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Sample records for health self-care behaviors

  1. Health locus of control and self-care behaviors in diabetic foot patients.

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    Abredari, Hamid; Bolourchifard, Fariba; Rassouli, Maryam; Nasiri, Navideh; Taher, Mohammad; Abedi, Ahmadreza

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot affects more than 25% of diabetic patients and finally up to 20% of cases result in amputation. The most important factor resulting in severe complications or even death is lack of self-care. Health locus of control has been introduced as one of health factors and predicting factors of self-care. This research was performed for analyzing the correlation between self-care behaviors and health locus of control in diabetic foot patients. In this descriptive study, 120 patients with diabetic foot were chosen using convenience sampling from endocrine clinic and wards of endocrine and vascular surgery of Teleqani Hospital of Shahid Beheshti Medical University. The data were gathered by demographic, self-care behavior, and health locus of control questionnaires. The t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and spearman coefficient were used to analyze the data. RESULTS of this research showed that there is a direct and significant relation between selfcare behaviors and internal health locus of control (plocus of control (plocus of control improve and strengthen patients' self-care behaviors and their involvement in treatment.

  2. The Relationship between Health Literacy, Self-Efficacy, and Self-Care Behaviors in Diabetic Patients

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    Mojgan Masoompour

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neglecting self-care behaviors is considered an important factor contributing to mortality among diabetic patients. According to Bandura’s Social-Cognitive Theory, there is a close relationship between individual performance and self-efficacy. Moreover, access to health-related information or health literacy can affect health status. Aim: To investigate the relationship between health literacy, self-efficacy, and self-care behaviors in diabetic patients. Method: This descriptive correlational study was conducted on 400 patients with diabetes referred to a diabetes clinic during 2015. The participants were selected through convenience sampling. The data collection tools included Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults, Diabetes Management Self-Efficacy Scale, and the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities. To analyze the data, Pearson’s correlation coefficient, independent t-test, and one-way analysis of variance were run in SPSS, version 19. Results: The mean age of the participants was 55.1±10.1 years and 74.75% of them were male. The mean scores of self-care behaviors, health literacy, and self-efficacy were 61.94±14.35, 63.6±20.7, and 146.3±22.9, respectively. Moreover, the results of Pearson’s correlation coefficient showed a significant direct correlation between health literacy and self-efficacy (P=0.03, r=0.1, as well as health literacy and self-care behaviors (P=0.04, r=0.1. Furthermore, self-efficacy had a significant direct correlation with self-care behaviors (P

  3. Basic need status and health-promoting self-care behavior in adults.

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    Acton, G J; Malathum, P

    2000-11-01

    Health-promoting self-care behavior emphasizing positive lifestyle practices may improve the health and quality of life of adults. One variable that may influence health-related decisions is the status of basic needs as described by Maslow. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among basic need satisfaction, health-promoting self-care behavior, and selected demographic variables in a sample of community-dwelling adults. A convenience sample of 84 community-dwelling adults was recruited to complete the Basic Need Satisfaction Inventory, the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II, and demographic information. Results of the study indicated that self-actualization, physical, and love/belonging need satisfaction accounted for 64% of the variance in health-promoting self-care behavior. The findings of this study are consistent with Maslow's theory of human motivation and suggest that persons who are more fulfilled and content with themselves and their lives, have physical need satisfaction, and have positive connections with others may be able to make better decisions regarding positive health-promoting self-care behaviors.

  4. Health Promoting Self-Care Behaviors and Its Related Factors in Elderly: Application of Health Belief Model

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    Mojtaba Azadbakht

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health beliefs significantly affect health promoting self-care behaviors. The most important model designed based on health beliefs is the Health Belief Model. This study examined the association between health belief model constructs and demographic factors with behaviors in elderly. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was performed on 465 elders referring to Tehran's cultural centers recruited with a multi-stage sampling method. Study instruments were questionnaires regarding demographic information, health beliefs, self-efficacy and health-promoting self-care behaviors. Data analysis was performed using SPSS-22 software by Independent T-test, one-way ANOVA, Pearson correlation and Multiple linear regression. Results: The mean (±SD age of subjects was 68.24±6.12 years and the mean of general self-care score was 1.79±0.36. Gender (P=0.011, economy (P<0.001, education level (P<0.001 and age (P=0.008 were significantly associated with self-care behaviors. Regression analysis showed that perceived barriers, self-efficacy and perceived severity were determinants of behavior (P<0.001. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, it is essential to pay special attention to self-efficacy, perceived severity and perceived barriers to design health education for elderly.

  5. Self-care behaviour for minor symptoms: can Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use help us to understand it?

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    Porteous, Terry; Wyke, Sally; Hannaford, Philip; Bond, Christine

    2015-02-01

    To explore whether Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use can aid understanding of self-care behaviour and inform development of interventions to promote self-care for minor illness. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 24 Scottish participants about their experience and management of minor symptoms normally associated with analgesic use. Synthesised data from the interviews were mapped onto the Behavioral Model. All factors identified as influencing decisions about how to manage the symptoms discussed, mapped onto at least one domain of Andersen's model. Individual characteristics including beliefs, need factors and available resources were associated with health behaviour, including self-care. Outcomes such as perceived health status and consumer satisfaction from previous experience of managing symptoms also appeared to feed back into health behaviour. The Behavioral Model seems relevant to self-care as well as formal health services. Additional work is needed to explore applicability of the Behavioral Model to different types of symptoms, different modalities of self-care and in countries with different health care systems. Future quantitative studies should establish the relative importance of factors influencing the actions people take to manage minor symptoms to inform future interventions aimed at optimising self-care behaviour. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  6. Health literacy, self-efficacy, and self-care behaviors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

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    Bohanny, Walton; Wu, Shu-Fang Vivienne; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Yeh, Shu-Hui; Tsay, Shiow-Luan; Wang, Tsae-Jyy

    2013-09-01

    The study purpose was to explore the relationships among health literacy, self-efficacy, and self-care behaviors of patients with type 2 diabetes. A cross-sectional study with a descriptive correlational design was conducted. Patients (N = 150) with type 2 diabetes were recruited from diabetes clinics in the Marshall Islands. Levels of health literacy, self-efficacy, and self-care behaviors were assessed by a questionnaire. Health literacy, receiving diabetes education, and employment status together explained 11.8% of the variance in self-efficacy (F((3,147)) = 7.58, p < .001). Patients who had higher health literacy, received more diabetes-related education, were currently employed and had better self-efficacy. Self-efficacy and marital status together explained 16.7% of the variance in self-care behaviors (F((2,148)) = 15.96, p < .001). Patients who had higher self-efficacy and who were married had better self-care behaviors. Strategies are needed to incorporate the concept of self-efficacy in the design of diabetes education to promote patients' self-care behaviors, with an emphasis on dealing with hyper- or hypoglycemia, following the diet plan, and checking blood sugar levels as recommended. Diabetes education material that requires a lower literacy level may be needed for older or unemployed adult populations. ©2013 The Author(s) ©2013 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  7. Predicting health-promoting self-care behaviors in people with pre-diabetes by applying Bandura social learning theory.

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    Chen, Mei-Fang; Wang, Ruey-Hsia; Hung, Shu-Ling

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to apply Bandura social learning theory in a model for identifying personal and environmental factors that predict health-promoting self-care behaviors in people with pre-diabetes. The theoretical basis of health-promoting self-care behaviors must be examined to obtain evidence-based knowledge that can help improve the effectiveness of pre-diabetes care. However, such behaviors are rarely studied in people with pre-diabetes. This quantitative, cross-sectional survey study was performed in a convenience sample of two hospitals in southern Taiwan. Two hundred people diagnosed with pre-diabetes at a single health examination center were recruited. A questionnaire survey was performed to collect data regarding personal factors (i.e., participant characteristics, pre-diabetes knowledge, and self-efficacy) and data regarding environmental factors (i.e., social support and perceptions of empowerment process) that may have associations with health-promoting self-care behaviors in people with pre-diabetes. Multiple linear regression showed that the factors that had the largest influence on the practice of health-promoting self-care behaviors were self-efficacy, diabetes history, perceptions of empowerment process, and pre-diabetes knowledge. These factors explained 59.3% of the variance in health-promoting self-care behaviors. To prevent the development of diabetes in people with pre-diabetes, healthcare professionals should consider both the personal and the environmental factors identified in this study when assessing health promoting self-care behaviors in patients with pre-diabetes and when selecting the appropriate interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of Self-care Health Behaviors on Quality of Life Mediated by Cardiovascular Risk Factors Among Individuals with Coronary Artery Disease: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

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    Sukhee Ahn, RN, PhD

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The findings indicate that self-efficacy, self-care health behaviors, and modifiable risk factors play an important role in QOL in adults with coronary artery disease. Patients could be more confident in performing self-care health behaviors, leading to a better QOL, by more effectively managing their cardiovascular risk factors. Nursing strategies to improve QOL in this population should include motivating them to perform self-care health behaviors.

  9. Pathways of empowerment perceptions, health literacy, self-efficacy, and self-care behaviors to glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

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    Lee, Yau-Jiunn; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Wang, Ruey-Hsia; Lin, Kun-Der; Lee, Yu-Li; Wang, Yi-Hsien

    2016-02-01

    To validate a hypothesized model exploring the influencing pathways of empowerment perceptions, health literacy, self-efficacy, and self-care behaviors to glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Overall, 295 patients with T2DM were recruited from five endocrine clinics in Taiwan through convenience sampling. Data regarding personal characteristics, empowerment perceptions, health literacy, self-efficacy, self-care behaviors, and HbA1c levels were collected. A structural equation modeling was used to validate the hypothesized model. Significant direct pathways were determined from empowerment perceptions to health literacy, from health literacy to self-efficacy, from self-efficacy to self-care behaviors, and from self-care behaviors to HbA1c levels. The empowerment perceptions and health literacy relatively influenced self-efficacy and self-care behaviors. Self-efficacy and self-care behaviors relatively influenced glycemic control in patients with T2DM. Modifying self-care behaviors have been demonstrated to be the most essential for improving glycemic control. To improve self-care behaviors, healthcare providers should target improving self-efficacy, and enhancing health literacy can be considered to be a potential strategy for improving self-efficacy. To enhance health literacy, healthcare providers could use an empowerment approach rather than an authoritative approach that emphasizes patient compliance in managing patients with T2DM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of a Behavioral Self-Care Intervention for Public Health Students

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    White, Marney A.; Mayer, Margaret; Vanderlind, W. Michael; Allswede, Dana

    2018-01-01

    Background: Postgraduate education is recognized as a time of intense stress. Rates of anxiety and depression are elevated among graduate students, and longitudinal studies have documented increases in clinical symptoms over the course of training. Purpose: The current study was to evaluate whether an academically sponsored self-care intervention…

  11. Evaluation of the Effect of Educating Self Care Behavior of Heart failure Patients on Economy of Health

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    Maryam Seraji

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Heart disease is the most costly reason for hospitalization. The purpose of this research was evaluation of the influence of teaching self care behavior for heart failure patients on economy of health in hospitals in the city of Zahedan of Iran in the year 2012.This study was quasi-experimental with a control group in the CCU and Post CCU wards of the hospitals of the city of Zahedan in 2012. The patients were randomly and conveniently placed in two groups of intervention (70 individuals and control (70. The intervention group received an educational package and three months after discharge, both groups were evaluated using interview and phone follow-up as well as coding system (HIS, frequency of admissions and clinic visits and expenditures partaken. Next using descriptive and analytic statistical tests and the SPSS software version 18, the data was analyzed. the results showed that in the intervention group the percent of attendance to the clinic for health check up on an outpatient basis (visit and EKG was 25% in three months before intervention and reached 41/6% at three months after intervention. Percent hospitalization in the CCU three months before intervention was 33/3% and reached 13/3% at three months after intervention and the percent change was 20%. Self care teaching program for patients with Heart failureleads to decreased hospitalization and as a result decreased treatment expenditures

  12. Illness perception, risk perception and health promotion self-care behaviors among Chinese patient with type 2 diabetes: A cross-sectional survey.

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    Nie, Rong; Han, Yanhong; Xu, Jiaqi; Huang, Qiao; Mao, Jing

    2018-02-01

    To explore illness perception and perceived risk of developing diabetes complications in relation to health-promoting self-care behaviors among Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. Illness and risk perceptions are important determinants of various health behaviors. However, few studies have simultaneously examined the impacts of these two constructs on self-care among diabetic patients. Data were collected on participants' characteristics, illness perception, risk perception, and health-promoting self-care behaviors over 6months among 304 subjects from three general hospitals. Significant associations between illness perception and risk perception were observed. Illness perception and/or risk perception explained an independent, small but significant proportion of the variance in each health-promoting self-care behavior. One's perceptions of illness and future risk might be influential in understanding health-promoting self-care among diabetic patients. It may be useful to improve self-management by tailoring intervention content to individuals' illness-related perceptions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SELF-CARE BEHAVIORS AND SELF-ESTEEM OF RURAL ELDERLIES; NECESSITY OF HEALTH PROMOTION

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    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Goudarzian, Amir Hossein; Mirani, Hesam; Jouybari, Sina Sabourian; Nasiri, Davoud

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Changes in the modern medical science caused significant reduction of mortality and every day increase of the elderly in the world. According to prevalence of physical and mental problems in elderly, it is necessary to take some actions. Self care in one of the best way to improve elderly health and life satisfaction that seems have a relation to self-esteem. Methods: This descriptive and analytical study was performed on 180 elderly in rural areas of the Sari city. Elderly selected by multi-stage randomize sampling method. Data were gathered by using standard questionnaires of self-care and Rosenberg self-esteem. Data were analyzed by Spearman and Pearson’s correlation using SPSS software (V16). Findings: The mean±SD of the ages of the elderly were 66.85±7.661. The score of self-care varies between 99 to 155 and most of them (66.7%) had good level of self-care. Also, most of elderly (52.2%) had high level of self-esteem. Also there was a significant relationship, between self-care and self-esteem (Pself-care and self-esteem of elderly, by the planning for improving the self care of elderly, can increase their health and significantly reduce from physical and mental complications. PMID:27047266

  14. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SELF-CARE BEHAVIORS AND SELF-ESTEEM OF RURAL ELDERLIES; NECESSITY OF HEALTH PROMOTION.

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    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Goudarzian, Amir Hossein; Mirani, Hesam; Jouybari, Sina Sabourian; Nasiri, Davoud

    2016-02-01

    Changes in the modern medical science caused significant reduction of mortality and every day increase of the elderly in the world. According to prevalence of physical and mental problems in elderly, it is necessary to take some actions. Self care in one of the best way to improve elderly health and life satisfaction that seems have a relation to self-esteem. This descriptive and analytical study was performed on 180 elderly in rural areas of the Sari city. Elderly selected by multi-stage randomize sampling method. Data were gathered by using standard questionnaires of self-care and Rosenberg self-esteem. Data were analyzed by Spearman and Pearson's correlation using SPSS software (V16). The mean±SD of the ages of the elderly were 66.85±7.661. The score of self-care varies between 99 to 155 and most of them (66.7%) had good level of self-care. Also, most of elderly (52.2%) had high level of self-esteem. Also there was a significant relationship, between self-care and self-esteem (Pself-care and self-esteem of elderly, by the planning for improving the self care of elderly, can increase their health and significantly reduce from physical and mental complications.

  15. Health-seeking behaviors and self-care practices of people with filarial lymphoedema in Nepal: a qualitative study.

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    Adhikari, Ram Kumar; Sherchand, Jeevan Bahadur; Mishra, Shiva Raj; Ranabhat, Kamal; Pokharel, Amrit; Devkota, Pramila; Mishra, Durga; Ghimire, Yadu Chandra; Gelal, Khageshwor; Paudel, Rajan; Wagle, Rajendra Raj

    2015-01-01

    Background. Lymphatic filariasis is endemic in Nepal. This study aimed to investigate health-seeking behaviors and self-care practices of people with filarial Lymphoedema in Nepal. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted using qualitative methods in three endemic districts. Twenty-three patients with current Lymphoedema were recruited in the study. Results. Hydrocele was found to be a well-known condition and a major health problem in the studied communities. People with Lymphoedema primarily sought health care from traditional healers, whereas sometimes home-based care was their first treatment. Later Ayurvedic and allopathic hospital-based care were sought. Respondents reported various psychological problems such as difficulty in engaging in sexual intercourse, anxiety, worry and stress, depression, low self-esteem, feeling weak, fear of being abandoned, and fear of transmitting disease to the children. Standard foot care practices except washing were largely absent. Conclusions. Lymphoedema in the limbs and hydrocele were found to be major health problems. The traditional health care providers were the first contact of care for the majority of respondents. Only a few patients had been practicing standard foot care practices.

  16. Health-Seeking Behaviors and Self-Care Practices of People with Filarial Lymphoedema in Nepal: A Qualitative Study

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    Ram Kumar Adhikari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lymphatic filariasis is endemic in Nepal. This study aimed to investigate health-seeking behaviors and self-care practices of people with filarial Lymphoedema in Nepal. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted using qualitative methods in three endemic districts. Twenty-three patients with current Lymphoedema were recruited in the study. Results. Hydrocele was found to be a well-known condition and a major health problem in the studied communities. People with Lymphoedema primarily sought health care from traditional healers, whereas sometimes home-based care was their first treatment. Later Ayurvedic and allopathic hospital-based care were sought. Respondents reported various psychological problems such as difficulty in engaging in sexual intercourse, anxiety, worry and stress, depression, low self-esteem, feeling weak, fear of being abandoned, and fear of transmitting disease to the children. Standard foot care practices except washing were largely absent. Conclusions. Lymphoedema in the limbs and hydrocele were found to be major health problems. The traditional health care providers were the first contact of care for the majority of respondents. Only a few patients had been practicing standard foot care practices.

  17. The effects of health promotion model-based educational program on self-care behaviors in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting in Iran

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    Mohsenipouya, Hossein; Majlessi, Fereshteh; Ghafari, Rahman

    2018-01-01

    Background and aim Post-operative self-care behaviors, have positive effects on increase in adaptability, and reduce cardiac surgery patients’ disability. The present study is carried out aimed at determining the effect of education based on a health promotion model on the patients’ self-care behaviors after coronary artery bypass surgery. Methods This is a semi-experimental study carried out in Mazandaran (Iran) in 2016. Two hundred and twenty patients who participated in the study were selected using a simple random sampling method from a population of postoperative patients, and divided into control and experimental groups (110 patients in each) using block (AABB) randomization. Self-designed self-care questionnaires based on a health promotion model were distributed among the patients once before and three months after intervention. The data were analyzed by SPSS-22, Chi-Square tests, Mann-Whitney and ANCOVA at the significance level of ppromotion model can enhance self-care behaviors and reduce the number of admissions in patients after cardiac surgery. PMID:29588828

  18. Association of Online Health Information-Seeking Behavior and Self-Care Activities Among Type 2 Diabetic Patients in Saudi Arabia.

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    Jamal, Amr; Khan, Samina A; AlHumud, Ahmed; Al-Duhyyim, Abdulaziz; Alrashed, Mohammed; Bin Shabr, Faisal; Alteraif, Alwalid; Almuziri, Abdullah; Househ, Mowafa; Qureshi, Riaz

    2015-08-12

    Health information obtained from the Internet has an impact on patient health care outcomes. There is a growing concern over the quality of online health information sources used by diabetic patients because little is known about their health information-seeking behavior and the impact this behavior has on their diabetes-related self-care, in particular in the Middle East setting. The aim of this study was to determine the online health-related information-seeking behavior among adult type 2 diabetic patients in the Middle East and the impact of their online health-related information-seeking behavior on their self-care activities. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 344 patients with type 2 diabetes attending inpatient and outpatient primary health care clinics at 2 teaching hospitals in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The main outcome measures included the ability of patients to access the Internet, their ability to use the Internet to search for health-related information, and their responses to Internet searches in relation to their self-care activities. Further analysis of differences based on age, gender, sociodemographic, and diabetes-related self-care activities among online health-related information seekers and nononline health-related information seekers was conducted. Among the 344 patients, 74.1% (255/344) were male with a mean age of 53.5 (SD 13.8) years. Only 39.0% (134/344) were Internet users; 71.6% (96/134) of them used the Internet for seeking health-related information. Most participants reported that their primary source of health-related information was their physician (216/344, 62.8%) followed by television (155/344, 45.1%), family (113/344, 32.8%), newspapers (100/344, 29.1%), and the Internet (96/344, 27.9%). Primary topics participants searched for were therapeutic diet for diabetes (55/96, 57%) and symptoms of diabetes (52/96, 54%) followed by diabetes treatment (50/96, 52%). Long history of diabetes, familial history of the disease

  19. Self-care as a health resource of elders

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    Høy, Bente; Wagner, Lis; Hall, Elisabeth O.C.

    2007-01-01

    into self-care as a significant health resource of elders with different health status. It suggests that an elder's self-care ability is determined by the interaction of various sub-resources and conditions and emphasizes the constantly evolving nature of self-care. The framework may be of use in clinical......AIM: To review the literature related to self-care and health promotion for elders and to develop an understanding of self-care as a health resource. BACKGROUND: Self-care may improve health and prevent illness and disabilities in elders. Although studies of self-care are numerous, the significance...... of the concept as a health resource for elders lacks clarity. Before 1989, research focused principally on medical self-care at the expense of health care, and self-care was seen more as supplementary to professional health care rather than as a health-promoting approach in health care. METHOD...

  20. Incorporating Natural Products, Pharmaceutical Drugs, Self-Care and Digital/Mobile Health Technologies into Molecular-Behavioral Combination Therapies for Chronic Diseases

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    Bulaj, Grzegorz; Ahern, Margaret M.; Kuhn, Alexis; Judkins, Zachary S.; Bowen, Randy C.; Chen, Yizhe

    2016-01-01

    Merging pharmaceutical and digital (mobile health, mHealth) ingredients to create new therapies for chronic diseases offers unique opportunities for natural products such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA), curcumin, resveratrol, theanine, or α-lipoic acid. These compounds, when combined with pharmaceutical drugs, show improved efficacy and safety in preclinical and clinical studies of epilepsy, neuropathic pain, osteoarthritis, depression, schizophrenia, diabetes and cancer. Their additional clinical benefits include reducing levels of TNFα and other inflammatory cytokines. We describe how pleiotropic natural products can be developed as bioactive incentives within the network pharmacology together with pharmaceutical drugs and self-care interventions. Since approximately 50% of chronically-ill patients do not take pharmaceutical drugs as prescribed, psychobehavioral incentives may appeal to patients at risk for medication non-adherence. For epilepsy, the incentive-based network therapy comprises anticonvulsant drugs, antiseizure natural products (n-3 PUFA, curcumin or/and resveratrol) coupled with disease-specific behavioral interventions delivered by mobile medical apps. The add-on combination of antiseizure natural products and mHealth supports patient empowerment and intrinsic motivation by having a choice in self-care behaviors. The incentivized therapies offer opportunities: (1) to improve clinical efficacy and safety of existing drugs, (2) to catalyze patient-centered, disease self-management and behavior-changing habits, also improving health-related quality-of-life after reaching remission, and (3) merging copyrighted mHealth software with natural products, thus establishing an intellectual property protection of medical treatments comprising the natural products existing in public domain and currently promoted as dietary supplements. Taken together, clinical research on synergies between existing drugs and pleiotropic natural products

  1. Self-care as a health resource of elders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente; Wagner, Lis; Hall, Elisabeth O.C.

    2007-01-01

    into self-care as a significant health resource of elders with different health status. It suggests that an elder's self-care ability is determined by the interaction of various sub-resources and conditions and emphasizes the constantly evolving nature of self-care. The framework may be of use in clinical...... practice, policy-making and research into health care of frail or robust elders.......AIM: To review the literature related to self-care and health promotion for elders and to develop an understanding of self-care as a health resource. BACKGROUND: Self-care may improve health and prevent illness and disabilities in elders. Although studies of self-care are numerous, the significance...

  2. Analysis of Self-care Behaviors and Its Related Factors among Diabetic Patients

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    Babak Moeini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Diabetes is one of the most common health problems with remarkable outcomes. Treatment and management of diabetes is mainly related to self-care status. This study aimed to analyzing self-care behaviors and its related factors in diabetic patients. Methods: In this descriptive study, 131 diabetic patients referred to the Tuyserkan Diabetes Clinic in 2014, were studied by census method. Self-care behaviors data were collected by self-care scale of Toobert and Glasgow. Background information of diabetic patients, were investigated using pre-designed checklists based on forms in patients` records. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, and Spearman’s correlation coefficient tests. The significance level was considered to be 5%. Results: Out of total 131 diabetic patients, 66 persons (50.4% were male and 65 persons (49.6% were female. Their mean age was 51.8 years. Eight patients had heart disease complications. The mean self-care scores of the patients was 25.6 and was indicative of average level of self-care. Self-care behaviors were significantly associated with education level, employment status, type of treatment, and body mass index. There was a significant relationship between self-care components (including diet, physical activity, blood glucose testing and foot care. Conclusion: Considering the self-care status of patients and the importance of self-care training for diabetics, more attention should be paid to self-care in diabetic patients in health education and health promotion programs.

  3. Health Literacy Influences Heart Failure Knowledge Attainment but Not Self-Efficacy for Self-Care or Adherence to Self-Care over Time

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    Aleda M. H. Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inadequate health literacy may be a barrier to gaining knowledge about heart failure (HF self-care expectations, strengthening self-efficacy for self-care behaviors, and adhering to self-care behaviors over time. Objective. To examine if health literacy is associated with HF knowledge, self-efficacy, and self-care adherence longitudinally. Methods. Prior to education, newly referred patients at three HF clinics (N=51, age: 64.7±13.0 years completed assessments of health literacy, HF knowledge, self-efficacy, and adherence to self-care at baseline, 2, and 4 months. Repeated measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni-adjusted alpha levels was used to test longitudinal outcomes. Results. Health literacy was associated with HF knowledge longitudinally (P<0.001 but was not associated with self-efficacy self-care adherence. In posthoc analyses, participants with inadequate health literacy had less HF knowledge than participants with adequate (P<0.001 but not marginal (P=0.073 health literacy. Conclusions. Adequate health literacy was associated with greater HF knowledge but not self-efficacy or adherence to self-care expectations over time. If nurses understand patients’ health literacy level, they may educate patients using methods that promote understanding of concepts. Since interventions that promote self-efficacy and adherence to self-care were not associated with health literacy level, new approaches must be examined.

  4. Nurses' self-care behaviors related to weight and stress.

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    Nahm, Eun-Shim; Warren, Joan; Zhu, Shijun; An, Minjeong; Brown, Jeanine

    2012-01-01

    Considerable research on preventive health care behaviors has been conducted in different segments of the population. Although nurses are the largest group of direct health care providers (3 million), little is known about their preventive health care behaviors. As the average age of nurses working in the United States (US) increases (mean age 47 years), maintaining their health to ensure they can continue to provide optimal health care to others becomes a greater priority. This descriptive online study examined registered nurses' dietary and exercise practices, weight status, stress levels, and preferred preventive health strategies using a sample of nurses recruited from a community-based, urban teaching hospital (n = 183; mean age 47 ± 11.3 years). The majority of participants (72.2%, n = 122) reported a lack of exercise, and more than half (53.8%, n = 91) had an irregular meal pattern. The average body mass index (BMI) was 28.3 ± 6.8, and 59.2% (n = 100) were either overweight (n = 47) or obese (n = 53). BMI had a significant inverse relationship with having a regular meal schedule and the amount of time spent exercising. Participants who reported greater stress had more irregular meal schedules. The most frequently used stress-release method was eating (n = 32), followed by exercise (n = 31). Nurses are fully aware of measures that should be taken for healthy living. Their knowledge, however, has not been well translated into their own self-care. As nursing shortages loom, maintaining the health of the aging nursing workforce is essential to retention. Further research is needed to identify factors that may motivate nurses to better care for themselves and measures that can be implemented by employers to initiate and sustain these preventive health care behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Self-Care Behaviors among Patients with Heart Failure in Iran

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    Vahid Zamanzadeh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recovery from heart failure and dealing with its effects is significantly influenced by patient’s self-care. In order to maximize the effects of behavioral interventions and for educational planning, it is essential to know how much experience and information do patients with heart failure have about their disease and self-care behaviors. The present study aimed to identify self-care behaviors in patients with heart failure. Methods: Eighty heart failure patients hospitalized in Shahid Madani Training Center in Tabriz, Iran, participated in this study. Data collection was done through Self-Care of Heart Failure Index (SCHFI that contained 22 questions in three sections including self-care behaviors, self-care management and confidence in performing self-care behaviors. Results: The patient’s self-care behaviors in three behavioral sub categories of maintaining, managing and confidence were low. The most repeated self-care behavior in the participating patients was taking medication and visiting the doctor. Conclusion: The results of the study showed low levels of self-care behaviors in patients with heart failure, which notes the need for patient empowerment. It is necessary to develop appropriate strategies in this regard by the authorities

  6. Examining Self-Care Behaviors and Their Associated Factors Among Adolescent Girls With Dysmenorrhea: An Application of Orem's Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Cho Lee; Ip, Wan Yim; Choi, Kai Chow; Lam, Lai Wah

    2015-05-01

    To test a hypothesized model that examines the relationship between selected basic conditioning factors, self-care agency, and self-care behaviors among adolescent girls with dysmenorrhea using Orem's self-care deficit nursing theory as a framework. This was a predictive correlational study conducted with a total of 531 secondary school girls. Self-care agency, self-care behaviors, and 11 variables that have been theoretically or empirically justified in previous studies as relevant to basic conditioning factors were selected and collected by means of structured questionnaires. Path analyses were performed to test the hypothesized linkages among variables. Path analysis revealed that age and received menstrual education had both direct and indirect effects through self-care agency on self-care behaviors. Mother's and father's educational level, pain intensity, and self-medication used when experiencing dysmenorrhea only affected the self-care behaviors directly. This is the first study that provided information about the relationship between basic conditioning factors, self-care agency, and self-care behaviors among adolescent girls with dysmenorrhea. Knowledge of the factors influencing self-care behaviors in these adolescent girls will assist healthcare professionals in developing effective interventions to promote self-care and ameliorate the adverse impact of this condition. Interventional strategies that aim at promoting self-care behaviors among adolescent girls with dysmenorrhea should strengthen girls' self-care agency and should target those with a younger age, higher pain intensity, mother with a higher educational level, father with a lower educational level, and those who do not take self-medication for dysmenorrhea. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  7. Self-Care Behaviors of African Americans Living with Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woda, Aimee; Haglund, Kristin; Belknap, Ruth Ann; Sebern, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    African Americans have a higher risk of developing heart failure (HF) than persons from other ethnic groups. Once diagnosed, they have lower rates of HF self-care and poorer health outcomes. Promoting engagement in HF self-care is amenable to change and represents an important way to improve the health of African Americans with HF. This study used a community-based participatory action research methodology called photovoice to explore the practice of HF self-care among low-income, urban, community dwelling African Americans. Using the photovoice methodology, themes emerged regarding self-care management and self-care maintenance.

  8. Longitudinal testing of the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills model of self-care among adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Sophie; Coulombe, Simon; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Côté, José; Lespérance, François; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Bherer, Louis; Lambert, Jean; Houle, Janie

    2016-11-01

    The study's aim was to test prospective associations between information, motivation, and behavioral skills (IMB model) and self-care behaviors (diet, exercise, and blood glucose testing) among patients with type 2 diabetes. 295 participants were surveyed one (T1), six (T2), and 12 (T3) months after a diabetes course. Cross-lagged panel analyses were performed to test unidirectional and bidirectional relationships between IMB model variables and self-care behaviors. Blood-glucose testing at T1 was positively related to information at T2, which in turn was positively related to blood-glucose testing at T3. Controlled motivation at T1 was positively related to exercise at T2. Autonomous motivation at T2 was positively associated with exercise at T3. There was a positive bidirectional relationship across time between behavioral skills and general diet. Patterns of prospective associations between IMB model variables and diabetes self-care depend on the self-care behavior considered. This model offers an interesting framework for examining how diabetes self-care behaviors evolve. Diabetes education programs should provide information about current health status and promote experiential learning to help patients realize the impact of their behaviors on glycemic control; should foster autonomous motivation for long-term change; and should build on patients' strengths and skills. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Self-care behaviors of Filipino-American adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Deovina N; Jordan, James L

    2010-01-01

    To examine the diabetes self-care behaviors of Filipino-American (FA) adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). The Summary of Diabetes Self Care Activities-Revised and Expanded measure was administered to 192 (74 males and 118 females) FA adult immigrants with type 2 DM. Older FAs (> or =65 years), females, those who were older when they immigrated, and participants diagnosed with type 2 DM longer were more likely to follow recommended medication regimens. Younger FAs (healthful eating plans. Likewise, females reported eating five or more servings of fruits and/or vegetables daily. Moreover, older FAs reported evenly spacing carbohydrate intake everyday. Furthermore, older participants, those with less education, participants who were older when they immigrated, and those older when diagnosed with type 2 DM ate fewer foods high in fats. As to physical activity, FA males and participants with higher education exercised more frequently. Younger FAs were less likely to perform optimum type 2 DM self-care behaviors pertaining to diet, medication taking, and blood glucose testing compared to their older counterparts. This finding suggests an increased risk for type 2 DM comorbidities and/or complications in younger FAs, which may require more intensive treatments in later years. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Validation of an Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills model of diabetes self-care (IMB-DSC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Chandra Y; Egede, Leonard E

    2010-04-01

    Comprehensive behavior change frameworks are needed to provide guidance for the design, implementation, and evaluation of diabetes self-care programs in diverse populations. We applied the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) model, a well-validated, comprehensive health behavior change framework, to diabetes self-care. Patients with diabetes were recruited from an outpatient clinic. Information gathered pertained to demographics, diabetes knowledge (information); diabetes fatalism (personal motivation); social support (social motivation); and diabetes self-care (behavior). Hemoglobin A1C values were extracted from the patient medical record. Structural equation models tested the IMB framework. More diabetes knowledge (r=0.22 pbehavior; and through behavior, were related to glycemic control (r=-0.20, pmotivation (less fatalistic attitudes), and social motivation (more social support) was associated with behavior; and behavior was the sole predictor of glycemic control. The IMB model is an appropriate, comprehensive health behavior change framework for diabetes self-care. The findings indicate that in addition to knowledge, diabetes education programs should target personal and social motivation to effect behavior change. 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Regulatory focus and adherence to self-care behaviors among adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraham, Rinat; Van Dijk, Dina; Simon-Tuval, Tzahit

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this study were, first, to test the association between regulatory focus of adults with type 2 diabetes and their adherence to two types of self-care behaviors - lifestyle change (e.g. physical activity and diet) and medical care regimens (blood-glucose monitoring, foot care and medication usage). Second, to explore whether a fit between the message framing and patients' regulatory focus would improve their intentions to adhere specifically when the type of behavior fits the patients' regulatory focus as well. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 130 adults with type 2 diabetes who were hospitalized in an academic medical center. The patients completed a set of questionnaires that included their diabetes self-care activities, regulatory focus, self-esteem and demographic, socioeconomic and clinical data. In addition, participants were exposed to either a gain-framed or a loss-framed message, and were then asked to indicate their intention to improve adherence to self-care behaviors. A multivariable linear regression model revealed that promoters reported higher adherence to lifestyle change behaviors than preventers did (B = .60, p = .028). However, no effect of regulatory focus on adherence to medical care regimens was found (B = .46, p = .114). In addition, preventers reported higher intentions to adhere to medical care behaviors when the message framing was congruent with prevention focus (B = 1.16, p = .023). However, promoters did not report higher intentions to adhere to lifestyle behaviors when the message framing was congruent with promotion focus (B = -.16, p = .765). These findings justify the need to develop tailor-made interventions that are adjusted to both patients' regulatory focus and type of health behavior.

  12. Attitudes and Self-Care Behaviors of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis Referred to Rheumatology Clinical Centers in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Morowatisharifabad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Knee Osteoarthritis is the most common age-related causes of knee pain which can induce disability, disablement and reduced quality of life. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine attitudes and self-care behaviors of knee osteoarthritis patients referred to three Rheumatology Clinical Centers in Yazd. Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was carried out on 235 patients referred to Health Care Centers of Yazd who were selected randomly. In order to glean the study data, a researcher-designed questionnaire was utilized probing into demographic variables as well as patients' attitudes and self-care behaviors. The reliability and validity of the questionnaire were approved, as well. The study data were analyzed applying SPSS software (ver. 18 via T-Test, ANOVA, Pearson correlation coefficient at 0.05 of the significant level. Results: The participants' mean age and Mean BMI were reported 54.90±9.15 and 28.8±4.61, respectively. Mean score of patients' attitude toward self-care was 47.4±3.95 out of 55 and the mean score of their self-care behaviors was 43.11±5.75 out of 60, which the both scores were at a moderate level. Furthermore, a positive significant correlation was detected between attitude and self-care behaviors (p=0.01. Within different self-care behaviors, participants' attitude towards the positive effect of using crutches while walking was at the lowest level. Meanwhile, according to the patients' attitude, using crutches was demonstrated to have the least performance within the self-care behaviors. Conclusion: Based on the findings of the present study, the attitude level can cause an increase in the patients' self-care behaviors. Moreover, since the participants' attitude towards such behaviors as using crutches, using pool and weight loss were at a low level, interventional programs are recommended to emphasize the mentioned issues. Keywords: Attitude; Knee osteoarthritis; Performance; Self-care

  13. Survey of CAM interest, self-care, and satisfaction with health care for type 2 diabetes at group health cooperative

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    Bradley Ryan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Very little research has explored the factors that influence interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM treatments. We surveyed persons with sub-optimally controlled type 2 diabetes to evaluate potential relationships between interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM treatments, current self-care practices, motivation to improve self-care practices and satisfaction with current health care for diabetes. Methods 321 patients from a large integrated healthcare system with type 2 diabetes, who were not using insulin and had hemoglobin A1c values between 7.5-9.5%, were telephoned between 2009-2010 and asked about their self-care behaviors, motivation to change, satisfaction with current health care and interest in trying naturopathic (ND care for their diabetes. Responses from patients most interested in trying ND care were compared with those from patients with less interest. Results 219 (68.5% patients completed the survey. Nearly half (48% stated they would be very likely to try ND care for their diabetes if covered by their insurance. Interest in trying ND care was not related to patient demographics, health history, clinical status, or self-care behaviors. Patients with greater interest in trying ND care rated their current healthcare as less effective for controlling their blood sugar (mean response 5.9 +/- 1.9 vs. 6.6 +/- 1.5, p = 0.003, and were more determined to succeed in self-care (p = 0.007. Current CAM use for diabetes was also greater in ND interested patients. Conclusions Patients with sub-optimally controlled type 2 diabetes expressed a high level of interest in trying ND care. Those patients with the greatest interest were less satisfied with their diabetes care, more motivated to engage in self-care, and more likely to use other CAM therapies for their diabetes.

  14. Prevalence Rates of Self-Care Behaviors and Related Factors in a Rural Hypertension Population: A Questionnaire Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanhuan Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the self-care behaviors among hypertensive patients in primary care. A cross-sectional survey, with 318 hypertensive patients, was conducted in a rural area in Beijing, China, in 2012. Participants were mainly recruited from a community health clinic and completed questionnaires assessing their self-care behaviors, including data on adherence to a prescribed medication regimen, low-salt diet intake, smoking habits, alcohol consumption, blood pressure monitoring, and physical exercise. The logistic regression model was used for the analysis of any association between self-care behaviors and age, gender, duration of hypertension, self-rated health, marital status, education level, diabetes status, or body mass index. Subjects that adhered to their medication schedule were more likely to have hypertension for a long duration (OR, 3.44; 95% CI 1.99–5.97. Older participants (OR, 1.80; 95% CI 1.08–2.99 were more likely to monitor their blood pressure. Subjects who did not partake in physical exercise were more likely to be men, although the difference between genders was not significant (OR, 0.60; 95% CI 0.36–1.01. Patients with shorter history of hypertension, younger and being males have lower self-care behaviors. Primary care providers and public health practitioner should pay more attention to patients recently diagnosed with hypertension as well as younger male patients.

  15. Depression, self-esteem, diabetes care and self-care behaviors among middle-aged and older Mexicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Hernandez, Maricruz

    2014-07-01

    Examine the associations of depression and self-esteem on self-care activities and care received among Mexicans with diabetes. Using data from the Mexican Nutrition and Health Survey 2012, logistic regression models were fit to test the associations between each self-care activity and diabetes care, and self-esteem and depression. People with low self-esteem were less likely to follow a diet, but no other associations were found. Contrary to what was expected, there were no relationships between depression and quality of care received or self-care behaviors. Current findings support the importance of looking at mental health and emotional state among older adults with diabetes. Future studies should explore the relationship between different psychological barriers to proper diabetes management. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Depression, self-esteem, diabetes care and self-care behaviors among middle-aged and older Mexicans☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Hernandez, Maricruz

    2016-01-01

    Aims Examine the associations of depression and self-esteem on self-care activities and care received among Mexicans with diabetes. Methods Using data from the Mexican Nutrition and Health Survey 2012, logistic regression models were fit to test the associations between each self-care activity and diabetes care, and self-esteem and depression. Results People with low self-esteem were less likely to follow a diet, but no other associations were found. Contrary to what was expected, there were no relationships between depression and quality of care received or self-care behaviors. Conclusion Current findings support the importance of looking at mental health and emotional state among older adults with diabetes. Future studies should explore the relationship between different psychological barriers to proper diabetes management. PMID:24846446

  17. Perceived oral health, oral self-care habits and dental attendance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceived oral health, oral self-care habits and dental attendance among pregnant women in Benin-City, Nigeria. ... Results: The majority of the respondents (81.7%) rated their oral health as excellent/good using the global oral health rating scale. Seventy one percent of the respondents did not change their oral self-care ...

  18. Brief report: self-care behaviors of children with type 1 diabetes living in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streisand, Randi; Respess, Deedrah; Overstreet, Stacy; Gonzalez de Pijem, Lilliam; Chen, Ru San; Holmes, Clarissa

    2002-12-01

    To examine self-care behaviors among children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes living in Puerto Rico, to determine the relationship between self-care and demographic variables, and to investigate the utility of the 24-hour recall interview within a Hispanic population. Forty-one children (M age = 12.6 years) with type 1 diabetes, and their mothers, were administered the 24-hour recall interview on three separate occasions to assess diabetes-related self-care behaviors. Children reported self-care behaviors that included daily administration of an average of two insulin injections and two blood glucose tests, and consumption of 5.5 meals a day comprised of 52% carbohydrates and 29% fat. Younger age, female gender, longer illness duration, and better metabolic control were associated with higher rates of several self-care behaviors. Data provide a first look at self-care behaviors of children with type 1 diabetes living in Puerto Rico and suggest the utility of the 24-hour recall interview within this population.

  19. Women's self-perception and self-care practice: implications for health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendias, E P; Clark, M C; Guevara, E B

    2001-01-01

    Mexican American women experience unique health care needs related to integration of Mexican and American cultures. To learn how to better promote self-care practices and service utilization in women of Mexican origin living in Texas, researchers used a qualitative approach to interview a convenience sample of 11 low-income women attending a health clinic. Researchers collected narrative data about the women's perceptions of health, wellness, and self-care. Using the matrix approach described by Miles and Huberman, we organized findings around women's roles, including participants' descriptions of themselves, their health and wellness awareness, self-care practices for health/illness and wellness/nonwellness, barriers to self-care, origin of self-care practices, and perceptions of life control. Implications for health planning and service delivery are presented.

  20. The effectiveness of the telehomecare for self-care behaviors of patients with diabetes in Taiwan: A consecutive observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Han Chiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Poor glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus can increase associated complications and mortality. We use the telehomecare system in patients with diabetes and investigate the associated impact in clinical practice. Materials and Methods: The purpose of the study is to examine the effectiveness of the telehomecare system on diabetic self-care. The telehomecare system incorporated into the daily care program in the experimental group. A cloud health-care platform designed for information storage and exchange be constructed and monitored by case managers. Comprehensive care instructions and in-time consultation in case of abnormalities were provided. The patients in the control group adopted conventional care program. Self-care questionnaires were completed by both groups before and after the study. All participants measured before the experiment and at 4 months after. Results: The participants were 117 patients (including 56 at the experimental and 61 at the control group, which recruited from a community hospital in New Taipei city, Taiwan. In two-way mixed design ANCOVA, in self-care behaviors, there are significant differences between two groups. The outcome of experimental group is superior to the control group both in posttest. However, there is no significant difference between two groups in subscales of foot care and athletics care. Moreover, there is no delayed effect in self-care behaviors of drug adjustment and blood sugar surveillance. Conclusions: This observational study revealed early intervention model to the health education strategy, the telehomecare might strengthen self-care behaviors of the participants. To the future study, we can put emphasis on the diabetes mellitus patient's foot care and exercise behaviors. The telehomecare model could also become the important health-care policy for the government in the future.

  1. Health Care Autonomy in Children with Chronic Conditions: Implications for Self Care and Family Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beacham, Barbara L.; Deatrick, Janet A.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Health care autonomy typically occurs during late adolescence but health care providers and families often expect children with chronic health conditions to master self-care earlier. Few studies have examined the development of health care autonomy as it pertains to self-care and family management. This review will link the three concepts and discuss implications for families and health care providers. Case studies are provided as exemplars to highlight areas where intervention and research is needed. PMID:23659815

  2. Self-care practice of patients with arterial hypertension in primary health care

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    Cláudia Rayanna Silva Mendes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the practice of self-care performed by patients with systemic arterial hypertension in primary health care. Methods: this is a descriptive and cross-sectional study, conducted with 92 individuals with arterial hypertension in a primary care unit. The data collection occurred through script and data analyzed using descriptive statistics (frequency, mean and standard deviation and through the understanding of the adaption between capacity and self-care demand. Results: it was identified as a practice of self-care: adequate water intake, salt intake and restricted coffee, satisfactory sleep period, abstinence from smoking and alcoholism, continuing pharmacological treatment and attending medical appointments. As the demands: inadequate feeding, sedentary lifestyle, had no leisure activities, self-reported stress, and limited knowledge. Conclusion: although patients performed treatment a few years ago, still showed up self-care deficits, highlighting the need for nurses to advise and sensitize about the importance of self-care practice.

  3. Influence of psychosocial factors on self-care behaviors and glycemic control in Turkish patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosansu, Gulhan; Erdogan, Semra

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the direct and indirect effects of psychosocial factors on self-care behavior and glycemic control in Turkish patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The study used a cross-sectional questionnaire survey design (N = 350). Data were collected using the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Scale and the Multidimensional Diabetes Questionnaire. The relationship between the study variables was analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficient and structural equation modeling. Self-efficacy was associated with social support, outcome expectancies, perceived interference, educational level, and self-care and A1C. According to the structural equation model, self-efficacy was the predictor variable that influenced both self-care and glycemic control. Self-efficacy in achieving desired health outcomes was found to play a central role in Turkish patients. Although interventions are planned and implemented to achieve and maintain self-management in individuals with diabetes, strengthening psychosocial factors, particularly self-efficacy, may contribute to adjustment to disease and good glycemic control in the long term.

  4. Health care autonomy in children with chronic conditions: implications for self-care and family management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beacham, Barbara L; Deatrick, Janet A

    2013-06-01

    Health care autonomy typically occurs during late adolescence but health care providers and families often expect children with chronic health conditions to master self-care earlier. Few studies have examined the development of health care autonomy as it pertains to self-care and family management. This review links the 3 concepts and discusses the implications for families and health care providers. Case studies are provided as exemplars to highlight areas where intervention and research is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of Education of Self-care Behaviors on HbA1C level in Diabetic Patients

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    Ahmadi Zakieh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The successful glycemic control in diabetic patients is very important. Since the poor self-care is reported as the most important causes of mortality and complications, therefore these patients require self-care knowledge. This study aimed to determine the effect of education of self-care behaviors on HbA1C level in diabetic patients. Materials and Method: In this clinical trial, 80 diabetic patients referred to the diabetes clinic in Bandar Abbas were selected through random sampling and then were randomly allocated into two groups of intervention and control based on stratified random sampling. Designed educational program was implemented in 9 sessions (60 minutes, once a week for 12 weeks for patients in the intervention group. Patients in the control group were received usual care of clinic. Data were collected through using demographic information form and HbA1c test. Data were collected at the beginning of the study and 12 weeks after the intervention. Data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 18 using independent T- test, paired T-test, Mann-Whitney U and chi-square. Results: Before the intervention, the HbA1c average in the intervention and control groups was 8.18 ± 1.66 and 8.41 ± 2.10, respectively and after the intervention these values were changed to 7.78 ± 1.48 and 8.82 ± 2.11 in the intervention and control groups respectively (p = 0.01. Conclusion: Implementation of educational program of self-care behaviors was effective in reducing HbA1C and it can be used as an appropriate educational method by nurses and other health care team in controlling of diabetes in patients.

  6. Self-Care for Older People (SCOPE): a cluster randomized controlled trial of self-care training and health outcomes in low-income elderly in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Angelique; Matchar, David B; Tsao, Mary Ann; Harding, Susana; Chiu, Chi-Tsun; Tay, Bryan; Raman, Prassanna; Pietryla, Zachary; Klein, Mara K; Haldane, Victoria Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Population aging is associated with a higher prevalence of chronic health conditions. Previous studies have shown that older persons, specifically those with chronic conditions, often lack sufficient knowledge about their condition and thus frequently have poor self-care skills. Efforts to increase general health screenings and improve access to chronic condition management resources are hampered by a lack of disease and health awareness. Self-Care for Older People (SCOPE) study, a cluster randomized controlled trial in Singapore, was designed to evaluate the impact of a self-care program for chronic disease awareness and management of specific health measures and quality of life of older people over eighteen months. SCOPE provided self-care education targeted at older people with low income and low education in order to improve health-related knowledge. A total of 378 low-income older people with no or minimal disability, defined as having difficulty in one or more activities of daily living (ADL), were recruited from senior activity centers. The measurements taken included self-reported health conditions, health and disease knowledge questions, and biomarkers (HbA1c, blood pressure, peak expiratory flow, lipid panel, albumin, and creatinine). SCOPE was also designed to provide information for policy makers on chronic disease burden and healthcare facility utilization among community-dwelling older adults. NCT01672177. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Allergic rhinitis - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay fever - self-care; Seasonal rhinitis - self-care; Allergies - allergic rhinitis - self-care ... in a row. Talk to your child's health care provider before giving your child decongestants. Nasal corticosteroid ...

  8. Psychometric Properties of the Dietary Salt Reduction Self-Care Behavior Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikan, Pratsani; Phillips, Kenneth D

    2014-07-01

    Valid, reliable, and culturally-specific scales to measure salt reduction self-care behavior in older adults are needed. The purpose of this study was to develop the Dietary Salt Reduction Self-Care Behavior Scale (DSR-SCB) for use in hypertensive older adults with Orem's self-care deficit theory as a base. Exploratory factor analysis, Rasch modeling, and reliability were performed on data from 242 older Thai adults. Nine items loaded on one factor (factor loadings = 0.63 to 0.79) and accounted for 52.28% of the variance (Eigenvalue = 4.71). The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin method of sampling adequacy was 0.89, and the Bartlett's test showed significance (χ 2 ( df =36 ) = 916.48, p < 0.0001). Infit and outfit mean squares ranged from 0.81 to 1.25, while infit and outfit standardized mean squares were located at ±2. Cronbach's alpha was 0.88. The 9-item DSR-SCB is a short and reliable scale. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. The changes and factors associated with post-discharge self-care behaviors among Chinese patients with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu XL

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Xiaolin Hu,1 Xiuying Hu,1 Yonglin Su,2 Moying Qu,3 Mary A Dolansky41Department of Nursing, 2Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, 3Department of Cardiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China; 4Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USABackground: Self-care behavior is essential for achieving good outcomes among patients with heart failure. Understanding the factors associated with self-care over time is important for the provision of appropriate and targeted interventions. However, little is known regarding the changes and factors associated with post-discharge self-care behaviors among Chinese patients with heart failure.Objective: To investigate the changes and factors of self-care behaviors during the first 3 months following discharge among patients with heart failure in the People’s Republic of China.Methods: A descriptive design with a convenience sample was utilized in this study. Patients (N=128 from two hospitals, West China Hospital and Angjin Hospital, in Chengdu, People’s Republic of China, were recruited from June 2013 to June 2014. The instruments used in the study included the following: the Social Support Rating Scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Disease 6-Item Scale, and the European Heart Failure Self-Care Behaviour Scale. Multivariate linear regression analyses were used to identify the factors related to self-care behaviors at baseline, 1 month, and 3 months following discharge.Results: Patients’ self-care behaviors were poor and decreased significantly over time (F=4.09, P<0.05. The factors associated with self-care behaviors at baseline included the following: education level, comorbidities, and social support. The factors related to self-care behaviors at 1 and 3 months following discharge included the following: education level, comorbidities, social

  10. Intervention Mapping Approach in the Design of an Interactive Mobile Health Application to Improve Self-care in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athilingam, Ponrathi; Clochesy, John M; Labrador, Miguel A

    2018-02-01

    Heart failure is a complex syndrome among older adults who may experience and interpret symptoms differently. These differences in symptom interpretation may influence decision-making in symptom management. A well-informed and motivated person may develop the knowledge and skills needed to successfully manage symptoms. Therefore, the patient-centered mobile health application HeartMapp was designed to engage patients with heart failure in self-care management by offering tailored alerts and feedback using mobile phones. The main objective of this article is to describe the six-step intervention mapping approach including (1) the initial needs assessment, (2) proximal program objective, (3) selection of theory-based methods, (4) the translation of objectives into an actual program plan for mobile health intervention, (5) adaptation and implementation plan, and (6) evaluation plan that assisted the team in the development of a conceptual framework and intervention program matrix during the development of HeartMapp. The HeartMapp intervention takes the information, motivation, and behavioral skills model as the theoretical underpinning, with "patient engagement" as the key mediator in achieving targeted and persistent self-care behavioral changes in patients with heart failure. The HeartMapp intervention is proposed to improve self-care management and long-term outcomes.

  11. The importance of health belief models in determining self-care behaviour in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, J N; Lawson, V L

    2009-01-01

    Patients' self-care behaviours have a major role in diabetes management. Diabetes education provides the required knowledge, but despite this, self-care is often suboptimal. The degree to which patients follow advice as regards the various self-care behaviours is determined by their health beliefs (Illness Representations or Personal Models) of diabetes. Psychometric studies have tried to categorize and measure the beliefs about illness that influence patients to adhere to treatment recommendations in diabetes. Various models have been proposed to explain the relationship between beliefs and behaviour. Leventhal's Self-Regulatory Model, which takes account of the emotional as well as the objective rational response to illness, currently seems to offer the best system for identifying the determinants of patient self-care behaviour. A review of interventions indicates those based on psychological theory offer professionals the best chance of maximizing their patients' contribution to diabetes self-management and achieving improved outcomes, both glycaemic and psychosocial. Studies designed specifically to modify illness representations are now being undertaken. This brief review aims to summarize developments in this area of psychological theory over the last 20 years and the implications for promoting better self-care behaviour in diabetes.

  12. Can online social support be detrimental in stigmatized chronic diseases? A quadratic model of the effects of informational and emotional support on self-care behavior of HIV patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xunyi; Parameswaran, Srikanth; Bagul, Darshan Mahendra; Kishore, Rajiv

    2018-04-18

    We studied the impact of online social support on patient self-care behavior in an online health community for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients. We conceptualized emotional and informational support provided by community members into nuanced sub-dimensions. We explored how the direct and interaction effects of these sub-dimensions impact the self-care behavior of a support seeker. We used data from 330 255 posts in 30 050 threads from POZ, an online health community for HIV patients. Our key variables-self-care behaviori, objective informationj, experiential supportj, and emotional tonej-were operationalized using linguistic analysis with self-generated dictionaries and Python libraries. We tested our hypotheses using Tobit regression. Out of 6 null hypotheses, 5 were rejected. Objective information and emotional tone had an inverted-U relationship with self-care behavior. Experiential information and community involvement were positively related to self-care behavior. Community involvement amplified the inverted-U relationship between emotional tone and self-care behavior. No significant interaction effect was found between experiential support and objective information. Beyond a threshold, both informational and emotional online social support had a deleterious impact on self-care behavior of HIV patients. Our results suggested that caution should be exercised in the use of online health community interventions for HIV patients, and perhaps patients with other stigmatized chronic diseases.

  13. Factors influencing self-care behaviors of African Americans with heart failure: a photovoice project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woda, Aimee; Belknap, Ruth Ann; Haglund, Kristin; Sebern, Margaret; Lawrence, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the influences of heart failure (HF) self-care among low income, African Americans. Compared to all other racial groups, African Americans have the highest risk of developing HF, coupled with high mortality and morbidity rates. Using the photovoice method, participants related important lifestyle factors through photography. The participants and researcher met for reflection and discussion 2 h per week for six weeks. Four themes emerged: family support gives me the push I need, social interaction lifts me up, improving my mind to lift depression can improve my heart, and it is important but challenging to follow the HF diet. The findings from this study may assist policy makers, health care professionals, patients, and support systems in understanding the complexity of engaging in HF self-care. This understanding may lead to the development of appropriate patient-centered assessments and interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationship of Health Literacy of Heart Failure Patients and Their Family Members on Heart Failure Knowledge and Self-Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jia-Rong; Reilly, Carolyn M; Holland, James; Higgins, Melinda; Clark, Patricia C; Dunbar, Sandra B

    2017-02-01

    We explored the relationships among patients' and family members' (FMs) health literacy, heart failure (HF) knowledge, and self-care behaviors using baseline data from HF patients and their FMs ( N = 113 pairs) in a trial of a self-care intervention. Measures included Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine, Atlanta HF Knowledge Test, a heart failure Medication Adherence Scale, and sodium intake (24-hr urine and 3-day food record). Patients with low health literacy (LHL) were more likely to have lower HF knowledge ( p < .001) and trended to poorer medication adherence ( p = .077) and higher sodium intake ( p = .072). When FMs had LHL, FMs were more likely to have lower HF knowledge ( p = .001) and patients trended toward higher sodium intake ( p = .067). When both patients and FMs had LHL, lowest HF knowledge and poorest medication adherence were observed ( p < .027). The health literacy of both patient and FM needs to be considered when designing interventions to foster self-care.

  15. Neck pain or spasms - self care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - neck - self-care; Neck stiffness - self-care; Cervicalgia - self-care; Whiplash - self-care ... some pharmacies or retail stores. Ask your health care provider about using a soft neck collar to ...

  16. The barriers and facilitators of supporting self care in Mental Health NHS Trusts

    OpenAIRE

    Gillard, Steve; Edwards, Christine; White, Sarah; White, Rachel; Adams, Katie; Davies, Lucy; Green, Katherine; Kettle, Trevor; Lathlean, Judith; Lucock, Mike; Miller, Stephen; Minogue, Virginia; Nugent, Christine; Simons, Lucy; Turner, Kati

    2010-01-01

    Background\\ud The Department of Health has prioritised the need to support individuals in the care they take to maintain their own mental health (2005). Research onthe effectiveness of a variety of self care interventions has been reviewed (DH 2007). Challenges to changing from a culture of ‘doing for’ to ‘doing\\ud with’ have been identified (Wilson 2005).\\ud \\ud We use a theoretical framework derived from organisational research to explore how health service organisations change (Edwards 200...

