.; Clift, P.; Holloway, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Fontan circuit is the result of a palliative surgical procedure that is performed in patients with a functionally single ventricle cardiac anomaly. The success of this operation has resulted in an increasing population of adults with this anatomy and physiology. The purpose of this article is to familiarize the general radiologist with the expected anatomy and cross-sectional imaging findings, highlight special imaging considerations, and examine the common complications that are encountered in this group of patients

  3. Taking radionuclides to heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleynhans, P.H.T.; Lotter, M.G.; Van Aswegen, A.; Minnaar, P.C.; Iturralde, M.; Herbst, C.P.; Marx, D.

    1980-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is a main cause of death in South Africa. Non-invasive ECG gated radionuclide bloodpool imaging plays an increasingly useful role in the evalution of the function of the heart as a pump, and the extent of heart muscle perfusion defects is further pinpointed by invasive krypton-81m studies to improve patient management

  4. Relationship between quantitative cardiac neuronal imaging with ¹²³I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine and hospitalization in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Matthew W; Sood, Nitesh; Ahlberg, Alan W; Jacobson, Arnold F; Heller, Gary V; Lundbye, Justin B

    2014-09-01

    Hospitalization in patients with systolic heart failure is associated with morbidity, mortality, and cost. Myocardial sympathetic innervation, imaged by (123)I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-mIBG), has been associated with cardiac events in a recent multicenter study. The present analysis explored the relationship between (123)I-mIBG imaging findings and hospitalization. Source documents from the ADMIRE-HF trial were reviewed to identify hospitalization events in patients with systolic heart failure following cardiac neuronal imaging using (123)I-mIBG. Time to hospitalization was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method and compared to the mIBG heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratio using multiple-failure Cox regression. During 1.4 years of median follow-up, 362 end-point hospitalizations occurred in 207 of 961 subjects, 79 % of whom had H/M ratio heart failure diagnosis, a low mIBG H/M ratio was associated with cardiac-related hospitalization (HR 1.48, 95 % CI 1.05 - 2.0; p = 0.02). The mIBG H/M ratio may risk-stratify patients with heart failure for cardiac-related hospitalization, especially when used in conjunction with BNP. Further studies are warranted to examine these relationships.

  5. What the cardiothoracic surgeon wants to know from the radiologist: from X-ray reporting to imaging consultancy and Heart Team membership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogers, Ad J.J.C. [Erasmus MC, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Thoraxcentre, Bd 557, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Head, Stuart J.; Kappetein, A.P. [Erasmus MC, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    In the early days of cardiac surgery, the pretreatment multidisciplinary discussion involved a presentation of the case history and diagnostic imaging by the clinical cardiologist. At this time, most, if not all, cardiac imaging techniques were in the hands of the cardiologist. If the radiologist made a report, this was done relatively late in the clinical process and only concerned the perioperative radiographs. In recent years, multidisciplinary decision-making in the context of a Heart Team has gained an increasingly important role in the process of decision-making with regard to the available therapy options in individual patients. Nevertheless, the concept of the Heart Team is still evolving. The minimal requirements for the Heart Team include the presence of the attending cardiologist, an interventional cardiologist and a cardiac surgeon. Those members of the Heart Team should be aware of the local possibilities, should correctly make conclusions about the available data and should put this information into the clinical context and preference of the patient. In addition, in areas where expertise in cardiac imaging such as CT and MRI is relevant, this would explicitly require expertise of the Heart Team in these specific areas, most often by involving a radiologist, to provide the optimal joint treatment strategy recommendation. (orig.)

  6. Estimation of heart-position variability in 3D-surface-image-guided deep-inspiration breath-hold radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Betgen, Anja; Elkhuizen, Paula H.M.; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Remeijer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the heart position variability in deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiation therapy (RT) for breast cancer when 3D surface imaging would be used for monitoring the BH depth during treatment delivery. For this purpose, surface setup data were compared with heart setup data. Materials and methods: Twenty patients treated with DIBH-RT after breast-conserving surgery were included. Retrospectively, heart registrations were performed for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to planning CT. Further, breast-surface registrations were performed for a surface, captured concurrently with CBCT, to planning CT. The resulting setup errors were compared with linear regression analysis. Furthermore, geometric uncertainties of the heart (systematic [Σ] and random [σ]) were estimated relative to the surface registration. Based on these uncertainties planning organ at risk volume (PRV) margins for the heart were calculated: 1.3Σ − 0.5σ. Results: Moderate correlation between surface and heart setup errors was found: R 2 = 0.64, 0.37, 0.53 in left–right (LR), cranio-caudal (CC), and in anterior–posterior (AP) direction, respectively. When surface imaging would be used for monitoring, the geometric uncertainties of the heart (cm) are [Σ = 0.14, σ = 0.14]; [Σ = 0.66, σ = 0.38]; [Σ = 0.27, σ = 0.19] in LR; CC; AP. This results in PRV margins of 0.11; 0.67; 0.25 cm in LR; CC; AP. Conclusion: When DIBH-RT after breast-conserving surgery is guided by the breast-surface position then PRV margins should be used to take into account the heart-position variability relative to the breast-surface

  7. Decreased right heart blood volume determined by magnetic resonance imaging: evidence of central underfilling in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Søndergaard, L; Møgelvang, J

    1995-01-01

    mL, NS), and left atrial volume (70 vs. 57 mL, P = .08) were normal or slightly increased. The right ejection fraction (68% vs. 53%, P fraction was slightly reduced (61% vs. 69%, NS). The central and arterial blood volume (CBV), assessed......Whether the central blood volume is reduced or expanded in cirrhosis is still under debate. Accordingly, the current study was undertaken to assess the volume of the heart cavities. Ten cirrhotic patients and matched controls had their right and left ventricular end-diastolic volumes (RVDV and LVDV...... as the cardiac output (CO) multiplied by the central circulation time, was significantly decreased (1.47 vs. 1.81 L, P blood volume (4.43 vs. 3.64 L, P

  8. Histopathology Image Analysis in Two Long-Term Animal Experiments with Helical Flow Total Artificial Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotke, Jiri; Homolka, Pavel; Vasku, Jaromír; Dobsak, Petr; Palanova, Petra; Mrkvicova, Veronika; Konecny, Petr; Soska, Vladimir; Pohanka, Michal; Novakova, Marie; Yurimoto, Terumi; Saito, Itsuro; Inoue, Yusuke; Isoyama, Takashi; Abe, Yusuke

    2016-12-01

    Histopathological analysis can provide important information in long-term experiments with total artificial heart (TAH). Recently, a new type of blood pump, the helical flow total artificial heart (HF-TAH) was developed. This study aimed to investigate the changes in selected vital organs in animal experiments with implanted HF-TAH. Samples from lung, liver, and kidneys from two female goats (No. 1301 and No. 1304) with implanted HF-TAH were analyzed. Tissue samples were fixed in 10% formaldehyde and 4 µm thick transverse sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (HE). Additional staining was done for detection of connective tissue (Masson-Goldner stain) and for detection of iron (hemosiderin) deposits (Perls stain). Sections were scanned at 100× and 500× magnification with a light microscope. Experiment no. 1301 survived 100 days (cause of termination was heavy damage of the right pump); experimental goat no.1304 survived 68 days and was sacrificed due to severe right hydrodynamic bearing malfunction. Histopathological analysis of liver samples proved signs of chronic venostasis with limited focal necrotic zones. Dilated tubules, proteinaceous material in tubular lumen, and hemosiderin deposits were detected in kidney samples. Contamination of the organs by embolized micro-particles was suspected at the autopsy after discovery of visible damage (scratches) of the pump impeller surface (made from titanium alloy) in both experiments. Sporadic deposits of foreign micro-particles (presumably titanium) were observed in most of the analyzed parenchymal organs. However, the described deposits were not in direct connection with inflammatory reactions in the analyzed tissues. Histopathological analysis showed the presence of minimal contamination of the lung, kidney, and liver tissue samples by foreign material (titanium very likely). The analysis showed only limited pathological changes, especially in liver and kidneys, which might be attributed to the influence of

  9. Gated listmode acquisition with the QuadHIDAC animal PET to image mouse hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefers, K.P.; Lang, N.; Stegger, L.; Schober, O.; Schaefers, M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: the aim of this study was to develop ECG and respiratory gating in combination with listmode acquisition for the quadHIDAC small-animal PET scanner. Methods: ECG and respiratory gating was realized with the help of an external trigger device (BioVET) synchronized with the listmode acquisition. Listmode data of a mouse acquisition (injected with 6.5 MBq of 18 F-FDG) were sorted according to three different gating definitions: 12 cardiac gates, 8 respiratory gates and a combination of 8 cardiac and 8 respiratory gates. Images were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (ramp filter), and parameters like left ventricular wall thickness (WT), wall-to-wall separation (WS) and blood to myocardium activity ratios (BMR) were calculated. Results: cardiac gated images show improvement of all parameters (WT 2.6 mm, WS 4.1 mm, BRM 2.3) in diastole compared to ungated images (WT 3.0 mm, WS 3.4 mm, BMR 1.3). Respiratory gating had little effect on calculated parameters. Conclusion: ECG gating with the quadHIDAC can improve myocardial image quality in mice. This could have a major impact on the calculation of an image-derived input function for kinetic modelling. (orig.)

  10. Clinical value of lung uptake of iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a myocardial sympathetic nerve imaging agent, in patients with chronic heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Xiuli; Hasegawa, Shinji; Yoshioka, Jun [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine] (and others)

    2001-10-01

    This study investigated the clinical value of I-123 MIBG pulmonary accumulation and washout in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Nineteen patients with CHF and 15 normal volunteers (NL) were included. The uptake ratio of heart to mediastinum (H/M), that of lung fields to mediastinum (L/M), and washout rate (WR) of the heart and lung fields were calculated in anterior planar images and compared with results of echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. In the CHF group, the lung uptake in delayed images increased and lung WR was decreased, suggesting pulmonary endothelial lesions. Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between right and left lung WR and pulmonary arterial diastolic pressure (PA(D)) and pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PA(S)) in the CHF group. Since the WR of MIBG reflected PA, it may be used as an index of severity of cardiac dysfunction. (author)

  11. Systemic and inflammatory disorders involving the heart: the role of PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JUNEAU, Daniel; ERTHAL, Fernanda; ALZAHRANI, Atif; ALENAZY, Ali; NERY, Pablo B.; BEANLANDS, Rob S.; CHOW, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac inflammatory disorders, either primarily cardiac or secondary to a systemic process, are associated with significant morbidity and/or mortality. Their diagnosis can be challenging, especially due to significant overlap in their clinical presentation with other cardiac diseases. Recent publications have investigated the potential diagnostic role of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in these patients. Most of the available literature is focused on Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), a tracer which has already demonstrated its use in other inflammatory and infectious processes. PET imaging can help in the diagnosis, prognosis and follow-up in a variety of cardiac inflammatory processes, including infective endocarditis, cardiac implantable electronic device infection, pericarditis, myocarditis, sarcoidosis and amyloidosis. PET’s ability to depict metabolic changes and abnormalities, sometime even before the onset of any anatomical changes, can be a significant advantage over standard anatomical imaging. PET appears to be particularly useful in cases where standard investigation is non-diagnostic or equivocal.

  12. Myocardial imaging in coronary heart disease with radionuclides, with emphasis on thallium-201

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wackers, F J.Th.; Sokole, E B; Samson, G; van der Schoot, J B; Wellens, H J.J. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis

    1976-09-01

    During the past few years there has been an increasing interest in cardiology for myocardial imaging with radionuclides. At present the experience with both negative (thallium-201) and positive (sup(99m)Tc-pyrophosphate) imaging of myocardial infarction is increasing rapidly. Since 1974, over 1100 patient studies with thallium-201 were performed. In this article a survey is presented of experience with thallium-201 in patients with acute and chronic coronary artery disease. In patients with acute myocardial infarction data from studies with sup(99m)Tc-pyrophosphate will be discussed as well.

  13. Long-term effects of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor enalapril on chronic heart failure. Examination by {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeki, Takeshi; Tamura, Yoshiyuki; Bandou, Kanji; Tanaka, Hideji; Takeichi, Naoki; Shinohara, Hisanori; Yui, Yasuko; Fukuda, Nobuo; Sui, Osamu [Zentsuji National Hospital, Kagawa (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    To examine the long-term effects of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor enalapril on chronic heart failure, 10 patients (7 men and 3 women, mean age: 62{+-}11 years) with chronic stable heart failure, classified as New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class 2-3 for more than 3 months, and a left ventricular ejection fraction less than 45% were treated with 2.5-5.0 mg of enalapril once a day for 3-15 months (mean 7 months). The causes of heart failure were old myocardial infarction (n=7), hypertension (n=2), and atrial fibrillation (n=1). Radioiodinated metaiodobenzyl guanidine ({sup 123}I-MIBG) imaging, radionuclide angiography, and treadmill exercise test were performed before and after the treatment. With enalapril treatment, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) increased significantly from 38.3{+-}6.9% to 47.5{+-}14.7%; sub-maximal exercise time increased significantly from 205{+-}112 to 272{+-}120 seconds; the heart to mediastinum (H/M) ratio of {sup 123}I-MIBG increased significantly (early image: 1.99{+-}0.38 versus 2.20{+-}0.50; delayed image: 1.86{+-}0.44 versus 2.09{+-}0.51); and the washout rate of {sup 123}I-MIBG decreased slightly from 29.1{+-}9.1% to 25.4{+-}7.0%. The improvement rate of LVEF was significantly correlated with the improvement rates of the H/M ratio and washout rate after treatment with enalapril. Thus, the long-term effects of enalapril can be observed in the cardiac sympathetic nervous system, and {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging appears to be useful for evaluating the therapeutic effects of enalapril on the cardiac sympathetic nervous system in patients with chronic heart failure. (author)

  14. Long-term effects of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor enalapril on chronic heart failure. Examination by 123I-MIBG imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeki, Takeshi; Tamura, Yoshiyuki; Bandou, Kanji; Tanaka, Hideji; Takeichi, Naoki; Shinohara, Hisanori; Yui, Yasuko; Fukuda, Nobuo; Sui, Osamu

    1998-01-01

    To examine the long-term effects of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor enalapril on chronic heart failure, 10 patients (7 men and 3 women, mean age: 62±11 years) with chronic stable heart failure, classified as New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class 2-3 for more than 3 months, and a left ventricular ejection fraction less than 45% were treated with 2.5-5.0 mg of enalapril once a day for 3-15 months (mean 7 months). The causes of heart failure were old myocardial infarction (n=7), hypertension (n=2), and atrial fibrillation (n=1). Radioiodinated metaiodobenzyl guanidine ( 123 I-MIBG) imaging, radionuclide angiography, and treadmill exercise test were performed before and after the treatment. With enalapril treatment, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) increased significantly from 38.3±6.9% to 47.5±14.7%; sub-maximal exercise time increased significantly from 205±112 to 272±120 seconds; the heart to mediastinum (H/M) ratio of 123 I-MIBG increased significantly (early image: 1.99±0.38 versus 2.20±0.50; delayed image: 1.86±0.44 versus 2.09±0.51); and the washout rate of 123 I-MIBG decreased slightly from 29.1±9.1% to 25.4±7.0%. The improvement rate of LVEF was significantly correlated with the improvement rates of the H/M ratio and washout rate after treatment with enalapril. Thus, the long-term effects of enalapril can be observed in the cardiac sympathetic nervous system, and 123 I-MIBG imaging appears to be useful for evaluating the therapeutic effects of enalapril on the cardiac sympathetic nervous system in patients with chronic heart failure. (author)

  15. High-tension electrical injury to the heart as assessed by radionuclide imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iino, Hitoshi; Chikamori, Taishiro; Hatano, Tsuguhisa [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)] [and others

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate cardiac complications associated with electrical injury, 7 patients with high-tension electrical injury (6,600 V alternating current) underwent {sup 201}Tl and {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging in addition to conventional electrocardiographic and echocardiographic assessments. Electrocardiography showed transient atrial fibrillation, second degree atrioventricular block, ST-segment depression, and sinus bradycardia in each patient. Echocardiography showed mild hypokinesis of the anterior wall in only 2 patients, but {sup 201}Tl and {sup 123}I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy showed an abnormal scan image in 6/7 and 5/6 patients, respectively. Decreased radionuclide accumulation was seen primarily in areas extending from the anterior wall to the septum. Decreased radionuclide accumulation was smaller in extent and milder in degree in {sup 123}I-MIBG than in {sup 201}Tl imaging. These results suggest that even in patients without definite evidence of severe cardiac complications in conventional examinations, radionuclide imaging detects significant damage due to high-tension electrical injury, in which sympathetic nerve dysfunction might be milder than myocardial cell damage. (author)

  16. A new clinical tool for the quantification of myocardial CT perfusion imaging in patients with suspected Ischemic Heart Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Muñoz, A.; Dux-Santoy Hurtado, L.; Rodriguez Palomares, J.L.; Piella Fenoy, G.

    2016-07-01

    In the clinical practice, the evaluation of myocardial perfusion by using Computed Tomography (CT) Imaging is usually performed visually or semi-quantitatively. The scarcity of quantitative perfusion data not always allows a proper diagnose of patients which are suspected of suffering from some diseases, such as Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD). In this work, a clinical tool for the automatic quantification of myocardial perfusion in patients with suspected IHD is proposed. Myocardial perfusion is assessed based on a combined diagnosis protocol (CT/CTP protocol) which involves the acquisition of two contrastenhanced CT images, one obtained at rest and another acquired under pharmacological stress. The clinical tool allows the automatic quantification of perfusion in different myocardial segments defined according to the 16-AHA-segmentation model of the left ventricle, by providing the mean of Hounsfield Units in those regions. Based on this analysis, the clinicians can compare the values at baseline and at hyperemia, and they can better determine hypoperfusion defects in patients with IHD. The validation of the clinical tool was performed by comparing automatic and manual perfusion measurements of 10 patients with suspected IHD who were previously assessed with Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) for perfusion analysis. A strong linear correlation was found between the automatic and manual results. Afterwards, perfusion defects obtained from CT/CTP protocol were compared to perfusion defects from SPECT, to assess the applicability of this clinical tool for the diagnosis of IHD. (Author)

  17. Comparison of adenosine stress and exercise stress 201Tl myocardial perfusion imaging for diagnosis of coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guibing; Wu Hua; Jiang Ningyi; Liu Sheng; Lu Xianping; Liang Jiugen; Zhang Hong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic values of adenosine and exercise stress 201 Tl myocardial perfusion imaging for detecting coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods: 41 patients with suspected CHD were randomly divided into two groups. In one group adenosine stress was submitted, the exercise stress myocardial SPECT was performed in another. Coronary angiography (CAG) was performed in each patient within 2 weeks before or after SPECT. The result of CAG was taken as 'gold standard of CHD. They compared the diagnostic value of two methods. Results: In adenosine group, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, accuracy are 92.86%, 57.14%, 81.25%, 80.00%, 80.95% respectively. In exercise stress group, are 100%, 60.0%, 71.43%, 100%, 80.00% respectively. Detection rates of coronary artery lesions were 66.67% and 72.22% in two groups respectively. Conclusion Adenosine stress testing and exercise stress testing 201 Tl myocardial perfusion imaging may provide similar value for detection of CHD. (authors)

  18. The impact of heart rate on image quality and reconstruction timing of dual-source CT coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yining; Jin Zhengyu; Kong Lingyan; Zhang Zhuhua; Song Lan; Mu Wenbin; Wang Yun; Zhao Wenmin; Zhang Shuyang; Lin Songbai

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of patient's heart rate (HR) on coronary CT angiography (CTA) image quality (IQ) and reconstruction timing in dual-source CT (DSCT). Methods Ninety-five patients with suspicion of coronary artery disease were examined with a DSCT scanner (Somatom Definition, Siemens) using 32 x 0.6 mm collimation. All patients were divided three groups according to the heart rate (HR): group 1, HR ≤ 70 beats per minute (bpm), n=26; group 2, HR >70 bpm to ≤90 bpm, n=37; group 3, HR > 90 bpm, n=32. No beta-blockers were taken before CT scan. 50- 60 ml of nonionic contrast agent were injected with a rate of 5 ml/s. Images were reconstructed from 10% to 100% of the R-R interval using single-segment reconstruction. Two readers independently assessed IQ of all coronary, segments using a 3-point scale from excellent (1) to non-assessable (3) for coronary segments and the relationship between IQ and the HR. Results: Overall mean IQ score was 1.31 ± 0.55 for all patients with 1.08 ± 0.27 for group 1, 1.32 ± 0.58 for group 2 and 1.47 ± 0.61 for group 3. The IQ was better in the LAD than the RCA and LCX (P<0.01). Only 1.4% (19/1386) of coronary artery segments were considered non-assessable due to the motion artifacts. Optimal image quality of all coronary segments in 74 patients (77.9%) can be achieved with one reconstruction data set. The best IQ was predominately in diastole (88.5%) in group 1, while the best IQ was in systole (84.4%) in group 3. Conclusions: DSCT can achieve the optimal IQ with a wide range of HR using single-segment reconstruction. With the increasing of HR, the timing of data reconstruction for the best IQ shifts from mid-diastole to systole. (authors)

  19. Cardiac imaging : X-ray, magnetic resonance and ultrasound in congenital heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigby, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    In many instances, the management of simple or common congenital cardiac anomalies, such as patient arterial duct, atrial septal defect or ventricular septal defect, can be based upon clinical evaluation, the chest radiograph and conventional transthoracic echocardiography and Doppler investigation. Angiography is usually required for those conditions, such as the tetralogy of Fallot, in which the size and anatomy of the pulmonary arteries influence the timing or the type of surgical intervention. Interventional cardiac catheterization, however, requires high quality X-ray screening and, frequently, transesophageal echocardiography. The investigation of more complex anomalies, such as those in hearts with a univentricular atrioventricular connection, often involves several methods of investigation. These complex anomalies require complete morphological and physiological assessment in order to provide optimum medical and surgical management. Increasingly, the diagnosis is established in utero. Should termination of pregnancy then be encouraged? Or, should all patients be subjected to an aggressive medical and surgical treatment regimen to optimize the chances of a later successful Fontan operation? Finally, what is the role of cardiac transplantation or the Norwood operation in those infants in whom the long term prognosis of conventional treatment is considered to be poor? (author). 20 refs.; 6 figs

  20. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess myocardial fibrosis in valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesnikar, Tomaz; Delgado, Victoria; Bax, Jeroen J

    2018-01-01

    The left ventricular (LV) remodeling process associated with significant valvular heart disease (VHD) is characterized by an increase of myocardial interstitial space with deposition of collagen and loss of myofibers. These changes occur before LV systolic function deteriorates or the patient develops symptoms. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) permits assessment of reactive fibrosis, with the use of T1 mapping techniques, and replacement fibrosis, with the use of late gadolinium contrast enhancement. In addition, functional consequences of these structural changes can be evaluated with myocardial tagging and feature tracking CMR, which assess the active deformation (strain) of the LV myocardium. Several studies have demonstrated that CMR techniques may be more sensitive than the conventional measures (LV ejection fraction or LV dimensions) to detect these structural and functional changes in patients with severe left-sided VHD and have shown that myocardial fibrosis may not be reversible after valve surgery. More important, the presence of myocardial fibrosis has been associated with lesser improvement in clinical symptoms and recovery of LV systolic function. Whether assessment of myocardial fibrosis may better select the patients with severe left-sided VHD who may benefit from surgery in terms of LV function and clinical symptoms improvement needs to be demonstrated in prospective studies. The present review article summarizes the current status of CMR techniques to assess myocardial fibrosis and appraises the current evidence on the use of these techniques for risk stratification of patients with severe aortic stenosis or regurgitation and mitral regurgitation.

  1. Heart imaging by cadmium telluride gamma camera European Program 'BIOMED' consortium

    CERN Document Server

    Scheiber, C; Chambron, J; Prat, V; Kazandjan, A; Jahnke, A; Matz, R; Thomas, S; Warren, S; Hage-Hali, M; Regal, R; Siffert, P; Karman, M

    1999-01-01

    Cadmium telluride semiconductor detectors (CdTe) operating at room temperature are attractive for medical imaging because of their good energy resolution providing excellent spatial and contrast resolution. The compactness of the detection system allows the building of small light camera heads which can be used for bedside imaging. A mobile pixellated gamma camera based on 2304 CdTe (pixel size: 3x3 mm, field of view: 15 cmx15 cm) has been designed for cardiac imaging. A dedicated 16-channel integrated circuit has also been designed. The acquisition hardware is fully programmable (DSP card, personal computer-based system). Analytical calculations have shown that a commercial parallel hole collimator will fit the efficiency/resolution requirements for cardiac applications. Monte-Carlo simulations predict that the Moire effect can be reduced by a 15 deg. tilt of the collimator with respect to the detector grid. A 16x16 CdTe module has been built for the preliminary physical tests. The energy resolution was 6.16...

  2. Heart murmurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest sounds - murmurs; Heart sounds - abnormal; Murmur - innocent; Innocent murmur; Systolic heart murmur; Diastolic heart murmur ... The heart has 4 chambers: Two upper chambers (atria) Two lower chambers (ventricles) The heart has valves that close ...

  3. Cost-effectiveness of functional cardiac imaging in the diagnostic work-up of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletscher, Mark; Walker, Simon; Moschetti, Karine; Pinget, Christophe; Wasserfallen, Jean-Blaise; Greenwood, John P; Schwitter, Juerg; Girardin, François R

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of eight common diagnostic work-up strategies for coronary heart disease (CHD) in patients with stable angina symptoms in Switzerland. A decision analytical model was used to perform a cost-effectiveness comparison of eight common multitest strategies to diagnose CHD using combinations of four diagnostic techniques: exercise treadmill test (ETT), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR), and coronary angiography (CA). We used a Markov state transition model to extrapolate the results over a life-time horizon, from a third-party payer perspective. We used a CHD prevalence rate of 39% in patients and a base-case scenario with 60-year-old male patients with intermediate symptom severity Canadian Cardiovascular Society grading of angina pectoris 2 and at least one cardiovascular (CV) risk factor but without a history of myocardial infarction and without need for revascularization. Among the eight work-up strategies, one strategy was dominant, i.e. least costly and most effective: ETT followed by CMR if the ETT result was inconclusive and then CA if the CMR result was positive or inconclusive. The CMR features a favourable balance between false-negative diagnoses, associated with an elevated risk of CV events, and false-positive diagnoses, leading to unnecessary CA and related mortality. Key parameters guiding the diagnostic strategy are the prevalence of CHD in patients with angina symptoms and the diagnostic costs of CA and CMR. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging appears to be a cost-effective work-up strategy compared with other regimens using SPECT or direct CA. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging should be more widely recommended as a diagnostic procedure for patients with suspected angina symptoms.

