WorldWideScience

Sample records for heart failure disease

  1. Ivabradine, heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Di Lullo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of congestive heart failure are actually increasing worldwide, especially in Western countries. In Europe and the United States, congestive heart failure represents a disabling clinical disease, accountable for increased hospitalization and health care costs. European guidelines have underlined the importance of pharmacological treatment to improve both patients’ outcomes and quality of life. The latest clinical trials to evaluate ivabradine’s efficacy have underlined its usefulness as a stand-alone medication and in combination with conventional congestive heart failure therapy, including in chronic kidney disease patients.

  2. Towards defining heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolger, Aidan P; Gatzoulis, Michael A

    2004-12-01

    Injury to the myocardium disrupts geometric integrity and results in changes to intracardiac pressure, wall stress and tension, and the pattern of blood flow through the heart. Significant disruption to pump function results in heart failure which is defined in terms of symptoms: breathlessness and fatigue, signs of salt and water retention, and neurohormonal activation. This syndrome most commonly occurs in the context of injury due to ischaemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathy but because patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) are born with sometimes gross distortions of cardiac anatomy they too are subject to the forces that drive heart failure. This paper explores the available data relating to the clinical and neurohormonal manifestations of heart failure in patients with congenital heart disease and describes how, by additionally exploring events at a cellular level, we may be able to arrive at a definition of heart failure relevant to this population.

  3. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  4. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  5. What Is Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  6. What Causes Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  7. Living with Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  8. Heart Failure in Pediatric Patients With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Robert B; Ware, Stephanie M

    2017-03-17

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome resulting from diverse primary and secondary causes and shared pathways of disease progression, correlating with substantial mortality, morbidity, and cost. HF in children is most commonly attributable to coexistent congenital heart disease, with different risks depending on the specific type of malformation. Current management and therapy for HF in children are extrapolated from treatment approaches in adults. This review discusses the causes, epidemiology, and manifestations of HF in children with congenital heart disease and presents the clinical, genetic, and molecular characteristics that are similar or distinct from adult HF. The objective of this review is to provide a framework for understanding rapidly increasing genetic and molecular information in the challenging context of detailed phenotyping. We review clinical and translational research studies of HF in congenital heart disease including at the genome, transcriptome, and epigenetic levels. Unresolved issues and directions for future study are presented. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Heart failure - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart failure; Right-sided heart failure - cor pulmonale; Cardiomyopathy - heart failure; HF ... Disease Section. Heart Failure as a newly approved diagnosis for cardiac rehabilitation: challenges and opportunities. J Am ...

  10. Heart failure in patients with kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuegel, Courtney; Bansal, Nisha

    2017-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the population of CKD patients with concurrent HF continues to grow. The accurate diagnosis of HF is challenging in patients with CKD in part due to a lack of validated imaging and biomarkers specifically in this population. The pathophysiology between the heart and the kidneys is complex and bidirectional. Patients with CKD have greater prevalence of traditional HF risk factors as well as unique kidney-specific risk factors including malnutrition, acid-base alterations, uraemic toxins, bone mineral changes, anemia and myocardial stunning. These risk factors also contribute to the decline of kidney function seen in patients with subclinical and clinical HF. More targeted HF therapies may improve outcomes in patients with kidney disease as current HF therapies are underutilised in this population. Further work is also needed to develop novel HF therapies for the CKD population. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Conceptual model for heart failure disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrikopoulou, Efstathia; Abbate, Kariann; Whellan, David J

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this review is to propose a conceptual model for heart failure (HF) disease management (HFDM) and to define the components of an efficient HFDM plan in reference to this model. Articles that evaluated 1 or more of the following aspects of HFDM were reviewed: (1) outpatient clinic follow-up; (2) self-care interventions to enhance patient skills; and (3) remote evaluation of worsening HF either using structured telephone support (STS) or by monitoring device data (telemonitoring). The success of programs in reducing readmissions and mortality were mixed. Outpatient follow-up programs generally resulted in improved outcomes, including decreased readmissions. Based on 1 meta-analysis, specialty clinics improved outcomes and nonspecialty clinics did not. Results from self-care programs were inconsistent and might have been affected by patient cognitive status and educational level, and intervention intensity. Telemonitoring, despite initially promising meta-analyses demonstrating a decrease in the number and duration of HF-related readmissions and all-cause mortality rates at follow-up, has not been shown in randomized trials to consistently reduce readmissions or mortality. However, evidence from device monitoring trials in particular might have been influenced by technology and design issues that might be rectified in future trials. Results from the literature suggest that the ideal HFDM plan would include outpatient follow-up at an HF specialty clinic and continuous education to improve patient self-care. The end result of this plan would lead to better understanding on the part of the patient and improved patient ability to recognize and respond to signs of decompensation. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. How Is Heart Failure Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  13. How Is Heart Failure Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  14. Heart failure in children - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congestive heart failure - children; Cor pulmonale - children; Cardiomyopathy - children; CHF - children; Congenital heart defect - heart failure in children; Cyanotic heart disease - heart failure in children; Birth defect of the heart - heart ...

  15. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Liver disease and heart failure: Back and forth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correale, Michele; Tarantino, Nicola; Petrucci, Rossella; Tricarico, Lucia; Laonigro, Irma; Di Biase, Matteo; Brunetti, Natale Daniele

    2017-10-31

    In their clinical practice, physicians can face heart diseases (chronic or acute heart failure) affecting the liver and liver diseases affecting the heart. Systemic diseases can also affect both heart and liver. Therefore, it is crucial in clinical practice to identify complex interactions between heart and liver, in order to provide the best treatment for both. In this review, we sought to summarize principal evidence explaining the mechanisms and supporting the existence of this complicate cross-talk between heart and liver. Hepatic involvement after heart failure, its pathophysiology, clinical presentation (congestive and ischemic hepatopathy), laboratory and echocardiographic prognostic markers are discussed; likewise, hepatic diseases influencing cardiac function (cirrhotic cardiomyopathy). Several clinical conditions (congenital, metabolic and infectious causes) possibly affecting simultaneously liver and heart have been also discussed. Cardiovascular drug therapy may present important side effects on the liver and hepato-biliary drug therapy on heart and vessels; post-transplantation immunosuppressive drugs may show reciprocal cardio-hepatotoxicity. A heart-liver axis is drafted by inflammatory reactants from the heart and the liver, and liver acts a source of energy substrates for the heart. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Ivabradine in stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Kim; Ford, Ian; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An elevated heart rate is an established marker of cardiovascular risk. Previous analyses have suggested that ivabradine, a heart-rate-reducing agent, may improve outcomes in patients with stable coronary artery disease, left ventricular dysfunction, and a heart rate of 70 beats per...... minute or more. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of ivabradine, added to standard background therapy, in 19,102 patients who had both stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure and a heart rate of 70 beats per minute or more (including 12...... without activity-limiting angina (P=0.02 for interaction). The incidence of bradycardia was higher with ivabradine than with placebo (18.0% vs. 2.3%, Pdisease without clinical heart failure, the addition of ivabradine to standard...

  18. Nutrition in cardiovascular disease: salt in hypertension and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Feng J; Burnier, Michel; Macgregor, Graham A

    2011-12-01

    There is much evidence for a causal relationship between salt intake and blood pressure (BP). The current salt intake in many countries is between 9 and 12 g/day. A reduction in salt intake to the recommended level of 5-6 g/day lowers BP in both hypertensive and normotensive individuals. A further reduction to 3-4 g/day has a much greater effect. Prospective studies and outcome trials have demonstrated that a lower salt intake is associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular disease. Increasing evidence also suggests that a high salt intake is directly related to left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) independent of BP. Both raised BP and LVH are important risk factors for heart failure. It is therefore possible that a lower salt intake could prevent the development of heart failure. In patients who already have heart failure, a high salt intake aggravates the retention of salt and water, thereby exacerbating heart failure symptoms and progression of the disease. A lower salt intake plays an important role in the management of heart failure. Despite this, currently there is no clear evidence on how far salt intake should be reduced in heart failure. Our personal view is that these patients should reduce their salt intake to <5 g/day, i.e. the maximum intake recommended by the World Health Organisation for all adults. If salt intake is successfully reduced, there may well be a need for a reduction in diuretic dosage.

  19. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart failure due to systolic dysfunction. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 26, 2014. Colucci WS. ... patient with heart failure or cardiomyopathy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 26, 2014. Colucci WS. ...

  20. Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorsal, Anders; Wiggers, Henrik; McMurray, John J V

    2018-01-01

    This article briefly discusses the epidemiology of heart failure and diabetes and summarizes the key findings from the recent cardiovascular outcome trials in patients with type 2 diabetes, with a focus on heart failure as an endpoint.......This article briefly discusses the epidemiology of heart failure and diabetes and summarizes the key findings from the recent cardiovascular outcome trials in patients with type 2 diabetes, with a focus on heart failure as an endpoint....

  1. Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:May 9,2017 When heart failure (HF) ... Making This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  2. Ivabradine, coronary artery disease, and heart failure: beyond rhythm control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scicchitano P

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pietro Scicchitano,1 Francesca Cortese,1 Gabriella Ricci,1 Santa Carbonara,1 Michele Moncelli,1 Massimo Iacoviello,1 Annagrazia Cecere,1 Michele Gesualdo,1 Annapaola Zito,1 Pasquale Caldarola,2 Domenico Scrutinio,3 Rocco Lagioia,3 Graziano Riccioni,4 Marco Matteo Ciccone1 1Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, University of Bari, School of Medicine, Policlinico, Bari, Italy; 2Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Policlinic, San Paolo Hospital, Bari, Italy; 3Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Fondazione Maugeri, Cassano Murge, Italy; 4Intensive Cardiology Care Unit, San Camillo de Lellis Hospital, Manfredonia, Foggia, Italy Abstract: Elevated heart rate could negatively influence cardiovascular risk in the general population. It can induce and promote the atherosclerotic process by means of several mechanisms involving endothelial shear stress and biochemical activities. Furthermore, elevated heart rate can directly increase heart ischemic conditions because of its skill in unbalancing demand/supply of oxygen and decreasing the diastolic period. Thus, many pharmacological treatments have been proposed in order to reduce heart rate and ameliorate the cardiovascular risk profile of individuals, especially those suffering from coronary artery diseases (CAD and chronic heart failure (CHF. Ivabradine is the first pure heart rate reductive drug approved and currently used in humans, created in order to selectively reduce sinus node function and to overcome the many side effects of similar pharmacological tools (ie, β-blockers or calcium channel antagonists. The aim of our review is to evaluate the role and the safety of this molecule on CAD and CHF therapeutic strategies. Keywords: chronic heart failure, heart rate reduction, cardiac ischemic disease, heart-rate lowering drugs, funny current

  3. [The German National Disease Management Guideline "Chronic Heart Failure"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbrenner, S; Langer, T; Scherer, M; Störk, S; Ertl, G; Muth, Ch; Hoppe, U C; Kopp, I; Ollenschläger, G

    2012-02-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is an illness mostly affecting elderly people. In Germany CHF is one of the most common causes of death and at the same time one of the most common diagnosis in inpatient care. Due to the expected increase in life expectancy in the next few years experts predict a further step-up of the incidence. Against this background development of a national guideline on chronic heart failure was prioritised and accordingly the National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) Chronic Heart Failure was developed by a multi- and interdisciplinary group. The guideline group comprised experts from all relevant scientific medical societies as well as a patient expert. The National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) on Chronic Heart Failure aims at supporting patients and health care providers with respect to decisions on a specific health care problem by giving recommendations for actions. Recommendations are informed by the best available scientific evidence on this topic.Patients with CHF often suffer from multiple conditions. Due to this fact and the old age patients do have very complex and demanding health care needs. Thus accounting for co-morbidities is paramount in planning and providing health care for theses patients and communication between doctor and patient but also between all health care providers is crucial.Basic treatment strategies in chronic heart failure comprise management of risk factors and prognostic factors as well as appropriate consideration of co-morbidities accompanied by measures empowering patients in establishing a healthy life style and a self-dependant management of their illness.Psycho-social aspects have a very strong influence on patients' acceptance of the disease and their self-management. In addition they have a strong influence on therapy management of the treating physician thus they have to be addressed adequately during the consultation.The National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) Chronic Heart Failure (CHF

  4. Chronic heart failure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admissions.3 Therefore, heart failure is also an expensive disease. Pathophysiology. The first step in the ... hypertrophy or injury due to a valvular problem. This myocardial injury leads to ... heart failure is also an expensive disease. Keywords: acute myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, heart failure, hypertension, obesity.

  5. Heart Failure and Chronic Kidney Disease in Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cernea Simona

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Complex hemodynamic, neurohormonal and biochemical changes occur in heart failure and chronic kidney disease, and hyperglycemia/diabetes further accentuate the multifactorial pathogenetic mechanisms. The acknowledgement of concomitant heart and kidney dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes has major clinical implications with regards to prognosis, as they significantly increase the risk of mortality, and to therapeutical strategy of both conditions, as well as of hyperglycemia. A comprehensive interdisciplinary approach is needed in these cases in order to improve the outcomes.

  6. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaui, Eduardo Nagib, E-mail: engaui@cardiol.br; Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Klein, Carlos Henrique [Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública Sérgio Arouca da Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-06-15

    Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast), from 1996 to 2011. Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes.

  7. Who Is at Risk for Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  8. How Can Heart Failure Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  9. A review of heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Dhaval R

    2011-01-01

    The nearly one-million estimated adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients in the United States now outnumber children with congenital heart disease (CHD). With continued improvement in survival due to surgical and medical management of patients born with CHD, there is an overall shift in the burden of care from childhood to adulthood. Due to this transitioning population, the probability of heart failure continues to increase with age and represents nearly one-quarter of all mortality in ACHD. Despite these sobering figures adult cardiologist and fellows continue to have limited exposure in the care of patients with congenital heart disease. The syndrome of heart failure represents a complex derangement of neurohormones, natriuretic peptides, and cytokines leading to progressive symptoms of exercise intolerance, dyspnea, and fatigue. Congenital heart patients represent a unique challenge in both categorization and protocol management of heart failure (HF). It remains unclear if the current four-stage ACC/AHA guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of HF in adults can serve as a meaningful framework for congenital heart patients. Additionally, widely used conventional HF therapy of beta-blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) have not demonstrated clear survival benefit in this population. Unfortunately, adequately powered and controlled randomized studies are grossly lacking and remain challenging to conduct. Nonetheless, a review of heart failure associated with ACHD is provided.

  10. Congestive heart failure in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poskurica Mileta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disorders are the most frequent cause of death (46-60% among patients with advanced chronic renal failure (CRF, and on dialysis treatment. Uremic cardiomyopathy is the basic pathophysiologic substrate, whereas ischemic heart disease (IHD and anemia are the most important contributing factors. Associated with well-know risk factors and specific disorders for terminal kidney failure and dialysis, the aforementioned factors instigate congestive heart failure (CHF. Suspected CHF is based on the anamnesis, clinical examination and ECG, while it is confirmed and defined more precisely on the basis of echocardiography and radiology examination. Biohumoral data (BNP, NT-proBNP are not sufficiently reliable because of specific volemic fluctuation and reduced natural clearance. Therapy approach is similar to the one for the general population: ACEI, ARBs, β-blockers, inotropic drugs and diuretics. Hypervolemia and most of the related symptoms can be kept under control effectively by the isolated or ultrafiltation, in conjunction with dialysis, during the standard bicarbonate hemodialysis or hemodiafiltration. In the same respect peritoneal dialysis is efficient for the control of hypervolemia symptoms, mainly during the first years of its application and in case of the lower NYHA class (II°/III°. In general, heart support therapy, surgical interventions of the myocardium and valve replacement are rarely used in patients on dialysis, whereas revascularization procedures are beneficial for associated IHD. In selected cases the application of cardiac resynchronization and/or implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator are advisable.

  11. Treating Disease Mechanisms in Patients With Heart Failure and Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, Amanda; Aguilar, David

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes and heart failure commonly coexist and portend worsened prognosis than either disease alone. We explore mechanisms that may serve as potential treatment targets and review the effects of various contemporary glucose-lowering agents on heart failure outcomes. Promising data has emerged on sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SLGT2) inhibitors as the first class of agents to improve cardiovascular mortality and heart failure outcomes in diabetic individuals both with and without established heart failure. Poor glycemic control is linked to worse heart failure outcomes; however, targeting glycemic control alone has not been sufficient. Furthermore, multiple commonly used antihyperglycemic agents may lead to adverse heart failure effects. SGLT2 inhibitors target multiple mechanisms implicated in diabetes and heart failure and may play a promising role in primary prevention of heart failure and in treatment of individuals with diabetes and established heart failure.

  12. The epidemiology of heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Fred H; Marelli, Ariane J

    2014-01-01

    The impact of lifelong exposure to myocardial dysfunction in populations with congenital heart disease (CHD) is becoming increasingly recognized. Most children born with CHD now reach adulthood and the long-term sequelae of treatment are contributing to substantial comorbidity. The combination of structural changes present at birth with changes resulting from cardiac surgery can result in heart failure. This article reports on the current state of knowledge on the epidemiology of heart failure in this patient population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Hyperkalemia in Heart Failure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarwar, Chaudhry M S; Papadimitriou, Lampros; Pitt, Bertram; Piña, Ileana; Zannad, Faiez; Anker, Stefan D; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Butler, Javed

    2016-01-01

    .... Heart failure patients have a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease, which further heightens the risk of hyperkalemia, especially when renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors are used...

  14. Silent disease progression in clinically stable heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbah, Hani N

    2017-04-01

    Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) is a progressive disorder whereby cardiac structure and function continue to deteriorate, often despite the absence of clinically apparent signs and symptoms of a worsening disease state. This silent yet progressive nature of HFrEF can contribute to the increased risk of death-even in patients who are 'clinically stable', or who are asymptomatic or only mildly symptomatic-because it often goes undetected and/or undertreated. Current therapies are aimed at improving clinical symptoms, and several agents more directly target the underlying causes of disease; however, new therapies are needed that can more fully address factors responsible for underlying progressive cardiac dysfunction. In this review, mechanisms that drive HFrEF, including ongoing cardiomyocyte loss, mitochondrial abnormalities, impaired calcium cycling, elevated LV wall stress, reactive interstitial fibrosis, and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, are discussed. Additionally, limitations of current HF therapies are reviewed, with a focus on how these therapies are designed to counteract the deleterious effects of compensatory neurohumoral activation but do not fully prevent disease progression. Finally, new investigational therapies that may improve the underlying molecular, cellular, and structural abnormalities associated with HF progression are reviewed. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society of Cardiology.

  15. Angiopoietin-2 in adults with congenital heart disease and heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Lukasz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic heart failure is an important cause for morbidity and mortality in adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD. While NT-proBNP is an established biomarker for heart failure of non-congenital origin, its application in ACHD has limitations. The angiogenic factors Angiopoietin-1 and -2 (Ang-1, Ang-2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, and soluble receptor tyrosine kinase of the Tie family (sTie2 correlate with disease severity in heart failure of non-congenital origin. Their role in ACHD has not been studied. METHODS: In 91 patients Ang-2 and NT-proBNP were measured and related to New York Heart Association class, systemic ventricular function and parameters of cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Ang-1, VEGF, and sTie2 were also measured. RESULTS: Ang-2 correlates with NYHA class and ventricular dysfunction comparable to NT-proBNP. Further, Ang-2 showed a good correlation with parameters of cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Both, Ang-2 and NT-proBNP identified patients with severely limited cardiopulmonary exercise capacity. Additionally, Ang-2 is elevated in patients with a single ventricle physiology in contrast to NT-proBNP. VEGF, Ang-1, and sTie2 were not correlated with any clinical parameter. CONCLUSION: The performance of Ang-2 as a biomarker for heart failure in ACHD is comparable to NT-proBNP. Its significant elevation in patients with single ventricle physiology indicates potential in this patient group and warrants further studies.

  16. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation alterations in heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillmore, N; Mori, J; Lopaschuk, G D

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. In many forms of heart disease, including heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathies, changes in cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolism contribute to contractile dysfunction and to a decrease in cardiac efficiency. Specific metabolic changes include a relative increase in cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates and an uncoupling of glycolysis from glucose oxidation. In heart failure, overall mitochondrial oxidative metabolism can be impaired while, in ischaemic heart disease, energy production is impaired due to a limitation of oxygen supply. In both of these conditions, residual mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation dominates over mitochondrial glucose oxidation. In diabetes, the ratio of cardiac fatty acid oxidation to glucose oxidation also increases, although primarily due to an increase in fatty acid oxidation and an inhibition of glucose oxidation. Recent evidence suggests that therapeutically regulating cardiac energy metabolism by reducing fatty acid oxidation and/or increasing glucose oxidation can improve cardiac function of the ischaemic heart, the failing heart and in diabetic cardiomyopathies. In this article, we review the cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolic changes that occur in these forms of heart disease, what role alterations in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation have in contributing to cardiac dysfunction and the potential for targeting fatty acid oxidation to treat these forms of heart disease. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24147975

  17. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients admitted with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, K K; Kjaergaard, J; Akkan, D

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an important differential diagnosis in patients with heart failure (HF). The primary aims were to determine the prevalence of COPD and to test the accuracy of self-reported COPD in patients admitted with HF. Secondary aims were to study...... valve. CONCLUSION: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is frequent in patients admitted with HF and self-reported COPD only identifies a minority. The prevalence of COPD was high in both patients with systolic and nonsystolic HF....... a possible relationship between right and left ventricular function and pulmonary function. DESIGN: Prospective substudy. SETTING: Systematic screening at 11 centres. SUBJECTS: Consecutive patients (n = 532) admitted with HF requiring medical treatment with diuretics and an episode with symptoms...

  18. Heart failure - tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... the best test to: Identify which type of heart failure (systolic, diastolic, valvular) Monitor your heart failure and ...

  19. An Effective Treatment for Heart Failure Caused by Valvular Heart Diseases: Thoracic Sympathetic Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Liu, Wei; Ma, Dan; Yun, Fengxiang; Li, Shu; Liu, Fengqi

    2017-02-27

    The pilot study is designed to investigate the effect of continuous thoracic sympathetic block (TSB) on cardiac function, reconstruction, and hemodynamic parameters in patients with heart failure resulting from valvular heart disease. The cardiac function parameters, including left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricle end-diastole diameter (LVEDD), fractional shortening (FS), and N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), were measured in 19 patients before and after TSB treatment. The patients were also classified on the basis of NYHA classification system. 4 weeks of TSB administration improved cardiac function in 18 of 19 patients (94.74%). The patients' LVEF, LVEDD, and NT-proBNP were all improved significantly after treatment. The favorable clinical outcome of TSB administration suggests an alternative treatment for the patients with heart failure caused by valvular dysfunctions.

  20. Cost-effectiveness of telephonic disease management in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brad; Hughes-Cromwick, Paul F; Forkner, Emma; Galbreath, Autumn Dawn

    2008-02-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a telephonic disease management (DM) intervention in heart failure (HF). Randomized controlled trial of telephonic DM among 1069 community-dwelling patients with systolic HF (SHF) and diastolic HF performed between 1999 and 2003. The enrollment period was 18 months per subject. Bootstrap-resampled incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were computed and compared across groups. Direct medical costs were obtained from a medical record review that collected records from 92% of patients; 66% of records requested were obtained. Disease management produced statistically significant survival advantages among all patients (17.4 days, P = .04), among patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III/IV symptoms (47.7 days, P = .02), and among patients with SHF (24.2 days, P = .01). Analyses of direct medical and intervention costs showed no cost savings associated with the intervention. For all patients and considering all-cause medical care, the ICER was $146 870 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained, while for patients with NYHA class III/IV symptoms and patients with SHF, the ICERs were $67 784 and $95 721 per QALY gained, respectively. Costs per QALY gained were $101 120 for all patients, $72 501 for patients with SHF, and $41 348 for patients with NYHA class III/IV symptoms. The intervention was effective but costly to implement and did not reduce utilization. It may not be cost-effective in other broadly representative samples of patients. However, with program cost reductions and proper targeting, this program may produce life-span increases at costs that are less than $100 000 per QALY gained.

  1. Heart failure in pregnant women with cardiac disease: Data from the ROPAC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.P.E. Ruys (Titia); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien); R. Hall (Ruth); M.T. Subirana-Domèlnech (Maria); J. Grando-Ting (Jennifer); M. Estensen (Mette); R. Crepaz (Roberto); V. Fesslova (Vlasta); M. Gurvitz (Michelle); J. de Backer (Julie); M.R. Johnson (Mark); P.G. Pieper (Petronella)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjective Heart failure (HF) is one of the most important complications in pregnant women with heart disease, causing maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. Methods This is an international observational registry of patients with structural heart disease during pregnancy. Sixty

  2. Heart Failure in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Heart Failure in Children and Adolescents Updated:May 8,2017 ... lives. This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure Introduction Types of Heart ...

  3. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic heart failure in elderly people: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Gubkina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article provides literature review on the subject: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: pathogenesis, principles of treatment, the course of heart failure in elderly people with comorbide pathology (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cardio-vascular diseases. Role of NT-pro BNP as marker of heart failure in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD was analyzed. Influence в-blockers and m-anticholinergic drug on cardiovascular system, and possibility of reception of β-blockers at people with COPD and HF was studied. 

  4. Valve repair improves central sleep apnea in heart failure patients with valvular heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Hidetoshi; Takahashi, Masafumi; Yaegashi, Hironobu; Eda, Seiichiro; Kitahara, Hiroto; Tsunemoto, Hideo; Kamikozawa, Mamoru; Koyama, Jun; Yamazaki, Kyohei; Ikeda, Uichi

    2009-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that treatment of heart failure (HF) could improve cardiac function and sleep apnea syndrome (SAS), but it is unknown how cardiac surgery may affect SAS in HF patients. Relationships between HF with valvular heart diseases and 2 types of SAS (obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and central sleep apnea (CSA)) were examined. The effects of valve repair surgery on OSA and CSA was also investigated. Polysomnography, echocardiography and right cardiac catheterization were used to study 150 severe HF patients with mitral valvular and/or aortic valvular diseases. Significant associations between SAS and age, gender, body mass index, or hypertension were observed. The value of the CSA-apnea index (AI) was significantly correlated with pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) and mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP). These associations were not identified for OSA-AI. Valve repair surgery was used to treat 74 patients with severe SAS. The treatment led to a significant improvement in PCWP and mean PAP, and CSA-AI, but not in OSA-AI. These findings suggest close associations between CSA and cardiac function in HF patients with valvular heart diseases. Furthermore, improvement of cardiac function with valvular surgery reduces the severity of CSA in HF patients with valvular heart diseases.

  5. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE RAAS blockade and diastolic heart failure in chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, Casper F. M.; Navis, Gerjan

    New data from Ahmed et al. show that discharge prescriptions for renin-angiotensin-aldosterone inhibitor therapy are associated with a significant reduction in all-cause mortality in elderly patients with diastolic heart failure and chronic kidney disease (CKD). These observational data support the

  6. Effect of moderate or intensive disease management program on outcome in patients with heart failure : Coordinating Study Evaluating Outcomes of Advising and Counseling in Heart Failure (COACH)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, T.; van der Wal, Martje H.L.; Lesman-Leegte, Ivonne; Luttik, Marie-Louise; Hogenhuis, Jochem; Veeger, Nic J.; Sanderman, Robbert; Hoes, A.W.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Lok, D.J.; Dunselman, P.H.; Tijssen, J.G.; Hillege, Hans L.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2008-01-01

    Background:: Heart failure (HF) disease management programs are widely implemented, but data about their effect on outcome have been inconsistent. Methods: The Coordinating Stud), Evaluating Out-comes of Advising and Counseling in Heart Failure (COACH) was a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial

  7. Predictors of exercise capacity following exercise-based rehabilitation in patients with coronary heart disease and heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddin, Jamal; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Lewinter, Christian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to undertake a comprehensive assessment of the patient, intervention and trial-level factors that may predict exercise capacity following exercise-based rehabilitation in patients with coronary heart disease and heart failure. DESIGN: Meta-analysis and meta...... of improvement in exercise capacity following exercise-based rehabilitation compared to control among patients with coronary heart disease or heart failure. Whilst higher exercise intensities were associated with a greater level of post-rehabilitation exercise capacity, there was no strong evidence to support...

  8. The new concept of ''interventional heart failure therapy'': part 2--inotropes, valvular disease, pumps, and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Keith A; Philip, Kiran J; Simsir, Sinan; Schwarz, Ernst R

    2010-09-01

    Recent advances in heart failure therapy include a variety of mechanical and device-based technologies that target structural aspects of heart failure that cannot be treated with drug therapy alone; these newer therapies can collectively be described as interventional heart failure therapy. This article is the second in a 2-part series reviewing interventional heart failure therapy. Interventions included in this discussion include those indicated for the treatment of end-stage refractory heart failure, including interventional medical therapy, interventional treatment of valvular disease, mechanical assist devices, and heart transplantation. Also included is a review of the currently available catheter-based pumps, which are intended to provide temporary support in patients with acute hemodynamic compromise. The use of cellular or stem cell therapy for the treatment of heart failure is an emerging interventional therapy and data supporting its use for the treatment heart failure will also be presented, as will a discussion of the role of palliative care and self-care in heart failure therapy.

  9. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  10. Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team Updated:May 9,2017 Patients with ... to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  11. Heart failure - medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken once ...

  12. Current Role of Ivabradine in Stable Coronary Artery Disease Without Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porres-Aguilar, Mateo; Muñoz, Oscar C; Abbas, Aamer

    2016-02-01

    Increase in heart rate represents a significant contribution in the pathophysiology of coronary artery disease and heart failure, by promoting atherosclerotic process and endothelial dysfunction. Thus, it negatively influences cardiovascular risk in the general population. The aim of this review is to analyze the current, controversial, and future role of ivabradine as an anti-anginal agent in the setting of coronary artery disease without heart failure. Ivabradine represents a selective heart rate-lowering agent that increased diastolic perfusion time and improving energetics in the ischemic myocardium.

  13. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery; HF - surgery; Intra-aortic balloon pumps - heart failure; IABP - heart failure; Catheter based assist devices - heart failure ... problem may cause heart failure or make heart failure worse. Heart valve surgery may be needed to repair or ...

  14. Lungs in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Apostolo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung function abnormalities both at rest and during exercise are frequently observed in patients with chronic heart failure, also in the absence of respiratory disease. Alterations of respiratory mechanics and of gas exchange capacity are strictly related to heart failure. Severe heart failure patients often show a restrictive respiratory pattern, secondary to heart enlargement and increased lung fluids, and impairment of alveolar-capillary gas diffusion, mainly due to an increased resistance to molecular diffusion across the alveolar capillary membrane. Reduced gas diffusion contributes to exercise intolerance and to a worse prognosis. Cardiopulmonary exercise test is considered the “gold standard” when studying the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and metabolic adaptations to exercise in cardiac patients. During exercise, hyperventilation and consequent reduction of ventilation efficiency are often observed in heart failure patients, resulting in an increased slope of ventilation/carbon dioxide (VE/VCO2 relationship. Ventilatory efficiency is as strong prognostic and an important stratification marker. This paper describes the pulmonary abnormalities at rest and during exercise in the patients with heart failure, highlighting the principal diagnostic tools for evaluation of lungs function, the possible pharmacological interventions, and the parameters that could be useful in prognostic assessment of heart failure patients.

  15. [Apathetic hyperthyroidism with heart failure in an elderly patient with Plummer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narisawa, Manabu; Okada, Yosuke; Arao, Tadashi; Kuno, Fumi; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2014-12-01

    We report a case of apathetic hyperthyroidism associated with unrecognized slowly growing functional thyroid adenoma (Plummer's disease), atrial fibrillation and heart failure. An 81-year-old woman with worsening thyroid dysfunction was admitted to our hospital for the treatment of heart failure. The patient had developed heart failure associated with chronic atrial fibrillation at 76 years of age, and one year later was found to have asymptomatic hyperthyroidism. Anti-thyroid autoantibodies were negative, but thyroid echography showed a 32-mm tumor devoid of internal blood flow in the left lower lobe. Free thyroxine 4 (FT4) decreased from 3.30 to 2.60 ng/dl without treatment. The patient was diagnosed with transient thyroiditis and was followed-up without treatment. However, a repeat thyroid echography showed growth of the tumor to 41 mm in 4 years. Thyroid scintigraphy showed uptake that matched the thyroid mass. Based on these findings, the established diagnosis was Plummer's disease complicated with heart failure. The patient was treated with anti-thyroid drugs, which resulted in improvement of FT4 and reduced the severity of heart failure. In this rare case of an elderly patient, Plummer's disease was associated with a slowly-growing functional thyroid adenoma, apathetic hyperthyroidism, repeated episodes of atrial fibrillation and heart failure. Since symptoms of thyrotoxicosis are likely to be missed in the elderly, it is necessary to include hyperthyroidism in the pathoetiology of heart failure and atrial fibrillation in this population.

  16. The business concept of leader pricing as applied to heart failure disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptman, Paul J; Bednarek, Heather L

    2004-01-01

    The implementation of a disease management approach for patients with heart failure has been promoted as a way to improve outcomes, including a decrease in hospitalizations. However, in the absence of rigorous cost analyses and with revenues limited by professional fees, heart failure disease management programs may appear to operate at a loss. The literature outlining the importance of disease management for patients with heart failure is summarized. We review the limitations of current cost analyses and outline the economic concepts of leader pricing, vertical integration and transaction costs to argue that heart failure disease management programs may provide significant "downstream" revenue for an integrated system of health care delivery in a fee-for-service payment structure, while reducing overall costs of care. Pilot data from a university-based program are used in support of this argument. In addition, the favorable impact on patient satisfaction and loyalty can enhance market share, a vital consideration for all health systems. Options for improving the reputation of heart failure disease management within a health system are suggested. Viewed as a loss leader, disease management provides not only quality care for patients with heart failure but also appears to provide financial benefits to the health system that funds the infrastructure and administration of the program. The actual magnitude of this benefit and the degree to which it mitigates overall administration costs requires further study.

  17. Characteristics and outcomes of heart failure-related hospitalization in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Nidhal Ben; Karsenty, Clement; Pontnau, Florence; Malekzadeh-Milani, Sophie; Boudjemline, Younes; Legendre, Antoine; Bonnet, Damien; Iserin, Laurence; Ladouceur, Magalie

    2017-05-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the main cause of death in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD). We aimed to characterize HF-related hospitalization of patients with ACHD, and to determine HF risk factors and prognosis in this population. We prospectively included 471 patients with ACHD admitted to our unit over 24 months. Clinical and biological data and HF management were recorded. Major cardiovascular events were recorded for ACHD with HF. HF was the main reason for hospitalization in 13% of cases (76/583 hospitalizations). Patients with HF were significantly older (median age 44±14 years vs. 37±15 years; Pcongenital heart disease (P=0.04). In the multivariable analysis, pulmonary arterial hypertension (odds ratio [OR] 6.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.5-10.7), history of HF (OR 9.8, 95% CI 5.7-16.8) and history of atrial arrhythmia (OR 3.6, 95% CI 2.2-5.9) were significant risk factors for HF-related admissions (Pheart transplantation during the median follow-up of 18 months (95% CI 14-20 months). The risk of cardiovascular events was 19-fold higher after HF-related hospitalization. HF is emerging as a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the ACHD population. Earlier diagnosis and more active management are required to improve outcomes of HF in ACHD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Heart failure treatment in adults with congenital heart disease: where do we stand in 2014?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Eric V; Valente, Anne Marie

    2014-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the leading cause of death in adults with repaired congenital heart disease (CHD). However there is currently little evidence to guide treatment strategies in this growing group of patients. Unlike the majority of HF, which is usually caused by LV systolic or diastolic dysfunction, CHD-HF is more often a consequence of RV disease, valve dysfunction, shunting or pulmonary hypertension. It is therefore not appropriate to extrapolate from the acquired HF literature and apply it to this heterogeneous population of CHD patients. Additionally, patients with CHD have been excluded from most large trials of medical or device therapy of HF, which has resulted in small retrospective and underpowered studies in the CHD population. This article critically reviews the current knowledge about CHD-HF, paying particular attention to medical therapy in different CHD populations, cardiac resynchronisation therapy and implantable cardiac defibrillators, and the challenges of heart transplantation and mechanical circulatory support in CHD patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Updated:May 9, ... you? This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  20. Heart failure - home monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000113.htm Heart failure - home monitoring To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Heart failure is a condition in which the heart is ...

  1. Is there any difference between Vitamin D deficiency among heart failure and Non-heart failure elderly with cardiovascular disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Taraghi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is common among the elderly with and without heart failure (HF. This study was designed to identify the degree of vitamin D deficiency among HF and Non- HF elderly with cardiovascular disease. In this study, fifty hospitalized elderly patients with HF (26 women and 24 men, age range 60-90 years and fifty elderly without HF were randomly selected. The level of serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D was measured using the Eliza method. There were no significantly difference between two groups regarding to the mean age, living location, life style parameters, mean years of disease involvement and disease severity, cardiovascular risk factors and co-morbidities, except for renal problems(P=0/039, hemoglobin levels(P=0/044, and creatinine levels (P=0/048. In both groups, the majority of patients, were moderately vitamin D deficient and there was no significantly difference between two groups. Considering the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among HF and Non-HF elderly with cardiovascular disease, its monitoring and correcting seems essential.

  2. Management of hypertension in children with cardiovascular disease and heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaheh Malakan Rad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although primary chronic hypertension (HTN is increasingly common in adolescence, secondary forms of HTN are more common among children. Primary HTN is associated with being overweight and/or a positive family history of HTN. Carotid intima-media thickness, a known risk factor for atherosclerosis is frequent in both adults and children with HTN and other associated cardiovascular (CV risk factors including obesity, dyslipidemia, diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Left ventricular (LV hypertrophy is also a common finding in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed HTN. Children with certain medical conditions such as congenital heart disease and Kawasaki disease can develop premature atherosclerosis heart disease that may lead to coronary heart disease and heart failure. Life-style interventions are recommended for all children with HTN, with pharmacologic therapy added for symptomatic children based on the presence of co-morbidities. As an example, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blocker and/or calcium channel blockers would be best for children with CV risk factors such as diabetes or renal disease, whereas an ACE inhibitor in combination with a beta-blocker and diuretics including spironolactone are recommended for patients with heart failure and reduced LV ejection fraction. This report will summarize new developments in the management of pediatric HTN complicated with CV disease and heart failure and will address the appropriate antihypertensive therapy that could potentially reduce the future burden of adult CV disease.

  3. Diabetes, glycemic control, and new-onset heart failure in patients with stable coronary artery disease : data from the heart and soul study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Melle, J.P.; Bot, M.; de Jonge, P.; de Boer, R.A.; van Veldhuisen, D.J.; Whooley, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetes is a predictor of both coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure. It is unknown to what extent the association between diabetes and heart failure is influenced by other risk factors for heart failure. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We evaluated the association of diabetes and

  4. Low circulating microRNA levels in heart failure patients are associated with atherosclerotic disease and cardiovascular-related rehospitalizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegter, Eline L.; Ovchinnikova, Ekaterina S.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Jaarsma, Tiny; Berezikov, Eugene; van der Meer, Peter; Voors, Adriaan A.

    Objective Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in both heart failure and atherosclerotic disease. The aim of this study was to examine associations between heart failure specific circulating miRNAs, atherosclerotic disease and cardiovascular-related outcome in patients with heart

  5. Antihyperglycemic Medication Use Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Heart Failure, Diabetes Mellitus, and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Priyesh A; Liang, Li; Khazanie, Prateeti; Hammill, Bradley G; Fonarow, Gregg C; Yancy, Clyde W; Bhatt, Deepak L; Curtis, Lesley H; Hernandez, Adrian F

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus, heart failure (HF), and chronic kidney disease are common comorbidities, but overall use and safety of antihyperglycemic medications (AHMs) among patients with these comorbidities are poorly understood. Using Get With the Guidelines-Heart Failure and linked Medicare Part D data, we assessed AHM use within 90 days of hospital discharge among HF patients with diabetes mellitus discharged from Get With the Guidelines-Heart Failure hospitals between January 1, 2006, and October 1, 2011. We further summarized use by renal function and assessed renal contraindicated AHM use for patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate chronic kidney disease is complex, and these patients are commonly treated with renal contraindicated AHMs, including over 6% receiving a thiazolidinedione, despite known concerns regarding HF. More research regarding safety and efficacy of various AHMs among HF patients is needed. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Hospital cost effect of a heart failure disease management program: the Specialized Primary and Networked Care in Heart Failure (SPAN-CHF) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Douglas; Kimmelstiel, Carey; Perry, Kathleen; Parikh, Amay; Konstam, Varda; Konstam, Marvin A

    2006-05-01

    Determine the effect on hospitalization cost of a heart failure disease management (HFDM) program delivered within a diverse provider network as demonstrated in the SPAN-CHF randomized controlled trial. The SPAN-CHF trial was a prospective randomized assessment of the effectiveness of HFDM delivered for 90 days across a diverse provider network in a heterogeneous population of 200 patients. Baseline clinical and demographic data were obtained on each patient, mortality was monitored, and hospitalizations were tracked for 90 days. Cost estimates for each hospitalization were based on a subsample of patients seen at Tufts-New England Medical Center for whom hospitalization costs were calculated. Heart failure disease management program costs were estimated using a programmatic budget model. Hospital utilization and cost data were combined to estimate medical costs for intervention and control groups. Heart failure disease management had a favorable effect on heart failure hospitalization, which was partially offset by noncardiac hospitalizations. The relative odds of at least one all-cause hospitalization during the intervention period trended less for the intervention group compared with the control group (0.76 [95% CI 0.38-1.51]). The point estimate of the differential hospitalization cost between control and intervention groups was a reduction in cost of $375 per patient. The net effect including the costs of the program was an increase of $488 per patient for the intervention group compared with the control group. The program would have been cost saving if HFDM costs had been 24% lower. The HFDM intervention, administered over 90 days to patients hospitalized for heart failure, succeeded in reducing the rate of heart failure hospitalizations, although this effect was partially offset by an increase in non-heart failure hospitalizations. The resulting modest reduction in all-cause hospitalization costs was exceeded by the cost of the intervention. Thus, although

  7. Abstract 18092: Source of Galectin-3 in Human Heart Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease and Cardio-renal Failure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hussain, Imad; Alexander, Mariam P; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Pereira, Naveen L; Redfield, Margaret M

    2015-01-01

    .... The source of Gal-3 in human HF, chronic kidney disease (CKD) or cardio-renal failure (HF+CKD) is unclear.ObjectiveTo assess Gal-3 presence and location in human heart or kidney tissue from patients with HF, CKD or HF...

  8. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease Heart bypass surgery Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive Heart failure - overview Heart pacemaker High blood cholesterol levels High blood pressure Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator Smoking - tips on how to ...

  9. Congestive heart failure disease management program: 1-Year population experience from a tertiary center heart failure registry in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Khal; Fallata, Dania; ElSebaie, Maha; Montasser, Ahmad; ElGedamy, Khaled; ElKhateeb, Osama

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate congestive heart failure (CHF) multidisciplinary disease management program (DMProg) impact on mortality, readmission rates, length of stay (LOS), and gender health characteristics. This was a quasi-observational, pre- and post-trial with a parallel nonequivalent group. We enrolled 174 inpatients having CHF with reduced ejection fraction and New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class II-IV, and a total of 197 hospital admissions. A comparative follow-up was performed from 15 December 2014 to 15 December 2015. Among 197 consecutive hospital admissions, 76 (39%) were included in the preintervention or usual care group and 121 (61%) were assigned to the postintervention group. After 1 year, in comparison with the preintervention group, the postintervention group had shorter average LOS in days (7.6 days vs. 11.1 days, p < 0.002), lower 1-year readmission rate (36% vs. 57%, p < 0.003), and lower in-house mortality (1.6% vs. 7.8%, p = 0.03), but similar baseline mortality scores (38.2 vs. 38.6, p = 0.7), 30-day and 90-day readmission rates (15% vs. 18.3%, p = 0.62 and 27.6% vs. 30%, p = 0.65), and 30-day readmission risk score (24.9% vs. 26.2%, p = 0.09). By regression analysis, the DMProg intervention was an independent factor for 1-year readmission reduction (p = 0.001). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis favored the postintervention group (log-rank, p < 0.001). DMProg significantly decreased 1-year readmission rates, LOS, and in-house mortality.

  10. Depression and the usefulness of a disease management program in heart failure : insights from the COACH (Coordinating study evaluating Outcomes of Advising and Counseling in Heart failure) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, Tiny; Lesman-Leegte, Ivonne; Hillege, Hans L.; Veeger, Nic J.; Sanderman, Robbert; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to study the possible role of depressive symptoms in the effectiveness of a disease management program (DMP) in heart failure (HF) patients. Background Disease management programs are recommended in current HF guidelines, but certain patient groups, such as those with

  11. Classes of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... second installment explains heart failure with muscle intact. Queen Latifah and her mom, Rita, share their personal ... a Heart Attack 10 Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate *Red Dress ™ DHHS, Go Red ™ AHA ; National Wear Red ...

  12. Types of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... second installment explains heart failure with muscle intact. Queen Latifah and her mom, Rita, share their personal ... a Heart Attack 10 Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate *Red Dress ™ DHHS, Go Red ™ AHA ; National Wear Red ...

  13. Genetically Low Antioxidant Protection and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Heart Failure in Diabetic Subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobylecki, Camilla J; Afzal, Shoaib; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress is one mechanism believed to underlie diabetic vascular disease. We tested the hypothesis that diabetic subjects heterozygous for extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) R213G, which entails lower antioxidant capacity in tissues, have increased...... risk of cardiovascular disease and heart failure. METHODS: We used the prospective Copenhagen General Population Study and Copenhagen City Heart Study and genotyped 95,871 individuals for the rs1799895 R213G variation in the SOD3 gene, of which 4498 had diabetes. We used national hospitalization...... and death registers to assess cardiovascular disease and heart failure. FINDINGS: Out of 95,871 individuals, we identified 93,521 R213G non-carriers (213RR, 97.5%), 2336 heterozygotes (213RG, 2.4%) and 14 homozygotes (213GG, 0.01%). In diabetic subjects, the hazard ratio for cardiovascular disease in R213G...

  14. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type of heart disease you have. Symptoms of heart disease in your blood vessels (atherosclerotic disease) Cardiovascular disease ... can sometimes be found early with regular evaluations. Heart disease symptoms caused by abnormal heartbeats (heart arrhythmias) A ...

  15. Heart failure in subjects with chronic kidney disease: Best management practices

    OpenAIRE

    Aslam, Farhan; Haque, Attiya; Haque, Javeria; Joseph, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is common in patients with heart failure (HF) and can complicate HF therapy. Treating patients with HF and kidney disease is difficult and requires careful assessment, monitoring and balancing of risk between potential benefits of treatment and adverse impact on renal function. In this review, we address the pathophysiological contexts and management options in this adversarial relation between the heart and the kidney, which exists in a substantial proportion of HF patients...

  16. Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about other tests and procedures, go to the diagnosis sections of the Health Topics Coronary Heart Disease , Heart Failure , and Cardiomyopathy articles. Treatment Diabetic heart disease (DHD) is treated ...

  17. Managing Feelings about Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Heart Failure Module 6: Managing Feelings About Heart Failure Download Module Order Hardcopy Heart failure can cause ... professional help for emotional problems. Common Feelings About Heart Failure It is common for people to feel depressed ...

  18. Disease-specific health status as a predictor of mortality in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mastenbroek, Mirjam H; Versteeg, Henneke; Zijlstra, Wobbe P

    2014-01-01

    . Searching PubMed (until March 2013) resulted in 17 articles in the systematic review and 17 studies in the meta-analysis. About half of the studies reported a significant relationship between disease-specific health status and mortality in heart failure, while the remainder found no association. A larger...

  19. Risk of stroke and bleeding in patients with heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melgaard, Line; Overvad, Thure Filskov; Skjøth, Flemming

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic value of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in relation to ischaemic stroke, intracranial haemorrhage, major bleeding, and all-cause death in heart failure patients without atrial fibrillation. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this observational cohort...

  20. Plasma calprotectin levels reflect disease severity in patients with chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Jn; Kistorp, Caroline Michaela Nervil; Bjerre, Mette

    2011-01-01

    Background: Low-grade inflammation has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic heart failure (CHF). The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential usefulness of the inflammatory protein calprotectin as a biomarker in CHF. Methods: Plasma calprotectin...... was measured in 193 CHF patients with left ventricular function...

  1. Relationship between heart failure, concurrent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and beta-blocker use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sessa, Maurizio; Mascolo, Annamaria; Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark

    2017-01-01

    Aims: To compare the hazard of all-cause, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and heart failure (HF) hospitalization in carvedilol vs. metoprolol/bisoprolol/nebivolol users with COPD and concurrent HF from 2009 to 2012, and to evaluate the use and persistence in treatment of these β-bloc...

  2. Diuretics for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Rajaa F; Flather, Marcus; Purcell, Henry; Poole-Wilson, Philip A; Coats, Andrew J S

    2012-02-15

    Chronic heart failure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diuretics are regarded as the first-line treatment for patients with congestive heart failure since they provide symptomatic relief. The effects of diuretics on disease progression and survival remain unclear. To assess the harms and benefits of diuretics for chronic heart failure Updated searches were run in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials in The Cochrane Library (CENTRAL Issue 1 of 4, 2011), MEDLINE (1966 to 22 February 2011), EMBASE (1980 to 2011 Week 07) and HERDIN database (1990 to February 2011). We hand searched pertinent journals and reference lists of papers were inspected. We also contacted manufacturers and researchers in the field. No language restrictions were applied. Double-blinded randomised controlled trials of diuretic therapy comparing one diuretic with placebo, or one diuretic with another active agent (e.g. ACE inhibitors, digoxin) in patients with chronic heart failure. Two authors independently abstracted the data and assessed the eligibility and methodological quality of each trial. Extracted data were analysed by determining the odds ratio for dichotomous data, and difference in means for continuous data, of the treated group compared with controls. The likelihood of heterogeneity of the study population was assessed by the Chi-square test. If there was no evidence of statistical heterogeneity and pooling of results was clinically appropriate, a combined estimate was obtained using the fixed-effects model. This update has not identified any new studies for inclusion. The review includes 14 trials (525 participants), 7 were placebo-controlled, and 7 compared diuretics against other agents such as ACE inhibitors or digoxin. We analysed the data for mortality and for worsening heart failure. Mortality data were available in 3 of the placebo-controlled trials (202 participants). Mortality was lower for participants treated with diuretics than for

  3. Management of hypertension and heart failure in patients with Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inder, Warrick J; Meyer, Caroline; Hunt, Penny J

    2015-06-01

    Addison's disease may be complicated by hypertension and less commonly by heart failure. We review the pathophysiology of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis in Addison's disease and how this is altered in the setting of hypertension and heart failure. An essential first step in management in both conditions is optimizing glucocorticoid replacement and considering dose reduction if excessive. Following this, if a patient with Addison's disease remains hypertensive, the fludrocortisone dose should be reviewed and reduced if there are clinical and/or biochemical signs of mineralocorticoid excess. In the absence of such signs, where the renin is towards the upper end of the normal range or elevated, an angiotensin II (AII) receptor antagonist or angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor is the treatment of choice, and the fludrocortisone dose should remain unchanged. Dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers are clinically useful as second line agents, but diuretics should be avoided. In the setting of heart failure, there is an increase in total body sodium and water; therefore, it is appropriate to reduce and rarely consider ceasing the fludrocortisone. Loop diuretics may be used, but not aldosterone antagonists such as spironolactone or eplerenone. Standard treatment with ACE inhibitors, or as an alternative, AII receptor antagonists, are appropriate. Measurements of renin are no longer helpful in heart failure to determine the volume status but plasma levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP/proBNP) may help guide therapy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. [Obesity and heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weismann, D; Wiedmann, S; Bala, M; Frantz, S; Fassnacht, M

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for the development of heart failure. In normotensive obese patients, a reduced peripheral resistance is typically observed and is accompanied by an increased fluid volume and an increase in cardiac work, resulting in hypertrophy and diastolic heart failure, which can be visualized with echocardiography. However, in the presence of arterial hypertension cardiac geometry is not different to hypertensive heart disease without obesity. Furthermore, the typical changes found with obesity, such as reduced peripheral resistance and increased blood volume, are no longer present. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is very common in obesity and warrants screening but levels of the heart failure marker N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-ProBNP) might be misleading as the values are lower in obesity than in normal weight controls. Body weight reduction is advisable but difficult to achieve and much more difficult to maintain. Furthermore, diet and exercise has not been proven to enhance life expectancy in obesity. However, with bariatric surgery, long-term weight reduction can be achieved and mortality can be reduced. With effective weight loss and improved clinical outcome after bariatric surgery, treatment of obesity has shifted much more into focus. Regardless of technical challenges in the work-up of obese patients, clinical symptoms suggestive of cardiac disorders warrant prompt investigation with standard techniques following recommendations as established for normal weight patients.

  5. Heart Failure Secondary to Chagas Disease: an Emerging Problem in Non-endemic Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traina, Mahmoud; Meymandi, Sheba; Bradfield, Jason S

    2016-12-01

    Chagas disease affects millions of people worldwide. Though the majority of infected individuals remain asymptomatic, approximately 30 % of patients progress to develop cardiac manifestations and eventual heart failure. While vectorial transmission occurs predominantly in South America, Central America, and Mexico, millions of people originally from these endemic regions immigrate to non-endemic countries in North America, Europe, and Asia. Outside of rare specialized centers, health-care providers lack experience diagnosing and treating this disease. This lack of experience likely leads to far fewer Chagas disease patients being diagnosed than what actually exist in non-endemic countries, with subsequent adverse effect on patient outcomes and health-care expenses. Underdiagnosis increases the risk of developing cardiomyopathy, associated heart failure, and life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias as the disease progresses.

  6. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases.

  7. Copeptin in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasota B

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bartosz Lasota,1 Katarzyna Mizia-Stec212nd Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland; 21st Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, PolandAbstract: Copeptin is a novel indicator of arginine–vasopressin activation in the body. Its value has primarily been documented in acute life-threatening conditions mediated by the stress response system. Recently, some studies have revealed copeptin's promising role as a marker in cardiovascular diseases. In our review, we summarize the current knowledge on copeptin in pathophysiology, as well as in risk assessment in different clinical settings involving the cardiovascular system with a special focus on heart failure.Keywords: copeptin, heart failure, arginine–vasopressin

  8. Plasma microvesicle analysis identifies microRNA 129-5p as a biomarker of heart failure in univentricular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Sweta; Lowenthal, Alexander; Ritner, Carissa; Lowenthal, Shiri; Bernstein, Harold S

    2017-01-01

    Biomarkers of heart failure in adults have been extensively studied. However, biomarkers to monitor the progression of heart failure in children with univentricular physiology are less well understood. We proposed that as mediators of diverse pathophysiology, miRNAs contained within circulating microvesicles could serve as biomarkers for the presence and progression of heart failure in univentricular patients. To test this, we studied the association of heart failure with elevations in specific miRNAs isolated from circulating microvesicles in a cohort of children with univentricular heart disease and heart failure. We conducted a single site cross-sectional observational study of 71 children aged 1 month-7 years with univentricular heart disease and heart failure. We demonstrated that levels of miR129-5p isolated from plasma microvesicles were inversely related to the degree of clinical heart failure as assessed by Ross score. We then showed that miR129-5p levels are downregulated in HL1 cells and human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes exposed to oxidative stress. We demonstrated that bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2, which has been implicated in the development of pulmonary vascular disease, is a target of miR129-5p, and conversely regulated in response to oxidative stress in cell culture. Levels of miR129-5p were inversely related to the degree of clinical heart failure in patients with univentricular heart disease. This study demonstrates that miR129-5p is a sensitive and specific biomarker for heart failure in univentricular heart disease independent of ventricular morphology or stage of palliation. Further study is warranted to understand the targets affected by miR129-5p with the development of heart failure in patients with univentricular physiology.

  9. Plasma microvesicle analysis identifies microRNA 129-5p as a biomarker of heart failure in univentricular heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweta Ramachandran

    Full Text Available Biomarkers of heart failure in adults have been extensively studied. However, biomarkers to monitor the progression of heart failure in children with univentricular physiology are less well understood. We proposed that as mediators of diverse pathophysiology, miRNAs contained within circulating microvesicles could serve as biomarkers for the presence and progression of heart failure in univentricular patients. To test this, we studied the association of heart failure with elevations in specific miRNAs isolated from circulating microvesicles in a cohort of children with univentricular heart disease and heart failure. We conducted a single site cross-sectional observational study of 71 children aged 1 month-7 years with univentricular heart disease and heart failure. We demonstrated that levels of miR129-5p isolated from plasma microvesicles were inversely related to the degree of clinical heart failure as assessed by Ross score. We then showed that miR129-5p levels are downregulated in HL1 cells and human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes exposed to oxidative stress. We demonstrated that bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2, which has been implicated in the development of pulmonary vascular disease, is a target of miR129-5p, and conversely regulated in response to oxidative stress in cell culture. Levels of miR129-5p were inversely related to the degree of clinical heart failure in patients with univentricular heart disease. This study demonstrates that miR129-5p is a sensitive and specific biomarker for heart failure in univentricular heart disease independent of ventricular morphology or stage of palliation. Further study is warranted to understand the targets affected by miR129-5p with the development of heart failure in patients with univentricular physiology.

