WorldWideScience

Sample records for health protection inspectorate

  1. A qualitative exploration of the perceptions and information needs of public health inspectors responsible for food safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sargeant Jan M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Ontario, local public health inspectors play an important frontline role in protecting the public from foodborne illness. This study was an in-depth exploration of public health inspectors' perceptions of the key food safety issues in public health, and their opinions and needs with regards to food safety information resources. Methods Four focus group discussions were conducted with public health inspectors from the Central West region of Ontario, Canada during June and July, 2008. A questioning route was used to standardize qualitative data collection. Audio recordings of sessions were transcribed verbatim and data-driven content analysis was performed. Results A total of 23 public health inspectors participated in four focus group discussions. Five themes emerged as key food safety issues: time-temperature abuse, inadequate handwashing, cross-contamination, the lack of food safety knowledge by food handlers and food premise operators, and the lack of food safety information and knowledge about specialty foods (i.e., foods from different cultures. In general, participants reported confidence with their current knowledge of food safety issues and foodborne pathogens. Participants highlighted the need for a central source for food safety information, access to up-to-date food safety information, resources in different languages, and additional food safety information on specialty foods. Conclusions The information gathered from these focus groups can provide a basis for the development of resources that will meet the specific needs of public health inspectors involved in protecting and promoting food safety.

  2. A qualitative exploration of the perceptions and information needs of public health inspectors responsible for food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Mai T; Jones, Andria Q; Sargeant, Jan M; Marshall, Barbara J; Dewey, Catherine E

    2010-06-16

    In Ontario, local public health inspectors play an important frontline role in protecting the public from foodborne illness. This study was an in-depth exploration of public health inspectors' perceptions of the key food safety issues in public health, and their opinions and needs with regards to food safety information resources. Four focus group discussions were conducted with public health inspectors from the Central West region of Ontario, Canada during June and July, 2008. A questioning route was used to standardize qualitative data collection. Audio recordings of sessions were transcribed verbatim and data-driven content analysis was performed. A total of 23 public health inspectors participated in four focus group discussions. Five themes emerged as key food safety issues: time-temperature abuse, inadequate handwashing, cross-contamination, the lack of food safety knowledge by food handlers and food premise operators, and the lack of food safety information and knowledge about specialty foods (i.e., foods from different cultures). In general, participants reported confidence with their current knowledge of food safety issues and foodborne pathogens. Participants highlighted the need for a central source for food safety information, access to up-to-date food safety information, resources in different languages, and additional food safety information on specialty foods. The information gathered from these focus groups can provide a basis for the development of resources that will meet the specific needs of public health inspectors involved in protecting and promoting food safety.

  3. Investigation into qualitative discourses of the occupational safety and health inspectors in order to promote enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, Toivo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to conduct an ex-post evaluation of the OSH Enforcement Act. The focus of the study was to collate the views of occupational safety and health (OSH) inspectors on how the OSH Enforcement Act and the practices of the governmental OSH inspectorate operate from an effectiveness perspective. The questionnaire included open questions addressed to OSH inspectors. The results indicated that there is a tension between the quantitative performance targets, e.g., the number of inspections and the effectiveness of the practical enforcement work. Harmonizing the enforcement practices should be implemented at two levels: OSH local agencies and individual inspectors. OSH inspectors believe that developing the professional skills of OSH inspectors and the monitoring of OSH management systems are important ways of promoting the effectiveness of OSH enforcement.

  4. An evaluation of the effects of the occupational safety and health inspectors' supervision in workplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, Toivo; Louhelainen, Kyösti; Hirvonen, Maria L

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the administrational supervision of occupational safety and health (OSH) inspectors in the workplaces that they inspect. In the questionnaire survey, the respondents were OSH managers and workers' OSH representatives in the chemical companies' plants. For workers, the aggregated variable 'General OSH enforcement operations' was positively related to the aggregated variable 'Effects of the current OSH inspection'. In contrast, for the OSH managers, the corresponding data did not reveal any correlation. The professional competence in carrying out the OSH inspections was positively related to the different variables of the aggregated variable 'Effects of the current OSH inspection (Outputs)'. In contrast, for the workers' OSH representatives, the analysis failed to confirm this relationship. The present findings are that OSH managers and workers' OSH representatives desired that the OSH inspector should follow up more effectively that OSH management systems are being implemented in practice. They should provide more advice to workplaces in order to help them to exceed the minimum level laid down by law. Workers' OSH representatives expressed clearly that the OSH inspector should more often impose binding obligations. The professional skills of the OSH inspectors need to correspond better to the needs of today's working life and to be able to react to system changes in the workplaces. The OSH enforcement approach should become more uniform and be harmonized between the individual OSH inspectors and the OSH agencies. The development of the quality of OSH inspections and the professional competence of inspectors are important aspects from the point of the effectiveness.

  5. Specialty food safety concerns and multilingual resource needs: an online survey of public health inspectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Mai T; Jones, Andria Q; Sargeant, Jan M; Marshall, Barbara J; Dewey, Catherine E

    2010-12-01

    The province of Ontario, Canada, has a highly diverse and multicultural population. Specialty foods (i.e., foods from different cultures) are becoming increasingly available at retail food outlets and foods service establishments across the province; as a result, public health inspectors (PHIs) are increasingly required to assess the safety of foods with which they may be unfamiliar. The aim of this study was to investigate the concerns, perceptions, and self-identified needs of PHIs in Ontario with regard to specialty foods and food safety information resources in languages other than English. A cross-sectional online survey of 239 PHIs was conducted between April and June 2009. The study found that while some food safety information resources were available in languages other than English, fewer than 25% of respondents (56/239) were satisfied with the current availability of these resources. With regard to specialty foods, 60% of respondents (143/239) reported at least one specialty food with which they were not confident about their current food safety knowledge, and 64% of respondents (153/239) reported at least one specialty food with which they were dissatisfied with the current availability of food safety information. Therefore, the development of additional food safety information resources for specialty foods, and food safety resources in additional languages may provide enhanced support to PHIs involved in protecting and promoting a safe food supply.

  6. Health Care Programs: Fraud and Abuse; Revisions to the Office of Inspector General's Exclusion Authorities. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-12

    This final rule amends the regulations relating to exclusion authorities under the authority of the Office of Inspector General (OIG) of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS or the Department). The final rule incorporates statutory changes, early reinstatement provisions, and policy changes, and clarifies existing regulatory provisions.

  7. [The restructuring of national sanitary inspectorate with regard to environmental hazards and health needs of the population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Marek L

    2002-01-01

    The article presents the history of Polish sanitary and epidemiological services from 1918 until contemporary times. Emphasizing many achievements of National Sanitary Inspectorate, which are responsible for the low sick-rate of infectious diseases in Poland, the article also points to the increasing number and growing severity of environmental hazards in recent years. The article discusses problems caused by the "old" infectious diseases, which, though until recently regarded as passed, are posing threats to the society nowadays (e.g. TB, pestis, cholera). Equally, the article highlights problems caused by the "new" highly infectious diseases (e.g. Ebola fever, AIDS). Moreover, the article focuses on the particularly relevant subject of tackling biological weapons, the use of which can be traced past the recent events after September 11 and back to the Middle Ages. Finally, the article stresses the role of sanitary and epidemiological services in fighting recent animal epidemics, such as foot-and-mouth disease and mad cow disease. Discussing particular cases of the environmental hazards mentioned above, recorded in Poland, the article emphasizes the importance of the proper staff selection for National Sanitary Inspectorate. In the past decade in Poland, Sanitary Inspectors were selected mostly with regard to their political orientation, rather than their professional background. The author of the article hopes that human life and health will be treated with more respect in Poland in the neart future and the positions of Sanitary Inspectors will be given to professionals with proper epidemiological preparation. Radical changes in the policy of staff selection, modernization of training programs, as well as creation of a more practical structure of National Sanitary Inspectorate are the necessary conditions for transforming sanitary and epidemiological services in Poland into reliable and prestigious institutions, capable of dealing with the environmental hazards

  8. State Labour Inspectorate – specialized authority exercising supervising and control tasks in the field of labour security and health..

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolae ROMANDAŞ, Felicia PĂSCĂLUŢĂ

    2016-01-01

    In present, State Labour Inspectorate is the main supervisory body in health and safety at the work, and has all the rights to exercise an efficient control in order to target the compliance of employers of legal regulations which aim mentioned sphere. Therefore, the mechanism which involves changes in work culture, the most important from of them which refers to security and healthy of work place, take place in our society for harmonization and labor market adjustment. It is o...

  9. Food safety issues and information needs: an online survey of public health inspectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Mai T; Jones, Andria Q; Dewey, Catherine E; Sargeant, Jan M; Marshall, Barbara J

    2012-06-01

    In the study described in this article, the authors investigated the perceptions and needs of public health inspectors (PHIs) in the province of Ontario, Canada, with regard to food safety issues and information resources. A cross-sectional online survey of 239 Ontario PHIs was conducted between April and June 2009. Questions pertained to their perceptions of key food safety issues and foodborne pathogens, knowledge confidence, available resources, and resource needs. All respondents rated time-temperature abuse, inadequate hand washing, and cross contamination as important food safety issues. Salmonella, Campylobacter, and E. coli O157:H7 were pathogens reported to be of concern to 95% of respondents (221/233). Most respondents indicated that they were confident in their knowledge of food safety issues and foodborne pathogens, but wanted a central, online resource for food safety information and ongoing food safety education training for PHIs. The data from the authors' study can be used in the development of information resources targeted to the needs of PHIs involved in food safety.

  10. 75 FR 81276 - Office of Inspector General; Delegation of Authorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... delegates two authorities of the Inspector General, Office of Inspector General for the Federal Housing... enforcement activity. This notice delegates this authority to request records protected by the Privacy Act for... Inspector General delegates the following authorities: Section A. Authority Delegated: The Inspector General...

  11. The role of public health inspectors in maintaining housing in northern and rural communities: recommendations to support public health practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Stephanie; Montgomery, Phyllis; Michel, Isabelle; Warren, Claire; Larose, Tricia; Kauppi, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Although there is much evidence about the effects of particular housing conditions on health, less is known about the practices of public health inspectors (PHIs) in relation to minimizing or eliminating potential housing health risks. The purpose of this qualitative study was to illuminate the practices of PHIs in relation to types of biological and physical housing risks. This study used photo vignettes to focus on PHIs' perceptions, options, and resultant interventions with regards to typical housing risks encountered by PHIs in northeastern Ontario. The vignettes represented two general categories of potential housing risks: biological exposures, and physical characteristics of housing. During a semi-structured interview, 34 PHI participants viewed the vignettes, assessed the housing hazard depicted in each, and described the most appropriate intervention. Traditional content analysis methods were used. The assessment of the physical housing hazards was fairly consistent among the PHIs. There seemed to be more variation in their assessment of risk associated with biological factors. Variation in responses was often explained by their different interpretations of the scope of the provincial legislation as well as local public health unit policies and practices. This study demonstrated that PHIs' assessment and responses to potential physical housing hazards were influenced by an interplay between variables related to residents, local service partners, organizational culture, and policy. The recommendations for action also range from specific public health unit protocol to broader research and policy advocacy initiatives. Collectively, the recommendations focus on strategies for optimizing the role of PHIs in reducing housing health risks in mid-size urban or rural areas.

  12. [Effectiveness of the Federal Inspectorate for the Protection of Consumer Rights and Human Welfare in the Novosibirsk Region in 2007 to 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, V N; Ivanova, L K; Iagudin, B I; Turbinskiĭ, V V

    2010-01-01

    A system for monitoring and analyzing the effectiveness and efficiency of the performance of the Board of the Federal Inspectorate for the Protection of Consumer Rights and Human Welfare in the Novosibirsk Region was introduced into its activities to estimate the provision of the Novosibirsk Region's population with sanitary epidemiological wellbeing in 2007-2009. The introduction of monitoring was ascertained to increase the effectiveness of budgetary fund surveillance and spending, by predicting the effectiveness and choice of priority lines of activities, by increasing the quality of budgetary services rendered in the provision of sanitary and epidemiological well-being to the population.

  13. Environmental Protection Agency, Protecting Children's Environmental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Agency Search Search Contact Us Share Protecting Children's Environmental Health Children are often more vulnerable to pollutants ... during development. Learn more about children's health, the environment, and what you can do. Basic Information Children ...

  14. The use of mystery guests by the Dutch Health Inspectorate: Results of a pilot study in long-term intramural elderly care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Samantha A; Paul, Katharina T; Ketelaars, Corry; Robben, Paul

    2015-06-01

    This paper examines the use of 'mystery guests' as an instrument for monitoring quality and safety in healthcare. The Dutch Health Inspectorate initiated a mystery guest pilot project in elderly care as a response to political and social pressure. An independent evaluation of this project revealed that the primary goal of this approach--to provide a better view of the exigencies of daily practice in elderly care--was not met. Inspectors did not use the information delivered by the mystery guests because how they evaluated quality and reported findings did not align with practices used by the health inspectorate. Additionally, the inspectors felt that other instruments being developed were more appropriate for providing a better view of practice. While political pressure is important for effecting change in general, the specific instruments to be used for formal supervision of health institutions should be developed and implemented within the organization in accordance with existing standards and approaches. The choice to implement a new supervision instrument, including sending mystery guests into care institutions, should be preceded by an ethical analysis that takes into account the specific context of its use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Phytochemicals: Health Protective Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Winston; Beck, Leslie

    1999-01-01

    Consuming a diet rich in plant foods will provide a milieu of phytochemicals, non-nutritive substances in plants that possess health-protective benefits. Vegetables, fruits, whole grains, herbs, nuts and seeds contain an abundance of phenolic compounds, terpenoids, sulfur compounds, pigments, and other natural antioxidants that have been associated with protection from and/or treatment of conditions such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. The foods and herbs with the highest anticancer activity include garlic, soybeans, cabbage, ginger, licorice root, and the umbelliferous vegetables. Citrus, in addition to providing an ample supply of vitamin C, folic acid, potassium, and soluble fibre, contains a host of active phytochemicals. Clinical trials have not yet been able to demonstrate the same protective effects from taking supplements. It is difficult to estimate how many Canadians achieve an adequate level of consumption, but it seems reasonable to assume that many Canadians could benefit from substantially increasing their intake of vegetables and fruit.

  16. Evaluation of moral case deliberation at the Dutch Health Care Inspectorate: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Seekles (Wike); G.A. Widdershoven (Guy); P.B.M. Robben (Paul); G. Van Dalfsen (Gonny); B. Molewijk (Bert)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Moral case deliberation (MCD) as a form of clinical ethics support is usually implemented in health care institutions and educational programs. While there is no previous research on the use of clinical ethics support on the level of health care regulation, employees of regul

  17. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General Advisory Opinion List

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This OIG website contains a list of recently issued advisory opinions and a link to archives of previously issued advisory opinions. In accordance with section...

  18. State Mines Inspectorate of Saarland and Rheinland-Pfalz, Mines Inspectorate Saarbruecken / Mines Inspectorate Rheinland-Pfalz. Annual report 2001. Economic and technical aspects, industrial safety and environmental protection, statistics, activities of the mining authorities; Oberbergamt fuer das Saarland und das Land Rheinland-Pfalz, Bergamt Saarbruecken / Bergamt Rheinland-Pfalz. Jahresbericht 2001. Bergwirtschaft, Bergtechnik, Arbeitsschutz, Umweltschutz, Statistiken, Taetigkeiten der Bergbehoerden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boettcher, R.; Hugo, K.H.; Kuhn, M.; Strauch, T. (comps.)

    2002-07-01

    The annual report of the Saarland and Rheinland-Pfalz State Mines Inspectorate and the Mines Inspectorates of the two states provide an insight into the many activities of mines inspectorates and of the current trends in mining engineering. The importance of mining and regional raw materials management is stressed. [German] Der vorliegende Jahresbericht des Oberbergamtes fuer das Saarland und das Land Rheinland-Pfalz sowie der Bergaemter in beiden Bundeslaendern gibt einen Einblick in das vielfaeltige Arbeitsgebiet der Bergbehoerden. Gleichzeitig vermittelt er einen Ueberblick ueber die bergtechnische Entwicklung und unterstreicht die volkswirtschaftliche Bedeutung des Bergbaus und der standortgebundenen Rohstoffwirtschaft.

  19. The New Zealand Health and Disability Commissioner: a comparative assessment of the commissioner's contribution to protecting the rights of mental health consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmierow, Maria

    2002-02-01

    The Health and Disabliity Commissioner's contribution to the protection of mental health consumers' rights is examined. This assessment covers a number of aspects. It includes the scope of consumer rights jurisdiction, the breadth of legal entitlements, protective mechanisms used, and the effectiveness of that protection. The Commissioner's role is also assessed comparatively. It is contrasted domestically with District Inspectors of Mental Health and internationally with Scottish and United Kingdom reform proposals. While analysis reveals considerable similarities, the New Zealand Health and Disability Commissioner is favourably highlighted in contrast with Scotland and the United Kingdom, particularly in the area of enforceability of mental health consumer rights.

  20. Health Protection Products Are Hot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JANE SHAW

    1994-01-01

    FooDS and beverages that are made from natural ingredients and advertised as therapies are sweeping the consumer market. The health protection products I’ve seen can be divided into five categories. They include: 1. Beverages: tea, haw juice, mineral water; 2. Medicinal liquids: royal jelly, black-boned chicken essence, softshelled turtle essence; 3. Health protection foods: brown rice powder, rice vinegar, asparagus juice, egg-white candy;

  1. [Interaction of the bodies and institutions of the Russian Inspectorate for the protection of consumer rights and human welfare on sanitary-and-epidemiological examinations and issuing sanitary-and-epidemiological opinions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safonkina, S G

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes problems in the organization of the interaction of the Russian Inspectorate for the Protection of Consumer Rights and Human Welfare in Moscow and the Center for Hygiene and Epidemiology in Moscow to perform sanitary-and-epidemiological examinations and to issue sanitary-and-epidemiological opinions. The goals of setting up a one-window service and measures required for its effective work are defined. Positive results of one-window activities are shown.

  2. Radiation protection policies to protect public health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muckerheide, J. [Commonwealth Massachusetts, Needham, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Scientific data from plant, animal, and human populations more strongly find radiation essential to life, i.e., suppressing background radiation is debilitating and that moderately enhanced radiation doses have positive effects, than that low-moderate radiation dose has adverse effects. {close_quote} Federal radiation protection policy will be in the public interest and save hundreds of billions of dollars at no public health cost when known dose effects to exposed populations are applied to ensure no adverse health effects, with safety margins, and when appropriate research is funded (and public benefits from new radiation and nuclear science and technology applications are enabled) at the sole cost of reduced federal power and influence.

  3. [Chile: social protection in health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urriola, Rafael

    2006-10-01

    This piece begins with a brief discussion of the concepts leading to the social right to health protection. Special emphasis is placed on the principle of social cohesion, which has influenced social health protection in European countries. Chile's experience in this field from the 1990s to the present is described, as exemplified in three dimensions. In the first place, social security coverage is presented as a means to achieve universal (horizontal) coverage. A discussion follows on vertical coverage, where the author identifies health problems for which insured persons have guaranteed rights of access to medical care. This section describes available emergency care, primary health care, and the special plan for Universal Access to Explicit Guarantees (Acceso Universal de Garantías Explícitas de salud, or AUGE). Thirdly, the discussion covers the funding sources supporting the Chilean health care system: Government subsidies, contributions to social security, and out-of-pocket disbursements for private care. Chile's public health system has various special programs. One of them is catastrophic insurance, which covers 100% of the care needed for complex and very costly treatments. Older persons (over 65) have coverage for 100% of the cost of eyeglasses and hearing aids, and for 50% of the cost of home care. If life expectancy is an appropriate indicator of health system results, it is worth noting that Chile and the United States of America have both achieved a life expectancy of 77 years, even though Chile spends only 5.9% of its gross domestic product on health care, as compared to the 15% spent by the United States.

  4. Time Management of Educational Inspectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göksoy, Süleyman

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the research is to determine the fields that Educational Inspectors have to spare time for and the fields that Educational Inspectors demand to make time for. The data collected by review form was analyzed by content analysis method. According to research results: Educational Inspectors want to make time mostly for counselling and…

  5. Inspector shortage in the offshore oil industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varcoe, David

    2002-07-01

    According to an article published by the Scotsman Online, a critical shortage of offshore safety inspectors is placing the lives of thousands of North Sea oil men at risk. Key improvements in the offshore safety regime, which followed the Piper Alpha disaster, are being compromised by the inability of front-line inspectors from the UK government's Health and Safety Executive to police platforms in the UK sector of the North Sea. The present article discusses the safety situation in the petroleum industry of the North Sea.

  6. Medicare and State Health Care Programs: Fraud and Abuse; Revisions to the Office of Inspector General's Civil Monetary Penalty Rules. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-07

    This final rule amends the civil monetary penalty (CMP or penalty) rules of the Office of Inspector General to incorporate new CMP authorities, clarify existing authorities, and reorganize regulations on civil money penalties, assessments, and exclusions to improve readability and clarity.

  7. PC Inspector File Recovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    PC Inspector File Recovery是一个数据修复软件,它支持Fat12/16/32和NTFS文件系统。3.x的新特点:1,即使在引导区或FAT被删除或损坏的情况下,也能自动寻找到驱动器(对NTFS系统不具有该功能)。2.按照原始的时间和日期重新恢复文件。3.支持恢复文件的储存及网络驱。

  8. Protecting the Health of Family Caregivers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-12-23

    This podcast discusses role of family caregivers and the importance of protecting their health. It is primarily targeted to public health and aging services professionals.  Created: 12/23/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/23/2009.

  9. HSE inspector advises on 'common mistakes'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2012-10-01

    A recent IHEEM seminar on water hygiene and safety, 'The Invisible Threat', saw John Newbold, an HM specialist inspector at the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) with experience investigating Legionella cases and outbreaks, provide useful insight into how healthcare estates engineers and other 'responsible' personnel could ensure compliance with the law by properly 'managing and controlling' Legionella risk. He provided a first-hand view of what he dubbed 'some of the common mistakes' made by those responsible for managing water system safety, and gave useful advice and guidance on how to avoid them, and thus minimise the risk of falling foul of the HSE and other regulators. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, reports.

  10. 33 CFR 140.101 - Inspection by Coast Guard marine inspectors or Minerals Management Service inspectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... inspectors or Minerals Management Service inspectors. 140.101 Section 140.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Inspections § 140.101 Inspection by Coast Guard marine inspectors or Minerals Management Service inspectors... Minerals Management Service (MMS). (c) Under the direction of the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection...

  11. 7 CFR 29.22 - Appeal inspector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appeal inspector. 29.22 Section 29.22 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.22 Appeal inspector. An inspector or other person designated...

  12. 76 FR 25342 - Children's Health Protection Advisory Committee; Request for Nominations to the Children's Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ... AGENCY Children's Health Protection Advisory Committee; Request for Nominations to the Children's Health... for appointment to its Children's Health Protection Advisory Committee. Vacancies are anticipated to... solicit nominees. Background: The Children's Health Protection Advisory Committee is a Federal advisory...

  13. 45 CFR 164.522 - Rights to request privacy protection for protected health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Health Information § 164.522 Rights to request privacy protection for protected health information. (a)(1... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rights to request privacy protection for protected health information. 164.522 Section 164.522 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  14. External radiation protection audit in National Health Service hospitals. Radiation protecgtion advisors (RPA) of the Nottingham City Hospital NHS Trust and the Oxford Radcliffe Hospital NHS Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, A T; Crawley, M T; Dixon-Brown, A; Dudley, N J; Nicholas, D; Pearson, D; Przeslak, A; Weatherburn, H

    1996-11-01

    Radiation protection advisers are accustomed to carrying out internal audit in organizations for which they provide services but, traditionally, external audit has not been a part of the radiation protection adviser function. To provide an external audit function, two teams of radiation protection advisers undertook external radiation protection audits of their respective organizations, including the radiation protection adviser function itself. These audits were more representative of audits or inspections carried out by government agencies, for example the Health and Safety Executive and the former Inspectorate of Pollution, now the Environment Agency. Subsequently, reports, including recommendations for remedial action, were prepared for each management by the external auditors. The process of setting up and carrying out the external audits is described. Guidelines are suggested for those seeking to carry out an external audit.

  15. Brazilian union actions for workers' health protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolpho Repullo Junior

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Many authors have emphasized the importance of worker strength through unionized organizations, in relation to the improvement of working procedures, and have reported on the decisiveness of labor movement actions in achieving modifications within the field of work and health. OBJECTIVE: To describe the ways in which Brazilian unions have tried to intervene in health-illness and work processes, identifying the existence of commonality in union actions in this field. TYPE OF STUDY: Qualitative study. SETTING: Postgraduate Program, Environmental Health Department, Faculdade de Saúde Pública, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Union health advisers and directors were interviewed. Documents relating to union action towards protecting workers' health were collected and analyzed. RESULTS: Unions articulate actions regarding workers' health of a technical and political nature that involve many aspects and high complexity. These have been divided into thematic categories for better analysis. DISCUSSION: Union actions regarding workers' health in Brazil are restricted to some unions, located mainly in the southern, southeastern and northeastern regions of the country. Nonetheless, the unions undertaking such actions represent many professions of great economic and political importance. CONCLUSIONS: The recent changes in health and safety at work regulations, recognition of professional diseases, creation of workers' health services and programs within the unified health system, and operational improvements in companies' specialized safety and occupational medicine services, all basically result from union action. There is commonality of union action in this field in its seeking of technical and political strengthening for all workers and their general and local representation. This has the objective of benefiting collective bargaining between employers and workers. Inter-institutional action on behalf of workers' rights

  16. Indigenous populations health protection: A Canadian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Katya L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The disproportionate effects of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic on many Canadian Aboriginal communities have drawn attention to the vulnerability of these communities in terms of health outcomes in the face of emerging and reemerging infectious diseases. Exploring the particular challenges facing these communities is essential to improving public health planning. In alignment with the objectives of the Pandemic Influenza Outbreak Research Modelling (Pan-InfORM team, a Canadian public health workshop was held at the Centre for Disease Modelling (CDM to: (i evaluate post-pandemic research findings; (ii identify existing gaps in knowledge that have yet to be addressed through ongoing research and collaborative activities; and (iii build upon existing partnerships within the research community to forge new collaborative links with Aboriginal health organizations. The workshop achieved its objectives in identifying main research findings and emerging information post pandemic, and highlighting key challenges that pose significant impediments to the health protection and promotion of Canadian Aboriginal populations. The health challenges faced by Canadian indigenous populations are unique and complex, and can only be addressed through active engagement with affected communities. The academic research community will need to develop a new interdisciplinary framework, building upon concepts from ‘Communities of Practice’, to ensure that the research priorities are identified and targeted, and the outcomes are translated into the context of community health to improve policy and practice.

  17. Emergency Preparedness technology support to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) of the United Kingdom. Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Kula, K.R.

    1994-03-01

    The Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) of the United Kingdom (UK) suggested the use of an accident progression logic model method developed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) for K Reactor to predict the magnitude and timing of radioactivity releases (the source term) based on an advanced logic model methodology. Predicted releases are output from the personal computer-based model in a level-of-confidence format. Additional technical discussions eventually led to a request from the NII to develop a proposal for assembling a similar technology to predict source terms for the UK`s advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR) type. To respond to this request, WSRC is submitting a proposal to provide contractual assistance as specified in the Scope of Work. The work will produce, document, and transfer technology associated with a Decision-Oriented Source Term Estimator for Emergency Preparedness (DOSE-EP) for the NII to apply to AGRs in the United Kingdom. This document, Appendix A is a part of this proposal.

  18. 77 FR 51040 - Accreditation and Approval of Inspectorate America Corporation, as a Commercial Gauger and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Accreditation and Approval of Inspectorate America Corporation, as a Commercial Gauger and Laboratory AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of... and Scientific Services, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 1331 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Suite...

  19. 78 FR 59947 - Accreditation and Approval of Inspectorate America Corporation, as a Commercial Gauger and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Accreditation and Approval of Inspectorate America Corporation, as a Commercial Gauger and Laboratory AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of... Laboratories Manager, Laboratories and Scientific Services, U.S. Customs and Border Protection,...

  20. 78 FR 59948 - Accreditation and Approval of Inspectorate America Corporation, as a Commercial Gauger and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Accreditation and Approval of Inspectorate America Corporation, as a Commercial Gauger and Laboratory AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of..., Laboratories and Scientific Services, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 1331 Pennsylvania Avenue NW.,...

  1. 77 FR 31634 - Approval of Inspectorate America Corporation, as a Commercial Gauger

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Approval of Inspectorate America Corporation, as a Commercial Gauger AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Notice of... by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection to conduct the specific gauger service...

  2. 77 FR 34054 - Accreditation and Approval of Inspectorate America Corporation, as a Commercial Gauger and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Accreditation and Approval of Inspectorate America Corporation, as a Commercial Gauger and Laboratory AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of... CONTACT: Jonathan McGrath, Laboratories and Scientific Services, U.S. Customs and Border Protection,...

  3. 77 FR 40078 - Approval of Inspectorate America Corporation as a Commercial Gauger

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Approval of Inspectorate America Corporation as a Commercial Gauger AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Notice of...Grath, Laboratories and Scientific Services, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 1331...

  4. Recommendations for European health data protection legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, S; Nys, H

    1996-01-01

    In year 1 of the SEISMED project, the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven coordinated the inventory and analysis of medical personal data protection legislation in Europe. A report on legal issues of medical data protection legislation in Europe was written by the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Centre National pour la Recherche Scientifique (Paris) and the University College Dublin. This report served as a basis for a second important legal deliverable, i.e. the Health Informatics Deontology Code. In this third and final report, we take into account the results of the other two legal reports and we formulate recommendations for the national and European legislator. This report analyses critically the upcoming privacy directive. We propose several recommendations which should be taken into account by the European and national legislator. We focused quite extensively on the use of medical data for research purposes. We had several reasons to do this. One of them is the fact that the use of medical data for research purposes is very popular, in particular now the health care sector is becoming more and more 'standardized' by using computers, networksystems and telematics. Legislation is therefore needed. Moreover, the use of medical data for research purposes involves the transfer of data from one Member State to another. Therefore, a harmonized legislation is really needed. We hope that the recommendations we propose, will be taken into consideration by the European legislator.

  5. 7 CFR 29.19 - Inspector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inspector. 29.19 Section 29.19 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.19 Inspector. Person employed, licensed, or authorized by...

  6. Health protection in the USA: Right or privilege?

    OpenAIRE

    Vidojević, Jelena

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with the system of health protection in the USA, its key features, problems it faces and attempts for improvement of its functioning. Corresponding to the manner in which (residual) social state is organized, the American health protection system is rather rudimental, characterized by high costs and inequality in approach to and quality of health protection. Accordingly, general health situation of the nation is comparatively poorer than in developed market economy countries. ...

  7. 45 CFR 164.526 - Amendment of protected health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... RELATED REQUIREMENTS SECURITY AND PRIVACY Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information § 164.526 Amendment of protected health information. (a) Standard: Right to amend. (1) Right to amend. An... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Amendment of protected health information. 164.526...

  8. 78 FR 59949 - Accreditation and Approval of Inspectorate America Corporation, as a Commercial Gauger and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Accreditation and Approval of Inspectorate America Corporation, as a Commercial Gauger and Laboratory AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of... Accredited Laboratories Manager, Laboratories and Scientific Services, U.S. Customs and Border...

  9. Health promotion versus health protection? Employees' perceptions and concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, D C; Jennings, S E; Mangione, T; Merrigan, D M

    1991-01-01

    The "second public health revolution" targets factors in the environment, together with lifestyle, to prevent illness and untimely death. Yet the growth of the "wellness movement" has driven a wedge between public health advocates who argue for environmental solutions and those whose major focus is individual behavior. This tension is nowhere more evident than in the workplace, where the new wellness professionals are at odds with specialists in occupational health and industrial hygiene. This paper reports findings from a cross-sectional survey of a sizeable sample of workers at six New England facilities of a very large American manufacturing firm, assessing their perceptions of risk in the two domains: environmental exposures and lifestyle risks. Multiple regression analyses reveal that both job risks and life risks are associated with a variety of potentially costly and disruptive health problems, even after controlling for demographic and occupational factors. This analysis suggests that wellness programs in the workplace will be more effective if they integrate environmental protection with efforts to reduce lifestyle risk.

  10. Hearing protector fit testing with off-shore oil-rig inspectors in Louisiana and Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, William J; Themann, Christa L; Murata, Taichi K

    2016-11-01

    This field study aimed to assess the noise reduction of hearing protection for individual workers, demonstrate the effectiveness of training on the level of protection achieved, and measure the time required to implement hearing protector fit testing in the workplace. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted field studies in Louisiana and Texas to test the performance of HPD Well-Fit. Fit tests were performed on 126 inspectors and engineers working in the offshore oil industry. Workers were fit tested with the goal of achieving a 25-dB PAR. Less than half of the workers were achieving sufficient protection from their hearing protectors prior to NIOSH intervention and training; following re-fitting and re-training, over 85% of the workers achieved sufficient protection. Typical test times were 6-12 minutes. Fit testing of the workers' earplugs identified those workers who were and were not achieving the desired level of protection. Recommendations for other hearing protection solutions were made for workers who could not achieve the target PAR. The study demonstrates the need for individual hearing protector fit testing and addresses some of the barriers to implementation.

  11. Data Protection Compliance in the Age of Digital Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordern, Victoria

    2016-06-01

    Advances in technology are transforming the way that health data is collected and used. This includes improvements in existing technology as well as innovations in mobile technology such as smartphone apps and wearables. Health data is strictly regulated under the EU Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC. Under current data protection rules, health data is broadly interpreted and will, in most circumstances not connected to the provision of healthcare, require organisations to obtain explicit consent from individuals for its collection and use. Further data protection compliance issues arise such as identifying who is a controller, ensuring transparency, using health data for research purposes and keeping health data secure. As the EU data protection landscape is due to change in the next few years and will affect the collection and use of health data, the forthcoming Data Protection Regulation also deserves attention.

  12. STUDENT, REFERENCE THE INSPECTORATE OF EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Castán Esteban

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presenting a reflection on the work of the Inspectorate of Education from 1990 until LOGSE currently focusing on three aspects: A critical analysis of the low prestige of the Education Inspectorate and poor contribution to the quality of the system education to be centered in the administration and counseling, and have forgotten or delegate aspects of the evaluation. Secondly raise the central reference Inspectorate of Education should not be the focus and organization, but must be the student. And so it should be changed with the inspector's professional profile and increase its presence in the classroom. His training and selection has to be focused on teaching, methodology and subject areas, which is the dimension that most affects the quality of teaching.

  13. THE NICE CASE OF THE GREEK INSPECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristóbal Barea Romero

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available It is described the disappearance of the Inspector of Education in the Greek educational system and the recent discussion on recovery or not on the context of political and social changes of modern Greece. This portrait is described within the political and social historical area of Greece. Finally, conclusions about the institution of inspector of education and its relevance in the European context are extracted. No direct similarities are established with the Spanish case.

  14. Inspector General Semiannual Report to Congress - October 1, 2008 - March 31, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-10-01

    On behalf of the Department of Energy's Office of Inspector General, I am pleased to submit our Semiannual Report to Congress for the period ending March 31, 2009. The Report highlights key accomplishments of the Office of Inspector General, particularly pertaining to our efforts to ensure the economy, efficiency, and effectiveness of Department of Energy operations. Details pertaining to some of our most significant reviews and projects are presented in the Report. This reporting period has been quite eventful. On February 17, 2009, the President signed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The stated intent of this new legislation is to strengthen the U.S. economy through the creation of new jobs, aiding State and local governments with budget shortfalls, cutting taxes for working families, and investing in the long-term health of the Nation's economic prosperity. The Recovery Act establishes the status of the Nation's energy supply as a prime focus. Specifically, the Department of Energy will receive approximately $40 billion for various energy, environmental, and science programs and initiatives. The passage of this legislation makes the coming months an exciting and transformative time for the Department of Energy and the Office of Inspector General. In recognition of the need for effective oversight to protect taxpayer interests, the Recovery Act includes the creation of the Recovery Act Accountability and Transparency Board and mandates specific actions by the Inspectors General. I will be a permanent member of this newly created Board, along with nine other Inspectors General whose agencies are significant recipients of Recovery Act funds. Since the passage of the legislation, my office has developed a strategy consistent with the objectives outlined in the Recovery Act. The overarching goal of the strategy is to ensure that the taxpayers interests relating to the performance and results of the Recovery Act are protected. During

  15. Health Risk Assessment for Organotins in Textiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen PJCM; Veen MP van; Speijers GJA; CSR; LBM

    2000-01-01

    In January 1998 RIVM was asked to carry out a preliminary risk assessment on organic tin compounds (organotins) in textiles. Measurements carried out by the Dutch Health Protection Inspectorate had shown these potentially toxic compounds to be present in several consumer products, including items of

  16. Protect Childrens Health with EPA School App

    Science.gov (United States)

    DALLAS - (Aug. 24, 2015) Are you looking for ways to promote a healthier learning environment, reduce absenteeism, improve test scores or enhance student or staff productivity? The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently launched a new m

  17. Electronic Health Record in Italy and Personal Data Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bologna, Silvio; Bellavista, Alessandro; Corso, Pietro Paolo; Zangara, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    The present article deals with the Italian Electronic Health Record (hereinafter EHR), recently introduced by Act 221/2012, with a specific focus on personal data protection. Privacy issues--e.g., informed consent, data processing, patients' rights and minors' will--are discussed within the framework of recent e-Health legislation, national Data Protection Code, the related Data Protection Authority pronouncements and EU law. The paper is aimed at discussing the problems arising from a complex, fragmentary and sometimes uncertain legal framework on e-Health.