  17. Self-care confidence may be more important than cognition to influence self-care behaviors in adults with heart failure: Testing a mediation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellone, Ercole; Pancani, Luca; Greco, Andrea; Steca, Patrizia; Riegel, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    Cognitive impairment can reduce the self-care abilities of heart failure patients. Theory and preliminary evidence suggest that self-care confidence may mediate the relationship between cognition and self-care, but further study is needed to validate this finding. The aim of this study was to test the mediating role of self-care confidence between specific cognitive domains and heart failure self-care. Secondary analysis of data from a descriptive study. Three out-patient sites in Pennsylvania and Delaware, USA. A sample of 280 adults with chronic heart failure, 62 years old on average and mostly male (64.3%). Data on heart failure self-care and self-care confidence were collected with the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index 6.2. Data on cognition were collected by trained research assistants using a neuropsychological test battery measuring simple and complex attention, processing speed, working memory, and short-term memory. Sociodemographic data were collected by self-report. Clinical information was abstracted from the medical record. Mediation analysis was performed with structural equation modeling and indirect effects were evaluated with bootstrapping. Most participants had at least 1 impaired cognitive domain. In mediation models, self-care confidence consistently influenced self-care and totally mediated the relationship between simple attention and self-care and between working memory and self-care (comparative fit index range: .929-.968; root mean squared error of approximation range: .032-.052). Except for short-term memory, which had a direct effect on self-care maintenance, the other cognitive domains were unrelated to self-care. Self-care confidence appears to be an important factor influencing heart failure self-care even in patients with impaired cognition. As few studies have successfully improved cognition, interventions addressing confidence should be considered as a way to improve self-care in this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  18. Improving Self-Care of Patients with Chronic Disease using Online Personal Health Record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Wagholikar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Effective management of chronic diseases such as prostate cancer is important. Research suggests a tendency to use self-care treatment options such as over-the-counter (OTC complementary medications among prostate cancer patients. The current trend in patient-driven recording of health data in an online Personal Health Record (PHR presents an opportunity to develop new data-driven approaches for improving prostate cancer patient care. However, the ability of current online solutions to share patients’ data for better decision support is limited. An informatics approach may improve online sharing of self-care interventions among these patients. It can also provide better evidence to support decisions made during their self-managed care.Aims To identify requirements for an online system and describe a new case-based reasoning (CBR method for improving self-care of advanced prostate cancer patients in an online PHR environment. Method A non-identifying online survey was conducted to understand self-care patterns among prostate cancer patients and to identify requirements for an online information system. The pilot study was carried out between August 2010 and December 2010. A case-base of 52 patients was developed. Results The data analysis showed self-care patterns among the prostate cancer patients. Selenium (55% was the common complementary supplement used by the patients. Paracetamol (about 45% was the commonly used OTC by the patients. Conclusion The results of this study specified requirements for an online case-based reasoning information system. The outcomes of this study are being incorporated in design of the proposed Artificial Intelligence (AI driven patient journey browser system. A basic version of the proposed system is currently being considered for implementation.

  19. Consumer Health Informatics: Promoting Patient Self-care Management of Illnesses and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minsoo

    Consumer health informatics (CHI) is propelling important changes for medical providers and the lives of patients through information and communications technology. Independently, medical consumers seek, collect, and use health information for decision making. However, when constructing a CHI-based medical platform, high technology must be applied in a fully understandable and usable format for both health care providers and consumers. This study examines the present status of CHI and its effect on medical consumers. For the development of CHI, we discuss the need for tailored health communications and capacity building with chronic patients at the medical center. First, empowerment is a key characteristic needed for medical consumer health care management. However, promoting patient self-care management of illnesses and health is necessary to create conjugation where cooperation with medical service providers is possible. Also, establishing a health care delivery system that will support cooperation is necessary. Second, tailored health communications can uniquely construct the health information of patients, which prevents unnecessary or excessive information from leading patients to confused and inappropriate decisions. Ultimately, through the present environment of health communication, the innovation of a consumer health care information system has become the tide of the times and the positive effect of improved health can be expected.

  20. Metabolic control, self-care behaviors, and parenting in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: a correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Maia Stoker; Mandleco, Barbara; Roper, Susanne Olsen; Marshall, Elaine S; Dyches, Tina

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to explore relationships among metabolic control, self-care behaviors, and parenting in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Twenty-nine adolescents (mean age, 14.1 years) and their parents participated. Metabolic control was determined by an average of 4 A1C values taken prior to study enrollment; self-care behaviors were measured with a 12-item self-report questionnaire; parenting style was evaluated using the Parenting Practices Report. The mean for A1C values was 8.5%; the mean for overall self-care behaviors was 4.93 (5 = usually). Participants rated themselves highest on the self-care behaviors of giving insulin shots when indicated and adjusting insulin when eating a lot. They ranked themselves lowest on eating a low-fat diet and testing urine for ketones. Parents tended to be more authoritative in their approaches to parenting than either authoritarian or permissive. A significant relationship was found between authoritative mothering and adolescent self-care behaviors and metabolic control. Regression analyses controlling for age and length of time with diabetes confirmed the significance of these relationships. Authoritative fathering positively correlated with the self-care behaviors of monitoring blood glucose, taking insulin, and not skipping meals. A relationship was also noted between permissive parenting by mothers/fathers and poorer metabolic outcomes. However, the permissive parenting correlations did not remain significant when controlling for age and length of time with diabetes. Clinicians may help prevent declining participation in self-care behaviors and metabolic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes by working with parents, particularly mothers, and encouraging authoritative parenting.

  1. Quality of life and self-care in elderly patients with cardiovascular diseases: The effect of a Traditional Chinese Medicine health educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi-Qin; Jiang, An-Li; Chen, San-Mei; Li, Hui; Xing, Hai-Yan; Wang, Fang

    2017-12-01

    To explore the effects of a Traditional Chinese Medicine health educational intervention on the quality of life and self-care agency of elderly patients living with chronic cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The secondary prevention and treatment for chronic cardiovascular disease emphasize the importance of lifestyle modification. However, behavior-changing is difficult and individual choices are influenced by broader environmental factors. The lifestyle intervention for the purpose of self-care enhancing should be considered the driving force from the cultural element. The study was conducted from April 2014 to October 2014. Ninety-eight community dwelling individuals with chronic cardiovascular disease were recruited from Shaoxing and randomized. 48 participants were in the intervention group with a 6-month Traditional Chinese Medicine health education and 50 participants were in the control group with routine care. The main measurements included health-related quality of life and self-care agency, which was assessed by the Short Form-36 Chinese version and the Exercise of Self-Care Agency Scale respectively, and were measured at the baseline and post intervention (6months after baseline). After 6months of intervention, the quality of life and self-care agency in the intervention group were significantly improved. The traditional Chinese medicine health education is an effective method for promoting quality of life and self-care agency in cardiovascular disease patients. It could be applied as adjunctive care for cardiovascular disease patients self-care supporting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Health Collaborative Network Focus on Self-care Processes in Personal Assistant Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Fuente, Ma Victoria; Ros, Lorenzo

    Public health is oriented to the management of an adequate health atmosphere which acts directly on health, as well as health education work and the supervision of environmental health threats. The work presented in this paper aims to reduce inequality, and give disabled people the tools to be integrated more effectively, reducing social exclusion, removing obstacles and barriers, and facilitating mobility and the use of technology. The work is planned to design a special healthcare collaborative network as the best solution for addressing the needs of the disabled self-care and health care community through the creation and implementation of an interconnected, electronic information infrastructure and adoption of open data standards.

  3. Usability of an adaptive computer assistant that improves self-care and health literacy of older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanson Henkemans, O.A.; Rogers, W.A.; Fisk, A.D.; Neerincx, M.A.; Lindenberg, J.; Mast, C.A.P.G. van der

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: We developed an adaptive computer assistant for the supervision of diabetics' self-care, to support limiting illness and need for acute treatment, and improve health literacy. This assistant monitors self-care activities logged in the patient's electronic diary. Accordingly, it provides

  4. Self-care behaviors of adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chourdakis, Michael; Kontogiannis, Vasileios; Malachas, Konstantinos; Pliakas, Triantafyllos; Kritis, Aristidis

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine self-care behaviors of adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus living in the Metropolitan Area of Thessaloniki in Northern Greece. The Summary of Diabetes Self-Care behaviors measurement was administered to 215 patients, out of which 177 were eligible to participate (87 males). Patients, aged 30 years or more, were recruited through a university hospital day-clinic. Older patients (>65 years), as well as those with "higher educational level" did not distribute their daily carbohydrate intake equally. Nevertheless, they were more likely to adapt to their physician's recommendations regarding medication and to regularly perform suggested blood glucose checking. Exercise patterns were more often found for higher educated, earlier diagnosed males. Younger patients were less likely to follow their healthcare professional's recommendations, regarding diet, medication intake, blood glucose checking, foot care and exercise compared to older patients. These results pose a higher risk for complications and morbidity in younger patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, who most possibly will require intensive treatment in the future.

  5. Relationship between perceived social support and self-care behavior in type 2 diabetics: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebi, Siamak; Parham, Mahmoud; Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Gharlipour, Zabihollah; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Rajati, Fatemeh

    2018-01-01

    Social support is one of the most effective factors on the diabetic self-care. This study aimed to assess social support and its relationship to self-care in type 2 diabetic patients in Qom, Iran. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 325 diabetics attending the Diabetes Mellitus Association. Patients who meet inclusion and exclusion criteria were selected using random sampling method. Data were collected by the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, with hemoglobin A 1 C test. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and independent t -test, analysis of variance, Pearson correlation, and linear regression test, using 0.05 as the critical significance level, provided by SPSS software. The mean and standard deviation of self-care and social support scores were 4.31 ± 2.7 and 50.32 ± 11.09, respectively. The mean level of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA 1 C) of patients was 7.54. There was a significant difference between mean score of self-care behaviors and social support according to gender and marital status ( P social support significantly correlated ( r = 0.489, P > 0.001) and also predictive power of social support was 0.28. Self-care was significantly better in diabetics with HbA 1 C ≤7%. Patients who had higher HbA 1 C felt less, but not significant, social support. This study indicated the relationship between social support and self-care behaviors in type 2 diabetic patients. Interventions that focus on improving the social support and self-care of diabetic control may be more effective in improving glycemic control.

  6. Taking good care of myself: a qualitative study on self-care behavior among Chinese persons with a permanent colostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Hui; Songwathana, Praneed; Isaramalai, Sang-arun; Wang, Qingxi

    2014-12-01

    In Chinese culture, as a possible consequence of Confucianism, caring for the sick is considered a moral obligation of family members, while self-care is only the basis of fulfilling filial piety. This qualitative study aims to explore the self-care behavior among persons with a permanent colostomy in a Chinese cultural context of emphasizing the role of family caregiving. Data from in-depth interviews with seven Chinese adults at a university hospital in southwest China were analyzed using content analysis. Informants' self-care behavior was characterized by "taking good care of myself," which underlined individuals' efforts to manage colostomy-related impacts involving: (i) taking care of my colostomy with a proper degree of independence; (ii) taking care of my life by dealing with limitations; (iii) taking care of my mood in a positive way. Findings revealed that informants' self-care behavior was linked to their Confucian beliefs in family obligations, and also influenced by a happy-go-lucky outlook of life, a likely product of Taoism. The information is useful for nurses to design a culturally appropriate care plan to improve self-care behavior and proper family caregiving. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Connecting Patients to mHealth Applications to Enhance Self-care Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Meghan K

    2015-09-01

    Smartphone use and the desire to use mHealth are growing in the population of patients who most commonly use home healthcare (HHC) services, a population with chronic conditions and complex healthcare management needs. HHC nurses are positioned to connect HHC patients with mHealth Apps to access health-related information, engage in interactive monitoring, and manage self-care activities. The challenge of finding reputable Apps is discussed and resources are presented to overcome this challenge at the business orindividual level.

  8. Health education programmes to improve foot self-care practices and foot problems among older people with diabetes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Sharoni, Siti Khuzaimah; Minhat, Halimatus Sakdiah; Mohd Zulkefli, Nor Afiah; Baharom, Anisah

    2016-09-01

    To assess the effectiveness of health education programmes to improve foot self-care practices and foot problems among older people with diabetes. The complications of diabetes among older people are a major health concern. Foot problems such as neuropathy, ulcer and ultimately amputation are a great burden on older people with diabetes. Diabetes foot education programmes can influence the behaviour of older people in practising foot self-care and controlling the foot problems. However, the educational approaches used by the educators are different. Therefore, it is important to assess the education programmes from various evidence-based practices. Six databases, EBSCOhost medical collections (MEDLINE, CINAHL, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection), SAGE, Wiley Online Library, ScienceDirect, SpringerLink and Web of Science, were used to search for articles published from January 2000 to March 2015. The search was based on the inclusion criteria and keywords including 'foot', 'care' and 'diabetes'. Fourteen studies were assessed and reviewed in the final stage. Health education programmes varied according to their design, setting, approach, outcome measured and results. Foot assessment, verbal and written instructions and discussion were proved to improve the foot self-care and foot problems. Subsequent follow-ups and evaluations had a significant effect. An improvement was observed in foot self-care scores and foot problems (such as neuropathy, foot disability, lesion, ulcer, tinea pedis and callus grade) after implementation of the health education programme. The findings of this study support the claim that a health education programme increases the foot self-care scores and reduces the foot problems. However, there were certain methodological concerns in the reviewed articles, indicating the need for further evaluation. In future, researchers and practitioners must implement a vigorous education programme focusing on diabetes foot self-care among the

  9. Low-income Euro-American mothers' perceptions of health and self-care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendias, Elnora P; Clark, Michele C; Guevara, Edilma B; Svrcek, Claire Y

    2011-01-01

    Health promotion activities may decrease preventable diseases and health system overuse. This study examined how low-income Euro-American mothers described their health/wellness, self-care practices (SCP), and SCP benefits, barriers, and interpersonal influences (norms, modeling, and social support) affecting their SCP. This descriptive qualitative study used a convenience sample of 10 low-income, English-speaking mothers, 25-43 years old, seeking women's/children's health services at a large urban Texas health clinic. Data were collected via face-to-face interviews, using a standardized semistructured interview guide; data were analyzed using Miles and Huberman's qualitative research methods. All participants primarily described themselves positively and as mothers and workers. Most viewed health and wellness as distinct but typically included physical and emotional well-being. Mothers valued health and SCP for personal and family reasons. All identified SCP benefits. Most identified SCP barriers. Women viewed themselves as vital to family function and well-being, learned SCP primarily from parents during childhood, and described limited support for SCP. The results provide a better understanding of participants' self-care decision making and are useful in designing appropriate clinical health promotions. Reducing health inequities in low-income women requires further study of the underlying causes and development of effective policies and measures to address them. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Experiencing type 2 diabetes mellitus: qualitative analysis of adolescents' concept of illness, adjustment, and motivation to engage in self-care behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, Katherine S; Brouwer, Amanda M; Fox, Michelle M; Olson, Kimberly A; Yelich-Koth, Sara L; Fleischman, Katie M; Hains, Anthony A; Davies, W Hobart; Kichler, Jessica C

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of adolescents diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in terms of how youths conceptualized the effect of T2DM on daily life, adjustment to the illness, and motivation related to diabetes self-care management. The aims of the study were to gather essential information in order to develop appropriate intervention techniques and inform future studies intended to understand the psychosocial experiences of youths with T2DM. Eight adolescents diagnosed with T2DM were recruited from an outpatient pediatric diabetes clinic at a Midwestern children's hospital. A qualitative interview was developed, which was scheduled to last about 30 to 45 minutes. Data were analyzed using the consensual qualitative research methodology, wherein qualitative coders developed core ideas and themes related to the adolescent experience of T2DM. Three main themes were identified, including how the youths conceptualized the impact of T2DM, adjustment to self-care, and motivation to perform self-care behaviors. Knowledge related to the cause of T2DM and adjustment to completing self-care behaviors was varied among youths. Few adolescents spoke about motivation sources, although when mentioned, it typically involved witnessing negative health consequences in family members or friends with T2DM. The data represent essential initial information related to youths with T2DM, which will help guide in developing future studies designed to understand the psychosocial experiences of youths with T2DM and appropriate intervention techniques. Future research that aims to increase internal and external motivation may be able to subsequently impact adherence to self-care behaviors.

  11. Socio-economic inequalities in health, habits and self-care during pregnancy in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrañaga, Isabel; Santa-Marina, Loreto; Begiristain, Haizea; Machón, Mónica; Vrijheid, Martine; Casas, Maribel; Tardón, Adonina; Fernández-Somoano, Ana; Llop, Sabrina; Rodriguez-Bernal, Clara L; Fernandez, Mariana F

    2013-09-01

    Socioeconomic disadvantage can be harmful for mother's health and can influence child's health long term. The aim of this study is to analyse social inequalities between pregnant women from four INMA (INfancia y Medio Ambiente) cohorts. The analysis included 2,607 pregnant women recruited between 2004 and 2008 from four INMA cohorts. Data on maternal characteristics were collected through two questionnaires completed in the first and third trimester of pregnancy. The relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and maternal health, dietary intake, lifestyle habits and self-care related variables was modelled using logistic regression analysis. 33.5 % of women had a university level of education and 47 % had high occupational class. Women with higher SES reported healthier habits, fewer complications during pregnancy, better weight gain control and attended more prenatal appointments than women with lower SES. The risk of sedentary behaviour and passive smoking was higher among women with a lower level of education (OR = 1.7, 95 % CI 1.3-2.2 and OR = 1.6, 95 % CI 1.2-2.3, respectively) and with less skilled occupations (OR = 1.7, 95 % CI 1.4-2.0 and OR = 1.2, 95 % CI 1.0-1.5, respectively). Although both SES indicators-occupation and education-act as social determinants of diet, occupation was a more powerful determinant than education. For other lifestyle and self-caring variables, education was a more powerful predictor than occupation. Social inequalities were observed in health, habits and self-care during pregnancy. Proper care during pregnancy requires the control of common clinical variables and the knowledge of socioeconomic conditions of the pregnant women.

  12. The effect of education through motivational interviewing compared with conventional education on self-care behaviors in heart failure patients with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navidian, Ali; Mobaraki, Hajar; Shakiba, Mansour

    2017-08-01

    To determine the effect of education based on motivational interviewing on self-care behaviors in heart failure patients with depression. In this study, 82 patients suffering from heart failure whose depression had been confirmed were selected and divided into two groups. The Self-Care Heart Failure Index was utilized to evaluate self-care behavior. The intervention group received four sessions of self-care behavior education based on the principles of motivational interviewing, and the control group received four sessions of conventional education on self-care behavior. At 8 weeks after finishing the interventions, the self-care behaviors of both groups were evaluated. Data were analyzed using paired and independent t-tests, Chi-square, and analysis of covariance, as appropriate. The average increase in the overall scores and the scores on the three sub-scales of self-care behavior (maintenance, management, and confidence) of the heart failure patients with depression were significantly higher after education based on motivational interviewing than after conventional self-care education (pMotivational interviewing had a significant positive effect on self-care behaviors in patients with heart failure and depression. Due to the effectiveness of the MI, using motivational interviewing for education in depressed HF patients is recommended. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Measurement of the Constructs of Health Belief Model related to Self-care during Pregnancy in Women Referred to South Tehran Health Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalda Soleiman Ekhtiari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Self-care activities during pregnancy can be effective in reducing adverse pregnancy outcomes. Health Belief Model (HBM is one of the most applicable models in educational need assessment for planning and implementation of educational interventions. The purpose of this study was to measurement of the constructs of HBM related to self-care during pregnancy in women referred to South Tehran health network.Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study 270 pregnant women who referred to health centers of South Tehran Health Networks participated. Demographic, knowledge and attitude questionnaires based on constructs of HBM was used to measure the status of knowledge and attitude of women. Data were analyzed using statistical software SPSS18.Results: Results showed that 92.2% of women had the knowledge scores in good level. The scores of perceived severity, perceived self-efficacy and cues to action were in good level in almost of women but almost of women obtained weak point in perceived susceptibility, perceived benefits and barriersConclusion: HBM can be used as an appropriate tool for assessment the status of pregnant women in the field of self-care behaviors during pregnancy and planning and implementation of educational interventions.

  14. Mobile Health Apps to Facilitate Self-Care: A Qualitative Study of User Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kevin; Burford, Oksana; Emmerton, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Consumers are living longer, creating more pressure on the health system and increasing their requirement for self-care of chronic conditions. Despite rapidly-increasing numbers of mobile health applications ('apps') for consumers' self-care, there is a paucity of research into consumer engagement with electronic self-monitoring. This paper presents a qualitative exploration of how health consumers use apps for health monitoring, their perceived benefits from use of health apps, and suggestions for improvement of health apps. 'Health app' was defined as any commercially-available health or fitness app with capacity for self-monitoring. English-speaking consumers aged 18 years and older using any health app for self-monitoring were recruited for interview from the metropolitan area of Perth, Australia. The semi-structured interview guide comprised questions based on the Technology Acceptance Model, Health Information Technology Acceptance Model, and the Mobile Application Rating Scale, and is the only study to do so. These models also facilitated deductive thematic analysis of interview transcripts. Implicit and explicit responses not aligned to these models were analyzed inductively. Twenty-two consumers (15 female, seven male) participated, 13 of whom were aged 26-35 years. Eighteen participants reported on apps used on iPhones. Apps were used to monitor diabetes, asthma, depression, celiac disease, blood pressure, chronic migraine, pain management, menstrual cycle irregularity, and fitness. Most were used approximately weekly for several minutes per session, and prior to meeting initial milestones, with significantly decreased usage thereafter. Deductive and inductive thematic analysis reduced the data to four dominant themes: engagement in use of the app; technical functionality of the app; ease of use and design features; and management of consumers' data. The semi-structured interviews provided insight into usage, benefits and challenges of health monitoring

  15. Unhealthy Substance Use Behaviors as Symptom-Related Self-Care in HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brion, John M.; Rose, Carol Dawson; Nicholas, Patrice K.; Sloane, Rick; Voss, Joachim G.; Corless, Inge B.; Lindgren, Teri G.; Wantland, Dean J.; Kemppainen, Jeanne K.; Sefcik, Elizabeth F.; Nokes, Kathleen M.; Kirksey, Kenn M.; Eller, Lucille Sanzero; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Holzemer, William L.; Portillo, Carmen J.; Mendez, Marta Rivero; Robinson, Linda M.; Moezzi, Shanaz; Rosa, Maria; Human, Sarie; Maryland, Mary; Arudo, John; Ros, Ana Viamonte; Nicholas, Thomas P.; Cuca, Yvette; Huang, Emily; Bain, Catherine; Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Zang, Sheryl M.; Shannon, Maureen; Peters-Lewis, Angelleen

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of symptoms in HIV disease can be associated with HIV disease itself, comorbid illness, and/or antiretroviral therapy. Unhealthy substance use behaviors, particularly substance-use behaviors including heavy alcohol intake, marijuana use, other illicit drug use, and cigarette smoking, are engaged in by many HIV-positive individuals, often as a way to manage disease-related symptoms. This study is a secondary data analysis of baseline data from a larger randomized-controlled trial of an HIV/AIDS Symptom Management Manual. In the present study, the prevalence and characteristics of unhealthy substance use behaviors in relation to HIV/AIDS symptoms are examined. Subjects were recruited from a variety of settings which provide HIV/AIDS care and treatment. The mean age of the sample (n=775) was 42.8 years (SD=9.6) and nearly thirty-nine percent (38.5%) of the sample was female. The racial demographics of the sample were: 28% African American, 28% Hispanic, 21% White/Caucasian, 16% African from Kenya or South Africa, 1% Asian, and 5% self-described as “Other.” The mean number of years living with HIV was reported to be 9.1 years (SD=6.6).Specific self-reported unhealthy substance-use behaviors were use of marijuana (n= 111; 14.3%), cigarette smoking (n=355; 45.8%), heavy alcohol use (n= 66; 8.5%), and illicit drugs (n= 98; 12.6%). A subset of individuals who identified high levels of specific symptoms also reported significantly higher substance use behaviors including amphetamine and injection drug use in addition to heavy alcohol use, cigarette smoking, and marijuana use. Implications for clinical practice include assessment of self-care behaviors, screening for substance abuse, and education of persons related to self-management across the trajectory of HIV disease. PMID:21352430

  16. Effect of self-care training program based on Orem's model on the behaviors leading to sexually transmitted disease in vulnerable women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghersad, Zahra; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah; Boroumandfar, Zahra; Golshiri, Parastoo

    2016-01-01

    Vulnerable women are prone to sexually transmitted diseases due to their high-risk behaviors. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of self-care training program based on Orem's model on the behaviors leading to sexually transmitted diseases in vulnerable women. This field trial was initially conducted on 100 women covered under health services and welfare organization in Isfahan city, who were selected by rationing ssampling. For needs assessment, they filled the self-care needs assessment questionnaire in three domains of knowledge, attitude, and practice. Then, at the stage of intervention (self-care training), 64 subjects were selected through convenient sampling and were assigned to experimental and control groups by random allocation. Data were analyzed by descriptive and analytical statistical tests through SPSS 18. Results showed that mean scores of knowledge ( P < 0.001), attitude ( P < 0.001), practice ( P = 0.04), and behavior change ( P = 0.01) were significantly higher immediately after and 3 months after intervention, compared to before intervention, but there was no significant difference in mean scores between immediately after and 3 months after intervention. With regard to these results, it can be concluded that if the educational programs are planned based on clients' real needs assessment, the learners follow the educational materials, related to their problems, more seriously and it results in a notable behavior change in them.

  17. Informing the development of services supporting self-care for severe, long term mental health conditions: a mixed method study of community based mental health initiatives in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Gillard

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Supporting self-care is being explored across health care systems internationally as an approach to improving care for long term conditions in the context of ageing populations and economic constraint. UK health policy advocates a range of approaches to supporting self-care, including the application of generic self-management type programmes across conditions. Within mental health, the scope of self-care remains poorly conceptualised and the existing evidence base for supporting self-care is correspondingly disparate. This paper aims to inform the development of support for self-care in mental health by considering how generic self-care policy guidance is implemented in the context of services supporting people with severe, long term mental health problems. Methods A mixed method study was undertaken comprising standardised psychosocial measures, questionnaires about health service use and qualitative interviews with 120 new referrals to three contrasting community based initiatives supporting self-care for severe, long term mental health problems, repeated nine months later. A framework approach was taken to qualitative analysis, an exploratory statistical analysis sought to identify possible associations between a range of independent variables and self-care outcomes, and a narrative synthesis brought these analyses together. Results Participants reported improvement in self-care outcomes (e.g. greater empowerment; less use of Accident and Emergency services. These changes were not associated with level of engagement with self-care support. Level of engagement was associated with positive collaboration with support staff. Qualitative data described the value of different models of supporting self-care and considered challenges. Synthesis of analyses suggested that timing support for self-care, giving service users control over when and how they accessed support, quality of service user-staff relationships and decision

  18. Cognition and Health Literacy in Older Adults’ Recall of Self-Care Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Anna; Gao, Xuefei; Graumlich, James F.; Conner-Garcia, Thembi; Murray, Michael D.; Stine-Morrow, Elizabeth A. L.; Morrow, Daniel G.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose of the Study: Health literacy is associated with health outcomes presumably because it influences the understanding of information needed for self-care. However, little is known about the language comprehension mechanisms that underpin health literacy. Design and Methods: We explored the relationship between a commonly used measure of health literacy (Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults [STOFHLA]) and comprehension of health information among 145 older adults. Results: Results showed that performance on the STOFHLA was associated with recall of health information. Consistent with the Process-Knowledge Model of Health Literacy, mediation analysis showed that both processing capacity and knowledge mediated the association between health literacy and recall of health information. In addition, knowledge moderated the effects of processing capacity limits, such that processing capacity was less likely to be associated with recall for older adults with higher levels of knowledge. Implications: These findings suggest that knowledge contributes to health literacy and can compensate for deficits in processing capacity to support comprehension of health information among older adults. The implications of these findings for improving patient education materials for older adults with inadequate health literacy are discussed. PMID:26209450

  19. Cognition and Health Literacy in Older Adults' Recall of Self-Care Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jessie; Madison, Anna; Gao, Xuefei; Graumlich, James F; Conner-Garcia, Thembi; Murray, Michael D; Stine-Morrow, Elizabeth A L; Morrow, Daniel G

    2017-04-01

    Health literacy is associated with health outcomes presumably because it influences the understanding of information needed for self-care. However, little is known about the language comprehension mechanisms that underpin health literacy. We explored the relationship between a commonly used measure of health literacy (Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults [STOFHLA]) and comprehension of health information among 145 older adults. Results showed that performance on the STOFHLA was associated with recall of health information. Consistent with the Process-Knowledge Model of Health Literacy, mediation analysis showed that both processing capacity and knowledge mediated the association between health literacy and recall of health information. In addition, knowledge moderated the effects of processing capacity limits, such that processing capacity was less likely to be associated with recall for older adults with higher levels of knowledge. These findings suggest that knowledge contributes to health literacy and can compensate for deficits in processing capacity to support comprehension of health information among older adults. The implications of these findings for improving patient education materials for older adults with inadequate health literacy are discussed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Communication competence, self-care behaviors and glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parchman, Michael L; Flannagan, Dorothy; Ferrer, Robert L; Matamoras, Mike

    2009-10-01

    To examine the relationship between physician communication competence and A1c control among Hispanics and non-Hispanics seen in primary care practices. Observational. Direct observation and audio-recording of patient-physician encounters by 155 Hispanic and non-Hispanic white patients seen by 40 physicians in 20 different primary care clinics. Audio-recordings were transcribed and coded to derive an overall communication competence score for the physician. An exit survey was administered to each patient to assess self-care activities and their medical record was abstracted for the most recent glycosylated hemoglobin (A1c) level. Higher levels of communication competence were associated with lower levels of A1c for Hispanics, but not non-Hispanic white patients. Although communication competence was associated with better self-reported diet behaviors, diet was not associated with A1c control. Across all patients, higher levels of communication competence were associated with improved A1c control after controlling for age, ethnicity and diet adherence. Physician's communication competence may be more important for promoting clinical success in disadvantaged patients. Acquisition of communication competence skills may be an important component in interventions to eliminate Hispanic disparities in glucose control. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Relationship between person's health beliefs and diabetes self-care management regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albargawi, Moudi; Snethen, Julia; Al Gannass, Abdulaziz; Kelber, Sheryl

    2017-12-01

    To examine the relationship between the health beliefs of Saudi adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and their adherence to daily diabetes self-care management regimen. A secondary aim was to examine the health beliefs of adults with a diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) and participants without a DFU. Descriptive correlational design with a convenience sample of 30 participants. Participants were recruited for this pilot study from an outpatient clinic at King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh. The participants completed self-reported questionnaires about their health beliefs, daily diabetes self-care management regimen, and demographic characteristics. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to test the interaction effects. Participants who reported having a high internal health locus of control (IHLoC) and a high level of self-efficacy (SE) adhered well to their foot care regimen (P = .038). The more the participants believed that God controls their health, and the higher their SE, the greater the participant's adherence to their medication regimen (P = .035). The stronger the participant's belief that following their diabetes treatment regimen will lead to good outcomes, the greater the participant's adherence to their dietary regimen for those with a low IHLoC (P = .015). Participants with a high SE and reported that their doctor is able to help them control their diabetes were more likely to follow their dietary regimen (P = .048). Participants with a DFU reported having additional health conditions besides T2DM (P = .018) and had less than a college education (P = .015). Although participants with a DFU reported that they were responsible for their diabetes (P = .21), they stated that God manages their diabetes (P = .29), and the disease can be controlled based on luck (P = .10). Participants' beliefs were found to influence their daily self-care management regimen. Further studies are needed using a larger sample. Copyright © 2017

  2. Race, socioeconomic status, health-related quality of life, and self-care of type 2 diabetes mellitus among adults in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Crystal N; Chalakalal, Shilpa; Sebastian, Neethu; Warren-Findlow, Jan; Thompson, Michael E

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the associations among race, education, income, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in self-care of type 2 diabetes mellitus among adults in North Carolina. A secondary analysis was conducted using data from the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS), a large population-based survey (N = 432,607) conducted in the United States. The data were analyzed to account for the weighted complex multistage sampling design of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey. Parametric testing using univariate/bivariate/multivariate analysis was performed. The majority of participants reported taking a class/course on diabetes mellitus management and having checked their blood glucose levels at least once per day. The majority (61.26%) of the participants did not have good self-management skills, based on the education and blood glucose-monitoring criteria established for this study. Participants with poor HRQoL had significantly increased odds of good diabetes mellitus self-care practices. Individuals with poor HRQoL had significantly increased odds of good diabetes mellitus self-care practices. Although findings on race, education, and income were not statistically significant, they were consistent with previous research. In the future, individuals who are nonwhite, have less than a high school level of education, and have no health insurance should be targeted to improve diabetes mellitus self-care practices through educational and informational materials. Further investigation using more comprehensive measures of diabetes mellitus self-care is warranted.

  3. Validation of an information-motivation-behavioral skills model of self-care among Chinese adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junling; Wang, Jingli; Zhu, Yaocheng; Yu, Jinming

    2013-02-04

    Self-care is a crucial component of diabetes management. But comprehensive behavior change frameworks are needed to provide guidance for the design, implementation, and evaluation of diabetes self-care programs in diverse populations. We tested the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) model in a sample of Chinese adults with Type 2 diabetes. A cross-sectional study of 222 Chinese adults with type 2 diabetes was conducted in a primary care center. We collected information on demographics, provider-patient communication (knowledge), social support (motivation), self-efficacy (behavioral skills), and diabetes self-care (behavior). The values of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were also obtained. Measured variable path analyses were used to the IMB framework. Provider-patient communication (β = 0.12, p = .037), and social support (β = 0.19, p = .007) and self-efficacy (β = 0.41, p motivation and behavioral skills to effect behavior change.

  4. The Effect of Self-Care Education on the Awareness, Attitude, and Adherence to Self-Care Behaviors in Hospitalized Patients Due to Heart Failure with and without Depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Navidian

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are among somatic disorders and psychological factors affect their onset, exacerbation, and treatment. This study was conducted on the hospitalized patients who had heart failure with and without depression. The study criteria was to evaluate the effect of self-care education on awareness, attitude, and adherence to self-care behaviors on these patients.In this quasi-experimental study, seventy patients with heart failure that met the inclusion criteria were recruited through purposive sampling method. They were assigned in to two equal size groups regarding their depression status. First, the eligible patients were selected; then Beck Depression Inventory was done on the patients followed by examination by the clinical psychologist. Patients with average and higher scores were classified in the depressed group and others who got lower than average scores were classified as the non -depressed group. A questionnaire containing items related to awareness, attitude, and adherence to self-care behaviors was used to collect the data. First, self-care behavior was determined and then a four-sessions of educational intervention were held individually for both groups. The second round of questionnaires were completed at patients' home twelve weeks after the discharge. The Collected data was analyzed using independent-samples and paired-sample t tests, Chi square, and statistical analysis of covariance (ANCOVA tests through SPSS (version 21, SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA.After the educational sessions, the statistical analysis showed significant differences in the mean scores of awareness, attitude, and adherence to self-care behaviors between the two groups (P<0.0001.Self-care behavior education had lower effects on the depressed patients with heart failure. Therefore, before providing education for these patients, it is necessary to consider their psychological problems such as depression.

  5. Self-Care Behaviors and Health Indicators in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Conductas de autocuidado e indicadores de salud en adultos con diabetes tipo 2 Condutas de autocuidado e indicadores de saúde em adultos com diabetes tipo 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Guadalupe Compeán Ortiz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This descriptive correlational study aimed to analyze self-care behaviors and their relationship with health indicators represented by glycemic control, lipid profile, Body Mass Index [BMI], waist circumference and body fat percentage in a sample of 98 adults with type 2 diabetes in an area of Nuevo Leon, Mexico (August 2005/May 2006. The results showed a low self-care behaviors index ( or = 36.94, SD=15.14. A significant relationship was found between self-care behaviors and glycosilated hemoglobin [HbA1c] (r s=-.379, pSe trata de un estudio descriptivo y correlacional que tuvo como objetivo analizar las conductas de autocuidado y su relación con indicadores de salud, representados por el control de la glucemia, perfil de lípidos, IMC, circunferencia de cintura y porcentaje de grasa corporal, en una muestra aleatoria de 98 adultos con diabetes tipo 2 de un zona periférica de la ciudad de Nuevo León, en México; los datos fueron recolectados entre agosto del 2005 y mayo del 2006. Los resultados mostraron un índice de autocuidado bajo (promedio= 36,94 y desvío estándar=15,14. Se encontró correlación significativa entre el autocuidado y la HbA1c (r s= 0,379, pEstudo descritivo correlacional que teve como objetivo analisar as condutas de autocuidado e a sua relação com indicadores de saúde, representados pelo controle glicêmico, perfil de lipídios, índice de massa corpórea (IMC, circunferência da cintura e porcentagem de gordura corporal, em amostra aleatória de 98 adultos com diabetes tipo 2, de uma zona conturbada em Nuevo León, México (agosto 2005/maio 2006. Os resultados mostraram índice de autocuidado baixo ( ou = 36,94, dp=15,14. Encontrou-se correlação significativa entre o autocuidado e a hemoglobina glicolisada (HbA1c (r s=0,379, p<0,001, triglicerídeos (r s=0,208, p=0,040, IMC (r s=0,248, p=0,014 e gordura corporal (r s=0,221, p=0,029. A análise multivariada revelou influência do autocuidado em HbA1c, IMC e

  6. Assessment of the Relationship between Spiritual and Social Health and the Self-Care Ability of Elderly People Referred to Community Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mahboobeh; Alavi, Mousa; Bahrami, Masoud; Zandieh, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Promotion of self-care ability among older people is an essential means to help maintain and improve their health. However, the role of spiritual and social health has not yet been considered in detail in the context of self-care ability among elderly. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between spiritual and social health and self-care ability of older people referred to community health centers in Isfahan. In this cross-sectional correlation study, 200 people, aged 60 years and older, referred to healthcare centers in 2016 were recruited through convenience sampling method. Data were collected by four-part tool comprising of: (a) demographics, (b) Ellison and Palotzin's spiritual well-being scale, (c) Kees's "social health" scale, and (d) self-care ability scale for the elderly by Soderhamn's; data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential (independent t -test, analysis of variance - ANOVA, Pearson's coefficient tests, and multiple regression analysis) statistics by SPSS16 software. Findings showed that the entered predictor variables were accounted for 41% of total variance ( R 2 ) of the two self-care ability in the model ( p well-being and social health, significantly predicted the self-care ability of older people. The results of this study emphasized on the relationship between spiritual and social health of the elderly people and their ability to self-care. Therefore, it would be recommended to keep the focus of the service resources towards improving social and spiritual health to improve self-care ability in elderly people.

  7. Assessment of the relationship between spiritual and social health and the self-care ability of elderly people referred to community health centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboobeh Mohammadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Promotion of self-care ability among older people is an essential means to help maintain and improve their health. However, the role of spiritual and social health has not yet been considered in detail in the context of self-care ability among elderly. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between spiritual and social health and self-care ability of older people referred to community health centers in Isfahan. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional correlation study, 200 people, aged 60 years and older, referred to healthcare centers in 2016 were recruited through convenience sampling method. Data were collected by four-part tool comprising of: (a demographics, (b Ellison and Palotzin's spiritual well-being scale, (c Kees's “social health” scale, and (d self-care ability scale for the elderly by Soderhamn's; data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential (independent t-test, analysis of variance – ANOVA, Pearson's coefficient tests, and multiple regression analysis statistics by SPSS16 software. Results: Findings showed that the entered predictor variables were accounted for 41% of total variance (R2 of the two self-care ability in the model (p < 0.001, F3, 199 = 46.02. Two out of the three predictor variables including religious well-being and social health, significantly predicted the self-care ability of older people. Conclusions: The results of this study emphasized on the relationship between spiritual and social health of the elderly people and their ability to self-care. Therefore, it would be recommended to keep the focus of the service resources towards improving social and spiritual health to improve self-care ability in elderly people.

  8. Self-Efficacy and Blood Pressure Self-Care Behaviors in Patients on Chronic Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauric-Klein, Zorica; Peters, Rosalind M; Yarandi, Hossein N

    2017-07-01

    This study examined the effects of an educative, self-regulation intervention on blood pressure self-efficacy, self-care outcomes, and blood pressure control in adults receiving hemodialysis. Simple randomization was done at the hemodialysis unit level. One hundred eighteen participants were randomized to usual care ( n = 59) or intervention group ( n = 59). The intervention group received blood pressure education sessions and 12 weeks of individual counseling on self-regulation of blood pressure, fluid, and salt intake. There was no significant increase in self-efficacy scores within ( F = .55, p = .46) or between groups at 12 weeks ( F = 2.76, p = .10). Although the intervention was not successful, results from the total sample ( N = 118) revealed that self-efficacy was significantly related to a number of self-care outcomes including decreased salt intake, lower interdialytic weight gain, increased adherence to blood pressure medications, and fewer missed hemodialysis appointments. Increased blood pressure self-efficacy was also associated with lower diastolic blood pressure.

  9. A correlational study of illness knowledge, self-care behaviors, and quality of life in elderly patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min-Hui; Wang, Chao-Hung; Huang, Yu-Yen; Cherng, Wen-Jin; Wang, Kai-Wei Katherine

    2014-06-01

    Patients with heart failure experience adverse physical symptoms that affect quality of life. The number of patients with heart failure in Taiwan has been growing in recent years. This article examines correlations among illness knowledge, self-care behaviors, and quality of life in elderly patients with heart failure. A cross-sectional research design using three questionnaires was adopted. The study was undertaken in an outpatient department of a teaching hospital in Taiwan from January to June 2008. Potential participants aged 65 years or older were selected by a physician based on several diagnostic findings of heart failure that included an International Classification of Diseases' code 4280 or 4289. Patients who were bedridden or had a prognosis of less than 6 months were excluded from consideration. One hundred forty-one patients with heart failure were recruited. Most participants were men (51.8%), older adults (49.6% older than 71 years old), and either educated to an elementary school level or illiterate (69.5%) and have New York Heart Association class II (61.0%). Participants had an average left ventricular ejection fraction of 41.1%. The illness knowledge of participants was poor (accuracy rate: 29.3%), and most were unaware of the significance of self-care. Illness knowledge correlated with both self-care behaviors (r = -.42, p r = -.22, p R = .22); and functional class, living independently, and age were identified as significant correlated factors of quality of life (R = .41). Participants in this study with higher self-reported self-care behaviors and quality of life were younger in age and had better illness knowledge. Furthermore, physical function and independence in daily living significantly affected quality of life. Care for patients with heart failure, particularly older adults, should focus on teaching these patients about heart failure illness and symptom management. Assisting elderly patients with heart failure to promote and maintain

  10. Development and validation of The Personal Diabetes Questionnaire (PDQ): a measure of diabetes self-care behaviors, perceptions and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetson, Barbara; Schlundt, David; Rothschild, Chelsea; Floyd, Jennifer E; Rogers, Whitney; Mokshagundam, Sri Prakash

    2011-03-01

    To develop and evaluate the validity and reliability of The Personal Diabetes Questionnaire (PDQ), a brief, yet comprehensive measure of diabetes self-care behaviors, perceptions and barriers. To examine individual items to provide descriptive and normative information and provide data on scale reliability and associations between PDQ scales and concurrently assessed HBA(1c) and BMI. Items were written to address nutritional management, medication utilization, blood glucose monitoring, and physical activity. The initial instrument was reviewed by multidisciplinary diabetes care providers and items subsequently revised until the measure provided complete coverage of the diabetes care domains using as few items as possible. The scoring scheme was generated rationally. Subjects were 790 adults (205 with type 1 and 585 with type 2 diabetes) who completed the PDQ while waiting for clinic appointments. Item completion rates were high, with few items skipped by participants. Subscales demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach α=.650-.834) and demonstrated significant associations with BMI (p ≤.001) and HbA(1c) (p ≤.001). The PDQ is a useful measure of diabetes self-care behaviors and related perceptions and barriers that is reliable and valid and feasible to administer in a clinic setting. This measure may be used to obtain data for assessing diabetes self-management and barriers and to guide patient care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Diabetes Self-Care and the Older Adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinger, Katie; Beverly, Elizabeth A.; Smaldone, Arlene

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is highest in older adults, a population that is increasing. Diabetes self-care is complex with important recommendations for nutrition, physical activity, checking glucose levels, and taking medication. Older adults with diabetes have unique issues which impact self-care. As people age, their health status, support systems, physical and mental abilities, and nutritional requirements change. Furthermore, comorbidities, complications, and polypharmacy complicate diabetes self-care. Depression is also more common among the elderly and may lead to deterioration in self-care behaviors. Because of concerns about cognitive deficits and multiple comorbidities, adults older than 65 years are often excluded from research trials. Thus, little clinical evidence is available and the most appropriate treatment approaches and how to best support older patients’ self-care efforts are unclear. This review summarizes the current literature, research findings, and expert and consensus recommendations with their rationales. PMID:24510969

  12. Mental health self-care in medical students: a comprehensive look at help-seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Jessica A; Johnson, Benjamin; Leydon, Gary; Rohrbaugh, Robert M; Wilkins, Kirsten M

    2015-02-01

    The authors characterize medical student help-seeking behaviors and examine the relationship with stress, burnout, stigma, depression, and personal health behaviors. In 2013, the authors administered an electronic survey of all enrolled students at Yale School of Medicine (183 responders, response rate=35 %), inquiring about students' primary medical and mental health care, personal health behaviors, support systems, and help-seeking behaviors. Students completed the Attitudes to Mental Health Questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire-2, and a modified Maslach Burnout Inventory. The authors analyzed the results with logistic regression, the Wilcoxon rank-sum test, the Kruskal-Wallis test, or a test for significance of Kendall rank correlation. Most students reported having a primary care provider (PCP), yet few reported seeking care when sick (33 %). Nineteen percent of students reported having a mental health provider, fewer than reported having a PCP (pstudents reported increased mental health needs since beginning medical school, and these students were more likely to agree that their needs were untreated. The majority of students endorsed stress, which correlated with increased and unmet mental health needs (pstudents and correlated with stress and increased and untreated needs. Most students reported comfort with asking for academic help; those uncomfortable were more likely to have mental health needs for which they did not seek treatment (p=0.004). Mental health stigma was low. Medical students had a significant unmet need for health care, influenced by barriers to accessing care, stress, burnout, and depression. Academic help seeking and supportive faculty relationships appear related to mental health treatment seeking. Targeted interventions for stress and burnout reduction, as well as incorporation of reflective practice, may have an impact on overall care seeking among medical students. Future studies should expand to other medical and professional

  13. Quality of recipient-caregiver relationship and psychological distress are correlates of self-care agency after lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVito Dabbs, Annette; Terhorst, Lauren; Song, Mi-Kyung; Shellmer, Diana A; Aubrecht, Jill; Connolly, Mary; Dew, Mary Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Self-care behaviors are crucial for following the complex regimen after lung transplantation, yet little is known about recipients' levels of self-care agency (the capability and willingness to engage in self-care behaviors) and its correlates. We examined levels of self-care agency and recipient characteristics (socio-demographics, psychological distress, quality of relationship with primary lay caregiver, and health locus of control) in 111 recipients. Based on Perceived Self-Care Agency scores, recipients were assigned to either the low- or high-self-care agency comparison group. Characteristics were compared between groups to identify characteristics likely to be associated with lower-self-care agency. Mean (SD) score for self-care agency (scale range, 53-265) was 223.02 (22.46). Recipients with lowest-self-care agency scores reported significantly poorer quality of caregiver relationships (p recipient-caregiver relationship remained significantly associated with self-care agency. Every one-point decrease in the quality of caregiver relationship increased the risk of low-self-care agency by 12%. Recipients with poorer caregiver relationships and greater psychological distress may need additional support to perform the self-care behaviors expected after lung transplantation. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. The Health Deviation of Post-Breast Cancer Lymphedema: Symptom Assessment and Impact on Self-Care Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armer, Jane M; Henggeler, Mary H; Brooks, Constance W; Zagar, Eris A; Homan, Sherri; Stewart, Bob R

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cancer among women world-wide, affecting 1 of 8 women during their lifetimes. In the US alone, some 2 million breast cancer survivors comprise 20% of all cancer survivors. Conservatively, it is estimated that some 20-40% of all breast cancer survivors will develop the health deviation of lymphedema or treatment-related limb swelling over their lifetimes. This chronic accumulation of protein-rich fluid predisposes to infection, leads to difficulties in fitting clothing and carrying out activities of daily living, and impacts self-esteem, self-concept, and quality of life. Lymphedema is associated with self-care deficits (SCD) and negatively impacts self-care agency (SCA) and physiological and psychosocial well-being. Objectives of this report are two-fold: (1) to explore four approaches of assessing and diagnosing breast cancer lymphedema, including self-report of symptoms and the impact of health deviations on SCA; and (2) to propose the development of a clinical research program for lymphedema based on the concepts of Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory (SCDNT). Anthropometric and symptom data from a National-Institutes-of-Health-funded prospective longitudinal study were examined using survival analysis to compare four definitions of lymphedema over 24 months post-breast cancer surgery among 140 of 300 participants (all who had passed the 24-month measurement). The four definitions included differences of 200 ml, 10% volume, and 2 cm circumference between pre-op baseline and/or contralateral limbs, and symptom self-report of limb heaviness and swelling. Symptoms, SCA, and SCD were assessed by interviews using a validated tool. Estimates of lymphedema occurrence varied by definition and time since surgery. The 2 cm girth change provided the highest estimation of lymphedema (82% at 24 months), followed by 200 ml volume change (57% at 24 months). The 10% limb volume change converged with symptom report of heaviness and swelling at 24 months

  15. Engagement, knowledge and autonomy : facing a new generation older urban living people : studies on self-care and health

    OpenAIRE

    Sundsli, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The overall purpose of this thesis was to explore the phenomenon of self-care among older, urban homedwelling people in order to enhance health and well-being and be able to inform and improve policy and practise. Methods: A mixed methods design was chosen. A descriptive cross-sectional design was applied for Study I and 1,044 randomly chosen men and women aged 65+ years, living in urban areas in southern Norway answered a postal questionnaire consisting of five instrument...

  16. The diabetes online community: Older adults supporting self-care through peer health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchman, Michelle L; Rothwell, Erin; Edelman, Linda S

    2018-03-01

    The use of the diabetes online community (DOC) is growing across all age groups. The aim of this exploratory study was to describe why older adults participated in the DOC, and how DOC users interacted with their healthcare providers. Telephone interviews (N=20) were conducted with older adult DOC users (born between 1946 and 1964) living in the United States. Interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis adhering to rigor and reproducibility standards. Themes that emerged from the data related to DOC participation included: information to improve self-care, emotional support, belonging to a community, validation of information, cause for concern and interaction with healthcare providers. Participants used the DOC for day to day diabetes management advice and healthcare providers for medical information and care. Participants highly valued the DOC and regarded their participation as a way to increase knowledge to improve self-care and reciprocate emotional support with others for diabetes management. The DOC filled gaps in knowledge and support participants were not able to get elsewhere. The DOC serves as an important source of information and support for individuals with diabetes and may be a cost-effective strategy to augment standard diabetes care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Exploring the relationship between cognitive illness representations and poor emotional health and their combined association with diabetes self-care. A systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Joanna L; Bundy, Chris; Coventry, Peter A; Dickens, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Depression and anxiety are common in diabetes and are associated with lower diabetes self-care adherence. How this occurs is unclear. Our systematic review explored the relationship between cognitive illness representations and poor emotional health and their combined association with diabetes self-care. Medline, Psycinfo, EMBASE, and CINAHL were searched from inception to June 2013. Data on associations between cognitive illness representations, poor emotional health, and diabetes self-care were extracted. Random effects meta-analysis was used to test the relationship between cognitive illness representations and poor emotional health. Their combined effect on diabetes self-care was narratively evaluated. Nine cross-sectional studies were included. Increased timeline cyclical, consequences, and seriousness beliefs were associated with poorer emotional health symptoms. Lower perceived personal control was associated with increased depression and anxiety, but not mixed anxiety and depressive symptoms. Remaining cognitive illness representation domains had mixed statistically significant and non-significant relationships across emotional states or were measured only once. Effect sizes ranged from small to large (r=±0.20 to 0.51). Two studies explored the combined effects of cognitions and emotions on diabetes self-care. Both showed that cognitive illness representations have an independent effect on diabetes self-care, but only one study found that depression has an independent effect also. Associations between cognitive illness representations and poor emotional health were in the expected direction - negative diabetes perceptions were associated with poorer emotional health. Few studies examined the relative effects of cognitions and emotions on diabetes self-care. Longitudinal studies are needed to clarify directional pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Self-reported gingival conditions and self-care in the oral health of Danish women during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, L.B.; Jeppe-Jensen, Dorte; Petersen, P.E.

    2003-01-01

    AND METHODS: The study group comprised 1935 pregnant women living in two areas of Denmark consecutively recruited from August 1998 to March 1999. The survey data were based on telephone interviews. Questions in the interview concerned general health, lifestyles, socioeconomic conditions, gingival conditions......OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the present study was to describe the self-assessment of gingival health conditions in pregnant women, their oral hygiene behaviour and dental visiting habits, and to analyse self-care practices of pregnant women in relation to perceived gingival problems. MATERIAL......, oral hygiene and utilisation of dental health services. RESULTS: One-third of the study population perceived signs of gingival inflammation; 5% of the pregnant women assessed their gingiva as poor, while 95% reported good or "normal" gingival condition. Ninety six per cent brushed their teeth at least...

  19. Kidney stones - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... self-care; Nephrolithiasis and self-care; Stones and kidney - self-care; Calcium stones and self-care; Oxalate ... provider or the hospital because you have a kidney stone. You will need to take self-care ...

  20. Health care to empower self-care in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus and an immigrant minority background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åse Boman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pediatric diabetes team aims to support health, quality of life, and normal growth and development among adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Adolescents with an immigrant background have been found less successful in self-care. Previous research indicated that adolescents who had integrated the disease as a part of their self-image reasoned differently about their self-care to those who had not. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify elements in the patient–pediatrician consultations that might influence such integration of the disease among adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Methods: A total of 12 pediatrician–adolescent consultations were video-recorded and analyzed. The adolescents all had an immigrant background. Results: Integration of the disease appeared enabled when responsibility was shared; when hope, autonomy, and emotions were confirmed; and when the pediatrician asked probing questions. Letting objective data dominate the adolescent’s experiences, using risk as a motivator, neutralizing emotions in relation to having diabetes, and confirming forgetfulness, may instead inhibit disease integration. Conclusion: An extended person-centered approach with focus on the adolescent’s experiences of everyday life with a chronic disease and less attention on physical parameters in the pediatrician–adolescent consultations may increase integration of the disease.

  1. Perspectives of health and self-care among older persons-To be implemented in an interactive information and communication technology-platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göransson, Carina; Wengström, Yvonne; Ziegert, Kristina; Langius-Eklöf, Ann; Eriksson, Irene; Kihlgren, Annica; Blomberg, Karin

    2017-12-01

    To acquire knowledge regarding the contents to be implemented in an interactive information and communication technology-platform perceived to be relevant to health and self-care among older persons based on the literature, healthcare professionals and the older persons themselves. The growing ageing population places demands on the healthcare system to promote healthy ageing and to strengthen the older person's self-care ability. This requires innovative approaches to facilitate communication between the older person and healthcare professionals, and to increase the older person's participation in their care. An information and communication technology-platform could be used for this purpose, but the content needs to be relevant to both the older persons and the healthcare professionals. Descriptive qualitative design. This study was based on three samplings: a scoping review of the literature (n = 20 articles), interviews with healthcare professionals (n = 5) and a secondary analysis of interviews with older persons (n = 8) and nursing assistants (n = 7). The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Four areas were identified to be of relevance to older persons' perceived health: frame of mind, having relationships and social activities, physical ability and concerns, and maintaining self-care. Self-care was described in the literature and by the healthcare professionals more than by the older persons. The results show a concordance in the data samplings that give a clear indication of the areas relevant to older persons' health and self-care that can be integrated in an interactive information and communication technology-platform for use in regular daily care assessments. Descriptions of self-care were limited indicating a possible gap in knowledge that requires further research. Areas relevant to older persons' health and self-care could be used for regular assessment to support and promote healthy ageing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Impact of health education on drug adherence and self-care in people with epilepsy with low education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Deepa; Sebastian, Teenu Mary; Aggarwal, Meena; Tripathi, Manjari

    2015-03-01

    This study was conducted to observe the effect of a structured educational program on drug adherence and self-care management in people with epilepsy in a developing country. A total of 180 consecutive people with epilepsy were enrolled from the epilepsy clinic of a tertiary care hospital in North India. Out of these, 90 were randomized to the epilepsy health education group and received the educational program and 90 were in the control group and received the standard of care but did not receive any structured educational program. The modified Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) and Epilepsy Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES) were administered to assess drug adherence and self-care, respectively, on the day of enrollment. The patients enrolled in the epilepsy health education group received 4 sessions of the structured educational program. The MMAS and ESES questionnaires were again administered to both groups after 6months. Continuous and categorical variables were compared between control and epilepsy health education groups using a chi-square test, with p value less than 0.05 considered significant. A comparison between pretest and posttest MMAS scores and ESES scores was done using a paired t-test. In the epilepsy health education group, the pretest mean MMAS score was 6.58 whereas the posttest mean MMAS score was 7.53; the difference was significant (p=0.001). The mean MMAS scores for the control group's pretest and posttest were 6.46 and 6.58, respectively, which were not significantly different (p=0.224). On comparing the ESES scores at the beginning of the study and after 6months, there was no significant change in both groups. The present study proves the efficacy of a structured educational program in improving drug adherence in a cohort of people with epilepsy with low educational background. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Can self-care health books affect amount of contact with the primary health care team? A randomized controlled trial in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platts, Amanda; Mitton, Rosly; Boniface, David; Friedli, Karin

    2005-09-01

    To investigate the effects of two differently styled self-care health books in general practice on the frequency and duration of patients' consultations and their views of the books. Random allocation of patients to either a descriptive or a decision-tree based self-care health book, or a no-book control condition. Three- and 12-months follow-up by postal questionnaire and monitoring of consultations. A large general practice in the South East of England. A total of 1967 volunteer, adult patients who attended the practice in 2001 participated. Demographics; health problems; use of health services; use and perceptions of the trial book; frequency and duration of consultations. Response rates to postal questionnaires at 3 and 12 months were 80% and 74%. In all, 48% consulted their allocated book, compared with 25% who consulted any healthcare book in the Control group. Those reporting health problems were more likely to have consulted their allocated book; 60% reported that the allocated book made them more likely to deal with a problem themselves and 40% reported themselves less likely to consult the practice. However, there were no differences in consultation rates or durations of consultations between the three groups. Handing out of self-care health books may provide qualitative benefits for patients but is unlikely to reduce attendance at the GP practice.