  10. [Bidirectional impact of two chronic diseases: heart failure and diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafur, José D; Ventura, Héctor O

    2016-12-27

    Heart failure remains a significant burden to healthcare systems. Even of the advances in medical therapy, heart failure morbidity and mortality have not been significantly reduced. Diabetes mellitus has shown to be a significant risk factor for the development and prognosis of heart failure. Traditionally, these two chronic illnesses have been managed in relative isolation. Clinicians should be more cognizant of the bidirectional impact between heart failure and diabetes.

  11. Obesity and chronic kidney disease in patients with chronic heart failure: an insight from the China Heart Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Shi, Hong; Yu, Jinming; Chen, Fang; Jiang, Qingwu; Hu, Dayi

    2011-08-01

    Obesity and decreased kidney function have been shown to be prevalent in Western patients with heart failure; however, whether this phenomenon exists in Chinese patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) is not known. One thousand and nine patients with CHF from the China Heart Survey were assessed. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) was 34.2%, and there was a stepwise increase in the prevalence of CKD with New York Heart Association (NYHA) classes (P obesity and central obesity was 35.7% and 62.5%, respectively. Notably, there was a downward trend in the prevalence of obesity with advanced NYHA classes (trend test, P = 0.003). Multivariate analysis further supported the finding that obesity, but not central obesity, was inversely associated with the extent of CHF (OR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.55-0.94, P = 0.017). Renal dysfunction is common in Chinese patients with CHF and is independently associated with advanced NYHA classes. Obesity was inversely associated with the extent of CHF, which further supports the notion that obesity confers improved prognosis in patients with heart failure.

  12. Causes of hospital readmission with heart failure at Muhimbili ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Causes of hospital readmission with heart failure at Muhimbili National hospital: Tanzanian experience. ... Background: Readmission rates for patients discharged with heart failure approaches fifty percent within six months. ... cardiomyopathies, hypertensive heart disease, rheumatic heart disease and pericardial disease.

  13. Simple platelet markers: Mean platelet volume and congestive heart failure coexistent with periodontal disease. Pilot studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerniuk, Maciej R; Bartoszewicz, Zbigniew; Dudzik-Niewiadomska, Iwona; Pilecki, Tomasz; Górska, Renata; Filipiak, Krzysztof J

    2017-07-17

    Conducted pilot study concerning mean platelet volume parameter among patients suffering from congestive heart failure and periodontal disease. Examination of dynamic changes of platelet and periodontal markers in group of 50 patients before and an average of 6 months subsequent to professional periodontal treatment. Both platelet and periodontal parameters decreased after periodontal treatment, what is more, the decrease of mean platelet volume (MPV) value due to periodontal disease/mm improvement was shown to be statistically significant (p = 0.05). Improvement of periodontal status may influence decrease of MPV value andincrease of congestive heart failure treatment efficacy and effect patient comfort. It is a new, not frequently used pattern of chronic disease treatment optimalization.

  14. Plasma sphingosine-1-phosphate concentrations are associated with systolic heart failure in patients with ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Amin; Piayda, Kerstin; Keul, Petra; Dannenberg, Lisa; Mohring, Annemarie; Gräler, Markus; Zeus, Tobias; Kelm, Malte; Levkau, Bodo

    2017-09-01

    Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid with important functions in immunity, inflammation and cardiovascular biology. S1P is associated with prevalence and severity of coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction. However, its relevance in ischemic cardiomyopathy is unknown. We aimed to investigate associations of plasma S1P and other sphingolipids with the extent of heart failure in patients with ischemic heart disease. 74 patients with ischemic heart disease were investigated in this observational study. Plasma concentrations of S1P, C16 ceramide and sphingomyelin (SM) were measured using liquid chromatography/tandem mass-spectrometry and associated with objective (echocardiography) and subjective (dyspnea) signs of heart failure. Plasma S1P and SM but not C16 ceramide concentrations were negatively associated with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and dyspnea (ranked by New York Heart Association; LVEF: S1P standardized coefficient beta: -0.25; 95%CI: -273 to -13nM, p=0.03; SM beta: -0.24; 95%CI: -16,310 to -413nM, p=0.04; NYHA: S1P beta: -0.3; 95%CI: -174 to -26nM, p=0.009; SM beta: -0.46; 95%CI: -13,462 to -5013nM, p<0.001). ROC analysis revealed that S1P and SM predicted impaired LVEF with optimal cut-off levels below 843nM and 77μM, respectively. S1P is associated with the impairment of LVEF and dyspnea. Considering the major effects of S1P on cardiac and vascular functions in experimental models, we put forward the hypothesis that S1P is causally involved in the pathophysiology of heart failure. Interfering pharmacologically with S1P receptors may have an impact on ischemic cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Diabetes Mellitus and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrke, Michael; Marx, Nikolaus

    2017-06-01

    Epidemiologic and clinical data from the last 2 decades have shown that the prevalence of heart failure in diabetes is very high, and the prognosis for patients with heart failure is worse in those with diabetes than in those without diabetes. Experimental data suggest that various mechanisms contribute to the impairment in systolic and diastolic function in patients with diabetes, and there is an increased recognition that these patients develop heart failure independent of the presence of coronary artery disease or its associated risk factors. In addition, current clinical data demonstrated that treatment with the sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor empagliflozin reduced hospitalization for heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high cardiovascular risk. This review article summarizes recent data on the prevalence, prognosis, pathophysiology, and therapeutic strategies to treat patients with diabetes and heart failure. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nutrition in cardiovascular disease: salt in hypertension and heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    He, Feng J.; Burnier, Michel; MacGregor, Graham A.

    2017-01-01

    There is much evidence for a causal relationship between salt intake and blood pressure (BP). The current salt intake in many countries is between 9 and 12 g/day. A reduction in salt intake to the recommended level of 5-6 g/day lowers BP in both hypertensive and normotensive individuals. A further reduction to 3-4 g/day has a much greater effect. Prospective studies and outcome trials have demonstrated that a lower salt intake is associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular disease. Inc...

  17. Heart failure etiology impacts survival of patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecini, Redi; Møller, Daniel Vega; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of heart failure (HF) etiology on prognosis of HF is not well known. METHODS: 3078 patients (median age 75years, 61% male) hospitalized with HF were studied. Patients were classified into six etiology groups: hypertension (HTN, 13.9%), ischemic heart disease (IHD, 42...

  18. Malnutrition and growth failure in cyanotic and acyanotic congenital heart disease with and without pulmonary hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Varan, B.; Tokel, K.; Yilmaz, G.

    1999-01-01

    AIM—To investigate the effect of several types of congenital heart disease (CHD) on nutrition and growth.
PATIENTS AND METHODS—The prevalence of malnutrition and growth failure was investigated in 89 patients with CHD aged 1−45 months. They were grouped according to cardiac diagnosis: group aP (n = 26), acyanotic patients with pulmonary hypertension; group ap (n = 5), acyanotic patients without pulmonary hypertension; group cp (n = 42), cyanotic patients without pulmon...

  19. Incidence and Predictors of End-Stage Renal Disease in Outpatients With Systolic Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosselmann, Helle Skovmand; Gislason, Gunnar; Gustafsson, Finn

    2013-01-01

    Background- Renal dysfunction is an important prognostic factor in heart failure (HF), but whether this dysfunction progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is unknown. Therefore, we examined incidence and predictors of ESRD in outpatients with HF. Methods and Results- Patients with systolic HF......(2), group II: 30 to 59 mL/min per 1.73 m(2), group III: 15 to 29 mL/min per 1.73 m(2), group IV:...

  20. Acute heart failure syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heart failure can be defined as a clinical syndrome in which a structural or functional cardiac abnormality impairs the capacity of the ventricle to fill or eject enough blood for the requirements of the body. Acute heart failure syndrome represents a complex, heterogeneous set of clinical conditions, all with the common.

  1. Hyponatremia in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Kanu

    2009-01-01

    Hyponatremia is one of the newer and emerging risk factors for an adverse prognosis in chronic heart failure. Why decreased serum sodium is associated with worse prognosis remains unclear. It may reflect worsening heart failure and the deleterious effects of activation of neurohormones. The mechanism of hyponatremia in heart failure also remains unclear. A relatively greater degree of free-water retention compared to sodium retention is probably the major mechanism. The treatment of significant hyponatremia in heart failure is difficult. The conventional treatments such as fluid restriction, infusion of hypertonic saline, and aggressive diuretic therapies are not usually effective. Vasopressin receptor antagonists have been shown to enhance aquaresis and correct hyponatremia. However, long-term beneficial effects of such treatments in chronic heart failure have not been documented.

  2. Left ventricular failure produces profound lung remodeling and pulmonary hypertension in mice: heart failure causes severe lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingjie; Guo, Haipeng; Xu, Dachun; Xu, Xin; Wang, Huan; Hu, Xinli; Lu, Zhongbing; Kwak, Dongmin; Xu, Yawei; Gunther, Roland; Huo, Yuqing; Weir, E Kenneth

    2012-06-01

    Chronic left ventricular failure causes pulmonary congestion with increased lung weight and type 2 pulmonary hypertension. Understanding the molecular mechanisms for type 2 pulmonary hypertension and the development of novel treatments for this condition requires a robust experimental animal model and a good understanding of the nature of the resultant pulmonary remodeling. Here we demonstrate that chronic transverse aortic constriction causes massive pulmonary fibrosis and remodeling, as well as type 2 pulmonary hypertension, in mice. Thus, aortic constriction-induced left ventricular dysfunction and increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure are associated with a ≤5.3-fold increase in lung wet weight and dry weight, pulmonary hypertension, and right ventricular hypertrophy. Interestingly, the aortic constriction-induced increase in lung weight was not associated with pulmonary edema but resulted from profound pulmonary remodeling with a dramatic increase in the percentage of fully muscularized lung vessels, marked vascular and lung fibrosis, myofibroblast proliferation, and leukocyte infiltration. The aortic constriction-induced left ventricular dysfunction was also associated with right ventricular hypertrophy, increased right ventricular end-diastolic pressure, and right atrial hypertrophy. The massive lung fibrosis, leukocyte infiltration, and pulmonary hypertension in mice after transverse aortic constriction clearly indicate that congestive heart failure also causes severe lung disease. The lung fibrosis and leukocyte infiltration may be important mechanisms in the poor clinical outcome in patients with end-stage heart failure. Thus, the effective treatment of left ventricular failure may require additional efforts to reduce lung fibrosis and the inflammatory response.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of a disease management programme for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease and heart failure in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D A; Paul, S; Stone, M A; Juarez-Garcia, A; Squire, I; Khunti, K

    2008-12-01

    To determine if a disease management programme for patients with coronary heart disease and heart failure represents an efficient use of health services resources. We carried out an economic evaluation alongside a cluster randomised control trial of 1163 patients with coronary heart disease and chronic heart failure in 20 primary care practices in the United Kingdom. Practices were randomised to either a control group, where patients received standard general practice care, or an intervention group where patients had access to a specialist nurse-led disease management programme. We estimated costs in both groups for coronary heart disease-related resource use. The main outcome measure used in the economic evaluation was quality adjusted life years (QALY) measured using the EuroQol. The disease management programme was associated with an increase in the QALY measured of 0.03 per year and an increase in the total NHS costs of 425 pounds (540 euros), of this only 83 pounds was directly associated with the provision of the nurse clinics. The clinics generated additional QALY at an incremental cost of 13 pounds 158 per QALY compared to the control group. The use of a nurse-led disease management programme is associated with increased costs in other coronary heart disease-related services as well as for the costs of the clinics. They are also associated with improvements in health. Even in the short term these disease management programmes may represent a cost-effective service, as additional QALY are generated at an acceptable extra cost.

  4. Obesity and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pergola, Giovanni; Nardecchia, Adele; Giagulli, Vito Angelo; Triggiani, Vincenzo; Guastamacchia, Edoardo; Minischetti, Manuela Castiglione; Silvestris, Franco

    2013-03-01

    Epidemiological studies have recently shown that obesity, and abdominal obesity in particular, is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure (HF). Higher cardiac oxidative stress is the early stage of heart dysfunction due to obesity, and it is the result of insulin resistance, altered fatty acid and glucose metabolism, and impaired mitochondrial biogenesis. Extense myocyte hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis are early microscopic changes in patients with HF, whereas circumferential strain during the left ventricular (LV) systole, LV increase in both chamber size and wall thickness (LV hypertrophy), and LV dilatation are the early macroscopic and functional alterations in obese developing heart failure. LV hypertrophy leads to diastolic dysfunction and subendocardial ischemia in obesity, and pericardial fat has been shown to be significantly associated with LV diastolic dysfunction. Evolving abnormalities of diastolic dysfunction may include progressive hypertrophy and systolic dysfunction, and various degrees of eccentric and/or concentric LV hypertrophy may be present with time. Once HF is established, overweight and obese have a better prognosis than do their lean counterparts with the same level of cardiovascular disease, and this phenomenon is called "obesity paradox". It is mainly due to lower muscle protein degradation, brain natriuretic peptide circulating levels and cardio-respiratory fitness than normal weight patients with HF.

  5. Childhood heart failure in Ibadan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    respiratory tract infections (36%), intrinsic heart disease. (31%) and severe ... becomes unable to deliver an adequate cardiac output to meet ..... room setting. Nig. J paediat 1990; 17: 1 –6. Olowu AO. Studies on heart failure in Sagamu. Nig J Paediatr. 1993; 20: 29 – 34. Shann F, MacGregor D, Richens J et al. Cardiac ...

  6. Long-term cost-effectiveness of disease management in systolic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, George; Randolph, Stephen; Forkner, Emma; Smith, Brad; Galbreath, Autumn Dawn

    2009-01-01

    Although congestive heart failure (CHF) is a primary target for disease management programs, previous studies have generated mixed results regarding the effectiveness and cost savings of disease management when applied to CHF. We estimated the long-term impact of systolic heart failure disease management from the results of an 18-month clinical trial. We used data generated from the trial (starting population distributions, resource utilization, mortality rates, and transition probabilities) in a Markov model to project results of continuing the disease management program for the patients' lifetimes. Outputs included distribution of illness severity, mortality, resource consumption, and the cost of resources consumed. Both cost and effectiveness were discounted at a rate of 3% per year. Cost-effectiveness was computed as cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Model results were validated against trial data and indicated that, over their lifetimes, patients experienced a lifespan extension of 51 days. Combined discounted lifetime program and medical costs were $4850 higher in the disease management group than the control group, but the program had a favorable long-term discounted cost-effectiveness of $43,650/QALY. These results are robust to assumptions regarding mortality rates, the impact of aging on the cost of care, the discount rate, utility values, and the targeted population. Estimation of the clinical benefits and financial burden of disease management can be enhanced by model-based analyses to project costs and effectiveness. Our results suggest that disease management of heart failure patients can be cost-effective over the long term.

  7. Plasma activity of B-type natriuretic peptide in patients with biventricular heart failure versus those with right heart failure due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flessas, Nikolaos; Alexanian, Ioannis; Parissis, John; Kremastinos, Dimitrios; Lekakis, John; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2014-06-01

    Plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is an established prognostic indicator in patients with left ventricular systolic heart failure (LHF). However, no efficient data exist regarding the differences in plasma BNP activity between patients with biventricular heart failure and those with right heart failure (RHF) due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study investigates BNP in RHF due to COPD in comparison to RHF due to LHF, and estimates the relation of BNP levels with clinical and echocardiographic parameters. We evaluated plasma BNP in 88 patients admitted to hospital with acutely decompensated chronic heart failure (31 with RHF due to LHF, 30 with RHF due to COPD without left heart disease, and 27 with LHF without right ventricular involvement). All patients underwent echocardiography examination and blood samples were collected to determine BNP and routine blood chemistry measurements. Plasma BNP levels were significantly higher in RHF due to LHF compared with RHF due to COPD (P RHF due to LHF and LHF alone (P = 0.802). In multiple linear regression analysis, tissue Doppler imaging e(LV) (B: -0.053, P = 0.002) and e(RV) (B: -0.079, P = 0.007) had an independent negative association with BNP, whereas logUrea (B: 0.635, P RHF due to COPD. BNP levels were significantly lower in RHF due to COPD compared with RHF due to LHF and were independently predicted by indices of left ventricular and right ventricular diastolic function, renal function, and anemia.

  8. [Reliability of nursing outcomes classification label "Knowledge: cardiac disease management (1830)" in outpatients with heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañón-Montañez, Wilson; Oróstegui-Arenas, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    To determine the reliability (internal consistency, inter-rater reproducibility and level of agreement) of nursing outcome: "Knowledge: cardiac disease management (1830)" of the version published in Spanish, in outpatients with heart failure. A reliability study was conducted on 116 outpatients with heart failure. Six indicators of nursing outcome were operationalized. All participants were assessed simultaneously by two evaluators. Three evaluation periods were defined: initial (at baseline), final (a month later), and follow-up (two months later). Internal consistency by Cronbach alpha coefficient, inter-rater reproducibility with intraclass correlation coefficient of reproducibility or agreement and level agreement using the 95% limits of Bland and Altman. Cronbach's alpha was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.77 - 0.89) in the final evaluation, and follow-up values of 0.85 (95% CI: 0.82-0.89) and 0.83 (95% CI: 0.78 - 0.88) were found for the first and second evaluator, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficient showed values greater 0.9 in the three evaluation periods in both the random and mixed model. The Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement were close to zero in the three evaluations performed. The questionnaire operationalized to assess the nursing outcome: "Knowledge: cardiac disease management (1830)" in its Spanish version, is a reliable method to measure skills and knowledge in outpatients with heart failure in the Colombian context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Oxygen uptake efficiency slope in patients with chronic heart failure and coexisting respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, Blagoy I; Tokmakova, Maria P; Kostianev, Stefan S; Djurdjev, Atanas B

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES) is proposed as an objective index of cardiorespiratory functional reserve. The AIM of the present study was to evaluate the effect of coexisting respiratory diseases on OUES in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) (New York Heart Association class II-III) during incremental exercise testing. Fifty-five males were allocated to three groups: group 1-19 patients with only CHF (CHF); group 2-17 patients with CHF and a history of respiratory disease (CHF-RD); group 3-19 matched controls (C). They all underwent comprehensive lung function testing and symptom-limited ramp cardiopulmonary exercise test on a cycle ergometer. The patients with a history of respiratory diseases had the lowest value of OUES, but their results were not significantly different from those of the CHF patients (OUES mL.min(-1).logL(-1)= 1461 +/- 268 vs. 1571 +/- 383 vs. 2112 +/- 263 in controls). Significant correlation was found between OUES and important functional variables: VO2peak (r=0.833), V(E)/NCO2 slope (r = -0.757), FEV1 (r=0.582), T(L,CO) (r=0.574), and EF% (r=0.350). OUES is significantly reduced in patients with CHF and tends to be lower in the presence of a respiratory disease. It can be regarded as an useful, reliable physiologic marker of reduced ventilatory efficiency and cardiorespiratory reserve in chronic heart failure.

  10. Iron therapy in heart failure patients without anaemia: possible implications for chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyszko, Jolanta; Anker, Stefan D

    2017-12-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia is a global health problem that manifests as fatigue and poor physical endurance. Anaemia can be caused by dietary iron deficiency, blood loss or a combination of poor iron absorption and ineffective iron mobilization in patients with chronic disease. Nephrologists caring for patients with impaired renal function understand that iron treatment is necessary to provide adequate iron for erythropoiesis during the treatment of overt anaemia. However, a less well-understood health problem is iron deficiency, which creates symptoms that overlap with those of anaemia and often occurs in concert with chronic disease. Recently, several randomized controlled clinical trials have been conducted to investigate the effects of treatment with intravenous iron in heart failure patients with iron deficiency who may or may not also have anaemia. Given that heart and kidney disease are often comorbid, these clinical trials may have implications for the way nephrologists view their patients with iron deficiency. In this article, we review several clinical studies of intravenous iron therapy for patients with iron deficiency and heart failure and discuss possible implications for the treatment of patients with kidney disease.

  11. Data and Statistics: Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High Blood Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Heart Failure Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... not mean that the heart has stopped beating. Heart Failure in the United States About 5.7 million ...

  12. Consequences of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic heart failure : The relationship between objective and subjective health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, R.; Ranchor, A.V; Koëter, G.H; DeJongste, M.J.; Sanderman, R.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates whether the relationship between objective health parameters and general health perceptions was mediated by symptoms of dyspnoea and physical functioning in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). The different

  13. Antithrombotic treatment in patients with heart failure and associated atrial fibrillation and vascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberts, Morten; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Ruwald, Martin H.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of atrial fibrillation (AF) and antithrombotic treatment on the prognosis in patients with heart failure (HF) as well as vascular disease. BACKGROUND: HF, vascular disease, and AF are pathophysiologically related, and understanding...... antithrombotic treatment for these conditions is crucial. METHODS: In hospitalized patients with HF and coexisting vascular disease (coronary artery disease or peripheral arterial disease) followed from 1997 to 2009, AF status was categorized as prevalent AF, incident AF, or no AF. Risk of thromboembolism (TE...... differences were seen between antithrombotic therapies in TE or MI risk, whereas bleeding risk was significantly increased for VKA with and without single-antiplatelet therapy. CONCLUSIONS: In AF patients with coexisting HF and vascular disease, adding single-antiplatelet therapy to VKA therapy...

  14. Preservation of Skin Integrity in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    DEMİR BARUTCU, Canan

    2018-01-01

    Congestive heart failure is an international health problem with its high incidence, prevalence, morbidity and mortality rates. Congestive heart failure is the most common reason of hospitalization in patients older than 65 and it causes more than a million hospitalizations a year. Patients with congestive heart failure experience a number of complications due to physiopathologic reasons, side effects of drugs, accompanying comorbid diseases and limitations caused by congestive heart failure....

  15. Clinical benefit of tolvaptan in patients with acute decompensated heart failure and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Yusuke; Shibata, Rei; Takemoto, Kenji; Uchikawa, Tomohiro; Koyasu, Masayoshi; Ishikawa, Shinji; Mitsuda, Takayuki; Miura, Ayako; Imai, Ryo; Iwamiya, Satoshi; Ozaki, Yuta; Kato, Tomohiro; Miura, Takanori; Watarai, Masato; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2016-10-01

    Tolvaptan, a vasopressin type 2 receptor antagonist, has an aquaretic effect without affecting renal function. The effects of long-term tolvaptan administration in heart failure patients with renal dysfunction have not been clarified. Here, we assessed the clinical benefit of tolvaptan during a 6-month follow-up in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) patients with severe chronic kidney disease (CKD; estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) tolvaptan in addition to loop diuretics (TLV group), with 36 patients with ADHF and severe CKD who were administered high-dose loop diuretics (≥40 mg) alone (LD group). Alterations in serum creatinine and eGFR levels from the time of hospital discharge to 6-month follow-up were significantly different between the groups, with those in the TLV group being more favorable. Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that rehospitalization for heart failure (HF) was significantly lower in the TLV group compared with the LD group. In ADHF patients with severe CKD, tolvaptan use for 6 months reduced worsening of renal function and rehospitalization rates for HF when compared with conventional diuretic therapy. In conclusion, tolvaptan could be a safe and effective agent for long-term management of HF and CKD.

  16. A randomized trial of heart failure disease management in skilled nursing facilities (SNF Connect): Lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daddato, Andrea; Wald, Heidi L; Horney, Carolyn; Fairclough, Diane L; Leister, Erin C; Coors, Marilyn; Capell, Warren H; Boxer, Rebecca S

    2017-06-01

    Conducting clinical trials in skilled nursing facilities is particularly challenging. This manuscript describes facility and patient recruitment challenges and solutions for clinical research in skilled nursing facilities. Lessons learned from the SNF Connect Trial, a randomized trial of a heart failure disease management versus usual care for patients with heart failure receiving post-acute care in skilled nursing facilities, are discussed. Description of the trial design and barriers to facility and patient recruitment along with regulatory issues are presented. The recruitment of Denver-metro skilled nursing facilities was facilitated by key stakeholders of the skilled nursing facilities community. However, there were still a number of barriers to facility recruitment including leadership turnover, varying policies regarding research, fear of litigation and of an increased workload. Engagement of facilities was facilitated by their strong interest in reducing hospital readmissions, marketing potential to hospitals, and heart failure management education for their staff. Recruitment of patients proved difficult and there were few facilitators. Identified patient recruitment challenges included patients being unaware of their heart failure diagnosis, patients overwhelmed with their illness and care, and frequently there was no available proxy for cognitively impaired patients. Flexibility in changing the recruitment approach and targeting skilled nursing facilities with higher rates of admissions helped to overcome some barriers. Recruitment of skilled nursing facilities and patients in skilled nursing facilities for clinical trials is challenging. Strategies to attract both facilities and patients are warranted. These include aligning study goals with facility incentives and flexible recruitment protocols to work with patients in "transition crisis."

  17. Heart failure - palliative care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000365.htm Heart failure - palliative care To use the sharing features on this page, ... you may want to discuss the option of palliative or comfort care with your providers and loved ones. Many people ...

  18. Epidemiology of Heart Failure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roger, Véronique L

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) has been singled out as an epidemic and is a staggering clinical and public health problem, associated with significant mortality, morbidity, and healthcare expenditures, particularly among those aged ≥65 years...

  19. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  20. Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease and Heart Failure in Type 2 Diabetes – Mechanisms, Management, and Clinical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low Wang, Cecilia C.; Hess, Connie N.; Hiatt, William R.; Goldfine, Allison B.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the principal cause of death and disability among patients with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes exacerbates mechanisms underlying atherosclerosis and heart failure. Unfortunately, these mechanisms are not adequately modulated by therapeutic strategies focusing solely on optimal glycemic control with currently available drugs or approaches. In the setting of multi-factorial risk reduction with statins and other lipid lowering agents, anti-hypertensive therapies, and anti-hyperglycemic treatment strategies, cardiovascular complication rates are falling, yet remain higher for patients with diabetes than for those without. This review considers the mechanisms, history, controversies, new pharmacologic agents, and recent evidence for current guidelines for cardiovascular management in the patient with diabetes mellitus to support evidence-based care in the patient with diabetes and heart disease outside of the acute care setting. PMID:27297342

  1. Epicardial adipose tissue as a metabolic transducer: role in heart failure and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vaibhav B; Shah, Saumya; Verma, Subodh; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2017-07-31

    Obesity and diabetes are strongly associated with metabolic and cardiovascular disorders including dyslipidemia, coronary artery disease, hypertension, and heart failure. Adipose tissue is identified as a complex endocrine organ, which by exerting a wide array of regulatory functions at the cellular, tissue and systemic levels can have profound effects on the cardiovascular system. Different terms including "epicardial," "pericardial," and "paracardial" have been used to describe adipose tissue deposits surrounding the heart. Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is a unique and multifaceted fat depot with local and systemic effects. The functional and anatomic proximity of EAT to the myocardium enables endocrine, paracrine, and vasocrine effects on the heart. EAT displays a large secretosome, which regulates physiological and pathophysiological processes in the heart. Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) secretes adipose-derived relaxing factor, which is a "cocktail" of cytokines, adipokines, microRNAs, and cellular mediators, with a potent effect on paracrine regulation of vascular tone, vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, migration, atherosclerosis-susceptibility, and restenosis. Although there are various physiological functions of the EAT and PVAT, a phenotypic transformation can lead to a major pathogenic role in various cardiovascular diseases. The equilibrium between the physiological and pathophysiological properties of EAT is very delicate and susceptible to the influences of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Various adipokines secreted from EAT and PVAT have a profound effect on the myocardium and coronary arteries; targeting these adipokines could be an important therapeutic approach to counteract cardiovascular disease.

  2. Management of heart failure in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Faisal; Chan, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure is a major chronic illness with no definitive cure. With improving healthcare and with an aging population in many countries, heart failure has become a common disease of the elderly. Pharmacological management of heart failure in the elderly remains a challenge. The syndrome of heart failure cannot be isolated from other comorbidities, which are very common in this population. The purpose of this review is to assist practicing clinicians to more effectively make decisions about management of heart failure in the elderly. In this review, we will try to integrate recent research studies, recent guidelines, and new treatment modalities, and discuss some controversies. In general, the elderly patient with heart failure should be treated according to current heart failure guidelines; however, untailored heart failure management may cause untoward effects in this age group and may worsen clinical outcome.

  3. THE POSSIBILITY OF USAGE OF METABOLIC CORRECTION THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE AND HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Sergienko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To estimate an effect of metabolic corrector mildronate on cardiac hemodynamics and endothelium function in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD and heart failure (HFMaterial and methods. 60 patients with IHD and HF of I-III functional class according to NYHA were included into the study. 30 patients of the main group received mildronate at a daily dose of 1000 mg during 3 months additionally to standard therapy. Patients of the control group took standard therapy only. Cardiac function was estimated by 4D Gated Equilibrium Radionuclide Ventriculography. The endothelium function was measured as endothelium dependent vasodilation.Results. During 3 months mildronate therapy resulted in increase of left ventricular (LV ejection fraction, peak filling and peak ejecting rate of LV.Conclusion. Metabolic corrector mildronate has positive effect on cardiac function in patients with IHD and CHF.

  4. Benefits of Heart Rate Slowing With Ivabradine in Patients With Systolic Heart Failure and Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borer, Jeffrey S; Deedwania, Prakash C; Kim, Jae B; Böhm, Michael

    2016-12-15

    Heart rate (HR) is a risk factor in patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HF) that, when reduced, provides outcome benefits. It is also a target for angina pectoris prevention and a risk marker in chronic coronary artery disease without HF. HR can be reduced by drugs; however, among those used clinically, only ivabradine reduces HR directly in the sinoatrial nodal cells without other known effects on the cardiovascular system. This review provides current information regarding the safety and efficacy of HR reduction with ivabradine in clinical studies involving >36,000 patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease and >6,500 patients with systolic HF. The largest trials, Morbidity-Mortality Evaluation of the I f Inhibitor Ivabradine in Patients With Coronary Disease and Left Ventricular Dysfunction and Study Assessing the Morbidity-Mortality Benefits of the I f Inhibitor Ivabradine in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease, showed no effect on outcomes. The Systolic Heart Failure Treatment With the I f Inhibitor Ivabradine Trial, a randomized controlled trial in >6,500 patients with HF, revealed marked and significant HR-mediated reduction in cardiovascular mortality or HF hospitalizations while improving quality of life and left ventricular mechanical function after treatment with ivabradine. The adverse effects of ivabradine predominantly included bradycardia and atrial fibrillation (both uncommon) and ocular flashing scotomata (phosphenes) but otherwise were similar to placebo. In conclusion, ivabradine improves outcomes in patients with systolic HF; rates of overall adverse events are similar to placebo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Reassessing guidelines for heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Drexler

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been made in the last few years in the management of heart failure. In particular, several trials have given significant results. It has become apparent that heart failure may be prevented in some patients by treatment of risk factors such as coronary artery disease.Experience with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors has shown that the survival and symptomatic benefits do last in the long term, and confirm that they are the first-line treatment in heart failure.The results of a number of trials using the angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs candesartan, valsartan and losartan are presented and discussed. There is also some experience now in the use of candesartan for patients with heart failure and preserved left ventricular systolic function.The COMET trial compared the β-blockers carvedilol and metoprolol tartrate, and suggests that there may be differences in clinical effect between β-blockers.The selective aldosterone receptor blocker eplerenone was evaluated in the EPHESUS trial in post-MI patients with signs of heart failure.Based on these clinical trials, heart failure guidelines are now being updated.

  6. Reassessing guidelines for heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Drexler

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been made in the last few years in the management of heart failure. In particular several trials have given significant results. It has become apparent that heart failure may be prevented in some patients by treatment of risk factors such as coronary artery disease. Experience with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors has shown that the survival and symptomatic benefits do last in the long term, and confirm that they are the first-line treatment in heart failure. The results of a number of trials using the angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs candesartan, valsartan and losartan are presented and discussed. There is also some experience now in the use of candesartan for patients with heart failure and preserved left ventricular systolic function. The COMET trial compared the β-blockers carvedilol and metoprolol tartrate, and suggests that there may be differences in clinical effect between β-blockers. The selective aldosterone receptor blocker eplerenone was evaluated in the EPHESUS trial in post-MI patients with signs of heart failure. Based on these clinical trials, heart failure guidelines are now being updated.

  7. [Competence Network Heart Failure (CNHF). Together against heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan; Börste, Rita

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure is one of the most urgent medical and socio-economic challenges of the 21(st) century. Up to three million people are affected in Germany; this means one in ten people over the age of 65  live with heart failure. The current demographic changes will accentuate the importance of this grave health problem. The care of patients with heart failure, as well as the associated research mandates a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach. The Competence Network Heart Failure (CNHF) pursues this objective. CNHF is a research alliance with 11 sites in Germany and was funded by the Federal Ministry of Research (BMBF) from 2003 through 2014. Since January 2015, the network has been an associate cooperating partner of the German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK). During the 12-year funding period by the BMBF, scientists in the field of heart failure from 30 university hospitals, 5 research institutes, 7 heart centers, 17 cardiovascular clinics, over 200 general practitioners, 4 rehabilitation clinics, as well as numerous organizations and associations were involved in cooperative CNHF research. In the context of 22 projects, the CNHF covered basic, clinical, and health care research, and generated numerous groundbreaking insights into disease mechanisms, as well as diagnosis and treatment of heart failure, which are documented in more than 350 publications. With its central study database and bank of biomaterials, the network has set up a Europe-wide unique research resource, which can be used in the future for national and international cooperations with the DZHK and other partners. Furthermore, the CNHF strongly promotes nation- and Europe-wide public relations and heart failure awareness activities.

  8. Arrhythmias in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auricchio; Klein

    2000-08-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are very common in the setting of heart failure, with atrial and ventricular arrhythmias often present in the same patient. The risk and the benefit of antiarrhythmic therapies are still a matter of debate. Class I antiarrhythmic drugs should be avoided in patients with heart failure, cardiac ischemia, or previous myocardial infarction. Beta-blocker agents reduce morbidity and decrease mortality in patients suffering from moderate to severe heart failure. Amiodarone may be beneficial in patients with advanced heart failure and increased resting heart rates. This class III drug may be effective to suppress episodes of atrial fibrillation but can also be beneficial in reducing ventricular response by slowing atrioventricular conduction during chronic atrial fibrillation. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) markedly reduce sudden cardiac death in patients with ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation. In patients with advanced heart failure, however, the ICD may not markedly extend survival. Recently analyzed data from the Canadian Implantable Defibrillator Study (CIDS), Antiarrhythmics Versus Implantable Defibrillators (AVID) registry, Multicenter Unsustained Tachycardia Trial (MUSTT), and Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial (MADIT) have consistently shown that it is the sickest patient who benefits the most from ICD therapy. Patients with markedly depressed ejection fraction (death will translate into a reduction of all-cause mortality. For patients resuscitated from sustained ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation, an ICD or, in some cases, amiodarone should be considered. Catheter or surgical ablation can be considered for selected patients with ventricular tachycardia.

  9. Evaluation of chronic kidney disease in chronic heart failure: From biomarkers to arterial renal resistances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacoviello, Massimo; Leone, Marta; Antoncecchi, Valeria; Ciccone, Marco Matteo

    2015-01-16

    Chronic kidney disease and its worsening are recurring conditions in chronic heart failure (CHF) which are independently associated with poor patient outcome. The heart and kidney share many pathophysiological mechanisms which can determine dysfunction in each organ. Cardiorenal syndrome is the condition in which these two organs negatively affect each other, therefore an accurate evaluation of renal function in the clinical setting of CHF is essential. This review aims to revise the parameters currently used to evaluate renal dysfunction in CHF with particular reference to the usefulness and the limitations of biomarkers in evaluating glomerular dysfunction and tubular damage. Moreover, it is reported the possible utility of renal arterial resistance index (a parameter associated with abnormalities in renal vascular bed) for a better assesment of kidney disfunction.

  10. Heart failure etiology impacts survival of patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecini, Redi; Møller, Daniel Vega; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of heart failure (HF) etiology on prognosis of HF is not well known. METHODS: 3078 patients (median age 75years, 61% male) hospitalized with HF were studied. Patients were classified into six etiology groups: hypertension (HTN, 13.9%), ischemic heart disease (IHD, 42...... risk, HR 1.71 (CI: 1.3-2.2, p/=30% (HR 1.3, CI: 1.0-1.5, p=0.03), compared to the reference (p-value for interaction...

  11. Heart failure - fluids and diuretics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000112.htm Heart failure - fluids and diuretics To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Heart failure is a condition in which the heart is ...

  12. Being active when you have heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart bypass surgery - discharge Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive - discharge Heart disease - risk factors Heart failure - discharge High blood pressure - what to ask your doctor How to read ...

  13. Candesartan in heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Toni L; Chonlahan, Jennifer S; Germany, Robin E

    2006-01-01

    Candesartan cilexetil is a nonpeptide selective blocker of the angiotensin II receptor sub-type 1. It is a prodrug that is converted to its active metabolite during its variable absorption. It is highly protein bound with a small volume of distribution and a nine-hour half-life. Candesartan is one of two angiotensin receptor blockers approved for use in heart failure. MEDLINE was searched using OVID and PubMed to evaluate the evidence for using candesartan in patients with heart failure. Pharmacologic and pharmacokinetic evaluations, as well as clinical trials, were selected and are presented in this review. Clinical evidence supports the indication for use in systolic heart failure. Results for use in patients with diastolic heart failure were non-significant. Candesartan was well tolerated in the trials, with hyperkalemia, renal dysfunction, and hypotension being the most common adverse events. Use of angiotensin receptor blockers with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors needs further study; however, candesartan appears to provide added benefit in this setting. Candesartan is a safe and effective option for patients with systolic heart failure. Data regarding other angiotensin receptor blockers is underway. PMID:18046913

  14. Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren Lund; Ahlehoff, Ole; Lindhardsen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been linked to adverse cardiovascular events, but a relation to heart failure (HF) is uncertain. We investigated the IBD-associated risk of HF in a nationwide setting. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 5 436 647 Danish citizens, with no history of IBD...... or HF, were included on January 1, 1997, and followed up until first hospitalization for HF, death, or December 31, 2011. Of these subjects, 23 681 developed IBD for which disease activity was determined continuously throughout the study. The risk of hospitalization for HF was estimated with a Poisson...... for HF, and this risk was strongly correlated to periods of active disease. The mechanisms underlying this finding warrant further studies....

  15. New-onset heart failure due to heart muscle disease in childhood: a prospective study in the United kingdom and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Rachel E; Fenton, Matthew J; Ridout, Deborah A; Burch, Michael

    2008-01-01

    We undertook the first prospective, national, multicenter study to describe the incidence and outcome of heart muscle disease-induced heart failure in children. Data were collected on patients admitted to a hospital through 2003 with a first episode of heart failure in the absence of congenital heart disease. All 17 pediatric cardiac centers in the United Kingdom and Ireland participated. Follow-up data were obtained to a minimum of 1 year. The incidence was 0.87/100,000 population Heart Association class III to IV. Causes of heart failure included dilated cardiomyopathy (50 idiopathic, 8 familial), probable myocarditis (23), occult arrhythmia (7), anthracycline toxicity (5), metabolic disease (4), left ventricular noncompaction (3), and other (4). Overall 1-year survival was 82%, and event (death or transplantation)-free survival was 66%. Regression analysis showed older age and reduced systolic function on admission echocardiogram increased the event risk. Only 8% of event-free survivors (n=69) remained in New York Heart Association class III to IV, but 35 required readmission during the study period, and all but 8 remained on medication. This first national prospective study of new-onset heart failure in children has shown an incidence of 0.87/100,000. Multivariable analysis of survival data indicates a better outcome for younger children and for those with better systolic function at presentation, but overall, one third of children die or require transplantation within 1 year of presentation.

  16. Ventilatory disorders in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güder, G.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), heart failure (HF) or both syndromes are the most common reasons for dyspnea in the elderly. Currently there is no standard to diagnose COPD and multiple definitions (fixed ratio [GOLD], lower limit of normal [LLN]) are discussed. Further,

  17. Enteral nutrition in infants with congenital heart disease and growth failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, S M; Gewitz, M H; See, C C; Berezin, S; Glassman, M S; Medow, C M; Fish, B C; Newman, L J

    1990-09-01

    To determine an effective nutritional regimen for management of growth failure in infants with congenital heart disease and congestive heart failure, the authors studied 19 infants with cardiac anomalies who were not candidates for early corrective surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to one of three feeding groups: group 1 (n = 7) received continuous, 24-hour nasogastric alimentation; group 2 (n = 5) received overnight, 12-hour nasogastric infusions plus daytime oral feedings as tolerated; and group 3 (n = 7) received oral feedings alone. For all patients, commercial infant formula (cow's milk or soy protein) was supplemented to a calorie density of approximately 1 kcal/mL. During a 5.25 +/- 0.45 month study period, only group 1 infants achieved intakes greater than 140 kcal/kg per day (mean = 147 kcal). Serial anthropometric measurements demonstrated that only 24-hour infusions (group 1) were associated with significantly improved nutritional status, when assessed by z scores for weight (P less than .01) and length (P less than .05). Group 1 infants also showed marked increases in midarm muscle circumference and triceps and subscapular skinfold thicknesses (P less than .01, compared with groups 2 and 3). These data suggest that infants with congenital cardiac defects complicated by malnutrition manifest increased nutrient requirements for growth and weight gain. Continuous, 24-hour, nasogastric alimentation is a safe and effective method for achieving both increased nutrient intake and improved overall nutritional status in these infants.

  18. [Clinical trials on heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosín Aguilar, J; Hernándiz Martínez, A

    2001-01-01

    n 1987 the results of the Consensus study were published, and showed that enalapril, an angiotensin convertor enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), was able to modify the clinical course of the heart failure syndrome thereby reducing mortality. Other ACEI later demonstrated the same effect on the different degrees of symptomatic heart failure, left ventricular dysfunction, myocardial infarction and more recently in diabetic patients. In 1996 studies on the betablockers carvedilol, bisoprolol and metoprolol showed their efficacy in reducing deaths due to progressive heart impairment and sudden death in chronic heart failure. The RALES study showed that small doses of spironolactone also improved the prognosis on this disease. Digital improves the quality of life but not the survival rate. Only amiodarone (among the antiarrhythmics) reduces sudden death. Other drugs and groups of drugs can not be considered for chronic outpatient treatment of heart failure. Multicenter trials make it possible to obtain scientific evidence for establishing rational treatments. Many groups of patients such as women, elderly people and the more severe cases of the disease are often not included in these trials. Occasionally, multicenter trials are badly designed (CIBIS and MCD), which in the case of betablockers, led to a substantial delay in their administration. Other times, as in the ELITE study, the results were badly interpreted. The knowledge obtained from these studies is slow in reaching patients, with few patients taking betablockers. It is known that most patients do not take the doses found to be effective in multicenter trials.

  19. Copeptin in Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Louise; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the most common causes of hospitalization and mortality in the modern Western world and an increasing proportion of the population will be affected by HF in the future. Although HF management has improved quality of life and prognosis, mortality remains very high...

  20. Open access to an outpatient intravenous diuresis program in a systolic heart failure disease management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Kathy; Dias, Andre; Franco, Emiliana; Tamariz, Leonardo; Steen, Dylan; Arcement, Lee M

    2011-01-01

    In order to provide efficient utilization of resources in an outpatient setting for acute exacerbation of heart failure (HF), the authors piloted an open-access outpatient intravenous (IV) diuretic program (IVDP) to evaluate utilization in an HF disease management program (HFDMP), patient characteristics for users of the program, and safety. An outpatient HFDMP at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, Florida, enrolling 577 patients 18 years and older with an ejection fraction ≤40% was implemented. For symptoms or weight gain ≥5 pounds, patients were eligible to use an open-access IVDP during clinic hours. A total of 130 HFDM patients (22.5%) used the IVDP. IVDP users were more likely to be diabetic, with lower body mass indices than non-IVDP users. New York Heart Association class IV patients and previously hospitalized patients were more likely to use the IVDP. There were no documented adverse reactions for patients receiving treatment and no difference in mortality between groups. This open-access outpatient IVDP model for patients with HF was readily utilized by the HFDMP participants and appears safe for use in this population. This unique model may provide alternative access for acute HF treatment. Congest Heart Fail. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Management of heart failure in primary care after implementation of the National Service Framework for Coronary Heart Disease: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, A; Williams, J; de Lusignan, S; Chan, T

    2005-02-01

    To compare the management of heart failure with the standards set out in the National Service Framework for Coronary Heart Disease. A cross-sectional study in 26 general practices, with a combined list size of 256,188, that are members of the Kent, Surrey and Sussex Primary Care Research Network. Information was extracted on the management of 2129 patients with heart failure, of whom 2097 were aged 45 years and over. The prevalence of heart failure was 8.3 per 1000. Prevalence rates increased with age, from 0.2 per 1000 in people aged under 35 years of age to 125 per 1000 in those aged 85 years and over. Coronary heart disease (present in 47%) was the most common comorbid condition in men with heart failure, whereas hypertension (present in 46%) was the most common condition in women. Recording of cardiovascular risk factors was generally higher in younger patients than in older patients, and in men than in women. Blood pressure (92% of men and 90% of women) and smoking status (84% of men and 77% of women) were generally the best-recorded cardiovascular risk factors. Blood electrolytes were recorded in about 83% of men and 75% of women. Only 17% of men and 11% of women with heart failure had a record of undergoing an echocardiogram. Use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or antagonists was 76% in men with heart failure and 68% in women; lowest rates were seen in older patients. Uptake of influenza immunization was generally high, at 85% in men and 84% in women. The use of ACE inhibitors in patients with heart failure was higher than in some previous studies. However, many patients have no documentation in their computerized medical records of having undergone key investigations, such as echocardiography.

  2. A randomized trial of heart failure disease management in skilled nursing facilities: design and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxer, Rebecca S; Dolansky, Mary A; Bodnar, Christine A; Singer, Mendel E; Albert, Jeffery M; Gravenstein, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) disease management can improve health outcomes for older community dwelling patients with heart failure. HF disease management has not been studied in skilled nursing facilities, a major site of transitional care for older adults. The objective of this trial is to investigate if a HF- disease management program (HF-DMP) in skilled nursing facilities (SNF)s will decrease all-cause rehospitalizations for the first 60 days post-SNF admission. The trial is a randomized cluster trial to be conducted in 12 for-profit SNF in the greater Cleveland area. The study population is inclusive of patients with HF regardless of ejection fraction but excludes those patients on dialysis and with a life expectancy of 6 months or less. The HF-DMP includes 7 elements considered standard of care for patients with HF documentation of left ventricular function, tracking of weight and symptoms, medication titration, discharge instructions, 7-day follow-up appointment post-SNF discharge, and patient education. The HF-DMP is conducted by a research nurse tasked with adhering to each element of the program and regularly audited to maintain fidelity of the program. Additional outcomes include health status, self-care management, and discharge destination. The SNF-Connect Trial is the first trial of its kind to assess if a HF-DMP will improve outcomes for patients in SNFs. This trial will provide evidence on the effectiveness of HF-DMP to improve outcomes for older frail HF patients undergoing postacute rehabilitation. Copyright © 2013 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Inflammation Markers and Major Depressive Disorder in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure: Results From the Sertraline Against Depression and Heart Disease in Chronic Heart Failure Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Glen L; Prybol, Kevin; Boyle, Stephen H; Hall, Russell; Streilein, Robert D; Steffens, David C; Krishnan, Ranga; Rogers, Joseph G; O'Connor, Christopher M; Jiang, Wei

    2015-09-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) and chronic heart failure (CHF) have in common heightening states of inflammation, manifested by elevated inflammation markers such as C-reactive protein. This study compared inflammatory biomarker profiles in patients with CHF and MDD to those without MDD. The study recruited patients admitted to inpatient care for acute heart failure exacerbations, after psychiatric diagnostic interview. Patients with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores lower than 10 and with no history of depression served as the nondepressed reference group (n = 25). MDD severity was defined as follows: mild (BDI 10-15; n = 48), moderate (BDI 16-23; n = 51), and severe (BDI ≥ 24; n = 33). A Bio-Plex assay measured 18 inflammation markers. Ordinal logistic models were used to examine the association of MDD severity and biomarker levels. Adjusting for age, sex, statin use, body mass index, left ventricular ejection fraction, tobacco use, and New York Heart Association class, the MDD overall group variable was significantly associated with elevated interleukin (IL)-2 (p = .019), IL-4 (p = .020), IL-6 (p = .026), interferon-γ (p = .010), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (p = .002), macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (p = .003), and tumor necrosis factor α (p = .004). MDD severity subgroups had a greater probability of elevated IL-6, IL-8, interferon-γ, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, macrophage inflammatory protein 1β, and tumor necrosis factor α compared with nondepressed group. The nondepressed group had greater probability of elevated IL-17 (p marker levels compared with patients with CHF who had no depression. Whether effective depression treatment will normalize the altered inflammation marker levels requires further study. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00078286.

  4. EFFECT OF FUROSEMIDE AND TORASEMIDE ON HEART RATE VARIABILITY AND VENTRICULAR RHYTHM DISORDERS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE COMPLICATING ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE: COMPARATIVE NONRANDOMIZED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. H. Shugushev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study effect of diuretic therapy with furosemide and torasemide on heart rate variability (HRV and frequency of ventriclar rhythm disorders in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF complicating ischemic heart disease (IHD.Material and methods. Patients (n=107 with CHF III-IV functional class (NYHA complicating IHD were examined. The first group of patients received furosemide, 20-60 mg QD (n=52, the second group received torasemide, 5-20 mg QD (n=55. Analysis of heart rhythm disorders and the basic HRV indicators was performed by ECG 10-minute recordings initially and after 10 days of therapy.Results. Decrease in time and spectral HRV parameters and increase in daily number of ventricular extrasystoles was found in furosemide treated patients. Improvement of HRV parameters and reduction of daily number of ventricular rhythm disorders was found torasemide treated patients.Conclusion. Torasemide therapy improves an autonomic regulation of heart rhythm and leads to the reduction of ventricular heart rhythm disorders in patients with CHF complicating IHD.

  5. Heart Failure and Sudden Cardiac Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saour, Basil; Smith, Bryan; Yancy, Clyde W

    2017-12-01

    The Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention estimates that 5.7 million adults in the United States suffer from heart failure and 1 in 9 deaths in 2009 cited heart failure as a contributing cause. Almost 50% of patients who are diagnosed with heart failure die within 5 years of diagnosis. Cardiovascular disease is a public health burden. The prognosis of patients with heart failure has improved significantly. However, the risk for death remains high. Managing sudden death risk and intervening appropriately with primary or secondary prevention strategies are of paramount importance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Use and predictors of heart failure disease management referral in patients hospitalized with heart failure: insights from the Get With the Guidelines Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharacholou, S Michael; Hellkamp, Anne S; Hernandez, Adrian F; Peterson, Eric D; Bhatt, Deepak L; Yancy, Clyde W; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2011-05-01

    Heart failure disease management (HFDM) may be beneficial in heart failure (HF) patients at risk for readmission or post-discharge mortality. However, characteristics of hospitalized HF patients referred to HFDM are not known. Get With the Guidelines (GWTG) program data was used to analyze 57,969 patients hospitalized with HF from January 2005 through January 2010 from 235 sites. Factors associated with referral to HFDM and rates of HF quality measures by referral status were studied. Mean age of patients was 69.7 ± 14.5 years, 52% were men, and 65% were white. HFDM referral occurred in 11,150 (19.2%) patients. The median rate of HFDM referral among all hospitals was 3.5% (25th-75th percentiles 0%-16.7%) and 8.7% (2.8%-27.7%) among hospitals with at least one previous HFDM referral. Quality and performance measures were higher in patients referred to HFDM. HFDM referral was associated with atrial fibrillation, implanted cardiac device, depression, and treatment at larger hospitals. Patients at higher 90-day mortality risk were paradoxically less likely to receive HFDM referral. HFDM referral occurred in less than one-fifth of hospitalized HF patients and was more frequently recommended to lower-risk patients. Increasing use and optimizing selection of patients for HFDM referral is a potential target for quality improvement. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. CORRECTION OF MICROCIRCULATORY DISORDERS IN NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Statsenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Combined liver damage in patients with chronic heart failure and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease leads to the formation of pathological hemodynamic types of microcirculation with prevalence of shunt blood flow, nutritional deficiency, that correlated with changes in the functional state of the liver. Using cytoprotector mexicor for 16 weeks as part of the basic treatment of patients with chronic heart failure and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease can correct these microcirculatory disorders, has a beneficial effect on endothelial function, autonomic tone of microvessels, which is accompanied by the positive dynamics of indicators of cytolysis and cholestasis.

  8. Can we reduce preventable heart failure readmissions in patients enrolled in a Disease Management Programme?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, D

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Disease Management Programmes (DMPs) are successful in reducing hospital readmissions in heart failure (HF). However, there remain a number of patients enrolled in a DMP who are readmitted with HF. The primary aim of the study was to determine the proportion of preventable readmissions (PR). The secondary aim was to recognise patient characteristics which would identify certain patients at risk of having a PR. METHODS: A retrospective chart search was performed on patients readmitted over a 1-year period. RESULTS: 38.5% of readmissions were classified as PR. None of these patients made prior contact with the DMP. Admission levels of BNP, potassium, urea and creatinine were significantly lower in the PR group. CONCLUSION: DMP have proven benefits in reducing hospital readmission nonetheless a significant proportion of these readmissions are preventable. Further work is required to prospectively analyse why these patients fail to contact the DMP.

  9. Significant benefits after renal transplantation in patients with chronic heart failure and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kute, Vivek B; Vanikar, Aruna V; Patel, Himanshu V; Gumber, Manoj R; Shah, Pankaj R; Engineer, Divyesh P; Balwani, Manish R; Gautam, Rajesh Singh; Modi, Pranjal R; Shah, Veena R; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2014-07-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are serious medical conditions with significant morbidity and mortality and often coexist. Because of perioperative risks in these patients, they may not be considered a candidate for renal transplantation (RTx). We compare retrospectively RTx outcomes [graft/patient survival, rejection rates and adverse cardiac events] in study group [low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 45% by echocardiogram, n = 63] and control group [normal LVEF ≥ 50%, n = 537] from a developing country. The mean EF was 35 ± 5.6 and 57 ± 3% for the study and control groups, respectively (p renal transplantation, this appears not to be the case. The outcomes between the 2 groups are comparable and transplant is an option for even low EF patients.

  10. Heart Failure Society of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Regurgitation Resource Page Patient Clinical Trials Learn About Heart Failure Patient Tools Patient Resources Patient Webinar Series Patient Upcoming Events Research Heart Failure Research Resources and Guidelines Research General Information HFSA ...

  11. Prognostic indices in childhood heart failure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mia (28%), and congenital heart disease (25 %). There was a case-fatality rate of 24% among the study population. Poor prognostic indices identified were age below one year or above 5years, presence of underlying acute respiratory in- fections, rheumatic heart disease and renal disorders. Conclusion: Heart failure in ...

  12. Heart failure complicating tetralogy of Fallot

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), a cyanotic congenital heart disease comprising of right ventricular outflow tract obstruction (RVOTO), right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), ventricular septal defect (VSD) and overriding of the aorta, constitutes about 10% of congenital heart diseases seen in. Nigeria.1 Congestive heart failure is not a ...

  13. Recognizing Advanced Heart Failure and Knowing Your Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Recognizing Advanced Heart Failure and Knowing Your Options Updated:May 9,2017 ... need in the future. Treatment Options for Advanced Heart Failure Major Interventions Open-heart surgery: For patients with ...

  14. Body composition, appetite-related hormones, adipocytokines, and heart failure in adult patients with congenital heart disease: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, Yumi; Murakami, Tomoaki; Matsumoto, Noriko; Okamura, Daisuke; Takahashi, Yuta; Nishihata, Yosuke; Komiyama, Nobuyuki; Niwa, Koichiro

    2017-11-27

    To assess body composition and relationships among body composition, appetite-related hormones, adipocytokines, and heart failure (HF) in adult patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). This prospective study enrolled 46 consecutive adult patients with CHD and 12 age-matched healthy controls. The patients and control subjects were divided into four groups: 13 patients with Fontan circulation (group A), 16 patients with cyanosis (group B), 17 patients who previously underwent biventricular repair (group C), and 12 age-matched healthy controls. Body composition was measured using InBody730, and levels of appetite-related hormones (ghrelin and leptin) and adipocytokines (leptin, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α) were determined. Relationships of these measurements between severe HF, defined as New York Heart Association functional class III-IV and/or recent repeated unscheduled hospitalizations due to HF, were examined using univariate logistic analysis. Mean patient age was 32.1 ± 7.4 years. The skeletal muscle mass was significantly decreased in groups A and B compared with that in controls. Interestingly, ghrelin levels in groups A and B were also significantly lower than those in controls. Univariate logistic analysis revealed that ghrelin level, percent body fat, and pulse oximetric oxygen saturation were significantly associated with severe HF. Patients with Fontan circulation and those with cyanosis might be at a risk of sarcopenia. Despite the decreased skeletal muscle mass and increased body fat, ghrelin levels in these patients were decreased. These changes might have a negative impact on HF in these patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Lifestyle Changes for Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Lifestyle Changes for Heart Failure Updated:Sep 27,2017 Following recommendations about diet, ... making. This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  16. Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure Updated:May 9,2017 An important part of ... Care This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  17. Warning Signs of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... second installment explains heart failure with muscle intact. Queen Latifah and her mom, Rita, share their personal ... a Heart Attack 10 Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate *Red Dress ™ DHHS, Go Red ™ AHA ; National Wear Red ...