  18. Fundamentals of health physics for the radiation-protection officer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, B.L.; Traub, R.J.; Gilchrist, R.L.; Mann, J.C.; Munson, L.H.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Baer, J.L.

    1983-03-01

    The contents of this book on health physics include chapters on properties of radioactive materials, radiation instrumentation, radiation protection programs, radiation survey programs, internal exposure, external exposure, decontamination, selection and design of radiation facilities, transportation of radioactive materials, radioactive waste management, radiation accidents and emergency preparedness, training, record keeping, quality assurance, and appraisal of radiation protection programs. (ACR)

  19. [Correlation between legal protection of the environment and health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldi, Guglielmo; Rinaldi, Alessandro; D'Andrea, Elvira; Lucchetti, Pietro; Messano, Giuseppe Alessio; d'Alessandro, Eugenia De Luca

    2012-01-01

    Health promotion is a priority of our time and planning and the evaluation of health and hygiene should be directed towards strategies to improve the well-being and lifestyles of the community. At the legislative level in Italy, the Ministry of Health, was established in 1958 with the task of providing for the collective health of the whole nation and in 1978, with Law 833, the National Health Service (NHS) was created which secured assistance and healthcare to all Italian citizens. The most important component of the entire health system is the Local Health Unit (USL) which has responsibility for prevention, treatment and rehabilitation, and highlights the importance of safeguarding the health, hygiene and safely at home and at work and the "hygiene of urban settlements and communities", ie environmental protection. One of the reasons for the delays in the promotion of environmental protection initiatives in Italy is to be found in the referendums of 1993, including the one which removed the tasks regarding environmental controls from the NHS. The temporary skills gap in the environmental field was filled with the 'National Agency for Environmental Protection (ANPA), which later became the Agency for Environmental Protection and Technical Services (APAT), and the regional level, the Regional Agencies Environmental Protection Agency (ARPA). Law 61/21 January 1994 joined the ARPA to the National Institute for Environmental Research and Protection (ISPRA). It is now necessary to implement a program that takes account of the damage caused to the environment and consequently the individual, which is totally committed the combination of the environment and human health and not, as in the recent past, as two distinct entities. In this sense, it is of fundamental importance the role of prevention departments to promote the organization networking and of individual companies' and individuals' skills, in fact. The integration of planning processes, environmental monitoring

  20. State of health protection and self-protection: the history and nowadays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Оксана Михайлівна Юрченко

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The author of the article determined the essence of the concept of "self-protection technology"; main directions of views of the human to their life and health in the context of the historical process. Relevant ideas of improvement of teachers’ work using self-protection technologies in educational space are defined. It is noted that education and health are mutually reinforcing components of successful everyday life of participants of the educational process

  1. US statutes for enforcement by security inspectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, J.J.; Ruger, C.J.

    1995-12-01

    This document is one of a three volume set. BNL 52201 is titled `Selected Text of Atomic Energy Act Executive Orders and Other Laws of General Interest to Safeguards and Security Executives`, and it contains detailed information for use by executives. BNL 52202 is titled `U.S. Statutes of General Interest to Safeguards and Security Officers`, and contains less detail than BNL 52201. It is intended for use by officers. BNL 52203 is titled `U.S. Statutes for Enforcement by Security Inspectors`, and it contains statutes to be applied by uniformed security inspectors.

  2. 14 CFR 183.27 - Designated aircraft maintenance inspectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Designated aircraft maintenance inspectors...: Privileges § 183.27 Designated aircraft maintenance inspectors. A designated aircraft maintenance inspector (DAMI) may approve maintenance on civil aircraft used by United States military flying clubs in foreign...

  3. Protect the Health of Women and Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    CHINA has reached its present standard of maternal and child health by constant effort. Before the founding of New China in 1949, Chinese women’s life expectancy was only 37.6 years. A girl born today can expect to live an average of 72 years. Hygienic practices barely existed for mother and children in the early 1950s, said a health worker who remembers that period. Maternal mortality was high as a result of traditional midwifery practices, which often caused childbed fever. Infant

  4. Health Protection Features of Student Youth in Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonova, Tatyana V.; Kozhanov, Vladimir V.; Kolodovsky, Alexander A.; Shivrinskaya, Svetlana E.; Kudyashev, Nail K.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the study is conditioned by the adverse dynamics of students' physical and mental health, which creates objective obstacles to the development of research universities. The article aims to find out particular health protection features of student youth in research universities. The leading approach of the study is the systematic…

  5. What Your Can Do to Protect Your Health Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... store health information on your personal computer or mobile device, exchange emails about it, or participate in health-related online communities, here are a few things you should know: While the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules are in place to protect and secure ...

  6. The difficult encounter between inspector and farmer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anneberg, Inger; Sørensen, Jan Tind; Vaarst, Mette

    2012-01-01

    When the inspector drives into the farmyard and asks to see the animal barns to inspect the welfare of the animals, a tense situation may arise because inspections transcend limits and are complex and difficult for many farmers to relate to. A new research project is examining the interaction...... between authorities and farmers....

  7. 49 CFR 212.215 - Locomotive inspector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... applicable sections of the Safety Glazing Standards (49 CFR part 223), Locomotive Safety Standards (49 CFR part 229), Safety Appliance Standards (49 CFR part 231) and Power Brake Standards (49 CFR part 232), to... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locomotive inspector. 212.215 Section...

  8. Health Insecurity and Social Protection: Pathways, Gaps, and Their Implications on Health Outcomes and Poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Elvis

    2015-11-27

    Health insecurity has emerged as a major concern among health policy-makers particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). It includes the inability to secure adequate healthcare today and the risk of being unable to do so in the future as well as impoverishing healthcare expenditure. The increasing health insecurity among 150 million of the world's poor has moved social protection in health (SPH) to the top of the agenda among health policy-makers globally. This paper aims to provide a debate on the potential of social protection contribution to addressing health insecurity, poverty, and vulnerability brought by healthcare expenditure in low-income countries, to explore the gaps in current and proposed social protection measures in healthcare and provide suggestions on how social protection intervention aimed at addressing health insecurity, poverty, and vulnerability may be effectively implemented.

  9. New Law Protects the Health of Mothers and Infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    CHINA celebrates International Children’s Day this year with the implementation of a law protecting the health of the country’s mothers and infants. The Law of the P.R.C. on the Protection of Mothers and Infants, passed on October 27, 1994, during the 10th Session of the 8th Standing Committee of National People’s Congress, was publicly issued on the No.33 Command of the President of the P.R.C. and will go into effect June 1, 1995. This first law specifically concerned with the protection of the health of women and children is expected to play an important role in the overall improvement of the health of the Chinese people, the quality of the population, the advancement of the society, and the overall happiness among families. The law stresses the promotion of maternal and child hygiene

  10. Clinical Investigator Inspector List (CLIIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Clinical Investigator Inspection List (CLIIL) contains names, addresses, and other pertinent information gathered from inspections of clinical investigators who...

  11. Apollo experience report: Protection of life and health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooley, B. C.

    1972-01-01

    The development, implementation, and effectiveness of the Apollo Lunar Quarantine Program and the Flight Crew Health Stabilization Program are discussed as part of the broad program required for the protection of the life and health of U.S. astronauts. Because the goal of the Apollo Program has been the safe transport of men to the moon and back to earth, protection of the astronauts and of the biosphere from potentially harmful lunar contaminants has been required. Also, to ensure mission success, the continuing good health of the astronauts before and during a mission has been necessary. Potential applications of specific aspects of the health and quarantine programs to possible manned missions to other planets are discussed.

  12. Does social capital protect mental health among migrants in Sweden?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecerof, Susanne Sundell; Stafström, Martin; Westerling, Ragnar; Östergren, Per-Olof

    2016-09-01

    Poor mental health is common among migrants. This has been explained by migration-related and socio-economic factors. Weak social capital has also been related to poor mental health. Few studies have explored factors that protect mental health of migrants in the post-migration phase. Such knowledge could be useful for health promotion purposes. Therefore, this study aimed to analyse associations between financial difficulties, housing problems and experience of discrimination and poor mental health; and to detect possible effect modification by social capital, among recently settled Iraqi migrants in Sweden. A postal questionnaire in Arabic was sent to recently settled Iraqi citizens. The response rate was 51% (n = 617). Mental health was measured by the GHQ-12 instrument and social capital was defined as social participation and trust in others. Data were analysed by means of logistic regression. Poor mental health was associated with experience of discrimination (OR 2.88, 95% CI 1.73-4.79), housing problems (OR 2.79, 95% CI 1.84-4.22), and financial difficulties (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.44-3.19), after adjustments. Trust in others seemed to have a protective effect for mental health when exposed to these factors. Social participation had a protective effect when exposed to experience of discrimination. Social determinants and social capital in the host country play important roles in the mental health of migrants. Social capital modifies the effect of risk factors and might be a fruitful way to promote resilience to factors harmful to mental health among migrants, but must be combined with policy efforts to reduce social inequities.

  13. Office of the Inspector General. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, J.K.

    1981-03-01

    A summary of the progress and problems encountered by the Office of the Inspector General during 1980 is presented. Information on such administrative matters as the IG office organization, staffing, affirmative action, and training is reported. Planning and policy matters and expectations for the future are discussed. Important work done by the audit, inspection, and investigative staffs is summarized. Summaries of significant findings, recommendations, and actions taken in response are included. (MCW)

  14. Health, Education and Economic Crisis : Protecting the Poor in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparrow, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    When an economic crisis hits, a primary policy concern in developing countries is how social services can be protected and, in particular, how access to health and education for the poor can be maintained. Using the Indonesian Social Safety Net (SSN) as case study, this dissertation investigates

  15. Health, Education and Economic Crisis : Protecting the Poor in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparrow, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    When an economic crisis hits, a primary policy concern in developing countries is how social services can be protected and, in particular, how access to health and education for the poor can be maintained. Using the Indonesian Social Safety Net (SSN) as case study, this dissertation investigates th

  16. Prevention of occupational musculo-skeletal injuries. Labour Inspectorate investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmlert, K

    1996-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect on ergonomic conditions by Labour Inspectorate intervention at the work place and to follow health and employment among occupationally injured. 195 reports on occupational musculo-skeletal injury (accidents and diseases) from men and women with different occupations were collected consecutively at three Labour Inspectorate offices. Fifteen Labour Inspectors volunteered to investigate half of the reports by work place visits within three months. The other half was kept for control. The inspectors were trained in ergonomics and also got complementary training in ergonomic work place assessment. A check-list was designed for the purpose and tested for validity and reliability. Eighteen months after the time of the injury reports, all work places were visited by ergonomists to evaluate possible improvements in ergonomic conditions. Due to turnover and prolonged sick-leaves, evaluations were performed for only 92 of the injured. At 160 work places other employees had performed similar tasks as the injured at the time of the injury report. Evaluations of possible improvements in ergonomic conditions were performed also for these employees. As regards changes at the work place there were no differences between the injured in the study and control groups. The inspectors had delivered 11 inspection notices to the employers demanding improvements for the injured and 14 notices regarding the conditions of work-mates. For this latter group there was a significant association between delivered notices and improved ergonomic conditions eighteen months after the reports. Three years after the time of the reports a postal questionnaire on health, psychological well-being and employment was distributed to the injured. The response rate was 93%. Questionnaire answers were compared to results from other studies, where identical questions were used. There was a significantly higher prevalence of musculo-skeletal and

  17. Protecting health from climate change: Preparedness of medical interns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majra Jai

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Climate change is a significant and emerging threat to public health and to meet the challenge, health systems require qualified staff. Aims : To study the preparedness of medical interns to meet the challenge of protecting health from climate change. Settings and Design: Medical colleges in a coastal town. Cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: A proportionate number of medical interns from five medical colleges were included in the study. Level of awareness was used as a criterion to judge the preparedness. A self-administered, pretested, open-ended questionnaire was used. Responses were evaluated and graded. Statistical Analysis Used: Proportions, percentage, Chi-test. Results : About 90% of the medical interns were aware of the climate change and human activities that were playing a major role. Ninety-four percent were aware of the direct health impacts due to higher temperature and depletion in ozone concentration, and about 78% of the respondents were aware about the change in frequency / distribution of vector-borne diseases, water borne / related diseases, malnutrition, and health impact of population displacement. Knowledge regarding health protection was limited to mitigation of climate change and training / education. Options like adaptation, establishing / strengthening climate and disease surveillance systems, and health action in emergency were known to only nine (7%, eight (6%, and 17 (13%, respectively. Collegewise difference was statistically insignificant. Extra / co-curricular activities were the major source of knowledge. Conclusions : Majority of medical interns were aware of the causes and health impacts of climate change, but their knowledge regarding health protection measures was limited.

  18. It is not on Medicines that Protecting-health Depend

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Han-ping

    2003-01-01

    @@ What should people depend on for pursuing the health and longevity? It is first on one's own efforts according to my viewpoint, such as rationalizing daily diet, making an appropriate exercises and a mental balance, giving up smoking while moderating liquor, etc. Then one turns to the medical measure for help if necessary. Even though in this case it is not imperative to select medicinal simply, because acupuncture therapy,as well as Tuina one, both called "alternative medicine" in Western medical sector, is also able to play an important role in protecting health and treating illness. This is what expected to be expressed by this paper, in the light of the therapies' properties of efficiency in treating disorder as well as in protecting health, while no complicated toxicity and other side-effects, therefore they are called "green-therapy" and deeply concerned by medical scientists and the publics in the world, especially when the drug-evil runs wild worldwide.

  19. Radiation Protection and Dosimetry An Introduction to Health Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stabin, Michael G

    2007-01-01

    This comprehensive text provides an overview of all relevant topics in the field of radiation protection (health physics). Radiation Protection and Dosimetry serves as an essential handbook for practicing health physics professionals, and is also ideal as a teaching text for courses at the university level. The book is organized to introduce the reader to basic principles of radiation decay and interactions, to review current knowledge and historical aspects of the biological effects of radiation, and to cover important operational topics such as radiation shielding and dosimetry. In addition to presenting the most up to date treatment of the topics and references to the literature, most chapters contain numerical problems with their solutions for use in teaching or self assessment. One chapter is devoted to Environmental Health Physics, which was written in collaboration with leading professionals in the area.

  20. Psychoneuroimmunology and health psychology: inflammation and protective factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertini, M; Conti, C M; Fulcheri, M

    2013-01-01

    A common clinical observation is the adverse relationship between stress and human diseases. The attention of scientific research on health has been disproportionately focused on risk factors that predict the onset of certain health outcomes, in particular there has been an increasing interest in the role of inflammation as a common mechanism of disease in a number of medical and neuropsychiatric diseases. Despite the importance of such research being undisputed, it is necessary to emphasize what the protective factors are that promote psychosocial recovery processes and increased survival rates in a biopsychosocial perspective. This article aims to understand the relationship between psychosocial factors and immune system in the interests of health psychology, highlighting the protective factors that promote recovery, resiliency and resistance to disease.

  1. Large-scale Health Information Database and Privacy Protection*1

    Science.gov (United States)

    YAMAMOTO, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    Japan was once progressive in the digitalization of healthcare fields but unfortunately has fallen behind in terms of the secondary use of data for public interest. There has recently been a trend to establish large-scale health databases in the nation, and a conflict between data use for public interest and privacy protection has surfaced as this trend has progressed. Databases for health insurance claims or for specific health checkups and guidance services were created according to the law that aims to ensure healthcare for the elderly; however, there is no mention in the act about using these databases for public interest in general. Thus, an initiative for such use must proceed carefully and attentively. The PMDA*2 projects that collect a large amount of medical record information from large hospitals and the health database development project that the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) is working on will soon begin to operate according to a general consensus; however, the validity of this consensus can be questioned if issues of anonymity arise. The likelihood that researchers conducting a study for public interest would intentionally invade the privacy of their subjects is slim. However, patients could develop a sense of distrust about their data being used since legal requirements are ambiguous. Nevertheless, without using patients’ medical records for public interest, progress in medicine will grind to a halt. Proper legislation that is clear for both researchers and patients will therefore be highly desirable. A revision of the Act on the Protection of Personal Information is currently in progress. In reality, however, privacy is not something that laws alone can protect; it will also require guidelines and self-discipline. We now live in an information capitalization age. I will introduce the trends in legal reform regarding healthcare information and discuss some basics to help people properly face the issue of health big data and privacy

  2. Large-scale Health Information Database and Privacy Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Ryuichi

    2016-09-01

    Japan was once progressive in the digitalization of healthcare fields but unfortunately has fallen behind in terms of the secondary use of data for public interest. There has recently been a trend to establish large-scale health databases in the nation, and a conflict between data use for public interest and privacy protection has surfaced as this trend has progressed. Databases for health insurance claims or for specific health checkups and guidance services were created according to the law that aims to ensure healthcare for the elderly; however, there is no mention in the act about using these databases for public interest in general. Thus, an initiative for such use must proceed carefully and attentively. The PMDA projects that collect a large amount of medical record information from large hospitals and the health database development project that the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) is working on will soon begin to operate according to a general consensus; however, the validity of this consensus can be questioned if issues of anonymity arise. The likelihood that researchers conducting a study for public interest would intentionally invade the privacy of their subjects is slim. However, patients could develop a sense of distrust about their data being used since legal requirements are ambiguous. Nevertheless, without using patients' medical records for public interest, progress in medicine will grind to a halt. Proper legislation that is clear for both researchers and patients will therefore be highly desirable. A revision of the Act on the Protection of Personal Information is currently in progress. In reality, however, privacy is not something that laws alone can protect; it will also require guidelines and self-discipline. We now live in an information capitalization age. I will introduce the trends in legal reform regarding healthcare information and discuss some basics to help people properly face the issue of health big data and privacy

  3. Financial protection in health: updates for Mexico to 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Marie Knaul

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetive. Document financial protection in health in Mexico up to 2014. Materials and methods. We update the measures of impoverishing and catastrophic health expenditure to 2014, to analyse shifts since the implementation of the System for Social Protection in Health and the Seguro Popular using time series data from the Household Income and Expenditure Survey. Results. Between 2004 and 2014 there has been a continued improvement in levels of financial protection. Excessive expenditure reached its lowest point: –2.0% in 2012 and 2.1% in 2014. Impoverishing expenditure dropped to 1.3% in 2004, compared to 0.5% in 2014, and catastrophic expenditures from 2.7% to 2.1%. Conclusions. The time series of data on financial protection show a clear pattern of improvement between 2000 and 2014 and level off and low levels in 2012 and 2014. Still, levels continue to be relatively high for households in the poorest quintile, in rural areas and with an elderly person.

  4. Integrating occupational health protection and health promotion: theory and program application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blix, A

    1999-04-01

    1. The worksite offers an excellent setting to focus on both health protection and health promotion. Collaboration between health professionals concerned with health protection and health promotion would achieve common goals of risk reduction related to job risks and life risks. 2. Workers who experience "double jeopardy" because they are exposed to job risks and life risks would benefit most. 3. Benefits of integration include lower health risks, joint responsibility to promote health and safety shared between management and workers, and cost effectiveness. 4. The social ecological model is useful in developing an integrated program as it is multidimensional, interdisciplinary, and includes the dynamic interplay between the environment and personal factors impacting the health outcome.

  5. Applying radiation health effects data to radiation protection policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muckerheide, James [Center for Nuclear Technology and Society at WPI, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Data from the peer-reviewed scientific literature establish a sound basis to define a low-dose, low-dose-rate, dose-response. These data include human health dose-response studies; immunologically 'whole' animal studies; and cellular and molecular biological studies of complete biological systems for the relevant immunological and physiological responses. Initiatives are required to constructively apply these data to both radiation research and radiation protection policies. First, current low level radiation health effects research must apply existing data to define research projects to integrate and confirm existing dose-response data, with specific emphasis on the biological bases that exist in definitive and reproducible cellular and biological dose-response. Second, dose-response assessment must identify and incorporate all existing substantial and confirmed data, including natural radiation sources, to establish the bases for radiation protection policy for interventions to protect public health and safety. A preliminary assessment of these data is applied to: 1) Specify research that can be constructively applied to describe radiation health effects dose-response. 2) Apply health effects dose-response to radiation and radioactivity applications policies to maximize radiation health effects interventions for occupational applications, medical applications, and other radiation and radioactive materials applications controls to cost-effectively assure public health and safety. An assessment of the proposed revisions to ICRP radiation protection policies is provided that associates the basis for administrative limits with the previous proposal of the US NRC for a 'Below Regulatory Concern' (BRC) policy. This proposal ignores the context of the fact that very low levels of radiation exposure are far within the variations of natural radiation exposures, and therefore can have no gross net consequences. The equivalent failure of the BRC proposal

  6. Space toxicology: protecting human health during space operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan-Mayberry, Noreen; James, John T; Tyl, Rochelle; Lam, Chiu-wing

    2011-02-01

    Space toxicology is a unique and targeted discipline for spaceflight, space habitation, and occupation of celestial bodies including planets, moons, and asteroids. Astronaut explorers face distinctive health challenges and limited resources for rescue and medical care during space operation. A central goal of space toxicology is to protect the health of the astronaut by assessing potential chemical exposures during spaceflight and setting safe limits that will protect the astronaut against chemical exposures while in a physiologically altered state. In order to maintain sustained occupation in space on the International Space Station (ISS), toxicological risks must be assessed and managed within the context of isolation, continuous exposures, reuse of air and water, limited rescue options, and the need to use highly toxic compounds for propulsion and other purposes. As we begin to explore other celestial bodies, in situ toxicological risks, such as inhalation of reactive mineral dusts, must also be managed.

  7. ON HEALTH PROTECTION AND HEALTH RELATED PHYSICAL CULTURE TRAININGS OF FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Fotynyuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to assess health protection and health related physical culture trainings of first year students. Material: in the research first year students (n=121; 86 boys and 35girls of age 16 - 19 years, participated. Results: components of students’ individual health were found. Situation with health related physical culture trainings, ensuring students’ sound health and optimal functional potentials of their organisms were determined. It was found that leading role shall be played by formation of health world vision values, knowledge about formation of practical skills in healthy life style. Motivation tendency for realization of intentions and practicing of health related physical culture trainings were found in students. Conclusions: the received results prove students’ tendency to pay insufficient attention to individual health. It was found that health related physical culture trainings require modern renewal of education’s content, forms and methods of physical education. The basis of such trainings shall be health related orientation.

  8. The Data Protection Act (1998): implications for health researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redsell, S A; Cheater, F M

    2001-08-01

    This paper reports on the methods used in two studies to obtain access to subjects to comply with the common law duty of confidence laid out in the Data Protection Act (1998) and discusses the researchers' problems in interpreting the procedures. The amendments to the United Kingdom (UK) Data Protection Act (1998) are causing confusion within the health service and academic institutions. There is a need to balance patient confidentiality with the requirement to conduct vital, unbiased research in which health service professionals are not subject to ethical dilemmas. This paper examines the recruitment methods used in two studies in which the researchers' attempts to adhere to the requirements lengthened the study costs and may have produced less reliable results. The methodological difficulties in two studies are presented. In Study 1, the difficulties encountered when the Multicentre Research Ethics Committee refused permission for researchers to recruit patients directly to a multicentre randomized controlled trial are discussed. In Study 2, the method used to compile a sampling frame for a national questionnaire survey following the eight principles of the Act are described. Our experience has shown that health care professionals are increasingly required to recruit patients to intervention trials, and that researchers are not allowed access to the names of patients or other subjects to ask them for consent to participate in a study. The requirement for researchers to use "intermediaries" to obtain consent from and recruit subjects to studies increases the risk of selection bias, may expose the practitioner to ethical difficulties and may compromise the external validity of trial results. There is also a danger that research costs will soar when the Data Protection Act (1998) is fully realized. The Data Protection Act (1998) is currently being interpreted in a number of different ways. We conclude there is an urgent need for consensus within the health service

  9. Constitutional rights to health, public health and medical care: the status of health protections in 191 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, Jody; Cassola, Adèle; Raub, Amy; Mishra, Lipi

    2013-07-01

    United Nations (UN) member states have universally recognised the right to health in international agreements, but protection of this right at the national level remains incomplete. This article examines the level and scope of constitutional protection of specific rights to public health and medical care, as well as the broad right to health. We analysed health rights in the constitutions of 191 UN countries in 2007 and 2011. We examined how rights protections varied across the year of constitutional adoption; national income group and region; and for vulnerable groups within each country. A minority of the countries guaranteed the rights to public health (14%), medical care (38%) and overall health (36%) in their constitutions in 2011. Free medical care was constitutionally protected in 9% of the countries. Thirteen per cent of the constitutions guaranteed children's right to health or medical care, 6% did so for persons with disabilities and 5% for each of the elderly and the socio-economically disadvantaged. Valuable next steps include regular monitoring of the national protection of health rights recognised in international agreements, analyses of the impact of health rights on health outcomes and longitudinal multi-level studies to assess whether specific formulations of the rights have greater impact.

  10. 12 CFR 905.11 - Office of Inspector General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Office of Inspector General. 905.11 Section 905.11 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD ORGANIZATION AND... under the Inspector General Act include: (1) Conducting and supervising audits and...

  11. 38 CFR 45.605 - Inspector General report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inspector General report. 45.605 Section 45.605 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... comparable to an Inspector General shall prepare and submit the annual report, or, if there is no...

  12. [Children's health protection in the state political system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, A A; Iakovleva, T V; Lapin, Iu E

    2011-01-01

    The system of children's health protection in this country still lacks an adequate legal basis. Its improvement should be considered as a function of the state realized through legal regulation of public relations for the benefit of each child based on the legislatively fixed government policy in the sphere of children's health care. Such an approach may strengthen the role of this sphere in the intersectoral relations and implies the extension of pediatrics toward interaction with the spheres of politics and law. It reflects the understanding that physiological processes behind regulation of the functioning of the child's organism in the course of its development need an adequate support from the outside through regulation of public relations on behalf of children. The definition of state policy in the sphere of children's health care is proposed and its basic principles are considered.

  13. Mask degradation monitoring with aerial mask inspector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Wen-Jui; Fu, Yung-Ying; Lu, Shih-Ping; Jiang, Ming-Sian; Lin, Jeffrey; Wu, Clare; Lifschitz, Sivan; Tam, Aviram

    2013-06-01

    As design rule continues to shrink, microlithography is becoming more challenging and the photomasks need to comply with high scanner laser energy, low CDU, and ever more aggressive RETs. This give rise to numerous challenges in the semiconductor wafer fabrication plants. Some of these challenges being contamination (mainly haze and particles), mask pattern degradation (MoSi oxidation, chrome migration, etc.) and pellicle degradation. Fabs are constantly working to establish an efficient methodology to manage these challenges mainly using mask inspection, wafer inspection, SEM review and CD SEMs. Aerial technology offers a unique opportunity to address the above mask related challenges using one tool. The Applied Materials Aera3TM system has the inherent ability to inspect for defects (haze, particles, etc.), and track mask degradation (e.g. CDU). This paper focuses on haze monitoring, which is still a significant challenge in semiconductor manufacturing, and mask degradation effects that are starting to emerge as the next challenge for high volume semiconductor manufacturers. The paper describes Aerial inspector (Aera3) early haze methodology and mask degradation tracking related to high volume manufacturing. These will be demonstrated on memory products. At the end of the paper we take a brief look on subsequent work currently conducted on the more general issue of photo mask degradation monitoring by means of an Aerial inspector.

  14. Philosophy in medical education: a means of protecting mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Eric J

    2014-08-01

    This study sought to identify and examine less commonly discussed challenges to positive mental health faced by medical students, residents, and physicians with hopes of improving current efforts to protect the mental health of these groups. Additionally, this work aimed to suggest an innovative means of preventing poor mental health during medical education. Literature on medical student, resident, and physician mental health was carefully reviewed and a number of psychiatrists who treat physician-patients were interviewed. The culture of medicine, medical training, common physician psychology and identity, and conflicting professional expectations all seem to contribute to poor mental health among medical students, residents, and physicians. Many current efforts may be more successful by better addressing the negative effects of these characteristics of modern medicine. Programs aimed at promoting healthy mental lifestyles during medical education should continue to be developed and supported to mitigate the deleterious effects of the challenging environment of modern medicine. To improve these efforts, educators may consider incorporating philosophical discussions on meaning and fulfillment in life between medical students and faculty. Through medical school faculty members sharing and living out their own healthy outlooks on life, students may emulate these habits and the culture of medicine may become less challenging for positive mental health.

  15. Environmental health needs and launching of an environmental health protection unit in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M Z A; Kazi, B M; Bile, K M; Magan, M; Nasir, J A

    2010-01-01

    Pakistan is seriously confronted by many complex and difficult environmental challenges related to air, water, soil, forests and food including issues such as climate change. The close link between environment and health is neither well understood nor appreciated. The annual cost of environmental degradation in Pakistan has been estimated to be around US $4.0 billion orat least 6% of the country's GDP. Up to 35% of the burden of disease is attributable to environmental hazards and risk factors and most of this burden is preventable. A systematic process for identifying environmental health needs and issues as well as the efforts made by the government of Pakistan and the World Health Organization in establishing and launching an environmental health protection unit are described. Also presented are the mission, functions, structure (operational and logistical) and technical requirements as well as sustainability aspects of the environmental health protection unit.

  16. [Telematics in the public health sector. Where is the protection of health data?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voßhoff, Andrea; Raum, Bertram; Ernestus, Walter

    2015-10-01

    There is a long history of telematics in the German health system. Apart from the growing technical possibilities in the field, it is important to concentrate on the protection of health data in telematics applications. Health data in the hands of service providers or other third parties entails certain risks for the patient's personality rights, because these institutions may not be bound by the practice of medical confidentiality. In addition, big data processing risks make the individual lives of patients and insured persons totally transparent. Measures to reduce these risks have to be taken by the providers as well as by the users of telematics infrastructure; they are the ones who should explicitly address the relevant risks and dangers in a data protection and IT-security concept and develop adequate strategies to cope with these dangers. Additionally, the German legislator remains obliged to create a regulatory framework for the protection of patients' rights.

  17. Protecting the environment and public health from rare earth mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiang; Zhang, Guochun; Pan, An; Chen, Fengying; Zheng, Chunli

    2016-11-01

    As increasing demand for green energy and high-tech devices grows, so does the rising prospecting of rare earth metals required for their production. Protecting the environment and public health from rare earth element (REE) mining as well as emerging pollutants is urgently required to achieve sustainable development. This study mapped Earth's hidden REE deposits to identify potential contamination hotspots with the aim of preventing its deleterious effects on the environment. We worry that there would be widespread tailing facilities concomitant with serious pollutions, such as the Bayan Obo tailings site, and argue that a tradeoff between the underground REE exploration and environment conservation should be reached as soon as possible.

  18. Food protection activities of the Pan American Health Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    One of the most widespread health problems in the Caribbean and Latin America is contaminated food and foodborne illness. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) has been a major force in activities to strengthen food protection. The program within the regional Program of Technical Cooperation is administered by the Veterinary Public Health program and under the guidance of the Pan American Institute for Food protection and Zoonoses in Buenos Aires, Argentina. A food action plan for 1986-90 was established at the 1986 Pan American Sanitary Conference, and extended to cover 1991-95. Program activities during the 1990s covered cholera, epidemiologic surveillance, street food vendors, shellfish poisoning, meat, national programs, information systems, air catering, food irradiation, and tourism. The action plan for 1991-95 promoted greater political support and cooperation within and between related sectors and institutions, management, and education. The aims were to organize national integrated programs, to strengthen laboratory services, to strengthen inspection services, to establish epidemiologic surveillance systems, and to promote food protection through community participation. Program activities included the initiatives of the Veterinary Public Health Program in 1991 to distribute literature on the transmission of cholera by foods. Studies were conducted in Bolivia, Colombia, and Peru on food contamination. Microbiologists received training on standard methods for detecting Vibrio cholerae in foods. A working group of experts from 10 countries examined the issues and produced a guide for investigating the incidence of foodborne disease. PAHO has contributed to the formation of an Inter-American Network for Epidemiologic Surveillance of Foodborne Diseases. PAHO has worked to improve hygienic practices among street food vendors. Seminars on paralytic shellfish poisoning were conducted in 1990; the outcome was a network working to strengthen national

  19. Promoting and protecting the health of children and young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licence, K

    2004-11-01

    The health-related behaviours adopted by children and young people can have both immediate and long-term health effects. Health promotion interventions that target children and young people can lay the foundations of a healthy lifestyle that may be sustained into adulthood. This paper is based on a selective review of evidence relating to health promotion in childhood, carried out to support the external working group on the 'Healthy Child' module of the Children's National Service Framework. This is a selective review of mainly secondary research. It focuses on injury prevention, support for parenting and the promotion of good mental health, and promoting a healthy diet and physical activity amongst children and young people. In many areas, the quality of primary research into health promotion interventions aimed at children and young people is poor. Interventions are heterogeneous and not described in sufficient detail. Sample sizes tend to be small, and there are commonly problems of bias. Despite these difficulties, there is good evidence for a range of interventions, including (1) area road safety schemes; (2) combining a variety of approaches to the promotion of the use of safety equipment, including legislation and enforcement, loan/assisted purchase/giveaway schemes, education, fitting and maintenance of safety equipment; (3) school-based mental health promotion; (4) parenting support; (5) interventions that promote and facilitate 'lifestyle' activity for children, such as walking and cycling to school, and those that aim to reduce sedentary behaviours such as parent education to reduce the time children spend watching TV and using computers; and (6) controlling advertising of unhealthy food that is aimed at children. There are effective interventions to promote and protect the health of children and young people that require action across the five areas described in the Ottawa Charter. Health, social care and education services have a direct role in the

  20. Promoting employee health by integrating health protection, health promotion, and continuous improvement: a longitudinal quasi-experimental intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica; Augustsson, Hanna; Hasson, Henna; Stenfors-Hayes, Terese

    2015-02-01

    To test the effects of integrating health protection and health promotion with a continuous improvement system (Kaizen) on proximal employee outcomes (health promotion, integration, and Kaizen) and distal outcomes (workability, productivity, self-rated health and self-rated sickness absence). Twelve units in a county hospital in Sweden were randomized to control or intervention groups using a quasiexperimental study design. All staff (approximately 500) provided self-ratings in questionnaires at baseline, and a 12- and 24-month follow-up (response rate, 79% to 87.5%). There was a significant increase in the proximal outcomes over time in the intervention group compared with the control group, and a trend toward improvement in the distal outcomes workability and productivity. Integration seems to promote staff engagement in health protection and promotion, as well as to improve their understanding of the link between work and health.