  4. Las instituciones de salud y el autocuidado de los médicos Health institutions and physicians' self-care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Arenas-Monreal

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analizar la influencia que la profesión y la institución laboral ejercen sobre el autocuidado de la salud de los médicos. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: La investigación se realizó de marzo de 2000 hasta febrero de 2001 en un centro de salud, un hospital general y un instituto de investigación en salud. En el estudio se utilizó un diseño cualitativo; los datos fueron obtenidos a través de entrevistas en profundidad. Se realizaron cuatro entrevistas a médicos que laboran en las instituciones mencionadas: dos a médicos del primer nivel de atención y dos del segundo nivel. RESULTADOS: Los hallazgos de esta investigación señalan que los médicos tienen dificultades para prodigarse cuidados. Estos obstáculos se acentúan para los médicos del segundo nivel de atención, quienes laboran jornadas prolongadas y realizan multicontratación institucional. Las dificultades están relacionadas principalmente con el estrés, la alimentación, el descanso y el esparcimiento. Los médicos no se someten a revisiones médicas de rutina y efectúan "consultas de pasillo" con sus colegas cuando tienen alguna dolencia o enfermedad. Los entrevistados coincidieron en señalar que las instituciones de salud carecen de políticas, programas, reglamentaciones y espacios que promuevan el autocuidado en los trabajadores que laboran en ellas. CONCLUSIONES: Las instituciones de salud no están diseñadas ni estructuradas para promover e impulsar el autocuidado de quienes ahí laboran y, en el caso de quienes trabajan en el segundo nivel de atención, la estructura organizativa dificulta el autocuidado.OBJECTIVE: To analyze how self-care of health workers is influenced by their professional training and institutional setting. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study took place from March 2000 to February 2001 in a health center, a general hospital, and a health research institute. Qualitative in-depth interviews were used to collect data. Four in-depth interviews were

  5. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the European Heart Failure Self-care Behavior Scale for Brazilian Portuguese Adaptación transcultural y validación de la European Heart Failure Self-care Behavior Scale para el Portugués de Brasil Adaptação transcultural e validação da European Heart Failure Self-care Behavior Scale para o português do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Karolina Feijó

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To adapt and validate a Brazilian Portuguese version of the European Heart Failure Self-Care Behavior Scale. METHODS: The cross-cultural adaptation (translation, synthesis, back-translation, expert committee review, and pretesting and validation (assessment of face validity, content validity, and internal consistency reliability were carried out in accordance with the literature. The European Heart Failure Self-Care Behavior Scale assesses key components of self-care: recognition of the signs and symptoms of decompensated heart failure (HF and decision-making when these signs and symptoms arise. It comprises 12 items (range 12-60, where lower scores indicate better self-care. RESULTS: The sample comprised 124 HF patients with a mean age of 62.3 ± 12 years. The Cronbach's Alpha internal consistency was 0.70 and the intraclass correlation coefficient for reproducibility was 0.87. CONCLUSION: Face and content validity, internal consistency and reproducibility have lended validity and reliability for the use of the instrument in Brazil.OBJETIVO: Adaptar y validar European Heart Failure Self-Care Behavior Scale para uso en lengua portuguesa de Brasil. MÉTODOS: El proceso de adaptación cultural (traducción, síntesis, retro traducción, revisión por comité de expertos y pré test, validación (validez de facie, de contenido y confiabilidad fue realizado según la literatura. La European Heart Failure Self-Care Behavior Scale evalúa los componentes-clave para el auto cuidado: reconocimiento de señales y síntomas de descompensación de insuficiencia cardiaca (IC y la decisión cuando ocurren dichos síntomas. Se compone de 12 cuestiones (que van desde 12-60, en donde las puntuaciones bajas indican peor autocuidado. RESULTADOS: Fueron inclusos 124 pacientes con IC, con edad entre 62,3 ±12 años. La consistencia interna de las cuestiones presentó un Alfa de Cronbach de 0,70 y la reproducibilidad evaluada por el coeficiente de

  6. The Relationship between Health Literacy, Perceived Self-efficacy and Self-care Performance of Female Senior High School Students in Health Promoting Schools of Miyaneh, 2016-2017

    OpenAIRE

    Mahnaz Khodabandeh; Sadegh Maleki Avarasin; Leila Nikniaz

    2017-01-01

    Background and objective: Self-care in adolescents is considered as an effective measure in line with the promotion of health in each community. In this regard, the role of health promoting schools is of great importance. Furthermore, health literacy, as one of the basic tools for promoting community health, has been given much attention by policymakers. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between the health literacy, perceived self-efficacy and self-care performance of fe...

  7. Genital herpes - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herpes - genital - self-care; Herpes simplex - genital - self-care; Herpesvirus 2 - self-care; HSV-2 - self-care ... Genital herpes cannot be cured. Antiviral medicine (acyclovir and related drugs) may relieve pain and discomfort and help ...

  8. Cognitive behavioral therapy for body image and self-care (CBT-BISC) in sexual minority men living with HIV: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blashill, Aaron J; Safren, Steven A; Wilhelm, Sabine; Jampel, Jonathan; Taylor, S Wade; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2017-10-01

    Body image disturbance is a distressing and interfering problem among many sexual minority men living with HIV, and is associated with elevated depressive symptoms and poor HIV self-care (e.g., antiretroviral therapy [ART] nonadherence). The current study tested the preliminary efficacy of a newly created intervention: cognitive-behavioral therapy for body image and self-care (CBT-BISC) for this population. The current study entailed a 2-arm randomized controlled trial (N = 44) comparing CBT-BISC to an enhanced treatment as usual (ETAU) condition. Analyses were conducted at 3 and 6 months after baseline. The primary outcome was body image disturbance (BDD-YBOCS), and secondary outcomes were ART adherence (electronically monitored via Wisepill), depressive symptoms (MADRS), and global functioning (GAF). At 3 months, the CBT-BISC condition showed substantial improvement in BDD-YBOCS (b = -13.6, SE = 2.7, 95% CI [-19.0, -8.3], p adherence (b = 8.8, SE = 3.3, 95% CI [2.0, 15.6], p = .01; dppc2 = .94); and GAF (b = 12.3, SE = 3.2, 95% CI [6.1, 18.6], p adherence findings were mixed depending on the calculation method. CBT-BISC shows preliminary efficacy in the integrated treatment of body image disturbance and HIV self-care behaviors among sexual minority men living with HIV. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Stealing minutes: a tri-study of reconstructing self-care for mental health professionals using research as daily practice, case study, and grounded theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppola, John Lafayette Granger

    2016-01-01

    The majority of approaches to self-care in the mental health field revolve around activities that take place outside of the work environment or on supervision and policy level approaches. Using social constructionist and narrative principles, I created, implemented, and studied a series of workshops

  10. Econometric analysis to evaluate the effect of community-based health insurance on reducing informal self-care in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robyn, Paul Jacob; Hill, Allan; Liu, Yuanli; Souares, Aurélia; Savadogo, Germain; Sié, Ali; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2012-03-01

    This study examines the role of community-based health insurance (CBHI) in influencing health-seeking behaviour in Burkina Faso, West Africa. Community-based health insurance was introduced in Nouna district, Burkina Faso, in 2004 with the goal to improve access to contracted providers based at primary- and secondary-level facilities. The paper specifically examines the effect of CBHI enrolment on reducing the prevalence of seeking modern and traditional methods of self-treatment as the first choice in care among the insured population. Three stages of analysis were adopted to measure this effect. First, propensity score matching was used to minimize the observed baseline differences between the insured and uninsured populations. Second, through matching the average treatment effect on the treated, the effect of insurance enrolment on health-seeking behaviour was estimated. Finally, multinomial logistic regression was applied to model demand for available health care options, including no treatment, traditional self-treatment, modern self-treatment, traditional healers and facility-based care. For the first choice in care sought, there was no significant difference in the prevalence of self-treatment among the insured and uninsured populations, reaching over 55% for each group. When comparing the alternative option of no treatment, CBHI played no significant role in reducing the demand for self-care (either traditional or modern) or utilization of traditional healers, while it did significantly increase consumption of facility-based care. The average treatment effect on the treated was insignificant for traditional self-care, modern self-care and traditional healer, but was significant with a positive effect for use of facility care. While CBHI does have a positive impact on facility care utilization, its effect on reducing the prevalence of self-care is limited. The policy recommendations for improving the CBHI scheme's responsiveness to population health care

  11. Cognitive impairment and self-care in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajduk AM

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Alexandra M Hajduk,1,2 Stephenie C Lemon,3 David D McManus,1,2,4 Darleen M Lessard,1 Jerry H Gurwitz,1,2,4 Frederick A Spencer,5 Robert J Goldberg,1,2 Jane S Saczynski1,2,4 1Division of Epidemiology of Chronic Diseases and Vulnerable Populations, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 2Meyers Primary Care Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 3Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 4Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 5Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Background: Heart failure (HF is a prevalent chronic disease in older adults that requires extensive self-care to prevent decompensation and hospitalization. Cognitive impairment may impact the ability to perform HF self-care activities. We examined the association between cognitive impairment and adherence to self-care in patients hospitalized for acute HF. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting and participants: A total of 577 patients (mean age = 71 years, 44% female hospitalized for HF at five medical centers in the United States and Canada. Measurements and methods: Participants were interviewed for information on self-reported adherence to self-care using the European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour Scale. We assessed cognitive impairment in three domains (memory, processing speed, and executive function using standardized measures. Patients' demographic and clinical characteristics were obtained through medical record review. Multivariable linear regression was used to examine the association between cognitive impairment and self-care practices adjusting for demographic and clinical factors. Results: A total of 453 patients (79% were impaired in at least one cognitive

  12. Usability and feasibility of health IT interventions to enhance Self-Care for Lymphedema Symptom Management in breast cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei R. Fu, PhD, RN, FAAN

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: This usability study provided evidence on breast cancer survivor's acceptance and highly positive evaluation of TOLF's usability as well as feasibility of using technologically-driven delivery model to enhance self-care strategies for lymphedema symptom management.

  13. Toward an ambient empathic health companion for self care in the intelligent home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, V.; Kröse, B.; Brinkman, W.-P.; Neerincx, M.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation--This paper describes our work in progress to develop a personal monitoring system that can monitor the physical and emotional condition of a patient by using contextual information from a sensor network, provide the patient with feedback concerning their health status and motivate the

  14. Antecedents of Self-Care in Adults with Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Nancy; Dunbar, Sandra B.; Butler, Javed; Higgins, Melinda; Book, Wendy; Reilly, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Background Adults with congenital heart defects (ACHD) face long-term complications related to prior surgery, abnormal anatomy, and acquired cardiovascular conditions. Although self-care is an important part of chronic illness management, few studies have explored self-care in the ACHD population. The purpose of this study is to describe self-care and its antecedents in the ACHD population. Methods Persons with moderate or severe ACHD (N=132) were recruited from a single ACHD center. Self-care (health maintenance behaviors, monitoring and management of symptoms), and potential antecedents including sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, ACHD knowledge, behavioral characteristics (depressive symptoms and self-efficacy), and family-related factors (parental overprotection and perceived family support) were collected via self-report and chart review. Multiple regression was used to identify antecedents of self-care maintenance, monitoring, and management. Results Only 44.7%, 27.3%, and 23.3% of participants performed adequate levels of self-care maintenance, monitoring and management, respectively. In multiple regression analysis, self-efficacy, education, gender, perceived family support, and comorbidities explained 25% of the variance in self-care maintenance (R2=.248, F(5, 123)=9.44, p<.001). Age, depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, and NYHA Class explained 23% of the variance in self-care monitoring (R2=.232, F(2, 124)=10.66, p<.001). Self-efficacy and NYHA Class explained 9% of the variance in self-care management (R2=.094, F(2, 80)=5.27, p=.007). Conclusions Low levels of self-care are common among persons with ACHD. Multiple factors, including modifiable factors of self-efficacy, depressive symptoms, and perceived family support, are associated with self-care and should be considered in designing future interventions to improve outcomes in the ACHD population. PMID:26340127

  15. Perspectives on barriers and facilitators to self-care in Lebanese cardiac patients: A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumit, Nuhad Yazbik; Noureddine, Samar Nayef; Magilvy, Joan Kathy

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Cardiac self-care practices are essential for managing cardiac illness and improving quality of life. However, these practices may be affected by factors that may hinder or facilitate self-care especially in countries that experience political and economic instabilities. The purpose of this study was to explore self-care practices among Lebanese cardiac patients. Another aim was to reveal factors that might influence these self-care practices. This is a qualitative descriptive study. Participants were recruited from a referral medical center in Beirut, Lebanon and interviews took place in their homes. Purposive sample of 15 adult participants, seven females and eight males, diagnosed with coronary artery disease at least a year ago and not in critical condition recruited from the cardiology clinics of the medical center. Data were collected through semi-structured audio-recorded interviews that took place in their places of residents. Three themes emerged from the data: I. The behaviors of cardiac patients demonstrated selected self-care practices; II. Patients identified barriers to self-care reflective of the Lebanese political and socio-economic situation; and, III. Patients described facilitators to self-care consistent with the Lebanese socio-cultural values and norms. The most common self-care practices included taking medications and eating properly. Participants emphasized avoiding stress and being upset as a self-protective measure for cardiac health. Health care costs, family responsibilities, psychological factors and the country's political situation impeded self-care practices whereas family support facilitated them. Lebanese patients reported select self-care practices in dealing with their cardiac illness. Barriers and facilitators to their self-care behaviors reflected the Lebanese context and culture. Thus health care providers must assess their patients' practices within their

  16. Using Qualitative Methods to Explore Lay Explanatory Models, Health-Seeking Behaviours and Self-Care Practices of Podoconiosis Patients in North-West Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison S Banks

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Podoconiosis (endemic non-filarial elephantiasis is a chronic, non-infectious disease resulting from exposure of bare feet to red-clay soil in tropical highlands. This study examined lay beliefs about three under-researched aspects of podoconiosis patients' care: explanatory models, health-seeking behaviours and self-care.In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were undertaken with 34 participants (19 male, 15 female between April-May 2015 at podoconiosis treatment centres across East and West Gojjam regions in north-west Ethiopia.Explanatory models for podoconiosis included contamination from blood, magic, soil or affected individuals. Belief in heredity or divine punishment often delayed clinic attendance. All participants had tried holy water treatment and some, holy soil. Herbal treatments were considered ineffectual, costly and appeared to promote fluid escape. Motivators for clinic attendance were failure of traditional treatments and severe or disabling symptoms. Patients did not report self-treatment with antibiotics. Self-care was hindered by water being unavailable or expensive and patient fatigue.A pluralistic approach to podoconiosis self-treatment was discovered. Holy water is widely valued, though some patients prefer holy soil. Priests and traditional healers could help promote self-care and "signpost" patients to clinics. Change in behaviour and improving water access is key to self-care.

  17. Using Qualitative Methods to Explore Lay Explanatory Models, Health-Seeking Behaviours and Self-Care Practices of Podoconiosis Patients in North-West Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Harrison S.; Tsegay, Girmay; Wubie, Moges; Tamiru, Abreham; Davey, Gail; Cooper, Max

    2016-01-01

    Background Podoconiosis (endemic non-filarial elephantiasis) is a chronic, non-infectious disease resulting from exposure of bare feet to red-clay soil in tropical highlands. This study examined lay beliefs about three under-researched aspects of podoconiosis patients’ care: explanatory models, health-seeking behaviours and self-care. Methods In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were undertaken with 34 participants (19 male, 15 female) between April-May 2015 at podoconiosis treatment centres across East and West Gojjam regions in north-west Ethiopia. Results Explanatory models for podoconiosis included contamination from blood, magic, soil or affected individuals. Belief in heredity or divine punishment often delayed clinic attendance. All participants had tried holy water treatment and some, holy soil. Herbal treatments were considered ineffectual, costly and appeared to promote fluid escape. Motivators for clinic attendance were failure of traditional treatments and severe or disabling symptoms. Patients did not report self-treatment with antibiotics. Self-care was hindered by water being unavailable or expensive and patient fatigue. Conclusion A pluralistic approach to podoconiosis self-treatment was discovered. Holy water is widely valued, though some patients prefer holy soil. Priests and traditional healers could help promote self-care and “signpost” patients to clinics. Change in behaviour and improving water access is key to self-care. PMID:27536772

  18. Using Qualitative Methods to Explore Lay Explanatory Models, Health-Seeking Behaviours and Self-Care Practices of Podoconiosis Patients in North-West Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Harrison S; Tsegay, Girmay; Wubie, Moges; Tamiru, Abreham; Davey, Gail; Cooper, Max

    2016-08-01

    Podoconiosis (endemic non-filarial elephantiasis) is a chronic, non-infectious disease resulting from exposure of bare feet to red-clay soil in tropical highlands. This study examined lay beliefs about three under-researched aspects of podoconiosis patients' care: explanatory models, health-seeking behaviours and self-care. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were undertaken with 34 participants (19 male, 15 female) between April-May 2015 at podoconiosis treatment centres across East and West Gojjam regions in north-west Ethiopia. Explanatory models for podoconiosis included contamination from blood, magic, soil or affected individuals. Belief in heredity or divine punishment often delayed clinic attendance. All participants had tried holy water treatment and some, holy soil. Herbal treatments were considered ineffectual, costly and appeared to promote fluid escape. Motivators for clinic attendance were failure of traditional treatments and severe or disabling symptoms. Patients did not report self-treatment with antibiotics. Self-care was hindered by water being unavailable or expensive and patient fatigue. A pluralistic approach to podoconiosis self-treatment was discovered. Holy water is widely valued, though some patients prefer holy soil. Priests and traditional healers could help promote self-care and "signpost" patients to clinics. Change in behaviour and improving water access is key to self-care.

  19. Self-care among healthcare social workers: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J Jay; Lianekhammy, Joann; Pope, Natalie; Lee, Jacquelyn; Grise-Owens, Erlene

    2017-01-01

    Despite growing interest in self-care, few studies have explicitly examined the self-care practices of healthcare social workers. This exploratory study investigated self-care among practitioners (N = 138) in one southeastern state. Overall, data suggest that healthcare social workers only moderately engaged in self-care. Additionally, analyses revealed significant differences in self-care practices by financial stability, overall health, and licensure status, respectively. Interestingly, perceived health status and current financial situation were significant predictors for overall self-care practices. After a brief review of the literature, this narrative will explicate findings, elucidate discussion points, identify salient implications, and conclude with areas for future research.

  20. Health-care climate, perceived self-care competence, and glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Koponen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study showed, in line with self-determination theory, that glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes ( n  = 2866 was strongly associated with perceived self-care competence, which in turn was associated with autonomous motivation and autonomy-supportive health-care climate. These associations remained after adjusting for the effect of important life-context factors. Autonomous motivation partially mediated the effect of health-care climate on perceived competence, which fully mediated the effect of autonomous motivation on glycemic control. The results of the study emphasize health-care personnel’s important role in supporting patients’ autonomous motivation and perceived self-care competence.

  1. Comparison of the influence of acupressure and self-care behavior education on the severity of primary dysmenorrhea based on visual analogue scale among students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Ansaripour

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dysmenorrhea is one of the frequently occurring problems which affect many young women’s life, and their efficiency and productivity. The aim is comparison of the effect of acupressure in two points of Guan Yuan (RN- 4 and Qiujo (RN- 2 with self-care behaviors education on severity of primary dysmenorrhea based on visual analogue scale. This is a non-randomized open-label parallel-group clinical trial. The study was conducted on 120 female students residing in dormitory who suffered from dysmenorrhea in three groups in 2014.Pressure in the acupressure group was done for 20 minutes (15 seconds pressure, 15 seconds rest on the first two days of menstruation for two cycles. Training was conducted in four sessions and the control group received ibuprofen 400 mg for three cycles. For evaluating of pain severity, visual analog scale was applied. Paired t-test was employed to compare the means before and after the intervention. The mean and standard deviation of pain severity before and after the intervention in all three groups of acupressure and education of self-caring behavior and control before and after the intervention showed statistically meaningful differences (p0.05. Regarding the prevalence and side effects of medical methods (non-steroid anti-inflammatory such as ibuprofen, it can be said that today we can equally use methods with the same effects like acupressure and education of self-caring in order to reduce the pain caused by dysmenorrhea which are available easily and with the least cost.

  2. The Relationship between Health Literacy, Perceived Self-efficacy and Self-care Performance of Female Senior High School Students in Health Promoting Schools of Miyaneh, 2016-2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Khodabandeh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Self-care in adolescents is considered as an effective measure in line with the promotion of health in each community. In this regard, the role of health promoting schools is of great importance. Furthermore, health literacy, as one of the basic tools for promoting community health, has been given much attention by policymakers. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between the health literacy, perceived self-efficacy and self-care performance of female senior high school students in the health promoting schools of Miyaneh in 2016-2017. Methods: In this descriptive-correlational study, 320 female senior high school students were selected randomly using the multi –stage cluster sampling method. Data were collected by using the questionnaires of Health Literacy Measure for Adolescents (HELMA, General Self-efficacy Scale, and the Adolescent Health Promotion (AHP scale. Data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 21 using the statistical tests of Pearson correlation coefficient and Multiple Regression (ENTER method. Results: The results showed that there is a positive and significant relationship between the health literacy and perceived self-efficacy and the self-care performance of female students in the health promoting schools, as well as between the components of health literacy and self-care components. No significant relationship was found between the component of health literacy calculation and the self-care components of nutrition, responsibility for health, spiritual growth, and physical activity. The results of regression analysis indicated that the dimensions of self-efficacy, use and correlation of health literacy are good predictors of self-care performance (R2 = 0.605. Moreover, the health literacy and the perceived self-efficacy can predict the self-care performance of students by 51 percent. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicated that a student with high levels of

  3. Broken toe - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fractured toe - self-care; Broken bone - toe - self-care; Fracture - toe - self-care; Fracture phalanx - toe ... often treated without surgery and can be taken care of at home. Severe injuries include: Breaks that ...

  4. HIV self-care practices during pregnancy and maternal health outcomes among HIV-positive postnatal mothers aged 18-35 years at Mbuya Nehanda maternity hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodzo, Lilian Gertrude; Mahaka, Hilda Tandazani; Mukona, Doreen; Zvinavashe, Mathilda; Haruzivishe, Clara

    2017-06-01

    HIV-related conditions are one of the indirect causes of maternal deaths in Zimbabwe and the prevalence rate was estimated to be 13.63% in 2009. The study utilised a descriptive correlational design on 80 pregnant women who were HIV positive at Mbuya Nehanda maternity hospital in Harare, Zimbabwe. Participants comprised a random sample of 80 postnatal mothers. Permission to carry out the study was obtained from the respective review boards. Participants signed an informed consent. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire and record review from 1 to 20 March 2012. Interviews were done in a private room and code numbers were used to identify the participants. Completed questionnaires were kept in a lockable cupboard and the researcher had sole access to them. Data were analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 12. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse data on demographics, maternal health outcomes and self-care practices. Inferential statistics (Pearson's correlation and regression analysis) were used to analyse the relationship between self-care practices and maternal health outcomes. Self-care practices were good with a mean score of 8 out of 16. Majority (71.3%) fell within the good category. Maternal outcomes were poor with a mean score of 28 out of 62 and 67.5% falling in the poor category. Pearson's correlation indicated a weak significant positive relationship (r = .317, p = <.01). Regression analysis (R 2 ) was .10 implying that self-care practices explained 10% of the variance observed in maternal health outcomes. More research needs to be carried out to identify other variables affecting maternal outcomes in HIV-positive pregnant women.

  5. Preeclampsia - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000606.htm Preeclampsia - self-care To use the sharing features on ... as you get used to it. Risks of Preeclampsia There are risks to both you and your ...

  6. Effect of family nursing therapeutic conversations on health-related quality of life, self-care and depression among outpatients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Birte; Mahrer-Imhof, Romy; Wagner, Lis

    2018-01-01

    . The control group (n = 167) received usual care, and the intervention group (n = 180) received FNTCs as supplement to usual care. Primary outcome was clinically significant changes (6 points) in Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) summary score between groups. Secondary outcomes were changes...... in self-care behaviour and depression scores. Data were assessed before first consultation and repeated after three months. Results: No statistically significant difference was found in the change of KCCQ, self-care and depression scores between the groups. KCCQ scores of patients in the FNTC group...... changed clinically significant in seven domains, compared to one domain in the control group, with the highest improvement in self-efficacy, social limitation and symptom burden. Conclusion: FNTC was not superior to standard care of patients with HF regarding health-related quality of life, self...

  7. [Differences in eating habits and self-care behavior in a group of obese people before and after the weight loss program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak-Sosnowska, Monika; Zahorska-Markiewicz, Barbara; Trzcieniecka-Green, Anna

    2005-01-01

    In common beliefs the care of obese people for their health and appearance is not sufficient, which is both the cause and the result of their obesity. The aim of the present study was to check whether obese and normal weight persons are different in selected behaviours connected with eating and self-care, and also whether providing them with knowledge about the desired behaviour changes would improve the effects of weight loss. Authors used structured interview of 20 limited questions. The participants were 32 obese women taking part in group weight loss programme organized in "Waga" treatment center in Katowice. The measures were taken before and after the programme. The comparing group constituted women of normal body weight. Obese women before the treatment comparing to normal weight women, presented more disadvantageous behaviours in the range of: fast eating and reaching for the food in time of strain (p eating daily no more than two meals. Statistically significant improvements were observed in: greater physical activity, greater care for appearance and meals aesthetics (p wrong meal ingredients (p eating habits and self-care behaviour. The exception was that obese women reached for food more often in the situations of strain and stress. The weight loss of the participants cannot be attributed solely to the change in their behaviour, but could be influenced also by group support and/or by emotional, cognitive and social changes. It might serve as a starting point for further investigations. Researching the long term effects of the treatment (how permanent is the alteration in the participants' weight and self-care behaviour) seems to be essential to answer those questions.

  8. Impact of a 12-week wellness coaching on self-care behaviors among primary care adult patients with prediabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona S. DeJesus

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This single arm prospective study assessed the impact of individualized wellness coaching intervention for primary care patients with prediabetes on self-reported changes in physical activity level and food choices. Five hundred sixty adult patients 18 years and older with prediabetes, seen in primary care clinic, were invited to participate in 12 weeks wellness coaching sessions delivered by certified coaches. Responses from questionnaires at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks were analyzed. Of 168 consented patients, 99 completed at least one coaching session; majority was elderly, female, overweight or obese. At baseline, 50% had <60 min aerobic exercise/week. At 6 and 12 weeks, average aerobic exercise time significantly increased from 117 min to 166 and 199 min respectively. Effect was sustained at 24 weeks. Success in making healthy eating choices also statistically improved from baseline. Significant effects on both activity level and eating behavior persisted even after adjusting for age, sex and baseline glucose/A1c values. Secondary outcomes of self-efficacy and quality of life likewise showed significant improvement. Results suggest that integration of wellness coaching in primary care practice among individuals at high risk for diabetes is feasible and may be useful as part of diabetes prevention management strategies in target populations. Future randomized clinical trials are needed to further explore this issue. Keywords: Wellness coaching, Primary care, Prediabetes, Preventive health, Health behavior

  9. Self-Care Motivation Among Patients With Heart Failure: A Qualitative Study Based on Orem's Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abotalebidariasari, Ghasem; Memarian, Robabe; Vanaki, Zohreh; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Naderi, Nasim

    2016-11-01

    Initiating and adhering to self-care activities necessitate self-care motivation. This study was undertaken in Iran to explore self-care motivation among patients with heart failure (HF). This qualitative study was done in 2014 and 2015. Study participants were patients with HF and their family members who were purposively selected from Shaheed Rajaei Cardiovascular, Medical and Research Center, Tehran, Iran. The study data were collected from December 2014 to May 2015 by doing in-depth semistructured face-to-face interviews and were analyzed via the directed content analysis approach. Eleven primary codes were generated which reflected motivations for self-care among patients with HF in the Iranian sociocultural context. To enhance the clarity of the findings, these primarily codes were summarized and grouped into 7 subcategories including fear of death and love of life, returning to previous physical health status and preventing or alleviating symptoms, understanding the value of self-care behaviors and trusting them, having the desire for remaining independent, relying on God, reassuring and supporting family members, and preventing family members from feeling irritation. The findings of this study indicate that patients with HF have different motivations for doing self-care activities. Fear of death, love of life, wish to return to previous health status, and prevention or alleviation of HF symptoms were the participants' strongest motivations for self-care. Understanding the motivations for self-care among patients with HF, based a holistic approach and evidence-based practice, can help nurses and physicians develop motivational programs for promoting self-care behaviors.

  10. iMHere: A Novel mHealth System for Supporting Self-Care in Management of Complex and Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmanto, Bambang; Pramana, Gede; Yu, Daihua Xie; Fairman, Andrea D; Dicianno, Brad E; McCue, Michael P

    2013-07-11

    Individuals with chronic conditions are vulnerable to secondary complications that can be prevented with adherence to self-care routines. They benefit most from receiving effective treatments beyond acute care, usually in the form of regular follow-up and self-care support in their living environments. One such population is individuals with spina bifida (SB), the most common permanently disabling birth defect in the United States. A Wellness Program at the University of Pittsburgh in which wellness coordinators supervise the care of individuals with chronic disease has produced remarkably improved outcomes. However, time constraints and travel costs have limited its scale. Mobile telehealth service delivery is a potential solution for improving access to care for a larger population. The project's goal was to develop and implement a novel mHealth system to support complex self-care tasks, continuous adherence to regimens, monitoring of adherence, and secure two-way communications between patients and clinicians. We developed and implemented a novel architecture of mHealth system called iMHere (iMobile Health and Rehabilitation) consisting of smartphone apps, a clinician portal, and a two-way communication protocol connecting the two. The process of implementing iMHere consisted of: (1) requirement analysis to identify clinically important functions that need to be supported, (2) design and development of the apps and the clinician portal, (3) development of efficient real-time bi-directional data exchange between the apps and the clinician portal, (4) usability studies on patients, and (5) implementation of the mHealth system in a clinical service delivery. There were 9 app features identified as relevant, and 5 apps were considered priority. There were 5 app features designed and developed to address the following issues: medication, skin care, bladder self-catheterization, bowel management, and mental health. The apps were designed to support a patient's self-care

  11. Activation and Self-Efficacy in a Randomized Trial of a Depression Self-Care Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Jane; Lambert, Sylvie D; Cole, Martin G; Ciampi, Antonio; Strumpf, Erin; Freeman, Ellen E; Belzile, Eric

    2016-12-01

    In a sample of primary care participants with chronic physical conditions and comorbid depressive symptoms: to describe the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of activation and self-efficacy with demographic, physical and mental health status, health behaviors, depression self-care, health care utilization, and use of self-care tools; and to examine the effects of a depression self-care coaching intervention on these two outcomes. Design/Study Setting. A secondary analysis of activation and self-efficacy data collected as part of a randomized trial to compare the effects of a telephone-based coached depression self-care intervention with a noncoached intervention. Activation (Patient Activation Measure) was measured at baseline and 6 months. Depression self-care self-efficacy was assessed at baseline, at 3 months, and at 6 months. In multivariable cross-sectional analyses (n = 215), activation and/or self-efficacy were associated with language, birthplace, better physical and mental health, individual exercise, specialist visits, and antidepressant nonuse. In longitudinal analyses (n = 158), an increase in activation was associated with increased medication adherence; an increase in self-efficacy was associated with use of cognitive self-care strategies and increases in social and solitary activities. There were significant improvements from baseline to 6 months in activation and self-efficacy scores both among coached and noncoached groups. The self-care coaching intervention did not affect 6-month activation or self-efficacy but was associated with quicker improvement in self-efficacy. Overall, the results for activation and self-efficacy were similar, although self-efficacy correlated more consistently than activation with depression-specific behaviors and was responsive to a depression self-care coaching intervention. © 2016 Society for Public Health Education.

  12. Being old and living alone in urban areas: the meaning of self-care and health on the perception of life situation and identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundsli K

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Kari Sundsli,1,2, Geir Arild Espnes,3 Olle Söderhamn21Department of Social Work and Health Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, 2Centre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, Norway; 3Research Centre for Health Promotion and Resources, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, NorwayBackground: Living alone in urban areas when getting old is an important and necessary field for research as the growth of the urban population worldwide increases, and due to the fact that people live longer. How older people manage their self-care and health, and how this might influence their identity and life situation may be very important to understand when planning for a new, upcoming older generation. The aim of this study was to elucidate the meaning of self-care and health for the perception of life situation and identity among single-living older individuals in urban areas in southern Norway.Methods: A phenomenological–hermeneutic approach inspired by Ricoeur was applied. Nine single-living older persons in urban areas, 70–82 years of age, and identified to be in good health were interviewed. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using a phenomenological–hermeneutic method.Results: Strength and a time dimension characterized the meaning of self-care and health for the perception of life situation and identity as narrated by the group of single-living older individuals in urban areas in southern Norway. The informants were, as older individuals, caring, autonomous, and robust characters, who had gone through difficult times in life, and in a resilient way moved towards a new future. They valued and were grateful for what they had learned in their lives and could go forward and still experience and explore.Conclusion: Self-care is significant in the perception of life situation and identity among single

  13. Omaha company capitalizes on the potential of self-care to drive down costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Engage patients in managing their own health now. Why? Because lifestyle-related chronic disease is overburdening the nation's health care system, and behavioral change is key to getting the problem under control. See how one Omaha-based company is leveraging the power of self-care to improve outcomes and lower health care-related costs.

  14. Activation and Self-Efficacy in a Randomized Trial of a Depression Self-Care Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Jane; Lambert, Sylvie D.; Cole, Martin G.; Ciampi, Antonio; Strumpf, Erin; Freeman, Ellen E.; Belzile, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: In a sample of primary care participants with chronic physical conditions and comorbid depressive symptoms: to describe the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of activation and self-efficacy with demographic, physical and mental health status, health behaviors, depression self-care, health care utilization, and use of…

  15. Predictors of Self-care among the Elderly with Diabetes Type 2: Using Social Cognitive Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhaninejad, Vahidreza; Iranpour, Abedin; Shati, Mohsen; Tahami, Ahmad Naghibzadeh; Yousefzadeh, Gholamrezan; Fadayevatan, Reza

    Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases among the elderly and is also a very serious health problem. Adopting theory-based self-care behaviors is an effective means in managing such diseases. This study aimed to determine the predictors of diabetes self-care in the elderly in Kerman based on a social cognitive theory. In this cross-sectional study, 384 elderly diabetic patients who had referred to health screening centers in Kerman were chosen via cluster sampling. To collect information about self-care and its predictors, Toobert Glasgow's diabetes self-efficacy scale as well as a questionnaire was used which was based on social cognitive theory constructs. The validity and reliability of the questionnaire was confirmed. The data were analyzed using Pearson correlation and linear regression analysis in SPSS software 17. Among the subjects, 67.37% (252) had poor self-care ability; 29.14% (109) had average ability, and 3.40% (13) enjoyed a proper level of self- care ability. There was a significant relationship between the constructs of the social cognitive theory (knowledge, self- efficacy, social support, outcome expectations, outcome expectancy and self-regulation) and the self-care score. Furthermore, the mentioned constructs could predict 0.47% of the variance of the self-care behaviors. self-care behaviors in this study were poor. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an educational intervention based on cognitive theory constructs with the goal of properly managing diabetes in the elderly patients. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Heart Failure Self-care Within the Context of Patient and Informal Caregiver Dyadic Engagement: A Mixed Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Harleah G; Hupcey, Judith; Wang, Hsiao-Lan; Fradley, Michael; Donovan, Kristine A; Watach, Alexa

    2018-03-29

    Recent heart failure (HF) patient and informal caregiver (eg, dyadic) studies have either examined self-care from a qualitative or quantitative perspective. To date, the 2 types of data have not been integrated. The aim of this study was to understand HF self-care within the context of dyadic engagement. This was a cross-sectional, mixed methods (quantitative/qualitative) study. Heart failure self-care was measured with the Self-care of Heart Failure Index (v.6) dichotomized to adequate (≥70) or inadequate (Creswell and Plano Clark's methods. Of the 27 dyads, HF participants were 56% men, with a mean age of 77 years. Caregivers were 74% women, with a mean age of 66 years, representing spouses (n = 14) and adult children (n = 7). Quantitatively, few dyads scored as adequate (≥70) in self-care; the qualitative data described the impact of adequacy on the dyads' behavior. Dyads who scored higher, individually or both, on self-care self-efficacy and self-care management were less likely to change from their life course pattern. Either the patient or dyad continued to handle all self-care as they always had, rather than trying new strategies or reaching out for help as the patient's condition deteriorated. Our data suggest links that should be explored between dyadic adequacy and response to patients' symptoms. Future studies should assess dyadic adequacy longitudinally and examine its relationship to event-free survival and health services cost.

  17. Shin splints - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to make sure you do not have a stress fracture. You will also be checked to make sure you do not have ... Pain - shins - self-care; Anterior tibial pain - self-care; Medial tibial stress syndrome - self- ...

  18. Effect of healing touch training on self-care awareness in nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Pegi

    Nursing focuses on supporting clients' health and health behaviors; however, they tend to exhibit unproductive behaviors when it comes to caring for themselves. As nurses' self-neglect can undermine client care, supporting nurses' self-care practices are expected to translate into clients' self-care. Healing Touch (HT) is one option for supporting nurses' self-care, as it is an accepted nursing practice and studies suggest that HT may have beneficial effects for those delivering it. This study examined the impact of a 2-day HT training on awareness of the need for self-care in nurses. HT training was offered as continuing education for 45 nurses at a Veteran's Administration hospital in Long Beach, CA. This mixed-methods study used a pre/post-test design to measure the effects of HT Level 1 training on nurses' self-care self-awareness. Independent samples t-tests and analyses of variance were used to detect whether any significant differences emerged based on participant demographic data. Data were analyzed using paired t-tests to determine whether participants' self-awareness changed over the study period. Effect size for any differences were calculated using Cohen's d. Open-ended responses were reviewed and common themes were identified related to what participants believed they learned and how it affected their care for themselves and their clients. Two increases were found to be significant and of sufficient power when comparing pre- to delayed post-test scores: physical self-care awareness (mean difference = 0.956, t(44) = 5.085, p = .000, r = .61) and professional self-care awareness (mean difference = .955, t(43) = 5.277, p = .000, r = .63). Qualitative findings suggested that changes in their awareness, self-directed practices, and patient care practices are anticipated, evident, and sustained based upon themes across the three tests. Nurses are advised to take a course that teaches specific self-care techniques and strategies and continue practicing

  19. Development and evaluation of a self-care assessment inventory for workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Eiko; Shiihara, Yasufumi; Ando, Michiyo

    2013-06-01

    To develop and evaluate a self-care assessment inventory for workers (SCAI-W). A study using a self-care assessment inventory for workers consisting of 27 self-care items, the Japanese version of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Japanese version of the University of Wales Institute of Science and Technology Mood Adjective Checklist (JUMACL) was conducted. These questionnaires were distributed to 2297 workers. There were 893 valid responses (39.9%, 584 men and 309 women, mean age 37.2±10.2 years). Three primary and eight secondary factors were established for the conceptual structure of self-care and validated by structural equation modeling. "Positive attitude" comprised the secondary factors, "hope" and "sense of fulfillment", and was influenced by another secondary factor, "social support". "Positive attitude" contributed to "attitude toward health". "Attitude toward health" comprised the secondary factors, "care about one's health" and "correction of bad habits". "Attitude toward health" influenced a primary factor, "everyday behavior", comprised of "wakefulness", "eating in moderation", and "lack of self-control". The primary factors "positive attitude" and "everyday behavior" influenced the BDI scores. A multiple regression analysis indicated that JUMACL subscale scores (energetic arousal and tense arousal), demographic data (living alone, sex, and age) and health-related data (exercise, smoking, body mass index, drinking more than three alcoholic drinks/day, and gambling) predicted the scores of the self-care assessment inventory for workers. This assessment inventory could be a useful measure of workers' self-care because it establishes a relationship between psychological and behavioral concepts that are important for health promotion. © 2012 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2012 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  20. Mechanism of Change in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Body Image and Self-Care on ART Adherence Among Sexual Minority Men Living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Kalina M; Nogg, Kelsey A; Safren, Steven A; Blashill, Aaron J

    2018-05-11

    Body image disturbance is a common problem reported among sexual minority men living with HIV, and is associated with poor antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. Recently, a novel integrated intervention (cognitive behavioral therapy for body image and self-care; CBT-BISC) was developed and pilot tested to simultaneously improve body image and ART adherence in this population. Although CBT-BISC has demonstrated preliminary efficacy in improving ART adherence, the mechanisms of change are unknown. Utilizing data from a two-armed randomized controlled trial (N = 44 sexual minority men living with HIV), comparing CBT-BISC to an enhanced treatment as usual (ETAU) condition, sequential process mediation via latent difference scores was assessed, with changes in body image disturbance entered as the mechanism between treatment condition and changes in ART adherence. Participants assigned to CBT-BISC reported statistically significant reductions in body image disturbance post-intervention, which subsequently predicted changes in ART adherence from post-intervention to long term follow-up (b = 20.01, SE = 9.11, t = 2.19, p = 0.028). One pathway in which CBT-BISC positively impacts ART adherence is through reductions in body image disturbance. Body image disturbance represents one, of likely several, mechanism that prospectively predicts ART adherence among sexual minority men living with HIV.

  1. Phenomenological perspectives on self-care in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderhamn, Olle

    2013-01-01

    Self-care is a central concept in health care and may be considered as a means to maintain, restore, and improve one's health and well-being. When performed effectively, self-care contributes not only to human functioning but also to human structural integrity and human development (ie, to a dynamic and holistic state of health). Self-care as a clinical concept is relevant for health care professionals, and it should be meaningful to investigate it at a philosophical level and to further elaborate upon this concept. The aim of this article is to discuss and elaborate upon a phenomenological perspective on self-care in aging that is relevant for the health sciences. Self-care may be preliminarily regarded as a fundamental perspective for the conscious older individual, and as a way of being in the world with both the objective body and with the lived body. The lived body is the personal center of perception and the field of action, and it is also the center of self-care. The potentiality or ability for self-care activity and self-care activity itself are structures given to perception, with self-care ability as an integral part of the lived body. The actualization of self-care ability comes about through a certain meaning, which can be regarded as an important driving force. It is constituted by communication, a healthy lifestyle, and by building meaning and socializing. Successful self-care involves having contacts with the health care system, being conscious of a sound lifestyle, being physically and mentally active, being engaged, having social contacts with family and others, as well as being satisfied, positive, and being able to look forward. One fundamental cornerstone is serenity on behalf of the individual. Self-care can facilitate transitions, and it may also be an outcome of transitions.

  2. Self-Care Among Older Adults With Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumayya Attaallah MSN, RN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is estimated that 5.7 million Americans are living with heart failure (HF today. Despite the fact that HF is one of the most common reasons people aged 65 years and older are admitted into the hospital, few studies describe the self-care in this older adult population. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to review the current literature on self-care in this population to better understand the influence of selected factors on self-care and health outcomes. Methods: A literature search was completed and resulted in including 28 studies. Results: Multiple factors have been reported as barriers to self-care including depression and presence of peripheral arterial disease. Factors having a positive effect on self-care are male gender, number of cardiologist referrals, and self-efficacy. There were few studies that described the association between cognitive functioning and self-care. There is a lack of strong evidence to support the association between self-care and health outcomes such as readmission rate, but recent studies suggest that a 30-day readmission is not a valid predictor of health outcomes. Implications: The assessment of the psychological factors and health care resource utilization patterns that may influence self-care is recommended. More research that addresses the role of cognitive factors in influencing self-care is needed.

  3. Self-caring of women with osteoarthritis living at different levels of independence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Carol L; Schmeiser, Donna; Yehle, Karen T

    2003-08-01

    Successful management of chronic conditions such as osteoarthritis (OA) may improve health and quality of life and foster independence. Health professionals need to understand what women do to manage their OA by self-caring in order to support the improvement of health in older adults. A descriptive study of difficulties of living with and self-caring of OA was conducted. Sixty women over 65 years old who lived in homes in the community, in assisted living (AL) apartments, and in long-term care (LTC) facilities participated in interviews. Data were the reports of symptoms and self-caring behaviors. Descriptive, Kendall tau-b and tau-c, and chi-square analyses revealed that there were similarities and differences among the women. All of the women used a variety of self-caring techniques. Differences included that community-residing women reported more often that they had pain, moved too slowly, and had sleep disturbances. Community-residing women reported more negative emotions, while reporting significantly more often that they used a wide range of positive coping methods. By anticipating severe physical and functional problems of living with OA and difficulties in self-caring, health care providers may help women maintain an independent lifestyle.

  4. The Practice of Self-Care among Counseling Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, Mary G.; Devries, Sabina R.; Wardle, Elizabeth Ann

    2015-01-01

    Self-care behavior is recognized as an important component for the helping professional who practices in the field of counseling or who is training to become a helping professional. Occupational stress and burnout in the field of counseling is of great concern. This study examined the practice of self-care among master level counseling students to…

  5. Amount of health care and self-care following a randomized clinical trial comparing flexion-distraction with exercise program for chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keenum Michael

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous clinical trials have assessed the percentage of participants who utilized further health care after a period of conservative care for low back pain, however no chiropractic clinical trial has determined the total amount of care during this time and any differences based on assigned treatment group. The objective of this clinical trial follow-up was to assess if there was a difference in the total number of office visits for low back pain over one year after a four week clinical trial of either a form of physical therapy (Exercise Program or a form of chiropractic care (Flexion Distraction for chronic low back pain. Methods In this randomized clinical trial follow up study, 195 participants were followed for one year after a four-week period of either a form of chiropractic care (FD or a form of physical therapy (EP. Weekly structured telephone interview questions regarded visitation of various health care practitioners and the practice of self-care for low back pain. Results Participants in the physical therapy group demonstrated on average significantly more visits to any health care provider and to a general practitioner during the year after trial care (p Conclusion During a one-year follow-up, participants previously randomized to physical therapy attended significantly more health care visits than those participants who received chiropractic care.

  6. Cardiac rehabilitation with a nurse case manager (GoHeart) across local and regional health authorities improves risk factors, self-care and psychosocial outcomes. A one-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vibeke Brogaard; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen

    2014-01-01

    %). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cardiac risk factors, stratified self-care and self-reported psychosocial factors (SF12 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)) were assessed at admission (phase IIa), at three months at discharge (phase IIb) and at one-year follow-up (phase III). Intention.......01), self-care management (p depression symptoms (p ...OBJECTIVES: In Denmark, the local and regional health authorities share responsibility for cardiac rehabilitation (CR). The objective was to assess effectiveness of CR across sectors coordinated by a nurse case manager (NCM). DESIGN: A one-year follow-up study. SETTING: A CR programme (Go...

  7. The Effect of Age on the Use of Health and Self-Care Information: Confronting the Stereotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Lisa Smith; Wagner, Todd H.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Given stereotypes of older adults, there is the perception that older adults will not use health information technologies. One concern is that practitioners might shy away from providing older patients with health information, and in particular, computerized information. The study's primary objective was to evaluate whether a health…

  8. Venous ulcers -- self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery to improve blood flow through your veins. Prevention If you are at risk for venous ulcers, take the steps listed above under Wound Care. ... weight if you are overweight. Manage your blood pressure and cholesterol levels. ... Venous leg ulcers - self-care; Venous insufficiency ulcers - self-care; Stasis ...

  9. [Factors related to self-care in diabetes mellitus patients attended at emergency service in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquedano, Irasema Romero; dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; Teixeira, Carla Regina de Souza; Martins, Tatiane Aparecida; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia

    2010-12-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the self-care ability of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus and to relate this capacity with some sociodemographic and clinical variables. Participants were 251 patients who attended the Emergency Service at the Mérida Regional Hospital in Yucatán, Mexico, in 2006. Data were obtained through directed home interviews, using a form, a questionnaire and the Self-Care Capacity Scale. Descriptive and correlation statistics were used for data analysis. The results showed 83 (33.5%) subjects with good and 168 (66.5%) subjects with regular ability. A directly proportional correlation was found between self-care ability and years of study (r = 0.124; p diabetes patients, and further research needs to be developed with a focus on other variables involved in the behavior adopted to benefit their health.

  10. Testing Self-Efficacy as a Pathway that Supports Self-Care among Family Caregivers in a Psychoeducational Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savundranayagam, Marie Y.; Brintnall-Peterson, Mary

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which a psychoeducational intervention supports family-centered care by influencing health risk and self-care behaviors of caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer's disease (N = 325). Moreover, this study investigated the extent to which changes in self-efficacy explained changes in health risk and self-care…

  11. IMPROVING SELF-CARE INDEPENDENCY OF TYPE 2 DM PATIENTS BASED ON LASALLIAN EDUCATION MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annastasia Sintia Lamonge

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The specific objectives of this study were: (1 Analyze the effectiveness of Lasallian health education in order to increased knowledge and attitude. (2 Analyze the effectiveness of Lasallian health education in order to increase the self-care independency of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM. Research design of this study was  Pre-Experiment with target population patients with type 2 DM. 12 participants were recruited in the study with  purposive sampling technique. Bivariate test results of knowledge and attitudes before and after giving the Lasallian health education showed significant results with ρ-value of 0.016 (p-value <ά 0.05. Research result of self-care independency of type 2 diabetic patients in before and after giving Lasallian health education show significant result with ρ-value of 0.001 (p-value <ά 0:01. Transformation of people behavior or habit by a health education program should have three important determinant, there are cognitive,  affective and psychomotor aspects of participants to motivate and increase self-awareness, and adherence of self-care management and improving of quality of life. Keywords: Type 2 DM, Lasallian Health Education, Knowledge, Attitude, Self-care independency.

  12. Health coaching by telephony to support self-care in chronic diseases: clinical outcomes from The TERVA randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patja Kristiina

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim was to evaluate the effect of a 12-month individualized health coaching intervention by telephony on clinical outcomes. Methods An open-label cluster-randomized parallel groups trial. Pre- and post-intervention anthropometric and blood pressure measurements by trained nurses, laboratory measures from electronic medical records (EMR. A total of 2594 patients filling inclusion criteria (age 45 years or older, with type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease or congestive heart failure, and unmet treatment goals were identified from EMRs, and 1535 patients (59% gave consent and were randomized into intervention or control arm. Final analysis included 1221 (80% participants with data on primary end-points both at entry and at end. Primary outcomes were systolic and diastolic blood pressure, serum total and LDL cholesterol concentration, waist circumference for all patients, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c for diabetics and NYHA class in patients with congestive heart failure. The target effect was defined as a 10-percentage point increase in the proportion of patients reaching the treatment goal in the intervention arm. Results The proportion of patients with diastolic blood pressure initially above the target level decreasing to 85 mmHg or lower was 48% in the intervention arm and 37% in the control arm (difference 10.8%, 95% confidence interval 1.5–19.7%. No significant differences emerged between the arms in the other primary end-points. However, the target levels of systolic blood pressure and waist circumference were reached non-significantly more frequently in the intervention arm. Conclusions Individualized health coaching by telephony, as implemented in the trial was unable to achieve majority of the disease management clinical measures. To provide substantial benefits, interventions may need to be more intensive, target specific sub-groups, and/or to be fully integrated into local health care. Trial registration

  13. Rotator cuff - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000358.htm Rotator cuff - self-care To use the sharing features on ... and shoulder exercises may help ease your symptoms. Rotator Cuff Problems Common rotator cuff problems include: Tendinitis , which ...

  14. Human bites - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bites - human - self-care ... Human bites can occur in 2 ways: If someone bites you If your hand comes into contact ... bite to express anger or other negative feelings. Human bites may be more dangerous than animal bites. ...

  15. Mental health nurses' and allied health professionals' perceptions of the role of the Occupational Health Service in the management of work-related stress: how do they self-care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, J; Cameron, I M; Hamilton, R; Murphy, E; Naji, S

    2010-11-01

    Higher rates of stress-related sickness are found in health care professionals when compared with other sectors. The annual direct cost of absence to the National Health Service is £1.7 billion. Increased clinical demand, long hours, low staffing and a lack of support from colleagues and management are contributing to absenteeism, somatic complaints and mental health problems. Mental health work is inherently stressful and levels of work stress experienced by mental health nurses are especially high. The study investigated mental health nurses' and allied health professionals' (AHPs) awareness and knowledge of the service provided by the Occupational Health Service (OHS) and identified work-related stress and self-care strategies within these two groups. Nurses and AHP staff employed in mental health services in a Scottish healthboard area were invited to complete an anonymous questionnaire. Results demonstrated that staff found their contact with the OHS to be a positive experience. They considered direct patient care to be less stressful than the organizational constraints they work under, and they reported a lack of support from both their peer groups and management. There should be recognition of the increased stress that hospital-based nurses and AHPs experience. These areas should be scrutinized and reviewed further to support staff within these environments in accordance with organizational objectives. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing.

  16. Trauma, stress, and self-care in clinical training: Predictors of burnout, decline in health status, secondary traumatic stress symptoms, and compassion satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Lisa D; Carello, Janice; Maguin, Eugene

    2017-07-01

    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 9(4) of Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy (see record 2016-54155-001). In the article, there was an error in Table 4 of the Results. The Outcomes and Predictors columns were not clearly categorized from one another. The corrected table is present in the erratum.] Objective: Courtois and Gold (2009) have called for the inclusion of trauma in the curriculum for all mental health training programs. The present study investigated the impact of trauma-related content, stress, and self-care (SC) on trainees in such a program. Method: The study examined potential risk factors (trauma exposures in training [being faced with or reacting to trauma-related field work experiences and course content] and perceptions of stress in field and coursework) and protective factors (SC effort and importance) in relation to burnout (BO), health status (HS), secondary traumatic stress symptoms (STSS), and compassion satisfaction (CS) among 195 students in a graduate social work training program. Results: All students reported trauma exposures in their field placements and/or coursework, including retraumatization experiences that were associated with higher STSS and BO. Field stress and SC effort were both consistent predictors across outcomes. Higher field stress levels predicted higher BO and STSS, a greater likelihood of decline in HS, and lower CS. Lower SC effort was also associated with higher BO and STSS, and a greater likelihood of decline in HS, while higher SC effort predicted higher CS. Older students, those with traumatized field clients, and those whose field work addressed trauma, also reported higher CS. Conclusions: These findings suggest that clinical training involving trauma content can be both rewarding and stressful, and may evoke distress in some trainees. Given that learning about and working with trauma are essential to adequate clinical training, the authors suggest

  17. The Association Between Commonly Investigated User Factors and Various Types of eHealth Use for Self-Care of Type 2 Diabetes: Case of First-Generation Immigrants From Pakistan in the Oslo Area, Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatara, Naoe; Hammer, Hugo Lewi; Andreassen, Hege Kristin; Mirkovic, Jelena; Kjøllesdal, Marte Karoline Råberg

    2017-10-05

    Sociodemographic and health-related factors are often investigated for their association with the active use of electronic health (eHealth). The importance of such factors has been found to vary, depending on the purpose or means of eHealth and the target user groups. Pakistanis are one of the biggest immigrant groups in the Oslo area, Norway. Due to an especially high risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) among this population, knowledge about their use of eHealth for T2D self-management and prevention (self-care) will be valuable for both understanding this vulnerable group and for developing effective eHealth services. The aim of this study was to examine how commonly were the nine types of eHealth for T2D self-care being used among our target group, the first-generation Pakistani immigrants living in the Oslo area. The nine types of eHealth use are divided into three broad categories based on their purpose: information seeking, communication, and active self-care. We also aimed to investigate how sociodemographic factors, as well as self-assessment of health status and digital skills are associated with the use of eHealth in this group. A survey was carried out in the form of individual structured interviews from September 2015 to January 2016 (N=176). For this study, dichotomous data about whether or not an informant had used each of the nine types of eHealth in the last 12 months and the total number of positive answers were used as dependent variables in a regression analysis. The independent variables were age, gender, total years of education, digital skills (represented by frequency of asking for help when using information and communication technology [ICT]), and self-assessment of health status. Principal component analyses were applied to make categories of independent variables to avoid multicollinearity. Principal component analysis yielded three components: knowledge, comprising total years of education and digital skills; health, comprising age

  18. The association of minor and major depression with health problem-solving and diabetes self-care activities in a clinic-based population of adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Na; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Langan, Susan; Payne, Jennifer L; Lyketsos, Constantine; Golden, Sherita Hill

    2017-05-01

    We examined whether problem-solving and diabetes self-management behaviors differ by depression diagnosis - major depressive disorder (MDD) and minor depressive disorder (MinDD) - in adults with Type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We screened a clinical sample of 702 adults with T2DM for depression, identified 52 positive and a sample of 51 negative individuals, and performed a structured diagnostic psychiatric interview. MDD (n=24), MinDD (n=17), and no depression (n=62) were diagnosed using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM-IV) Text Revised criteria. Health Problem-Solving Scale (HPSS) and Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA) questionnaires determined problem-solving and T2DM self-management skills, respectively. We compared HPSS and SDSCA scores by depression diagnosis, adjusting for age, sex, race, and diabetes duration, using linear regression. Total HPSS scores for MDD (β=-4.38; pdepression. Total SDSCA score for MDD (β=-10.1; pdepression, and was partially explained by total HPSS. MinDD and MDD individuals with T2DM have impaired problem-solving ability. MDD individuals had impaired diabetes self-management, partially explained by impaired problem-solving. Future studies should assess problem-solving therapy to treat T2DM and MinDD and integrated problem-solving with diabetes self-management for those with T2DM and MDD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Phenomenological perspectives on self-care in aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söderhamn O

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Olle SöderhamnCenter for Caring Research- Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, NorwayAbstract: Self-care is a central concept in health care and may be considered as a means to maintain, restore, and improve one's health and well-being. When performed effectively, self-care contributes not only to human functioning but also to human structural integrity and human development (ie, to a dynamic and holistic state of health. Self-care as a clinical concept is relevant for health care professionals, and it should be meaningful to investigate it at a philosophical level and to further elaborate upon this concept. The aim of this article is to discuss and elaborate upon a phenomenological perspective on self-care in aging that is relevant for the health sciences. Self-care may be preliminarily regarded as a fundamental perspective for the conscious older individual, and as a way of being in the world with both the objective body and with the lived body. The lived body is the personal center of perception and the field of action, and it is also the center of self-care. The potentiality or ability for self-care activity and self-care activity itself are structures given to perception, with self-care ability as an integral part of the lived body. The actualization of self-care ability comes about through a certain meaning, which can be regarded as an important driving force. It is constituted by communication, a healthy lifestyle, and by building meaning and socializing. Successful self-care involves having contacts with the health care system, being conscious of a sound lifestyle, being physically and mentally active, being engaged, having social contacts with family and others, as well as being satisfied, positive, and being able to look forward. One fundamental cornerstone is serenity on behalf of the individual. Self-care can facilitate transitions, and it may also be an outcome of transitions

  20. Role of motivation in the relationship between depression, self-care, and glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egede, Leonard E; Osborn, Chandra Y

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism by which depression influences health outcomes in persons with diabetes is uncertain. The purpose of this study was to test whether depression is related to self-care behavior via social motivation and indirectly related to glycemic control via self-care behavior. Patients with diabetes were recruited from an outpatient clinic. Information gathered pertained to demographics, depression, and diabetes knowledge (information); diabetes fatalism (personal motivation); social support (social motivation); and diabetes self-care (behavior). Hemoglobin A1C values were extracted from the patient medical record. Structural equation models tested the predicted pathways. Higher levels of depressive symptoms were significantly related to having less social support and decreased performance of diabetes self-care behavior. In addition, when depressive symptoms were included in the model, fatalistic attitudes were no longer associated with behavioral performance. Among adults with diabetes, depression impedes the adoption of effective self-management behaviors (including physical activity, appropriate dietary behavior, foot care, and appropriate self-monitoring of blood glucose behavior) through a decrease in social motivation.

  1. The nurse entrepreneur: empowerment needs, challenges, and self-care practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vannucci MJ

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Marla J Vannucci,1 Sharon M Weinstein2 1Psychology Department, Adler University, Chicago, IL, 2SMW Group, North Bethesda, MD, USA Abstract: The purpose of this exploratory study was to better understand the experiences and challenges of nurse entrepreneurs. Nurse entrepreneurs (N=44 reported on their transitions from employment to entrepreneurship, key motivators in the decision to start a business, and the challenges they face as entrepreneurs in the health care field. Additionally, participants completed the 33-item Mindful Self-Care Scale – Short, which measured their self-care activities and behaviors in six domains: Physical Care, Supportive Relationships, Mindful Awareness, Self-compassion/Purpose, Mindful Relaxation, and Supportive Structure. Nurse entrepreneurs reported higher rates of self-care practices than a norm community sample, and age was positively correlated with higher rates of self-care practices. Nurse entrepreneurs reported that factors related to psychological empowerment, such as meaning/purpose, having an impact, need for growth, and getting to make decisions, were more critical motivators in the decision to start a business than factors associated with structural empowerment, such as financial gain and job or organizational constraints. Some work/life balance challenges, such as juggling multiple roles in a business, balancing one’s own needs with those of others, time management, and addressing both family and business needs, were associated with fewer self-care behaviors. The biggest challenges to success that were identified, such as implementing a marketing strategy, networking, and accessing mentorship, were all related to relying on connections with others. The results of this study will benefit nurse entrepreneurs, potential nurse entrepreneurs, and others in the health care delivery system. Keywords: career development, entrepreneurship, mindfullness, work/life balance, health care

  2. Physician self-care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    impact on patient care, increasing the number of medical errors, lowering both patient and physician satisfaction and lengthening the recovery phase.[1-3]. Joan Halifax[4] has taught at programmes in palliative care for health professional caregivers for many years. She identified frequent challenges facing healthcare ...

  3. Animal bites - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bites - animals - self-care ... Most animal bites come from pets. Dog bites are common and most often happen to children. Cat bites are ... which can cause deeper puncture wounds. Most other animal bites are caused by stray or wild animals, ...