  18. Effects of tolvaptan in patients with chronic kidney disease and chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumata, Mari; Hirawa, Nobuhito; Sumida, Koichiro; Kagimoto, Minako; Ehara, Yosuke; Okuyama, Yuki; Fujita, Megumi; Fujiwara, Akira; Kobayashi, Mayumi; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Yuichiro; Saka, Sanae; Yatsu, Keisuke; Fujikawa, Tetsuya; Toya, Yoshiyuki; Yasuda, Gen; Tamura, Kouichi; Umemura, Satoshi

    2017-10-01

    Tolvaptan, a vasopressin V2 receptor blocker, has a diuretic effect for patients with heart failure. However, there were a few data concerning the effects of tolvaptan in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We retrospectively analyzed 21 patients with chronic heart failure and CKD. Tolvaptan was co-administered with other diuretics in-use, every day. We compared clinical parameters before and after the treatments with tolvaptan. Furthermore, we examined the correlations between baseline data and the change of body weight. Tolvaptan decreased the body weight and increased the urine volume (p = 0.001). The urine osmolality significantly decreased throughout the study period. Urinary Na/Cr ratio and FENa changed significantly after 4 h, and more remarkable after 8 h (p = 0.003, both). Serum creatinine increased slightly after 1 week of treatment (p = 0.012). The alteration of body weight within the study period correlated negatively with the baseline urine osmolality (r = -0.479, p = 0.038), the baseline urine volume (r = -0.48, p = 0.028), and the baseline inferior vena cava diameter (IVCD) (r = -0.622, p = 0.017). Hyponatremia was improved to the normal value, and the augmentations of the sodium concentration were negatively associated with the basal sodium levels (p = 0.01, r = -0.546). Tolvaptan is effective in increasing diuresis and improved hyponatremia, even in patients with CKD. The baseline urine osmolality, urine volume, and IVCD may be useful predictors for diuretic effects of tolvaptan.

  19. Impact of chronic kidney disease on the diuretic response of tolvaptan in acute decompensated heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Shuntaro; Ohshima, Kiyotaka; Miyazaki, Shigehiro; Kadota, Hisaki; Shimizu, Hideaki; Ogimoto, Akiyoshi; Hamada, Mareomi

    2017-11-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the initial diuretic response to tolvaptan and clinical predictors for tolvaptan responders in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). Patients (153) with ADHF (clinical scenario 2 or 3 with signs of fluid retention) who were administered tolvaptan were enrolled. Tolvaptan (15 or 7.5 mg) was administered for at least 7 days to those patients in whom fluid retention was observed even after standard treatment. The maximum urine volume immediately after tolvaptan administration showed good correlations with the ejection fraction and estimated glomerular filtration rate that were independent predictors of the urine volume (UV) responders (≥1500 mL increase in urine volume). The diuretic response (in terms of maximum diuresis) diminished with advancing chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage and concomitant deterioration of the renal function. Furthermore, advanced CKD was a significant negative predictor for the body weight (BW) responders (2.0% decrease in the body weight within 1 week after starting tolvaptan). As compared with non-CKD, the presence of advanced CKD predicts poor diuretic response for both UV and BW responders. The diuretic response following tolvaptan administration gradually diminished with progressive deterioration of the CKD stage. Worsening renal function was not observed. Tolvaptan is effective in treating CS2 or CS3 ADHF patients who present fluid retention and congestion, suggesting its potential efficacy for fluid management in the ADHF patients with CKD without worsening the renal function. © 2017 The Authors. ESC Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  20. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme ID Polymorphism in Patients with Heart Failure Secondary to Chagas Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Silene Jacinto da; Rassi, Salvador; Pereira, Alexandre da Costa

    2017-10-01

    Changes in the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene may contribute to the increase in blood pressure and consequently to the onset of heart failure (HF). The role of polymorphism is very controversial, and its identification in patients with HF secondary to Chagas disease in the Brazilian population is required. To determine ACE polymorphism in patients with HF secondary to Chagas disease and patients with Chagas disease without systolic dysfunction, and to evaluate the relationship of the ACE polymorphism with different clinical variables. This was a comparative clinical study with 193 participants, 103 of them with HF secondary to Chagas disease and 90 with Chagas disease without systolic dysfunction. All patients attended the outpatient department of the General Hospital of the Federal University of Goias general hospital. Alleles I and D of ACE polymorphism were identified by polymerase chain reaction of the respective intron 16 fragments in the ACE gene and visualized by electrophoresis. In the group of HF patients, 63% were male, whereas 53.6% of patients with Chagas disease without systolic dysfunction were female (p = 0,001). The time from diagnosis varied from 1 to 50 years. Distribution of DD, ID and II genotypes was similar between the two groups, without statistical significance (p = 0,692). There was no difference in clinical characteristics or I/D genotypes between the groups. Age was significantly different between the groups (p = 0,001), and mean age of patients with HF was 62.5 years. No differences were observed in the distribution of (Insertion/Deletion) genotype frequencies of ACE polymorphism between the studied groups. The use of this genetic biomarker was not useful in detecting a possible relationship between ACE polymorphism and clinical manifestations in HF secondary to Chagas disease.

  1. Psoriasis and risk of heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Usman; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Psoriasis is a common inflammatory disease that is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, including myocardial infarction. Heart failure (HF) is independently associated with several cardiovascular risk factors and is a major cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality...

  2. Heart failure and COPD: partners in crime?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannink, J.D.C.; Helvoort, H.A.C. van; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Heijdra, Y.F.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and heart failure (HF) are both common diseases with major impact and seem to coexist more frequently than expected from their separate population prevalences. However, estimates of combined prevalence must be interpreted carefully because of

  3. Reciprocal transcriptional regulation of metabolic and signaling pathways correlates with disease severity in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Andreas S; Kumordzie, Ami; Frangakis, Constantine; Margulies, Kenneth B; Cappola, Thomas P; Tomaselli, Gordon F

    2011-10-01

    Systolic heart failure (HF) is a complex systemic syndrome that can result from a wide variety of clinical conditions and gene mutations. Despite phenotypic similarities, characterized by ventricular dilatation and reduced contractility, the extent of common and divergent gene expression between different forms of HF remains a matter of intense debate. Using a meta-analysis of 28 experimental (mouse, rat, dog) and human HF microarray studies, we demonstrate that gene expression changes are characterized by a coordinated and reciprocal regulation of major metabolic and signaling pathways. In response to a wide variety of stressors in animal models of HF, including ischemia, pressure overload, tachypacing, chronic isoproterenol infusion, Chagas disease, and transgenic mouse models, major metabolic pathways are invariably downregulated, whereas cell signaling pathways are upregulated. In contrast to this uniform transcriptional pattern that recapitulates a fetal gene expression program in experimental animal models of HF, human HF microarray studies displayed a greater heterogeneity, with some studies even showing upregulation of metabolic and downregulation of signaling pathways in end-stage human hearts. These discrepant results between animal and human studies are due to a number of factors, prominently cardiac disease and variable exposure to cold cardioplegic solution in nonfailing human samples, which can downregulate transcripts involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), thus mimicking gene expression patterns observed in failing samples. Additionally, β-blockers and ACE inhibitor use in end-stage human HF was associated with higher levels of myocardial OXPHOS transcripts, thus partially reversing the fetal gene expression pattern. In human failing samples, downregulation of metabolism was associated with hemodynamic markers of disease severity. Irrespective of the etiology, gene expression in failing myocardium is characterized by downregulation of

  4. Organizational structure for chronic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinne, Seppo T; Liu, Chuan-Fen; Wong, Edwin S; Hebert, Paul L; Heidenreich, Paul; Bastian, Lori A; Au, David H

    2016-03-01

    In contrast to chronic heart failure (CHF), measures of quality of care for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are poor. Our objective was to examine differences in organizational structure available to support quality of care for patients with CHF and COPD. We performed 2 nationwide surveys exploring organizational structure for the management of CHF and COPD. We surveyed the chief of medicine and the chief of cardiology and pulmonary medicine at 120 Veterans Affairs facilities in the United States. Analogous questions about organizational structure that enhanced adherence to guideline-based care were compared between CHF and COPD surveys. We found large and notable differences in the organizational structure for disease management, with systematically less attention given to COPD than CHF. These differences were evident in multiple processes of care. Key differences included fewer facilities: having COPD clinics than CHF clinics (12.7% vs 50.8%; P organizational structure existed for COPD than CHF. Lack of organizational structure for COPD likely impedes an organization's abilities to encourage high-quality care and avoid recently implemented hospital readmission penalties. Our results suggest the need to develop a systematic approach for healthcare systems to provide essential organizational structure based on the burden of disease in the population.

  5. The impact of chronic heart failure on misinterpretation and misclassification of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.I. Vyshnyvetskyy

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the impact of comorbid chronic heart failure (CHF on the severity of symptoms and correctness of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD classification. Materials and methods. Cross-sectional study included 177 patients with COPD and concomitant cardiovascular diseases. All patients were undergone spirometry, chest radiography, echocardiography, validated questionnaires (COPD assessment test (CAT, Hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS. Multiple regression was used to establish adjusted impact of CHF presence on CAT scores and COPD severity misclassification. Results. It was established that the presence of comorbid CHF increases CAT score by 3.29, 95% CI [1.71–5.02] points. In the overall cohort of COPD patients CAT scores adjustment for the presence of CHF has resulted in reclassification of 15.5% of patients from group B to group A, and 4.3% of patients from group D to group C. Among selective patients with COPD and CHF the rate of revised classification constituted 32.1% and 7.9%, respectively. Conclusion. The presence of comorbid CHF is able to significantly change the correct assessment of the intensity of COPD symptoms, disease-specific health status and classification of COPD severity.

  6. The value of telemonitoring and ICT-guided disease management in heart failure : Results from the IN TOUCH study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraai, Imke; de Vries, Arjen; Vermeulen, Karin; van Deursen, Vincent; van der Wal, Martje; de Jong, Richard; van Dijk, Rene; Jaarsma, Tiny; Hillege, Hans; Lesman, Ivonne

    Aim: It is still unclear whether telemonitoring reduces hospitalization and mortality in heart failure (HF) patients and whether adding an Information and Computing Technology-guided-disease-management-system (ICT-guided-DMS) improves clinical and patient reported outcomes or reduces healthcare

  7. Safety and efficacy of sertraline for depression in patients with heart failure: results of the SADHART-CHF (Sertraline Against Depression and Heart Disease in Chronic Heart Failure) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Christopher M; Jiang, Wei; Kuchibhatla, Maragatha; Silva, Susan G; Cuffe, Michael S; Callwood, Dwayne D; Zakhary, Bosh; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Arias, Rebekka M; Rivelli, Sarah K; Krishnan, Ranga

    2010-08-24

    The objective was to test the hypothesis that heart failure (HF) patients treated with sertraline will have lower depression scores and fewer cardiovascular events compared with placebo. Depression is common among HF patients. It is associated with increased hospitalization and mortality. The SADHART-CHF (Sertraline Against Depression and Heart Disease in Chronic Heart Failure) trial was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of sertraline 50 to 200 mg/day versus matching placebo for 12 weeks. All participants also received nurse-facilitated support. Eligible patients were age 45 years or older with HF (left ventricular ejection fraction CHF]; NCT00078286). Copyright 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Markers of kidney disease and risk of subclinical and clinical heart failure in African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Nisha; Katz, Ronit; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Afkarian, Maryam; Kestenbaum, Bryan; de Boer, Ian H; Young, Bessie

    2016-12-01

    African Americans and patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at high risk for clinical heart failure (HF). In this study, we aimed to determine the association of markers of kidney disease with subclinical HF (by echocardiogram) and risk of clinical HF among a large, well-characterized community-based cohort of African American patients. We also examined whether the association of markers of kidney disease with HF was attenuated with adjustment for echocardiographic measures. We studied participants in the Jackson Heart Study, a large community-based cohort of African Americans. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urine albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR) were measured at baseline. We tested the association of eGFR and urine ACR with left ventricular mass (LVM), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and physician-adjudicated incident HF. Among the 3332 participants in the study, 166 (5%) had eGFR disease, lower eGFR and higher urine ACR were associated with higher LVM {β-coefficient 1.54 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78-2.31] per 10 mL/min/1.73 m 2 decrease in eGFR and 2.87 (95% CI 1.85-3.88) per doubling of urine ACR}. There was no association of eGFR and urine ACR with LVEF [β-coefficient -0.12 (95% CI -0.28-0.04) and -0.11 (95% CI -0.35-0.12), respectively]. There was no association of eGFR with the risk of incident HF [HR 1.02 (95% CI 0.91-1.14) per 10 mL/min/1.73 m 2 decrease], while there was a significant association of urine ACR [HR 2.22 (95% CI 1.29-3.84) per doubling of urine ACR]. This association was only modestly attenuated with adjustment for LVM [HR 1.95 (95% CI 1.09-3.49)]. Among a community-based cohort of African Americans, lower eGFR and higher ACR were associated with higher LVM. Furthermore, higher urine ACR was associated with incident HF, which was not entirely explained by the presence of left ventricular disease. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  9. Heart failure in hypertension: prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiopoulou, Vasiliki V; Kalogeropoulos, Andreas P; Butler, Javed

    2012-07-09

    The heart failure epidemic calls for urgent prevention efforts. Hypertension is present in the majority of individuals who develop heart failure and carries the highest population-attributable risk for heart failure together with coronary heart disease. Therefore, hypertension is a natural prime target for prevention interventions. However, a substantial proportion of heart failure develops among individuals with a systolic BP (SBP) level below current therapeutic target recommendations (140 mmHg or 130 mmHg for high-risk groups), which are accepted as 'normal' levels, underlining the importance of prehypertension for heart failure development. Prevalence and incidence of both hypertension and prehypertension are high. Efforts to prevent or attenuate BP rise could lead to a substantial reduction of complications, including heart failure development. Lifestyle modifications play a crucial role in preventing elevation of BP levels and better control of high BP. Weight loss, control of sodium intake and diet, and physical activity are essential steps towards this direction. However, when medications are needed to reduce BP levels, the selection of the appropriate agent is important not only for effective control of BP but also to reduce hypertension-related complications. Diuretics and renin-angiotensin system modulators seem to be the most effective agents for heart failure prevention according to the existing evidence. Patients with heart failure and hypertension should be treated for hypertension based on the same principles, although medication selection should take into account concomitant medications, other risk factors and type of heart failure (reduced vs preserved left ventricular ejection fraction).

  10. Malnutrition and growth failure in cyanotic and acyanotic congenital heart disease with and without pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varan, B; Tokel, K; Yilmaz, G

    1999-07-01

    To investigate the effect of several types of congenital heart disease (CHD) on nutrition and growth. The prevalence of malnutrition and growth failure was investigated in 89 patients with CHD aged 1-45 months. They were grouped according to cardiac diagnosis: group aP (n = 26), acyanotic patients with pulmonary hypertension; group ap (n = 5), acyanotic patients without pulmonary hypertension; group cp (n = 42), cyanotic patients without pulmonary hypertension; and group cP (n = 16), cyanotic patients with pulmonary hypertension. Information on socioeconomic level, parental education status, birth weight and nutrition history, number of siblings, and the timing, quality, and quantity of nutrients ingested during weaning period and at the time of the examination were obtained through interviews with parents. There was no significant difference between groups in terms of parental education status, socioeconomic level, duration of breast feeding, and number of siblings (p > 0.05). Group cP patients ingested fewer nutrients for their age compared to other groups. 37 of the 89 patients were below the 5th centile for both weight and length, and 58 of 89 patients were below the 5th centile for weight. Mild or borderline malnutrition was more common in group aP patients. Most group cp patients were in normal nutritional state, and stunting was more common than wasting. Both moderate to severe malnutrition and failure to thrive were more common in group cP patients. Patients with CHD are prone to malnutrition and growth failure. Pulmonary hypertension appears to be the most important factor, and cyanotic patients with pulmonary hypertension are the ones most severely affected. This study shows the additive effects of hypoxia and pulmonary hypertension on nutrition and growth of children with CHD.

  11. Heart failure and respiratory hospitalizations are reduced in patients with heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with the use of an implantable pulmonary artery pressure monitoring device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahnke, Jason S; Abraham, William T; Adamson, Philip B; Bourge, Robert C; Bauman, Jordan; Ginn, Greg; Martinez, Fernando J; Criner, Gerard J

    2015-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a frequent comorbidity in patients with heart failure (HF). Elevated pulmonary arterial (PA) pressure can be seen in both conditions and has been shown to predict morbidity and mortality. A total of 550 subjects with New York Heart Association functional class III HF were randomly assigned to the treatment (n = 270) and control (n = 280) groups in the CHAMPION Trial. Physicians had access to the PA pressure measurements in the treatment group only, in which HF therapy was used to lower the elevated pressures. HF and respiratory hospitalizations were compared in both groups. A total of 187 subjects met criteria for classification into the COPD subgroup. In the entire cohort, the treatment group had a 37% reduction in HF hospitalization rates (P respiratory hospitalization rates (P = .0061). In the COPD subgroup, the treatment group had a 41% reduction in HF hospitalization rates (P = .0009) and a 62% reduction in respiratory hospitalization rates (P = .0023). The rate of respiratory hospitalizations in subjects without COPD was not statistically different (P = .76). HF management incorporating hemodynamic information from an implantable PA pressure monitor significantly reduces HF and respiratory hospitalizations in HF subjects with comorbid COPD compared with standard care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hemodynamic-guided heart-failure management using a wireless implantable sensor: Infrastructure, methods, and results in a community heart failure disease-management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jermyn, Rita; Alam, Amit; Kvasic, Jessica; Saeed, Omar; Jorde, Ulrich

    2017-03-01

    The real-world impact of remote pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) monitoring on New York Heart Association (NYHA) class improvement and heart failure (HF) hospitalization rate is presented here from a single center. METHODS: Seventy-seven previously hospitalized outpatients with NYHA class III HF were offered PAP monitoring via device implantation in a multidisciplinary HF-management program. Prospective effectiveness analyses compared outcomes in 34 hemodynamically monitored patients to a group of similar patients (n = 32) who did not undergo device implantation but received usual care. NYHA class and 6-minute walk testing were assessed at baseline and 90 days. All hospitalizations were collected after 6 months of the implantation date (average follow-up, 15 months) and compared with the number of hospitalizations experienced prior to hemodynamic monitoring. Patients in both groups had similar distributions of age, sex, and ejection fraction. After 90 days, 61.8% of the monitored patients had NYHA class improvement of ≥1, compared with 12.5% in the controls (P management leads to significant improvements in NYHA class and HF hospitalization rate in a real-world setting compared with usual care delivered in a comprehensive disease-management program. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Modulation of myocardial energetics: An important category of agents in the multimodal treatment of coronary artery disease and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Jamshed J; Mishra, Sundeep

    The combined and relative contribution of glucose and fatty acid oxidation generates myocardial energy, which regulates the cardiac function and efficiency. Any dysregulation in this metabolic homeostasis can adversely affect the function of heart and contribute to cardiac conditions such as angina and heart failure. Metabolic agents ameliorate this internal metabolic anomaly, by shifting the energy production pathway from free fatty acids to glucose, resulting in a better performance of the heart. Metabolic therapy is relatively a new modality, which functions through optimization of cardiac substrate metabolism. Among the metabolic therapies, trimetazidine and ranolazine are the agents presently available in India. In the present review, we would like to present the metabolic perspective of pathophysiology of coronary artery disease and heart failure, and metabolic therapy by using trimetazidine and ranolazine. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Modulation of myocardial energetics: An important category of agents in the multimodal treatment of coronary artery disease and heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshed J. Dalal

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The combined and relative contribution of glucose and fatty acid oxidation generates myocardial energy, which regulates the cardiac function and efficiency. Any dysregulation in this metabolic homeostasis can adversely affect the function of heart and contribute to cardiac conditions such as angina and heart failure. Metabolic agents ameliorate this internal metabolic anomaly, by shifting the energy production pathway from free fatty acids to glucose, resulting in a better performance of the heart. Metabolic therapy is relatively a new modality, which functions through optimization of cardiac substrate metabolism. Among the metabolic therapies, trimetazidine and ranolazine are the agents presently available in India. In the present review, we would like to present the metabolic perspective of pathophysiology of coronary artery disease and heart failure, and metabolic therapy by using trimetazidine and ranolazine.

  15. [Hronic heart failure and concomitant diseases in elderly patients: anemia and cardio-renal anemic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, V N; Bart, B Ia; Raspopova, T N; Larin, V G

    2014-01-01

    to assess impact of anemia on chronic heart failure (CHF) course in elderly patients in primary care setting. Methods. We examined 164 outpatients (n=164) aged 60-85 years with clinically stable CHF due to ischemic heart disease and arterial hypertension. All patients underwent clinical, laboratorial evaluation, ECG, EchoCG measurements, 6 min walk test. Patients were categorized according to the presence of anemia, as defined by the WHO criteria (hemoglobin levels Hb>9 g/dl). It was associated with diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [R] 2.2, 95% CI 1.03-4.69, =0.041), high creatinine level (R 2.76, 95% CI 1.25-6.12, =0.012) and chronic kidney disease (R 5.66, 95% CI 2.51-12.77, 75 years (R 3.58, 95% CI 1.59-7.99, =0.002), diabetes (R 2.68, 95% CI 1.19-6.04, =0.018), history of myocardial infarction (R 2.7, 95% CI 1.24-6.04, =0.013), systolic blood pressure 130 mmol/l (OR 3.53, 95% CI 1.51-8.22, =0.004) were predictors of mortality of elderly patients with CRAS. Conclusions. CHF patients with and without anemia had similar survival but survival of those with CRAS was worse compared with patients without anemia and preserved kidney function. Age >75 years, diabetes mellitus, history of myocardial infarction, low systolic blood pressure, complete LBBB, high creatinine level were predictors of mortality in patients with CRAS.

  16. Caloric intake during the perioperative period and growth failure in infants with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, George T; Clabby, Martha L; Kanter, Kirk R; Mahle, William T

    2013-02-01

    Infants with congenital heart disease have impaired weight gain during the first several months of life. Efforts have focused on improving weight gain and nutritional status during the first months of life. Close examination of the data suggests that the immediate postoperative period is problematic. Etiology of this early growth failure should be identified to develop effective interventions. This is a retrospective study of neonates who underwent modified systemic-to-pulmonary artery shunt, including Norwood palliation, at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta between January 2009 and July 2011. We analyzed growth from time of surgical intervention to hospital discharge. Measures of calculated weight-for-age Z-score (WAZ score) were performed using the World Health Organization's Anthro Software (version 3.2.2, January 2011; WHO, Geneva, Switzerland). Seventy-three patients were identified. Eight patients did not meet inclusion criteria. Complete data were collected on the remaining 65 patients. Median caloric intake patients received was 50.4 [interquartile range (IQR) 41.6 to 63.6] calories/kg/day while exclusively on parental nutrition. At hospital discharge, the median WAZ score was -2.0 (IQR -2.7 to -1.2) representing an overall median WAZ score decrease of -1.3 (IQR -1.7 to -0.7) from time of shunt palliation to hospital discharge. Despite studies showing poor weight gain in infants with congenital heart disease after neonatal palliation, this study reports the impact of hospital-based nutritional practices on weight gain in infants during the immediate postoperative period. Our data demonstrate that actual caloric intake during the cardiac intensive care unit stay is substantially below what is recommended.

  17. Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire Score Is Associated With Incident Heart Failure Hospitalization in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease Without Previously Diagnosed Heart Failure: Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rakesh K; Yang, Wei; Roy, Jason; Anderson, Amanda H; Bansal, Nisha; Chen, Jing; DeFilippi, Christopher; Delafontaine, Patrice; Feldman, Harold I; Kallem, Radhakrishna; Kusek, John W; Lora, Claudia M; Rosas, Sylvia E; Go, Alan S; Shlipak, Michael G

    2015-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a risk factor for heart failure (HF). Patients with chronic kidney disease without diagnosed HF have an increased burden of symptoms characteristic of HF. It is not known whether these symptoms are associated with occurrence of new onset HF. We studied the association of a modified Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire with newly identified cases of hospitalized HF among 3093 participants enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study who did not report HF at baseline. The annually updated Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire score was categorized into quartiles (Q1-4) with the lower scores representing the worse symptoms. Multivariable-adjusted repeated measure logistic regression models were adjusted for demographic characteristics, clinical risk factors for HF, N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide level and left ventricular hypertrophy, left ventricular systolic and diastolic dysfunction. Over a mean (±SD) follow-up period of 4.3±1.6 years, there were 211 new cases of HF hospitalizations. The risk of HF hospitalization increased with increasing symptom quartiles; 2.62, 1.85, 1.14, and 0.74 events per 100 person-years, respectively. The median number of annual Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire assessments per participant was 5 (interquartile range, 3-6). The annually updated Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire score was independently associated with higher risk of incident HF hospitalization in multivariable-adjusted models (odds ratio, 3.30 [1.66-6.52]; P=0.001 for Q1 compared with Q4). Symptoms characteristic of HF are common in patients with chronic kidney disease and are associated with higher short-term risk for new hospitalization for HF, independent of level of kidney function, and other known HF risk factors. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Changes in Echocardiographic Parameters in Iron Deficiency Patients with Heart Failure and Chronic Kidney Disease Treated with Intravenous Iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toblli, Jorge E; Di Gennaro, Federico; Rivas, Carlos

    2015-07-01

    Treatment of iron deficiency helps to improve cardiac and renal function in patients with chronic heart failure. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is currently unclear. We undertook a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled study of intravenous iron sucrose treatment (200mg/mL weekly for five weeks) in patients with chronic heart failure, chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anaemia receiving optimal treatment for chronic heart failure (N=60). Markers of disease severity, iron status, anaemia and inflammation were measured during a six-month follow-up period, and evaluation of echocardiographic parameters was performed at baseline and six months after treatment. At six months after treatment initiation, intravenous iron was associated with reduced severity of the symptoms of chronic heart failure and improved renal function (both pchronic kidney disease. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Relationship Among Heart Failure Disease Management, Quality of Care, and Hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eugene S; Bartone, Cheryl; Daly, Kathleen; Menon, Santosh; McDonald, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) affects 5.1 million adult patients, accounting for over 1 million hospitalizations, 1.8 million office visits, and nearly 680,000 emergency department visits annually. HF hospitalizations have been incorporated into a national measure of hospital and provider quality, with associated financial penalties based on the 30-day readmission rate after an index hospitalization for HF. However, it is not clear whether the number of HF-related hospitalizations or 30-day readmissions is consistently related to quality of care. The relationships between various measures of HF care quality and hospitalization rates were evaluated by performing a cohort study of an HF disease management program in a clinical practice setting. Following the statistical analyses assessing outcomes and survival, the conclusion was that an HF disease management program in clinical practice associated with improved utilization of evidence-based medical and device therapies tends to improve ejection fraction and survival, and reduce sex and race disparities, but not with an associated reduction in hospitalizations or total hospital days.

  20. Home-based nursing interventions improve knowledge of disease and management in patients with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina de Oliveira Azzolin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to assess patient knowledge of heart failure by home-based measurement of two NOC Nursing Outcomes over a six-month period and correlate mean outcome indicator scores with mean scores of a heart failure Knowledge Questionnaire.METHODS: in this before-and-after study, patients with heart failure received four home visits over a six-month period after hospital discharge. At each home visit, nursing interventions were implemented, NOC outcomes were assessed, and the Knowledge Questionnaire was administered.RESULTS: overall, 23 patients received home visits. Mean indicator scores for the outcome Knowledge: Medication were 2.27±0.14 at home visit 1 and 3.55±0.16 at home visit 4 (P<0.001; and, for the outcome Knowledge: Treatment Regimen, 2.33±0.13 at home visit 1 and 3.59±0.14 at home visit 4 (P<0.001. The correlation between the Knowledge Questionnaire and the Nursing Outcomes Classification scores was strong at home visit 1 (r=0.7, P<0.01, but weak and non significant at visit 4.CONCLUSION: the results show improved patient knowledge of heart failure and a strong correlation between Nursing Outcomes Classification indicator scores and Knowledge Questionnaire scores. The NOC Nursing Outcomes proved effective as knowledge assessment measures when compared with the validated instrument.

  1. Distinct trajectories of disease-specific health status in heart failure patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mastenbroek, Mirjam H.; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Meine, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is well known that a significant proportion of heart failure patients (10-44 %) do not show improvement in symptoms or functioning from cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), yet no study has examined patient-reported health status trajectories after implantation. METHODS: A cohort...

  2. Effects of structured heart failure disease management on mortality and morbidity depend on patients' mood: results from the Interdisciplinary Network for Heart Failure Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelbrich, Götz; Störk, Stefan; Kreißl-Kemmer, Sonja; Faller, Hermann; Prettin, Christiane; Heuschmann, Peter U; Ertl, Georg; Angermann, Christiane E

    2014-10-01

    Depression is common in heart failure (HF) and associated with adverse outcomes. Randomized comparisons of the effectiveness of HF care strategies by patients' mood are scarce. We therefore investigated in a randomized trial a structured collaborative disease management programme (HeartNetCare-HF™; HNC) recording mortality, morbidity, and symptoms in patients enrolled after hospitalization for decompensated systolic HF according to their responses to the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) during an observation period of 180 days. Subjects scoring <12/≥12 were categorized as non-depressed/depressed, and those ignoring the questionnaire as PHQ-deniers. Amongst 715 participants (69 ± 12 years, 29% female), 141 (20%) were depressed, 466 (65%) non-depressed, and 108 (15%) PHQ-deniers. The composite endpoint of mortality and re-hospitalization was neutral overall and in all subgroups. However, HNC reduced mortality risk in both depressed and non-depressed patients [adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) 0.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03-0.56, P = 0.006, and 0.49, 95% CI 0.25-0.93, P = 0.03, respectively], but not in PHQ-deniers (HR 1.74, 95% CI 0.77-3.96, P = 0.19; P = 0.006 for homogeneity of HRs). Average frequencies of patient contacts in the HNC arm were 12.8 ± 7.9 in non-depressed patients, 12.4 ± 7.1 in depressed patients, and 5.5 ± 7.2 in PHQ-deniers (P < 0.001). Early after decompensation, HNC reduced mortality risk in non-depressed and even more in depressed subjects, but not in PHQ-deniers. This suggests that differential acceptability and chance of success of care strategies such as HNC might be predicted by appropriate assessment of patients' baseline characteristics including psychological disposition. These post-hoc results should be reassessed by prospective evaluation of HNC in larger HF populations. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2014 European Society of Cardiology.

  3. Aging, telomeres and heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, Liza S. M.; van der Harst, Pim; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Huzen, Jardi; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    During normal aging, the heart undergoes functional, morphological and cellular changes. Although aging per se does not lead to the expression of heart failure, it is likely that age-associated changes lower the threshold for the manifestation of signs and symptoms of heart failure. In patients, the

  4. Usefulness of frailty profile for targeting older heart failure patients in disease management programs: a cost-effectiveness, pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulignano, Giovanni; Del Sindaco, Donatella; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Tarantini, Luigi; Cioffi, Giovanni; Gregori, Dario; Tinti, Maria Denitza; Monzo, Luca; Minardi, Giovanni

    2010-10-01

    Disease management programs (DMP) improve outcomes in patients with heart failure. Because older heart failure patients represent a heterogeneous population, the aim of this study was to determine which patients benefit mostly from a DMP, by means of their frailty profile. Heart failure outpatient clinic. Consecutive (n = 173) patients aged more than 70 years were randomized to a multidisciplinary DMP (n = 86) or usual care (n = 87). A modified frailty score (range 1-6) was used as an index of global functional impairment. Mild to moderate frailty (frailty score = 2-3) was associated with significant improvements in outcomes (death and/or heart failure admission, heart failure admissions and all-cause admissions) in DMP patients vs. usual care. Even in more frail patients (frailty score = 4-6) a significant reduction in heart failure admissions was observed. By contrast, nonfrail patients (frailty score = 1) did not derive significant benefit. In the cost-effectiveness analysis, the mean savings per patient, stratified according to their frailty score, were -1003.31 euro for frailty score 1 (95% confidence interval -3717.00-1709.00), 1104.72 euro for frailty score 2 (-280.6-2491.00), 2635.42 euro for frailty score 3 (352.60-4917.00, P = 0.025) and 419.53 euro for frailty score 4-6 (-1909.00-2749.00). Intervention was therefore significantly cost saving in moderately frail, but not in nonfrail or severely frail patients. Thus, DMP was dominant (i.e. both less costly and more effective than usual care) in moderately frail patients. At sensitivity analysis, DMP remained dominant even to changes in cost of intervention and hospitalizations. This suggests that an intensive, hospital-based DMP appears to be more effective in older patients with mild-to-moderate levels of frailty. Thus, a multidimensional assessment of frailty seems to be a useful tool for appropriate selection of model of care.

  5. Risk Factors for Heart Failure in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: The CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiang; Shlipak, Michael; Anderson, Amanda; Roy, Jason A; Feldman, Harold I; Kallem, Radhakrishna Reddy; Kanthety, Radhika; Kusek, John W; Ojo, Akinlolu; Rahman, Mahboob; Ricardo, Ana C; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Wolf, Myles; Zhang, Xiaoming; Raj, Dominic; Hamm, Lee

    2017-05-17

    Heart failure is common in patients with chronic kidney disease. We studied risk factors for incident heart failure among 3557 participants in the CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study. Kidney function was assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using serum creatinine, cystatin C, or both, and 24-hour urine albumin excretion. During an average of 6.3 years of follow-up, 452 participants developed incident heart failure. After adjustment for age, sex, race, and clinical site, hazard ratio (95% CI) for heart failure associated with 1 SD lower creatinine-based eGFR was 1.67 (1.49, 1.89), 1 SD lower cystatin C-based-eGFR was 2.43 (2.10, 2.80), and 1 SD higher log-albuminuria was 1.65 (1.53, 1.78), all Pkidney function measures were simultaneously included in the model, lower cystatin C-based eGFR and higher log-albuminuria remained significantly and directly associated with incidence of heart failure. After adjusting for eGFR, albuminuria, and other traditional cardiovascular risk factors, anemia (1.37, 95% CI 1.09, 1.72, P=0.006), insulin resistance (1.16, 95% CI 1.04, 1.28, P=0.006), hemoglobin A1c (1.27, 95% CI 1.14, 1.41, Pkidney disease. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  6. Risk of exacerbation following pneumonia in adults with heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornheimer, Rebecca; Shea, Kimberly M; Sato, Reiko; Weycker, Derek; Pelton, Stephen I

    2017-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrates increased short-term risk of cardiac complications and respiratory failure among patients with heart failure (HF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), respectively, concurrent with an episode of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We evaluated patients with pre-existing HF or COPD, beginning 30 days after CAP diagnosis, to determine if CAP had a prolonged impact on their underlying comorbidity. A retrospective matched-cohort design using US healthcare claims was employed. In each month of accrual, patients with HF or COPD who developed CAP ("CAP patients") were matched (1:1, without replacement, on demographic and clinical profiles) to patients with HF or COPD who did not develop CAP ("comparison patients"). All patients were aged ≥40 years, and were pneumonia free during prior 1-year period. Exacerbation beginning 30 days after the CAP diagnosis and for the subsequent 1-year period were compared between CAP and comparison patients. 38,010 (4·6%) HF patients and 48,703 (5·9%) COPD patients experienced a new CAP episode requiring hospitalization or outpatient care only, and were matched to comparison patients. In the HF subset, CAP patients were 47·2% more likely to experience an exacerbation vs patients without CAP (17·8% vs. 12·1%; p<0·001); in the COPD subset, CAP patients were 42·3% more likely to experience an exacerbation (16·2% vs. 11·4%; p<0·001). Our data provide evidence that CAP foreshadows a prolonged increase in risk of exacerbation of underlying HF or COPD in adults, and suggests a potential benefit to CAP prevention strategies.

  7. Risk of exacerbation following pneumonia in adults with heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Bornheimer

    Full Text Available Recent evidence demonstrates increased short-term risk of cardiac complications and respiratory failure among patients with heart failure (HF and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, respectively, concurrent with an episode of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. We evaluated patients with pre-existing HF or COPD, beginning 30 days after CAP diagnosis, to determine if CAP had a prolonged impact on their underlying comorbidity.A retrospective matched-cohort design using US healthcare claims was employed. In each month of accrual, patients with HF or COPD who developed CAP ("CAP patients" were matched (1:1, without replacement, on demographic and clinical profiles to patients with HF or COPD who did not develop CAP ("comparison patients". All patients were aged ≥40 years, and were pneumonia free during prior 1-year period. Exacerbation beginning 30 days after the CAP diagnosis and for the subsequent 1-year period were compared between CAP and comparison patients.38,010 (4·6% HF patients and 48,703 (5·9% COPD patients experienced a new CAP episode requiring hospitalization or outpatient care only, and were matched to comparison patients. In the HF subset, CAP patients were 47·2% more likely to experience an exacerbation vs patients without CAP (17·8% vs. 12·1%; p<0·001; in the COPD subset, CAP patients were 42·3% more likely to experience an exacerbation (16·2% vs. 11·4%; p<0·001.Our data provide evidence that CAP foreshadows a prolonged increase in risk of exacerbation of underlying HF or COPD in adults, and suggests a potential benefit to CAP prevention strategies.

  8. Biomarkers in cardiovascular disease: Statistical assessment and section on key novel heart failure biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Ravi; Vasan, Ramachandran S

    2017-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of death worldwide and continues to increase in prevalence compared to previous decades, in part because of the aging of the world population. Atherosclerotic CVD starts at a very young age and progresses over time allowing sufficient time for screening and early detection of the condition. Advances in biomarker research and developments related to CVD over the past 30 years have led to more sensitive screening methods, a greater emphasis on its early detection and diagnosis, and improved treatments resulting in more favorable clinical outcomes in the community. However, the use of biomarkers for different purposes in CVD remains an important area of research that has been explored by scientists over the years and many new developments are still underway. Therefore, a detailed description of all CVD biomarkers that are currently been used or investigated for future use in the field of cardiovascular medicine is out of scope for any review article. In the present review, we do not intend to replicate the information from previous exhaustive review on biomarkers, but highlight key statistical and clinical issues with an emphasis on methods to evaluate the incremental yield of biomarkers, including their clinical utility, a prerequisite before any putative novel biomarker is utilized in clinical practice. In addition, we will summarize information regarding recent novel heart failure biomarkers in current practice, which are undergoing scrutiny before they can be available for clinical use, and their impact on clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Heart failure in patients with kidney disease and iron deficiency; the role of iron therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cases Amenós, Aleix; Ojeda López, Raquel; Portolés Pérez, José María

    Chronic kidney disease and anaemia are common in heart failure (HF) and are associated with a worse prognosis in these patients. Iron deficiency is also common in patients with HF and increases the risk of morbidity and mortality, regardless of the presence or absence of anaemia. While the treatment of anaemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in patients with HF have failed to show a benefit in terms of morbidity and mortality, treatment with IV iron in patients with HF and reduced ejection fraction and iron deficiency is associated with clinical improvement. In a posthoc analysis of a clinical trial, iron therapy improved kidney function in patients with HF and iron deficiency. In fact, the European Society of Cardiology's recent clinical guidelines on HF suggest that in symptomatic patients with reduced ejection fraction and iron deficiency, treatment with IV ferric carboxymaltose should be considered to improve symptoms, the ability to exercise and quality of life. Iron plays a key role in oxygen storage (myoglobin) and in energy metabolism, and there are pathophysiological bases that explain the beneficial effect of IV iron therapy in patients with HF. All these aspects are reviewed in this article. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Mortality benefit of a comprehensive heart failure disease management program in indigent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Kathy A; Horswell, Ronald L; Dy, Sydney; Key, Ira J; Butler, Michael K; Cerise, Frederick P; Arcement, Lee M

    2006-02-01

    Heart failure (HF) produces significant morbidity and mortality. Although HF disease management (HFDM) programs have been shown to decrease this morbidity, there is still a paucity of data on their effect on mortality. The objective of this study was to determine whether participation in an HFDM program would reduce mortality in an indigent population from rural Louisiana. Proportional hazards modeling was used to determine whether patients participating in the HFDM program had improved survival compared with patients receiving traditional outpatient care at the same institution. Inclusion criteria consisted of an index hospitalization with discharge occurring between July 1, 1997, and May 30, 2002, hospital discharge diagnosis of HF, left ventricular systolic dysfunction documented during hospitalization, and at least 1 subsequent outpatient visit. Data from patients having participated in the HFDM program before their index hospitalization were excluded. Compared with patients who were given traditional care (n = 100), HFDM patients (n = 156) were younger (56.7 vs 60 years, P = .031), more likely to be African American (48.7% vs 33.0%, P = .014), more likely to be uninsured (47.4% vs 27%, P = .001), and more likely to have an ejection fraction of HFDM program was associated with a significant reduction in mortality compared with traditional care (adjusted hazard ratio .33, P HFDM program was associated with decreased mortality compared with traditional follow-up care.

  11. Can Peak Expiratory Flow Measurements Differentiate Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease from Congestive Heart Failure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Gough

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyspneic patients are commonly encountered by Emergency Medical Service (EMS. Frequent causes include Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD and Congestive Heart Failure (CHF. Measurement of peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR has been proposed to help differentiate COPD from CHF. This prospective, cohort, pilot study was conducted to determine if PEFR in patients with an exacerbation of COPD were significantly different than CHF. Included were patients presenting with dyspnea plus a history of COPD and/or CHF. A PEFR was measured, values were compared to predicted average, and a percentage was calculated. Twenty-one patients were enrolled. Six had a diagnosis of COPD, 12 CHF; 3 had other diagnoses. Mean percentage of predicted PEFR with COPD was 26.36%, CHF 48.9% (=0.04. Patients presenting with acute COPD had significantly lower percentage of predicted PEFR than those with CHF. These results suggest that PEFR may be useful in differentiating COPD from CHF. This study should be expanded to the prehospital setting with a larger number of subjects.

  12. [Complementary treatment of acute heart failure in patients with diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Recio Iglesias, Jesús; Grau Amorós, Jordi

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and anemia are comorbidities with a high prevalence and impact in heart failure (HF). The presence of these comorbidities considerably worsens the prognosis of HF. Diabetic patients have a higher likelihood of developing symptoms of HF and both the treatment of diabetes and that of acute HF are altered by the coexistence of both entities. The glycemic targets in patients with acute HF are not well-defined, but could show a U-shaped relationship. Stress hyperglycemia in non-diabetic patients with HF could also have a deleterious effect on the medium-term prognosis. The inter-relationship between COPD and HF hampers diagnosis due to the overlap between the symptoms and signs of both entities and complementary investigations. The treatment of acute HF is also altered by the presence of COPD. Anemia is highly prevalent and is often the direct cause of decompensated HF, the most common cause being iron deficiency anemia. Iron replacement therapy, specifically intravenous forms, has helped to improve the prognosis of acute HF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. [Anaemia in chronic heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hradec, J

    2010-08-01

    Anaemia is a relatively frequent co-morbidity of chronic heart as well as chronic renal failure. In both conditions, it represents a strong and independent predictor of increased morbidity and mortality. Aetiology of this anaemia is multi-factorial. A number of various factors play a role in its development, e.g. inadequate erythropoietin production in the kidneys, bone marrow inhibition, iron deficiency as well as haemodilution associated with fluid retention. Treatment strategies aim at two directions. One is the stimulation of erythropoiesis with recombinant human erythropoietin or its analogues such as darbepoetin alpha. The other involves iron substitution, administered preferably intravenously for improved efficacy and tolerability. Clinical studies evaluating treatment of anaemia in chronic heart failure with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents conducted so far were ofa small scale, were not controlled with placebo and usually assessed proxy parameters. Their results suggested that effective treatment of anaemia in patients with chronic heart failure improves exertion tolerance, clinical status (NYHA class) as well as the quality of life and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Recently completed TREAT study was the first large morbidity and mortality study evaluating treatment of anaemia with an erythropoietin analogue compared to placebo. On a sample of more than 4000 patients with diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure and significant anaemia, this study has shown that effective treatment of anaemia with darbepoetin alpha did not affect at all the incidence of cardiovascular and renal events; on the other hand, it had lead to a nearly two-fold increase in the incidence of cerebrovascular events. Some doubts about the safety of treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents have occurred in the past based on the studies of anaemia treatment in patients with cancer and renal diseases. An answer to the question whether the treatment of anaemia

  14. Immune mechanisms in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingying; Bauersachs, Johann; Langer, Harald F

    2017-09-11

    Elevated levels of circulating pro-inflammatory biomarkers in patients with both ischaemic and non-ischaemic heart failure (HF) correlate with disease severity and prognosis. Experimental studies have shown activation of immune response mechanisms in the heart to provoke cardiac adverse remodelling and cause left ventricular dysfunction. Consequently, most of the clinical trials targeting elements of the immune response in HF attempted to modulate the inflammatory response. Surprisingly, clinical studies targeting immune effectors were either neutral or even increased pre-specified clinical endpoints, and some studies resulted in worsening of HF. This review discusses immune mediators involved in the pathogenesis and progression of HF and potential therapeutic applications targeting inflammation in HF. Besides more obvious settings featuring immune activation such as inflammatory or ischaemic cardiomyopathy, the relevance of immune activation in acute or chronic HF of other origins, including volume overload or valvular heart disease, is highlighted. Understanding how cell-specific and molecular mechanisms of the immune response interfere with cardiac remodelling in HF may open new avenues to design biomarkers or druggable targets. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  15. Heart failure in the general Danish population and among individuals with ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach

    Background The incidence and fatality of acute myocardial infarction (MI) has decreased during the last decade - due to both improved medical treatment and a shift toward a healthier lifestyle. The consequence of the improved treatment is likely to be a falling incidens of heart failure following...... diagnosis of HF among patients with first myocardial infarction was estimated applying Cox regression analyses (competing risk: Death and emigration), comparing three calendar years. ...

  16. How should we manage heart failure developing in patients already treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers for hypertension, diabetes or coronary disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Segura, Julian; Ruilope, Luis M

    2010-01-01

    failure despite such treatment. Based on data from hypertension trials it can be estimated that approximately 5% of treated patients will develop heart failure over 5 years. It is unclear whether patients developing heart failure on and off ACE-inhibitors or beta-blockers, respectively, at the time......An increasing number of patients in the community are being treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and beta-blockers for hypertension, coronary disease or diabetic renal and vascular complications. Some of these patients will develop heart...... of heart failure diagnosis have similar prognosis.Treatment options for patients developing heart failure while already treated with ACE inhibitors/ARBs and beta-blockers are very limited if current heart failure guidelines are followed. In this review possible strategies are outlined and important areas...

  17. How should we manage heart failure developing in patients already treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers for hypertension, diabetes or coronary disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Segura, Julian; Ruilope, Luis M

    2010-01-01

    An increasing number of patients in the community are being treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and beta-blockers for hypertension, coronary disease or diabetic renal and vascular complications. Some of these patients will develop heart...... failure despite such treatment. Based on data from hypertension trials it can be estimated that approximately 5% of treated patients will develop heart failure over 5 years. It is unclear whether patients developing heart failure on and off ACE-inhibitors or beta-blockers, respectively, at the time...... of heart failure diagnosis have similar prognosis.Treatment options for patients developing heart failure while already treated with ACE inhibitors/ARBs and beta-blockers are very limited if current heart failure guidelines are followed. In this review possible strategies are outlined and important areas...

  18. How should we manage heart failure developing in patients already treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers for hypertension, diabetes or coronary disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Segura, Julian; Ruilope, Luis M

    2010-08-01

    An increasing number of patients in the community are being treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and beta-blockers for hypertension, coronary disease or diabetic renal and vascular complications. Some of these patients will develop heart failure despite such treatment. Based on data from hypertension trials it can be estimated that approximately 5% of treated patients will develop heart failure over 5 years. It is unclear whether patients developing heart failure on and off ACE-inhibitors or beta-blockers, respectively, at the time of heart failure diagnosis have similar prognosis.Treatment options for patients developing heart failure while already treated with ACE inhibitors/ARBs and beta-blockers are very limited if current heart failure guidelines are followed. In this review possible strategies are outlined and important areas for research are identified. It is suggested that trials are designed specifically to address prognosis and treatment in this growing population.

  19. Heart rate modulation in stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure: What we have already learned from SIGNIFY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Piero Perna

    2016-12-01

    In conclusion, heart rate is a marker of risk but is not a risk factor and/or a target of therapy in patients with stable coronary artery disease and preserved ventricular systolic function. Standard doses of ivabradine are indicated for treatment of angina as an alternative or in addition to beta-blockers, but should not be administered in association with CYP3A4 inhibitors or heart rate-lowering calcium-channel blockers.

  20. Renal failure following hospitalization for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the number of patients with heart failure readmitted for renal failure to IU Health Bloomington within 30 days of hospital discharge in 2010, and to determine whether there are factors that might have been identified before the original discharge that would have prevented the readmission. The goal of the research is to identify factors from previous admissions of patients with heart failure that would have possibly predicted a subsequent admission for renal failure, so that interventions can be developed to prevent such readmissions. The results from this study are applicable to all primary care settings. A retrospective descriptive design was employed. Subjects were patients diagnosed with heart failure in 2010 and subsequently readmitted with renal failure within 30 days of their previous hospital admission. A retrospective chart review was completed extracting the variables blood urea nitrogen levels upon patients' discharge and readmission, serum creatinine levels upon discharge and readmission, weight in kilograms upon discharge and readmission, total intake and output during the first hospitalization, diuretic medication dosage, history of renal failure, history of renal insufficiency, and death. Renal failure may be a predictable complication of heart failure. Although there are varying secondary pathophysiologies, which could account for readmission with renal failure and the severity of the renal failure, more attention should be paid to the variables identified in this study. Case managers can play a crucial role in identifying potential patients with renal failure and, where possible, collaborating with other health care providers to proactively preventing renal complications in patients with heart failure.

  1. The impact of coronary artery disease risk loci on ischemic heart failure severity and prognosis : association analysis in the COntrolled ROsuvastatin multiNAtional trial in heart failure (CORONA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haver, Vincent G.; Verweij, Niek; Kjekshus, John; Fox, Jayne C.; Wedel, Hans; Wikstrand, John; van Gilst, Wiek H.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van der Harst, Pim

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recent genome-wide association studies have identified multiple loci that are associated with an increased risk of developing coronary artery disease (CAD). The impact of these loci on the disease severity and prognosis of ischemic heart failure due to CAD is currently unknown. Methods:

  2. Tools for Economic Analysis of Patient Management Interventions in Heart Failure Cost-Effectiveness Model: A Web-based program designed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of disease management programs in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Shelby D; Neilson, Matthew P; Gardner, Matthew; Li, Yanhong; Briggs, Andrew H; Polsky, Daniel E; Graham, Felicia L; Bowers, Margaret T; Paul, Sara C; Granger, Bradi B; Schulman, Kevin A; Whellan, David J; Riegel, Barbara; Levy, Wayne C

    2015-11-01

    Heart failure disease management programs can influence medical resource use and quality-adjusted survival. Because projecting long-term costs and survival is challenging, a consistent and valid approach to extrapolating short-term outcomes would be valuable. We developed the Tools for Economic Analysis of Patient Management Interventions in Heart Failure Cost-Effectiveness Model, a Web-based simulation tool designed to integrate data on demographic, clinical, and laboratory characteristics; use of evidence-based medications; and costs to generate predicted outcomes. Survival projections are based on a modified Seattle Heart Failure Model. Projections of resource use and quality of life are modeled using relationships with time-varying Seattle Heart Failure Model scores. The model can be used to evaluate parallel-group and single-cohort study designs and hypothetical programs. Simulations consist of 10,000 pairs of virtual cohorts used to generate estimates of resource use, costs, survival, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios from user inputs. The model demonstrated acceptable internal and external validity in replicating resource use, costs, and survival estimates from 3 clinical trials. Simulations to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of heart failure disease management programs across 3 scenarios demonstrate how the model can be used to design a program in which short-term improvements in functioning and use of evidence-based treatments are sufficient to demonstrate good long-term value to the health care system. The Tools for Economic Analysis of Patient Management Interventions in Heart Failure Cost-Effectiveness Model provides researchers and providers with a tool for conducting long-term cost-effectiveness analyses of disease management programs in heart failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. How Can I Live with Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More How Can I Live With Heart Failure? Updated:Dec 8, ... recover. Medicine Notes: Diet Notes: Exercise Notes: How can I learn more? Call 1-800-AHA-USA1 ( ...

  4. Obesity, Heart Failure, and Obesity Paradox

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nikoo Hamzeh; Fatemeh Ghadimi; Rojin Farzaneh; Seyed Kianoosh Hosseini

    2017-01-01

    .... The concept of the “obesity paradox” has been proposed by some previously published studies, in which the prognosis of obese patients with established cardiovascular diseases, especially heart failure, is better than that of their leaner counterparts...

  5. Metabolic mechanisms in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafian, Houman; Frenneaux, Michael P; Opie, Lionel H

    2007-07-24

    Although neurohumoral antagonism has successfully reduced heart failure morbidity and mortality, the residual disability and death rate remains unacceptably high. Though abnormalities of myocardial metabolism are associated with heart failure, recent data suggest that heart failure may itself promote metabolic changes such as insulin resistance, in part through neurohumoral activation. A detrimental self-perpetuating cycle (heart failure --> altered metabolism --> heart failure) that promotes the progression of heart failure may thus be postulated. Accordingly, we review the cellular mechanisms and pathophysiology of altered metabolism and insulin resistance in heart failure. It is hypothesized that the ensuing detrimental myocardial energetic perturbations result from neurohumoral activation, increased adverse free fatty acid metabolism, decreased protective glucose metabolism, and in some cases insulin resistance. The result is depletion of myocardial ATP, phosphocreatine, and creatine kinase with decreased efficiency of mechanical work. On the basis of the mechanisms outlined, appropriate therapies to mitigate aberrant metabolism include intense neurohumoral antagonism, limitation of diuretics, correction of hypokalemia, exercise, and diet. We also discuss more novel mechanistic-based therapies to ameliorate metabolism and insulin resistance in heart failure. For example, metabolic modulators may optimize myocardial substrate utilization to improve cardiac function and exercise performance beyond standard care. The ultimate success of metabolic-based therapy will be manifest by its capacity further to lessen the residual mortality in heart failure.

  6. The obesity paradox in men with coronary heart disease and heart failure: the role of muscle mass and leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannamethee, S Goya; Shaper, A Gerald; Whincup, Peter H; Lennon, Lucy; Papacosta, Olia; Sattar, Naveed

    2014-01-15

    We have investigated the role of muscle mass, natriuretic peptides and adipokines in explaining the obesity paradox. The obesity paradox relates to the association between obesity and increased survival in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) or heart failure (HF). Prospective study of 4046 men aged 60-79 years followed up for a mean period of 11 years, during which 1340 deaths occurred. The men were divided according to the presence of doctor diagnosed CHD and HF: (i) no CHD or HF ii), with CHD (no HF) and (iii) with HF. Overweight (BMI 25-9.9 kg/m(2)) and obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) were associated with lower mortality risk compared to men with normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)) in those with CHD [hazards ratio (HR) 0.71 (0.56,0.91) and 0.77 (0.57,1.04); p=0.04 for trend] and in those with HF [HR 0.57 (0.28,1.16) and 0.41 (0.16,1.09; p=0.04 for trend). Adjustment for muscle mass and NT-proBNP attenuated the inverse association in those with CHD (no HF) [HR 0.78 (0.61,1.01) and 0.96 (0.68,1.36) p=0.60 for trend) but made minor differences to those with HF [p=0.05]. Leptin related positively to mortality in men without HF but inversely to mortality in those with HF; adjustment for leptin abolished the BMI mortality association in men with HF [HR 0.82 (0.31,2.20) and 0.99 (0.27,3.71); p=0.98 for trend]. The lower mortality risk associated with excess weight in men with CHD without HF may be due to higher muscle mass. In men with HF, leptin (possibly reflecting cachexia) explain the inverse association. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Insomnia Self-Management in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-05

    Cardiac Failure; Heart Failure; Congestive Heart Failure; Heart Failure, Congestive; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders; Chronic Insomnia; Disorders of Initiating and Maintaining Sleep; Fatigue; Pain; Depressive Symptoms; Sleep Disorders; Anxiety

  8. Psychosocial risk factors and heart failure hospitalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Naja Hulvej; Andersen, Ingelise; Prescott, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Prospective studies on the role of psychosocial factors in heart failure development are virtually nonexistent. The authors aimed to address the effect of psychosocial factors on the risk of heart failure hospitalization in men and women free of cardiovascular disease. In 1991-1993, the 8......-fourth of the population reported some degree of vital exhaustion. The vital exhaustion score was associated with a higher risk of heart failure in a dose-response manner (P heart failure in both men (hazard ratio = 1.93, 95% confidence...... interval: 1.20, 3.10) and women (hazard ratio = 2.56, 95% confidence interval: 1.80, 3.65). Contrary to expectation, major life events, social network, and sleeping medication did not play an individual role for heart failure hospitalization. Because of the high prevalence of vital exhaustion...