  1. Protecting unauthorized immigrant mothers improves their children's mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainmueller, Jens; Lawrence, Duncan; Martén, Linna; Black, Bernard; Figueroa, Lucila; Hotard, Michael; Jiménez, Tomás R; Mendoza, Fernando; Rodriguez, Maria I; Swartz, Jonas J; Laitin, David D

    2017-09-08

    The United States is embroiled in a debate about whether to protect or deport its estimated 11 million unauthorized immigrants, but the fact that these immigrants are also parents to more than 4 million U.S.-born children is often overlooked. We provide causal evidence of the impact of parents' unauthorized immigration status on the health of their U.S. citizen children. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program granted temporary protection from deportation to more than 780,000 unauthorized immigrants. We used Medicaid claims data from Oregon and exploited the quasi-random assignment of DACA eligibility among mothers with birthdates close to the DACA age qualification cutoff. Mothers' DACA eligibility significantly decreased adjustment and anxiety disorder diagnoses among their children. Parents' unauthorized status is thus a substantial barrier to normal child development and perpetuates health inequalities through the intergenerational transmission of disadvantage. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  2. Health sector employment: a tracer indicator for universal health coverage in national Social Protection Floors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheil-Adlung, Xenia; Behrendt, Thorsten; Wong, Lorraine

    2015-08-31

    Health sector employment is a prerequisite for availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality (AAAQ) of health services. Thus, in this article health worker shortages are used as a tracer indicator estimating the proportion of the population lacking access to such services: The SAD (ILO Staff Access Deficit Indicator) estimates gaps towards UHC in the context of Social Protection Floors (SPFs). Further, it highlights the impact of investments in health sector employment equity and sustainable development. The SAD is used to estimate the share of the population lacking access to health services due to gaps in the number of skilled health workers. It is based on the difference of the density of the skilled health workforce per population in a given country and a threshold indicating UHC staffing requirements. It identifies deficits, differences and developments in access at global, regional and national levels and between rural and urban areas. In 2014, the global UHC deficit in numbers of health workers is estimated at 10.3 million, with most important gaps in Asia (7.1 million) and Africa (2.8 million). Globally, 97 countries are understaffed with significantly higher gaps in rural than in urban areas. Most affected are low-income countries, where 84 per cent of the population remains excluded from access due to the lack of skilled health workers. A positive correlation of health worker employment and population health outcomes could be identified. Legislation is found to be a prerequisite for closing access as gaps. Health worker shortages hamper the achievement of UHC and aggravate weaknesses of health systems. They have major impacts on socio-economic development, particularly in the world's poorest countries where they act as drivers of health inequities. Closing the gaps by establishing inclusive multi-sectoral policy approaches based on the right to health would significantly increase equity, reduce poverty due to ill health and ultimately contribute

  3. Industrial hygiene programs for workers' health protection in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchetti, G; Peruzzo, G F; Sordelli, D

    1988-06-01

    The recent Health and Safety Act devolves the management of workers' health protection to new local authorities named "Local Sanitary Units." The specific program is framed in the existing state regulations and is in agreement with European community politics regarding health risks arising from the industrial use of particular substances like lead, asbestos, benzene, PCBs and others. The rapid industrial growth during recent years put into evidence completely new and numerous risks with the result of both qualitative and quantitative modifications of occupational diseases which existed in the years preceding the second world war. This rapid and remarkable change required a general adjustment in the country, which involved universities, government and industry. At the same time, the need of new relationships between occupational risks and insurance management rose. Beginning in the seventies, the Italian Industrial Hygiene Association [Associazione Italiana Degli Igienisti Industriali (A.I.D.I.I.)] promoted the progress of industrial hygiene in Italy through national and international conferences, continuous educational activities and participation with government standard-setting committees. The trend in A.I.D.I.I. future activities embraces the development of standard evaluation and control procedures and the improvement of research following European guidelines in strict cooperation with correlated European and American organizations.

  4. Whistle-blower accuses VA inspector general of a "whitewash"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Yesterday, Dr. Sam Foote, the initial whistle-blower at the Phoenix VA, criticized the Department of Veterans Affairs inspector general's (VAOIG report on delays in healthcare at the Phoenix VA at a hearing before the House Committee of Veterans Affairs (1,2. Foote accused the VAOIG of minimizing bad patient outcomes and deliberately confusing readers, downplaying the impact of delayed health care at Phoenix VA facilities. "At its best, this report is a whitewash. At its worst, it is a feeble attempt at a cover-up," said Foote. Foote earlier this year revealed that as many as 40 Phoenix patients died while awaiting care and that the Phoenix VA maintained secret waiting lists while under-reporting patient wait times for appointments. His disclosures triggered the national VA scandal. Richard Griffin, the acting VAOIG, said that nearly 300 patients died while on backlogged wait lists in the Phoenix VA Health Care System, a much higher ...

  5. 45 CFR 164.502 - Uses and disclosures of protected health information: general rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Standard. A covered entity may not use or disclose protected health information, except as permitted or.... A covered entity is permitted to use or disclose protected health information as follows: (i) To the... entity that has agreed to a restriction pursuant to § 164.522(a)(1) may not use or disclose the protected...

  6. Automatic detection of protected health information from clinic narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Garibaldi, Jonathan M

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a natural language processing (NLP) system that was designed to participate in the 2014 i2b2 de-identification challenge. The challenge task aims to identify and classify seven main Protected Health Information (PHI) categories and 25 associated sub-categories. A hybrid model was proposed which combines machine learning techniques with keyword-based and rule-based approaches to deal with the complexity inherent in PHI categories. Our proposed approaches exploit a rich set of linguistic features, both syntactic and word surface-oriented, which are further enriched by task-specific features and regular expression template patterns to characterize the semantics of various PHI categories. Our system achieved promising accuracy on the challenge test data with an overall micro-averaged F-measure of 93.6%, which was the winner of this de-identification challenge.

  7. A privacy protection for an mHealth messaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaleswara, Lakshmipathi; Akopian, David; Chronopoulos, Anthony T.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a new software system that employs features that help the organization to comply with USA HIPAA regulations. The system uses SMS as the primary way of communication to transfer information. Lack of knowledge about some diseases is still a major reason for some harmful diseases spreading. The developed system includes different features that may help to communicate amongst low income people who don't even have access to the internet. Since the software system deals with Personal Health Information (PHI) it is equipped with an access control authentication system mechanism to protect privacy. The system is analyzed for performance to identify how much overhead the privacy rules impose.

  8. Health research and the Data Protection Act 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Phil

    2003-07-01

    The 1998 Data Protection Act in the UK largely restates existing good practice: individuals have a right to know what data are held about them and why; and those processing data have a duty to proceed with fairness and transparency, maintain high data quality and keep data secure. Some health researchers have criticised the Act, seeing it as a legal minefield, unnecessary bureaucracy and interference from the European Union. This is largely based on misconceptions. Recent guidance from the Information Commissioner aims to assist researchers by advising how legal requirements can be met through anonymisation of data, attention to data-processing methods and fair collection of data. The Act provides a clear framework of rights and responsibilities that should be embraced with enthusiasm rather than with the reluctance of a person forced to carry out a meaningless chore.

  9. LEGAL BASES FOR DISCLOSING CONFIDENTIAL PATIENT INFORMATION FOR PUBLIC HEALTH: DISTINGUISHING BETWEEN HEALTH PROTECTION AND HEALTH IMPROVEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    The disclosure of confidential patient data without an individual's explicit consent should be for purposes that persons have reason to both expect and accept. We do not currently have the required level of clarity or consistency in understanding regarding the disclosure of confidential patient information for public health purposes to support effective public dialogue. The Health Service (Control of Patient Information) Regulations 2002 establish a legal basis in England and Wales for data to be disclosed for public health purposes without patient consent. Under the Regulations, there is more than one potential route towards lawful processing: Data may be processed for public health purposes under both Regulations 3 and 5. The alternatives have different safeguards and conditions attached, and their respective applicability to processing for purposes of public health improvement is currently unclear and subject to review. Beyond the need for clarity regarding the safeguards applicable to processing for particular public health purposes, there are reasons to prefer recognition that Regulation 5 is the most appropriate legal basis for disclosure when the purpose is public health improvement rather than public health protection. Where health improvement, rather than protection, is the aim, there is no justification for discarding the additional safeguards associated with processing under Regulation 5.

  10. Development of a respiratory protection survey instrument for occupational health nurses: an educational project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, Deborah; Burgel, Barbara J

    2013-02-01

    The Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training outlined seven recommendations to improve the competency of occupational health nurses in respiratory protection. An advisory group was convened in December 2011, with stakeholder representation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health/National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory, American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., American Board for Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare, American Nurses Association, and Institute of Medicine Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health. The initial work of the advisory group included developing and administering a survey to assess current occupational health nurse roles and responsibilities relevant to respiratory protection. Development of the survey was led by a master's student and advisor who worked with the advisory group. The process of tool development and preliminary findings are presented in this article.

  11. Information resources used in health risk assessment by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, G.B.; Baratta, M.; Wolfson, S.; McGeorge, L. [New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Trenton (United States)

    1990-12-31

    The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection`s responsibilities related to health-based risk assessment are described, including its research projects and its development of health based compound specific standards and guidance levels. The resources used by the agency to support health risk assessment work are outlined.

  12. Radiation. Protection. Health. Proceedings; Strahlen. Schutz. Gesundheit. Tagungsband

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajek, Michael [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wien (Austria); Maringer, Franz Josef; Steurer, Andreas [Bundesamt fuer Eich- und Vermessungswesen, Wien (Austria); Schwaiger, Martina [Seibersdorf Labor GmbH, Seibersdorf (Austria); Timal, Guenter (ed.) [Bundesministerium fuer Inneres, Wien (Austria)

    2015-07-01

    The topics of the meeting are the diagnostic and therapeutic application of ionizing radiations, the application of radiation in research, industry and engineering and radiation protection. The volume includes the following chapters: Radiation protection and society, radiation protection infrastructure, population and environment, metrology and measuring techniques, 1. Workshop on population and environment, NORM and radon, 2. Update: dose - extent of damage - limiting value definition, radiation protection for personnel (except medicine), radiation protection in medicine.

  13. Annual report, Office of the Inspector General

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansfield, J.K.

    1979-03-01

    The law which created the Department of Energy (DOE) also established within the Department an Office of Inspector General (IG). This office has statutory responsibilities relating to the promotion of efficiency and economy and the prevention or detection of fraud and abuse in the programs and operations of the Department. The first sections of this report take note of the relatively short time that the current senior IG officials have been on the job, and describe the office organizational structure that the new management team created in the last half of 1978. The next section discusses in some detail the most critical problem, the lack of sufficient staff to discharge the full range of statutory responsibilities. Subsequent sections deal with the activities of audits, investigations, and inspections units during 1978. Examples of significant problems encountered and corrective actions taken are given. The question of what is needed for IG to play a true leadership role in the Department's overall audit effort is also addressed. Then Departmental compliance with IG recommendations and the DOE program areas of unusually high vulnerability are discussed. Next, staff training efforts and a legal challenge to the subpoena power of the IG office are described. Finally, advance planning and some important IG goals for the coming year are addressed. (RWR)

  14. Biologically inspired robots as artificial inspectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2002-06-01

    Imagine an inspector conducting an NDE on an aircraft where you notice something is different about him - he is not real but rather he is a robot. Your first reaction would probably be to say 'it's unbelievable but he looks real' just as you would react to an artificial flower that is a good imitation. This science fiction scenario could become a reality at the trend in the development of biologically inspired technologies, and terms like artificial intelligence, artificial muscles, artificial vision and numerous others are increasingly becoming common engineering tools. For many years, the trend has been to automate processes in order to increase the efficiency of performing redundant tasks where various systems have been developed to deal with specific production line requirements. Realizing that some parts are too complex or delicate to handle in small quantities with a simple automatic system, robotic mechanisms were developed. Aircraft inspection has benefitted from this evolving technology where manipulators and crawlers are developed for rapid and reliable inspection. Advancement in robotics towards making them autonomous and possibly look like human, can potentially address the need to inspect structures that are beyond the capability of today's technology with configuration that are not predetermined. The operation of these robots may take place at harsh or hazardous environments that are too dangerous for human presence. Making such robots is becoming increasingly feasible and in this paper the state of the art will be reviewed.

  15. Saarland and Rheinland-Pfalz Mines Inspectorate. Annual report 1996. Economic and technical aspects, industrial safety and environmental protection, statistics, activities of the mining authorities; Oberbergamt fuer das Saarland und das Land Rheinland-Pfalz. Jahresbericht 1996. Bergwirtschaft, Bergtechnik, Arbeitsschutz, Umweltschutz, Statistiken, Taetigkeiten der Bergbehoerden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The annual report of the Saarland and Rheinland-Pfalz Mines Inspectorate outlines the economic and technical developments in mining in these two German states as well as the activities of the mining authorities in all fields of mining. (orig.) [Deutsch] Der Jahresbericht des Oberbergamtes fuer das Saarland und das Land Rheinland-Pfalz gibt einen Ueberblick zur bergwirtschaftlichen und bergtechnischen Entwicklung in beiden Bundeslaendern und vermittelt einen umfassenden Einblick in die Taetigkeiten der Bergbehoerden in den vielfaeltigen Bergbauzweigen. (orig.)

  16. Co-occurrence of protective health behaviours and perceived psychosocial job characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera J.C. Mc Carthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the association between positive job characteristics of older workers and the co-occurrence of protective health behaviours. This study aims to investigate the association between perceived psychosocial job characteristics and the adoption of protective health behaviours. A population-based cross-sectional study was performed on a sample of 1025 males and females (age-range 50–69-years attending a primary healthcare clinic. Perceived job characteristics (job demands: quantitative and cognitive demands; resources: possibility for development and influence at work were determined using the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire. Each scale is presented in tertiles. Protective health behaviours were; consumption of five or more portions of fruit and vegetables a day, moderate alcohol, non/ex-smoker, and high and moderate physical activity. Each participant was scored 0–4 protective health behaviours. The majority of the sample had three protective health behaviours. Higher levels of influence at work and cognitive demands were associated with higher self-reported physical activity, but not with any number of protective health behaviours. Conversely, higher quantitative and higher cognitive demands were associated with reporting any number of protective health behaviours or above average number of protective health behaviours respectively. The findings on protective health behaviours were inconsistent in relation to the different measures of perceived psychosocial job characteristics and were largely confined to physical activity and diet.

  17. Pesticide assessment: Protecting public health on the home turf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Meg; Walker, C Robin; van der Jagt, Richard Hc; Claman, Paul

    2006-04-01

    Pesticide regulation is examined in the context of Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency's assessment of the chlorophenoxy herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) for turf. 2,4-D is the most common herbicide used to kill weeds in grass.The medical literature does not uniformly indicate harms from herbicides. However, the balance of epidemiological research suggests that 2,4-D can be persuasively linked to cancers, neurological impairment and reproductive problems. These may arise from 2,4-D itself, from breakdown products or dioxin contamination, or from a combination of chemicals.Regulators rely largely on toxicology, but experiments may not replicate exposures from 2,4-D application to lawns because environmental breakdown products (eg, 2,4-dichlorophenol) may not accumulate and selected herbicides are possibly less contaminated. Dioxins are bioaccumulative chemicals that may cause cancer, harm neurological development, impair reproduction, disrupt the endocrine system and alter immune function. No dioxin analyses were submitted to the Pest Management Regulatory Agency, and the principal contaminants of 2,4-D are not among the 17 congeners covered in pesticide regulation. Independent assessment of all dioxins is needed, in tissues and in the environment.The 2,4-D assessment does not approach standards for ethics, rigour or transparency in medical research. Canada needs a stronger regulator for pesticides. Potentially toxic chemicals should not be registered when more benign solutions exist, risks are not clearly quantifiable or potential risks outweigh benefits. Until landscaping pesticides are curtailed nationally, local bylaws and Quebec's Pesticide Code are prudent measures to protect public health. Physicians have a role in public education regarding pesticides.

  18. Response to health inequity: the role of social protection in reducing poverty and achieving equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheil-Adlung, Xenia

    2014-06-01

    Health inequities are determined by multiple factors within the health sector and beyond. While gaps in social health protection coverage and effective access to health care are among the most prominent causes of health inequities, social and economic inequalities existing beyond the health sector contribute greatly to barriers to access affordable and acceptable health care. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. [Human habitats and the protection of health in Islam].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadrović, A

    1997-01-01

    Architecture is an expression so wide in its dimensions and meanings, that it can be compared to expression "life". Architecture is a synthesis and an expression of all rational and irrational that attributes a man, family, community in general, or mankind at all-im one hand; and rational expression of physical structure given by architects, in other hand. Thus, architecture comes down from the highest spheres of philosophy, sociology, discussions on ethics etc., to life. That is the way how architecture becomes defining frame of human life. Human habitude and health protection in islam could be elaborated through theoretical concept of architecturally defined space (ADS), that considers (treats) architecture as a complex system, consisting of four fundamental elements: man, environment, limits and perspectives. Each of these elements, when looking from the perspective of islam, has its specific characteristics, that author discusses in this paper. No doubt, in islamic sphere of life there is a wide spectrum of architectural programmes, that follows natural environment, and has a goal to confirm human and general social values.

  20. Health research and systems' governance are at risk: should the right to data protection override health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Iorio, C T; Carinci, F; Oderkirk, J

    2014-07-01

    The European Union (EU) Data Protection Regulation will have profound implications for public health, health services research and statistics in Europe. The EU Commission's Proposal was a breakthrough in balancing privacy rights and rights to health and healthcare. The European Parliament, however, has proposed extensive amendments. This paper reviews the amendments proposed by the European Parliament Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs and their implications for health research and statistics. The amendments eliminate most innovations brought by the Proposal. Notably, derogation to the general prohibition of processing sensitive data shall be allowed for public interests such as the management of healthcare services,but not health research, monitoring, surveillance and governance. The processing of personal health data for historical, statistical or scientific purposes shall be allowed only with the consent of the data subject or if the processing serves an exceptionally high public interest, cannot be performed otherwise and is legally authorised. Research, be it academic, government,corporate or market research, falls under the same rule.The proposed amendments will make difficult or render impossible research and statistics involving the linkage and analysis of the wealth of data from clinical,administrative, insurance and survey sources, which have contributed to improving health outcomes and health systems performance and governance; and may illegitimise efforts that have been made in some European countries to enable privacy-respectful data use for research and statistical purposes. If the amendments stand as written, the right to privacy is likely to override the right to health and healthcare in Europe.

  1. Patents and the obligation to protect health: examining the significance of human rights considerations in the protection of pharmaceutical patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoeye, Olasupo Ayodeji

    2014-06-01

    This article discusses the human right to health in the context of patent protection and access to medicines. It considers the limitations in international human rights law, especially in relation to socioeconomic rights, that make it difficult for the right to health to be a potent justification for derogation from trade or intellectual property agreements. It concludes by taking the view that while the right to health may be somewhat unenforceable in international law, its close association with enforceable rights such as the right to life can be a legitimate basis for making maximum use of the flexibilities in the international intellectual property regime to protect public health. The article takes the view that trade and intellectual property agreements must be interpreted in a way that endeavours as much as possible to resolve any seeming inconsistency with the right to health.

  2. 78 FR 44947 - Children's Health Protection Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-25

    ..., pediatricians, obstetrics, occupational medicine, community nurses, environmental groups, health groups, health... exposures, chemical exposures, public health information tracking, knowledge of EPA regulation development... communication; Water quality, regulations, policies, outreach and communication; Prenatal exposures and...

  3. Applying the Recovery Approach to the Interface between Mental Health and Child Protection Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Joe; Davidson, Gavin; Kavanagh, Damien

    2016-01-01

    There is a range of theoretical approaches which may inform the interface between child protection and adult mental health services. These theoretical perspectives tend to be focused on either child protection or mental health with no agreed integrating framework. The interface continues to be identified, in research, case management reviews and…

  4. Applying the Recovery Approach to the Interface between Mental Health and Child Protection Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Joe; Davidson, Gavin; Kavanagh, Damien

    2016-01-01

    There is a range of theoretical approaches which may inform the interface between child protection and adult mental health services. These theoretical perspectives tend to be focused on either child protection or mental health with no agreed integrating framework. The interface continues to be identified, in research, case management reviews and…

  5. Indian community health insurance schemes provide partial protection against catastrophic health expenditure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranson Kent

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 72% of health expenditure in India is financed by individual households at the time of illness through out-of-pocket payments. This is a highly regressive way of financing health care and sometimes leads to impoverishment. Health insurance is recommended as a measure to protect households from such catastrophic health expenditure (CHE. We studied two Indian community health insurance (CHI schemes, ACCORD and SEWA, to determine whether insured households are protected from CHE. Methods ACCORD provides health insurance cover for the indigenous population, living in Gudalur, Tamil Nadu. SEWA provides insurance cover for self employed women in the state of Gujarat. Both cover hospitalisation expenses, but only upto a maximum limit of US$23 and US$45, respectively. We reviewed the insurance claims registers in both schemes and identified patients who were hospitalised during the period 01/04/2003 to 31/03/2004. Details of their diagnoses, places and costs of treatment and self-reported annual incomes were obtained. There is no single definition of CHE and none of these have been validated. For this research, we used the following definition; "annual hospital expenditure greater than 10% of annual income," to identify those who experienced CHE. Results There were a total of 683 and 3152 hospital admissions at ACCORD and SEWA, respectively. In the absence of the CHI scheme, all of the patients at ACCORD and SEWA would have had to pay OOP for their hospitalisation. With the CHI scheme, 67% and 34% of patients did not have to make any out-of-pocket (OOP payment for their hospital expenses at ACCORD and SEWA, respectively. Both CHI schemes halved the number of households that would have experienced CHE by covering hospital costs. However, despite this, 4% and 23% of households with admissions still experienced CHE at ACCORD and SEWA, respectively. This was related to the following conditions: low annual income, benefit

  6. Study of critical dimension uniformity (CDU) using a mask inspector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mei-Chun; Yu, Ching-Fang; Lai, Mei-Tsu; Hsu, Luke T. H.; Chin, Angus; Yen, Anthony

    2012-11-01

    This paper studies the repeatability and the reliability of CDUs from a mask inspector and their correlation with CD SEM measurements on various pattern attributes such as feature sizes, tones, and orientations. Full-mask image analysis with a mask inspector is one of potential solutions for overcoming the sampling rate limitation of a mask CD SEM. By comparing the design database with the inspected dimension, the complete CDU behavior of specific patterns can be obtained without extra work and tool time. These measurements can be mapped and averaged over various spatial lengths to determine changes in relative CDU across the mask. Eventually, success of this methodology relies on the optical system of the inspector being highly stable.

  7. What do inspectors need to know about BMPs?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foote, Jennifer [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lemke, Terrill [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zimmerly, Tim [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    A successful inspection program is the key to proper implementation of Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plans (SWPPP) and maintaining regulatory compliance. Best Management Practices (BMPs), in turn, are the cornerstone of SWPPP implementation, effective storm water management, and successful sediment and erosion control. To ensure an effective and successful inspection program, inspectors need to have an appropriate and adequate knowledge of BMPs. This presentation will address obtaining adequate BMP knowledge, the challenges of interacting with others regarding BMPs, and examples of some frequently misused BMPs. Ensuring that inspectors have appropriate BMP knowledge gives them the tools to be effective. It is also important that inspectors understand how to discuss this information with the contractor, designers and regulators. This fosters consistence, quality, and regulatory compliance, which lends credibility to the industry.

  8. Radiological protection report 2007; Strahlenschutzbericht 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This annual report issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Inspectorate (HSK) reports on the work carried out by the Inspectorate in 2007. It provides comprehensive data on radiation protection activities in Switzerland during 2007. This is the fourth annual summary report on the radiological protection issues regulated by the Inspectorate. It provides comprehensive data on doses for the staff and for individual jobs. It also includes year-to-year comparisons and comments on the continuing decline in collective and average doses for persons exposed to radiation in the course of their work. Radiation doses are commented on. Radiation in the four Swiss nuclear power stations and in four further nuclear installations in various Swiss research facilities is commented on. The Swiss radiation measurement network is commented on and the results obtained are discussed. The Inspectorate concludes that radiological protection in Swiss nuclear facilities is carried out consistently and in compliance with existing legislation.

  9. [Historical reflections on health protection and the condom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrai, J

    1991-12-01

    The condom was first mentioned in a 1564 writing by Gabriel Fallopius as a means of protection against syphilis describing his tests on 1100 people. The name itself has been ascribed to the Latin word condere, Cum Domino, the French city of Condom, and doctor Quondom, the physician of the English King Charles II. The Marquis de Sade and Casanova used it to avoid venereal diseases (VDs). In London condom manufacturing started in the 18th century. Later it became a symbol of prostitution and immorality. The material used consisted of fish bladder or animal intestines (calf, sheep). The discovery of the rubber tree and the invention of vulcanization by the American technician Goodyear in 1840 made possible large-scale production. In Hungary the 1st rubber manufacturing plant EMERGE started production in 1893 along with toys and other wares. IN 1895 the HUngarian medial association warned about the spread of syphilis facilitated by the activities of 15,400 syphilitic prostitutes in the country. 30% of hospital patients had syphilis. The use of the condom was limited, and illegitimate births increased by 10.5% during the millennium celebrations of Hungary's existence in 1896. EMERGE manufactured condoms called Nono which were mostly distributed to soldiers during World War I, yet they had little popularity. US soldiers did not use the condoms either, as 7 million active days were lost due to VDs during World War II. In the 1950's Anna Ratko was Minister of Health in Hungary who opposed promotion of condoms to increase the population. The invention of penicillin in 1942 also pushed the condom to the background, but in the 1980's the epidemic of AIDS has made its use widespread.

  10. Congressional Testimony: Statement of Wade T. Najjum Before the Subcommittee on Superfund and Environmental Health Committee on Environment and Public Works United States Senate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statement of Wade T. Najjum Assistant Inspector General for Program Evaluation U.S. EPA Office of Inspector General Before the Subcommittee on Superfund and Environmental Health Committee on Environment and Public Works United States Senate

  11. 76 FR 42706 - Amendment of Inspector General Operations & Reporting System Audit, Assignment, and Timesheet...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... Inspector General Operations & Reporting (IGOR) System Audit, Assignment, and Timesheet Files (EPA-42) to... & Reporting (IGOR) System Audit, Assignment, and Timesheet Files (EPA-42) will be changed to Inspector General... AGENCY Amendment of Inspector General Operations & Reporting System Audit, Assignment, and...

  12. 76 FR 71019 - Amendment of Inspector General's Operation and Reporting (IGOR) System Investigative Files (EPA-40)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... AGENCY Amendment of Inspector General's Operation and Reporting (IGOR) System Investigative Files (EPA-40... General's Operation and Reporting (IGOR) System Investigative Files (EPA-40) to the Inspector General... The Inspector General's Operation and Reporting (IGOR) System Investigative Files (EPA-40) will...

  13. 48 CFR 1552.203-71 - Display of EPA Office of Inspector General Hotline poster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Inspector General Hotline poster. 1552.203-71 Section 1552.203-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Provisions and Clauses 1552.203-71 Display of EPA Office of Inspector General Hotline poster. As prescribed... all contract options. Display of EPA Office of Inspector General Hotline Poster (AUG 2000) (a) For...

  14. Environmental Health Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Alan; Smith, Robert

    1975-01-01

    Describes an environmental health science technology curriculum designed to provide technicians in the areas of air, water and wastewater analyses, treatment plant operators, public health enforcement officers, and pollution inspectors. (GS)

  15. Protection motivation theory and adolescent drug trafficking: relationship between health motivation and longitudinal risk involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Stanton, Bonita F; Li, Xiaoming; Galbraith, Jennifer; Cole, Matthew L

    2005-03-01

    To assess health protection motivation as explained by the constructs of protection motivation theory (PMT) and its association with drug trafficking over 2 years. The sample included 817 African American youth (13-16 years old) participating in an adolescent risk-reduction program. We developed an instrument measuring the level of health protection motivation (LHPM) using factor analysis. Changes in LHPM over time were examined among drug traffickers, abstainers, initiators, and nonrisk youths. In sum, 151 participants reported selling and/or delivering drugs during the study period. The significant inverse correlation between drug-trafficking intention and health protection motivation was consistent with PMT. Changes in LHPM were strongly associated with the dynamics of behavior over 2 years. Adolescent drug trafficking can be predicted by an overall level of health protection motivation. PMT and related theories should be considered in the design of drug-trafficking prevention intervention.

  16. The Role of Labour Inspectorates in Tackling the Psychosocial Risks at Work in Europe: Problems and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Toukas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Significant changes in the past year have taken place in the world of work that are bringing new challenges with regard to employee safety and health. These changes have led to emerging psychosocial risks (PSRs at work. The risks are primarily linked to how work is designed, organized, and managed, and to the economic and social frame of work. These factors have increased the level of work-related stress and can lead to serious deterioration in mental and physical health. In tackling PSRs, the European labor inspectorates can have an important role by enforcing preventive and/or corrective interventions in the content and context of work. However, to improve working conditions, unilateral interventions in the context and content of work are insufficient and require adopting a common strategy to tackle PSRs, based on a holistic approach. The implementation of a common strategy by the European Labor Inspectorate for tackling PSRs is restricted by the lack of a common legislative frame with regard to PSR evaluation and management, the different levels of labor inspectors' training, and the different levels of employees' and employers' health and safety culture.

  17. The Role of Labour Inspectorates in Tackling the Psychosocial Risks at Work in Europe: Problems and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toukas, Dimitrios; Delichas, Miltiadis; Toufekoula, Chryssoula; Spyrouli, Anastasia

    2015-12-01

    Significant changes in the past year have taken place in the world of work that are bringing new challenges with regard to employee safety and health. These changes have led to emerging psychosocial risks (PSRs) at work. The risks are primarily linked to how work is designed, organized, and managed, and to the economic and social frame of work. These factors have increased the level of work-related stress and can lead to serious deterioration in mental and physical health. In tackling PSRs, the European labor inspectorates can have an important role by enforcing preventive and/or corrective interventions in the content and context of work. However, to improve working conditions, unilateral interventions in the context and content of work are insufficient and require adopting a common strategy to tackle PSRs, based on a holistic approach. The implementation of a common strategy by the European Labor Inspectorate for tackling PSRs is restricted by the lack of a common legislative frame with regard to PSR evaluation and management, the different levels of labor inspectors' training, and the different levels of employees' and employers' health and safety culture.

  18. Vice President He Minghong Met with NSF Inspector General

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiuping

    2008-01-01

    @@ NSFC Vice President,Prof.He Minghong met with Dr.Tina Boesz,Inspector General of the US National Science Foundation on 29 October,2008.In-depth discussions were carried out on new progresses in both organizations on financial auditing and countermeasures on scientific misconducts.

  19. 9 CFR 355.31 - Supervision by inspector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Supervision by inspector. 355.31..., CERTIFICATION, AND IDENTIFICATION AS TO CLASS, QUALITY, QUANTITY, AND CONDITION Supervision § 355.31 Supervision... filled in whole or in part and no such label shall be affixed thereto except under the supervision of...

  20. THE AUTHORITY OF INSPECTORS OF EDUCATION: AUCTORITAS AND POTESTAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Camacho Prats

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Educational Inspection is an institution with almost 170 years of history that traditionally has enjoyed credibility and influence, endorsed by the knowhow and good works of its inspectors. Furthermore, from the mid twentieth century, these government workers legally boast the category of Public Authority. In this article we highlight the concepts of Auctoritas and Potestas, which describe the notion of authority of the Educational Inspectors and we carry out a theoretical revision of the current legislation by showing its impact in six Spanish Autonomous Communities. In addition, we examine scientific works by authors of reference. We can conclude that the legal authority does not necessarily implicate a moral authority, and in order for it to be reached, it appears necessary to obtain a solid training in Pedagogy by the Educational Inspectors, and at the same time a constant update in diverse fundamental elements of the scholastic actuality. In this work, we process the authority of the Inspector staff from a perspective that encourages the reflection on the profile that should characterize these public workers with their performances and interventions.

  1. Financial risk protection and universal health coverage: evidence and measurement challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksena, Priyanka; Hsu, Justine; Evans, David B

    2014-09-01

    Financial risk protection is a key component of universal health coverage (UHC), which is defined as access to all needed quality health services without financial hardship. As part of the PLOS Medicine Collection on measurement of UHC, the aim of this paper is to examine and to compare and contrast existing measures of financial risk protection. The paper presents the rationale behind the methodologies for measuring financial risk protection and how this relates to UHC as well as some empirical examples of the types of measures. Additionally, the specific challenges related to monitoring inequalities in financial risk protection are discussed. The paper then goes on to examine and document the practical challenges associated with measurement of financial risk protection. This paper summarizes current thinking on the area of financial risk protection, provides novel insights, and suggests future developments that could be valuable in the context of monitoring progress towards UHC.

  2. Financial risk protection and universal health coverage: evidence and measurement challenges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Saksena

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Financial risk protection is a key component of universal health coverage (UHC, which is defined as access to all needed quality health services without financial hardship. As part of the PLOS Medicine Collection on measurement of UHC, the aim of this paper is to examine and to compare and contrast existing measures of financial risk protection. The paper presents the rationale behind the methodologies for measuring financial risk protection and how this relates to UHC as well as some empirical examples of the types of measures. Additionally, the specific challenges related to monitoring inequalities in financial risk protection are discussed. The paper then goes on to examine and document the practical challenges associated with measurement of financial risk protection. This paper summarizes current thinking on the area of financial risk protection, provides novel insights, and suggests future developments that could be valuable in the context of monitoring progress towards UHC.

  3. MOBILE PHONE AND CHILDREN: INFLUENCE ON HEALTH AND PROTECTION MEASURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Liberman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An article presents an analysis of the results of research aimed at clarifying the possible shortand long-term effects of exposure from electromagnetic fields (EMF of mobile radio communication – mobile (cellularand wireless (home phones on children and adolescents. Measures are considered to protect them from exposure to EMF, directions for further researches are formulated.

  4. opinion maternal and infant health is protected by antiretroviral drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-03-01

    Mar 1, 2012 ... stricter legislation to protect the rights of breastfeeding mothers. They objected to ... formula for HIV-positive women, and lamented that there has been hardly ... newborns against disease and support the maturation of their own immune ... two types of 'exceptionalism': (i) HIV exceptionalism and (ii) South.

  5. On-Orbit Health Monitoring and Repair Assessment of Thermal Protection Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project delivers On-orbit health MoNItoring and repair assessment of THERMal protection systems (OMNI_THERM). OMNI_THERM features impedance-based...

  6. Community nurses' child protection role: views of public health nurses in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, Susan

    2011-11-01

    Public health nurses in Ireland are generalist practitioners with a wide range of roles that address the needs of clients in the community across their lifespan. Child protection is one of many of the roles of Irish public health nurses. However, with increasing caseloads, birth rates and aging populations, their child protection role is becoming more difficult to define and practise safely. This paper presents a key finding of a qualitative study that explored the views of a group of public health nurses (n = 10) regarding their role with pre-school children. A significant theme following analysis of the interviews were the nurses\\' expressed concerns on their role in child protection. There is a need to define the role practised by public health nurses in child protection and to achieve a standard for this nationally.

  7. 78 FR 48683 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Personal Protective Technology (PPT...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    ... Health (NIOSH) Personal Protective Technology (PPT) Program; Framework Document for the Healthcare Worker... availability of a document titled ``Framework for Setting the NIOSH PPT Program Action Plan for Healthcare... ). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The NIOSH personal protective technology (PPT) program publishes and periodically...

  8. 77 FR 18309 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of Exchanges and Qualified Health Plans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of Exchanges and Qualified Health Plans; Exchange Standards..., 156, and 157 RIN 0938-AQ67 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of Exchanges and... collectively as the Affordable Care Act. The Exchanges will provide competitive marketplaces for...

  9. 76 FR 41865 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of Exchanges and Qualified Health Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of Exchanges and Qualified Health Plans; Proposed Rule #0... Exchanges (``Exchanges''), consistent with title I of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010...-152), referred to collectively as the Affordable Care Act. The Exchanges will provide...

  10. Veterinarians in Environmental Health: Opportunities for Veterinarians at the Environmental Protection Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was created in 1970 partially in response to widespread public concern about environmental degradation. The EPA mission is to protect human health and the environment and the Agency is tasked with enforcing our nation's envi...

  11. [Concept of personal data relating to health in the law of personal data protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Jesús Rubí

    2006-01-01

    The Law on the Protection of Data states that health data are sensible data and therefore subject to a strengthened system of guarantees. In order to apply this, the information must make reference to physical persons and must be susceptible of being included within the concept of health data. The resolutions of the Spanish Agency for Data Protection and the rulings of the Courts provide very valuable elements to clarify both concepts.

  12. Evaluation of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Model Used to Develop Health Protective Levels for Trichloroethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-28

    AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2017-0014 EVALUATION OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL USED TO DEVELOP HEALTH PROTECTIVE LEVELS FOR...Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Model Used to Develop Health Protective Levels for Trichloroethylene 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-15-2-6608 5b. GRANT...Anita Meyer, Army Corps of Engineers (CEHNC-EMS) and Shannon S. Garcia, AFCEC/CZTE for their efforts to obtain the required funding. The authors also

  13. Protecting Pakistan's health during the global economic crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jooma, R; Khan, A; Khan, A A

    2012-03-01

    The world is facing an unprecedented global economic crisis, with many countries needing to reconsider their level of health care spending. This paper explores the many consequences of the global economic turndown on Pakistan's health, including reduced government and donor spending and increased poverty with the consequent diversion of funds away from health. Nevertheless, these challenges may provide opportunities not only to mitigate the adverse effects of the economic crisis but also to institute some much-needed reforms that may not receive political support during more affluent times. Our suggestions focus on setting priorities based on the national disease burden, prioritizing prevention interventions, demanding results, curbing corruption, experimenting with innovative funding mechanisms, advocating for increased funding by presenting health spending as an investment rather than an expense and by selected recourse to civil society interventions and philanthropy to bridge the gap between available and needed resources.