  4. Prevalence and correlates of increased lung/heart ratio of thallium-201 during dipyridamole stress imaging for suspected coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, F.S.; Kaul, S.; Smith, W.H.; Watson, D.D.; Varma, S.K.; Beller, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    There is little information concerning the prevalence and clinical correlates of increased pulmonary thallium-201 uptake during dipyridamole thallium-201 stress imaging. Accordingly, the clinical characteristics and quantitative thallium-201 findings were correlated with quantitative lung/heart thallium-201 ratio in 87 patients undergoing dipyridamole thallium-201 stress testing. Nineteen patients (22%) had an elevated ratio (greater than 0.51). These patients were more likely to have had an infarction, to be taking beta blockers, and have a lower rate-pressure product after dipyridamole administration than those with a normal ratio (p less than 0.03). An elevated ratio was associated with a greater likelihood of initial, redistribution and persistent defects, as well as left ventricular cavity dilatation on thallium-201 imaging (p less than 0.05). In addition, the number of myocardial segments demonstrating initial, redistribution and persistent defects was also greater in patients with increased ratios (p less than 0.03). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the presence of redistribution and left ventricular cavity dilatation were the most significant correlates of lung/heart thallium-201 ratio. It is concluded that the prevalence of increased lung/heart thallium-201 ratio with dipyridamole thallium-201 stress imaging is similar to that seen with exercise stress imaging. As with exercise thallium-201 imaging, increased pulmonary thallium-201 uptake may be a marker of functionally more significant coronary artery disease

  5. Image quality at low tube voltage (70 kV) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction for computed tomography in infants with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Motoo; Ozawa, Yoshiyuki; Sakurai, Keita; Shimohira, Masashi; Shibamoto, Yuta; Ohashi, Kazuya; Asano, Miki; Yamaguchi, Sachiko

    2015-01-01

    Lower tube voltage has advantages for CT angiography, such as improved contrast To evaluate the image quality of low-voltage (70 kV) CT for congenital heart disease and the ability of sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction to improve image quality. Forty-six children with congenital heart disease (median age: 109 days) were examined using dual-source CT. Scans were performed at 80 kV and 70 kV in 21 and 25 children, respectively. A nonionic iodinated contrast medium (300 mg I/ml) was used for the 80-kV protocol. The contrast medium was diluted to 75% (225 mgI/mL) with saline for the 70-kV protocol. Image noise was measured in the two protocols for each group by extracting the standard deviations of a region of interest placed on the descending aorta. We then determined whether sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction reduced the image noise at 70 kV. There was more noise at 70 kV than at 80 kV (29 ± 12 vs 20 ± 4.8; P < 0.01). Sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction with grade 4 strength settings improved the noise (20 ± 5.9; P < 0.01) for the 70-kV group. Sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction improved the image quality of CT in congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  6. Image quality at low tube voltage (70 kV) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction for computed tomography in infants with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Motoo; Ozawa, Yoshiyuki; Sakurai, Keita; Shimohira, Masashi; Shibamoto, Yuta [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Nagoya (Japan); Ohashi, Kazuya [Nagoya City University Hospital, Division of Central Radiology, Nagoya (Japan); Asano, Miki [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Nagoya (Japan); Yamaguchi, Sachiko [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Pediatrics and Neonatology, Nagoya (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Lower tube voltage has advantages for CT angiography, such as improved contrast To evaluate the image quality of low-voltage (70 kV) CT for congenital heart disease and the ability of sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction to improve image quality. Forty-six children with congenital heart disease (median age: 109 days) were examined using dual-source CT. Scans were performed at 80 kV and 70 kV in 21 and 25 children, respectively. A nonionic iodinated contrast medium (300 mg I/ml) was used for the 80-kV protocol. The contrast medium was diluted to 75% (225 mgI/mL) with saline for the 70-kV protocol. Image noise was measured in the two protocols for each group by extracting the standard deviations of a region of interest placed on the descending aorta. We then determined whether sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction reduced the image noise at 70 kV. There was more noise at 70 kV than at 80 kV (29 ± 12 vs 20 ± 4.8; P < 0.01). Sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction with grade 4 strength settings improved the noise (20 ± 5.9; P < 0.01) for the 70-kV group. Sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction improved the image quality of CT in congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  7. Diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in patients undergoing open heart surgery: a comparison of serial myocardial imaging with cardiac enzymes, electrocardiography, and vectocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowenthal, I.S.; Parisi, A.F.; Tow, D.E.; Barsamian, E.M.; Sasahara, A.A.; McCaughan, D.; Clemson, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    In 44 consecutive patients undergoing elective open heart surgery (OHS), serial electrocardiograms (ECG), vectorcardiograms (VCG), serum CPK, cardiac isoenzymes (CPKMB), and myocardial images using Tc-99m pyrophosphate were obtained, before and after the operation, for the detection of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Twenty-nine patients developed one or more positive tests postoperatively. Two patients had positive myocardial scintiscans; both had other evidence of infarction. Conversely, the appearance of CPKMB, or new ECG and VCG changes, occurred frequently without evidence of infarction, and were not associated with the development of a positive scintiscan. The results show that false-negative results are infrequent in patients imaged early after OHS, and that cardiac surgical procedures do not cause a high incidence of false-positive scintigrams. Consequently, radionuclide imaging for AMI offers an important adjunct for excluding acute infarction following open heart surgery

  8. Recommendations for the imaging assessment of prosthetic heart valves: a report from the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging endorsed by the Chinese Society of Echocardiography, the Inter-American Society of Echocardiography, and the Brazilian Department of Cardiovascular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Pibarot, Philippe; Chambers, John; Edvardsen, Thor; Delgado, Victoria; Dulgheru, Raluca; Pepi, Mauro; Cosyns, Bernard; Dweck, Mark R; Garbi, Madalina; Magne, Julien; Nieman, Koen; Rosenhek, Raphael; Bernard, Anne; Lowenstein, Jorge; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Rabischoffsky, Arnaldo; Vyhmeister, Rodrigo Hernández; Zhou, Xiao; Zhang, Yun; Zamorano, Jose-Luis; Habib, Gilbert

    2016-06-01

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction is rare but potentially life-threatening. Although often challenging, establishing the exact cause of PHV dysfunction is essential to determine the appropriate treatment strategy. In clinical practice, a comprehensive approach that integrates several parameters of valve morphology and function assessed with 2D/3D transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography is a key to appropriately detect and quantitate PHV dysfunction. Cinefluoroscopy, multidetector computed tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and to a lesser extent, nuclear imaging are complementary tools for the diagnosis and management of PHV complications. The present document provides recommendations for the use of multimodality imaging in the assessment of PHVs. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. PET tomographic 2-D and/or 3-D imaging of nitrogen-13, derived from 13N-amino acids, in the heart, pancreas, liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, W.G.; Bigler, R.E.; Gelbard, A.S.; Benua, R.S.; Graham, M.C.; Laughlin, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    The loci of accumulations of Nitrogen-13, derived from enzymatically-synthesized, intravenously-injected, natural L-forms of (N-13)-L-Glutamate, (N-13)-L-Leucine, (N-13)-L-Valine, or (N-13)-L-Methionine, were determined in situ in several organs after a large meal. The images were made with the first commercial version of the MGH ''positron'' camera. When operated in the transverse, coronal, 2-D mode, high concentrations of N-13 were found consistently in the Heart and Pancreas, and lesser amounts in the Liver, after (N-13)-Glutamate or (N-13)-L-Leucine. Little accumulation occurred in the Heart after (N-13)-L-Methionine or (N-13)-L-Valine. High concentrations of N-13 were found in the Pancreas after the (N-13)-L-Methionine or (N-13)-L-Valine. When the PCT-4200 instrument was operated in the 3-D orthogonal mode, following intravenous (N-13)-L-Glutamate, five transverse 1.0-cm-thick slice images were made at 1.4-cm sequential spacings, both of the Heart and of the Pancreas. The computer simultaneously collected the data for reconstrutions subsequently of all ten image slices through both the Heart and the Pancreas

  10. Morphological and Functional Measurements of the Heart Obtained by Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Brazilians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macedo, Robson, E-mail: robmacedo@yahoo.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil); Fernandes, Juliano Lara [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Andrade, Solange Souza; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo [Instituto do Coração, Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lima, Kênio Costa; Maciel, Álvaro Campos Cavalcanti [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil); Maciel, Fernanda Cunha; Alves, Geraldo Souza Pinho [Universidade Potiguar, Natal, RN (Brazil); Coelho, Otávio Rizzi [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Diniz, Rosiane Viana Zuza [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    Still today, measurements used as a reference in the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging have been obtained mainly from studies carried out in North-American and European populations. To obtain measurements of the diastolic diameter, systolic diameter, end diastolic volume, end systolic volume, ejection fraction, and myocardial mass of the left and right ventricles in Brazilians. 54 men and 53 women, with mean age of 43.4 ± 13.1 years, asymptomatic, with no cardiomyopathies, have been subjected to the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, using a balanced steady state free precession technique. The averages and the standard deviations of the parameters for the left ventricle have been: diastolic diameter =4.8 ± 0.5 cm; systolic diameter = 3.0 ± 0.6 cm; end diastolic volume = 128.4 ± 29.6 mL; end systolic volume = 45.2 ± 16.6 mL; ejection fraction = 65.5 ± 6.3%; mass = 95.2 ± 30.8 g. For the right ventricle, they have been: diastolic diameter = 3.9 ± 1.3 cm; systolic diameter = 2.5 ± 0.5 cm; end diastolic volume = 126.5 ± 30.7 mL; end systolic volume = 53.6 ± 18.4 mL; ejection fraction = 58.3 ± 8.0%, and mass = 26.1 ± 6.1 g. The masses and the volumes were significantly greater in the men, except for the end systolic volume of the left ventricle. The ejection fraction of the right ventricle has been significantly greater in the women. There has been a significant and inverted correlation of the systolic volume of the right volume with the progression of the age. This study has described, for the first time, cardiac measurements obtained through the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in Brazilians, asymptomatic, with no cardiomyopathies, showing differences in accordance with gender and age.

  11. Temporal and spatial performance of vector velocity imaging in the human fetal heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, H; Germanakis, I; Kulinskaya, E; Gardiner, H M

    2011-02-01

    To assess the spatial and temporal performance of fetal myocardial speckle tracking, using high-frame-rate (HFR) storing and Lagrangian strain analysis. Dummy electrocardiographic signaling permitted DICOM HFR in 124 normal fetuses and paired low-frame-rate (LFR) video storing at 25 Hz in 93 of them. Vector velocity imaging (VVI) tracking co-ordinates were used to compare time and spatial domain measures. We compared tracking success, Lagrangian strain, peak diastolic velocity and positive strain rate values in HFR vs. LFR video storing. Further comparisons within an HFR subset included Lagrangian vs. natural strain, VVI vs. M-mode annular displacement, and VVI vs. pulsed-wave tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) peak velocities. HFR (average 79.4 Hz) tracking was more successful than LFR (86 vs. 76%, P = 0.024). Lagrangian and natural HFR strain correlated highly (left ventricle (LV): r = 0.883, P < 0.001; right ventricle (RV): r = 0.792, P < 0.001) but natural strain gave 20% lower values, suggesting reduced reliability of measurement. Lagrangian HFR strain was similar in LV and RV and decreased with gestation (P = 0.015 and P < 0.001, respectively). LV Lagrangian LFR strain was significantly lower than the values for the RV (P < 0.001) and those using paired LV-HFR recordings (P = 0.007). Annular displacement methods correlated highly (LV = 1.046, r = 0.90, P < 0.001; RV = 1.170, r = 0.88, P < 0.001). Early diastolic waves were visible in 95% of TDI, but in only 26% of HFR and 0% of LFR recordings, and HFR-VVI velocities were significantly lower than those for TDI (P < 0.001). Doppler estimation of velocities remains superior to VVI but image gating and use of original co-ordinates should improve offline VVI assessment of fetal myocardial function. Copyright © 2011 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Morphological and Functional Measurements of the Heart Obtained by Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Brazilians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Robson; Fernandes, Juliano Lara; Andrade, Solange Souza; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo; Lima, Kênio Costa; Maciel, Álvaro Campos Cavalcanti; Maciel, Fernanda Cunha; Alves, Geraldo Souza Pinho; Coelho, Otávio Rizzi; Diniz, Rosiane Viana Zuza

    2013-01-01

    Still today, measurements used as a reference in the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging have been obtained mainly from studies carried out in North-American and European populations. To obtain measurements of the diastolic diameter, systolic diameter, end diastolic volume, end systolic volume, ejection fraction, and myocardial mass of the left and right ventricles in Brazilians. 54 men and 53 women, with mean age of 43.4 ± 13.1 years, asymptomatic, with no cardiomyopathies, have been subjected to the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, using a balanced steady state free precession technique. The averages and the standard deviations of the parameters for the left ventricle have been: diastolic diameter =4.8 ± 0.5 cm; systolic diameter = 3.0 ± 0.6 cm; end diastolic volume = 128.4 ± 29.6 mL; end systolic volume = 45.2 ± 16.6 mL; ejection fraction = 65.5 ± 6.3%; mass = 95.2 ± 30.8 g. For the right ventricle, they have been: diastolic diameter = 3.9 ± 1.3 cm; systolic diameter = 2.5 ± 0.5 cm; end diastolic volume = 126.5 ± 30.7 mL; end systolic volume = 53.6 ± 18.4 mL; ejection fraction = 58.3 ± 8.0%, and mass = 26.1 ± 6.1 g. The masses and the volumes were significantly greater in the men, except for the end systolic volume of the left ventricle. The ejection fraction of the right ventricle has been significantly greater in the women. There has been a significant and inverted correlation of the systolic volume of the right volume with the progression of the age. This study has described, for the first time, cardiac measurements obtained through the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in Brazilians, asymptomatic, with no cardiomyopathies, showing differences in accordance with gender and age

  13. ECAT III: A new PET system for heart and whole body dynamic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.J.; Phelps, M.E.; Huang, S.C.; Collard, P.E.; Bidaut, L.M.; Schwab, R.L.; Schwaiger, M.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    A new whole body PET system has been developed and is being evaluated. The ECAT III consists of 1 to 4 rings of 512-5.6 x 29 x 30 mm BGO detectors per 100 cm diameter ring. The system has a unique data collection scheme in which all events are buffered in a 512 by 32 data matrix. The 512 dimension corresponds to detector number and the 32 dimension corresponds to 8 nsec time bins. A dedicated microprocessor searches the array (1) to determine which detectors had events simultaneously +- 8 nsec to establish coincidences, (2) to determine accidentals by determining the probability of off-time events, which can be determined with a statistical accuracy improvement of a factor of 10 by using a larger ''software'' time window, and (3) to determine and distinguish between adjacent detector crosstalk and random triple events. System can process 500 K coincident events/sec/per image plane. Data are collected in list mode and scan parameter information, such as time, wobble position and occurrence of gating signals are inserted in data. Wobble position is divided in 1000 parts per rotation, minimizing positioning error in binning events, timing information allows retrospective choice of time frame for dynamic studies and cardiac gate data allows retrospective choice of framing. ECAT III has an image resolution of 4.5 mm when system is wobbled and 7.2 mm when system is stationary. Loss of efficiency due to nearest neighbor cross talk is 8 to 12%. Axial resolution is selectable with remotely driven side shielding, and interchangeable interplane sept allow different configurations to accomodate a variety of imaging conditions

  14. Influence of heart rhythm, breathing and arm position during computed tomography scanning on the registration accuracy of electro anatomical map (EAM) images, left atrium three-dimensional computed tomography angiography images, and fluoroscopy time during ablation to treat atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chono, Taiki; Shimoshige, Shinya; Yoshikawa, Kenta; Mizonobe, Kazuhusa; Ogura, Keishi

    2013-01-01

    In CARTOMERGE for treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) by ablation, by integrating electro anatomical map (EAM) and left atrium three-dimensional computed tomography angiography (3D-CTA) images, identification of the ablation points is simplified and the procedure can be made carried out more rapidly. However, the influence that heart rhythm, breathing and arm position during CT scanning have on registration accuracy and fluoroscopy time is not clear. To clarify the influence on registration accuracy and fluoroscopy time of heart rhythm, breathing and arm position during CT scanning. The patients were CT-scanned during both sinus rhythm (SR) and AF in each study subject. We evaluated the registration accuracy of images reconstructed between the cardiac cycle and assessed the registration accuracy and fluoroscopy time of images obtained during inspiratory breath-hold, expiratory breath-hold and up and down position of the arm. Although the registration accuracy of the EAM image and left atrium 3D-CTA image showed a significant difference during SR, no significant difference was seen during AF. Expiratory breath-hold and down position of the arm resulted in the highest registration accuracy and the shortest fluoroscopy time. However, arm position had no significant effect on registration accuracy. Heart rhythm and breathing during CT scanning have a significant effect on the registration accuracy of EAM images, left atrium 3D-CTA images, and fluoroscopy time. (author)

  15. Framingham coronary heart disease risk score can be predicted from structural brain images in elderly subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Maryam Rondina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent literature has presented evidence that cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF play an important role on cognitive performance in elderly individuals, both those who are asymptomatic and those who suffer from symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders. Findings from studies applying neuroimaging methods have increasingly reinforced such notion. Studies addressing the impact of CVRF on brain anatomy changes have gained increasing importance, as recent papers have reported gray matter loss predominantly in regions traditionally affected in Alzheimer’s disease (AD and vascular dementia in the presence of a high degree of cardiovascular risk. In the present paper, we explore the association between CVRF and brain changes using pattern recognition techniques applied to structural MRI and the Framingham score (a composite measure of cardiovascular risk largely used in epidemiological studies in a sample of healthy elderly individuals. We aim to answer the following questions: Is it possible to decode (i.e., to learn information regarding cardiovascular risk from structural brain images enabling individual predictions? Among clinical measures comprising the Framingham score, are there particular risk factors that stand as more predictable from patterns of brain changes? Our main findings are threefold: i we verified that structural changes in spatially distributed patterns in the brain enable statistically significant prediction of Framingham scores. This result is still significant when controlling for the presence of the APOE 4 allele (an important genetic risk factor for both AD and cardiovascular disease. ii When considering each risk factor singly, we found different levels of correlation between real and predicted factors; however, single factors were not significantly predictable from brain images when considering APOE4 allele presence as covariate. iii We found important gender differences, and the possible causes of that finding are discussed.

  16. Dobutamine stress magnetic resonance imaging: a valuable method in the noninvasive diagnosis of ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijkman, Paul R M; Kuijpers, Dirkjan A; Blom, Bernadette M; van Herpen, Gerard

    2002-01-01

    We assessed the clinical applicability of dobutamine stress magnetic resonance imaging (DS-MRI) for the detection of myocardial ischemia and myocardial viability. One hundred patients with suspected coronary artery disease and inconclusive exercise electrocardiography or significant repolarization abnormalities on the resting ECG underwent breath hold DS-MRI (1 Tesla), 4 days after cessation of anti-ischemic medication. Three left ventricular short axis planes were imaged at increasing doses of dobutamine. Recovery of wall thickening in a previously diminished or non contracting segment at low dose dobutamine was considered proof of viability. Development of hypo-, a- or dyskinesia at higher doses of dobutamine was taken to indicate ischemia. If the DS-MRI test was positive for ischemia, coronary angiography was performed. If indicated, this was followed by revascularization. If DS-MRI did not demonstrate ischemia, neither angiography nor revascularization were carried out. Ninety five DS-MRI investigations were available for diagnosis. Forty two patients had DS-MRI scans positive for ischemia and subsequently coronary angiography assessment of the clinical applicability of DS-MRI for the detection of myocardial ischemia was performed. One patient was false-positive. All 53 patients with non-ischemic DS-MRI scans had follow-up for 11-23 months (mean 17 months). One patient died suddenly 2 weeks after the MRI-test. The other 52 patients did not experience any coronary event nor sudden cardiac death. The predictive value of a positive (for ischemia) DS-MRI test is 98% and the predictive value of a negative DS-MRI test is also 98%.

  17. Three-dimensional rotational angiography fused with multimodal imaging modalities for targeted endomyocardial injections in the ischaemic heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauwe, Dieter Frans; Nuyens, Dieter; De Buck, Stijn; Claus, Piet; Gheysens, Olivier; Koole, Michel; Coudyzer, Walter; Vanden Driessche, Nina; Janssens, Laurens; Ector, Joris; Dymarkowski, Steven; Bogaert, Jan; Heidbuchel, Hein; Janssens, Stefan

    2014-08-01

    Biological therapies for ischaemic heart disease require efficient, safe, and affordable intramyocardial delivery. Integration of multiple imaging modalities within the fluoroscopy framework can provide valuable information to guide these procedures. We compared an anatomo-electric method (LARCA) with a non-fluoroscopic electromechanical mapping system (NOGA(®)). LARCA integrates selective three-dimensional-rotational angiograms with biplane fluoroscopy. To identify the infarct region, we studied LARCA-fusion with pre-procedural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), dedicated CT, or (18)F-FDG-PET/CT. We induced myocardial infarction in 20 pigs by 90-min LAD occlusion. Six weeks later, we compared peri-infarct delivery accuracy of coloured fluospheres using sequential NOGA(®)- and LARCA-MRI-guided vs. LARCA-CT- and LARCA-(18)F-FDG-PET/CT-guided intramyocardial injections. MRI after 6 weeks revealed significant left ventricular (LV) functional impairment and remodelling (LVEF 31 ± 3%, LVEDV 178 ± 15 mL, infarct size 17 ± 2% LV mass). During NOGA(®)-procedures, three of five animals required DC-shock for major ventricular arrhythmias vs. one of ten during LARCA-procedures. Online procedure time was shorter for LARCA than NOGA(®) (77 ± 6 vs. 130 ± 3 min, P integration allowed closer approximation of the targeted border zone than LARCA-PET (4.0 ± 0.5 mm vs. 6.2 ± 0.6 mm, P technology for cardiac biological therapies. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of athlete's heart: myocardial mass, left ventricular function, and cross-sectional area of the coronary arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zandrino, F.; Sardanelli, F.; Molinari, G.; Masperone, M.A.; Smeraldi, A.; Odaglia, G.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate left ventricular myocardial mass and function as well as ostial coronary artery cross-sectional area in endurance athletes, an athlete group of 12 highly trained rowers and a control group of 12 sedentary healthy subjects underwent MR examination. An ECG-gated breath-hold cine gradient-echo sequence was used to calculate myocardial mass, end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes, stroke volume, and cardiac output, all related to body surface area, as well as ejection fraction. A 3D fat-saturated ECG- and respiratory-triggered navigator echo sequence was used to evaluate coronary arteries: left main (LM), left anterior descending (LAD), left circumflex (LCx), and right coronary artery (RCA). Cross-sectional area was calculated and divided for body surface area. Myocardial mass was found significantly larger in athlete group than in control group (p = 0.0078), the same being for end-diastolic volume (p = 0.0078), stroke volume (p = 0.0055), LM (p = 0.0066) and LAD (p = 0.0129). No significant difference was found for all the remaining parameters. Significant correlation with myocardial mass was found for LM (p < 0.001) and LAD (p = 0.0340), not for LCx and RCA. Magnetic resonance imaging is a useful tool in evaluating the myocardial hypertrophy and function of athlete's heart. Magnetic resonance angiography is a valuable noninvasive method to visualize the correlated cross-sectional area increase of the left coronary artery system. (orig.)

  19. Comparison of adenosine and exercise stress 201Tl myocardial perfusion imaging for diagnosing coronary heart disease in women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiangjin; Ma Shuren; Meng Tao; Bao Zhi; Cui Jianhe

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic value of adenosine and exercise stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) for detecting coronary heart disease (CHD) in women. Methods: One hundred and thirty-eight patients with CHD were randomly divided into two groups: adenosine stress group (n=69)and exercise stress group (n=69). All patients underwent myocardial SPECT evaluation. Coronary angiography (CAG), referred as 'gold standard' , was performed in each patient within 1 week before or after MPI. The diagnostic value of the two stress MPI was compared with χ 2 test or Fisher's exact test. Results: In adenosine stress group, the sensitivity, negative predictive value and accuracy were 88.2% (45/51), 72.7% (16/22), 88.4% (61/69), respectively, which were not significantly different from those of the exercise stress group (91.7% (44/48), 66.7% (8/12), 81.2% (52/64); χ 2 =0.571, 0.714, 0.249, P>0.05). However, the false positive rate of adenosine stress (11.1%, 2/18) was significantly lower than that of exercise stress (50.0%, 8/16), P=0.023. Conclusions: Adenosine and exercise stress MPI have similar value for CHD diagnosis in women, however, adenosine stress MPI may have an advantage of low false positive rate. (authors)

  20. Cardiothoracic ratio and vertebral heart size (VHS to standardize the heart size of the tufted capuchin (Cebus apella Linnaeus, 1758 in computerized radiographic images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermínio J. Rocha-Neto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The VHS and CTR were assessed using computerized thoracic radiographs of ten clinically healthy tufted capuchin monkeys (five males and five females from the Wild Animal Screening Center in São Luís (Centro de Triagem de Animais Silvestres de São Luís-MA-CETAS. Radiographs were taken in laterolateral and dorsoventral projections to calculate the cardiothoracic ratio (VHS and vertebral heart size (CTR. The VHS showed mean values of 9.34±0.32v (males and 9.16±0.34v (females and there was no statistical difference between males and females (p>0.05. The CTR showed mean values of 0.55±0.04 (males and 0.52±0.03 (females and there was no statistical difference between the sexes (p>0.05. There was positive correlation between VHS and CTR (r=0.78. The thoracic and heart diameters showed mean values of 5.70±0.48cm and 2.16±0.40cm in the males, respectively. In the females they measured 5.32±0.39cm and 2.94±0.32cm. There was no statistical difference between the sexes. Our results show that the high correlation found between VHS and CTR permitted the verification with similar clinical precision between the two methods to estimate alterations in the heart silhouette by radiographic examination of tufted capuchin, making it an easy technique to apply that can be considered in the investigation of heart problems for this wild species.

  1. Enlarged Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rheumatic fever, a heart defect, infections (infectious endocarditis), connective tissue disorders, certain medications or radiation treatments for cancer, your heart may enlarge. Disease of the heart ...

  2. In vivo cardiac nano-imaging: A new technology for high-precision analyses of sarcomere dynamics in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimozawa, Togo; Hirokawa, Erisa; Kobirumaki-Shimozawa, Fuyu; Oyama, Kotaro; Shintani, Seine A; Terui, Takako; Kushida, Yasuharu; Tsukamoto, Seiichi; Fujii, Teruyuki; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Fukuda, Norio

    2017-03-01

    The cardiac pump function is a result of a rise in intracellular Ca 2+ and the ensuing sarcomeric contractions [i.e., excitation-contraction (EC) coupling] in myocytes in various locations of the heart. In order to elucidate the heart's mechanical properties under various settings, cardiac imaging is widely performed in today's clinical as well as experimental cardiology by using echocardiogram, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. However, because these common techniques detect local myocardial movements at a spatial resolution of ∼100 μm, our knowledge on the sub-cellular mechanisms of the physiology and pathophysiology of the heart in vivo is limited. This is because (1) EC coupling occurs in the μm partition in a myocyte and (2) cardiac sarcomeres generate active force upon a length change of ∼100 nm on a beat-to-beat basis. Recent advances in optical technologies have enabled measurements of intracellular Ca 2+ dynamics and sarcomere length displacements at high spatial and temporal resolution in the beating heart of living rodents. Future studies with these technologies are warranted to open a new era in cardiac research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Imaging Ca2+ nanosparks in heart with a new targeted biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Wei; Lu, Fujian; Sun, Tao; Xu, Jiejia; Li, Lin-Lin; Wang, Yanru; Wang, Gang; Chen, Liangyi; Wang, Xianhua; Cannell, Mark B; Wang, Shi-Qiang; Cheng, Heping

    2014-01-31

    In cardiac dyads, junctional Ca2+ directly controls the gating of the ryanodine receptors (RyRs), and is itself dominated by RyR-mediated Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Existing probes do not report such local Ca2+ signals because of probe diffusion, so a junction-targeted Ca2+ sensor should reveal new information on cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and its modification in disease states. To investigate Ca2+ signaling in the nanoscopic space of cardiac dyads by targeting a new sensitive Ca2+ biosensor (GCaMP6f) to the junctional space. By fusing GCaMP6f to the N terminus of triadin 1 or junctin, GCaMP6f-triadin 1/junctin was targeted to dyadic junctions, where it colocalized with t-tubules and RyRs after adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. This membrane protein-tagged biosensor displayed ≈4× faster kinetics than native GCaMP6f. Confocal imaging revealed junctional Ca2+ transients (Ca2+ nanosparks) that were ≈50× smaller in volume than conventional Ca2+ sparks (measured with diffusible indicators). The presence of the biosensor did not disrupt normal Ca2+ signaling. Because no indicator diffusion occurred, the amplitude and timing of release measurements were improved, despite the small recording volume. We could also visualize coactivation of subclusters of RyRs within a single junctional region, as well as quarky Ca2+ release events. This new, targeted biosensor allows selective visualization and measurement of nanodomain Ca2+ dynamics in intact cells and can be used to give mechanistic insights into dyad RyR operation in health and in disease states such as when RyRs become orphaned.

  4. First determination of the heart-to-mediastinum ratio using cardiac dual isotope ({sup 123}I-MIBG/{sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin) CZT imaging in patients with heart failure: the ADRECARD study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellevre, Dimitri; Desmonts, Cedric [CHU Cote de Nacre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); Manrique, Alain; Agostini, Denis [CHU Cote de Nacre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); EA 4650, Normandie Universite, Caen (France); Legallois, Damien [EA 4650, Normandie Universite, Caen (France); CHU Cote de Nacre, Cardiology Department, Caen (France); Bross, Samy; Baavour, Rafael; Roth, Nathaniel [Spectrum Dynamics, Biosensors, Caesarea (Israel); Blaire, Tanguy; Bailliez, Alban [EA 4650, Normandie Universite, Caen (France); IRIS, Polyclinique du Bois, Nuclear Medicine Department, Lille (France)

    2015-11-15

    Cardiac innervation is assessed using the heart-to-mediastinum ratio (HMR) of metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) on planar imaging using Anger single photon emission computed tomography (A-SPECT). The aim of the study was to determine the HMR of MIBG obtained using a CZT-based camera (D-SPECT; Spectrum Dynamics, Israel) in comparison with that obtained using conventional planar imaging. The ADRECARD study prospectively evaluated 44 patients with heart failure. They underwent planar acquisition using the A-SPECT camera 4 h after {sup 123}I-MIBG injection (236.4 ± 39.7 MBq). To localize the heart using D-SPECT, {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin (753 ± 133 MBq) was administered and dual isotope acquisition was performed using the D-SPECT system. HMR was calculated using both planar A-SPECT imaging and front view D-SPECT cine data. In a phantom study, we estimated a model fitting the A-SPECT and the D-SPECT data that was further applied to correct for differences between the cameras. A total of 44 patients (39 men and 5 women, aged 60 ± 11 years) with ischaemic (31 patients) and nonischaemic (13 patients) cardiomyopathy completed the study. Most patients (28 of 44) were NYHA class II, and the mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 33 ± 7 %. The mean HMR values were 1.34 ± 0.15 and 1.45 ± 0.27 from A-SPECT and D-SPECT, respectively (p < 0.0001). After correction, Lin's concordance correlation showed an almost perfect concordance between corrected D-SPECT HMR and A-SPECT HMR, and Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated a high agreement between the two measurements. The ADRECARD study demonstrated that determination of late HMR during cardiac MIBG imaging using dual isotope ({sup 123}I and {sup 99m}Tc) acquisition on a CZT camera (D-SPECT) is feasible in patients with heart failure. A linear correction based on the phantom study yielded a high agreement between {sup 123}I MIBG HMR obtained using a CZT camera and that from conventional planar imaging. (orig.)