  9. Implantation of Total Artificial Heart in Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Adachi, Iki; Morales, David S. L.

    2014-01-01

    In patients with end-stage heart failure (HF), a total artificial heart (TAH) may be implanted as a bridge to cardiac transplant. However, in congenital heart disease (CHD), the malformed heart presents a challenge to TAH implantation.

  10. Plasma microRNAs serve as biomarkers of therapeutic efficacy and disease progression in hypertension-induced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Brent A; Semus, Hillary M; Montgomery, Rusty L; Stack, Christianna; Latimer, Paul A; Lewton, Steven M; Lynch, Joshua M; Hullinger, Thomas G; Seto, Anita G; van Rooij, Eva

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that microRNAs (miRNAs), besides being potent regulators of gene expression, can additionally serve as circulating biomarkers of disease. The aim of this study is to determine if plasma miRNAs can be used as indicators of disease progression or therapeutic efficacy in hypertension-induced heart disease. In order to define circulating miRNAs that change during hypertension-induced heart failure and that respond to therapeutic treatment, we performed miRNA arrays on plasma RNA from hypertensive rats that show signs of heart failure. Array analysis indicated that approximately one-third of the miRNAs on the array are detectable in plasma. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis for a selected panel of miRNAs indicated that circulating levels of miR-16, miR-20b, miR-93, miR-106b, miR-223, and miR-423-5p were significantly increased in response to hypertension-induced heart failure, while this effect was blunted in response to treatment with antimiR-208a as well as an ACE inhibitor. Moreover, treatment with antimiR-208a resulted in a dramatic increase in one miRNA, miR-19b. A time course study indicated that several of these miRNA changes track with disease progression. Circulating levels of miRNAs are responsive to therapeutic interventions and change during the progression of hypertension-induced heart disease.

  11. Depression and anxiety in chronic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: prevalence, relevance, clinical implications and management principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohannes, A M; Willgoss, T G; Baldwin, R C; Connolly, M J

    2010-12-01

    To review evidence regarding the prevalence, causation, clinical implications, aspects of healthcare utilisation and management of depression and anxiety in chronic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A critical review of the literature (1994-2009). The prevalence of depression and anxiety is high in both chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (8-80% depression; 6-74% anxiety) and chronic heart failure (10-60% depression; 11-45% anxiety). However, methodological weaknesses and the use of a wide range of diagnostic tools make it difficult to reach a consensus on rates of prevalence. Co-morbid depression and anxiety are associated with increased mortality and healthcare utilisation and impact upon functional disability and quality of life. Despite these negative consequences, the identification and management of co-morbid depression and anxiety in these two diseases is inadequate. There is some evidence for the positive role of pulmonary/cardiac rehabilitation and psychotherapy in the management of co-morbid depression and anxiety, however, this is insufficient to guide recommendations. The high prevalence and associated increase in morbidity and mortality justifies future research regarding the management of anxiety and depression in both chronic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Current evidence suggests that multi-faceted interventions such as pulmonary and cardiac rehabilitation may offer the best hope for improving outcomes for depression and anxiety. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Diuretics as pathogenetic treatment for heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglin, Maya

    2011-01-01

    Increased intracardiac filling pressure or congestion causes symptoms and leads to hospital admissions in patients with heart failure, regardless of their systolic function. A history of hospital admission, in turn, predicts further hospitalizations and morbidity, and a higher number of hospitalizations determine higher mortality. Congestion is therefore the driving force of the natural history of heart failure. Congestion is the syndrome shared by heart failure with preserved and reduced systolic function. These two conditions have almost identical morbidity, mortality, and survival because the outcomes are driven by congestion. A small difference in favor of heart failure with preserved systolic function comes from decreased ejection fraction and left ventricular remodeling which is only present in heart failure with decreased systolic function. The magnitude of this difference reflects the contribution of decreased systolic function and ventricular remodeling to the progression of heart failure. The only treatment available for congestion is fluid removal via diuretics, ultrafiltration, or dialysis. It is the only treatment that works equally well for heart failure with reduced and preserved systolic function because it affects congestion, the main pathogenetic feature of the disease. Diuretics are pathogenetic therapy for heart failure. PMID:21403798

  13. The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation outperforms the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation for estimating glomerular filtration rate in chronic systolic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valente, Mattia A. E.; Hillege, Hans L.; Navis, Gerjan; Voors, Adriaan A.; Dunselman, Peter H. J. M.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Damman, Kevin

    Aims The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) formula estimates glomerular filtration rate (GFR) better than the simplified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (sMDRD) formula in numerous populations. It has not previously been validated in heart failure patients. Methods

  14. Survival advantage of hemodialysis relative to peritoneal dialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease and congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sens, Florence; Schott-Pethelaz, Anne-Marie; Labeeuw, Michel; Colin, Cyrille; Villar, Emmanuel

    2011-11-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) has been proposed as a therapeutic option for patients with end-stage renal disease and associated congestive heart failure (CHF). Here, we compare mortality risks in these patients by dialysis modality by including all patients who started planned chronic dialysis with associated congestive heart failure and were prospectively enrolled in the French REIN Registry. Survival was compared between 933 PD and 3468 hemodialysis (HD) patients using a Kaplan-Meier model, Cox regression, and propensity score analysis. The patients were followed from their first dialysis session and stratified by modality at day 90 or last modality if death occurred prior. There was a significant difference in the median survival time of 20.4 months in the PD group and 36.7 months in the HD group (hazard ratio, 1.55). After correction for confounders, the adjusted hazard ratio for death in PD compared to the HD patients remained significant at 1.48. Subgroup analyses showed that the results were not changed with regard to the New York Heart Association stage, age strata, or estimated glomerular filtration rate strata at first renal replacement therapy. The use of propensity score did not change results (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.55). Thus, mortality risk was higher with PD than with HD among incident patients with end-stage renal disease and congestive heart failure. These results may help guide clinical decisions and also highlight the need for randomized clinical trials.

  15. Clinic and ambulatory heart rates in patients with ischaemic heart disease and/or chronic heart failure taking rate-limiting medications: are they interchangeable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Omar; Koo, Kenneth; El-Omar, Omar; Allen, Stuart; Squires, Alexander; El-Omar, Magdi

    2015-01-01

    The prognostic benefit from heart rate (HR) reduction in patients with ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and/or chronic heart failure (CHF) is now firmly established. Most decisions regarding initiation and/or dose adjustment of HR-limiting medications in such patients are based on clinic HR. Yet, this is a highly variable parameter that may not necessarily reflect HR control over the 24 h period. To examine the level of agreement between mean clinic and mean ambulatory HRs in patients with IHD and/or CHF taking rate-limiting medications. Prospective, observational study. Fifty patients with IHD and/or CHF who attended cardiology outpatient clinics at the Manchester Heart Centre and underwent same-day 24 h continuous ECG recording between March and October 2013 were included in the study. Mean clinic HR was compared with mean 24 h, daytime and night-time HRs. Limits-of-agreement plots were constructed to examine the relationship between the two HR measures in more detail. The mean clinic HR was numerically similar to the mean HRs of all ambulatory time periods examined. However, on Bland-Altman plots, the limits of agreement between clinic and ambulatory HR means were quite wide, with the mean clinic HR ranging between 10.93 and 13.58 bpm below and 8.4 and 18.15 bpm above the mean ambulatory HR. Although numerically similar, the means of clinic and ambulatory HRs in patients with IHD and/or CHF display wide limits of agreement. As such, the two measures cannot be regarded as interchangeable. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Heart failure and levels of other comorbidities in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a Swedish population: a register-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszuba, Elzbieta; Odeberg, Håkan; Råstam, Lennart; Halling, Anders

    2016-04-12

    Despite the fact that heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often exist together and have serious clinical and economic implications, they have mostly been studied separately. Our aim was to study prevalence of coexisting heart failure and COPD in a Swedish population. A further goal was to describe levels of other comorbidity and investigate where the patients received care: primary, secondary care or both. We conducted a register-based, cross-sectional study. The population included all people older than 19 years, living in Östergötland County in Sweden. The data were obtained from the Care Data Warehouse register from the year 2006. The diagnosis-based Adjusted Clinical Groups Case-Mix System 7.1 was used to describe the comorbidity level. The prevalence of the diagnosis of heart failure in patients with COPD was 18.8% while it was 1.6% in patients without COPD. Age standardized prevalence was 9.9 and 1.5%, respectively. Standardized relative risk for the diagnosis of heart failure in patients with COPD was 6.6. The levels of other comorbidity were significantly higher in patients with coexisting heart failure and COPD compared to patients with either heart failure or COPD alone. Primary care was the only care provider for 36.2% of patients with the diagnosis of heart failure and 20.7% of patients with coexisting diagnoses of heart failure and COPD. Primary care participated furthermore in shared care of 21.5% of patients with the diagnosis of heart failure and 21.7% of patients with coexisting diagnoses of heart failure and COPD. The share of care between primary and secondary care varied depending on levels of comorbidity both in patients with coexisting heart failure and COPD and patients with heart failure alone. Patients with coexisting diagnoses of heart failure and COPD are common in the Swedish population. Patients with coexisting heart failure and COPD have higher levels of other comorbidity than patients with heart failure or

  17. A disease management program for heart failure: collaboration between a home care agency and a care management organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Lisa A; Johnson, Kathy

    2003-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative approach to manage patients with heart failure between a home care agency and a care management agency. The resulting disease management program used a combination of home visits and phone contact. Care management plans emphasized patient education on increasing adherence to medical and diet regimens, and recognizing early symptoms of exacerbation that could lead to rehospitalization. Clinician activities and patient outcomes are described.

  18. Heart failure in patients with kidney disease and iron deficiency: The role of iron therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleix Cases Amenós

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease and anaemia are common in heart failure (HF and are associated with a worse prognosis in these patients. Iron deficiency is also common in patients with HF and increases the risk of morbidity and mortality, regardless of the presence or absence of anaemia. While the treatment of anaemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in patients with HF have failed to show a benefit in terms of morbidity and mortality, treatment with IV iron in patients with HF and reduced ejection fraction and iron deficiency is associated with clinical improvement. In a post hoc analysis of a clinical trial, iron therapy improved kidney function in patients with HF and iron deficiency. In fact, the European Society of Cardiology's recent clinical guidelines on HF suggest that in symptomatic patients with reduced ejection fraction and iron deficiency, treatment with IV ferric carboxymaltose should be considered to improve symptoms, the ability to exercise and quality of life. Iron plays a key role in oxygen storage (myoglobin and in energy metabolism, and there are pathophysiological bases that explain the beneficial effect of IV iron therapy in patients with HF. All these aspects are reviewed in this article. Resumen: La enfermedad renal crónica y la anemia son frecuentes en la insuficiencia cardíaca (IC y su presencia se asocia con un peor pronóstico en estos pacientes. La ferropenia es frecuente en pacientes con IC y aumenta el riesgo de morbimortalidad, independientemente de la presencia o no de anemia. Mientras el tratamiento de la anemia con agentes estimuladores de la eritropoyesis en pacientes con IC no ha demostrado un beneficio sobre la morbimortalidad, el tratamiento con hierro intravenoso (iv en pacientes con IC y fracción de eyección disminuida y déficit de hierro se asocia con una mejoría clínica. Además, en un análisis post hoc de un ensayo clínico, la ferroterapia mejoró la función renal en pacientes con IC y

  19. Effects of beta-blockers for congestive heart failure in pediatric and congenital heart disease patients: a meta-analysis of published studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, M J; Lim, R K; Jung Kwak, M; Park, K H; Kim, H Y; Kim, Y M; Lee, H D

    2015-12-01

    The effects of beta-blockers in pediatric and congenital heart disease (CHD) patients suffering from heart failure are controversial. We performed a meta-analysis to determine whether beta-blockers are effective for heart failure in pediatric and CHD patients. We searched for clinical trials focusing on clinical on clinical and ventricular functional/dimensional changes after beta-blocker therapy in PubMed (from its inception to August 2013) and bibliographies of identified studies. Studies investigating any of three beta blockers (carvedilol, bisoprolol, and extended release metoprolol succinate) which are known to be effective in adult patients with heart failure were included. Of the 158 screened, 17 (N.=476) fulfilled the study criteria and were analyzed. Beta-blockers were associated with significant improvements in left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) (12.47%; 95% CI, 10.36 to 14.61), fraction shortening (5.75%; 95% CI, 4.42 to 7.08), LV end-diastolic dimension (-2.91 mm; 95% CI, -5.46 to -0.36), and LV systolic dimension (-4.03 mm; 95% CI, -6.81 to -1.25). No significant change in the pooled mean difference of the right ventricular (RV) EF (3.50%; P=0.08) was observed. However, the RV EF in the untreated group showed a deteriorating trend (-3%), which was different from the trend in the treatment group. There was a significant reduction in the incidence of clinical worsening (odds ratio, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.27 to 3.66). Beta-blocker therapy was associated with a significant improvement of echocardiographic parameters in patients with systemic LV failure. However, the use of beta-blockers did not provide significant benefits in terms of improving the EF in patients with RV failure. Nonetheless, beta-blockers may be effective to prevent the clinical deterioration of pediatric and CHD patients with heart failure.

  20. Do heart failure disease management programs make financial sense under a bundled payment system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Zubin J; Reed, Shelby D; Curtis, Lesley H; Hernandez, Adrian F; Peterson, Eric D

    2011-05-01

    Policy makers have proposed bundling payments for all heart failure (HF) care within 30 days of an HF hospitalization in an effort to reduce costs. Disease management (DM) programs can reduce costly HF readmissions but have not been economically attractive for caregivers under existing fee-for-service payment. Whether a bundled payment approach can address the negative financial impact of DM programs is unknown. Our study determined the cost-neutral point for the typical DM program and examined whether published HF DM programs can be cost saving under bundled payment programs. We used a decision analytic model using data from retrospective cohort studies, meta-analyses, 5 randomized trials evaluating DM programs, and inpatient claims for all Medicare beneficiaries discharged with an HF diagnosis from 2001 to 2004. We determined the costs of DM programs and inpatient care over 30 and 180 days. With a baseline readmission rate of 22.9%, the average cost for readmissions over 30 days was $2,272 per patient. Under base-case assumptions, a DM program that reduced readmissions by 21% would need to cost $477 per patient to be cost neutral. Among evaluated published DM programs, 2 of the 5 would increase provider costs (+$15 to $283 per patient), whereas 3 programs would be cost saving (-$241 to $347 per patient). If bundled payments were broadened to include care over 180 days, then program saving estimates would increase, ranging from $419 to $1,706 per patient. Proposed bundled payments for HF admissions provide hospitals with a potential financial incentive to implement DM programs that efficiently reduce readmissions. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Oxygen uptake efficiency slope and chronotropic incompetence in chronic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terziyski, Kiril V; Marinov, Blagoi I; Aliman, Okan Ism; St Kostianev, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES) and chronotropic index (CRI) are measures of cardiorespiratory reserve and chronotropic incompetence, but no direct comparison of OUES and CRI in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic heart failure (CHF) has been done. To compare OUES and CRI in CHF and COPD patients. Fifty-one subjects divided in three groups--CHF group (n=17) (NYHA II and III functional class), COPD group (n=17) (FEV1% = 49.7 +/- 17.3) and healthy controls (C) (n=17), matched by age and BMI. COPD and CHF patients presented comparable decrease in functional capacity. Subjects undertook maximal exercise test on a treadmill by means of Bruce protocol. CHF and COPD patients showed a significant and comparable decrease in exercise capacity (VO2/kg = 18.5 +/- 4.0 vs. 19.5 +/- 4.9 vs. 28.3 +/- 6.2 mL x min(-1) x kg(-1), p < 0.001) and ventilatory efficiency in comparison with controls. COPD patients presented with a typical pattern of exercise limitation due to ventilatory restraints (%breathing reserve = 15.6 +/- 18.0%). OUES was lower than controls in both CHF and COPD groups, being lowest in CHF (1686 +/- 483 vs. 2101 +/- 478 vs. 2481 +/- 398 mL.min(-1) x logL(-1), p < 0.001). Chronotropic index was lower in CHF patients (0.60 +/- 0.15 in CHF vs. 0.72 +/- 0.16 in COPD vs. 0.81 +/- 0.18 in controls, p < 0.001) in comparison with controls. OUES is decreased in CHF and COPD patients, but the decline is significantly more pronounced in the CHF group. CRI is lower in CHF patients.

  2. Renin-angiotensin system antagonists and clinical outcomes in stable coronary artery disease without heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbets, Emmanuel; Labreuche, Julien; Simon, Tabassome; Delorme, Laurent; Danchin, Nicolas; Amarenco, Pierre; Goto, Shinya; Meune, Christophe; Eagle, Kim A; Bhatt, Deepak L; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin-II receptor blocker (ARB) use is associated with lower rates of cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) but without heart failure (HF) receiving contemporary medical management. Using data from the Reduction of Atherothrombosis for Continued Health (REACH) registry, we examined, using propensity score approaches, relationships between cardiovascular outcomes and ACEI/ARB use (64.1% users) in 20 909 outpatients with stable CAD and free of HF at baseline. As internal control, we assessed the relation between statin use and outcomes. At 4-year follow-up, the risk of cardiovascular death, MI, or stroke (primary outcome) was similar in ACEI/ARB users compared with non-users (hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.91-1.16; P = 0.66). Similarly, the risk of the primary outcome and cardiovascular hospitalization for atherothrombotic events (secondary outcome) was not reduced in ACEI/ARB users (hazard ratio, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01-1.16; P = 0.04), nor were the rates of any of its components. Analyses using propensity score matching yielded similar results, as did sensitivity analyses accounting for missing covariates, changes in medications over time, or analysing separately ACEI and ARB use. In contrast, in the same cohort, statin use was associated with lower rates for all outcomes. Use of ACEI/ARB was not associated with better outcomes in stable CAD outpatients without HF. The benefit of ACEI/ARB seen in randomized clinical trials was not replicated in this large contemporary cohort, which questions their value in this specific subset. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Quality of life predicts outcome in a heart failure disease management program.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Loughlin, Christina

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic heart failure (HF) is associated with a poor Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). HRQoL has been shown to be a predictor of HF outcomes however, variability in the study designs make it difficult to apply these findings to a clinical setting. The aim of this study was to establish if HRQoL is a predictor of long-term mortality and morbidity in HF patients followed-up in a disease management program (DMP) and if a HRQoL instrument could be applied to aid in identifying high-risk patients within a clinical context. METHODS: This is a retrospective analysis of HF patients attending a DMP with 18+\\/-9 months follow-up. Clinical and biochemical parameters were recorded on discharge from index HF admission and HRQoL measures were recorded at 2 weeks post index admission. RESULTS: 225 patients were enrolled into the study (mean age=69+\\/-12 years, male=61%, and 78%=systolic HF). In multivariable analysis, all dimensions of HRQoL (measured by the Minnesota Living with HF Questionnaire) were independent predictors of both mortality and readmissions particularly in patients <80 years. A significant interaction between HRQoL and age (Total((HRQoL))age: p<0.001) indicated that the association of HRQoL with outcomes diminished as age increased. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that HRQoL is a predictor of outcome in HF patients managed in a DMP. Younger patients (<65 years) with a Total HRQoL score of > or =50 are at high risk of an adverse outcome. In older patients > or =80 years HRQoL is not useful in predicting outcome.

  4. 24-HOUR ARTERIAL STIFFNESS PROFILE IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE AND CHRONIC HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Borodkin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the specific features of arterial stiffness (AS in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and chronic heart failure (CHF as evidenced by 24­hour monitoring. Subjects and methods. A total of 111 patients with COPD, including 76 with signs of CHF, were examined. The patients with COPD and CHF were divided into 2 groups according to the presence or absence of prior myocardial infarction (MI. A BPLab МнСДП­2 apparatus was used to study 24­hour AS monitoring readings. Results. The patients with COPD and CHF were noted to have higher values of AS index (ASI (during a day, daytime and pulse wave propa­ gation velocity (during a day, daytime, nighttime than those with COPD without CHF. There was an association between ASI and major car­ diovascular risk factors (hypertension, age, body mass index. The patients with COPD, CHF, and prior MI, unlike those without the latter, were found to have an increased augmentation index throughout the follow­up (during both daytime and nighttime. In the patients with CHF without prior MI, the diurnal ASI was considerably greater than that in both the COPD patients without CHF and those with CHF and prior MI. Conclusion. Increased vascular wall stiffness was detected in the patients with COPD and CHF. By taking into account pronounced AS changes not only during daytime and nighttime hours, it is reasonable to perform 24­hour AS monitoring in patients with comorbidities in order to obtain more objective results. 

  5. Excess Ventilation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease-Heart Failure Overlap. Implications for Dyspnea and Exercise Intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Alcides; Arbex, Flavio F; Sperandio, Priscilla A; Souza, Aline; Biazzim, Ligia; Mancuso, Frederico; Berton, Danilo C; Hochhegger, Bruno; Alencar, Maria Clara N; Nery, Luiz E; O'Donnell, Denis E; Neder, J Alberto

    2017-11-15

    An increased ventilatory response to exertional metabolic demand (high [Formula: see text]e/[Formula: see text]co 2 relationship) is a common finding in patients with coexistent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart failure. We aimed to determine the mechanisms underlying high [Formula: see text]e/[Formula: see text]co 2 and its impact on operating lung volumes, dyspnea, and exercise tolerance in these patients. Twenty-two ex-smokers with combined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction undertook, after careful treatment optimization, a progressive cycle exercise test with capillary (c) blood gas collection. Regardless of the chosen metric (increased [Formula: see text]e-[Formula: see text]co 2 slope, [Formula: see text]e/[Formula: see text]co 2 nadir, or end-exercise [Formula: see text]e/[Formula: see text]co 2 ), ventilatory inefficiency was closely related to Pc CO 2 (r values from -0.80 to -0.84; P chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-heart failure overlap. Excessive ventilation led to better arterial oxygenation but at the expense of earlier critical mechanical constraints and intolerable dyspnea.

  6. The Danish Heart Failure Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Inge; Nakano, Anne; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Heart Failure Registry (DHFR) is to monitor and improve the care of patients with incident heart failure (HF) in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: The DHFR includes inpatients and outpatients (≥18 years) with incident HF. Reporting to the DHFR is mandatory for the ...

  7. Sex differences in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, Sven

    2016-01-01

    This thesis examined differences between men and women with heart failure. First, it was shown that biological sex is a strong modulator in the clinical expression of various cardiomyopathies. In the general population it was shown that men are more likely to develop heart failure with reduced

  8. Biomarkers in acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Aditi; Januzzi, James L

    2015-06-01

    The care of patients with acutely decompensated heart failure is being reshaped by the availability and understanding of several novel and emerging heart failure biomarkers. The gold standard biomarkers in heart failure are B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Novel biomarkers that are increasingly involved in the processes of myocardial injury, neurohormonal activation, and ventricular remodeling are showing promise in improving diagnosis and prognosis among patients with acute decompensated heart failure. These include midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide, soluble ST2, galectin-3, highly-sensitive troponin, and midregional proadrenomedullin. There has also been an emergence of biomarkers for evaluation of acute decompensated heart failure that assist in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea, such as procalcitonin (for identification of acute pneumonia), as well as markers that predict complications of acute decompensated heart failure, such as renal injury markers. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology and usefulness of established and emerging biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Michelle W; Greenberg, Barry; Jaarsma, Tiny; Januzzi, James L; Lam, Carolyn S P; Maggioni, Aldo P; Trochu, Jean-Noël; Butler, Javed

    2017-08-24

    Heart failure is a global public health problem that affects more than 26 million people worldwide. The global burden of heart failure is growing and is expected to increase substantially with the ageing of the population. Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction accounts for approximately 50% of all cases of heart failure in the United States and is associated with substantial morbidity and reduced quality of life. Several diseases, such as myocardial infarction, certain infectious diseases and endocrine disorders, can initiate a primary pathophysiological process that can lead to reduced ventricular function and to heart failure. Initially, ventricular impairment is compensated for by the activation of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, but chronic activation of these pathways leads to worsening cardiac function. The symptoms of heart failure can be associated with other conditions and include dyspnoea, fatigue, limitations in exercise tolerance and fluid accumulation, which can make diagnosis difficult. Management strategies include the use of pharmacological therapies and implantable devices to regulate cardiac function. Despite these available treatments, heart failure remains incurable, and patients have a poor prognosis and high mortality rate. Consequently, the development of new therapies is imperative and requires further research.

  10. Exercise training in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepoli, Massimo F

    2005-05-01

    The reduction of exercise capacity with early occurrence of fatigue and dyspnea is a hallmark of heart failure syndrome. There are objective similarities between heart failure and muscular deconditioning. Deficiencies in peripheral blood flow and skeletal muscle function, morphology, metabolism, and function are present. The protective effects of physical activity have been elucidated in many recent studies: training improves ventilatory control, skeletal muscle metabolism, autonomic nervous system, central and peripheral circulation, and heart function. These provide the physiologic basis to explain the benefits in terms of survival and freedom from hospitalization demonstrated by physical training also in heart failure.

  11. Bisoprolol for congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J.; Gustafsson, F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: beta-Blockers are a cornerstone in the treatment of systolic heart failure treatment, but not all beta-blockers are effective or in this setting. Objective: To define the role of bisoprolol, a highly selective beta(1)-antagonist in congestive heart failure due to systolic dysfunction....... Methods: Using the keywords 'bisoprolol' and 'heart failure' PubMed and BIOSIS databases were searched for information regarding pharmacology and relevant randomised clinical trials. Supplementary publications were acquired by scrutinising reference lists of relevant papers. Additional information...... was obtained from the FDA website. Conclusion: Bisoprolol is an effective and well-tolerated first-line beta-blocker for patients with systolic heart failure. The knowledge is primarily based on study patients with moderate-to-severe heart failure from the three CIBIS trials Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  12. Evaluation of red blood cell distribution width as a prognostic indicator in cats with acquired heart disease, with and without congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderick, Kursten V; Abelson, Amanda L; Nielsen, Lindsey; Price, Lori Lyn; Quinn, Rebecca

    2017-06-01

    Objectives Congestive heart failure secondary to cardiomyopathy is a common manifestation of cardiac disease in cats, carrying a variable prognosis. The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the relationship between red blood cell distribution width (RDW) and survival time in feline patients with acquired heart disease with and without congestive heart failure (CHF). Methods Three hundred and forty-nine client-owned cats with echocardiograms and complete blood count, including RDW measurement, performed between March 2006 and December 2011, were included in the study. Patient characteristics, including signalment, hematocrit, RDW, echocardiographic parameters and survival, were recorded. Comparisons between RDW in cats with asymptomatic acquired heart disease and those with CHF were made. Survival was documented and compared at 30 days and 6 months. Results CHF was present in 80 cats and absent in 269 cats. Cats with CHF had an increase in mortality compared with cats without CHF at 30 days and 6 months ( P = 0.007 and P = 0.04, respectively). RDW was not significantly associated with survival in cats with or without CHF at 30 days or 6 months. A significant difference was found between median RDW values in cats with CHF vs cats without CHF (16.3% vs 15.8%; P = 0.02). The median RDW value was significantly higher in cats with unclassified cardiomyopathy compared with cats with other types of cardiomyopathy (16.3% vs 15.8%; P = 0.03). Conclusions and relevance Single RDW values did not predict mortality in cats with acquired heart disease but may be useful in determining if cats have decompensated heart disease and CHF. Human studies indicate that incremental increases in serial RDW measurements are associated with decreased survival; serial RDW measurements in cats may be an area of future study.

  13. Understanding the economic burden of heart failure in China: impact on disease management and resource utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun; Yin, Hongjun; Zhang, Milun; Ni, Qian; Xuan, Jianwei

    2017-05-01

    This study has two objectives: (1) to examine healthcare resource utilization in heart failure (HF) patients; and (2) to examine the treatment costs associated with HF in China. The data used in this study was from the 2014 national insurance database sponsored by the China Health Insurance Research Association (CHIRA), that covers national urban employees and residents. ICD-10 codes and keywords indicating heart failure diagnoses were used to identify patients with heart failure. Drug utilization, hospital visits, re-admission, and treatment costs in different service categories were examined. A total of 7,847 patients were included in this analysis, of which 1,157 patients had a 1-year complete follow-up period. In total, 48.16% of patients received the combination treatment of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACEI)/angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) and beta-blockers (BB); and 22.87% of patients received the combination treatment of ACEI/ARB, beta-blockers and Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs). The annual treatment cost per patient with HF diagnosis was RMB 28,974, of which 66% was for inpatient care. The cost on HF medications accounted for 8.2% of annual cost. Treatment cost was much higher in provincial-level municipalities than that of prefecture-level and other cities. Hospitalization is a major driver of HF treatment cost. Compared to the requirements in international treatment guidelines, HF standard of care medication treatment was under-utilized among HF patients in China. The high re-admission rate among Chinese patients indicates that the management of HF needs to be improved. The percentage of GDP spent on treating HF patients was much lower than that in the developed countries.

  14. [Heart failure among elderly Icelanders: Incidence, prevalence, underlying diseases and long-term survival].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarsson, Haukur; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Danielsen, Ragnar; Olafsson, Orn; Aspelund, Thor; Gudnason, Vilmundur

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a common and a serious condition that predominantly affects elderly people. On the basis of the left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) it can be divided into HF with reduced or preserved ejection fraction (HFrEF and HFpEF, respectively). The goal of this study was to investigate the prevalence and incidence of HF among elderly Icelanders, explore underlying diseases and estimate the effect of HF on overall survival. Included were 5706 participants of the AGES study. The hospital records of those diagnosed with HF before entry into AGES were used to calculate prevalence and the records of those diagnosed from entry into AGES until 28.2.2010 were used to calculate incidence. All cases of HF were verified according to predetermined criteria for diagnosis. Information on underlying diseases and EF of HF patients were obtained from hospital records. Survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Lifetime prevalence of HF was 3.6% as of 2004, higher among men than women (p<0,001). The incidence was 16.2 cases per 1000 person-years, higher among men than among women (p<0,001). The incidence of HFrEF was 6.1 per 1000 person-years also higher among men than women (p<0,001). The incidence of HFpEF was 6.8 per 1000 person-years and there was no statistical difference between the sexes (p=0.62). The age adjusted 5-year survival rate of HF-patients was 32.5%, there was no statistical difference in relative survival between men and women (p=0.46). There was no statistical difference between the survival of patients with HFrEF and those with HFpEF (p=0.52). Both prevalence and incidence of HF are high among elderly Icelanders, increasing sharply with age and 5-year survival rate is only around 30%. While men are more likely to develop HF, especially HFrEF, women are more likely to be diagnosed with HFpEF.

  15. Cardiorespiratory response during exercise in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease with and without a Fontan operation and in patients with congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohuchi, H; Arakaki, Y; Hiraumi, Y; Tasato, H; Kamiya, T

    1998-10-30

    To clarify the different cardiorespiratory response to exercise in patients with congenital heart disease and patients with chronic congestive heart failure, we investigated the effect of a progressive exercise test in 30 patients aged 10 to 24 years, including 9 patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (group A), 13 patients who had undergone a Fontan operation (group B), and 8 patients with reduced left ventricular function (group C), and 18 healthy controls (group D). There was no difference in peak oxygen uptake among patient groups and all group A, B, and C values were lower than those in group D (Ppatient groups than in group D, heart rate at a given exercise intensity was highest in group C. The oxygen pulse (oxygen uptake divided by heart rate=stroke volume x arterial venous oxygen difference), as an indicator of stroke volume, was lower in patients groups, especially in group C, than in group D. There was no difference in tidal volume between groups A and D, but the respiratory rates at any given exercise intensity were higher in group A than in the other patient groups, thus minute ventilation and the ventilatory equivalent were highest in group A. The increased respiratory rate and low tidal volume in group C resulted in rapid and shallow respiration. There was no difference in exertional symptoms at peak exercise among the groups. In addition to impaired responses of stroke volume during exercise in patients with reduced exercise capacity, there was little limitation of increase in ventilation in group B and excessive ventilation in group A. The present results suggest that relationship between ventilatory and cardiac responses during exercise in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease with and without a Fontan operation is different from the relationship in patients with chronic congestive heart failure; however, these pathological differences did not influence exertional symptoms.

  16. Distinct trajectories of disease-specific health status in heart failure patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mastenbroek, Mirjam H.; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Meine, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is well known that a significant proportion of heart failure patients (10-44 %) do not show improvement in symptoms or functioning from cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), yet no study has examined patient-reported health status trajectories after implantation. METHODS: A cohort......-specific health status over time. RESULTS: All health status trajectories showed an initial small to large improvement from baseline to 2-month follow-up, whereafter most trajectories displayed a stable pattern between short- and long-term follow-up. Low educational level, NYHA class III/IV, smoking, no use...

  17. Economic impact assessment from the use of a mobile app for the self-management of heart diseases by patients with heart failure in a Spanish region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano Martín, José Antonio; Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel

    2014-09-01

    Currently, cardiovascular diseases are the deadliest diseases with a total of 17 million deaths worldwide. Hence, they are the focus of many mobile applications for smartphones and tablets. This paper will assess the ex-ante economic impact as well as will determine the cost-effectiveness analysis that the use of one of this app, CardioManager, by patients with heart failure will have in a Spanish community, Castile and Leon. For this, a cost-effectiveness analysis using the hidden Markov model were performed in a hypothetical cohort of patients diagnosed with heart failure, based on the information of epidemiological parameters and the costs derived from the management and care of heart failure patients by the Public Health Care System of Castile and Leon. The costs of patient care were estimated from the perspective of the Ministry of Health of Spain using a discount rate of 3 %. Finally, an estimation of the ex-ante impact that would suppose the introduction of CardioManager in the Health Care System is performed. It is concluded that the introduction of CardioManager may generate a 33 % reduction in the cost of management and treatment of the disease. This means that CardioManager may be able to save more than 9,000 € per patient to the local Health Care System of Castile and Leon, which can be translated in a saving of 0.31 % of the total health expenditure of the region.

  18. Guideline compliance in chronic heart failure patients with multiple comorbid diseases: evaluation of an individualised multidisciplinary model of care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tam H Ho

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of individualised, reconciled evidence-based recommendations (IRERs and multidisciplinary care in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF on clinical guideline compliance for CHF and common comorbid conditions. DESIGN AND SETTING: A retrospective hospital clinical audit conducted between 1st July 2006 and February 2011. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 255 patients with a diagnosis of CHF who attended the Multidisciplinary Ambulatory Consulting Services (MACS clinics, at the Royal Adelaide Hospital, were included. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Compliance with Australian clinical guideline recommendations for CHF, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus and ischaemic heart disease. RESULTS: Study participants had a median of eight medical conditions (IQR 6-10 and were on an average of 10 (±4 unique medications. Compliance with clinical guideline recommendations for pharmacological therapy for CHF, comorbid atrial fibrillation, diabetes or ischaemic heart disease was high, ranging from 86% for lipid lowering therapy to 98% anti-platelet agents. For all conditions, compliance with lifestyle recommendations was lower than pharmacological therapy, ranging from no podiatry reviews for CHF patients with comorbid diabetes to 75% for heart failure education. Concordance with many guideline recommendations was significantly associated if the patient had IRERs determined, a greater number of recommendations, more clinic visits or if patients participated in a heart failure program. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the high number of comorbid conditions and resulting complexity of the management, high compliance to clinical guideline recommendations was associated with IRER determination in older patients with CHF. Importantly these recommendations need to be communicated to the patient's general practitioner, regularly monitored and adjusted at clinic visits.

  19. [Quality indicators for National Disease Management Guidelines using the example of the National Disease Management Guideline for "Chronic Heart Failure"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothacker, Monika Judith; Langer, Thomas; Weinbrenner, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Together with an expert committee a structured approach to determining quality indicators for National Disease Management Guidelines has been developed. The key steps of this approach include: introducing guideline authors to the methodology at an early stage of the process of guideline development, pre-selecting recommendations of the guideline which are potentially measurable by means of quality indicators, assessing the potentially measurable quality indicators in written form using five criteria (including their importance for the health care system and clarity of definitions) and approving them in a formal consensus process. For lack of a database these quality indicators must be regarded as preliminary. For the National Disease Management Guideline "Chronic Heart Failure" nine rate-based indicators have been chosen. The indicators correspond to important strong recommendations (grade of recommendation: A) from the fields of diagnosis (two), general therapeutic strategy (two), specific treatment (three), clinical monitoring (one) and co-ordination of care (one). In a second step, the quality indicators have to be validated within a pilot project. The determination and assessment of the potential quality indicators have revealed room for improvement of guideline development. In particular, there is a need for more health care data and for specification of recommendations.

  20. Biomarker Guided Therapy in Chronic Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektas, Sema

    2015-01-01

    This review article addresses the question of whether biomarker-guided therapy is ready for clinical implementation in chronic heart failure. The most well-known biomarkers in heart failure are natriuretic peptides, namely B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-BNP. They are well-established in the diagnostic process of acute heart failure and prediction of disease prognosis. They may also be helpful in screening patients at risk of developing heart failure. Although studied by 11 small- to medium-scale trials resulting in several positive meta-analyses, it is less well-established whether natriuretic peptides are also helpful for guiding chronic heart failure therapy. This uncertainty is expressed by differences in European and American guideline recommendations. In addition to reviewing the evidence surrounding the use of natriuretic peptides to guide chronic heart failure therapy, this article gives an overview of the shortcomings of the trials, how the results may be interpreted and the future directions necessary to fill the current gaps in knowledge. Therapy guidance in chronic heart failure using other biomarkers has not been prospectively tested to date. Emerging biomarkers, such as galectin-3 and soluble ST2, might be useful in this regard, as suggested by several post-hoc analyses. PMID:28785440

  1. Men and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Men and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Source: Interactive Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke Heart Disease Facts in Men Heart disease is the leading ...

  2. Heart Failure: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Heart Failure Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ... or maintain quality of life. Urinary Incontinence and Heart Failure If you have heart failure, you may experience ...

  3. Cost-effectiveness of nurse-led disease management for heart failure in an ethnically diverse urban community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Paul L; Sisk, Jane E; Wang, Jason J; Tuzzio, Leah; Casabianca, Jodi M; Chassin, Mark R; Horowitz, Carol; McLaughlin, Mary Ann

    2008-10-21

    Randomized, controlled trials have shown that nurse-led disease management for patients with heart failure can reduce hospitalizations. Less is known about the cost-effectiveness of these interventions. To estimate the cost-effectiveness of a nurse-led disease management intervention over 12 months, implemented in a randomized, controlled effectiveness trial. Cost-effectiveness analysis conducted alongside a randomized trial. Medical costs from administrative records, and self-reported quality of life and nonmedical costs from patient surveys. Patients with systolic dysfunction recruited from ambulatory clinics in Harlem, New York. 12 months. Societal and payer. 12-month program that involved 1 face-to-face encounter with a nurse and regular telephone follow-up. Quality of life as measured by the Health Utilities Index Mark 3 and EuroQol-5D and cost-effectiveness as measured by the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Costs and quality of life were higher in the nurse-managed group than the usual care group. The ICERs over 12 months were $17,543 per EuroQol-5D-based quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) and $15,169 per Health Utilities Index Mark 3-based QALY (in 2001 U.S. dollars). From a payer perspective, the ICER ranged from $3673 to $4495 per QALY. Applying national prices in place of New York City prices yielded a societal ICER of $13,460 to $15,556 per QALY. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves suggest that the intervention was most likely cost-effective for patients with less severe (New York Heart Association classes I to II) heart failure. The trial was conducted in an ethnically diverse, inner-city neighborhood; thus, results may not be generalizable to other communities. Over 12 months, the nurse-led disease management program was a reasonably cost-effective way to reduce the burden of heart failure in this community.

  4. Low-dose copper infusion into the coronary circulation induces acute heart failure in diabetic rats: New mechanism of heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Carlos Chun Ho; Soon, Choong Yee; Chuang, Chia-Lin; Phillips, Anthony R J; Zhang, Shaoping; Cooper, Garth J S

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes impairs copper (Cu) regulation, causing elevated serum Cu and urinary Cu excretion in patients with established cardiovascular disease; it also causes cardiomyopathy and chronic cardiac impairment linked to defective Cu homeostasis in rats. However, the mechanisms that link impaired Cu regulation to cardiac dysfunction in diabetes are incompletely understood. Chronic treatment with triethylenetetramine (TETA), a Cu²⁺-selective chelator, improves cardiac function in diabetic patients, and in rats with heart disease; the latter displayed ∼3-fold elevations in free Cu²⁺ in the coronary effluent when TETA was infused into their coronary arteries. To further study the nature of defective cardiac Cu regulation in diabetes, we employed an isolated-perfused, working-heart model in which we infused micromolar doses of Cu²⁺ into the coronary arteries and measured acute effects on cardiac function in diabetic and non-diabetic-control rats. Infusion of CuCl₂ solutions caused acute dose-dependent cardiac dysfunction in normal hearts. Several measures of baseline cardiac function were impaired in diabetic hearts, and these defects were exacerbated by low-micromolar Cu²⁺ infusion. The response to infused Cu²⁺ was augmented in diabetic hearts, which became defective at lower infusion levels and underwent complete pump failure (cardiac output = 0 ml/min) more often (P hearts. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the acute effects on cardiac function of pathophysiological elevations in coronary Cu²⁺. The effects of Cu²⁺ infusion occur within minutes in both control and diabetic hearts, which suggests that they are not due to remodelling. Heightened sensitivity to the acute effects of small elevations in Cu²⁺ could contribute substantively to impaired cardiac function in patients with diabetes and is thus identified as a new mechanism of heart disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A randomized clinical trial of hospital-based, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients with congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or high risk of ischemic heart disease (the DANREHAB trial)--design, intervention, and population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe Olsen; Soja, Anne Merete Boas; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    randomized clinical trial to clarify whether hospital-based comprehensive CR is superior to usual care for patients with congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or high risk for ischemic heart disease. A combined primary outcome measure included total mortality, myocardial infarction...... management, and clinical assessment. STUDY POPULATION: Of 5060 discharged patients, 1614 (32%) were eligible for the trial and 770 patients were randomized (47% of those eligible). Participants were younger (P ... that a large-scale, centrally randomized clinical trial on comprehensive CR can be conducted among a broadly defined patient group, but reaching the stipulated number of 1800 patients was difficult. Although the study included relatively many women and older people, elderly patients and patients with high...

  6. Patient Experiences of Structured Heart Failure Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuala E. Tully

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Patient experiences of structured heart failure rehabilitation and their views on the important components of heart failure services were examined. Methods. Focus groups were conducted with fifteen participants (men, =12 attending one of two heart failure rehabilitation programmes. Sessions were guided by a semistructured interview schedule covering participants' experiences of the programme, maintenance, and GP role. Focus group transcripts were analysed qualitatively. Results. Participants indicated that rehabilitation programmes substantially met their needs. Supervised exercise sessions increased confidence to resume physical activity, while peer-group interaction and supportive medical staff improved morale. However, once the programme ended, some participants' self-care motivation lapsed, especially maintenance of an exercise routine. Patients doubted their GPs' ability to help them manage their condition. Conclusion. Structured rehabilitation programmes are effective in enabling patients to develop lifestyle skills to live with heart failure. However, postrehabilitation maintenance interventions are necessary to sustain patients' confidence in disease self-management.

  7. Proportional Mortality due to Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Diseases in the Brazilian Regions from 2004 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaui, Eduardo Nagib; Klein, Carlos Henrique; Oliveira, Glaucia Maria Moraes de

    2016-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) and ischemic heart diseases (IHD) are important causes of death in Brazil. To assess proportional mortality (PM) due to HF and IHD as underlying causes stratified by sex and age groups in the Brazilian geoeconomic regions from 2004 to 2011. Data from death certificates were obtained in the DATASUS site under the following International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems codes, 10th Revision: 1) from chapter IX: I20 to I24 for acute IHD, I25 for chronic IHD, and I50 for HF; and 2) from chapter XVIII, for ill-defined causes (IDC). Proportional mortality due to HF increased with age in both sexes and all regions, the highest percentages being found among elderly women. Among men, the highest percentages were observed in the West-Central region up to the ninth decade, but, among the eldest individuals, the highest percentages were identified in the Southern region. Among women, the regions did not differ up to the age group of 70-79 years, although the West-Central region took the lead from 50 to 79 years; however, from the age of 80 years on, the Southern region showed the highest PM due to HF. Proportional mortality due to acute IHD in all Brazilian regions and in both sexes increased up to the age group of 60-69 years, from which it decreased. Among men, the Southeastern region had the highest percentages in the age group of 50-59 years, while women had lower PM due to acute IHD than men in all regions. In both sexes, PM due to chronic IHD increased with age in the Southern and Southeastern regions, which did not happen in the others, while the Southern region had the highest rate of all regions for all age groups. Regional differences were more prominent at more advanced ages, especially when deaths due to IDC were excluded. Insuficiência cardíaca (IC) e doenças isquêmicas do coração (DIC) são importantes causas de morte no Brasil. Avaliar a mortalidade proporcional (MP) por IC e DIC, como causas b

  8. Heart Disease (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... System Taking Care of Your Teeth Bad Breath Heart Disease KidsHealth > For Kids > Heart Disease Print A A ... chest pain, heart attacks, and strokes . What Is Heart Disease? The heart is the center of the cardiovascular ...

  9. Risk factors for heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and stage 4 chronic kidney disease treated with bardoxolone methyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Melanie P; Wrolstad, Danielle; Bakris, George L; Chertow, Glenn M; de Zeeuw, Dick; Goldsberry, Angie; Linde, Peter G; McCullough, Peter A; McMurray, John J; Wittes, Janet; Meyer, Colin J

    2014-12-01

    A phase 3 randomized clinical trial was designed to test whether bardoxolone methyl, a nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activator, slows progression to end-stage renal disease in patients with stage 4 chronic kidney disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The trial was terminated because of an increase in heart failure in the bardoxolone methyl group; many of the events were clinically associated with fluid retention. We randomized 2,185 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and stage 4 chronic kidney disease (CKD) (estimated glomerular filtration rate 15 to <30 mL min(-1) 1.73 m(-2)) to once-daily bardoxolone methyl (20 mg) or placebo. We used classification and regression tree analysis to identify baseline factors predictive of heart failure or fluid overload events. Elevated baseline B-type natriuretic peptide and previous hospitalization for heart failure were identified as predictors of heart failure events; bardoxolone methyl increased the risk of heart failure by 60% in patients with these risk factors. For patients without these baseline characteristics, the risk for heart failure events among bardoxolone methyl- and placebo-treated patients was similar (2%). The same risk factors were also identified as predictors of fluid overload and appeared to be related to other serious adverse events. Bardoxolone methyl contributed to events related to heart failure and/or fluid overload in a subpopulation of susceptible patients with an increased risk for heart failure at baseline. Careful selection of participants and vigilant monitoring of the study drug will be required in any future trials of bardoxolone methyl to mitigate the risk of heart failure and other serious adverse events. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nutritional considerations in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne-Emerson, Heather; Lennie, Terry A

    2008-03-01

    There are a number of factors related to heart failure pathophysiology and treatment that influence nutrient requirements for patients. These include catabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, diuretic use, and presence of comorbidities. On the other hand, there is evidence that specific nutrients can alter heart failure pathophysiology. This article reviews the current evidence for nutritional recommendations regarding sodium and fluid restriction, macro- and micronutrient intake, and dietary changes required by the presence of common comorbidities.

  11. Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aortic Aneurysm More Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Mar 14,2017 Plain old snoring can ... and is associated with high blood pressure , arrhythmia , stroke and heart failure . Heart disease is the leading ...

  12. Tachyarrhythmias in structural heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiès, Philippine

    2006-01-01

    Ventricular tachyarrhythmias, the major cause of sudden unexpected cardiac arrest, occur specifically in patients with structural heart disease. In general, all types of structural heart disease may lead to chronic heart failure, a severe condition with an additional high risk of atrial- and

  13. Cardiac rehabilitation for women with breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure compared with coronary artery disease: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsignore, Alis; Marzolini, Susan; Oh, Paul

    2017-03-06

    To examine clinical outcomes and completion rates of cardiac rehabilitation in women with breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure. Data for women with breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure were compared with those for age-matched women with coronary artery disease. Retrospective data were obtained from the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute database for dates between 1998 and 2011, for cardiopulmonary exercise test results at baseline and 6 months, body composition measures, and cardiac rehabilitation completion rates. A total of 29 women with breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure (mean 57 years (standard deviation (SD) 9.4)) and 29 age-matched women with coronary artery disease were identified. There was no significant difference between the proportion of women with breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure and those with coronary artery disease who completed the programme. Peak aerobic power (VO2peak) increased in the breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure group (mean 16.2 ml-1.kg-1.min-1 (SD 3.4) to mean 18.5 ml-1.kg-1.min-1 (SD 4.5) ; p = 0.002) and in the coronary artery disease group (mean 18.9 ml-1.kg-1.min-1 (SD 4.5) to mean 20.8 ml-1.kg-1.min-1 (SD 4.9); p = 0.01). Body fat percentage increased in the breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure group (mean 34.8% (SD 8.5) to mean 36.3% (SD 6.9); p = 0.04). Women with breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure participating in cardiac rehabilitation demonstrate similar significant gains in VO2peak and similar completion rates to those of age-matched women with coronary artery disease. Further research is needed to determine interventions that improve body composition in women with breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure.

  14. Association between β-blocker therapy and outcomes in patients hospitalised with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive lung disease with underlying ischaemic heart disease, heart failure or hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Mihaela S; Rothberg, Michael B; Priya, Aruna; Pekow, Penelope S; Au, David H; Lindenauer, Peter K

    2012-11-01

    β-Blocker therapy has been shown to improve survival among patients with ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and congestive heart failure (CHF) and is underused among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Evidence regarding the optimal use of β-blocker therapy during an acute exacerbation of COPD is particularly weak. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients aged ≥40 years with IHD, CHF or hypertension who were hospitalised for an acute exacerbation of COPD from 1 January 2006 to 1 December 2007 at 404 acute care hospitals throughout the USA. We examined the association between β-blocker therapy and in-hospital mortality, initiation of mechanical ventilation after day 2 of hospitalisation, 30-day all-cause readmission and length of stay. Of 35 082 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 29% were treated with β blockers in the first two hospital days, including 22% with β1-selective and 7% with non-selective β blockers. In a propensity-matched analysis, there was no association between β-blocker therapy and in-hospital mortality (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.09), 30-day readmission (OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.89 to 1.03) or late mechanical ventilation (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.24). However, when compared with β1 selective β blockers, receipt of non-selective β blockers was associated with an increased risk of 30-day readmission (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.44). Among patients with IHD, CHF or hypertension, continuing β1-selective β blockers during hospitalisation for COPD appears to be safe. Until additional evidence becomes available, β1-selective β blockers may be superior to treatment with a non-selective β blocker.

  15. Exercise Intolerance in Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brassard, Patrice; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Exercise tolerance is affected in patients with heart failure (HF). Although the inability of the heart to pump blood to the working muscle has been the conventional mechanism proposed to explain the lowered capacity of patients with HF to exercise, evidence suggests that the pathophysiological...

  16. Hypertension, Obesity, Diabetes, and Heart Failure-Free Survival: The Cardiovascular Disease Lifetime Risk Pooling Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faraz S; Ning, Hongyan; Rich, Jonathan D; Yancy, Clyde W; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Wilkins, John T

    2016-12-01

    This study was designed to quantify the relationship between the absence of heart failure risk factors in middle age and incident heart failure, heart failure-free survival, and overall survival. Quantification of years lived free from heart failure in the context of risk factor burden in mid-life may improve risk communication and prevention efforts. We conducted a pooled, individual-level analysis sampling from communities across the United States as part of 4 cohort studies: the Framingham Heart, Framingham Offspring, Chicago Heart Association Detection Project in Industry, and ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities) studies. Participants with and without hypertension (blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg or treatment), obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m 2 ), or diabetes (fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dl or treatment), and combinations of these factors, at index ages of 45 years and 55 years through 95 years. Competing risk-adjusted Cox models, a modified Kaplan-Meier estimator, and Irwin's restricted mean were used to estimate the association between the absence of risk factors at mid-life and incident heart failure, heart failure-free survival, and overall survival. For participants at age 45 years, over 516,537 person-years of follow-up, 1,677 incident heart failure events occurred. Men and women with no risk factors, compared to those with all 3, had 73% to 85% lower risks of incident heart failure. Men and women without hypertension, obesity, or diabetes at age 45 years lived on average 34.7 years and 38.0 years without incident heart failure, and they lived on average an additional 3 years to 15 years longer free of heart failure than those with 1, 2, or 3 risk factors. Similar trends were seen when stratified by race and at index age 55 years. Prevention of hypertension, obesity, and diabetes by ages 45 years and 55 years may substantially prolong heart failure-free survival, decrease heart failure-related morbidity, and reduce the public health impact of

  17. Patients’ knowledge of heart failure and their perception of the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Płotka A

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Anna Płotka,1 Edyta Prokop,2 Jacek Migaj,2 Ewa Straburzyńska–Migaj,2 Stefan Grajek2 1Medical Faculty I, Poznań University of Medical Sciences, Poznań, Poland, 21st Department of Cardiology, University Hospital of Lord’s Transfiguration, Poznań University of Medical Sciences, Poznań, Poland Purpose: The aim of this study was to gain a deeper insight into patients’ perception of chronic heart failure (CHF symptoms by analyzing their compliance with nonpharmacological recommendations. Patients and methods: This was a prospective, single-center survey-based registry. Patients included in this study were hospitalized between December 2014 and January 2016 at the 1st Department of Cardiology, University Hospital of Lord’s Transfiguration, Poznan´ University of Medical Sciences, and had been diagnosed with CHF at least 3 months prior to inclusion. Participants were divided according to New York Heart Association (NYHA functional class into mild CHF (NYHA I and II and severe CHF (NYHA III and IV, and according to age into young (<50 years, middle-aged (50–70 years and old (>70 years. The survey included information about the patients’ sex, age, education, length of the illness and 12 questions about their perception of CHF. This study included 201 patients. The mean age was 58±15 years. Results: The younger the patients, the more often they thought that CHF is curable. The patients presenting with severe CHF tended to think that CHF is incurable significantly more often than those with mild CHF. Most of the patients considered loss of appetite, cough and vomiting the least alarming symptoms. Significantly more patients with severe CHF exercised less and reported reduced sexual activity more often in comparison to the mild CHF patients. Most of the young patients reported no changes to their sexual activity, body mass index (BMI or exercise after diagnosis of CHF. Most of the old patients exercised less than before diagnosis of CHF

  18. Cardiohepatic Interactions: Implications for Management in Advanced Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendyal, Akshay; Gelow, Jill M

    2016-07-01

    Liver disease is a common sequela of heart failure and can range from mild reversible liver injury to hepatic fibrosis and, in its most severe form, cardiac cirrhosis. Hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis due to chronic heart failure have important implications for prognosis, medication management, mechanical circulatory support, and heart transplantation. This article reviews the current understanding of liver disease in heart failure and provides a framework for approaching liver disease in the advanced heart failure population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. De novo acute heart failure and acutely decompensated chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Astrid; Empe, Klausn; Dörr, Marcus; Felix, Stephan B

    2015-04-24

    Heart failure is one of the most common diseases of adults in Europe, with an overall prevalence of 1-2%. Among persons aged 60 and above, its prevalence is above 10% in men and 8% in women. Acute heart failure has a poor prognosis; it is associated with a high rate of rehospitalization and a 1-year mortality of 20-30%. This review is based on pertinent literature, including guidelines, retrieved by a selective search in PubMed. There are different types of acute heart failure; the basic diagnostic assessment is performed at once and consists of ECG, echocardiography, and the measurement of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) and troponin levels. The most common causes of decompensation are arrhythmia, valvular dysfunction, and acute cardiac ischemia, each of which accounts for 30% of cases. The potential indication for immediate revascularization should be carefully considered in cases where acute heart failure is due to coronary heart disease. The basic treatment of acute heart failure is symptomatic, with the administration of oxygen, diuretics, and vasodilators. Ino-tropic agents, vasopressors, and temporary mechanical support for the circulatory system are only used to treat cardiogenic shock. The treatment of acute heart failure is markedly less evidence-based than that of chronic heart failure. Newer treatment approaches that are intended to improve outcomes still need to be tested in multicenter trials.