  4. Social support and its association with diet self-care in patients with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Alarcón-Mora

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a major public health problem with many elements, such as self-care and social support, that could be interacting with its evolution. Nevertheless, there is no evidence of association between these two elements. Thus, this study aims to determine the relationship between medical, nutritional and physical activity self-care, perceived social support and duration of the disease. A cross-sectional Study was conducted on 126 people with diabetes with a mean age of 55 (±10.4 years old. The Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Scale and the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS Social Support Survey were applied. Social support, specifically the instrumental one, may generate negative effects by limiting self-care behavior of a person. Based on these findings, it is possible to conclude that social support does not always turn out to be beneficial for people: having more instrumental support generates dependency and no responsibility on the diet.

  5. Relations of Behavioral Autonomy to Health Outcomes Among Emerging Adults With and Without Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Kerry A.; Becker, Dorothy; Escobar, Oscar; Siminerio, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the relation of behavioral autonomy to psychological, behavioral, and physical health among emerging adults with and without type 1 diabetes. Methods High school seniors with (n = 118) and without type 1 diabetes (n = 122) completed online questionnaires for three consecutive years. Behavioral autonomy, psychological health, risk behaviors, and diabetes outcomes were assessed. Regression analyses were conducted to predict Time 2 and 3 outcomes, controlling for Time 1 outcomes. Results There were no group differences in behavioral autonomy. Behavioral autonomy predicted better psychological health but only for emerging adults without diabetes. Behavioral autonomy was related to increased risk behavior for both groups. Behavioral autonomy was unrelated to self-care but predicted better glycemic control for females. Conclusions Behavioral autonomy may be beneficial for psychological health, but is related to increased risk behavior. The implications of behavioral autonomy for emerging adults with type 1 diabetes require careful consideration. PMID:25157070

  6. [Project work: formation of health-care personnel for self-care of tunnelled central venous catheters in hemodialysis patients of the territory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morale, Walter; Patanè, D; Incardona, C; Seminara, G; Malfa, P; L'Anfusa, G; Calcara, G; Bisceglie, P; Puliatti, D; Di Landro, D

    2013-01-01

    Scientific data from current literature demonstrate an incidence of bacteraemia due to tunnelled central venous catheter (tCVC) use accounting for 1.6 / 1000 days per tCVC, with a range of 1.5 to 1.8. In Sicily no data on the incidence of tCVC- related bacteraemia are available. In our hospital, tCVC infection occurs 2.4 times in 1000 days during CVC use. A retrospective analysis carried out from 2006 to 2012 was performed on 650 patients with tunnelled catheters. Of the subjects who received tCVC in our hospital, 90% were destined to undergo haemodialysis in a private health care environment outside our hospital. In order to improve the aforementioned infection outcome, we planned and implemented a specific work project. The work project (WP) was subdivided into two steps: 1) The first step was further subdivided into two sub-phases. The first was principally concerned with the implementation of educational courses, conducted directly on the ward and aimed at the implementation of meticulous nursing regimes for the care of tCVC by our health care nurse. The courses were entitled Management of Vascular Access: from doing - to teaching to do!. These educational courses were organized by the Nephrology Department, which takes care of the management and handling of the major complications of tCVCs for the maintenance of haemodialysis. After this first step, the nurses who had participated became the promoters of the second part of the course, which concerned the development of know-how within an outpatient clinic, which deals exclusively with the nursing management of tCVCs. 2) The title of the second phase was Therapeutic Education: self-Care and understanding and managing your venous access at home. The aim of this step was the integration of correct in-hospital care with that available in outsourced private institutions, via the involvement of the patient in the management of their own central venous access. During our training project, a more detailed analysis of

  7. Comportamientos y capacidad de agencia de autocuidado de adultos con insuficiencia cardiaca Comportamentos e capacidade de agência de autocuidado de adultos com insuficiência cardíaca Behaviors and self-care agency capacity of adults with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDITH ARREDONDO HOLGUÍN

    2010-06-01

    , which measures the frequency of self-care behaviors of adults with heart failure when requesting help, adjusting to a life with the illness and therapeutic regime, modifying self-esteem and acceptance of oneself, living with the effects of heart failure and the related treatment. It concludes that the majority of patients were males; that basic conditioning factors such as family support, work performance, affiliation to health system, socio-economic level and education level access were important for the patients. The self-care behavior frequency was average in adults in the majority of the dimensions and the level of agency was high to very high. Similarly, it was concluded that there is no correlation between agency and self-care behavior, which states that adults have the knowledge but have not made the decision of conducting self-care actions.

  8. Development of the Professional Self-Care Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorociak, Katherine E; Rupert, Patricia A; Bryant, Fred B; Zahniser, Evan

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased emphasis on the importance of self-care for psychologists and other mental health professionals. With the growth of positive psychology and preventive medicine, self-care is an emerging topic, promulgated as a means of avoiding the adverse effects of stress and promoting professional functioning and well-being. However, the research on self-care is limited because of the lack of an empirically based, psychometrically sound measure of this construct. Thus, the purpose of this project was to develop a measure of professional self-care. Professional psychologists were the focus of study, with the goal being to develop a measure that can be used in this population and similar groups of professionals. Based on expert feedback and a preliminary study of 422 licensed psychologists in Illinois, a 5-factor, 21-item scale was created. Factor analysis identified the following self-care factors: Professional Support, Professional Development, Life Balance, Cognitive Awareness, and Daily Balance. Preliminary analyses provided initial support for the validity of the 5 factors. A follow-up study was conducted with a second sample of clinical psychologists. The 5-factor structure provided a good fit to the data with the second sample. Thus, based on factor analysis and validity data, a 5-factor, 21-item Professional Self-Care Scale was established for further study and use in future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. A literature review on self-care of chronic illness: definition, assessment and related outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausili, Davide; Masotto, Matteo; Dall'Ora, Chiara; Salvini, Lorena; Di Mauro, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Chronic illnesses care represents a challenging issue for people well-being and future health systems' sustainability. Promotion of self-care is considered a key point for chronically ill patients' care. The aim of this literature was to explore: how self-care of chronic illness has been theoretically defined; how self-care can be assessed in clinical and research settings; what associations exist between self-care and health outcomes of chronically ill patients. A wide range of definitions and terminologies related to self-care of chronic illness has been found in the literature. Although some common elements useful to explain the concept of self-care have been identified, the physical, cognitive, emotional and social processes underlying self-care remain controversial and poorly defined. Valid and reliable disease-specific assessment tools have been developed and used in a growing number of studies; however, the lack of utilization of standardized instruments in clinical practice has been referred by many authors. Significant correlations between self-care of chronic illness and outcome measures e.g. general health status, quality of life and healthcare costs, are reported by a limited number of studies. Supporting patient self-care is recognized as a crucial factor in chronic illness care. A deeper analysis of variables and processes influencing self-care could help for a full description of the phenomenon. A systematic evaluation of self-care in health professionals' everyday clinical practice is strongly recommended. The development of general non-disease-specific assessment tools could facilitate the evaluation of complex patients, especially those with multiple co-morbidities. Although self-care has been recognized as a vital intermediate outcome, further large-scale studies clarifying the association between self-care and patients' and health systems' outcomes are needed.

  10. Stress, self-esteem and well-being among female health professionals: A randomized clinical trial on the impact of a self-care intervention mediated by the senses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Eliseth Ribeiro; Dal Fabbro, Daniela Reis; Oliveira, Rebeca Barqueiro de; Santos, Ingrid Ribeiro Dos; Victor, Elivane da Silva; Aquarone, Rita Lacerda; Andrade, Cristiane Benvenuto; Ribeiro, Vivian Finotti; Oliveira, Roselaine Coelho de; Friedlander, Rosa; Ferreira, Daniela Santos

    2017-01-01

    Stress levels are evident among health professionals. However, there are few studies on sensory-based self-care aimed at stress management, self-esteem and subjective well-being in this group of professionals. To assess the impact of a self-care intervention mediated by the senses on the stress levels, self-esteem and well-being of health professionals in a hospital environment. A total of 93 health professionals participated in an unblinded clinical trial, randomized into four groups: 1) control (no intervention); 2) Monosensory-daily body moisturizing (DBM) with odorless cream; 3) Bisensory-DBM with scented cream; 4) Multisensory-DBM with scented cream associated with audiovisual material. Participants answered specific questionnaires to assess stress, self-esteem and well-being and cortisol samples were collected at baseline, 15 and 30 days following intervention, and at the 30-day follow-up. Self-care was characterized as neglected, with most participants reporting inadequate hours of sleep (74%), irregular physical activity (68%), and inadequate nutrition (45%). Compared to the other groups, the Bisensory group had lower stress on all three assessments (p = 0.017; 0.012; 0.036), a life satisfaction 8% higher at follow-up than at baseline (95% CI: 2% to 15%, p = 0.016), a 10% increase in positive affect (95% CI: 2% to 19%, p = 0.011) and a 12% reduction in negative affect (95% CI: 3% to 21% less, p = 0.014) after 30 days. The Multisensory group showed improvement in self-esteem (p = 0.012) and reduced cortisol (p = 0.036) after 30 days of intervention. The control group showed no changes in the variables studied, except for cortisol: an increase at the 15-day evaluation (denoting higher risk for stress, p = 0.009) and a reduction at follow-up (p = 0.028), which was nevertheless within normal levels. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02406755.

  11. The relationship between self-efficacy and diabetic foot self-care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey Wendling, MSN, RN, FNP, CFCN

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: This study adds to the body of knowledge regarding self-efficacy and diabetic foot self-care behaviors. Further research is needed to explore the relationship of gender, diabetes education attendance, and foot self-care behaviors as influencing factors in LEA prevention.

  12. Self - care strategies among risky profession workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Vasková

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking care of oneself is crucial for maintaining one´s psychical and physical health. In the context of risky profession this topic can play an even more important role, because it can be the source of necessary information for improvement of coping capacity when one is confronted with crisis situations. The aim of the present study is to identify the most common forms of self-care among selected risky professions. In the second part is the attention focused on the comparison of the specificities of risky to non-risky professions in self-care. Methods: For data collection Self-regulation Self-care Questionnaire by authors Hricová and Lovaš (in press is used. The sample consists of two groups. In the first one participated 156 respondents, who worked in risky professions - namely police officers (60 at the age between 22 to 55 years (average age is 36.88, SD=9.49, fire fighters (46 at the age between 22 to 62 years (average age is 35.13, SD=8.31 and paramedics (50 at the age between 25 to 55 years (average age is 40.3, SD=6.62. 76.2% of the sample are men, 19.0% are women and 4,8% didn´t state their gender. The second sample consists of 161 participants who work in administrative, industry production or IT sphere. They were at the age between 23 to 61 years (average age is 38.01, SD=10.45. 74% of the sample are men and 21.7% are women. Results and discussion: Results confirmed the dominance of psychological self-care above physical among risky professions. To the forefront gets the need to live meaningful life, to fully use one´s skills and to be satisfied with one´s life and decisions. All this needs can be assigned to the necessity of sense, which could be seen as a result of everyday contact with critical and life threaten situations. Equally important sphere of self-care is the necessity of high-quality relationships, which doesn´t mean only relationships with family or friends. It is important to highlight also relationships with

  13. Self-Care Technologies in HCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunes, Francisco; Verdezoto, Nervo; Fitzpatrick, Geraldine

    2015-01-01

    Many studies show that self-care technologies can support patients with chronic conditions and their carers in understanding the ill body and increasing control of their condition. However, many of these studies have largely privileged a medical perspective and thus overlooked how patients......-care, and increasing the influence on medical research and practice around self-care technology....... and carers integrate self-care into their daily lives and mediate their conditions through technology. In this review, we focus on how patients and carers use and experience self-care technology through a Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) lens. We analyse studies of self-care published in key HCI journals...

  14. The confidence in diabetes self-care scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Der Ven, Nicole C W; Weinger, Katie; Yi, Joyce

    2003-01-01

    evaluated in Dutch (n = 151) and U.S. (n = 190) outpatients with type 1 diabetes. In addition to the CIDS scale, assessment included HbA(1c), emotional distress, fear of hypoglycemia, self-esteem, anxiety, depression, and self-care behavior. The Dutch sample completed additional measures on perceived burden......OBJECTIVE: To examine psychometric properties of the Confidence in Diabetes Self-Care (CIDS) scale, a newly developed instrument assessing diabetes-specific self-efficacy in Dutch and U.S. patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Reliability and validity of the CIDS scale were...... and importance of self-care. Test-retest reliability was established in a second Dutch sample (n = 62). RESULTS: Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.86 for Dutch patients and 0.90 U.S. patients) and test-retest reliability (Spearman's r = 0.85, P

  15. Self-Care of Older Black Adults in a South African Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Eugenie; Robertson, Barbara

    1995-01-01

    Descriptive data from 309 South Africans aged 60 and older showed that self-care skills and health practices are a mixture of Western and traditional thinking. A health education and screening project was designed to empower older adults in self-care. (SK)

  16. Analysis of Health Behavior Theories for Clustering of Health Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Hee; Duffy, Sonia A

    The objective of this article was to review the utility of established behavior theories, including the Health Belief Model, Theory of Reasoned Action, Theory of Planned Behavior, Transtheoretical Model, and Health Promotion Model, for addressing multiple health behaviors among people who smoke. It is critical to design future interventions for multiple health behavior changes tailored to individuals who currently smoke, yet it has not been addressed. Five health behavior theories/models were analyzed and critically evaluated. A review of the literature included a search of PubMed and Google Scholar from 2010 to 2016. Two hundred sixty-seven articles (252 studies from the initial search and 15 studies from the references of initially identified studies) were included in the analysis. Most of the health behavior theories/models emphasize psychological and cognitive constructs that can be applied only to one specific behavior at a time, thus making them not suitable to address multiple health behaviors. However, the Health Promotion Model incorporates "related behavior factors" that can explain multiple health behaviors among persons who smoke. Future multiple behavior interventions guided by the Health Promotion Model are necessary to show the utility and applicability of the model to address multiple health behaviors.

  17. Beyond the realist turn: a socio-material analysis of heart failure self-care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Allan; Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne; Goldszmidt, Mark; Harkness, Karen; Strachan, Patricia; Lingard, Lorelei

    2018-01-01

    For patients living with chronic illnesses, self-care has been linked with positive outcomes such as decreased hospitalisation, longer lifespan, and improved quality of life. However, despite calls for more and better self-care interventions, behaviour change trials have repeatedly fallen short on demonstrating effectiveness. The literature on heart failure (HF) stands as a case in point, and a growing body of HF studies advocate realist approaches to self-care research and policymaking. We label this trend the 'realist turn' in HF self-care. Realist evaluation and realist interventions emphasise that the relationship between self-care interventions and positive health outcomes is not fixed, but contingent on social context. This paper argues socio-materiality offers a productive framework to expand on the idea of social context in realist accounts of HF self-care. This study draws on 10 interviews as well as researcher reflections from a larger study exploring health care teams for patients with advanced HF. Leveraging insights from actor-network theory (ANT), this study provides two rich narratives about the contextual factors that influence HF self-care. These descriptions portray not self-care contexts but self-care assemblages, which we discuss in light of socio-materiality. © 2018 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  18. Heart Failure: Self-care to Success: Development and evaluation of a program toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Rebecca

    2017-08-17

    The Heart Failure: Self-care to Success toolkit was developed to assist NPs in empowering patients with heart failure (HF) to improve individual self-care behaviors. This article details the evolution of this toolkit for NPs, its effectiveness with patients with HF, and recommendations for future research and dissemination strategies.

  19. Self-care of patients with diabetes mellitus cared for at an emergency service in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquedano, Irasema Romero; dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; Martins, Tatiane Aparecida; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the self-care ability of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and relates it to sociodemographic and clinical variables. The study included 251 patients who were cared for by an emergency service in Mexico, in 2007. Data were obtained through structured interviews held at participants' households, through a form, a questionnaire and the Self-Care Ability Scale. Descriptive and correlation statistics were used for data analysis. The results show that 83 (33.5%) individuals displayed good self-care ability and 168 (66.5%) individuals displayed regular ability. A directly proportional correlation was found between self-care ability and schooling (r=0.124; pdiabetes mellitus displayed regular ability for self-care. Self-care ability is related to multiple variables that should be taken into account by health professionals when suggesting educational programs.

  20. How general practitioners perceive and assess self-care in patients with multiple chronic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Mads Aage Toft; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Waldorff, Frans Boch

    2017-01-01

    Background: It is not known how general practitioners (GPs) perceive the concept of self-care and how they assess self-care ability in patients with multiple chronic conditions. As a part of the strategy to improve the care of people living with chronic conditions, disease management programs...... in Denmark require GPs and other health care workers to assess and support patients' self-care ability. The aim of the present study was to explore GPs' perceptions and assessment of self-care ability in patients with multiple chronic conditions who have difficulty following a given treatment. Methods...

  1. Stress, self-esteem and well-being among female health professionals: A randomized clinical trial on the impact of a self-care intervention mediated by the senses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliseth Ribeiro Leão

    Full Text Available Stress levels are evident among health professionals. However, there are few studies on sensory-based self-care aimed at stress management, self-esteem and subjective well-being in this group of professionals.To assess the impact of a self-care intervention mediated by the senses on the stress levels, self-esteem and well-being of health professionals in a hospital environment.A total of 93 health professionals participated in an unblinded clinical trial, randomized into four groups: 1 control (no intervention; 2 Monosensory-daily body moisturizing (DBM with odorless cream; 3 Bisensory-DBM with scented cream; 4 Multisensory-DBM with scented cream associated with audiovisual material. Participants answered specific questionnaires to assess stress, self-esteem and well-being and cortisol samples were collected at baseline, 15 and 30 days following intervention, and at the 30-day follow-up.Self-care was characterized as neglected, with most participants reporting inadequate hours of sleep (74%, irregular physical activity (68%, and inadequate nutrition (45%. Compared to the other groups, the Bisensory group had lower stress on all three assessments (p = 0.017; 0.012; 0.036, a life satisfaction 8% higher at follow-up than at baseline (95% CI: 2% to 15%, p = 0.016, a 10% increase in positive affect (95% CI: 2% to 19%, p = 0.011 and a 12% reduction in negative affect (95% CI: 3% to 21% less, p = 0.014 after 30 days. The Multisensory group showed improvement in self-esteem (p = 0.012 and reduced cortisol (p = 0.036 after 30 days of intervention. The control group showed no changes in the variables studied, except for cortisol: an increase at the 15-day evaluation (denoting higher risk for stress, p = 0.009 and a reduction at follow-up (p = 0.028, which was nevertheless within normal levels.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02406755.

  2. Cardiac rehabilitation with a nurse case manager (GoHeart across local and regional health authorities improves risk factors, self-care and psychosocial outcomes. A one-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibeke Brogaard Hansen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives In Denmark, the local and regional health authorities share responsibility for cardiac rehabilitation (CR. The objective was to assess effectiveness of CR across sectors coordinated by a nurse case manager (NCM. Design A one-year follow-up study. Setting A CR programme (GoHeart was evaluated in a cohort at Lillebaelt Hospital Vejle, DK from 2010 to 2011. Participants Consecutive patients admitted to CR were included. The inclusion criteria were the event of acute myocardial infarction or stable angina and invasive revascularization (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF ≥45%. Main outcome measures Cardiac risk factors, stratified self-care and self-reported psychosocial factors (SF12 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS were assessed at admission (phase IIa, at three months at discharge (phase IIb and at one-year follow-up (phase III. Intention-to-treat and predefined subgroup analysis on sex was performed. Results Of 241 patients, 183 (75.9% were included (mean age 63.8 years. At discharge improvements were found in total-cholesterol ( p  < 0.001, low density lipoprotein (LDL; p  < 0.001, functional capacities (metabolic equivalent of tasks (METS, p  < 0.01, self-care management ( p  < 0.001, Health status Short Form 12 version (SF12; physical; p  < 0.001 and mental; p  < 0.01 and in depression symptoms ( p  < 0.01. At one-year follow-up these outcomes were maintained; additionally there was improvement in body mass index (BMI; p  < 0.05, and high density lipoprotein (HDL; p  < 0.05. There were no sex differences. Conclusion CR shared between local and regional health authorities led by a NCM (GoHeart improves risk factors, self-care and psychosocial factors. Further improvements in most variables were at one-year follow-up.

  3. The Situation-Specific Theory of Heart Failure Self-Care: Revised and Updated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegel, Barbara; Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Faulkner, Kenneth M

    2016-01-01

    Since the situation-specific theory of heart failure (HF) self-care was published in 2008, we have learned much about how and why patients with HF take care of themselves. This knowledge was used to revise and update the theory. The purpose of this article was to describe the revised, updated situation-specific theory of HF self-care. Three major revisions were made to the existing theory: (1) a new theoretical concept reflecting the process of symptom perception was added; (2) each self-care process now involves both autonomous and consultative elements; and (3) a closer link between the self-care processes and the naturalistic decision-making process is described. In the revised theory, HF self-care is defined as a naturalistic decision-making process with person, problem, and environmental factors that influence the everyday decisions made by patients and the self-care actions taken. The first self-care process, maintenance, captures those behaviors typically referred to as treatment adherence. The second self-care process, symptom perception, involves body listening, monitoring signs, as well as recognition, interpretation, and labeling of symptoms. The third self-care process, management, is the response to symptoms when they occur. A total of 5 assumptions and 8 testable propositions are specified in this revised theory. Prior research illustrates that all 3 self-care processes (ie, maintenance, symptom perception, and management) are integral to self-care. Further research is greatly needed to identify how best to help patients become experts in HF self-care.

  4. Student Perceptions of and Confidence in Self-Care Course Concepts Using Team-based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, Tracy R; Gryka, Rebecca; Kiersma, Mary E; Todt, Abby L; Cailor, Stephanie M; Chen, Aleda M H

    2016-04-25

    Objective. To evaluate changes in student perceptions of and confidence in self-care concepts after completing a team-based learning (TBL) self-care course. Methods. Team-based learning was used at two universities in first professional year, semester-long self-care courses. Two instruments were created and administered before and after the semester. The instruments were designed to assess changes in student perceptions of self-care using the theory of planned behavior (TPB) domains and confidence in learning self-care concepts using Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory. Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to evaluate pre/post changes, and Mann Whitney U tests were used to evaluate university differences. Results. Fifty-three Cedarville University and 58 Manchester University students completed both instruments (100% and 92% response rates, respectively). Student self-care perceptions with TPB decreased significantly on nine of 13 items for Cedarville and decreased for one of 13 items for Manchester. Student confidence in self-care concepts improved significantly on all questions for both universities. Conclusion. Data indicate TBL self-care courses were effective in improving student confidence about self-care concepts. Establishing students' skill sets prior to entering the profession is beneficial because pharmacists will use self-directed learning to expand their knowledge and adapt to problem-solving situations.

  5. The knowledge and practice of self-care management among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Self-care management in diabetic patients is crucial to control and ... Rwanda Journal Series F: Medicine and Health Sciences Vol. 2 No. 1, 2015 .... the shoes, and 63% (n=51) checked their feet every day as a matter of principle.

  6. Cardiac rehabilitation with a nurse case manager (GoHeart) across local and regional health authorities improves risk factors, self-care and psychosocial outcomes. A one-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Vibeke Brogaard; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark, the local and regional health authorities share responsibility for cardiac rehabilitation (CR). The objective was to assess effectiveness of CR across sectors coordinated by a nurse case manager (NCM). A one-year follow-up study. A CR programme (GoHeart) was evaluated in a cohort at Lillebaelt Hospital Vejle, DK from 2010 to 2011. Consecutive patients admitted to CR were included. The inclusion criteria were the event of acute myocardial infarction or stable angina and invasive revascularization (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥45%). Cardiac risk factors, stratified self-care and self-reported psychosocial factors (SF12 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)) were assessed at admission (phase IIa), at three months at discharge (phase IIb) and at one-year follow-up (phase III). Intention-to-treat and predefined subgroup analysis on sex was performed. Of 241 patients, 183 (75.9%) were included (mean age 63.8 years). At discharge improvements were found in total-cholesterol (p management (p < 0.001), Health status Short Form 12 version (SF12; physical; p < 0.001 and mental; p < 0.01) and in depression symptoms (p < 0.01). At one-year follow-up these outcomes were maintained; additionally there was improvement in body mass index (BMI; p < 0.05), and high density lipoprotein (HDL; p < 0.05). There were no sex differences. CR shared between local and regional health authorities led by a NCM (GoHeart) improves risk factors, self-care and psychosocial factors. Further improvements in most variables were at one-year follow-up.

  7. The impact of a multidisciplinary self-care management program on quality of life, self-care, adherence to anti-hypertensive therapy, glycemic control, and renal function in diabetic kidney disease: A Cross-over Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helou, Nancy; Talhouedec, Dominique; Shaha, Maya; Zanchi, Anne

    2016-07-19

    Diabetic kidney disease, a global health issue, remains associated with high morbidity and mortality. Previous research has shown that multidisciplinary management of chronic disease can improve patient outcomes. The effect of multidisciplinary self-care management on quality of life and renal function of patients with diabetic kidney disease has not yet been well established. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of a multidisciplinary self-care management program on quality of life, self-care behavior, adherence to anti-hypertensive treatment, glycemic control, and renal function of adults with diabetic kidney disease. A uniform balanced cross-over design is used, with the objective to recruit 40 adult participants with diabetic kidney disease, from public and private out-patient settings in French speaking Switzerland. Participants are randomized in equal number into four study arms. Each participant receives usual care alternating with the multidisciplinary self- care management program. Each treatment period lasts three months and is repeated twice at different time intervals over 12 months depending on the cross-over arm. The multidisciplinary self-care management program is led by an advanced practice nurse and adds nursing and dietary consultations and follow-ups, to the habitual management provided by the general practitioner, the nephrologist and the diabetologist. Data is collected every three months for 12 months. Quality of life is measured using the Audit of Diabetes-Dependent Quality of Life scale, patient self-care behavior is assessed using the Revised Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities, and adherence to anti-hypertensive therapy is evaluated using the Medication Events Monitoring System. Blood glucose control is measured by the glycated hemoglobin levels and renal function by serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. Data will be analyzed using STATA version 14. The cross

  8. [Evaluation of a self-care leaflet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lystad, N; Heian, F

    1989-01-20

    A self care leaflet of 50 pages was distributed in Tingvoll, a municipality with 3,500 inhabitants. The leaflet gives advice about self treatment and prevention of common health problems, and guidelines for contacting the health services. In surveys conducted just before and 10 months after the distribution, we documented -- how the leaflet was accepted and used --changes in knowledge about the health problems mentioned in the leaflet. The leaflet was well accepted. It was characterized as easy to read and to use. 10 months after distribution to read and to use. 10 months after distribution 90% found it within five minutes. 63% used the leaflet when they had a health problem. 90% of those using the leaflet felt more sure that they acted correctly after consulting it, and 60% changed their mind about consulting a general practitioner. We consider the level of knowledge about health problems to be low. The evaluation showed increased knowledge in all groups, except for persons "responsible for caring for elderly relatives". The increase was most marked for "men" and for "persons with health education".

  9. Self-care coping strategies in people with diabetes: a qualitative exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Sullivan Tony

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of diabetes self-care is largely the responsibility of the patient. With more emphasis on the prevention of complications, adherence to diabetes self-care regimens can be difficult. Diabetes self-care requires the patient to make many dietary and lifestyle changes. This study will explore patient perceptions of diabetes self-care, with particular reference to the burden of self-care and coping strategies among patients. Methods A maximum variation sample of 17 patients was selected from GP practices and diabetes clinics in Ireland to include patients with types 1 and 2 diabetes, various self-care regimens, and a range of diabetes complications. Data were collected by in-depth interviews; which were tape-recorded and transcribed. The transcripts were analysed using open and axial coding procedures to identify main categories, and were reviewed by an independent corroborator. Discussion of the results is made in the theoretical context of the health belief, health value, self-efficacy, and locus of control frameworks. Results Patients' perceptions of their self-care varied on a spectrum, displaying differences in self-care responsibilities such as competence with dietary planning, testing blood sugar and regular exercise. Three patient types could be distinguished, which were labeled: "proactive manager," a patient who independently monitors blood glucose and adjusts his/her self-care regime to maintain metabolic control; "passive follower," a patient who follows his/her prescribed self-care regime, but does not react autonomously to changes in metabolic control; and "nonconformist," a patient who does not follow most of his/her prescribed self-care regimen. Conclusion Patients have different diabetes self-care coping strategies which are influenced by their self-care health value and consequently may affect their diet and exercise choices, frequency of blood glucose monitoring, and compliance with prescribed

  10. Veterans Health Administration Behavioral Health Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of VHA hospitals with behavioral health measure data. VHA reports data on a set of core performance measures for Hospital-Based Inpatient Psychiatric Services...

  11. Self-care self-efficacy, religious participation and depression as predictors of poststroke self-care among underserved ethnic minorities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne M. Robertson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Underserved ethnic minorities have multiple chronic disease risk factors, including tobacco, alcohol and substance use, which contribute to increased incidence of stroke. Self-efficacy (self-care self-efficacy, religious participation and depression may directly and indirectly influence engagement in post stroke self-care behaviors. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of self-care self-efficacy, religious participation and depression, on tobacco, alcohol and substance use in a sample of largely ethnic minority, underserved stroke survivors (n=52. Participants previously recruited for a culturally tailored secondary stroke prevention self-care intervention were included. The treatment group received three stroke self-care sessions. The usual care group completed assessments only. Both groups were included in these analyses. Main outcome measures included tobacco, alcohol and substance use. Self-care self-efficacy, religious participation and depression were also assessed. Logistic regression analyses, using self-efficacy, religious practice and depression as the referents, were used to predict binary outcomes of tobacco, alcohol and substance use at 4-weeks post-stroke. Higher depression and self-care self-efficacy were associated with reduced odds of smoking and substance use. Greater participation in religious activities was associated with lower odds of alcohol use. We can conclude that incorporating depression treatment and techniques to increase self-care self-efficacy, and encouraging religious participation may help to improve stroke self-care behaviors for underserved and low socioeconomic status individuals. Results are discussed in the context of stroke self-management.

  12. Guidelines to facilitate self-care among older persons in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinda Rabie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The number of older persons is growing at an alarming rate, yet the South African healthcare sector is not giving this issue the required attention. Moreover, the healthcare sector serves four-fifths of the country's population and primary healthcare (PHC facilities are overcrowded, and thus professional nurses are prevented from providing sufficient self-care health education to older persons. Aim: To develop guidelines for the three role players — the public health sector, professional nurse and older person — to facilitate self-care among older persons in South Africa. Design: Quantitative, descriptive, explorative and contextual research design. Methods: A literature review followed by a self-care assessment of a sample of older persons using the Appraisal of Self-care Agency (ASA-A and Exercise of Self-care Agency (ESCA questionnaires which led to the identification of conclusions and self-care deficits. Results: Based on Menon's psychological health empowerment model, and from the conclusions and self-care deficits, nine self-care guidelines were developed for the public health sector, professional nurses and older persons. Conclusion: This is the first systematic development of guidelines to facilitate self-care among older persons in South Africa. Implications for practice: The implementation of the self-care guidelines by the public health sector, professional nurses and older persons will improve the healthcare of older persons at home which will in turn improve their quality of life, reduce unintentional self-neglect, as well as assist in alleviating overcrowding in clinics because unnecessary visits to the clinic will drop.

  13. How general practitioners perceive and assess self-care in patients with multiple chronic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Mads Aage Toft; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Waldorff, Frans Boch

    2017-01-01

    in Denmark require GPs and other health care workers to assess and support patients' self-care ability. The aim of the present study was to explore GPs' perceptions and assessment of self-care ability in patients with multiple chronic conditions who have difficulty following a given treatment. METHODS...... text condensation. RESULTS: Most GPs in our study had a health-related perception of self-care, but some had a broader perception encompassing the situational context of the patient's life. The GPs' assessments of patients' self-care ability were based on information from the ongoing and often long...... and do not consider whether a relationship with the patient is established. If GPs' perceptions and assessments of self-care ability are not included in chronic disease management models, there is a risk that they vill be insufficiently implemented in general practice....

  14. Peer Positive Social Control and Men's Health-Promoting Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Janie; Meunier, Sophie; Coulombe, Simon; Mercerat, Coralie; Gaboury, Isabelle; Tremblay, Gilles; de Montigny, Francine; Cloutier, Lyne; Roy, Bernard; Auger, Nathalie; Lavoie, Brigitte

    2017-09-01

    Men are generally thought to be less inclined to take care of their health. To date, most studies about men's health have focused on deficits in self-care and difficulties in dealing with this sphere of their life. The present study reframes this perspective, using a salutogenic strengths-based approach and seeking to identify variables that influence men to take care of their health, rather than neglect it. This study focuses on the association between peer positive social control and men's health behaviors, while controlling for other important individual and social determinants (sociodemographic characteristics, health self-efficacy, home neighborhood, spousal positive social control, and the restrictive emotionality norm). In a mixed-method study, 669 men answered a self-reported questionnaire, and interviews were conducted with a maximum variation sample of 31 men. Quantitative results indicated that, even after controlling for sociodemographic variables and other important factors, peer positive social control was significantly associated with the six health behaviors measured in the study (health responsibility, nutrition, physical activity, interpersonal relations, stress management, and spirituality). Interview results revealed that peer positive social control influenced men's health behaviors through three different mechanisms: shared activity, being inspired, and serving as a positive role model for others. In summary, friends and coworkers could play a significant role in promoting various health behaviors among adult men in their daily life. Encouraging men to socialize and discuss health, and capitalizing on healthy men as role models appear to be effective ways to influence health behavior adoption among this specific population.

  15. How do informal self-care strategies evolve among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease managed in primary care? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apps, Lindsay D; Harrison, Samantha L; Williams, Johanna E A; Hudson, Nicky; Steiner, Michael; Morgan, Mike D; Singh, Sally J

    2014-01-01

    There is much description in the literature of how patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) manage their breathlessness and engage in self-care activities; however, little of this is from the perspective of those with less severe disease, who are primarily managed in primary care. This study aimed to understand the self-care experiences of patients with COPD who are primarily managed in primary care, and to examine the challenges of engaging in such behaviors. Semistructured interviews were carried out with 15 patients with COPD as part of a larger project evaluating a self-management intervention. Thematic analysis was supported by NVivo software (version 8, QSR International, Melbourne, Australia). Three main themes are described, ie, experiencing and understanding symptoms of COPD, current self-care activities, and the importance of family perceptions in managing COPD. Self-care activities evolved spontaneously as participants experienced symptoms of COPD. However, there was a lack of awareness about whether these strategies would impact upon symptoms. Perceptions of COPD by family members posed a challenge to self-care for some participants. Health care professionals should elicit patients' prior disease experiences and utilize spontaneous attempts at disease management in future self-management. These findings have implications for promoting self-management and enhancing quality of life.

  16. Exploring Self-Care and Preferred Supports for Adult Parents in Recovery from Substance Use Disorders: Qualitative Findings from a Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynor, Phyllis A; Pope, Charlene; York, Janet; Smith, Gigi; Mueller, Martina

    2017-11-01

    Very little is known about the self-care behaviors (SCB) that adult parents employ and the preferred supports they utilize to maintain their recovery from substance use disorders (SUD) while also parenting their children. This study used a qualitative descriptive approach to explore perceptions of self-care and parenting to inform future self-care interventions for parents in early recovery. Nineteen mothers and fathers of at least one child between the ages of 6-18 were interviewed by telephone about parental self-care practices while in recovery from SUD, recovery management, and preferred supports in the community. Participants described the experience of parenting as challenging, with variations in the level of support and resources. Self-care included meaningful connection with recovery support and children, taking care of physical health, maintaining spirituality, healthy eating, exercise, journaling, continuing education, staying busy, sponsorship, establishing boundaries, self-monitoring, abstinence, and dealing with destructive emotions. Participants reported SCB as being a critical component of their ongoing recovery and their parenting practices, though differences in SCB by gender and for minorities require further exploration. Parental gains were perceived as benefits of SCB that minimized the negative impact of prior parental drug use on their children.

  17. Making sense of self-care practices at the intersection of severe mental illness and physical health-An Australian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Carolyn; Chester, Polly; Kisely, Steve; Crompton, David; Kendall, Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    The poor physical health of people who experience severe mental illness (SMI) is an important public health issue that has been acknowledged, yet not properly addressed. People who live with SMI perform a myriad of complex tasks in order to take care of their physical health, while receiving unpredictable levels of support and assistance from health professionals. In this qualitative study, we aimed to uncover the kinds of work people with SMI do in order to look after their physical health. In a metropolitan area in Queensland, Australia, 32 people with lived experience of SMI participated in semi-structured, face-to-face interviews. Data were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim and open coded. They were then themed using a constant comparative process. We found that people with SMI were engaged in a "rhythm of life with illness" that consisted of relatively short, acute and chaotic cycles of mental and physical illness, accompanied by much longer mental and physical illness recovery cycles. Participants engaged in three specific types of health-related work to manage these cycles: discovery work (and the associated role of the health professional); sense-making work to meaningfully interpret health and illness; and embedding work to become engaged self-managers of illness and producers of health. We discuss how varying levels of support from health professionals impact consumers' self-management of their physical and mental health; how health professionals influence consumers' experience of treatment burden; and implications for practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Designing self-care for everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdezoto, Nervo; Nunes, Francisco; Grönvall, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Managing chronic conditions can be challenging. People in such conditions, and the people around them, have to: deal with symptoms, adapt to the resulting disability, manage emotions, and change habits to keep the condition under control. Self-care technologies have the potential to support self-care...... and mediate the relationship between patients (and caregivers) and the condition. However, these technologies often disregard the complexity of the settings in which they are used and fail to become integrated in everyday life. In this workshop we will discuss how to design self-care technologies...

  19. Self-Tracking, Social Media and Personal Health Records for Patient Empowered Self-Care. Contribution of the IMIA Social Media Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, C; Hansen, M; Fernandez-Luque, L; Lau, A Y S

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the range of self-tracking devices and social media platforms used by the self-tracking community, and examines the implications of widespread adoption of these tools for scientific progress in health informatics. A literature review was performed to investigate the use of social media and self-tracking technologies in the health sector. An environmental scan identified a range of products and services which were used to exemplify three levels of self-tracking: self-experimentation, social sharing of data and patient controlled electronic health records. There appears to be an increase in the use of self-tracking tools, particularly in the health and fitness sector, but also used in the management of chronic diseases. Evidence of efficacy and effectiveness is limited to date, primarily due to the health and fitness focus of current solutions as opposed to their use in disease management. Several key technologies are converging to produce a trend of increased personal health surveillance and monitoring, social connectedness and sharing, and integration of regional and national health information systems. These trends are enabling new applications of scientific techniques, from personal experimentation to e-epidemiology, as data gathered by individuals are aggregated and shared across increasingly connected healthcare networks. These trends also raise significant new ethical and scientific issues that will need to be addressed, both by health informatics researchers and the communities of self-trackers themselves.

  20. Prostatitis-bacterial - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000395.htm Prostatitis - bacterial - self-care To use the sharing features ... enable JavaScript. You have been diagnosed with bacterial prostatitis . This is an infection of the prostate gland. ...

  1. Nerve damage from diabetes - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000326.htm Nerve damage from diabetes - self-care To use the ... or at other unusual times. Treating and Preventing Nerve Damage from Diabetes Treating diabetic neuropathy can make ...

  2. "Trauma, stress, and self-care in clinical training: Predictors of burnout, decline in health status, secondary traumatic stress symptoms, and compassion satisfaction": Correction to Butler, Carello, and Maguin (2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Reports an error in "Trauma, stress, and self-care in clinical training: Predictors of burnout, decline in health status, secondary traumatic stress symptoms, and compassion satisfaction" by Lisa D. Butler, Janice Carello and Eugene Maguin ( Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy , Advanced Online Publication, Sep 12, 2016, np). In the article, there was an error in Table 4 of the Results. The Outcomes and Predictors columns were not clearly categorized from one another. The corrected table is present in the erratum. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2016-43766-001.) Objective: Courtois and Gold (2009) have called for the inclusion of trauma in the curriculum for all mental health training programs. The present study investigated the impact of trauma-related content, stress, and self-care (SC) on trainees in such a program. Method: The study examined potential risk factors (trauma exposures in training [being faced with or reacting to trauma-related field work experiences and course content] and perceptions of stress in field and coursework) and protective factors (SC effort and importance) in relation to burnout (BO), health status (HS), secondary traumatic stress symptoms (STSS), and compassion satisfaction (CS) among 195 students in a graduate social work training program. Results: All students reported trauma exposures in their field placements and/or coursework, including retraumatization experiences that were associated with higher STSS and BO. Field stress and SC effort were both consistent predictors across outcomes. Higher field stress levels predicted higher BO and STSS, a greater likelihood of decline in HS, and lower CS. Lower SC effort was also associated with higher BO and STSS, and a greater likelihood of decline in HS, while higher SC effort predicted higher CS. Older students, those with traumatized field clients, and those whose field work addressed trauma, also reported higher CS. Conclusions

  3. Older adults' readiness to engage with eHealth patient education and self-care resources: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Nancy P; Hornbrook, Mark C

    2018-03-27

    This study examined access to digital technologies, skills and experience, and preferences for using web-based and other digital technologies to obtain health information and advice among older adults in a large health plan. A primary aim was to assess the extent to which digital divides by race/ethnicity and age group might affect the ability of a large percentage of seniors, and especially those in vulnerable groups, to engage with online health information and advice modalities (eHIA) and mobile health (mHealth) monitoring tools. A mailed survey was conducted with age-sex stratified random samples of English-speaking non-Hispanic white, African-American/black (black), Hispanic/Latino (Latino), Filipino-American (Filipino), and Chinese-American (Chinese) Kaiser Permanente Northern California members who were aged 65-79 years. Respondent data were weighted to the study population for the cross-sectional analyses. Older seniors and black, Latino, and Filipino seniors have less access to digital tools, less experience performing a variety of online tasks, and are less likely to believe that they would be capable of going online for health information and advice compared to younger and white Non-Hispanic seniors. Consequently, they are also less likely to be interested in using eHIA modalities. The same subgroups of seniors that have previously been shown to have higher prevalence of chronic conditions and greater difficulties with healthcare access are also less likely to adopt use of eHIA and mHealth monitoring technologies. At the patient population level, this digital divide is important to take into account when planning health information and chronic disease management programs. At the individual patient level, to provide good patient-centered care, it is important for providers to assess rather than assume digital access, eHealth skills, and preferences prior to recommending use of web-based resources and mHealth tools.

  4. Prescription for natural cures: a self-care guide for treating health problems with natural remedies including diet, nutrition, supplements, and other holistic methods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Balch, James F; Stengler, Mark; Young-Balch, Robin

    2011-01-01

    .... You'll find easy-to-understand discussions of the symptoms and root causes of each health problem along with a proven, natural, customized prescription that may include supplements, herbal medicine...

  5. Health behaviors of postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jasińska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health status and health-related quality of life of postmenopausal women are issues, which nowadays pose a serious challenge to many domains of science. Climacteric symptoms which occur at this stage of life, lower its quality and make a negative contribution to self-reported health status, are mostly observed in a particular group of women. Evaluation of health behaviors performed using a standardized questionnaire, the Health Behavior Inventory (HBI, may help establish a comprehensive diagnosis of women’s health, and thus select effective interventions. A systemic approach to menopause assumes that full fitness of women and good quality of their lives can be maintained not only by means of pharmacotherapy but also other forms of action, especially health education oriented towards changes in the lifestyle and promotion of healthy behaviors. The aim of this study is to perform a HBI-based assessment of women’s health behaviors in such categories as healthy eating habits (HEH, preventive behaviors (PB, positive mental attitudes (PMA, and health practices (HP. Material and methods: The study involved 151 healthy postmenopausal women. A research tool was a standardized questionnaire, the Health Behavior Inventory (HBI. Results: The surveyed women obtained 70% of the maximum score on average, which suggests a medium level of health behaviors in this group. The levels of health behaviors in the categories of positive mental attitudes and health practices significantly differed between older women and their younger counterparts (higher levels were observed among older respondents. There were also significant differences in the levels of healthy behaviors between women with secondary and higher education (those better educated declared healthy behaviors more often. There was no correlation between the level of health behaviors and the BMI of the surveyed women. Conclusions : Older women attached greater

  6. Assessment of Oral Health Knowledge, Attitude and Self-Care Practice Among Adolescents - A State Wide Cross- Sectional Study in Manipur, North Eastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahengbam, Pragya Pandey; Kshetrimayum, Nandita; Wahengbam, Brucelee Singh; Nandkeoliar, Tanya; Lyngdoh, Daiasharailang

    2016-06-01

    The World Health Organization global strategy of promoting oral health have shown vast improvements in developed countries but the scenario is glum among underprivileged communities due to lacunae in implementation of these promotional programs. Manipur, a North Eastern state in India, is one such marginalized area. The study aimed to evaluate Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) towards oral health in 15-18 year adolescents residing in Manipur together with the association of these variables to sociodemographic factors. This cross-sectional study included 810 healthy adolescents drawn from various primary health care centers spanning in all the nine districts of Manipur. A closed ended questionnaire for the purpose of collecting data was used in the survey. Of the total participants 90.9% had high knowledge, 79.8% had favorable attitude and 70.4% had adequate practice towards oral health. Education of the parents and respondents was the only factor significantly associated with all three variables, knowledge, attitude and practice. Significant and positive linear correlation between knowledge-attitude (r=0.369, pknowledge-practice (r=0.405, pknowledge, favorable attitude and sound practice with respect to oral health. A positive linear correlation exists between the knowledge, attitude and practice. Evidence based reinforcement programs should be introduced to further reduce the gap between knowledge, attitude and practice. The study will also serve as a reference value for use in future evaluation to help measure the effectiveness of the planned activities. Future research needs to focus on establishing the dental caries prevalence and oral hygiene status of Manipuri youth.

  7. Self-care essential extras: an integration of holistic nursing, functional medicine, and health coaching to promote therapeutic lifestyle change and decrease chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scattergood, Donna M

    2010-01-01

    The Essential Vitality Program blends holistic nursing, functional medicine, and health coaching to promote lifestyle changes that modify risk factors of costly chronic disease. Karl is a client who experienced enhanced vitality, decreased chronic pain and medications use, and improved meaningful functioning, by partnering with a holistic nurse coach.

  8. EFFECTS OF AROMATHERAPY FOR SELF-CARE DURING PREGNANCY

    OpenAIRE

    Igarashi, Toshiko; Fujita, Mineko

    2010-01-01

    Stress reduction care is important for pregnant women to decrease obstetric complications and children's health problems after birth. We investigated the long-term effects during pregnancy of daily self-care with aromatherapy using essential oils containing linalyl acetate and linalool. We randomly assigned 16 healthy pregnant women into an aromatherapy group and a control group. Nine participants were assigned to the aromatherapy group and seven participants to the control group. Interventio...

  9. [Heart failure in primary care: Attitudes, knowledge and self-care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadó-Hernández, Cristina; Cosculluela-Torres, Pilar; Blanes-Monllor, Carmen; Parellada-Esquius, Neus; Méndez-Galeano, Carmen; Maroto-Villanova, Neus; García-Cerdán, Rosa Maria; Núñez-Manrique, M Pilar; Barrio-Ruiz, Carmen; Salvador-González, Betlem

    2018-04-01

    To determine the attitudes, knowledge, and self-care practices in patients with heart failure (HF) in Primary Care, as well as to identify factors associated with better self-care. Cross-sectional and multicentre study. Primary Care. Subjects over 18 years old with HF diagnosis, attended in 10 Primary Health Care Centres in the Metropolitan Area of Barcelona. Self-care was measured using the European Heart Failure Self-Care Behaviour Scale. Sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, tests on attitudes (Self-efficacy Managing Chronic Disease Scale), knowledge (Patient Knowledge Questionnaire), level of autonomy (Barthel), and anxiety and depression screening (Goldberg Test), were also gathered in an interview. A multivariate mixed model stratified by centre was used to analyse the adjusted association of covariates with self-care. A total of 295 subjects (77.6%) agreed to participate, with a mean age of 75.6 years (SD: 11), 56.6% women, and 62% with no primary education. The mean self-care score was 28.65 (SD: 8.22), with 25% of patients scoring lower than 21 points. In the final stratified multivariate model (n=282; R 2 conditional=0.3382), better self-care was associated with higher knowledge (coefficient, 95% confidence interval: -1.37; -1.85 to -0.90), and coronary heart disease diagnosis (-2.41; -4.36: -0.46). Self-care was moderate. The correlation of better self-care with higher knowledge highlights the opportunity to implement strategies to improve self-care, which should consider the characteristics of heart failure patients attended in Primary Care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. RESPONSIBLE SELF-CARE – THE FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES AND PLACE IN THE MODERN RUSSIAN HEALTHCARE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Tolpygina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An increase in the prevalence of chronic noncommunicable diseases is a significant problem for both patients and the health system. According to the World Health Organization "Promoting effective responsible self-care ... is essential to reduce the financial burden on health systems". The term "responsible self-care" means "self-help" and "self-care". The concept of responsible self-care is to create conditions and prerequisites for forming a responsible attitude to own health, children's and family's health by maintaining a healthy lifestyle, wider and more competent use of over-the-counter medication for the prevention or self-care of the trifling ailment and chronic non-communicable diseases, continuing the therapy prescribed by the doctor. Changes in the legislative framework, coordinated activity of medical workers of various levels and specialties, as well as improvement of medical literacy of the population are necessary for the implementation of the practice of responsible self-care in Russia. Promotion of healthy lifestyles and the personal responsibility of people for their health in the media and Internet resources, self-monitoring of the status and basic health indicators, increasing adherence of patients to prescribed medicines for the treatment of chronic diseases based on gained medical know-ledge, skills and habits are the most applicable measures for Russia to date.

  11. Spirituality Self-Care Practices as a Mediator between Quality of Life and Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary L. White

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to develop a midrange theory, building on Orem’s self-care deficit nursing theory (SCDNT to include constructs of religion, spirituality, and spiritual self‑care practices. This mid-range theory, White’s theory of spirituality and spiritual self-care (WTSSSC, was developed and tested as part of a larger study of African American patients with heart failure (HF. The aim of the study was to determine if spiritual self-care practices were mediating the relationship between depression and quality of life for African Americans diagnosed with heart failure. Participants in this study included 142 African Americans diagnosed with HF who were recruited at the clinic where they were being treated. Four instruments were used to measure spiritual self-care practices (White’s Spiritual Self-Care Practice Scale (WSPSCPC, depression symptomology (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9, quality of life (World Health Organization QOL (WHOQOL-Bref, and personal characteristics. Results of the analysis were statistically significant, indicating that spirituality self-care practices were mediating the relationship between depression and quality of life for African American individuals diagnosed with HF. As the population ages and chronic illness becomes more common, nurses need to promote the use of spirituality self-care practices to help patients maintain their well-being.

  12. Hypertension and Diabetes Self-care Activities: A Hospital Based Pilot Survey in Benin City, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbi, O G; Ofili, A N; Oviasu, E

    2015-06-01

    The burden of hypertension and diabetes is on the increase globally with its attendant complications. Although self-care activities are critical to the successful management of both conditions, there are only a few reports on such activities, especially in this part of the world. This pilot study was therefore undertaken to assess the self-care activities among hypertensive and diabetic patients in Benin City. Hypertensive and diabetic patients were consecutively recruited from the out- patient department of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital. The questionnaires were developed based on past assessment scales such as the Hypertension Self-Care Activity Level Effects (H-SCALE) and the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Assessment (SDSCA) for hypertensive and diabetic participants respectively. A total of 85(32 hypertensive, 24 diabetic and 29 co-morbid hypertensive diabetic) participants completed the study. Only 14 (16.5%) subjects had good self-care practice, 39 (45.9%) had fair practice while poor self-care practice was found in 32 (37.6%) subjects. Adherence to medications, clinic adherence, use of self-monitoring devices, regular exercising and dietician contact were generally low. However, only a relatively few subjects smoked tobacco or took significant alcohol. The health-related self-care practice among the patients was generally not good. There was no significant difference in the overall level of self-care among hypertensive, diabetic patients or those with co-morbid conditions. There is need for more aggressive health education aimed at improving the current health-related self-care habits among these patients.

  13. The association between self-care and quality of life in hypertensive patients: findings from the Azar cohort study in the North West of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryamalsadat Kazemi Shishavan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertension affects the quality of life of patients and their caregivers. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and self-care behaviors and health-related quality of life (HRQOL among hypertensive people Methods: All people aged 35 years and older with hypertension were invited to participate in this study. Information on self-care behavior for hypertension (H-scale, and health-related quality of life (WHOHRQOL-BRFF were completed by trained interviewer. Data analysis was done using SPSS 16.Results: The median age of hypertensive patients was 62.5(25th to 75th percentile: 55 to 72 years, the correlation between quality of life and overall self-care scores was not significant(r =-0.048, P =0.520. Physical activity was the only significant predictor for quality of life,showing that the quality of life of hypertensive people increased by 3.371 units per day of being physically active in the cohort study (β =0.223, P<0.01. The only significant predictor of quality of life among the elderly was medication use (β =-0.572, P<0.001. Quality of life of participants decreased 3.456 units per day as a result of medication adherence Conclusion: No association was observed between self-care and HRQOL total score in hypertensive patients in the study. Among the self-care domains, only medication adherence and physical activity had significant association with social health. There was a reverse association between smoking and HRQOL.

  14. Nursing interventions for promoting self-care of persons with type 2 diabetes: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glória Yanne Martins de Oliveira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This is an integrative review aiming at analyzing and identifying the evidence available in the literature on nursing interventions to promote self-care for persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Data collection occurred in the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences (LILACS, MEDLINE (via EBSCO, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL and SCOPUS. The survey of articles occurred in July and August 2015 by two independent reviewers. The initial search identified 239 articles and eight of them met the selection criteria. Health education has emerged as a strategic field for implementing nursing interventions. Interventions with patient monitoring and that provided more care time were more satisfactory regarding self-care practices. The Orem's Self-Care Deficit Theory is indicated as a guide to direct the educator in self-care of diabetic persons.

  15. Self-care agency in systemic lupus erythematosus and its associated factors: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Xie, Xia; Song, Yuqing; Nie, Anliu; Chen, Hong

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the level of self-care agency and explore its associated factors in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this cross-sectional study, all patients were from a tertiary general hospital between July and October 2016 in Southwest China. The self-care agency was assessed using the Exercise of Self-care Agency Scale. Other variables were measured by the Visual Analog Scale, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000, the physical component summary, and mental component summary of the 36-item Short Form Health Survey. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to explore the associated factors of self-care agency. A total of 123 patients were recruited. The mean score of Exercise of Self-care Agency Scale was 86.29. In univariate analysis, self-care agency of patients differed in regard to gender, work status, educational level, household income monthly per capita, and disease activity ( P agency ( P agency. Patients with SLE had a middle level of self-care agency, suggesting that there is still much scope for improvement. The lower level of self-care agency was associated with male gender, lower educational level, lower household income monthly per capita, and worse mental health. Therefore, health care providers should develop targeted and comprehensive interventions to enhance self-care agency in patients with SLE.

  16. Predictors of adherence with self-care guidelines among persons with type 2 diabetes: results from a logistic regression tree analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takashi; Kart, Cary S; Noe, Douglas A

    2012-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes is known to contribute to health disparities in the U.S. and failure to adhere to recommended self-care behaviors is a contributing factor. Intervention programs face difficulties as a result of patient diversity and limited resources. With data from the 2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, this study employs a logistic regression tree algorithm to identify characteristics of sub-populations with type 2 diabetes according to their reported frequency of adherence to four recommended diabetes self-care behaviors including blood glucose monitoring, foot examination, eye examination and HbA1c testing. Using Andersen's health behavior model, need factors appear to dominate the definition of which sub-groups were at greatest risk for low as well as high adherence. Findings demonstrate the utility of easily interpreted tree diagrams to design specific culturally appropriate intervention programs targeting sub-populations of diabetes patients who need to improve their self-care behaviors. Limitations and contributions of the study are discussed.

  17. Atopic dermatitis -- self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C. Evolution of conventional therapy in atopic dermatitis. Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America . 2010;30( ... D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Eczema Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., ...

  18. Neuroeconomics and behavioral health economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    2009-01-01

      Objective: Neuroeconomics integrates behavioral economics, psychology and neuroscience. Recently, this line of research is summarized in a neuroeconomic model (NeM) which addresses behavioral health from a new angle as surveyed in this study. Data and Method Firstly, NeM is used as framework...... for explanation of the neural dynamics of normal decision making. Secondly, the literature is reviewed for evidence on hypothesized applications of NeM in behavioral health. Results I. The present bias as documented by neuroeconomic game-trials is explained by NeM as rooted in the basal activation of Amygdala...... mechanism. In this case neuroeconomics may serve as an evidence-based public monitoring across specific historical meditation settings. Conclusion Neuroeconomics reveal the action-mechanism of dominant behavioral health interventions as integrated home care for patients suffering from stroke, heart failure...

  19. Self-care under the perspective of Occupational Therapy: analysis of scientific production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Célia Titotto Castanharo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This is an exploratory descriptive study aiming to explain how self-care has been addressed by Occupational Therapy (OT. Data collection was carried out by consulting LILACS, SciELO databases and national journals of Occupational Therapy. From 1994 to 2012, twelve articles published by occupational therapists were selected considering the following keywords on abstracts or full texts: occupational therapy, self-care, daily activities or daily life activities. The results were submitted to integrative review and thematic analysis. The categories evidenced were self-care and activities of daily life; autonomy and independence for self-care; and intervention of OT favoring self-care by the individual. The results showed different dimensions of self-care when associated with the individual and private autonomy as well as with professional interdisciplinary practices of OT. The intervention in this area is directed to human performance in the cycles of life, faced with situations of vulnerability, such as disease and social exclusion. Adaptations, modifications, assistive technology resources and/or functional rehabilitation are used to promote the independence of individuals, favoring autonomy and recovery routines. We observed similarities between the conceptions of self-care found in the scientific production of OT and in the Orem’s concepts (1971-2001. In general, health professionals can achieve benefits to the systematization of knowledge that underlie their practice when they articulate them with the knowledge systematized by other areas.

  20. Gestational diabetes - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will create a diet just for you. Your health care provider may ask you to keep track of what you eat. Exercise will help keep your blood sugar under control. A low-impact activity such as walking is a safe and effective type of exercise. Try walking 1 to 2 ...

  1. Relations of behavioral autonomy to health outcomes among emerging adults with and without type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeson, Vicki S; Reynolds, Kerry A; Becker, Dorothy; Escobar, Oscar; Siminerio, Linda

    2014-01-01

    To examine the relation of behavioral autonomy to psychological, behavioral, and physical health among emerging adults with and without type 1 diabetes. High school seniors with (n = 118) and without type 1 diabetes (n = 122) completed online questionnaires for three consecutive years. Behavioral autonomy, psychological health, risk behaviors, and diabetes outcomes were assessed. Regression analyses were conducted to predict Time 2 and 3 outcomes, controlling for Time 1 outcomes. There were no group differences in behavioral autonomy. Behavioral autonomy predicted better psychological health but only for emerging adults without diabetes. Behavioral autonomy was related to increased risk behavior for both groups. Behavioral autonomy was unrelated to self-care but predicted better glycemic control for females. Behavioral autonomy may be beneficial for psychological health, but is related to increased risk behavior. The implications of behavioral autonomy for emerging adults with type 1 diabetes require careful consideration. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Self-care practice in people with sickle cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Bastos Ferreira Tavares

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the application of Orem’s self-care theory in patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA at a regional hematology center. Methods: It is a study of a descriptive nature, with an exploratory and qualitative approach, held at the regional hematology center of an inland municipality of Ceará, Brazil, with patients diagnosed and treated for SCA. The data collection was carried out in May 2014, through an interview applied to patients with sickle cell anemia or their respective legal guardians, conducted while they were in the waiting room for medical care in the institution. The following guiding question was asked: “What are the main precautions you take to prevent the complications of sickle cell disease?”. Data were analyzed according to Bardin’s content analysis technique. Results: It was evidenced that patients lack an accurate knowledge about their disease, thus disadvantaging the primary foundation for self-care. The discovery of the disease usually occurs due to the need for clinical interventions in repeated episodes of pain. The painful events represent the main difficulties and causes of hospitalizations with the search for emergency medical services. Conclusion: The educational actions provided by the multidisciplinary health team make it possible for the SCA patient and caregiver to provide better care by means of self-care activities and actions.