  14. Will the new Australian health privacy law provide adequate protection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomba, David; Hallit, George

    2002-01-01

    Amendments to the original Privacy Act (1988) come at a key point in time, as a national medical record system looms on the Australian horizon. Changes to The Privacy Act have the potential to define a level of information privacy prior to the implementation of such a system. We have therefore collected expert opinions on the ability of the Health Privacy Guidelines (enacted in December 2001 under The Privacy Act and hereafter more specifically known as Health Privacy Legislation) to ensure the privacy and security of patient information. We conclude that the legislation is flawed in its capacity to withstand an increasingly corporatised health sector. Deficiencies in consent requirements, together with feeble enforcement capabilities, mean The Legislation cannot effectively ensure that personally identifiable information will not end up in corporate third party hands. To significantly bolster the new legislation, we argue that it should be supplemented with explicit health data legislation and privacy auditing.

  15. Identifying Protective Factors to Promote Health in American Indian and Alaska Native Adolescents: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Michele; Sabo, Samantha; Trujillo, Aurora; Teufel-Shone, Nicolette

    2017-04-01

    Exposure to protective factors, conditions that protect against the occurrence of an undesirable outcome or promote the occurrence of a desirable outcome within an adolescent's environment, can foster healthy adolescent behaviors and reduce adult morbidity and mortality. Yet, little is known about the nature and effect of protective factors on the positive social and health outcomes among American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) adolescents. We conducted a review of the literature to identify the protective factors associated with positive health outcomes among AIAN adolescents. We consulted Elsevier Science Direct, ERIC EBSCOhost, PubMed, and the Web of Science databases. A total of 3421 articles were encountered. Excluded publications were those that did not focus on AIAN adolescents (n = 3341), did not identify protective factors (n = 56), were not original research studies (n = 8), or were not written in the English language. We identified nine categories of protective factors positively associated with health and social outcomes, including: current and/or future aspirations, personal wellness, positive self-image, self-efficacy, non-familial connectedness, family connectedness, positive opportunities, positive social norms, and cultural connectedness. Such factors positively influenced adolescent alcohol, tobacco, and substance use; delinquent and violent behavior; emotional health including depression, suicide attempt; resilience; and academic success. Protective factors spanned multiple domains of the socio-ecological model. Strengths-based health promotion efforts that leverage local, innate protective factors and work with AIANs to create environments rich in protective factors are key to improving the health and wellbeing of AIAN adolescents.

  16. The Fitbit Fault Line: Two Proposals to Protect Health and Fitness Data at Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Employers are collecting and using their employees' health data, mined from wearable fitness devices and health apps, in new, profitable, and barely regulated ways. The importance of protecting employee health and fitness data will grow exponentially in the future. This is the moment for a robust discussion of how law can better protect employees from the potential misuse of their health data. While scholars have just begun to examine the problem of health data privacy, this Article contributes to the academic literature in three important ways. First, it analyzes the convergence of three trends resulting in an unprecedented growth of health-related data: the Internet of Things, the Quantified Self movement, and the Rise of Health Platforms. Second, it describes the insufficiencies of specific data privacy laws and federal agency actions in the context of protecting employee health data from employer misuse. Finally, it provides two detailed and workable solutions for remedying the current lack of protection of employee health data that will realign employer use with reasonable expectations of health and fitness privacy. The Article proceeds in four Parts. Part I describes the growth of self-monitoring apps, devices, and other sensor-enabled technology that can monitor a wide range of data related to an employee's health and fitness and the relationship of this growth to both the Quantified Self movement and the Internet of Things. Part II explains the increasing use of employee monitoring through a wide range of sensors, including wearable devices, and the potential uses of that health and fitness data. Part III explores the various regulations and agency actions that might protect employees from the potential misuse of their health and fitness data and the shortcomings of each. Part IV proposes two specific measures that would help ameliorate the ineffective legal protections that currently exist in this context. In order to improve employee notice of and control

  17. Beyond UHC: monitoring health and social protection coverage in the context of tuberculosis care and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnroth, Knut; Glaziou, Philippe; Weil, Diana; Floyd, Katherine; Uplekar, Mukund; Raviglione, Mario

    2014-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global public health problem. In all societies, the disease affects the poorest individuals the worst. A new post-2015 global TB strategy has been developed by WHO, which explicitly highlights the key role of universal health coverage (UHC) and social protection. One of the proposed targets is that "No TB affected families experience catastrophic costs due to TB." High direct and indirect costs of care hamper access, increase the risk of poor TB treatment outcomes, exacerbate poverty, and contribute to sustaining TB transmission. UHC, conventionally defined as access to health care without risk of financial hardship due to out-of-pocket health care expenditures, is essential but not sufficient for effective and equitable TB care and prevention. Social protection interventions that prevent or mitigate other financial risks associated with TB, including income losses and non-medical expenditures such as on transport and food, are also important. We propose a framework for monitoring both health and social protection coverage, and their impact on TB epidemiology. We describe key indicators and review methodological considerations. We show that while monitoring of general health care access will be important to track the health system environment within which TB services are delivered, specific indicators on TB access, quality, and financial risk protection can also serve as equity-sensitive tracers for progress towards and achievement of overall access and social protection.

  18. Beyond UHC: monitoring health and social protection coverage in the context of tuberculosis care and prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Lönnroth

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains a major global public health problem. In all societies, the disease affects the poorest individuals the worst. A new post-2015 global TB strategy has been developed by WHO, which explicitly highlights the key role of universal health coverage (UHC and social protection. One of the proposed targets is that "No TB affected families experience catastrophic costs due to TB." High direct and indirect costs of care hamper access, increase the risk of poor TB treatment outcomes, exacerbate poverty, and contribute to sustaining TB transmission. UHC, conventionally defined as access to health care without risk of financial hardship due to out-of-pocket health care expenditures, is essential but not sufficient for effective and equitable TB care and prevention. Social protection interventions that prevent or mitigate other financial risks associated with TB, including income losses and non-medical expenditures such as on transport and food, are also important. We propose a framework for monitoring both health and social protection coverage, and their impact on TB epidemiology. We describe key indicators and review methodological considerations. We show that while monitoring of general health care access will be important to track the health system environment within which TB services are delivered, specific indicators on TB access, quality, and financial risk protection can also serve as equity-sensitive tracers for progress towards and achievement of overall access and social protection.

  19. Confidentiality Protection of Digital Health Records in Cloud Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shyh-Wei; Chiang, Dai Lun; Liu, Chia-Hui; Chen, Tzer-Shyong; Lai, Feipei; Wang, Huihui; Wei, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Electronic medical records containing confidential information were uploaded to the cloud. The cloud allows medical crews to access and manage the data and integration of medical records easily. This data system provides relevant information to medical personnel and facilitates and improve electronic medical record management and data transmission. A structure of cloud-based and patient-centered personal health record (PHR) is proposed in this study. This technique helps patients to manage their health information, such as appointment date with doctor, health reports, and a completed understanding of their own health conditions. It will create patients a positive attitudes to maintain the health. The patients make decision on their own for those whom has access to their records over a specific span of time specified by the patients. Storing data in the cloud environment can reduce costs and enhance the share of information, but the potential threat of information security should be taken into consideration. This study is proposing the cloud-based secure transmission mechanism is suitable for multiple users (like nurse aides, patients, and family members).

  20. Protecting health from metal exposures in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Margaret-Ann

    2016-03-01

    Drinking water is essential to us as human beings. According to the World Health Organization "The quality of drinking-water is a powerful environmental determinant of health" (http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/dwq/en/), but clean drinking water is a precious commodity not always readily available. Surface and ground water are the major sources of drinking water. Both can be contaminated, surface water with bacteria while ground water frequently contains salts of metals that occur naturally or are introduced by human activity. This paper will briefly review the metallic salts found in drinking water in areas around the world, as well as list some of the methods used to reduce or remove them. It will then discuss our research on reducing the risk of pollution of drinking water by removal of metal ions from wastewater.

  1. Protecting Bone Health in Pediatric Rheumatic Diseases: Pharmacological Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujuan; Milojevic, Diana

    2017-06-01

    Bone health in children with rheumatic conditions may be compromised due to several factors related to the inflammatory disease state, delayed puberty, altered life style, including decreased physical activities, sun avoidance, suboptimal calcium and vitamin D intake, and medical treatments, mainly glucocorticoids and possibly some disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Low bone density or even fragility fractures could be asymptomatic; therefore, children with diseases of high inflammatory load, such as systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and those requiring chronic glucocorticoids may benefit from routine screening of bone health. Most commonly used assessment tools are laboratory testing including serum 25-OH-vitamin D measurement and bone mineral density measurement by a variety of methods, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry as the most widely used. Early disease control, use of steroid-sparing medications such as disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and biologics, supplemental vitamin D and calcium, and promotion of weight-bearing physical activities can help optimize bone health. Additional treatment options for osteoporosis such as bisphosphonates are still controversial in children with chronic rheumatic diseases, especially those with decreased bone density without fragility fractures. This article reviews common risk factors leading to compromised bone health in children with chronic rheumatic diseases and discusses the general approach to prevention and treatment of bone fragility.

  2. Salt Matters: Preserving Choice, Protecting Health (Long Version)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-02-01

    This video presents information about salt as a major contributor to high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke.  Created: 2/1/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention (DHDSP).   Date Released: 4/20/2011.

  3. Salt Matters: Preserving Choice, Protecting Health (Short Version)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-02-01

    This video presents information about salt as a major contributor to high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke.  Created: 2/1/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention (DHDSP).   Date Released: 2/1/2011.

  4. The quest for universal health coverage: achieving social protection for all in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaul, Felicia Marie; González-Pier, Eduardo; Gómez-Dantés, Octavio; García-Junco, David; Arreola-Ornelas, Héctor; Barraza-Lloréns, Mariana; Sandoval, Rosa; Caballero, Francisco; Hernández-Avila, Mauricio; Juan, Mercedes; Kershenobich, David; Nigenda, Gustavo; Ruelas, Enrique; Sepúlveda, Jaime; Tapia, Roberto; Soberón, Guillermo; Chertorivski, Salomón; Frenk, Julio

    2012-10-06

    Mexico is reaching universal health coverage in 2012. A national health insurance programme called Seguro Popular, introduced in 2003, is providing access to a package of comprehensive health services with financial protection for more than 50 million Mexicans previously excluded from insurance. Universal coverage in Mexico is synonymous with social protection of health. This report analyses the road to universal coverage along three dimensions of protection: against health risks, for patients through quality assurance of health care, and against the financial consequences of disease and injury. We present a conceptual discussion of the transition from labour-based social security to social protection of health, which implies access to effective health care as a universal right based on citizenship, the ethical basis of the Mexican reform. We discuss the conditions that prompted the reform, as well as its design and inception, and we describe the 9-year, evidence-driven implementation process, including updates and improvements to the original programme. The core of the report concentrates on the effects and impacts of the reform, based on analysis of all published and publically available scientific literature and new data. Evidence indicates that Seguro Popular is improving access to health services and reducing the prevalence of catastrophic and impoverishing health expenditures, especially for the poor. Recent studies also show improvement in effective coverage. This research then addresses persistent challenges, including the need to translate financial resources into more effective, equitable and responsive health services. A next generation of reforms will be required and these include systemic measures to complete the reorganisation of the health system by functions. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications of the Mexican quest to achieve universal health coverage and its relevance for other low-income and middle-income countries.

  5. Workplace incivility and new graduate nurses' mental health: the protective role of resiliency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laschinger, Heather K; Wong, Carol; Regan, Sandra; Young-Ritchie, Carol; Bushell, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between coworker, physician, and supervisor workplace incivility and new graduate nurses' mental health and the protective role of personal resiliency. Positive interpersonal relationships in healthcare work environments are important for new graduate nurses' career transition and commitment. Workplace incivility threatens new graduate nurses' health and well-being. Personal resiliency helps employees to recover from negative stressors and may protect new nurses from the negative effects of workplace incivility. We surveyed 272 new graduate nurses in Ontario to explore the influence of 3 forms of workplace incivility and personal resiliency on new nurses' mental health. All sources of incivility were related to poor mental health. Results suggest that personal resiliency may protect nurses from the negative effects of incivility. New nurses are experiencing workplace incivility from a variety of sources in their work environments, which have detrimental effects on their workplace well-being.

  6. Characteristics of teacher's health protecting activities in the modern secondary school environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yefimova V.M.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers general approaches to the definition of the notion of anomia. It analyzes different aspects of the term's modern interpretation and discusses the main problems connected with the formation of the social context of the future teacher professional training for health protecting activities. The features of health protecting activity are exposed in the conditions of anomia. Certainly its influences on the social, psychical and physical health of young people. It is well-proven that introduction to maintenance of professional preparation of future teachers of presentations about anomia and its intercommunications with the different aspects of vital functions are necessity in connection with actualization of health protecting activity of teachers.

  7. NETWORK GROUNDS OF DEVELOPMENT OF REGIONAL HEALTH PROTECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yermolenko V. V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article heads a series of the publications devoted to the solution of an actual problem of modern health care - a management problem at the regional level. The contradiction between expectations and needs of the population for high-quality medical services and quality of management of the medical organizations is shown in the Russian health system. This contradiction is shown at the micro and meso (regional level in poor quality of not medical part of medical services and in total generates a dissatisfaction of patients with quality of medical services in general. At this stage of reforming of health system in Russia, economic and administrative problems are main issues. It is necessary to master and quickly to introduce in work practice modern economic methods and administrative technologies for their decision. Network creation of the companies belongs to a remarkable trend of development modern societies and economics. The cluster campaign was widely adopted. Studying of network forms of the organizations is based on interdisciplinary researches on ecological, economic, administrative and relational approaches. Application of network structures in health sector is based on the new organizational and administrative principles, from which are main: principle of systems; principle of a synergy of material and immaterial resources; principle of trust; principle of reciprocity; principle of formation of network culture and ideological coordination of actors of a network; principle of economy of the valid human capital; accession of the network management and its actors to business services in relation to the diagnostic and treatment process; professionalizing of activity of infrastructure service of a network and its participants

  8. Health protection and risks for rescuers in cases of floods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janev Holcer, Nataša; Jeličić, Pavle; Grba Bujević, Maja; Važanić, Damir

    2015-03-01

    Floods can pose a number of safety and health hazards for flood-affected populations and rescuers and bring risk of injuries, infections, and diseases due to exposure to pathogenic microorganisms and different biological and chemical contaminants. The risk factors and possible health consequences for the rescuers involved in evacuation and rescuing operations during the May 2014 flood crisis in Croatia are shown, as well as measures for the prevention of injuries and illnesses. In cases of extreme floods, divers play a particularly important role in rescuing and first-response activities. Rescuing in contaminated floodwaters means that the used equipment such as diving suits should be disinfected afterwards. The need for securing the implementation of minimal health and safety measures for involved rescuers is paramount. Data regarding injuries and disease occurrences among rescuers are relatively scarce, indicating the need for medical surveillance systems that would monitor and record all injuries and disease occurrences among rescuers in order to ensure sound epidemiological data. The harmful effects of flooding can be reduced by legislation, improvement of flood forecasting, establishing early warning systems, and appropriate planning and education.

  9. Health care worker protection in mass casualty respiratory failure: infection control, decontamination, and personal protective equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Elizabeth L

    2008-02-01

    Maintenance of a safe and stable health care infrastructure is critical to an effective mass casualty disaster response. Both secondary contamination during chemical disasters and hospital-associated infections during epidemic illness can pose substantial threats to achieving this goal. Understanding basic principles of decontamination and infection control during responses to chemical and biologic disasters can help minimize the risks to patients and health care workers. Effective decontamination following toxic chemical exposure should include both removal of contaminated clothing and decontamination of the victim's skin. Wet decontamination is the most feasible strategy in a mass casualty situation and should be performed promptly by trained personnel. In the event of an epidemic, infection prevention and control measures are based on essential principles of hand hygiene and standard precautions. Expanded precautions should be instituted as needed to target contact, droplet, and airborne routes of infectious disease transmission. Specific equipment and measures for critical care delivery may serve to decrease risk to health care workers in the event of an epidemic. Their use should be considered in developing comprehensive disaster response plans.

  10. Farmers sun exposure, skin protection and public health campaigns: An Australian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel Smit-Kroner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-melanoma skin cancer is a common and costly cancer in agricultural populations. Prevention and early detection are an effective way to decrease the burden of disease and associated costs. To examine sun exposure and skin protection practices in agricultural workers and farmers a thematic review of the literature between 1983 and 2014 was undertaken. Comparison between studies was complicated by differences in study design, definitions of skin protection, and analytic methods used. Farmers are the most exposed to harmful ultraviolet (UV radiation of all outdoor workers and the level of reported skin protection by farmers is suboptimal. Years of public health campaigns have failed to adequately address farmers' specific needs. Increased rates of skin cancer and subsequent higher costs are expected. Estimates of sun exposure and skin protection practice indicate that protective clothing is the most promising avenue to improve on farmers' skin protection. Early detection needs to be part of public health campaigns. This review explores the quantitative data about Australian farmers and their skin protective behaviours. We investigate what the documented measurable effect of the public health campaign Slip!Slop!Slap! has had on agricultural workers and farmers and make recommendations for future focus.

  11. Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-30

    early diagnosis of diabetes in children, diagnosis of growth hormone abnormalities, and monitoring and assisting with infertility .489 Agriculture. PRT...and Negotiation Skills program, 60 male and female students from Mosul University were trained in conflict management and negotia- tion skills, helping...major health conference, in Ramadi. More than 100 Iraqi doc- tors attended, including 3 female doctors from the Women’s and Children’s Hospital.471

  12. [Health promotion and computer science in radiation protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennarola, R; Porzio, G; Cavaliere, L

    2007-01-01

    An automatic system of clinical-diagnostic information has been applied to workers exposed to ionising radiation at the University of Naples Federico II with reference to the last 5 years. For every person exposed a computerized case sheet was elaborated recording clinical, biological, dosimetric and other preventive data. In the localized risk, capillaroscopic monitoring was used. This research has highlighted the role of medical surveillance in developing health promotion criteria and the planning of the interventions with the complete control of all data in real time.

  13. FOOD EDUCATION: AN ISTRUMENT FOR CONSUMER’S HEALTH PROTECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saccares

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Health is defined by WHO, as a “state of complete physical, mental and social well-being, not just absence of disease.” So it needs not simply treat but also prevent, inform, and promote healthy behaviors. From here the importance of putting into practice all possible strategies for prevention from age lowest. The purpose of this work is just to describe the project “Food and Culture”, between the IZSLT and and the Municipality of Ariccia in order to promote nutrition education in the family from the boys.

  14. Health protection and food preservation by gamma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Results of several major studies on food systems for space missions beginning with Apollo 12 through Apollo-Soyuz and investigations of the application of irradiation to food for manned space flight are reported. The study of flight food systems involved the application of radurization (pasteurizing levels) doses of gamma irradiation to flour and bread supplied by Pepperidge Farms in advance of the missions. All flights from Apollo 12 through 17 carried irradiated fresh bread. On Apollo 17, cooperation with Natick Laboratories permitted the introduction of a ham sandwich using irradiated bread and irradiated sterile ham. Investigations centered on irradiated bread were conducted during the course of these missions. Studies were applied to the concept of improving fresh bread from the point of view of mold inhibition. The studies considered how irradiation could best be applied at what levels and on a variety of bread types. Throughout the studies of the application of gamma irradiation the emphasis was placed upon using low levels of irradiation in the pasteurizing or radurizing doses--under a Megarad. The primary goal was to determine if a public health benefit could be demonstrated using radurization along with food preservation and food quality improvements. The public health benefit would be parallel to that of pasteurization of milk as a concept. Publications are included providing the details of these observations, one dealing with the flour characteristics and the other dealing with the influence on fresh bread types. These demonstrate the major findings noted during the period of the studies examining bread.

  15. Investigating m-Health Acceptance from a Protection Motivation Theory Perspective: Gender and Age Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xitong; Han, Xiaocui; Zhang, Xiaofei; Dang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Chun

    2015-08-01

    Mobile health (m-health) services are becoming increasingly important and widely accepted. However, empirical studies on potential users' m-health acceptance behavior remain underexplored. Indeed, m-health adoption is not only a technology acceptance behavior, but also a health-related behavior. Based on the Protection Motivation Theory, this article explores users' m-health adoption behavior from the perspectives of threat appraisal and coping appraisal, and also examines the moderating role of gender and age through a survey of potential users. The survey was conducted among 500 potential m-health service participants. Our results show that threat appraisal and coping appraisal factors influence adoption intention through attitude. It is also found that gender and age play different moderating roles with threat appraisal and coping appraisal factors. Gender and age play different roles between threat appraisal and coping appraisal factors in the acceptance of m-health. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  16. [Protection of the environment, protection of the health. Note 1 - fluvial monitoring: cultural evolution and methodological evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocchioni, M; Scuri, S; Morichetti, L; Petrelli, F; Grappasonni, I

    2006-01-01

    The article underlines the fundamental importance of the protection and promotion of environmental quality for the human health. The evolution of fluvial monitoring techniques is contemplated from chemical and bacteriological analysis until the Index Functional Index (I.F.F). This evolution it's very important because shows a new methodological and cultural maturation that has carried from a anthropocentric vision until an ecocentric vision. The target of this ecological vision is the re-establishment of ecological functionality of the rivers, eliminating the consumer's vision of the water considered only as a usable resource. The importance of an correct monitoring of a river is confirmed, even though the preventive approach priority remains.

  17. Enabling Technology to Advance Health-Protecting Individual Rights-Are We Walking the Talk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Crystal; Gwadry-Sridhar, Femida

    The evolving structure and business of health care services and delivery need the functionality and capability offered by electronic health record (EHR) systems. By electronically diffusing the traditional patient record, however, this new model blurs the long-established medical data home, raising concerns about data ownership, confidentiality, access and individual rights. In 2008 the Lawson Health Research Institute began the process of instituting a robust health informatics and collaborative research infrastructure, now known as I-THINK Research. As data are migrated to the platform and policies are developed, we are forced to confront the complexity of issues around protection of individual rights. The paper presents, in a broader context, the main issues surrounding the privacy debate and the need for education, accountability and new legislation to help define and protect individual rights as new e-health business models emerge.

  18. The protection of the environment: Protection of health and food safety - EU and Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sič Magdolna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available From the last century the process of harmonization and unification of the law on food safety for the protection of consumers in the European Union (EU is ongoing. According to these rules, participants in the production and distribution of food have to respect the rules in all phases of production: 'From Farm to Fork'. Honoring of the rules is based on self-control and the responsibility of producers and distributors, and is subject to public control with appropriate sanctions by competent authorities of a Member State as well as the EU. In the Republic of Serbia, after singing the Stabilization and Association Agreement, the statutory law has been approximated with the laws of the EU. That however, is not sufficient. It is necessary to develop the self-control of producers as well as to organize an efficient public control, not only because this is a necessary condition for export of food products to the single market of the EU, or for the membership in the EU, but also for ensuring safe food in the internal market of Serbia.

  19. Oberbergamt fuer das Saarland und das Land Rheinland-Pfalz, Bergamt Saarbruecken/Bergamt Rheinland-Pfalz. Annual report 1999. Economic and technical aspects, industrial safety and environmental protection, statistics, activities of the mining authorities; Oberbergamt fuer das Saarland und das Land Rheinland-Pfalz, Bergamt Saarbruecken/Bergamt Rheinland-Pfalz. Jahresbericht 1999.. Bergwirtschaft, Bergtechnik, Arbeitsschutz, Umweltschutz, Statistiken, Taetigkeiten der Bergbehoerden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boettcher, R.; Hugo, K.H.; Kuhn, M.; Strauch, T. (comps.)

    1999-07-01

    The developments in Saarland and Rhineland-Palatinate mining are presented. Structure and responsibilities of the regional mines inspectorate are described, and their activities in the following fields are reported: industrial safety, health, mining and safety, mining and environmental protection. (orig.) [German] Nach Darstellung der bergwirtschaftlichen Entwicklung im Saarland und im Land Rheinland-Pfalz wird ueber den Aufbau und die Zustaendigkeit der Bergbehoerden sowie ueber deren Taetigkeiten auf folgenden Gebieten berichtet: Arbeits- und Gesundheitsschutz, Bergtechnik und Sicherheit, Bergbau und Umwelt. (orig.)

  20. The American Association of Occupational Health Nurses' Respiratory Protection Education Program and Resources Webkit for Occupational Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompeii, Lisa; Byrd, Annette; Delclos, George L; Conway, Sadie H

    2016-12-01

    Organizations are required to adhere to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Respiratory Protection Standard (29 CFR 1910.134) if they have workers that wear a respirator on the job. They must also have an employee "suitably trained" to administer their program. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and its National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory have worked to champion the occupational health nurse in this role by collaborating with the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses to develop free, online respiratory protection training and resources (RPP Webkit). This article describes the development, content, and success of this training. To date, 724 participants have completed the training, 32.6% of whom lead their organization's respiratory protection program, 15.3% who indicated they will lead a program in the near future, and 52% who did not lead a program, but indicated that the training was relevant to their work. The majority "strongly agreed" the training was applicable to their work and it enhanced their professional expertise. © 2016 The Author(s).

  1. Financial protection from health spending in the Philippines: policies and progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredenkamp, Caryn; Buisman, Leander R

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this article is to assess the progress of the Philippines health sector in providing financial protection to the population, as measured by estimates of health insurance coverage, out-of-pocket spending, catastrophic payments and impoverishing health expenditures. Data are drawn from eight household surveys between 2000 and 2013, including two Demographic and Health Surveys, one Family Health Survey and five Family Income and Expenditure Surveys. We find that out-of-pocket spending increased by 150% (real) from 2000 to 2012, with the sharpest increases occurring in recent years. The main driver of health spending is medicines, accounting for almost two-thirds of total health spending, and as much as three-quarters among the poor. The incidence of catastrophic payments has tripled since 2000, from 2.5% to 7.7%. The percentage of people impoverished by health spending has also increased and, in 2012, out-of-pocket spending on health added 1.5 percentage points to the poverty rate, pushing more than 1.5 million people into poverty. In light of these findings, recent policies to enhance financial risk protection-such as the expansion of government-subsidized health insurance from the poor to the near-poor, a policy of zero copayments for the poor, a deepening of the benefit package and provider payment reform aimed at cost-containment-are to be commended. Indeed, between 2008 and 2013, self-reported health insurance coverage increased across all quintiles and its distribution became more pro-poor. To speed progress toward financial protection goals, quick wins could include issuing health insurance cards to the poor to increase awareness of coverage and limiting out-of-pocket spending by clearly defining a clear copayment structure for non-poor members. An in-depth analysis of the pharmaceutical sector would help to shed light on why medicines impose such a large financial burden on households.

  2. Cancer registration, public health and the reform of the European data protection framework: Abandoning or improving European public health research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Mette Rye; Storm, Hans H

    2015-06-01

    The importance of cancer- and other disease registries for planning, management and evaluation of healthcare systems has been shown repeatedly during the last 50 years. Complete and unbiased population-level analyses on routinely collected, individual data concerning health and personal characteristics can address significant concerns about risk factors for cancer and provide sound evidence about public health and the effectiveness of healthcare systems. The existence of quality controlled and comprehensive data in registries, allowed to be used for quality control, research and public health purposes are taken as granted by most health professionals and researchers. However, the current revision of the European Union (EU) data protection framework suggests a harmonisation of requirements for confidentiality and individual consent to data processing, likely at the expense of proper use of registry data in the health sector. Consequences of excessive confidentiality rules that may lead to missed data linkages have been simulated. The simulations provide one possible explanation for observed heterogeneity among some cancer incidence data. Further, public health, quality control and epidemiological research on large populations can no longer provide evidence for health interventions, if requirements for consent renders research impossible or where attempts to obtain consent from each data subject generates biased results. Health professionals should engage in the on-going debate on the Commission's proposal for a General Data Protection Regulation. The nature and use of registry data in public health research must be explained and known to policy-makers and the public. Use of cancer registry data and other epidemiological activity will terminate abruptly if an unnecessarily strict EU data protection regulation is adopted. Research based interventions, as well as the international recognised standing of cancer registries and register-based research institutions in

  3. The importance of traceability for public health and consumer protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, J D

    2001-08-01

    Since the 1980s, concerns about the safety and quality of food have increased at both governmental and consumer levels. The importance of traceability of animals and animal products has grown as food production and marketing have been removed from direct consumer control. Product traceability, which requires a transparent chain of custody to maintain credibility and to complete information transfer functions, has two components, namely: a unique identification system, and a credible and verifiable mechanism for identity preservation. Traceability systems can be subdivided into the following four categories: country of origin; retail; processor; and farm-to-retail identity. Although the availability of computers and electronic data devices can enhance the speed and accuracy of data acquisition and manipulation, a common set of developmental criteria exists, irrespective of data-handling processes. As data management technologies become more powerful and less costly, product traceability requirements will multiply. Public and private sectors should seize these opportunities to improve public health and quality parameters, or risk a narrowing of their markets.

  4. The Norwegian Labour Inspectorate's Registry for Work-Related Diseases: data from 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samant, Yogindra; Parker, David; Wergeland, Ebba; Wannag, Axel

    2008-01-01

    The Norwegian Labour Inspectorates (NLI's) Registry for Work-Related Diseases was established in 1920. Based on the principle of sentinel health events (SHE), its central purpose is to provide information to the NLI to enable workplace interventions and the prevention of hazardous exposures. Although physicians are required to report work-related diseases to the NLI, only 3% did so in 2006. There were 3392 cases of work-related diseases reported to the NLI by 561 physicians in 2006. Diseases of the ear (noise-induced hearing loss) comprised 59% (n=1987) of the cases, while 12% (n=398) of the cases were attributed to the diseases of the respiratory system and 7% (n =239) were diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue. Despite limitations, the registry continues to inform NLI's prevention strategies, supplements data concerning work-environment surveillance, and provides impetus for epidemiological studies.

  5. Health Equity and Financial Protection Streamlined Analysis with ADePT Software

    CERN Document Server

    Bank, World

    2011-01-01

    Two key policy goals in the health sector are equity and financial protection. New methods, data and powerful computers have led to a surge of interest in quantitative analysis that permits monitoring progress toward these objectives, and comparisons across countries. ADePT is a new computer program that streamlines and automates such work, ensuring that results are genuinely comparable and allowing them to be produced with a minimum of programming skills. This book provides a step-by-step guide to the use of ADePT for quantitative analysis of equity and financial protection in the health sect

  6. Curbing transboundary air pollution : protecting health through legal action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeown, D.; Campbell, M.; Clark, K.; Ursitti, F.

    2005-03-01

    Concerns regarding coal-fired power plants in North America were addressed in this report with particular reference to facilities in the United States that negatively impact the air quality and the health of residents in the City of Toronto. Aging coal-fired plants in the United States generate more pollutant emissions per unit of electricity produced than coal-fired plants in Ontario and as such, contribute to smog, acid rain and global warming. They also contribute to the contamination of fish through deposition and biotransformation of mercury in the aquatic ecosystem. Toronto's concerns also stem from actions to extend the life of several plants in the United States without investing in modern pollution control technology, an action that contradicts the requirements of the United States Clean Air Act, and which is contrary to Ontario's commitment to phase out coal-fired electricity production. Lawsuits have been filed against power plants that failed to install pollution control technology. The City of Toronto was granted Friend of the Court status in the United States court deliberating on the case involving the American Electric Power (AEP) Corporation and its contravention of the Clean Air Act. The next phase of legal proceedings will be to determine the remedy should the court find AEP in violation of the Act. The outcome of this court case could result in improvements in Toronto's air quality. The proposed United States Clear Skies legislation, however, may also delay reductions of pollutant emissions from coal-fired power plants until 2018. 12 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs., 3 appendices.

  7. Protecting human and ecological health under viral threats in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, S

    2005-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbroke in 2003, and the avian influenza A (H5N1) also outbroke in 2003 and continued to 2004. These pandemic viral diseases originated in South East Asia. Many human and animal lives were lost. Economic damages due to the pandemics were also very large. The question arises of why did the pandemics originate from South East Asian areas. Human influenza A consists of many sub-types of coronaviruses including the SARS virus and the avian influenza (H5N1) that are all variants of RNA of avian coronavirus. Variants are formed during infection of a coronavirus through not only birds but also mammals, including human beings. There are hot spots where viral infection rates are accelerated among birds, mammals and human beings. Suspicious areas are in South East Asia, where living conditions of birds, mammals and human beings are so close that there are always risks of viral infection. When we see the living conditions of farmers in southern China, northern Vietnam, Laos and northern Myanmar, they commonly raise ducks/chickens with pigs sharing ponds into which they discharge household wastewater, including human excreta, and pig excreta that are significant carriers of viruses. Bird faeces are also key carriers of the viruses. In the ponds, they raise ducks and conduct fish culture. Other important players are migrating birds from North Asia, which are principal vectors of avian influenza viruses. There is an urgent necessity of improving human and ecological health in South East Asia to control viral infection among birds, mammals and human beings. We can hinder the vicious cycle of virus infection through water contamination in ponds by providing good human, pig and chicken sanitation. It is easy to provide good sanitation practices for human, pigs and chickens, introducing collection and treatment of excreta. Our modern water technology can find good solutions for the problem.

  8. Improving Health Care Coverage, Equity, And Financial Protection Through A Hybrid System: Malaysia's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rannan-Eliya, Ravindra P; Anuranga, Chamara; Manual, Adilius; Sararaks, Sondi; Jailani, Anis S; Hamid, Abdul J; Razif, Izzanie M; Tan, Ee H; Darzi, Ara

    2016-05-01

    Malaysia has made substantial progress in providing access to health care for its citizens and has been more successful than many other countries that are better known as models of universal health coverage. Malaysia's health care coverage and outcomes are now approaching levels achieved by member nations of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Malaysia's results are achieved through a mix of public services (funded by general revenues) and parallel private services (predominantly financed by out-of-pocket spending). We examined the distributional aspects of health financing and delivery and assessed financial protection in Malaysia's hybrid system. We found that this system has been effective for many decades in equalizing health care use and providing protection from financial risk, despite modest government spending. Our results also indicate that a high out-of-pocket share of total financing is not a consistent proxy for financial protection; greater attention is needed to the absolute level of out-of-pocket spending. Malaysia's hybrid health system presents continuing unresolved policy challenges, but the country's experience nonetheless provides lessons for other emerging economies that want to expand access to health care despite limited fiscal resources.

  9. Ways to implement a health protective educational environment in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykytyuk O.M.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The features of organization and creation of health protective educational environment are exposed in higher institute. They foresee creation of the special terms for realization structurally of functional model of organization of students' healthy way of life. A model plugs in itself pedagogical, organizational, material and technical, sanitary-hygenic, informatively-methodical, skilled and financial economic terms. A questionnaire is conducted 95 students of 1-3 courses. It is set that the level of factors of risk for the health of students is high enough: prevalence of smoking is 47%, swizzles use more than 20%. It is discovered that the number of students with active physical activity makes not more than 45%. Most students consider that for the health they are responsible, ready and want to get information on forming of healthy way of life. Principles of organization of health protective behave to the features of organization of health protective of educational environment, nature protective, valeological, sequence, integration, pedagogical support, flexibility.

  10. [Management System of Personal Data Protection in the Health Care Field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Ryuichi

    2014-11-01

    In Japan, the law on personal data protection was enacted in 2005. Privacy is a human right, including the 1981 right to be let alone. The need for confidentiality in the health care field has been accepted since the ancient Greek era, and privacy in the 19th century was developed in this field. However, the concept of privacy has gradually altered, especially due to the development of information technology. The author suggests that the guideline for the security of heath information systems of the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare is very important and information security management with PDCA cycles is essential for personal data protection in the health care field. In recent years, gathering a large amount of life logging or health-related data and analyzing such data for academic and/or industrial applications has become common. Revising privacy protection legislation has become an urgent political issue in many countries. The Japanese Government published their policy to personal data protection act in Dec. 2013. Balancing public benefit and privacy is a major task of future legislation. The author recommends that health care professionals pay attention to, participate in the discussion of, and make suggestions regarding this act.