  20. Disease management 360 degrees: a scorecard approach to evaluating TRICARE's programs for asthma, congestive heart failure, and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenya; Dall, Timothy M; Zhang, Yiduo; Hogan, Paul F; Arday, David R; Gantt, Cynthia J

    2010-08-01

    To assess the effect of TRICARE's asthma, congestive heart failure, and diabetes disease management programs using a scorecard approach. EVALUATION MEASURES: Patient healthcare utilization, financial, clinical, and humanistic outcomes. Absolute measures were translated into effect size and incorporated into a scorecard. Actual outcomes for program participants were compared with outcomes predicted in the absence of disease management. The predictive equations were established from regression models based on historical control groups (n = 39,217). Z scores were calculated for the humanistic measures obtained through a mailed survey. Administrative records containing medical claims, patient demographics and characteristics, and program participation status were linked using an encrypted patient identifier (n = 57,489). The study time frame is 1 year prior to program inception through 2 years afterward (October 2005-September 2008). A historical control group was identified with the baseline year starting October 2003 and a 1-year follow-up period starting October 2004. A survey was administered to a subset of participants 6 months after baseline assessment (39% response rate). Within the observation window--24 months for asthma and congestive heart failure, and 15 months for the diabetes program--we observed modest reductions in hospital days and healthcare cost for all 3 programs and reductions in emergency visits for 2 programs. Most clinical outcomes moved in the direction anticipated. The scorecard provided a useful tool to track performance of 3 regional contractors for each of 3 diseases and over time.

  1. The Danish Heart Failure Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Inge; Nakano, Anne; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Heart Failure Registry (DHFR) is to monitor and improve the care of patients with incident heart failure (HF) in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: The DHFR includes inpatients and outpatients (≥18 years) with incident HF. Reporting to the DHFR is mandatory......: The main variables recorded in the DHFR are related to the indicators for quality of care in patients with incident HF: performance of echocardiography, functional capacity (New York Heart Association functional classification), pharmacological therapy (angiotensin converting enzyme/angiotensin II...

  2. Chronic kidney disease and worsening renal function in acute heart failure: different phenotypes with similar prognostic impact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzuoli, Alberto; Lombardi, Carlo; Ruocco, Gaetano; Padeletti, Margherita; Nuti, Ranuccio; Metra, Marco; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    Nearly a third of patients with acute heart failure experience concomitant renal dysfunction. This condition is often associated with increased costs of care, length of hospitalisation and high mortality. Although the clinical impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been well established, the exact clinical significance of worsening renal function (WRF) during the acute and post-hospitalisation phases is not completely understood. Therefore, it is still unclear which of the common laboratory markers are able to identify WRF at an early stage. Recent studies comparing CKD with WRF showed contradictory results; this could depend on a different WRF definition, clinical characteristics, haemodynamic disorders and the presence of prior renal dysfunction in the population enrolled. The current definition of acute cardiorenal syndrome focuses on both the heart and kidney but it lacks precise laboratory marker cut-offs and a specific diagnostic approach. WRF and CKD could represent different pathophysiological mechanisms in the setting of acute heart failure; the traditional view includes reduced cardiac output with systemic and renal vasoconstriction. Nevertheless, it has become a mixed model that encompasses both forward and backward haemodynamic dysfunction. Increased central venous pressure, renal congestion with tubular obliteration, tubulo-glomerular feedback and increased abdominal pressure are all potential additional contributors. The impact of WRF on patients who experience preserved renal function and individuals affected with CKD is currently unknown. Therefore it is extremely important to understand the origins, the clinical significance and the prognostic impact of WRF on CKD. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  3. Current management of congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druck, M N

    1987-04-01

    The author describes the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure and outlines treatment based on the mechanism and hemodynamics of heart failure. He discusses vasodilator therapy, ACE inhibitors in heart failure, and initiation of treatment. The paper concludes with a short discussion of methods of treating refractory heart failure.

  4. Current Management of Congestive Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Druck, Maurice N.

    1987-01-01

    The author describes the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure and outlines treatment based on the mechanism and hemodynamics of heart failure. He discusses vasodilator therapy, ACE inhibitors in heart failure, and initiation of treatment. The paper concludes with a short discussion of methods of treating refractory heart failure.

  5. Understand Your Risk for Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Causes and Risks for Heart Failure Updated:Feb 13,2018 Who Develops Heart Failure ( ... HF. This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  6. Importance of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease for prognosis and diagnosis of congestive heart failure in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Erik; Køber, Lars; Iversen, Kasper

    2004-01-01

    for a randomised controlled trial. A history of COPD was present in 765 (11.5%) patients. Thirty-day and 5-year survival in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was 86.3 and 42.9%. In patients without pulmonary disease the figures were 87.7 and 57.5%, respectively, giving a relative risk of 1.49 (1.......35-1.65). In multivariate analysis the relative risk was 1.15 (1.04-1.28). The prevalence of congestive heart failure was 65.9% in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and 52.0% in patients without. This difference was most distinct in patients with normal or only slightly decreased left ventricular systolic...

  7. [Usefulness of enalapril in congestive heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, J; Necoechea, J C; Navarro, J

    1987-01-01

    The usefulness of vasodilating agents in congestive heart failure depends on their ability to diminish left ventricular afterload; this effect does not necessarily persist with long-term treatment. The present study reports the clinical response of 16 patients in heart failure; the trial was double blind with enalapril and/or placebo during 24 weeks. Diagnoses were dilated cardiomyopathy in six, rheumatic heart disease in five, ischemic heart disease in four und hypertensive heart disease in one. Two patients on enalapril died of non cardiac causes and one was withdrawn from the study due to pregnancy. In those patients treated with enalapril the NYHA functional class improved from 2.9/0.8 to 1.1/0.4 (p less than 0.001), and the effort capacity increased from 545/171 to 888/160 seconds (p less than 0.01). Left ventricular systolic function evaluated by echocardiogram and Tc 99 m ventriculogram, radiologic size of the heart and echocardiographic left ventricular diameters showed no significant changes. There were no adverse clinical effects nor laboratory abnormalities. It is concluded that in this study, enalapril produced sustained clinical improvement in patients with heart failure and it was well tolerated during long-term treatment.

  8. Factors that precipitate heart failure among children with rheumatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To identify factors that precipitates heart failure in children with rheumatic heart disease. Design: a descriptive cross-sectional study. Setting: Paediatric wards at the Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital. Subjects: Children with Rheumatic heart disease admitted for in-patient care due to decompensated heart ...

  9. Pharmacological modulation of beta-adrenoceptor function in patients with coexisting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matera, Maria Gabriella; Martuscelli, Eugenio; Cazzola, Mario

    2010-02-01

    Pharmacological modulation of beta-adrenoceptor function is one of the critical issues in the treatment of patients with concurrent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic heart failure (CHF). A volume of published evidence sustains the role of long-acting beta(2)-agonists in the treatment of stable COPD, but beta-agonists seem to be detrimental when used for long term in CHF. beta(2)-agonists may exacerbate heart failure and, in any case, they induce adverse cardiac effects in COPD patients with pre-existing cardiovascular disease. The adverse effects of beta(2)-agonists are likely to be exacerbated in COPD patients with coexistent CHF. beta-Blockers are the standard treatment in CHF, but they can worsen FEV(1) and airway hyperresponsiveness and reluctance exists to prescribe these agents to COPD patients, despite the anticipated beneficial cardiovascular effects. Although the literature is reassuring, there are currently no prospective long-term studies on the safety of beta-blockers in COPD. Therefore, although beta-blockers can be introduced in any medical setting for treating patients with concurrent COPD and CHF, it still seems appropriate to only use those beta-blockers that are more selective for the beta(1)-AR but without ISA at the lowest dose and to titrate them slowly with attention to lung function and symptoms, adding an inhaled antimuscarinic agent when bronchodilation is needed. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Angiotensin inhibition in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John JV Mcmurray

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Survival in patients with heart failure remains very poor, and is worse than that for most common cancers, including bowel cancer in men and breast cancer in women. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS is not completely blocked by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibition. Blockade of the RAAS at the AT1-receptor has the theoretical benefit of more effective blockade of the actions of angiotensin II. ACE inhibitors (ACE-Is prevent the breakdown of bradykinin: this has been blamed for some of the unwanted effects of ACE-Is although bradykinin may have advantageous effects in heart failure. Consequently, ACE-Is and ARBs might be complementary or even additive treatments; recent trials have tested these hypotheses. The Candesartan in Heart failure Assessment of Reduction in Mortality and morbidity (CHARM programme compared the angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB candesartan (target dose 32 mg once daily to placebo in three distinct but complementary populations of patients with symptomatic heart failure. These were: patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF who were ACE-I-intolerant (CHARM-Alternative; patients with reduced LVEF who were being treated with ACE-Is (CHARM-Added; and patients with preserved left ventricular systolic function (CHARM-Preserved. There were substantial and statistically significant reductions in the primary composite end point (risk of cardiovascular death or hospital admission for heart failure in CHARM-Alternative. This was also the case in CHARM-Added, supporting and extending the findings of Val-HeFT. In CHARM-Preserved, the effect of candesartan on the primary end point did not reach conventional statistical significance though hospital admission for heart failure was reduced significantly with candesartan. In the CHARM-Overall programme there was a statistically borderline reduction in all-cause mortality with a clear reduction in cardiovascular mortality. All-cause mortality was

  11. Angiotensin inhibition in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John JV McMurray

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Survival in patients with heart failure remains very poor, and is worse than that for most common cancers, including bowel cancer in men and breast cancer in women. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS is not completely blocked by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibition. Blockade of the RAAS at the AT1-receptor has the theoretical benefit of more effective blockade of the actions of angiotensin II. ACE inhibitors (ACE-Is prevent the breakdown of bradykinin: this has been blamed for some of the unwanted effects of ACE-Is although bradykinin may have advantageous effects in heart failure. Consequently, ACE-Is and ARBs might be complementary or even additive treatments; recent trials have tested these hypotheses.The Candesartan in Heart failure Assessment of Reduction in Mortality and morbidity (CHARM programme compared the angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB candesartan (target dose 32 mg once daily to placebo in three distinct but complementary populations of patients with symptomatic heart failure. These were: patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF who were ACE-I-intolerant (CHARM-Alternative; patients with reduced LVEF who were being treated with ACE-Is (CHARM-Added; and patients with preserved left ventricular systolic function (CHARM-Preserved.There were substantial and statistically significant reductions in the primary composite end point (risk of cardiovascular death or hospital admission for heart failure in CHARM-Alternative. This was also the case in CHARM-Added, supporting and extending the findings of Val-HeFT. In CHARM-Preserved, the effect of candesartan on the primary end point did not reach conventional statistical significance though hospital admission for heart failure was reduced significantly with candesartan. In the CHARM-Overall programme there was a statistically borderline reduction in all-cause mortality with a clear reduction in cardiovascular mortality. All-cause mortality was

  12. Heart Failure and Hypertension: Importance of Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Marc A

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the role of hypertension in heart failure. Elevated blood pressure has the greatest population attributable risk for the development of heart failure. The mortality rates following the clinical recognition of heart failure is increased multifold. The treatment of hypertension with antihypertensive agents is particularly effective in preventing heart failure, which makes it the most effective therapy for heart failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanisms of Heart Failure in Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Ebong, Imo A.; Goff, David C.; Rodriguez, Carlos J.; Chen, Haiying; Bertoni, Alain G.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and its prevalence continues to rise. Because obesity has been linked with heart failure, the increasing prevalence of obesity may presage further rise in heart failure in the future. Obesity-related factors are estimated to cause 11% of heart failure cases in men and 14% in women. Obesity may result in heart failure by inducing hemodynamic and myocardial changes that lead to cardiac dysfunction, or due to an increased predisposition...

  14. Insulin Signaling and Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehle, Christian; Abel, E. Dale

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is associated with generalized insulin resistance. Moreover, insulin resistant states such as type 2 diabetes and obesity increases the risk of heart failure even after adjusting for traditional risk factors. Insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes alters the systemic and neurohumoral milieu leading to changes in metabolism and signaling pathways in the heart that may contribute to myocardial dysfunction. In addition, changes in insulin signaling within cardiomyocytes develop in the failing heart. The changes range from activation of proximal insulin signaling pathways that may contribute to adverse left ventricular remodeling and mitochondrial dysfunction to repression of distal elements of insulin signaling pathways such as forkhead (FOXO) transcriptional signaling or glucose transport which may also impair cardiac metabolism, structure and function. This article will review the complexities of insulin signaling within the myocardium and ways in which these pathways are altered in heart failure or in conditions associated with generalized insulin resistance. The implications of these changes for therapeutic approaches to treating or preventing heart failure will be discussed. PMID:27034277

  15. Increased Atrial β-Adrenergic Receptors and GRK-2 Gene Expression Can Play a Fundamental Role in Heart Failure After Repair of Congenital Heart Disease with Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marcela Silva; Carmona, Fabio; Vicente, Walter V A; Manso, Paulo H; Mata, Karina M; Celes, Mara Rúbia; Campos, Erica C; Ramos, Simone G

    2017-04-01

    Surgeries to correct congenital heart diseases are increasing in Brazil and worldwide. However, even with the advances in surgical techniques and perfusion, some cases, especially the more complex ones, can develop heart failure and death. A retrospective study of patients who underwent surgery for correction of congenital heart diseases with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in a university tertiary-care hospital that died, showed infarction in different stages of evolution and scattered microcalcifications in the myocardium, even without coronary obstruction. CPB is a process routinely used during cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease. However, CPB has been related to increased endogenous catecholamines that can lead to major injuries in cardiomyocytes. The mechanisms involved are not completely understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the alterations induced in the β-adrenergic receptors and GRK-2 present in atrial cardiomyocytes of infants with congenital heart disease undergoing surgical repair with CPB and correlate the alterations with functional and biochemical markers of ischemia/myocardial injury. The study consisted of right atrial biopsies of infants undergoing surgical correction in HC-FMRPUSP. Thirty-three cases were selected. Atrial biopsies were obtained at the beginning of CPB (group G1) and at the end of CPB (group G2). Real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence analysis were conducted to evaluate the expression of β 1 , β 2 -adrenergic receptors, and GRK-2 in atrial myocardium. Cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiography and biochemical analysis (N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-ProBNP), lactate, and cardiac troponin I). We observed an increase in serum lactate, NT-proBNP, and troponin I at the end of CPB indicating tissue hypoxia/ischemia. Even without major clinical consequences in cardiac function, these alterations were followed by a significant increase in gene expression of β 1 and β 2

  16. Multimorbidity in Older Adults with Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmarajan, Kumar; Dunlay, Shannon M

    2016-05-01

    Multimorbidity is common among older adults with heart failure and creates diagnostic and management challenges. Diagnosis of heart failure may be difficult, as many conditions commonly found in older persons produce dyspnea, exercise intolerance, fatigue, and weakness; no singular pathognomonic finding or diagnostic test differentiates them from one another. Treatment may also be complicated, as multimorbidity creates high potential for drug-disease and drug-drug interactions in settings of polypharmacy. The authors suggest that management of multimorbid older persons with heart failure be patient, rather than disease-focused, to best meet patients' unique health goals and minimize risk from excessive or poorly-coordinated treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Heart failure with anemia: novel findings on the roles of renal disease, interleukins, and specific left ventricular remodeling processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, Eileen; Rouleau, Jean L; White, Michel; Roy, Karine; Blondeau, Lucie; Ducharme, Anique; Neagoe, Paul-Eduard; Sirois, Martin G; Lavoie, Joël; Racine, Normand; Liszkowski, Mark; Madore, François; Tardif, Jean-Claude; de Denus, Simon

    2014-09-01

    Anemia is a highly prevalent and strong independent prognostic marker in heart failure (HF), yet this association is not completely understood. Whether anemia is simply a marker of disease severity and concomitant chronic kidney disease or represents the activation of other detrimental pathways remains uncertain. We sought to determine which pathophysiological pathways are exacerbated in patients with HF, reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and anemia in comparison with those without anemia. In a prospective study involving 151 patients, selected biomarkers were analyzed, each representing proposed contributive mechanisms in the pathophysiology of anemia in HF. We compared clinical, echocardiographic, and circulating biomarkers profiles among patients with HFrEF and anemia (group 1), HFrEF without anemia (group 2), and chronic kidney disease with preserved EF, without established HF (chronic kidney disease control group 3). We demonstrate here that many processes other than those related to chronic kidney disease are involved in the anemia-HF relationship. These are linked to the pathophysiological mechanisms pertaining to left ventricular systolic dysfunction and remodeling, systemic inflammation and volume overload. We found that levels of interleukin-6 and interleukin-10, specific markers of cardiac remodeling (procollagen type III N-terminal peptide, matrix metalloproteinase-2, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase 1, left atrial volume), myocardial stretch (NT-proBNP [N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide]), and myocyte death (troponin T) are related to anemia in HFrEF. Anemia is strongly associated not only with markers of more advanced and active heart disease but also with the level of renal dysfunction in HFrEF. Increased myocardial remodeling, inflammation, and volume overload are the hallmarks of patients with anemia and HF. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00834691. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Follow-up and treatment of an instable patient with heart failure using telemonitoring and a computerised disease management system: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Arjen E; van der Wal, Martje Hl; Bedijn, Wendy; de Jong, Richard M; van Dijk, Rene B; Hillege, Hans L; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2012-12-01

    In the last decades, the introduction of information and communication technology (ICT) in healthcare promised an improved quality of care while reducing workload and improving cost-effectiveness. This might be realised by the use of computer guided decision support systems and telemonitoring. This case study describes the process of care of a patient with chronic heart failure, who was treated with a computerised disease management system in combination with telemonitoring. With the help of these appliances, we think we were probably able to prevent at least two readmissions for heart failure in a period of 10 months. We also gained more insight into patient's behaviour with regards to compliance with the heart failure regimen at home. Frequent contact at distance and the online availability of physiological measurements at home facilitated patient tailored education and helped the patient to react adequately to symptoms of deterioration. Additionally, up-titration of heart failure medication was performed without contacting the patient at the outpatient clinic.

  19. Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... email updates Enter email Submit Heart Disease and Stroke Heart disease and stroke are important health issues ... Stroke risk factors View more Heart Disease and Stroke resources Related information Heart-healthy eating Stress and ...

  20. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Back to Patient Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Millions of people experience irregular or abnormal ... harmless and happen in healthy people free of heart disease. However, some abnormal heart rhythms can be serious ...

  1. Sarcoid heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrey, Simon W; Bell, Alex; Mittal, Tarun K

    2007-10-01

    To this day the aetiology of sarcoidosis continues to elude definition. Partially as a consequence of this, little in the way of new therapies has evolved. The enigma of this condition is that, unusually for a disease with the potential for devastating consequences, many patients show spontaneous resolution and recover. Cardiac involvement can affect individuals of any age, gender or race and has a predilection for the conduction system of the heart. Heart involvement can also cause a dilated cardiomyopathy with consequent progressive heart failure. The most common presentation of this systemic disease is with pulmonary infiltration, but many cases will be asymptomatic and are detected on routine chest radiography revealing lymphadenopathy. Current advances lie in the newer methods of imaging and diagnosing this unusual heart disease. This review describes the pathology and diagnosis of this condition and the newer imaging techniques that have developed for determining cardiac involvement.

  2. Heart failure - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tests to check how well your heart was working. What to Expect at Home Your energy will slowly return. You may need ... erection problems without checking first. Make sure your home is set up to be safe and easy ... appointments at your provider's office. You will likely need to have certain lab ...

  3. [Impact of the disease: acceptability, ceiling and floor effects and reliability of an instrument on heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Simey de Lima Lopes; Rodrigues, Roberta Cunha Matheus; São-João, Thaís Moreira; Pavan, Renata Bigatti Bellizzotti; Padilha, Kátia Melissa; Gallani, Maria-Cecília

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated the acceptability, ceiling/floor effects, and the reliability of the instrument for measuring the Impact of the Disease on the Daily Life of Patients with Valvular Disease (IDCV) when applied to 135 patients with heart failure (HF). Acceptability was evaluated by the percentage of unanswered items and by the proportion of patients who responded to all items; the ceiling/floor effects by the percentage of patients who scored in the top of 10% best and worst results of the scale, respectively. Reliability was estimated by internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficient) and stability of the measure (intraclass correlation coefficient - ICC). All patients responded to all items. Ceiling/floor effects evidenced were of moderate magnitude. The Cronbach's alpha was satisfactory for the majority of the domains and ICC> 0.90 in all the domains. The IDCV proved to be an easy to understand questionnaire, with evidence of reliability in patients with HF.

  4. Impact of the disease: acceptability, ceiling and floor effects and reliability of an instrument on heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simey de Lima Lopes Rodrigues

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the acceptability, ceiling/floor effects, and the reliability of the instrument for measuring the Impact of the Disease on the Daily Life of Patients with Valvular Disease (IDCV when applied to 135 patients with heart failure (HF. Acceptability was evaluated by the percentage of unanswered items and by the proportion of patients who responded to all items; the ceiling/floor effects by the percentage of patients who scored in the top of 10% best and worst results of the scale, respectively. Reliability was estimated by internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficient and stability of the measure (intraclass correlation coefficient - ICC. All patients responded to all items. Ceiling/floor effects evidenced were of moderate magnitude. The Cronbach's alpha was satisfactory for the majority of the domains and ICC> 0.90 in all the domains. The IDCV proved to be an easy to understand questionnaire, with evidence of reliability in patients with HF.

  5. HerzMobil Tirol network: rationale for and design of a collaborative heart failure disease management program in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von der Heidt, Andreas; Ammenwerth, Elske; Bauer, Karl; Fetz, Bettina; Fluckinger, Thomas; Gassner, Andrea; Grander, Willhelm; Gritsch, Walter; Haffner, Immaculata; Henle-Talirz, Gudrun; Hoschek, Stefan; Huter, Stephan; Kastner, Peter; Krestan, Susanne; Kufner, Peter; Modre-Osprian, Robert; Noebl, Josef; Radi, Momen; Raffeiner, Clemens; Welte, Stefan; Wiseman, Andreas; Poelzl, Gerhard

    2014-11-01

    Heart failure (HF) is approaching epidemic proportions worldwide and is the leading cause of hospitalization in the elderly population. High rates of readmission contribute substantially to excessive health care costs and highlight the fragmented nature of care available to HF patients. Disease management programs (DMPs) have been implemented to improve health outcomes, patient satisfaction, and quality of life, and to reduce health care costs. Telemonitoring systems appear to be effective in the vulnerable phase after discharge from hospital to prevent early readmissions. DMPs that emphasize comprehensive patient education and guideline-adjusted therapy have shown great promise to result in beneficial long-term effects. It can be speculated that combining core elements of the aforementioned programs may substantially improve long-term cost-effectiveness of patient management.We introduce a collaborative post-discharge HF disease management program (HerzMobil Tirol network) that incorporates physician-controlled telemonitoring and nurse-led care in a multidisciplinary network approach.

  6. Review Paper Heart Failure in Small Animals - Advances in Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rationale for the use of drugs and supportive therapy in the management of heart diseases (HDs) and heart failure (HF), is discussed in the light of contemporary concepts. The in-adequacy of the age-long therapy of heart failure with oxygen supplementation, cardiac glycosides, rest and the withholding of salt in food is ...

  7. Psychological distress and mortality in systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelle, Aline J; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Schiffer, Angélique A

    2010-01-01

    Depression, anxiety, and type D ("distressed") personality (tendency to experience negative emotions paired with social inhibition) have been associated with poor prognosis in coronary heart disease, but little is known about their role in chronic heart failure. Therefore, we investigated whether...... these indicators of psychological distress are associated with mortality in chronic heart failure....

  8. Prognostic Importance of Chronic Kidney Disease in Japanese Patients With Chronic Heart Failure Implications of the CHART Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shiba, Nobuyuki; Matsuki, Mika; Takahashi, Jun; Tada, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Jun; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2008-01-01

    Background Renal insufficiency is common in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), so to improve the prognosis of patients with cardiovascular risks clinical guidelines recommend estimating the glomerular filtration rate...

  9. Heart failure patients' perceptions and use of technology to manage disease symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Amanda K; Dodd, Virginia; Harris, Amy; McArthur, Kara; Dacso, Clifford; Colton, Lara M

    2014-04-01

    Technology use for symptom management is beneficial for both patients and physicians. Widespread acceptance of technology use in healthcare fuels continued development of technology with ever-increasing sophistication. Although acceptance of technology use in healthcare by medical professionals is evident, less is known about the perceptions, preferences, and use of technology by heart failure (HF) patients. This study explores patients' perceptions and current use of technology for managing HF symptoms (MHFS). A qualitative analysis of in-depth individual interviews using a constant comparative approach for emerging themes was conducted. Fifteen participants (mean age, 64.43 years) with HF were recruited from hospitals, cardiology clinics, and community groups. All study participants reported use of a home monitoring device, such as an ambulatory blood pressure device or bathroom scale. The majority of participants reported not accessing online resources for additional MHFS information. However, several participants stated their belief that technology would be useful for MHFS. Participants reported increased access to care, earlier indication of a worsening condition, increased knowledge, and greater convenience as potential benefits of technology use while managing HF symptoms. For most participants financial cost, access issues, satisfaction with current self-care routine, mistrust of technology, and reliance on routine management by their current healthcare provider precluded their use of technology for MHFS. Knowledge about HF patients' perceptions of technology use for self-care and better understanding of issues associated with technology access can aid in the development of effective health behavior interventions for individuals who are MHFS and may result in increased compliance, better outcomes, and lower healthcare costs.

  10. Arteriosclerotic changes in the myocardium, lung, and kidney in dogs with chronic congestive heart failure and myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Bo Torkel; Jönsson, Lennart; Olsen, Lisbeth Høier

    2006-01-01

    and pulmonary artery. Results: Dogs with congestive heart failure had significantly more arterial narrowing in the left ventricle (Pthickening in the pulmonary artery (P=.04); and fibrosis in the left ventricle (P..., they did not have more plaque formation or intimal-medial thickening in the aorta than controls. There was significantly more arterial narrowing in papillary muscles than in all other locations in dogs with congestive heart failure (P

  11. Copeptin as a biomarker in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Louise; Gustafsson, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Increased neurohormonal activation is a key feature of heart failure (HF). Copeptin is a surrogate marker for proarginine vasopressin and the prognostic value of copeptin has been reported for multiple disease states of both nonvascular and cardiovascular etiology. Elevated plasma copeptin in HF...

  12. The heart failure epidemic: a UK perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin R Cowie

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is appropriately described as an epidemic, with 1–2% of health care expenditure being directed at its management. In England, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE has issued guidance on the best practice for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure. Echocardiography is key to the diagnosis of the underlying cardiac abnormalities, and access to this (with our without biochemical testing using natriuretic peptides is key to high-quality and speedy diagnosis. New models of care aim to speed up access to echocardiography, but a shortage of technically trained staff remains a limiting factor in improving standards of care. The NHS audits the quality of care and outcome for patients admitted to hospital with heart failure, and this continues to show wide variation in practice, particularly, where patients are not reviewed by the local heart failure multidisciplinary team. Recently, the All Party Parliamentary Group on Cardiac Disease issued 10 suggestions for improvement in care for patients with heart failure – access to echocardiography being one of the key suggestions. Time will tell as to whether this support from law makers will assist in the implementation of NICE-recommended standards of care consistently across the country.

  13. Quality of life in patients receiving telemedicine enhanced chronic heart failure disease management: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Liam; Rahman, Rachel J; Beedie, Chris

    2017-08-01

    Background Previous reviews have investigated the effectiveness of telemedicine in the treatment of heart failure (HF). Dependent variables have included hospitalisations, mortality rates, disease knowledge and health costs. Few reviews, however, have examined the variable of health-related quality of life (QoL). Methods Randomised controlled trials comparing the delivery methods of any form of telemedicine with usual care for the provision of HF disease-management were identified via searches of all relevant databases and reference lists. Studies had to report a quantitative measure for mental, physical or overall QoL in order to be included. Results A total of 33 studies were identified. However, poor reporting of data resulted in the exclusion of seven, leaving 26 studies with 7066 participants. Three separate, random effects meta-analyses were conducted for mental, physical and overall QoL. Telemedicine was not significantly more effective than usual care on mental and physical QoL (standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.03, (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.05-0.12), p = 0.45 and SMD 0.24, (95% CI -0.08-0.56), p = 0.14, respectively). However, when compared to usual care, telemedicine was associated with a small significant increase in overall QoL (SMD 0.23, (95% CI 0.09-0.37), p = 0.001). Moderator analyses indicated that telemedicine delivered over a long-duration (≥52 weeks) and via telemonitoring was most beneficial. Conclusion Compared to usual care, telemedicine significantly increases overall QoL in patients receiving HF disease management. Statistically non-significant but nonetheless positive trends were also observed for physical QoL. These findings provide preliminary support for the use of telemedicine in the management of heart failure without jeopardising patient well-being.

  14. The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation outperforms the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation for estimating glomerular filtration rate in chronic systolic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Mattia A E; Hillege, Hans L; Navis, Gerjan; Voors, Adriaan A; Dunselman, Peter H J M; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Damman, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) formula estimates glomerular filtration rate (GFR) better than the simplified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (sMDRD) formula in numerous populations. It has not previously been validated in heart failure patients. The GFR was measured in 120 patients with chronic systolic heart failure (CHF) using [(125)I]iothalamate clearance (GFR(IOTH)) and estimated using the sMDRD and CKD-EPI equations. Accuracy, bias, and prognostic performance were compared. Cockcroft-Gault, CKD-EPI serum cystatin C, and CKD-EPI creatinine-serum cystatin C equations were compared in secondary analyses. Mean age was 59 ± 12 years, 80% were male. Mean LVEF was 29 ± 10%. Mean GFR(IOTH) was 74 ± 27 mL/min/1.73 m(2), and mean estimated GFR was 66 ± 23 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (CKD-EPI) and 63 ± 21 mL/min/1.73m(2) (sMDRD). CKD-EPI showed less bias than sMDRD (-8 ± 15 vs. -11 ± 16 mL/min/1.73 m(2), P heart failure patients, particularly those with preserved or moderately impaired renal function. First published online by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2013.

  15. Pulmonary Hypertension Is Associated With a Higher Risk of Heart Failure Hospitalization and Mortality in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: The Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Senthil; Shah, Sanjiv J; Ommerborn, Mark J; Clark, Cheryl R; Hall, Michael E; Mentz, Robert J; Qazi, Saadia; Robbins, Jeremy M; Skelton, Thomas N; Chen, Jiaying; Gaziano, J Michael; Djoussé, Luc

    2017-06-01

    African Americans develop chronic kidney disease and pulmonary hypertension (PH) at disproportionately high rates. Little is known whether PH heightens the risk of heart failure (HF) admission or mortality among chronic kidney disease patients, including patients with non-end-stage renal disease. We analyzed African Americans participants with chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate 30 mg/g) and available echocardiogram-derived pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) from the Jackson Heart Study (N=408). We used Cox models to assess whether PH (PASP>35 mm Hg) was associated with higher rates of HF hospitalization and mortality. In a secondary, cross-sectional analysis, we examined the relationship between cystatin C (a marker of renal function) and PASP and potential mediators, including BNP (B-type natriuretic peptide) and endothelin-1. In our cohort, the mean age was 63±13 years, 70% were female, 78% had hypertension, and 22% had PH. Eighty-five percent of the participants had an estimated glomerular filtration rate >30 mL/min per 1.73 m 2 . During follow-up, 13% were hospitalized for HF and 27% died. After adjusting for potential confounders, including BNP, PH was found to be associated with HF hospitalization (hazard ratio, 2.37; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-4.86) and the combined outcome of HF hospitalization or mortality (hazard ratio, 1.84; confidence interval, 1.09-3.10). Log cystatin C was directly associated with PASP (adjusted β =2.5 [95% confidence interval, 0.8-4.1] per standard deviation change in cystatin C). Mediation analysis showed that BNP and endothelin-1 explained 56% and 40%, respectively, of the indirect effects between cystatin C and PASP. Among African Americans with chronic kidney disease, PH, which is likely pulmonary venous hypertension, was associated with a higher risk of HF admission and mortality. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. A case of peripartum heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Vinci

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old woman was admitted in congestive heart failure (CHF 3 days after delivery. She had no history of cardiovascular disease and impaired left ventricular Ejection Fraction (EF 35%. She underwent complete heart catheterisation, selective coronary angiography and right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy (EMB.Coronary arteries were normal and EMB revealed active virus negative myocarditis. Serum was positive for anti-heart autoantibodies (AHA. Thus myocarditis was classified as autoimmune and the patient was treated with immunosuppressive therapy, with clinical and hemodynamic improvement. At 27 months follow-up EMB showed healed myocarditis. Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM is a rare disorder in which left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure occur in the peripartum period in previously healthy women. The etiology is still unknown but a sizable proportion of patients may have an underlying organ-specific autoimmune myocarditis.

  17. The innate immune response to coxsackievirus B3 predicts progression to cardiovascular disease and heart failure in male mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onyimba Jennifer A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Men are at an increased risk of dying from heart failure caused by inflammatory heart diseases such as atherosclerosis, myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. We previously showed that macrophages in the spleen are phenotypically distinct in male compared to female mice at 12 h after infection. This innate immune profile mirrors and predicts the cardiac immune response during acute myocarditis. Methods In order to study sex differences in the innate immune response, five male and female BALB/c mice were infected intraperitoneally with coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3 or phosphate buffered saline and their spleens were harvested 12 h later for microarray analysis. Gene expression was determined using an Affymetrix Mouse Gene 1.0 ST Array. Significant gene changes were verified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction or ELISA. Results During the innate immune response to CVB3 infection, infected males had higher splenic expression of genes which are important in regulating the influx of cholesterol into macrophages, such as phospholipase A2 (PLA2 and the macrophage scavenger receptor compared to the infected females. We also observed a higher expression in infected males compared to infected females of squalene synthase, an enzyme used to generate cholesterol within cells, and Cyp2e1, an enzyme important in metabolizing cholesterol and steroids. Infected males also had decreased levels of the translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO, which binds PLA2 and is the rate-limiting step for steroidogenesis, as well as decreased expression of the androgen receptor (AR, which indicates receptor activation. Gene differences were not due to increased viral replication, which was unaltered between sexes. Conclusions We found that, compared to females, male mice had a greater splenic expression of genes which are important for cholesterol metabolism and activation of the AR at 12 h after infection. Activation of the AR has been linked to

  18. An approach to heart failure and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonarow, Gregg C

    2005-08-22

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic progressive disease that results in microvascular and macrovascular complications. Diabetes is a significant independent risk factor for heart failure, and there are a substantial number of patients with diabetes and heart failure. Neurohormonal activation plays an important pathophysiologic role in insulin resistance, diabetes, cardiovascular events, and progression of heart failure. Pharmacologic intervention in these neurohormonal systems (ie, angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE] inhibition, aldosterone antagonism, and beta-adrenergic blockade) has been shown to decrease the morbidity and mortality of diabetes and of heart failure. Despite this knowledge, ACE inhibitors, aldosterone antagonists, and beta-blockers are grossly underutilized, and deaths and hospitalizations due to heart failure have steadily increased. Guidelines for the management of heart failure recommend the use of ACE inhibitors and beta-blockers in patients with mild, moderate, and severe heart failure with or without diabetes. Aldosterone antagonists are recommended in severe heart failure and recent data also support their use in mild to moderate heart failure. Concerns about increased incidence of hypoglycemia, worsening dyslipidemia, and decreased insulin sensitivity with beta-blockers may be preventing physicians from prescribing these agents for their patients with diabetes who have heart failure. Beta-blockade, in conjunction with ACE inhibition and aldosterone antagonism, should be standard therapy for all patients with diabetes and heart failure. Furthermore, every effort should be made to ensure that eligible patients are treated with these evidence-based, guideline-recommended, life-prolonging therapies.

  19. Predicting survival in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pocock, Stuart J; Ariti, Cono A; McMurray, John J V

    2012-01-01

    AimsUsing a large international database from multiple cohort studies, the aim is to create a generalizable easily used risk score for mortality in patients with heart failure (HF).Methods and resultsThe MAGGIC meta-analysis includes individual data on 39 372 patients with HF, both reduced...

  20. Carcinoid heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Saamir A; Banchs, Jose; Iliescu, Cezar; Dasari, Arvind; Lopez-Mattei, Juan; Yusuf, Syed Wamique

    2017-10-01

    Rare neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) that most commonly arise in the gastrointestinal tract can lead to carcinoid syndrome and carcinoid heart disease. Patients with carcinoid syndrome present with vasomotor changes, hypermotility of the gastrointestinal system, hypotension and bronchospasm. Medical therapy for carcinoid syndrome, typically with somatostatin analogues, can help control symptoms, inhibit tumour progression and prolong survival. Carcinoid heart disease occurs in more than 50% of these patients and is the initial presentation of carcinoid syndrome in up to 20% of patients. Carcinoid heart disease has characteristic findings of plaque-like deposits composed of smooth muscle cells, myofibroblasts, extracellular matrix and an overlying endothelial layer which can lead to valve dysfunction. Valvular dysfunction can lead to oedema, ascites and right-sided heart failure. Medical therapy of carcinoid heart disease is limited to symptom control and palliation. Valve surgery for carcinoid heart disease should be considered for symptomatic patients with controlled metastatic carcinoid syndrome. A multidisciplinary approach is needed to guide optimal management. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. The Danish Heart Failure Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Inge; Nakano, Anne; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Heart Failure Registry (DHFR) is to monitor and improve the care of patients with incident heart failure (HF) in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: The DHFR includes inpatients and outpatients (≥18 years) with incident HF. Reporting to the DHFR is mandatory......: The main variables recorded in the DHFR are related to the indicators for quality of care in patients with incident HF: performance of echocardiography, functional capacity (New York Heart Association functional classification), pharmacological therapy (angiotensin converting enzyme/angiotensin II...... antagonist inhibitors, beta-blockers, and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist), nonpharmacological therapy (physical training, patient education), 4-week readmission rate, and 1-year mortality. Furthermore, basic patient characteristics and prognostic factors (eg, smoking and alcohol) are recorded...

  2. A new approach to early diagnosis of congestive heart failure disease by using Hilbert-Huang transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan, Gokhan; Kutlu, Yakup; Allahverdi, Novruz

    2016-12-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a degree of cardiac disease occurring as a result of the heart's inability to pump enough blood for the human body. In recent studies, coronary artery disease (CAD) is accepted as the most important cause of CHF. This study focuses on the diagnosis of both the CHF and the CAD. The Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), which is effective on non-linear and non-stationary signals, is used to extract the features from R-R intervals obtained from the raw electrocardiogram data. The statistical features are extracted from instinct mode functions that are obtained applying the HHT to R-R intervals. Classification performance is examined with extracted statistical features using a multilayer perceptron neural network. The designed model classified the CHF, the CAD patients and a normal control group with rates of 97.83%, 93.79% and 100%, accuracy, specificity and sensitivity, respectively. Also, early diagnosis of the CHF was performed by interpretation of the CAD with a classification accuracy rate of 97.53%, specificity of 98.18% and sensitivity of 97.13%. As a result, a single system having the ability of both diagnosis and early diagnosis of CHF is performed by integrating the CAD diagnosis method to the CHF diagnosis method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Financial implications of a model heart failure disease management program for providers, hospital, healthcare systems, and payer perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whellan, David J; Reed, Shelby D; Liao, Lawrence; Gould, Stuart D; O'connor, Christopher M; Schulman, Kevin A

    2007-01-15

    Although heart failure disease management (HFDM) programs improve patient outcomes, the implementation of these programs has been limited because of financial barriers. We undertook the present study to understand the economic incentives and disincentives for adoption of disease management strategies from the perspectives of a physician (group), a hospital, an integrated health system, and a third-party payer. Using the combined results of a group of randomized controlled trials and a set of financial assumptions from a single academic medical center, a financial model was developed to compute the expected costs before and after the implementation of a HFDM program by 3 provider types (physicians, hospitals, and health systems), as well as the costs incurred from a payer perspective. The base-case model showed that implementation of HFDM results in a net financial loss to all potential providers of HFDM. Implementation of HFDM as described in our base-case analysis would create a net loss of US dollars 179,549 in the first year for a physician practice, US dollars 464,132 for an integrated health system, and US dollars 652,643 in the first year for a hospital. Third-party payers would be able to save US dollars 713,661 annually for the care of 350 patients with heart failure in a HFDM program. In conclusion, although HFDM programs may provide patients with improved clinical outcomes and decreased hospitalizations that save third-party payers money, limited financial incentives are currently in place for healthcare providers and hospitals to initiate these programs.

  4. COMPARISON OF EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF RAMIPRIL, MOLSIDOMINE AND THEIR COMBINATION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE, WHICH COMPLICATED ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Sinitsina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study effects of ramipril, molsidomine and their combinations on morphofunctional heart indices and clinical status of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF, which complicated an ischemic heart disease (IHD.Material and methods. 41 patients with CHF class II-III (NYHA, which complicated IHD (postinfarction cardiosclerosis were included in the study. Patients did not receive ACE inhibitors. Patients were split in 3 groups: patients of the 1st group received ramipril, patients of the 2nd group - molsidomine and patients of the 3rd group – combination of ramipril and molsidomine. Clinical examination, laboratory tests, electrocardiogram, cardiac ultrasonograthy, exercise tolerance test was performed before treatment and after 3 months and 1 year of treatment.Results. Improvement of clinical status and decrease of class NYHA was found in 38,5% of patients in ramipril group; in 33,3% of patients in molsidomine group and in 23,1 % of patients in combined therapy group. Increase of ejection fraction on 17 % from initial level was found in patients receiving combined therapy; on 25,2% - in patients receiving molsidomine; and on 12,4% - in patients receiving ramipril. Decrease of residual volumes of a left ventricle also was detected.Conclusion. All therapies (ramipril, molsidomine and their combination in patients with CHF class II-III and postinfarction cardiosclerosis are clinically and hemodynamically effective in long term implementation.

  5. Osteoporosis and congestive heart failure (CHF) in the elderly patient: double disease burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Raya, Suzan; Abou-Raya, Anna

    2009-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the association between osteoporosis and CHF in elderly patients and to assess the effect of physical performance, vitamin D levels, inflammatory markers on this association. One hundred and twenty-six consecutive patients aged 65 years and above, with moderate to severe CHF who presented to our institution for CHF management and 54 age- and sex-matched controls were screened for osteoporosis. All patients were thoroughly interrogated for cause of CHF, medications, smoking, alcohol use, additional comorbidities and previous falls/fractures. A physical examination was performed to assess CHF severity and New York Heart Association (NYHA) class. Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) were performed at the lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN). Physical performance assessment included grip strength, 6-min walk, "Get up and Go Test", activities of daily living (ADL) and frailty assessment. Biochemical assessment included measurement of levels of serum calcium, phosphorus, 1,25-dihyroxycholecalciferol=1,25(OH)(2)D (vitamin D(3)) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The BMD-Z-scores were significantly lower in HF patients compared to the non-HF controls. Furthermore, there was an association between the ejection fraction (EF) and the BMD-Z-scores. HF patients were significantly more likely to have poor physical performance, a higher frailty composite score, higher TNF-alpha and lower 1,25(OH)(2)D levels. A significant association was found between EF and frailty score, pCHF is likely to increase fracture risk. Thus, strategies for optimal treatment of CHF and for optimizing vitamin D(3), calcium and physical activity to improve quality of life (QoL) in these patients who have double disease burden are critical in these individuals.

  6. CHRONIC HEART FAILURE OF ISCHEMIC GENESIS AND CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE: POSSIBILITIES OF COMBINATION THERAPY INCLUDING NEBIVOLOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Fedotov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal the features of chronic heart failure (CHF of ischemic genesis concurrent with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and to investigate the effect of the cardioselective β1-adrenoblocker (β1-AB nebivolol on the course of COPD and the parameters of the bronchopulmonary system in patients with CHF of ischemic genesis during treatment.Subjects and methods.The investigation enrolled 63 patients aged 40–70 years, including 43 patients with functional class (FC II–IV CHF with a Simpson left ventricular ejection fraction of  45 % concurrent with COPD (a study group and 20 patients with CHF and no bronchopulmonary pathology (a control group. The study group patients were randomly divided into 2 subgroups: 1 23 patients who received nebivolol in addition to background therapy; 2 20 patients in whom the therapy ruled out the use of β1-AB. The control patients were switched to nebivolol therapy. During 6-month follow-up, the authors made clinical examination, recorded the rate, duration, and severity of COPD exacerbations, performed a 6-minute walking test (6MWT, and used a clinical status scale modified by R. Cody, a dyspnea 0–10 category ratio (Borg scale, and a Medical Research Council Dyspnoea Scale (MRS scale. Besides, quality of life in patients was assessed using the specific Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire. All the patients underwent echocardiography, bronchodilatation-induced external respiratory function test, peak flowmetry, and blood brain natriuretic peptide quantification. These studies were conducted at baseline and at 1 and 6 months of therapy.Results. During the investigation, the patients with CHF concurrent with COPD were found to have a high rate of hypertensive disease, prior myocardial infarctions, atrial fibrillations, and higher FC exertional angina. These patients also showed a delayed optimal result achievement during the combination therapy involving the use of β1-AB

  7. CHRONIC HEART FAILURE OF ISCHEMIC GENESIS AND CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE: POSSIBILITIES OF COMBINATION THERAPY INCLUDING NEBIVOLOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Fedotov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal the features of chronic heart failure (CHF of ischemic genesis concurrent with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and to investigate the effect of the cardioselective β1-adrenoblocker (β1-AB nebivolol on the course of COPD and the parameters of the bronchopulmonary system in patients with CHF of ischemic genesis during treatment.Subjects and methods.The investigation enrolled 63 patients aged 40–70 years, including 43 patients with functional class (FC II–IV CHF with a Simpson left ventricular ejection fraction of  45 % concurrent with COPD (a study group and 20 patients with CHF and no bronchopulmonary pathology (a control group. The study group patients were randomly divided into 2 subgroups: 1 23 patients who received nebivolol in addition to background therapy; 2 20 patients in whom the therapy ruled out the use of β1-AB. The control patients were switched to nebivolol therapy. During 6-month follow-up, the authors made clinical examination, recorded the rate, duration, and severity of COPD exacerbations, performed a 6-minute walking test (6MWT, and used a clinical status scale modified by R. Cody, a dyspnea 0–10 category ratio (Borg scale, and a Medical Research Council Dyspnoea Scale (MRS scale. Besides, quality of life in patients was assessed using the specific Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire. All the patients underwent echocardiography, bronchodilatation-induced external respiratory function test, peak flowmetry, and blood brain natriuretic peptide quantification. These studies were conducted at baseline and at 1 and 6 months of therapy.Results. During the investigation, the patients with CHF concurrent with COPD were found to have a high rate of hypertensive disease, prior myocardial infarctions, atrial fibrillations, and higher FC exertional angina. These patients also showed a delayed optimal result achievement during the combination therapy involving the use of β1-AB

  8. Procalcitonin: a marker of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canbay, Alper; Celebi, Ozlem Ozcan; Celebi, Savas; Aydogdu, Sinan; Diker, Erdem

    2015-08-01

    Serum procalcitonin levels are associated with congestive heart failure, but are not established biomarkers of the disease. We evaluated the predictive value of serum procalcitonin levels for diagnosing heart failure and assessing its severity. This retrospective, case-control study involved 59 subjects (mean age 59.7-10.1 years; 38 males), including 21 outpa- tients and 19 inpatients with heart failure and left ventricular ejection fractions procalcitonin levels were measured and compared among the 3 groups. Procalcitonin levels were significantly higher among inpatients (median [interquartile range], 1.45 [0.25-5.801 ng/mL) than among the outpatients (0.35 [0.001.-1.70] ng/mL; Pprocalcitonin cut-off level of 0.09 ng/mL, 35 (87.5%) of the 40 inpatients and outpatients were procalcitonin-positive; all control individuals were procalcitonin-negative. Serum procalcitonin levels differentiated between heart failure patients and healthy controls (sensitivity, 88.9% [95% confidence interval, 75.9-96.2%]; specificity, 100% [82.2-100.0%]; positive predictive value, 100% [91.1-100.0%]; negative predictive value, 79.2% [57.8-92.8%]). Pro calcitonin levels were >0.53 ng/mL in 4/21 (19%) outpatients and in 16/19 (84.2%) inpatients. The sensitivity and specificity of serum procalcitonin levels for differentiating between inpatients and outpatients were 84.2% and 81.0%, respectively (positive predictive value 80% [95% confidence interval, 67.6-92.4%] and 85.0% [73.9-96.1%], respectively). Serum procalcitonin levels, showing high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing and assessing the severity of heart failure in this small study, might be considered ootential heart failure biomarkers.

  9. Heart failure in children - home care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for children; Cor pulmonale - home monitoring for children; Cardiomyopathy - heart failure home monitoring for children ... PF, Lougheed J, Dancea A, et al. Presentation, diagnosis, and medical management of heart failure in children: ...

  10. Fewer Americans Hospitalized for Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_166896.html Fewer Americans Hospitalized for Heart Failure But blacks still face far greater odds than ... HealthDay News) -- The number of Americans hospitalized for heart failure has dropped substantially since 2002, but blacks still ...

  11. Heart failure in patients treated with bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grove, E L; Abrahamsen, B; Vestergaard, P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of heart failure in patients treated with bisphosphonates.......The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of heart failure in patients treated with bisphosphonates....

  12. Diabetes-related heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bando, Yasuko K; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2014-01-01

    As the link between heart failure (HF) and diabetes mellitus (DM) becomes unignorable, so the need is further increasing for pathological comprehension: What is "diabetic cardiomyopathy (DMC)?" In response to current concern, the most updated guidelines stated by the ACCF/AHA and by the ESC/EASD take one step further, including the definition of DMC, although it is a matter yet to be completed. For more than 40 years, coronary artery disease and hypertension have been considered as the main causes of diabetes-related cardiac dysfunction. HF was originally considered as a result of reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HF-REF); however, it has been recognized that HF symptoms are often observed in patients with preserved EF (HF-PEF). DMC includes HF with both reduced and preserved entities independent of coronary stenosis and hypertension. Cardiologists are thus facing a sort of chaos without clear guidelines for the "deadly intersection" of DM and HF. Today, the increasing interest and concern have caused DMC to be revisited and the first step in controlling the chaos around DMC is to organize and analyze all of the available evidence from preclinical and clinical studies. This review aims to illustrate the current concepts of DMC by shedding light on the new molecular mechanisms.  (Circ J 2014; 78: 576-583).

  13. Renin Genetic Polymorphism in Heart Failure Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, Dana; Sitar-Tăut, Adela-Viviana; Procopciuc, Lucia; Cebanu, Mirela; Zdrenghea, M; Zdrenghea, D

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphism of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system affects the pathogenesis of hypertension (HTN), ischemic heart disease (IHD) and heart failure (HF). The purpose of our study is to analyze A/G renin genetic polymorphism in heart failure patients. We investigated renin polymorphism in 83 subjects hospitalized in the Cardiology Department of the Rehabilitation Hospital Cluj-Napoca, using the PCR amplification method. 43 patients were diagnosed with heart failure [NYHA III-IV class], and 40 subjects without cardiovascular disease (control group). The NT-proBNP and the presence of cardiovascular risk factors were assessed. Heart failure etiology was IHD in 60.46% of patients. The average value of NT-pro BNP was 2991.24 ± 2034.6 pg/ml. As it was expected, HF patients presented low lipid levels: total cholesterol = 162.36 ± 38.28 mg/dl, LDL-Cholesterol = 104.88 ± 27.60 mg/dl, triglycerides= 109.12 ± 55.84 mg/dl, HDL-Co = 35.68 ± 9.55 mg/dl. A/G renin genetic polymorphism [with pathogenic potential] in heart failure patients was of 60.46% (homozygote 4.65% and heterozygote 55.81%). Conversely, pathogenic mutations were found only in 38.46% of hypertensive patients, but also in 55.88% and 22.22% patients with obesity/overweight and diabetes. The heterozygote form was found in only 37.5% of control subjects. This study showed no involvement of A/G renin polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of HF.

  14. Heart failure as an endpoint in heart failure and non-heart failure cardiovascular clinical trials: the need for a consensus definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zannad, F.; Stough, W.G.; Pitt, B.

    2008-01-01

    Specific criteria have been established to define the occurrence of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke in cardiovascular clinical trials, but there is not a consistent definition for heart failure. Heart failure events appear to occur at a rate that is similar to stroke and MI in trials...... of hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, and coronary heart disease, yet a consistent approach to defining heart failure events has not yet been realized. The wide range of definitions used in clinical trials makes it difficult to interpret new data in the context of existing literature. This inconsistency has...... led to challenges in determining the incidence of heart failure in cardiovascular studies and the effects of interventions on these endpoints. This paper examines issues related to defining heart failure events in cardiovascular clinical trials and presents a definition to formally address this issue...

  15. Heart Failure Complicating Acute Mtyocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronow, Wilbert S

    2017-07-01

    Factors predisposing the older person with acute myocardial infarction (MI) to develop heart failure (HF) include an increased prevalence of MI, multivessel coronary artery disease, decreased left ventricular (LV) contractile reserve, impairment of LV diastolic relaxation, increased hypertension, LV hypertrophy, diabetes mellitus, valvular heart disease, and renal insufficiency. HF associated with acute MI should be treated with a loop diuretic. The use of nitrates, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, aldosterone antagonists, beta-blockers, digoxin, and positive inotropic drugs; treatment of arrhythmias and mechanical complications; and indications for use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and cardiac resynchronization is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical characteristics of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems in patients with combination of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Vyshnyvetskyy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work was to assess the respiratory and cardiovascular systems of patients with a combination of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and congestive heart failure (CHF. Materials and methods. The study included 177 patients who had been diagnosed COPD by criteria GOLD. CHF was diagnosed in 77 (43.5 % cases – 29 (16.4 % with reduced systolic function and 48 (27.1 % with preserved systolic function. We analyzed some important parameters characterizing respiratory and cardiovascular systems. We tried to identify statistically significant difference of parameters between patients with COPD and those with COPD and CHF. Moreover, patients with CHF were evaluated as a whole, and separately with reduced and with preserved systolic function. Results. Thus, we observed significant deterioration in general clinical, laboratory, spirometric and echocardiographic parameters depending on the presence and severity of CHF in patients with COPD. In particular, the presence of CHF, especially with impaired systolic function significantly impair indicators such as incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and signs of ischemia on the ECG, NT-proBNP levels, prevalence of concentric, eccentric hypertrophy and concentric LV remodeling and diastolic dysfunction type "relaxation disorder", and incidence of a-wave absence during assessment of motion of the rear pulmonary artery valve wall. Listed changes as well as some of the tendencies that have not reached a certain level of significance, indicate that patients with COPD and concomitant CHF, especially with impaired systolic function, worsens general clinical parameters (breath rate, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, frequency arrhythmias and myocardial ischemia on ECG; laboratory levels of hemoglobin, hematocrit, cholesterol, glomerular filtration rate; spirometric indicators of bronchial obstruction (FEV1, FVC, instant volume expiratory flow rates; echocardiographic indicators suggest the

  17. Living with Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Diabetic Heart Disease Diabetic Heart Disease What Is The term "diabetic heart ... Web page. What Heart Diseases Are Involved in Diabetic Heart Disease? DHD may include coronary heart disease ( ...

  18. Heart failure highlights in 2012-2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Licette C. Y.; Damman, Kevin; Lipsic, Eric; Maass, Alexander H.; Rienstra, Michiel; Westenbrink, B. Daan

    Heart failure has become the cardiovascular epidemic of the century. The European Journal of Heart Failure is dedicated to the advancement of knowledge in the field of heart failure management. In 2012 and 2013, several pioneering scientific discoveries and paradigm-shifting clinical trials have

  19. Progenitor Hematopoietic Cells Implantation Improves Functional Capacity of End Stage Coronary Artery Disease Patients with Advanced Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoga Yuniadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Proangiogenic Hematopoietic Cells (PHC which comprise diverse mixture of cell types are able to secrete proangiogenic factors and interesting candidate for cell therapy. The aim of this study was to seek for benefit in implantation of PHC on functional improvement in end stage coronary artery disease patients with advanced heart failure. Methods. Patients with symptomatic heart failure despite guideline directed medical therapy and LVEF less than 35% were included. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated, cultivated for 5 days, and then harvested. Flow cytometry and cell surface markers were used to characterize PHC. The PHC were delivered retrogradely via sinus coronarius. Echocardiography, myocardial perfusion, and clinical and functional data were analyzed up to 1-year observation. Results. Of 30 patients (56.4±7.40 yo preimplant NT proBNP level is 5124.5±4682.50 pmol/L. Harvested cells characterized with CD133, CD34, CD45, and KDR showed 0.87±0.41, 0.63±0.66, 99.00±2.60, and 3.22±3.79%, respectively. LVEF was improved (22±5.68 versus 26.8±7.93, p<0.001 during short and long term observation. Myocardial perfusion significantly improved 6 months after treatment. NYHA Class and six-minute walk test are improved during short term and long term follow-up. Conclusion. Expanded peripheral blood PHC implantation using retrograde delivery approach improved LV systolic function, myocardial perfusion, and functional capacity.