  5. Contrast-enhanced time-resolved 4D MRA of congenital heart and vessel anomalies: image quality and diagnostic value compared with 3D MRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Florian M.; Hunold, Peter; Barkhausen, Joerg [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Clinic for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Luebeck (Germany); Theysohn, Jens M.; Kinner, Sonja [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Michna, Dariusz [Elisabeth Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Essen (Germany); Neudorf, Ulrich [University Hospital Essen, Clinic for Pediatrics III, Essen (Germany); Quick, Harald H. [University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Institute of Medical Physics, Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    To evaluate time-resolved interleaved stochastic trajectories (TWIST) contrast-enhanced 4D magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and compare it with 3D FLASH MRA in patients with congenital heart and vessel anomalies. Twenty-six patients with congenital heart and vessel anomalies underwent contrast-enhanced MRA with both 3D FLASH and 4D TWIST MRA. Images were subjectively evaluated regarding total image quality, artefacts, diagnostic value and added diagnostic value of 4D dynamic imaging. Quantitative comparison included signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and vessel sharpness measurements. Three-dimensional FLASH MRA was judged to be significantly better in terms of image quality (4.0 {+-} 0.6 vs 3.4 {+-} 0.6, P < 0.05) and artefacts (3.8 {+-} 0.4 vs 3.3 {+-} 0.5, P < 0.05); no difference in diagnostic value was found (4.2 {+-} 0.4 vs 4.0 {+-} 0.4); important additional functional information was found in 21/26 patients. SNR and CNR were higher in the pulmonary trunk in 4D TWIST, but slightly higher in the systemic arteries in 3D FLASH. No difference in vessel sharpness delineation was found. Although image quality was inferior compared with 3D FLASH MRA, 4D TWIST MRA yields robust images and added diagnostic value through dynamic acquisition was found. Thus, 4D TWIST MRA is an attractive alternative to 3D FLASH MRA. (orig.)

  6. The impact of acquisition time of planar cardiac 123I-MIBG imaging on the late heart to mediastinum ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitriu-Leen, Aukelien C.; Veltman, Caroline E.; Bax, Jeroen J.; Scholte, Arthur J.H.A.; Gimelli, Alessia; Al Younis, Imad; Verberne, Hein J.; Wolterbeek, Ron; Zandbergen-Harlaar, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether performing the late cardiac 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scan earlier than 4 h post-injection (p.i.) has relevant impact on the late heart to mediastinum ratio (H/M ratio) in patients with heart failure (HF). Forty-nine patients with HF (median left ventricular ejection fraction of 31 %, 51 % ischaemic HF) referred for cardiac 123 I-MIBG scintigraphy were scanned at 15 min (early) p.i. and at 1, 2, 3 and 4 h (late) p.i. of 123 I-MIBG. Late H/M ratios were calculated and evaluated using a linear mixed model with the mean late H/M ratio at 4 h p.i. as a reference. A difference in late H/M ratios of more than 0.10 between the different acquisition times in comparison with the late H/M ratio at 4 h p.i. was considered as clinically relevant. Statistically significant mean differences were observed between the late H/M ratios at 1, 2 and 3 h p.i. compared with the late H/M ratio at 4 h p.i. (0.09, 0.05 and 0.02, respectively). However, the mean differences did not exceed the cut-off value of 0.10. On an individual patient level, compared to the late H/M ratio at 4 h p.i., the late H/M ratios at 1, 2 and 3 h p.i. differed more than 0.10 in 24 (50 %), 9 (19 %) and 2 (4 %) patients, respectively. Variation in acquisition time of 123 I-MIBG between 2 and 4 h p.i. does not lead to a clinically significant change in the late H/M ratio. An earlier acquisition time seems to be justified and may warrant a more time-efficient cardiac 123 I-MIBG imaging protocol. (orig.)

  7. Optical Time-Domain and Radio Imaging Analyses of the Dynamic Hearts of AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Krista Lynne

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are among the most extreme objects in the universe: galaxies with a central supermassive black hole feeding on gas from a hot accretion disk. Despite their potential as powerful tools to study topics ranging from relativity to cosmology, they remain quite mysterious. In the first portion of this thesis, we explore how an AGN may influence the formation of stars in its host galaxy. Using high-resolution 22 GHz radio imaging of an X-ray selected sample of radio-quiet AGN, we find that the far-infrared radio correlation for normal star forming galaxies remains valid within a few hundred parsecs of the central engine. Because the core flux is often spatially isolated from star formation, we can also determine that the radio emission in radio-quiet AGN is consistent with both coronal and disk-jet coupling models. Finally, we find that AGN with jet-like radio morphologies have suppressed star formation, possibly indicating ongoing feedback. The second portion of this thesis uses optical AGN light curves to study the physics of accretion. The Kepler spacecraft produces groundbreaking light curves, but its fixed field of view only contained a handful of known AGN. We conduct an X-ray survey of this field, yielding 93 unique X-ray sources identified by optical follow-up spectroscopy as a mixture of AGN and stars. For the AGN, we spectroscopically measure black hole masses and accretion rates. We then analyze a sample of 22 Kepler AGN light curves. We develop a customized pipeline for AGN science with Kepler, a necessary step since the initial data was optimized for the unique goal of exoplanet detection. The light curves display an astonishing variety of behaviors in a new regime of optical variability inaccessible with previous facilities. We find power spectral slopes inconsistent with the damped random walk model, characteristic variability timescales, correlations of variability properties with physical parameters, and bimodal flux

  8. 99Tcm-tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion imaging for diagnosis of coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lele; Tian Wei; Shao Guoqiang; Zhang Hang; You Wei; Meng Qingle; Yang Rui; Cao Yan; Wang Xiaowen; Wang Feng

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical value of 99 Tc m -tetrofosmin (TF) MPI for diagnosis of CHD. Methods: A total of 73 patients (46 males,27 females; age: (61.16 ± 12.95) y) were included in this study. 99 Tc m -TF MPI and CAG were performed in all patients. Two-day protocol of MPI was used in this study, with rest MPI performed on the first day and stress (exercise stress or adenosine stress) imaging on the next day. CAG was performed within one week after MPI and served as the gold standard in diagnosis of CHD. Stenosis over 50% of the lumen was considered positive. The diagnostic efficacy of 99 Tc m -TF MPI was evaluated based on the results of CAG. Results: Among the 73 patients,43 patients were CAG positive, 27 cases with single vessel disease, 10 patients with double vessel disease and 6 patients with triple vessel disease. There were 37 patients with abnormality in MPI and 36 patients with normal MPI. Out of 43 patients with positive CAG, there were 32 cases diagnosed with myocardial ischemia and 11 with normal results in MPI. Among the 65 diseased vessels,there were 33 involved in LAD, 16 LCX and 16 RCA. The sensitivity,specificity, positive predictive value,negative predictive value and accuracy of MPI for detection of CHD were 74.4% (32/43), 83.3% (25/30), 86.5% (32/37), 69.4% (25/36) and 78.1% (57/73), respectively. The sensitivities for detection of single vessel disease, double vessel disease and triple vessel disease were 66.7% (18/27), 80.0% (8/10) and 5/6, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of MPI for detection of coronary disease in all 219 vessels were 67.7% (44/65) and 89.0% (137/154), respectively. Conclusion: 99 Tc m -TF MPI, with convenient preparation and reliable properties of the tracer, may provide an alternative modality for accurate detection of CHD. (authors)

  9. Diagnosis of iron overload and heart disease by magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Wood

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to estimate tissue iron was initiated nearly three decades ago but has only become a practical reality in the last ten years. MRI is most often used to estimate hepatic and cardiac iron in patients with thalassemia or sickle cell disease and has largely replaced liver biopsy for liver iron quantification. The ability of MRI to image extra hepatic organs has really transformed our understanding of iron mediated toxicity in transfusional siderosis. For decades, iron cardiomyopathy was the leading cause of death in thalassemia major, but it is now relatively rare in centers with regular MRI screening. Early recognition of cardiac iron loading allows more gentle modifications of iron chelation therapy prior to life threatening organ dysfunction. Serial MRI evaluations have demonstrated differential kinetics of uptake and clearance among the difference organs of the body. Although elevated serum ferritin and liver iron concentration increase the risk of cardiac and endocrine toxicities, extra hepatic iron deposition and toxicity occurs in many patients despite having low total body iron stores; there is no safe liver iron level in chronically transfused patients. Instead, the type, dose, and pattern of iron chelation therapy all contribute to whether cardiac iron accumulation will occur. These observations, coupled with the advent of increasing options for iron chelation therapy, are allowing clinicians to more appropriately tailor chelation therapy to individual patient needs, producing greater efficacy with fewer toxicities. With the decline in cardiac mortality, future frontiers in MRI monitoring including better prevention of endocrine toxicities, particularly hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and diabetes. These organs also serve as early warning signals for inadequate control of non-transferrin bound iron, a risk factor for cardiac iron loading. Thus MRI assessment of extra hepatic iron stores is a

  10. Imaging analysis of heart movement for improving the respiration-gated radiotherapy in patients with left sided breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelhamid, Rania; Farrag, A.; Khalifa, A. [Clinical Oncology Department, Assiut University (Egypt); Block, Andreas [Institut fuer Medizinische Strahlenphysik und Strahlenschutz, Klinikum Dortmund (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Respiration induced heart movement during radiotherapy exposes the heart to the inevitable risks of radio-exposure, and hence radiation injury, in cases of Lt. sided breast cancer. The impact of such a risk is additionally aggravated by the use of radiotherapy in combination with cardiotoxic chemotherapeutic agents. Radio-oncologists pay special attention to the coronary arteries that might be included in this small part of the heart exposed to radiation. The aim of this study was to include the internal heart movement for improving respiration-gated radiotherapy of left sided breast cancer. For 70 patients, all females left sided breast cancer, two planning CT's in inspiration and expiration, and one free breathing scan are performed. The heart motion was analyzed with the clinic-developed software ORAT in the simulator sequence for acquiring information of the cranio-caudal amplitude of heart movements in free breathing (respiration-induced amplitude) and a 15 seconds breath-hold phase (inherent amplitude). The role of inherent heart movement varies from one patient to another which should be taken in consideration during defining the parameters of respiration-gated radiotherapy. The inherent amplitude of the heart motion is the physiological lower limit of the respiration-gating window.

  11. Evaluation of myocardial preconditioning and adenosine effects in cardioprotection in rat hearts with ischemia-reperfusion injury using 99MTc-glucarate imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhonglin; Barrett, H.H.; Koon Yan Pak

    2004-01-01

    Significant tolerance to myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, as assessed by biochemical assay and noninvasive infarct-avid imaging, was induced with an IPC protocol in the rat model. The cardioprotection of IPC could be simulated by adenosine receptor A1 agonist CCPA, or blocked by antagonist SPT. Thus, adenosine mediates protection by ischemic preconditioning in this specific rat heart model. 99mTc-glucarate imaging is not only useful in detecting early ischemia-reperfusion injury, but also invaluable in evaluating the effects of cardioprotective treatments. uantitative anal ses on dynamic images with 99m Tc-glucarate would make it possible to identify myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury more accurate, and provide a unique tool for evaluation of cardioprotection. The FASTSPECT imaging with the ischenuc-reperfused rat heart model provides a solution-specific approach with high-resolution and fast dynamic acquisition for kinetic studies of new myocardial imaging agents as the evidence of its major role in the present study. (authors)

  12. In vivo cell tracking imaging of hexadecyl-4-[{sup 123,} {sup 124}I]iodobenzoate labeled adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) in rat heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Hwan; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, Kyo Chul [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Monitoring of transplanted stem cells for cardiac repair is important part in regenerative medicine. Direct cell labeling techniques using [{sup 18}F]FDG, [{sup 64}Cu]PTSM and [{sup 99m}Tc]-HMPAO have been developed for in vivo imaging. Especially, {sup 18}F-labeled derivates have been widely used for direct labeling agent. But the {sup 18}F has short half life (T{sub 1/2}={approx}2 h), thus this imaging agent has limitation of in vivo imaging. We used {sup 123}I or {sup 124}I which has relative long half life, to track the transplanted stem cells for a long-term imaging. This study is aimed to track the transplanted adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) in rat heart using hexadecyl-4-[{sup 123,} {sup 124}I]iodobenzoate ([{sup 123,} {sup 124}I]HIB) mediated direct labeling method in vivo

  13. Using medical imaging for the detection of adverse events ("incidents") during the utilization of left ventricular assist devices in adult patients with advanced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Friedrich; Krabatsch, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VAD) are used for mechanical support of the terminally failing heart. Failure of these life supporting systems can be fatal. Early and reliable detection of any upcoming problems is mandatory and is crucial for the outcome. Medical imaging methods are described within this review, which are not only essential for diagnosis of typically VAD-related complications but also for the detection or verification of technical issues. Within this review the utilization of medical imaging equipment for the diagnosis of technical malfunctions or damages of implanted system components is discussed. A newly developed specialized acoustic imaging method for pump thrombosis detection will also be described along with the most common VAD-related medical complications and their respective imaging methods and the limitations induced by the use of the VAD-system.

  14. Role of pyruvate dehydrogenase inhibition in the development of hypertrophy in the hyperthyroid rat heart: a combined magnetic resonance imaging and hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Helen J; Dodd, Michael S; Heather, Lisa C; Schroeder, Marie A; Griffin, Julian L; Radda, George K; Clarke, Kieran; Tyler, Damian J

    2011-06-07

    Hyperthyroidism increases heart rate, contractility, cardiac output, and metabolic rate. It is also accompanied by alterations in the regulation of cardiac substrate use. Specifically, hyperthyroidism increases the ex vivo activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, thereby inhibiting glucose oxidation via pyruvate dehydrogenase. Cardiac hypertrophy is another effect of hyperthyroidism, with an increase in the abundance of mitochondria. Although the hypertrophy is initially beneficial, it can eventually lead to heart failure. The aim of this study was to use hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate the rate and regulation of in vivo pyruvate dehydrogenase flux in the hyperthyroid heart and to establish whether modulation of flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase would alter cardiac hypertrophy. Hyperthyroidism was induced in 18 male Wistar rats with 7 daily intraperitoneal injections of freshly prepared triiodothyronine (0.2 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)). In vivo pyruvate dehydrogenase flux, assessed with hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy, was reduced by 59% in hyperthyroid animals (0.0022 ± 0.0002 versus 0.0055 ± 0.0005 second(-1); P=0.0003), and this reduction was completely reversed by both short- and long-term delivery of dichloroacetic acid, a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitor. Hyperpolarized [2-(13)C]pyruvate was also used to evaluate Krebs cycle metabolism and demonstrated a unique marker of anaplerosis, the level of which was significantly increased in the hyperthyroid heart. Cine magnetic resonance imaging showed that long-term dichloroacetic acid treatment significantly reduced the hypertrophy observed in hyperthyroid animals (100 ± 20 versus 200 ± 30 mg; P=0.04) despite no change in the increase observed in cardiac output. This work has demonstrated that inhibition of glucose oxidation in the hyperthyroid heart in vivo is mediated by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase. Relieving this inhibition can increase the metabolic

  15. Visual assessment of brain magnetic resonance imaging detects injury to cognitive regulatory sites in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Alan; Kumar, Rajesh; Macey, Paul M; Fonarow, Gregg C; Harper, Ronald M; Woo, Mary A

    2013-02-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients exhibit depression and executive function impairments that contribute to HF mortality. Using specialized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis procedures, brain changes appear in areas regulating these functions (mammillary bodies, hippocampi, and frontal cortex). However, specialized MRI procedures are not part of standard clinical assessment for HF (which is usually a visual evaluation), and it is unclear whether visual MRI examination can detect changes in these structures. Using brain MRI, we visually examined the mammillary bodies and frontal cortex for global and hippocampi for global and regional tissue changes in 17 HF and 50 control subjects. Significantly global changes emerged in the right mammillary body (HF 1.18 ± 1.13 vs control 0.52 ± 0.74; P = .024), right hippocampus (HF 1.53 ± 0.94 vs control 0.80 ± 0.86; P = .005), and left frontal cortex (HF 1.76 ± 1.03 vs control 1.24 ± 0.77; P = .034). Comparison of the visual method with specialized MRI techniques corroborates right hippocampal and left frontal cortical, but not mammillary body, tissue changes. Visual examination of brain MRI can detect damage in HF in areas regulating depression and executive function, including the right hippocampus and left frontal cortex. Visual MRI assessment in HF may facilitate evaluation of injury to these structures and the assessment of the impact of potential treatments for this damage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of radioiodinated (2S,{alpha}S)-2-({alpha}-(2-iodophenoxy)benzyl)morpholine as a radioligand for imaging of norepinephrine transporter in the heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiyono, Yasushi [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Radioisotopes Research Laboratory, Kyoto University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)], E-mail: ykiyono@u-fukui.ac.jp; Sugita, Taku [Department of Pathofunctional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Ueda, Masashi [Radioisotopes Research Laboratory, Kyoto University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Kawashima, Hidekazu [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Kanegawa, Naoki; Kuge, Yuji [Department of Pathofunctional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Saji, Hideo [Department of Pathofunctional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2008-02-15

    Introduction: The norepinephrine transporter (NET) is located presynaptically on noradrenergic nerve terminals and plays a critical role in the regulation of the synaptic norepinephrine (NE) concentration via the reuptake of NE. Changes in NET have been recently reported in several cardiac failures. Therefore, a NET-specific radioligand is useful for in vivo assessment of changes in NET density in various cardiac disorders. Recently, we developed a radioiodinated reboxetine analogue, (2S,{alpha}S)-2-({alpha}-(2-iodophenoxy)benzyl)morpholine ((S,S)-IPBM), for NET imaging. In the current study, we assessed the applicability of radioiodinated (S,S)-IPBM to NET imaging in the heart. Methods: The NET affinity and selectivity were measured from the ability to displace specific [{sup 3}H]nisoxetine and (S,S)-[{sup 125}I]IPBM binding to rat heart membrane, respectively. To evaluate the distribution of (S,S)-[{sup 125}I]IPBM in vivo, biodistribution experiment was performed in rats. With the use of several monoamine transporter binding agents, pharmacological blocking experiments were performed in rats. Results: In vitro binding assays showed that the affinity of (S,S)-IPBM to NET was similar to those of the well-known NET-specific binding agents, nisoxetine and desipramine. Furthermore, (S,S)-[{sup 125}I]IPBM binding was inhibited by nisoxetine and desipramine, but not by dopamine or serotonin transporter binding agents. These data indicated that (S,S)-IPBM had high affinity and selectivity for NET in vitro. Biodistribution studies in rats showed rapid and high uptake of (S,S)-[{sup 125}I]IPBM by the heart and rapid clearance from the blood. The heart-to-blood ratio was 31.9 at 180 min after the injection. The administration of nisoxetine and desipramine decreased (S,S)-[{sup 125}I]IPBM accumulation in the heart, but injection of fluoxetine and GBR12909 had little influence. Conclusions: Radioiodinated (S,S)-IPBM is a potential radioligand for NET imaging in the heart.

  17. Breath-hold dark-blood T{sub 2}-weighted MR imaging of the heart. Estimation of optimum preset repetition time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, Toshiharu; Yamada, Naoaki; Yamasaki, Hidetoshi; Kita, Yoshinobu; Fujii, Hiroshi [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    It has recently become possible to obtain T{sub 2}-weighted images using turbo spin echo with a preparation pulse to inhibit the signal from flowing blood (dark blood turbo spin echo: DB-TSE) during breath holding. In order to obtain higher-quality T{sub 2}-weighted images of the heart, we assessed the optimum preset repetition time (TR preset), the interval between the dark blood preparation pulse and the end of data acquisition on DB-TSE. DB-TSE left ventricular short-axis images were obtained with varying TR presets in eight volunteers. Signal intensity was measured for the myocardium and blood in the left ventricular cavity, and the signal intensity ratio of myocardium to blood was calculated. The optimum TR preset was determined so as to give the highest signal intensity ratio of myocardium to blood. A comparison was made of the myocardium-to-blood ratios between the eight volunteers and nine patients. The optimum TR preset changed according to the cardiac cycle. By using the optimum TR preset, we obtained the peak signal intensity ratios in the volunteers and the patients. By using DB-TSE with the optimum TR preset for the cardiac cycle, we can obtain better quality T{sub 2}-weighted images of the heart. (author)

  18. [A study of the process by which a school-age child adapted to body image changes following open-heart surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Heng-Ching; Tsai, Jia-Ling

    2006-10-01

    This case report attempts to explore the adaptive process of body image changes in school-age children suffering from congenital ventricular septal defect (VSD) following open-heart surgery. After establishing trust relationship, we applied atraumatic care, projective communication techniques, interviews, behavioral observation, storytelling and play in our interaction with that child. We found the child experienced "body image disturbance" after open-heart surgery and underwent a four stage adaptive process as follows: (1) Impact (questioning, perception of punishment for wrongdoing, loss, anger); (2) Retreat (denial, anxiety, withdrawal, escaping social contact, inferiority); (3) Acknowledgment (cognitive change, active participation, future-oriented concerns); and (4) Reconstruction (positive self-image, reconstructing body image). Nursing intervention provided the case with more opportunities for sensory feedback and positive reinforcement and also assisted the patient to adopt a positive view of the situation and then to reconstruct and realize the meaning of such surgery. We reinforced the social supporting system to promote self-confidence, self-esteem, and self-value. The child finally accepted the wounds resulting from the operation as a symbol of "bravery"; a breakthrough likely to help in the child's re-entrance to school and normalization of life. Study findings both enhanced pediatric nurse understanding of the adaptive process involved in body image change and provided knowledge essential to designing flexible-option nursing interventions tailored to meet the demands of different adaptation stages. Obviously, such a caring model designed to meet the differing needs of different body image changes has the potential to benefit of body image integration greatly and can provide the pediatric nursing framework in the future.

  19. Eleven fetal echocardiographic planes using 4-dimensional ultrasound with spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC): a logical approach to fetal heart volume analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantarasaengaram, Surasak; Vairojanavong, Kittipong

    2010-09-15

    Theoretically, a cross-sectional image of any cardiac planes can be obtained from a STIC fetal heart volume dataset. We described a method to display 11 fetal echocardiographic planes from STIC volumes. Fetal heart volume datasets were acquired by transverse acquisition from 200 normal fetuses at 15 to 40 weeks of gestation. Analysis of the volume datasets using the described technique to display 11 echocardiographic planes in the multiplanar display mode were performed offline. Volume datasets from 18 fetuses were excluded due to poor image resolution. The mean visualization rates for all echocardiographic planes at 15-17, 18-22, 23-27, 28-32 and 33-40 weeks of gestation fetuses were 85.6% (range 45.2-96.8%, N = 31), 92.9% (range 64.0-100%, N = 64), 93.4% (range 51.4-100%, N = 37), 88.7%(range 54.5-100%, N = 33) and 81.8% (range 23.5-100%, N = 17) respectively. Overall, the applied technique can favorably display the pertinent echocardiographic planes. Description of the presented method provides a logical approach to explore the fetal heart volumes.

  20. Thoracic and heart biometrics of non-anesthetized agouti (Dasyprocta primnolopha Wagler, 1831 measured on radiographic images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaemilia das N. Diniz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The agouti is a species intensively hunted throughout the Amazon and the semi-arid regions of northeastern Brazil. Considering the current trend in conservation management of wild species, the aim of this study was to determine the morphometric reference to the heart of agouti raised in captivity, based on thoracic and cardiac measurements in these animals. Thirty adult agoutis, 1 to 3 years of age, without clinical signs of cardiac disease were selected. The animals were physically restrained and radiographies in laterolateral (LL and ventrodorsal (VD recumbence were produced. The following measures were taken: the apicobasilar length of the heart (at the most cranial height of the Carina region to the heart apex (AB, maximum width of the heart perpendicular to AB (CD, heart inclination angle (AIC, trachea inclination angle (AIT, distance from the right heart wall (DPTd, distance from the left heart wall (DPTe and vertical depth of the thorax, and the ventral face of the vertebral column to the dorsal border of the sternum at the level of the trachea bifurcation (H. The ratios between AB/CD, AB/H and CD/H were also analyzed. To calculate the vertebral heart scale (VHS, the AB and CD measurements were laid over the thoracic vertebra starting at T4. Radiographic evaluation showed values consistent with those reported in small animals and some wild and exotic species. The main biometric values in the chest cavity and heart of agouti are arranged as follows: (1 The ratios between AB/H ratio and CD/H were not sensitive for identifying heart increases (p>0.05, while the ratio AB/CD was more sensitive in this identification (p<0.05; (2 AIC: 21.2±6.4º (mean between male and famale; (3 AIT for males and females: 9.93±3.23° and 8.4±3.94°; (4 DPTd and DPTe for males: 0.97±0.40cm and 0.7±0.30cm; (5 DPTd and DPTe for females: 1.12±0.42cm and 01.02±0.43cm; (6 VHS for males and females: 7.75±0.48v e 7.61±0.34v; (7 The caudal vena cava (CVC was

  1. A prediction model for 5-year cardiac mortality in patients with chronic heart failure using {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Matsuo, Shinro [Kanazawa University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kanazawa (Japan); Nakata, Tomoaki [Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Second Department of Internal Medicine (Cardiology), Sapporo (Japan); Hakodate-Goryoukaku Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Hakodate (Japan); Yamada, Takahisa [Osaka Prefectural General Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Osaka (Japan); Yamashina, Shohei [Toho University Omori Medical Center, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Momose, Mitsuru [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kasama, Shu [Cardiovascular Hospital of Central Japan, Department of Cardiology, Shibukawa (Japan); Matsui, Toshiki [Social Insurance Shiga General Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Otsu (Japan); Travin, Mark I. [Albert Einstein Medical College, Department of Cardiology and Nuclear Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Jacobson, Arnold F. [GE Healthcare, Medical Diagnostics, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Prediction of mortality risk is important in the management of chronic heart failure (CHF). The aim of this study was to create a prediction model for 5-year cardiac death including assessment of cardiac sympathetic innervation using data from a multicenter cohort study in Japan. The original pooled database consisted of cohort studies from six sites in Japan. A total of 933 CHF patients who underwent {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging and whose 5-year outcomes were known were selected from this database. The late MIBG heart-to-mediastinum ratio (HMR) was used for quantification of cardiac uptake. Cox proportional hazard and logistic regression analyses were used to select appropriate variables for predicting 5-year cardiac mortality. The formula for predicting 5-year mortality was created using a logistic regression model. During the 5-year follow-up, 205 patients (22 %) died of a cardiac event including heart failure death, sudden cardiac death and fatal acute myocardial infarction (64 %, 30 % and 6 %, respectively). Multivariate logistic analysis selected four parameters, including New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, age, gender and left ventricular ejection fraction, without HMR (model 1) and five parameters with the addition of HMR (model 2). The net reclassification improvement analysis for all subjects was 13.8 % (p < 0.0001) by including HMR and its inclusion was most effective in the downward reclassification of low-risk patients. Nomograms for predicting 5-year cardiac mortality were created from the five-parameter regression model. Cardiac MIBG imaging had a significant additive value for predicting cardiac mortality. The prediction formula and nomograms can be used for risk stratifying in patients with CHF. (orig.)

  2. Three-dimensional speckle tracking imaging assessment of left ventricular change in patient with coronary heart disease and its correlation with serum indexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Li Fu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the three-dimensional speckle tracking imaging assessment of left ventricular change in patient with coronary heart disease and its correlation with serum indexes. Methods: A total of 152 patients first diagnosed with coronary heart disease were the observation group of the study and 117 healthy subjects were the control group. Threedimensional speckle tracking imaging (3D-STI was used to evaluate the left ventricular function parameters of two groups, the serum content of endothelial function indexes and platelet function indexes were detected, and the correlation between left ventricular function parameters under 3D-STI and serum indexes was further analyzed. Results: Absolute values of left ventricular function parameters LVGLS, LVGRS, LVGCS and LVGAS from 3D-STI of observation group were significantly less than those of control group while Ptw and Torsion levels were greater than those of control group; endothelial function indexes vWF, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1 and ET-1 content in serum were significantly higher than those of control group while vWF-cp and NO content were significantly lower than those of control group; platelet function indexes CD62P, GMP-140, CD63, sP-selectin, sCD40L and PAC-1 content in serum were significantly higher than those of control group. The levels of left ventricular function parameters from 3D-STI in patients with coronary heart disease were directly correlated with serum indexes. Conclusion: 3D-STI can accurately assess the left ventricular function and the overall disease severity in patients with coronary heart disease, and it is expected to become an effective method for early diagnosis of diseases and guidance of clinical treatment.