  11. Integrating community health workers within Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Nadia; Nadkarni, Smiti Kapadia; Zahn, Deborah; Skillman, Megan; Kwon, Simona C; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2015-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act's (PPACA) emphasis on community-based initiatives affords a unique opportunity to disseminate and scale up evidence-based community health worker (CHW) models that integrate CHWs within health care delivery teams and programs. Community health workers have unique access and local knowledge that can inform program development and evaluation, improve service delivery and care coordination, and expand health care access. As a member of the PPACA-defined health care workforce, CHWs have the potential to positively impact numerous programs and reduce costs. This article discusses different strategies for integrating CHW models within PPACA implementation through facilitated enrollment strategies, patient-centered medical homes, coordination and expansion of health information technology (HIT) efforts, and also discusses payment options for such integration. Title V of the PPACA outlines a plan to improve access to and delivery of health care services for all individuals, particularly low-income, underserved, uninsured, minority, health disparity, and rural populations. Community health workers' role as trusted community leaders can facilitate accurate data collection, program enrollment, and provision of culturally and linguistically appropriate, patient- and family-centered care. Because CHWs already support disease management and care coordination services, they will be critical to delivering and expanding patient-centered medical homes and Health Home services, especially for communities that suffer disproportionately from multiple chronic diseases. Community health workers' unique expertise in conducting outreach make them well positioned to help enroll people in Medicaid or insurance offered by Health Benefit Exchanges. New payment models provide opportunities to fund and sustain CHWs. Community health workers can support the effective implementation of PPACA if the capacity and potential of CHWs to serve as cultural

  12. Education for the protection of young people’s reproductive health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rašević Mirjana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Education for the protection of reproductive health is of special importance for young people in Serbia for several reasons. The first reason is an extremely low birth rate. The second is the fact that a large part of the population suffers from serious and long-standing problems in reproductive health. The third, common to all countries passing through transition, is an increase in risk behavior among young people which threatens their reproductive health either directly or indirectly. Education for reproductive health is a long-lasting process which should be initiated at an early age and should involve all social institutions, primarily health institutions, media and schools. The school is the most important link in the chain of knowledge acquisition. Therefore during elementary education, time must be found for topics such as puberty, emotional life of young people, physiology of reproduction, adolescent pregnancy, communication skills, risk behavior, contraception, sexually transmitted diseases and the importance of family and children. Over the last few years more than thirty counseling centers for young people’s reproductive health have been set up in Serbia within health clinics. Unlike health institutions, media and schools have not yet been mobilized. Therefore it is necessary to promote the role of media and schools in the process of the protection of young people’s reproductive health. .

  13. Supporting breastfeeding in emergencies: protecting women's reproductive rights and maternal and infant health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Karleen D; McGrath, Marie; MacLaine, Ali; Lhotska, Lida

    2011-10-01

    Women have the right to support that enables them to breastfeed. Supporting breastfeeding in emergencies is important because artificial feeding places mothers and children at risk. In emergencies, artificial feeding is dangerous to the infant, difficult and requires substantial resources. In contrast, breastfeeding guards infant health. It is also protective against postpartum haemorrhage, maternal depletion, maternal anaemia and closely spaced births and should therefore concern not only nutritionists, but also those involved in reproductive health. However, it is common for women's ability to breastfeed to be undermined in emergencies by the indiscriminate distribution of breast-milk substitutes and the absence of breastfeeding support. Controlling the distribution of breast-milk substitutes, providing supportive environments, and appropriate medical and practical assistance to breastfeeding women safeguards the health and well-being of mothers and babies. Greater collaboration between the nutrition and reproductive health sectors is required to promote best practice in protecting breastfeeding women and their children in emergencies.

  14. TEACHERS’ OPINIONS RELATED WITH ETHIC BEHAVIOURS OF EDUCATION INSPECTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yrd.Doç.Dr.Celal Teyyar UĞURLU

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Problem: Relation styles of education inspectors that take into consideration ethic values can provide teachers to have more morale and loyalty while working for their schools and students. Secondary school teachers’ opinions related with ethic behaviors of education inspectors and sample situations the teachers have experienced are brought out by this search. Population of this study concerns 42 primary schools from Adıyaman and its central counties. As applying to this poll at schools will create some problems (like time, cost and control difficulties %25 (twenty-five percent of the research population has been chosen randomly as cluster sample. (10 schools.All the teachers working in these schools were chosen randomly and they were all included in the study. Polls were applied to the all teachers from 10 schools. Returning and appropriate questionnaires for processing were evaluated.Method: A poll that had 22 questions with 5 multiple choices were used to collect data. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of the data from the account of reliability based on data acquired from application was calculated as 87. SPSS packaged software was used to analyze the data, t test and one-way analysis of variance were used as statistical analysis methods. While commenting on arithmetic averages , ranges were evaluated like this.1.00 – 1.79 ‘very low’ , 1.80 – 2.59 ‘low’, 2.60 -3.39 ‘moderate’ , 3.40 – 4.19 ‘high’ ,4.20 – 5.00 ‘very high’. The highest score was 110 points and the lowest score was 22 points available for the questionnaire test, Mann Whitney U test ,one- way analysis of variance and Kruskal Wallish test were performed to test whether the opinions changed or not according to personal characteristics.Findings: As a result of this study, teachers have identified that ethical behavior level of education inspectors is at medium level. Variances like gender, the number of teachers at school and the question of desire to be

  15. Stress on health-related quality of life in older adults: the protective nature of mindfulness

    OpenAIRE

    de Frias, Cindy M.; Whyne, Erum

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The current study examined whether the link between stress and health-related quality of life was buffered by protective factors, namely mindfulness, in a sample of middle-aged and older adults. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 134 healthy, community-dwelling adults (ages 50–85 years) were recruited from Dallas, TX. The participants were screened for depressive symptoms and severity (using the Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ-9]). All participants completed measures of sel...

  16. Nutrition and Other Protective Behaviors Motivated by Environmental Health Risk Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth W; Feng, Limin; Dixon, Jane K; Dixon, John P; Hofe, Carolyn R; Gaetke, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    Research findings have suggested that exposure to environmental pollutants contributes to increased health risks, which may be modulated by certain nutrition and other protective health behaviors. Nutrition professionals play an important role in effectively disseminating this information and in devising specific community-based nutrition education programs for audiences located in areas with environmental health issues. To assess awareness of environmental health problems and motivation to adopt protective health behaviors for use in planning nutrition education programs for communities exposed to environmental pollutants. Data were collected from a modified, validated Environmental Health Engagement Profile (EHEP) survey instrument administered to adults (n=774) participating in community events in Kentucky based on location relative to hazardous waste sites. The modified EHEP survey instrument showed good internal consistency reliability, and demographic characteristics were evaluated. Correlation analyses revealed significant positive correlations in all groups, separately and combined, between awareness of environmental pollution in an individual's surroundings and the extent of concern that pollutants cause adverse health effects (P environmental insults (P awareness posed by pollution are those residing near federally designated hazardous waste sites. These results suggest that determining and expanding an audience's knowledge and perceptions of environmental health risks will enhance effective nutrition education program planning.

  17. 76 FR 60788 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of Exchanges and Qualified Health Plans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Parts 153, 155 and 156 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment... and Affordable Care Act of 2010 as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, referred to collectively as the Affordable Care Act. The other proposed rule would implement standards...

  18. 38 CFR 17.91 - Protection of health-care eligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protection of health-care eligibility. 17.91 Section 17.91 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... veteran but only if the veteran's annual income from sources other than such earnings would, taken...

  19. Risk and Protective Factors for Depression and Health Outcomes in American Indian and Alaska Native Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, David D.

    2001-01-01

    A study examined whether protective factors reduce the effects of depression in American Indian and Alaska Native adolescents. Surveys of 2,034 Native high school students from 33 states indicated that depression moderately influenced self-perceived health status and that caring and connectedness counteracted the risk factors from depression that…

  20. 45 CFR 164.528 - Accounting of disclosures of protected health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... individual was disclosed for such research protocol or activity, the covered entity shall, at the request of... receive an accounting of disclosures of protected health information made by a covered entity in the six...) That occurred prior to the compliance date for the covered entity. (2)(i) The covered entity must...

  1. BEIR-III report and its implications for radiation protection and public health policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-03-01

    A general background is given of the implications the BEIR-III Report may have on societal decision-making in the regulation of activities concerned with the health effects of low-level radiation. The scientific basis for establishing appropriate radiation protection guides are discussed. (ACR)

  2. Biologically Hazardous Agents at Work and Efforts to Protect Workers' Health: A Review of Recent Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Taek Rim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Because information on biological agents in the workplace is lacking, biological hazard analyses at the workplace to securely recognize the harmful factors with biological basis are desperately needed. This review concentrates on literatures published after 2010 that attempted to detect biological hazards to humans, especially workers, and the efforts to protect them against these factors. It is important to improve the current understanding of the health hazards caused by biological factors at the workplace. In addition, this review briefly describes these factors and provides some examples of their adverse health effects. It also reviews risk assessments, protection with personal protective equipment, prevention with training of workers, regulations, as well as vaccinations.

  3. Effect of Professionalism, Competence, Knowledge of Financial Management, and Intensity Guidance Apparatus Inspectorate for Quality of Financial Statements (Study on Inspectorate Regencies/Cities in Aceh)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Darwanis Darwanis; Mulia Saputra; Kartini Kartini

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to: 1. Examine the influence of professionalism, competence, knowledge of financial management and intensity guidance apparatus Inspectorate together to the quality of the financial statements of Regions; 2...

  4. Reciprocity and Educational Evaluations by European Inspectorates : assumptions and reality checks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, Frans L.

    2002-01-01

    Many European countries have inspectorates of education and although they differ in some ways, all focus on the quality of education, all undertake evaluations and all strive for improvement in education. First, it will be argued that reciprocity between inspectors and inspectees (such as schools, c

  5. The Place of Emotions While Inspecting Schools: Reflections of Two Ofsted Inspectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elonga Mboyo, Jean Pierre

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates the role of emotions of inspectors while inspecting schools as reported by inspectors themselves within an education context of increased accountability that arguably privileges rationality over emotions. The study is built on an emotion management framework that regards emotions not only as unavoidably natural and…

  6. 28 CFR 45.11 - Reporting to the Office of the Inspector General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting to the Office of the Inspector General. 45.11 Section 45.11 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES § 45.11 Reporting to the Office of the Inspector General. Department of Justice employees have...

  7. PRIDE Inspector: a tool to visualize and validate MS proteomics data

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Rui; Fabregat, Antonio; Ríos, Daniel; Ríos, Daniel; Ovelleiro, David; Foster, Joseph M; Côté, Richard G; Côté, Richard G; Griss, Johannes; Csordas, Attila; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Reisinger, Florian; Hermjakob, Henning; Martens, Lennart; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2012-01-01

    PRIDE Inspector thus provides a user-friendly, comprehensive tool for the browsing, inspection, and evaluation of data in the PRIDE database, or in a compatible standard file format. As such, we believe that PRIDE Inspector will substantially increase the ability of researchers, editors and peer-reviewers to explore, review, evaluate, and reuse proteomics data.

  8. 76 FR 6159 - Solicitation for a Cooperative Agreement-State Jail Inspector: Training Curriculum Revision and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ... Cooperative Agreement--State Jail Inspector: Training Curriculum Revision and Update AGENCY: National... revision and update of its curriculum for State jail inspector training. The project will be for a 12-month... inspections, and (4) expertise and experience in developing curriculums based on adult learning principles as...

  9. Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction Quarterly Report to the United States Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-30

    and to introduce salt-tolerant Bermuda grass into Iraq674 Th e PRT also met with German investors in- terested in establishing car dealerships in... Triangle Institute International SET Security Escort Team SIGAR Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction SIGIR Special Inspector

  10. 48 CFR 1852.203-70 - Display of Inspector General Hotline Posters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... General Hotline Posters. 1852.203-70 Section 1852.203-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.203-70 Display of Inspector General Hotline Posters. As prescribed in 1803.7001, insert the following clause: Display of Inspector General Hotline Posters (JUN 2001) (a) The...

  11. 24 CFR 4.34 - Review of Inspector General's report by the Ethics Law Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... report by the Ethics Law Division. 4.34 Section 4.34 Housing and Urban Development Office of the... Funding Decisions § 4.34 Review of Inspector General's report by the Ethics Law Division. After receipt of the Inspector General's report, the Ethics Law Division shall review the facts and circumstances...

  12. Use of "excess" human embryos for stem cell research: protecting women's rights and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, C B

    2000-01-01

    Proposed National Institutes of Health guidelines for stem cell research are too narrowly drawn and do not adequately protect the freedom of choice and health of women who donate embryos. They need to be expanded to cover not only the point of embryo donation, but also that of embryo creation. Guidelines are provided to ensure that donors undergoing hyperstimulation and egg retrieval gave voluntary informed consent to the production of embryos that might later prove in excess. A standard for determining when embryos have been overproduced is presented to address the possibility that additional embryos will be created for stem cell research in violation of the guidelines and at risk to women's health.

  13. Women's Health in the Age of Patient Protection and the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Joanne

    2015-06-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 is the most sweeping health care legislation in a generation. The goal of the legislation is to increase access to both public and private insurance, and to improve the affordability and quality of care. Many provisions of the bill have a direct impact on the women's health care services. This paper provides an overview of the bill's provisions that have the largest impact on women's health care and provides data on the impact of the bill to date.

  14. Action planning as predictor of health protective and health risk behavior: an investigation of fruit and snack consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candel Math

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large discrepancies between people's intention to eat a healthy diet and actual dietary behavior indicate that motivation is not a sufficient instigator for healthy behavior. Research efforts to decrease this 'intention - behavior gap' have centered on aspects of self-regulation, most importantly self-regulatory planning. Most studies on the impact of self-regulatory planning in health and dietary behavior focus on the promotion of health protective behaviors. This study investigates and compares the predictive value of action planning in health protective behavior and the restriction of health risk behavior. Methods Two longitudinal observational studies were performed simultaneously, one focusing on fruit consumption (N = 572 and one on high-caloric snack consumption (N = 585 in Dutch adults. Structural equation modeling was used to investigate and compare the predictive value of action planning in both behaviors, correcting for demographics and the influence of motivational factors and past behavior. The nature of the influence of action planning was investigated by testing mediating and moderating effects. Results Action planning was a significant predictor of fruit consumption and restricted snack consumption beyond the influence of motivational factors and past behavior. The strength of the predictive value of action planning did not differ between the two behaviors. Evidence for mediation of the intention - behavior relationship was found for both behaviors. Positive moderating effects of action planning were demonstrated for fruit consumption, indicating that individuals who report high levels of action planning are significantly more likely to translate their intentions into actual behavior. Conclusion The results indicate that the planning of specific preparatory actions predicts the performance of healthy dietary behavior and support the application of self-regulatory planning in both health protective and health

  15. Why nafta failed and what's needed to protect workers' health and safety in international trade treaties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Garrett

    2005-01-01

    Labor standards, including occupational health and safety regulations and enforcement, are being subjected to intense downward pressures as a result of fundamental shifts in the global economy. The 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) was the first trade treaty that attempted to promote and protect workplace health and safety through a "labor side agreement." NAFTA failed to protect workers' health and safety due to the weaknesses of the side agreement's text; the political and diplomatic considerations limiting its implementation; and the failure to recognize and address the economic context, and political consequences of this context, in which the agreement was implemented. Subsequent trade treaties, both bilateral and regional, have not overcome the weaknesses of NAFTA. The treaty components needed to protect workers' health in future trade agreements are: 1) a minimum floor of occupational health and safety regulations; 2) an "upward harmonization" of regulatory standards and actual practice; 3) inclusion of employers so that they have formal responsibility and liability for violations of the standards; 4) effective enforcement of national regulations and international standards; 5) transparency and public participation; and 6) recognition of disparate economic conditions among trading partners and provision of financial and technical assistance to overcome economic disincentives and lack of resources. Also required are continued actions by non-governmental actors, including the workers themselves and civil society organizations.

  16. An American Academy for Training Safeguards Inspectors - An Idea Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip Casey Durst; Robert Bean

    2010-07-01

    In 2009, we presented the idea of an American academy for training safeguards inspectors for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), due to the declining percentage of Americans in that international organization. In this paper we assert that there is still a compelling need for this academy. While the American Safeguards Academy would be useful in preparing and pre-training American inspectors for the IAEA, it would also be useful for preparing Americans for domestic safeguards duties in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. DOE National Laboratories, and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). It is envisioned that such an academy would train graduate and post-graduate university students, DOE National Laboratory interns, and nuclear safeguards professionals in the modern equipment, safeguards measures, and approaches currently used by the IAEA. It is also envisioned that the Academy would involve the domestic nuclear industry, which could provide use of commercial nuclear facilities for tours and demonstrations of the safeguards tools and methods in actual nuclear facilities. This would be in support of the U.S. DOE National Nuclear Security Administration’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). This training would also help American nuclear safeguards and non-proliferation professionals better understand the potential limitations of the current tools used by the IAEA and give them a foundation from which to consider even more effective and efficient safeguards measures and approaches.

  17. [ELGA--the electronic health record in the light of data protection and data security].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströher, Alexander; Honekamp, Wilfried

    2011-07-01

    The introduction of an electronic health record (ELGA) is a subject discussed for a long time in Austria. Another big step toward ELGA is made at the end of 2010 on the pilot project e-medication in three model regions; other projects should follow. In addition, projects of the ELGA structure are sped up on the part of the ELGA GmbH to install the base of a functioning electronic health record. Unfortunately, many of these initiatives take place, so to speak, secretly, so that in the consciousness of the general public - and that includes not only patients but also physicians and other healthcare providers - always concerns about protection and security of such a storage of health data arouse. In this article the bases of the planned act are discussed taking into account the data protection and data security.

  18. Congress, courts, and commerce: upholding the individual mandate to protect the public's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, James G; Brown, Erin C Fuse; Orenstein, Daniel G; O'Keefe, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Among multiple legal challenges to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) is the premise that PPACA's "individual mandate" (requiring all individuals to obtain health insurance by 2014 or face civil penalties) is inviolate of Congress' interstate commerce powers because Congress lacks the power to regulate commercial "inactivity." Several courts initially considering this argument have rejected it, but federal district courts in Virginia and Florida have concurred, leading to numerous appeals and prospective review of the United States Supreme Court. Despite creative arguments, the dispositive constitutional question is not whether Congress' interstate commerce power extends to commercial inactivity. Rather, it is whether Congress may regulate individual decisions with significant economic ramifications in the interests of protecting and promoting the public's health. This article offers a counter-interpretation of the scope of Congress' interstate commerce power to regulate in furtherance of the public's health.

  19. Migration selection, protection, and acculturation in health: a binational perspective on older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riosmena, Fernando; Wong, Rebeca; Palloni, Alberto

    2013-06-01

    In this article, we test for four potential explanations of the Hispanic Health Paradox (HHP): the "salmon bias," emigration selection, and sociocultural protection originating in either destination or sending country. To reduce biases related to attrition by return migration typical of most U.S.-based surveys, we combine data from the Mexican Health and Aging Study in Mexico and the U.S. National Health Interview Survey to compare self-reported diabetes, hypertension, current smoking, obesity, and self-rated health among Mexican-born men ages 50 and older according to their previous U.S. migration experience, and U.S.-born Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites. We also use height, a measure of health during childhood, to bolster some of our tests. We find an immigrant advantage relative to non-Hispanic whites in hypertension and, to a lesser extent, obesity. We find evidence consistent with emigration selection and the salmon bias in height, hypertension, and self-rated health among immigrants with less than 15 years of experience in the United States; we do not find conclusive evidence consistent with sociocultural protection mechanisms. Finally, we illustrate that although ignoring return migrants when testing for the HHP and its mechanisms, as well as for the association between U.S. experience and health, exaggerates these associations, they are not fully driven by return migration-related attrition.

  20. [Ways of improving the education of specialists from the health care organizations, agencies, and institutions of the Russian Inspectorate for the Protection of Consumer Rights and Human Welfare, in the area of parasitology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astanina, S Iu; Dovgalev, A S; Avdiukhina, T I

    2014-01-01

    The intensive modern Russian reforms in professional education require that stafftraining in medicine should be also improved. The main directions and ways of improving education in the specialty of Parasitology are as follows:--to update professional education, by applying a competence approach, in terms of which the main focus is on mastering the activity and obtaining the experience in make this activity in different situations;--to apply the modular principle in the design of educational programs and a teaching process;--to improve the fundamental training of staff in the area ofparasitology;--to enhance the integration of special, related, and basic disciplines in stafftraining.

  1. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; health insurance market rules. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    This final rule implements provisions related to fair health insurance premiums, guaranteed availability, guaranteed renewability, single risk pools, and catastrophic plans, consistent with title I of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, referred to collectively as the Affordable Care Act. The final rule clarifies the approach used to enforce the applicable requirements of the Affordable Care Act with respect to health insurance issuers and group health plans that are non-federal governmental plans. This final rule also amends the standards for health insurance issuers and states regarding reporting, utilization, and collection of data under the federal rate review program, and revises the timeline for states to propose state-specific thresholds for review and approval by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

  2. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and reproductive health: harnessing data to improve care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulberg, Debra

    2013-04-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) has great potential to improve reproductive health through several components: expanded coverage of people of reproductive age; required coverage of many reproductive health services; and insurance exchange structures that encourage individuals and states to hold plans and providers accountable. These components can work together to improve reproductive health. But in order for this to work, consumers and states need information with which to assess plans. This review article summarizes state contracting theory and argues that states should use this structure to require health plans to collect and report meaningful data that patients, providers, plans, payers, and third-party researchers can access. Now that the Supreme Court has upheld the PPACA and states must set up health insurance exchanges, populations can benefit from improved care and outcomes through data transparency.

  3. [Survey on individual occupational health protection behaviors of welding workers using theory of reasoned action].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ming-luan; Zhou, Xu-dong; Yuan, Wei-ming; Chen, Qing; Zhang, Mei-bian; Zou, Hua; Zhao, Hai-ying

    2012-03-01

    To apply theory of reasoned action at survey on welding workers occupational health protection behaviors and explore related influencing factors. nine companies were randomly selected from areas with many welding works in Zhejiang Province. All welding workers were surveyed using a questionnaire based on theory of reasoned action. 10.06%, 26.80% and 37.50% of the respondents never or seldom used eyeshade, mask and earplug, respectively. After controlling the socio-demographic factors, welding workers' behavioral belief was correlated with the behaviors of eyeshade-mask and earplug use (χ(2) = 31.88, 18.77 and 37.77, P Theory of reasoned action is suitable for welding worker occupational health related behaviors. It is useful to improve occupational health education, to effectively select health education objective and to tailor health education contents.

  4. The sentinel role of poisons centers in the protection of children's environmental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronczuk de Garbino, Jenny

    2002-01-01

    Growing concern exists about the threats posed by environmental pollutants and physical agents on children's health. A number offactors, including globalization, increased industrialization, and trade of chemicals and poverty have an impact on the quality of the environment and on children's health. Acute toxic exposures lead to poisoning, and chronic low-level exposures may cause functional and organ damage during periods of special vulnerability. The need to protect children's environmental health is urgent, in view of the magnitude of the problem and the fact that "children are not little adults." The effects suffered during special developmental periods-"windows of vulnerability"-can be permanent and irreversible. The main global environmental problems affecting children's health are lack of access to safe drinking water and sanitation and exposure to indoor air pollution. Furthermore, environmentally related accidents, injuries, and poisonings have a major impact on children and adolescent's morbidity and mortality. A number of examples that illustrate the complexity of assessing and dealing with children's environmental health issues are presented. A Task Force on the Protection of Children's Environmental Health that aims to prevent disease and disability in children associated with chemical and physical threats was set up in 1999 by the World Health Organization. The priorities for action include the consideration of accidents, injuries, and poisonings (accidental, intentional, and occupational), and children in the workplace (e.g., scavenging children, children in cottage industries). Poisons Centers and related toxicology centers are in a strategic position to play a "sentinel" role in the protection of children's environmental health. They record acute and chronic toxic exposures in children in a harmonized manner, using controlled vocabularies and definitions. This will allow collecting a large, highly valuable database on the main toxicological

  5. 30 CFR 250.107 - What must I do to protect health, safety, property, and the environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., property, and the environment? 250.107 Section 250.107 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE... Performance Standards § 250.107 What must I do to protect health, safety, property, and the environment? (a) You must protect health, safety, property, and the environment by: (1) Performing all operations in...

  6. Notification: Review of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Purchase Card and Convenience Check Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OA-FY13-0116, December 20, 2012. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Inspector General, plans to begin preliminary research for an audit of the agency’s purchase card and convenience check programs.

  7. Health protection in times of economic crisis: challenges and opportunities for Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaid, David; Quaglio, Gianluca; Correia de Campos, António; Dario, Claudio; Van Woensel, Lieve; Karapiperis, Theodoros; Reeves, Aaron

    2013-11-01

    STOA, the European Parliament's technology assessment body, and the European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies recently organised a workshop on the impacts of the economic crisis on European health systems. Evidence of the impact of the recent financial crisis on health outcomes is only just beginning to emerge. Data suggests that this latest recession has led to more frequent poor health status, rising incidence of some communicable diseases, and higher suicide rates. Further, available data are likely to underestimate the broader mental health crisis linked to increased rates of stress, anxiety, and depression among the economically vulnerable. Not only does recession affect factors that determine health, but it also affects the financial capacity to respond. Many European governments have reduced public expenditure on health services during the financial crisis, while introducing or increasing user charges. The recession has driven structural reforms, and has affected the priority given to public policies that could be used to help protect population health. The current economic climate, while challenging, presents an opportunity for reforming and restructuring health promotion actions and taking a long-term perspective.

  8. Measuring financial protection for health in families with chronic conditions in Rural China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Chunhong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the world’s largest developing country, China has entered into the epidemiological phase characterized by high life expectancy and high morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases. Cardiovascular diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and malignant tumors have become the leading causes of death since the 1990s. Constant payments for maintaining the health status of a family member who has chronic diseases could exhaust household resources, undermining fiscal support for other necessities and eventually resulting in poverty. The purpose of this study is to probe to what degree health expenditure for chronic diseases can impoverish rural families and whether the New Cooperative Medical Scheme can effectively protect families with chronic patients against catastrophic health expenditures. Methods We used data from the 4th National Health Services Survey conducted in July 2008 in China. The rural sample we included in the analysis comprised 39,054 households. We used both households suffering from medical impoverishment and households with catastrophic health expenditures to compare the financial protection for families having a chronic patient with different insurance coverage statuses. We used a logistic regression model to estimate the impact of different benefit packages on health financial protection for families having a chronic patient. Results An additional 10.53% of the families with a chronic patient were impoverished because of healthcare expenditure, which is more than twice the proportion in families without a chronic patient. There is a higher catastrophic health expenditure incidence in the families with a chronic patient. The results of logistic regression show that simply adding extra benefits did not reduce the financial risks. Conclusions There is a lack of effective financial protection for healthcare expenditures for families with a chronic patient in rural China, even though there is a high

  9. Developments in Genetic and Epigenetic Data Protection in Behavioral and Mental Health Spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Nicolas

    2015-10-01

    The legal system has been preparing for an explosion of epigenetic issues in public health, environmental regulation and litigation. So far, this explosion has been muted, and for now epigenetic data protection merely seems to be "enjoying" the same technological and legal challenges experienced by other clinical and research data. However, three areas of development suggest where epigenetic data protection may prove problematic. This article examines these three issues, noting the rapid expansion of research based on EMR-sourced clinical data, the large number of data protection models that can apply to genetic data (including point-of-use prohibitions on discrimination and confidentiality), and the increasing and controversial dangers of deidentified information being reidentified.

  10. Protecting children's rights in the collection of health and welfare data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Katie; Murove, Tapfuma; Williamson, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Program managers and researchers promoting children's rights to health, education, and an adequate standard of living often gather data directly from children to assess their needs and develop responsive services. Gathering information within a participatory framework recognizing children's views contributes to protection of their rights. Extra precautions, however, are needed to protect children because of the vulnerabilities associated with their developmental needs. Using case studies of ethical challenges faced by program implementers and sociobehavioral researchers, this article explores ways in which data collection activities among children may affect their rights. We suggest ways in which rights-based principles may be used to derive safeguards to protect against unintentional harm and abuses, based on a multidisciplinary consultation with researchers and service providers.

  11. Masculinity constructs as protective buffers and risk factors for men's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levant, Ronald F; Wimer, David J

    2014-03-01

    This study was designed to replicate the study of Levant, Wimer, and Williams (2011), which reported complex relationships between masculinity and health behaviors using a more diverse sample and updated measures. A sample of 589 college and community-dwelling men responded to an online survey consisting of five scales. Levant et al.'s (2011) study was partially replicated-some masculinity constructs were identified as protective buffers for some health behaviors and others as risk factors. The vast majority of the findings that were replicated were risk factors, suggesting that traditional masculinity is more of risk than a buffer, and occurred in the analyses involving Avoiding Anger and Stress and Avoiding Substance Use subscales, suggesting that these health behaviors are most closely associated with masculinity. The results are discussed in terms of limitations, suggestions for future research, and implications for health care practice.

  12. Industrial radiography in the State of Bahia, Brazil The health protection of workers

    CERN Document Server

    Andrade, A E O D

    1997-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the Regulatory and Inspection Authority for actions developed by industrial radiography enterprises in the State of Bahia, Brazil, concerning health protection of workers exposed to ionizing radiation in industry. Institutions which legislate about this matter at international, national and State level were identified. These legislations were analysed according to recommendations by the Basic Safety Standards from the Atomic Energy International Agency. Medical Supervision is proposed as a factor to warrant protection to worker's health. This is a service evaluation study, encompassing results, processes and structural components. Emphasis is given to the process component which investigated the adequacy of which is performed by employees and workers. Five enterprises which provide industrial radiography services in the State of Bahia were identified, employing forty workers on a temporary basis. This study also observed: intense workforce, a complete process of contracting out in...

  13. Protecting children from myopia: a PMT perspective for improving health marketing communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwin, May O; Saw, Seang-Mei

    2007-01-01

    This research examined the predictive utility of the protection motivation theory (PMT) model for myopia prevention amongst children. An integrative model for myopia prevention behavior of parents was first developed in the context of theory and survey instruments then refined using information gathered from two focus groups. Empirical data then was collected from parents of primary school children in Singapore, a country with one of the highest rates of myopia in the world, and analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). Our findings revealed that coping appraisal variables were more significantly associated with protection motivation, relative to threat appraisal variables. In particular, perceived self-efficacy was the strongest predictor of parental intention to enforce good visual health behaviors, while perceived severity was relatively weak. Health marketing communications and public policy implications are discussed.

  14. Wireless Subsurface Microsensors for Health Monitoring of Thermal Protection Systems on Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milos, Frank S.; Watters, David G.; Pallix, Joan B.; Bahr, Alfred J.; Huestis, David L.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Health diagnostics is an area where major improvements have been identified for potential implementation into the design of new reusable launch vehicles in order to reduce life cycle costs, to increase safety margins, and to improve mission reliability. NASA Ames is leading the effort to develop inspection and health management technologies for thermal protection systems. This paper summarizes a joint project between NASA Ames and SRI International to develop 'SensorTags,' radio frequency identification devices coupled with event-recording sensors, that can be embedded in the thermal protection system to monitor temperature or other quantities of interest. Two prototype SensorTag designs containing thermal fuses to indicate a temperature overlimit are presented and discussed.

  15. Climate change and natural disasters – integrating science and practice to protect health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Sauerborn

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hydro-meteorological disasters are the focus of this paper. The authors examine, to which extent climate change increases their frequency and intensity. Methods: Review of IPCC-projections of climate-change related extreme weather events and related literature on health effects. Results: Projections show that climate change is likely to increase the frequency, intensity, duration, and spatial distribution of a range of extreme weather events over coming decades. Conclusions: There is a need for strengthened collaboration between climate scientists, the health researchers and policy-makers as well as the disaster community to jointly develop adaptation strategies to protect human.

  16. Selenium in bone health: roles in antioxidant protection and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Cao, Jay J; Combs, Gerald F

    2013-01-10

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element for humans and animals, and several findings suggest that dietary Se intake may be necessary for bone health. Such findings may relate to roles of Se in antioxidant protection, enhanced immune surveillance and modulation of cell proliferation. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which Se supports these cellular processes can lead to a better understanding of the role of this nutrient in normal bone metabolism. This article reviews the current knowledge concerning the molecular functions of Se relevant to bone health.

  17. Protecting policy space for public health nutrition in an era of international investment agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thow, Anne Marie; McGrady, Benn

    2014-02-01

    Philip Morris has recently brought claims against Australia (2011) and Uruguay (2010) under international investment agreements (IIAs). The claims allege that Philip Morris is entitled to compensation following the introduction of innovative tobacco packaging regulations to reduce smoking and prevent noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). Since tobacco control measures are often viewed as a model for public health nutrition measures, the claims raise the question of how investment law governs the latter. This paper begins to answer this question and to explain how governments can proactively protect policy space for public health nutrition in an era of expanding IIAs. The authors first consider the main interventions proposed to reduce diet-related NCDs and their intersection with investment in the food supply chain. They then review the nature of investment regimes and relevant case law and examine ways to maximize policy space for public health nutrition intervention within this legal context. As foreign investment increases across the food-chain and more global recommendations discouraging the consumption of unhealthful products are issued, investment law will increase in importance as part of the legal architecture governing the food supply. The implications of investment law for public health nutrition measures depend on various factors: the measures themselves, the terms of the applicable agreements, the conditions surrounding the foreign investment and the policies governing agricultural support. This analysis suggests that governments should adopt proactive measures--e.g. the clarification of terms and reliance on exceptions--to manage investment and protect their regulatory autonomy with respect to public health nutrition.

  18. An Adult Protective Services' view of collaboration with Mental Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teaster, Pamela B; Stansbury, Kim L; Nerenberg, Lisa; Stanis, Patricia

    2009-10-01

    Mental Health Services (MHS) meet mental health needs of older adults through active, outpatient, community-based care. Adult Protective Services (APS) are involved with needs of older adults who have mental disability and mental illness. Adult Protective Services and MHS staff may to work together when they respond to the needs of victims and adults at risk for abuse, neglect, self-neglect, and exploitation. The purpose of this study was to understand effective APS-MHS collaborations (e.g., leadership, organizational culture, administration, and resources in predicting success). A survey that was sent to members of the National Adult Protective Services Association (NAPSA) revealed that both APS and MHS have strong commitments to protecting clients' rights and autonomy, but there appear to be differences between the two with regard to implementation, apparent in cases involving clients with diminished mental capacity who are at imminent risk, but who refuse help. Strengths of APS-MHS collaborations included improved communication and better service for at-risk clients.

  19. Social capital and health-protective behavior intentions in an influenza pandemic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chih Chuang

    Full Text Available Health-protective behaviors, such as receiving a vaccine, wearing a face mask, and washing hands frequently, can reduce the risk of contracting influenza. However, little is known about how social capital may influence health-protective behavior in the general population. This study examined whether each of the social capital dimensions (bonding, bridging, and linking contributed to the intention to adopt any of the health-protective behaviors in an influenza pandemic. The data of this study were from the 2014 Taiwan Social Change Survey. A stratified, three-stage probability proportional-to-size sampling from across the nation, was conducted to select adults aged 20 years and older (N = 1,745. Bonding social capital was measured by the frequency of neighborly contact and support. Bridging social capital was measured based on association membership. Linking social capital was measured according to general government trust and trust in the government's capacity to counter an influenza pandemic. Binary logistic regressions were used to assess the multivariate associations between social capital and behavioral intention. The study results indicate that social capital may influence the response to influenza pandemic. Specifically, the intention to receive a vaccine and to wash hands more frequently were associated with the linking dimension and the bonding dimension of social capital, while the intention to wear a face mask was associated with all forms of social capital. The findings of this study suggest that government credibility and interpersonal networks may play a crucial role in health-protective behavior. This study provides new insights into how to improve the effectiveness of influenza prevention campaigns.

  20. Predictor variables of happiness and its connection with risk and protective factors for health

    OpenAIRE

    Maite eGaraigordobil

    2015-01-01

    Great thinkers, philosophers, scientists, and artists from History have often been concerned about one of the most important elements of life: happiness. The study had four goals: 1) To analyze possible differences in feelings of happiness as a function of sex and age; 2) To explore the relations of happiness with risk factors (psychopathological symptoms, behavior problems) and protective factors (self-concept-self-esteem, cooperative behavior, social skills) for health; 3) To identify predi...