  3. Self-care and depression in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzapfel, Nicole; Löwe, Bernd; Wild, Beate; Schellberg, Dieter; Zugck, Christian; Remppis, Andrew; Katus, Hugo A; Haass, Markus; Rauch, Bernhard; Jünger, Jana; Herzog, Wolfgang; Müller-Tasch, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Although chronic heart failure (CHF) is often complicated by comorbid depression and poor self-care, little is known about their specific association in patients with CHF. To investigate self-care behavior among patients with CHF with different degrees of depression severity. A total of 287 patients with documented CHF, New York Heart Association functional class II to IV, completed the European Heart Failure Self-Care Behavior Scale. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM (SCID) IV served as the criterion standard for the presence of a depressive disorder. Analyses of covariance and linear regression analyses revealed that patients with CHF with minor depression reported significantly lower levels of self-care than patients with major depression (P = .003) and nondepressed patients (P = .014). In addition to minor depression, age (P < or = .001), multimorbidity (P = .01), left ventricular ejection fraction (P = .001), and family status (P = .01) were determinants of self-care. Our results demonstrate that patients with CHF with minor depression and not major depression are at higher risk for poor self-care and its resulting consequences, such as symptom deterioration and frequent hospitalization.

  4. Facilitating factors of self-care among HIV-positive young women in Iran: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskouie, Fatemeh; Kashefi, Farzaneh; Rafii, Forough; Gouya, Mohammad Mehdi; Vahid-Dastjerdi, Marzieh

    2018-02-05

    Background Providing care for chronic disease such as HIV is a growing challenge in the world. In order to address the challenges of linkage and care in chronic disease management, we need to identify factors that can influence people to get more involved in self-care. This study was part of an extensive qualitative study conducted in Tehran, Iran in 2016. Methods The data were collected through semi-structured interviews conducted on 25 women with HIV, and were analyzed using grounded theory. Four main themes were identified as facilitating self-care among participants: health system support, clinicians' support, family support and improved life expectancy. Sub-themes that emerged were free HIV tests; free medication; free membership in positive clubs; free psychological consultation; positive attitudes and friendly behavior from clinic staff; telephone follow up; support from husbands, mothers and peers; hope for recovery; hope for the future; and love for own children. Results Our results showed that, providing appropriate support and services, as well as a positive attitude of society towards HIV positive women, can contribute to adherence to self-care in young women with HIV. Conclusion Understanding the facilitating factors based on the patients' experiences can contribute to the development of new policies and procedures to improve the care of these patients.

  5. Modifying and developing health behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, L W

    1984-01-01

    The literatures on both behavior modification and behavioral development have engendered innovations in public health programs, addressing problems of patient adherance to preventive and therapeutic regimens, delay in seeking diagnosis of illness symptoms, risk-taking behavior, and other aspects of lifestyle associated with health. Because most of this literature derives from psychology, there has been a distinct bias in the construction of interventions, pointing them directly at individuals, usually in a counseling or small group mode of delivery. These developments served public health well enough during a decade or so when the preoccupation was with utilization of health services and medical management of chronic diseases. With the publication of the Lalonde Report in Canada in 1974, the passage of Public Law 94-317 in 1976 in the United States, and similar initiatives in other English-speaking and European countries, the recognition of the greater complexities of lifestyle development and modification in the absence of symptoms has taken hold. Policy makers and public health workers seek a more efficient and equitable set of strategies to meet the behavioral health challenges of modern society without placing the entire weight of responsibility for behavior on the individual or on therapeutic practitioners. Concurrently, on a more global scale and in the developing countries, a concern has emerged for strategies that give individuals, families, and communities a greater role in deciding their own health priorities. The convergence of these two trends--one seeking to distribute responsibility for lifestyle more equitably and the other seeking to distribute responsibility for planning health programs more equitably --calls for policies, strategies, and interventions that will place similar emphasis on health education and organizational, economic, and environmental supports for health behavior. The combination of these elements of support for behavior calls, in

  6. Use of social adaptability index to explain self-care and diabetes outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jennifer A; Walker, Rebekah J; Smalls, Brittany L; Egede, Leonard E

    2017-06-20

    To examine whether the social adaptability index (SAI) alone or components of the index provide a better explanatory model for self-care and diabetes outcomes. Six hundred fifteen patients were recruited from two primary care settings. A series of multiple linear regression models were run to assess (1) associations between the SAI and diabetes self-care/outcomes, and (2) associations between individual SAI indicator variables and diabetes self-care/outcomes. Separate models were run for each self-care behavior and outcome. Two models were run for each dependent variable to compare associations with the SAI and components of the index. The SAI has a significant association with the mental component of quality of life (0.23, p < 0.01). In adjusted analyses, the SAI score did not have a significant association with any of the self-care behaviors. Individual components from the index had significant associations between self-care and multiple SAI indicator variables. Significant associations also exist between outcomes and the individual SAI indicators for education and employment. In this population, the SAI has low explanatory power and few significant associations with diabetes self-care/outcomes. While the use of a composite index to predict outcomes within a diabetes population would have high utility, particularly for clinical settings, this SAI lacks statistical and clinical significance in a representative diabetes population. Based on these results, the index does not provide a good model fit and masks the relationship of individual components to diabetes self-care and outcomes. These findings suggest that five items alone are not adequate to explain or predict outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes.

  7. Diabetes and oral health: the importance of oral health-related behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjirath, Preetha P; Kim, Seung Eun; Rohr Inglehart, Marita

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore oral health-related behavior, how patients with diabetes differ from patients not diagnosed with diabetes in their oral health and whether oral health-related behavior moderates the oral health status of patients with diabetes. Survey and chart review data were collected from 448 patients (52% male, 48% female, average age: 57 years) of which 77 were diagnosed with diabetes (17%). Patients with diabetes had a higher percentage of teeth with mobility than those not diagnosed with diabetes (14% vs. 8%, p=0.023), as well as gingival recession (16% vs. 12%, p=0.035) and more teeth with recession in the esthetic zone (1.17 vs. 0.88, p=0.046). They also had more decayed, missing and filled surfaces due to caries (101 vs. 82, pteeth due to caries (11 vs. 7, pbrushed and flossed less frequently. Patients with diabetes who did not brush regularly had poorer periodontal health (percentage of teeth with probing depth of teeth: 32% vs. 15%, p=0.033) than regularly brushing patients with diabetes. Educating patients with diabetes about the importance of good oral self care needs to become a priority for their oral health care providers.

  8. Self-care among patients enrolled in a self-monitoring blood glucose program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Saraiva Veras

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study checks specific self-care activities of patients with diabetes mellitus enrolled in a self-monitoring blood glucose program from August to December 2012 in two Primary Health Care units in the interior of São Paulo, Brazil. The sample was composed of 74 female and male individuals, aged 18 years old or older. The Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Questionnaire was used. It contains six dimensions: general diet, specific diet, physical activity, blood glucose monitoring, foot care, medication usage, plus three items about smoking. Eight out of the 15 self-care activities were within desirable levels, namely: healthy diet, not eating sweets, blood glucose testing and as frequently as recommended, drying between toes after washing feet, and taking medications (three items. The results enabled the identification of gaps in specific self-care activities among patients with diabetes mellitus.

  9. Consumer attitudes towards computer-assisted self-care of the common cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, J; Wrestler, F

    1994-04-01

    Knowledge of colds and flu and attitudes towards use of computers for self-care are compared for 260 young adult users and 194 young adult non-users of computer-assisted self-care for colds and flu. Participants completed a knowledge questionnaire on colds and flu, used a computer program designed to enhance self-care for colds and flu, and then completed a questionnaire on their attitudes towards using a computer for self-care for colds and flu, and then completed a questionnaire on their attitudes towards using a computer for self-care for colds and flu, perceived importance of physician interactions, physician expertise, and patient-physician communication. Compared with users, non-users preferred personal contact with their physicians and felt that computerized health assessments would be limited in vocabulary and range of current medical information. Non-users were also more likely to agree that people could not be trusted to do an accurate computerized health assessment and that the average person was too computer illiterate to use computers for self-care.

  10. A randomized controlled study to evaluate the effect of pharmacist-led educational intervention on glycemic control, self-care activities and disease knowledge among type 2 diabetes patients: A consort compliant study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhsh, Allah; Nawaz, Muhammad Sarfraz; Ahmed, Hafiz Sajjad; Khan, Tahir Mehmood

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes self-care activities, like, healthy diet, regular exercise, self-monitoring of blood glucose, and rational use of medicines are considered to play a vital role in establishing euglycemia. Health literacy among type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients in Pakistan is very low, which is the most likely cause for poor clinical outcomes. This study is designed to investigate the impact of pharmacist-led educational intervention on glycemic control, self-care activities and disease knowledge among T2DM patients in Pakistan. In this randomized controlled trail, effectiveness of a 6-month pharmacist-led educational intervention will be examined on glycemic control, diabetes self-care activities and disease knowledge of 80 adult T2DM patients (age >30 years) with poorly controlled T2DM (HbA1c> 7%), after randomizing them into intervention and control groups, at diabetes care clinic of Capital Hospital Islamabad, Pakistan. The primary outcome is change in patients' HbA1c, whereas, changes in self-care activities and patients' disease knowledge are the secondary outcomes. After baseline assessment of their self-care activities and disease knowledge by using validated Urdu versions of Diabetes Self-management Questionnaire (DSMQ) and Diabetes Knowledge Questionnaire (DKQ), respectively, interventional group patients will be supplemented with a face-to-face pharmacist-led educational intervention, whereas, the control group will receive usual care. Intervention arm patients will be educated successively at their first follow-up visit (12th week) and telephonically after every 4 weeks. All assessments will be made at baseline and end of trail for both intervention and control groups. Multivariate general linear model will be applied to analyze the effects of the intervention. Glycemic control in T2DM patients requires optimum self-care activities. This study is an attempt to improve self-care behaviors among poorly controlled T2DM patients who are at higher risk of

  11. Self-care among Nursing Students: Determining Constructive Concepts of Self-care using Factor Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Shintani, Keiko

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to clearly defi ne the constructive concepts of self-care among nursing students, in the present study a survey was conducted a survey of 655 individuals, comprised of 260 college nursing students and 395 vocational school nursing students. We found four factors of constructive concepts of self-care among nursing students, which included maintaining diet, coping with stress, maintaining habits and regulating lifestyle patterns, and maintaining interpersonal relationships.

  12. Multimedia psychoeducational interventions to support patient self-care in degenerative conditions: A realist review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Peter; Scott, David; Reid, Joanne; Porter, Sam

    2015-10-01

    Multimedia interventions are increasingly used to deliver information in order to promote self-care among patients with degenerative conditions. We carried out a realist review of the literature to investigate how the characteristics of multimedia psychoeducational interventions combine with the contexts in which they are introduced to help or hinder their effectiveness in supporting self-care for patients with degenerative conditions. Electronic databases (Medline, Science Direct, PSYCHinfo, EBSCO, and Embase) were searched in order to identify papers containing information on multimedia psychoeducational interventions. Using a realist review approach, we reviewed all relevant studies to identify theories that explained how the interventions work. Ten papers were included in the review. All interventions sought to promote self-care behaviors among participants. We examined the development and content of the multimedia interventions and the impact of patient motivation and of the organizational context of implementation. We judged seven studies to be methodologically weak. All completed studies showed small effects in favor of the intervention. Multimedia interventions may provide high-quality information in an accessible format, with the potential to promote self-care among patients with degenerative conditions, if the patient perceives the information as important and develops confidence about self-care. The evidence base is weak, so that research is needed to investigate effective modes of delivery at different resource levels. We recommend that developers consider how an intervention will reduce uncertainty and increase confidence in self-care, as well as the impact of the context in which it will be employed.

  13. Barriers to self-care in women of reproductive age with HIV/AIDS in Iran: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskouie, Fatemeh; Kashefi, Farzaneh; Rafii, Forough; Gouya, Mohammad Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Although increasing attention is paid to HIV/AIDS, patients with HIV still experience several barriers to self-care. These barriers have been previously identified in small quantitative studies on women with HIV, but qualitative studies are required to clarify barriers to self-care. We conducted our study using the grounded theory methodological approach. A total of 28 women with HIV and their family members, were interviewed. The data were analyzed with the Corbin and Strauss method (1998). The key barriers to self-care in women with HIV/AIDS included social stigma, addiction, psychological problems, medication side-effects and financial problems. Women with HIV/AIDS face several barriers to self-care. Therefore, when designing self-care models for these women, social and financial barriers should be identified. Mental health treatment should also be incorporated into such models and patients' access to health care services should be facilitated.

  14. Success in Weight Management Among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Do Perceived Autonomy Support, Autonomous Motivation, and Self-Care Competence Play a Role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, Anne M; Simonsen, Nina; Suominen, Sakari B

    2018-01-01

    Based on self-determination theory (SDT), this study investigated whether the three central SDT variables-perceived autonomy support (from a physician), autonomous motivation and self-care competence-were associated with success in weight management (SWM) among primary care patients with type 2 diabetes when the effect of other important life-context factors was controlled for. Patients participated in a mail survey in 2011. Those who had tried to change their health behavior during the past two years in order to lose weight, either with or without success (n = 1433, mean age 63 years, 50% men), were included in this study. The successors were more autonomously motivated and energetic than the non-successors. Moreover, male gender, younger age, taking oral medication only, and receiving less social support in diabetes care predicted better success. Autonomous motivation predicted SWM; self-care competence also played a role by partly mediating the effect of autonomous motivation on SWM. These results support the idea of SDT that internalizing the value of weight management and its health benefits is necessary for long-term maintenance of health behavior change. Perceived autonomy support was not directly associated with SWM. However, physicians can promote patients' weight management by supporting their autonomous motivation and self-care competence.

  15. Diabetes self-care: lessons from research on the family and broader contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Barbara J

    2003-04-01

    The foundation of diabetes management is the self-care behavior of the patient. All of the systems within which the person with diabetes interacts, as well as the media and broader social and cultural values, affect this self-care behavior. In this article I focus on recent research that has examined the link between relationships in the patient's intimate network (i.e., family and close friends) and in the patient's exchange network (i.e., patient-provider relationship, Internet support). The goal of this review is to identify relational targets associated with self-care behaviors that are potentially modifiable within the diabetes medical care setting. Evidence-based suggestions are made for points of intervention entry, and areas for future research are explored.

  16. Self-Efficacy, Self-Care, and Metabolic Control in Persons with Type 2, Diet and Exercised Controlled Diabetes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Randall, Lisa

    1998-01-01

    .... psychological determinants of self-care and metabolic control must be explored. Self-efficacy (Bandura, 1977) has demonstrated its importance in behavioral modification but has been minimally investigated in diabetes...

  17. Men, bodily control, and health behaviors: the importance of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calasanti, Toni; Pietilä, Ilkka; Ojala, Hanna; King, Neal

    2013-01-01

    To conduct an intersectional analysis of relations between gender and age in the health behaviors of middle-aged men, informed by cross-national comparison between Finland and the United States. Thematic and discourse analysis of data from interviews conducted among professional and working-class, middle-aged men in the U.S. and Finland. Respondents report that middle age inspires them to regard many bodily changes as more than transitory; and they assume a sense of responsibility that can lead to greater self-care. Men reported using such strategies as discipline, routine, and monitoring in their attempts to forestall aging. The men face contradictions: While they may adopt ideologies of masculinity and control and accept responsibility for influencing their health, their bodies may also present them with age-based limitations to their abilities to do so. How men respond to these changes varies by context, including their aging and these nations' different systems of health care. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. BEHAVIORAL HAZARD IN HEALTH INSURANCE*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baicker, Katherine; Mullainathan, Sendhil; Schwartzstein, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental implication of standard moral hazard models is overuse of low-value medical care because copays are lower than costs. In these models, the demand curve alone can be used to make welfare statements, a fact relied on by much empirical work. There is ample evidence, though, that people misuse care for a different reason: mistakes, or “behavioral hazard.” Much high-value care is underused even when patient costs are low, and some useless care is bought even when patients face the full cost. In the presence of behavioral hazard, welfare calculations using only the demand curve can be off by orders of magnitude or even be the wrong sign. We derive optimal copay formulas that incorporate both moral and behavioral hazard, providing a theoretical foundation for value-based insurance design and a way to interpret behavioral “nudges.” Once behavioral hazard is taken into account, health insurance can do more than just provide financial protection—it can also improve health care efficiency. PMID:23930294

  19. Importance of Self-Care in Elderly Adults with Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ydalsys Naranjo Hernández

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a syndrome characterized by hyperglycemia which is caused by an absolute or relative deterioration of insulin secretion. It is a complex process of metabolism of carbohydrates, fats and proteins. It is a disease of prime importance at the level of public health worldwide, especially in the elderly people, as one of the most common non-communicable diseases, and the severity and diversity of its chronic complications. A very important element in relation to the treatment of diabetes mellitus is self-care. This perspective helps these patients to become aware of their own condition, by improving their knowledge and skills oriented toward positive behavior change, allowing them ultimately, reduce the risk of complications.

  20. Depression, distress and self-efficacy: The impact on diabetes self-care practices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassidy Devarajooh

    Full Text Available The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing in Malaysia, and people with diabetes have been reported to suffer from depression and diabetes distress which influences their self-efficacy in performing diabetes self-care practices. This interviewer administered, cross sectional study, conducted in the district of Hulu Selangor, Malaysia, involving 371 randomly selected patients with type 2 diabetes, recruited from 6 health clinics, aimed to examine a conceptual model regarding the association between depression, diabetes distress and self-efficacy with diabetes self-care practices using the partial least square approach of structural equation modeling. In this study, diabetes self-care practices were similar regardless of sex, age group, ethnicity, education level, diabetes complications or type of diabetes medication. This study found that self-efficacy had a direct effect on diabetes self-care practice (path coefficient = 0.438, p<0.001. Self-care was not directly affected by depression and diabetes distress, but indirectly by depression (path coefficient = -0.115, p<0.01 and diabetes distress (path coefficient = -0.122, p<0.001 via self-efficacy. In conclusion, to improve self-care practices, effort must be focused on enhancing self-efficacy levels, while not forgetting to deal with depression and diabetes distress, especially among those with poorer levels of self-efficacy.

  1. [Health behavior change: motivational interviewing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pócs, Dávid; Hamvai, Csaba; Kelemen, Oguz

    2017-08-01

    Public health data show that early mortality in Hungary could be prevented by smoking cessation, reduced alcohol consumption, regular exercise, healthy diet and increased adherence. Doctor-patient encounters often highlight these aspects of health behavior. There is evidence that health behavior change is driven by internal motivation rather than external influence. This finding has led to the concept of motivational interview, which is a person-centered, goal-oriented approach to counselling. The doctor asks targeted questions to elicit the patient's motivations, strengths, internal resources, and to focus the interview around these. The quality and quantity of the patient's change talk is related to better outcomes. In addition, the interview allows the patient to express ambivalent feelings and doubts about the change. The doctor should use various communication strategies to resolve this ambivalence. Furthermore, establishing a good doctor-patient relationship is the cornerstone of the motivational interview. An optimal relationship can evoke change talk and reduce the patient's resistance, which can also result in a better outcome. The goal of the motivational interview is to focus on the 'why' to change health behavior rather than the 'how', and to utilize internal motivation instead of persuasion. This is the reason why motivational interview has become a widely-accepted evidence based approach. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(34): 1331-1337.

  2. Diabetes HealthSense: Resources for Living Well

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on the right track. Cope with Stress and Emotions AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Handouts - Healthy Coping These ... active Manage my weight Cope with stress and emotions Set goals Stop smoking Prevent diabetes-related health ...

  3. Diabetes HealthSense: Resources for Living Well

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cope with Stress and Emotions AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Handouts - Healthy Coping These handouts provide facts, tips, ... professional K-8th grade Community health worker Community organization Age Select one: Child Teen and young adult ...

  4. How does gender influence the recognition of cardiovascular risk and adherence to self-care recommendations?: A study in Polish primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymczyk, Ireneusz; Wojtyna, Ewa; Lukas, Witold; Kępa, Joanna; Pawlikowska, Teresa

    2013-11-01

    Studies have shown a correlation between gender and an ability to change lifestyle to reduce the risk of disease. However, the results of these studies are ambiguous, especially where a healthy lifestyle is concerned. Additionally, health behaviors are strongly modified by culture and the environment. Psychological factors also substantially affect engagement with disease-related lifestyle interventions. This study aimed to examine whether there are differences between men and women in the frequency of health care behavior for the purpose of reducing cardiovascular risk (CVR), as well as cognitive appraisal of this type of risk. We also aimed to identify the psychological predictors of engaging in recommended behavior for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease after providing information about this risk in men and women. A total of 134 consecutive eligible patients in a family practice entered a longitudinal study. At initial consultation, the individual's CVR and associated health burden was examined, and preventive measures were recommended by the physician. Self-care behavior, cognitive appraisal of risk, and coping styles were then assessed using psychological questionnaires. Six months after the initial data collection, the frequency of subjects' self-care behavior was examined. We found an increase in health care behavior after providing information regarding the rate of CVR in both sexes; this increase was greater for women than for men. Women followed self-care guidelines more often than men, particularly for preventive measures and dietary advice. Women were more inclined to recognize their CVR as a challenge. Coping style, cognitive appraisal, age, level of health behaviors at baseline and CVR values accounted for 48% of the variance in adherence to self-care guidelines in women and it was 52% in men. In women, total risk of CVD values were most important, while in men, cognitive appraisal of harm/loss was most important. Different predictors of

  5. Tailoring consumer resources to enhance self-care in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Andrea; Davidson, Patricia; Clark, Robyn; Huang, Nancy; Aho, Zoe

    2009-08-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is associated with high hospitalisation and mortality rates and debilitating symptoms. In an effort to reduce hospitalisations and improve symptoms individuals must be supported in managing their condition. Patients who can effectively self-manage their symptoms through lifestyle modification and adherence to complex medication regimens will experience less hospitalisations and other adverse events. The purpose of this paper is to explain how providing evidence-based information, using patient education resources, can support self-care. Self-care relates to the activities that individuals engage in relation to health seeking behaviours. Supporting self-care practices through tailored and relevant information can provide patients with resources and advice on strategies to manage their condition. Evidence-based approaches to improve adherence to self-care practices in patients with heart failure are not often reported. Low health literacy can result in poor understanding of the information about CHF and is related to adverse health outcomes. Also a lack of knowledge can lead to non-adherence with self-care practices such as following fluid restriction, low sodium diet and daily weighing routines. However these issues need to be addressed to improve self-management skills. Recently the Heart Foundation CHF consumer resource was updated based on evidence-based national clinical guidelines. The aim of this resource is to help consumers improve understanding of the disease, reduce uncertainty and anxiety about what to do when symptoms appear, encourage discussions with local doctors, and build confidence in self-care management. Evidence-based CHF patient education resources promote self-care practices and early detection of symptom change that may reduce hospitalisations and improve the quality of life for people with CHF.

  6. Control in chronic condition self-care management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawn, Sharon; Delany, Toni; Sweet, Linda

    2014-01-01

    of their communication style and the power of their role must improve for client chronic condition self-care management to be achieved. Training on the impacts of control in worker communication and systems where they work must be provided if unbeneficial forms of client dependency are to be overcome and true self......Aim: To examine health worker-client interactions during care planning to understand processes that foster client empowerment and disempowerment. Background: It is unclear how health worker-client exchanges and information sharing through chronic condition care planning currently operate in primary...... health care. Moreover, it is unclear how control in these exchanges either enhances collaborative decision-making, partnership and client empowerment, or works to create client disempowerment and dependency on workers and health services. Design: Critical discourse analysis of qualitative data from...

  7. The Relation Between Depressive Symptoms and Self-Care in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopjani, Idriz; Vehapi, Shemsedin; Gorani, Daut; Imeri, Miradije; Vitoja, Sidita; Tahiri, Shqipe

    2016-12-01

    The depression is a significant problem in patients with diabetes. This research is the first of it's kind conducted in the Republic of Kosovo to determine the prevalence of depression diagnosed in people with diabetes mellitus type 2 (DMT2) and interrelation between depressive symptoms and behavior of diabetes self-care (glucose monitoring, exercise, diet, and self- health care). Research was conducted in the University Clinical Center of Kosovo (UCCK), in Pristine. The sample consisted of 200 individuals. Data collection was done through structured questionnaires. HANDS (Harvard Department of Psychiatry / National Depression Screening Day Scale) questionnaire was used to assess depressive symptoms and DSMQ (The Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire) was used to assess self-care behavior. Data analysis was run through SSPS program, version 21. The results showed that the prevalence of depression in diabetic patients was 66.5% in Kosovo. Being a woman, a resident of rural areas or with low level of education, there were significant predictors and were associated with increased chance of developing the symptoms of major depression. Significant relations were found between major depression and physical activity (phealth care, no significant correlation was found. This paper concluded the involvement of psychological aspect in health care plan for diabetics, in order to reduce the number of individuals affected by depression, to diagnose and to treat these individuals for a better quality of life.

  8. Clinical and socio-demographic determinants of self-care behaviours in patients with heart failure and diabetes mellitus: A multicentre cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausili, Davide; Rebora, Paola; Di Mauro, Stefania; Riegel, Barbara; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Paturzo, Marco; Alvaro, Rosaria; Vellone, Ercole

    2016-11-01

    Self-care is vital for patients with heart failure to maintain health and quality of life, and it is even more vital for those who are also affected by diabetes mellitus, since they are at higher risk of worse outcomes. The literature is unclear on the influence of diabetes on heart failure self-care as well as on the influence of socio-demographic and clinical factors on self-care. (1) To compare self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence of patients with heart failure and diabetes versus those heart failure patients without diabetes; (2) to estimate if the presence of diabetes influences self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence of heart failure patients; (3) to identify socio-demographic and clinical determinants of self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence in patients with heart failure and diabetes. Secondary analysis of data from a multicentre cross-sectional study. Outpatient clinics from 29 Italian provinces. 1192 adults with confirmed diagnosis of heart failure. Socio-demographic and clinical data were abstracted from patients' medical records. Self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence were measured with the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index Version 6.2; each scale has a standardized score from 0 to 100, where a score self-care. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed. Of 1192 heart failure patients, 379 (31.8%) had diabetes. In these 379, heart failure self-care behaviours were suboptimal (means range from 53.2 to 55.6). No statistically significant differences were found in any of the three self-care measures in heart failure patients with and without diabetes. The presence of diabetes did not influence self-care maintenance (p=0.12), self-care management (p=0.21) or self-care confidence (p=0.51). Age (p=0.04), number of medications (p=0.01), presence of a caregiver (p=0.04), family income (p=0.009) and self-care confidence (pself

  9. Patients' Perspectives on Factors that Influence Diabetes Self-Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibazadeh, E; Larijani, B; Shojaeezadeh, D; Rashidian, A; Forouzanfar, Mh; Bartholomew, Lk

    2011-12-01

    Although diabetes mellitus is of high concern in Iran, and the level of control is unacceptable, few qualitative studies have been carried out to reflect the experiences of patients on the barriers and motivators to self-care. This study aimed to explore a culturally based experience of Iranian diabetic patients regarding the personal and environmental barriers to and facilitating factors for diabetes self-care. Six focus groups were conducted among type 2 diabetic patients in the Charity Foundation for Special Diseases' diabetes clinic. Purposeful sampling was used. Newly diagnosed patients (less than six months) and all type 1 diabetic patients were excluded. Three focus groups were held on for each sex. A total of 43 patients participated in the study. Frame-work analysis was used to extract the themes from the data. DATA ANALYSIS SHOWED FIVE MAIN BARRIERS: physical barriers (such as physical effects of diabetes); psychological barriers (such as health beliefs); educational barriers (such as lack of knowledge about diabetes); social barriers (such as group pressure); and care system barriers (such as service availability). Along with the barriers, there were some motivators that the participants mentioned as a stimuli to control their diabetes. They include beliefs about diabetes, perceived responsibility for family, religious beliefs, and the views of significant others. Culturally based interventions are needed to improve diabetes care management in Iran. In addition to personal factors, diabetes health educators should pay attention to the environmental factors when they develop programs.

  10. What Factors Affect Health Seeking Behavior?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reducing cost, disability and death from diseases. (2). However, good health ... The Health Belief Model where the concept is the 'perceived susceptibility', which refers ... behavioral intentions and actions (6). ... integrated behavioral model.

  11. Predictors of Better Self-Care in Patients with Heart Failure after Six Months of Follow-Up Home Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojahn, Melina Maria; Ruschel, Karen Brasil; Nogueira de Souza, Emiliane; Mussi, Cláudia Motta; Naomi Hirakata, Vânia; Nogueira Mello Lopes, Alexandra; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the predictors of better self-care behavior in patients with heart failure (HF) in a home visiting program. This is a longitudinal study nested in a randomized controlled trial (ISRCTN01213862) in which the home-based educational intervention consisted of a six-month followup that included four home visits by a nurse, interspersed with four telephone calls. The self-care score was measured at baseline and at six months using the Brazilian version of the European Heart Failure Self-Care Behaviour Scale. The associations included eight variables: age, sex, schooling, having received the intervention, social support, income, comorbidities, and symptom severity. A simple linear regression model was developed using significant variables (P ≤ 0.20), followed by a multivariate model to determine the predictors of better self-care. One hundred eighty-eight patients completed the study. A better self-care behavior was associated with patients who received intervention (P < 0.001), had more years of schooling (P = 0.016), and had more comorbidities (P = 0.008). Having received the intervention (P < 0.001) and having a greater number of comorbidities (P = 0.038) were predictors of better self-care. In the multivariate regression model, being in the intervention group and having more comorbidities were a predictor of better self-care. PMID:24083023

  12. Ongoing ostomy self-care challenges of long-term rectal cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulkley, Joanna E; McMullen, Carmit K; Grant, Marcia; Wendel, Christopher; Hornbrook, Mark C; Krouse, Robert S

    2018-05-29

    Surgical treatment for rectal cancer (RC) can result in an intestinal ostomy that requires lifelong adaptation and investment of physical, cognitive, and financial resources. However, little is known about the extent of ongoing challenges related to ostomy self-care among long-term RC survivors. We analyzed the prevalence of self-reported ostomy self-care challenges and the physical and environmental factors that can support or undermine ostomy self-care. We mailed surveys to long-term (≥ 5 years post-diagnosis) RC survivors, including 177 adults with ostomies who were members of integrated health systems in northern California, Oregon, and Washington State. Potential participants were identified through tumor registries. Data were also extracted from electronic health records. The response rate was 65%. The majority of respondents were male (67%), and the mean age was 75 years. Sixty-three percent of respondents reported at least one ostomy self-care challenge. The most common challenges were leakage or skin problems around the ostomy and needing to change the pouching system too frequently. Twenty-two percent reported difficulty caring for their ostomy. Younger age and higher BMI were consistently related to ostomy self-care challenges. The majority of RC survivors reported ostomy-related self-care challenges, and 31% experienced problems across multiple domains of ostomy self-care. In addition, most survivors reported significant physical challenges that could lead to ostomy-related disability. Although the participants surveyed had access to ostomy care nurses, the care gaps we found suggest that additional work is needed to understand barriers to ostomy care, reduce unmet needs, and improve well-being among this group.

  13. How general practitioners perceive and assess self-care in patients with multiple chronic conditions: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Mads Aage Toft; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Waldorff, Frans Boch; Guassora, Ann Dorrit

    2017-12-22

    It is not known how general practitioners (GPs) perceive the concept of self-care and how they assess self-care ability in patients with multiple chronic conditions. As a part of the strategy to improve the care of people living with chronic conditions, disease management programs in Denmark require GPs and other health care workers to assess and support patients' self-care ability. The aim of the present study was to explore GPs' perceptions and assessment of self-care ability in patients with multiple chronic conditions who have difficulty following a given treatment. A qualitative study conducted through in-depth, semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of 12 GPs in rural areas of Denmark with economically disadvantaged populations. The interviews involved 36 complex patient cases selected by the GPs themselves. Our analysis followed the principles of systematic text condensation. Most GPs in our study had a health-related perception of self-care, but some had a broader perception encompassing the situational context of the patient's life. The GPs' assessments of patients' self-care ability were based on information from the ongoing and often long-term relationships with the patients. GPs identified four major factors that influenced patients' self-care ability, which accumulated and fluctuated over time: multimorbidity, cognitive resources, material resources, and the patients' social contexts. The GPs in this study had dual perceptions of self-care, related to both the chronic health conditions and to the broader situational contexts of their patients' lives. GPs' assessments of self-care ability depended largely on their experiences from the doctor-patient relationship, and they emphasized that the factors affecting self-care ability were highly dynamic over the patient's lifetime. However, these findings might be resisted by the Danish disease management programs, which tend to have a static and more narrow, health-related view of patient self-care

  14. Motivational techniques to improve self-care in hemophilia: the need to support autonomy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérubé, Sarah; Mouillard, Florine; Amesse, Claudine; Sultan, Serge

    2016-01-11

    In pediatric hemophilia, caregivers are facing unique challenges to adherence and self-care in children and adolescents with hemophilia. Hemophilia treatment requires adequate prophylaxis and on-demand treatment, as well as a clear behavioral strategy to limit risk-taking in terms of physical exercise and diet. Medication adherence rates of hemophilia patients have been reported to decrease during late childhood and adolescence. In the developing child, moving safely from parent-care to self-care is one of the greatest challenges of integrative care within this domain. There is a clear need for initiatives designed to increase an individual's motivation for treatment and self-care activities. Among motivational approaches, the self-determination perspective offers a useful framework to explain how the transition to self-care can be facilitated. We discuss how motivation regarding hemophilia treatment may be increased through parental autonomy support and we offer examples of applied communication techniques to facilitate autonomy-supportive caregiving. Although it has not yet been tested in the context of hemophilia, these communication techniques could potentially help caregivers promote adherence and self-care in children. Confronted by unique challenges to adherence and self-care, caregivers of children with hemophilia should move from an exclusive focus on illness-management education to an integrative strategy, including motivation-enhancing communication. The self-determination perspective provides important proximal objectives (e.g. autonomy support) to maintain optimal adherence in adolescents as they move from parent-care to self-care. Future research initiatives should address the practice of these communication techniques and evaluate them in the context of hemophilia.

  15. Low literacy self-care management patient education for a multi-lingual heart failure population: Results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Chyun, Deborah; Caridi, Cristina; Gregory, Jill K; Katz, Stuart

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to test the impact of language-free, low literacy self-care management patient education materials in an ethnically diverse multilingual heart failure (HF) population. A one group pre-test-post-test design measured changes in self-care, knowledge and health-related quality of life (HRQL) after a 1 month intervention using language-free, low literacy self-care management patient education materials and delivered by a health educator. The ethnically diverse sample (n=21) was predominately male (72%), 48% Black, 42% Hispanic, and 28% marginal/inadequate literacy. There were significant improvements in self-care and knowledge but not HRQL. Language-free, low literacy self-care patient education may facilitate improved self-care and knowledge in diverse populations who are at risk for poor HF outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Self-Care and Self-Help Groups for the Elderly: A Directory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. on Aging (DHHS/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This document notes that, as health care costs continue to rise, the elderly are monitoring themselves as a means of cost containment, and as a way of enhancing their sense of well-being and their ability to lead active lives. It points out that more and more organizations are sponsoring health programs that promote the concept of self-care and…

  17. How behavioral science can advance digital health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoto, Sherry; Bennett, Gary G

    2013-09-01

    The field of behavioral science has produced myriad data on health behavior change strategies and leveraged such data into effective human-delivered interventions to improve health. Unfortunately, the impact of traditional health behavior change interventions has been heavily constrained by patient and provider burden, limited ability to measure and intervene upon behavior in real time, variable adherence, low rates of implementation, and poor third-party coverage. Digital health technologies, including mobile phones, sensors, and online social networks, by being available in real time, are being explored as tools to increase our understanding of health behavior and to enhance the impact of behavioral interventions. The recent explosion of industry attention to the development of novel health technologies is exciting but has far outpaced research. This Special Section of Translational Behavioral Medicine, Smartphones, Sensors, and Social Networks: A New Age of Health Behavior Change features a collection of studies that leverage health technologies to measure, change, and/or understand health behavior. We propose five key areas in which behavioral science can improve the impact of digital health technologies on public health. First, research is needed to identify which health technologies actually impact behavior and health outcomes. Second, we need to understand how online social networks can be leveraged to impact health behavior on a large scale. Third, a team science approach is needed in the developmental process of health technologies. Fourth, behavioral scientists should identify how a balance can be struck between the fast pace of innovation and the much slower pace of research. Fifth, behavioral scientists have an integral role in informing the development of health technologies and facilitating the movement of health technologies into the healthcare system.

  18. Teaching strategies for self-care of the intestinal stoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína da Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Teaching self-care must ensure the intestinal stoma patient more independence concerning the family and health professionals. The planning involves the assessment of the clinical and socio-demographic data, and the conditions for the self-care. This study aimed at identifying strategies to teach self-care for intestinal stoma patients in the scientific production. We used an integrative review on MEDLINE, PUBMED, LILACS, CINAHL and COCHRANE bases from 2005 to 2011, 7 papers were selected. In the perioperative teaching, multimedia, telephone follow-up, personal meetings, interactive material through the Internet were used, besides the continuing education of the health professionals. These different strategies profess the needs of each individual that promote self-care learning about the surgery and its consequences, skills development and the necessary adaptation of the condition of a stoma patient. The nurse needs to have technical and scientific knowledge on surgical technique, demarcation, treatment, complications, and skills for the teaching of self-care.

  19. Barriers and facilitators to self-care in chronic heart failure: a meta-synthesis of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siabani, Soraya; Leeder, Stephen R; Davidson, Patricia M

    2013-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a costly condition that places large demands on self-care. Failure to adhere with self-care recommendations is common and associated with frequent hospitalization. Understanding the factors that enable or inhibit self-care is essential in developing effective health care interventions. This qualitative review was conducted to address the research question, "What are the barriers and facilitators to self-care among patients with CHF?" Electronic databases including Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, Scopus and Google scholar were searched. Articles were included if they were peer reviewed (1995 to 2012), in English language and investigated at least one contextual or individual factor impacting on self-care in CHF patients > 18years. The criteria defined by Kuper et al. including clarity and appropriateness of sampling, data collection and data analysis were used to appraise the quality of articles. Twenty-three articles met the inclusion criteria. Factors impacting on self-care were included factors related to symptoms of CHF and the self-care process; factors related to personal characteristics; and factors related to environment and self-care system. Important factors such as socioeconomic situation and education level have not been explored extensively and there were minimal data on the influence of age, gender, self-confidence and duration of disease. Although there is an emerging literature, further research is required to address the barriers and facilitators to self-care in patients with CHF in order to provide an appropriate guide for intervention strategies to improve self-care in CHF.

  20. Investigation and analysis of osteoporosis, falls, and fragility fractures in elderly people in the Beijing area: a study on the bone health status of elderly people ≥ 80 years old with life self-care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Qin, Ming-Zhao; Liu, Qian; Liu, Jin-Ping

    2017-12-06

    Among ≥ 80 years old and under life self-care in the Beijing area, the prevalences of osteoporosis, falls, and fragility fracture were high; and these prevalences were even higher in women. The treatment rate of osteoporosis is very low. Therefore, comprehensive and standardized prevention and treatment should be promoted. The purpose of this study is to investigate prevalence of osteoporosis, falls, and fragility fractures in this population, and analyze related factors, in order to provide a basis for standardized prevention and treatment. From August 2015 to August 2016 in Beijing City, a total of 175 elderly individuals, who were ≥ 80 years old and had good self-care ability, were included into this study. The questionnaire, risk of falls, grip force, and walking speed were measured, and the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) and chair-rising test (CRT) were performed. Compared to women, men have higher rates of smoking, drinking, drinking strong tea, longer outdoor activity time, as well as larger muscle strength and pace, and lower consumption of dairy products, fall risk assessment scale (FRA) score, 25OHD, administration rates of calcium and anti-osteoporosis drugs (P fall after 80 years old, and this rate was higher in women than in men (77 vs. 55.3%, P Risk factors included falls after age 80, high FRA score, and reduction in bone density of lumbar vertebrae 1-4, and odds ratio (OR) was 12.195, 1.339, and 0.076, respectively (P falls, prior fracture, and low BMD were high among ≥ 80 years old and under life self-care in the Beijing area. Therefore, a comprehensive approach to assessment and treatment should be promoted.

  1. Cognitive influences on self-care decision making in persons with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Victoria V; Tkacs, Nancy; Riegel, Barbara

    2007-09-01

    Despite advances in management, heart failure is associated with high rates of hospitalization, poor quality of life, and early death. Education intended to improve patients' abilities to care for themselves is an integral component of disease management programs. True self-care requires that patients make decisions about symptoms, but the cognitive deficits documented in 30% to 50% of the heart failure population may make daily decision making challenging. After describing heart failure self-care as a naturalistic decision making process, we explore cognitive deficits known to exist in persons with heart failure. Problems in heart failure self-care are analyzed in relation to neural alterations associated with heart failure. As a neural process, decision making has been traced to regions of the prefrontal cortex, the same areas that are affected by ischemia, infarction, and hypoxemia in heart failure. Resulting deficits in memory, attention, and executive function may impair the perception and interpretation of early symptoms and reasoning and, thereby, delay early treatment implementation. There is compelling evidence that the neural processes critical to decision making are located in the same structures that are affected by heart failure. Because self-care requires the cognitive ability to learn, perceive, interpret, and respond, research is needed to discern how neural deficits affects these abilities, decision-making, and self-care behaviors.

  2. Personal Models of Diabetes in Relation to Self-Care, Well-Being and Glycemic Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chas Skinner, T.; Hampson, Sarah E.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - Personal models of diabetes have been shown to be proximal determinants of self-care behavior in adults with diabetes, both cross-sectionally and prospectively. This study set out to test the predictive utility of this approach in adolescents with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS...

  3. Attitudes and awareness of web-based self-care resources in the military: a preliminary survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxton, David D; Armstrong, Christina M; Fantelli, Emily E; Thomas, Elissa K

    2011-09-01

    Web-based self-care resources have a number of potential benefits for military service members (SMs) and their families such as convenience, anonymity, and immediate 24/7 access to useful information. There is limited data available, however, regarding SM and military healthcare provider use of online self-care resources. Our goal with this study was to conduct a preliminary survey assessment of self-care Web site awareness, general attitudes about use, and usage behaviors of Web-based self-care resources among SMs and military healthcare providers. Results show that the majority of SMs and providers use the Internet often, use Internet self-care resources, and are willing to use additional Web-based resources and capabilities. SMs and providers also indicated a preference for Web-based self-care resources as adjunct tools to face-to-face/in-person care. Data from this preliminary study are useful for informing additional research and best practices for integrating Web-based self-care for the military community.

  4. The effect of a supportive educational intervention developed based on the Orem's self-care theory on the self-care ability of patients with myocardial infarction: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, Ali; Rahmati Sharghi, Narjes; Khosravan, Shahla; Alami, Ali; Akhond, Majid

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a supportive educational intervention developed based on the Orem's self-care theory on the self-care ability of patients with myocardial infarction. Patients with cardiovascular disease suffer from the lack of knowledge about the disease and consequently are not able to fulfil their own self-care needs. This was a randomised controlled trial conducted in 2012. We recruited a random sample of 66 patients with myocardial infarction who had been recently discharged from coronary care unit. The study setting was two university hospitals located in Khorasan, Iran. Patients were randomly allocated to either the experimental or the control groups. Patients in the experimental group received education, support, and counselling while patients in the control group received no intervention. We employed a demographic questionnaire and the Myocardial Infarction Self-Care Ability Questionnaire for data collection and spss version 16.00 for data analysis. After the study, patients in the experimental group had higher levels of self-care knowledge, motivation and skills compared to the prestudy readings and the control group. The supportive educational intervention developed based on the Orem's self-care theory can improve nonhospitalised patients' self-care ability and positively affect public health outcomes. Consequently, using the developed programme for providing follow-up care to nonhospitalised patients is recommended. Having the ability to develop caring systems based on the nursing theories is a prerequisite to standard nursing practice. Identifying patients' educational needs is a fundamental prerequisite to patient education. Our findings revealed that the supportive educational intervention developed based on the Orem's self-care theory can help health care providers identify and fulfil patients' self-care needs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Should We Care About Adolescents Who Care for Themselves? What We've Learned and What We Need to Know About Youth in Self-Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Joseph L; Parente, Maria E

    2009-12-01

    This article provides an overview of existing research on the prevalence and predictors of adolescent self-care and on the consequences associated with it. Self-care, in which the young are left unsupervised during out-of-school hours, is a common experience for millions of American youth, and existing studies suggest that this arrangement may represent a risk for the development of behavior problems. However, the behavior problems associated with self-care depend on both individual and environmental factors and are most likely to develop when self-care (1) occurs out of the home, (2) involves permissive parenting and/or low parental monitoring, (3) takes place in neighborhoods with high levels of crime and disorganization, (4) involves adolescents with preexisting behavioral problems, and (5) represents an intensive and persistent arrangement. Following our survey of current research on self-care, we offer recommendations regarding future research and policy.

  6. Self-care practices of Malaysian adults with diabetes and sub-optimal glycaemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ming Yeong; Magarey, Judy

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the self-care practices of Malaysian adults with diabetes and sub-optimal glycaemic control. Using a one-to-one interviewing approach, data were collected from 126 diabetic adults from four settings. A 75-item questionnaire was used to assess diabetes-related knowledge and self-care practices regarding, diet, medication, physical activity and self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG). Most subjects had received advice on the importance of self-care in the management of their diabetes and recognised its importance. Sixty-seven subjects (53%) scored below 50% in their diabetes-related knowledge. Subjects who consumed more meals per day (80%), or who did not include their regular sweetened food intakes in their daily meal plan (80%), or who were inactive in daily life (54%), had higher mean fasting blood glucose levels (p=0.04). Subjects with medication non-adherence (46%) also tended to have higher fasting blood glucose levels. Only 15% of the subjects practiced SMBG. Predictors of knowledge deficit and poor self-care were low level of education (p = <0.01), older subjects (p=0.04) and Type 2 diabetes subjects on oral anti-hyperglycaemic medication (p = <0.01). There were diabetes-related knowledge deficits and inadequate self-care practices among the majority of diabetic patients with sub-optimal glycaemic control. This study should contribute to the development of effective education strategies to promote health for adults with sub-optimal diabetes control.

  7. Self-Healing and Self-Care for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Patricia J; Ward, Suzanne F

    2016-11-01

    The potential effects of self-care techniques to increase nurses' effectiveness and influence positive patient care outcomes have often been underestimated. Today, nurses experience increased stress as a result of more work hours and greater patient loads. Research studies demonstrate the value to an organization and to individuals of educating nurses about self-care. Studies also show that how being aware of individual reaction patterns is vital to learning more effective coping mechanisms. In this article, we discuss the aspects of body, mind, emotions, and spirit as they relate to self-care; present self-care change techniques; and offer some practical self-care exercises. Most self-care skills can be learned and implemented in a short period of time. Nurses are encouraged to experiment with the various techniques to determine the most effective ones for them. Copyright © 2016 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Health Risk Behavior in Foster Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramkowski, Bridget; Kools, Susan; Paul, Steven; Boyer, Cherrie; Monasterio, Erica; Robbins, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Problem Adolescent health problems are predominantly caused by risk behavior. Foster adolescents have disproportionately poor health; therefore identification of risk behavior is critical. Method A secondary analysis of data from a larger study investigated the health risk behavior of 56 foster youth using the CHIP-AE. Findings Foster youth had some increased risk behavior. Younger adolescents and those in kinship care had less risky behavior. Youth had more risk behavior when: in group homes, parental death, histories of physical or emotional abuse, or history of attempted suicide. Conclusions These results point to areas of strength and vulnerability in foster youth. PMID:19490278

  9. Self-Care, Sense Of Coherence And Depression In Patients Hospitalized For Decompensated Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Martinelli Pelegrino Ferreira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the self-care behaviors according to gender, the symptoms of depression and sense of coherence and compare the measurements of depression and sense of coherence according to gender. METHOD A correlational, cross-sectional study that investigated 132 patients with decompensated heart failure (HF. Data were collected through interviews and consultation to medical records, and analyzed using the chi-square and the Student's t tests with significance level of 0.05. Participants were 75 men and 57 women, aged 63.2 years on average (SD = 13.8. RESULTS No differences in self-care behavior by gender were found, except for rest after physical activity (p = 0.017. Patients who practiced physical activity showed fewer symptoms of depression (p<0.001. There were no differences in sense of coherence according to self-care behavior and gender. Women had more symptoms of depression than men (p = 0.002. CONCLUSION Special attention should be given to women with HF considering self-care and depressive symptoms.

  10. Oral health attitude and behavior among health-care students in a teaching hospital, Telangana State: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kiran Jella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The behavior of health-care students and their attitudes toward their own oral health reflect not only understanding of the importance of preventive dental procedures but also in improving the oral health of their patients. Thus, the aim of the study is to enlighten self-reported attitude and behavior among dental and medical undergraduate students. Methodology: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study was conducted among undergraduate students of a tertiary care teaching hospital in Telangana state. The information regarding demographic data, attitude, and behavior toward oral health was collected using the Hiroshima University-Dental Behavioral Inventory questionnaire. Data were analyzed using the analysis of variance. Results: The study subjects consisted of 361 dental and 315 medical undergraduate students. The present study revealed that oral health attitudes and behavior improved significantly with increasing levels of education in both dental and medical students. The dental undergraduates have better attitude and behavior than medical students, which was statistically significant regarding oral hygiene practices, gingival health, and visit to the dentist. Conclusions: Significant improvement was found regarding oral health attitude and behavior among both dental and medical students, with increase in their academic year. The overall attitude and behavior were better in dental students than medical students; however, both dental and medical undergraduates should have a comprehensive program, self-care regimen practices starting from their 1st year of education.

  11. Psychosocial aspects of living with diabetes mellitus in promoting self-care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumaya Giarola Cecilio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the psychosocial aspects of living with diabetes mellitus. Methods: a descriptive exploratory study with qualitative approach, made with 16 patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. The data were collected through telephone calls using a semi-structured script approaching the care in health, barriers and family support, analyzed by Bardin’s content. Results: two categories emerged related to the practice of self-care: Self-care, containing three sub-categories: diet, physical activity and emotional aspects and support networks. Conclusion: the results of the study showed the importance of understanding the emotional aspects and attitudes of patients regarding educational practices for self care, in order to establish strategies to prevent and control the disease.

  12. The use of medicinal plants in self-care in the Agonlin region of Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allabi, Aurel Constant; Busia, Kofi; Ekanmian, Vital; Bakiono, Fidèle

    2011-01-07

    To investigate the extent and type of medicinal plants used in self-care by the inhabitants of the Agonlin community in the Republic of Benin. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to interview a total of one thousand mothers. The prevalence rate of the use of herbal medicines in self-care was found to be 51.04%. One hundred and fourteen (114) plant species belonging to 69 families were reported, each with their local names, medicinal use, and parts used. Of all the indications of the identified plants, fever, headache, abdominal pain, and vomiting were the most frequently reported, with malaria treatment recording the highest usage of plant remedies (22%). The plant part most frequently used was the leaves. This study showed that self-care using medicinal plants is a major part of health care in the Agonlin area. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An online self-care education program to support patients after total laryngectomy: feasibility and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnossen, Ingrid C; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Eerenstein, Simone E J; Jansen, Femke; Witte, Birgit I; Lacko, Martin; Hardillo, José A; Honings, Jimmie; Halmos, Gyorgy B; Goedhart-Schwandt, Noortje L Q; de Bree, Remco; Leemans, C René; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of an online self-care education program supporting early rehabilitation of patients after total laryngectomy (TLPs) and factors associated with satisfaction. Health care professionals (HCPs) were invited to participate and to recruit TLPs. TLPs were informed on the self-care education program "In Tune without Cords" (ITwC) after which they gained access. A study specific survey was used (at baseline T0 and postintervention T1) on TLPs' uptake. Usage, satisfaction (general impression, willingness to use, user-friendliness, satisfaction with self-care advice and strategies, Net Promoter Score (NPS)), sociodemographic, and clinical factors were analyzed. HCPs of 6 out of 9 centers (67% uptake rate) agreed to participate and recruited TLPs. In total, 55 of 75 TLPs returned informed consent and the baseline T0 survey and were provided access to ITwC (73% uptake rate). Thirty-eight of these 55 TLPs used ITwC and completed the T1 survey (69% usage rate). Most (66%) TLPs were satisfied (i.e., score ≥7 (scale 1-10) on 4 survey items) with the self-care education program (mean score 7.2, SD 1.1). NPS was positive (+5). Satisfaction with the self-care education program was significantly associated with (higher) educational level and health literacy skills (P = .004, P = .038, respectively). No significant association was found with gender, age, marital status, employment status, Internet use, Internet literacy, treatment modality, time since total laryngectomy, and quality of life. The online self-care education program ITwC supporting early rehabilitation was feasible in clinical practice. In general, TLPs were satisfied with the program.

  14. Barriers and facilitators to self-care communication during medical appointments in the United States for adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritholz, Marilyn D; Beverly, Elizabeth A; Brooks, Kelly M; Abrahamson, Martin J; Weinger, Katie

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes self-care is challenging and requires effective patient-provider communication to achieve optimal treatment outcomes. This study explored perceptions of barriers and facilitators to diabetes self-care communication during medical appointments. Qualitative study using in-depth interviews with a semistructured interview guide. Thirty-four patients with type 2 diabetes and 19 physicians who treat type 2 diabetes. Physicians described some patients as reluctant to discuss their self-care behaviors primarily because of fear of being judged, guilt, and shame. Similarly, patients described reluctant communication resulting from fear of being judged and shame, particularly shame surrounding food intake and weight. Physicians and patients recommended trust, nonjudgmental acceptance, open/honest communication, and providing patients hope for living with diabetes as important factors for improving self-care communication. Further, patients stressed the clinical benefits of physicians directly addressing poor self-care behaviors while physicians described having few strategies to address these difficulties. Physician-patient self-care communication barriers included patients' reluctance to discuss self-care behaviors and physicians' perceptions of few options to address this reluctance. Treatment recommendations stressed the importance of establishing trusting, nonjudgmental and open patient-provider communication for optimal diabetes treatment. Medical education is needed to improve physicians' strategies for addressing self-care communication during medical appointments. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  15. An online self-care education program to support patients after total laryngectomy : feasibility and satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cnossen, Ingrid C; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Eerenstein, Simone E J; Jansen, Femke; Witte, Birgit I; Lacko, Martin; Hardillo, José A; Honings, Jimmie; Halmos, Gyorgy B; Goedhart-Schwandt, Noortje L Q; de Bree, Remco; Leemans, C René; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of an online self-care education program supporting early rehabilitation of patients after total laryngectomy (TLPs) and factors associated with satisfaction. METHODS: Health care professionals (HCPs) were invited to participate

  16. An online self-care education program to support patients after total laryngectomy: feasibility and satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cnossen, Ingrid C; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F.; Eerenstein, Simone E J; Jansen, Femke; Witte, Birgit I.; Lacko, Martin; Hardillo, José A U; Honings, Jimmie; Halmos, Gyorgy B; Goedhart-Schwandt, Noortje L Q; de Bree, Remco; Leemans, C René; Leeuw, Irma M Verdonck de

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of an online self-care education program supporting early rehabilitation of patients after total laryngectomy (TLPs) and factors associated with satisfaction. METHODS: Health care professionals (HCPs) were invited to participate

  17. Self-Care Management among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in East Jerusalem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, Nihaya; Osman, Amira; Hart, Trevor A.; Berry, Elliott M.; Adler, Bella

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Little research exists on diabetes self-care management (DSCM) in Arab populations. We examined the contribution of health belief constructs, socioeconomic position (SEP) and clinical factors (glycated haemoglobin [HbA1C] level, type of diabetes treatments, and receiving professional guidance) to DSCM among Arab patients in East…

  18. Analyzing short message services application effect on diabetic patients′ self-caring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Abolhassan Naghibi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Regarding the study results on using cell phone, to utilize virtual training methods is recommended as an appropriate procedure for different health care, self-caring and follow-up training plans for various groups in society, especially diabetic and chronic patients.

  19. Guidelines to facilitate self-care among older persons in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tinda Rabie

    Results: Based on Menon's psychological health empowerment model, and from ... Implications for practice: The implementation of the self-care guidelines by the .... 115) a person who has good self- .... work in the communities - eight for the urban population in ... a sub-population of 333 men and women over the age of 60.

  20. Guidelines to facilitate self-care among older persons in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinda Rabie

    2015-06-01

    Implications for practice: The implementation of the self-care guidelines by the public health sector, professional nurses and older persons will improve the healthcare of older persons at home which will in turn improve their quality of life, reduce unintentional self-neglect, as well as assist in alleviating overcrowding in clinics because unnecessary visits to the clinic will drop.

  1. An online self-care education program to support patients after total laryngectomy : feasibility and satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cnossen, Ingrid C; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Eerenstein, Simone E J; Jansen, Femke; Witte, Birgit I; Lacko, Martin; Hardillo, José A; Honings, Jimmie; Halmos, Gyorgy B; Goedhart-Schwandt, Noortje L Q; de Bree, Remco; Leemans, C René; Leeuw, Irma M Verdonck-de

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of an online self-care education program supporting early rehabilitation of patients after total laryngectomy (TLPs) and factors associated with satisfaction. Health care professionals (HCPs) were invited to participate and to recruit

  2. Self-Care Strategies among Chinese Adolescent Girls with Dysmenorrhea: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Cho Lee; Ip, Wan Yim; Lam, Lai Wah

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about how Chinese adolescent girls manage dysmenorrhea. This study aims to explore self-care strategies among Chinese adolescent girls with dysmenorrhea. The study uses a mixed methods design with two phases: a cross-sectional survey in phase I and semistructured interviews in phase II. This paper reports phase II. In line with the phase I findings, 28 adolescent girls with different characteristics (high or low levels of self-care behavior and pain intensity, who did or did not self-medicate, and who had or had not received menstrual education) were recruited for interviews. Content analysis was used for data analysis. Four categories emerged from the data: lifestyle changes, symptom management, communicating dysmenorrhea with others, and seeking medical advice. Girls selected their diets carefully and reduced physical activity during menstruation to avoid aggravating symptoms. Heat therapy commonly was employed for symptom management. A few girls self-medicated to obtain immediate relief from pain, but the majority expressed reservations about using medication because they worried about dependence and side effects. Some girls communicated dysmenorrhea with their family and friends, but the majority did not seek medical advice. The present study showed that girls employed various self-care strategies for dysmenorrhea, including some strategies stemming from traditional Chinese medicine. The findings revealed menstrual etiquette among Chinese adolescent girls with dysmenorrhea, and demonstrated that self-medication was not part of most girls' self-care. Understanding the self-care strategies of these girls is important, as it can help nurses develop a culturally-specific intervention to promote self-care among adolescent girls with dysmenorrhea. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Self-care education needs in gestational diabetes tailored to the Iranian culture: A qualitative content analysiss

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra Kolivand; Afsaneh Keramat; MehrAli Rahimi; Zahra Motaghi; Mohammad Shariati; MohammadHassan Emamian

    2018-01-01

    Background: Gestational diabetes is one of the most common health problems in pregnancy that requires participation through self-care to reduce the maternal and neonatal complications. The present study aimed to determine the needs of women as an essential first step to formulate a self-care guide fitting the Iranian culture. Materials and Methods: The present qualitative study was conducted through interviews with 13 diabetic pregnant women and 10 care providers using semi-structured questio...

  4. Benefits Innovations in Employee Behavioral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Bruce; Block, Lori

    2017-01-01

    More and more employers recognize the business impact of behavioral health concerns in the workplace. This article provides insights into some of the current innovations in behavioral health benefits, along with their rationale for development. Areas of innovation include conceptual and delivery models, technological advance- ments, tools for engaging employees and ways of quantifying the business value of behavioral health benefits. The rapid growth of innovative behavioral health services should provide employers with confidence that they can tailor a program best suited to their priorities, organizational culture and cost limitations.