  3. Multimodal Imaging for In Vivo Evaluation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in a Murine Model of Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Sebastian V; Meier, Martin; Zweigerdt, Robert; Eckardt, Dominik; Rathert, Christian; Schecker, Natalie; Schmitto, Jan D; Rojas-Hernandez, Sara; Martin, Ulrich; Kutschka, Ingo; Haverich, Axel; Martens, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Myocardial stem cell therapy in heart failure is strongly dependent on successful cellular transfer, engraftment, and survival. Moreover, massive cell loss directly after intramyocardial injection is commonly observed, generating the need for efficient longitudinal monitoring of transplanted cells in order to develop more efficient transplantation techniques. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess viability and cardiac retention of induced pluripotent stem cells after intramyocardial delivery using in vivo bioluminescence analysis (BLI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Murine induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were transfected for luciferase reporter gene expression and labeled intracellularly with supraparamagnetic iron oxide particles. Consequently, 5 × 10 5 cells were transplanted intramyocardially following left anterior descending coronary artery ligation in mice. Cardiac iPSCs were detected using BLI and serial T2* sequences by MRI in a 14-day follow-up. Additionally, infarct extension and left ventricular (LV) function were assessed by MRI. Controls received the same surgical procedure without cell injection. MRI sequences showed a strong MRI signal of labeled iPSCs correlating with myocardial late enhancement, demonstrating engraftment in the infarcted area. Mean iPSC volumes were 4.2 ± 0.4 mm 3 at Day 0; 3.1 ± 0.4 mm 3 at Day 7; and 5.1 ± 0.8 mm 3 after 2 weeks. Thoracic BLI radiance decreased directly after injection from 1.0 × 10 6  ± 4.2 × 10 4 (p/s/cm 2 /sr) to 1.0 × 10 5  ± 4.9 × 10 3 (p/s/cm 2 /sr) on Day 1. Afterward, BLI radiance increased to 1.1 × 10 6  ± 4.2 × 10 4 (p/s/cm 2 /sr) 2 weeks after injection. Cardiac graft localization was confirmed by ex vivo BLI analysis and histology. Left ventricular ejection fraction was higher in the iPSC group (30.9 ± 0.9%) compared to infarct controls (24.0 ± 2.1%; P stem cell fate in vivo, enabling cardiac graft localization with

  4. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  5. Optimized imaging quality and radiation dose for coronary artery angiography using 128-slice, dual-source Flash Spiral CT under the natural heart rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Yuejun; Qian Nong; Shao Yanhui; Pan Changjie; Rong Weiliang; Xu Yiqun; Tao Zhiwei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the quality and radiation doses of coronary artery angiography under the natural heart rate condition between Flash spiral heart mode and prospective electrocardiogram- triggering sequence mode using dual-source, in order to choose personalized low doses of coronary artery scanning mode. Methods: Sixty patients who underwent coronary angiography (CTA) on a 128-slice, dual- source CT scanner were divided into 2 group i.e, group A (27 cases) and group B (33 cases). Flash spiral heart scan mode was employed for group A. Inclusion criteria included: heart rate 75 bpm), date acquisition was set at 30%-50% of the R-R interval. (3) At the arrhythmias, premature beat, fibrillation atrial, date acquisition was set at 20%-90% of the R-R interval. In both groups, patients with a BMI ≥ 25.0 kg/m 2 were examined with a tube voltage of 120 kV, while the other patients with a BMI 2 were examined with a tube voltage of 100 kV. The BMI was (24.6±1.0) kg/m 2 in group A, while that was (24.6±0.9) kg/m 2 in group B. In both groups, all images were transferred to the workstation for further processing and analysis. The imaging quality of coronary artery segments and the radiation dose were compared with t test. Results: A total of 336 coronary artery segments were evaluated in group A and 412 segments were evaluated in group B. The imaging quality of coronary artery segments were scored. Excellent or good was achieved in 98.2% (330 of 336) artery segments in group A, and that was 98.1% (404 of 412) in group B. There was no statistical difference in imaging quality between the two groups (t=0.513, P=0.608). The average effective dose was (0.74±0.29) mSv in group A, whereas that was (3.67± 1.37) mSv in group B. There was a significant difference between the two groups (t=-10.858, P= 0.000). Conclusions: The personalized low doses coronary artery scanning mode can substantially reduce radiation damage while preserving good imaging quality. (authors)

  6. Image based cardiac acceleration map using statistical shape and 3D+t myocardial tracking models; in-vitro study on heart phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashaei, Ali; Piella, Gemma; Planes, Xavier; Duchateau, Nicolas; de Caralt, Teresa M.; Sitges, Marta; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2013-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that the acceleration signal has potential to monitor heart function and adaptively optimize Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) systems. In this paper, we propose a non-invasive method for computing myocardial acceleration from 3D echocardiographic sequences. Displacement of the myocardium was estimated using a two-step approach: (1) 3D automatic segmentation of the myocardium at end-diastole using 3D Active Shape Models (ASM); (2) propagation of this segmentation along the sequence using non-rigid 3D+t image registration (temporal di eomorphic free-form-deformation, TDFFD). Acceleration was obtained locally at each point of the myocardium from local displacement. The framework has been tested on images from a realistic physical heart phantom (DHP-01, Shelley Medical Imaging Technologies, London, ON, CA) in which the displacement of some control regions was known. Good correlation has been demonstrated between the estimated displacement function from the algorithms and the phantom setup. Due to the limited temporal resolution, the acceleration signals are sparse and highly noisy. The study suggests a non-invasive technique to measure the cardiac acceleration that may be used to improve the monitoring of cardiac mechanics and optimization of CRT.

  7. Imaging technique and current status of valvular heart disease using cardiac MRI; Untersuchungstechniken und Stellenwert der MRT bei der Diagnostik von Herzklappenerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotz, J.; Sohns, J.M. [Universitaetsmedizin Goettingen, Georg-August-Universitaet, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Goettingen (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    The main indications for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of valvular heart disease are pathologies of the aortic and pulmonary valve. For mitral and tricuspid valve pathologies MRI is not the first line modality as these are usually well visualized by echocardiography. The advantages of MRI in valvular heart disease are a high reliability in the evaluation of ventricular volumes and function as well as the assessment of the perivalvular arterial or atrial structures. This reliability and the limitless access to any imaging plane partially compensates for the lower temporal and spatial resolution in comparison to echocardiography. In patients with congenital heart disease, cardiac MRI is established as a valuable diagnostic tool in daily clinical management, especially for the evaluation of pulmonary valve defects. Nevertheless, echocardiography remains the first-line diagnostic imaging tool for the foreseeable future. (orig.) [German] Die Untersuchung der Herzklappen in der MRT umfasst derzeit v. a. die Aorten- und Pulmonalisklappe. Pathologien der atrioventrikulaeren Klappen bilden demgegenueber nur selten die zentrale Fragestellung einer kardialen MRT-Untersuchung, da diese normalerweise einer echokardiographischen Untersuchung gut zugaenglich sind. Die Staerke der MRT ist die hohe Zuverlaessigkeit, mit der neben der Klappenmorphologie und -funktion die Funktionsparameter des jeweiligen Ventrikels und die Morphologie der nachgeschalteten Arterien bestimmt werden koennen. Dadurch kann die MRT die prinzipielle Schwaeche in der Orts- und Zeitaufloesung gegenueber der Echokardiographie teilweise kompensieren. Bei Patienten mit kongenitalen Herzvitien ist die MRT-basierte Klappendiagnostik fester Bestandteil des klinischen Managements. Das gilt besonders fuer die Evaluation der Pulmonalisklappe. Die Echokardiographie bleibt absehbar die Modalitaet der ersten Wahl fuer die Klappendiagnostik am Herzen. (orig.)

  8. Cardiac neuronal imaging with 123I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine in heart failure: implications of endpoint selection and quantitative analysis on clinical decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petretta, Mario; Pellegrino, Teresa; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    There are a number of radiopharmaceuticals that can be used to investigate autonomic neuronal functions. Among these, the norepinephrine analogue meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) labelled with 123 I has been widely used and validated as a marker of adrenergic neuron function. The first study addressing the prognostic value of 123 I-MIBG imaging in heart failure (HF) was that of Merlet et al. in 90 patients suffering from either ischaemic or idiopathic cardiomyopathy. After publication of this study, more recent studies have indicated that patients with HF and decreased late heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratio or increased myocardial MIBG washout have a worse prognosis than those with normal quantitative myocardial MIBG parameters. However, MIBG scintigraphy has still to reach widespread clinical application mainly because of the value of other cheaper variables such as left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) plasma levels. The possibility that the detection of mechanical dyssynchrony by innervation imaging might identify patients who would benefit from resynchronization pacing is another area of research interest. In 2010, the landmark AdreView Myocardial Imaging for Risk Evaluation in Heart Failure (ADMIRE-HF) study was published. This trial consisted of two identical open-label phase III studies enrolling patients in 96 sites in North America and Europe to provide prospective validation of the prognostic role of quantitation of sympathetic cardiac innervation using MIBG. The primary endpoint was the relationship between late HIM ratio and time-to-occurrence of the first event among a combination of HF progression, potentially life-threatening arrhythmic event, and cardiac death. The authors found that a HIM ratio <1.6 provided prognostic information beyond LV ejection fraction, BNP, and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class at the time of enrolment. In a recent article in this journal, Parker et al. present the results

  9. Cardiac neuronal imaging with {sup 123}I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine in heart failure: implications of endpoint selection and quantitative analysis on clinical decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petretta, Mario [University Federico II, Department of Translational Medicine, Naples (Italy); Pellegrino, Teresa [National Council of Research, Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, Naples (Italy); Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2014-09-15

    There are a number of radiopharmaceuticals that can be used to investigate autonomic neuronal functions. Among these, the norepinephrine analogue meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) labelled with {sup 123}I has been widely used and validated as a marker of adrenergic neuron function. The first study addressing the prognostic value of {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging in heart failure (HF) was that of Merlet et al. in 90 patients suffering from either ischaemic or idiopathic cardiomyopathy. After publication of this study, more recent studies have indicated that patients with HF and decreased late heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratio or increased myocardial MIBG washout have a worse prognosis than those with normal quantitative myocardial MIBG parameters. However, MIBG scintigraphy has still to reach widespread clinical application mainly because of the value of other cheaper variables such as left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) plasma levels. The possibility that the detection of mechanical dyssynchrony by innervation imaging might identify patients who would benefit from resynchronization pacing is another area of research interest. In 2010, the landmark AdreView Myocardial Imaging for Risk Evaluation in Heart Failure (ADMIRE-HF) study was published. This trial consisted of two identical open-label phase III studies enrolling patients in 96 sites in North America and Europe to provide prospective validation of the prognostic role of quantitation of sympathetic cardiac innervation using MIBG. The primary endpoint was the relationship between late HIM ratio and time-to-occurrence of the first event among a combination of HF progression, potentially life-threatening arrhythmic event, and cardiac death. The authors found that a HIM ratio <1.6 provided prognostic information beyond LV ejection fraction, BNP, and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class at the time of enrolment. In a recent article in this journal, Parker et al. present

  10. Effect of a novel motion correction algorithm (SSF) on the image quality of coronary CTA with intermediate heart rates: Segment-based and vessel-based analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qianwen, E-mail: qianwen18@126.com; Li, Pengyu, E-mail: lipyu818@gmail.com; Su, Zhuangzhi, E-mail: suzhuangzhi@xwh.ccmu.edu.cn; Yao, Xinyu, E-mail: 314985151@qq.com; Wang, Yan, E-mail: wy19851121@126.com; Wang, Chen, E-mail: fskwangchen@gmail.com; Du, Xiangying, E-mail: duxying_xw@163.com; Li, Kuncheng, E-mail: kuncheng.li@gmail.com

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • SSF provided better image quality than single-sector and bi-sector reconstruction among the intermediate heart rates (65–75 bpm). • Evidence for the application of prospective ECG-triggered coronary CTA with SSF onto an expanded heart rate range. • Information about the inconsistent effectiveness of SSF among the segments of coronary artery. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the effect of SnapShot Freeze (SSF) reconstruction at an intermediate heart-rate (HR) range (65–75 bpm) and compare this method with single-sector reconstruction and bi-sector reconstruction on segmental and vessel bases in retrospective coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Materials and methods: Retrospective electrocardiogram-gated CCTA was performed on 37 consecutive patients with HR between 65 and 75 bpm using a 64-row CT scanner. Retrospective single-sector reconstruction, bi-sector reconstruction, and SSF were performed for each patient. Multi-phase single-sector reconstruction was performed to select the optimal phase. SSF and bi-sector images were also reconstructed at the optimal phase. The images were interpreted in an intent-to-diagnose fashion by two experienced readers using a 5-point scale, with 3 points as diagnostically acceptable. Image quality among the three reconstruction groups were compared on per-patient, per-vessel, and per-segment bases. Results: The average HR of the enrolled patients was 69.4 ± 2.7 bpm. A total of 111 vessels and 481 coronary segments were assessed. SSF provided significantly higher interpretability of the coronary segments than bi-sector reconstructions. The qualified and excellent rates of SSF (97.9% and 82.3%) were significantly higher than those of single-sector (92.9% and 66.3%) and bi-sector (90.9% and 64.7%) reconstructions. The image quality score (IQS) using SSF was also significantly higher than those of single-sector and bi-sector reconstructions both on per-patient and per-vessel bases. On per

  11. ST segment/heart rate slope as a predictor of coronary artery disease: comparison with quantitative thallium imaging and conventional ST segment criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkelhor, R.S.; Newhouse, K.E.; Vrobel, T.R.; Miron, S.D.; Bahler, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    The ST segment shift relative to exercise-induced increments in heart rate, the ST/heart rate slope (ST/HR slope), has been proposed as a more accurate ECG criterion for diagnosing significant coronary artery disease (CAD). Its clinical utility, with the use of a standard treadmill protocol, was compared with quantitative stress thallium (TI) and standard treadmill criteria in 64 unselected patients who underwent coronary angiography. The overall diagnostic accuracy of the ST/HR slope was an improvement over TI and conventional ST criteria (81%, 67%, and 69%). For patients failing to reach 85% of their age-predicted maximal heart rate, its diagnostic accuracy was comparable with TI (77% and 74%). Its sensitivity in patients without prior myocardial infarctions was equivalent to that of thallium (91% and 95%). The ST/HR slope was directly related to the angiographic severity (Gensini score) of CAD in patients without a prior infarction (r = 0.61, p less than 0.001). The ST/HR slope was an improved ECG criterion for diagnosing CAD and compared favorably with TI imaging

  12. The role of indium-111 antimyosin (Fab) imaging as a noninvasive surveillance method of human heart transplant rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Nardo, D.; Scibilia, G.; Macchiarelli, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    The identification of rejection after heart transplantation in patients receiving cyclosporine immunosuppressive therapy requires the endomyocardial biopsy, an invasive method associated with a finite morbidity. To evaluate the role of indium-111 antimyosin (Fab) scintigraphy as a noninvasive surveillance method of heart transplant rejection, the Fab fragment of murine monoclonal antimyosin antibodies labeled with indium-111 was administered intravenously in 30 scintigraphic studies to 10 consecutive heart transplant recipients. Endomyocardial biopsy specimens were obtained 72 hours after each scintigraphic study. Nineteen scintigraphic studies had negative findings; no false negative finding was obtained. Eleven antimyosin scintigraphic studies had positive findings, and in these studies endomyocardial biopsy revealed mild rejection in two cases, moderate acute rejection with myocyte necrosis in two cases, myocyte necrosis as a consequence of ischemic injury in six cases, and possibly cytotoxic damage in one case. Antimyosin scintigraphy may represent a reliable screening method for the surveillance of heart transplant patients. In the presence of a negative finding from antimyosin scintigraphy, it may be possible to avoid endomyocardial biopsy. Conversely, in patients who have a positive finding from antimyosin scintigraphy, the endomyocardial biopsy is mandatory to establish the definitive diagnosis by histologic examination of the myocardium

  13. The Potential of Clinical Phenotyping of Heart Failure With Imaging Biomarkers for Guiding Therapies: A Focused Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Partho P; Kramer, Christopher M; Narula, Jagat; Dilsizian, Vasken

    2017-09-01

    The need for noninvasive assessment of cardiac volumes and ejection fraction (EF) ushered in the use of cardiac imaging techniques in heart failure (HF) trials that investigated the roles of pharmacological and device-based therapies. However, in contrast to HF with reduced EF (HFrEF), modern HF pharmacotherapy has not improved outcomes in HF with preserved EF (HFpEF), largely attributed to patient heterogeneity and incomplete understanding of pathophysiological insights underlying the clinical presentations of HFpEF. Modern cardiac imaging methods offer insights into many sets of changes in cardiac tissue structure and function that can precisely link cause with cardiac remodeling at organ and tissue levels to clinical presentations in HF. This has inspired investigators to seek a more comprehensive understanding of HF presentations using imaging techniques. This article summarizes the available evidence regarding the role of cardiac imaging in HF. Furthermore, we discuss the value of cardiac imaging techniques in identifying HF patient subtypes who share similar causes and mechanistic pathways that can be targeted using specific HF therapies. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of Gated SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging with Echocardiography for the Measurement of Left Ventricular Volumes and Ejection Fraction in Patients With Severe Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaeifard, Maryam; Ghaedian, Tahereh; Yaghoobi, Nahid; Malek, Hadi; Firoozabadi, Hasan; Bitarafan-Rajabi, Ahmad; Haghjoo, Majid; Amin, Ahmad; Azizian, Nasrin; Rastgou, Feridoon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is known as a feasible tool for the measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) and volumes, which are of great importance in the management and follow-up of patients with coronary artery diseases. However, considering the technical shortcomings of SPECT in the presence of perfusion defect, the accuracy of this method in heart failure patients is still controversial. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to compare the results from gated SPECT MPI with those from echocardiography in heart failure patients to compare echocardiographically-derived left ventricular dimension and function data to those from gated SPECT MPI in heart failure patients. Patients and Methods: Forty-one patients with severely reduced left ventricular systolic function (EF ≤ 35%) who were referred for gated SPECT MPI were prospectively enrolled. Quantification of EF, end-diastolic volume (EDV), and end-systolic volume (ESV) was performed by using quantitative gated spect (QGS) (QGS, version 0.4, May 2009) and emory cardiac toolbox (ECTb) (ECTb, revision 1.0, copyright 2007) software packages. EF, EDV, and ESV were also measured with two-dimensional echocardiography within 3 days after MPI. Results: A good correlation was found between echocardiographically-derived EF, EDV, and ESV and the values derived using QGS (r = 0.67, r = 0.78, and r = 0.80 for EF, EDV, and ESV, respectively; P echocardiography. ECTb-derived EDV was also significantly higher than the EDV measured with echocardiography and QGS. The highest correlation between echocardiography and gated SPECT MPI was found for mean values of ESV different. Conclusions: Gated SPECT MPI has a good correlation with echocardiography for the measurement of left ventricular EF, EDV, and ESV in patients with severe heart failure. However, the absolute values of these functional parameters from echocardiography and gated

  15. The Correlation between Left and Right Ventricular Ejection Fractions in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease, Documented by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Eshraghi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The correlation between right and left ventricular ejection fractions (RVEF and LVEF, respectively has been studied in only a small number of patients with a marked decrease in RVEF and LVEF. The aim of the present study was to compare LVEF and RVEF in patients with ischemic heart disease. RVEF and LVEF were measured by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR imaging. Materials and Methods: This observational study was done in Ghaem general hospital in 2014.  LVEF and RVEF were measured in a series of 33 patients with ischemic heart disease, undergoing CMR for the evaluation of myocardial viability. The correlation between RVEF and LVEF in patients with ischemic heart disease was studied, using Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient analysis.   This study was done in Ghaem general hospital in 2014 with simple sapling. Results: Right ventricular end diastolic volume (186.33±58.90 and left ventricular end diastolic volume (121.72±61.64 were significantly correlated (r=0.223, P=0.005. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between right ventricular end systolic volume (88.18±40.90 and left ventricular end systolic volume (140.96±35.33 (r=0.329, P=0.000. The most significant association was observed between RVEF and LVEF (r=0.913, P=0.000. Conclusion: Based on the findings, RVEF and LVEF were significantly correlated in patients with ischemic heart disease, although this association was not always present in all cardiac patients. The cause of this discrepancy is still unknown.

  16. Determination of the survival rate in patients with congestive heart failure stratified by 123I-MIBG imaging. A meta-analysis from the studies performed in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwabara, Yoichi; Tamaki, Nagara; Nakata, Tomoaki; Yamashina, Shohei; Yamazaki, Junichi

    2011-01-01

    The goals of this meta-analysis were to determine survival rates in patients with heart failure (HF) assessed by 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging results using recently published studies and to determine the prognostic value of 123 I-MIBG imaging. We reviewed published cohort studies carried out in Japan that compared the prognosis of patients with their 123 I-MIBG activity quantified as late heart-to-mediastinum ratio (H/M) or washout rate by performing a PubMed search for articles in English up to December 2006. Studies were selected if they analyzed a clearly defined lethal outcome (cardiovascular death) using life tables to estimate the odds ratio at 24 months after enrollment. Of 158 articles related to cardiac 123 I-MIBG, seven referred to studies that met the inclusion criteria: 5 evaluated H/M via 123 I-MIBG in a total of 866 patients and 4 calculated washout rate in a total of 491 patients. A low H/M indicated a high risk of cardiac death: pooled odds ratio, 5.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) of 3.1-5.7. A high washout was also associated with lethal events with a pooled odds ratio of 2.8 (CI: 1.6-5.0). The association between washout and cardiac death was heterogeneous (Chi-square=11.0, P 123 I-MIBG studies conducted in Japan indicated that both a decreased cardiac 123 I-MIBG activity (H/M) and an increased washout rate are indicative of a poor prognosis in patients with chronic heart failure. (author)

  17. Prognostic value of repeated {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy with congestive heart failure before and after optimized treatments. Comparison with neurohumoral factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, Toshiki; Tsutamoto, Takayoshi; Maeda, Keiko; Kusukawa, Junya; Kinoshita, Masahiko [Shiga Univ. of Medical Science, Otsu (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess whether repeated measurement of cardiac {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging parameters before and after optimized treatments is useful for predicting the prognosis of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) resulting from dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The subjects were 85 consecutive patients with DCM who had a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of less than 45%. The MIBG and the concentrations of neurohumoral factors were measured at baseline and after 6 months of optimized treatments. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed to assess the various parameters before and after treatment. Twenty-three patients had a cardiac event (12 died; 11 hospitalized) during a mean follow-up period of 2 years. Although there was no difference between the baseline heart to mediastinum (H/M) ratio measured by MIBG between survivors and nonsurvivors, the H/M ratio was significantly decreased in nonsurvivors after 6 months. Multivariate analysis revealed that a high plasma concentration of brain natriuretic peptide level after 6 months (p=0.0049) and absolute changes in the H/M ratio (p=0.0046) were independent predictors of mortality. Comparison of the H/M ratio on MIBG imaging before and after optimized additional treatment provided useful information for predicting mortality and was independent of clinical and neurohumoral factors previously shown to be associated with poor prognosis in patients with DCM. (author)

  18. Comparative binding characteristics of Tc-CPI, Tc-TBI, and Tc-MIBI in cultured heart cells: Correlation with biochemical analysis and animal images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwnica-Worms, D.; Kronauge, J.F.; Holman, B.L.; Davison, A.; Jones, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Hexakis (isonitrile)technetium (I) complexes are a new class of cationic, lipophilic myocaridal perfusion imaging agents. To better understand their cellular mechanisms of uptake and washout, chick heart cells grown in culture were used as a model myocardial system. Tc-MIBI showed uptake to a plateau at a rate similar to Tc-CPI (t1/2 = 4.1 +- 0.7 minutes); however, the plateau was 63% greater. Tc-TBI uptake approached a plateau 900% greater than Tc-CPI binding. Heart cell studies showed washout of Tc-CPI>Tc-TBI>Tc-MIBI, which correlated with kinetic analysis of rabbit myocardial images. Biochemical in vitro analysis in human plasma demonstrated 75% enzymatic ester hydrolysis of Tc-CPI by 3 minutes, but no hydrolysis of Tc-TBI and Tc-MIBI. The results suggest that metabolism of the ester function of Tc-CPI following myocardial uptake may in part account for the more rapid cellular washout rates of Tc-CPI compared with Tc-TBI and Tc-MIBI

  19. MIBG scintigraphy of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, M.; Weiss, M.

    2009-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system plays an important role in cardiovascular physiology. Planar MIBG with or without SPECT can be used to visualize the sympathetic innervation of the heart and the abnormalities in innervation caused by, for example, ischemia, heart failure, and arrhythmogenic disorders. Furthermore, cardiac neuronal imaging allows early detection of autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus. Assessment of sympathetic nerve activity in patients with heart failure has been shown to provide important prognostic information, and cardiac neuronal imaging can potentially identify patients who are at increased risk of sudden death. Moreover, therapeutic effects of different treatment strategies can be evaluated by imaging. To establish the clinical utility of cardiac neuronal imaging, it will be necessary to determine the incremental value of innervation imaging to triage heart failure patients to medical therapy, CRT (with or without ICD), or heart transplantation. (orig.)

  20. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  1. Heart Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  2. Relationship between lung-to-heart uptake ratio of technetium-99m-tetrofosmin during exercise myocardial single photon emission computed tomographic imaging and the number of diseased coronary arteries in patients with effort angina pectoris without myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okajima, Toshiya; Ueshima, Kenji; Nishiyama, Osamu; Ogawa, Muneyoshi; Ohuchi, Mami; Saitoh, Masahiko; Hiramori, Katsuhiko

    2004-01-01

    Increased lung uptake of thallium-201 in exercise myocardial perfusion imaging is a reliable marker of multivessel disease in patients with ischemic heart disease. This study investigated whether the lung-to-heart uptake ratio with technetium-99m ( 99m Tc)-tetrofosmin also provides valuable information to detect patients with multivessel disease. Fifty-three consecutive patients (35 men, 18 women, mean age 66±11 years; single-vessel disease: 29, double-vessel disease: 16, triple-vessel disease: 8) with stable effort angina pectoris without prior myocardial infarction and 17 control subjects (12 men, 5 women, mean age 62±9 years) underwent exercise myocardial perfusion imaging with 99m Tc-tetrofosmin and coronary angiography in January 2000 to December 2002. The lung-to-heart uptake ratio was calculated on an anterior projection before reconstruction of the exercise single photon emission computed tomographic images. The mean lung-to-heart uptake ratio was 0.34±0.04, 0.38±0.07, 0.41±0.05, and 0.46±0.09, in patients with normal coronary, single-vessel disease, double-vessel disease, and triple-vessel disease, respectively. Significantly higher lung-to-heart uptake ratio was associated with more diseased vessels (p 99m Tc-tetrofosmin can provide clinically useful information to detect multivessel disease in patients with ischemic heart disease. (author)

  3. Prospective Heart Tracking for Whole-heart Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghari, Mehdi H.; Geva, Tal; Powell, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop a prospective respiratory-gating technique (Heart-NAV) for use with contrast-enhanced 3D inversion recovery (IR) whole-heart magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) acquisitions that directly tracks heart motion without creating image inflow artifact. Methods With Heart-NAV, 1 of the startup pulses for the whole-heart steady-state free precession MRA sequence is used to collect the centerline of k-space, and its 1-dimensional reconstruction is fed into the standard diaphragm-navigator (NAV) signal analysis process to prospectively gate and track respiratory-induced heart displacement. Ten healthy volunteers underwent non-contrast whole-heart MRA acquisitions using the conventional diaphragm-NAV and Heart-NAV with 5 and 10 mm acceptance windows in a 1.5T scanner. Five patients underwent contrast-enhanced IR whole-heart MRA using a diaphragm-NAV and Heart-NAV with a 5 mm acceptance window. Results For non-contrast whole-heart MRA with both the 5 and 10 mm acceptance windows, Heart-NAV yielded coronary artery vessel sharpness and subjective visual scores that were not significantly different than those using a conventional diaphragm-NAV. Scan time for Heart-NAV was 10% shorter (p<0.05). In patients undergoing contrast-enhanced IR whole-heart MRA, inflow artifact was seen with the diaphragm-NAV but not with Heart-NAV. Conclusion Compared to a conventional diaphragm-NAV, Heart-NAV achieves similar image quality in a slightly shorter scan time and eliminates inflow artifact. PMID:26843458

  4. Evaluation of pulmonary hypertension and surgical therapeutic efficacy using first-pass radionuclide pulmonary perfusion imaging in patients with pulmonary hypertension of valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xuemei; Shi Rongfang; Fang Wei; Wang Daoyu; Zhou Baogui; Wang Qi; Pan Shiwei

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate pulmonary hypertension (PH) and surgical therapeutic efficacy using first-pass radionuclide pulmonary perfusion imaging (FPPPI) and pulmonary perfusion imaging (PPI) in patients with PH of valvular heart disease. Methods: One hundred and sixteen patients with valvular disease were included in the study. Swan-Ganz catheterization, echocardiography, FPPPI and PPI were performed on all patients before surgery. The patients were divided into four groups. Results: 1) Correlation coefficients were 0.856, 0.503 and 0.572 (P<0.01) between lung equilibrium time (LET) by FPPPI, superior lung/low lung ratio (S/L) by PPI , systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (SPAP) from echocardiography and SPAP from the catheter manometer. 2)The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PAP using FPPPI measuring were 94.7%, 68.3% and 85.3%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PAP using PPI measuring were 78.8%, 52.8% and 70.7%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PAP using FPPPI plus PPI measuring were 96.4%, 72.7% and 89.7%, respectively. 3)LET by FPPPI before surgery and 5-14 d after surgery were (27.71 ± 10.85) and (20.96 ± 6.25) s, respectively (P<0.001). SPL by PPI were 1.43 ± 0.41 and 1.30 ± 0.35, respectively (P<0.001). 4) Complete improvement rates of LET in the PAP slightly risen group, moderately risen group and weightily risen group were 47.6%, 34.5% and 1/4, respectively; part improvement rates of LET for corresponding groups were 40.5%, 62.1% and 3/4, respectively (P<0.001). Complete improvement rates of SPL were 31.0%, 34.5% and 0/4, respectively; part improvement rates of SPL were 35.7%, 55.2% and 3/4, respectively (P<0.05). Complete improvement rates of LET + SPL were 57.1%, 58.6% and 1/4; part improvement rates of LET+SPL were 38.1%, 41.4% and 3/4, respectively (P<0.01). Conclusions: 1)FPPPI is better than PPI and echocardiography for evaluating PH in valvular heart disease. 2)Combined FPPPI and PPI can

  5. Evaluation of image quality and radiation dose at prospective ECG-triggered axial 256-slice multi-detector CT in infants with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Mei-ping; Liang, Chang-hong; Zhao, Zhen-jun; Liu, Hui; Li, Jing-lei; Zhang, Jin-e; Cui, Yan-hai; Yang, Lin; Liu, Qi-shun [Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangdong General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou (China); Ivanc, Thomas B.; Vembar, Mani [Philips Healthcare, CT Clinical Science, Highland Heights, OH (United States)

    2011-07-15

    There are a limited number of reports on the technical and clinical feasibility of prospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) in infants with congenital heart disease (CHD). To evaluate image quality and radiation dose at weight-based low-dose prospectively gated 256-slice MDCT angiography in infants with CHD. From November 2009 to February 2010, 64 consecutive infants with CHD referred for pre-operative or post-operative CT were included. All were scanned on a 256-slice MDCT system utilizing a low-dose protocol (80 kVp and 60-120 mAs depending on weight: 60 mAs for {<=}3 kg, 80 mAs for 3.1-6 kg, 100 mAs for 6.1-10 kg, 120 mAs for 10.1-15 kg). No serious adverse events were recorded. A total of 174 cardiac deformities, confirmed by surgery or heart catheterization, were studied. The sensitivity of MDCT for cardiac deformities was 97.1%; specificity, 99.4%; accuracy, 95.9%. The mean heart rate during scan was 136.7 {+-} 14.9/min (range, 91-160) with a corresponding heart rate variability of 2.8 {+-} 2.2/min (range, 0-8). Mean scan length was 115.3 {+-} 11.7 mm (range, 93.6-143.3). Mean volume CT dose index, mean dose-length product and effective dose were 2.1 {+-} 0.4 mGy (range, 1.5-2.8), 24.7 {+-} 5.9 mGy.cm (range, 14.7-35.8) and 1.6 {+-} 0.3 mSv (range, 1.1-2.5), respectively. Diagnostic-quality images were achieved in all cases. Satisfactory diagnostic quality for visualization of all/proximal/distal coronary artery segments was achieved in 88.4/98.8/80.0% of the scans. Low-dose prospectively gated axial 256-slice CT angiography is a valuable tool in the routine clinical evaluation of infants with CHD, providing a comprehensive three-dimensional evaluation of the cardiac anatomy, including the coronary arteries. (orig.)