  1. Predictor variables of happiness and its connection with risk and protective factors for health

    OpenAIRE

    Garaigordobil, Maite

    2015-01-01

    Great thinkers, philosophers, scientists, and artists from History have often been concerned about one of the most important elements of life: happiness. The study had four goals: (1) To analyze possible differences in feelings of happiness as a function of sex and age; (2) To explore the relations of happiness with risk factors (psychopathological symptoms, behavior problems) and protective factors (self-concept-self-esteem, cooperative behavior, social skills) for health; (3) To identify pr...

  2. [Occupational morbidity among health care personnel in the Primorsky territory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektasova, M V; Kaptsov, V A; Sheparev, A A

    2011-01-01

    Occupational morbidity rates in health care personnel have recently attracted the particular attention of the specialists of the Russian Inspectorate for the Protection of Consumer Rights and Human Welfare and occupational pathologists. The rise in the incidence occupational diseases (during nosocomial infection) in the medical workers of therapeutic-and-prophylactic institutions affects the reduction of their ability to work. Contact with blood or other biological fluids and with bacteria-excreting patients, handing medical waste, and influence of work environment factors are causes of nosocomial infection among the medical staff.

  3. Health Monitoring System for Nursing Homes with Lightweight Security and Privacy Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu’e Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid growth of aged population in China, it is urgent to design a safe and effective monitoring system for the nursing homes. An optimized scheme and high performance security and privacy protection for monitoring system have already become the focus studied especially. So this paper proposed a health monitoring system with lightweight security and privacy protection for nursing homes. Dual-band RFID, virtual routing location algorithm, and diet and exercise data collection based on RFID were adopted to obtain the location and health information. And that fused a mobile authentication protocol based on Hash function to realize security access and privacy protection, which can improve security and reduce the complexity of calculation and the implementation cost compared with the typical authentication protocols. The experiment results show that the ratio of relative network delay is below 35%. The system has strong real-time, high security, more comprehensive data, and lower cost of computation and communication. It can satisfy the requirements of health monitoring for nursing homes.

  4. Microarray Inspector: tissue cross contamination detection tool for microarray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stępniak, Piotr; Maycock, Matthew; Wojdan, Konrad; Markowska, Monika; Perun, Serhiy; Srivastava, Aashish; Wyrwicz, Lucjan S; Świrski, Konrad

    2013-01-01

    Microarray technology changed the landscape of contemporary life sciences by providing vast amounts of expression data. Researchers are building up repositories of experiment results with various conditions and samples which serve the scientific community as a precious resource. Ensuring that the sample is of high quality is of utmost importance to this effort. The task is complicated by the fact that in many cases datasets lack information concerning pre-experimental quality assessment. Transcription profiling of tissue samples may be invalidated by an error caused by heterogeneity of the material. The risk of tissue cross contamination is especially high in oncological studies, where it is often difficult to extract the sample. Therefore, there is a need of developing a method detecting tissue contamination in a post-experimental phase. We propose Microarray Inspector: customizable, user-friendly software that enables easy detection of samples containing mixed tissue types. The advantage of the tool is that it uses raw expression data files and analyses each array independently. In addition, the system allows the user to adjust the criteria of the analysis to conform to individual needs and research requirements. The final output of the program contains comfortable to read reports about tissue contamination assessment with detailed information about the test parameters and results. Microarray Inspector provides a list of contaminant biomarkers needed in the analysis of adipose tissue contamination. Using real data (datasets from public repositories) and our tool, we confirmed high specificity of the software in detecting contamination. The results indicated the presence of adipose tissue admixture in a range from approximately 4% to 13% in several tested surgical samples.

  5. Office of Inspector General fiscal year 1996 annual work plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This FY 1996 Office of Inspector General (OIG) Annual Work Plan is a summary and distillation of information contained in annual work plans, and includes audits and inspections that are carried over from FY 1995 as well as audits and inspections scheduled to start during FY 1996. Audits and inspections included in this consolidated OIG Annual Work Plan will be performed by OIG staff. Specialized expertise available through a Certified Public Accounting firm will be used to assist in auditing the Department`s financial statements. As part of the OIG Cooperative Audit Strategy, additional audit coverage of the Department`s programs is provided by internal auditors of the Department`s integrated contractors. Through the Cooperative Audit Strategy, the OIG ensures that the internal auditors satisfy audit standards, provides planning guidance to the internal auditors, coordinates work to avoid duplication, and tracks the work of internal auditors to ensure that needed audits are performed. Applicable portions of the four annual work plans issued for Fiscal Year 1996 by the Deputy/Assistant Inspectors General have been combined to form a major part of this overall OIG Annual Work Plan. Also included are portions of the most recent OIG Semiannual Reports to Congress to give an overview of the OIG`s mission/organization, resource status, and the environment in which the OIG currently operates. The OIG Annual Work Plan also lists ongoing and planned audits and inspections, and it presents investigative statistics which have been previously reported in the two OIG Semiannual Reports to Congress which cover Fiscal Year 1995. Furthermore, included in this work plan are descriptions of several innovations developed by the OIG to streamline its operations and to conserve as much efficiency and economy as possible in a time of resource reductions.

  6. 45 CFR 170.210 - Standards for health information technology to protect electronic health information created...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... information—(1) General. Any encryption algorithm identified by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as an approved security function in Annex A of the Federal Information Processing Standards... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for health information technology...

  7. A Nonpolynomial Optimal Algorithm for Sequencing Inspectors in a Repeat Inspection System with Rework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Hee Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Assuming that two types of inspection errors are nonidentical and that only the items rejected by an inspector are reworked and sent to the next inspection cycle, we formulate a combinatorial optimization problem for simultaneously determining both the minimum frequency of inspection-rework cycles and the optimal sequence of inspectors selected from a set of available inspectors, in order to meet the constraints of the outgoing quality level. Based on the inherent properties from our mathematical model, we provide a nonpolynomial optimal algorithm with a time complexity of O(2m.

  8. Protective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessam M. Abdel-Wahab

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Many active ingredients extracted from herbal and medicinal plants are extensively studied for their beneficial effects. Antioxidant activity and free radical scavenging properties of thymoquinone (TQ have been reported. The present study evaluated the possible protective effects of TQ against the toxicity and oxidative stress of sodium fluoride (NaF in the liver of rats. Rats were divided into four groups, the first group served as the control group and was administered distilled water whereas the NaF group received NaF orally at a dose of 10 mg/kg for 4 weeks, TQ group was administered TQ orally at a dose of 10 mg/kg for 5 weeks, and the NaF-TQ group was first given TQ for 1 week and was secondly administered 10 mg/kg/day NaF in association with 10 mg/kg TQ for 4 weeks. Rats intoxicated with NaF showed a significant increase in lipid peroxidation whereas the level of reduced glutathione (GSH and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione S-transferase (GST and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were reduced in hepatic tissues. The proper functioning of the liver was also disrupted as indicated by alterations in the measured liver function indices and biochemical parameters. TQ supplementation counteracted the NaF-induced hepatotoxicity probably due to its strong antioxidant activity. In conclusion, the results obtained clearly indicated the role of oxidative stress in the induction of NaF toxicity and suggested hepatoprotective effects of TQ against the toxicity of fluoride compounds.

  9. Skin protective behavior amongst girl students; based on health belief model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Davati

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Skin cancer is the most prevalent type of cancer in most of the countries and more than 90% of cancer cases are related to ultra violet rays of the sun. Therefore protective behaviors against sunlight are considered the most essential measures for skin cancer prevention. This study has been conducted to determine the frequency of protective behavior against sunlight among female students of Tehran city high schools. The Health Belief Model has been used for this cross-sectional study to analyze the factors related to protective behaviors. A multi-phase sampling method was used. 941 female student of Tehran city high schools were studied using a probed question form. The data were then analyzed using SPSS software. During the study of protective behaviors against the sunlight, 24.7% of participants mentioned that they always use sunscreen. The behavior of using sunscreen is related to perceived sensitivity, severity and benefit amongst the students (P<0.05. Also 3.8% of the students who participated in our study were always using gloves in summer to protect against sunlight. The behavior of using gloves in summer was also related to perceived sensitivity, severity and benefit (P<0.05. Physicians were the most effective influencing people with 84.9% influence on the appropriate decision making by these students. There is a low frequency of protective behavior against sunlight among the female students of Tehran city high schools. These findings show the necessity of training the students in this regard and promote the protective behaviors amongst them.

  10. The financial crisis, health and health inequities in Europe: the need for regulations, redistribution and social protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vogli, Roberto

    2014-07-25

    In 2009, Europe was hit by one of the worst debt crises in history. Although the Eurozone crisis is often depicted as an effect of government mismanagement and corruption, it was a consequence of the 2008 U.S. banking crisis which was caused by more than three decades of neoliberal policies, financial deregulation and widening economic inequities.Evidence indicates that the Eurozone crisis disproportionately affected vulnerable populations in society and caused sharp increases of suicides and deaths due to mental and behavioral disorders especially among those who lost their jobs, houses and economic activities because of the crisis. Although little research has, so far, studied the effects of the crisis on health inequities, evidence showed that the 2009 economic downturn increased the number of people living in poverty and widened income inequality especially in European countries severely hit by the debt crisis. Data, however, also suggest favorable health trends and a reduction of traffic deaths fatalities in the general population during the economic recession. Moreover, egalitarian policies protecting the most disadvantaged populations with strong social protections proved to be effective in decoupling the link between job losses and suicides.Unfortunately, policy responses after the crisis in most European countries have mainly consisted in bank bailouts and austerity programs. These reforms have not only exacerbated the debt crisis and widened inequities in wealth but also failed to address the root causes of the crisis. In order to prevent a future financial downturn and promote a more equitable and sustainable society, European governments and international institutions need to adopt new regulations of banking and finance as well as policies of economic redistribution and investment in social protection. These policy changes, however, require the abandonment of the neoliberal ideology to craft a new global political economy where markets and gross

  11. Astronautical Hygiene - A New Discipline to Protect the Health of Astronauts Working in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, J. R.

    This paper outlines the rationale for a new scientific discipline namely astronautical hygiene. Astronautical hygiene is an applied science that utilises a knowledge of space toxicology, space medicine, astronautics, occupational hygiene etc. to identify the hazards, assess the exposure risks to health, and thereby determine the measures to mitigate exposure to protect the health of astronauts during living and working in space. This paper describes the nature of the hazards (i.e. physical, chemical, microbial and psychological) encountered during space flight. It discusses exposure risk assessment and the use of sampling techniques to assess astronaut health risks. This paper then discusses the measures used to mitigate exposure to the exposure hazards during space exploration. A case study of the application of the principles of astronautical hygiene to control lunar dust exposure is then described.

  12. Organizational change and employees' mental health: the protective role of sense of coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahkin, Krista; Väänänen, Ari; Koskinen, Aki; Bergbom, Barbara; Kouvonen, Anne

    2011-02-01

    To examine the impact of sense of coherence (SOC) on psychiatric events in the context of organizational merger. Data were derived from a prospective "Still Working" study using questionnaire and health register data. The study population (n = 4279) consisted of employees with no psychiatric events prior to the 5-year mental health follow-up. Employees with a weaker premerger SOC were at a higher risk of perceiving the organizational change negatively (odds ratio = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.57 to 2.14) and had an elevated risk of postmerger psychiatric events (hazard ratio = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.04 to 1.94). A stronger SOC decreased the adverse effect of negative appraisal of change on psychiatric events. A strong premerger SOC seems to be a protective factor for mental health when the employee experiences negative changes during an organizational merger.

  13. Ethics and data protection in human biomarker studies in environmental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casteleyn, Ludwine; Dumez, Birgit; Van Damme, Karel; Anwar, Wagida A

    2013-08-01

    Human biomarker studies in environmental health are essential tools to study the relationship between health and environment. They should ultimately contribute to a better understanding of environmentally induced adverse health effects and to appropriate preventive actions. To ensure the protection of the rights and dignity of study participants a complex legal and ethical framework is applied, consisting of several international directives, conventions, and guidelines, whether or not translated in domestic laws. Main characteristics of ethics and data protection in studies using biomarkers in the field of environmental health are summarized and current discussions on related questions and bottlenecks highlighted. In the current regulatory context, dominated by the protection of the individual study participant, difficulties are reported due to the different interpretation and implementation of the regulations of concern within and across borders. Advancement of consistency and compatibility is recommended and efforts are ongoing. An increasing demand for secondary use of data and samples poses additional challenges in finding a right balance between the individual rights of the study participants on the one hand and the common interest of, and potential benefit for the public or community at large on the other. Ethics committees could play a key role in assessing problems originating from the sometimes competing needs at individual and societal level. Building trust in science amongst (potential) study participants and within the community allows the inclusion of arguments from the societal perspective. This requires increased attention for respectful communication efforts. Striving for public participation in decision making processes may promote policy relevant research and the related translation of study results into action.

  14. ORAL HYGIENE HABITS AND ORAL HEALTH STATUS OF FEMALE ADOLESCENTS UNDER STATE PROTECTION: A PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenker Zeki Koyuncuoğlu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate oral health status and oral hygiene practices of female adolescents under state protection. Subjects and Methods: Fifty-five female participants between the age of 12 and 18 who are under the care of The Child Protection Institution were included in this study. Self-administered questionnaires were used to obtain information regarding knowledge of oral health and habits. Dental caries status was scored according to the criteria of the World Health Organization (WHO, using the indices of Decayed (D, Missing (M, Filled (F, Surfaces (S (DMFS. In addition, Gingival Index (GI and Plaque Index (PI were recorded during periodontal assessment. Data were statistically analyzed by using Oneway analysis of variance, Tukey’s HSD and Student’s t tests. Results: Fourteen children had dental fear and 52.7% of them were not satisfied with their esthetic appearance. Although 78.2% of the children knew that brushing prevents dental caries, only 18 of them were brushing regularly twice per day. Mean DMFS, GI and PI scores were 13.18±5.68, 1.35±0.37 and 1.33±0.45, respectively. Only 20% of the children were using dental floss. There was statistically no significant difference between the DMFS scores of the children in terms of flossing. However, the difference between the mean GI and PI of the same group was found to be statistically significant (p<0.05. Conclusion: Children under state protection were found to have a reasonable knowledge of the causes of dental caries and gingival bleeding. Therefore, adequate management of this positive attitude can significantly improve the oral health of this population.

  15. Immigrants’ health protection: political, institutional and social perspectives at international and Italian level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Marceca

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available

    The issue of “immigrants’ health” has been the subject of increasing interest in recent years, both in scientific literature and in the declarations of international health institutions. Specifically, the Resolution of the 61st World Health Assembly (2008, and the Report of the European Parliament on the reduction of the inequalities in health within EU (2010 are worth highlighting.

    There is a clear convergence in the orientations recommended to local Governments regarding the health policies and interventions to be adopted in this sector. It may be stated that the health policies adopted in Italy in the 1980s have been pioneering in both European and international contexts. Enhanced by the unconditional recognition of the right to health, which is stated in the Italian Constitution, these orientations have been strongly suggested to the policymakers through effective lobbying efforts. Alongside ethical-legal recognition of the right to healthcare, the technical-scientific debate has also developed, especially following the publication of the WHO Report “Closing the gap in a generation” (2008. This has enabled the acknowledgement of the relevant role played by the socio-economic conditions which distinguish the different groups of immigrants.

    Moreover, the proposal of inter-sectorial policies and of an approach aimed at the empowerment of the community has become increasingly significant. In future, health protection for immigrants will be not only a priority as imposed by the recognition of health as a human right, but will also be more closely connected to capacities for the planning and support, at local level, of health promotion initiatives.

  16. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and Utilization of Preventive Health Care Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Eno

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We examined how (a health insurance coverage, and (b familiarity with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA’s or ObamaCare mandate of cost-free access to preventive health services, affect the use of preventive services by residents of a minority community. It was based on primary data collected from a survey conducted during March to April 2012 among a sample of self-identified African American adults in Tallahassee-Leon County area of northwest Florida. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS Version 22 was used for running frequency analysis on the data set and multivariable regression modeling. The results showed that of 524 respondents, 382 (73% had health insurance while 142 (27% lacked insurance. Majority of insured respondents, 332 (87%, used preventive health services. However, the remaining 13% of respondents did not use preventive services because they were unfamiliar with the ACA provision of free access to preventive services for insured people. Regression analysis showed a high (91.04% probability that, among the insured, the use of preventive health services depended on the person’s age, income, and education. For uninsured residents, the lack of health insurance was the key reason for non-use of preventive health services, while among the insured, lack of knowledge about the ACA benefit of free access contributed to non-use of preventive services. Expansion of Medicaid eligibility can increase insurance coverage rates among African Americans and other minority populations. Health promotion and awareness campaigns about the law’s benefits by local and state health departments can enhance the use of preventive services.

  17. Health insurance, patient protection and Affordable Care Act, and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodich, Colleen; Patel, Dilip

    2013-12-01

    In summary, the ACA aims to correct some of the shortcomings of our current health insurance systems. It aims to make health insurance more affordable and more accessible and the health insurance systems easier to navigate. For the young adult population, it aims to protect more individuals by allowing them to stay on their parent's insurance longer and by making it easier to choose an insurance plan that is right for them. Those with preexisting medical conditions do not have to worry about being excluded from a health plan because of their medical history. The law is also making health insurance mandatory, which may help prevent young adults who fall ill from incurring large medical bills. Initial outcomes from the implementation of the ACA have shown both positive and negative responses. All in all, it is giving young adults more options when it comes to obtaining health insurance. As part of discussion with adolescents and young adults, physicians may take into consideration key points summarized in Table 4.

  18. 75 FR 70936 - Accreditation and Approval of Inspectorate America Corporation, as a Commercial Gauger and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-19

    ... 151.13, Inspectorate America Corporation, 3306 Loop 197 North, Texas City, TX 77590, has been approved to gauge and accredited to test petroleum and petroleum products for customs purposes, in accordance...

  19. The Assessment of Animal Welfare in British Zoos by Government-Appointed Inspectors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Draper, Chris; Harris, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    We analysed the reports of government-appointed inspectors from 192 zoos between 2005-2008 to provide the first review of how animal welfare was assessed in British zoos since the enactment of the Zoo Licensing Act 1981...

  20. Office of Inspector General semiannual report to Congress, April 1--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This Office of Inspector General Semiannual Report to the Congress covers the period from April 1 through September 30, 1995. The report summarizes significant audit, inspection, and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period, a large portion of which facilitated Department of Energy management efforts to improve management controls and ensure efficient and effective operation of its programs. Narratives of the most significant reports are grouped by six primary performance measures which the Office of Inspector General uses to gauge its attainment of the outcomes established in the Office of Inspector General Strategic Plan. The common thread that ties the performance measures together is their emphasis on supporting Department efforts to produce high quality products at the lowest possible cost to the taxpayer. The six performance measures present outcomes of Office of Inspector General work in terms of improvements in Department programs and operations.

  1. 45 CFR 96.33 - Referral of cases to the Inspector General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Financial Management § 96.33 Referral of cases to the Inspector General. State or tribal officials who have information indicating the commission or potential commission of fraud or other offenses against the...

  2. Computer assisted extraction, merging and correlation of identities with Tracks Inspector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofste, Jop; Henseler, Hans; Keulen, van Maurice

    2013-01-01

    With the pervasiveness of computers and mobile devices, digital forensics becomes more important in law enforcement. Detectives increasingly depend on the scarce support of digital specialists which impedes efficiency of criminal investigations. Tracks Inspector is a commercial solution that enables

  3. Wireless Subsurface Sensors for Health Monitoring of Thermal Protection Systems on Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milos, Frank S.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Health diagnostics is an area where major improvements have been identified for potential implementation into the design of new reusable launch vehicles (RLVs) in order to reduce life cycle costs, to increase safety margins, and to improve mission reliability. NASA Ames is leading the effort to develop inspection and health management technologies for thermal protection systems. This paper summarizes a joint project between NASA Ames and industry partners to develop "wireless" devices that can be embedded in the thermal protection system to monitor temperature or other quantities of interest. These devices are sensors integrated with radio-frequency identification (RFID) microchips to enable non-contact communication of sensor data to an external reader that may be a hand-held scanner or a large portal. Both passive and active prototype devices have been developed. The passive device uses a thermal fuse to indicate the occurrence of excessive temperature. This device has a diameter under 0.13 cm. (suitable for placement in gaps between ceramic TPS tiles on an RLV) and can withstand 370 C for 15 minutes. The active device contains a small battery to provide power to a thermocouple for recording a temperature history during flight. The bulk of the device must be placed beneath the TPS for protection from high temperature, but the thermocouple can be placed in a hot location such as near the external surface.

  4. Today's ``safe" radiofrequency (RF) exposure limits DON'T protect human health near transmitters!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2005-03-01

    Maxwell's theory implies that electromagnetic (EM) radiation carries both energy and momentum. ``The momentum may have both linear and angular contributions; angular momentum [AM] has a spin part associated with polarization and an orbital part associated with spatial distribution. Any interaction between radiation and matter is inevitably accompanied by an exchange of momentum. This often has mechanical consequences ..."^2 Voluntary consensus standards [ANSI C95; NCRP; INCIRP] protect human health from most thermal [energy transfer] effects, but no standards yet exist to protect health against athermal [momentum transfer] effects, though laboratory transfer of spin AM was reported by 1935^3 and of orbital AM by 1992^2 for an optical vortex [tip of Poynting vector (PV) traces a helix about the beam axis]. In the far field of a dipole RF transmitter, radiation is linearly polarized (minimal spin AM) and locally approximated by a plane wave (zero orbital AM), but in the near field the orbital AM is non-zero [tip of PV traces an ellipse^4 in air] implying an athermal hazard [e.g., brain tumors in cellular phone users] against which no standard now in use anywhere in the world protects! ^2 L. Allen et al. Phys. Rev. A 45:8185-9(1992). ^3 R.A. Beth, Phys. Rev. 48:471(1935); 50:115-25 (1936). ^4 F. Landstorfer, Archiv für Elektronik und übertragungstechnik 26:189-96(1972) [in German].

  5. Investigating public health impacts of deer in a protected drinking water supply watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinque, K; Stevens, M A; Haydon, S R; Jex, A R; Gasser, R B; Campbell, B E

    2008-01-01

    The World Health Organisation's (WHO) Water Safety Plans highlight the need for preventative risk management when managing water contamination risks. As part of this approach, a management framework incorporating multiple barriers is necessary and there is a need to validate those barriers through scientific evidence. This paper reports on a study undertaken to validate the effectiveness, in terms of pathogen numbers, of having protected watersheds. The study aimed to determine if the deer population in a protected watershed carried Cryptosporidium and whether or not it was human infectious. Deer faecal samples were collected from the protected watersheds over a 12 month period and analysed using a new method, developed as part of this project, for genotyping Cryptosporidium. Early results showed the presence of Cryptosporidium, but following a refinement in the method no human infectious Cryptosporidium was detected. The results give some confidence that having protected watersheds is an effective barrier against pathogen contamination. They do not, however, imply that continued monitoring and management of the deer should cease. To maintain compliance with the Water Safety Plans, continual validation of barrier effectiveness is required.

  6. Environmental sensitivities of inspectors, managers and principals working for the Ministry of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askin Kiraz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the environmental attitudes, behaviours and consciousness levels of inspectors and school managers working for the Ministry of Education in the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC. The scope of this study covers the school managers of Primary Schools, Secondary Schools and Professional Technical Schools in the capital, Lefkosa, and the inspectors of the Ministry of Education. Data was collected by questionnaire forms, which were answered by the participants. The forms included the “Environmental Consciousness Survey List”. The data was evaluated by using SPSS. The results of this study revealed the environmental attitude, behaviour and knowledge of school managers and inspectors, according to their gender, age, level of education, job and professional seniorities. A sample of the study covered 71 school managers and inspectors of which 38% were females and 62% were males. The results showed that the environmental consciousness level of the school managers and inspectors was 74%, which could be accepted as average level. No significant differences were determined for the environmental consciousness levels of school managers and inspectors regarding the factors of gender, professional seniorities, membership to any environmental organization, and participation in any environmental project. On the other hand, the results indicated an increase in the environmental consciousness levels when the age and level of education increased. Another important result of this study was that the environmental consciousness level of inspectors is higher than the school managers. School managers and inspectors indicated that the most important environmental problem for the world and TRNC is the misuse of natural resources. According to participants, the most important factor for the prevention of environmental problems is the schools and the most important subject is education.

  7. Multifamily Quality Control Inspector Job/Task Analysis and Report: September 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owens, C. M.

    2013-09-01

    The development of job/task analyses (JTAs) is one of three components of the Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals project and will allow industry to develop training resources, quality assurance protocols, accredited training programs, and professional certifications. The Multifamily Quality Control Inspector JTA identifies and catalogs all of the tasks performed by multifamily quality control inspectors, as well as the knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) needed to perform the identified tasks.

  8. Environmental sensitivities of inspectors, managers and principals working for the Ministry of Education

    OpenAIRE

    Askin Kiraz; Begum Pastirmacioglu

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the environmental attitudes, behaviours and consciousness levels of inspectors and school managers working for the Ministry of Education in the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC). The scope of this study covers the school managers of Primary Schools, Secondary Schools and Professional Technical Schools in the capital, Lefkosa, and the inspectors of the Ministry of Education. Data was collected by questionnaire forms, which were answered by the participant...

  9. Legal aspects of workers' health protection against asbestos in Poland in the light of the EU legal framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Świątkowska

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Legal protection of human life and health against asbestos dust-related hazards is carried out in various dimensions of the European Union law mainly focused on health protection of employees and responsibilities of employers, as well as on environmental protection. The aim of this paper is to present the Community legal issues emphasizing the protection of workers against asbestos and discuss the current state of Polish law in this regard. An analysis of recent legal solutions provides a comprehensive look at the extensive steps currently taken to reduce the risk of exposure to asbestos dust. The legislation in the European Union, including Poland indicates sound foundations for assuring health and safety of workers still exposed to asbestos and those formerly employed in asbestos processing plants. It is only postulated to unify high standards of healthcare to provide all workers employed in asbestos exposure with equal and particular legal protection. Med Pr 2013;64(5:689–697

  10. Monogamy, the Protective Fallacy: Sexual versus Emotional Exclusivity and the Implication for Sexual Health Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, D Joye; Thompson, Suzanne C

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined the hypothesis that many individuals define monogamy based on emotional rather than sexual fidelity. Participants, 373 heterosexual college students and 282 gay men, read three vignettes of decreasing mitigation in which they imagined committing an act of infidelity against a hypothetical partner and where half the participants were cued to their emotional attachment toward the partner. Despite the infidelity, relationships in the emotional attachment-cued vignettes were rated as monogamous to a greater degree than relationships in the vignettes where emotional attachment was not cued. In addition, over one-third of the participants in our study reported infidelity in their current self-defined monogamous relationships yet also reported feeling more protected from sexual health risks and reported less condom use than individuals who defined their relationship as nonmonogamous. The implications for monogamy as a protective fallacy are discussed.

  11. Democratic transitions, health institutions, and financial protection in the emerging economies: insights from Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Eduardo J

    2016-11-14

    In recent years, several emerging economies have introduced national health insurance programs ensuring access to health care while offering financial protection from out-of-pocket and catastrophic expenses. Nevertheless, in several nations these expenses continue to increase. While recent research has emphasized the lack of funding, poor policy design and corruption as the main culprits, little is known about the politics of establishing federal regulatory agencies ensuring that state governments adhere to national insurance reimbursement and coverage procedures. This article fills in this lacuna by providing an alternative perspective, one that accounts for differences between nations in the creation of regulatory institutions, with an emphasis instead on governing elite strategies to campaign on access to health care during transitions to democracy, civil societal mobilization, constitutional constraints and the national electoral incentives to overcome ineffective decentralization processes. The cases of Indonesia and China are introduced as examples of how and why their differences in this political process accounted for Indonesia's success and China's failure to ensure financial protection.

  12. Who strategies and action to protect and promote the health of workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Dimov Ivanov

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available WHO's action on protecting and promoting the health of workers is mandated by the Constitution of the Organization and a number of resolutions of the World Health Assembly. Recognizing that occupational health is closely linked to public health and health systems development, WHO is addressing all determinants of workers' health, including risks for disease and injury in the occupational environment, social and individual factors, and access to health services. Furthermore, the workplace is being used as a setting for protecting and promoting the health of workers and their families. Concerned that despite the existence of effective interventions to prevent occupational diseases and injuries there are still major gaps in the health status of workers between and within countries, the 60th World Health Assembly in 2007 endorsed the Global Plan of Action on Workers' Health. This Plan provides a political framework for development of policies, infrastructure, technologies and partnerships for achieving a basic level of health protection in all workplaces throughout the world. The Health Assembly also urged the 193 Member States of WHO to develop national plans and strategies for implementing the Global Plan of Action and to work towards full coverage of all workers with essential interventions and basic services for prevention of occupational diseases and injuries. A large network of 65 collaborating centres provides support to WHO's action on workers' health. The priorities for global action in the coming ten years include policy instruments on workers' health, workplace health protection and promotion, occupational health services, evidence for action and practice, and workers' health in other policies. Thus, WHO action on workers' health contributes to the global health agenda with regards to health security, climate change and Millenium Development Goals.Las acciones de protección y promoción de la salud de los trabajadores se corresponde con

  13. Environmental Assessment for the Health Protection Instrument Calibration Facility at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to review the possible environmental consequences associated with the construction and operation of a Health Protection Instrument Calibration Facility on the Savannah River Site (SRS). The proposed replacement calibration facility would be located in B Area of SRS and would replace an inadequate existing facility currently located within A Area of SRS (Building 736-A). The new facility would provide laboratories, offices, test equipment and the support space necessary for the SRS Radiation Monitoring Instrument Calibration Program to comply with DOE Orders 5480.4 (Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Standards) and 5480.11 (Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers). The proposed facility would serve as the central site source for the evaluation, selection, inspection, testing, calibration, and maintenance of all SRS radiation monitoring instrumentation. The proposed facility would be constructed on a currently undeveloped portion in B Area of SRS. The exact plot associated with the proposed action is a 1.2 hectare (3 acre) tract of land located on the west side of SRS Road No. 2. The proposed facility would lie approximately 4.4 km (2.75 mi) from the nearest SRS site boundary. The proposed facility would also lie within the confines of the existing B Area, and SRS safeguards and security systems. Archaeological, ecological, and land use reviews have been conducted in connection with the use of this proposed plot of land, and a detailed discussion of these reviews is contained herein. Socioeconomic, operational, and accident analyses were also examined in relation to the proposed project and the findings from these reviews are also contained in this EA.

  14. Report: Opportunities to Improve Data Quality and Children’s Health through the Food Quality Protection Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #2006-P-00009, January 10, 2006. To meet the requirements of FQPA, EPA instituted numerous data requirements designed to provide infants and children with better protection against the health risks of pesticides.

  15. Reading About the Flu Online: How Health-Protective Behavioral Intentions Are Influenced by Media Multitasking, Polychronicity, and Strength of Health-Related Arguments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononova, Anastasia; Yuan, Shupei; Joo, Eunsin

    2017-06-01

    As health organizations increasingly use the Internet to communicate medical information and advice (Shortliffe et al., 2000; World Health Organization, 2013), studying factors that affect health information processing and health-protective behaviors becomes extremely important. The present research applied the elaboration likelihood model of persuasion to explore the effects of media multitasking, polychronicity (preference for multitasking), and strength of health-related arguments on health-protective behavioral intentions. Participants read an online article about influenza that included strong and weak suggestions to engage in flu-preventive behaviors. In one condition, participants read the article and checked Facebook; in another condition, they were exposed only to the article. Participants expressed greater health-protective behavioral intentions in the media multitasking condition than in the control condition. Strong arguments were found to elicit more positive behavioral intentions than weak arguments. Moderate and high polychronics showed greater behavioral intentions than low polychronics when they read the article in the multitasking condition. The difference in intentions to follow strong and weak arguments decreased for moderate and high polychronics. The results of the present study suggest that health communication practitioners should account for not only media use situations in which individuals typically read about health online but also individual differences in information processing, which puts more emphasis on the strength of health-protective suggestions when targeting light multitaskers.

  16. Patient protection and Affordable Care Act; data collection to support standards related to essential health benefits; recognition of entities for the accreditation of qualified health plans. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    This final rule establishes data collection standards necessary to implement aspects of section 1302 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Affordable Care Act), which directs the Secretary of Health and Human Services to define essential health benefits. This final rule outlines the data on applicable plans to be collected from certain issuers to support the definition of essential health benefits. This final rule also establishes a process for the recognition of accrediting entities for purposes of certification of qualified health plans.

  17. Health Education Specialists' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Perceptions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Jessica; Hanson, Carl L; Magnusson, Brianna; Neiger, Brad

    2016-03-01

    The changing landscape of health care as a result of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) may provide new opportunities for health education specialists (HES). The purpose of this study was to survey HES in the United States on their knowledge and attitudes of the ACA and assess their perceptions of job growth under the law. A random sample of 220 (36% response rate) certified HES completed a 53-item cross sectional survey administered online through Qualtrics. Findings were compared to public opinion on health care reform. HES are highly favorable of the law (70%) compared to the general public (23%). A total of 85% of respondents were able to list a provision of the ACA, and most (81%) thought the ACA would be successful at increasing insured Americans. Over half (64.6%) believe job opportunities will increase. Those who viewed the law favorably were significantly more likely to score better on a knowledge scale related to the ACA. HES understand publicized provisions but are uncertain about common myths and specific provisions related to Title IV, "Prevention of Chronic Disease and Improving Public Health." Directed and continuing education to HES regarding the ACA is warranted. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  18. Generation of Hospital Waste: An Awareness Impact on Health and Environmental Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available World is generating more and more waste as the population of people in the world & Hospitals are increasing day by day. Health care activities are a means of protecting health, curing patients and saving lives. Waste generating from hospitals, health centers and medicals are no exceptions. Medical waste contains toxic chemicals, can be infectious and pose contamination risks both to public health and environment. But they also generate waste, out of which 25 percent entail risks, either of infection, of trauma or radiation exposure. In addition the inappropriate treatment or disposal of the waste can lead to environmental contamination or pollution. Seventy five percent of the hospital waste is similar to household waste and do not entail any particular hazard. In general, PVC plastic waste represents the large amount in hospital waste. In this paper we are addressing the issue of incineration of medical waste and to control the surface water mercurial pollution, their impacts on health, environment and their remediation.

  19. Health Risk Perceptions and Exercise in Older Adulthood: An Application of Protection Motivation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthig, Joelle C

    2016-09-01

    Protection Motivation Theory (PMT) was applied to explore the relationship between perceived risk of acute health crises and intent to exercise. Interviews of 351 community-living older adults assessed prior physical activity (PPA), all PMT components, and exercise intent. A multi-group structural equation model revealed gender differences in PMT predictors of exercise intent. PPA, age, self-efficacy, and response efficacy directly predicted men's intent. Women's PPA and age predicted PMT components of self-efficacy and response costs, which predicted intent. Findings have implications for devising interventions to enhance physical activity in later life by targeting different PMT components for older men and women.

  20. Electronic Communication of Protected Health Information: Privacy, Security, and HIPAA Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolet, Brian C; Marwaha, Jayson S; Hyatt, Brad; Blazar, Phillip E; Lifchez, Scott D

    2017-06-01

    Technology has enhanced modern health care delivery, particularly through accessibility to health information and ease of communication with tools like mobile device messaging (texting). However, text messaging has created new risks for breach of protected health information (PHI). In the current study, we sought to evaluate hand surgeons' knowledge and compliance with privacy and security standards for electronic communication by text message. A cross-sectional survey of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand membership was conducted in March and April 2016. Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were performed of composite results as well as relevant subgroup analyses. A total of 409 responses were obtained (11% response rate). Although 63% of surgeons reported that they believe that text messaging does not meet Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 security standards, only 37% reported they do not use text messages to communicate PHI. Younger surgeons and respondents who believed that their texting was compliant were statistically significantly more like to report messaging of PHI (odds ratio, 1.59 and 1.22, respectively). A majority of hand surgeons in this study reported the use of text messaging to communicate PHI. Of note, neither the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 statute nor US Department of Health and Human Services specifically prohibits this form of electronic communication. To be compliant, surgeons, practices, and institutions need to take reasonable security precautions to prevent breach of privacy with electronic communication. Communication of clinical information by text message is not prohibited under Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, but surgeons should use appropriate safeguards to prevent breach when using this form of communication. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Information security governance: a risk assessment approach to health information systems protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Patricia A H

    2013-01-01

    It is no small task to manage the protection of healthcare data and healthcare information systems. In an environment that is demanding adaptation to change for all information collection, storage and retrieval systems, including those for of e-health and information systems, it is imperative that good information security governance is in place. This includes understanding and meeting legislative and regulatory requirements. This chapter provides three models to educate and guide organisations in this complex area, and to simplify the process of information security governance and ensure appropriate and effective measures are put in place. The approach is risk based, adapted and contextualized for healthcare. In addition, specific considerations of the impact of cloud services, secondary use of data, big data and mobile health are discussed.