  5. Technology-based self-care methods of improving antiretroviral adherence: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parya Saberi

    Full Text Available As HIV infection has shifted to a chronic condition, self-care practices have emerged as an important topic for HIV-positive individuals in maintaining an optimal level of health. Self-care refers to activities that patients undertake to maintain and improve health, such as strategies to achieve and maintain high levels of antiretroviral adherence.Technology-based methods are increasingly used to enhance antiretroviral adherence; therefore, we systematically reviewed the literature to examine technology-based self-care methods that HIV-positive individuals utilize to improve adherence. Seven electronic databases were searched from 1/1/1980 through 12/31/2010. We included quantitative and qualitative studies. Among quantitative studies, the primary outcomes included ARV adherence, viral load, and CD4+ cell count and secondary outcomes consisted of quality of life, adverse effects, and feasibility/acceptability data. For qualitative/descriptive studies, interview themes, reports of use, and perceptions of use were summarized. Thirty-six publications were included (24 quantitative and 12 qualitative/descriptive. Studies with exclusive utilization of medication reminder devices demonstrated less evidence of enhancing adherence in comparison to multi-component methods.This systematic review offers support for self-care technology-based approaches that may result in improved antiretroviral adherence. There was a clear pattern of results that favored individually-tailored, multi-function technologies, which allowed for periodic communication with health care providers rather than sole reliance on electronic reminder devices.

  6. Home Automated Telemanagement (HAT System to Facilitate Self-Care of Patients with Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Finkelstein

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Successful patient self-management requires a multidisciplinary approach that includes regular patient assessment, disease-specific education, control of medication adherence, implementation of health behavior change models and social support. Existing systems for computer-assisted disease management do not provide this multidisciplinary patient support and do not address treatment compliance issues. We developed the Home Automated Telemanagement (HAT system for patients with different chronic health conditions to facilitate their self-care. The HAT system consists of a home unit, HAT server, and clinician units. Patients at home use a palmtop or a laptop connected with a disease monitor on a regular basis. Each HAT session consists of self-testing, feedback, and educational components. The self-reported symptom data and objective results obtained from disease-specific sensors are automatically sent from patient homes to the HAT server in the hospital. Any web-enabled device can serve as a clinician unit to review patient results. The HAT system monitors self-testing results and patient compliance. The HAT system has been implemented and tested in patients receiving anticoagulation therapy, patients with asthma, COPD and other health conditions. Evaluation results indicated high level of acceptance of the HAT system by the patients and that the system has a positive impact on main clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction with medical care.

  7. A pilot study of yoga as self-care for arthritis in minority communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background While arthritis is the most common cause of disability, non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics experience worse arthritis impact despite having the same or lower prevalence of arthritis compared to non-Hispanic whites. People with arthritis who exercise regularly have less pain, more energy, and improved sleep, yet arthritis is one of the most common reasons for limiting physical activity. Mind-body interventions, such as yoga, that teach stress management along with physical activity may be well suited for investigation in both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Yoga users are predominantly white, female, and college educated. There are few studies that examine yoga in minority populations; none address arthritis. This paper presents a study protocol examining the feasibility and acceptability of providing yoga to an urban, minority population with arthritis. Methods/design In this ongoing pilot study, a convenience sample of 20 minority adults diagnosed with either osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis undergo an 8-week program of yoga classes. It is believed that by attending yoga classes designed for patients with arthritis, with racially concordant instructors; acceptability of yoga as an adjunct to standard arthritis treatment and self-care will be enhanced. Self-care is defined as adopting behaviors that improve physical and mental well-being. This concept is quantified through collecting patient-reported outcome measures related to spiritual growth, health responsibility, interpersonal relations, and stress management. Additional measures collected during this study include: physical function, anxiety/depression, fatigue, sleep disturbance, social roles, and pain; as well as baseline demographic and clinical data. Field notes, quantitative and qualitative data regarding feasibility and acceptability are also collected. Acceptability is determined by response/retention rates, positive qualitative data, and continuing yoga practice after three

  8. Social determinants of self-care subsequent to major medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on the findings of the study it was concluded that education, residential status, marital status, and availability and ability to convert social network into social capital constitute major social determinants of self-care. It was recommended among others that the social determinants of self-care identified above should ...

  9. Social Determinants of Self-Care Subsequent to Major Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-02

    Oct 2, 2016 ... determinants, therefore, have a big role in self-care after hospital ... whose profile met the study's objectives purposively chosen to provide the data for the ..... The study also explored how social network features in self-care .... made to run effectively it would ease the pressure on the heavy traffic of people to.

  10. Use of Self-Care and Practitioner-Based Forms of Complementary and Alternative Medicine before and after a Diagnosis of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alissa R. Link

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We examine factors associated with self-care, use of practitioner-based complementary and alternative medicine (CAM, and their timing in a cohort of women with breast cancer. Methods. Study participants were women with breast cancer who participated in the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project. Self-care is defined as the use of multivitamins, single vitamins, botanicals, other dietary supplements, mind-body practices, special diets, support groups, and prayer. Within each modality, study participants were categorized as continuous users (before and after diagnosis, starters (only after diagnosis, quitters (only before diagnosis, or never users. Multivariable logistic regression was used for the main analyses. Results. Of 764 women who provided complete data, 513 (67.2% initiated a new form of self-care following breast cancer diagnosis. The most popular modalities were those that are ingestible, and they were commonly used in combination. The strongest predictor of continuous use of one type of self-care was continuous use of other types of self-care. Healthy behaviors, including high fruit/vegetable intake and exercise, were more strongly associated with continuously using self-care than starting self-care after diagnosis. Conclusions. Breast cancer diagnosis was associated with subsequent behavioral changes, and the majority of women undertook new forms of self-care after diagnosis. Few women discontinued use of modalities they used prior to diagnosis.

  11. Responsible leader behavior in health sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longest, Beaufort

    2017-02-06

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to expand attention to responsible leader behavior in the world's health sectors by explaining how this concept applies to health sectors, considering why health sector leaders should behave responsibly, reviewing how they can do so, and asserting potential impact through an applied example. Design/methodology/approach This paper is a viewpoint, reflecting conceptualizations rooted in leadership literature which are then specifically applied to health sectors. A definition of responsible leader behavior is affirmed and applied specifically in health sectors. Conceptualizations and viewpoints about practice of responsible leader behavior in health sectors and potential consequences are then discussed and asserted. Findings Leadership failures and debacles found in health, but more so in other sectors, have led leadership researchers to offer insights, many of them empirical, into the challenges of leadership especially by more clearly delineating responsible leader behavior. Practical implications Much of what has been learned in the research about responsible leader behavior offers pathways for health sector leaders to more fully practice responsible leadership. Social implications This paper asserts and provides a supporting example that greater levels of responsible leader behavior in health sectors hold potentially important societal benefits. Originality/value This paper is the first to apply emerging conceptualizations and early empirical findings about responsible leader behavior specifically to leaders in health sectors.

  12. Reflective analysis of the self-care ability of home caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Cristina Clementino de Oliveira

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The constant dedication of the caregivers put their health at risk, especially for those whose care is provided only for themselves, which makes them overwhelmed. The daily burden of chores and care of the patient ends up compromising self-care and general health. This study aimed to reflect on the self-care ability of home caregivers. Methods: The methodology was descriptive through a qualitative approach that used the subjectivity of observers in the daily dynamics of dependent patients caregivers. Results and Discussion: The results showed that 40% of caregivers reported good family relationships and gratitude in the realization of care; 60% reported conflicts in relationship and sometimes overload and obligation. Most caregivers reported having difficulties in performing all care, because do not have someone to share the tasks with, which hinders the realization of self-care. Caregivers reported lack of availability for leisure — a common condition in the act of caring —, and, when they do it, feel uncomfortable, as they are doing something wrong leaving the bedridden who requires care, which leads to physical and emotional exhaustion. Conclusion: It follows that the act of care is to give yourself in favor of the other, is to change the entire life expectancy because of the other, so it is extremely important the awareness of informal caregivers in relation to self-care.

  13. Comparing health promotion behaviors of male and female high school students in Southeast of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, Nasibeh; Farokhzadian, Jamileh; Abazari, Faroukh

    2017-11-23

    Background Adolescence is one of the most challenging periods of human life. Many healthy or risky behaviors may be formed during this period and continue to the end of life. The aim of this study was to examine and compare the health promotion behaviors of male and female students in high schools. Methods In this descriptive-comparative study, 609 high school students were selected using multi-stage random sampling method. Data were collected using demographic and health-promoting lifestyle profile (HPLPII) questionnaires. Results The mean of health promotion behaviors was moderate in female (2.43 ± 0.46) and male (2.61 ± 0.45) students. The highest and lowest means in the male students were respectively the dimensions of spiritual growth and health responsibility. Also, the highest and lowest means in the female students were dimensions of interpersonal relationships as well as physical activity and exercise. The status of male health promotion behaviors was significantly more favorable than that of the female (p = 0.001, t = -4.71). The male students had a better situation than female in terms of all the six dimensions of HPLPII, so there was a significant difference between them in the four dimensions of spiritual growth, stress management, physical activity and health responsibility. There was also a significant relationship between the history of physical and mental illness in the past year and the students' health promotion behaviors (p importance of promoting self-care and educational interventions in the aspects such as physical activity and health responsibility of young people in order to improve the health of the community.

  14. Applying Behavioral Economics to Public Health Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matjasko, Jennifer L.; Cawley, John H.; Baker-Goering, Madeleine M.; Yokum, David V.

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral economics provides an empirically informed perspective on how individuals make decisions, including the important realization that even subtle features of the environment can have meaningful impacts on behavior. This commentary provides examples from the literature and recent government initiatives that incorporate concepts from behavioral economics in order to improve health, decision making, and government efficiency. The examples highlight the potential for behavioral economics to improve the effectiveness of public health policy at low cost. Although incorporating insights from behavioral economics into public health policy has the potential to improve population health, its integration into government public health programs and policies requires careful design and continual evaluation of such interventions. Limitations and drawbacks of the approach are discussed. PMID:27102853

  15. Mobile Phone Support for Diabetes Self-Care Among Diverse Adults: Protocol for a Three-Arm Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lyndsay A; Wallston, Kenneth A; Kripalani, Sunil; Greevy Jr, Robert A; Elasy, Tom A; Bergner, Erin M; Gentry, Chad K

    2018-01-01

    Background Nonadherence to self-care is common among patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and often leads to severe complications. Moreover, patients with T2D who have low socioeconomic status and are racial/ethnic minorities disproportionately experience barriers to adherence and poor outcomes. Basic phone technology (text messages and phone calls) provides a practical medium for delivering content to address patients’ barriers to adherence; however, trials are needed to explore long-term and sustainable effects of mobile phone interventions among diverse patients. Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of mobile phone–based diabetes support interventions on self-care and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) among adults with T2D using a 3-arm, 15-month randomized controlled trial with a Type 1 hybrid effectiveness-implementation approach. The intervention arms are (1) Rapid Encouragement/Education And Communications for Health (REACH) and (2) REACH + Family-focused Add-on for Motivating Self-care (FAMS). Methods We recruited primary care patients with T2D (N=512) from Federally Qualified Health Centers and an academic medical center, prioritizing recruitment of publicly insured and minority patients from the latter. Eligible patients were prescribed daily diabetes medication and owned a cell phone with text messaging capability. We excluded patients whose most recent HbA1c result within 12 months was <6.8% to support detection of intervention effects on HbA1c. Participants were randomly assigned to REACH only, REACH + FAMS, or the control condition. REACH provides text messages tailored to address patient-specific barriers to medication adherence based on the Information-Motivation-Behavioral skills model, whereas FAMS provides monthly phone coaching with related text message content focused on family and friend barriers to diet and exercise adherence. We collect HbA1c and self-reported survey data at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months, and again at 15

  16. ACADEMIC YOUTH’S HEALTH BEHAVIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Radzimińska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A very important role in the protection of human health is their life style, their habits and patterns of conduct. Early adulthood is the best period to achieve long-term benefits from a selection of healthy living. However, the results of studies on health-related behavior of youth in Poland and in the world are not satisfactory. The purpose of the study: The purpose of the research was to assess the health behaviors of students of higher education in Bydgoszcz. Material: The study involved 272 students (124 women and 148 men Bydgoszcz higher education students in the following fields of study: physiotherapy, nutrition, logistics and national security. The Inventory of Health-Related Behavior by Zygfryd Juczyński has been used in the research. The statistical analysis was performed using the package PQ Stat 1.6.2. Results: Throughout the treatment group an average level of health-related behavior has been shown. The results of the different categories of health-related behavior were lower than the results of the standardization groups. A higher level of health behavior has been shown in a group of medical students compared to non-medical students. The results for women were higher than men's results. Conclusions: The results of personal research and the research findings of other authors demonstrate that there is a need for implementation of programs of health promotion and health education in all fields of study.

  17. Emotional responses to behavioral economic incentives for health behavior change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Swaluw, Koen; Lambooij, Mattijs S.; Mathijssen, Jolanda J.P.; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Polder, Johan J.; Prast, Henriëtte M.

    2018-01-01

    Many people aim to change their lifestyle, but have trouble acting on their intentions. Behavioral economic incentives and related emotions can support commitment to personal health goals, but the related emotions remain unexplored. In a regret lottery, winners who do not attain their health goals

  18. Emotional Responses to Behavioral Economic Incentives for Health Behavior Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Swaluw, Koen; Lambooij, Mattijs S; Mathijssen, Jolanda; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Polder, Johan; Prast, Henriette

    2018-01-01

    Many people aim to change their lifestyle, but have trouble acting on their intentions. Behavioral economic incentives and related emotions can support commitment to personal health goals, but the related emotions remain unexplored. In a regret lottery, winners who do not attain their health goals

  19. Nativity, Chronic Health Conditions, and Health Behaviors in Filipino Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayog, Maria L G; Waters, Catherine M

    2018-05-01

    Nearly half of Americans have a chronic health condition related to unhealthful behavior. One in four Americans is an immigrant; yet immigrants' health has been studied little, particularly among Asian American subpopulations. Years lived in United States, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, walking, adiposity, and fruit/vegetable variables in the 2011-2012 California Health Interview Survey were analyzed to examine the influence of nativity on chronic health conditions and health behaviors in 555 adult Filipinos, the second largest Asian American immigrant subpopulation. Recent and long-term immigrant Filipinos had higher odds of having hypertension and diabetes, but lower odds of smoking and overweight/obesity compared with second-generation Filipinos. Being born in the United States may be protective against chronic health conditions, but not for healthful behaviors among Filipinos. Chronic disease prevention and health promotion strategies should consider nativity/length of residence, which may be a more consequential health determinant than other immigration and acculturation characteristics.

  20. Transformational leadership behaviors in allied health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, David A; Gallagher, Helen L

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore self-reported transformational leadership behavior profiles within the six largest allied health profession groups in the National Health Service in Scotland and to determine whether factors such as seniority of grade, locus of employment, and/or leadership training have a positive influence on transformational leadership behaviors. A postal survey comprising the shorter version of the Multifactorial Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) and contextual demographic information was completed by 753 allied health professionals from four Health Board areas across Scotland who were randomly selected through a modified cluster sampling technique. The MLQ contains 36 items that measure nine identified leadership factors; however, only the responses to the five transformational leadership factors are reported here. The study identified significant differences in transformational leadership behaviors between individual allied health professions. Radiographers and podiatrists scored consistently lower than the other professional groups across the range of transformational behaviors. Seniority of grade significantly influenced the scores, with higher-graded staff reporting greater leadership behaviors (p leadership training also positively influenced transformational behaviors (p transformational leadership behaviors between individual allied health professions, indicating that some professional groups are inherently advantaged in embracing the modernization agenda. This highlights an as-yet missed opportunity for effectively targeting and evaluating multidisciplinary leadership training programs across the allied health professions.

  1. [Health and health-related behaviors according to sexual attraction and behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Glòria; Martí-Pastor, Marc; Gotsens, Mercè; Bartoll, Xavier; Diez, Elia; Borrell, Carme

    2015-01-01

    to Describe perceived health, mental health and certain health-related behaviors according to sexual attraction and behavior in the population residing in Barcelona in 2011. Perceived health, mental health, chronic conditions and health-related behaviors were analyzed in 2675 people aged 15 to 64 years. The Barcelona Health Survey for 2011 was used, which included questions on sexual attraction and behavior. Multivariate robust Poisson regression models were fitted to obtain adjusted prevalence ratios. People feeling same-sex attraction reported a higher prevalence of worse perceived and mental health. These people and those who had had sex with persons of the same sex more frequently reported harmful health-related behaviors. Lesbian, gay, transgender and bisexual people may have health problems that should be explored in depth, prevented, and attended. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Proceedings of Designing Self-care for Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Managing chronic conditions can be challenging. People in such conditions, and the people around them, have to: deal with symptoms, adapt to the resulting disability, manage emotions, and change habits to keep the condition under control. Self-care technologies have the potential to support self-care...... and mediate the relationship between patients (and caregivers) and the condition. However, these technologies often disregard the complexity of the settings in which they are used and fail to become integrated in everyday life. In this workshop we will discuss how to design self-care technologies...

  3. The relationships among self-care, dispositional mindfulness, and psychological distress in medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Slonim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Past research suggests that medical students experience high levels of psychological distress. Objective: The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationships among engagement in self-care behaviours, dispositional mindfulness, and psychological distress. Methods: The sample consisted of 139 female and 68 male Australian medical students (N=207 aged 17–41 years (M=21.82, SD=3.62 across the 5 years of the Monash University medical course. Participants completed an online survey comprising a demographics questionnaire, the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire, the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II, and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales. Results: Results revealed significant and interpretable multivariate correlations between distress and both mindfulness and self-care. Furthermore, the dispositional mindfulness observation subscale was found to be a significant moderator of the relationship between several dimensions of self-care and psychological distress. Conclusions: The present study points to the potential of self-care and mindfulness to decrease medical student distress and enhance well-being.

  4. Education for type 2 diabetes mellitus self-care: from compliance to empowerment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pithon Cyrino

    Full Text Available Through a critical review of the literature on education for diabetes self-care and self-management, it was sought to point out the inappropriateness of traditional approaches towards compliance with treatment and transmission of information, considering the complexity of self-care under chronic conditions. The influence of the social sciences on the field of studies on chronic degenerative diseases in general, and diabetes in particular, was explored. From this perspective, it can be recognized that the fields of anthropology and sociology have been incorporated into research focusing more on individuals as patients, and on the experience gained through this process. Recently, there has been a slight change within the field of health education research relating to diabetes, with the introduction of strategies that seek to value the experience and autonomy of patients as self-care agents. This paper discusses the strategy for empowerment in education for diabetes self-care and self-management, as a dialogue-focused practice that respects patients' moral and cognitive autonomy.

  5. Education for type 2 diabetes mellitus self-care: from compliance to empowerment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pithon Cyrino

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Through a critical review of the literature on education for diabetes self-care and self-management, it was sought to point out the inappropriateness of traditional approaches towards compliance with treatment and transmission of information, considering the complexity of self-care under chronic conditions. The influence of the social sciences on the field of studies on chronic degenerative diseases in general, and diabetes in particular, was explored. From this perspective, it can be recognized that the fields of anthropology and sociology have been incorporated into research focusing more on individuals as patients, and on the experience gained through this process. Recently, there has been a slight change within the field of health education research relating to diabetes, with the introduction of strategies that seek to value the experience and autonomy of patients as self-care agents. This paper discusses the strategy for empowerment in education for diabetes self-care and self-management, as a dialogue-focused practice that respects patients' moral and cognitive autonomy.

  6. Developing an appropriate model for self-care of hypertensive patients: first experience from EMRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Sadeghi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs constitute 53% of deaths above the age of 30; 54% of these deaths are attributed to high blood pressure. Coronary artery disease (CAD is the main cause of mortality in the world. Hypertension accounts for 13% of mortalities and 6% of morbidities and is one of the main risk factors that cause loss of healthy life years. Blood pressure is not optimally controlled even among those who are aware of their disease. Previous studies showed that apart from pharmacological treatment, lifestyle improvement can also play a significant role in the prevention of high blood pressure CVDs. Self-care among them has been addressed in several previous studies. There are few self-care programs in Iran, but no study has been conducted on blood pressure. METHODS: In this study the primary model is designed and then revised, and in the pilot study the feasibility of the project was approved and the final model presented. RESULTS: The current project proposes a model for self-care of hypertensive patients and their families, and is based on education of health care providers and patients in such a way that patients can control their illness. CONCLUSION: The model can be implemented at a national scale.   Keywords: Self-care, Hypertension, Model 

  7. Self care of patients with chronic venous ulcers in the home environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Gonçalves do Nascimento Piropo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The venous ulcer is a skin lesion that affects the lower third of the legs. Is associated with chronic venous insufficiency, is the leading cause of ulcers of the lower limbs. Can interfere with the quality of life of patients, because it generates negative repercussions on social and economic sphere. The aim of this study was to identify self-care in the home environment of patients with venous ulcers, to assess the occurrence of alternative therapy use and verifythe involvement of domestic trauma. Methodologically, this study takes a quantitative and qualitative analytical cross-sectional held at the Clinical School of Physiotherapy, State University of Southwest Bahia / UESB / Jequié-BA, from January 2007 to September 2008. Data were collected through a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. The results showed that 100% of the participants played self care of their injuries, including with respect to occlusion and bandages when needed. However, 6.25% said they had not received adequate information to perform self-care. Concluded that it is necessary to interact and produce a mechanism between education and health assistance for the development of the practice of self-care in family life at home.

  8. The behavioral economics of health and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    People often make decisions in health care that are not in their best interest, ranging from failing to enroll in health insurance to which they are entitled, to engaging in extremely harmful behaviors. Traditional economic theory provides a limited tool kit for improving behavior because it assumes that people make decisions in a rational way, have the mental capacity to deal with huge amounts of information and choice, and have tastes endemic to them and not open to manipulation. Melding economics with psychology, behavioral economics acknowledges that people often do not act rationally in the economic sense. It therefore offers a potentially richer set of tools than provided by traditional economic theory to understand and influence behaviors. Only recently, however, has it been applied to health care. This article provides an overview of behavioral economics, reviews some of its contributions, and shows how it can be used in health care to improve people's decisions and health.

  9. The Assessment of Social Support and Self-Care Requisites for Preventing Diabetic Foot Ulcer in Diabetic Foot Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taher

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Diabetic foot as one of the most common complications of diabetes is involved in more than %25 of diabetic patients’ lives, and if not treated properly can lead to amputation up to %20. The lack of self-care is the underlying cause of mortality, morbidity and chronic complications of diabetes. Identification and rectifying of diabetic foot care needs of patients can additionally reduce readmission; also, %85 of diabetic foot problems can be prevented. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, 130patients with diabetic foot from Shahid Modarres hospital were selected using census method. Data in forms of demographic questionnaire, self-care requisites assessment tool for preventing diabetic foot ulcer, and Social Support Behavior Scale were completed by patients and then were collected. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 16. Results: In this study, a significant relationship was found between self-care and social support (P<0.05. This means that people with better social support reported better self-care than those with weaker social support. A significant relationship in level of education and monthly income with self-care was seen, as well as in level of education, monthly income and marital status with social support (P<0.001. Conclusions: The results showed that social support can be considered as an effective factor in individual self-care behaviors, and with regard to this factor in educational, treatment and care programs of patients, can improve their self-care, in addition to decreasing economic costs, and improve their qualities of lives as well.

  10. Lived experiences of self-care among older physically active urban-living individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundsli K

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Kari Sundsli,1,2 Geir Arild Espnes,3 Olle Söderhamn21Department of Social Work and Health Science, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway, 2Centre for Caring Research, Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, Norway, 3Research Centre for Health Promotion and Resources HiST-NTNU, Department of Social Work and Health Science, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, NTNU, Trondheim, NorwayBackground: Promoting physical activity is a public health priority in most industrial countries, and physical function is an important factor when taking into consideration older people’s self-care and health. Despite the increasing challenges associated with urbanization and the aging population, urban life appears to be positive in many ways for urban dwellers. However, the manner in which older people live in urban settings and how this influences their ability to take care of themselves should be considered important knowledge for health professionals and politicians to acquire. The aim of this study was to describe the lived experiences of self-care and features that may influence health and self-care among older urban home-dwelling individuals who are physically active.Methods: Ten subjects, three women and seven men, who were aged 65–82 years and identified to be physically active, were interviewed. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed according to the descriptive phenomenological method devised by Giorgi.Results: Our findings showed beneficial self-care. The participants lived active everyday lives and were frequently physically active. They were part of a supportive, inclusive, and promoting fellowship, and they had the opportunity to travel. They utilized their competence and experienced making themselves useful. It was a privilege to be part of a family life as a husband, wife, parent, and/or a grandparent. They

  11. OPERATIVE GROUP: EDUCATIONAL PRACTICE AS AN EXPRESSION FOR SELF-CARE IN DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Almeida Maia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal is to understand the views of users with type 2 diabetes about their participation in the operating groups and the impact of self-care practices. This is a qualitative descriptive- exploratory held in three basic health units of the sanitary district east of Belo Horizonte and involved the participation of 18 users in 2011. The speeches of the users were analyzed based on content analysis, identifying the categories: exchange of experience, education for self- care, assessment of user participation in the operative groups, Feelings and links between professionals and users. It was noted that the operational groups provided the construction of knowledge through listening, reflection and questioning of reality where the user identified the importance of knowledge about diet, physical activity and treatment. We found that health actions implemented through the operational groups encourage users to think about your lifestyle, characterized as a tool in health education from the perspective of promotion, prevention and control.

  12. Educational needs for improving self-care in heart failure patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, EunSeok; Clark, Patricia C; Reilly, Carolyn Miller; Higgins, Melinda; Lobb, Maureen; Smith, Andrew L; Dunbar, Sandra B

    2012-01-01

    To explore the need for self-monitoring and self-care education in heart failure patients with diabetes (HF- DM patients) by describing cognitive and affective factors to provide guidance in developing effective self-management education. A cross-sectional correlation design was employed using baseline patient data from a study testing a 12-week patient and family dyad intervention to improve dietary and medication-taking self-management behaviors in HF patients. Data from 116 participants recruited from metropolitan Atlanta area were used. Demographic and comorbidities, physical function, psychological distress, relationship with health care provider, self-efficacy (medication taking and low sodium diet), and behavioral outcomes (medications, dietary habits) were assessed. Descriptive statistics and a series of chi-square tests, t tests, or Mann-Whitney tests were performed to compare HF patients with and without DM. HF-DM patients were older and heavier, had more comorbidities, and took more daily medications than HF patients. High self-efficacy on medication and low-sodium diet was reported in both groups with no significant difference. Although HF-DM patients took more daily medications than HF, both groups exhibited high HF medication-taking behaviors. The HF-DM patients consumed significantly lower total sugar than HF patients but clinically higher levels of sodium. Diabetes educators need to be aware of potential conflicts of treatment regimens to manage 2 chronic diseases. Special and integrated diabetes self-management education programs that incorporate principles of HF self-management should be developed to improve self-management behavior in HF-DM patients.

  13. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF SUPPORTIVE EDUCATIVE IN INCREASING SELF REGULATION, SELF EFFICACY, AND SELF CARE AGENCY TO CONTROL GLICHEMIC INDEX IN PATIENT WITH TYPE II DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darmansyah AF

    2017-04-01

    control and diet, physical exercise, medication, blood sugar control and foot care (p = <0.05, self efficacy (p = 0,05, self care agency (p = <0,05. Test result of the correlation among the variables using Partial Least Square (PLS suggest supportive educative model and the obtained value of self regulation is (0,561, self effi cacy is (0,548 self regulation to self care agency (0,592, self effi cacy to self regulation (0,162, self regulation to self care agency (0,094, and self care agency to HbA1c (0,130. Discussion and Conclusion: Novelty in this study indicated that supportive educative is able to improve self care agency patient and HbA1c through increasing self regulation. It is recommended that model of supportive educative could be applied in health service in Indonesia in regard to be independency patient with type 2 DM and other chronical disease.

  14. Self-care activities and glycated haemoglobin in Iranian patients with type 2 diabetes: can coping styles and social support have a buffering role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayeghian, Zeinab; Aguilar-Vafaie, Maria E; Besharat, Mohammad Ali; Amiri, Parisa; Parvin, Mahmoud; Gillani, Kobra Roohi; Hassanabadi, Hamidreza

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes self-care is a key element in the overall management of diabetes. However, the importance of psychosocial factors for successful disease management is under investigated. This study aimed at exploring the role of coping styles and social support in the relationship between self-care activities and glycated haemoglobin in patients with type 2 diabetes. One hundred adults (60% female, aged 40-70 years) with type 2 diabetes completed questionnaires assessing self-care activities, coping styles and social support. In addition, a blood test was performed to obtain glycated haemoglobin levels. Result showed significant relationships of glycated haemoglobin with self-care activities, coping styles and social support. Regression analysis indicated that social support had a moderating role on the relationship between self-care activities and glycated haemoglobin, such that, at very high levels of social support the association, between Self-Care and HbA1c disappears. Findings indicate that health care providers, within the context of the Iranian social and cultural situation, should pay more attention to psychosocial factors when addressing self-care activities. Delineation of the role of coping styles and social support might be useful for identifying patients in need of particular counselling and support for improving self-care activities and HbA1c levels.

  15. Illness Perceptions and Depression in Relation to Self-care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    depression and illness beliefs influence self-care behaviour. Keywords: Illness ... patients in Rwanda will provide new information on which to base further ... English, to facilitate the data collection process we used a translated version of the ...

  16. Taking Care of You: Self-Care for Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Taking Care of YOU: Self-Care for Family Caregivers Order this publication Printer-friendly version First, Care ... 25 26 27 28 29 30 Smart Patients Caregivers Community In partnership with Family Caregiver Alliance Learn ...

  17. Gender differences in functional disability and self-care among seniors in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareque, Md Ismail; Tiedt, Andrew D; Islam, Towfiqua Mahfuza; Begum, Sharifa; Saito, Yasuhiko

    2017-08-08

    Disability among older adults is a public health concern. To date there are no in-depth and comprehensive analyses on older adults' disabilities in Bangladesh. This study investigated gender differences in the prevalence of disability and the socio-demographic factors associated with disability among older adults in Bangladesh. This research used a sample of 4176 elderly males and females aged 60 years and over from a nationally representative data set- Bangladesh's 2010 Household Income and Expenditure Survey. The study used both household level and individual level data and applied a wealth index, which was constructed based on household assets using principal component analysis. The Washington Group's short set of questions on disability were used to measure disability. Chi-square tests and ordinal logistic regression models were fit. Forty-two percent of older had some form of functional disability, including 5% of elderly with severe/extreme functional disability. Seven percent of older adults had a self-care disability, including 3% of elderly with a severe/extreme form of self-care disability. Elderly females suffered from all the studied disabilities, including functional and self-care disabilities in higher percentages, and had higher odds ratios of having both functional disability and self-care disability compared to elderly males. The study also identified some significant factors affecting functional disability and self-care disability, namely age, having a chronic condition, wealth status and place of residence, including divisional differences. Programs aimed at reducing functional disability among seniors, particularly elderly females, should be granted the highest priority in Bangladesh.

  18. Examining the Effects of Training According to Learning Styles on Self-care among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Reza Saleh Moghadam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the implementation of new training programs, neglecting individual differences in terms of learning styles can be taken into account as one of the reasons for poor levels of self-care behaviors in patients suffering from diabetes. Aim: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of training according to the learning styles on self-care behaviors among individuals suffering from type 2 diabetes. Method: This randomized, controlled clinical trial was performed on 69 diabetic patients referring to Parsian Clinic in Mashhad, Iran, who were divided into experimental (comprised of four aural, visual, read-write, and kinesthetic-sensory groups based on the results of the VARK [Visual, Auditory, Read/Write, Kinesthetic] Learning Styles Questionnaire and control (lecture-based education. Self-care training was also conducted during two sessions each two weeks on four domains of diet, exercise program adherence, blood glucose monitoring, and insulin intake. To analyze the data, independent samples t-test and Mann-Whitney U test were run, using SPSS version 21. Results: Based on the independent samples t-test, in the experimental and control groups, the total mean scores of self-care behaviors were not significantly different prior to the intervention (135.2±17.6, 129.7±27.6, respectively. However, a statistically significant difference was noted between the experimental and control groups regarding the total mean scores of self-care behaviors (164.1±7.6, 140.5±10.0, respectively; P=0.001. Conclusion: It was concluded that self-care training based on learning styles could be improved among patients with diabetes. The VARK Learning Styles Questionnaire could be used to facilitate this type of training through providing information about learning and teaching methods as well as using the media appropriate to individuals’ learning styles.

  19. Mobile Phone Support for Diabetes Self-Care Among Diverse Adults: Protocol for a Three-Arm Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lyndsay A; Wallston, Kenneth A; Kripalani, Sunil; Greevy, Robert A; Elasy, Tom A; Bergner, Erin M; Gentry, Chad K; Mayberry, Lindsay S

    2018-04-10

    Nonadherence to self-care is common among patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and often leads to severe complications. Moreover, patients with T2D who have low socioeconomic status and are racial/ethnic minorities disproportionately experience barriers to adherence and poor outcomes. Basic phone technology (text messages and phone calls) provides a practical medium for delivering content to address patients' barriers to adherence; however, trials are needed to explore long-term and sustainable effects of mobile phone interventions among diverse patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of mobile phone-based diabetes support interventions on self-care and hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) among adults with T2D using a 3-arm, 15-month randomized controlled trial with a Type 1 hybrid effectiveness-implementation approach. The intervention arms are (1) Rapid Encouragement/Education And Communications for Health (REACH) and (2) REACH + Family-focused Add-on for Motivating Self-care (FAMS). We recruited primary care patients with T2D (N=512) from Federally Qualified Health Centers and an academic medical center, prioritizing recruitment of publicly insured and minority patients from the latter. Eligible patients were prescribed daily diabetes medication and owned a cell phone with text messaging capability. We excluded patients whose most recent HbA 1c result within 12 months was phone coaching with related text message content focused on family and friend barriers to diet and exercise adherence. We collect HbA 1c and self-reported survey data at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months, and again at 15 months to assess sustained changes. We will use generalized estimating equation models to test the effects of REACH (either intervention arm) on HbA 1c relative to the control group, the potential additive effects of FAMS, and effects of either intervention on adherence to self-care behaviors and diabetes self-efficacy. The trial is ongoing; recruitment closed

  20. The Study of Frequency Self Care Strategies against Auditory Hallucinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin Nadem

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: In schizophrenic clients, self-care strategies against auditory hallucinations can decrease disturbances results in hallucination. This study was aimed to assess frequency of self-care strategies against auditory hallucinations in paranoid schizophrenic patients, hospitalized in Shafa Hospital.Materials and Method: This was a descriptive study on 201 patients with paranoid schizophrenia hospitalized in psychiatry unit with convenience sampling in Rasht. The gathered data consists of two parts, first unit demographic characteristic and the second part, self- report questionnaire include 38 items about self-care strategies.Results: There were statistically significant relationship between demographic variables and knowledg effect and self-care strategies against auditory hallucinaions. Sex with phisical domain p0.07, marriage status with cognitive domain (p>0.07 and life status with behavioural domain (p>0.01. 53.2% of reported type of our auditory hallucinations were command hallucinations, furtheremore the most effective self-care strategies against auditory hallucinations were from physical domain and substance abuse (82.1% was the most effective strategies in this domain.Conclusion: The client with paranoid schizophrenia used more than physical domain strategies against auditory hallucinaions and this result highlight need those to approprait nursing intervention. Instruction and leading about selection the effective self-care strategies against auditory ha

  1. Work stress and health risk behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegrist, Johannes; Rödel, Andreas

    2006-12-01

    This contribution discusses current knowledge of associations between psychosocial stress at work and health risk behavior, in particular cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption and overweight, by reviewing findings from major studies in the field published between 1989 and 2006. Psychosocial stress at work is measured by the demand-control model and the effort-reward imbalance model. Health risk behavior was analyzed in the broader context of a health-related Western lifestyle with socially and economically patterned practices of consumption. Overall, the review, based on 46 studies, only modestly supports the hypothesis of a consistent association between work stress and health risk behavior. The relatively strongest relationships have been found with regard to heavy alcohol consumption among men, overweight, and the co-manifestation of several risks. Suggestions for further research are given, and the need to reduce stressful experience in the framework of worksite health promotion programs is emphasized.

  2. Health promoting behaviors in industrial workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulay Yilmazel

    2015-04-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Health promoting behaviors were found to be in moderate level among cement factory workers. In our country, health protection and development programs at the national level would be useful to standardize for employees in the industrial sector. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(2.000: 153-162

  3. Exploring Older Adults' Health Information Seeking Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manafo, Elizabeth; Wong, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore older adults' (55-70 years) health information-seeking behaviors. Methods: Using a qualitative methodology, based on grounded theory, data were collected using in-depth interviews. Participants were community-living, older adults in Toronto, Canada who independently seek nutrition and health information. Interview transcripts…

  4. Social support and personal models of diabetes as predictors of self- care and well-being

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skinner, T. Chas; John, Mary; Hampson, Sarah E.

    2000-01-01

    , well-being, and social support. Results: Perceived impact of diabetes and supportive family and friends were prospectively predictive of participants' well-being measures. Although support from family and friends was predictive of better dietary self-care, this relationship was mediated by personal...... of diabetes are important determinants of both dietary self-care and well-being. In addition, personal models may serve to mediate the relationship between social support and dietary behavior.......Objectives: To examine whether peer support and illness representation mediate the link between family support, self-management and well-being. Method: Fifty-two adolescents (12-18 years old) with Type I diabetes were recruited and followed over 6 months, completing assessments of self- management...

  5. Nutritional self-care among a group of older home-living people in rural Southern Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale B

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bjørg Dale, Ulrika SöderhamnCentre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, NorwayBackground: Older home-living people are an at-risk group for undernutrition, particularly those who are living alone. Lack of knowledge about healthy dietary habits, altered taste sensation, and declined health status are shown to be some of the factors related to undernutrition. The aims of this study were to explore how a small group of older people in Southern Norway perceived their nutritional self-care.Methods: An exploratory qualitative approach, combined with a simple self-report questionnaire, was used. Five persons living in rural areas in Southern Norway, who in a former study were screened and found to be at risk for undernutrition, participated. Qualitative data assessed by means of individual self-care talks in the persons' own homes were analyzed using directed content analysis. A simple self-report questionnaire containing demographic variables, two health-related questions, and the Nutritional Form For the Elderly (NUFFE-NO instrument was filled out at baseline and 6 months after the self-care talks.Results: The qualitative data showed that the participants had adequate knowledge about healthy and nutritious diets. They were aware of and motivated to adapt their diet to their current state of health and to perform the necessary actions to maintain an optimal nutritional status and nutritional self-care.Conclusion: Older people living at home are a diverse group. However, this study showed that they may have sufficient knowledge, willingness, and ability to perform nutritional self-care, even if they live alone and have several chronic illnesses and impaired health.Keywords: adapting, decision-making, knowledge, self-care talks

  6. Systematic review of measurement properties of self-reported instruments for evaluating self-care in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarese, Maria; Lommi, Marzia; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2017-06-01

    The aims of this study were as follows: to identify instruments developed to assess self-care in healthy adults; to determine the theory on which they were based; their validity and reliability properties and to synthesize the evidence on their measurement properties. Many instruments have been developed to assess self-care in many different populations and conditions. Clinicians and researchers should select the most appropriate self-care instrument based on the knowledge of their measurement properties. Systematic review of measurement instruments according to the protocol recommended by the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) panel. PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, Scopus and CINAHL databases were searched from inception to December 2015. Studies testing measurement properties of self-report instruments assessing self-care in healthy adults, published in the English language and in peer review journals were selected. Two reviewers independently appraised the methodological quality of the studies with the COSMIN checklist and the quality of results using specific quality criteria. Twenty-six articles were included in the review testing the measurement properties of nine instruments. Seven instruments were based on Orem's Self-care theory. Not all the measurement properties were evaluated for the identified instruments. No self-care instrument showed strong evidence supporting the evaluated measurement properties. Despite the development of several instruments to assess self-care in the adult population, no instrument can be fully recommended to clinical nurses and researchers. Further studies of high methodological quality are needed to confirm the measurement properties of these instruments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Collaborative care model improves self-care ability, quality of life and cardiac function of patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.Y. Hua

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic heart failure (CHF is a common chronic disease that requires much care. This study aimed to explore the effects of collaborative care model (CCM on patients with CHF. A total of 114 CHF patients were enrolled in this study, and were randomly and equally divided into two groups: control and experimental. Patients in the two groups received either usual care or CCM for 3 continuous months. The impacts of CCM on the self-care ability and quality of life were assessed using self-care of heart failure index and short form health survey 12, respectively. Further, cardiac function was assessed by measuring left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF and the level of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, and by the 6-min walking test. Clinical and demographic characteristics of patients in the control and CCM groups were statistically equivalent. Compared with usual care, CCM significantly enhanced self-care abilities of patients with CHF, including self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence (all P<0.05. The physical and mental quality of life was also significantly improved by CCM (P<0.01 or P<0.05. Compared with usual care, CCM significantly increased the LVEF (P<0.01, decreased the NT-proBNP level (P<0.01, and enhanced exercise capacity (P<0.001. In conclusion, CCM improved the self-care, quality of life and cardiac function of patients with CHF compared with usual care.

  8. Enhancing self-care, adjustment and engagement through mobile phones in youth with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, M E; Samson-Akpan, P E; Etowa, J B; Akpabio, I I; John, E E

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of mobile phones in enhancing self-care, adjustment and engagement in non-disclosed youth living with HIV. Youth aged 15-24 years represent 42% of new HIV infections globally. Youth who are aware of their HIV status generally do not disclose it or utilize HIV-related facilities because of fear of stigma. They rely on the Internet for health maintenance information and access formal care only when immune-compromised and in crisis. This study shows how non-disclosed youth living with HIV can be reached and engaged for self-management and adjustment through mobile phone. One-group pre-test/post-test experimental design was used. Mobile phones were used to give information, motivation and counselling to 19 purposively recruited non-disclosed youth with HIV in Calabar, South-South Nigeria. Psychological adjustment scale, modified self-care capacity scale and patient activation measure were used to collect data. Data were analysed using PASW 18.0. Scores on self-care capacity, psychological adjustment and engagement increased significantly at post-test. HIV-related visits to health facilities did not improve significantly even at 6 months. Participants still preferred to consult healthcare providers for counselling through mobile phone. Mobile phone-based interventions are low cost, convenient, ensure privacy and are suitable for youth. Such remote health counselling enhances self-management and positive living. Mobile phones enhance self-care, psychological adjustment and engagement in non-disclosed youth living with HIV, and can be used to increase care coverage. Findings underline the importance of policies to increase access by locating, counselling and engaging HIV-infected youth in care. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  9. HUBUNGAN SELF CARE DENGAN KUALITAS HIDUP PASIEN DIABETES MELITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reny Chaidir

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia merupakan daerah terbanyak nomor dua penderita diabets melitus di kawasan Asia Tenggara dengan angka kejadian sebesar 9,116.03 kasus. Puskesmas Tigo Baleh angka kunjungan penderita diabetes melitus pada tahun 2015 mengalami peningkatan yaitu sebesar 408 kunjungan. Pasien diabetes melitus rentan mengalami komplikasi yang disebabkan oleh peningkatan kadar gula darah. Peningkatan kadar gula darah dapat dicegah dengan melakukan self care terdiri dari pengaturan diet, olah raga, terapi obat, perawatan kaki, dan pemantauan gula darah. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui adanya hubungan self care dengan kualitas hidup pasien diabetes mellitus. Penelitian ini menggunakan pendekatan cross sectional yang dilakukan terhadap 89 orang responden dengan menggunakan teknik simple random sampling. Pengumpulan data menggunakan kuesioner The Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA dan kuesioner The Diabetes Quality of Life Brief Clinical Inventory. Hasil penelitian ini menggunakan uji product moment (pearson correlation, diperoleh nilai r = 0.432. Kesimpulan dari penelitian ini adalah terdapat hubungan antara self care dengan kualitas hidup pasien diabetes melitus di wilayah kerja Puskesmas Tigo Baleh yang berbanding lurus dan memiliki tingkat korelasi yang sedang. Terdapat faktor yang mempengaruhi korelasi dengan kualitas hidup. Diharapkan agar pasien diabetes melitus dapat meningkatkan aktivitas self care sehingga dapat menjalankan kehidupan secara normal.

  10. Self-care needs in healthcare contexts: how to gather, read and fulfill them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Zannini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In light of a continuing education intervention (entitled “On the other side” conducted with a multi-professional group at a Northern Italian hospital, this paper offers a reflection on educational needs analysis for healthcare professionals. This process has been extensively investigated, including in the context of healthcare training, leading to the call for a multi-method approach to developing professionals’ competencies in the interest of optimizing their patients’ health and quality of life. However, when professionals’ deepest inner need is for self-care to help them cope with the perceived heavy demands of clinical practice, educators may usefully adopt the phenomenological approach, which involves bracketing, the ability to see, taking responsibility and attending to professionals’ emotional experience. The analysis of professionals’ self-care needs should be viewed as a continuous process, to be implemented on an ongoing basis throughout the entire educational intervention, and as a practice that itself requires a caring attitude.

  11. Self-care and clinical parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Thiago de Sousa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to verify characteristics related to self-care and clinical parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: descriptive and exploratory, cross-sectional study, conducted with 173 patients assisted in 12 Family Health Units in the urban area of a city in the Northeast region of Brazil. Results: most participants (61.3% were female, aged less than 60 years old. There were significant differences in the lower glycemic control (p = 0.014, capillary glycemia (p = 0.018 and alcohol consumption (p = 0.015 for men as well as higher central obesity indexes for women (p = 0.000. It was observed high frequency of overweight, abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, elevated blood glucose levels and insufficient levels of physical activity. Conclusion: there is the need for nursing actions aimed at improving self-care and control of the clinical parameters in these patients.

  12. Emotional responses to behavioral economic incentives for health behavior change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Swaluw, Koen; Lambooij, Mattijs S; Mathijssen, Jolanda J P; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Polder, Johan J; Prast, Henriëtte M

    2018-03-05

    Many people aim to change their lifestyle, but have trouble acting on their intentions. Behavioral economic incentives and related emotions can support commitment to personal health goals, but the related emotions remain unexplored. In a regret lottery, winners who do not attain their health goals do not get their prize but receive feedback on what their forgone earnings would have been. This counterfactual feedback should provoke anticipated regret and increase commitment to health goals. We explored which emotions were actually expected upon missing out on a prize due to unsuccessful weight loss and which incentive-characteristics influence their likelihood and intensity. Participants reported their expected emotional response after missing out on a prize in one of 12 randomly presented incentive-scenarios, which varied in incentive type, incentive size and deadline distance. Participants primarily reported feeling disappointment, followed by regret. Regret was expected most when losing a lottery prize (vs. a fixed incentive) and intensified with prize size. Multiple features of the participant and the lottery incentive increase the occurrence and intensity of regret. As such, our findings can be helpful in designing behavioral economic incentives that leverage emotions to support health behavior change.

  13. [The health preserving behavior in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al'bitskii, V Iu; Makeev, N I

    2010-01-01

    The article deals with the results of study of health preserving behavior of 310 students of senior classes of high schools of town of Jukovsky of Moskovskaya oblast. The higher level of prevalence of harmful habits among adolescents is revealed. It is emphasized that among girls the prevalence of harmful habits is not at large lower than among boys. The lower level of medical activities of respondents is explained by mistrusting physicians of curative preventive establishments, fear of queues, self-confidence in one's own knowledge and low level of medical awareness. The priority of physical culture and sport in the life of adolescents is reducing. The reorientation of trends in modern fashion to the behavior stereotypes with motional activities restriction occurs. The making of conditions to develop consistent health preserving behavior can become the most important reserve of preservation and enhancement of adolescents' health.

  14. Changing health behaviors with social marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Almazor, M E

    2011-08-01

    Social marketing uses marketing techniques to promote healthy attitudes and behaviors. As in traditional marketing, the development and implementation of social marketing programs is based on the four P's: product, price, place, and promotion, but it also incorporates the partnership and participation of stakeholders to enhance public health and engage policy makers. The "product" in social marketing is generally a behavior, such as a change in lifestyle (e.g., diet) or an increase in a desired health practice (e.g., screening). In order for people to desire this product, it must offer a solution to a problem that is weighed with respect to the price to pay. The price is not just monetary, and it often involves giving something up, such as time (e.g., exercising) or a wanted, satisfying behavior (e.g., smoking). In its development phase, social marketing incorporates qualitative methods to create messages that are powerful and potentially effective. The implementation of the programs commonly involves mass campaigns with advertisement in various media. There have been a few social media campaigns targeting bone health that have been disseminated with substantial outreach. However, these have not been systematically evaluated, specifically with respect to change in behavior and health outcomes. Future campaigns should identify target behaviors that are amenable to change such as bone mass measurement screening or exercise. Audience segmentation will be crucial, since a message for young women to increase peak bone mass would be very different from a message for older individuals who have just experienced a fracture. Campaigns should involve key stakeholders, including policy makers, health providers, and the public. Finally, success must be carefully evaluated, not just by the outreach of the campaign, but also by a change in relevant behaviors and a decrease in deleterious health outcomes.

  15. Electronic health records: eliciting behavioral health providers' beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shank, Nancy; Willborn, Elizabeth; Pytlikzillig, Lisa; Noel, Harmonijoie

    2012-04-01

    Interviews with 32 community behavioral health providers elicited perceived benefits and barriers of using electronic health records. Themes identified were (a) quality of care, (b) privacy and security, and (c) delivery of services. Benefits to quality of care were mentioned by 100% of the providers, and barriers by 59% of providers. Barriers involving privacy and security concerns were mentioned by 100% of providers, and benefits by 22%. Barriers to delivery of services were mentioned by 97% of providers, and benefits by 66%. Most providers (81%) expressed overall positive support for electronic behavioral health records.

  16. The Cultural Meaning of Cardiac Illness and Self-Care Among Lebanese Patients With Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumit, Nuhad Yazbik; Magilvy, Joan Kathy; Afifi, Rima

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac disease is the leading cause of death in Lebanon, accounting for 22% to 26% of total deaths in the country. A thorough understanding of perceptions of cardiac illness and related self-care management is critical to the development of secondary prevention programs that are specific to the Lebanese culture. To explore the cultural perceptions of cardiac illness and the associated meaning of self-care among Lebanese patients. Using a qualitative descriptive method, semistructured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 15 Lebanese cardiac patients recruited from a medical center in Beirut, Lebanon. The qualitative descriptive analysis yielded one overarching and two other themes describing perceptions of cardiac illness and self-care within the Lebanese cultural context. The overarching cultural theme was, "Lebanese cardiac patients were unfamiliar with the term concept and meaning of self-care." Lebanese cardiac patients thanked God and accepted their fate (Theme I). The participants considered their cardiac incident a life or death warning (Theme II). Health care providers need to consider patients' cultural perception of illness while planning and evaluating cardiac self-care programs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Urinary incontinence products - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prescription from your provider. Check with your insurance company to find out. When to Call the Doctor ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  18. Self-care follows from compassionate care - chronic pain patients' experience of integrative rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arman, Maria; Hök, Johanna

    2016-06-01

    The long-term outcome of any intervention for people suffering from chronic pain relies on the patient's ability for self-care. This study explores patient experiences of self-care in relation to a rehabilitation programme at an anthroposophic clinic. In a qualitative interview study with a hermeneutic approach, individual interviews were conducted, recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed. Interviews were conducted with ten women who were taking part in a year-long rehabilitation programme for chronic pain and overlapping illness. The women told stories of suffering with a focus on lives that were not functioning well. In this context, pain is like secondary. For many, the experience of loving care at the clinic became a turning point, a chance to be vulnerable, to be recognised, to reflect and to begin life anew. Signs of self-care could then be witnessed. The women described a process whereby they regained contact with their bodies and their fellow human beings; they were able to identify their needs and when to stand up for them. Everyday life at the clinic is guided by universal aspects of love, life and meanings. The care gives patients glimpses of a move towards community in contrast to past isolation, towards love in contrast to past alienation, and towards joy and inspiration in contrast to past suffering. Through receiving caritative and compassionate care, these women were able to identify their needs as a first step towards self-care. In the context of chronic pain, self-care needs to be more than advice, education and training. Health can be attained when the sufferer experiences what it is to be cared for. This study supports the potential of a caritative caring culture to help patients participate in a compassionate community both with others and with the self. This forms the basis for the reawakening of their natural self-care ability. © 2015 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of

  19. Care for the Caregiver: Evaluation of Mind-Body Self-Care for Accelerated Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Barbara L; Motter, Tracey; Ross, Ratchneewan; Goliat, Laura M; Sharpnack, Patricia A; Govoni, Amy L; Bozeman, Michelle C; Rababah, Jehad

    2016-01-01

    Stress affects the well-being of both nursing students and the individuals with whom they work. With the theory of cognitive appraisal as a framework for this study, it is proposed that mind-body self-care strategies promote stress management by stabilization of emotions. Outcomes will be a perception of less stress and more mindful engagement with the environment. Objective of the study was to describe an evaluation of student perceived stress and mindfulness to 1-hour per week of class time dedicated to mind-body self-care (yoga, mindful breathing, Reiki, and essential oil therapy). It was a quasi-experimental study; data collection took place at 4 time points. Participants were entry-level accelerated nursing students from 3 US universities: 50 in the treatment group, 64 in the comparison group. Data included health-promoting practices using Health-Promoting Promotion Lifestyle Profile II as a control variable, stress and mindfulness (Perceived Stress Scale [PSS] and Mindful Attention Awareness Scale [MAAS]), and demographic information; analysis using mixed-design repeated-measures analysis of variances. There was a statistically significant interaction between intervention and time on PSS scores, F(3, 264) = 3.95, P = .009, partial η(2) = 0.043, with PSS scores of the intervention group decreasing from baseline to T3 when intervention ended whereas PSS scores of the comparison group increased from baseline. The average scores on the MAAS did not differ significantly. Evaluation of an embedded mind-body self-care module in the first nursing course demonstrated promising improvements in stress management. The findings support the appropriateness of integrating mind-body self-care content into nursing curricula to enhance students' ability to regulate stress.

  20. Self-care in Patients with Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Céu Mendes Pinto Marques

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To adapt the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index V6.2 to Portuguese and analyze self-care capability in maintenance, management and self-confidence in patients with heart failure attending nursing care services at two Portuguese hospitals. Method: Exploratory study, sample of 110 patients who attended the nursing care service for patients with heart failure at two Portuguese hospitals, carried out over a six-month period. Descriptive statistics and psychometric tests were used. Results: Internal consistency similar to the original scale. The patients consisted mostly of older adults with low self-care literacy, low values associated with physical activity and salt control in meals taken outside the home, and inadequate control of signs and symptoms. Conclusion: Patients present difficulties in maintenance and management of the disease, and are self-confident regarding it. This instrument enables individualized assessment leading to decision-making and adjusted action.

  1. Behavioral health leadership: new directions in occupational mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Amy B; Saboe, Kristin N; Anderson, James; Sipos, Maurice L; Thomas, Jeffrey L

    2014-10-01

    The impact of stress on mental health in high-risk occupations may be mitigated by organizational factors such as leadership. Studies have documented the impact of general leadership skills on employee performance and mental health. Other researchers have begun examining specific leadership domains that address relevant organizational outcomes, such as safety climate leadership. One emerging approach focuses on domain-specific leadership behaviors that may moderate the impact of combat deployment on mental health. In a recent study, US soldiers deployed to Afghanistan rated leaders on behaviors promoting management of combat operational stress. When soldiers rated their leaders high on these behaviors, soldiers also reported better mental health and feeling more comfortable with the idea of seeking mental health treatment. These associations held even after controlling for overall leadership ratings. Operational stress leader behaviors also moderated the relationship between combat exposure and soldier health. Domain-specific leadership offers an important step in identifying measures to moderate the impact of high-risk occupations on employee health.

  2. Self-care education needs in gestational diabetes tailored to the Iranian culture: A qualitative content analysiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Kolivand

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gestational diabetes is one of the most common health problems in pregnancy that requires participation through self-care to reduce the maternal and neonatal complications. The present study aimed to determine the needs of women as an essential first step to formulate a self-care guide fitting the Iranian culture. Materials and Methods: The present qualitative study was conducted through interviews with 13 diabetic pregnant women and 10 care providers using semi-structured questionnaires in several cities of Iran in 2016. Further, the data analysis was performed using conventional content analysis. In addition, purposive sampling was performed at the diabetes clinic of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Imam Reza Hospital, and health centers across Kermanshah, Shahroud, and Tehran. Results: In the present qualitative content analysis study, four themes were identified: awareness and ability (knowing diabetes, mothers training and empowerment, continuity and quality, information resources, lifestyle (healthy diet, physical activity, mental health (counseling, interaction, spirituality, and religion, and supportive family (the husband's unique role, the psychological atmosphere at home. Conclusions: The present study highlighted main aspects of self-care educational/supportive needs, specifically in the domains of lifestyle, awareness and capability, mental health, and family. The results of our analysis highlighted the needs that can be useful for developing comprehensive self-care educational programs, with a higher focus on physical activity, mental health, the role of the family, and the use of religious interests.

  3. Self-care Education Needs in Gestational Diabetes Tailored to the Iranian Culture: A Qualitative Content Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolivand, Mitra; Keramat, Afsaneh; Rahimi, MehrAli; Motaghi, Zahra; Shariati, Mohammad; Emamian, MohammadHassan

    2018-01-01

    Gestational diabetes is one of the most common health problems in pregnancy that requires participation through self-care to reduce the maternal and neonatal complications. The present study aimed to determine the needs of women as an essential first step to formulate a self-care guide fitting the Iranian culture. The present qualitative study was conducted through interviews with 13 diabetic pregnant women and 10 care providers using semi-structured questionnaires in several cities of Iran in 2016. Further, the data analysis was performed using conventional content analysis. In addition, purposive sampling was performed at the diabetes clinic of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Imam Reza Hospital, and health centers across Kermanshah, Shahroud, and Tehran. In the present qualitative content analysis study, four themes were identified: awareness and ability (knowing diabetes, mothers training and empowerment, continuity and quality, information resources), lifestyle (healthy diet, physical activity), mental health (counseling, interaction, spirituality, and religion), and supportive family (the husband's unique role, the psychological atmosphere at home). The present study highlighted main aspects of self-care educational/supportive needs, specifically in the domains of lifestyle, awareness and capability, mental health, and family. The results of our analysis highlighted the needs that can be useful for developing comprehensive self-care educational programs, with a higher focus on physical activity, mental health, the role of the family, and the use of religious interests.

  4. Applying the Health Belief Model to college students' health behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak-Seon; Ahn, Joo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate how university students' nutrition beliefs influence their health behavioral intention. This study used an online survey engine (Qulatrics.com) to collect data from college students. Out of 253 questionnaires collected, 251 questionnaires (99.2%) were used for the statistical analysis. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) revealed that six dimensions, "Nutrition Confidence," "Susceptibility," "Severity," "Barrier," "Benefit," "Behavioral Intention to Eat Healthy Food," and "Behavioral Intention to do Physical Activity," had construct validity; Cronbach's alpha coefficient and composite reliabilities were tested for item reliability. The results validate that objective nutrition knowledge was a good predictor of college students' nutrition confidence. The results also clearly showed that two direct measures were significant predictors of behavioral intentions as hypothesized. Perceived benefit of eating healthy food and perceived barrier for eat healthy food to had significant effects on Behavioral Intentions and was a valid measurement to use to determine Behavioral Intentions. These findings can enhance the extant literature on the universal applicability of the model and serve as useful references for further investigations of the validity of the model within other health care or foodservice settings and for other health behavioral categories. PMID:23346306

  5. A self-care plan for hospice workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sally Hill

    2005-01-01

    Caring for dying patients and their families is a fulfilling, enriching, and meaningful experience. It can also be extremely stressful. Maintaining the balance between the output and input of energy in a caregiver's professional and personal life is an ongoing process. Clinical staff members often formulate plans of care for patients. To prevent worker burnout, hospice caregivers must develop a plan of self-care to balance their own needs with the needs of their patients. The goal of this article is to provide an overview of ways for hospice caregivers to relieve stress and develop an individualized self-care plan within the context of their work.