  6. Fusion of CT coronary angiography and whole-heart dynamic 3D cardiac MR perfusion: building a framework for comprehensive cardiac imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Spiczak, Jochen; Manka, Robert; Gotschy, Alexander; Oebel, Sabrina; Kozerke, Sebastian; Hamada, Sandra; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a framework for 3D fusion of CT coronary angiography (CTCA) and whole-heart dynamic 3D cardiac magnetic resonance perfusion (3D-CMR-Perf) image data-correlating coronary artery stenoses to stress-induced myocardial perfusion deficits for the assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD). Twenty-three patients who underwent CTCA and 3D-CMR-Perf for various indications were included retrospectively. For CTCA, image quality and coronary diameter stenoses > 50% were documented. For 3D-CMR-Perf, image quality and stress-induced perfusion deficits were noted. A software framework was developed to allow for 3D image fusion of both datasets. Computation steps included: (1) fully automated segmentation of coronary arteries and heart contours from CT; (2) manual segmentation of the left ventricle in 3D-CMR-Perf images; (3) semi-automatic co-registration of CT/CMR datasets; (4) projection of the 3D-CMR-Perf values on the CT left ventricle. 3D fusion analysis was compared to separate inspection of CTCA and 3D-CMR-Perf data. CT and CMR scans resulted in an image quality being rated as good to excellent (mean scores 3.5 ± 0.5 and 3.7 ± 0.4, respectively, scale 1-4). 3D-fusion was feasible in all 23 patients, and perfusion deficits could be correlated to culprit coronary lesions in all but one case (22/23 = 96%). Compared to separate analysis of CT and CMR data, coronary supply territories of 3D-CMR-Perf perfusion deficits were refined in two cases (2/23 = 9%), and the relevance of stenoses in CTCA was re-judged in four cases (4/23 = 17%). In conclusion, 3D fusion of CTCA/3D-CMR-Perf facilitates anatomic correlation of coronary lesions and stress-induced myocardial perfusion deficits thereby helping to refine diagnostic assessment of CAD.

  7. Impact of aging on cardiac sympathetic innervation measured by {sup 123}I-mIBG imaging in patients with systolic heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rengo, Giuseppe; Ferrara, Nicola [Scientific Institute of Telese Terme, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Telese Terme (Italy); University of Naples Federico II, Division of Geriatrics, Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Pagano, Gennaro; Formisano, Roberto; Komici, Klara; Petraglia, Laura; Parisi, Valentina; Femminella, Grazia Daniela; De Lucia, Claudio; Cannavo, Alessandro; Memmi, Alessia; Leosco, Dario [University of Naples Federico II, Division of Geriatrics, Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Vitale, Dino Franco [Scientific Institute of Telese Terme, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Telese Terme (Italy); Paolillo, Stefania [Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, SDN Foundation, Naples (Italy); Attena, Emilio [Fatebenefratelli Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Naples (Italy); Pellegrino, Teresa [Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages of the National Council of Research, Naples (Italy); Federico II University of Naples, Division of Imaging, Radiotherapy, Neuroradiology, and Medical Physics, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Dellegrottaglie, Santo [Ospedale Medico-Chirurgico Accreditato Villa dei Fiori, Division of Cardiology, Acerra, Naples (Italy); Trimarco, Bruno; Filardi, Pasquale Perrone [Federico II University of Naples, Division of Cardiology, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Cuocolo, Alberto [Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, SDN Foundation, Naples (Italy); Federico II University of Naples, Division of Imaging, Radiotherapy, Neuroradiology, and Medical Physics, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    Sympathetic nervous system (SNS) hyperactivity is a salient characteristic of chronic heart failure (HF) and contributes to the progression of the disease. Iodine-123 meta-iodobenzylguanidine ({sup 123}I-mIBG) imaging has been successfully used to assess cardiac SNS activity in HF patients and to predict prognosis. Importantly, SNS hyperactivity characterizes also physiological ageing, and there is conflicting evidence on cardiac {sup 123}I-mIBG uptake in healthy elderly subjects compared to adults. However, little data are available on the impact of ageing on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity assessed by {sup 123}I-mIBG scintigraphy, in patients with HF. We studied 180 HF patients (age = 66.1 ± 10.5 years [yrs]), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF = 30.6 ± 6.3 %) undergoing cardiac {sup 123}I-mIBG imaging. Early and late heart to mediastinum (H/M) ratios and washout rate were calculated in all patients. Demographic, clinical, and echocardiographic data were also collected. Our study population consisted of 53 patients aged >75 years (age = 77.7 ± 4.0 year), 67 patients aged 62-72 years (age = 67.9 ± 3.2 years) and 60 patients aged ≤61 year (age = 53.9 ± 5.6 years). In elderly patients, both early and late H/M ratios were significantly lower compared to younger patients (p < 0.05). By multivariate analysis, H/M ratios (both early and late) and washout rate were significantly correlated with LVEF and age. Our data indicate that, in a population of HF patients, there is an independent age-related effect on cardiac SNS innervation assessed by {sup 123}I-mIBG imaging. This finding suggests that cardiac {sup 123}I-mIBG uptake in patients with HF might be affected by patient age. (orig.)

  8. 3 tesla magnetic resonance imaging in children and adults with congenital heart disease; 3-Tesla-Magnetresonanztomographie zur Untersuchung von Kindern und Erwachsenen mit angeborenen Herzfehlern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voges, I.; Hart, C.; Kramer, H.H.; Rickers, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Klinik fuer angeborene Herzfehler und Kinderkardiologie, Kiel (Germany); Jerosch-Herold, M. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston (United States); Helle, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Institut fuer Neuroradiologie, Kiel (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has become a routinely used imaging modality for congenital heart disease. A CMR examination allows the assessment of thoracic anatomy, global and regional cardiac function, blood flow in the great vessels and myocardial viability and perfusion. In the clinical routine cardiovascular MRI is mostly performed at field strengths of 1.5 Tesla (T). Recently, magnetic resonance systems operating at a field strengths of 3 T became clinically available and can also be used for cardiovascular MRI. The main advantage of CMR at 3 T is the gain in the signal-to-noise ratio resulting in improved image quality and/or allowing higher acquisition speed. Several further differences compared to MRI systems with lower field strengths have to be considered for practical applications. This article describes the impact of CMR at 3 T in patients with congenital heart disease by meanings of methodical considerations and case studies. (orig.) [German] Die kardiovaskulaere Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) hat sich zu einer etablierten bildgebenden Methode zur Untersuchung von Patienten mit angeborenen Herzfehlern entwickelt. Sie erlaubt in einer einzigen Untersuchung die exakte Beurteilung von Anatomie, globaler und regionaler Funktion, Blutfluessen sowie der myokardialen Perfusion und Vitalitaet. In der klinischen Routine erfolgen die Untersuchungen zumeist bei einer Feldstaerke von 1,5 Tesla (T), mittlerweile gibt es jedoch Geraete und Bildgebungstechniken, die die kardiovaskulaere MRT auch bei 3 T ermoeglichen. Der wesentliche Vorteil der MRT bei 3 T ist das hoehere Signal-zu-Rausch-Verhaeltnis, das sowohl zu einer Verbesserung der Bildqualitaet als auch zu einer Verkuerzung der Untersuchungszeit genutzt werden kann. Darueber hinaus bestehen verschiedene andere Unterschiede gegenueber Systemen mit niedriger Feldstaerke, die im praktischen Einsatz beachtet werden muessen. Dieser Artikel beschreibt die Erfahrungen der 3-T-MRT fuer die

  9. Valvular Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrsic, Zorana; Hopkins, Scott P; Antevil, Jared L; Mullenix, Philip S

    2018-03-01

    This article outlines the diagnosis and management of commonly occurring valvular heart diseases for the primary care provider. Basic understanding of pathologic murmurs is important for appropriate referral. Echocardiography is the gold standard for diagnosis and severity grading. Patients with progressive valvular heart disease should be followed annually by cardiology and imaging should be performed based on the severity of valvular dysfunction. Surgery or intervention is recommended only when symptoms dictate or when changes in left ventricular function occur. Surgery or intervention should be performed after discussion by a heart team, including cardiologists and cardiac surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Functional radioanatomy of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhonov, K.B.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive data on radioanatomy of the heart and main vessels as applied to standard projections are presented. Anatomic structure evolution during heart cycle is described. A current trend towards complex examination of the heart and minor circulation vessels is illustrated, including digital roentgenography, digital subtraction angiography, nmr imaging, computerized tomography, radioisotope examination of the heart and positron emission tomography. Data testifying to essential effect of resperation phase and patient's placement on X-ray picture of the heart and blood flow in the lungs. 291 refs.; 131 figs

  11. Evaluation of single right atrial volume and function with magnetic resonance imaging in children with hypoplastic left heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijarnsorn, Chodchanok [University of Alberta, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Stollery Children' s Hospital, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Mahidol University, Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok (Thailand); Myers, Kimberley; Patton, David J. [Alberta Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Calgary, AB (Canada); Noga, Michelle; Crawley, Cinzia; Tham, Edythe [University of Alberta, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Stollery Children' s Hospital, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Standardized methods to evaluate atrial properties in single ventricles are lacking. To determine the feasibility of quantifying right atrial volumes and function in hypoplastic left heart using MRI. We studied 15 infants with hypoplastic left heart prior to Glenn surgery (mean age 4.2 months [standard deviation 0.3]) who underwent cardiac MRI with evaluation of atrial volumes and emptying fraction using monoplane two-chamber, monoplane four-chamber, and biplane methods, all of which were compared to the atrial short-axial oblique stack method. We compared atrial end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume and emptying fraction among these methods. We analyzed reproducibility of the methods using Bland-Altman plots. Both four-chamber and biplane methods showed high correlations for atrial end-diastolic volume (r = 0.7 and r = 0.8, respectively; P < 0.01) and end-systolic volume (r = 0.8 and r = 0.9, respectively; P < 0.01) with small mean differences (-0.2 ± 2.9 standard deviation [SD] ml and -0.8 ± 1.6 ml, respectively, for atrial end-diastolic volume and -0.8 ± 1.5 ml and -0.9 ± 0.9 ml, respectively, for atrial end-systolic volume). The short-axial oblique method was the most reproducible, followed by the four-chamber method. MRI assessment of atrial volume and function is feasible in hypoplastic left heart and might provide further insight into single-ventricle mechanics. (orig.)

  12. Identification of Pulmonary Hypertension Caused by Left-Sided Heart Disease (World Health Organization Group 2) Based on Cardiac Chamber Volumes Derived From Chest CT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviram, Galit; Rozenbaum, Zach; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Berliner, Shlomo; Topilsky, Yan; Fleischmann, Dominik; Sung, Yon K; Zamanian, Roham T; Guo, Haiwei Henry

    2017-10-01

    Evaluations of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) commonly include chest CT imaging. We hypothesized that cardiac chamber volumes calculated from the same CT scans can yield additional information to distinguish PH related to left-sided heart disease (World Health Organization group 2) from other PH subtypes. Patients who had PH confirmed by right heart catheterization and contrast-enhanced chest CT studies were enrolled in this retrospective multicenter study. Cardiac chamber volumes were calculated using automated segmentation software and compared between group 2 and non-group 2 patients with PH. This study included 114 patients with PH, 27 (24%) of whom were classified as group 2 based on their pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. Patients with group 2 PH exhibited significantly larger median left atrial (LA) volumes (118 mL vs 63 mL; P volumes (90 mL vs 76 mL; P = .02), and smaller median right ventricular (RV) volumes (173 mL vs 210 mL; P = .005) than did non-group 2 patients. On multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex, and mean pulmonary arterial pressure, group 2 PH was significantly associated with larger median LA and LV volumes (P volume ratios of RA/LA, RV/LV, and RV/LA (P = .001, P = .004, and P volumes demonstrated a high discriminatory ability for group 2 PH (area under the curve, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.870-0.968). Volumetric analysis of the cardiac chambers from nongated chest CT scans, particularly with findings of an enlarged left atrium, exhibited high discriminatory ability for identifying patients with PH due to left-sided heart disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Macroscopic fluorescence imaging: a novel technique to monitor retention and distribution of injected microspheres in an experimental model of ischemic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Andreas; Rojas, Sebastian V; Baraki, Hassina; Rathert, Christian; Schecker, Natalie; Hernandez, Sara Rojas; Schwanke, Kristin; Zweigerdt, Robert; Martin, Ulrich; Saito, Shunsuke; Haverich, Axel; Kutschka, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    The limited effectiveness of cardiac cell therapy has generated concern regarding its clinical relevance. Experimental studies show that cell retention and engraftment are low after injection into ischemic myocardium, which may restrict therapy effectiveness significantly. Surgical aspects and mechanical loss are suspected to be the main culprits behind this phenomenon. As current techniques of monitoring intramyocardial injections are complex and time-consuming, the aim of the study was to develop a fast and simple model to study cardiac retention and distribution following intramyocardial injections. For this purpose, our main hypothesis was that macroscopic fluorescence imaging could adequately serve as a detection method for intramyocardial injections. A total of 20 mice underwent ligation of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) for myocardial infarction. Fluorescent microspheres with cellular dimensions were used as cell surrogates. Particles (5 × 10(5)) were injected into the infarcted area of explanted resting hearts (Ex vivo myocardial injetions EVMI, n = 10) and in vivo into beating hearts (In vivo myocardial injections IVMI, n = 10). Microsphere quantification was performed by fluorescence imaging of explanted organs. Measurements were repeated after a reduction to homogenate dilutions. Cardiac microsphere retention was 2.78 × 10(5) ± 0.31 × 10(5) in the EVMI group. In the IVMI group, cardiac retention of microspheres was significantly lower (0.74 × 10(5) ± 0.18 × 10(5); pfluorescence imaging revealed venous drainage through the coronary sinus, resulting in a microsphere accumulation in the left (0.90 × 10(5) ± 0.20 × 10(5)) and the right (1.07 × 10(5) ± 0.17 × 10(5)) lung. Processing to homogenates involved further particle loss (pfluorescence imaging method for biodistribution analysis which enabled the quantification of fluorescent microspheres after intramyocardial delivery using macroscopic fluorescence imaging. This new technique

  14. Heart Truth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health! Get a free badge or banner to post to your website or blog. Are you at risk for heart disease? Here's how to find out . Planning to use The Heart Truth logo? Check out our logo guidelines and downloads. ...

  15. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it may be caused by diseases, such as connective tissue disorders, excessive iron buildup in your body (hemochromatosis), the buildup of abnormal proteins (amyloidosis) or by some cancer treatments. Causes of heart infection A heart infection, ...

  16. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... family history of heart attack race – African Americans, Mexican Americans, Native Americans, and native Hawaiians are at ... Your doctor will prescribe the medicines that are right for you. If you have had a heart ...

  17. Clinical application of heart rate-synchronized myocardial SPECT with {sup 99m}Tc-labeled imaging agents for myocardial blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Uehara, Toshiisa; Fukuchi, Kazuki; Tsujimura, Eiichiro; Hasegawa, Shinji; Ito, Yasushi; Hashimoto, Katsuji; Matsuda, Shinichi; Yutani, Kenji [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Biomedical Research Center

    1996-11-01

    Application of gated SPECT to assess multiple heart functions simultaneously in authors` facility was reported. The myocardial SPECT at rest was performed 1 hr after intravenous administration of 740 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi with Toshiba 3-detector type gamma camera GCA9300/HG. R wave monitored by ECG was used as a trigger to record images of 360deg direction (90 sec/6deg direction, 20 directions x 3). Data were processed by Toshiba GMS-5500A or Hitachi-Medico RW3000. Percent CI (count increase at a myocardial region) was calculated by =(ES-ED)=/ED x 100, where ES and ED were computed by circumferential profile analysis of reconstruction images at the end-systole and end-diastole stages, respectively. Left ventricular ejection fraction was calculated from %AC (area change between areas of left ventricle at end-systolic and -diasystolic stages). Ventricular wall-motion was assessed by bullet display of the gated SPECT images. The present procedure is expected to be widely used as a routine test of the myocardial functions and is beneficial from a viewpoint of cost/performance. (K.H.)

  18. Heart pacemaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiac pacemaker implantation; Artificial pacemaker; Permanent pacemaker; Internal pacemaker; Cardiac resynchronization therapy; CRT; Biventricular pacemaker; Arrhythmia - pacemaker; Abnormal heart ...

  19. Image quality of ct angiography using model-based iterative reconstruction in infants with congenital heart disease: Comparison with filtered back projection and hybrid iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Qianjun, E-mail: jiaqianjun@126.com [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Radiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Catheterization Lab, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of South China Structural Heart Disease, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Zhuang, Jian, E-mail: zhuangjian5413@tom.com [Department of Cardiac Surgery, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of South China Structural Heart Disease, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Jiang, Jun, E-mail: 81711587@qq.com [Department of Radiology, Shenzhen Second People’s Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong (China); Li, Jiahua, E-mail: 970872804@qq.com [Department of Catheterization Lab, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of South China Structural Heart Disease, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Huang, Meiping, E-mail: huangmeiping_vip@163.com [Department of Catheterization Lab, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of South China Structural Heart Disease, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Liang, Changhong, E-mail: cjr.lchh@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2017-01-15

    Purpose: To compare the image quality, rate of coronary artery visualization and diagnostic accuracy of 256-slice multi-detector computed tomography angiography (CTA) with prospective electrocardiographic (ECG) triggering at a tube voltage of 80 kVp between 3 reconstruction algorithms (filtered back projection (FBP), hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose{sup 4}) and iterative model reconstruction (IMR)) in infants with congenital heart disease (CHD). Methods: Fifty-one infants with CHD who underwent cardiac CTA in our institution between December 2014 and March 2015 were included. The effective radiation doses were calculated. Imaging data were reconstructed using the FBP, iDose{sup 4} and IMR algorithms. Parameters of objective image quality (noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR)); subjective image quality (overall image quality, image noise and margin sharpness); coronary artery visibility; and diagnostic accuracy for the three algorithms were measured and compared. Results: The mean effective radiation dose was 0.61 ± 0.32 mSv. Compared to FBP and iDose{sup 4}, IMR yielded significantly lower noise (P < 0.01), higher SNR and CNR values (P < 0.01), and a greater subjective image quality score (P < 0.01). The total number of coronary segments visualized was significantly higher for both iDose{sup 4} and IMR than for FBP (P = 0.002 and P = 0.025, respectively), but there was no significant difference in this parameter between iDose{sup 4} and IMR (P = 0.397). There was no significant difference in the diagnostic accuracy between the FBP, iDose{sup 4} and IMR algorithms (χ{sup 2} = 0.343, P = 0.842). Conclusions: For infants with CHD undergoing cardiac CTA, the IMR reconstruction algorithm provided significantly increased objective and subjective image quality compared with the FBP and iDose{sup 4} algorithms. However, IMR did not improve the diagnostic accuracy or coronary artery visualization compared with iDose{sup 4}.

  20. 31P-MR spectroscopy of all regions of the human heart at 1.5 T with acquisition-weighted chemical shift imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koestler, H.; Beer, M.; Buchner, S.; Sandstede, J.; Pabst, T.; Kenn, W.; Hahn, D.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: Aim of this study was to show whether or not acquisition-weighted chemical shift imaging (AW-CSI) allows the determination of PCr and ATP in the lateral and posterior wall of the human heart at 1.5 T. Methods: 12 healthy volunteers were examined using a conventional chemical shift imaging (CSI) and an AW-CSI. The sequences differed only in the number of repetitions for each point in k space. A hanning function was used as filter function leading to 7 repetitions in the center of the k space and 0 in the corners. Thus, AW-CSI had the same resolution as the CSI sequence. The results for both sequences were analyzed using identically positioned voxels in the septal, anterior, lateral and posterior wall. Results: The determined averaged AW-CSI signal to noise ratios were higher for PCr by a factor of 1.3 and for ATP by 1.4 than those of CSI. The PCr/ATP ratios were higher by a factor of 1.2 - 1.3 and showed a smaller standard deviation in all locations for AW-CSI. The mean PCr/ATP ratios determined by AW-CSI of septal, lateral and posterior wall were almost identical (1.72 - 1.76), while it was higher in the anterior wall (1.9). Conclusions: The reduced contamination in AW-CSI improves the signal to noise ratio and the determination of the PCr/ATP ratio in cardiac 31 P spectroscopy compared to CSI with the same resolution. The results in volunteers indicate that AW-CSI renders 31 P spectroscopy of the lateral and posterior wall of the human heart feasible for patient studies at 1.5 T. (orig.) [de

  1. Normal values for myocardial deformation within the right heart measured by feature-tracking cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boyang; Dardeer, Ahmed M; Moody, William E; Edwards, Nicola C; Hudsmith, Lucy E; Steeds, Richard P

    2018-02-01

    Reproducible and repeatable assessment of right heart function is vital for monitoring congenital and acquired heart disease. There is increasing evidence for the additional value of myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) in determining prognosis. This study aims to determine the reproducibility of deformation analyses in the right heart using cardiovascular magnetic resonance feature tracking (FT-CMR); and to establish normal ranges within an adult population. A cohort of 100 healthy subjects containing 10 males and 10 females from each decade of life between the ages of 20 and 70 without known congenital or acquired cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidaemia or renal, hepatic, haematologic and systemic inflammatory disorders underwent FT-CMR assessment of right ventricular (RV) and right atrial (RA) myocardial strain and strain rate. RV longitudinal strain (Ell) was -21.9±3.24% (FW+S Ell) and -24.2±3.59% (FW-Ell). Peak systolic strain rate (S') was -1.45±0.39s -1 (FW+S) and -1.54±0.41s -1 (FW). Early diastolic strain rate (E') was 1.04±0.26s -1 (FW+S) and 1.04±0.33s -1 (FW). Late diastolic strain rate (A') was 0.94±0.33s -1 (FW+S) and 1.08±0.33s -1 (FW). RA peak strain was -21.1±3.76%. The intra- and inter-observer ICC for RV Ell (FW+S) was 0.92 and 0.80 respectively, while for RA peak strain was 0.92 and 0.89 respectively. Normal values of RV & RA deformation for healthy individuals using FT-CMR are provided with good RV Ell and RA peak strain reproducibility. Strain rate suffered from sub-optimal reproducibility and may not be satisfactory for clinical use. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. 16-Channel surface coil for 13C-hyperpolarized spectroscopic imaging of cardiac metabolism in pig heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frijia, Francesca; Santarelli, Maria Filomena; Koellisch, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate and its metabolites in large animal models is a powerful tool for assessing cardiac metabolism in patho-physiological conditions. In 13C studies, a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is crucial to overcome the intrinsic data quality...... both targets. In this study, a 16-channel receive surface coil was designed for 13C hyperpolarized studies of the pig heart with a clinical 3-T scanner. The coil performance was characterized by phantom experiments and compared with that of a birdcage coil used in transmit/receive mode. Segmental...... of the 16-channel coil is recommended for studies of septal and anterior LV walls....

  3. Evaluation of the metabolism in rat hearts of two new radioiodinated 3-methyl-branched fatty acid myocardial imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrose, K R; Owen, B A; Goodman, M M; Knapp, Jr, F F

    1987-01-01

    The biological fate of two new radioiodinated 3-methyl-branched fatty acids has been evaluated in rat hearts following intravenous administration. Methyl-branching was introduced in (15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-R,S-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) and 15-(p-iodophenyl)-3,3-dimethylpentadecanoic acid (DMIPP) to inhibit ..beta..-oxidation. The goals of these studies were to correlate the effects of methyl-branching on the incorporation of these agents into the various fatty acid pools and subcellular distribution profiles, and to relate these data to the myocardial retention properties. The properties of BMIPP and DMIPP were compared with the 15-(p-iodophenyl)pentadecanoic acid straight-chain analogue (IPP). Differences in the heart retention of the analogues after intravenous administration in rats correlated with differences observed in subcellular distribution patterns. The dimethyl DMIPP analogue showed the longest retention and the highest association with the mitochondrial and microsomal fractions (34%, 38%) 30 min after injection. These data are in contrast to the rapid clearance of the straight-chain IPP analogue which showed much lower relative association with the mitochondria and microsomes (18%, 15%). The distribution patterns of each analogue in the various lipid pools appeared consistent with the expected capacity of the analogues to be metabolized by ..beta..-oxidation. In contrast to the rapid oxidation of the straight-chain IPP analogue, the 3-monomethyl BMIPP analogue appeared to undergo slower oxidation and clearance, whereas the dimethyl-branched DMIPP analogue was apparatently not catabolized by the myocardium. All three analogues showed some incorporation into triglycerides. The metabolism patterns of the branched analogues reported here may provide useful information in the description of the mechanisms by which BMIPP and DMIPP are retained in rat myocardium.

  4. Automated flow quantification in valvular heart disease based on backscattered Doppler power analysis: implementation on matrix-array ultrasound imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Thomas; Hwang, Shawn M; Plicht, Björn; Mucci, Ronald A; Hunold, Peter; Erbel, Raimund; Levine, Robert A

    2008-06-01

    Cardiac ultrasound imaging systems are limited in the noninvasive quantification of valvular regurgitation due to indirect measurements and inaccurate hemodynamic assumptions. We recently demonstrated that the principle of integration of backscattered acoustic Doppler power times velocity can be used for flow quantification in valvular regurgitation directly at the vena contracta of a regurgitant flow jet. We now aimed to accomplish implementation of automated Doppler power flow analysis software on a standard cardiac ultrasound system utilizing novel matrix-array transducer technology with detailed description of system requirements, components and software contributing to the system. This system based on a 3.5 MHz, matrix-array cardiac ultrasound scanner (Sonos 5500, Philips Medical Systems) was validated by means of comprehensive experimental signal generator trials, in vitro flow phantom trials and in vivo testing in 48 patients with mitral regurgitation of different severity and etiology using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for reference. All measurements displayed good correlation to the reference values, indicating successful implementation of automated Doppler power flow analysis on a matrix-array ultrasound imaging system. Systematic underestimation of effective regurgitant orifice areas >0.65 cm(2) and volumes >40 ml was found due to currently limited Doppler beam width that could be readily overcome by the use of new generation 2D matrix-array technology. Automated flow quantification in valvular heart disease based on backscattered Doppler power can be fully implemented on board a routinely used matrix-array ultrasound imaging systems. Such automated Doppler power flow analysis of valvular regurgitant flow directly, noninvasively, and user independent overcomes the practical limitations of current techniques.