  2. Rationing health protection: a proposal to exempt nuisance dust from US Clean Air Act regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centner, Terence J; Colson, Gregory

    2013-03-15

    The US House of Representative has passed a bill called the "Farm Dust Regulation Prevention Act" (Dust Act) that would exempt most types of particulate matter (PM) in rural areas from the air quality controls of the US Clean Air Act. The Dust Act would markedly change the country's air quality standards. An examination of the proposed provisions shows that they would exempt non-combustion PM pollutants from mining, smelting, petroleum production, and power generation from existing air quality standards. Persons downwind from pollutants generated in rural areas could be exposed to concentrations of carcinogenic heavy metals, asbestos, and benzene known to adversely affect their health and ecological resources. Existing federal air quality standards based on science would be replaced by a flexible standard that rations health protection.

  3. Bending the curve: force health protection during the insertion phase of the Ebola outbreak response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Mark S; Beaton, K; Bowley, D; Eardley, W; Hunt, P; Johnson, S; Round, J; Tarmey, N T; Williams, A

    2016-06-01

    After >10 years of enduring operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, Defence Strategic Direction is returning to a contingency posture. As the first post-Afghanistan operation, in September 2014, a UK Joint Inter-Agency Task Force deployed to Sierra Leone in response to the Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic in West Africa. The aims were expanding treatment capacity, assisting with training and supporting host nation resilience. The insertion phase of this deployment created a unique set of challenges for force health protection. In addition to the considerable risk of tropical disease and trauma, deployed personnel faced the risks of working in an EVD epidemic. This report explores how deployed medical assets overcame the difficulties of mounting a short-notice contingent operation in a region of the world with inherent major climatic and health challenges.

  4. A novel dentifrice technology for advanced oral health protection: A review of technical and clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Arif; He, Tao

    2005-09-01

    Throughout the world, dentifrices have played a key role in the practice of good oral hygiene and promotion of better oral health. In addition to providing general dental cleaning, toothpastes also have served as an excellent vehicle for the introduction of new agents that deliver therapeutic and cosmetic benefits. Key examples of using dentifrices to provide added benefits include the introduction in 1955 of the first fluoridated toothpaste clinically proven to fight caries (Crest Cavity Protection) and the launch of the first tartar-control dentifrice (Crest Tartar Control) in the mid-1980s. To continue expanding the health and esthetic benefits offered by a single dentifrice, a multitude of agents have been investigated over the past 3 decades. The focus of these investigations has been in the multibenefit segment, the most widely used among US consumers.

  5. Integrating biodiversity management and indigenous biopiracy protection to promote environmental justice and global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Tim K; Liang, Bryan A

    2012-06-01

    Many potentially useful medicines arise from developing countries' biodiverse environments and indigenous knowledge. However, global intellectual property rules have resulted in biopiracy, raising serious ethical concerns of environmental justice, exploitation, and health disparities in these populations. Furthermore, state-based approaches have not led to adequate biodiversity protection, management, or resource sharing, which affect access to lifesaving drugs. In response, country delegates adopted the Nagoya Protocol, which aims at promoting biodiversity management, combating biopiracy, and encouraging equitable benefits sharing with indigenous communities. However, the effectiveness of this framework in meeting these objectives remains in question. To address these challenges, we propose a policy building on the Nagoya Protocol that employs a World Health Organization-World Trade Organization Joint Committee on Bioprospecting and Biopiracy.

  6. A health protection model for Hispanic adults with Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Christine L; Calvillo, Evelyn

    2007-07-01

    The Hispanic Health Protection Model (HHPM) was designed to assist practitioners' systematic assessment of Hispanic people to establish baselines and evaluate the success of early diabetes treatment. This article provides the research basis of the HHPM and related assessment tools. The treatment of diabetes incorporates lifestyle change, and this adjustment is particularly important to follow with vulnerable groups. One such group is the Hispanic population, since the impact of diabetes is greatest on economically disadvantaged segments of this population, who suffer disproportionately higher Type 2 diabetes prevalence and higher levels of morbidity and mortality as compared with other populations. Traditional Hispanic health beliefs are often in conflict with Western medicine, so the adjustments to the lifestyle demands of this disease need to be evaluated. To understand this discrepancy fully in patient outcomes, a culturally sensitive assessment framework was developed based on health protection theories and research with Hispanic people with diabetes and, based on this framework, assessment tools were translated for use during interviews with low literacy, Spanish-speaking patients. The HHPM translated measures of premorbid lifestyle, health beliefs, support, self-efficacy, quality of life, knowledge of diabetes, and physiological parameters can be used during consecutive clinic visits during the first six months of therapy to map the success of patients' understanding of and psychological adjustment to diabetes. The HHPM is a culturally-relevant, systematic, and holistic approach to assessing adjustment of Hispanic people to a new diagnosis of diabetes, including their psychological, cognitive, and physiological outcomes. Using this type of systematic approach will allow practitioners to target barriers to therapy, such as a lack of self-efficacy or incomplete knowledge of the disease and its treatment in a strategic manner to improve patient success in

  7. Standpipe systems for fire protection

    CERN Document Server

    Isman, Kenneth E

    2017-01-01

    This important new manual goes beyond the published NFPA standards on installation of standpipe systems to include the rules in the International Building Code, municipal fire codes, the National Fire Code of Canada, and information on inspection, testing, and maintenance of standpipe systems. Also covered are the interactions between standpipe and sprinkler systems, since these important fire protection systems are so frequently installed together. Illustrated with design examples and practical applications to reinforce the learning experience, this is the go-to reference for engineers, architects, design technicians, building inspectors, fire inspectors, and anyone that inspects, tests or maintains fire protection systems. Fire marshals and plan review authorities that have the responsibility for reviewing and accepting plans and hydraulic calculations for standpipe systems are also an important audience, as are firefighters who actually use standpipe systems. As a member of the committees responsible for s...

  8. VA office of inspector general releases scathing report of Phoenix VA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The long-awaited Office of Inspector General’s (OIG report on the Phoenix VA Health Care System (PVAHCS was released on August 27, 2014 (1. The report was scathing in its evaluation of VA practices and leadership. Five questions were investigated: 1.Were there clinically significant delays in care? 2. Did PVAHCS omit the names of veterans waiting for care from its Electronic Wait List (EWL? 3. Were PVAHCS personnel not following established scheduling procedures? 4. Did the PVAHCS culture emphasize goals at the expense of patient care? 5. Are scheduling deficiencies systemic throughout the VA? In each case, the OIG found that the allegations were true. Despite initial denials, the OIG report showed that former PVAHCS director Sharon Helman, associate director Lance Robinson, hospital administration director Brad Curry, chief of staff Darren Deering and other senior executives were aware of delays in care and unofficial wait lists. Perhaps most disturbing is ...

  9. Goals: A Significant Tool for Protection of Mental and Physical Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Eryilmaz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Human beings want to have mental and physical health, attach to life, and also have a happy life. In this process, they need several tools. The goals are the most important tool for a happy and healthy life. Goals help individuals become aware of problems in a timely fashion, which in turn leads to healthy solutions. Goals give direction for life of an individual, and also help avoid chaos. Goals can help motivate individual by clarifying and communicating what the individual is striving to achieve. In addition to these, goals are important determinants for physical and mental health. In this article, the history of goals in psychology, definition of goals, types of goals, transferring of goals for real life, relationships between goals and cultures, implementation programs which are goal oriented, goals in national literature, and also relationships between goals, physical and mental health have been briefly reviewed. As a result, many scientific disciplines could use goals as protective and preventive tools for mental and physical health of individuals.

  10. Health Monitoring Technology for Thermal Protection Systems on Reusable Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milos, Frank S.; Watters, D. G.; Heinemann, J. M.; Karunaratne, K. S.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Integrated subsystem health diagnostics is an area where major improvements have been identified for potential implementation into the design of new reusable launch vehicles (RLVs) in order to reduce life cycle costs, to increase safety margins, and to improve mission reliability. This talk summarizes a joint effort between NASA Ames and industry partners to develop rapid non-contact diagnostic tools for health and performance monitoring of thermal protection systems (TPS) on future RLVs. The specific goals for TPS health monitoring are to increase the speed and reliability of TPS inspections for improved operability at lower cost. The technology being developed includes a 3-D laser scanner for examining the exterior surface of the TPS, and a subsurface microsensor suite for monitoring the health and performance of the TPS. The sensor suite consists of passive overlimit sensors and sensors for continuous parameter monitoring in flight. The sensors are integrated with radio-frequency identification (RFID) microchips to enable wireless communication of-the sensor data to an external reader that may be a hand-held scanner or a large portal. Prototypes of the laser system and both types of subsurface sensors have been developed. The laser scanner was tested on Shuttle Orbiter Columbia and was able to dimension surface chips and holes on a variety of TPS materials. The temperature-overlimit microsensor has a diameter under 0.05 inch (suitable for placement in gaps between ceramic TPS tiles) and can withstand 700 F for 15 minutes.

  11. Can economic deprivation protect health? Paradoxical multilevel effects of poverty on Hispanic children's wheezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Timothy W; Kim, Young-an; Grineski, Sara E; Clark-Reyna, Stephanie

    2014-08-06

    Prior research suggests that economic deprivation has a generally negative influence on residents' health. We employ hierarchical logistic regression modeling to test if economic deprivation presents respiratory health risks or benefits to Hispanic children living in the City of El Paso (Texas, USA) at neighborhood- and individual-levels, and whether individual-level health effects of economic deprivation vary based on neighborhood-level economic deprivation. Data come from the US Census Bureau and a population-based survey of El Paso schoolchildren. The dependent variable is children's current wheezing, an established respiratory morbidity measure, which is appropriate for use with economically-deprived children with an increased likelihood of not receiving a doctor's asthma diagnosis. Results reveal that economic deprivation (measured based on poverty status) at both neighborhood- and individual-levels is associated with reduced odds of wheezing for Hispanic children. A sensitivity analysis revealed similar significant effects of individual- and neighborhood-level poverty on the odds of doctor-diagnosed asthma. Neighborhood-level poverty did not significantly modify the observed association between individual-level poverty and Hispanic children's wheezing; however, greater neighborhood poverty tends to be more protective for poor (as opposed to non-poor) Hispanic children. These findings support a novel, multilevel understanding of seemingly paradoxical effects of economic deprivation on Hispanic health.

  12. Benzoxazinoids: Cereal phytochemicals with putative therapeutic and health-protecting properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Khem B; Tanwir, Fariha; Gregersen, Per L; Steffensen, Stine K; Jensen, Bettina M; Poulsen, Lars K; Nielsen, Claus H; Høyer, Søren; Borre, Michael; Fomsgaard, Inge S

    2015-07-01

    Benzoxazinoids (BXs) are a group of natural chemical compounds with putative pharmacological and health-protecting properties. BXs were formerly identified in and isolated from selected dicot medicinal plants and young cereal plants. Recently, BXs were found to be present in mature cereal grains and bakery products, such that knowledge about the pharmacological properties of BXs, which until now have unknowingly been consumed through the daily bread and breakfast cereals, has come into new focus. This review discusses published results from in vitro studies and a few human and animal model studies on the health effects and pharmacological responses of various BX compounds. Many of these studies have reported antimicrobial, anticancer, reproductive system stimulatory, central nervous system stimulatory, immunoregulatory, and appetite- and weight-reducing effects of BXs and/or BX derivatives. The health benefits of wholegrain intake may be associated with the solitary and/or overlapping biological effects of fibers, lignans, phenolic acids, alkylresorcinols, BXs, and other bioactive compounds. In the context of BXs as dietary ingredients, further comprehensive investigations are required to understand their biological functions, to elucidate the underlying mechanisms, to explore their potential contribution on the health effects associated with wholegrain consumption, and to examine their potential as functional food ingredients.

  13. Electrosmog. Health hazards, limit values, consumer protection; 4. rev. ed.; Elektrosmog. Gesundheitsrisiken, Grenzwerte, Verbraucherschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karus, M.; Ebert, L.; Wilke, I.; Schneider, W.; Koehnecke, W.; Loefflad, H.; Plotzke, O.; Niessen, P.

    1997-07-01

    The book deals with ``electrosmog``, the electromagnetic fields in our environment that are generated by electrical equipment and installations and which are being studied more closely recently as a suspected source of a variety of health hazards or diseases. The initial chapter explains the physical fundamentals and terminology, the process and the sources generating the electrical and magnetic fields found in our environment, as well as the measuring techniques applied for detection and assessment. The following chapters present information on the state of the art in research into the health effects of electrosmog in the low and high-frequency ranges, on currently applicable limit values and the underlying concepts of calculation, as well as the policy pursued in this context. The concluding chapters of the book discuss the sources of electrosmog in a variety of living environments as well as mitigating or protective measures defined from the angle of consumer protection. (FK) [Deutsch] Dieses Buch befasst sich mit der unter dem Namen `Elektrosmog` bekannt gewordenen elektromagnetischen Umweltbelastung, die in juengster Zeit fuer eine Vielzahl von Krankheiten verantwortlich gemacht wird. Eingangs werden grundlegende physikalische Begriffe, das Auftreten von elektrischen und magnetischen Feldern im Alltag sowie die Messung von Elektrosmog behandelt. Das folgende Kapitel stellt den aktuellen Forschungsstand ueber die gesundheitlichen Auswirkungen von Elektrosmog im Nieder- und Hochfrequenzbereich dar. Anschliessend werden die derzeit gueltigen Grenzwerte und ihre konzeptionelle und politische Basis diskutiert. Der letzte Teil geht auf die vielfaeltigen Quellen von Elektrosmog in den unterschiedlichen Lebensbereichen ein und diskutiert Massnahmen fuer den Verbraucherschutz. (FK)

  14. Sun protective behaviour in renal transplant recipients. A qualitative study based on individual interviews and the Health Belief Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiveren, Jette; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Haedersdal, Merete

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Renal transplant recipients (RTRs) are at high-risk of developing aggressive and potentially lethal non-melanoma skin cancer, which emphasizes the need for consistent sun protective behaviour. OBJECTIVE: To identify factors that exert an influence on the sun protective behaviour of RTRs...... towards the use of sunscreens and wearing hats were barriers against efficient sun protective behaviour. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the Health Belief Model can be used to identify and describe factors that influence decisions and behaviour among RTRs regarding sun protective behaviour. We......: The major result was the finding that patients did not perceive the threat of skin cancer as an important health problem and, therefore, did not give a high priority to sun protection, even though patients were aware of their increased risk of developing skin cancer. Moreover, negative individual attitudes...

  15. [Rethinking social protection in health in Latin America and the Caribbean].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, H; Andersson, B

    2000-01-01

    Despite what is written in the constitutions and other basic document mandates of the countries of the Region, exclusion from social protection in health (SPH) affects an important proportion of the population (at least 20%, which represents, in absolute figures, between 80 and 200 million people). These estimates are obtained through a series of theoretical (social security coverage) and practical indicators that encompass structural indicators (poverty, ethnicity, and geographical barriers) as well as process indicators (non-institutional births, compliance with vaccination schedules, and access to basic sanitation). Exclusion levels in a society are affected by the degree of segmentation of the health system. Traditionally, most countries of the Region have had a public, a social security and a private subsystem in health. Lack of attention to the problem has resulted in the formation of a community-based subsystem. The coexistence of many subsystems, along with poor regulation on the part of health authorities, has resulted in high levels of exclusion and inefficient resource allocation within the sector. The organization of social dialogue processes focusing on SPH within the context of health sector reform initiatives in each country is recommended. The process, which should be participatory, should include a full diagnosis of the situation (how many are excluded, who are they, and why, and what mechanisms are the most appropriate for tackling the issue in each country). It should also provide a political and technical feasibility analysis of the most suitable options for each society, and a determination of whether or not conventional subsystems have exhausted their potential. The process should culminate in a program for implementing the specific proposals made in each society, in an effort to maximize SPH.

  16. Health protection of health care workers from the prospective of ethics, science and good medical practice. Opinions from stakeholders in health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porru, S; Cannatelli, P; Cerioli, Beloyanna; Flor, L; Gramegna, Maria; Polato, R; Rodriguez, D

    2012-01-01

    Fitness for work (FFW) in health care workers poses multidisciplinary challenges because of management problems scientific and ethical implications and the implementation of preventive interventions in health care settings. All the relevant stakeholders, including the General Manager, Medical Director, worker's representative, the person responsible for prevention and protection, forensic medicine expert, the person responsible for prevention and health safety at public administration level, commented on: danger to third parties; FFW formulation; human resource management; stress; professional independence; role of the person responsible for prevention and protection and of the person responsible for prevention at public administration level; professional responsibilities. Opinions are reported regarding the main problems related to the role of the Occupational Physician in FFW formulation, such as the difficult balance between autonomy and independence, limited turnover and aging of workforce, need of confidentiality and respect for professional status of the HCW prevalence of susceptibility conditions, rights and duties of stakeholders. The most significant result was the request by the Lombardy Region for more quality in risk assessment and health surveillance; to maintain uniform conduct over all the local health authorities, to allow the board in charge of examining appeals against FFW to fully cooperate with the occupational physician; due attention to the person/worker; the opportunity to convene referral boards for complex FFW management; the challenge of stress management and the need for an observatory for psychological discomforts; the importance of the ICOH Code of Ethics and avoidance of conflicts of interests; the need for individual risk assessment and risk management; the concept of sharing responsibilities and of a real multidisciplinary approach.

  17. Risk and protection factors for women’s health in the prevention of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina de Oliveira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the risk and protection factors for women who access health services for the realization of preventive screening for cervical cancer. Quantitative study conducted with 51 women in Teresina-PI, Brazil, in August 2013. The semi-structured form caught the variables of interest and the data were analyzed by the SPSS. Of the women, 72.5% were aged 25-39 years, 66.7% were married, and 55.0% accessed the service for prevention. With regard to the risk factors, 41.2% were overweight, 19.6% obese, and 72.5% were sedentary. Regarding the access to health services, 78.5% sought care in the past year. The cervical cancer screening program should be discussed in the sociocultural context, which will promote understanding and adherence to the recommendations of take the exam periodically. For this purpose, we recommend conducting immediate and effective measures to improve the viability of public policies for women’s health.

  18. Children Affected by War and Armed Conflict: Parental Protective Factors and Resistance to Mental Health Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Slone

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the role of parenting styles and parental warmth in moderating relations between exposure to political life events and mental health symptoms among 277 Israeli adolescents aged 12–14 and their parents, who had been exposed to protracted periods of war, missile bombardments, and terrorism. Adolescents completed the Political Life Events (PLE scale, Brief Symptom Inventory and questionnaires regarding parenting style and parental warmth. The primary caregiver completed the Child Behavior Checklist for assessment of the child’s internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Results confirmed that severity of PLE exposure was positively correlated with psychological distress and with internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Maternal authoritativeness and warmth functioned as protective factors and had moderating effects on the relation between PLE exposure and mental health symptoms. In contrast, maternal authoritarianism exacerbated the relation between PLE exposure and children’s externalizing symptoms. Fathers’ parenting style and warmth had no significant relationship with children’s mental health outcomes. These findings have important clinical and practical implications for parental guidance and support during periods of war and armed conflict.

  19. Children Affected by War and Armed Conflict: Parental Protective Factors and Resistance to Mental Health Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slone, Michelle; Shoshani, Anat

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the role of parenting styles and parental warmth in moderating relations between exposure to political life events and mental health symptoms among 277 Israeli adolescents aged 12–14 and their parents, who had been exposed to protracted periods of war, missile bombardments, and terrorism. Adolescents completed the Political Life Events (PLE) scale, Brief Symptom Inventory and questionnaires regarding parenting style and parental warmth. The primary caregiver completed the Child Behavior Checklist for assessment of the child’s internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Results confirmed that severity of PLE exposure was positively correlated with psychological distress and with internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Maternal authoritativeness and warmth functioned as protective factors and had moderating effects on the relation between PLE exposure and mental health symptoms. In contrast, maternal authoritarianism exacerbated the relation between PLE exposure and children’s externalizing symptoms. Fathers’ parenting style and warmth had no significant relationship with children’s mental health outcomes. These findings have important clinical and practical implications for parental guidance and support during periods of war and armed conflict. PMID:28878705

  20. Children Affected by War and Armed Conflict: Parental Protective Factors and Resistance to Mental Health Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slone, Michelle; Shoshani, Anat

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the role of parenting styles and parental warmth in moderating relations between exposure to political life events and mental health symptoms among 277 Israeli adolescents aged 12-14 and their parents, who had been exposed to protracted periods of war, missile bombardments, and terrorism. Adolescents completed the Political Life Events (PLE) scale, Brief Symptom Inventory and questionnaires regarding parenting style and parental warmth. The primary caregiver completed the Child Behavior Checklist for assessment of the child's internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Results confirmed that severity of PLE exposure was positively correlated with psychological distress and with internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Maternal authoritativeness and warmth functioned as protective factors and had moderating effects on the relation between PLE exposure and mental health symptoms. In contrast, maternal authoritarianism exacerbated the relation between PLE exposure and children's externalizing symptoms. Fathers' parenting style and warmth had no significant relationship with children's mental health outcomes. These findings have important clinical and practical implications for parental guidance and support during periods of war and armed conflict.

  1. Inspection control and the environmental protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milkov Dragan L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental protection is the task of many administrative bodies, but the activity of the environmental inspection is of special importance. According to the Law on Environmental Protection, inspection's tasks in this area belong to the competence of republican bodies, ie. Ministry of Agriculture and Environmental Protection. Autonomous province and local self-government have only delegated competence in this field, under condition that this is explicitly regulated in special laws. Environmental inspection's activity consists in preventive actions, certain prior - preparatory activities and the audit itself. In addition, following the intervention of the Inspector issue of the control may be corrective or repressive. According to the Law on Inspection Control and the Law on Environmental Protection, the inspectors have a number of powers and responsibilities, which enable them to ensure the lawful and proper conduct of individuals and legal entities.

  2. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, October 1, 1997--March 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s eighteenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, October 1, 1997, through March 31, 1998, the Department took final action on 20 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 80 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on one contract and financial assistance audit, leaving two reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of those reports.

  3. Occupational health nurses’ achievement of competence and comfort in respiratory protection and preferred learning methods results of a nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgel, Barbara J; Novak, Debra A; Carpenter, Holly Elizabeth; Gruden, MaryAnn; Lachat, Ann M; Taormina, Deborah

    2014-02-01

    Additional findings are presented from a 2012 nationwide survey of 2,072 occupational health nurses regarding how they achieved competence in respiratory protection, their preferred methods of learning, and how they motivated employees to use respiratory protection. On-the-job training, taking a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health spirometry course, or attending professional conferences were the primary ways occupational health nurses gained respiratory protection knowledge. Attending professional conferences was the preferred method of learning, varying by type of industry and years of occupational health nurse experience. Employee motivational strategies were not widely used; the most common strategy was to tailor respiratory protection training to workplace culture. Designing training methods that match learning preferences, within the context of the organization's safety and quality improvement culture, is a key recommendation supported by the literature and these findings. Including respiratory protection content and competencies in all levels of academic nursing education is an additional recommendation. Additional research is needed to link training strategies with consistent and correct use of respiratory protection by employees.

  4. Poultry Houses, WI Livestock Consortium Livestock Premises; confidentiality protected by law; use for animal health emergencies only; some aggregated county data, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade & Consumer Protection.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — Poultry Houses dataset current as of 2009. WI Livestock Consortium Livestock Premises; confidentiality protected by law; use for animal health emergencies only; some...

  5. Health protection at the Savannah River Site: A guide to records series of the Department of Energy and its contractors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    As part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide to the records series pertaining to health protection activities at the DOE`s Savannah River Site (SRS). Since its inception in the early 1950s, the SRS, formerly known as the Savannah River Plant (SRP), has demonstrated significant interest in safeguarding facilities, protecting employees` health, and monitoring the environment. The guide describes records that concern health protection program administration, radiological monitoring of the plant and the environment, calibration and maintenance of monitoring instruments, internal and external dosimetry practices, medical surveillance of employees, occupational safety and training measures, site visitation, and electronic information systems. The introduction to the guide describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI`s role in the project. It provides brief histories of the DOE, SRS, and the SRS organizational units responsible for health protection activities. This introduction also summarizes HAI`s methodology in developing criteria and conducting its verification of the SRS inventory of active and inactive SRS Health Protection records. Furthermore, it furnishes information on the production of the guide, the content of the records series descriptions, the location of the records, and the procedures for accessing records repositories.

  6. Identifying the gaps: Armenian health care legislation and human rights in patient care protections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zopunyan, Violeta; Krmoyan, Suren; Quinn, Ryan

    2013-12-12

    Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Republic of Armenia has undergone an extensive legislative overhaul. Although a number of developments have aimed to improve the quality and accessibility of Armenia's health care system, a host of factors has prevented the country from fully introducing measures to ensure respect for human rights in patient care. In particular, inadequate health care financing continues to oblige patients to make both formal and informal payments to obtain basic medical care and services. More generally, a lack of oversight and monitoring mechanisms has obstructed the implementation of Armenia's commitments to human rights in several international agreements. Within the framework of a broader project on promoting human rights in patient care, research was carried out to examine Armenia’s health care legislation with the aim of identifying gaps in comparison with international and regional standards. This research was designed using the 14 rights enshrined in the European Charter on Patient Rights as guiding principles, along with domestic legal acts relevant to the rights of health care providers. The gaps analysis revealed numerous problems with Armenian legislation governing the relationships between stakeholders in health care service delivery. It also identified several practical inconsistencies with the international legal instruments ratified by the Armenian government. These legislative shortcomings are illustrated by highlighting key health-related rights violations experienced by patients and their health care providers, and by indicating opportunities for improved rights protections. A full list of human rights relevant to patient care and recommendations for promoting them in the Armenian context is provided in Tables 1 and 2. A number of initiatives must be undertaken in order to promote the full spectrum of human rights in patient care in Armenia. This section highlights certain recommendations flowing from the findings of

  7. Protecting the public's health following the Virginia Tech tragedy: issues of law and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, James G

    2007-09-01

    Assessing legal responsibility in the aftermath of the April 2007 tragedy at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) is inevitable. Beyond assigning blame, law- and policymakers should examine ways to protect the public from future incidences of gun violence on campuses and other settings. Although no combination of legal responses may fully deter individuals who are intent on causing significant harm, select legal reforms have the potential to prevent future acts of gun violence. These reforms include considering more restrictive gun laws nationally, reporting individuals with known mental impairments that may endanger themselves or others to federal or state databases, and refining laws that limit institutions from acting in advance to address prospectively dangerous people. Each of these reforms has the potential to reduce acts of gun violence to improve the public's health, but also implicates individual rights and interests.

  8. Protection of Health Imagery by Region Based Lossless Reversible Watermarking Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lakshmi Priya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Providing authentication and integrity in medical images is a problem and this work proposes a new blind fragile region based lossless reversible watermarking technique to improve trustworthiness of medical images. The proposed technique embeds the watermark using a reversible least significant bit embedding scheme. The scheme combines hashing, compression, and digital signature techniques to create a content dependent watermark making use of compressed region of interest (ROI for recovery of ROI as reported in literature. The experiments were carried out to prove the performance of the scheme and its assessment reveals that ROI is extracted in an intact manner and PSNR values obtained lead to realization that the presented scheme offers greater protection for health imageries.

  9. Protection of Health Imagery by Region Based Lossless Reversible Watermarking Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, R Lakshmi; Sadasivam, V

    2015-01-01

    Providing authentication and integrity in medical images is a problem and this work proposes a new blind fragile region based lossless reversible watermarking technique to improve trustworthiness of medical images. The proposed technique embeds the watermark using a reversible least significant bit embedding scheme. The scheme combines hashing, compression, and digital signature techniques to create a content dependent watermark making use of compressed region of interest (ROI) for recovery of ROI as reported in literature. The experiments were carried out to prove the performance of the scheme and its assessment reveals that ROI is extracted in an intact manner and PSNR values obtained lead to realization that the presented scheme offers greater protection for health imageries.

  10. Predictor variables of happiness and its connection with risk and protective factors for health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaigordobil, Maite

    2015-01-01

    Great thinkers, philosophers, scientists, and artists from History have often been concerned about one of the most important elements of life: happiness. The study had four goals: (1) To analyze possible differences in feelings of happiness as a function of sex and age; (2) To explore the relations of happiness with risk factors (psychopathological symptoms, behavior problems) and protective factors (self-concept-self-esteem, cooperative behavior, social skills) for health; (3) To identify predictor variables of happiness; and (4) To explore whether self-esteem mediates the relationship between happiness and psychopathological symptoms. The sample comprised 286 adolescents (14–16 years old). The study used a descriptive, correlational, and cross-sectional methodology. Seven assessment instruments were administered. The ANOVAs confirm that there are no sex differences, but happiness decreases as age increases. Pearson coefficients show that adolescents with more feelings of happiness had fewer psychopathological symptoms (somatization, obsession–compulsion, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, psychoticism…), fewer behavioral problems (school-academic, antisocial behavior, shyness-withdrawal, psychopathological, psychosomatic), high social adaptation, high self-concept/self-esteem, many cooperative behaviors, many appropriate social skills, and few negative social skills (inappropriate assertiveness, impulsiveness, jealousy-withdrawal). Multiple regression analysis identified five variables predicting happiness: high self-concept, few symptoms of depression, many cooperative behaviors, high self-esteem, and low psychoticism. Results showed a partial mediational effect of self-esteem in the relation between happiness and psychopathological symptoms. The discussion focuses on the importance of implementing programs to promote feelings of happiness, as well as protective factors for health (self

  11. Potential applications of smart clothing solutions in health care and personal protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinander, Harriet; Honkala, Markku

    2004-01-01

    The rapid development in the fields of sensor and telecommunication technologies has created completely new possibilities also for the textile and clothing field. New smart textile and clothing systems can be developed by integrating sensors in the textile constructions. Application fields for these added-value products are e.g. protective clothing for extreme environments, garments for the health care sector, technical textiles, sport and leisure wear. Some products have already been introduced on the markets, but generally it can be stated that the development is only in its starting phase, and the expectations for the future are big. Many different aspects have to be considered in the development of the wearable technology products for the health care sector: medical problems and their diagnosis, sensor choice, data processing and telecommunication solutions, clothing requirements. A functional product can be achieved only if all aspects work together, and therefore experts from all fields should participate in the RTD projects. In the EC-funded project DE3002 Easytex clothing and textiles for disabled and elderly people were investigated. Some recommendations concerning durability, appearance, comfort, service and safety of products for different special user groups were defined, based on user questionnaires and seminars, general textile and clothing requirements and on laboratory test series."Clothing Area Network--Clan" is a research project aiming to develop a technical concept and technology needed in enabling both wired and wireless data and power transfer between different intelligent modules (user interfaces, sensors, CPU's, batteries etc.) integrated into a smart clothing system. Fire-fighters clothing system is chosen as the development platform, being a very challenging application from which the developed technology can be transferred to other protective clothing systems.

  12. Predictor variables of happiness and its connection with risk and protective factors for health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maite eGaraigordobil

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Great thinkers, philosophers, scientists, and artists from History have often been concerned about one of the most important elements of life: happiness. The study had four goals: 1 To analyze possible differences in feelings of happiness as a function of sex and age; 2 To explore the relations of happiness with risk factors (psychopathological symptoms, behavior problems and protective factors (self-concept-self-esteem, cooperative behavior, social skills for health; 3 To identify predictor variables of happiness; and 4 To explore whether self-esteem mediates the relationship between happiness and psychopathological symptoms. The sample comprised 286 adolescents (14-16 years old. The study used a descriptive, correlational, and cross-sectional methodology. Seven assessment instruments were administered. The ANOVAs confirm that there are no sex differences, but happiness decreases as age increases. Pearson coefficients show that adolescents with more feelings of happiness had fewer psychopathological symptoms (somatization, obsession-compulsion, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, psychoticism…, fewer behavioral problems (school-academic, antisocial behavior, shyness-withdrawal, psychopathological, psychosomatic, high social adaptation, high self-concept/self-esteem, many cooperative behaviors, many appropriate social skills, and few negative social skills (inappropriate assertiveness, impulsiveness, jealousy-withdrawal. Multiple regression analysis identified five variables predicting happiness: high self-concept, few symptoms of depression, many cooperative behaviors, high self-esteem, and low psychoticism. Results showed a partial mediational effect of self-esteem in the relation between happiness and psychopathological symptoms. The discussion focuses on the importance of implementing programs to promote feelings of happiness, as well as protective factors for health (self

  13. Office of Inspector General semiannual report to Congress, October 1, 1996--March 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This Office of Inspector General Semiannual Report to the Congress covers the period from October 1, 1996, through March 31, 1997. The report summarizes significant audit, inspection, and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period which facilitated Department of Energy management efforts to improve management controls and ensure efficient and effective operation of its programs. Narratives of the most significant reports are grouped by measures which the Office of Inspector General uses to gauge its performance. The common thread that ties the performance measures together is their emphasis on supporting Department efforts to produce high quality products at the lowest possible cost to the taxpayer. Five such performance measures were used during this semiannual period to present outcomes of Office of Inspector General work in terms of improvements in Department programs and operations.

  14. Deputy Inspector General for audit services. FY 1998 annual performance plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-30

    This plan outlines the audie strategies that the Deputy Inspector General for Audit Services intends to implement and execute in Fiscal Year (FY) 1998. The plan also includes the details of efforts to improve customer service and to implement the Inspector General`s streamlining initiatives. The FY 1997/1998 Strategic Plan emphasizes six key issue areas: Financial Management, Contract Administration, Program Management, Environmental Quality, Infrastructure and Administrative Safeguards. These issue areas were chosen to ensure that the Inspector General`s audit, inspection, and investigative functions are focused to assist the Department to reach its goals, pursue its strategies, and monitor its success indicators. This plan also establishes goals, objectives, and performance measures, which are discussed in detail in Appendix I.

  15. QUALITY AUDIT AS A SERVICE IN THE INSPECTORATE OF EDUCATION OF NAVARRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseba Ozkoidi Pérez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Public policies in many countries drive towards improving both school performance and autonomy, besides accountability. Among the main issues insisted upon are school management and functioning, which are linked to educational leadership. To attain this purpose, many schools implement certified management systems leading in turn to external recognition. In Navarra, after experiencing with the ISO 9001 and EFQM models, the Department of Education resolved to create its own quality management system, the SGCC 2013, whose certification corresponds to the Inspectorate of Education. This constitutes an act of great significance, given its influence on the processes of teaching and learning. All inspectors participate in the auditing processes aimed at adding value to the school's dynamic of continuous improvement. Inspectors also collaborate in the EFQM assessment of the Excellence Award.

  16. Estimating the Tradeoff Between Risk Protection and Moral Hazard with a Nonlinear Budget Set Model of Health Insurance*

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda E. Kowalski

    2015-01-01

    Insurance induces a well-known tradeoff between the welfare gains from risk protection and the welfare losses from moral hazard. Empirical work traditionally estimates each side of the tradeoff separately, potentially yielding mutually inconsistent results. I develop a nonlinear budget set model of health insurance that allows for the calculation of both sides of the tradeoff simultaneously, allowing for a relationship between moral hazard and risk protection. An important feature of this mod...

  17. The Role of the School Inspectorate in Plan Implementation: A Systemic Approach (Based on Experiences in Costa Rica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera, Carlos E.

    In Latin American education systems the inspectorate is an administrative level linking the central national educational administration to the local operations level. Traditionally the inspector's function has been to enforce fulfillment of pedagogical and administrative norms at the local level and to transmit pertinent information on achievement…

  18. Child mental health in socioeconomically disadvantaged contexts: risk and protective factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Simões Matsukuraa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to identify and compare different situations of risk or protection in the socio-emotional development of children living in socioeconomically disadvantaged contexts. Seven (7 children aged eight to ten and their respective parents participated in the present survey. The children were 2nd to 5th grade students at an elementary public school in the countryside of Sao Paulo state. The subjects involved in this survey were divided into two different groups: one composed of children evaluated by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ – with clinical symptoms (Group with Clinical Symptoms of Mental Health - GSC; the other group was composed of children that did not present clinical symptoms (Group with Typical Development - GDT and their parents. Two different interview scripts were used for data collection: one answered by the children and the other responded by the parents. Data analysis was based on the technique of Collective Subject Discourse (CSD. The results showed similarities and differences between the GSC and GDT groups. Regarding the similarities, all the children have rules and responsibilities, and all the parents seek assistance in the care of their children by means of social, health and educational services. Concerning the differences, children in the GSC group refer to school in a negative way and have less support from their parents in school activities. It is worth mentioning that studies of this nature can contribute to the debate on public policies and practices aimed at this population.