  20. Tolvaptan, hyponatremia, and heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zmily HD

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hammam D Zmily1, Suleiman Daifallah2, Jalal K Ghali31Wayne State University/Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA; 2John D Dingell VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA; 3Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USAAbstract: Tolvaptan is the first FDA-approved oral V2 receptor antagonist for the treatment of euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia, in patients with conditions associated with free water excess such as heart failure, cirrhosis, and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. Tolvaptan inhibits the binding of arginine vasopressin to the V2 receptors on the collecting ducts of the kidneys resulting in aquaresis, the electrolytes sparing excretion of water. This article reviews the accumulated experience with tolvaptan and all the major clinical trials that were conducted to study its safety and efficacy and concludes by summarizing clinicians’ views of its current application in clinical practice.Keywords: arginine vasopressin antagonist, tolvaptan, heart failure, hyponatremia 

  1. Clinicopathological profiles of progressive heart failure in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melacini, Paola; Basso, Cristina; Angelini, Annalisa; Calore, Chiara; Bobbo, Fabiana; Tokajuk, Barbara; Bellini, Nicoletta; Smaniotto, Gessica; Zucchetto, Mauro; Iliceto, Sabino; Thiene, Gaetano; Maron, Barry J

    2010-09-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an important cause of heart failure-related disability over a wide range of ages. Profiles of severe progressive heart failure symptoms and death, or heart transplantation deserve more complete definition within large patient cohorts. Clinical and morphological features of heart failure were assessed in 293 consecutive HCM patients over a median follow-up of 6 (inter-quartile range 2-11) years. Gross and histopathological features were analysed in 12 patients for whom the heart was available for inspection. Of the 293 patients, 50 (17%) developed severe progressive heart failure, including 18 who died or were transplanted. Three profiles of heart failure were identified predominantly associated with: (i) end-stage systolic dysfunction (ejection fraction heart failure in 32 patients (64%) among the three profiles. Compared with other patients, those non-obstructive with preserved systolic function had earlier onset of heart failure symptoms mainly due to diastolic dysfunction, and the most accelerated progression to advanced heart failure and adverse outcome (P = 0.04). Thrombi were identified in the left atrial appendage of five gross heart specimens all belonging to patients with AF, including three of which were unrecognized clinically and had previously embolized. Extensive myocardial scarring with LV remodelling was evident in all end-stage patients; no or only focal scars were present in other patients. Profiles of advanced heart failure in HCM are due to diverse pathophysiological mechanisms, including LV outflow obstruction and diastolic or global systolic ventricular dysfunction. Atrial fibrillation proved to be the most common disease variable associated with progressive heart failure. Recognition of the heterogeneous pathophysiology of heart failure in HCM is relevant, given the targeted management strategies necessary in this disease.

  2. Pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary veno-occlusive disease complicated by right heart failure, hypotension and acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Golzy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD is rare condition which can lead to severe pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular dysfunction, and cardiopulmonary failure. The diagnosis of PVOD can be challenging due to its nonspecific symptoms and its similarity to idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and interstitial lung disease in terms of diagnostic findings. This case describes a 57 year old female patient who presented with a 5-month history of progressive dyspnea on exertion and nonproductive cough. Workup at another hospital was nonspecific and the patient underwent surgical lung biopsy due to concern for interstitial lung disease. She subsequently became hemodynamically unstable and was transferred to our hospital where she presented with severe hypoxemia, hypotension, and suprasystemic pulmonary artery pressures. Preliminary lung biopsy results suggested idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and the patient was started on vasodilating agents, including continuous epoprostenol infusion. Pulmonary artery pressures decreased but remained suprasystemic and the patient did not improve. Final review of the biopsy by a specialized laboratory revealed a diagnosis of PVOD after which vasodilating therapy was immediately weaned off. Evaluation for dual heart-lung transplantation was begun. The patient's hospital course was complicated by hypotension requiring vasopressors, worsening right ventricular dysfunction, and acute kidney injury. During the transplantation evaluation, the patient decided that she did not want to undergo continued attempts at stabilization of her progressive multi-organ dysfunction and she was transitioned to comfort care. She expired hours after removing inotropic support.

  3. Tolvaptan, hyponatremia, and heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Zmily HD; Daifallah S; Ghali JK

    2011-01-01

    Hammam D Zmily1, Suleiman Daifallah2, Jalal K Ghali31Wayne State University/Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA; 2John D Dingell VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA; 3Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USAAbstract: Tolvaptan is the first FDA-approved oral V2 receptor antagonist for the treatment of euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia, in patients with conditions associated with free water excess such as heart failure, cirrhosis, and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormon...

  4. Disease management in the treatment of patients with chronic heart failure who have universal access to health care: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalter-Leibovici, Ofra; Freimark, Dov; Freedman, Laurence S; Kaufman, Galit; Ziv, Arnona; Murad, Havi; Benderly, Michal; Silverman, Barbara G; Friedman, Nurit; Cukierman-Yaffe, Tali; Asher, Elad; Grupper, Avishay; Goldman, Dorit; Amitai, Miriam; Matetzky, Shlomi; Shani, Mordechai; Silber, Haim

    2017-05-01

    The efficacy of disease management programs in improving the outcome of heart failure patients remains uncertain and may vary across health systems. This study explores whether a countrywide disease management program is superior to usual care in reducing adverse health outcomes and improving well-being among community-dwelling adult patients with moderate-to-severe chronic heart failure who have universal access to advanced health-care services and technologies. In this multicenter open-label trial, 1,360 patients recruited after hospitalization for heart failure exacerbation (38%) or from the community (62%) were randomly assigned to either disease management or usual care. Disease management, delivered by multi-disciplinary teams, included coordination of care, patient education, monitoring disease symptoms and patient adherence to medication regimen, titration of drug therapy, and home tele-monitoring of body weight, blood pressure and heart rate. Patients assigned to usual care were treated by primary care practitioners and consultant cardiologists. The primary composite endpoint was the time elapsed till first hospital admission for heart failure exacerbation or death from any cause. Secondary endpoints included the number of all hospital admissions, health-related quality of life and depression during follow-up. Intention-to-treat comparisons between treatments were adjusted for baseline patient data and study center. During the follow-up, 388 (56.9%) patients assigned to disease management and 387 (57.1%) assigned to usual care had a primary endpoint event. The median (range) time elapsed until the primary endpoint event or end of study was 2.0 (0-5.0) years among patients assigned to disease management, and 1.8 (0-5.0) years among patients assigned to usual care (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.908; 95% confidence interval, 0.788 to 1.047). Hospital admissions were mostly (70%) unrelated to heart failure. Patients assigned to disease management had a better

  5. A randomized controlled study of finerenone vs. eplerenone in patients with worsening chronic heart failure and diabetes mellitus and/or chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filippatos, Gerasimos; Anker, Stefan D; Böhm, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aims To evaluate oral doses of the non-steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist finerenone given for 90 days in patients with worsening heart failure and reduced ejection fraction and chronic kidney disease and/or diabetes mellitus. Methods and results Miner Alocorticoid Receptor antagonist...

  6. The relationship between self-efficacy and self-reported physical functioning in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, R; Ranchor, AV; DeJongste, MJL; Koeter, GH; Ten Hacken, NHT; Aalbers, R; Sanderman, R

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigated whether self-reported physical functioning of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic systolic heart failure (CHF) was primarily explained by illness-specific differences related to diagnosis or whether more generic factors also

  7. 'End-stage' heart failure therapy: potential lessons from congenital heart disease: from pulmonary artery banding and interatrial communication to parallel circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schranz, Dietmar; Akintuerk, Hakan; Voelkel, Norbert F

    2017-02-15

    The final therapy of 'end-stage heart failure' is orthotopic heart, lung or heart-lung transplantation. However, these options are not available for many patients worldwide. Therefore, novel therapeutical strategies are needed. Based on pathophysiological insights regarding (1) the long-term impact of an obstructive pulmonary outflow tract in neonates with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, (2) the importance of a restrictive versus a non-restrictive atrial septum in neonates born with a borderline left ventricle and (3) the significance of both, a patent foramen ovale and/or open ductus arteriosus for survival of newborns with persistent pulmonary hypertension, the current review introduces some therapeutical strategies that may be applicable to selected patients with heart failure. These strategies include (1) reversible pulmonary artery banding in left ventricular-dilated cardiomyopathy with preserved right ventricular function, (2) the creation of restrictive interatrial communication to treat diastolic (systolic) heart failure, (3) atrioseptostomy or reverse Potts shunt in pulmonary arterial hypertension and (4) return to a fetal, parallel circulation by combining atrioseptostomy and reversed Potts shunt with or without placement of a bilateral pulmonary artery banding. While still being experimental, it is hoped that the procedures presented in the current overview will inspire future novel therapeutic strategies that may be applicable to selected patients with heart failure. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Fibroblast Growth Factor‐23 and Incident Coronary Heart Disease, Heart Failure, and Cardiovascular Mortality: The Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lutsey, Pamela L; Alonso, Alvaro; Selvin, Elizabeth; Pankow, James S; Michos, Erin D; Agarwal, Sunil K; Loehr, Laura R; Eckfeldt, John H; Coresh, Josef

    2014-01-01

    ... of cardiovascular disease, particularly independent of kidney function, is unclear. FGF‐23 may influence cardiovascular risk through the CKD or vitamin D pathways; CKD is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and accruing evidence suggests that low levels of vitamin D may increase cardiovascular risk. Furthermore, recent experime...

  9. EFFECTS OF Β-ADRENOBLOCKERS ON MYOCARDIAL REMODELING, IMMUNO-INFLAMMATORY REACTIONS AND ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE AND CHRONIC HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Zakirova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the effect of β-adrenoblockers (BAB on myocardial remodeling, immuno-inflammatory reactions and endothelial dysfunction in patients with ischemic heart disease and chronic heart failure (CHF.Material and methods. 84 patients with ischemic CHF of II-IV functional class were involved in the study. They were randomized in two groups. The first group was presented with 43 patients receiving carvedilol in addition to standard therapy for 24 weeks; the second group was presented with 41patients receiving metoprolol. Echocardiography, 6-minute walk test were applied. Blood levels of primary and secondary lipid peroxidation (LP products, cytokines, endothelin-1 (ET-1, intercellular adhesive molecule (VCAM-1 were determined.Results. Both of BAB improved the clinical condition and physical working ability of patients with CHF. Carvedilol in comparison with metoprolol was more effective in myocardial remodeling prevention, inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, interleukins (IL-1β IL-6] and LP. Besides carvedilol increased in endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and reduced in ET-1 and VCAM-1 levels.Conclusion. Long-term carvedilol treatment has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and endothelium-protective effects as well as improves haemodynamics. 

  10. Hypertensive heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000163.htm Hypertensive heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hypertensive heart disease refers to heart problems that occur because of ...

  11. Sex, the heart, and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiowski, Wolfgang; Brunner, Hanspeter; Schalcher, Christoph

    2006-09-01

    In the modern era of pharmacologic treatment of erectile dysfunction, men with heart disease increasingly approach their physicians regarding the possibility of restoring sexual activity. At the same time, patients are also frequently aware of public figures that have reportedly died during coitus, often in the arms of their mistresses or prostitutes. Added to this is the perception of patients, and oftentimes their physicians, that coitus and orgasm are associated with a near maximal or even "supermaximal" cardiac workload and therefore may be hazardous for a diseased heart. Accordingly, knowledge of the cardiovascular effects of sexual activity, the risks of triggering a cardiovascular event, and the potential risks inherent in the use of drug therapy of male impotence is important to properly advise patients and their spouses regarding this sensitive issue.

  12. Overlap and distinctiveness of psychological risk factors in patients with ischemic heart disease and chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelle, Aline J; Denollet, Johan; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2009-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the importance of psychological factors in the etiology and progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, this research has been criticized due to overlap between psychological constructs. We examined whether psychological questionnaires frequently used...

  13. Continuous-Time Semi-Markov Models in Health Economic Decision Making: An Illustrative Example in Heart Failure Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qi; Buskens, Erik; Feenstra, Talitha; Jaarsma, Tiny; Hillege, Hans; Postmus, Douwe

    2016-01-01

    Continuous-time state transition models may end up having large unwieldy structures when trying to represent all relevant stages of clinical disease processes by means of a standard Markov model. In such situations, a more parsimonious, and therefore easier-to-grasp, model of a patient's disease progression can often be obtained by assuming that the future state transitions do not depend only on the present state (Markov assumption) but also on the past through time since entry in the present state. Despite that these so-called semi-Markov models are still relatively straightforward to specify and implement, they are not yet routinely applied in health economic evaluation to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative interventions. To facilitate a better understanding of this type of model among applied health economic analysts, the first part of this article provides a detailed discussion of what the semi-Markov model entails and how such models can be specified in an intuitive way by adopting an approach called vertical modeling. In the second part of the article, we use this approach to construct a semi-Markov model for assessing the long-term cost-effectiveness of 3 disease management programs for heart failure. Compared with a standard Markov model with the same disease states, our proposed semi-Markov model fitted the observed data much better. When subsequently extrapolating beyond the clinical trial period, these relatively large differences in goodness-of-fit translated into almost a doubling in mean total cost and a 60-d decrease in mean survival time when using the Markov model instead of the semi-Markov model. For the disease process considered in our case study, the semi-Markov model thus provided a sensible balance between model parsimoniousness and computational complexity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Defibrillator Implantation in Patients with Nonischemic Systolic Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køber, Lars; Thune, Jens J; Nielsen, Jens C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The benefit of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) in patients with symptomatic systolic heart failure caused by coronary artery disease has been well documented. However, the evidence for a benefit of prophylactic ICDs in patients with systolic heart failure that is not due...

  15. Automatic identification of type 2 diabetes, hypertension, ischaemic heart disease, heart failure and their levels of severity from Italian General Practitioners' electronic medical records: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gini, Rosa; Schuemie, Martijn J; Mazzaglia, Giampiero; Lapi, Francesco; Francesconi, Paolo; Pasqua, Alessandro; Bianchini, Elisa; Montalbano, Carmelo; Roberto, Giuseppe; Barletta, Valentina; Cricelli, Iacopo; Cricelli, Claudio; Dal Co, Giulia; Bellentani, Mariadonata; Sturkenboom, Miriam; Klazinga, Niek

    2016-12-09

    The Italian project MATRICE aimed to assess how well cases of type 2 diabetes (T2DM), hypertension, ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and heart failure (HF) and their levels of severity can be automatically extracted from the Health Search/CSD Longitudinal Patient Database (HSD). From the medical records of the general practitioners (GP) who volunteered to participate, cases were extracted by algorithms based on diagnosis codes, keywords, drug prescriptions and results of diagnostic tests. A random sample of identified cases was validated by interviewing their GPs. HSD is a database of primary care medical records. A panel of 12 GPs participated in this validation study. 300 patients were sampled for each disease, except for HF, where 243 patients were assessed. The positive predictive value (PPV) was assessed for the presence/absence of each condition against the GP's response to the questionnaire, and Cohen's κ was calculated for agreement on the severity level. The PPV was 100% (99% to 100%) for T2DM and hypertension, 98% (96% to 100%) for IHD and 55% (49% to 61%) for HF. Cohen's kappa for agreement on the severity level was 0.70 for T2DM and 0.69 for hypertension and IHD. This study shows that individuals with T2DM, hypertension or IHD can be validly identified in HSD by automated identification algorithms. Automatic queries for levels of severity of the same diseases compare well with the corresponding clinical definitions, but some misclassification occurs. For HF, further research is needed to refine the current algorithm. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Influenza Vaccination Reduces Hospitalization for Heart Failure in Elderly Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yu-Ann; Chen, Chang-I; Liu, Ju-Chi; Sung, Li-Chin

    2016-05-01

    Elderly patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at a higher risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Previous studies have reported the beneficial effects of the influenza vaccine in patients with CVD. However, the effects of influenza vaccination on the reduction of hospitalizations for heart failure (HF) in elderly patients with CKD remain unclear. This cohort study comprised elderly patients (≥ 55 years of age) with a recorded diagnosis of CKD (n = 4406) between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2008. Each patient was followed-up until the end of 2008. The hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association between the influenza vaccination and the first HF hospitalization were analyzed. In addition, the patients were categorized into four groups based on their vaccination status (unvaccinated and total number of vaccinations: 1, 2-3, and ≥ 4). We found that elderly patients with CKD receiving influenza vaccination exhibited a lower risk of HF hospitalization (adjusted HR, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.26-0.39, p elderly patients with CKD receiving annual influenza vaccination are at a lower risk of HF hospitalization.

  17. Adrenal adrenoceptors in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio ede Lucia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is a chronic clinical syndrome characterized by the reduction in left ventricular (LV function and it represents one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite considerable advances in pharmacological treatment, HF represents a severe clinical and social burden. Sympathetic outflow, characterized by increased circulating catecholamines (CAs biosynthesis and secretion, is peculiar in HF and sympatholytic treatments (as β-blockers are presently being investigated for the treatment of this disease. Adrenal gland secretes Epinephrine (80% and Norepinephrine (20% in response to acetylcholine stimulation of nicotinic cholinergic receptors on the chromaffin cell membranes. This process is regulated by adrenergic receptors (ARs: α2ARs inhibit CA release through coupling to inhibitory Gi-proteins, and βARs (mainly β2ARs stimulate CA release through coupling to stimulatory Gs-proteins. All ARs are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and GPCR kinases (GRKs regulate their signaling and function. Adrenal GRK2-mediated α2AR desensitization and downregulation are increased in HF and seem to be a fundamental regulator of CA secretion from the adrenal gland. Consequently, restoration of adrenal a2AR signaling through the inhibition of GRK2 is a fascinating sympatholytic therapeutic strategy for chronic HF. This strategy could have several significant advantages over existing HF pharmacotherapies (antiadrenergic, such as bAR-blockers minimizing side-effects on extra-cardiac tissues and reducing the chronic activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone and endothelin systems.The role of adrenal ARs in regulation of sympathetic hyperactivity opens interesting perspectives in understanding pathophysiology of HF and identifying new potential therapeutic targets.

  18. Relaxation and the Role of Calcium in Isolated Contracting Myocardium From Patients With Hypertensive Heart Disease and Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runte, K Elisabeth; Bell, Stephen P; Selby, Donald E; Häußler, Tim N; Ashikaga, Takamuru; LeWinter, Martin M; Palmer, Bradley M; Meyer, Markus

    2017-08-01

    Relaxation characteristics and Ca(2+) homeostasis have not been studied in isolated myocardium from patients with hypertensive heart disease (HHD) and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Prolonged myocardial relaxation is believed to play an important role in the pathophysiology of these conditions. In this study, we evaluated relaxation parameters, myocardial calcium (Ca(2+)), and sodium (Na(+)) handling, as well as ion transporter expression and tested the effect of Na(+)-influx inhibitors on relaxation in isolated myocardium from patients with HHD and HFpEF. Relaxation characteristics were studied in myocardial strip preparations under physiological conditions at stimulation rates of 60 and 180 per minute. Intracellular Ca(2+) and Na(+) were simultaneously assessed using Fura-2 and AsanteNATRIUMGreen-2, whereas elemental analysis was used to measure total myocardial concentrations of Ca, Na, and other elements. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure expression levels of key ion transport proteins. The lusitropic effect of Na(+)-influx inhibitors ranolazine, furosemide, and amiloride was evaluated. Myocardial left ventricular biopsies were obtained from 36 control patients, 29 HHD and 19 HHD+HFpEF. When compared with control patients, half maximal relaxation time (RT50) at 60 per minute was prolonged by 13% in HHD and by 18% in HHD+HFpEF (both Pmyocardium from patients with HHD and HHD+HFpEF. This leads to incomplete relaxation at higher rates. Elevated calcium levels in HFpEF are neither a result of an impaired Na(+) gradient nor expression changes in key ion transporters and regulatory proteins. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Arterial hypertension in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Javier

    2014-04-01

    Hypertensive heart disease (HHD) has been considered the adaptive hypertrophy of the left ventricle wall to increased blood pressure. Recent findings in hypertensive animals and patients now challenge this paradigm by showing that HHD also results from pathologic structural remodeling of the myocardium in response to hemodynamic and nonhemodynamic factors that are altered in arterial hypertension. The possibility that hypertensive patients predisposed to develop heart failure may be detected before the appearance of clinical manifestations provides a new way to prevent this major arterial complication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Early expression of natriuretic peptides and SERCA in mild heart failure - Association with severity of the disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, RA; Henning, RH; Suurmeijer, AJH; Pinto, YM; Olthof, E; Kirkels, JH; van Gilst, WH; Crijns, HJGM; van Veldhuisen, DJ

    Background: We investigated changes in genetic expression of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) in patients with stable mild to moderate chronic heart failure (CHF), since data on this topic were primarily obtained in end-stage CHF.

  1. Heart failure and levels of other comorbidities in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a Swedish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaszuba, Elzbieta; Odeberg, H.; Råstam, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    in Sweden. The data were obtained from the Care Data Warehouse register from the year 2006. The diagnosis-based Adjusted Clinical Groups Case-Mix System 7.1 was used to describe the comorbidity level. Results: The prevalence of the diagnosis of heart failure in patients with COPD was 18.8 % while it was 1...

  2. Patient, Caregiver, and Physician Work in Heart Failure Disease Management: A Qualitative Study of Issues That Undermine Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Steven A; Magasi, Susan; Block, Phoebe; Whelen, Megan J; Hansen, Luke O; Bonow, Robert O; Schmidt, Philip; Shah, Ami; Grady, Kathleen L

    2016-08-01

    To identify factors underlying heart failure hospitalization. Between January 1, 2012, and May 31, 2012, we combined medical record reviews and cross-sectional qualitative interviews of multiple patients with heart failure, their clinicians, and their caregivers from a large academic medical center in the Midwestern United States. The interview data were analyzed using a 3-step grounded theory-informed process and constant comparative methods. Qualitative data were compared and contrasted with results from the medical record review. Patient nonadherence to the care plan was the most important contributor to hospital admission; however, reasons for nonadherence were complex and multifactorial. The data highlight the importance of patient education for the purposes of condition management, timeliness of care, and effective communication between providers and patients. To improve the consistency and quality of care for patients with heart failure, more effective relationships among patients, providers, and caregivers are needed. Providers must be pragmatic when educating patients and their caregivers about heart failure, its treatment, and its prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Progression of Renal Impairment and Chronic Kidney Disease in Chronic Heart Failure : An Analysis From GISSI-HF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Kevin; Masson, Serge; Lucci, Donata; Gorini, Marco; Urso, Renato; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Tavazzi, Luigi; Tarantini, Luigi; Tognoni, Gianni; Voors, Adriaan; Latini, Roberto

    Background: Data on the natural change in renal function in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) are limited. Methods and Results: Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was assessed over 36 months in 6934 patients included in the GISSI-HF study. Associations from baseline, changes in renal

  4. A Comparison of three diuretic Regimens in Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, F.; Eriksen, U.H.; Guul, S.-J.

    1993-01-01

    Farmakologi, bendroflumethiazide, diuretics, heart failure, bumethanide, ergometry plasma lactate......Farmakologi, bendroflumethiazide, diuretics, heart failure, bumethanide, ergometry plasma lactate...

  5. Epidemiological Study of Heart Failure in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Guo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is a complex clinical syndrome that results from any structural or functional impairment of ventricular filling or ejection of blood. HF is one of the most important and severe end stages of many cardiovascular diseases. Epidemiological studies of HF have focused mainly on the prevalence, incidence, mortality, fatality, and distribution and temporal trends of these indicators among different populations. This review highlights important epidemiological studies of HF in China.

  6. Subclinical heart failure in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a consequence of chronic inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamada S Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Our findings indicate the presence of subclinical heart failure in these patients. JIA patients with subclinical atherosclerosis, with systemic disease, and with active disease are at greatest risk of developing subclinical heart failure.

  7. Cardio-oncology Related to Heart Failure: Common Risk Factors Between Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaes, Anne; Prizment, Anna; Koene, Ryan J; Konety, Suma

    2017-04-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that suggests cancer and cardiovascular disease have a shared biological mechanism. Although there are several shared risk factors for both diseases, including advancing age, gender, obesity, diabetes, physical activity, tobacco use, and diet, inflammation and biomarkers, such as insulinlike growth factor 1, leptin, estrogen, and adiponectin, may also play a role in the biology of these diseases. This article provides an overview of the shared biological mechanism between cancer and cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Etiological Peculiarities in Pediatric Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Angela, Butnariu; Gabriel, Samasca

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure in children presents important characteristic features different from adult congestive failure, from a pathophysiological and mostly from an etiopathogenic point of view. Heart failure in children is, in most cases, a consequence of congenital structural cardiac abnormalities that remained unoperated, underwent a palliative operation or presented post-surgery complications, or of cardiomyopathy. Based on the nature of the clinical presentation, new onset heart failure can be dif...

  9. Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood pressure and excess protein in the urine. Preeclampsia is linked to an increased lifetime risk of CHD, heart attack, heart failure , and high blood pressure. Screening and Prevention Taking action to control risk factors can help ...

  10. Prevalence, aetiology and management of heart failure in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, F S; Crowley, T S; Bundred, P E

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a high level of morbidity and mortality among patients with heart failure. Management of the condition has changed substantially in recent years. However, there is little information on the management of heart failure in general practice. AIM: A study was carried out in 1994 to assess the prevalence, aetiology and management of heart failure in a general practice setting. METHOD: A retrospective review was undertaken of the manual and computerized medical records of patients in two group practices in Liverpool (combined patient population of 17 400). RESULTS: A total of 266 patients with heart failure were identified (a prevalence of 15 per 1000). The two practices had 2747 patients who were aged 65 years and over and 221 of these had heart failure (prevalence of 80 per 1000). The principal aetiological factor considered responsible for heart failure was: coronary heart disease in 45% of patients, hypertension 18%, valve disease 9%, cor pulmonale 7%, cardiomyopathy 2% and a metabolic problem 2% (aetiology unknown in 17% of cases). Urea and electrolytes had been checked in the last year in 59% of patients. Chest x-ray and electrocardiography had been performed in 89% and 80% of patients, respectively, and echocardiography in 30%. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors were being prescribed to 33% of patients. CONCLUSION: The study found a high prevalence of heart failure among patients aged 65 years and over. Coronary heart disease was considered to be the main aetiological factor. Patients were being investigated mainly by means of chest x-ray and electrocardiography. Most patients with heart failure were not receiving treatment with ACE inhibitors. Evaluation of heart failure by clinical criteria alone is now deemed insufficient. Echocardiography should be used routinely to assess cardiac dysfunction. Patients with confirmed left ventricular dysfunction will benefit from treatment with ACE inhibitors unless contraindications exist. The

  11. Protocol-driven remote monitoring of cardiac resynchronization therapy as part of a heart failure disease management strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Christophe J P; Verbrugge, Frederik H; Vranken, Julie; Van der Auwera, Jo; Mullens, Wilfried; Dupont, Matthias; Grieten, Lars; De Cannière, Hélène; Lanssens, Dorien; Vandenberk, Thijs; Storms, Valerie; Thijs, Inge M; Vandervoort, Pieter

    2017-08-14

    Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) is an established treatment for heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction. CRT devices are equipped with remote monitoring functions, which are pivotal in the detection of device problems, but may also facilitate disease management. The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive overview of the clinical interventions taken based on remote monitoring. This is a single centre observational study of consecutive CRT patients (n = 192) participating in protocol-driven remote follow-up. Incoming technical- and disease-related alerts were analysed together with subsequently triggered interventions. During 34 ± 13 months of follow-up, 1372 alert-containing notifications were received (2.53 per patient-year of follow-up), comprising 1696 unique alerts (3.12 per patient-year of follow-up). In 60%, notifications resulted in a phone contact. Technical alerts constituted 8% of incoming alerts (0.23 per patient-year of follow-up). Rhythm (1.43 per patient-year of follow-up) and bioimpedance alerts (0.98 per patient-year of follow-up) were the most frequent disease-related alerts. Notifications included a rhythm alert in 39%, which triggered referral to the emergency room (4%), outpatient cardiology clinic (36%) or general practitioner (7%), or resulted in medication changes (13%). Sole bioimpedance notifications resulted in a telephone contact in 91%, which triggered outpatient evaluation in 8% versus medication changes in 10%. Clinical outcome was excellent with 97% 1-year survival. Remote CRT follow-up resulted in 0.23 technical- versus 2.64 disease-related alerts annually. Rhythm and bioimpedance notifications constituted the majority of incoming notifications which triggered an actual intervention in 22% and 15% of cases, respectively.

  12. [Clinical indications for implant of CID in patients with coronary heart disease and cardiac failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-González, Celso

    2006-01-01

    The mortality of the myocardial acute infarction has diminished with the introduction of the new strategies of reperfusion; this way, the number of patients with ventricular left dysfunction has increased. This one is a special population with risk greater than rest of people of suffering an event of cardiac sudden death (SD). This fact needs of a suitable process of stratification of the risk for SD that this population has and it is necessary measures of primary and secondary prevention to diminish the mortality of these patients. In this paper the clinical characteristics of this population by precedent of heart attack of the myocardium and/or ventricular left dysfunction are checked. These characters can suggest the indication for the implant of an automatic defibrillator.

  13. Comparison of the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration, the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study and the Cockcroft-Gault equation in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szummer, Karolina; Evans, Marie; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Alehagen, Urban; Dahlström, Ulf; Benson, Lina; Lund, Lars H

    2017-01-01

    It is unknown how the creatinine-based renal function estimations differ for dose adjustment cut-offs and risk prediction in patients with heart failure. The renal function was similar with the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) (median 59 mL/min/1.73 m2, IQR 42 to 77) and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study (MDRD) (59 mL/min/1.73 m2, IQR 43 to 75) and slightly lower with the Cockcroft-Gault (CG) equation (57 mL/min, IQR 39 to 82). Across the commonly used renal function stages, the CKD-EPI and the MDRD classified patients into the same stage in 87.2% (kappa coefficient 0.83, pHeart Failure Registry (n= 40 736) with standardised creatinine values between 2000 and 2012 had their renal function estimated with the CKD-EPI, the MDRD and the CG. Agreement between the formulas was compared for categories. Prediction of death was assessed with c-statistics and with NRI. The choice of renal function estimation formula has clinical implications and differing results at various cut-off levels. For prognosis, the CG predicts mortality better than the CKD-EPI and MDRD.

  14. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awareness Day National Women's Health Week Supporting Nursing Moms at Work Popular Topics Autoimmune diseases Breastfeeding Carpal tunnel syndrome ... Awareness Day National Women's Health Week Supporting Nursing Moms at Work Popular Topics Autoimmune diseases Breastfeeding Carpal tunnel syndrome ...

  15. Unanswered Questions in Contemporary Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilstrap, Lauren G; Snipelisky, David; AbouEzzeddine, Omar; Vader, Justin; Cooper, Lauren; Kelley, Jacob; Perez, Antonio; Varian, Kenneth; Lala, Anuradha; Shah, Monica; Stevenson, Lynne W

    2017-10-01

    The epidemiology of heart failure (HF) is changing. This study aimed to describe questions that arise during the routine care of HF patients that are unanswered by the current literature and describe how the type and focus of these questions has changed over time. Investigators from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-sponsored Heart Failure Apprentice Network collected and categorized questions from 5 academic hospitals over 12 months. A total of 174 unanswered questions were collected and analyzed. Compared with 2004, there were more unanswered questions about "whether" to use therapies and fewer about "how" to use therapies. There were fewer questions about what therapeutic targets, therapy adjustment, and combination therapies. There were more questions about whether or how to stop therapies and how to add therapies back. Newly prominent topics, not observed in 2004, including novel therapeutics, refractory ventricular tachycardia, right heart failure, and nutrition/frailty, accounted for 24% of questions. Compared with 2004, there are fewer unanswered questions about how to use, adjust, and combine therapies. There were more unanswered questions about whether and how to stop therapies. Almost 25% of unanswered questions dealt with topics indicative of more advanced disease which were not observed in 2004. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE: EXPERIMENTAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Francesco Corno

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION.Surgically induced, combined volume and pressure overload has been used in rabbits to create a simplified and reproducible model of acute left ventricular (LV failure.MATERIALS AND METHODS.New Zealand white male rabbits (n=24, mean weight 3.1±0.2kg were randomly assigned to either the Control group (n=10 or to the Heart Failure group (HF, n=14. Animals in the Control group underwent sham procedures. Animals in the HF group underwent procedures to induce LV volume overload by inducing severe aortic valve regurgitation with aortic cusp disruption and pressure overload using an occlusive silver clip positioned around the pre-renal abdominal aorta.RESULTS.Following Procedure-1 (volume overload echocardiography confirmed severe aortic regurgitation in all animals in the HF group, with increased mean pulse pressure difference from 18±3mmHg to 38±3mmHg (P

  17. Is autonomic function associated with left ventricular systolic function in Chagas heart disease patients undergoing treatment for heart failure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte Raadschilders

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The association between cardiac autonomic and left ventricular (LV dysfunction in Chagas disease (ChD is controversial. Methods A standardized protocol that includes the Valsalva maneuver, a respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA test, and an echocardiographic examination was used. Spearman correlation coefficients (rho were used to investigate associations. Results The study population consisted of 118 ChD patients undergoing current medical treatment, with an average LV ejection fraction of 51.4±2.6%. The LV ejection fraction and diastolic dimension were correlated with the Valsalva index (rho=0.358, p<0.001 and rho=-0.266, p=0.004, respectively and the RSA (rho=0.391, p<0.001 and rho=-0.311, p<0.001, respectively. Conclusions The impairment of LV function is directly associated with a reduction of cardiac autonomic modulation in ChD.

  18. Predicting Heart Failure With Preserved and Reduced Ejection Fraction : The International Collaboration on Heart Failure Subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, Jennifer E.; Enserro, Danielle; Brouwers, Frank P.; Kizer, Jorge R.; Shah, Sanjiv J.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Bartz, Traci M.; Santhanakrishnan, Rajalakshmi; Lee, Douglas S.; Chan, Cheeling; Liu, Kiang; Blaha, Michael J.; Hillege, Hans L.; van der Harst, Pim; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Kop, Willem J.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Gardin, Julius M.; Levy, Daniel; Gottdiener, John S.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Larson, Martin G.

    Background-Heart failure (HF) is a prevalent and deadly disease, and preventive strategies focused on at-risk individuals are needed. Current HF prediction models have not examined HF subtypes. We sought to develop and validate risk prediction models for HF with preserved and reduced ejection

  19. Predicting heart failure with preserved and reduced ejection fraction : The international collaboration on heart failure subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, Jennifer E; Enserro, Danielle; Brouwers, Frank P; Kizer, Jorge R; Shah, Sanjiv J; Psaty, Bruce M; Bartz, Traci M; Santhanakrishnan, Rajalakshmi; Lee, Douglas S; Chan, Cheeling; Liu, Kiang; Blaha, Michael J; Hillege, Hans L; van der Harst, Pim; van Gilst, Wiek H; Kop, W.J.; Gansevoort, Ron T; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Gardin, Julius M; Levy, Daniel; Gottdiener, John S; de Boer, Rudolf A; Larson, Martin G

    Background—Heart failure (HF) is a prevalent and deadly disease, and preventive strategies focused on at-risk individuals are needed. Current HF prediction models have not examined HF subtypes. We sought to develop and validate risk prediction models for HF with preserved and reduced ejection

  20. TEAM-HF Cost-Effectiveness Model: A Web-Based Program Designed to Evaluate the Cost-Effectiveness of Disease Management Programs in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Shelby D.; Neilson, Matthew P.; Gardner, Matthew; Li, Yanhong; Briggs, Andrew H.; Polsky, Daniel E.; Graham, Felicia L.; Bowers, Margaret T.; Paul, Sara C.; Granger, Bradi B.; Schulman, Kevin A.; Whellan, David J.; Riegel, Barbara; Levy, Wayne C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart failure disease management programs can influence medical resource use and quality-adjusted survival. Because projecting long-term costs and survival is challenging, a consistent and valid approach to extrapolating short-term outcomes would be valuable. Methods We developed the Tools for Economic Analysis of Patient Management Interventions in Heart Failure (TEAM-HF) Cost-Effectiveness Model, a Web-based simulation tool designed to integrate data on demographic, clinical, and laboratory characteristics, use of evidence-based medications, and costs to generate predicted outcomes. Survival projections are based on a modified Seattle Heart Failure Model (SHFM). Projections of resource use and quality of life are modeled using relationships with time-varying SHFM scores. The model can be used to evaluate parallel-group and single-cohort designs and hypothetical programs. Simulations consist of 10,000 pairs of virtual cohorts used to generate estimates of resource use, costs, survival, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios from user inputs. Results The model demonstrated acceptable internal and external validity in replicating resource use, costs, and survival estimates from 3 clinical trials. Simulations to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of heart failure disease management programs across 3 scenarios demonstrate how the model can be used to design a program in which short-term improvements in functioning and use of evidence-based treatments are sufficient to demonstrate good long-term value to the health care system. Conclusion The TEAM-HF Cost-Effectiveness Model provides researchers and providers with a tool for conducting long-term cost-effectiveness analyses of disease management programs in heart failure. PMID:26542504

  1. Increased serum C-reactive protein concentrations in dogs with congestive heart failure due to myxomatous mitral valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, M J; Ljungvall, I; Hillström, A; Møller, J E; Hagman, R; Falk, T; Höglund, K; Häggström, J; Olsen, L H

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease in humans and dogs is associated with mildly increased circulating concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP). Few studies have evaluated associations between circulating CRP and canine myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) and the results reported have been divergent. The aim of this study was to investigate whether serum concentrations of CRP, determined using a novel automated canine-specific high-sensitivity CRP assay (Gentian hsCRP), were associated with severity of MMVD and selected clinical variables in dogs. The study included 188 client-owned dogs with different severities of MMVD. Dogs were classified based on ACVIM consensus statement guidelines (group A, n = 58; group B1, n = 56; group B2, n = 38; group C, n = 36). Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and multiple regression analysis. Dogs with congestive heart failure (CHF; group C) had significantly higher CRP concentrations (median, 2.65 mg/L; quartile 1-quartile 3, 1.09-5.09) compared to dogs in groups A (median, 0.97 mg/L; quartile 1-quartile 3, disease severity, including left atrial to aortic root ratio (P = 0.0002, adjusted r(2) = 0.07) and left ventricular end-diastolic diameter normalised for bodyweight (P = 0.0005, adjusted r(2) = 0.06), were positively associated with CRP concentration, but the association disappeared if dogs with CHF were excluded from analysis. In conclusion, slightly higher CRP concentrations were found in dogs with CHF whereas severity of asymptomatic MMVD showed no association with CRP concentrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Building consensus for provision of breathlessness rehabilitation for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, William D-C; Chowdhury, Faiza; Taylor, Rod S; Evans, Rachael A; Doherty, Patrick; Singh, Sally J; Booth, Sara; Thomason, Davey; Andrews, Debbie; Lee, Cassie; Hanna, Jackie; Morgan, Michael D; Bell, Derek; Cowie, Martin R

    2016-08-01

    The study aimed to gain consensus on key priorities for developing breathlessness rehabilitation services for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic heart failure (CHF). Seventy-four invited stakeholders attended a 1-day conference to review the evidence base for exercise-based rehabilitation in COPD and CHF. In addition, 47 recorded their views on a series of statements regarding breathlessness rehabilitation tailored to the needs of both patient groups. A total of 75% of stakeholders supported symptom-based rather than disease-based rehabilitation for breathlessness with 89% believing that such services would be attractive for healthcare commissioners. A total of 87% thought patients with CHF could be exercised using COPD training principles and vice versa. A total of 81% felt community-based exercise training was safe for patients with severe CHF or COPD, but only 23% viewed manual-delivered rehabilitation an effective alternative to supervised exercise training. Although there was strong consensus that exercise training was a core component of rehabilitation in CHF and COPD populations, only 36% thought that this was the 'most important' component, highlighting the need for psychological and other non-exercise interventions for breathlessness. Patients with COPD and CHF face similar problems of breathlessness and disability on a background of multi-morbidity. Existing pulmonary and cardiac rehabilitation services should seek synergies to provide sufficient flexibility to accommodate all patients with COPD and CHF. Development of new services could consider adopting a patient-focused rather than disease-based approach. Exercise training is a core component, but rehabilitation should include other interventions to address dyspnoea, psychological and education needs of patients and needs of carers. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Inflammatory markers as related to disease severity in patients with chronic heart failure: limited effects of exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrkjeland, Rune; Nilsson, Birgitta B; Westheim, Arne S; Arnesen, Harald; Seljeflot, Ingebjørg

    2011-11-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is associated with increased inflammation, and exercise training has in some studies been shown to have anti-inflammatory effect, although controversies exist. We investigated the effects of exercise training in CHF patients on markers of inflammation, and further explored any association between inflammation and the severity and etiology of the disease. Eighty patients in stable CHF were randomized to 4 months of group-based high intensity exercise training or to a control group. Physical capacity was measured by 6-minute walk test and cycle ergometer test. Blood samples were drawn at baseline, after 4 months and after 12 months follow-up for analyses of a range of biomarkers. Physical capacity was significantly inversely related to CRP, IL-6, VCAM-1 and TGF-β, and NT pro-BNP levels were significantly correlated to CRP, TNF-α, IL-6, VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and TGF-β (p markers of inflammation. We could not demonstrate over-all anti-inflammatory effect of exercise in this population of CHF patients. However, the etiology of CHF affected the inflammatory profile and the effect of exercise training.

  4. Left Ventricular global longitudinal strain predicts heart failure readmission in acute decompensated heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Simone; Mansour, Ibrahim N; Kansal, Mayank; Gheith, Hana; Dowdy, Zachary; Dickens, Carolyn A; Buto-Colletti, Cassandra; Chae, June M; Saleh, Hussam H; Stamos, Thomas D

    2017-03-15

    The goal of this study was to determine if left ventricular (LV) global longitudinal strain (GLS) predicts heart failure (HF) readmission in patients with acute decompensated heart failure. Two hundred ninety one patients were enrolled at the time of admission for acute decompensated heart failure between January 2011 and September 2013. Left ventricle global longitudinal strain (LV GLS) by velocity vector imaging averaged from 2, 3 and 4-chamber views could be assessed in 204 out of 291 (70%) patients. Mean age was 63.8 ± 15.2 years, 42% of the patients were males and 78% were African American or Hispanic. Patients were followed until the first HF hospital readmission up to 44 months. Patients were grouped into quartiles on the basis of LV GLS. Kaplan-Meier curves showed significantly higher readmission rates in patients with worse LV GLS (log-rank p heart disease, dementia, New York Heart Association class, LV ejection fraction, use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers, systolic and diastolic blood pressure on admission and sodium level on admission, worse LV GLS was the strongest predictor of recurrent HF readmission (p heart failure with a higher risk of readmission in case of progressive worsening of LV GLS, independent of the ejection fraction.

  5. Mechanisms of heart failure in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebong, Imo A; Goff, David C; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Chen, Haiying; Bertoni, Alain G

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and its prevalence continues to rise. Because obesity has been linked with heart failure, the increasing prevalence of obesity may presage further rise in heart failure in the future. Obesity-related factors are estimated to cause 11% of heart failure cases in men and 14% in women. Obesity may result in heart failure by inducing haemodynamic and myocardial changes that lead to cardiac dysfunction, or due to an increased predisposition to other heart failure risk factors. Direct cardiac lipotoxicity has been described where lipid accumulation in the heart results in cardiac dysfunction inexplicable of other heart failure risk factors. In this overview, we discussed various pathophysiological mechanisms that could lead to heart failure in obesity, including the molecular mechanisms underlying cardiac lipotoxicity. We defined the obesity paradox and enumerated various premises for the paradoxical associations observed in the relationship between obesity and heart failure. Copyright © 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hepcidin in anemia of chronic heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divakaran, Vijay; Mehta, Sachin; Yao, David; Hassan, Saamir; Simpson, Steven; Wiegerinck, Erwin; Swinkels, Dorine W.; Mann, Douglas L.; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid

    2010-01-01

    Anemia is a common finding among patients with chronic heart failure. Although co-morbidities, such as kidney failure, might contribute to the pathogenesis of anemia, many patients with heart failure do not have any other obvious etiology for their anemia. We investigated whether anemia in heart failure is associated with an elevation in hepcidin concentration. We used time-of-flight mass spectrometry to measure hepcidin concentration in urine and serum samples of patients with heart failure and in control subjects. We found that the concentration of hepcidin was lower in urine samples of patients with heart failure compared to those of control subjects. Serum hepcidin was also reduced in heart failure but was not significantly lower than that in controls. There were no significant differences between hepcidin levels in patients with heart failure and anemia compared to patients with heart failure and normal hemoglobin. We concluded that hepcidin probably does not play a major role in pathogenesis of anemia in patients with chronic heart failure. PMID:21080339

  7. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  8. Obesity and risk of incident heart failure in older men with and without pre-existing coronary heart disease: does leptin have a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannamethee, S Goya; Shaper, A Gerald; Whincup, Peter H; Lennon, Lucy; Sattar, Naveed

    2011-10-25

    We examined the relationship between body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and incident HF in men with and without pre-existing coronary heart disease (CHD) and assessed the contribution of plasma leptin concentration to these associations. Leptin has been proposed as a potential link between obesity and heart failure (HF). This was a prospective study of 4,080 men age 60 to 79 years with no diagnosed HF followed for a mean period of 9 years, in whom there were 228 incident HF cases. Increased BMI was associated with significantly increased risk of HF in men with and without pre-existing CHD (myocardial infarction or angina) after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors including C-reactive protein. The adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) associated with a 1-SD increase in BMI were 1.37 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.09 to 1.72) and 1.18 (95% CI: 1.00 to 1.39) in men with and without CHD, respectively. Increased leptin was significantly associated with an increased risk of HF in men without pre-existing CHD, independent of BMI and potential mediators (adjusted HR for a 1-SD increase in log leptin: 1.30 [95% CI: 1.06 to 1.61]; p = 0.01). However, no association was seen in those with pre-existing CHD (corresponding HR: 1.06 [95% CI: 0.77 to 1.45]; p = 0.72). Adjustment for leptin abolished the association between BMI and HF in men with no CHD; in those with CHD, the association between BMI and HF remained significant (p = 0.03). Similar patterns were seen for waist circumference. In the absence of established CHD, the association between obesity and HF may be mediated by plasma leptin. In those with CHD, obesity appears to increase the risk of HF independent of leptin. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index and C-Reactive Protein Are Useful Parameters for Identification of Ischemic Heart Disease in Acute Heart Failure Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Shunsuke; Hisatake, Shinji; Kabuki, Takayuki; Oka, Takashi; Dobashi, Shintaro; Fujii, Takahiro; Ikeda, Takanori

    2017-05-01

    The most common cause of heart failure (HF) is ischemic heart disease (IHD). Evaluation of IHD with non-invasive examinations is useful for the treatment of HF, and cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is a good parameter for detecting systemic arteriosclerosis. However, the relationship between IHD and CAVI in acute HF (AHF) patients is still unclear. Therefore, we investigated the effect of non-invasive examinations, including CAVI to detect IHD. We studied 53 consecutive patients (average age of 66.5 ± 10.9 years old, 36 males) with AHF from January 2009 to December 2012. These patients were classified into the IHD group (n = 19) and non-IHD group (n = 34) according to the coronary artery angiography results. We evaluated the vital signs, laboratory findings and CAVI. According to the laboratory findings, the C-reactive protein (CRP) in IHD group was significantly higher than non-IHD group (1.5 ± 2.1 mg/dL vs. 0.4 ± 0.4 mg/dL, P = 0.002). CAVI in IHD group was significantly higher than non-IHD group (9.58 ± 1.73 vs. 7.83 ± 1.86, P < 0.001). In the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for discriminating the probability of IHD, the cut-off point of the CRP plus CAVI was 9.00. At that cut-off point, the sensitivity and the specificity were 69.7% and 89.5%, respectively. The mean area under the ROC curve (AUC) defined by the CRP plus CAVI was the greatest at all parameters. The CRP and CAVI were useful parameters for the identification of IHD in patients with AHF.

  10. No adaptation to digitalization as evaluated by digitalis receptor (Na,K-ATPase) quantification in explanted hearts from donors without heart disease and from digitalized recipients with end-stage heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, T A; Allen, P D; Colucci, W S; Marsh, J D; Kjeldsen, K

    1993-01-01

    Speculations about development of tolerance to the inotropic effect of digitalis have been engendered since studies in various in vitro systems and tissues not representative of the heart have shown up-regulation of sodium potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na,K-ATPase) when exposed to digitalis. Moreover the digitalis receptor (i.e., Na,K-ATPase) concentration in the normal, vital human left ventricle has not been previously determined. On this basis, digitalis receptor concentration was quantified in the left ventricle of explanted hearts from subjects without heart disease and from patients with end-stage heart failure who had received digitalis therapy. This was performed using vanadate-facilitated 3H-ouabain binding to intact tissue samples giving values of 728 +/- 58 (n = 5) and 467 +/- 55 pmol/g wet weight (n = 6) (mean +/- SEM) (p digitalization was associated with occupancy of digitalis receptors in the failing human heart of 24% (p < 0.02).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. How Is Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Heart Disease in Women Heart Disease in Women Leer en español How Does Heart ... about coronary MVD and broken heart syndrome. Coronary Heart Disease CHD is a disease in which plaque (plak) ...

  12. Probability elicitation to inform early health economic evaluations of new medical technologies: a case study in heart failure disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qi; Postmus, Douwe; Hillege, Hans L; Buskens, Erik

    2013-06-01

    Early estimates of the commercial headroom available to a new medical device can assist producers of health technology in making appropriate product investment decisions. The purpose of this study was to illustrate how this quantity can be captured probabilistically by combining probability elicitation with early health economic modeling. The technology considered was a novel point-of-care testing device in heart failure disease management. First, we developed a continuous-time Markov model to represent the patients' disease progression under the current care setting. Next, we identified the model parameters that are likely to change after the introduction of the new device and interviewed three cardiologists to capture the probability distributions of these parameters. Finally, we obtained the probability distribution of the commercial headroom available per measurement by propagating the uncertainty in the model inputs to uncertainty in modeled outcomes. For a willingness-to-pay value of €10,000 per life-year, the median headroom available per measurement was €1.64 (interquartile range €0.05-€3.16) when the measurement frequency was assumed to be daily. In the subsequently conducted sensitivity analysis, this median value increased to a maximum of €57.70 for different combinations of the willingness-to-pay threshold and the measurement frequency. Probability elicitation can successfully be combined with early health economic modeling to obtain the probability distribution of the headroom available to a new medical technology. Subsequently feeding this distribution into a product investment evaluation method enables stakeholders to make more informed decisions regarding to which markets a currently available product prototype should be targeted. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Levosimendan beyond inotropy and acute heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmakis, Dimitrios; Alvarez, Julian; Gal, Tuvia Ben

    2016-01-01

    Levosimendan is a positive inotrope with vasodilating properties (inodilator) indicated for decompensated heart failure (HF) patients with low cardiac output. Accumulated evidence supports several pleiotropic effects of levosimendan beyond inotropy, the heart and decompensated HF. Those effects...

  14. Update on digoxin therapy in congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji, S A; Movahed, A

    2000-07-15

    Congestive heart failure is a progressive disease with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, the incidence and prevalence of congestive heart failure have increased in recent years. Contributing factors include increased survival in patients with coronary artery disease (especially myocardial infarction), an aging population and significant advances in the control of other potentially lethal diseases. New and existing agents, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta blockers and, more recently, spironolactone, are being used increasingly to prolong life in patients with heart failure. Although digoxin has been used to treat heart failure for more than 200 years, its role in patients with congestive heart failure and sinus rhythm is still debatable. Over the past decade, digoxin has received renewed attention because of recognition of its neurohormonal effect and the successful use of lower dosages. In recent trials, digoxin has been shown to reduce morbidity associated with congestive heart failure but to have no demonstrable effect on survival. The goal of digoxin therapy in patients with congestive heart failure is to improve quality of life by reducing symptoms and preventing hospitalizations.

  15. Growth Hormone as Biomarker in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Alberto M; Bobbio, Emanuele; D'Assante, Roberta; Salzano, Andrea; Arcopinto, Michele; Bossone, Eduardo; Cittadini, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    The impairment of growth hormone (GH)/insulin growth factor-1(IGF-1) plays a crucial role in chronic heart failure (CHF). Several studies have shown that patients affected by this condition display a more aggressive disease, with impaired functional capacity and poor outcomes. Interestingly, GH replacement therapy represents a possible future therapeutic option in CHF. In this review, the authors focus on the assessment of the main abnormalities in GH/IGF-1 axis in CHF, the underlying molecular background, and their impact on disease progression and outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Obesity and Heart Failure as a Mediator of the Cerebrorenal Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Jindal, Ankur; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Sowers, James R

    2013-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is contributing substantially to the burden of cardiovascular disease including heart disease and congestive heart failure, in the United States and the rest of the world. Overnutrition as a driver of obesity, promotes alterations in fatty acid, lipid, and glucose metabolism that influence myocardial function and progression of heart failure from diastolic to systolic failure. The association of progressive heart failure and progressive chronic kidney disease is well docu...

  17. Resting heart rate and the risk of heart failure in healthy adults: the Rotterdam Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanchen, David; Leening, Maarten J G; Locatelli, Isabella; Cornuz, Jacques; Kors, Jan A; Heeringa, Jan; Deckers, Jaap W; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Dehghan, Abbas

    2013-05-01

    An elevated resting heart rate is associated with rehospitalization for heart failure and is a modifiable risk factor in heart failure patients. We aimed to examine the association between resting heart rate and incident heart failure in a population-based cohort study of healthy adults without pre-existing overt heart disease. We studied 4768 men and women aged ≥55 years from the population-based Rotterdam Study. We excluded participants with prevalent heart failure, coronary heart disease, pacemaker, atrial fibrillation, atrioventricular block, and those using β-blockers or calcium channel blockers. We used extended Cox models allowing for time-dependent variation of resting heart rate along follow-up. During a median of 14.6 years of follow-up, 656 participants developed heart failure. The risk of heart failure was higher in men with higher resting heart rate. For each increment of 10 beats per minute, the multivariable adjusted hazard ratios in men were 1.16 (95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.28; P=0.005) in the time-fixed heart rate model and 1.13 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.25; P=0.017) in the time-dependent heart rate model. The association could not be demonstrated in women (P for interaction=0.004). Censoring participants for incident coronary heart disease or using time-dependent models to account for the use of β-blockers or calcium channel blockers during follow-up did not alter the results. Baseline or persistent higher resting heart rate is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure in healthy older men in the general population.