  5. 201Tl heart studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    At the annual meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine there was a preponderance of papers dealing with the heart. The most impressive papers detailed the use of monovalent cation 201 Tl in the evaluation of coronary artery disease. Thallium-201 behaves like potassium in that it enters heart muscle quickly and persists in that organ for several hours. It is unlike most radioactive potassium analogues used for heart studies in that: (1) its gamma energy peaks (69 keV and 80 keV) are more easily collimated with resultant image improvement, (2) its physical half life of 72 hours is sufficiently short to attain high counting rates without too much radiation and is sufficiently long so that storage is not prohibitive, (3) its short half life and lack of Beta radiation results in lower radiation to the patient, and (4) its uptake in heart is greater and uptake in liver and stomach less than other potassium analogues

  6. Significance of increased lung thallium-201 activity on serial cardiac images after dipyridamole treatment in coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, R.D.; Dai, Y.H.; Boucher, C.A.; Pohost, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Increased lung thallium-201 (Tl-201) activity occurs in patients with severe coronary artery disease (CAD) on initial postexercise images. To determine the significance of assessing lung Tl-201 on serial imaging after dipyridamole therapy, initial and delayed (2 to 3 hours) Tl-201 imaging was performed in 40 patients with CAD and 26 normal control subjects. Lung Tl-201 activity was quantitated as a percentage of maximal myocardial activity for each imaging time (lung Tl-201 index). The mean initial lung Tl-201 activity was 42 +/- 2% (+/- standard error of the mean) in 26 control subjects, 56 +/- 2% in 25 patients with 2- or 3-vessel CAD (p less than 0.001) and 53 +/- 2% in 15 patients with 1-vessel CAD (p less than 0.005 compared with control subjects) (difference not significant between 1-vessel and multivessel CAD). Dipyridamole lung Tl-201 activity decreased relative to the myocardium from initial to delayed images (p less than 0.001) in patients with CAD but not in control subjects. When a dipyridamole lung Tl-201 index of 58% (mean +/- 2 standard deviations for control subjects) was chosen as the upper limit of normal, 14 of 40 of the CAD patients (35%) had abnormal values and all control patients had values within normal limits. These 14 patients with CAD and abnormal initial lung Tl-201 indexes had rest ejection fractions that were not significantly different from those in patients with CAD, and normal initial dipyridamole lung Tl-201 index (58 +/- 4% and 63 +/- 2%, respectively)

  7. Differentiation of early from advanced coronary atherosclerotic lesions: systematic comparison of CT, intravascular US, and optical frequency domain imaging with histopathologic examination in ex vivo human hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurovich-Horvat, Pál; Schlett, Christopher L; Alkadhi, Hatem; Nakano, Masataka; Stolzmann, Paul; Vorpahl, Marc; Scheffel, Hans; Tanaka, Atsushi; Warger, William C; Maehara, Akiko; Ma, Shixin; Kriegel, Matthias F; Kaple, Ryan K; Seifarth, Harald; Bamberg, Fabian; Mintz, Gary S; Tearney, Guillermo J; Virmani, Renu; Hoffmann, Udo

    2012-11-01

    To establish an ex vivo experimental setup for imaging coronary atherosclerosis with coronary computed tomographic (CT) angiography, intravascular ultrasonography (US), and optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) and to investigate their ability to help differentiate early from advanced coronary plaques. All procedures were performed in accordance with local and federal regulations and the Declaration of Helsinki. Approval of the local Ethics Committee was obtained. Overall, 379 histologic cuts from nine coronary arteries from three donor hearts were acquired, coregistered among modalities, and assessed for the presence and composition of atherosclerotic plaque. To assess the discriminatory capacity of the different modalities in the detection of advanced lesions, c statistic analysis was used. Interobserver agreement was assessed with the Cohen κ statistic. Cross sections without plaque at coronary CT angiography and with fibrous plaque at OFDI almost never showed advanced lesions at histopathologic examination (odds ratio [OR]: 0.02 and 0.06, respectively; both Padvanced lesions (OR: 2.49, P=.0003; OR: 2.60, P=.002; and OR: 31.2, Padvanced lesions than intravascular US and coronary CT angiography (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.858 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 0.802, 0.913], 0.631 [95% CI: 0.554, 0.709], and 0.679 [95% CI: 0.618, 0.740]; respectively, Padvanced coronary plaques. © RSNA, 2012

  8. Prognostic value of systolic mitral annular velocity measured with Doppler tissue imaging in patients with chronic heart failure caused by left ventricular systolic dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, N P; Loh, P H; de Silva, R; Ghosh, J; Khaleva, O Y; Goode, K; Rigby, A S; Alamgir, F; Clark, A L; Cleland, J G F

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess the prognostic value of various conventional and novel echocardiographic indices in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) caused by left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction. Methods 185 patients with a mean (SD) age of 67 (11) years with CHF and LV ejection fraction < 45% despite optimal pharmacological treatment were prospectively enrolled. The patients underwent two dimensional echocardiography with tissue harmonic imaging to assess global LV systolic function and obtain volumetric data. Transmitral flow was assessed with conventional pulse wave Doppler. Systolic (Sm), early, and late diastolic mitral annular velocities were measured with the use of colour coded Doppler tissue imaging. Results During a median follow up of 32 months (range 24–38 months in survivors), 34 patients died and one underwent heart transplantation. Sm velocity (hazard ratio (HR) 0.648, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.463 to 0.907, p  =  0.011), diastolic arterial pressure (HR 0.965, 95% CI 0.938 to 0.993, p  =  0.015), serum creatinine (HR 1.006, 95% CI 1.001 to 1.011, p  =  0.023), LV ejection fraction (HR 0.945, 95% CI 0.899 to 0.992, p  =  0.024), age (HR 1.035, 95% CI 1.000 to 1.071, p  =  0.052), LV end systolic volume index (HR 1.009, 95% CI 0.999 to 1.019, p  =  0.067), and restrictive pattern of transmitral flow (HR 0.543, 95% CI 0.278 to 1.061, p  =  0.074) predicted the outcome of death or transplantation on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, only Sm velocity (HR 0.648, 95% CI 0.460 to 0.912, p  =  0.013) and diastolic arterial pressure (HR 0.966, 95% CI 0.938 to 0.994, p  =  0.016) emerged as independent predictors of outcome. Conclusions In patients with CHF and LV systolic dysfunction despite optimal pharmacological treatment, the strongest independent echocardiographic predictor of prognosis was Sm velocity measured with quantitative colour coded Doppler tissue

  9. Accelerated cardiovascular magnetic resonance of the mouse heart using self-gated parallel imaging strategies does not compromise accuracy of structural and functional measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörries Carola

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-gated dynamic cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR enables non-invasive visualization of the heart and accurate assessment of cardiac function in mouse models of human disease. However, self-gated CMR requires the acquisition of large datasets to ensure accurate and artifact-free reconstruction of cardiac cines and is therefore hampered by long acquisition times putting high demands on the physiological stability of the animal. For this reason, we evaluated the feasibility of accelerating the data collection using the parallel imaging technique SENSE with respect to both anatomical definition and cardiac function quantification. Results Findings obtained from accelerated data sets were compared to fully sampled reference data. Our results revealed only minor differences in image quality of short- and long-axis cardiac cines: small anatomical structures (papillary muscles and the aortic valve and left-ventricular (LV remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI were accurately detected even for 3-fold accelerated data acquisition using a four-element phased array coil. Quantitative analysis of LV cardiac function (end-diastolic volume (EDV, end-systolic volume (ESV, stroke volume (SV, ejection fraction (EF and LV mass in healthy and infarcted animals revealed no substantial deviations from reference (fully sampled data for all investigated acceleration factors with deviations ranging from 2% to 6% in healthy animals and from 2% to 8% in infarcted mice for the highest acceleration factor of 3.0. CNR calculations performed between LV myocardial wall and LV cavity revealed a maximum CNR decrease of 50% for the 3-fold accelerated data acquisition when compared to the fully-sampled acquisition. Conclusions We have demonstrated the feasibility of accelerated self-gated retrospective CMR in mice using the parallel imaging technique SENSE. The proposed method led to considerably reduced acquisition times, while preserving high

  10. I-123-mIBG myocardial imaging for assessment of risk for a major cardiac event in heart failure patients: insights from a retrospective European multicenter study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, Denis [CHU Cote de Nacre, Caen (France); Verberne, Hein J. [Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Burchert, Wolfgang [Ruhr University Bochum, Institute of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Heart and Diabetes Center NRW, Bad Oeyenhausen (Germany); Knuuti, Juhani [Turku University Central Hospital, Turku (Finland); Povinec, Pavol [Comenius University School of Medicine, Bratislava (Slovakia); Sambuceti, Gianmario [University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Unlu, Mustafa [Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey); Estorch, Montserrat [Hospital Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Banerjee, Gopa; Jacobson, Arnold F. [GE Healthcare, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Single-center experiences have shown that myocardial meta-iodobenzylguanidine (mIBG) uptake has prognostic value in heart failure (HF) patients. To verify these observations using a rigorous clinical trial methodology, a retrospective review and prospective quantitative reanalysis was performed on a series of cardiac {sup 123}I-mIBG scans acquired during a 10-year period at six centers in Europe. {sup 123}I-mIBG scans obtained on 290 HF patients [(262 with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) < 50%)] from 1993 to 2002 were reanalyzed using a standardized methodology to determine the heart-to-mediastinum ratio (H/M) on delayed planar images. All image results were verified by three independent reviewers. Major cardiac events [MCEs; cardiac death, cardiac transplant, potentially fatal arrhythmia (including implantable cardioverter-defibrillator discharge)] during 24-month follow-up were confirmed by an adjudication committee. MCEs occurred in 67 patients (26%): mean H/M ratio was 1.51 {+-} 0.30 for the MCE group and 1.97 {+-} 0.54 for the non-MCE group (p < 0.001). Two-year event-free survival using an optimum H/M ratio threshold of 1.75 was 62% for H/M ratio less than 1.75, 95% for H/M ratio greater than or equal to 1.75 (p < 0.0001). Logistic regression showed H/M ratio and LVEF as the only significant predictors of MCE. Using the lower and upper H/M quartiles of 1.45 and 2.17 as high- and very low-risk thresholds, 2-year event-free survival rates were 52% and 98%, respectively. Among patients with LVEF {<=} 35% and H/M {>=} 1.75 (n = 73), there were nine MCEs because of progressive HF and only one because of an arrhythmia. Application of a clinical trial methodology via the retrospective reanalysis of {sup 123}I-mIBG images confirms the previously reported prognostic value of this method in HF patients, including potential identification of a quantitative threshold for low risk for cardiac mortality and potentially fatal ventricular arrhythmias. (orig.)

  11. Image noise-based dose adaptation in dynamic volume CT of the heart: dose and image quality optimisation in comparison with BMI-based dose adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odedra, Devang [Queen' s University, School of Medicine, Kingston, ON (Canada); Blobel, Joerg [Toshiba Medical Systems Europe BV, Zoetermeer (Netherlands); University of Toronto, Division of Cardiothoracic Imaging, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); AlHumayyd, Saad; Durand, Miranda; Jimenez-Juan, Laura; Paul, Narinder [University of Toronto, Division of Cardiothoracic Imaging, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-01-15

    To compare the image quality and radiation dose using image-noise (IN)-based determination of X-ray tube settings compared with a body mass index (BMI)-based protocol during CT coronary angiography (CTCA). Two hundred consecutive patients referred for CTCA to our institution were divided into two groups: BMI-based, 100 patients had CTCA with the X-ray tube current adjusted to the patient's BMI while maintaining a fixed tube potential of 120 kV; IN-based, 100 patients underwent imaging with the X-ray tube current and voltage adjusted to the IN measured within the mid-left ventricle on a pre-acquisition trans-axial image. Two independent cardiac radiologists performed blinded image quality assessment with quantification of the IN and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) from the mid-LV and qualitative assessment using a three-point score. Radiation dose (CTDI and DLP) was recorded from the console. Results showed: IN (HU): BMI-based, 30.1 ± 9.9; IN-based, 33.1 ± 6.7; 32 % variation reduction (P = 0.001); SNR: BMI-based, 18.6 ± 7.1; IN-based, 15.4 ± 3.7; 48 % variation reduction (P < 0.0001). Visual scores: BMI-based, 2.3 ± 0.6; IN-based, 2.2 ± 0.5 (P = 0.54). Radiation dose: CTDI (mGy), BMI-based, 22.68 ± 8.9; IN-based, 17.16 ± 7.6; 24.3 % reduction (P < 0.001); DLP (mGy.cm), BMI-based, 309.3 ± 127.5; IN-based, 230.6 ± 105.5; 25.4 % reduction (P < 0.001). Image-noise-based stratification of X-ray tube parameters for CTCA results in 32 % improvement in image quality and 25 % reduction in radiation dose compared with a BMI-based protocol. (orig.)

  12. CMR in Heart Failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Sado, D. M.; Hasleton, J. M.; Herrey, A. S.; Moon, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Heart Failure (HF) is a common syndrome with multiple causes. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is a medical imaging technique with significant advantages, allowing the understanding of aetiology and pathophysiology of HF in the individual patient, permitting specific therapy to be administered and predicting prognosis. This paper discusses the diverse role of CMR in HF.

  13. Heart regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckwoldt, Kaja; Weinberger, Florian; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Echocardiographic Assessment of Left Ventricular Function in Healthy Horses and in Horses with Heart Disease Using Pulsed-Wave Tissue Doppler Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, T R; Mitchell, K J; Schwarzwald, C C

    2017-03-01

    Assessment of left ventricular (LV) function by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) is not well established in horses with heart disease. To describe the use of pulsed-wave (PW) TDI for the assessment of LV function, establish reference intervals, investigate effects of mitral regurgitation (MR), aortic regurgitation (AR), and primary myocardial disease (MD), and provide proof of concept for the use of PW TDI in Warmblood horses with heart disease. Thirty healthy horses, 38 horses with MR, 25 with AR, 8 with MD. Echocardiograms were retrospectively analyzed. Reference intervals were calculated. PW TDI indices of healthy horses and horses with MR, AR, and MD were compared by one-way ANOVA and Dunnett's test. A complete set of PW TDI variables could be obtained in 94 of 101 horses. Variables corresponding to isovolumic intervals were most difficult to measure. Valvular regurgitation influenced variables describing isovolumic contraction and ejection. Horses with MD had significantly shortened ET m (-118.5 [-154.1 to -82.9] ms; mean difference [95% CI of difference of means]), increased PEP m /ET m (0.11 [0.05 to 0.17]), prolonged IMP m (0.28 [0.18 to 0.37]), increased S 1 (8.9 [5.2 to 12.6] cm/s), and decreased E 1 (-2.6 [-4.7 to -0.5] cm/s), E m (-14.2 [-19.9 to -8.5] cm/s), and E m /A m ratio (-1.6 [-2.6 to -0.6]). Pulsed-wave TDI might be useful for detection of LV dysfunction in horses with primary MD. The clinical value of TDI in horses with MR and AR remains uncertain. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  15. Three-dimensional echocardiography in various types of heart disease: a comparison study of magnetic resonance imaging and 64-slice computed tomography in a real-world population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squeri, Angelo; Censi, Stefano; Reverberi, Claudio; Gaibazzi, Nicola; Baldelli, Marco; Binno, Simone Maurizio; Properzi, Enrico; Bosi, Stefano

    2017-03-01

    Accurate quantification of left ventricular (LV) volumes [end-diastolic volume (EDV) and end-systolic volume (ESV)] and ejection fraction (EF) is of critical importance. The development of real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE) has shown better correlation than two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. The aim of our study was to assess the accuracy of RT3DE and 64-slice computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of LV volumes and function using MRI as the reference standard in a real-world population with various types of heart disease with different chamber geometry. The study population consisted of 66 patients referred for cardiac MRI for various pathologies. All patients underwent cardiac MRI, and RT3DE and 64 slices CT were then performed on a subsequent day. The study population was then divided into 5 clinical groups depending on the underlying heart disease. RT3DE volumes correlated well with MRI values (R 2 values: 0.90 for EDV and 0.94 for ESV). RT3DE measurements of EF correlated well with MRI values (R 2  = 0.86). RT3DE measurements resulted in slightly underestimated values of both EDV and ESV, as reflected by biases of -9.18 and -4.50 mL, respectively. Comparison of RT3DE and MRI in various types of cardiomyopathies showed no statistical difference between different LV geometrical patterns. These results confirm that RT3DE has good accuracy in everyday clinical practice and can be of clinical utility in all types of cardiomyopathy independently of LV geometric pattern, LV diameter or wall thickness, taking into account a slight underestimation of LV volumes and EF compared to MRI.

  16. Influence of trigger type, tube voltage and heart rate on calcified plaque imaging in dual source cardiac computed tomography: phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penzkofer, Tobias; Donandt, Eva; Isfort, Peter; Allmendinger, Thomas; Kuhl, Christiane K; Mahnken, Andreas H; Bruners, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the impact of high pitch cardiac CT vs. retrospective ECG gated CT on the quantification of calcified vessel stenoses, with assessment of the influence of tube voltage, reconstruction kernel and heart rate. A 4D cardiac movement phantom equipped with three different plaque phantoms (12.5%, 25% and 50% stenosis at different calcification levels), was scanned with a 128-row dual source CT scanner, applying different trigger types (gated vs. prospectively triggered high pitch), tube voltages (100-120 kV) and heart rates (50–90 beats per minute, bpm). Images were reconstructed using different standard (B26f, B46f, B70f) and iterative (I26f, I70f) convolution kernels. Absolute and relative plaque sizes were measured and statistically compared. Radiation dose associated with the different methods (gated vs. high pitch, 100 kV vs. 120 kV) were compared. Compared to the known diameters of the phantom plaques and vessels both CT-examination techniques overestimated the degrees of stenoses. Using the high pitch CT-protocol plaques appeared larger (0.09 ± 0.31 mm, 2 ± 8 percent points, PP) in comparison to the ECG-gated CT-scans. Reducing tube voltage had a similar effect, resulting in higher grading of the same stenoses by 3 ± 8 PP. In turn, sharper convolution kernels lead to a lower grading of stenoses (differences of up to 5%). Pairwise comparison of B26f and I26f, B46f and B70f, and B70f and I70f showed differences of 0–1 ± 6–8 PP of the plaque depiction. Motion artifacts were present only at 90 bpm high pitch experiments. High-pitch protocols were associated with significantly lower radiation doses compared with the ECG-gated protocols (258.0 mGy vs. 2829.8 mGy CTDI vol , p ≤ 0.0001). Prospectively triggered high-pitch cardiac CT led to an overestimation of plaque diameter and degree of stenoses in a coronary phantom. This overestimation is only slight and probably negligible in a clinical situation. Even at higher heart rates high pitch CT

  17. Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    McMurray, John; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure occurs in 3% to 4% of adults aged over 65 years, usually as a consequence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, and causes breathlessness, effort intolerance, fluid retention, and increased mortality. The 5-year mortality in people with systolic heart failure ranges from 25% to 75%, often owing to sudden death following ventricular arrhythmia. Risks of cardiovascular events are increased in people with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) or heart failure.

  18. Artificial heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-18

    Super-pure plutonium-238 could use heat produced during fission to power an implanted artificial heart. Three model hearts have worked for some time. Concern that excess heat would make the procedure unsafe for humans has broadened the search for another energy source, such as electrohydraulic drive or an external power battery. A back pack approach may provide an interim solution until materials are developed which can withstand heart activity and be small enough for implantation.

  19. Doppler optical cardiogram gated 2D color flow imaging at 1000 fps and 4D in vivo visualization of embryonic heart at 45 fps on a swept source OCT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariampillai, Adrian; Standish, Beau A; Munce, Nigel R; Randall, Cristina; Liu, George; Jiang, James Y; Cable, Alex E; Vitkin, I A; Yang, Victor X D

    2007-02-19

    We report a Doppler optical cardiogram gating technique for increasing the effective frame rate of Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) when imaging periodic motion as found in the cardiovascular system of embryos. This was accomplished with a Thorlabs swept-source DOCT system that simultaneously acquired and displayed structural and Doppler images at 12 frames per second (fps). The gating technique allowed for ultra-high speed visualization of the blood flow pattern in the developing hearts of African clawed frog embryos (Xenopus laevis) at up to 1000 fps. In addition, four-dimensional (three spatial dimensions + temporal) Doppler imaging at 45 fps was demonstrated using this gating technique, producing detailed visualization of the complex cardiac motion and hemodynamics in a beating heart.

  20. Types of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Introduction Types of Heart Failure Classes of Heart Failure Heart Failure in Children Advanced Heart Failure • Causes and ... and procedures related to heart disease and stroke. Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Use these questions ...

  1. Novel 99mTc(III)-azide complexes [99mTc(N3)(CDO)(CDOH)2B-R] (CDOH2 = cyclohexanedione dioxime) as potential radiotracers for heart imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Min; Zheng, Yumin; Avcibasi, Ugur; Liu, Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, novel 99m Tc(III)-azide complexes [ 99m Tc(N 3 )(CDO)(CDOH) 2 B-R] ( 99m Tc-ISboroxime-N 3 : R = IS; 99m Tc-MPboroxime-N 3 : R = MP; 99m Tc-PAboroxime-N 3 : R = PA; 99m Tc-PYboroxime-N 3 : R = PY; and 99m Tc-Uboroxime-N 3 : R = 5U) were evaluated as heart imaging agents. Methods: Complexes [ 99m Tc(N 3 )(CDO)(CDOH) 2 B-R] (R = IS, MP, PA, PY and 5U) were prepared by ligand exchange between NaN 3 and [ 99m TcCl(CDO)(CDOH) 2 B-R]. Biodistribution and imaging studies were carried out in Sprague–Dawley rats. Image quantification was performed to compare their initial heart uptake and myocardial retention. Results: 99m Tc-ISboroxime-N 3 , 99m Tc-PYboroxime-N 3 and 99m Tc-Uboroxime-N 3 were prepared with high RCP (93–98%) while the RCP of 99m Tc-MPboroxime-N 3 and 99m Tc-PAboroxime-N 3 was 80–85%. The myocardial retention curves of 99m Tc-ISboroxime-N 3 , 99m Tc-PYboroxime-N 3 and 99m Tc-Uboroxime-N 3 were best fitted to the bi-exponential decay function. The half-time of the fast component was 1.6 ± 0.4 min for 99m Tc-ISboroxime-N 3 , 0.7 ± 0.1 min for 99m Tc-PYboroxime-N 3 and 0.9 ± 0.4 min for 99m Tc-Uboroxime-N 3 . The 2-min heart uptake from biodistribution studies followed the ranking order of 99m Tc-ISboroxime-N 3 (3.60 ± 0.68%ID/g) > 99m Tc-PYboroxime-N 3 (2.35 ± 0.37%ID/g) ≫ 99m Tc-Uboroxime-N 3 (1.29 ± 0.06%ID/g). 99m Tc-ISboroxime-N 3 had the highest 2-min heart uptake among 99m Tc radiotracers revaluated in SD rats. High quality SPECT images were obtained with the right and left ventricular walls being clearly delineated. The best image acquisition window was 0–5 min for 99m Tc-ISboroxime-N 3 . Conclusion: Both azide coligand and boronate caps had significant impact on the heart uptake and myocardial retention of complexes [ 99m Tc(N 3 )(CDO)(CDOH) 2 B-R]. Among the radiotracers evaluated in SD rats, 99m Tc-ISboroxime-N 3 has the highest initial heart uptake with the heart retention comparable to that of 99m Tc

  2. An improved optimization algorithm of the three-compartment model with spillover and partial volume corrections for dynamic FDG PET images of small animal hearts in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinlin; Kundu, Bijoy K.

    2018-03-01

    The three-compartment model with spillover (SP) and partial volume (PV) corrections has been widely used for noninvasive kinetic parameter studies of dynamic 2-[18F] fluoro-2deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography images of small animal hearts in vivo. However, the approach still suffers from estimation uncertainty or slow convergence caused by the commonly used optimization algorithms. The aim of this study was to develop an improved optimization algorithm with better estimation performance. Femoral artery blood samples, image-derived input functions from heart ventricles and myocardial time-activity curves (TACs) were derived from data on 16 C57BL/6 mice obtained from the UCLA Mouse Quantitation Program. Parametric equations of the average myocardium and the blood pool TACs with SP and PV corrections in a three-compartment tracer kinetic model were formulated. A hybrid method integrating artificial immune-system and interior-reflective Newton methods were developed to solve the equations. Two penalty functions and one late time-point tail vein blood sample were used to constrain the objective function. The estimation accuracy of the method was validated by comparing results with experimental values using the errors in the areas under curves (AUCs) of the model corrected input function (MCIF) and the 18F-FDG influx constant K i . Moreover, the elapsed time was used to measure the convergence speed. The overall AUC error of MCIF for the 16 mice averaged  -1.4  ±  8.2%, with correlation coefficients of 0.9706. Similar results can be seen in the overall K i error percentage, which was 0.4  ±  5.8% with a correlation coefficient of 0.9912. The t-test P value for both showed no significant difference. The mean and standard deviation of the MCIF AUC and K i percentage errors have lower values compared to the previously published methods. The computation time of the hybrid method is also several times lower than using just a stochastic

  3. Cartan frames for heart wall fiber motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samari, Babak; Aumentado-Armstrong, Tristan; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Froeling, Martijn; Siddiqi, Kaleem

    2017-01-01

    Current understanding of heart wall fiber geometry is based on ex vivo static data obtained through diffusion imaging or histology. Thus, little is known about the manner in which fibers rotate as the heart beats. Yet, the geometric organization of moving fibers in the heart wall is key to its

  4. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis of ischemic heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komarek, P; Chalabala, M [Institut pro Dalsi Vzdelavani Lekaru a Farmaceutu, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1982-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnosing ischemic heart disease in the experimental and clinical practice are reviewed. The mechanism of their retention by the heart muscle is briefly described. The respective radiopharmaceuticals are divided into preparations imaging disorders in the blood supply of the cardiac muscle, diagnosing the myocardial infarction, and evaluating the contractility of the heart.

  5. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for Multimodality Imaging in Valvular Heart Disease: A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, John U; Kort, Smadar; Mehran, Roxana; Schoenhagen, Paul; Soman, Prem; Dehmer, Greg J; Doherty, John U; Schoenhagen, Paul; Amin, Zahid; Bashore, Thomas M; Boyle, Andrew; Calnon, Dennis A; Carabello, Blase; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Conte, John; Desai, Milind; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Ferrari, Victor A; Ghoshhajra, Brian; Mehrotra, Praveen; Nazarian, Saman; Reece, T Brett; Tamarappoo, Balaji; Tzou, Wendy S; Wong, John B; Doherty, John U; Dehmer, Gregory J; Bailey, Steven R; Bhave, Nicole M; Brown, Alan S; Daugherty, Stacie L; Dean, Larry S; Desai, Milind Y; Duvernoy, Claire S; Gillam, Linda D; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Lindsay, Bruce D; Manning, Warren J; Mehrotra, Praveen; Patel, Manesh R; Sachdeva, Ritu; Wann, L Samuel; Winchester, David E; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2018-04-01

    This document is 1 of 2 companion appropriate use criteria (AUC) documents developed by the American College of Cardiology, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons. This document addresses the evaluation and use of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis and management of valvular heart disease, whereas the second, companion document addresses this topic with regard to structural heart disease. Although there is clinical overlap, the documents addressing valvular and structural heart disease are published separately, albeit with a common structure. The goal of the companion AUC documents is to provide a comprehensive resource for multimodality imaging in the context of valvular and structural heart disease, encompassing multiple imaging modalities. Using standardized methodology, the clinical scenarios (indications) were developed by a diverse writing group to represent patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included common applications and anticipated uses. Where appropriate, the scenarios were developed on the basis of the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines. A separate, independent rating panel scored the 92 clinical scenarios in this document on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that a modality is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Midrange scores of 4 to 6 indicate that a modality may be appropriate for the clinical scenario, and scores of 1 to 3 indicate that a modality is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario. The primary objective of the AUC is to provide a framework for the assessment of these scenarios by practices that will

  6. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for Multimodality Imaging in Valvular Heart Disease : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, John U; Kort, Smadar; Mehran, Roxana; Schoenhagen, Paul; Soman, Prem

    2017-12-01

    This document is 1 of 2 companion appropriate use criteria (AUC) documents developed by the American College of Cardiology, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons. This document addresses the evaluation and use of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis and management of valvular heart disease, whereas the second, companion document addresses this topic with regard to structural heart disease. Although there is clinical overlap, the documents addressing valvular and structural heart disease are published separately, albeit with a common structure. The goal of the companion AUC documents is to provide a comprehensive resource for multimodality imaging in the context of valvular and structural heart disease, encompassing multiple imaging modalities.Using standardized methodology, the clinical scenarios (indications) were developed by a diverse writing group to represent patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included common applications and anticipated uses. Where appropriate, the scenarios were developed on the basis of the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines.A separate, independent rating panel scored the 92 clinical scenarios in this document on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that a modality is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Midrange scores of 4 to 6 indicate that a modality may be appropriate for the clinical scenario, and scores of 1 to 3 indicate that a modality is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario.The primary objective of the AUC is to provide a framework for the assessment of these scenarios by practices that will

  7. Nuclear cardiology and heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giubbini, Raffaele; Bertagna, Francesco; Milan, Elisa; Mut, Fernando; Dondi, Maurizio; Metra, Marco; Rodella, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of heart failure in the adult population is increasing. It varies between 1% and 2%, although it mainly affects elderly people (6-10% of people over the age of 65 years will develop heart failure). The syndrome of heart failure arises as a consequence of an abnormality in cardiac structure, function, rhythm, or conduction. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of heart failure and it accounts for this disorder in 60-70% of all patients affected. Nuclear techniques provide unique information on left ventricular function and perfusion by gated-single photon emission tomography (SPECT). Myocardial viability can be assessed by both SPECT and PET imaging. Finally, autonomic dysfunction has been shown to increase the risk of death in patients with heart disease and this may be applicable to all patients with cardiac disease regardless of aetiology. MIBG scanning has a very promising prognostic value in patients with heart failure. (orig.)