  6. The business cycle and health behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin

    2013-01-01

    While it is well documented that economic expansions provide widespread and immediate financial benefits, the evidence on how an economic downturn affects individual's health behaviors is surprisingly mixed. In this paper, we take a structural approach to investigate the effects of wages and working hours on health behaviors of low-educated persons using variations in wages and hours caused by changes in local economic activity. In the empirical analysis, we adopt a two-sample instrumental variables approach to combine the data on individual health behaviors from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) with the data on individual employment from the Current Population Survey (CPS). The total sample size of the combined CPS-BRFSS data for the time period of 1984-2005 is 967,594, while that of the combined CPS-NHIS data for the time period of 1976-2001 is 364,078. We find that increases in wages caused by economic expansions are associated with greater consumption of cigarettes in the United States. We also find that increases in hours of work caused by economic expansions are associated with more cigarette consumption, but less physical activity and physician visits. More importantly, the evidence suggests that most of such effects associated with changes in hours of work can be attributed to the changes at the extensive margin of employment, meaning the changes in employment status, rather than the changes at the intensive margin, meaning changes in hours of work conditional on being employed. These findings imply that changes in employment may have heterogeneous impacts on time-intensive and less time-intensive health behaviors and also provide additional evidence on the importance of time in health production, particularly for time-intensive activities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Self-care for the caregiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radziewicz, R M

    2001-12-01

    Palliative care nurses can face unique stressors and compassion fatigue working in their field. Working with the dying and their families, communicating with other health care professionals, and handling ethical issues are often sources of stress in palliative care. The biochemistry and theory of stress are discussed. Various strategies to cope with caregiver stress are explained.

  8. Saberes relacionados ao autocuidado entre mulheres da área rural do Sul do Brasil Conocimientos relacionados a el autocuidado de mujeres del área rural del Sur de Brasil Knowledges related to self-care in health among women of the rural area of Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moara Ailane Thum

    2011-09-01

    reales de la comunidad asistida, rescatando la cultura relacionada con el autocuidado.This article aimed to study self-care actions by a group of rural women from the city of Pelotas, state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. This was a qualitative research in which 11 women living in the city's rural area have participated. Data collection occurred between May and June, 2010, through semi-structured interviews. A content analysis was performed on the data. The oldest informants have participated in the community group for 12 years, doing workmanship and exchanging knowledge on the use of medicinal plants. Self-care is part of the actions of these women, which are performed in many different ways, including actions in the family context, and the transmission of beliefs and habits through generations. We hope to contribute to the valorization of rural women, educating health professionals on health practices that meet real needs of the assisted community, reclaiming the culture related to self-care.

  9. Social factors and barriers to self-care adherence in Hispanic men and women with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansyur, Carol L; Rustveld, Luis O; Nash, Susan G; Jibaja-Weiss, Maria L

    2015-06-01

    To explore quantitatively the extent to which social support, social norms and barriers are associated with self-efficacy and self-care adherence in Hispanic patients with diabetes and the extent to which these differ for men and women. Baseline survey data were collected from 248 low-SES, Hispanic men and women who were participants in a randomized controlled trial of a culturally targeted intervention for diabetes management. Student's t, Pearson correlations and multiple regression were used to analyze the data. Compared to men, women were less likely to receive support, faced more barriers, reported less self-efficacy and had lower levels of self-care adherence. Perceived support was consistently correlated with better self-efficacy in women but not men, even though men reported higher levels of support. The lack of adequate support seems to be a fundamental barrier for Hispanic women with diabetes. Health care providers should be sensitive to sociocultural influences in Hispanic groups that may facilitate men's self-care adherence, but could potentially hamper women's efforts. Interventions designed for Hispanics should augment women's support needs and address culture and social factors that may differentially impact the ability of men and women to manage their diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Family Partner Intervention Influences Self-Care Confidence and Treatment Self-Regulation in Patients with Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamp, Kelly D.; Dunbar, Sandra B.; Clark, Patricia C.; Reilly, Carolyn M.; Gary, Rebecca A.; Higgins, Melinda; Ryan, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart failure self-care requires confidence in one’s ability and motivation to perform a recommended behavior. Most self-care occurs within a family context, yet little is known about the influence of family on heart failure self-care or motivating factors. Aims To examine the association of family functioning and the self-care antecedents of confidence and motivation among heart failure participants and determine if a family partnership intervention would promote higher levels of perceived confidence and treatment self-regulation (motivation) at four and eight months compared to patient-family education or usual care groups. Methods Heart failure patients (N = 117) and a family member were randomized to a family partnership intervention, patient-family education or usual care groups. Measures of patient’s perceived family functioning, confidence, motivation for medications and following a low-sodium diet were analyzed. Data were collected at baseline, four and eight months. Results Family functioning was related to self-care confidence for diet (p=.02) and autonomous motivation for adhering to their medications (p=.05 and diet p=0.2). The family partnership intervention group significantly improved confidence (p=.05) and motivation (medications (p=.004; diet p=.012) at four months whereas patient-family education group and usual care did not change. Conclusion Perceived confidence and motivation for self-care was enhanced by family partnership intervention, regardless of family functioning. Poor family functioning at baseline contributed to lower confidence. Family functioning should be assessed to guide tailored family-patient interventions for better outcomes. PMID:25673525

  11. Determinants of Heart Failure Self-Care Maintenance and Management in Patients and Caregivers: A Dyadic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwell, Julie T; Vellone, Ercole; Lyons, Karen S; D'Agostino, Fabio; Riegel, Barbara; Juárez-Vela, Raúl; Hiatt, Shirin O; Alvaro, Rosaria; Lee, Christopher S

    2015-10-01

    Disease self-management is a critical component of maintaining clinical stability for patients with chronic illness. This is particularly evident in the context of heart failure (HF), which is the leading cause of hospitalization for older adults. HF self-management, commonly known as HF self-care, is often performed with the support of informal caregivers. However, little is known about how a HF dyad manages the patient's care together. The purpose of this study was to identify determinants of patient and caregiver contributions to HF self-care maintenance (daily adherence and symptom monitoring) and management (appropriate recognition and response to symptoms), utilizing an approach that controls for dyadic interdependence. This was a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data from 364 dyads of Italian HF patients and caregivers. Multilevel modeling was used to identify determinants of HF self-care within patient-caregiver dyads. Patients averaged 76.2 (SD = 10.7) years old, and a slight majority (56.9%) was male, whereas caregivers averaged 57.4 (SD = 14.6) years old, and about half (48.1%) were male. Most caregivers were adult children (48.4%) or spouses (32.7%) of patients. Both patients and caregivers reported low levels of HF maintenance and management behaviors. Significant individual and dyadic determinants of self-care maintenance and self-care management included gender, quality of life, comorbid burden, impaired ADLs, cognition, hospitalizations, HF duration, relationship type, relationship quality, and social support. These comprehensive dyadic models assist in elucidating the complex nature of patient-caregiver relationships and their influence on HF self-care, leading to more effective ways to intervene and optimize outcomes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Health behaviors of Bydgoszcz high school graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Kostencka

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lifestyle affects the physical, mental, social development, health and learning ability. It seems that there are differences in the health behaviors  of young females and males, however these differences are not well described. The aim of the current study was to assess the lifestyle of eighteen-years old and to compare their health behaviors of young persons according to their gender. The study was conducted among 98 students of high schools in Bydgoszcz (35 females and 68 males. All participants were 18 years old. The questionnaire was prepared especially for the purposes of the study, a part of the questions of this questionnaire was taken from the Canada Fitness Survey. The physical activity, mode of nutrition, use of stimulants, hours of sleep, time spent in front of screens and the level of stress were taken into consideration while assessing the teenagers’ lifestyle. The lifestyle of high school graduates is worrisome. It is characterized by low level of physical activity, irregular nutrition, not enough fruits, vegetables and water consumed. A large group of young people drink alcohol, smoke tobacco and marijuana, sleep too short. Males also spend too many hours in front of a television, computer or other similar device. Differences in the health behaviors of  women and men appear to be significant. The prevalence of alcohol abuse in this group is very high and affects both sexes. The sex differences in the health-promoting behaviors among men and women in this group of adolescents seems to diminish. Observed unhealthy behaviors indicates the urgent need for health education, especially those that educate the student about the value of the person, the value of health, and the development of social skills that underlie personal development. The foremost priority is  risk prevention implementation in primary schools. Further research and continuous monitoring of health behaviors in different age groups  is needed as well as  to

  13. Self care activities among patients with diabetes attending a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Self care activities among patients with diabetes attending a tertiary care hospital in Mangalore Karnataka, India. ... Conclusions: Self‑care practices were found to be unsatisfactory in almost all aspects except for blood sugar monitoring and treatment adherence. As these practices are essential for prevention of ...

  14. When Teacher Self-Care Is Not Enough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Jeffrey

    2018-01-01

    Teachers who work with students who have mental illnesses face day-to-day challenges and high burnout rates. In this article, Jeffrey Benson argues that messages about teacher self-care and resiliency are not enough. Instead, the structures must change--by way of clinical consultations, mentorships, and in-school support systems--to best serve…

  15. Staging Co-design Processes for Self-care Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Søsser Grith Kragh; Lindegaard, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    field studies in people’s homes and discuss how to stage design processes with the people who are actually going to use the self-care technologies—not only end-users, but also many other actors, such as relatives, caregivers, and municipality and company staff. Specifically, we describe how challenges...

  16. The Role of Self-Care for Parents in Recovery From Substance Use Disorders: An Integrative Review of Parental Self-Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynor, Phyllis; Pope, Charlene

    2016-01-01

    Lack of stress modifiers, such as self-care behaviors (SCBs), can increase vulnerability to drug use for parents in recovery from substance use disorders (SUDs). The purpose of this integrative review was to determine how the existing literature describes, conceptualizes, and measures SCB for parents in the general population for its application to parents with a history of SUD. Framed by Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory of Substance Abuse, four qualitative and five quantitative studies identify SCB, although only one study describes SCB of parents in recovery. Few studies addressed parental SCB, and most of those studies focused on behaviors for new mothers with or without SUDs during the early child years. Exploring the role of SCB in relation to parental well-being for the general population is a needed area for further research, even more so for parents who are recovering from SUDs.

  17. Passion for Academics and Problematic Health Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, Alexander T; Razon, Selen; Saville, Bryan K; Tokac, Umit; Judge, Lawrence W

    2017-01-01

    According to the Dualistic Model of Passion (39), passion entails valuing, liking, and spending time on an activity. The Dualistic Model also posits two types of passion for activities: harmonious passion (individual voluntarily engages in the activity) and obsessive passion (individual is compelled to engage in the activity). The purpose of the present study was to examine the possible links between college students' passion for academic activities and problematic health behaviors including smoking, excessive drinking, exercise addiction, disordered eating, and sleepiness, which is a possible indicator of sleep deprivation. Participants (n = 502) completed a survey gauging passion type and health behaviors. Regression analyses revealed obsessive passion for academic activities was positively associated with scores on measures of excessive drinking (β = .15, p= .008), exercise addiction (β = .19, ppassion for academic activities, in contrast, was negatively associated with excessive drinking behavior (β = -.16, p = .002) and sleep deprivation (β = -.13, p = .007) but was not associated with exercise addiction (β = .002, p = .97) and disordered eating (β = -.04, p = .37). These findings provide further support for the Dualistic Model of Passion. Students who are obsessively passionate about their academic activities are more likely to engage in poor health behaviors and, in turn, may experience greater negative outcomes than students who are harmoniously passionate about their academics.

  18. The effectiveness of group visits for patients with heart failure on knowledge, quality of life, self-care, and readmissions: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slyer, Jason T; Ferrara, Lucille R

    The objective of this review is to identify the effectiveness of group visits for patients with heart failure (HF) on knowledge, quality of life, self-care behaviors, and hospital readmissions. BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF) continues to be a major health burden throughout the world. There are currently over 5.7 million Americans, 15 million Europeans, and 277,800 Australians living with HF. These numbers are expected to double by 2040. Patients and caregivers perform the majority of HF care in the home. Patients with HF need to learn to be successful in self-managing their condition to lessen the burden of symptoms such as fatigue, dyspnea, and edema.Patient education is the primary process used to increase knowledge of self-care practices for patients with HF. Patients with HF need to follow a complex medical regimen while adhering to a low sodium diet and prescribed fluid restrictions. In addition patients monitor their physical condition daily for exacerbation of symptoms or signs of fluid overload. Education, behavior modification, and skill development are necessary for a patient with HF to be successful in self-managing their condition.Most HF education occurs during one-on-one visits between the patient and the health care provider in an examination room during a regular clinic visit. However, there is usually limited time to address all of the needed education topics in an in-depth, meaningful manner with information the patient can take home and utilize in their daily routines.Group visits provide an alternative venue to provide care for this complex patient population. A group visit is an interactive process between a health care provider and a small group of patients and their caregivers who usually share a common medical concern. The participants of group visits can benefit from the knowledge and experiences of the other participants while providing support and encouragement to each other as they learn to cope with living with a chronic condition

  19. Behavioral Health Emergencies Managed by School Nurses Working with Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Mary M.; Greenberg, Cynthia; Sapien, Robert; Bauer-Creegan, Judith; Hine, Beverly; Geary, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Background: As members of interdisciplinary teams, school nurses provide behavioral health services. Studies indicate that school nurses may lack sufficient continuing education in adolescent behavioral health and in the management of behavioral health emergencies, specifically. We conducted this study to describe the adolescent behavioral health…

  20. Self-care and anticipated transition into retirement and later life in a Nordic welfare context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söderhamn O

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Olle Söderhamn1–3, Anne Skisland1,2, Margaretha Herrman31Department of Health and Nursing Sciences, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad and Kristiansand, Norway; 2Centre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Grimstad, Norway; 3Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, University West, Trollhättan, SwedenAbstract: Few studies have appeared in the health care literature on the meaning of transition into retirement and later life. However, this predictable-involuntary transition may influence personal health and well-being, and studying it from a self-care perspective could be useful. The aim of this study was to illuminate aspects of self-care in a group of middle-aged individuals in relation to their anticipated transition into retirement in the Nordic welfare context. A total of 13 individuals, aged 55 to 65 years, were randomly chosen from the total number of inhabitants in three municipalities in mid-west Sweden. Conversational interviews took place, during which the informants shared important events in their lives that had occurred from early childhood until the present time, together with thoughts about their anticipated future developmental transition into later life. The interviews were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim. After content analyses and interpretation, a comprehensive picture of the phenomenon was revealed. The results showed that there were opportunities, expectations, wishes, concerns, and worries related to the transition into retirement and old age among informants from both rural and urban municipalities. Self-care, in connection with this, depended on motivating and demotivating factors. Autonomy and mature dependence seemed to be positive driving forces for reaching a successful transition into later life. Supporting autonomy should be a way of facilitating the transition into retirement and later life.Keywords: aging, autonomy, motivation, older people, successful aging

  1. Medical feminism, working mothers, and the limits of home: finding a balance between self-care and other-care in cross-cultural debates about health and lifestyle, 1952-1956.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Frederick

    2016-07-12

    Post-war medical debates about the psychiatric consequences of married women's economic behaviour witnessed far more divergence and collision between perspectives than has often been acknowledged. Practitioners who approached women primarily as facilitators of family health-as wives and mothers-were mistrustful of the competing demands presented by paid employment. They were faced by a growing spectrum of opinion, however, which represented women as atrophying in the confines of domestic life, and which positioned work as a therapeutic act. Advocates of work tapped into anxieties about family instability by emphasizing the dangers posed by frustrated housewives, shifting clinical faith away from full-time motherhood, but nevertheless allowing responsibilities towards husbands and children to continue to frame argument about women's behaviour. Doctors, researchers and social critics, in this context, became preoccupied with questions of balance, mapping a path which sought to harmonize public and private fulfilment, identity and responsibility. This article traces this discursive shift through a series of conferences held by the Medical Women's International Association during the early-to-mid 1950s, connecting debates in Britain with systems of broader intellectual exchange. It enriches and complicates historical knowledge of post-war relationships between medicine and feminism, at the same time as offering a conceptual and linguistic context for modern discussion about work-life balance and gender. This article is published as part of a collection entitled "On balance: lifestyle, mental health and wellbeing".

  2. Pregnant adolescent self-care in the prevention of risk factors of Hypertensive Disorders in Pregnancy (HDP - doi:10.5020/18061230.2007.p173

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zélia Maria de Sousa Araújo Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adolescent pregnancy is considered a problem for public health, due to the high mortality related to hypertensive disorders in pregnancy – HDP. This was a descriptive study with the aim of analyzing the pregnant adolescent self-care in the prevention of HDP risk factors. It was carried out in the Nucleus of Integrated Medical Attention – NAMI, in Fortaleza – Ceará, with twenty women from the Dendê Community, taken care of in the prenatal ambulatory of that institution, during the months of September and October, 2005. The data were collected by means of interview. The pregnant adolescents informed precarious socio-economic conditions, low schooling and other risk factors for HDP, beyond the age: black color, familiar history, arterial hypertension (AH, diabetes mellitus, renal illness and emotional conflicts. The knowledge on the prevention of risk factors was restricted to five (25% pregnant adolescents; however it was reduced to fragmented information, and the preventive behaviors related to feeding habit, smoke and alcoholism cessation, and physical exercise. Therefore, it was evidenced among the adolescents the unsatisfactory exercise of self-care activities, aiming at preventing HDP risk factors; that beyond the age, they presented other predisposing factors to this disorders; that they were susceptible to preventive behaviors and/or control, as in the case of chronic-degenerative illnesses – AH and diabetes mellitus. Probably, this behavior was associated to the elementary and fragmented knowledge, and the absence or the deficiency of family participation in health promotion actions, mainly in those inherent to the prenatal follow-up.

  3. Complex systems and health behavior change: insights from cognitive science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Mark G; Plaut, David C

    2014-05-01

    To provide proof-of-concept that quantum health behavior can be instantiated as a computational model that is informed by cognitive science, the Theory of Reasoned Action, and quantum health behavior theory. We conducted a synthetic review of the intersection of quantum health behavior change and cognitive science. We conducted simulations, using a computational model of quantum health behavior (a constraint satisfaction artificial neural network) and tested whether the model exhibited quantum-like behavior. The model exhibited clear signs of quantum-like behavior. Quantum health behavior can be conceptualized as constraint satisfaction: a mitigation between current behavioral state and the social contexts in which it operates. We outlined implications for moving forward with computational models of both quantum health behavior and health behavior in general.

  4. Implementing Internet-Based Self-Care Programs in Primary Care: Qualitative Analysis of Determinants of Practice for Patients and Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Eric; Burrone, Laura; Perez, Elliottnell; Martino, Steve; Rowe, Michael

    2018-05-18

    Access to evidence-based interventions for common mental health conditions is limited due to geographic distance, scheduling, stigma, and provider availability. Internet-based self-care programs may mitigate these barriers. However, little is known about internet-based self-care program implementation in US health care systems. The objective of this study was to identify determinants of practice for internet-based self-care program use in primary care by eliciting provider and administrator perspectives on internet-based self-care program implementation. The objective was explored through qualitative analysis of semistructured interviews with primary care providers and administrators from the Veterans Health Administration. Participants were identified using a reputation-based snowball design. Interviews focused on identifying determinants of practice for the use of internet-based self-care programs at the point of care in Veterans Health Administration primary care. Qualitative analysis of transcripts was performed using thematic coding. A total of 20 physicians, psychologists, social workers, and nurses participated in interviews. Among this group, internet-based self-care program use was relatively low, but support for the platform was assessed as relatively high. Themes were organized into determinants active at patient and provider levels. Perceived patient-level determinants included literacy, age, internet access, patient expectations, internet-based self-care program fit with patient experiences, interest and motivation, and face-to-face human contact. Perceived provider-level determinants included familiarity with internet-based self-care programs, changes to traditional care delivery, face-to-face human contact, competing demands, and age. This exploration of perspectives on internet-based self-care program implementation among Veterans Health Administration providers and administrators revealed key determinants of practice, which can be used to develop

  5. Empowering individuals as carers of their own health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, M F

    2001-01-01

    Self-care as both treatment and prevention is assuming new importance for several reasons: chronic illness, which calls for self-care is becoming a more serious global problem; illnesses that are related to unhealthy behavior are more common; medical care is becoming more participative because of increased individualism; the costs of care make it necessary for more care to be assumed by patients; and new technology expands what people can do for themselves. Self-care is relevant to the enhancement of health, the prevention of illness; the management of disease, particularly chronic illnesses; and rehabilitation to reduce disability. Barriers to self-care include mental attitudes of depression and denial, addictions, cultural factors, low intelligence and illiteracy, and family conflict. Self-care is enhanced by a sustaining relationship with a health professional, trustworthy information, patient education that is culturally sensitive, technological aids, financial and other positive incentives, and peer group support. Self-care is a growing dimension of health care that needs and deserves further research and innovation.

  6. The Holistic, Interactive and Persuasive Model to Facilitate Self-care of Patients with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Lombard, Miguel; Jipsion, Armando; Vejarano, Rafael; Camargo, Ismael; Álvarez, Humberto; Mora, Elena Villalba; Menasalva Ruíz, Ernestina

    The patient, in his multiple facets of citizen and user of services of health, needs to acquire during, and later in his majority of age, favorable conditions of health to accentuate his quality of life and it is the responsibility of the health organizations to initiate the process of support for that patient during the process of mature life. The provision of services of health and the relation doctor-patient are undergoing important changes in the entire world, forced to a large extent by the indefensibility of the system itself. Nevertheless decision making requires previous information and, what more the necessity itself of being informed requires having a “culture” of health that generates pro activity and the capacity of searching for instruments that facilitate the awareness of the suffering and the self-care of the same. Therefore it is necessary to put into effect a ICT model (hiPAPD) that has the objective of causing Interaction, Motivation and Persuasion towards the surroundings of the diabetic Patient facilitating his self-care. As a result the patient himself individually manages his services through devices and AmI Systems (Ambient Intelligent).

  7. Medical feminism, working mothers, and the limits of home: finding a balance between self-care and other-care in cross-cultural debates about health and lifestyle, 1952–1956

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Post-war medical debates about the psychiatric consequences of married women’s economic behaviour witnessed far more divergence and collision between perspectives than has often been acknowledged. Practitioners who approached women primarily as facilitators of family health—as wives and mothers—were mistrustful of the competing demands presented by paid employment. They were faced by a growing spectrum of opinion, however, which represented women as atrophying in the confines of domestic life, and which positioned work as a therapeutic act. Advocates of work tapped into anxieties about family instability by emphasizing the dangers posed by frustrated housewives, shifting clinical faith away from full-time motherhood, but nevertheless allowing responsibilities towards husbands and children to continue to frame argument about women’s behaviour. Doctors, researchers and social critics, in this context, became preoccupied with questions of balance, mapping a path which sought to harmonize public and private fulfilment, identity and responsibility. This article traces this discursive shift through a series of conferences held by the Medical Women’s International Association during the early-to-mid 1950s, connecting debates in Britain with systems of broader intellectual exchange. It enriches and complicates historical knowledge of post-war relationships between medicine and feminism, at the same time as offering a conceptual and linguistic context for modern discussion about work-life balance and gender. This article is published as part of a collection entitled “On balance: lifestyle, mental health and wellbeing”. PMID:28090336

  8. [International development cooperation from the D. Orem self-care theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velo Higueras, María; Fajardo Galván, Darío; Cruces González, Marta; Sánchez Merino, Begoña; Santos Muñiz, Ana

    2013-05-01

    This article aim is to analyze the performance of Spanish cooperation from the perspective of Orem self-care theory, from the next hypothesis: the Spanish international cooperation programs works as total compensation systems. cross sectional and descriptive study in which qualitative analysis was performed 3 African countries: Mozambique, Angola and Namibia. The variables were management, focused area and resources used. All countries have a shared management of the cooperation. Mozambique has developed training activities (72%), management support (38%) and direct health care (27%), focused on the area of the fight against infection and tropical diseases. In Angola, the activities are based in training (37%), management support (37%) and health care (75%) in the area of basic health services (25%), fighting against tropical diseases (50%) and improving maternal and child health (25%). Namibia focuses on the health care area (100%) through direct assistance activities and management support. Health cooperation programs developed by the Spanish state have probed to work as partial compensation system.

  9. Quantifying direct effects of social determinants of health on glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rebekah J; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Martin-Harris, Bonnie; Egede, Leonard E

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if self-care is the pathway through which social determinants of health impact diabetes outcomes by analyzing the direct and indirect effects of socioeconomic and psychosocial factors on self-care and glycemic control. Six hundred fifteen adults were recruited from two primary care clinics in the southeastern United States. A series of confirmatory factor analyses identified the latent factors underlying social status, psychosocial determinants (psychological distress, self-efficacy, and social support), and self-care (diet, exercise, foot care, glucose testing, and medication adherence). Structured equation modeling investigated the relationship among social determinants, self-care and glycemic control. Latent variables were created for diabetes self-care, psychological distress, self-efficacy, social support, and social status. The final model [χ(2)(275)=450.07, Psocial support (r=0.14, P=0.01), and higher self-efficacy (r=0.47, Psocial support (r=0.10, P=0.02), and higher self-efficacy (r=-0.37, Psocial determinants of health variables were included in the model, self-care was no longer significantly associated with glycemic control (r=0.01, P=0.83). This study suggests a direct relationship between psychosocial determinants of health and glycemic control. Although associated with self-care, the relationship between social determinants of health and glycemic control is not mediated by self-care. Development of interventions should take psychosocial factors into account as independent influences on diabetes outcomes, rather than as indirect influences via self-care behavior.

  10. Review and Analysis of Existing Mobile Phone Apps to Support Heart Failure Symptom Monitoring and Self-Care Management Using the Mobile Application Rating Scale (MARS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson Creber, Ruth M; Maurer, Mathew S; Reading, Meghan; Hiraldo, Grenny; Hickey, Kathleen T; Iribarren, Sarah

    2016-06-14

    Heart failure is the most common cause of hospital readmissions among Medicare beneficiaries and these hospitalizations are often driven by exacerbations in common heart failure symptoms. Patient collaboration with health care providers and decision making is a core component of increasing symptom monitoring and decreasing hospital use. Mobile phone apps offer a potentially cost-effective solution for symptom monitoring and self-care management at the point of need. The purpose of this review of commercially available apps was to identify and assess the functionalities of patient-facing mobile health apps targeted toward supporting heart failure symptom monitoring and self-care management. We searched 3 Web-based mobile app stores using multiple terms and combinations (eg, "heart failure," "cardiology," "heart failure and self-management"). Apps meeting inclusion criteria were evaluated using the Mobile Application Rating Scale (MARS), IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics functionality scores, and Heart Failure Society of America (HFSA) guidelines for nonpharmacologic management. Apps were downloaded and assessed independently by 2-4 reviewers, interclass correlations between reviewers were calculated, and consensus was met by discussion. Of 3636 potentially relevant apps searched, 34 met inclusion criteria. Most apps were excluded because they were unrelated to heart failure, not in English or Spanish, or were games. Interrater reliability between reviewers was high. AskMD app had the highest average MARS total (4.9/5). More than half of the apps (23/34, 68%) had acceptable MARS scores (>3.0). Heart Failure Health Storylines (4.6) and AskMD (4.5) had the highest scores for behavior change. Factoring MARS, functionality, and HFSA guideline scores, the highest performing apps included Heart Failure Health Storylines, Symple, ContinuousCare Health App, WebMD, and AskMD. Peer-reviewed publications were identified for only 3 of the 34 apps. This review suggests

  11. [Participative action research; self-care education for the mature adult, a dialogic and empowered process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Gomez, Sheila; Medina Moya, José Luis; Mendoza Pérez de Mendiguren, Beatriz; Ugarte Arena, Ana Isabel; Martínez de Albéniz Arriaran, Mercedes

    2015-11-01

    Explore and transform dialogic-reflexive learning processes oriented to self-care, capacitation, empowerment and health promotion for "mature-adult" collective. Participative action research on a qualitative and sociocritic approach. Data generation methods are SITE: Field work focuses on the development of the educational program "Care is in your hands" that takes place in two villages (Primary Care. Comarca Araba). Through a theoretical sampling involved people who are in a "mature-adult" life stage and three nurses with extensive experience in development health education programs. Participant observation where health education sessions are recorded in video and group reflection on action. To triangulate the data, have been made in-depth interviews with 4 participants. Carried out a content and discourse analysis. Participant and nurses' Previous Frameworks, and these last ones' discourses as well, reveal a current technical rationality (unidirectional, informative,.) yet in practice that perpetuates the role of passive recipient of care. Educational keys constructed from a viewpoint of Dialogic Learning emerge as elements that facilitate overcoming these previous frames limitations. Finally, Reflective Learning launched, has provided advance in professional knowledge and improve health education. Dialogical learning emerges as key to the training and empowerment, where we have seen how practical-reflexive, and not technical, rationality is meanly useful confronting ambiguous and complex situations of self-care practice and education. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Life on Facebook: self-care in renal transplantation patients.

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    Roso, Camila Castro; Kruse, Maria Henriqueta Luce

    2017-07-06

    To analyze self-care in renal transplantation patients. Qualitative research, inspired in the post-structuralism. The empirical material was composed by the posts of a Facebook group of Renal Transplantation Patients, collected from February to May of 2016, totaling 53 posts from 35 participants. The research data were analyzed under the perspective of cultural analysis, using theories derived from Foucault. Self-care in renal transplantation patients was identified by the preoccupation with themselves and others, habits and lifestyles, restrictions and limitations that the disease imposes, such as lessons, ways of living and lifestyles after the procedure. This experience forces people that have been submitted to renal transplantation to reflect on the lifestyle they follow. The group also stimulates adhesion to treatment.

  13. Educational technologies to encourage (self) care in postpartum women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Eryjosy Marculino Guerreiro; Sousa, Albertina Antonielly Sydney de; Vasconcelos, Mardênia Gomes Ferreira; Carvalho, Rhanna Emanuela Fontenele Lima de; Oriá, Mônica Oliveira Batista; Rodrigues, Dafne Paiva

    2016-06-01

    to evaluate national and international literature regarding the use of educational technologies to encourage self care in postpartum women. an integrative review of the literature. The articles were collected from the CINAHL, SCOPUS, PubMed, SciELO, LILACS and Cochrane databases; the time period for the articles referred to January/2004 to July/2014; the languages used in the articles were Portuguese, English, Spanish and French; the articles were selected from the following descriptors: postpartum care period, educational technology, nursing and self care. Twenty-seven articles were selected for analysis Results: based on the information found, the scales, counseling and home visits were among the most recommended educational technologies. the technologies promote communication, but are sometimes dependent on computer and internet access, which hinder their use by low-income women.

  14. An Introduction to Item Response Theory for Health Behavior Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warne, Russell T.; McKyer, E. J. Lisako; Smith, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To introduce item response theory (IRT) to health behavior researchers by contrasting it with classical test theory and providing an example of IRT in health behavior. Method: Demonstrate IRT by fitting the 2PL model to substance-use survey data from the Adolescent Health Risk Behavior questionnaire (n = 1343 adolescents). Results: An…

  15. More Than Needles: The Importance of Explanations and Self-Care Advice in Treating Primary Dysmenorrhea with Acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Michael; Dahlen, Hannah G; Smith, Caroline A

    2016-01-01

    Background. Primary dysmenorrhea is a common gynaecological condition. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) acupuncturists commonly treat primary dysmenorrhea and dispense specific self-care advice for this condition. The impact of self-care advice on primary dysmenorrhea is unknown. Methods. 19 TCM acupuncture practitioners from New Zealand or Australia and 12 New Zealand women who had recently undergone acupuncture treatment for primary dysmenorrhea as part of a randomised controlled trial participated in this qualitative, pragmatic study. Focus groups and semistructured interviews were used to collect data. These were recorded, transcribed, and analysed using thematic analysis. Results. The overarching theme was that an acupuncture treatment consisted of "more than needles" for both practitioners and participants. Practitioners and participants both discussed the partnership they engaged in during treatment, based on openness and trust. Women felt that the TCM self-care advice was related to positive outcomes for their dysmenorrhea and increased their feelings of control over their menstrual symptoms. Conclusions. Most of the women in this study found improved symptom control and reduced pain. A contributing factor for these improvements may be an increased internal health locus of control and an increase in self-efficacy resulting from the self-care advice given during the clinical trial.

  16. More Than Needles: The Importance of Explanations and Self-Care Advice in Treating Primary Dysmenorrhea with Acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Armour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Primary dysmenorrhea is a common gynaecological condition. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM acupuncturists commonly treat primary dysmenorrhea and dispense specific self-care advice for this condition. The impact of self-care advice on primary dysmenorrhea is unknown. Methods. 19 TCM acupuncture practitioners from New Zealand or Australia and 12 New Zealand women who had recently undergone acupuncture treatment for primary dysmenorrhea as part of a randomised controlled trial participated in this qualitative, pragmatic study. Focus groups and semistructured interviews were used to collect data. These were recorded, transcribed, and analysed using thematic analysis. Results. The overarching theme was that an acupuncture treatment consisted of “more than needles” for both practitioners and participants. Practitioners and participants both discussed the partnership they engaged in during treatment, based on openness and trust. Women felt that the TCM self-care advice was related to positive outcomes for their dysmenorrhea and increased their feelings of control over their menstrual symptoms. Conclusions. Most of the women in this study found improved symptom control and reduced pain. A contributing factor for these improvements may be an increased internal health locus of control and an increase in self-efficacy resulting from the self-care advice given during the clinical trial.

  17. Effect of self-care education on lifestyle modification, medication adherence and blood pressure in hypertensive adults: Randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshahi, Jafar; Ahmadzadeh, Hamid; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Mohammadifard, Noushin; Pourmoghaddas, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Self-care management has recently been suggested as an effective approach for secondary prevention of hypertension. This study was conducted to examine whether self-care behaviors could modulate blood pressure levels and also comparing the different training methods of self-care on patients' adherence and controlling hypertension. This study was a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial, conducted on 180 hypertensive patients referring to four centers in Isfahan, Iran, between July and December 2013. Block randomization method were applied to divide eligible subjects into four equal groups, including group A in which the patients and their family were educated by cardiology resident about self-care behaviors through eight sessions, group B and group C were obtained self-care education through four pamphlets or eight short message services (SMS), respectively and group D were obtained only usual care of hypertension without any training about self-care management. Increasing vegetable intake and frequency of subject who took antihypertensive medication regularly and the reduction in the frequency of subjects who consumed high salt were significantly more in group A than the others (P = 0.001, P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). The systolic and diastolic blood pressure had significantly more reduction in the group A than the other groups (-8.18 ± 18.3 and - 3.89 ± 4.1; P < 0.001, respectively). The self-care management education integration into the usual care along with using SMS and other educational materials may improve the efficient and effective adherence strategies.

  18. A Qualitative Study Exploring Facilitators for Improved Health Behaviors and Health Behavior Programs: Mental Health Service Users’ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candida Graham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Mental health service users experience high rates of cardiometabolic disorders and have a 20–25% shorter life expectancy than the general population from such disorders. Clinician-led health behavior programs have shown moderate improvements, for mental health service users, in managing aspects of cardiometabolic disorders. This study sought to potentially enhance health initiatives by exploring (1 facilitators that help mental health service users engage in better health behaviors and (2 the types of health programs mental health service users want to develop. Methods. A qualitative study utilizing focus groups was conducted with 37 mental health service users attending a psychosocial rehabilitation center, in Northern British Columbia, Canada. Results. Four major facilitator themes were identified: (1 factors of empowerment, self-value, and personal growth; (2 the need for social support; (3 pragmatic aspects of motivation and planning; and (4 access. Participants believed that engaging with programs of physical activity, nutrition, creativity, and illness support would motivate them to live more healthily. Conclusions and Implications for Practice. Being able to contribute to health behavior programs, feeling valued and able to experience personal growth are vital factors to engage mental health service users in health programs. Clinicians and health care policy makers need to account for these considerations to improve success of health improvement initiatives for this population.

  19. The Health Seeking Behaviors and Perceptions of Iranian Patient with Osteoarthritis about Pain Management: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Foolady, Marjaneh; Behshid, Mozhgan; Irajpoor, Alireza

    2017-03-01

    Introduction: Pain is the main reason for patients with osteoarthritis (OA) to visit health clinics. Health seeking behaviors indicate unmet patient needs and lack of understanding of OA pain patterns. This study aimed to describe the experiences of Iranian patients with OA and explore their health seeking behaviors and perceptions on pain management related to osteoarthritis. Methods: Using a qualitative approach, data was collected by interviewing 19 patients, 2 family members, and 5 health care providers from the in-patient and out-patient clinics, and physicians' offices. Data saturation was reached after 31 in-depth and semi-structured interviews (five second interviews). Data were analyzed by qualitative content analysis, using comparison, reflection and interpretation techniques. The criteria used to enhance rigor included credibility, transferability, dependability, and confirmability. Results: Two main categories and six subcategories emerged from data analysis. The first main category included "adapting to the reality" which had three subcategories: Facing OA pain, seeking health care, and accepting pain as a part of life. The second main category included "behavior fluctuation" with three subcategory of role conflict, responsibility for self-care and, adherence to prescribed treatment versus self-treatment. Conclusion: Care seeking behaviors for chronic pain sufferers are void of cultural, emotional, social and financial situation and patient expectations. Some misconceptions emerged about the health problem and its management, which may lead to negative attitudes toward treatment and therapists and finally lead to non-adherence to treatment. Patients need for education to enhance appropriate health care utilization.

  20. The Health Seeking Behaviors and Perceptions of Iranian Patient with Osteoarthritis about Pain Management: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Zamanzadeh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pain is the main reason for patients with osteoarthritis (OA to visit health clinics. Health seeking behaviors indicate unmet patient needs and lack of understanding of OA pain patterns. This study aimed to describe the experiences of Iranian patients with OA and explore their health seeking behaviors and perceptions on pain management related to osteoarthritis. Methods: Using a qualitative approach, data was collected by interviewing 19 patients, 2 family members, and 5 health care providers from the in-patient and out-patient clinics, and physicians’ offices. Data saturation was reached after 31 in-depth and semi-structured interviews (five second interviews. Data were analyzed by qualitative content analysis, using comparison, reflection and interpretation techniques. The criteria used to enhance rigor included credibility, transferability, dependability, and confirmability. Results: Two main categories and six subcategories emerged from data analysis. The first main category included "adapting to the reality" which had three subcategories: Facing OA pain, seeking health care, and accepting pain as a part of life. The second main category included "behavior fluctuation" with three subcategory of role conflict, responsibility for self-care and, adherence to prescribed treatment versus self-treatment. Conclusion: Care seeking behaviors for chronic pain sufferers are void of cultural, emotional, social and financial situation and patient expectations. Some misconceptions emerged about the health problem and its management, which may lead to negative attitudes toward treatment and therapists and finally lead to non-adherence to treatment. Patients need for education to enhance appropriate health care utilization.

  1. Health lifestyle behaviors among U.S. adults

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    Jarron M. Saint Onge

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Existing research that studies individual health behaviors and conceive of behaviors as simplistically reflecting narrow intentions toward health may obscure the social organization of health behaviors. Instead, we examine how eight health behaviors group together to form distinct health behavior niches. Using nationally-representative data from U.S. adults aged 18 and over from the 2004–2009 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS, we use Latent Class Analysis to identify classes of behavior based on smoking status, alcohol use, physical activity, physician visits, and flu vaccination. We identify 7 distinct health behavior classes including concordant health promoting (44%, concordant health compromising (26%, and discordant classes (30%. We find significant race/ethnic, sex, regional, and age differences in class membership. We show that health behavior classes are associated with prospective mortality, suggesting that they are valid representations of health lifestyles. We discuss the implications of our results for sociological theories of health behaviors, as well as for multiple behavior interventions seeking to improve population health.

  2. Understanding Youth's Health-Compromising Behaviors in Germany: An Application of the Risk-Behavior Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazard, Barbara P.; Lee, Che-Fu

    1999-01-01

    Analyzed the health-compromising behaviors of German youth using responses of 2,330 seventh, eighth, and ninth graders from the German Youth Study. Smoking and drinking are not seen by these students as health-threatening behaviors, but as socially appealing behaviors. Discusses implications for health education. (SLD)

  3. Self-rated health in rural Appalachia: health perceptions are incongruent with health status and health behaviors

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    Pyle Donald N

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Appalachia is characterized by poor health behaviors, poor health status, and health disparities. Recent interventions have not demonstrated much success in improving health status or reducing health disparities in the Appalachian region. Since one's perception of personal health precedes his or her health behaviors, the purpose of this project was to evaluate the self-rated health of Appalachian adults in relation to objective health status and current health behaviors. Methods Appalachian adults (n = 1,576 were surveyed regarding health behaviors - soda consumer (drink ≥ 355 ml/d, or non-consumer (drink 30 min > 1 d/wk and sedentary (exercise Results Respondents reported being healthy, while being sedentary (65%, hypertensive (76%, overweight (73%, or hyperlipidemic (79%. Between 57% and 66% of the respondents who considered themselves healthy had at least two disease conditions or poor health behaviors. Jaccard Binary Similarity coefficients and odds ratios showed the probability of reporting being healthy when having a disease condition or poor health behavior was high. Conclusions The association between self-rated health and poor health indicators in Appalachian adults is distorted. The public health challenge is to formulate messages and programs about health and health needs which take into account the current distortion about health in Appalachia and the cultural context in which this distortion was shaped.

  4. Diabetes, diet-health behavior, and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Sven; Schroeter, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    High-quality diets play an important role in diabetes prevention. Appropriate dietary adherence can improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control, and thus contribute to lifestyle improvement. However, previous research suggests that dietary adherence is arguably among the most difficult cornerstones of diabetes management. The objectives of this study are (1) to estimate whether and to what extent individuals diagnosed with diabetes show significant differences in diet quality [healthy eating index (HEI)] compared to healthy individuals, (2) to quantify whether and to what extent diabetics experience significantly higher outcomes of body mass index (BMI), and (3) to estimate whether and to what extent dietary supplementation impacts diabetes patient's diet quality and/or BMI outcomes. We use data from the 2007-2008 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). The NHANES is the primary, randomized, and nationally representative survey used to assess the health and nutritional status in the U.S. We apply propensity score matching (PSM) to account for selection bias and endogeneity between self-reported diet and health behavir (treatment) and BMI outcomes. We control for an individual's BMI as to capture the impact of past dietary behavior in its impact on HEI. Matching results suggest that regular dietary supplement consumption is associated with significant lower BMI outcomes of almost 1 kg/m(2). The close relationship between diabetes and obesity has been at the center of the diet-health policy debate across Canada and the U.S. Knowledge about this linkage may help to improve the understanding of the factors that impact dietary choices and their overall health outcomes, which may lead to a more efficient and effective promotion of dietary guidelines, healthy food choices, and targeted consumer health and lifestyle policies.

  5. Health Care Waste Segregation Behavior among Health Workers in Uganda: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

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    Martha Akulume

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The goal of this study was to assess the appropriateness of the theory of planned behavior in predicting health care waste segregation behaviors and to examine the factors that influence waste segregation behaviors. Methodology. One hundred and sixty-three health workers completed a self-administered questionnaire in a cross-sectional survey that examined the theory of planned behavior constructs (attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and intention and external variables (sociodemographic factors, personal characteristics, organizational characteristics, professional characteristics, and moral obligation. Results. For their most recent client 21.5% of the health workers reported that they most definitely segregated health care waste while 5.5% did not segregate. All the theory of planned behavior constructs were significant predictors of health workers’ segregation behavior, but intention emerged as the strongest and most significant (r=0.524, P<0.001. The theory of planned behavior model explained 52.5% of the variance in health workers’ segregation behavior. When external variables were added, the new model explained 66.7% of the variance in behavior. Conclusion. Generally, health workers’ health care waste segregation behavior was high. The theory of planned behavior significantly predicted health workers’ health care waste segregation behaviors.

  6. Health Care Waste Segregation Behavior among Health Workers in Uganda: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akulume, Martha; Kiwanuka, Suzanne N

    2016-01-01

    Objective . The goal of this study was to assess the appropriateness of the theory of planned behavior in predicting health care waste segregation behaviors and to examine the factors that influence waste segregation behaviors. Methodology . One hundred and sixty-three health workers completed a self-administered questionnaire in a cross-sectional survey that examined the theory of planned behavior constructs (attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and intention) and external variables (sociodemographic factors, personal characteristics, organizational characteristics, professional characteristics, and moral obligation). Results . For their most recent client 21.5% of the health workers reported that they most definitely segregated health care waste while 5.5% did not segregate. All the theory of planned behavior constructs were significant predictors of health workers' segregation behavior, but intention emerged as the strongest and most significant ( r = 0.524, P theory of planned behavior model explained 52.5% of the variance in health workers' segregation behavior. When external variables were added, the new model explained 66.7% of the variance in behavior. Conclusion . Generally, health workers' health care waste segregation behavior was high. The theory of planned behavior significantly predicted health workers' health care waste segregation behaviors.

  7. Best practices in managing child and adolescent behavioral health emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuer, Vera; Rocker, Joshua; Saggu, Babar M; Andrus, Jason M

    2018-01-01

    Behavioral health emergencies most commonly present as depression, suicidal behavior, aggression, and severe disorganization. Emergency clinicians should avoid relying solely on past medical history or previous psychiatric diagnoses that might prematurely rule out medical pathologies. Treatments for behavioral health emergencies consist of de-escalation interventions aimed at preventing agitation, aggression, and harm. This issue reviews medical pathologies and underlying causes that can result in psychiatric presentations and summarizes evidence-based practices to evaluate, manage, and refer patients with behavioral health emergencies.

  8. Dysmenorrhea and self-care strategies in Iranian female students: a regression modeling of pain severity and underlying factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Fariba; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Mohseni Bandpei, Mohammad Ali

    2016-07-18

    Dysmenorrhea is the most common gynecologic condition experienced by menstruating women and has significant medical and psychosocial impacts. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and the problems related to menstruation, self-care strategies and their relations with pain severity in female students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. This cross sectional study was carried out among 197 unmarried and healthy female medical students during April 2013 to July 2013. A standardized questionnaire was given to participants to complete, which included questions about demographic information, prevalence and severity of pain, self-care strategies and its effectiveness. The prevalence of dysmenorrhea was 98.4% (95% confidence interval=97.6%-99.2%). Almost 76% (149) of students reported limitation of daily activities. The most common method for relief pain were: taking analgesics (64.3%), rest (61.9%), taking herbal medicine (11.7%), and applying hot compress on area of pain (22.3%). Obtaining information about self-care strategies offered from family and friends 79 (41%) were more common than scientific articles 56 (28.7%) and the Internet 43 (22%). Significant relations were observed between self-care strategies' scales and pain severity. The results indicated that dysmenorrhea was highly prevalent among female medical students and is a major problem affecting their life. A variety of treatments is available for dysmenorrhea but most of the participants did not seek medical advice and they used self-care strategies. However, further studies focusing on health education and routine screening for menstrual problems are recommended.

  9. Beliefs About Health and Illness in Latin-American Migrants with Diabetes Living in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Hjelm, Katarina; Bard, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The study explored beliefs about health and illness in Latin American migrants diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (DM) living in Sweden, and investigated the influence on health-related behavior including self-care and care-seeking behavior. Migrants are particularly affected in the diabetes pandemia. Beliefs about health and illness determine health-related behaviour and health but no studies have been found on Latin American migrants with DM. An explorative study design with focus-group inter...

  10. A brief intervention changing oral self-care, self-efficacy, and self-monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzer, Ralf; Antoniuk, Agata; Gholami, Maryam

    2015-02-01

    The roles of self-efficacy and self-monitoring as proximal predictors of dental flossing frequency are studied in the context of an oral health intervention. A study among 287 university students, aged 19 to 26 years, compared an intervention group that received a brief self-regulatory treatment, with a passive and an active control group. Dental flossing, self-efficacy, and self-monitoring were assessed at baseline and 3 weeks later. The intervention led to an increase in dental flossing regardless of experimental condition. However, treatment-specific gains were documented for self-efficacy and self-monitoring. Moreover, changes in the latter two served as mediators in a path model, linking the intervention with subsequent dental flossing and yielding significant indirect effects. Self-efficacy and self-monitoring play a mediating role in facilitating dental flossing. Interventions that aim at an improvement in oral self-care should consider using these constructs. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? The adoption and maintenance of oral self-care can be facilitated by a number of social-cognitive variables. Interventions that include planning, action control, or self-efficacy components have been shown to improve dental flossing. In one recent study on flossing in adolescent girls, planning intervention effects were mediated by self-efficacy. What does this study add? Self-monitoring is associated with better oral self-care. A 10-min intervention improves self-efficacy and self-monitoring. Self-efficacy and self-monitoring operate as mediators between treatment and flossing. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  11. Promovendo o autocuidado a pacientes com cefaléia por meio da perspectiva oriental de saúde Promoviendo el autocuidado en pacientes con dolor de cabeza a través de la perspectiva oriental de salud Promoting self-care to patients suffering headache through the oriental perspective of health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Wink

    2007-04-01

    Nursing graduation course, who presented headaches. Built from a subject of the Nursing Master Course of Federal University of Santa Catarina, the project was based in the concept of competence for self-care of Orem, understood through an oriental perspective of health. Three strategies of care were applied: the pain dairy, the focusing and the cranium-acupuncture, in monthly-weekly meetings and in individual meetings, for a two-month period. The participants related results of pain relief, discover of non-physical causes for pain and increase of welfare. It was possible to verify that the participants presented an individualized process of self-care development and that the strategies selected are suitable for the care.

  12. Self care programs and multiple sclerosis: physical therapeutics treatment - literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaille-Wlodyka, S; Donze, C; Givron, P; Gallien, P

    2011-03-01

    To clarify the therapeutic education program impact with multiple sclerosis patients, literature review. Highlight contents and efficacy. A non-systematic review on Medline, PubMed and Cochrane library databases from 1966 to 2010 using the following keywords: "multiple sclerosis", "self-care", "self-management" and specific symptoms keywords. Clinical trials and randomized clinical trials, as well as literature reviews published in English, French and German will be analyzed. Counseling is a part of the non-pharmacological management of chronic illnesses such as multiple sclerosis. Symptoms' diversity and the different clinical forms limit standardized programs of self-care management, applicable to patients. In the literature review, counseling programs have often low metrology. A behavior change with patients and medical staff could exist. To empower the patient, to reduce symptoms' impact and to improve treatment access are the aims of educational therapy. Therapeutic education program for multiple sclerosis patients could progress with their standardization and assessment, for each sign. To promote the educational therapy of multiple sclerosis patients, a specific training for medical staff, as specific financing are necessary. 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Anticipated regret and health behavior: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Noel T; DeFrank, Jessica T; Gilkey, Melissa B

    2016-11-01

    Risk beliefs are central to most theories of health behavior, yet many unanswered questions remain about an increasingly studied risk construct, anticipated regret. The authors sought to better understand anticipated regret's role in motivating health behaviors. The authors systematically searched electronic databases for studies of anticipated regret and behavioral intentions or health behavior. They used random effects meta-analysis to synthesize effect sizes from 81 studies (n = 45,618). Anticipated regret was associated with both intentions (r+ = .50, p emotions and risk appraisals. Anticipated inaction regret has a stronger and more stable association with health behavior than previously thought. The field should give greater attention to understanding how anticipated regret differs from similar constructs, its role in health behavior theory, and its potential use in health behavior interventions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Health Care Waste Segregation Behavior among Health Workers in Uganda: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Akulume, Martha; Kiwanuka, Suzanne N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The goal of this study was to assess the appropriateness of the theory of planned behavior in predicting health care waste segregation behaviors and to examine the factors that influence waste segregation behaviors. Methodology. One hundred and sixty-three health workers completed a self-administered questionnaire in a cross-sectional survey that examined the theory of planned behavior constructs (attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and intention) and externa...

  15. Associations between health culture, health behaviors, and health-related outcomes: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yingnan; Gao, Junling; Dai, Junming; Zheng, Pinpin; Fu, Hua

    2017-01-01

    To examine the associations between demographic characteristics, health behaviors, workplace health culture, and health-related outcomes in Chinese workplaces. A total of 1508 employees from 10 administrative offices and 6 enterprises were recruited for a cross-sectional survey. Self-administered questionnaires mainly addressed demographic characteristics, health behaviors, workplace health culture, and health-related outcomes including self-rated health, mental health, and happiness. The proportion of participants who reported good health-related outcomes was significantly higher in those working in administrative offices than those working in enterprises. The result of the potential factors related to self-rated health (SRH), mental health, and happiness by logistic regression analyses showed that age and income were associated with SRH; type of workplace, age, smoking, and health culture at the workplace level were associated with mental health; and beneficial health effects of direct leadership was positively associated with happiness. Moreover, there were some similar results among 3 multivariate regression models. Firstly, good SRH (Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.744), mental health (OR = 1.891), and happiness (OR = 1.736) were more common among highly physically active participants compared with those physical inactive. Furthermore, passive smoking was negatively correlated with SRH (OR = 0.686), mental health (OR = 0.678), and happiness (OR = 0.616), while health culture at the individual level was positively correlated with SRH (OR = 1.478), mental health (OR = 1.654), and happiness (OR = 2.916). The present study indicated that workplace health culture, health behaviors, and demographic characteristics were associated with health-related outcomes. Furthermore, individual health culture, physical activity, and passive smoking might play a critical role in workplace health promotion.

  16. Caring for Strangers: Aging, Traditional Medicine, and Collective Self-care in Post-socialist Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudakova, Tatiana

    2017-03-01

    This article explores how aging patients in Russia assemble strategies of care in the face of commercialization of medical services and public health discourses and initiatives aimed at improving the population's lifestyle habits. By focusing on how the formation of pensioner publics intersects with the health-seeking trajectories of elderly patients, it tracks an emerging ethic of collective self-care-a form of therapeutic collectivity that challenges articulations of good health as primarily an extension of personal responsibility or solely as a corollary of access to medical resources. By drawing on traditional medicine, these pensioners rely on and advocate for stranger intimacies that offer tactics for survival in the present through the care of (and for) a shared and embodied post-socialist condition of social, economic, and bodily precarity. © 2016 by the American Anthropological Association.

  17. Impact of Health Behaviors and Health Management on Employment After SCI: Psychological Health and Health Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Karla S; Meade, Michelle A; Krause, James S

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between employment and psychological health and health management as described by individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) who were employed at least once following injury. Methods: A qualitative approach used 6 focus groups at 2 sites with 44 participants who were at least 10 years post SCI. All had been employed at some point since injury. Heterogeneous and homogeneous groups were delineated based on specific characteristics, such as education, gender, or race. Group sessions followed a semi-structured interview format with questions about personal, environmental, and policy related factors influencing employment following SCI. All group sessions were recorded, transcribed, and coded into conceptual categories to identify topics, themes, and patterns. Inferences were drawn about their meaning. NVivo 10 software using the constant comparative method was used for data analysis. Results: Narratives discussed the relationship between employment and psychological and emotional health and health management. Four themes were identified: (1) adjustment and dealing with emotional reactions, (2) gaining self-confidence, (3) preventing burnout, and (4) attitudes and perspectives. Most themes reflected issues that varied based on severity of injury as well as stage of employment. Conclusions: Individuals with SCI who are successful in working following injury must determine how to perform the behaviors necessary to manage their health and prevent emotional or physical complications. The emotional consequences of SCI must be recognized and addressed and specific behaviors enacted in order to optimize employment outcomes.

  18. Self-care 3 months after attending chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patient education: a qualitative descriptive analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousing C

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Camilla Askov Mousing1, Kirsten Lomborg21School of Health Sciences, Randers School of Nursing, VIA University College, Randers, Denmark; 2Department of Public Health, Nursing Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus, DenmarkPurpose: The authors performed a qualitative descriptive analysis to explore how group patient education influences the self-care of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.Patients and methods: In the period 2009–2010, eleven patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease completed an 8-week group education program in a Danish community health center. The patients were interviewed 3 months after completion of the program.Findings: Patients reported that their knowledge of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease had increased, that they had acquired tools to handle their symptoms, and that the social aspect of patient education had motivated them to utilize their new habits after finishing the course. The data indicate that patients need a period of adjustment (a "ripening period": it took time for patients to integrate new habits and competencies into everyday life. Talking to health care professionals focused the patients' attention on their newly acquired skills and the research interview made them more aware of their enhanced self-care.Conclusion: Patients' self-care may be enhanced through group education, even though the patients are not always able to see the immediate outcome. Some patients may require professional help to implement their newly acquired knowledge and skills in everyday life. A planned dialogue concentrating on self-care in everyday life 3 months after finishing the course may enhance patients' awareness and appraisal of their newly acquired competencies.Keywords: COPD, education program, patient knowledge, patient perspective, patient skills, ripening period

  19. The self-care practices of family caregivers of persons with poor prognosis cancer: differences by varying levels of caregiver well-being and preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne-Odom, J Nicholas; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Taylor, Richard A; Rocque, Gabrielle B; Azuero, Andres; Acemgil, Aras; Martin, Michelle Y; Astin, Meka; Ejem, Deborah; Kvale, Elizabeth; Heaton, Karen; Pisu, Maria; Partridge, Edward E; Bakitas, Marie A

    2017-08-01

    Little is known about the impact of family caregiving for adults with poor prognosis cancer on caregivers' own individual self-care practices. We explored differences in caregivers' discrete self-care practices associated with varying levels of caregiver well-being, preparedness, and decision-making self-efficacy. Cross-sectional survey within eight community-based southeastern U.S. cancer centers was conducted. Family caregivers of Medicare beneficiaries ≥65 years with pancreatic, lung, brain, ovarian, head and neck, hematologic, or stage IV cancer completed measures of individual self-care practices (health responsibility, physical activity, nutrition, spiritual growth, interpersonal relations, stress management, and sleep), well-being (anxiety, depression, and health-related quality of life [HRQoL]), preparedness, and decision-making self-efficacy. Caregivers (n = 294) averaged 66 years, were mostly female (72.8%), white (91.2%), Protestant (76.2%), retired (54.4%), and patients' spouse/partner (60.2%). Approximately, half were rural-dwellers (46.9%) with incomes 1 year (68%). Nearly a quarter (23%) reported high depression and 34% reported borderline or high anxiety. Low engagement in all self-care practices was associated with worse caregiver anxiety, depression, and mental HRQoL (all p values Caregivers with lower health responsibility, spiritual growth, interpersonal relation, and stress management scores had lower preparedness and decision-making self-efficacy. A significant proportion of caregivers simultaneously report low engagement in all forms of self-care practices, high depression and anxiety, and low HRQoL mental health scores. Caregiver well-being, preparedness, and decision-making self-efficacy might be optimized through interventions targeted at enhancing health responsibility, stress management, interpersonal relationships, and spiritual growth self-care practices.

  20. A small business worksite wellness model for improving health behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Ray M

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a wellness program delivered by WellSteps, LLC, aimed at improving employee health behaviors in small companies that lack the resources to independently develop and manage a wellness program. Analyses are based on 618 employees from five diverse companies that completed an initial personal health assessment. Exercise and dietary behaviors significantly improved across the five companies. Significant improvements in health perception and life satisfaction also resulted and were associated with improvements in health behaviors. Three of the five companies, each with fewer than 50 employees, were most effective in influencing positive health behaviors, health perceptions, and life satisfaction. The worksite wellness program effectively improved health behaviors, health perceptions, and life satisfaction.