  18. Social Support, Perceived Stress, and Markers of Heart Failure Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    heart failure patients completed health-related questionnaires (Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire, KCCQ), performed functional assessments...3 Definition and etiology 4 Diagnosis and measurement 5 Physiological measurements 5 Functional status 6 Self-reported symptoms...functions of the heart due to cardiovascular diseases. Conditions such as coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, cardiomyopathies , and

  19. Persistent high serum bicarbonate and the risk of heart failure in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD): A report from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobre, Mirela; Yang, Wei; Pan, Qiang; Appel, Lawrence; Bellovich, Keith; Chen, Jing; Feldman, Harold; Fischer, Michael J; Ham, L L; Hostetter, Thomas; Jaar, Bernard G; Kallem, Radhakrishna R; Rosas, Sylvia E; Scialla, Julia J; Wolf, Myles; Rahman, Mahboob

    2015-04-20

    Serum bicarbonate varies over time in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, and this variability may portend poor cardiovascular outcomes. The aim of this study was to conduct a time-updated longitudinal analysis to evaluate the association of serum bicarbonate with long-term clinical outcomes: heart failure, atherosclerotic events, renal events (halving of estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] or end-stage renal disease), and mortality. Serum bicarbonate was measured annually, in 3586 participants with CKD, enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. Marginal structural models were created to allow for integration of all available bicarbonate measurements and proper adjustment for time-dependent confounding. During the 6 years follow-up, 512 participants developed congestive heart failure (26/1000 person-years) and 749 developed renal events (37/1000 person-years). The risk of heart failure and death was significantly higher for participants who maintained serum bicarbonate >26 mmol/L for the entire duration of follow-up (hazard ratio [HR] 1.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23 to 2.23, and HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.82, respectively) compared with participants who kept their bicarbonate 22 to 26 mmol/L, after adjusting for demographics, co-morbidities, medications including diuretics, eGFR, and proteinuria. Participants who maintained serum bicarbonate renal disease progression (HR 1.97; 95% CI, 1.50 to 2.57) compared with participants with bicarbonate 22 to 26 mmol/L. In this large CKD cohort, persistent serum bicarbonate >26 mmol/L was associated with increased risk of heart failure events and mortality. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal range of serum bicarbonate in CKD to prevent adverse clinical outcomes. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  20. Palliative care in heart failure : a position statement from the palliative care workshop of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, Tiny; Beattie, James M.; Ryder, Mary; Rutten, Frans H.; McDonagh, Theresa; Mohacsi, Paul; Murray, Scott A.; Grodzicki, Thomas; Bergh, Ingrid; Metra, Marco; Ekman, Inger; Angermann, Christiane; Leventhal, Marcia; Pitsis, Antonis; Anker, Stefan D.; Gavazzi, Antonello; Ponikowski, Piotr; Dickstein, Kenneth; Delacretaz, Etienne; Blue, Lynda; Strasser, Florian; McMurray, John

    Heart failure is a serious condition and equivalent to malignant disease in terms of symptom burden and mortality. At this moment only a comparatively small number of heart failure patients receive specialist palliative care. Heart failure patients may have generic palliative care needs, such as

  1. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Christine K; Rodgers, Jo E; Nappi, Jean M; Haines, Stuart T

    2008-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus and heart failure are common comorbidities, and their prevalence has increased significantly over the past decade. We examined the relationships between diabetes and heart failure, the effect of commonly prescribed antidiabetic drugs on the development of heart failure, and the benefits and risks of recommended heart failure therapies in patients with diabetes. Compared with patients with heart failure who do not have diabetes, patients with both diabetes and heart failure have a poorer prognosis, including a 1.5-2-fold higher risk of mortality. Based on the results of randomized controlled trials, insulin and sulfonylureas do not appear to protect against or contribute to the development of new-onset heart failure, whereas metformin may modestly reduce the risk. The use of metformin in patients with established heart failure is controversial; retrospective analyses have shown that metformin may have a beneficial effect on outcomes, but there are no prospective, randomized clinical trials to support its use in this population. The thiazolidinediones, however, contribute to the development of heart failure and increase the risk of heart failure exacerbations particularly when used in combination with insulin. Recommendations for the treatment of symptomatic heart failure in patients with diabetes have been largely derived from post hoc analyses or preplanned subgroup analyses in landmark clinical trials. The data clearly support the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers for both the prevention and treatment of symptomatic heart failure in patients with diabetes. Despite concerns regarding the potential risks of beta-blockers in patients with diabetes, these drugs have a clear mortality benefit in patients with stages B and C heart failure. Therefore, patients with diabetes should not be denied beta-blocker therapy unless there is a clear contraindication. Likewise, aldosterone receptor antagonists

  2. Anemia associated with chronic heart failure: current concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ravish; Agarwal, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent comorbidity of heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes. Anemia in heart failure is considered to develop due to a complex interaction of iron deficiency, kidney disease, and cytokine production, although micronutrient insufficiency and blood loss may contribute. Currently, treatment of anemia of heart failure lacks clear targets and specific therapy is not defined. Intravenous iron use has been shown to benefit anemic as well as nonanemic patients with heart failure. Treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents has been considered alone or in combination with iron, but robust evidence to dictate clear guidelines is not currently available. Available and emerging new agents in the treatment of anemia of heart failure will need to be tested in randomized, controlled studies. PMID:23403618

  3. Regulation of the renal sympathetic nerves in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit eRamchandra

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is a serious debilitating condition with poor survival rates and an increasing level of prevalence. Heart failure is associated with an increase in renal norepinephrine spillover, which is an independent predictor of mortality in HF patients. The excessive sympatho-excitation that is a hallmark of heart failure has long-term effects that contribute to disease progression. An increase in directly recorded renal sympathetic nerve activity has also been recorded in animal models of heart failure. This review will focus on the mechanisms controlling sympathetic nerve activity to the kidney during normal conditions and alterations in these mechanisms during heart failure. In particular the roles of afferent reflexes and central mechanisms will be discussed.

  4. Right ventricular strain in heart failure: Clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadic, Marijana; Pieske-Kraigher, Elisabeth; Cuspidi, Cesare; Morris, Daniel A; Burkhardt, Franziska; Baudisch, Ana; Haßfeld, Sabine; Tschöpe, Carsten; Pieske, Burket

    2017-10-01

    The number of studies demonstrating the importance of right ventricular remodelling in a wide range of cardiovascular diseases has increased in the past two decades. Speckle-tracking imaging provides new variables that give comprehensive information about right ventricular function and mechanics. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of right ventricular mechanics in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and preserved ejection fraction. We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, Ovid and Embase databases for studies published from January 2000 to December 2016 in the English language using the following keywords: "right ventricle"; "strain"; "speckle tracking"; "heart failure with reduced ejection fraction"; and "heart failure with preserved ejection fraction". Investigations showed that right ventricular dysfunction is associated with higher cardiovascular and overall mortality in patients with heart failure, irrespective of ejection fraction. The number of studies investigating right ventricular strain in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction is constantly increasing, whereas data on right ventricular mechanics in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction are limited. Given the high feasibility, accuracy and clinical implications of right ventricular strain in the population with heart failure, it is of great importance to try to include the evaluation of right ventricular strain as a regular part of each echocardiographic examination in patients with heart failure. However, further investigations are necessary to establish right ventricular strain as a standard variable for decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Performance of recommended measures on risk factors control in patients with hypertension, coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure: the data from 2014 Russian registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posnenkova O.M.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A report presents the results of evaluation of recommended measures on risk factors control in patients with hypertension, stable coronary artery disease (CAD and chronic heart failure (CHF. The performance of recommended measures was assessed with the help of specially developed system of clinical indicators on the basis of data of the year 2014 from patients enrolled in multicenter Russian registry of hypertension, CAD and CHF.

  6. The value of telemonitoring and ICT-guided disease management in heart failure: Results from the IN TOUCH study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraai, Imke; de Vries, Arjen; Vermeulen, Karin; van Deursen, Vincent; van der Wal, Martje; de Jong, Richard; van Dijk, René; Jaarsma, Tiny; Hillege, Hans; Lesman, Ivonne

    2016-01-01

    It is still unclear whether telemonitoring reduces hospitalization and mortality in heart failure (HF) patients and whether adding an Information and Computing Technology-guided-disease-management-system (ICT-guided-DMS) improves clinical and patient reported outcomes or reduces healthcare costs. A multicenter randomized controlled trial was performed testing the effects of INnovative ICT-guided-DMS combined with Telemonitoring in OUtpatient clinics for Chronic HF patients (IN TOUCH) with in total 179 patients (mean age 69 years; 72% male; 77% in New York Heart Association Classification (NYHA) III-IV; mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 28%). Patients were randomized to ICT-guided-DMS or to ICT-guided-DMS+telemonitoring with a follow-up of nine months. The composite endpoint included mortality, HF-readmission and change in health-related quality of life (HR-QoL). In total 177 patients were eligible for analyses. The mean score of the primary composite endpoint was -0.63 in ICT-guided-DMS vs. -0.73 in ICT-guided-DMS+telemonitoring (mean difference 0.1, 95% CI: -0.67 +0.82, p=0.39). All-cause mortality in ICT-guided-DMS was 12% versus 15% in ICT-guided-DMS+telemonitoring (p=0.27); HF-readmission 28% vs. 27% p=0.87; all-cause readmission was 49% vs. 51% (p=0.78). HR-QoL improved in most patients and was equal in both groups. Incremental costs were €1360 in favor of ICT-guided-DMS. ICT-guided-DMS+telemonitoring had significantly fewer HF-outpatient-clinic visits (pmanagement of HF patients did not affect the primary and secondary endpoints. However, we did find a reduction in visits to the HF-outpatient clinic in this group suggesting that telemonitoring might be safe to use in reorganizing HF-care with relatively low costs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Diabetes Mellitus, Microalbuminuria, and Subclinical Cardiac Disease: Identification and Monitoring of Individuals at Risk of Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, Peter P; McDiarmid, Adam K; Erhayiem, Bara; Ripley, David P; Dobson, Laura E; Garg, Pankaj; Musa, Tarique A; Witte, Klaus K; Kearney, Mark T; Barth, Julian H; Ajjan, Ramzi; Greenwood, John P; Plein, Sven

    2017-07-17

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and elevated urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR) have increased risk of heart failure. We hypothesized this was because of cardiac tissue changes rather than silent coronary artery disease. In a case-controlled observational study 130 subjects including 50 ACR+ve diabetes mellitus patients with persistent microalbuminuria (ACR >2.5 mg/mol in males and >3.5 mg/mol in females, ≥2 measurements, no previous renin-angiotensin-aldosterone therapy, 50 ACR-ve diabetes mellitus patients and 30 controls underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance for investigation of myocardial fibrosis, ischemia and infarction, and echocardiography. Thirty ACR+ve patients underwent further testing after 1-year treatment with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone blockade. Cardiac extracellular volume fraction, a measure of diffuse fibrosis, was higher in diabetes mellitus patients than controls (26.1±3.4% and 23.3±3.0% P=0.0002) and in ACR+ve than ACR-ve diabetes mellitus patients (27.2±4.1% versus 25.1±2.9%, P=0.004). ACR+ve patients also had lower E' measured by echocardiography (8.2±1.9 cm/s versus 8.9±1.9 cm/s, P=0.04) and elevated high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T 18% versus 4% ≥14 ng/L (P=0.05). Rate of silent myocardial ischemia or infarction were not influenced by ACR status. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone blockade was associated with increased left ventricular ejection fraction (59.3±7.8 to 61.5±8.7%, P=0.03) and decreased extracellular volume fraction (26.5±3.6 to 25.2±3.1, P=0.01) but no changes in diastolic function or high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T levels. Asymptomatic diabetes mellitus patients with persistent microalbuminuria have markers of diffuse cardiac fibrosis including elevated extracellular volume fraction, high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T, and diastolic dysfunction, which may in part be reversible by renin-angiotensin-aldosterone blockade. Increased risk in these patients may be mediated by subclinical

  8. Critical Heart Failure and Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronicki, Ronald A; Taylor, Mary; Baden, Harris

    2016-08-01

    The objectives of this review are to discuss the clinical assessment, pathophysiology, and management of shock, with an emphasis on circulatory physiology, cardiopulmonary interactions, and pharmacologic strategies to optimize systemic oxygen delivery. These principles will then be applied to the clinical syndromes of heart failure and cardiogenic shock that are seen in children. MEDLINE, PubMed. An understanding of essential circulatory physiology and the pathophysiology of shock are necessary for managing patients at risk for or in a state of shock. A timely and accurate assessment of cardiac function, cardiac output, and tissue oxygenation and the means by which to enhance the relationship between oxygen delivery and consumption are essential in order to optimize outcomes.

  9. [Diuretic therapy in heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trullàs, Joan Carles; Morales-Rull, José Luís; Formiga, Francesc

    2014-02-20

    Many of the primary clinical manifestations of heart failure (HF) are due to fluid retention, and treatments targeting congestion play a central role in HF management. Diuretic therapy remains the cornerstone of congestion treatment, and diuretics are prescribed to the majority of HF patients. Despite this ubiquitous use, there is limited evidence from prospective randomized studies to guide the use of diuretics. With the chronic use of diuretic and usually in advanced stages of HF, diuretics may fail to control salt and water retention. This review describes the mechanism of action of available diuretic classes, reviews their clinical use based on scientific evidence and discusses strategies to overcome diuretic resistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. Association of Blood Pressure Trajectory With Mortality, Incident Cardiovascular Disease, and Heart Failure in the Cardiovascular Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitson, Christopher C; Scherzer, Rebecca; Shlipak, Michael G; Psaty, Bruce M; Newman, Anne B; Sarnak, Mark J; Odden, Michelle C; Peralta, Carmen A

    2017-06-01

    Common blood pressure (BP) trajectories are not well established in elderly persons, and their association with clinical outcomes is uncertain. We used hierarchical cluster analysis to identify discrete BP trajectories among 4,067 participants in the Cardiovascular Health Study using repeated BP measures from years 0 to 7. We then evaluated associations of each BP trajectory cluster with all-cause mortality, incident cardiovascular disease (CVD, defined as stroke or myocardial infarction) (N = 2,837), and incident congestive heart failure (HF) (N = 3,633) using Cox proportional hazard models. Median age was 77 years at year 7. Over a median 9.3 years of follow-up, there were 2,475 deaths, 659 CVD events, and 1,049 HF events. The cluster analysis identified 3 distinct trajectory groups. Participants in cluster 1 (N = 1,838) had increases in both systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) BPs, whereas persons in cluster 2 (N = 1,109) had little change in SBP but declines in DBP. Persons in cluster 3 (N = 1,120) experienced declines in both SBP and DBP. After multivariable adjustment, clusters 2 and 3 were associated with increased mortality risk relative to cluster 1 (hazard ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence interval: 1.06-1.37 and hazard ratio = 1.20, 95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.36, respectively). Compared to cluster 1, cluster 3 had higher rates of incident CVD but associations were not statistically significant in demographic-adjusted models (hazard ratio = 1.16, 95% confidence interval: 0.96-1.39). Findings were similar when stratified by use of antihypertensive therapy. Among community-dwelling elders, distinct BP trajectories were identified by integrating both SBP and DBP. These clusters were found to have differential associations with outcomes.

  11. Heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease multimorbidity at hospital discharge transition: a study of patient and carer experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doos, Lucy; Bradley, Eleanor; Rushton, Claire A; Satchithananda, Duwarakan; Davies, Simon J; Kadam, Umesh T

    2015-12-01

    Care for patients with multimorbidity represents a major challenge not only for patients and carers but to health-care systems. Hospital discharge transition is a critical point at which challenges for multimorbidity may amplify. The main objective of the study was to explore the experiences of heart failure (HF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) multimorbid patients and their carers on hospital discharge. Secondary objectives included identification of gaps in the health care of multimorbidity and optimal solutions from patients and carers' perspectives. Mixed methods were applied to collect data using patient self-completion questionnaire from an adapted version of the American Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey and in-depth interviews. Participants were recruited from two cardiology and respiratory wards at a large regional hospital in England, and all had a multimorbidity diagnosis of COPD and HF. Findings revealed that patients experienced difficulties in their communication with health-care professionals and there were specific challenges with information about medication. Qualitative descriptions revealed that experiences fell into two main categories: (i) information transfer to patients with multimorbidity in terms of issues with medication and clarity of information on diagnosis and (ii) communication and continuity of care after discharge. Respondents highlighted gaps in the management of patients with multimorbidity of HF and COPD at the critical time of care transition. They suggested the need for a comprehensive, coordinated and integrated approach to incorporate patients, carers and staff preferences for treatment on discharge from hospital. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Delivering heart failure disease management in 3 tertiary care centers: key clinical components and venues of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Monica R; Whellan, David J; Peterson, Eric D; Nohria, Anju; Hasselblad, Vic; Xue, Zhenyi; Bowers, Margaret T; O'Connor, Christopher M; Califf, Robert M; Stevenson, Lynne W

    2008-04-01

    Little data exist to assist to help those organizing and managing heart failure (HF) disease management (DM) programs. We aimed to describe the intensity of outpatient HF care (clinic visits and telephone calls) and medical and nonpharmacological interventions in the outpatient setting. This was a prospective substudy of 130 patients enrolled in STARBRITE in HFDM programs at 3 centers. Follow-up occurred 10, 30, 60, 90, and 120 days after discharge. The number of clinic visits and calls made by HF cardiologists, nurse practitioners, and nurses were prospectively tracked. The results were reported as medians and interquartile ranges. There were a total of 581 calls with 4 (2, 6) per patient and 467 clinic visits with 3 (2, 5) per patient. Time spent per patient was 8.9 (6, 10.6) minutes per call and 23.8 (20, 28.3) minutes per clinic visit. Nurses and nurse practitioners spent 113 hours delivering care on the phone, and physicians and nurse practitioners spent 187.6 hours in clinic. Issues addressed during calls included HF education (341 times [52.6%]) and fluid overload (87 times [41.8%]). Medical interventions included adjustments to loop diuretics (calls 101 times, clinic 156 times); beta-blockers (calls 18 times, clinic 126 times); vasodilators (calls 8 times, clinic 55 times). More than a third of clinician time was spent on calls, during which >50% of patient contacts and HF education and >39% of diuretic adjustments occurred. Administrators and public and private insurers need to recognize the amount of medical care delivered over the telephone and should consider reimbursement for these activities.

  13. Use of Proton-Pump Inhibitors Predicts Heart Failure and Death in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Pello Lázaro

    Full Text Available Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs seem to increase the incidence of cardiovascular events in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD, mainly in those using clopidogrel. We analysed the impact of PPIs on the prognosis of patients with stable CAD.We followed 706 patients with CAD. Primary outcome was the combination of secondary outcomes. Secondary outcomes were 1 acute ischaemic events (any acute coronary syndrome, stroke, or transient ischaemic attack and 2 heart failure (HF or death.Patients on PPIs were older [62.0 (53.0-73.0 vs. 58.0 (50.0-70.0 years; p = 0.003] and had a more frequent history of stroke (4.9% vs. 1.1%; p = 0.004 than those from the non-PPI group, and presented no differences in any other clinical variable, including cardiovascular risk factors, ejection fraction, and therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel. Follow-up was 2.2±0.99 years. Seventy-eight patients met the primary outcome, 53 developed acute ischaemic events, and 33 HF or death. PPI use was an independent predictor of the primary outcome [hazard ratio (HR = 2.281 (1.244-4.183; p = 0.008], along with hypertension, body-mass index, glomerular filtration rate, atrial fibrillation, and nitrate use. PPI use was also an independent predictor of HF/death [HR = 5.713 (1.628-20.043; p = 0.007], but not of acute ischaemic events. A propensity score showed similar results.In patients with CAD, PPI use is independently associated with an increased incidence of HF and death but not with a high rate of acute ischaemic events. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  14. Heart disease and intimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000540.htm Heart disease and intimacy To use the sharing features on ... Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  15. Focus on renal congestion in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Baris; Ortiz, Alberto; Covic, Adrian; Solak, Yalcin; Goldsmith, David; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    Hospitalizations due to heart failure are increasing steadily despite advances in medicine. Patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure have high mortality in hospital and within the months following discharge. Kidney dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure patients. Recent evidence suggests that both deterioration in kidney function and renal congestion are important prognostic factors in heart failure. Kidney congestion in heart failure results from low cardiac output (forward failure), tubuloglomerular feedback, increased intra-abdominal pressure or increased venous pressure. Regardless of the cause, renal congestion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure. The impact on outcomes of renal decongestion strategies that do not compromise renal function should be explored in heart failure. These studies require novel diagnostic markers that identify early renal damage and renal congestion and allow monitoring of treatment responses in order to avoid severe worsening of renal function. In addition, there is an unmet need regarding evidence-based therapeutic management of renal congestion and worsening renal function. In the present review, we summarize the mechanisms, diagnosis, outcomes, prognostic markers and treatment options of renal congestion in heart failure.

  16. Thirst in chronic heart failure: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allida, Sabine M; Inglis, Sally C; Davidson, Patricia M; Lal, Sara; Hayward, Christopher S; Newton, Phillip J

    2015-04-01

    This review will (1) explore factors related to thirst in chronic heart failure and (2) describe interventions to alleviate thirst in chronic heart failure patients. Thirst is a common and troublesome symptom of chronic heart failure. Despite the burden and prevalence of this symptom, there are limited strategies to assist in its management. This is a review of literature on the burden of thirst, contributors to thirst and potential management strategies of thirst in patients with chronic heart failure. Medline, Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health, PubMed and Scopus were searched using the key words thirst, chronic heart failure, angiotensin II, fluid restriction and intervention. Of the 165 citations yielded, nine studies (n = 9) were included. The eligibility criteria included participants with confirmed diagnosis of chronic heart failure, randomised controlled studies or any studies with thirst as primary or secondary outcome, in humans and in English. There was no limit to the years searched. Factors related to thirst in chronic heart failure were condition; prolonged neurohormonal activation, treatment; pharmacological interventions and fluid restriction and emotion. No intervention studies were found in chronic heart failure patients. Interventions such as artificial saliva and chewing gum have been investigated for their effectiveness as a thirst reliever in haemodialysis patients. Thirst is a frequent and troublesome symptom for individuals with chronic heart failure. It is highly likely that this contributes to poor adherence with fluid restrictions. Chewing gum can help alleviate thirst, but investigation in people with heart failure is needed. Increasing awareness of thirst and interventions to relieve it in clinical practice is likely to improve the quality of care for people with chronic heart failure. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Novel Biomarkers of Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic-Radojevic, A; Pljesa-Ercegovac, M; Matic, M; Simic, D; Radovanovic, S; Simic, T

    Although substantial improvements have been made in majority of cardiac disorders, heart failure (HF) remains a major health problem, with both increasing incidence and prevalence over the past decades. For that reason, the number of potential biomarkers that could contribute to diagnosis and treatment of HF patients is, almost exponentially, increasing over the recent years. The biomarkers that are, at the moment, more or less ready for use in everyday clinical practice, reflect different pathophysiological processes present in HF. In this review, seven groups of biomarkers associated to myocardial stretch (mid-regional proatrial natriuretic peptide, MR-proANP), myocyte injury (high-sensitive troponins, hs-cTn; heart-type fatty acid-binding protein, H-FABP; glutathione transferase P1, GSTP1), matrix remodeling (galectin-3; soluble isoform of suppression of tumorigenicity 2, sST2), inflammation (growth differentiation factor-15, GDF-15), renal dysfunction (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL; kidney injury molecule-1, KIM-1), neurohumoral activation (adrenomedullin, MR-proADM; copeptin), and oxidative stress (ceruloplasmin; myeloperoxidase, MPO; 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, 8-OHdG; thioredoxin 1, Trx1) in HF will be overviewed. It is important to note that clinical value of individual biomarkers within the single time points in both diagnosis and outcome prediction in HF is limited. Hence, the future of biomarker application in HF lies in the multimarker panel strategy, which would include specific combination of biomarkers that reflect different pathophysiological processes underlying HF. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pathological alterations in liver injury following congestive heart failure induced by volume overload in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Shaqura, Mohammed; Mohamed, Doaa M.; Aboryag, Noureddin B.; Bedewi, Lama; Dehe, Lukas; Treskatsch, Sascha; Shakibaei, Mehdi; Schaefer, Michael; Mousa, Shaaban A

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure has emerged as a disease with significant public health implications. Following progression of heart failure, heart and liver dysfunction are frequently combined in hospitalized patients leading to increased morbidity and mortality. Here, we investigated the underlying pathological alterations in liver injury following heart failure. Heart failure was induced using a modified infrarenal aortocaval fistula (ACF) in male Wistar rats. Sham operated and ACF rats were compared for th...

  19. The Genetic Challenges and Opportunities in Advanced Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah-Shmouni, Fady; Seidelmann, Sara B; Sirrs, Sandra; Mani, Arya; Jacoby, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The causes of heart failure are diverse. Inherited causes represent an important clinical entity and can be divided into 2 major categories: familial and metabolic cardiomyopathies. The distinct features that might be present in early disease states can become broadly overlapping with other diseases, such as in the case of inherited cardiomyopathies (ie, familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or mitochondrial diseases). In this review article, we focus on genetic issues related to advanced heart failure. Because of the emerging importance of this topic and its breadth, we sought to focus our discussion on the known genetic forms of heart failure syndromes, genetic testing, and newer data on pharmacogenetics and therapeutics in the treatment of heart failure, to primarily encourage clinicians to place a priority on the diagnosis and treatment of these potentially treatable conditions. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Coronary artery aneurysms and congestive heart failure--possible long-term course of Kawasaki disease in an adult--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Y; Takayanagi, K; Inoue, T; Yamaguchi, H; Hayashi, T; Morooka, S; Takabatake, Y; Sato, Y

    1988-07-01

    Multiple coronary artery aneurysms, rarely seen in patients with atherosclerotic heart disease, can be frequently observed in children with Kawasaki disease. However, their long-term clinical courses still remain obscure. A thirty-nine-year-old male came to our clinic because of congestive heart failure. A left ventriculogram revealed highly reduced wall motion. A coronary angiogram showed left main trunk aneurysm with complete occlusion of the left anterior descending artery and ramification of the right coronary artery close to the ostium. Six months after discharge, he died suddenly. On autopsy, aneurysms were observed in the left main trunk and right coronary artery, together with an old anteroseptal myocardial infarction. Although he did not have a clear history of febrile disease in childhood, he was highly suspected to be a long-term survivor of Kawasaki disease because of the unique form and distribution of the coronary artery aneurysms.

  1. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing ... the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and ...

  2. Heart failure patients utilizing an electric home monitor: What effects does heart failure have on their quality of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simuel, Gloria J.

    Heart Failure continues to be a major public health problem associated with high mortality and morbidity. Heart Failure is the leading cause of hospitalization for persons older than 65 years, has a poor prognosis and is associated with poor quality of life. More than 5.3 million American adults are living with heart failure. Despite maximum medical therapy and frequent hospitalizations to stabilize their condition, one in five heart failure patients die within the first year of diagnosis. Several disease-management programs have been proposed and tested to improve the quality of heart failure care. Studies have shown that hospital admissions and emergency room visits decrease with increased nursing interventions in the home and community setting. An alternative strategy for promoting self-management of heart failure is the use of electronic home monitoring. The purpose of this study was to examine what effects heart failure has on patient's quality of life that had been monitoring on an electronic home monitor longer than 2 months. Twenty-one questionnaires were given to patients utilizing an electronic home monitor by their home health agency nurse. Eleven patients completed the questionnaire. The findings showed that there is some deterioration in quality of life with more association with the physical aspects of life than with the emotional aspects of life, which probably was due to the small sample size. There was no significant difference in readmission rates in patients utilizing an electronic home monitor. Further research is needed with a larger population of patients with chronic heart failure and other chronic diseases which may provide more data, and address issues such as patient compliance with self-care, impact of heart failure on patient's quality of life, functional capacity, and heart failure patient's utilization of the emergency rooms and hospital. Telemonitoring holds promise for improving the self-care abilities of persons with HF.

  3. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetic Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about other tests and procedures, go to the diagnosis sections of the Health Topics Coronary Heart Disease , Heart Failure , and Cardiomyopathy articles. Treatment Diabetic heart disease (DHD) is treated ...

  4. Effects of Coping Skills Training on Quality of Life, Disease Biomarkers, and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Heart Failure: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Andrew; Blumenthal, James A; Koch, Gary G; Hoffman, Benson M; Watkins, Lana L; Smith, Patrick J; O'Connor, Christopher M; Adams, Kirkwood F; Rogers, Joseph G; Sueta, Carla; Chang, Patricia P; Johnson, Kristy S; Schwartz, Jeanne; Hinderliter, Alan L

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a chronic disease that compromises patients' quality of life (QoL). Interventions designed to reduce distress and improve disease self-management are needed. We evaluated the efficacy of a telephone-based coping skills training (CST) intervention. This randomized clinical trial involved 180 HF outpatients with reduced ejection fraction. Participants ranged in age from 29 to 87 years (mean=58 years); 27% were women, and 47% were nonwhite. Participants were randomized to either a CST intervention or heart failure education, both delivered over 16 weeks. The primary outcomes were (1) postintervention effects on QoL and HF disease biomarkers (both with α=0.01), and (2) a composite measure of time to death or first hospitalization (with α=0.03) over a median follow-up period of 3 years. CST resulted in greater improvements in QoL compared with heart failure education (P<0.01), including the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (P=0.009), depressive symptoms (P=0.027), and the 6-minute walk test (P=0.012). However, it did not differentially improve HF disease biomarkers or reduce risk of all-cause hospitalizations or death (hazard ratio=0.84 [95% confidence interval, 0.59-1.12]). Interestingly, exploratory analyses showed that participants randomized to CST experienced a reduction in the composite end point of worsening HF hospitalization or death during the 3-year follow-up period (hazard ratio=0.65 [95% confidence interval, 0.44-0.98]; P=0.040). CST improved QoL in patients with HF. Monitoring and improving QoL is emerging as an important aspect of the clinical management of HF that can reduce disease burden and may help improve clinical outcomes in this vulnerable patient population. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00873418. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Isolated left ventricular noncompaction as a cause for heart failure and heart transplantation: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic-Preradovic, T; Jenni, R; Oechslin, E N; Noll, G; Seifert, B; Attenhofer Jost, C H

    2009-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of isolated left ventricular noncompaction (IVNC) as a cause of heart failure and heart transplantation. There were 960 patients seen in the heart failure clinic from 1987 to 2005, with a complete evaluation including echocardiography at our center (study population, 82% men, mean age 52 years). The following data were collected: type of heart disease, age at echocardiography and at heart transplantation, and frequency of heart transplantation. Echocardiographic diagnosis of IVNC was based on our published criteria. The etiologies of heart failure were coronary artery disease (CAD; 37%), idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (33%), valvular heart disease (11%), congenital heart disease (5%), IVNC (3%), hypertensive heart disease (3%), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (2%), myocarditis (1%), and Heart transplantation was performed in 253 patients (26%) due to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (42%), CAD (39%), valvular heart disease (5%), congenital heart disease (5%), IVNC (2%), or other etiologies (heart failure remain idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, CAD and valvular heart disease. Strictly using the criteria for the definition of IVNC, IVNC is a rare underlying cardiomyopathy for both, heart failure (2.7%) and heart transplantation (2%) in our center. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Chagas disease as a cause of heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias in patients long removed from endemic areas: an emerging problem in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, Vieri; Tomberli, Benedetta; Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Fornaro, Alessandra; Castelli, Gabriele; Pieralli, Filippo; Berni, Andrea; Yacoub, Sophie; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Olivotto, Iacopo

    2015-12-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. In endemic areas (South and Central America), Chagas disease represents a relevant public health issue, and is the most frequent cause of cardiomyopathy. In nonendemic areas, such as Europe, Chagas disease represents an emerging problem following the establishment of sizeable communities from Brazil and Bolivia. Chagas cardiomyopathy represents the most frequent and serious complication of chronic Chagas disease, affecting about 20-30% of patients, potentially leading to heart failure, arrhythmias, thromboembolism, stroke and sudden death. Because late complications of Chagas disease may develop several years or even decades after the acute infection, it may be extremely challenging to reach the correct diagnosis in patients long removed from the countries of origin. We report two examples of Chagas cardiomyopathy in South American women permanently residing in Italy for more than 20 years, presenting with cardiac manifestations ranging from left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure to isolated ventricular arrhythmias. The present review emphasizes that Chagas disease should be considered as a potential diagnosis in patients from endemic areas presenting with 'idiopathic' cardiac manifestations, even when long removed from their country of origin, with potential implications for treatment and control of Chagas disease transmission.

  7. Efficacy of carvedilol in pediatric heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Alex Hørby; Fatkin, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of: Huang M, Zhang X, Chen S et al. The effect of carvedilol treatment on chronic heart failure in pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy: a prospective, randomized-controlled study. Pediatr. Cardiol. 34, 680-685 (2013). A role for β-blockers in children with heart failure has...

  8. [Telemedicine and wireless devices in heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeci, Lucia; Guerriero, Lorenzo; L'Abbate, Antonio; Pioggia, Giovanni; Tartarisco, Gennaro; Trivella, Maria Giovanna

    2014-05-01

    Telemedicine has the potential to constitute the central element of the future primary care and become an effective means of prevention and early warning of acute exacerbation of chronic diseases. Up to now, the application of telemedicine has found a variety of difficulties, regarding the types and methods of acquisition and transmission of biological signals, the acceptance and cooperation of the patient, etc. The latest technological developments involve the combined use of wireless technologies and smartphones, for the collection and the transmission of data, and specific softwares for their automatic analysis. This paper examines some of the critical aspects in the application of new technologies for heart failure remote management.

  9. Progression of Renal Impairment and Chronic Kidney Disease in Chronic Heart Failure: An Analysis From GISSI-HF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damman, Kevin; Masson, Serge; Lucci, Donata; Gorini, Marco; Urso, Renato; Maggioni, Aldo P; Tavazzi, Luigi; Tarantini, Luigi; Tognoni, Gianni; Voors, Adriaan; Latini, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Data on the natural change in renal function in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) are limited. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was assessed over 36 months in 6934 patients included in the GISSI-HF study. Associations from baseline, changes in renal function, and occurrence of cardiovascular death or HF hospitalization were assessed. Mean age was 67 years, mainly men (78%), and mean eGFR was 68 mL • min(-1) • 1.73 m(-2). Change in eGFR in the 1st year was -1.5 ± 16 mL • min(-1) • 1.73 m(-2), and over 36 months it was -3.7 ± 18 mL • min(-1) • 1.73 m(-2). Over the latter period, only 25% deteriorated ≥1 Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiatives (KDOQI) class of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Fifteen percent of patients had >15 mL • min(-1) • 1.73 m(-2) decrease in eGFR in the 1st 12 months. Lower eGFR was associated with outcome: hazard ratio (HR) 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.10 (P 15 mL • min(-1) • 1.73 m(-2) in the 1st year showed the highest risk of events (HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.10-1.36; P renal function over time in patients with chronic HF was modest. Only 25% deteriorated ≥1 KDOQI class of CKD after 3 years. Any decrease in eGFR over time was associated with strongly increased event rates. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Blood Content of Markers of Inflammation and Cytokines in Patients With Alcoholic Cardiomyopathy and Ischemic Heart Disease at Various Stages of Heart Failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, L F; Moiseev, V S; Pirozhkov, S V; Terebilina, N N; Naumova, T A; Baronets, V Iu; Goncharov, A S

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a comparative study of content proinflammatory cytokines, biomarkers of inflammatory process, biochemical indicators of congestive heart failure (CHF) and hemodynamic parameters in patients with alcoholic cardiomyopathy (ACMP) and ischemic heart disease (IHD) with various NYHA classes. We examined 62 men with ACMP (n = 45) and IHD (n = 17) and NYHA class III-IV CHF. Patients of both groups had lowered ejection fraction (EF), dilated cardiac chambers, and increased left ventricular (LV) myocardial mass index (MMI). Relative LV wall thickness was within normal limits but in the ACMP group it was significantly lower than in IHD group what corresponded to the eccentric type of myocardial hypertrophy. Higher NYHA class was associated with lower EF and larger end diastolic and end systolic LV dimensions. In ACMP it was also associated with larger dimension of the right ventricle while in IHD--with substantially larger (by 30%) dimension of atria. Substantial amount of endotoxin found in blood plasma of patients with IHD corresponded to the conception of increased intestinal permeability of in CHF. Alcohol abuse was an aggravating factor of endotoxin transmission and its concentration in patients with ACMP was 3 times higher than in patients with IHD. Patients with ACMP had substantially elevated blood concentrations of interleukins (IL) 6, 8, 12, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and its soluble receptor s-TNF-R; they also had twofold elevation of C-reactive protein concentration. ACMP was associated with manifold rise of blood content of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). Patients with IHD also had elevated blood concentrations of IL 6, 8 and 12 but their values were 1.5-2 times lower than ACMP group. Blood content of TNF-α and s-TNF-R in IHD group was within normal limits. Higher NYHA class in ACMP patients was associated with higher concentrations of IL 6 and 8, TNF-a, and BNP. In both groups of patients contents of IL-12, s-TNF-R, TGF-1β and factors of

  11. Predictive Value of Hepatic and Renal Dysfunction Based on the Models for End-Stage Liver Disease in Patients With Heart Failure Evaluated for Heart Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyguła-Jurkiewicz, B; Nadziakiewicz, P; Zakliczynski, M; Szczurek, W; Chraponski, J; Zembala, M; Gasior, M

    2016-06-01

    The evaluation of prognosis and determination of a long-term treatment strategy is an important element of management in patients with heart failure (HF). The aim of the study was to determine the prognostic value of the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) and its modifications, MELD and serum sodium (MELD-Na) and MELD excluding the international normalized ratio (MELD-XI), as well as other independent risk factors for death during a 4-year follow-up. We analyzed retrospectively 143 patients with advanced HF, evaluated for heart transplant between 2009 and 2011. Patients using warfarin were excluded from the study. The long-term follow-up data were obtained during follow-up visits and/or phone contact with the patients or their families. The age of the patients was 54 (48-59) years and 88.1% of patients were male. Mortality rate during the follow-up period was 49%. The MELD scores (hazard ratio [HR], 1.12; P < .001), as well as serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP; HR, 1.01; P < .01) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP; HR, 1.01; P < .05) levels, were independent risk factors for death. Receiver operator characteristic analysis indicated that a MELD cutoff of 10 (area under the curve [AUC], 0.756; P < .0001], MELD-XI cutoff of 13.0 (AUC, 0.720; P < .0001), MELD-Na cutoff of 13.0 (AUC, 0.813; P < .0001), hs-CRP cutoff of 4.02 (AUC, 0.686; P < .001), and NT-proBNP cutoff of 1055 (AUC, 0.722; P < .001) were the best predictive values as predictors of death. MELD, MELD-Na, and MELD-XI scores are prognostic factors for death during a 4-year follow-up. A high MELD score is an independent prognostic factor for death. NT-proBNP and hs-CRP serum concentrations are other independent factors influencing death. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Major Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Gout and Associated Cardiovascular Disease or Heart Failure and Chronic Kidney Disease Initiating a Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foody, JoAnne; Turpin, Robin S; Tidwell, Beni A; Lawrence, Debra; Schulman, Kathy L

    2017-11-01

    Several observational studies and meta-analyses have suggested that treating hyperuricemia in patients with gout and moderate or severe chronic kidney disease (CKD) may improve renal and cardiovascular (CV) outcomes. To evaluate the impact of initiating allopurinol or febuxostat treatment on major CV events in patients with gout, preexisting CV disease (CVD) or heart failure (HF), and stage 3 or 4 CKD in a real-world setting. Patients with gout (aged >18 years) who initiated allopurinol or febuxostat treatment between 2009 and 2013 after a diagnosis of stage 3 or 4 CKD and CVD-including coronary artery disease (CAD), cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral vascular disease (PVD)-or HF were selected from the MarketScan databases. The major CV events included CAD-specific, cerebrovascular disease-specific, and PVD-specific events. Cox proportional hazards modeling identified the predictors of major CV events in aggregate, and of CAD, cerebrovascular disease, and PVD events, individually. During follow-up, 2426 patients (370 receiving febuxostat and 2056 receiving allopurinol; 63% male; mean age, 73 years) had 162 major CV events (3.8% in those receiving febuxostat vs 7.2% in those receiving allopurinol; P = .015). The rates of major CV events per 1000 person-years were 51.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 28-87) in patients initiating febuxostat and 99.3 (95% CI, 84-117) among those initiating allopurinol. Overall, 49.4% of patients had a CAD event, 32.5% had a PVD event, and 23.5% had a cerebrovascular disease-specific event. Febuxostat initiation was associated with a significantly lower risk for a major CV event versus patients who initiated allopurinol (hazard ratio, 0.52; P = .02), driven in large part by lower PVD-specific events (P = .026). Patients with moderate-to-severe CKD and CVD or HF who initiated febuxostat treatment had a significantly lower rate of major CV events than patients who initiated allopurinol.

  13. Correlation of 6-min walk test with left ventricular function and quality of life in heart failure due to Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambela, Mayara C; Mediano, Mauro F F; Ferreira, Roberto R; Japiassú, André M; Waghabi, Mariana C; da Silva, Gilberto M S; Saraiva, Roberto M

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the correlation of the total distance walked during the six-minute walk test (6MWT) with left ventricular function and quality of life in patients with Chagas Disease (ChD) complicated by heart failure. This is a cross-sectional study of adult patients with ChD and heart failure diagnosed based on Framingham criteria. 6MWT was performed following international guidelines. New York Heart Association functional class, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) serum levels, echocardiographic parameters and quality of life (SF-36 and MLHFQ questionnaires) were determined and their correlation with the distance covered at the 6MWT was tested. Forty adult patients (19 male; 60 ± 12 years old) with ChD and heart failure were included in this study. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 35 ± 12%. Only two patients (5%) ceased walking before 6 min had elapsed. There were no cardiac events during the test. The average distance covered was 337 ± 105 metres. The distance covered presented a negative correlation with BNP (r = -0.37; P = 0.02), MLHFQ quality-of-life score (r = -0.54; P = 0.002), pulmonary artery systolic pressure (r = -0.42; P = 0.02) and the degree of diastolic dysfunction (r = -0.36; P = 0.03) and mitral regurgitation (r = -0.53; P = 0.0006) and positive correlation with several domains of the SF-36 questionnaire. The distance walked during the 6MWT correlates with BNP, quality of life and parameters of left ventricular diastolic function in ChD patients with heart failure. We propose this test to be adopted in endemic areas with limited resources to aid in the identification of patients who need referral for tertiary centres for further evaluation and treatment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease Updated:May 17,2017 Most illegal drugs can ... www.dea.gov/druginfo/factsheets.shtml Alcohol and Heart Disease Caffeine and Heart Disease Tobacco and Heart Disease ...

  15. N-acteyl-ß-D-glucosaminidase and kidney injury molecule-1: New predictors for long-term progression of chronic kidney disease in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungbauer, Carsten G; Uecer, Ekrem; Stadler, Stefan; Birner, Christoph; Buchner, Stefan; Maier, Lars S; Luchner, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) are often characterized by the cardiorenal syndrome (CRS). The aim of the present study was to assess whether novel markers of kidney injury are able to predict progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in patients with CHF. New renal biomarkers, N-acteyl-ß-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin (NGAL), were assessed from urine samples of 149 patients with chronic heart failure. During a 5-year-follow-up, renal function was assessed by creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR CKD EPI) and was available for 138 patients. Further, data regarding all-cause mortality was obtained. Twenty-six patients (18.8%) developed a progression of CKD during the follow-up period, as defined by decline in eGFR category accompanied by a ≥25% drop in eGFR form baseline. No difference regarding age, sex, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes or EF was present between patients with and without CKD progression (each P = n.s.). At baseline, creatinine concentrations and eGFR were significantly different between both groups (sCr: 1.50 ± 0.67 vs 1.04 ± 0.37, P =  median (OR 3.25,P = 0.013), initial eGFR (OR 0.94, P chronic heart failure patients with CKD show a relevant disease progression. The current study emphasizes a strong association of the tubular biomarkers NAG and KIM-1 with CKD progression in chronic heart failure and suggests their usefulness as cardiorenal markers. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  16. Heart transplantation in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchill, Luke J

    2016-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) is vastly different to that observed in acquired heart disease. Unlike acquired HF in which pharmacological strategies are the cornerstone for protecting and improving ventricular function, ACHD-related HF relies heavily upon structural and other interventions to achieve these aims. patients with ACHD constitute a small percentage of the total adult heart transplant population (∼3%), although the number of ACHD heart transplant recipients is growing rapidly with a 40% increase over the last two decades. The worldwide experience to date has confirmed heart transplantation as an effective life-extending treatment option in carefully selected patients with ACHD with end-stage cardiac disease. Opportunities for improving outcomes in patients with ACHD-related HF include (i) earlier recognition and referral to centres with combined expertise in ACHD and HF, (ii) increased awareness of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death risk in this population, (iii) greater collaboration between HF and ACHD specialists at the time of heart transplant assessment, (iv) expert surgical planning to reduce ischaemic time and bleeding risk at the time of transplant, (v) tailored immunosuppression in the post-transplant period and (vi) development and validation of ACHD-specific risk scores to predict mortality and guide patient selection. The purpose of this article is to review current approaches to diagnosing and treating advanced HF in patients with ACHD including indications, contraindications and clinical outcomes after heart transplantation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Isolated left ventricular noncompaction as a cause for heart failure and heart transplantation: a single center experience

    OpenAIRE

    Kovacevic-Preradovic, T; Jenni, R; Oechslin, E N; Noll, G; Seifert, Burkhardt; Attenhofer Jost, C H

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of isolated left ventricular noncompaction (IVNC) as a cause of heart failure and heart transplantation. Methods: There were 960 patients seen in the heart failure clinic from 1987 to 2005, with a complete evaluation including echocardiography at our center (study population, 82% men, mean age 52 years). The following data were collected: type of heart disease, age at echocardiography and at heart transplantation, and frequency of heart transplantation....

  18. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Attack Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Attack Symptoms Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... NHLBI has uncovered some of the causes of heart diseases and conditions, as well as ways to prevent ...

  19. Telehealth Interventions to Support Self-Management of Long-Term Conditions: A Systematic Metareview of Diabetes, Heart Failure, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Peter; Daines, Luke; Campbell, Christine; McKinstry, Brian; Weller, David; Pinnock, Hilary

    2017-05-17

    Self-management support is one mechanism by which telehealth interventions have been proposed to facilitate management of long-term conditions. The objectives of this metareview were to (1) assess the impact of telehealth interventions to support self-management on disease control and health care utilization, and (2) identify components of telehealth support and their impact on disease control and the process of self-management. Our goal was to synthesise evidence for telehealth-supported self-management of diabetes (types 1 and 2), heart failure, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cancer to identify components of effective self-management support. We performed a metareview (a systematic review of systematic reviews) of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of telehealth interventions to support self-management in 6 exemplar long-term conditions. We searched 7 databases for reviews published from January 2000 to May 2016 and screened identified studies against eligibility criteria. We weighted reviews by quality (revised A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews), size, and relevance. We then combined our results in a narrative synthesis and using harvest plots. We included 53 systematic reviews, comprising 232 unique RCTs. Reviews concerned diabetes (type 1: n=6; type 2, n=11; mixed, n=19), heart failure (n=9), asthma (n=8), COPD (n=8), and cancer (n=3). Findings varied between and within disease areas. The highest-weighted reviews showed that blood glucose telemonitoring with feedback and some educational and lifestyle interventions improved glycemic control in type 2, but not type 1, diabetes, and that telemonitoring and telephone interventions reduced mortality and hospital admissions in heart failure, but these findings were not consistent in all reviews. Results for the other conditions were mixed, although no reviews showed evidence of harm. Analysis of the mediating role of self-management, and of components of successful

  20. Telehealth Interventions to Support Self-Management of Long-Term Conditions: A Systematic Metareview of Diabetes, Heart Failure, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Peter; Daines, Luke; Campbell, Christine; McKinstry, Brian; Weller, David

    2017-01-01

    Background Self-management support is one mechanism by which telehealth interventions have been proposed to facilitate management of long-term conditions. Objective The objectives of this metareview were to (1) assess the impact of telehealth interventions to support self-management on disease control and health care utilization, and (2) identify components of telehealth support and their impact on disease control and the process of self-management. Our goal was to synthesise evidence for telehealth-supported self-management of diabetes (types 1 and 2), heart failure, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cancer to identify components of effective self-management support. Methods We performed a metareview (a systematic review of systematic reviews) of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of telehealth interventions to support self-management in 6 exemplar long-term conditions. We searched 7 databases for reviews published from January 2000 to May 2016 and screened identified studies against eligibility criteria. We weighted reviews by quality (revised A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews), size, and relevance. We then combined our results in a narrative synthesis and using harvest plots. Results We included 53 systematic reviews, comprising 232 unique RCTs. Reviews concerned diabetes (type 1: n=6; type 2, n=11; mixed, n=19), heart failure (n=9), asthma (n=8), COPD (n=8), and cancer (n=3). Findings varied between and within disease areas. The highest-weighted reviews showed that blood glucose telemonitoring with feedback and some educational and lifestyle interventions improved glycemic control in type 2, but not type 1, diabetes, and that telemonitoring and telephone interventions reduced mortality and hospital admissions in heart failure, but these findings were not consistent in all reviews. Results for the other conditions were mixed, although no reviews showed evidence of harm. Analysis of the mediating role of self-management, and

  1. [Therapy of terminal heart failure using heart transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, M; Warnecke, H; Schüler, S; Hempel, B; Spiegelsberger, S; Hetzer, R

    1991-08-16

    Heart transplantation (HTx) has now become an accepted treatment modality for end-stage heart disease. The limited supply of suitable donor organs imposes constraints upon the decision of who should be selected for transplantation. Usually patients are candidates for HTx, who remain NYHA functional class III or IV despite maximal medical therapy. Further criteria are low left ventricular ejection fraction (less than 20%) with heart rhythm disturbances class IIIA-V (LOWN), which are associated with poor prognosis. Additionally, the suffering of the patient and also the course of heart failure are essential for judging the urgency of HTx. Contraindications are absolute in patients with untreated infections, fixed pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) above 8 WOOD-degrees, severe irreversible kidney and liver disease, active ventricular or duodenal ulcers and acute, psychiatric illness. HTx is relatively contraindicated in patients with diabetes mellitus, age over 60 years, PVR above 6 WOOD-degrees and an unstable psychosocial situation. To prevent rejection of the transplant heart, live-long immunosuppressive therapy is needed. Most immunosuppressive regimes consist of Cyclosporine A and Azathioprine (double drug therapy) or in combination (tripple drug therapy) with Prednisolone. For monitoring of this therapy, control of hole blood cyclosporine A level and white blood count is needed. Rejection episodes can be suspected if there is a greater than 20 mmHg decrease of systolic blood pressure, elevated body temperature, malaise, tachycardia or heart rhythm disturbance. The diagnosis of cardiac rejection can be established by endomyocardial biopsy. Measurement of the voltage of either the surface or intramyocardial ECG, echocardiography with special consideration to early left ventricular filling time as well as immunological methods are additionally used tools. Graft sclerosis as the main risk factor of the late transplant period remains an unsolved problem.

  2. Case of congestive heart failure induced by therapeutic irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushigami, Motohiko; Suruda, Hidetoshi; Mizukoshi, Masato; Umemoto, Masaaki; Fujiwara, Setsuko; Yamamoto, Katsuhiro; Ueno, Yuji; Nishio, Ichiro; Masuyama, Yoshiaki

    1985-02-01

    Valvular insufficiency in radiation-induced heart disease is very rare. We described a patient, 53 years old woman, who developed congestive heart failure 2.5 years later following radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. The findings on examinations including cardiac catheterization revealed pericarditis with effusion, mitral and tricuspid valve insufficiency and pulmonary infarction. (author).

  3. Acute care costs of patients admitted for management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: contribution of disease severity, infection and chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, A; Brand, C; Irving, L; Roberts, C; Thompson, P; Campbell, D

    2010-05-01

    In 2003, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) accounted for 46% of the burden of chronic respiratory disease in the Australian community. In the 65-74-year-old age group, COPD was the sixth leading cause of disability for men and the seventh for women. To measure the influence of disease severity, COPD phenotype and comorbidities on acute health service utilization and direct acute care costs in patients admitted with COPD. Prospective cohort study of 80 patients admitted to the Royal Melbourne Hospital in 2001-2002 for an exacerbation of COPD. Patients were followed for 12 months and data were collected on acute care utilization. Direct hospital costs were derived using Transition II, an activity-based costing system. Individual patient costs were then modelled to ascertain which patient factors influenced total direct hospital costs. Direct costs were calculated for 225 episodes of care, the median cost per admission was AU$3124 (interquartile range $1393 to $5045). The median direct cost of acute care management per patient per year was AU$7273 (interquartile range $3957 to $14 448). In a multivariate analysis using linear regression modelling, factors predictive of higher annual costs were increasing age (P= 0.041), use of domiciliary oxygen (P= 0.008) and the presence of chronic heart failure (P= 0.006). This model has identified a number of patient factors that predict higher acute care costs and awareness of these can be used for service planning to meet the needs of patients admitted with COPD.

  4. [Healthcare delivery to patients with heart failure: from healthcare networks to management of end-stage disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cester, Alberto; Scevola, Moreno; Buoso, Sandro

    2013-03-01

    In geriatrics, end-stage chronic heart failure, old age and death are often an almost obliged clinical and existential continuum. Accompanying these patients to death with dignity and relief is an issue deserving a high degree of cultural attention not only by our discipline, but also by all other specialties and scientific societies that are devoted to the management of terminal illness. Involved professionals are too often in troubles in identifying the conditions that mark the boundary between continuing or stopping the specific treatments. Management of terminal illness requires the ability to identify and treat the complexity of patient's frailty; to discern when continuing therapy is still appropriate; to prepare young physicians in the soft communicative modalities needed to cope with such delicate problems; to face with patient's family expectations in front of death. It is also necessary to distinguish technocratic medicine from humanistic medicine, including human, cultural and overall coordinating capabilities and sharing these capabilities with all actors involved, focusing attention mainly on patient's dignity. Advanced or end-stage chronic heart failure is a peculiar clinical arena that requires close interaction among hospitals, outpatient health district services, and families' needs, expectations and support. Multidimensional assessment teams, firstly introduced into daily clinical practice by geriatricians, address individualized choices and share part of knowledge with cardiology teams. Dichotomy and cultural and scientific debate between aggressive treatment and euthanasia should not prevent from discussing crucial issues such as therapy withdrawal.

  5. Training-induced increase in nitric oxide metabolites in chronic heart failure and coronary artery disease: an extra benefit of water-based exercises?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Mourot; Daline, Teffaha; Malika, Bouhaddi; Fawzi, Ounissi; Philippe, Vernochet; Benoit, Dugue; Catherine, Monpère; Jacques, Regnard

    2009-04-01

    Rehabilitation programs involving immersed exercises are more and more frequently used, with severe cardiac patients as well. This study investigated whether a rehabilitation program including water-based exercises has additional effects on the cardiovascular system compared with a traditional land-based training in heart disease patients. Twenty-four male stable chronic heart failure patients and 24 male coronary artery disease patients with preserved left ventricular function participated in the study. Patients took part in the rehabilitation program performing cycle endurance exercises on land. They also performed gymnastic exercises either on land (first half of the participants) or in water (second half). Resting plasma concentration of nitric oxide metabolites (nitrate and nitrite) and catecholamine were evaluated, and a symptom-limited exercise test on a cycle ergometer was performed before and after the rehabilitation program. In the groups performing water-based exercises, the plasma concentration of nitrates was significantly increased (P = 0.035 for chronic heart failure and P = 0.042 for coronary artery disease), whereas it did not significantly change in the groups performing gymnastic exercise on land. No changes in plasma catecholamine concentration occurred. In every group, the cardiorespiratory capacity of patients was significantly increased after rehabilitation. The water-based exercises seemed to effectively increase the basal level of plasma nitrates. Such changes may be related to an enhancement of endothelial function and may be of importance for the health of the patients.

  6. Remote monitoring of heart failure: benefits for therapeutic decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosyan, Mihran; Caliskan, Kadir; Theuns, Dominic A M J; Szili-Torok, Tamas

    2017-07-01

    Chronic heart failure is a cardiovascular disorder with high prevalence and incidence worldwide. The course of heart failure is characterized by periods of stability and instability. Decompensation of heart failure is associated with frequent and prolonged hospitalizations and it worsens the prognosis for the disease and increases cardiovascular mortality among affected patients. It is therefore important to monitor these patients carefully to reveal changes in their condition. Remote monitoring has been designed to facilitate an early detection of adverse events and to minimize regular follow-up visits for heart failure patients. Several new devices have been developed and introduced to the daily practice of cardiology departments worldwide. Areas covered: Currently, special tools and techniques are available to perform remote monitoring. Concurrently there are a number of modern cardiac implantable electronic devices that incorporate a remote monitoring function. All the techniques that have a remote monitoring function are discussed in this paper in detail. All the major studies on this subject have been selected for review of the recent data on remote monitoring of HF patients and demonstrate the role of remote monitoring in the therapeutic decision making for heart failure patients. Expert commentary: Remote monitoring represents a novel intensified follow-up strategy of heart failure management. Overall, theoretically, remote monitoring may play a crucial role in the early detection of heart failure progression and may improve the outcome of patients.

  7. Individualizing the care of older heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, George A; McKelvie, Robert S; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2018-03-01

    The heart failure epidemic is driven mainly by population aging and the improving survival of patients with cardiovascular risk factors. Aging heart failure patients are affected by multiple concurrent comorbidities and geriatric syndromes, the most important of which are frailty and cognitive impairment. The purpose of this review is to provide clinicians with practical advice on how to individualize the care of older heart failure patients. Frailty and cognitive impairment are common in older heart failure patients. Frailty is increasingly recognized as a key risk factor for functional decline, health service utilization and mortality in aging heart failure patients. Similarly, cognitive impairment impairs patients' ability for self-care and leads to adverse outcomes. Simple and efficient instruments exist to screen for these conditions. Heart failure patients who are frail or cognitively impaired are best looked after in a disease management setting that is deployed in a more integrated healthcare system with access to specialized geriatric consultants. Optimal care planning requires knowledge of these conditions as well as patient and caregiver engagement. Frailty and cognitive impairment are central features of the heart failure syndrome in aging patients and should be routinely considered in assessment and care planning.

  8. CPAP in chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic Heart Failure (CHF represents worldwide a clinical condition with increasing prevalence, high social, economical and epidemiological impact. Even if new pharmacological and non-pharmacological approachs have been recently used, mortality remains high in general population and quality of life is poor in these patients. DISCUSSION The association between CHF and sleep disorders is frequent but still undervalued: sleep apnoeas in CHF produce negative effects on cardiovascular system and an aggravation of prognosis. CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure is commonly used to treat sleep apnoeas in patients without cardiac involvement and it is also used in first line treatment of acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema thanks to its hemodynamic and ventilatory effects. The addition of nightly CPAP to standard aggressive medical therapy in patients with CHF and sleep apnoeas reduces the number of apnoeas, reduces the blood pressure, and the respiratory and cardiac rate, reduces the activation of sympathetic nervous system, the left ventricular volume and the hospitalization rate; besides CPAP increases the left ventricular ejection fraction, amd the oxygenation, it improves quality of life, tolerance to exercise and seems to reduce mortality in patients with a higher apnoeas suppression. CONCLUSIONS These implications suggest to investigate sleep apnoeas in patients with CHF in order to consider a possible treatment with CPAP. Further studies need to be developed to confirm the use of CPAP in patients with CHF without sleep disorders.