  8. Nuclear cardiology and heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giubbini, Raffaele; Bertagna, Francesco [University of Brescia, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Brescia (Italy); Milan, Elisa [Ospedale Di Castelfranco Veneto, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Castelfranco Veneto (Italy); Mut, Fernando; Dondi, Maurizio [International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Vienna (Austria); Metra, Marco [University of Brescia, Department of Cardiology, Brescia (Italy); Rodella, Carlo [Health Physics Department, Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    The prevalence of heart failure in the adult population is increasing. It varies between 1% and 2%, although it mainly affects elderly people (6-10% of people over the age of 65 years will develop heart failure). The syndrome of heart failure arises as a consequence of an abnormality in cardiac structure, function, rhythm, or conduction. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of heart failure and it accounts for this disorder in 60-70% of all patients affected. Nuclear techniques provide unique information on left ventricular function and perfusion by gated-single photon emission tomography (SPECT). Myocardial viability can be assessed by both SPECT and PET imaging. Finally, autonomic dysfunction has been shown to increase the risk of death in patients with heart disease and this may be applicable to all patients with cardiac disease regardless of aetiology. MIBG scanning has a very promising prognostic value in patients with heart failure. (orig.)

  9. Image quality and radiation dose of coronary CT angiography performed with whole-heart coverage CT scanner with intra-cycle motion correction algorithm in patients with atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreini, Daniele; Fiorentini, Cesare; Pontone, Gianluca; Mushtaq, Saima; Mancini, Maria Elisabetta; Conte, Edoardo; Guglielmo, Marco; Volpato, Valentina; Annoni, Andrea; Baggiano, Andrea; Formenti, Alberto; Ditali, Valentina; Pepi, Mauro; Perchinunno, Marco; Bartorelli, Antonio L.

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate image quality, coronary evaluability and radiation exposure of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) performed with whole-heart coverage cardiac-CT in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). We prospectively enrolled 164 patients with AF who underwent a clinically indicated CCTA with a 16-cm z-axis coverage scanner. In all patients CCTA was performed using prospective ECG-triggering with targeted RR interval. We evaluated image quality, coronary evaluability and effective dose (ED). Patients were divided in two subgroups based on heart rate (HR) during imaging. Group 1: 64 patients with low HR (<75 bpm), group 2: 100 patients with high HR (≥75 bpm). Written informed consent was obtained from all patients and the institutional ethics committee approved the study protocol. In a segment-based analysis, coronary evaluability was 98.4 % (2,577/2,620 segments) in the whole population, without significant differences between groups (1,013/1,024 (98.9 %) and 1,565/1,596 (98.1 %), for groups 1 and 2, respectively, p=0.15). Mean ED was similar in both groups (3.8±1.9 mSv and 3.9±2.1 mSv in groups 1 and 2, respectively, p=0.75) The whole-heart-coverage scanner could evaluate coronary arteries with high image quality and without increase in radiation exposure in AF patients, even in the high HR group. (orig.)

  10. Efficacy of pre-scan beta-blockade and impact of heart rate on image quality in patients undergoing coronary multidetector computed tomography angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, Michael D.; Pena, Antonio J.; Nichols, John H.; Worrell, Stewart; Bamberg, Fabian; Dannemann, Nina; Abbara, Suhny; Cury, Ricardo C.; Brady, Thomas J.; Hoffmann, Udo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: While beta-blockers are routinely administered to patients prior to coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA), their effectiveness is unknown. We therefore assessed the efficacy of beta-blockade with regards to heart rate (HR) control and image quality in an unselected patient cohort. Methods: We studied 150 consecutive patients (104 men/46 female; mean age, 56 ± 13 years) referred for coronary CTA. Intravenous metoprolol (5-20 mg) was administered to patients with a HR >65 beats per minute (bpm). The goal HR was defined as an average HR <65 bpm without a single measurement above 68 bpm. Results: Overall, 45% (68/150) of patients met the HR criteria for beta-blocker administration of which 76% (52/68) received metoprolol (mean dose 12 ± 10 mg). Of the 52 patients who received beta-blocker versus the 98 who did not, 18 (35%) versus 62 (64%) patients achieved the goal HR, respectively. All patients who achieved the target HR had an evaluable CTA while five patients who did not achieve the target HR had at least one non-evaluable coronary artery due to motion artifact. There was also a significant reduction in any motion artifact among those who achieved the goal HR as compared to those who did not (p = 0.001). Logistic regression revealed an increase in the odds of stair step artifact of 11.6% (95% CI: 2.4% decrease, 27.5% increase) per 1 bpm increase in the standard deviation of scan HR. Conclusion: Overall, efficacy of beta-blocker administration to reach target HR is limited. Improvements in CT scanner temporal resolution are mandatory to achieve consistently high image quality independent of HR and beta-blocker administration

  11. Efficacy of pre-scan beta-blockade and impact of heart rate on image quality in patients undergoing coronary multidetector computed tomography angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, Michael D. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Pena, Antonio J.; Nichols, John H. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Worrell, Stewart [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Bamberg, Fabian [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Dannemann, Nina [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Abbara, Suhny; Cury, Ricardo C.; Brady, Thomas J. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Hoffmann, Udo [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States)], E-mail: uhoffmann@partners.org

    2008-04-15

    Objective: While beta-blockers are routinely administered to patients prior to coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA), their effectiveness is unknown. We therefore assessed the efficacy of beta-blockade with regards to heart rate (HR) control and image quality in an unselected patient cohort. Methods: We studied 150 consecutive patients (104 men/46 female; mean age, 56 {+-} 13 years) referred for coronary CTA. Intravenous metoprolol (5-20 mg) was administered to patients with a HR >65 beats per minute (bpm). The goal HR was defined as an average HR <65 bpm without a single measurement above 68 bpm. Results: Overall, 45% (68/150) of patients met the HR criteria for beta-blocker administration of which 76% (52/68) received metoprolol (mean dose 12 {+-} 10 mg). Of the 52 patients who received beta-blocker versus the 98 who did not, 18 (35%) versus 62 (64%) patients achieved the goal HR, respectively. All patients who achieved the target HR had an evaluable CTA while five patients who did not achieve the target HR had at least one non-evaluable coronary artery due to motion artifact. There was also a significant reduction in any motion artifact among those who achieved the goal HR as compared to those who did not (p = 0.001). Logistic regression revealed an increase in the odds of stair step artifact of 11.6% (95% CI: 2.4% decrease, 27.5% increase) per 1 bpm increase in the standard deviation of scan HR. Conclusion: Overall, efficacy of beta-blocker administration to reach target HR is limited. Improvements in CT scanner temporal resolution are mandatory to achieve consistently high image quality independent of HR and beta-blocker administration.

  12. Evaluation of image quality and radiation dose of thoracic and coronary dual-source CT in 110 infants with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, Moez Ben; Rohnean, Adela; Sigal-Cinqualbre, Anne; Adler, Ghazal; Paul, Jean-Francois

    2009-01-01

    There are only a few reports on the diagnostic accuracy, and the technical and clinical feasibility, of multidetector CT (MDCT) in infants with congenital heart disease (CHD). To evaluate the image quality and radiation dose of DSCT in babies with CHD. From November 2006 to November 2007, 110 consecutive infants with CHD referred for pre- or postoperative CT evaluation were included. All these infants had a spiral angiothoracic DSCT scan after injection of 300 mg/ml iopromide at 0.5-1 ml/s with a power injector using a low-dose protocol (80 kVp and 10 mAs/kg). Of these infants, 34 also underwent an ECG-gated coronary CT scan for evaluation of the course of the coronary arteries. No serious adverse events were recorded. The mean dose-length product was 8±6 mGy.cm (effective dose 0.5±0.2 mSv) and 21±9 mGy.cm (effective dose 1.3±0.6 mSv) during the non-ECG-gated spiral acquisition and ECG-gated acquisition, respectively. Diagnostic quality images were achieved with the spiral acquisition in 89% of cases. Compared to the spiral mode, ECG-gated acquisition significantly improved the visualization of the coronary arteries, with a diagnostic rate of 91% and 84% for the left and right coronary arteries, respectively. DSCT together with iopromide at 300 mg/ml is a valuable tool for the routine clinical evaluation of infants with CHD. ECG-gated acquisition provides reliable visualization of the course of the coronary arteries. (orig.)

  13. Differentiation of hypertensive heart disease with hypertrophy and hepertrophic cardiomyopathy using consecutive time-course images of Gd-DTPA enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Kouichi; Isibashi, Yutaka; Shimada, Toshio; Tsukihashi, Hironori; Sato, Hidetoshi; Kitamura, Jun; Morioka, Shigefumi; Kawamitsu, Hideaki; Sugimura, Kazuro

    1996-01-01

    We used consecutive time-course Gd-DTPA contrast magnetic resonance images to differentiate hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) from hypertensive heart disease with hypertrophy (HHD). Seventeen patients with HCM, 6 patients with HHD and 5 normal subjects (control) were studied. ECG-gated MRI with 1.5T system was performed before and after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA (0.1mmol/Kg) using spin echo sequence. Gd-DTPA enhanced MRI was repeated every 10 to 55 minutes. We measured signal intensity (SI) of midleft ventricular myocardium and skeletal muscle, and then calculated the ratio between myocardial SI and skeletal muscle SI. Myocardium was enhanced by Gd-DTPA in all patients. However, there was difference in the decay of enhancement effect by Gd-DTPA between HCM and HHD. The decay in HCM was more slowly than in both HHD and control. There was no difference in the decay between HHD and control. The difference in the decay between HCM and HHD became significant 25 minutes after Gd-DTPA injection and lasted until 55 minutes. We conclude that the time-course of the decay of enhancement effect by Gd-DTPA is helpful to differentiate HCM from HHD and the difference of the decay might reflect structural changes of myocardium. (author)

  14. High-resolution in vivo imaging of the cross-sectional deformations of contracting embryonic heart loops using optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Männer, J.; Thrane, Lars; Norozi, K.

    2008-01-01

    The embryonic heart tube consists of an outer myocardial tube, a middle layer of cardiac jelly, and an inner endocardial tube. It is said that tubular hearts pump the blood by peristaltoid contractions. The traditional concept of cardiac peristalsis sees the cyclic deformations of pulsating heart...... tubes as concentric narrowing and widening of tubes of circular cross-section. We have visualized the cross-sectional deformations of contracting embryonic hearts in chick embryos (HH-stages 9-17) using real-time high-resolution optical coherence tomography. Cardiac contractions are detected from HH...... of the endocardial tube is the consequence of an uneven distribution of the cardiac jelly. Our data show that the cyclic deformations of pulsating embryonic heart tubes run other than originally thought. There is evidence that heart tubes of elliptic cross-section might pump blood with a higher mechanical efficiency...

  15. Simple, heart-smart substitutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronary artery disease - heart smart substitutions; Atherosclerosis - heart smart substitutions; Cholesterol - heart smart substitutions; Coronary heart disease - heart smart substitutions; Healthy diet - heart ...

  16. LOOKING INTO THE HEARTS OF BOK GLOBULES: MILLIMETER AND SUBMILLIMETER CONTINUUM IMAGES OF ISOLATED STAR-FORMING CORES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Launhardt, R.; Henning, Th.; Khanzadyan, T.; Schmalzl, M.; Wolf, S.; Nutter, D.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bourke, T. L.; Zylka, R.

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of a comprehensive infrared, submillimeter, and millimeter continuum emission study of isolated low-mass star-forming cores in 32 Bok globules, with the aim to investigate the process of star formation in these regions. The submillimeter and millimeter dust continuum emission maps together with the spectral energy distributions are used to model and derive the physical properties of the star-forming cores, such as luminosities, sizes, masses, densities, etc. Comparisons with ground-based near-infrared and space-based mid- and far-infrared images from Spitzer are used to reveal the stellar content of the Bok globules, association of embedded young stellar objects (YSOs) with the submillimeter dust cores, and the evolutionary stages of the individual sources. Submillimeter dust continuum emission was detected in 26 out of the 32 globule cores observed. For 18 globules with detected (sub)millimeter cores, we derive evolutionary stages and physical parameters of the embedded sources. We identify nine starless cores, most of which are presumably prestellar, nine Class 0 protostars, and twelve Class I YSOs. Specific source properties like bolometric temperature, core size, and central densities are discussed as a function of evolutionary stage. We find that at least two thirds (16 out of 24) of the star-forming globules studied here show evidence of forming multiple stars on scales between 1000 and 50,000 AU. However, we also find that most of these small prototstar and star groups are comprised of sources with different evolutionary stages, suggesting a picture of slow and sequential star formation in isolated globules.

  17. Potential benefit of a simultaneous, side-by-side display of contrast MDCT and echocardiography over routine sequential imaging for assessment of adult congenital heart disease: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oe, Hiroki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Miyoshi, Toru; Osawa, Kazuhiro; Akagi, Teiji; Kanazawa, Susumu; Ito, Hiroshi

    2018-06-18

    Management of adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients requires understanding of its complex morphology and functional features. An innovative imaging technique has been developed to display a virtual multi-planar reconstruction obtained from contrast-enhanced multidetector-computed tomography (MDCT) corresponding to the same cross-sectional image from transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). The aim of this study is to assess the usefulness of this imaging technology in ACHD patients. This study consisted of 46 consecutive patients (30 women; mean age, 52±18 years old) with ACHD who had undergone contrast MDCT. All patients underwent TTE within a week of MDCT. An experienced sonographer who did not know the results of MDCT conducted a diagnosis using TTE and, then, using the new imaging technology. We studied whether this imaging technology provided additional or unexpected findings or makes more accurate diagnosis. In this imaging technology, MDCT cross-section provides higher-resolution image to the deep compared to corresponding TTE image. Depending on the MDCT section which can be arbitrarily set under the echo guide, we can diagnose unexpected or incremental lesions or more accurately assess the severity of the lesion in 27 patients (59%) compared to TTE study alone. This imaging technology was useful in the following situations: CONCLUSIONS: This integrated imaging technology provides incremental role over TTE in complex anatomy, and allows functional information in ACHD patients. Copyright © 2018 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Image quality and radiation dose of coronary CT angiography performed with whole-heart coverage CT scanner with intra-cycle motion correction algorithm in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreini, Daniele; Pontone, Gianluca; Mushtaq, Saima; Mancini, Maria Elisabetta; Conte, Edoardo; Guglielmo, Marco; Volpato, Valentina; Annoni, Andrea; Baggiano, Andrea; Formenti, Alberto; Ditali, Valentina; Perchinunno, Marco; Fiorentini, Cesare; Bartorelli, Antonio L; Pepi, Mauro

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate image quality, coronary evaluability and radiation exposure of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) performed with whole-heart coverage cardiac-CT in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). We prospectively enrolled 164 patients with AF who underwent a clinically indicated CCTA with a 16-cm z-axis coverage scanner. In all patients CCTA was performed using prospective ECG-triggering with targeted RR interval. We evaluated image quality, coronary evaluability and effective dose (ED). Patients were divided in two subgroups based on heart rate (HR) during imaging. Group 1: 64 patients with low HR (ethics committee approved the study protocol. In a segment-based analysis, coronary evaluability was 98.4 % (2,577/2,620 segments) in the whole population, without significant differences between groups (1,013/1,024 (98.9 %) and 1,565/1,596 (98.1 %), for groups 1 and 2, respectively, p=0.15). Mean ED was similar in both groups (3.8±1.9 mSv and 3.9±2.1 mSv in groups 1 and 2, respectively, p=0.75) CONCLUSIONS: The whole-heart-coverage scanner could evaluate coronary arteries with high image quality and without increase in radiation exposure in AF patients, even in the high HR group. • Last-generation CT scanner improves coronary artery assessment in AF patients. • The new CT scanner enables low radiation exposure in AF patients. • Diagnostic ICA maybe avoided in AF patients with suspected CAD. • Whole-heart coverage CT scanner enables low radiation exposure in AF patients.

  19. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other diseases. Chronic diseases — such as diabetes, HIV, hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, or a buildup of iron (hemochromatosis) or ... transplantation or support with a ventricular assist device. Prevention The key to preventing heart failure is to ...

  20. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... properly causes your body's blood sugar levels to rise, increasing your risk of heart attack. Metabolic syndrome. This occurs when you have obesity, high blood pressure and high blood sugar. Having metabolic ...

  1. Classes of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Introduction Types of Heart Failure Classes of Heart Failure Heart Failure in Children Advanced Heart Failure • Causes and ... and Advanced HF • Tools and Resources • Personal Stories Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Use these questions ...

  2. Men and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Men and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Source: Interactive Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke Heart Disease Facts in Men Heart disease is the leading ...

  3. Wine and heart health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health and wine; Wine and heart disease; Preventing heart disease - wine; Preventing heart disease - alcohol ... more often just to lower your risk of heart disease. Heavier drinking can harm the heart and ...

  4. Nuclear cardiology. I - Radionuclide angiographic assessment of left ventricular contraction: uses, limitations and future directions. II - The role of myocardial perfusion imaging using thallium-201 in diagnosis of coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodenheimer, M.M.; Banka, V.S.; Helfant, R.H.; Pennsylvania, University, Philadelphia, PA)

    1980-01-01

    The current status of radionuclide angiography is reviewed. First pass and gated equilibrium methods for determining left ventricular contraction are compared. Some clinical applications of radionuclide angiography are then examined, including the detection of discrete versus diffuse asynergy and the assessment of myocardial infarction. The second part of this work reviews the uses and limitations of thallium-201 perfusion imaging in the diagnosis of the acute and chronic manifestations of coronary heart disease. Theoretical and technical considerations of thallium-201 imaging are reviewed along with the clinical implications of the technique

  5. Radioisotope heart examination during exercise to diagnose ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farsky, S.

    1986-01-01

    The radioisotope exercise test is discussed and its benefits characterized for the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease, namely the use of 99m Tc in scintiscanning heart ventricles and of 201 Tl in scintiscanning myocardial perfusion. The exercise ventricular function and perfusion scintigraphies are compared with the common exercise ECG examination, and their superior sensitivity and specificity emphasized. Considering the constraints of scintigraphic imaging, indications are outlined for patients including those with suspect serious ischemic heart disease in whom the exercise ECG test has been negative or inconclusive, patients with the so-called nondiagnostic ECG, patients with atypical symptoms, and healthy individuals for whom the exercise ECG test indicated with respect to their occupation has been positive. Both radionuclide imaging techniques are complementary and are shown to be valuable not only in improving the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease but also in identifying the high-risk patients in whom cardiac surgery is to be considered. (L.O.)

  6. Image quality of CT angiography in young children with congenital heart disease: a comparison between the sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) and advanced modelled iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE) algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, S B; Jeong, D W; Choo, K S; Nam, K J; Hwang, J-Y; Lee, J W; Kim, J Y; Lim, S J

    2017-12-01

    To compare the image quality of computed tomography angiography (CTA) reconstructed by sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) with that of advanced modelled iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE) in children with congenital heart disease (CHD). Thirty-one children (8.23±13.92 months) with CHD who underwent CTA were enrolled. Images were reconstructed using SAFIRE (strength 5) and ADMIRE (strength 5). Objective image qualities (attenuation, noise) were measured in the great vessels and heart chambers. Two radiologists independently calculated the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) by measuring the intensity and noise of the myocardial walls. Subjective noise, diagnostic confidence, and sharpness at the level prior to the first branch of the main pulmonary artery were also graded by the two radiologists independently. The objective image noise of ADMIRE was significantly lower than that of SAFIRE in the right atrium, right ventricle, and myocardial wall (p0.05). The mean CNR values were 21.56±10.80 for ADMIRE and 18.21±6.98 for SAFIRE, which were significantly different (p0.05). CTA using ADMIRE was superior to SAFIRE when comparing the objective and subjective image quality in children with CHD. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantification of pulmonary regurgitation and prediction of pulmonary valve replacement by echocardiography in patients with congenital heart defects in comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellas, Claudia; Kammerer, Laura; Gravenhorst, Verena; Lotz, Joachim; Paul, Thomas; Steinmetz, Michael

    2018-04-01

    Pulmonary regurgitation (PR) is common in patients with congenital heart defects (CHD) and contributes to morbidity and mortality in the long-term. We investigated in this retrospective analysis whether readily accessible echocardiographic parameters are useful for quantification of PR and for predicting pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) in comparison to the gold-standard phase contrast (PC) flow measurements from cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Continuous wave (CW) Doppler and colour flow images in echocardiograms from 53 patients with CHD were analysed. Slope and jet-to-RVOT ratio correlated significantly with CMR-assessed regurgitation fraction (RF), whereas pressure half time (PHT) showed an inverse correlation. Patients with mild PR in CMR had significantly higher PHT, lower slope and jet-to-RVOT ratio than patients with moderate or severe regurgitation. The AUC regarding PR severity was 0.778 for PHT (95% CI, 0.649-0.907; P = 0.007 for CMR-RF ≤ 35%), 0.744 for slope (95% CI, 0.603-0.885; P = 0.017 for CMR-RF > 35%) and 0.652 for jet-to-RVOT ratio (95% CI, 0.473-0.860; P = 0.168 for CMR-RF > 35%). The optimal cut-off values calculated from ROC analysis were 95 ms for PHT and 4.9 m/s 2 for slope. In logistic regression analysis, slope emerged as the most valuable parameter for predicting the indication for PVR (OR 12.9, 95% CI, 1.8-90.9, P = 0.010). In conclusion, echocardiographic assessment of PR was feasible. Both parameters, PHT and in particular slope, were predictors for PVR. Thus, echocardiography appears appropriate in the management of patients with PR.

  8. Low-level 45,X/46,XX mosaicism is not associated with congenital heart disease and thoracic aorta dilatation:prospective magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klásková, E; Tüdös, Z; Sobek, A; Zapletalová, J; Dostál, J; Zbořilová, B; Sobek, A; Adamová, K; Lattová, V; Dostálová, Z; Procházka, M

    2015-06-01

    To establish the prevalence of risk factors for aortic dissection, such as bicuspid aortic valve, aortic coarctation and ascending aorta dilatation, in women with low-level 45,X/46,XX mosaicism undergoing an in-vitro fertilization (IVF) procedure. The study group comprised 25 women with low-level 45,X/46,XX mosaicism (ranging from 3.3% to 10.0%) who were referred to two reproductive medicine units between 2009 and 2013 because of infertility and who underwent subsequent karyotyping. In accordance with the recommendation of the Practice Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine for patients with Turner syndrome (TS), prior to the IVF procedure, all women underwent careful cardiovascular screening for congenital heart disease and thoracic aorta dilatation, including standard cardiac examination, echocardiography and non-contrast cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Aortic size index (ASI, diameter of the ascending aorta normalized to body surface area) and the prevalence of coarctation of the aorta and of bicuspid aortic valve were compared with findings previously reported in women with TS and the general population. Bicuspid aortic valve without any stenosis or regurgitation was found in one woman in the study group with low-level 45,X/46,XX mosaicism, a statistically significantly lower prevalence of bicuspid aortic valve than that reported in women with TS. Aortic coarctation was not identified in any individual. The ASI was below the  95th percentile in all cases and the mean value was significantly lower than the mean reference values for both the general population and women with TS. Compared with the general population, the prevalence of risk factors for aortic dissection was not found to be higher in women with low-level 45,X/46,XX mosaicism without any noticeable features except infertility. Copyright © 2014 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and Laser Doppler Anemometry velocity measurements downstream of replacement heart valves: implications for in vivo assessment of prosthetic valve function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, A A; Heinrich, R S; Walker, P G; Pedersen, E M; Scheidegger, M B; Boesiger, P; Walton, S P; Yoganathan, A P

    1996-01-01

    The non-invasive, in-vivo assessment of prosthetic valve function is compromised by the lack of accurate measurements of the transvalvular flow fields or hemodynamics by current techniques. Short echo time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may provide a method for the non-invasive, in vivo assessment of prosthetic valve function by accurately measuring changes in the transvalvular flow fields associated with normal and dysfunctional prosthetic valves. The objectives of these in vitro experiments were to investigate the potential for using MRI as a tool to measure the complex flow fields distal to replacement heart valves, and to assess the accuracy of MRI velocity measurements by comparison with Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA), a gold standard. The velocity fields downstream of tilting disc, bileaflet, ball and cage, and pericardial tissue valves were measured using both three-component LDA and MRI phase velocity encoding under a steady flow rate of 22.8 l/min, simulating peak systolic flow. The valves were tested under normal and stenotic conditions to assess the MRI capabilities under a wide range of local flow conditions, velocities and turbulence levels. A new short echo time MRI technique (FAcE), which allowed velocity measurements in stenotic jets with high turbulence, was tested. Good overall agreement was obtained between the MRI velocity measurements and the LDA data. The MRI velocity measurements adequately reproduced the spatial structure of the flow fields. In most cases peak velocities were accurately measured to within 15%. The results indicate that the FAcE MRI method has the potential to be used as a diagnostic tool to assess prosthetic valve function.