  1. “These classes have been my happy place”: Feasibility study of a self-care program in Native Hawaiian custodial grandparents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loriena Yancura

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Native Hawaiian custodial grandparents have a distinctive set of strengths and challenges that may lead them to benefit from a structured self-care program. The purpose of this paper is to describe a feasibility study with nine Native Hawaiian custodial grandparents who participated in a 6-week self-care intervention. Based on open-ended questions during the post-questionnaire and at the 6-month follow-up focus group, grandparent participants noted that their grandchildren needed education and clothing. Most grandparents did not endorse statements that their grandchildren had any mental or physical health conditions. Grandparents reflected that the intervention provided them with skills to help cope with raising grandchildren and helped them realize the importance of their health to providing care to their grandchildren. Based on the findings from this pilot study, the self-care approach may have benefits for Native Hawaiian custodial grandparents.

  2. Stress among Graduate Students in Relation to Health Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Berkel, Kelly; Reeves, Brenda

    2017-01-01

    Problem: While stress is universal for graduate students, the difference in terms of stress symptoms and the effects on health behavior is how students cope. While numerous research studies have linked stress and negative health behaviors, few studies have objectively assessed these variables. Purpose: Utilize current health and fitness technology…

  3. Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Testing of the Brazilian Version of the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index Version 6.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Christiane Wahast; Riegel, Barbara; Pokorski, Simoni Chiarelli; Camey, Suzi; Silveira, Luana Claudia Jacoby; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To adapt and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Brazilian version of the SCHFI v 6.2. Methods. With the approval of the original author, we conducted a complete cross-cultural adaptation of the instrument (translation, synthesis, back translation, synthesis of back translation, expert committee review, and pretesting). The adapted version was named Brazilian version of the self-care of heart failure index v 6.2. The psychometric properties assessed were face validity and content validity (by expert committee review), construct validity (convergent validity and confirmatory factor analysis), and reliability. Results. Face validity and content validity were indicative of semantic, idiomatic, experimental, and conceptual equivalence. Convergent validity was demonstrated by a significant though moderate correlation (r = −0.51) on comparison with equivalent question scores of the previously validated Brazilian European heart failure self-care behavior scale. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the original three-factor model as having the best fit, although similar results were obtained for inadequate fit indices. The reliability of the instrument, as expressed by Cronbach's alpha, was 0.40, 0.82, and 0.93 for the self-care maintenance, self-care management, and self-care confidence scales, respectively. Conclusion. The SCHFI v 6.2 was successfully adapted for use in Brazil. Nevertheless, further studies should be carried out to improve its psychometric properties. PMID:24163765

  4. Self-care in individuals who recycle garbage (recyclers of Medellín, Colombia, 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda L. López A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to understand the conceptions, attitudes and practices about self-care among informal recyclers in Medellín. Methodology: a qualitative study from the perspective of recyclers not belonging to any guild in Medellín in 2005 was developed. A total amount of 52 interviews with previous informed consent were applied, plus non-participant observation and field diary. Results: self-care is understood as the constant protection of the body in order to avoid the occurrence of diseases. It includes aspects of hygiene, diet, medical consultation, proper use of leisure time and utilization of instruments for personal protection, such as gloves, face masks, caps, and ear plugs among other devices. Discussion: disease prevention goes beyond biological aspects and becomes part of a social dimension for people in which the most important features are the consequences for themselves, their labor team and their families. Recyclers have knowledge on prevention and practices that promote health and well-being, but the latter are not applied because they diminish their job performance, or they do not consider them to be necessary, do not feel like executing them nor they lack the economic resources to assume them. Autocare practices of recyclers are mainly supported by the primacy of the team history than by the scientific knowledge concerning it.

  5. Lived Experience of Self-Care in Blind Individuals: A Phenomenological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Shamshir i

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Blindness is a serious condition, which can affect mental balance and general organized personality of blind person. This study was carried out with the purpose of explaining the lived experience of self-care in blind individuals. Methods: in this study, interpretive phenomenology was used to conduct the study. Through a purposeful sampling, 8 in-depth semi structured interviews were performed for 8 participants, which their duration was between 50-120 minutes. The method introduced by van Manen was used to perform the research and extract the concepts. Results: Analysis of the data led to three concepts, including “Being through discipline”, “independent through discipline”, and “protection of discipline”, which finally caused the appearance of the main concept, “self-care through a disciplined life”. Conclusion: Blind individuals benefit from a disciplined lifestyle to have an independent life, and also expect this kind of discipline from others. Therefore, it is necessary that family members and health care providers consider the concept of disciplined life.

  6. Instruments to assess self-care among healthy children: A systematic review of measurement properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urpí-Fernández, Ana-María; Zabaleta-Del-Olmo, Edurne; Montes-Hidalgo, Javier; Tomás-Sábado, Joaquín; Roldán-Merino, Juan-Francisco; Lluch-Canut, María-Teresa

    2017-12-01

    To identify, critically appraise and summarize the measurement properties of instruments to assess self-care in healthy children. Assessing self-care is a proper consideration for nursing practice and nursing research. No systematic review summarizes instruments of measurement validated in healthy children. Psychometric review in accordance with the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) panel. MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Web of Science and Open Grey were searched from their inception to December 2016. Validation studies with a healthy child population were included. Search was not restricted by language. Two reviewers independently assessed the methodological quality of included studies using the COSMIN checklist. Eleven studies were included in the review assessing the measurement properties of ten instruments. There was a maximum of two studies per instrument. None of the studies evaluated the properties of test-retest reliability, measurement error, criterion validity and responsiveness. Internal consistency and structural validity were rated as "excellent" or "good" in four studies. Four studies were rated as "excellent" in content validity. Cross-cultural validity was rated as "poor" in the two studies (three instruments) which cultural adaptation was carried out. The evidence available does not allow firm conclusions about the instruments identified in terms of reliability and validity. Future research should focus on generate evidence about a wider range of measurement properties of these instruments using a rigorous methodology, as well as instrument testing on different countries and child population. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Business travel and behavioral and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundle, Andrew G; Revenson, Tracey A; Friedman, Michael

    2017-12-21

    Assess associations between business travel and behavioral and mental health. Cross-sectional analyses of de-identified electronic medical record data from EHE International, Inc. a provider of corporate wellness programs. Higher levels of business travel were associated with poorer outcomes. Compared to traveling 1-6 nights/month for work, those who traveled 21 + nights were more likely to: smoke (prevalence ratio = 3.74, 95% CI 2.56, 5.46), report trouble sleeping (PR = 1.37, 95% CI 1.09, 1.71), be sedentary (PR = 1.95, 95%CI 1.56, 2.43) and score above clinical thresholds for alcohol dependence (CAGE score>1: PR = 2.04, 95% CI 1.26, 3.29), and mild or worse anxiety (GAD-7 Score>4: PR = 1.69, 95% CI 1.29, 2.21) and depression symptoms (PHQ-9 Score>4: PR = 2.27, 95%CI 1.70, 3.03). Employers should provide programs to help employees manage stress and maintain health while traveling for work.

  8. A Behavior Change Framework of Health Socialization and Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Christopher T.; Stanley, Lauren H. K.

    2017-01-01

    An individual's identity related to health is critically important in terms of the adoption and maintenance of health behaviors, and guides approaches to health change across the lifespan. This article presents a review of the literature and proposes a health socialization and health identity framework, which may be used to clarify challenges in…

  9. Time series clustering analysis of health-promoting behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chi-Ta; Hung, Yu-Shiang; Deng, Guang-Feng

    2013-10-01

    Health promotion must be emphasized to achieve the World Health Organization goal of health for all. Since the global population is aging rapidly, ComCare elder health-promoting service was developed by the Taiwan Institute for Information Industry in 2011. Based on the Pender health promotion model, ComCare service offers five categories of health-promoting functions to address the everyday needs of seniors: nutrition management, social support, exercise management, health responsibility, stress management. To assess the overall ComCare service and to improve understanding of the health-promoting behavior of elders, this study analyzed health-promoting behavioral data automatically collected by the ComCare monitoring system. In the 30638 session records collected for 249 elders from January, 2012 to March, 2013, behavior patterns were identified by fuzzy c-mean time series clustering algorithm combined with autocorrelation-based representation schemes. The analysis showed that time series data for elder health-promoting behavior can be classified into four different clusters. Each type reveals different health-promoting needs, frequencies, function numbers and behaviors. The data analysis result can assist policymakers, health-care providers, and experts in medicine, public health, nursing and psychology and has been provided to Taiwan National Health Insurance Administration to assess the elder health-promoting behavior.

  10. Health-related behaviors and technology usage among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Bridget F; Bigham, Lauren E; Bland, Helen W; Bird, Matthew; Fairman, Ciaran

    2014-07-01

    To examine associations between technology usage and specific health factors among college students. The research employed was a quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional design; undergraduate students enrolled in spring 2012 general health education courses were recruited to participate. To explore college students' specific technology usage and health-related behaviors, a 28-item questionnaire was utilized. Statistical significant differences of technology usage were found between 3 of the 4 health-related behaviors under study (BMI, sleep, and nutrition) (p technology usage continues to evolve within the college student population, health professionals need to understand its implications on health behaviors.

  11. The Effect of Orem's Self-Care Model on Quality of Life in Patients with Migraine: a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh Zarandi, Fatemeh; Raiesifar, Afsaneh; Ebadi, Abbas

    2016-03-01

    Many aspects of the lives of migraineurs are commonly affected by the condition, including occupational affairs, social and family life, responsibilities and ultimately the quality of life. This study was designed to determine the effect of orem's self-care nursing model on quality of life in patients with a migraine. This study was carried out in Tehran, Iran. According to the pre-post design of the randomized clinical trial, 88 patients were selected. After obtaining approval from the ethics committee of the Baqiyatallah Medical Sciences University's Research Deputy; Patients who signed the informed consent aged 20-55 years and without any more disease or disability affecting the quality of life were selected and randomly assigned to a group. Data collection tools were a demographic questionnaire, general health survey short form (SF36), and Orem cognition form and self-care checklist. Self-care model were held as four 30-45 minutes training sessions based on self-care deficit needs for the experimental group. The quality of life scores was measured in two stages, before and three months after intervention then were compared in both groups. Data were analyzed with statistical software SPSS and use of descriptive analysis tests, Chi-square, Mann-Whitney u and Wilcoxon. The final analysis was performed on 43 experimental and 40 controls. No significant difference was detected in the two groups in terms of demographic variables (P>0.05). All dimensions of quality of life including physical functioning, physical role limitation, body pain, general health, vitality, social functioning and emotional role limitation and mental health in the experimental group showed a significant increase after intervention compared to the control group (Pmodel improves function and overall quality of life and reduces the high cost of a migraine and migraine-related disability to individuals and society.

  12. Attack of the S. Mutans!: a stereoscopic-3D multiplayer direct-manipulation behavior-modification serious game for improving oral health in pre-teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, Ari; Rose, Howard; Kollin, Joel; Moss, William

    2011-03-01

    Attack! of the S. Mutans is a multi-player game designed to harness the immersion and appeal possible with wide-fieldof- view stereoscopic 3D to combat the tooth decay epidemic. Tooth decay is one of the leading causes of school absences and costs more than $100B annually in the U.S. In 2008 the authors received a grant from the National Institutes of Health to build a science museum exhibit that included a suite of serious games involving the behaviors and bacteria that cause cavities. The centerpiece is an adventure game where five simultaneous players use modified Wii controllers to battle biofilms and bacteria while immersed in environments generated within a 11-foot stereoscopic WUXGA display. The authors describe the system and interface used in this prototype application and some of the ways they attempted to use the power of immersion and the appeal of S3D revolution to change health attitudes and self-care habits.

  13. Reflecting on healthcare and self-care in the Intensive Care Unit: our story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Peterkin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Health care professionals working in Intensive Care Units (ICUs are exposed to high levels of stress-provoking stimuli. Some may unconsciously employ negative coping skill s which may contribute to burnout and negatively affect patient care. We chose to explore ways of facilitating and encouraging self-reflective practice in an effort to increase empathic traits and enhance communication. A narrative medicine series, which included six sessions that were focused on different narrative approaches, was organized for staff of an academic teaching hospital. Totally, 132 interdisciplinary ICU staff attended the sessions. They were generally open to exploring the selected approaches and discussing their reflections within the interdisciplinary environment. The narrative medicine series provided tools for health care professionals to enhance self-reflective skills utilizing a team-based learning approach. The anticipated outcomes were improved self-care, increased empathy and communication skills, enhanced team functioning, which all contribute to better patient care at the bedside.

  14. Prática do autocuidado vivenciada pela mulher hipertensa: um análise no âmbito da educação em saúde La práctica del autocuidado vivenciada por la mujer hipertensa: un análisis en el ámbito de la educación para la salud Self-care practice lived by hipertensive woman: analysis on the health education focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zélia Maria de Souza Araújo Santos

    2006-04-01

    developed with 200 women who presented high blood pressure at a Public Health Agency, located in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. The data were collected during nursing encounters, organized in categories, and analyzed according to the fundaments of the referred Theory. In this surveyed sample, about 172 (86% women found out that they had high blood pressure problems by means of signs and symptoms related to the "climateric". It was evidenced on the women interviewed, that they presented knowledge knowledge about this syndrome, partial adherence to the treatment, and consequently inefficient practice of self-care, related to this deficit. In this way, it is possible to conclude that the self-care practice was influenced by the age, by disease stage development, and by the social, economic and health problems.

  15. A Review of Hip Hop-Based Interventions for Health Literacy, Health Behaviors, and Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Cendrine; Seaman, Elizabeth L; Montgomery, LaTrice; Winfrey, Adia

    2017-07-01

    African-American children and adolescents experience an undue burden of disease for many health outcomes compared to their White peers. More research needs to be completed for this priority population to improve their health outcomes and ameliorate health disparities. Integrating hip hop music or hip hop dance into interventions may help engage African-American youth in health interventions and improve their health outcomes. We conducted a review of the literature to characterize hip hop interventions and determine their potential to improve health. We searched Web of Science, Scopus, PsycINFO, and EMBASE to identify studies that assessed hip hop interventions. To be included, studies had to (1) be focused on a psychosocial or physical health intervention that included hip hop and (2) present quantitative data assessing intervention outcomes. Twenty-three articles were identified as meeting all inclusion criteria and were coded by two reviewers. Articles were assessed with regards to sample characteristics, study design, analysis, intervention components, and results. Hip hop interventions have been developed to improve health literacy, health behavior, and mental health. The interventions were primarily targeted to African-American and Latino children and adolescents. Many of the health literacy and mental health studies used non-experimental study designs. Among the 12 (of 14) health behavior studies that used experimental designs, the association between hip hop interventions and positive health outcomes was inconsistent. The number of experimental hip hop intervention studies is limited. Future research is required to determine if hip hop interventions can promote health.

  16. Parenting style, parenting stress, and children's health-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunjeong; Walton-Moss, Benita

    2012-07-01

    Parental guidance is critical to the development of children's health-related behaviors. The purpose of this study was to look at the relationship between parenting factors, including parenting style and parenting stress, and children's health-related behaviors. In this descriptive, correlational study, 284 parents of preschool children were interviewed using the Child Rearing Questionnaire and the Korean Parenting Stress Index-Short Form. Parent distress, authoritative and permissive parenting styles, family income, and mother's education were significantly associated with children's health-related behaviors. These findings suggest that higher levels of warmth, characteristics of both parenting styles, may be a critical factor in the development of health-related behaviors.

  17. Construction and validation of the Self-care Assessment Instrument for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonize Cunha Barreto de Mendonça

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to construct and validate the contents of the Self-care Assessment instrument for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Method: methodological study, based on Orem's General Theory of Nursing. The empirical categories and the items of the instrument were elucidated through a focus group. The content validation process was performed by seven specialists and the semantic analysis by 14 patients. The Content Validity Indices of the items, ≥0.78, and of the scale, ≥0.90, were considered excellent. Results: the instrument contains 131 items in six dimensions corresponding to the health deviation self-care requisites. Regarding the maintenance, a Content Validity Index of 0.98 was obtained for the full set of items, and, regarding the relevance, Content Validity Indices ≥0.80 were obtained for the majority of the assessed psychometric criteria. Conclusion: the instrument showed evidence of content validity.

  18. Diabetes HealthSense: Resources for Living Well

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you get on the right track. Cope with Stress and Emotions AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Handouts - Healthy Coping These ... healthy Be active Manage my weight Cope with stress and emotions Set goals Stop smoking Prevent diabetes-related health ...

  19. Diabetes HealthSense: Resources for Living Well

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the text smaller. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services HOME | CONTACT US | JOBS AT NIDDK | RSS ... Cope with Stress and Emotions AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Handouts - Healthy Coping These handouts provide facts, tips, ...

  20. Parental influence on children's oral health-related behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poutanen, Raija; Lahti, Satu; Tolvanen, Mimmi; Hausen, Hannu

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there are differences between oral health-related knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and behaviors of children and their parents, and to identify the family-related factors associated with children's poor or good oral health-related behavior. The data were gathered by means of questionnaires from 11-12-year-old schoolchildren and their parents who replied without having knowledge of the answers of the others. Differences between subgroups of children were analyzed by cross-tabulation, and the factors related to children's good or poor oral health-related behavior by logistic regression analyses. Parents of children who reported good oral health-related behavior had better knowledge and more favorable behaviors than those of other parents. Predictors for a child's poor oral health-related behavior were the child's poor knowledge, male gender, the parent's frequent consumption of sweets, and the parent's infrequent use of xylitol gum. When a less strict threshold for the child's poor oral health-related behavior was used, more predictors entered the model: the parent's unfavorable use of fluoride toothpaste; among girls, the parent's lack of knowledge; and among children whose mother's occupation level was high, the parent's infrequent use of xylitol gum. The parents of children whose oral health behavior was favorable were more likely to have a high level occupation and favorable oral health-related behaviors. Oral health-related knowledge of children and their parents seems to be associated with children's oral health-related behavior. Parents' behaviors, but not attitudes, were associated with children's oral health behavior.

  1. Oral health related knowledge and health behavior of parents and school children

    OpenAIRE

    Lalić Maja; Aleksić Ema; Gajić Mihajlo; Malešević Đoka

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The family provides the background for developing behaviors, attitudes and knowledge related to oral health of children. The aim of this study was to compare oral health behavior of parents and their children and to asses the impact of parental behavior on children’s oral health. Material and Methods. This cross-sectional study included 99 parent - child pairs (12 to 15 years old). Data on oral health behavior, knowledge and attitudes regarding oral hygiene, fluorides and ...

  2. The Behavioral Health Role in Nursing Facility Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Dennis R; Rogers, Robin K; LeCrone, Harold H; Kelley, Katherine

    2017-09-01

    Types of compromised resident behaviors licensed nursing facility social workers encounter, the behavioral health role they enact, and effective practices they apply have not been the subject of systematic investigation. Analyses of 20 in-depth interviews with Bachelor of Social Work (BSW)/Master of Social Work (MSW) social workers averaging 8.8 years of experience identified frequently occurring resident behaviors: physical and verbal aggression/disruption, passive disruption, socially and sexually inappropriateness. Six functions of the behavioral health role were care management, educating, investigating, preventing, mediating, and advocating. Skills most frequently applied were attention/affirmation/active listening, assessment, behavior management, building relationship, teamwork, and redirection. Narratives revealed role rewards as well as knowledge deficits, organizational barriers, personal maltreatment, and frustrations. Respondents offered perspectives and prescriptions for behavioral health practice in this setting. The findings expand understanding of the behavioral health role and provide an empirical basis for more research in this area. Recommendations, including educational competencies, are offered.

  3. Effect of Orem’s Self-Care Model on Self-Esteem of Adolescents with Asthma Referred to an Asthma and Allergy Clinic in Isfahan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemati, Zeinab; Mosaviasl, Fatemeh Sadat; Abasi, Samira; Ghazavi, Zohre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acquisition of chronic diseases such as asthma leads to psychological, mental and physical complications in adolescents, and hence their self-esteem may be compromised. Therefore, the present study was conducted to assess the effect of Orem’s self-care model on self-esteem of adolescents with asthma. Materials and Methods: This semi-experimental study enrolled 64 asthmatic adolescents referred to Shariati Hospital, Isfahan. Subjects were assigned to two groups of control and intervention consecutively. Then, the self-care training program was conducted according to Orem’s self-care model in eight two-hour sessions based on self-care needs, and self-esteem was measured in the two groups prior to and two months after the last training session. The data were collected by a questionnaire of demographic characteristics and the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventories (CSEI) and analyzed by SPSS version 20. Results: Independent t-test showed a significant difference in the mean score of self-esteem between the intervention and control groups after the training (Pself-esteem before and after the training in the intervention group (P0.05). Conclusion: Regarding the effect of Orem’s self-care model on self-esteem of adolescents with asthma, we recommend the use of this model as a care intervention in healthcare centers to promote adolescents’ health. PMID:27114724

  4. Knowledge and self-care practices regarding diabetes among patients with Type 2 diabetes in Rural Sullia, Karnataka: A community-based, cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peraje Vasu Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes is a lifestyle disease which requires a multipronged approach for its management, wherein patient has an important role to play in terms of self-care practices, which can be taught to them by educational programs. To develop such an educational program, a baseline assessment of knowledge and self-care practices of patients, needs to be made. The two objectives of the study were to estimate the knowledge of diabetic patients regarding the disease and its complications, and to estimate the knowledge and adherence to self-care practices concerned with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: The study was conducted in rural Sullia, Karnataka, from January 2014 to May 2015. The sample size was calculated to be 400, and the sampling method was probability proportionate to sampling size. Result: Majority of them were married males of Hindu religion and belonged to upper middle class. Only 24.25% of them had good knowledge. Among the self-care practices, foot care was the most neglected area. Conclusion: Only one-fourth of the study population had a good knowledge toward diabetes. Adherence to some of the self-care practices was also poor. Government policies may help in creating guidelines on diabetes management, funding community programs for public awareness, availability of medicines, and diagnostic services to all sections of the community. Continuing education programs for health-care providers and utilization of mass media to the fullest potential may also help in creating awareness.

  5. Effect of Orem's Self-Care Model on Self-Esteem of Adolescents with Asthma Referred to an Asthma and Allergy Clinic in Isfahan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemati, Zeinab; Mosaviasl, Fatemeh Sadat; Abasi, Samira; Ghazavi, Zohre; Kiani, Davood

    2015-01-01

    Acquisition of chronic diseases such as asthma leads to psychological, mental and physical complications in adolescents, and hence their self-esteem may be compromised. Therefore, the present study was conducted to assess the effect of Orem's self-care model on self-esteem of adolescents with asthma. This semi-experimental study enrolled 64 asthmatic adolescents referred to Shariati Hospital, Isfahan. Subjects were assigned to two groups of control and intervention consecutively. Then, the self-care training program was conducted according to Orem's self-care model in eight two-hour sessions based on self-care needs, and self-esteem was measured in the two groups prior to and two months after the last training session. The data were collected by a questionnaire of demographic characteristics and the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventories (CSEI) and analyzed by SPSS version 20. Independent t-test showed a significant difference in the mean score of self-esteem between the intervention and control groups after the training (Pself-esteem before and after the training in the intervention group (P0.05). Regarding the effect of Orem's self-care model on self-esteem of adolescents with asthma, we recommend the use of this model as a care intervention in healthcare centers to promote adolescents' health.

  6. The role of information in supporting self-care in vascular conditions: a conceptual and empirical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blickem, Christian; Bower, Peter; Protheroe, Joanne; Kennedy, Anne; Vassilev, Ivaylo; Sanders, Caroline; Kirk, Sue; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Rogers, Anne

    2011-09-01

    Self-care has the potential to make a significant contribution to vascular conditions, but engagement with self-care support has been limited. Lack of relevant information is highlighted by patients and policy-makers as an important barrier to effective self-care, and information provides a potentially efficient platform for changing behaviour. However, work within the social sciences has generally seen information as a necessary but insufficient driver of health behaviours. Furthermore, some groups (such as the socially disadvantaged) are expected to be less amenable to information interventions. We conducted an integrated conceptual and empirical review on information-based interventions for people with vascular disease (diabetes, heart disease and kidney disease). We reviewed conceptual and empirical work concerning the role and impact of information in self-care support to generate an explanatory framework to determine why information was effective or ineffective in encouraging self-care in patients with vascular conditions. This involved mapping relevant theories and models linking information and self-care. We also explored published systematic reviews of educational interventions in diabetes, coronary heart disease and chronic kidney disease to examine the role of information and evidence concerning its effectiveness and impact in different patient populations. The conceptual review identified variation among information interventions in terms of type, function, and their relationship to behaviour change techniques and psychological mediators of behaviour change. Key moderators of the effect of information included types of disorder, and patient capacity and resources. A wealth of educational interventions exists for diabetes and heart conditions, but the precise components of these interventions that are effective are difficult to identify. There is little evidence concerning optimal ways of tailoring interventions for socially disadvantaged groups other

  7. PROspective MEmory Training to improve HEart failUre Self-care (PROMETHEUS): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jan; Rendell, Peter G; Ski, Chantal F; Kure, Christina E; McLennan, Skye N; Rose, Nathan S; Prior, David L; Thompson, David R

    2015-04-29

    Cognitive impairment is seen in up to three quarters of heart failure (HF) patients and has a significant negative impact on patients' health outcomes. Prospective memory, which is defined as memory to carry out future intentions, is important for functional independence in older adults and involves application of multiple cognitive processes that are often impaired in HF patients. The objective of this study is to examine the effects of prospective memory training on patients' engagement in HF self-care and health outcomes, carer strain and quality of life. The proposed study is a randomised, controlled trial in which 200 patients diagnosed with HF, and their carers will be recruited from 3 major hospitals across Melbourne. Eligible patients with HF will be randomised to receive either: 1) The Virtual Week Training Program - a computerised prospective memory (PM) training program (intervention) or 2) non-adaptive computer-based word puzzles (active control). HF patients' baseline cognitive function will be compared to a healthy control group (n = 60) living independently in the community. Patients will undergo a comprehensive assessment of PM, neuropsychological functioning, self-care, physical, and emotional functioning. Assessments will take place at baseline, 4 weeks and 12 months following intervention. Carers will complete measures assessing quality of life, strain, perceived control in the management of the patients' HF symptoms, and ratings of the patients' level of engagement in HF self-care behaviours. If the Virtual Week Training Program is effective in improving: 1) prospective memory; 2) self-care behaviours, and 3) wellbeing in HF patients, this study will enhance our understanding of impaired cognitive processes in HF and potentially is a mechanism to reduce healthcare costs. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry #366376; 27 May 2014. https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=366376&isClinicalTrial=False .

  8. Self-care management of Thai Buddhists and Muslims with type 2 diabetes after an empowerment education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Pranee C; Thrakul, Supunnee

    2018-04-23

    The aim of the present study was to explore self-care management of Thai Buddhists and Muslims with type 2 diabetes and inadequate blood glucose levels, after they had been subjected to a 6-month diabetes empowerment education program. Twenty-seven participants (male and female) were selected through purposive convenience sampling for an explorative qualitative study. Semistructured focus group interviews with four open-ended questions were used to study the participants' self-care behavior at the beginning and the end of the program, and the data obtained were subjected to content analysis. At the end, one third of the participants had been able to reduce their blood glucose to acceptable levels. Most of the others had achieved reduced but irregular blood glucose levels; however, some did not achieve any reduction. Diet was the most difficult problem, and economic difficulties, incorrect knowledge, and misleading beliefs were barriers. In conclusion, an empowerment education program can substantially improve the outcome of self-care management for many people with type 2 diabetes. In the planning of such programs, barriers should be taken into account. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Health behavior change: can genomics improve behavioral adherence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Colleen M; Bryan, Angela D; Bray, Molly S; Swan, Gary E; Green, Eric D

    2012-03-01

    The National Human Genome Research Institute recommends pursuing "genomic information to improve behavior change interventions" as part of its strategic vision for genomics. The limited effectiveness of current behavior change strategies may be explained, in part, by their insensitivity to individual variation in adherence responses. The first step in evaluating whether genomics can inform customization of behavioral recommendations is evidence reviews to identify adherence macrophenotypes common across behaviors and individuals that have genetic underpinnings. Conceptual models of how biological, psychological, and environmental factors influence adherence also are needed. Researchers could routinely collect biospecimens and standardized adherence measurements of intervention participants to enable understanding of genetic and environmental influences on adherence, to guide intervention customization and prospective comparative effectiveness studies.

  10. Relationship between Health Literacy, Health-Related Behaviors and Health Status: A Survey of Elderly Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Bing; Liu, Liu; Li, Yan-Fei; Chen, Yan-Li

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the large volume of research dedicated to health-related behavior change, chronic disease costs continue to rise, thus creating a major public health burden. Health literacy, the ability to seek, understand, and utilize health information, has been identified as an important factor in the course of chronic conditions. Little research has been conducted on the relationship between health literacy and health-related behaviors and health status in elderly Chinese. The aim of this study was to elucidate the relationship between health literacy and health-related behaviors and health status in China. Methods: The subjects enrolled in this study were selected based on a stratified cluster random sampling design. Information involving >4500 older adults in 44 pension institutions in Urumqi, Changji, Karamay, and Shihezi of Xinjiang between September 2011 and June 2012 was collected. The Chinese Citizen Health Literacy Questionnaire (China Health Education Centre, 2008) and a Scale of the General Status were administered and the information was obtained through face-to-face inquiries by investigators. A total of 1452 respondents met the inclusion criteria. A total of 1452 questionnaires were issued and the valid response rate was 96.14% (1396 of 1452). Factors affecting health literacy and the relationship to health literacy were identified by one-way ANOVA and a multiple linear regression model. Results: The average health literacy level of the elderly in nursing homes was relatively low (71.74 ± 28.35 points). There were significant differences in the health literacy score among the factors of age, gender, race, education level, household income, marital conditions, and former occupation (p 0.05). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the independent influencing factors of health literacy included education level, race, former occupation, household income, age, physical exercise, health examination, smoking, and health information access (p

  11. Relationship between Health Literacy, Health-Related Behaviors and Health Status: A Survey of Elderly Chinese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Bing Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the large volume of research dedicated to health-related behavior change, chronic disease costs continue to rise, thus creating a major public health burden. Health literacy, the ability to seek, understand, and utilize health information, has been identified as an important factor in the course of chronic conditions. Little research has been conducted on the relationship between health literacy and health-related behaviors and health status in elderly Chinese. The aim of this study was to elucidate the relationship between health literacy and health-related behaviors and health status in China. Methods: The subjects enrolled in this study were selected based on a stratified cluster random sampling design. Information involving >4500 older adults in 44 pension institutions in Urumqi, Changji, Karamay, and Shihezi of Xinjiang between September 2011 and June 2012 was collected. The Chinese Citizen Health Literacy Questionnaire (China Health Education Centre, 2008 and a Scale of the General Status were administered and the information was obtained through face-to-face inquiries by investigators. A total of 1452 respondents met the inclusion criteria. A total of 1452 questionnaires were issued and the valid response rate was 96.14% (1396 of 1452. Factors affecting health literacy and the relationship to health literacy were identified by one-way ANOVA and a multiple linear regression model. Results: The average health literacy level of the elderly in nursing homes was relatively low (71.74 ± 28.35 points. There were significant differences in the health literacy score among the factors of age, gender, race, education level, household income, marital conditions, and former occupation (p < 0.001. The health literacy score was significantly associated with smoking, drinking, physical exercise, and health examination (p < 0.001. The elderly with higher health literacy scores were significantly less likely to have risky behaviors

  12. Self-care interventions for the school-aged child with encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitito, L M

    2000-01-01

    Encopresis, an elimination disorder in children, presents as a challenging problem for gastroenterology nurses working with patients and families confronted with this disorder. This article offers a summary of the literature on encopresis, including pathogenesis, causative factors, early treatment, and clinical interventions focused on self-care. The antecedent factors that facilitate the child's participation in self-care are summarized, along with the intended outcomes of the self-care intervention plan.

  13. The evidence base for professional and self-care prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante

    2015-01-01

    Med and the Cochrane library through April 2014 using established MeSH-terms and disease-related search words in various combinations. The search was restricted to SR's published in English or Scandinavian and all age groups were considered. The reference lists of the selected papers were hand-searched for additional...... review articles of potential interest. Meta-analyses, guidelines and treatment recommendations were considered only when SR's were lacking. In the event of updates or multiple systematic reviews covering the same topic, only the most recent article was included. No quality assessment of the systematic....... Likewise, the GRADE score for preventing erosions located in the enamel with fluoride supplements was low. The quality of evidence for various professional and self-care methods to prevent and manage dentine hypersensitivity was very low. CONCLUSIONS: There are knowledge gaps in many domains of cariology...

  14. Health behaviors, care needs and attitudes towards self-prescription: a cross-sectional survey among Dutch medical students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjeerd Van der Veer

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: There is a growing awareness of the potent ways in which the wellbeing of physicians impacts the health of their patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the health behaviors, care needs and attitudes towards self-prescription of Dutch medical students, and any differences between junior preclinical and senior clinically active students. METHODS: All students (n = 2695 of a major Dutch medical school were invited for an online survey. Physical activity, eating habits, alcohol consumption, smoking, Body Mass Index, substance use and amount of sleep per night were inquired, as well as their need for different forms of care and their attitude towards self-prescription. RESULTS: Data of 902 students were used. Physical activity levels (90% sufficient and smoking prevalence (94% non-smokers were satisfying. Healthy eating habits (51% insufficient and alcohol consumption (46% excessive were worrying. Body Mass Indexes were acceptable (20% unhealthy. We found no significant differences in health behaviors between preclinical and clinically active students. Care needs were significantly lower among clinically active students. (p<0.05 Student acceptance of self-prescription was significantly higher among clinically active students. (p<0.001 CONCLUSIONS: Unhealthy behaviors are prevalent among medical students, but are no more prevalent during the clinical study phase. The need for specific forms of care appears lower with study progression. This could be worrying as the acceptance of self-care and self-prescription is higher among senior clinical students. Medical faculties need to address students' unhealthy behaviors and meet their care needs for the benefit of both the future physicians as well as their patients.

  15. Determinants of Consumer eHealth Information Seeking Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandefer, Ryan H; Westra, Bonnie L; Khairat, Saif S; Pieczkiewicz, David S; Speedie, Stuart M

    2015-01-01

    Patients are increasingly using the Internet and other technologies to engage in their own healthcare, but little research has focused on the determinants of consumer eHealth behaviors related to Internet use. This study uses data from 115,089 respondents to four years of the National Health Interview Series to identify the associations between one consumer eHealth behavior (information seeking) and demographics, health measures, and Personal Health Information Management (PHIM) (messaging, scheduling, refills, and chat). Individuals who use PHIM are 7.5 times more likely to search the internet for health related information. Just as health has social determinants, the results of this study indicate there are potential social determinants of consumer eHealth behaviors including personal demographics, health status, and healthcare access.

  16. Antecedents of Philanthropic Behavior of Health Care Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alias, Siti Noormi; Ismail, Maimunah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to propose a conceptual model of philanthropic behavior of volunteers in the health care sector. Design/methodology/approach: This study is based on an extensive review of past research on philanthropic behavior. To conduct the literature review, keywords such as philanthropy, philanthropic behavior, giving, donating,…

  17. Child labor and childhood behavioral and mental health problems in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objectives of this study are to estimate the prevalence and describe the nature of behavioral and mental health problems, as well as child abuse, nutritional problems, gross physical illness and injury among child laborers aged 8 to 15 years in Ethiopia. However, only the behavioral and mental health ...

  18. Health risk behavior of youth in foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramkowski, Bridget; Kools, Susan; Paul, Steven; Boyer, Cherrie B; Monasterio, Erica; Robbins, Nancy

    2009-05-01

    Many adolescent health problems are predominantly caused by risk behavior. Foster adolescents have disproportionately poor health; therefore, identification of risk behavior is critical. Data from a larger study were analyzed to investigate the health risk behavior of 56 youth in foster care using the Child Health and Illness Profile-Adolescent Edition. Data indicated that youth in foster care had some increased risk behavior when compared with a normative adolescent population. Younger adolescents and those in relative placement had less risky behavior. Risk behavior was increased for youth in foster care when they were in group homes, had experienced a parental death, or had a history of physical or emotional abuse or attempted suicide. These results point to areas of strength and vulnerability for youth in foster care and suggest areas for clinicians and caregivers of these adolescents to focus interventions towards harm reduction and enhancement of resiliency.

  19. Television viewing, psychological positive health, health complaints and health risk behaviors in Spanish children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Moledo, C; Castro-Piñero, J; Ortega, F B; Pulido-Martos, M; Sjöström, M; Ruiz, J R

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to study the correlation of television viewing with positive and negative health in youth. The present cross-sectional study comprised a total of 680 children and adolescents aged 6-17.9 (46% girls) representative of the province of Cádiz (south Spain). We used the Health Behavior in School-aged Children questionnaire to assess television viewing, positive and negative health. It was found that correlations between television viewing >2 hours and several outcomes were inconsistent. No effects were found for quality of family relationships, quality of peer relationships, perceived academic performance and health risk behaviors in children, or with perceived excellent health status, excellent life satisfaction, quality of peer relationships, perceived academic performance and health risk behaviors in adolescents. However viewing >2 hours of television was correlated with lower quality family relations in adolescents, and lower perceived excellent health status, lower life satisfaction and higher health complaints index in children. Correction for multiple comparisons would render all television relationships as non-significant. Our results suggest that negative television influences on children and adolescents are minimal. However excessive television viewing may be symptomatic of other underlying mental health problems for some children.

  20. Health Behaviors and Academic Performance Among Korean Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Eun Sun; Park, Byoung Mo

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to examine the most prominent health-related behaviors impacting the academic performance of Korean adolescents. The 2012 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-Based Survey data were analyzed using an ordinal regression analysis after adjusting for general and other health behaviors. Before adjustment, all health behaviors were significantly associated with academic performance. After adjustment for other health behaviors and confounding factors, only smoking [odds ratio (OR) = 2.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.98, 2.16), p academic performance, and engaging in a regular diet [OR = 0.65, 95% CI (0.65, 0.62), p academic performance. Regular diet, reducing smoking and alcohol drinking, and physical activity should be the target when designing health interventions for improving academic performance in Korean adolescents. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. PROMOTING PSYCHO-SOCIAL-SPIRITUAL RESPONSE IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS THROUGH APLICATION ON SELF CARE MANAGEMENT MODUL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusnanto Kusnanto

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus was a kind of incurable chronic disease that actually manageable. The global prevalence tends to increase due to less self management of the disease and the impact of it was severe health condition. There were so many interventions implemented but failed to give optimal improvement in patient’s condition and there are so many DM patients have insufficient ability to manage their own disease. Patients need to have knowledge, skills, and self confident to be able to manage their disease. Patient’s self-management depends on patient’s education, empowerment, and self monitoring in evaluating their self-care management. The purpose of this research was promoting patient’s psychological, social, and spiritual conditions through Self Care Management. Improvement in psychological, social, and spiritual conditions in patients with DM will lead to better level of blood glucose and HbA1C. Method: Patient newly diagnose with Type 2 DM at Puskesmas Kebonsari was selected with purposive sampling and divided into two groups. Each group contains 25 patients. Intervention group was given Self Diabetes Management Module. Before and after intervention patient was given Questionnaire. The data then analyzed using Student-T test, McNemar and Chi-Square. Result: The result of this research showed patient have constructive coping, increase interpersonal relation. Patients also have better acceptance about the disease and involve in its management. Discussion: Self Care Management Module promotes psychological, social, and spiritual conditions in patients with type 2 DM.

  2. Understanding Health and Health-Related Behavior of Users of Internet Health Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimble, Matt

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about how actual use of Internet health-related information is associated with health or health-related behavior. Using a nationally representative sample of 34,525 from 2012, this study examined the demographics of users of Internet health-related information (users), reports estimates of association with several health and behavioral outcomes adjusting for demographic factors, and analyzed the sample by education level, race, gender, and age. Analysis of a large nationally representative sample shows evidence that users of health-related information (users) on the Internet are younger, more educated, more likely to be insured, more likely to be female, and less likely to be African American. After adjusting for demographic differences, users are more likely to have been diagnosed with hypertension, cancer, stroke, and high cholesterol, but no evidence of current hypertension, weight-related issues, or being in fair or poor health. Users are less likely to smoke and among smokers are more likely to attempt quitting. Users are more likely to exercise, get a flu shot, pap smear, mammogram, HIV test, colon cancer screening, blood pressure check, and cholesterol check, but likely to be heavy drinkers. With few exceptions, results appear robust across gender, age groups, level of education, and ethnicity. Use is generally positively associated with prior diagnosis for several conditions and behaviors related to improved health, but I find no relationship with existing health status. The association between use of health-related Internet information and health-related behavior seems robust across levels of education, age, gender, and race.

  3. Behavioral Health Services in the Changing Landscape of Private Health Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horgan, Constance M; Stewart, Maureen T; Reif, Sharon; Garnick, Deborah W; Hodgkin, Dominic; Merrick, Elizabeth L; Quinn, Amity E

    2016-06-01

    Health plans play a key role in facilitating improvements in population health and may engage in activities that have an impact on access, cost, and quality of behavioral health care. Although behavioral health care is becoming more integrated with general medical care, its delivery system has unique aspects. The study examined how health plans deliver and manage behavioral health care in the context of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the 2008 Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA). This is a critical time to examine how health plans manage behavioral health care. A nationally representative survey of private health plans (weighted N=8,431 products; 89% response rate) was conducted in 2010 during the first year of MHPAEA, when plans were subject to the law but before final regulations, and just before the ACA went into effect. The survey addressed behavioral health coverage, cost-sharing, contracting arrangements, medical home innovations, support for technology, and financial incentives to improve behavioral health care. Coverage for inpatient and outpatient behavioral health services was stable between 2003 and 2010. In 2010, health plans were more likely than in 2003 to manage behavioral health care through internal arrangements and to contract for other services. Medical home initiatives were common and almost always included behavioral health, but financial incentives did not. Some plans facilitated providers' use of technology to improve care delivery, but this was not the norm. Health plans are key to mainstreaming and supporting delivery of high-quality behavioral health services. Since 2003, plans have made changes to support delivery of behavioral health services in the context of a rapidly changing environment.

  4. Lifestyle Assessment: Helping Patients Change Health Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Ciliska, Donna; Wilson, Douglas M. C.

    1984-01-01

    This article is the second in a series of six on lifestyle assessment and behavior change. The first article presented an assessment tool called FANTASTIC, which has been tested for reliability and is currently in wide use. After assessment, family physicians must help patients decide to change—and give them guidance on how to change—unhealthy behaviors. This article explains how the family physician can use educational, behavioral and relaxation strategies to increase patients' motivation, m...

  5. Applying the reasoned action approach to understanding health protection and health risk behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Mark; McEachan, Rosemary; Lawton, Rebecca; Gardner, Peter

    2017-12-01

    The Reasoned Action Approach (RAA) developed out of the Theory of Reasoned Action and Theory of Planned Behavior but has not yet been widely applied to understanding health behaviors. The present research employed the RAA in a prospective design to test predictions of intention and action for groups of protection and risk behaviors separately in the same sample. To test the RAA for health protection and risk behaviors. Measures of RAA components plus past behavior were taken in relation to eight protection and six risk behaviors in 385 adults. Self-reported behavior was assessed one month later. Multi-level modelling showed instrumental attitude, experiential attitude, descriptive norms, capacity and past behavior were significant positive predictors of intentions to engage in protection or risk behaviors. Injunctive norms were only significant predictors of intention in protection behaviors. Autonomy was a significant positive predictor of intentions in protection behaviors and a negative predictor in risk behaviors (the latter relationship became non-significant when controlling for past behavior). Multi-level modelling showed that intention, capacity, and past behavior were significant positive predictors of action for both protection and risk behaviors. Experiential attitude and descriptive norm were additional significant positive predictors of risk behaviors. The RAA has utility in predicting both protection and risk health behaviors although the power of predictors may vary across these types of health behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Health and self-care among garbage collectors: work experiences in a recyclable garbage cooperative Salud y autocuidado entre minadores de basura: vivencias en el trabajo en una cooperativa de basura reciclable Saúde e autocuidado entre catadores de lixo: vivências no trabalho em uma cooperativa de lixo reciclável

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarice Maria Dall'Agnol

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Study performed with garbage pickers who organized a cooperative to sort recyclable garbage in Porto Alegre, Brazil, in a shed loaned by the city administration. This activity, which has attracted an increasing number of people excluded from the formal job market, presents peculiar health risks and patterns of disease. The study aimed to learn about the participants' concepts and self-care actions, proposing discussions and jointly reflection on their problems. It focuses on the working environment and on attitudes towards health risks. Through the focal group technique with ten female subjects, the expression of capacity of situational analysis of those involved was privileged, giving rise to three main themes. Each theme discussed was followed by the construction of a plan of action in order to meet compatibly the more pressing needs according to the operational feasibility of the solutions proposed.Estudio realizado con minadores de basura que organizaron una cooperativa de separación de basura reciclable en un galpón de la municipalidad de Porto Alegre, RS. Esta actividad, que ha atraído un número creciente de excluidos del mercado formal de trabajo, presenta riesgos a la salud y estándares peculiares de enfermedad. La finalidad fue conocer las concepciones y acciones de autocuidado de las participantes, todas mujeres, proponiendo discusiones y reflexiones conjuntas sobre la problemática vivida por ellas. El foco miró el ambiente de trabajo y las actitudes relacionados a los riesgos a la salud. La técnica de grupos focales con diez sujetos permitió privilegiar la expresión de su capacidad de análisis situacional, originando tres ejes temáticos. A cada tema discutido se siguió la construcción de un plan de acción de manera a compatibilizar la atención a las necesidades más demandadas con la viabilidad operacional de los encaminamientos propuestos.Estudo realizado com catadores de lixo que organizaram uma cooperativa de

  7. Forging Multidisciplinary Collaboration to Improve Mental/Behavioral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Wanda M; Bunde, Paula K; Remick-Erickson, Kara; Rebeck, Shelby; Denny, Darla

    2017-09-01

    Five Johnson and Johnson fellows validated the lack of communication regarding students with mental/behavioral health issues and took a leadership position within their school district to address the problem. An open-ended survey revealed inconsistent and fragmented support given to students with mental/behavioral health concerns. A multidisciplinary task force was formed consisting of stakeholders including district and nondistrict community members. The procedure for district staff to address students' behavioral/mental health concerns was adapted by representatives from all stakeholders and was distributed district wide and uploaded to the district's staff website for general access. Training of district employees in Youth Mental Health First Aid has provided the foundation for communicating and implementing a standardized approach for identifying, responding, and referring students with mental/behavioral health concerns. Open dialog, better communication and understanding of disciplines, and more initiatives aimed at improving the mental health of all students has resulted from the collaboration started with this initiative.

  8. Diabetes HealthSense: Resources for Living Well

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... right track. Cope with Stress and Emotions AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Handouts - Healthy Coping These handouts provide ... advice, and activities for seven different areas of self-care to focus on when you are trying ...

  9. Diabetes HealthSense: Resources for Living Well

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... track. Cope with Stress and Emotions AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Handouts - Healthy Coping These handouts provide facts, ... and activities for seven different areas of self-care to focus on when you are trying to ...

  10. Pregnancy-related Health Behavior of Women with Congenital Heart Disease : Room for Behavioral Change Interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moons, Philip; Budts, Werner; Costermans, Els; Huyghe, Els; Pieper, Petronella G.; Drenthen, Wim

    2009-01-01

    Background. Pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease is associated with maternal and neonatal complications. In order to reduce risks for unfavorable outcomes, pregnant women need to adopt specific health behaviors. We investigated the pregnancy-related health behavior of women with

  11. Why are there social gradients in preventative health behavior? A perspective from behavioral ecology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Nettle

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Within affluent populations, there are marked socioeconomic gradients in health behavior, with people of lower socioeconomic position smoking more, exercising less, having poorer diets, complying less well with therapy, using medical services less, ignoring health and safety advice more, and being less health-conscious overall, than their more affluent peers. Whilst the proximate mechanisms underlying these behavioral differences have been investigated, the ultimate causes have not.This paper presents a theoretical model of why socioeconomic gradients in health behavior might be found. I conjecture that lower socioeconomic position is associated with greater exposure to extrinsic mortality risks (that is, risks that cannot be mitigated through behavior, and that health behavior competes for people's time and energy against other activities which contribute to their fitness. Under these two assumptions, the model shows that the optimal amount of health behavior to perform is indeed less for people of lower socioeconomic position.The model predicts an exacerbatory dynamic of poverty, whereby the greater exposure of poor people to unavoidable harms engenders a disinvestment in health behavior, resulting in a final inequality in health outcomes which is greater than the initial inequality in material conditions. I discuss the assumptions of the model, and its implications for strategies for the reduction of health inequalities.

  12. The Utrecht Healthy School Project: Connecting adolescent health behavior, academic achievement and Health Promoting Schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busch, V.

    2014-01-01

    Unhealthy behaviors contribute to the development of diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and psychiatric disorders. Most often these behaviors develop in the teenage years. This thesis addresses the following topics: (1) How do health-related behaviors cluster and affect health in

  13. Health plans' disease management programs: extending across the medical and behavioral health spectrum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Elizabeth Levy; Horgan, Constance M; Garnick, Deborah W; Hodgkin, Dominic; Morley, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    Although the disease management industry has expanded rapidly, there is little nationally representative data regarding medical and behavioral health disease management programs at the health plan level. National estimates from a survey of private health plans indicate that 90% of health plan products offered disease management for general medical conditions such as diabetes but only 37% had depression programs. The frequency of specific depression disease management activities varied widely. Program adoption was significantly related to product type and behavioral health contracting. In health plans, disease management has penetrated more slowly into behavioral health and depression program characteristics are highly variable.

  14. Social support, self-care, and quality of life in cancer patients receiving radiotherapy in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanucharurnkul, S.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the study was two-fold: (1) to examine the relationships among self-care, social support, and quality of life in adult cancer patients receiving radiotherapy while the selected basic conditioning factors of age, marital and socio-economic status, living arrangement, stage and site of cancer were statistically controlled; and (2) to test a theoretical model which postulated that (a) quality of life was predicted jointly by the selected basic conditioning factors, social support and self-care, and (b) self-care was predicted jointly by the selected basic conditioning factors and social support. A convenience sample of 112 adult cervical and head/neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy was obtained from radiotherapy outpatient clinic in three hospitals located in Bangkok, Thailand. Results of the study indicated positive relationships among self-care, social support, and quality of life. Socio-economic status, site of cancer, and self-care were significant predictors for reported quality of life. Social support appeared to be a significant predictor of quality of life indirectly through self-care. Socio-economic status and social support were also significant predictors of self-care, whereas, stage and site of cancer seemed to predict self-care indirectly through social support

  15. How Do Cognitive Function and Knowledge Affect Heart Failure Self-Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Lee, Christopher S.; Riegel, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive patient education, few heart failure (HF) patients master self-care. Impaired cognitive function may explain why patient education is ineffective. A concurrent triangulation mixed methods design was used to explore how knowledge and cognitive function influence HF self-care. A total of 41 adults with HF participated in interviews…

  16. Evaluation of the european heart failure self-care behaviour scale in a united kingdom population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shuldham, Caroline; Theaker, Chris; Jaarsma, Tiny; Cowie, Martin R.

    2007-01-01

    Title. Evaluation of the European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour Scale in a United Kingdom population Aim. This paper is a report of a study to test the internal consistency, reliability and validity of the 12-item European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour Scale in an English-speaking sample in

  17. [Dissertation 25 years after date 39. Oral self-care by dentate elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluter, W.J.; Baat, C. de

    2015-01-01

    In 1989, the dissertation 'Oral self-care for dentate elderly' was published. Among other things, the effect of an information leaflet on oral self-care was investigated in a randomised, controlled trial. The outcome of the entire intervention was positive. Subsequent to this dissertation no

  18. Application of Orem self-care theory on injection of interferon antiviral therapy in patients with

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujuan Tao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Guided by Orem self-care theory, the nursing staff evaluate the injection of interferon antiviral therapy in patients, finding that patients with the presence of self-care was insufficient, so effective nursing care in different periods of application of different nursing system was necessary.

  19. The Relationship between Health Locus of Control and Health Behaviors in Emergency Medicine Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhoseinzadeh, Mansour; Gheibizadeh, Mahin; Moradikalboland, Mehrnaz

    2017-10-01

    Health locus of control defined as individual beliefs based on past experiences in health issues and having external or internal control over them, could affect health. Health locus of control plays a role in health behaviors. We aimed to investigate the relationship between health locus of control and health behavior in emergency medical personnel in Ahvaz during 2016. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study, which began in August 2016 for a period of six months on 215 emergency medical personnel in Ahvaz who were selected randomly. The data were collected by a demographic questionnaire, Rotter's locus of control questionnaire, and health behavior questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS software, version 22. The correlation between variables was estimated by Pearson's correlation coefficient and independent t test. The level of significance for all statistical tests was set at 0.05. We found no significant relationship between health locus of control (external and internal) and health behavior (P>0.05).Health behaviors were very good in terms of personal health (86.5%), nutrition (53%), and sleep and rest (48.4%), and poor in terms of physical activity (52.6%) and stress management (79.5%). Furthermore, 79.5% of the emergency personnel, in general, had poor heath behaviors. Leaders and officials in the field of health must necessarily design programs in relation to health locus of control and the factors developing and affecting it as well as the role of health locus of control in doing correct behaviors.

  20. Some current dimensions of the behavioral economics of health-related behavior change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Warren K; Moody, Lara; Higgins, Stephen T

    2016-11-01

    Health-related behaviors such as tobacco, alcohol and other substance use, poor diet and physical inactivity, and risky sexual practices are important targets for research and intervention. Health-related behaviors are especially pertinent targets in the United States, which lags behind most other developed nations on common markers of population health. In this essay we examine the application of behavioral economics, a scientific discipline that represents the intersection of economics and psychology, to the study and promotion of health-related behavior change. More specifically, we review what we consider to be some core dimensions of this discipline when applied to the study health-related behavior change. Behavioral economics (1) provides novel conceptual systems to inform scientific understanding of health behaviors, (2) translates scientific understanding into practical and effective behavior-change interventions, (3) leverages varied aspects of behavior change beyond increases or decreases in frequency, (4) recognizes and exploits trans-disease processes and interventions, and (5) leverages technology in efforts to maximize efficacy, cost effectiveness, and reach. These dimensions are overviewed and their implications for the future of the field discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Oral Health Attitudes and Behavior among Graduating Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The high dependence on doctors for oral health information due to the shortage of oral health manpower in Nigeria cannot be over emphasized. It is imperative therefore, that medical students as future medical doctors have proper knowledge and oral health behavior. Objective: To evaluate self reported oral ...

  2. Peer Mentoring for Health Behavior Change: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petosa, R. L.; Smith, Laureen H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Peer mentoring can be a powerful complement to health instruction. Mentoring has been used to change health behaviors and promote sustainable lifestyle patterns in adults and, more recently, among adolescents. Purpose: This article reviews the use of peer mentoring to promote health practices and describes how this approach can be used…

  3. Ethical Theories for Promoting Health through Behavioral Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Janelle K.; Price, James H.

    1983-01-01

    Arguments based on the philosophies of natural law, utilitarianism, paternalism, and distributive justice are examined for their pertinence to health behavior change strategies. Health educators should prepare individuals to make health-generating decisions but may need to limit the conditions under which they intervene. (Author/PP)

  4. Sexual Health Attitudes, Knowledge, and Clinical Behaviors: Implications for Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Elizabeth B.

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the impact of practitioners' attitudes and knowledge of sexual health on clinical behaviors. Sexual health topics are often areas of concern for clients of any age in counseling. Thus, counselors must be trained and equipped to address sexual health across the life span. This study explored whether child and adolescent…

  5. Development of a Medicaid Behavioral Health Case-Mix Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robst, John

    2009-01-01

    Many Medicaid programs have either fully or partially carved out mental health services. The evaluation of carve-out plans requires a case-mix model that accounts for differing health status across Medicaid managed care plans. This article develops a diagnosis-based case-mix adjustment system specific to Medicaid behavioral health care. Several…

  6. Mental Health Issues and Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoach, Kendra P.; Dvorsky, Melissa; Miller, Elaine; Paget, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral challenges are significantly impacted by mental health issues. Teachers and other school staff need mental health knowledge to work more effectively with these students. Collaboration with mental health professionals and sharing of information is essential. [For complete volume, see ED539318.

  7. The role of narcissism in health-risk and health-protective behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Erin M

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the role of narcissism in health-risk and health-protective behaviors in a sample of 365 undergraduate students. Regression analyses were used to test the influence of narcissism on health behaviors. Narcissism was positively predictive of alcohol use, marijuana use, and risky driving behaviors, and it was associated with an increased likelihood of consistently having a healthy eating pattern. Narcissism was also positively predictive of physical activity. Results are discussed with reference to the potential short-term and long-term health implications and the need for future research on the factors involved in the relationship between narcissism and health behaviors. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Special issue: Behavioral Economics and Health Annual Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    The application of behavioral economics to health and health care has captured the imagination of policymakers across the political spectrum. The idea is that many people are irrational in predictable ways, and that this both contributes to unhealthy behaviors like smoking and holds one of the keys to changing those behaviors. Because health care costs continue to increase, and a substantial portion of costs are incurred because of unhealthy behaviors, employers and insurers have great interest in using financial incentives to change behaviors. However, it is in the details that complexity and controversies emerge. Who should the targets be, and what outcomes should be rewarded? How should incentives be structured, to maximize their effectiveness and minimize unintended consequences? In what situations should we be intervening to affect decisions by people who may prefer to be obese or to smoke, and in what situations should we accept their preferences? To begin to answer these questions, the Penn-CMU Roybal P30 Center on Behavioral Economics and Health held its first annual Behavioral Economics and Health Symposium on March 24-25, 2011 with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The symposium drew more than 50 researchers, scholars, and health professionals from a variety of disciplines, including medicine, public health, economics, law, management, marketing, and psychology. They heard perspectives on behavioral economics from public and private funders, the CEO of the University of Pennsylvania Health System, and the CEO of stickK.com, a start-up company that uses online, voluntary commitment contracts to help people achieve their goals. Participants formed eight working groups to review the current state-of-the-art in a variety of clinical contexts and to consider how behavioral economics could inform a research agenda to improve health. This Issue Brief summarizes the findings of these working groups and the symposium.

  9. Problematic gaming behavior among adolescents and young adults:relationship between gaming behavior and health

    OpenAIRE

    Männikkö, N. (Niko)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to describe and explain the problematic gaming behavior and the relationship between the digital gaming behavior (gaming time, medium, genres and motives), health (psychological, social and physical) and problematic gaming behavior among young people aged from 13 to 24 years. Information received can be used for developing practices to identify individuals with problematic gaming behavior, promote their lifestyle change and subsequently to increase knowle...

  10. Self-care practice of ostomy patients: contributions of the Orem’s theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Catunda Gomes Menezes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the conditioning factors to self-care practice of ostomy patients, and verify knowledge and practices on stoma care. Descriptive and qualitative study, referencing the Orem’s Self-Care Theory, carried out at the Ostomy Association of Fortaleza-CE, Brazil, in June and July 2007. We identified as the main conditioning factors for self-care: male, aged over 51 years, low education, from the capital city/metropolitan area, married, and with low family income. From the participants’ statements, emerged three categories: Learning to take care of stoma: education-support system; Stoma Care: knowledge and practices; and Difficulties found in the practice of self-care. It was concluded that ostomy patients require a multidimensional and individualized nursing care, which enables them to perform self-care effectively.

  11. Individualized Behavioral Health Monitoring Tool, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Given the extended duration of future missions and the isolated, extreme and confined environments, there is the possibility that behavioral conditions and mental...

  12. Associations between barriers to self-care and diabetes complications among patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sina, Maryam; Graffy, Jonathan; Simmons, David

    2018-07-01

    To determine which barriers to care are associated with type 2 diabetes complications in an area in rural East England. 3649 individuals with type 2 diabetes from 62 general practices were contacted via postal invitation which included a 33 item Barriers-to-Diabetes-Care Survey. Barriers were grouped into five priori major categories: educational, physical, psychological, psychosocial, and systems. The associations of reported barriers, both individually and as a group, with self-reported complications were assessed using logistic regression. 39.5% of participants had self-reported diabetes complications. Physical health barriers (OR = 3.3; 95%CI: 2.7, 4.0), systems barriers (OR = 1.6; 95%CI: 1.3, 2.0) and psychologic