  9. Cellular Therapy for Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaltis, Peter J.; Schwarz, Nisha; Toledo-Flores, Deborah; Nicholls, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy and heart failure (HF) is underpinned by complex changes at subcellular, cellular and extracellular levels in the ventricular myocardium. For all of the gains that conventional treatments for HF have brought to mortality and morbidity, they do not adequately address the loss of cardiomyocyte numbers in the remodeling ventricle. Originally conceived to address this problem, cellular transplantation for HF has already gone through several stages of evolution over the past two decades. Various cell types and delivery routes have been implemented to positive effect in preclinical models of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy, with pleiotropic benefits observed in terms of myocardial remodeling, systolic and diastolic performance, perfusion, fibrosis, inflammation, metabolism and electrophysiology. To a large extent, these salubrious effects are now attributed to the indirect, paracrine capacity of transplanted stem cells to facilitate endogenous cardiac repair processes. Promising results have also followed in early phase human studies, although these have been relatively modest and somewhat inconsistent. This review details the preclinical and clinical evidence currently available regarding the use of pluripotent stem cells and adult-derived progenitor cells for cardiomyopathy and HF. It outlines the important lessons that have been learned to this point in time, and balances the promise of this exciting field against the key challenges and questions that still need to be addressed at all levels of research, to ensure that cell therapy realizes its full potential by adding to the armamentarium of HF management. PMID:27280304

  10. Diastolic heart failure in anaesthesia and critical care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pirracchio, R.; Cholley, B.; de Hert, S.; Solal, A. Cohen; Mebazaa, A.

    2007-01-01

    Diastolic heart failure is an underestimated pathology with a high risk of acute decompensation during the perioperative period. This article reviews the epidemiology, risk factors, pathophysiology, and treatment of diastolic heart failure. Although frequently underestimated, diastolic heart failure

  11. Living with Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Institute) Heart Attack: Interactive Tutorial (MedlinePlus—Patient Education Institute) RELATED NEWS March 13, 2017 | Research Feature NHLBI, nursing sorority team up to fight heart disease in ...

  12. What Causes Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Institute) Heart Attack: Interactive Tutorial (MedlinePlus—Patient Education Institute) RELATED NEWS March 13, 2017 | Research Feature NHLBI, nursing sorority team up to fight heart disease in ...

  13. Aging-associated cardiovascular changes and their relationship to heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, James B.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2011-01-01

    Synopsis Aging represents a convergence of declining cardioprotective systems and increasing disease processes that is fertile ground for the development of heart failure. With 50% of all heart failure diagnoses and 90% of all heart failure deaths occurring in the segment of the population over age 70, heart failure is largely a disease of the elderly. This review discusses the microscopic and macroscopic changes in cardiovascular structure, function, protective systems, and disease associated with aging. In addition to outlining important clinical considerations and conditions in older persons, the link between normal aging and the elevated risk for development of stage B heart failure is explained and potential therapeutic pathways highlighted. PMID:22108734

  14. Myocardial beta-adrenoceptor changes in heart failure: concomitant reduction in beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptor function related to the degree of heart failure in patients with mitral valve disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brodde, O. E.; Zerkowski, H. R.; Doetsch, N.; Motomura, S.; Khamssi, M.; Michel, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    In patients suffering from end-stage congestive cardiomyopathy, cardiac beta 1-adrenoceptor function is markedly reduced, whereas cardiac beta 2-adrenoceptor function is nearly normal. To determine whether beta 1-adrenoceptor function is impaired in heart failure selectively, beta 1- and beta

  15. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) can predict outcomes in ambulatory patients with advanced heart failure who have been referred for cardiac transplantation evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyguła-Jurkiewicz, Bożena; Zakliczyński, Michał; Andrejczuk, Mariusz; Mościński, Mateusz; Zembala, Marian

    2014-06-01

    Risk stratification in heart failure (HF) patients is an important element for management. There are several risk stratification models that can be used to predict the prognosis of patients with HF, such as Aaronson's scale, CVM-HF (CardioVascular Medicine Heart Failure), the Seattle Heart Failure Model (SHFM) and the Munich score. These models fail to adequately address the impact of multiorgan dysfunction on prognosis. The classical Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score consists of: total bilirubin, INR (international normalized ratio) and creatinine level. There are some modifications of the MELD scale: MELD-XI, which excludes the INR score; the mod-MELD score, in which INR is replaced with albumin levels; and MELD-Na, which consists of the bilirubin and creatinine levels, INR ratio and the sodium level. Therefore, the MELD score systems are markers of multisystem dysfunction (renal, cardiac, hepatic). It is important that they are composed of routinely collected laboratory measures which are easy to use.

  16. Comparison of Indian subcontinent and Middle East acute heart failure patients: Results from the Gulf Acute Heart Failure Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Panduranga

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: AHF patients from this region are a decade younger than Western patients with high prevalence of ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, and AHF with reduced ejection fraction. There is an urgent need to control risk factors among both groups, as well as the need for setting up heart failure clinics for better postdischarge management.

  17. [Obesity and cardiac cachexia in chronic heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauser, M; Altenberger, J

    2013-09-01

    Obesity as well as cardiac cachexia in heart failure patients are not fully understood and therefore of high scientific interest. Obesity as a common risk factor for cardiovascular disease is associated with a high mortality. In contrast obesity in patients suffering from chronic heart failure seems to be accompanied with a favorable outcome in contrast to people with normal weight, known as the obesity paradox. In the last decade there has been growing interest in cachexia, which is common in advanced stages of chronic diseases, such as heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cancer and renal failure and is associated with a poor prognosis. Until now cachexia has been underdiagnosed and undertreated. This review discusses the complex underlying pathomechanisms as well as potential therapeutic approaches.

  18. Accurate diagnoses, evidence based drugs, and new devices (3 Ds in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang B. Siswanto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure becomes main problem in cardiology because of increasing of heart failure patients, rehospitalization rate, morbidity, and mortality rate. The main causes of increasing heart failure problems are: (1 Successful treatment of acute myocardial infarction can be life saving, but its sequelae can cause heart failure. (2 Increasing life expectancy rate grows along with incidences of ageing related heart failure. (3 High prevalence of infection in Indonesia can cause rheumatic heart disease post Streptococcal beta hemolyticus infection, viral myocarditis, infective endocartitis, and tuberculoid pericarditis. (4 Many risk factors for coronary heart disease are often found in heart failure patients, for examples smoking, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and obesity. Indonesia joined international multicentered registry in 2006. Acute Decompensated HEart failure REgistry is a web based international registry to record patient with acute decompensated heart failure treated in emergency room. It was found that heart failure patients in 5 big hospitals in Java and Bali island that joined this registry are younger, sicker and late to seek treatment. The median hospital length of stay was 7 days and in hospital mortality rate was 6.7%. The aim of this article is to give summary about essential things in diagnosing and treating heart failure patients. 3D (accurate diagnoses, evidence based drugs, and new devices are the most important but what to do and what not to do in dealing with heart failure is also useful for your daily practice. (Med J Indones 2012;21:52-8Keywords: Devices, diagnostic, drugs, heart failure

  19. Adherence in heart failure in the elderly : Problem and possible solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Martje H. L.; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2008-01-01

    Background: As a result of the improvement of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of heart failure patients, the heart failure regimen is becoming more complicated, especially for elderly patients with co-morbid diseases. Non-adherence to this regimen is a problem in many heart failure

  20. Comparison of the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration, the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study and the Cockcroft-Gault equation in patients with heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szummer, Karolina; Evans, Marie; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Alehagen, Urban; Dahlström, Ulf; Benson, Lina; Lund, Lars H

    2017-01-01

    Background It is unknown how the creatinine-based renal function estimations differ for dose adjustment cut-offs and risk prediction in patients with heart failure. Method and results The renal function was similar with the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) (median 59 mL/min/1.73 m2, IQR 42 to 77) and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study (MDRD) (59 mL/min/1.73 m2, IQR 43 to 75) and slightly lower with the Cockcroft-Gault (CG) equation (57 mL/min, IQR 39 to 82). Across the commonly used renal function stages, the CKD-EPI and the MDRD classified patients into the same stage in 87.2% (kappa coefficient 0.83, prenal function estimated with the CKD-EPI, the MDRD and the CG. Agreement between the formulas was compared for categories. Prediction of death was assessed with c-statistics and with NRI. Conclusion The choice of renal function estimation formula has clinical implications and differing results at various cut-off levels. For prognosis, the CG predicts mortality better than the CKD-EPI and MDRD. PMID:28761677

  1. Predicting costs of care in heart failure patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith David H

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying heart failure patients most likely to suffer poor outcomes is an essential part of delivering interventions to those most likely to benefit. We sought a comprehensive account of heart failure events and their cumulative economic burden by examining patient characteristics that predict increased cost or poor outcomes. Methods We collected electronic medical data from members of a large HMO who had a heart failure diagnosis and an echocardiogram from 1999–2004, and followed them for one year. We examined the role of demographics, clinical and laboratory findings, comorbid disease and whether the heart failure was incident, as well as mortality. We used regression methods appropriate for censored cost data. Results Of the 4,696 patients, 8% were incident. Several diseases were associated with significantly higher and economically relevant cost changes, including atrial fibrillation (15% higher, coronary artery disease (14% higher, chronic lung disease (29% higher, depression (36% higher, diabetes (38% higher and hyperlipidemia (21% higher. Some factors were associated with costs in a counterintuitive fashion (i.e. lower costs in the presence of the factor including age, ejection fraction and anemia. But anemia and ejection fraction were also associated with a higher death rate. Conclusions Close control of factors that are independently associated with higher cost or poor outcomes may be important for disease management. Analysis of costs in a disease like heart failure that has a high death rate underscores the need for economic methods to consider how mortality should best be considered in costing studies.

  2. Optimizing clinical risk stratification in acute heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demissei, Biniyam Gemechu

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure occurs when the heart is unable to pump sufficiently to maintain blood flow to meet the body's needs. Acute heart failure is defined as a rapid onset of signs and symptoms of heart failure resulting in the need for urgent medical treatment. Acute heart failure is associated with

  3. Clinical characteristics and causes of heart failure, adherence to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical characteristics and causes of heart failure, adherence to treatment guidelines, and mortality of patients with acute heart failure: Experience at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa.

  4. Prognostic importance of pulmonary hypertension in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Jesper; Akkan, Dilek; Iversen, Kasper Karmark

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a well-known complication in heart failure, but its prognostic importance is less well established. This study assessed the risk associated with pulmonary hypertension in patients with heart failure with preserved or reduced left ventricular (LV) ejection fractions...... obstructive lung disease, heart failure, and impaired renal function. In conclusion, pulmonary hypertension is associated with increased short- and long-term mortality in patients with reduced LV ejection fractions and also in patients with preserved LV ejection fractions........ Patients with known or presumed heart failure (n = 388) underwent the echocardiographic assessment of pulmonary systolic pressure and LV ejection fraction. Patients were followed for up to 5.5 years. Increased pulmonary pressure was associated with increased short- and long-term mortality (p

  5. Stem Cell Therapy for Congestive Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunduz E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionHeart failure is a major cardiovascular health problem. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of congestive heart failure (CHF [1]. Cardiac transplantation remains the most effective long-term treatment option, however is limited primarily by donor availability, rejection and infections. Mechanical circulatory support has its own indications and limitations [2]. Therefore, there is a need to develop more effective therapeutic strategies.Recently, regenerative medicine has received considerable scientific attention in the cardiovascular arena. We report here our experience demonstrating the beneficial effects of cardiac stem cell therapy on left ventricular functions in a patient with Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL who developed CHF due to ischemic heart disease during the course of lymphoma treatment. Case reportA 58-year-old male with relapsed HL was referred to our bone marrow transplantation unit in October 2009. He was given 8 courses of combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin, bleomycin, vincristine, and dacarbazine (ABVD between June 2008 and February 2009 and achieved complete remission. However, his disease relapsed 3 months after completing the last cycle of ABVD and he was decided to be treated with DHAP (cisplatin, cytarabine, dexamethasone followed autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT. After the completion of first course of DHAP regimen, he developed acute myocardial infarction (AMI and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG was performed. After his cardiac function stabilized, 3 additional courses of DHAP were given and he was referred to our centre for consideration of autologous SCT. Computed tomography scans obtained after chemotherapy confirmed complete remission. Stem cells were collected from peripheral blood after mobilization with 10 µg/kg/day granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF subcutaneously. Collection was started on the fifth day of G-CSF and performed for 3 consecutive days. Flow cytometric

  6. A randomized clinical trial of hospital-based, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients with congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or high risk of ischemic heart disease (the DANREHAB trial) - design, intervention, and population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, A.D.O.; Schou, O.; Soja, A.M.B.

    2005-01-01

    , or readmissions due to heart disease based on linkage to public registries. The CR was an individually tailored, multidisciplinary program (6 weeks of intensive CR and 12 months of follow-up) including patient education, exercise training, dietary counseling, smoking cessation, psychosocial support, risk factor...

  7. Tackling heart disease and poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geraldine; Carrington, Melinda

    2007-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, with a projected increase in incidence in developed and developing countries. This paper will review the literature on the role of poverty and socioeconomic deprivation in cardiovascular disease and outline ways to tackle poverty. The literature acknowledges the individual risk factors for cardiovascular disease, but highlights the negative effects of neighborhood deprivation on the incidence of cardiovascular disease and its mortality rates. The studies show that equitable access to health care is not evident and those in less affluent neighborhoods have greater disease incidence and increased mortality and morbidity rates, particularly for angina, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. The approach to reducing disease rates needs to be conducted from an individual level to the societal level and needs to prevent and treat heart disease (particularly in deprived neighborhoods). Nurses and health professionals must drive health policy so that progress can be achieved in reducing the disease rates.

  8. Coronary artery disease prevalence and outcome in patients hospitalized with acute heart failure: an observational report from seven Middle Eastern countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Amar M; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi; Aljaraallah, Mohammed; Al Faleh, Husam; Elasfar, Abdelfatah; Panduranga, Prasanth; Singh, Rajvir; Abi Khalil, Charbel; Al Suwaidi, Jassim

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to report prevalence, clinical characteristics, precipitating factors, management and outcome of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) among patients hospitalized with heart failure (HF) in seven Middle Eastern countries and compare them to non-CAD patients. Data were derived from Gulf CARE (Gulf aCute heArt failuRe rEgistry), a prospective multicenter study of 5005 consecutive patients hospitalized with acute HF during February-November 2012 in 7 Middle Eastern countries. The prevalence of CAD among Acute Heart Failure (AHF) patients was 60.2% and varied significantly among the 7 countries (Qatar 65.7%, UAE 66.6%, Kuwait 68.0%, Oman 65.9%, Saudi Arabia 62.5%, Bahrain 52.7% and Yemen 49.1%) with lower values in the lower income countries. CAD patients were older and more likely to have diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and chronic kidney disease. Moreover, CAD patients were more likely to have history of cerebrovascular and peripheral vascular disease when compared to non-CAD patients. In-hospital mortality rates were comparable although CAD patients had more frequent re-hospitalization and worse long-term outcome. However, CAD was not an independent predictor of poor outcome. The prevalence of CAD amongst patients with HF in the Middle East is variable and may be related to healthcare sources. Regional and national studies are needed for assessing further the impact of various etiologies of HF and for developing appropriate strategies to combat this global concern.

  9. Parallel paths to improve heart failure outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Nancy M.

    2013-01-01

    Gaps and disparities in delivery of heart failure education by nurses and performance in accomplishing self-care behaviors by patients with advanced heart failure may be factors in clinical decompensation and unplanned consumption of health care. Is nurse-led education effectively delivered before...... hospital discharge? Nurse leaders must understand the strength of nurses’ knowledge base related to self-care principles and important barriers to best practice. Nurses may not be comfortable teaching patients about dry weight, meal planning, heart failure medications, or progressive steps of activity...... and exercise. Further, clinical nurses may not have time to provide in-depth education to patients before discharge. Equally important, research is needed to learn about factors that enhance patients’ adherence to heart failure self-care behaviors, because adherence to recommendations of national, evidence...

  10. Drug Therapy for Acute Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Somma, Salvatore; Magrini, Laura

    2015-08-01

    Acute heart failure is globally one of most frequent reasons for hospitalization and still represents a challenge for the choice of the best treatment to improve patient outcome. According to current international guidelines, as soon as patients with acute heart failure arrive at the emergency department, the common therapeutic approach aims to improve their signs and symptoms, correct volume overload, and ameliorate cardiac hemodynamics by increasing vital organ perfusion. Recommended treatment for the early management of acute heart failure is characterized by the use of intravenous diuretics, oxygen, and vasodilators. Although these measures ameliorate the patient's symptoms, they do not favorably impact on short- and long-term mortality. Consequently, there is a pressing need for novel agents in acute heart failure treatment with the result that research in this field is increasing worldwide. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Coenzyme Q10 for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madmani, Mohammed E; Yusuf Solaiman, Ahmad; Tamr Agha, Khalil; Madmani, Yasser; Shahrour, Yasser; Essali, Adib; Kadro, Waleed

    2014-06-02

    Coenzyme Q10, or ubiquinone, is a non-prescription nutritional supplement. It is a fat-soluble molecule that acts as an electron carrier in mitochondria and as a coenzyme for mitochondrial enzymes. Coenzyme Q10 deficiency may be associated with a multitude of diseases including heart failure. The severity of heart failure correlates with the severity of coenzyme Q10 deficiency. Emerging data suggest that the harmful effects of reactive oxygen species are increased in patients with heart failure and coenzyme Q10 may help to reduce these toxic effects because of its antioxidant activity. Coenzyme Q10 may also have a role in stabilising myocardial calcium-dependent ion channels and preventing the consumption of metabolites essential for adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. Coenzyme Q10, although not a primary recommended treatment, could be beneficial to patients with heart failure. Several randomised controlled trials have compared coenzyme Q10 to other therapeutic modalities, but no systematic review of existing randomised trials has been conducted. To review the safety and efficacy of coenzyme Q10 in heart failure. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2012, Issue 12); MEDLINE OVID (1950 to January Week 3 2013) and EMBASE OVID (1980 to 2013 Week 03) on 24 January 2013; Web of Science with Conference Proceedings (1970 to January 2013) and CINAHL Plus (1981 to January 2013) on 25 January 2013; and AMED (Allied and Complementary Medicine) (1985 to January 2013) on 28 January 2013. We applied no language restrictions. We included randomised controlled trials of either parallel or cross-over design that assessed the beneficial and harmful effects of coenzyme Q10 in patients with heart failure. When cross-over studies were identified, we considered data only from the first phase. Two authors independently extracted data from the included studies onto a pre-designed data extraction form. We then entered the data into Review

  12. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Most heart attacks happen when a clot in the coronary ...

  13. Rehospitalization for heart failure: problems and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Fonarow, Gregg C; Bonow, Robert O

    2013-01-29

    With a prevalence of 5.8 million in the United States alone, heart failure (HF) is associated with high morbidity, mortality, and healthcare expenditures. Close to 1 million hospitalizations for heart failure (HHF) occur annually, accounting for over 6.5 million hospital days and a substantial portion of the estimated $37.2 billion that is spent each year on HF in the United States. Although some progress has been made in reducing mortality in patients hospitalized with HF, rates of rehospitalization continue to rise, and approach 30% within 60 to 90 days of discharge. Approximately half of HHF patients have preserved or relatively preserved ejection fraction (EF). Their post-discharge event rate is similar to those with reduced EF. HF readmission is increasingly being used as a quality metric, a basis for hospital reimbursement, and an outcome measure in HF clinical trials. In order to effectively prevent HF readmissions and improve overall outcomes, it is important to have a complete and longitudinal characterization of HHF patients. This paper highlights management strategies that when properly implemented may help reduce HF rehospitalizations and include adopting a mechanistic approach to cardiac abnormalities, treating noncardiac comorbidities, increasing utilization of evidence-based therapies, and improving care transitions, monitoring, and disease management. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Frequency of risk factors and aetiologies for heart failure in Saudi Arabia: A hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelfatah Elasfar

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: Coronary artery disease, hypertension, cardiomyopathy and valvular heart disease are the major contributors to heart failure in this patient’s cohort. The exacerbating factors for acute heart failure included high rate of noncompliance to either heart failure diet or medications which remains as a potential target for improvement of care.

  15. Mechanical circulatory treatment of advanced heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løgstrup, Brian B; Vase, Henrik; Gjedsted, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. When patients cease to respond adequately to optimal medical therapy mechanical circulatory support has been promising. The advent of mechanical circulatory support devices has allowed significant improvements...... in patient survival and quality of life for those with advanced or end-stage heart failure. We provide a general overview of current mechanical circulatory support devices encompassing options for both short- and long-term ventricular support....

  16. Advanced Heart Failure and Management Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Gaddam, Krishna K.; Yelamanchili, Pridhvi; Sedghi, Yabiz; Ventura, Hector O.

    2009-01-01

    The global healthcare burden attributable to heart failure is ever increasing. Patients presenting with refractory heart failure should be evaluated for compliance with medical regimens and sodium and/or fluid restriction, and every attempt should be made to optimize conventional strategies. Reversible causes such as ischemia should be identified and revascularization considered in persistently symptomatic patients, particularly those with a viable myocardium. Carefully selected patients who ...

  17. The total artificial heart for biventricular heart failure and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Tang, Daniel G; Katlaps, Gundars J; Shah, Keyur B

    2012-05-01

    Treatment options for late-stage biventricular heart failure are limited but include medical therapy with intravenous inotropes, biventricular assist devices (Bi-VADs) and the total artificial heart (TAH). In this manuscript, we review the indications, surgical techniques and outcomes for the TAH. The TAH offers biventricular replacement, rather than 'assistance', as the device is placed orthotopically after excision of the entire ventricular myocardium and all four native valves. In contrast to patients with Bi-VADs, patients with the TAH have no postoperative inotrope requirements, arrhythmias or inflow/outflow cannulae-related complications. Additionally, patients participate in rehabilitation early after device placement and the development of a portable drive may facilitate hospital discharge in the USA. Furthermore, total heart replacement may be ideal for heart failure associated with unique anatomical and mechanical complications. The TAH is an effective therapeutic option for the treatment of patients dying of heart failure who may not be suitable candidates for left ventricular assist devices.

  18. Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients With Coronary Artery Disease and Angina: Analysis of the Irbesartan in Patients With Heart Failure and Preserved Systolic Function Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badar, Athar A; Perez-Moreno, Ana Cristina; Hawkins, Nathaniel M; Jhund, Pardeep S; Brunton, Alan P T; Anand, Inder S; McKelvie, Robert S; Komajda, Michel; Zile, Michael R; Carson, Peter E; Gardner, Roy S; Petrie, Mark C; McMurray, John J V

    2015-07-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between coronary artery disease (CAD), angina, and clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction enrolled in the irbesartan in patients with heart failure and preserved systolic function (I-Preserve) trial. The mean follow-up period for the 4128 patients enrolled in I-Preserve was 49.5 months. Patients were divided into 4 mutually exclusive groups according to history of CAD and angina: patients with no history of CAD or angina (n=2008), patients with no history of CAD but a history of angina (n=649), patients with a history of CAD but no angina (n=468), and patients with a history of CAD and angina (n=1003); patients with no known CAD or angina were the reference group. After adjustment for other prognostic variables using Cox proportional-hazard models, patients with CAD but no angina were found to be at higher risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.58 [1.22-2.04]; P<0.01) and sudden death (HR, 2.12 [1.33-3.39]; P<0.01), compared with patients with no CAD or angina. Patients with CAD and angina were also at higher risk of all-cause mortality (HR, 1.29 [1.05-1.59]; P=0.02) and sudden death (HR, 1.83 [1.24-2.69]; P<0.01) compared with the same reference group and had the highest risk of unstable angina or myocardial infarction (HR, 5.84 [3.43-9.95]; P<0.01). Patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction and CAD are at higher risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death when compared with those without CAD. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00095238. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. New Insights in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnetti, Giulio; Piepoli, Massimo F.; Siniscalchi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the US and in westernized countries with ischemic heart disease accounting for the majority of these deaths. Paradoxically, the improvements in the medical and surgical treatments of acute coronary syndrome are leading to an increasing number of “survivors” who are then developing heart failure. Despite considerable advances in its management, the gold standard for the treatment of end-stage heart failure patients remains heart transplantation. Nevertheless, this procedure can be offered only to a small percentage of patients who could benefit from a new heart due to the limited availability of donor organs. The aim of this review is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of innovative approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of patients refractory to standard medical therapy and excluded from cardiac transplantation lists. PMID:26634204

  20. New Insights in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Agnetti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the US and in westernized countries with ischemic heart disease accounting for the majority of these deaths. Paradoxically, the improvements in the medical and surgical treatments of acute coronary syndrome are leading to an increasing number of “survivors” who are then developing heart failure. Despite considerable advances in its management, the gold standard for the treatment of end-stage heart failure patients remains heart transplantation. Nevertheless, this procedure can be offered only to a small percentage of patients who could benefit from a new heart due to the limited availability of donor organs. The aim of this review is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of innovative approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of patients refractory to standard medical therapy and excluded from cardiac transplantation lists.

  1. The kidney in heart failure : an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Kevin; Testani, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Heart and kidney are closely related in the clinical syndrome of heart failure (HF). It is now sufficiently clear that renal dysfunction occurs frequently in all phenotypes of HF, and when present, it is associated with higher mortality and morbidity. While the pathophysiology is multifactorial, the

  2. A meta-review of evidence on heart failure disease management programs: the challenges of describing and synthesizing evidence on complex interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson David R

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite favourable results from past meta-analyses, some recent large trials have not found Heart Failure (HF disease management programs to be beneficial. To explore reasons for this, we evaluated evidence from existing meta-analyses. Methods Systematic review incorporating meta-review was used. We selected meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials published after 1995 in English that examined the effects of HF disease management programs on key outcomes. Databases searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR, DARE, NHS EED, NHS HTA, Ageline, AMED, Scopus, Web of Science and CINAHL; cited references, experts and existing reviews were also searched. Results 15 meta-analyses were identified containing a mean of 18.5 randomized trials of HF interventions +/- 10.1 (range: 6 to 36. Overall quality of the meta-analyses was very mixed (Mean AMSTAR Score = 6.4 +/- 1.9; range 2-9. Reporting inadequacies were widespread around populations, intervention components, settings and characteristics, comparison, and comparator groups. Heterogeneity (statistical, clinical, and methodological was not taken into account sufficiently when drawing conclusions from pooled analyses. Conclusions Meta-analyses of heart failure disease management programs have promising findings but often fail to report key characteristics of populations, interventions, and comparisons. Existing reviews are of mixed quality and do not adequately take account of program complexity and heterogeneity.

  3. PULMONARY ARTERIAL DISEASE ASSOCIATED WITH RIGHT-SIDED CARDIAC HYPERTROPHY AND CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE IN ZOO MAMMALS HOUSED AT 2,100 M ABOVE SEA LEVEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan-Sallés, Carles; Martínez, Liliana Sofía; Rosas-Rosas, Arely G; Parás, Alberto; Martínez, Osvaldo; Hernández, Alejandra; Garner, Michael M

    2015-12-01

    Subacute and chronic mountain sickness of humans and the related brisket disease of cattle are characterized by right-sided congestive heart failure in individuals living at high altitudes as a result of sustained hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Adaptations to high altitude and disease resistance vary among species, breeds, and individuals. The authors conducted a retrospective survey of right-sided cardiac hypertrophy associated with pulmonary arterial hypertrophy or arteriosclerosis in zoo mammals housed at Africam Safari (Puebla, México), which is located at 2,100 m above sea level. Seventeen animals with detailed pathology records matched the study criterion. Included were 10 maras (Dolichotis patagonum), 2 cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus oedipus), 2 capybaras (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris), and 1 case each of Bennet's wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus), nilgai antelope (Boselaphus tragocamelus), and scimitar-horned oryx (Oryx dammah). All had right-sided cardiac hypertrophy and a variety of arterial lesions restricted to the pulmonary circulation and causing arterial thickening with narrowing of the arterial lumen. Arterial lesions most often consisted of medial hypertrophy or hyperplasia of small and medium-sized pulmonary arteries. All maras also had single or multiple elevated plaques in the pulmonary arterial trunk consisting of fibrosis, accompanied by chondroid metaplasia in some cases. Both antelopes were juvenile and died with right-sided congestive heart failure associated with severe pulmonary arterial lesions. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description of cardiac and pulmonary arterial disease in zoo mammals housed at high altitudes.

  4. [Patient Participation in Development of Quality Indicators using the Example of National Disease Management Guidelines for Chronic Heart Failure - A Qualitative Analysis of Collective Perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, H; Bernateck, K; Welti, F; Joos, S; Pohontsch, N J; Blozik, E; Scherer, M

    2016-06-01

    In this qualitative study it was investigated by group discussions with patients suffering from chronic heart failure, how relevant the existing quality indicators of the National Disease Management Guidelines for Chronic Heart Failure are being estimated. 6 group discussions were performed. The sample was formed from 4 mixed-gender groups, a male group and a female group. Participants were recruited from local heart sports groups. For the interpretation a method similar to the grounded theory was used. The main conclusion is that in principle quality indicators are accepted. However, many of these indicators neglect the everyday aspects of patients' life. Participants show a disposition of "yes - but" regarding the quality indicators. This phenomenon could be theoretically grasped using the concept of order of knowledge. While participants keep referring to an order of everyday knowledge, quality indicators make recourse to a medical order of knowledge. Both orders of knowledge may compete with each other. The professional knowledge order of medicine needs to open up to a patients' knowledge order. Patient representatives in health care bodies need to be trained to develop a reflexive point of view to different knowledge orders enabling them to represent patients' everyday knowledge more confidently. Otherwise there is danger of conformation to the professional knowledge order of medicine only for reasons of being recognised as equal partners. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of a structured collaborative disease management in the Interdisciplinary Network for Heart Failure (INH) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Anja; Mostardt, Sarah; Biermann, Janine; Gelbrich, Götz; Goehler, Alexander; Geisler, Benjamin P; Siebert, Uwe; Störk, Stefan; Ertl, Georg; Angerrmann, Christiane E; Wasem, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Non-pharmacological treatment programmes are being developed, in which specialised nurses take care of heart failure (HF) patients. Such disease management programmes might increase survival and quality of life in HF patients, but evidence on their cost-effectiveness remains limited. A prospective economic evaluation piggy-backed onto the randomised controlled Interdisciplinary Network for Heart Failure (INH) Study weighted costs of the intervention HeartNetCare -HF™ (HNC) regarding effectiveness, mortality and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). To consider uncertainty sensitivity analyses were performed. Compared to usual care (UC), HNC revealed 8,284 per death avoided within the 6 month study follow-up period. The cost-utility analysis showed additional costs of 49,335 per QALY. Although HNC did not reduce short-term re-admission rates of HF patients hospitalised for cardiac decompensation within the first 180 days after discharge, HNC might reduce mortality and increase quality of life in these patients at reasonable costs. Therefore, long-term HNC-effects deserve further evaluation.

  6. What Is Coronary Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Coronary Heart Disease Coronary Heart Disease Also known as Coronary Artery Disease Leer en ... type of fat. Other Risks Related to Coronary Heart Disease Other conditions and factors also may contribute to ...

  7. Living with Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Coronary Heart Disease Coronary Heart Disease Also known as Coronary Artery Disease Leer en ... type of fat. Other Risks Related to Coronary Heart Disease Other conditions and factors also may contribute to ...

  8. Graves' disease presenting as bi-ventricular heart failure with severe pulmonary hypertension and pre-eclampsia in pregnancy--a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabah, Khandker Mohammad Nurus; Chowdhury, Abdul Wadud; Islam, Mohammad Shahidul; Cader, Fathima Aaysha; Kawser, Shamima; Hosen, Md Imam; Saleh, Mohammed Abaye Deen; Alam, Md Shariful; Chowdhury, Mohammad Monjurul Kader; Tabassum, Humayara

    2014-11-18

    Graves' disease, a well-known cause of hyperthyroidism, is an autoimmune disease with multi-system involvement. More prevalent among young women, it appears as an uncommon cardiovascular complication during pregnancy, posing a diagnostic challenge, largely owing to difficulty in detecting the complication, as a result of a low index of suspicion of Graves' disease presenting during pregnancy. Globally, cardiovascular disease is an important factor for pregnancy-related morbidity and mortality. Here, we report a case of Graves' disease detected for the first time in pregnancy, in a patient presenting with bi- ventricular heart failure, severe pulmonary hypertension and pre- eclampsia. Emphasis is placed on the spectrum of clinical presentations of Graves' disease, and the importance of considering this thyroid disorder as a possible aetiological factor for such a presentation in pregnancy. A 30-year-old Bangladeshi-Bengali woman, in her 28th week of pregnancy presented with severe systemic hypertension, bi-ventricular heart failure and severe pulmonary hypertension with a moderately enlarged thyroid gland. She improved following the administration of high dose intravenous diuretics, and delivered a premature female baby of low birth weight per vaginally, twenty four hours later. Pre-eclampsia was diagnosed on the basis of hypertension first detected in the third trimester, 3+ oedema and mild proteinuria. Electrocardiography revealed sinus tachycardia with incomplete right bundle branch block and echocardiography showed severe pulmonary hypertension with an estimated pulmonary arterial systolic pressure of 73 mm Hg, septal and anterior wall hypokinesia with an ejection fraction of 51%, grade I mitral and tricuspid regurgitation. Thyroid function tests revealed a biochemically hyperthyroid state and positive anti- thyroid peroxidase antibodies was found. (99m)Technetium pertechnetate thyroid scans demonstrated diffuse toxic goiter as evidenced by an enlarged thyroid

  9. Heart disease and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 22367731 . Ridker PM, Libby P, Buring JE. Risk markers and the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. ...

  10. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 21325087 . Ridker PM, Libby P, Buring JE. Risk markers and the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. ...

  11. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 13,2017 Understand the risks of inflammation. Although it is not proven that inflammation causes ...

  12. The Prevalence of Anemia in Elderly With Systolic Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharareh Zeighami Mohammadi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Anemia is prevalent in heart failures and is an independent risk factor for adverse clinical outcomes in patients with CHF. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of anemia in elderly with systolic heart failure hospitalized in Alborz Hospital of Karaj in 2009. Methods & Materials: This is a descriptive retrospective study that reviewed 154 medical records of elderly with systolic heart failure during 2002-2008. Demographic, laboratory, and echocardiography data were reviewed from medical records. Anemia was defined as a hemoglobin level below 12 g/dL in women and below 13 g/dL in men in this study. Data were analysed by descriptive statistics such as frequency distribution, mean, standard deviation and independent group test and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: The findings indicated that prevalence of anemia in elderly with systolic heart failure was (42.9%. There was significant difference between mean level of hemoglobin in heart failure with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (P=0.000. level of hemoglobin significant associated with age (P=0.014 and left ventricular ejection fraction (0.022. Conclusion: This study indicated that anemia is frequent among elderly with systolic heart failure and anemia may be associated with age, LVEF and COPD. More research into the mechanisms of anemia in CHF is needed.

  13. Ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlberg Hansen, Louise; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Correct prehospital diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) may accelerate and improve the treatment. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of prehospital diagnoses of ischemic heart diseases assigned by physicians. Methods. The Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Odense, Denmark...

  14. Travel and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Travel and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 23,2017 Travel precautions help people with heart disease. Traveling to a faraway place ... you do so. Tell your doctor about your travel plans to get the best ... some people might need compression stockings or additional oxygen. Others ...

  15. Incident Heart Failure in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Usman; Egeberg, Alexander; Ahlehoff, Ole

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with a wide range of comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease, but its association with heart failure (HF) is not fully clear. We investigated the risk of incident HF in a nationwide cohort of patients with RA...

  16. Management of undernutrition and failure to thrive in children with congenital heart disease in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argent, Andrew C; Balachandran, Rakhi; Vaidyanathan, Balu; Khan, Amina; Kumar, R Krishna

    2017-12-01

    Poor growth with underweight for age, decreased length/height for age, and underweight-for-height are all relatively common in children with CHD. The underlying causes of this failure to thrive may be multifactorial, including innate growth potential, severity of cardiac disease, increased energy requirements, decreased nutritional intake, malabsorption, and poor utilisation of absorbed nutrition. These factors are particularly common and severe in low- and middle-income countries. Although nutrition should be carefully assessed in all patients, failure of growth is not a contraindication to surgical repair, and patients should receive surgical repair where indicated as soon as possible. Close attention should be paid to nutritional support - primarily enteral feeding, with particular use of breast milk in infancy - in the perioperative period and in the paediatric ICU. This nutritional support requires specific attention and allocation of resources, including appropriately skilled personnel. Thereafter, it is essential to monitor growth and development and to identify causes for failure to catch-up or grow appropriately.

  17. Scintigraphy of the heart using noradrenaline has a prognostic value when visualising heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasbak, Philip; Kjær, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    A number of cardiac diseases are associated with dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system, which causes an increased risk of heart failure progression. Visualisation of the heart's sympathetic nervous system, using dedicated radiolabelled tracers (which is so far mostly done with iod-123-metai...

  18. A Novel Closed-Chest Porcine Model of Chronic Ischemic Heart Failure Suitable for Experimental Research in Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Biondi-Zoccai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac pathologies are among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in industrialized countries, with myocardial infarction (MI representing one of the major conditions leading to heart failure (HF. Hitherto, the development of consistent, stable, and reproducible models of closed-chest MI in large animals, meeting the clinical realism of a patient with HF subsequent to chronic ischemic necrosis, has not been successful. We hereby report the design and ensuing application of a novel porcine experimental model of closed-chest chronic ischemia suitable for biomedical research, mimicking post-MI HF. We also emphasize the key procedural steps involved in replicating this unprecedented model, from femoral artery and vein catheterization to MI induction by permanent occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery through superselective deployment of platinum-nylon coils, as well as endomyocardial biopsy sampling for histologic analysis and cell harvesting. Our model could indeed represent a valuable contribution and tool for translational research, providing precious insights to understand and overcome the many hurdles concerning, and currently quenching, the preclinical steps mandatory for the clinical translation of new cardiovascular technologies for personalized HF treatments.

  19. Predictors of incident heart failure in patients after an acute coronary syndrome: The LIPID heart failure risk-prediction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Andrea; Barnes, Elizabeth H; Blankenberg, Stefan; Colquhoun, David M; Hunt, David; Nestel, Paul J; Stewart, Ralph A; West, Malcolm J; White, Harvey D; Simes, John; Tonkin, Andrew

    2017-12-01

    Coronary heart disease is a major cause of heart failure. Availability of risk-prediction models that include both clinical parameters and biomarkers is limited. We aimed to develop such a model for prediction of incident heart failure. A multivariable risk-factor model was developed for prediction of first occurrence of heart failure death or hospitalization. A simplified risk score was derived that enabled subjects to be grouped into categories of 5-year risk varying from 20%. Among 7101 patients from the LIPID study (84% male), with median age 61years (interquartile range 55-67years), 558 (8%) died or were hospitalized because of heart failure. Older age, history of claudication or diabetes mellitus, body mass index>30kg/m(2), LDL-cholesterol >2.5mmol/L, heart rate>70 beats/min, white blood cell count, and the nature of the qualifying acute coronary syndrome (myocardial infarction or unstable angina) were associated with an increase in heart failure events. Coronary revascularization was associated with a lower event rate. Incident heart failure increased with higher concentrations of B-type natriuretic peptide >50ng/L, cystatin C>0.93nmol/L, D-dimer >273nmol/L, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein >4.8nmol/L, and sensitive troponin I>0.018μg/L. Addition of biomarkers to the clinical risk model improved the model's C statistic from 0.73 to 0.77. The net reclassification improvement incorporating biomarkers into the clinical model using categories of 5-year risk was 23%. Adding a multibiomarker panel to conventional parameters markedly improved discrimination and risk classification for future heart failure events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Self-Care Guide for the Heart Failure Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cardiology Patient Page Self-Care Guide for the Heart Failure Patient Maria Fe White , Joan Kirschner , Michele A. ... Vaccinations for pneumonia and influenza are recommended. Additional Heart Failure Treatments Your heart condition may remain stable long ...

  1. Management of congestive heart failure (CHF): a case report on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. A case report on the management of Congestive Heart Failure is presented with emphasis on the use of DIGOXIN. Keywords: Congestive heart failure, Failing heart syndrome, Digoxin, Digoxin Toxicity ...

  2. The Initial Evaluation and Management of a Patient with Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoosain, Jamael; Whittier, Jabar; Hasni, Farhan; Hankins, Shelley

    2017-09-06

    The goal of this review is to summarize and discuss a thorough and effective manner in the evaluation of the patient with heart failure. Heart failure is a prevalent disease worldwide and while the diagnosis of heart failure has remained relatively unchanged via a careful history and physical examination, identification of the etiology of the heart failure and treatment has made significant advances. Mechanical circulatory support (MCS), neprilysin inhibitors, and chronic resynchronization therapy (CRT) are just some of the relatively recent therapies afforded to assist heart failure patients. Heart failure is a complicated, multifactorial diagnosis that requires a careful history and physical for diagnosis with the support of laboratory tests. While the prognosis for heart failure patients remains poor in comparison to other cardiovascular disease and even certain cancers, new advancements in therapy have shown survival and quality of life improvement.

  3. The cardiorenal syndrome in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damman, Kevin; Voors, Adriaan A; Navis, Gerjan; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Hillege, Hans L

    2011-01-01

    The frequently occurring condition of renal failure in heart failure (HF) has been termed the cardiorenal syndrome. However, the importance of renal insufficiency in HF has only been embraced in the last decade, and therefore, the pathophysiology of cardiorenal failure is still poorly understood. The main driving force of renal failure in HF is probably hemodynamic derangement, with both reduced renal perfusion and increased venous pressure as the most important driving forces. Different cardiorenal connectors may modulate this relationship. Furthermore, renal failure is not only limited to reduced filtration but also includes glomerular hypertension and tubulointerstitial hypoxia, leading to loss of glomerular integrity and tubular damage. Recognition of these key pathophysiologic pathways in the concept of the cardiorenal syndrome is needed to value the interrelationship and incremental contribution of different risk markers and possible new treatments to improve renal function and outcome in this complex and bidirectional interplay between the heart and the kidney. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Survival Benefits of Invasive Versus Conservative Strategies in Heart Failure in Patients With Reduced Ejection Fraction and Coronary Artery Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Georg; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Andreotti, Felicita; Kołodziejczak, Michalina; Jung, Christian; Scicchitano, Pietro; Devito, Fiorella; Zito, Annapaola; Occhipinti, Michele; Castiglioni, Battistina; Calveri, Giuseppe; Maisano, Francesco; Ciccone, Marco M; De Servi, Stefano; Navarese, Eliano P

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction caused by ischemic heart disease is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. It remains unclear whether revascularization by either coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) carries benefits or risks in this group of stable patients compared with medical treatment. We performed a meta-analysis of available studies comparing different methods of revascularization (PCI or CABG) against each other or medical treatment in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular ejection fraction ≤40%. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality; myocardial infarction, revascularization, and stroke were also analyzed. Twenty-one studies involving a total of 16 191 patients were included. Compared with medical treatment, there was a significant mortality reduction with CABG (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval, 0.61-0.72; Pdisease and reduced ejection fraction. Between the 2 revascularization strategies, CABG seems more favorable compared with PCI in this particular clinical setting. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Management of heart failure in primary care (the IMPROVEMENT of Heart Failure Programme) : an international survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleland, JGF; Cohen-Solal, A; Aguilar, JC; Dietz, R; Eastaugh, J; Follath, F; Freemantle, N; Gavazzi, A; van Gilst, WH; Hobbs, FDR; Korewicki, J; Madeira, HC; Preda, [No Value; Swedberg, K; Widimsky, J

    2002-01-01

    Background Heart failure is a prevalent condition that is generally treated in primary care. The aim of this study was to assess how primary-care physicians think that heart failure should be managed, how they implement their knowledge, and whether differences exist in practice between countries.

  6. Usefulness of liver test and controlled attenuation parameter in detection of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with chronic renal failure and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasevic, Ivana; Orlic, Lidija; Zaputovic, Luka; Racki, Sanjin; Cubranic, Zlatko; Anic, Kata; Devcic, Bosiljka; Stimac, Davor

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) was recognized as an important factor in chronic kidney disease (CKD) pathogenesis. The concentrations of serum aminotransferases in both chronic dialysis and chronic renal failure (CRF) patients most commonly fall within the lower end of the range of normal values. The aim of the present study was to investigate the usefulness of four liver tests and four biological scores in detection of NAFLD in comparison with transient elastography (TE) findings in different groups of patients. The study was cross-sectional analysis collected data from a single tertiary care center. Of 202 patents there were 52 patients with CKD, 50 patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) treated with haemodialysis (HD), 50 renal transplant recipients (RTRs) and 50 patients with proven coronary heart disease (CHD). Fifty sex- and age-matched individuals without NAFLD and with normal liver and kidney function tests served as controls. With the help of TE (FibroScan®, Echosense SA, Paris, France), liver stiffness was selected as the parameter to quantify liver fibrosis and Controlled Attenuation Parameter (CAP) was used to detect and quantify liver steatosis. According to the CAP findings 76.9 %CKD patients, 82 %HD patients, 74 %RTRs and 69.1 % CHD patients had CAP > 238 dB.m(-1) and thus by definition NAFLD. We have found that ALT, AST and GGT levels were positively correlated with CAP values while ALT and AST showed positive correlation with liver stiffness acquired with TE only in CHD patients. According to TE findings APRI (AUC 0.796) and FIB-4 (AUC 0.790) scores were correlated with the presence of fibrosis, while HIS score was correlated with the presence of steatosis (AUC 0.867) only in CHD patients. Liver tests and biological scores are not useful for NAFLD detection in CRF patients. TE with CAP provides the opportunity of noninvasive screening for NAFLD as well as liver fibrosis in patients with CRF.

  7. Complete Heart Block with Diastolic Heart Failure and Pulmonary Edema Secondary to Enlarging Previously Diagnosed Thrombosed Aneurysm of Sinus of Valsalva in a Patient with History of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif Ali Eltawansy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is associated with vascular aneurysms that can affect any part of the vascular tree, like ascending aorta or coronary arteries. Sinus of Valsalva is known as an anatomical dilation at the root of aorta above the aortic valve and very few cases show aneurysm at that site in patients with ADPKD. Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SVA can present with rupture and acute heart failure and infective endocarditis or could be asymptomatic accidentally discovered during cardiac catheterization. We report a case of a 76-year-old male with a unique constellation of cardiovascular anomalies associated with ADPKD. Patient was previously diagnosed with aneurysms affecting ascending aorta, sinus of Valsalva, and coronary arteries. Several years later, he came with complete heart block which was discovered later to be secondary to enlargement of his previously diagnosed thrombosed SVA. His case was complicated with acute heart failure and pulmonary edema. Conclusion. Patients with ADPKD can present with extrarenal manifestations. In our case, aneurysm at sinus of Valsalva was progressively enlarging and presented with complete heart block.

  8. Ischaemic Heart Disease : Early Recognition and Risk Disparities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bank, I.E.M.

    2017-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) comprises the principal clinical manifestations of coronary artery disease - myocardial infarction, stable and unstable angina pectoris, heart failure and sudden death - and is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The relentlessly growing burden of

  9. Prognostic Factors in Severe Chagasic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sandra de Araújo; Rassi, Salvador; Freitas, Elis Marra da Madeira; Gutierrez, Natália da Silva; Boaventura, Fabiana Miranda; Sampaio, Larissa Pereira da Costa; Silva, João Bastista Masson

    2017-03-01

    Prognostic factors are extensively studied in heart failure; however, their role in severe Chagasic heart failure have not been established. To identify the association of clinical and laboratory factors with the prognosis of severe Chagasic heart failure, as well as the association of these factors with mortality and survival in a 7.5-year follow-up. 60 patients with severe Chagasic heart failure were evaluated regarding the following variables: age, blood pressure, ejection fraction, serum sodium, creatinine, 6-minute walk test, non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, QRS width, indexed left atrial volume, and functional class. 53 (88.3%) patients died during follow-up, and 7 (11.7%) remained alive. Cumulative overall survival probability was approximately 11%. Non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (HR = 2.11; 95% CI: 1.04 - 4.31; p 72 mL/m2 are independent predictors of mortality in severe Chagasic heart failure, with cumulative survival probability of only 11% in 7.5 years.

  10. Palliative care for the terminal heart failure patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Walter L; Long, R Craig; Geraci, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a chronic disease afflicting millions of patients worldwide. Advances in treatment have allowed sufferers to enjoy overall prolonged survival and enhanced quality of life. Yet, a consequence of these therapeutic successes is that more patients survive to end-stage disease, with severe symptoms, poor quality of life, and no options available to prolong their survival reasonably. End-stage heart failure patients require a comprehensive palliative approach to care during their final months, with treatment goals focusing on symptom relief. Often, specific heart failure therapies can further this cause and should be administered when appropriate to alleviate specific symptoms, while other general palliative measures should also be considered as with other terminal patients. End-of-life palliative strategies must conform to accepted principles of ethical care. Constant communication with patients and families is essential to achieve best treatment goals for this growing segment of the population.

  11. Management of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayakkara, Shane; Kaye, David M

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the clinical management of patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF). For this critical review, electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed) were searched for relevant basic research studies and randomized clinical trials recently published or presented at major meetings. Details of in-progress or planned studies were obtained from the ClinicalTrials.gov website. The range of publication dates was the year 2000 to 2015. Search terms included HFPEF, heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, HFPSF, heart failure with preserved systolic function, diastolic heart failure, diastolic dysfunction, HFNEF, heart failure with normal ejection fraction, treatment, management, therapy. Patients with HFPEF account for up to half of all patients with a clinical diagnosis of HF. Key contributing factors include hypertension, obesity, and atrial fibrillation, and other chronic diseases, including diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and anemia, frequently coexist. To date, large-scale clinical trials, particularly those focused on antagonism of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, have provided limited evidence of clinical benefit. The aggressive management of contributing factors, including hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and myocardial ischemia, is key in the management of HFPEF. New insights into the mechanisms and thus the identification of potential therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical trials update from Heart Rhythm 2008 and Heart Failure 2008: ATHENA, URGENT, INH study, HEART and CK-1827452.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, Alison P; Cleland, John G F; Cullington, Damien; Clark, Andrew L

    2008-09-01

    This article provides information and a commentary on trials relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of heart failure, presented at the Heart Rhythm Society meeting in San Francisco, USA and the Heart Failure Association meeting of the European Society of Cardiology which was held in Milan, Italy in June 2008. Unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary data, as analyses may change in the final publication. The ATHENA study showed that dronedarone reduced the incidence of the composite outcome of cardiovascular hospitalisation or death, in patients with atrial fibrillation or flutter, 29% of whom had a history of heart failure, compared with placebo. The URGENT study demonstrated that treatment of acute heart failure with standard therapy, including intravenous diuretics and nitrates, leads to a rapid resolution of breathlessness in the sitting position but that orthopnoea often persists. The INH study showed that a disease management programme could reduce mortality compared to usual care but not hospitalisation rates. The HEART study failed to recruit its planned number of patients, although it is the largest randomised trial of revascularisation in heart failure reported to date. At a median follow-up of 5 years no difference in mortality was observed but the study lacked power to provide a conclusive result. The selective myosin activator CK-1827452 produced a concentration dependent increase in systolic ejection time, stroke volume and fractional shortening in patients with heart failure compared to placebo.

  13. New pharmacological and technological management strategies in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhry SP

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sunit-Preet Chaudhry,1 Garrick C Stewart2 1Division of Cardiology, St Vincent Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN, 2Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Center for Advanced Heart Disease, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Heart failure is a complex clinical syndrome resulting from impairment of ventricular filling or ejection of blood associated with symptoms of dyspnea, fatigue, as well as peripheral and/or pulmonary edema. This syndrome is progressive and characterized by worsening quality of life despite escalating levels of care, affecting 5.7 million Americans with an annual cost of over $30 billion US dollars. Treatment for this syndrome has evolved over three distinct eras: the nonpharmacological era, the pharmacological era, and the device era, with the focus shifting from symptomatic relief to decreasing morbidity and mortality. Over the past 10 years, the field has undergone a renaissance, with the development of new pharmacologic, hemodynamic monitoring, and device therapies proven to improve outcomes in patients with heart failure. This article will review several recent innovations in the management of patients with heart failure. Keywords: heart failure, heart-assist devices, disease management

  14. How Is Diabetic Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Diabetic Heart Disease Diabetic Heart Disease What Is The term "diabetic heart ... Web page. What Heart Diseases Are Involved in Diabetic Heart Disease? DHD may include coronary heart disease ( ...

  15. How Is Diabetic Heart Disease Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Diabetic Heart Disease Diabetic Heart Disease What Is The term "diabetic heart ... Web page. What Heart Diseases Are Involved in Diabetic Heart Disease? DHD may include coronary heart disease ( ...

  16. Heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houyel, Lucile; To-Dumortier, Ngoc-Tram; Lepers, Yannick; Petit, Jérôme; Roussin, Régine; Ly, Mohamed; Lebret, Emmanuel; Fadel, Elie; Hörer, Jürgen; Hascoët, Sébastien

    2017-05-01

    With the advances in congenital cardiac surgery and postoperative care, an increasing number of children with complex congenital heart disease now reach adulthood. There are already more adults than children living with a congenital heart defect, including patients with complex congenital heart defects. Among these adults with congenital heart disease, a significant number will develop ventricular dysfunction over time. Heart failure accounts for 26-42% of deaths in adults with congenital heart defects. Heart transplantation, or heart-lung transplantation in Eisenmenger syndrome, then becomes the ultimate therapeutic possibility for these patients. This population is deemed to be at high risk of mortality after heart transplantation, although their long-term survival is similar to that of patients transplanted for other reasons. Indeed, heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease is often challenging, because of several potential problems: complex cardiac and vascular anatomy, multiple previous palliative and corrective surgeries, and effects on other organs (kidney, liver, lungs) of long-standing cardiac dysfunction or cyanosis, with frequent elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance. In this review, we focus on the specific problems relating to heart and heart-lung transplantation in this population, revisit the indications/contraindications, and update the long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. When the heart kills the liver: acute liver failure in congestive heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saner FH

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congestive heart failure as a cause of acute liver failure is rarely documented with only a few cases. Although the pathophysiology is poorly understood, there is rising evidence, that low cardiac output with consecutive reduction in hepatic blood flow is a main causing factor, rather than hypotension. In the setting of acute liver failure due to congestive heart failure, clinical signs of the latter can be absent, which requires an appropriate diagnostic approach. As a reference center for acute liver failure and liver transplantation we recorded from May 2003 to December 2007 202 admissions with the primary diagnoses acute liver failure. 13/202 was due to congestive heart failure, which was associated with a mortality rate of 54%. Leading cause of death was the underlying heart failure. Asparagine transaminase (AST, bilirubin, and international normalized ratio (INR did not differ significantly in surviving and deceased patients at admission. Despite both groups had signs of cardiogenic shock, the cardiac index (CI was significantly higher in the survival group on admission as compared with non-survivors (2.1 L/min/m2 vs. 1.6 L/min/m2, p = 0.04. Central venous - and pulmonary wedge pressure did not differ significantly. Remarkable improvement of liver function was recorded in the group, who recovered from cardiogenic shock. In conclusion, patients with acute liver failure require an appropriate diagnostic approach. Congestive heart failure should always be considered as a possible cause of acute liver failure.

  18. Aspirin and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attack . Your provider may recommend to take daily aspirin if: You do not have a history of heart disease or stroke, but you are at high risk for a heart attack or stroke. You have been diagnosed ... already. Aspirin helps get more blood flowing to your legs. ...

  19. Adults living with heart failure and fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Inge; Sommer, Irene; Bjerrum, Merete

    Background Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms reported by patients with heart failure (HF). Fatigue negatively impacts on patients’ everyday life, prognosis and quality of life. No specific cure or effective interventions to alleviate fatigue are available. Over the past decade, qualitative...... studies have been performed to develop more coherent and effective interventions to support self-care among heart failure patients experiencing fatigue. The findings of qualitative research should be synthesised to optimise nurses' understanding of fatigue and develop recommendations for practice. Aim...... To synthesise the best available evidence related to the lived experiences and management of fatigue in everyday life in adult patients with stable heart failure to develop effective interventions to support self-care. Specific questions on the patients’ lived experiences included: • How do patients with HF...

  20. Advanced heart failure and management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddam, Krishna K; Yelamanchili, Pridhvi; Sedghi, Yabiz; Ventura, Hector O

    2009-01-01

    The global healthcare burden attributable to heart failure is ever increasing. Patients presenting with refractory heart failure should be evaluated for compliance with medical regimens and sodium and/or fluid restriction, and every attempt should be made to optimize conventional strategies. Reversible causes such as ischemia should be identified and revascularization considered in persistently symptomatic patients, particularly those with a viable myocardium. Carefully selected patients who continue to deteriorate clinically in spite of optimization of medical therapy may be considered for advanced treatment strategies, such as continuous inotropic infusions, mechanical circulatory support devices, cardiac transplantation, or referral to hospice care. We discuss the clinical presentation and management of patients with advanced/refractory (Stage D) heart failure.