  10. Comparison of echocardiographic and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging measurements of functional single ventricular volumes, mass, and ejection fraction (from the Pediatric Heart Network Fontan Cross-Sectional Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margossian, Renee; Schwartz, Marcy L; Prakash, Ashwin; Wruck, Lisa; Colan, Steven D; Atz, Andrew M; Bradley, Timothy J; Fogel, Mark A; Hurwitz, Lynne M; Marcus, Edward; Powell, Andrew J; Printz, Beth F; Puchalski, Michael D; Rychik, Jack; Shirali, Girish; Williams, Richard; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Geva, Tal

    2009-08-01

    Assessment of the size and function of a functional single ventricle (FSV) is a key element in the management of patients after the Fontan procedure. Measurement variability of ventricular mass, volume, and ejection fraction (EF) among observers by echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and their reproducibility among readers in these patients have not been described. From the 546 patients enrolled in the Pediatric Heart Network Fontan Cross-Sectional Study (mean age 11.9 +/- 3.4 years), 100 echocardiograms and 50 CMR studies were assessed for measurement reproducibility; 124 subjects with paired studies were selected for comparison between modalities. Interobserver agreement for qualitative grading of ventricular function by echocardiography was modest for left ventricular (LV) morphology (kappa = 0.42) and weak for right ventricular (RV) morphology (kappa = 0.12). For quantitative assessment, high intraclass correlation coefficients were found for echocardiographic interobserver agreement (LV 0.87 to 0.92, RV 0.82 to 0.85) of systolic and diastolic volumes, respectively. In contrast, intraclass correlation coefficients for LV and RV mass were moderate (LV 0.78, RV 0.72). The corresponding intraclass correlation coefficients by CMR were high (LV 0.96, RV 0.85). Volumes by echocardiography averaged 70% of CMR values. Interobserver reproducibility for the EF was similar for the 2 modalities. Although the absolute mean difference between modalities for the EF was small (<2%), 95% limits of agreement were wide. In conclusion, agreement between observers of qualitative FSV function by echocardiography is modest. Measurements of FSV volume by 2-dimensional echocardiography underestimate CMR measurements, but their reproducibility is high. Echocardiographic and CMR measurements of FSV EF demonstrate similar interobserver reproducibility, whereas measurements of FSV mass and LV diastolic volume are more reproducible by CMR.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measurement of Left Ventricular Blood Flow and Coronary Flow Reserve in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure due to Coronary Artery Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aras, A.; Anik, Y.; Demirci, A.; Balci, N.C.; Kozdag, G.; Ural, D.; Komsuoglu, B. (Radiology Dept. and Cardiology Dept., Kocaeli Univ. School of Medicine, Kocaeli (Turkey))

    2007-11-15

    Background: Coronary sinus flow reflects global cardiac perfusion and has been used for the assessment of myocardial flow reserve, which is reduced in chronic heart failure (CHF). Coronary flow reserve (CFR) can be measured by using phase-contrast (PC) velocity-encoded cine (VEC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Purpose: To quantify and compare global left ventricular (LV) perfusion and CFR in patients with CHF and in a healthy control group by measuring coronary sinus flow with PC VEC MRI, and to correlate this with global LV perfusion, segmental first-pass perfusion, and viability in the same patients. Material and Methods: Cardiac MRI was performed in 20 patients with CHF of ischemic origin and in a control group of healthy subjects (n 11) at rest and after pharmacological stress induced by i.v. dipyridamole. The MRI protocol included cine MRI, VEC MRI, first-pass perfusion, and delayed contrast-enhanced MRI for viability. Global LV perfusion was quantified by measuring coronary sinus flow on VEC MRI at rest in all subjects. CFR was determined as the ratio of global LV perfusion before and after pharmacologic stress. Results: At rest, global LV perfusion was not significantly different in patients with CHF and the control group. After administration of dipyridamole, global LV perfusion and CFR were significantly lower in patients with CHF compared to the control group (P<0.001). An inverse correlation was observed between CFR and the number of infarcted and/or ischemic segments (P = 0.083, P = 0.037). Conclusion: A combined cardiac MRI protocol including function and perfusion techniques together with VEC MRI can be used to evaluate global LV perfusion and CFR in patients with CHF. Global LV perfusion and CFR measurements may have potential in the monitoring of CHF. Impaired CFR may contribute to progressive decline in LV function in patients with CHF

  12. Simultaneous Measurement of T2 and Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (T2+ADC) in the Heart With Motion-Compensated Spin Echo Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliotta, Eric; Moulin, Kévin; Zhang, Zhaohuan; Ennis, Daniel B.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate a technique for simultaneous quantitative T2 and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping in the heart (T2+ADC) using spin echo (SE) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Theory and Methods T2 maps from T2+ADC were compared with single-echo SE in phantoms and with T2-prepared (T2-prep) balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) in healthy volunteers. ADC maps from T2+ADC were compared with conventional DWI in phantoms and in vivo. T2+ADC was also demonstrated in a patient with acute myocardial infarction (MI). Results Phantom T2 values from T2+ADC were closer to a single-echo SE reference than T2-prep bSSFP (−2.3 ± 6.0% vs 22.2 ± 16.3%; P T2 values from T2+ADC were significantly shorter than T2-prep bSSFP (35.8 ± 3.1 vs 46.8 ± 3.8 ms; P T2+ADC and conventional motion-compensated DWI (1.39 ± 0.18 vs 1.38 ± 0.18 mm2/ms; P = N.S.). In the patient, T2 and ADC were both significantly elevated in the infarct compared with remote myocardium (T2: 40.4 ± 7.6 vs 56.8 ± 22.0; P T2+ADC generated coregistered, free-breathing T2 and ADC maps in healthy volunteers and a patient with acute MI with no cost in accuracy, precision, or scan time compared with DWI. PMID:28516485

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measurement of Left Ventricular Blood Flow and Coronary Flow Reserve in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure due to Coronary Artery Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aras, A.; Anik, Y.; Demirci, A.; Balci, N.C.; Kozdag, G.; Ural, D.; Komsuogl u, B.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Coronary sinus flow reflects global cardiac perfusion and has been used for the assessment of myocardial flow reserve, which is reduced in chronic heart failure (CHF). Coronary flow reserve (CFR) can be measured by using phase-contrast (PC) velocity-encoded cine (VEC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Purpose: To quantify and compare global left ventricular (LV) perfusion and CFR in patients with CHF and in a healthy control group by measuring coronary sinus flow with PC VEC MRI, and to correlate this with global LV perfusion, segmental first-pass perfusion, and viability in the same patients. Material and Methods: Cardiac MRI was performed in 20 patients with CHF of ischemic origin and in a control group of healthy subjects (n 11) at rest and after pharmacological stress induced by i.v. dipyridamole. The MRI protocol included cine MRI, VEC MRI, first-pass perfusion, and delayed contrast-enhanced MRI for viability. Global LV perfusion was quantified by measuring coronary sinus flow on VEC MRI at rest in all subjects. CFR was determined as the ratio of global LV perfusion before and after pharmacologic stress. Results: At rest, global LV perfusion was not significantly different in patients with CHF and the control group. After administration of dipyridamole, global LV perfusion and CFR were significantly lower in patients with CHF compared to the control group (P<0.001). An inverse correlation was observed between CFR and the number of infarcted and/or ischemic segments (P = 0.083, P 0.037). Conclusion: A combined cardiac MRI protocol including function and perfusion techniques together with VEC MRI can be used to evaluate global LV perfusion and CFR in patients with CHF. Global LV perfusion and CFR measurements may have potential in the monitoring of CHF. Impaired CFR may contribute to progressive decline in LV function in patients with CHF

  14. MR of the heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolozzi, C; Petacchi, D; De Dominicis, R; Casolo, G C

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic Rasonance imaging is a new completely non-invasive diagnostic technique now available even for heart studies. Due to the long time of this examination the main goal for the application to the cardiovascular diagnosis is to obtain the major number of information in a reasonable time for the patient. On the basis of initial experience with this technique a method suitable for the morphological, functional and tissutal characterization in cardiovascular diagnosis is proposed.

  15. MR of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartolozzi, C.; Petacchi, D.; De Dominicis, R.; Casolo, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic Rasonance imaging is a new completely non-invasive diagnostic technique now available even for heart studies. Due to the long time of this examination the main goal for the application to the cardiovascular diagnosis is to obtain the major number of information in a reasonable time for the patient. On the basis of initial experience with this technique a method suitable for the morphological, functional and tissutal characterization in cardiovascular diagnosis is proposed

  16. Prognostic value of myocardial perfusion SPECT images in combination with the maximal heart rate at exercise testing in Japanese patients with suspected ischemic heart disease. A sub-analysis of J-ACCESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueshima, Kenji; Usami, Satoru; Yasuno, Shinji; Nakao, Kazuwa; Yamashina, Akira; Nishiyama, Osamu; Yamazaki, Takuya; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2009-01-01

    We assessed whether a combination of summed stress scores (SSS) using exercise myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) (Ex-SPECT) and maximal heart rate accurately predicts cardiac events through a sub-analysis of J-ACCESS (Japanese Assessment of Cardiac Events and Survival Study by Quantitative Gated SPECT) which was conducted to evaluate the prognosis of Japanese patients with suspected ischemic heart disease. In J-ACCESS, 2,373 patients with suspected coronary artery disease not receiving beta-blocker treatment underwent Ex-SPECT. These patients were categorized into the following four groups: Group A [achieved target heart rate (THR) and SSS<4: n=631], B (did not achieve THR and SSS<4: n=612), C (achieved THR and SSS≥4: n=570), and D (did not achieve THR and SSS≥4: n=560). We evaluated the incidence rate of cardiac events including cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and heart failure requiring hospital admission during a 3-year period. In Group A, B, C, and D, 9 of 631 (1.4%), 15 of 612 (2.4%), 23 of 570 (4.0%) and 30 of 560 (5.4%) patients experienced cardiac events, respectively. Although the hazard ratio of the SSS≥4 was 2.45 (p<0.001) and that of the attained THR was 0.69 (p=0.10) in the multiple Cox regression analysis, Kaplan-Meier curves showed that the cardiac events rate was lower in the order of A, B, C, and D (p<0.001). The combination of SSS using Ex-SPECT and the maximal heart rate is a useful predictor of cardiac events in patients with suspected coronary artery disease. (author)

  17. Volumetric Single-Beat Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography: Relationship of Image Quality, Heart Rate, and Body Mass Index. Initial Patient Experience With a New Computed Tomography Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Muhammad Aamir; Sanchez, Frank W; Sayegh, Karl; Veledar, Emir; Aziz, Muhammad; Malik, Rehan; Haider, Imran; Agatston, Arthur S; Batlle, Juan C; Janowitz, Warren; Peña, Constantino; Ziffer, Jack A; Nasir, Khurram; Cury, Ricardo C

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) image quality (IQ) is very important for accurate diagnosis. We propose to evaluate IQ expressed as Likert scale, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) from coronary CT angiography images acquired with a new volumetric single-beat CT scanner on consecutive patients and assess the IQ dependence on heart rate (HR) and body mass index (BMI). We retrospectively analyzed the data of the first 439 consecutive patients (mean age, 55.13 [SD, 12.1] years; 51.47% male), who underwent noninvasive coronary CT angiography in a new single-beat volumetric CT scanner (Revolution CT) to evaluate chest pain at West Kendall Baptist Hospital. Based on patient BMI (mean, 29.43 [SD, 5.81] kg/m), the kVp (kilovolt potential) value and tube current were adjusted within a range of 80 to 140 kVp and 122 to 720 mA, respectively. Each scan was performed in a single-beat acquisition within 1 cardiac cycle, regardless of the HR. Motion correction software (SnapShot Freeze) was used for correcting motion artifacts in patients with higher HRs. Autogating was used to automatically acquire systolic and diastolic phases for higher HRs with electrocardiographic milliampere dose modulation. Image quality was assessed qualitatively by Likert scale and quantitatively by SNR and CNR for the 4 major vessels right coronary, left main, left anterior descending, and left circumflex arteries on axial and multiplanar reformatted images. Values for Likert scale were as follows: 1, nondiagnostic; 2, poor; 3, good; 4, very good; and 5, excellent. Signal-to-noise ratio and CNR were calculated from the average 2 CT attenuation values within regions of interest placed in the proximal left main and proximal right coronary artery. For contrast comparison, a region of interest was selected from left ventricular wall at midcavity level using a dedicated workstation. We divided patients in 2 groups related to the HR: less than or equal to 70 beats/min (bpm) and

  18. Differentiation of thrombus from pannus as the cause of acquired mechanical prosthetic heart valve obstruction by non-invasive imaging: a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanis, Wilco; Habets, Jesse; van den Brink, Renee B. A.; Symersky, Petr; Budde, Ricardo P. J.; Chamuleau, Steven A. J.

    2014-01-01

    For acquired mechanical prosthetic heart valve (PHV) obstruction and suspicion on thrombosis, recently updated European Society of Cardiology guidelines advocate the confirmation of thrombus by transthoracic echocardiography, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), and fluoroscopy. However, no

  19. Safety and observer variability of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging combined with low-dose dobutamine stress-testing in patients with complex congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robbers-Visser, D.; Luijnenburg, S.E.; Berg, J. van den; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.; Strengers, J.L.; Kapusta, L.; Moelker, A.; Helbing, W.A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) abnormal ventricular stress responses have been reported with dobutamine stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance (DCMR). These abnormal stress responses are potential indicators of long-term outcome. However, safety and

  20. Examination of a Novel Method for Non-Contact, Low-Cost, and Automated Heart-Rate Detection in Ambient Light Using Photoplethysmographic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Unclassified 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code ) 407-208-5693 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 iii...more intrusive than those recording facial and vocal expression. For example, to measure heart rate (HR) or heart rate variability (HRV), the subject...during surgery . Capnographs monitor respiratory status 2 and pulse of patients during anesthesia and intensive care. These methods are proven

  1. Heart valve surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... replacement; Valve repair; Heart valve prosthesis; Mechanical valves; Prosthetic valves ... surgery. Your heart valve has been damaged by infection ( endocarditis ). You have received a new heart valve ...

  2. Heart failure - tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... the best test to: Identify which type of heart failure (systolic, diastolic, valvular) Monitor your heart failure and ...

  3. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Attack Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Attack Symptoms Past Issues / Winter ... most common heart attack symptom in men and women is chest pain or discomfort. However, women also ...

  4. Heart Health: The Heart Truth Campaign 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health The Heart Truth Campaign 2009 Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table ... one of the celebrities supporting this year's The Heart Truth campaign. Both R&B singer Ashanti (center) ...

  5. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Most heart attacks happen when a clot in the coronary ...

  6. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk ...

  7. The value of gated myocardial perfusion imaging for the evaluation of early treatment effectiveness of ischemic heart disease using Ad-HGF myocardial injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Jianlin; Cheng Xu; Li Jianhua; Xu Zhaoqiang; Li Dianfu; Yuan Biao; Zhang Yourong; Cao Kejiang; Huang Jun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has multipotent actions mediated by c- Mesenchymal epithelial transition factor (Met) receptor. Preclinical studies in animal models of myocardial ischemia demonstrated that treatment with HGF could benefit myocardial perfusion, cardiac remodeling, angiogenesis and myocardial function. This study used gated 99 Tc m -methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) myocardial perfusion imaging (G-MPI) to assess the early treatment effectiveness of adenovirus HGF (Ad-HGF) directly administered in ischemic heart disease (IHD) patients. Methods: Eighteen patients with IHD were divided into 3 groups receiving low dose [5 x 10 8 plaque forming unit (PFU)/site], medium (1.5 x 10 9 PFU/site) and high dose (5 x l0 9 PFU/site) of Ad-HGF. And the Ad-HGF was injected at 10 sites in each patient. Rest G-MPI was performed before and after treatment for myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function measurement. Stata 7.0 was used to analyse the data. Results: (1) After Ad-HGF, myocardial perfusion was improved in 3/6, 5/6 and 6/6 patients in low, medium and high dosage groups. The dosage of AD-HGF was closely correlated with the improvement of myocardial perfusion (χ 2 =4.34, P<0.05). (2) Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was significantly increased [(50.1 ± 6.4)% vs (58.7 ± 5.6)%, t=6.1, P<0.01], end-diastolic volume [EDV, (137.7 ± 33.2) ml vs (123.7 ± 32.7) ml] and end-systolic volume [ESV, (70.2 ± 22.4) ml vs (51.9 ± 14.9) ml] were significantly reduced. (3) The LVEFs were increased in all groups, and the LVEF improvement in the high dosage group [(8.6 ± 5.9)%] was significantly greater than the other two groups [(4.3 ± l.2)%, (6.8 ± 5.7)%]. The difference of post-treatment improvement on LVEF between the low and medium dosage groups was not significant. The dosage of Ad-HGF was closely correlated with the improvement of LVEF (r=0.67, P< 0.01). Conclusion: G-MPI is a reliable method for evaluating the early effectiveness of

  8. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease using four-dimensional spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC) telemedicine via an Internet link: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viñals, F; Mandujano, L; Vargas, G; Giuliano, A

    2005-01-01

    To assess whether the spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC) acquisition technique can be taught to a general obstetrician by e-mail; whether STIC volume datasets can be transmitted over the Internet; and whether STIC volume datasets analyzed offline at a remote setting can be used to confirm or exclude major cardiac defects (TELE-STIC). This was a prospective study involving 50 pregnant women with gestational ages ranging between 20 and 36 weeks. These patients were selected by two general obstetricians (operators) working in geographically remote areas of Chile. Although both obstetricians were users of equipment capable of four-dimensional (4D) ultrasound with STIC, they lacked skill in the performance of fetal cardiac examination. A dedicated web disk was created to upload the acquired volume datasets using an Internet broadband connection. Offline analysis was performed by a single investigator experienced in fetal echocardiography (the administrator). A telemedicine link via the Internet was possible in all cases. Seventy-seven volume datasets were sent to the web server. A complete cardiac examination according to set criteria was achieved by the administrator in 86% of the cases scanned by one operator and 95% of the cases scanned by the other operator. Three patients had cardiac defects confirmed postnatally, two fetuses had extracardiac anomalies and one fetus had a suspected cardiac defect unconfirmed by second-opinion TELE-STIC. There were two isolated major congenital heart defects. Both patients were given advice by e-mail and teleconference using a web camera about the likely outcome and benefits of scheduling in utero transport to a tertiary care center. STIC volumes can be obtained by operators inexperienced in fetal echocardiography, transmitted via the Internet, and their analysis enables recognition of most of the structures and views necessary to assess fetal cardiac anatomy. The preliminary use of TELE-STIC allowed us to demonstrate that

  9. Pericarditis - after heart attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: A previous heart attack Open heart surgery Chest trauma A heart attack that has affected the thickness of your heart muscle Symptoms Symptoms include: Anxiety Chest pain from the swollen pericardium rubbing on the ...

  10. Heart failure - home monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000113.htm Heart failure - home monitoring To use the sharing features on ... your high blood pressure Fast food tips Heart failure - discharge Heart failure - fluids and diuretics Heart failure - what to ...

  11. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Back to Patient Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Millions of people experience irregular or abnormal ... harmless and happen in healthy people free of heart disease. However, some abnormal heart rhythms can be serious ...

  12. Heart disease and diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - heart disease; CAD - diet; Coronary artery disease - diet; Coronary heart disease - diet ... diet and lifestyle can reduce your risk of: Heart disease, heart attacks, and stroke Conditions that lead ...

  13. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... buildup of plaque in the arteries to your heart. This may also be called hardening of the ...

  14. Heart attack first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that carries oxygen to the heart is blocked. The heart muscle ...

  15. Pediatric heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  16. Recent advances in echocardiography for valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Echocardiography is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of patients with valvular heart disease. Echocardiographic advancements may have particular impact on the assessment and management of patients with valvular heart disease. This review will summarize the current literature on advancements, such as three-dimensional echocardiography, strain imaging, intracardiac echocardiography, and fusion imaging, in this patient population.

  17. Right heart function in impaired left ventricular diastolic function: 2D speckle tracking echocardiography-based and Doppler tissue imaging-based analysis of right atrial and ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Anna; Bathe, Marny; Oertelt-Prigione, Sabine; Seeland, Ute; Rücke, Mirjam; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Stangl, Karl; Knebel, Fabian; Stangl, Verena; Dreger, Henryk

    2018-01-01

    The aim of our study was to describe right atrial (RA) and right ventricular (RV) function, assessed by Doppler tissue imaging and 2D speckle tracking echocardiography (2DSTE), in women with signs of early impaired left ventricular diastolic function (DD). In a cross-sectional trial, standard parameters of diastolic and right heart function were investigated in 438 women of the Berlin Female Risk Evaluation (BEFRI) study. In a subset of women, average peak systolic RA strain (RAS), as well as the average peak systolic RV strain of the free wall (RVS free wall) and of all RV segments (average RV strain; RVS Avg), was analyzed using 2DSTE. Compared to women with normal diastolic function (DD0), RAS, RVS free wall and RVS Avg were significantly reduced in DD (43.1% ± 11.9%, -26.7% ± 5.6%, and -23.3% ± 3.5% in DD0; vs 35.1% ± 10.4%, -23.9% ± 5.5%, and -20.6% ± 3.8% in DD; P right heart function is significantly altered in DD. DTI as well as 2DSTE constitute sensitive echocardiographic tools that enable the diagnosis of impaired right heart mechanics in early-staged DD. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Positron emission tomography of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.; Yano, Y.; Mathis, C.A.; Moyer, B.R.; Huesman, R.H.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1983-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) offers the opportunity to noninvasively measure heart muscle blood perfusion, oxygen utilization, metabolism of fatty acids, sugars and amino acids. This paper reviews physiological principles which are basic to PET instrumentation for imaging the heart and gives examples of the application of positron emission tomography for measuring myocardial flow and metabolism. 33 references, 11 figures, 1 table

  19. Heart in anatomy history, radiology, anthropology and art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinković, S; Lazić, D; Kanjuh, V; Valjarević, S; Tomić, I; Aksić, M; Starčević, A

    2014-05-01

    Anthropologic, artistic and medical significance of heart inspired usto undertake this multidisciplinary study. Amongst the 24 obtained echocardiograms and phonograms, 1 was used for a Photoshop processing. In addition, over 20,000 art work reproductions were examined in this study. Artistic and symbolic presentation of heart started some 15,000 years ago. First heart models were made by the Egyptian and Olmec civilisations. Ancient cultures regarded heart as the seat of the soul, spirit and intelligence. First anatomical and artistic images of heart were created by Leonardo da Vinci in the15th century, and first wax models by the Italian anatomists in the 17th century. Mediaeval religious symbolism of heart was replaced in the Renaissance and later on mainly by its role in the romantic love. Anatomical heart art continued in the 18th and 19th centuries through the works of Sénac, Cloquet, Hirschfeldand Bourgery. Some modern artists, such as Dalí, Kahlo, Rivera, Warhol, Ivanjicki, Vital, Kober and Mastrlova, created the anatomical heart images or sculptures, whereas some others, such as Duchamp, Klee, Miró, Matisse and Dine, presented heart symbol in their artworks. New radiologic technologies produce fine images of heart, some of which are similar to the works of modern artists. Heart biology and symbolism have had a tremendous influence on our culture, including art and medical sciences. New radiologic techniques and computer technology have produced such images of heart, which substantially improved diagnosis, but also enhanced the heart aesthetics.

  20. MRI in ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazirolan, T.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of ischemic heart disease has increased over the last years. Cardiac MRI is the only imaging modality that provides 'one stop shop' assessment. Information about ventricular function, myocardial ischemia and myocardial viability can be obtained in a single cardiac MRI session. Additionally, Cardiac MRI has become a gold standard method in evaluation of myocardial viability and in assessment of ventricular mass and function. As a result, cardiac MRI enable radiologist to comprehensively assess ischemic heart disease. The aim of this presentation is to provide the reader a state-of-the art on how the newest cardiac MRI techniques can be used to study ischemic heart disease patients.

  1. Cardio MRI right heart assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genova, K.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: In recent years, the evaluation of the function and morphology of the right heart caused increasing interest as right sided dysfunction is an important prognostic factor in many cardiovascular diseases. Modern MRI technique is the method of choice for precise assessment of the morphology and function of the right heart and is increasingly used in routine practice. What you will learn: Selecting appropriate techniques tailored to the morphology and function of right heart and conform to accepted standards is crucial for obtaining diagnostic imaging. This requires, as knowledge of the art of study, and diseases that assessment of right heart is key. The various techniques used and the specifics of the study protocol in the underlying disease leading to right dysfunction, consistent with standards and based on our experience will be presented. Discussion: The function of the right heart and in particular right sided function affects the prognosis of a number of cardiovascular diseases. Right sided morphology and function are assessed in terms of hemodynamic and prognostic significance in a number of heart and lung diseases. This enables clinicians to refine therapy, monitoring the effect of treatment and appropriate adjustment and precise timing invasive procedure or surgery. Knowing the capabilities and limitations of the method, combined with clinically - oriented approach are prerequisites for accurate and informative assessment of the right heart. Conclusion: Cardiac MRI is a method that allows precise , non-invasive and non- ionizing radiation morphological and functional assessment of the right heart, with the evaluation of the pulmonary circulation, which determines its key importance in conditions requiring assessment of right heart

  2. Comparison of left and right ventricular ejection and filling parameters by fast cine MR imaging in breath-hold technique: clinical study of 42 patients with cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rominger, M.B.; Bachmann, G.F.; Geuer, M.; Puzik, M.; Rau, W.S.; Ricken, W.W.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of left and right ventricular filling and ejection of localized and diffuse heart diseases with fast cine MR imaging in breath-hold technique. Methods: 42 patients (14 idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathies (DCM), 13 hypertrophic cardiomyopathies (HCM) and 15 coronary artery diseases (CAD)) and 10 healthy volunteers were examined. Time-volume-curves of three left ventricular and one right ventricular slices were evaluated and peak ejection and filling rates (PER, PFR end-diastolic volume (EDV)/s) time to PER and PFR (TPER, TPFR ms) and time of end-systole (TSYS in % RR-intervall) were calculated. Results: There were significant regional and left-/right-sided differences of the filling and ejection of both ventricles within and between the different groups. In DCM the left ventricular PFR was reduced (DCM 3.1 EDV/s; volunteers 4.9 EDV/s) and Z-SYS prolonged (DCM 50.1%; volunteers 35.4%). In CAD there were localized decreased filling rates in comparison to the normal volunteer group (left ventricle: basal: 2.9 and 6.3 EDV/s, apical: 4.4 and 6.3 EDV/s; right ventricle: 3.6 and 5.7 EDV/s). HCM typically showed an isovolumetric lengthening of the endsystole. Conclusions: Cardiac MR imaging in breath-hold technique is suitable for measuring contraction and relaxation disturbances of localized and diffuse heart diseases by means of ejection and filling volume indices. (orig.) [de

  3. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery; HF - surgery; Intra-aortic balloon pumps - heart failure; IABP - heart failure; Catheter based assist devices - heart failure ... problem may cause heart failure or make heart failure worse. Heart valve surgery may be needed to repair or ...

  4. Comparison of different tissue clearing methods and 3D imaging techniques for visualization of GFP-expressing mouse embryos and embryonic hearts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolesová, H.; Čapek, Martin; Radochová, Barbora; Janáček, Jiří; Sedmera, David

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 146, č. 2 (2016), s. 142-152 ISSN 0948-6143 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-12412S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH13028 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : green fluorescent protein (GFP) * confocal microscopy * optical projection tomography * tissue transparency * heart * embryo Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 2.553, year: 2016

  5. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazacu, A.; Ciubotaru, A.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of congenital heart disease can be attributed to major improvements in diagnosis and treatment. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the clinical management strategy of patients with congenital heart disease. The development of new cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques allows comprehensive assessment of complex cardiac anatomy and function and provides information about the long-term residual post-operative lesions and complications of surgery. It overcomes many of the limitations of echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. This review evaluates the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging modality in the management of subject with congenital heart disease (CHD). (authors)

  6. Imagen y discurso de la representación religiosa del Sagrado Corazón de Jesús / Image and discourse of the representation of the Sacred Heart of Jesus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Díaz Patiño

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo presenta la historia de la devoción e imagen del Sagrado Corazón de Jesús, desde los primeros indicios de su construcción como imagen devocional hasta la consagración de toda la humanidad a dicha devoción en el año de 1899. El propósito de este recorrido histórico es entender la evolución de los sentidos religiosos otorgados a una imagen devocional a lo largo del tiempo desde la óptica institucional; entender las sutilezas de esas transformaciones a lo largo de espacios de larga duración, así como las innovaciones que en el campo espiritual encuentra la institución eclesiástica para reestructurar los usos y funciones de las imágenes devocionales./ The article presents the history of the cult and image of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, from the first signs of its construction as a devotional image until the consecration of all humanity to the devotion in 1899. The purpose of this historical survey is to understand the evolution of religious meanings given to a devotional image over time from the institutional perspective, to understand the subtleties of these changes over long-term spaces, as well as the innovations that in the spiritual realm the ecclesiastic institution finds to restructure the uses and functions of devotional images.

  7. Revealing Hearts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saghaug, Kristin Falck; Pattison, George; Lindgren, Peter

    2014-01-01

    with reference to Tillich’s account of the meaning of revelation through culture and art, summed up in the statement that “(...) revelation is the manifestation of the ground of being for human knowledge” (Tillich, 1951, p.94), which, we argue, can be extended to everyday experiences, for example, in business......Some small business owners want to balance personal values as well as economic values. “I have to follow my heart” or “it must be meaningful” some of them say. But how might they be able to know what gives meaning to the heart? The philosophical theologian Paul Tillich finds that the problem...... life. In Tillich’s own terms, even preliminary concerns may point at an ultimate concern (Tillich, 1964), which can also be understood as ‘knowledge of the heart’. Our account is also connected to wider discussions concerning the nature of intuition....

  8. Getting a New Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be able to replace it with an artificial (man-made) valve. Cardiac size reduction . During this procedure, your doctor removes a piece of the heart muscle from an enlarged heart. This makes your heart ...

  9. Heart-Health Screenings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools For Your Heart Health • Watch, Learn & Live Animations Library Subscribe to Heart Insight magazine and monthly ... in Spanish . Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  10. Heart Attack Recovery FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... recommendations to make a full recovery. View an animation of a heart attack . Heart Attack Recovery Questions ... Support Network Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  11. Open heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002950.htm Open heart surgery To use the sharing features on this ... large arteries connected to the heart. The term "open heart surgery" means that you are connected to a ...

  12. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discharge; Heart valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 434. ...

  13. Congenital Heart Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart defects. Important Notice The Congenital Heart Information Network website is temporarily out of service. Please join ... and Uwe Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright © ...

  14. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  15. Hypertensive heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000163.htm Hypertensive heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hypertensive heart disease refers to heart problems that occur because of ...

  16. Left heart catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye (sometimes called "contrast") will be ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  17. Right heart ventriculography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiography - right heart ... moved forward into the right side of the heart. As the catheter is advanced, the doctor can ... is injected into the right side of the heart. It helps the cardiologist determine the size and ...

  18. Congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a problem with the heart's structure and function that is present at birth. ... Fraser CD, Kane LC. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM Jr, ... Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: The Biological Basis of Modern ...

  19. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About CDC.gov . Home About Heart Disease Coronary Artery Disease Heart Attack Heart Attack Signs and Symptoms ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  20. Are two hearts better than one?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, H.; Cowie, A.; Kalff, V.; Richardson, M.; Kelly, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Cardiac transplantation has become routine treatment, but not all available donor hearts can be matched. Heterotopic Cardiac Transplantation (the native heart remains in-situ), a technically difficult procedure, was introduced to partly address this limitation. Post-transplantation Gated Blood Pool Scans for these patients presented two challenges - finding the best angle for imaging the transplanted left ventricle, and distinguishing the ECG signals of the native and transplanted hearts. This allowed (a) observation of serial changes in LVEF of both hearts in seven patients, and (b) resolution of the controversy of what happens to native heart function. The transplanted heart was best imaged between LAO 5 deg and RAO 45 deg. By changing ECG limb lead positions or using a wandering V lead, it was usually possible to obtain a