  19. Predictors of diabetes outcomes in Mexico: testing the Hispanic health protection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Christine L; Calvillo, Evelyn

    2013-07-01

    Given the high morbidity and mortality rate of Hispanic immigrants to the United States, a study of the Hispanic Health Protection Model (HHPM) was replicated with 109 residents in Mexico who were newly diagnosed with diabetes. People with diabetes from rural clinics in Tlaxcala underwent a three-phase interview process with laboratory and weight follow-up over 4 to 6 months following a confirmed diagnosis of diabetes. This predictive, correlational study replicated the HHPM and the previous U.S. findings, including relationships between lifestyle profile, health beliefs, professional and social support, self-efficacy, diabetes knowledge, quality of life (self-satisfaction and impact of diabetes), and changes in HbA1c and body mass index. The study found that participants frequently followed good lifestyle practices while continuing to adhere to culturally based treatment and attribution beliefs. There were moderate perceptions of diabetes self-care efficacy, low ratings of support, very poor understanding of diabetes, continued obesity, acceptable quality of life ratings, and near-normal HbA1c levels.

  20. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: impact on mental health services demand and provider availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Shoshannah A

    2013-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) will greatly increase the demand for mental health (MH) services, as 62.5 million Americans from relatively high-need populations will be newly eligible for MH benefits. Consequently, the supply of MH care provider services is expected to proportionately decrease by 18% to 21% in 2014. ACA funding does not demonstrate the ability to increase turnout of psychiatrists sufficiently to meet the need. Available data indicate that the numbers of advanced practice psychiatric nurses (APPNs) continue to increase at a much greater rate, but information from either a clinical perspective or a market perspective is complicated by the weak distinctions that are made between nurse practitioners (NPs) and other nonphysician care professionals. The following recommendations are made: (a) some of the ACA funding for research into efficient and effective care delivery systems should be allocated to acquiring data on APPNs in leadership roles or clinical settings in which they are ultimately responsible for management of MH care, as differentiated from settings in which they provide support for psychiatrists; and (b) since the available data indicate nurse practitioners achieve good outcomes and are more economically viable than psychiatrists, placement of psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioners in community settings should be recognized as a realistic solution to the shortfall of MH services.

  1. The microbiome in early life: self-completion and microbiota protection as health priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietert, Rodney R

    2014-08-01

    This minireview considers the benefits of refocusing attention away from treating the patient as a mammalian human to managing the complete patient: a majority microbial superorganism. Under the "completed self" model for formation of the human-microbial superorganism, the single, most pivotal sign in distinguishing a life course of health versus that filled with disease is self-completion (i.e., seeding of the minority mammalian human by the majority microbial portion of the symbiont). From a disease prevention perspective, microbial seeding at birth and subsequent nurturing of the microbiota are significant steps to reduce the risk of both noncommunicable diseases (e.g., type 1 diabetes) and certain infectious diseases. Management of the microbiome during pregnancy, birth, and shortly thereafter appears to be the most significant critical window for healthy superorganism formation. However, the bolus for microbiota seeding at birth and the nurturing process are subject to environmental influences and disruption, such as exposure to toxic chemicals and drugs, infections, and other physical and psychological stressors. Additionally, childhood and adult corrective measures, such as fecal transplantation and administration of prebiotics and probiotics, while potentially useful, may have limitations that are yet to be fully defined. This minireview considers (1) basic features of management of the microbiome to facilitate self-completion, (2) protection of the microbiota from environmental hazards, and (3) the benefits of using a superorganism focus for health management beginning with pregnancy and extending throughout childhood and adult life.

  2. Scheduling of inspectors for ticket spot checking in urban rail transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Per; Clausen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    of the inspectors, this tool enables the construction of new schedules for ticket inspectors, such that the income from penalty fares claimed from passengers without a valid ticket is maximised. Other tools to increase income from ticket sales and penalty fares are also discussed.......A central issue for operators of passenger transportation in urban rail is balancing the income from tickets against the cost of the operation. The main part of the income except for governmental subsides comes from sales of tickets. There are various ways to ensure that all passengers carry valid...

  3. Training in Tbilisi nuclear facility provides new sampling perspectives for IAEA inspectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brim, Cornelia P.

    2016-06-08

    Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control- (NPAC-) sponsored training in a “cold” nuclear facility in Tbilisi, Georgia provides International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors with a new perspective on environmental sampling strategies. Sponsored by the Nuclear Safeguards program under the NPAC, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) experts have been conducting an annual weeklong class for IAEA inspectors in a closed nuclear facility since 2011. The Andronikashvili Institute of Physics and the Republic of Georgia collaborate with PNNL to provide the training, and the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Embassy in Tbilisi and the U.S. Mission to International Organizations in Vienna provide logistical support.

  4. Reproductive Toxic Chemicals at Work and Efforts to Protect Workers' Health: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Taek Rim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A huge number of chemicals are produced and used in the world, and some of them can have negative effects on the reproductive health of workers. To date, most chemicals and work environments have not been studied for their potential to have damaging effects on the workers' reproductive system. Because of the lack of information, many workers may not be aware that such problems can be related to occupational exposures. Newly industrialized countries such as Republic of Korea have rapidly amassed chemicals and other toxicants that pose health hazards, especially to the reproductive systems of workers. This literature review provides an overview of peer-reviewed literature regarding the teratogenic impact and need for safe handling of chemicals. Literature searches were performed using PubMed, Google Scholar, and ScienceDirect. Search strategies were narrowed based on author expertise and 100 articles were chosen for detailed analysis. A total of 47 articles met prespecified inclusion criteria. The majority of papers contained studies that were descriptive in nature with respect to the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH terms and keywords: “reproductive and heath or hazard and/or workplace or workers or occupations.” In the absence of complete information about the safe occupational handling of chemicals in Republic of Korea (other than a material safety data sheet, this review serves as a valuable reference for identifying and remedying potential gaps in relevant regulations. The review also proposes other public health actions including hazard surveillance and primary prevention activities such as reduction, substitution, ventilation, as well as protective equipment.

  5. Commissions of audit in Australia: health system privatisation directives and civil conscription protections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, Caroline; Faunce, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    practitioner co-payment as a means of testing the response of the medical profession and public. The column also examines how the civil conscription clause in s 51 (xxiiiA) of the Australian Constitution may serve to protect practitioner and patient rights should some of these privatisation changes to Australia's health system be challenged in the High Court of Australia.

  6. Impact of Publicly Financed Health Insurance Schemes on Healthcare Utilization and Financial Risk Protection in India: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinja, Shankar; Chauhan, Akashdeep Singh; Karan, Anup; Kaur, Gunjeet; Kumar, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Several publicly financed health insurance schemes have been launched in India with the aim of providing universalizing health coverage (UHC). In this paper, we report the impact of publicly financed health insurance schemes on health service utilization, out-of-pocket (OOP) expenditure, financial risk protection and health status. Empirical research studies focussing on the impact or evaluation of publicly financed health insurance schemes in India were searched on PubMed, Google scholar, Ovid, Scopus, Embase and relevant websites. The studies were selected based on two stage screening PRISMA guidelines in which two researchers independently assessed the suitability and quality of the studies. The studies included in the review were divided into two groups i.e., with and without a comparison group. To assess the impact on utilization, OOP expenditure and health indicators, only the studies with a comparison group were reviewed. Out of 1265 articles screened after initial search, 43 studies were found eligible and reviewed in full text, finally yielding 14 studies which had a comparator group in their evaluation design. All the studies (n-7) focussing on utilization showed a positive effect in terms of increase in the consumption of health services with introduction of health insurance. About 70% studies (n-5) studies with a strong design and assessing financial risk protection showed no impact in reduction of OOP expenditures, while remaining 30% of evaluations (n-2), which particularly evaluated state sponsored health insurance schemes, reported a decline in OOP expenditure among the enrolled households. One study which evaluated impact on health outcome showed reduction in mortality among enrolled as compared to non-enrolled households, from conditions covered by the insurance scheme. While utilization of healthcare did improve among those enrolled in the scheme, there is no clear evidence yet to suggest that these have resulted in reduced OOP expenditures or

  7. Impact of Publicly Financed Health Insurance Schemes on Healthcare Utilization and Financial Risk Protection in India: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Akashdeep Singh; Karan, Anup; Kaur, Gunjeet; Kumar, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Several publicly financed health insurance schemes have been launched in India with the aim of providing universalizing health coverage (UHC). In this paper, we report the impact of publicly financed health insurance schemes on health service utilization, out-of-pocket (OOP) expenditure, financial risk protection and health status. Empirical research studies focussing on the impact or evaluation of publicly financed health insurance schemes in India were searched on PubMed, Google scholar, Ovid, Scopus, Embase and relevant websites. The studies were selected based on two stage screening PRISMA guidelines in which two researchers independently assessed the suitability and quality of the studies. The studies included in the review were divided into two groups i.e., with and without a comparison group. To assess the impact on utilization, OOP expenditure and health indicators, only the studies with a comparison group were reviewed. Out of 1265 articles screened after initial search, 43 studies were found eligible and reviewed in full text, finally yielding 14 studies which had a comparator group in their evaluation design. All the studies (n-7) focussing on utilization showed a positive effect in terms of increase in the consumption of health services with introduction of health insurance. About 70% studies (n-5) studies with a strong design and assessing financial risk protection showed no impact in reduction of OOP expenditures, while remaining 30% of evaluations (n-2), which particularly evaluated state sponsored health insurance schemes, reported a decline in OOP expenditure among the enrolled households. One study which evaluated impact on health outcome showed reduction in mortality among enrolled as compared to non-enrolled households, from conditions covered by the insurance scheme. While utilization of healthcare did improve among those enrolled in the scheme, there is no clear evidence yet to suggest that these have resulted in reduced OOP expenditures or

  8. Discussion on massage therapy to health protection in Prescriptions Worth a Thousand Gold%《千金要方》推拿保健探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王道全; 林西芳

    2000-01-01

    The massage therapy to health protection in preseriptions worth a thousand gold was discussed.Itinclude four aspects,which are massage to health protection for adults,massage to health protection for infants,LAO Zi massage to health protection,old indian massage to health protection.Conclusion:the massage therapy to health protection plays an important role in traditional Chinese medicine.%将《千金要方》中的推拿保健部分,分别从成人推拿保健、小儿推拿保健、老子推拿保健、天竺国推拿保健等四个方面进行了探讨。从而反映该书推拿保健内容对祖国医学的重要贡献。

  9. The mental health of children of migrant workers in Beijing: the protective role of public school attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qin; Li, Hong; Zou, Hong; Cross, Wendi; Bian, Ran; Liu, Yan

    2015-08-01

    The present study aims to understand the mental health status of an understudied group of migrant children - children of migrant workers in China. A total of 1,466 children from Beijing participated in the study that compared migrant children (n = 1,019) to their local peers (n = 447) in public and private school settings. Results showed that overall, migrant children reported more internalizing and externalizing mental health problems and lower life satisfaction than local peers. However, public school attendance served as a protective factor for migrant children's mental health. The mental health status of migrant children attending public schools, including externalizing problems as well as friend and school satisfaction, was not different from local children. In addition, our data indicates that the protective effect of public school attendance for migrant children may be even more salient among girls than boys, and for younger children than older children.

  10. 75 FR 37242 - Requirements for Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Under the Patient Protection and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 54 RIN 1545-BJ57 Requirements for Group Health Plans and Health Insurance..., Health care, Health insurance, Pensions, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Proposed Amendments to... U.S. Department of Health and Human Services are issuing substantially similar interim final...

  11. Defining Medically Necessary Services To Protect Children. Protecting Consumer Rights in Public Systems: Managed Mental Health Care Policy. A Series of Issue Papers on Contracting for Managed Behavioral Health Care, #5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, Washington, DC.

    This issue paper is designed to help families, advocates and policymakers ensure that "medically necessary" standards in public-sector contracts for managed mental health care protect children's rights, particularly the rights of children who have serious emotional disturbance. Fundamental principles for developing sound contracts for…

  12. Conflicting paradigms in radiation protection: 20 Questions with answers from the regulator, the health physicist, the scientist, and the lawyers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, D.J.; Stansbury, P.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Porter, S.W. Jr. [Porter Consultants, Inc., Ardmore, PA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    George Orwell`s {open_quotes}doublethink{close_quotes} should be generalized to {open_quotes}polythink{close_quotes} to describe the multiplicity of views that radiation protection professionals must simultaneously accommodate. The paradigms, that is, organizing principles and beliefs, that (1) regulators, (2) operational health physicists, (3) scientists, (4) lawyers for the defendant, and (5) lawyers for the plaintiff use in their approaches to radiation protection are presented. What we believe as scientists often conflicts with what we do for purposes of radiation protection. What we need to do merely to protect humankind and the environment from harmful effects of radiation is far less than what we must do to satisfy the regulator, whose paradigm has checklists, score-keeping, and penalties. In the hands of lawyers, our work must overcome different challenges. Even if the paradigms of the operational health physicist, the scientist, and the regulator match, the odds against the lawyers paradigms also matching are astronomical. The differing paradigms are illustrated by example questions and answers. It is important for educators, trainers, and health physicists to recognize and separate the score-keeping, practice, science, and legal issues in health physics.

  13. TUESDAY: EPA Administrator to Discuss Historic Clean Power Plan to Cut U.S. Carbon Pollution and Protect Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    WASHINGTON - On Tuesday, August 11, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy will be discussing the Clean Power Plan at the Resources for the Future (RFF) Leadership Forum. The Clean Power Plan will protect public health, spur clean energy investments and st

  14. Impact of community-based health insurance in rural India on self-medication & financial protection of the insured

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.M. Dror (David); A. Chakraborty (Arpita); M. Majumdar (Manabi); P. Panda (Pradeep); R. Koren (Ruth)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground & objectives: The evidence-base of the impact of community-based health insurance (CBHI) on access to healthcare and financial protection in India is weak. We investigated the impact of CBHI in rural Uttar Pradesh and Bihar States of India on insured households’ self-medicatio

  15. 78 FR 54618 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Swine Health Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... and to conduct programs to detect, control, and eradicate pests and disease of livestock. The Swine... infectious and communicable diseases can be transmitted to swine. APHIS' regulations promulgated under the... diseases and, therefore, plays a vital role in our swine health protection program. We are asking the...

  16. Protecting America's economy, environment, health, and security against invasive species requires a strong federal program in systematic biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilda Diaz-Soltero; Amy Y. Rossman

    2011-01-01

    Systematics is the science that identifies and groups organisms by understanding their origins, relationships, and distributions. It is fundamental to understanding life on earth, our crops, wildlife, and diseases, and it provides the scientific foundation to recognize and manage invasive species. Protecting America's economy, environment, health, and security...

  17. [Kidney transplant patients without social protection in health: what do patients say about the economic hardships and impact?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado-Martínez, Francisco Javier; Hernández-Ibarra, Eduardo; Ascencio-Mera, Carlos D; Díaz-Medina, Blanca A; Padilla-Altamira, Cesar; Kierans, Ciara

    2014-10-01

    Kidney transplant is the optimal treatment for renal disease according to biomedical criteria, but the technology is highly expensive. The aim of this article was to examine the economic hardships experienced by kidney transplant patients and the impact on their lives, specifically when they lack social protection in health. The article reports on a qualitative study conducted in Mexico. Twenty-one kidney transplant patients participated. Semi-structured interviews were performed and submitted to content analysis. Patients experience extreme economic hardship due to the high cost of renal therapies, particularly medicines. Such economic problems adversely affect their condition, since many patients report difficulties in maintaining their immunosuppressant medication, attending medical appointments, and curtailing household expenditures, further aggravated by loss of earnings. In conclusion, kidney transplantation is associated with patients' impoverishment when they lack social protection in health. A protection system is urgently needed for this group.

  18. Office of Inspector General List of Excluded Individuals and Entities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The objective is to ensure that providers who bill Federal health care programs do not submit claims for services furnished, ordered or prescribed by an excluded...

  19. 76 FR 32839 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Agency Office of the Inspector General (DFARS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-06

    ... the Inspector General, as required by FAR clause 52.203-13, Contractor Code of Business Ethics and... read as follows: Authority: 41 U.S.C. 1303 and 48 CFR chapter 1. PART 203--IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES... General, in solicitations and contracts that include the FAR clause 52.203-13, Contractor Code of Business...

  20. The Assessment of Animal Welfare in British Zoos by Government-Appointed Inspectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Chris; Harris, Stephen

    2012-09-28

    We analysed the reports of government-appointed inspectors from 192 zoos between 2005-2008 to provide the first review of how animal welfare was assessed in British zoos since the enactment of the Zoo Licensing Act 1981. We examined the effects of whether or not a veterinarian was included in the inspection team, type of inspection, licence status of the zoo and membership of a zoo association on the inspectors' assessments of animal welfare standards in five areas that approximate to the Five Freedoms. At least 11% of full licence inspections did not comply with the legal requirement for two inspectors. The inspectors' reports were unclear as to how animal welfare was assessed, whether all animals or only a sub-sample had been inspected, and were based predominantly on welfare inputs rather than outcomes. Of 9,024 animal welfare assessments across the 192 zoos, 7,511 (83%) were graded as meeting the standards, 782 (9%) as substandard and the rest were not graded. Of the 192 zoos, 47 (24%) were assessed as meeting all the animal welfare standards. Membership of a zoo association was not associated with a higher overall assessment of animal welfare standards, and specialist collections such as Farm Parks and Other Bird collections performed least well. We recommend a number of changes to the inspection process that should lead to greater clarity in the assessment of animal welfare in British zoos.

  1. Office of Inspector General semiannual report to Congress: April 1 to September 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The report summarizes significant audit, inspection, and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period which facilitated Department of Energy management efforts to improve management controls and ensure efficient and effective operation of its programs. Narratives of the Office`s most significant reports are grouped by measures which the Office of Inspector General uses to gauge its performance. The common thread tying the performance measures together is their emphasis on supporting the Department efforts to produce high quality products at the lowest possible cost to the taxpayer. During this reporting period, the Office of Inspection General issued 59 reports. These reports included recommendations than, when implemented by management, could result in $211.7 million being put to better use. Furthermore, management has committed to taking corrective actions which the Office of Inspector General estimates will result in a more efficient use of funds totaling $57 million. Office of Inspector General investigations led to 7 criminal convictions, as well as criminal and civil prosecutions which resulted in fines and recoveries of approximately $1.95 million. The Office of Inspector General also provided 9 investigative reports to management for recommending positive change.

  2. 29 CFR 4902.11 - Specific exemptions: Office of Inspector General Investigative File System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Investigative File System. 4902.11 Section 4902.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION... General Investigative File System. (a) Criminal Law Enforcement. (1) Exemption. Under the authority... Inspector General Investigative File System—PBGC” from the provisions of 5 U.S.C. 552a (c)(3), (c)(4),...

  3. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General fiscal year 1999 annual performance plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    This plan is published pursuant to requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993. The plan outlines the goals, objectives, and strategies that the Office of Inspector General intends to implement and execute in FY 1999. The plan also includes the details of this office`s efforts to continually improve customer service.

  4. Schuldig landschap: over de toeristische aantrekkingskracht van Baantjer, Wallander en Inspector Morse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, S.

    2009-01-01

    [Watching the detectives. Inside the guilty landscapes of Inspector Morse, Baantjer and Wallander] Abstract Visiting the settings of popular media products has become a growing niche within the tourist market. This paper provides a content-based explanation for the popularity of one specific

  5. 75 FR 70011 - Guidance for Industry, Mammography Quality Standards Act Inspectors, and Food and Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry, Mammography Quality Standards Act Inspectors, and Food and Drug Administration Staff; The Mammography Quality Standards Act Final Regulations: Modifications and Additions to Policy Guidance Help System 13; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  6. 9 CFR 72.9 - Interstate movements of cattle; inspection and certification by APHIS inspector required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.9 Interstate... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interstate movements of cattle; inspection and certification by APHIS inspector required. 72.9 Section 72.9 Animals and Animal...

  7. 78 FR 42149 - Privacy Act; System of Records: State-53, Office of Inspector General Investigation Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ..., affidavits, banking and other financial records, medical records, and personnel and other employment-related... statutes, Executive Orders and the Code of Federal Regulations. These records may be disclosed as follows... Office of Inspector General Investigation Management System, State-53. POLICIES AND PRACTICES FOR STORING...

  8. 13 CFR 120.197 - Notifying SBA's Office of Inspector General of suspected fraud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notifying SBA's Office of Inspector General of suspected fraud. 120.197 Section 120.197 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Policies Applying to All Business Loans Reporting § 120.197 Notifying SBA's...

  9. A Study on Overestimating a Given Fraction Defective by an Imperfect Inspector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Hee Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been believed that even an imperfect inspector with nonzero inspection errors could either overestimate or underestimate a given FD (fraction defective with a 50 : 50 chance. What happens to the existing inspection plans, if an imperfect inspector overestimates a known FD, when it is very low? We deal with this fundamental question, by constructing four mathematical models, under the assumptions that an infinite sequence of items with a known FD is given to an imperfect inspector with nonzero inspection errors, which can be constant and/or randomly distributed with a uniform distribution. We derive four analytical formulas for computing the probability of overestimation (POE and prove that an imperfect inspector overestimates a given FD with more than 50%, if the FD is less than a value termed as a critical FD. Our mathematical proof indicates that the POE approaches one when FD approaches zero under our assumptions. Hence, if a given FD is very low, commercial inspection plans should be revised with the POE concept in the near future, for the fairness of commercial trades.

  10. Access to Treatment for Diabetes and Hypertension in Rural Cambodia: Performance of Existing Social Health Protection Schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigdeli, Maryam; Jacobs, Bart; Men, Chean Rithy; Nilsen, Kristine; Van Damme, Wim; Dujardin, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) pose challenges to Cambodia's health system. Medicines for NCD are on the National Essential Medicines List but no clinical guidelines support their utilization. Two social health protection schemes aimed at the informal sector population exist (Health Equity Funds and Insurance) together with two disease-specific interventions (a Peer Educator Network and Chronic Diseases Clinics) targeted at NCD patients. This study examines performance of these various schemes in relation to NCD. Cross-sectional household survey among 709 individuals self-reporting diabetes and/or hypertension in three geographical locations in rural Cambodia using a structured questionnaire investigating diagnostic and treatment pathways, health seeking behaviour, health expenditures, and financial coping mechanisms. Two third of respondents with NCD were female and 55% did not belong to any scheme. The majority (59%) were diagnosed in the private sector and only 56% were on allopathic treatment that was mainly sought in the private sector (49%). Outpatient treatment cost was higher in the private sector and when using multiple providers of care. The majority were indebted, 11% due to health-related expenses. Contrary to social health protection schemes, disease-specific interventions offered better access to allopathic treatment and provided medicines in accordance with NEML. The benefit packages of existing social health protection schemes and services in the public health sector should be adjusted to cater for the needs of people living with NCD in rural Cambodia. Initiatives that offer active disease management strategies and promote patients and community participation appear more successful in increasing treatment adherence and decreasing the risk of financial hardship.

  11. Access to Treatment for Diabetes and Hypertension in Rural Cambodia: Performance of Existing Social Health Protection Schemes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Bigdeli

    Full Text Available Non-communicable diseases (NCD pose challenges to Cambodia's health system. Medicines for NCD are on the National Essential Medicines List but no clinical guidelines support their utilization. Two social health protection schemes aimed at the informal sector population exist (Health Equity Funds and Insurance together with two disease-specific interventions (a Peer Educator Network and Chronic Diseases Clinics targeted at NCD patients. This study examines performance of these various schemes in relation to NCD.Cross-sectional household survey among 709 individuals self-reporting diabetes and/or hypertension in three geographical locations in rural Cambodia using a structured questionnaire investigating diagnostic and treatment pathways, health seeking behaviour, health expenditures, and financial coping mechanisms.Two third of respondents with NCD were female and 55% did not belong to any scheme. The majority (59% were diagnosed in the private sector and only 56% were on allopathic treatment that was mainly sought in the private sector (49%. Outpatient treatment cost was higher in the private sector and when using multiple providers of care. The majority were indebted, 11% due to health-related expenses. Contrary to social health protection schemes, disease-specific interventions offered better access to allopathic treatment and provided medicines in accordance with NEML.The benefit packages of existing social health protection schemes and services in the public health sector should be adjusted to cater for the needs of people living with NCD in rural Cambodia. Initiatives that offer active disease management strategies and promote patients and community participation appear more successful in increasing treatment adherence and decreasing the risk of financial hardship.

  12. Different stage, different performance: the protective strategy of role play on emotional health in sex work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Gillian M

    2011-04-01

    This paper uses Arlie Hochschild's (1983) concept of emotion management and "surface" and "deep acting" to explore how sex workers separate and distance themselves from their public role. Experiences of stigmatisation prevail among sex workers and how stigma is resisted or managed has an impact on their health. In-depth interviews were carried out between August 2006 and April 2007 with 58 sex workers in five cities in New Zealand following decriminalisation of the sex industry. Most participants drew on ideas of professionalism in sustaining a psychological distance between their private and public lives. They utilised "deep acting", transmuting private experiences for use in the work environment, to accredit themselves as professional in their business practices. They also constructed different meanings for sex between public and private relationships with the condom providing an important symbol in separating the two. A few (mostly female street-based) participants were less adept at "deep acting" and relied on drugs to maintain a separation of roles. This paper argues that in an occupation which is highly stigmatised and in which depersonalisation as an aspect of burn-out has been reported as a common occurrence, the ability to draw on strategies which require "deep acting" provides a healthy estrangement between self and role and can be seen as protective. The separation of self from work identity is not damaging as many radical feminists would claim, but an effective strategy to manage emotions. Hochschild, A. (1983). The managed heart: Commercialization of human feeling. Berkeley: University of California Press.

  13. Getting it right the first time: developing nanotechnology while protecting workers, public health, and the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbus, John M; Florini, Karen; Denison, Richard A; Walsh, Scott A

    2006-09-01

    Nanotechnology, the design and manipulation of materials at the atomic scale, may well revolutionize many of the ways our society manufactures products, produces energy, and treats diseases. Innovative nanotechnology products are already reaching the market in a wide variety of consumer products. Some of the observed properties of nanomaterials call into question the adequacy of current methods for determining hazard and exposure, and for controlling resulting risks. Given the limitations of existing regulatory tools and policies, two distinct kinds of initiatives are urgently needed: first, a major increase in the federal investment nanomaterial risk research, and second, rapid development and implementation of voluntary standards of care pending development of adequate regulatory safeguards. The U.S. government should increase federal funding for nanomaterial risk research under the National Nanotechnology Initiative to at least $100 million annually for the next several years. Several voluntary programs are currently at various stages of evolution, though the eventual outputs of each of these are still far from clear. Ultimately, effective regulatory safeguards, harmonized globally, are necessary to provide a level playing field for industry while adequately protecting human health and the environment.

  14. Protein and Essential Amino Acids to Protect Musculoskeletal Health during Spaceflight: Evidence of a Paradox?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle J. Hackney

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Long-duration spaceflight results in muscle atrophy and a loss of bone mineral density. In skeletal muscle tissue, acute exercise and protein (e.g., essential amino acids stimulate anabolic pathways (e.g., muscle protein synthesis both independently and synergistically to maintain neutral or positive net muscle protein balance. Protein intake in space is recommended to be 12%–15% of total energy intake (≤1.4 g∙kg−1∙day−1 and spaceflight is associated with reduced energy intake (~20%, which enhances muscle catabolism. Increasing protein intake to 1.5–2.0 g∙kg−1∙day−1 may be beneficial for skeletal muscle tissue and could be accomplished with essential amino acid supplementation. However, increased consumption of sulfur-containing amino acids is associated with increased bone resorption, which creates a dilemma for musculoskeletal countermeasures, whereby optimizing skeletal muscle parameters via essential amino acid supplementation may worsen bone outcomes. To protect both muscle and bone health, future unloading studies should evaluate increased protein intake via non-sulfur containing essential amino acids or leucine in combination with exercise countermeasures and the concomitant influence of reduced energy intake.

  15. Electrosmog. Health hazards, limiting values, consumer protection; 3. ed.; Elektrosmog. Gesundheitsrisiken, Grenzwerte, Verbraucherschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The book starts with the physical facts. All definitions and units required for understanding electrosmog are presented and discussed with a view to their practical application. The main part of the book is dedicated to the health hazards of elctrosmog. The present state of knowledge is outlined. Current limiting values are discussed along with their conceptional and political basis. The last part of the book discusses problems of consumber protection. It is shown how everybody can reduce their own exposure to electric and magnetic fields. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Das Buch beginnt mit den physikalischen Fakten. Alle Begriffe und Einheiten, die zum Verstaendnis von Elektrosmog notwendig sind, werden vorgestellt und in Bezug zur Praxis gebracht. Den weitaus groessten Teil des Buches nehmen die gesundheitlichen Auswirkungen von Elektrosmog ein. Praesentiert wird der aktuelle wissenschaftliche Forschungsstand. Im Kapitel Grenzwerte, diskutiert werden die gueltigen Grenzwerte und ihre konzeptionelle und politische Basis. Der letzte Teil des Buches ist dem Verbraucherschutz gewidmet. Es wird gezeigt, wie man die eigene Belastung durch elektrische und magnetische Felder reduzieren kann. (orig./MG)

  16. Commentary: ethical issues of current health-protection policies on low-dose ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socol, Yehoshua; Dobrzyński, Ludwik; Doss, Mohan; Feinendegen, Ludwig E; Janiak, Marek K; Miller, Mark L; Sanders, Charles L; Scott, Bobby R; Ulsh, Brant; Vaiserman, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    The linear no-threshold (LNT) model of ionizing-radiation-induced cancer is based on the assumption that every radiation dose increment constitutes increased cancer risk for humans. The risk is hypothesized to increase linearly as the total dose increases. While this model is the basis for radiation safety regulations, its scientific validity has been questioned and debated for many decades. The recent memorandum of the International Commission on Radiological Protection admits that the LNT-model predictions at low doses are "speculative, unproven, undetectable and 'phantom'." Moreover, numerous experimental, ecological, and epidemiological studies show that low doses of sparsely-ionizing or sparsely-ionizing plus highly-ionizing radiation may be beneficial to human health (hormesis/adaptive response). The present LNT-model-based regulations impose excessive costs on the society. For example, the median-cost medical program is 5000 times more cost-efficient in saving lives than controlling radiation emissions. There are also lives lost: e.g., following Fukushima accident, more than 1000 disaster-related yet non-radiogenic premature deaths were officially registered among the population evacuated due to radiation concerns. Additional negative impacts of LNT-model-inspired radiophobia include: refusal of some patients to undergo potentially life-saving medical imaging; discouragement of the study of low-dose radiation therapies; motivation for radiological terrorism and promotion of nuclear proliferation.

  17. Protecting human health and security in digital Europe: how to deal with the "privacy paradox"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büschel, Isabell; Mehdi, Rostane; Cammilleri, Anne; Marzouki, Yousri; Elger, Bernice

    2014-09-01

    This article is the result of an international research between law and ethics scholars from Universities in France and Switzerland, who have been closely collaborating with technical experts on the design and use of information and communication technologies in the fields of human health and security. The interdisciplinary approach is a unique feature and guarantees important new insights in the social, ethical and legal implications of these technologies for the individual and society as a whole. Its aim is to shed light on the tension between secrecy and transparency in the digital era. A special focus is put from the perspectives of psychology, medical ethics and European law on the contradiction between individuals' motivations for consented processing of personal data and their fears about unknown disclosure, transferal and sharing of personal data via information and communication technologies (named the "privacy paradox"). Potential benefits and harms for the individual and society resulting from the use of computers, mobile phones, the Internet and social media are being discussed. Furthermore, the authors point out the ethical and legal limitations inherent to the processing of personal data in a democratic society governed by the rule of law. Finally, they seek to demonstrate that the impact of information and communication technology use on the individuals' well-being, the latter being closely correlated with a high level of fundamental rights protection in Europe, is a promising feature of the socalled "e-democracy" as a new way to collectively attribute meaning to large-scale online actions, motivations and ideas.

  18. Meeting the public health challenge of protecting private wells: Proceedings and recommendations from an expert panel workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Mary A., E-mail: mfox9@jhu.edu [Department of Health Policy and Management, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 624 North Broadway, Room 407, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Risk Sciences and Public Policy Institute, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 624 North Broadway, Room 429, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Nachman, Keeve E. [Department of Health Policy and Management, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 624 North Broadway, Room 407, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Risk Sciences and Public Policy Institute, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 624 North Broadway, Room 429, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Center for a Livable Future, Johns Hopkins University, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room W7010, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Anderson, Breeana [Risk Sciences and Public Policy Institute, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 624 North Broadway, Room 429, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Lam, Juleen [Department of Health Policy and Management, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 624 North Broadway, Room 407, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Risk Sciences and Public Policy Institute, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 624 North Broadway, Room 429, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); University of California at San Francisco, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, Mailstop 0132, 550 16th Street, 7th Floor, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); and others

    2016-06-01

    Private wells serving fewer than 25 people are federally unregulated, and their users may be exposed to naturally occurring agents of concern such as arsenic and radionuclides, as well as anthropogenic contaminants. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Clean Water for Health Program works to protect private wells and prevent adverse health outcomes for the roughly 15% of Americans who rely on them. To understand current and emerging challenges to the private drinking water supply, an interdisciplinary expert panel workshop on “Future and Emerging Issues for Private Wells” was organized to inform strategic planning for the Clean Water for Health Program. The panel assessed current conditions of ground water as a source for private wells, identified emerging threats, critical gaps in knowledge, and public health needs, and recommended strategies to guide future activities to ensure the safety of private drinking water wells. These strategies addressed topics of broad interest to the environmental public health community including: development of new methods to support citizen science; addressing contaminant mixtures; expanding capacity for well testing; evaluating treatment technologies; building an evidence base on best practices on well owner outreach and stewardship; and research and data needs. - Highlights: • About 43 million Americans use federally unregulated private wells for drinking water. • Private wells may be contaminated with naturally occurring and man-made chemicals. • Protecting well water requires an “infrastructure for stewardship”. • Recommendations to advance private well protection are offered.

  19. [Nuclear energy and public health, the mission of OPRI (Office of Protection from Ionizing Radiation)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisné, M R

    1995-03-15

    In the domain of the use of ionising radiation for medical purposes and in the nuclear industry, the protection of man and his environment is primordial. Such protection is defined in European Community countries by the Directives of the Euratom Council, applied as national law. In France, the "Office de protection contre les rayonnements ionisants" oversees the application of laws and rules relating to protection from radiation and determines the inspections and analyses required to ensure the protection of the population against ionising radiation.

  20. Prostate cancer and toxicity from critical use exemptions of methyl bromide: Environmental protection helps protect against human health risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budnik Lygia T

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although ozone-depleting methyl bromide was destined for phase-out by 2005, it is still widely applied as a consequence of various critical-use-exemptions and mandatory international regulations aiming to restrict the spread of pests and alien species (e.g. in globalized transport and storage. The withdrawal of methyl bromide because of its environmental risk could fortuitously help in the containment of its human toxicity. Methods We performed a systematic review of the literature, including in vitro toxicological and epidemiological studies of occupational and community exposure to the halogenated hydrocarbon pesticide methyl bromide. We focused on toxic (especially chronic or carcinogenic effects from the use of methyl bromide, on biomonitoring data and reference values. Eligible epidemiological studies were subjected to meta-analysis. Results Out of the 542 peer reviewed publications between 1990-2011, we found only 91 referring to toxicity of methyl bromide and 29 using the term "carcinogenic", "neoplastic" or "mutagenic". Several studies provide new additional data pertaining to the mechanistic aspects of methyl bromide toxicity. Few studies have performed a detailed exposure assessment including biomonitoring. Three evaluated epidemiological studies assessed a possible association between cancer and methyl bromide. Overall, exposure to methyl bromide is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer OR, 1.21; 95% CI (0,98-1.49, P = 0.076. Two epidemiological studies have analyzed environmental, non-occupational exposure to methyl bromide providing evidence for its health risk to the general public. None of the epidemiological studies addressed its use as a fumigant in freight containers, although recent field and case reports do refer to its toxic effects associated with its use in shipping and storage. Conclusions Both the epidemiological evidence and toxicological data suggest a possible link between methyl

  1. [Complaints by private health insurance policy-holders to the Consumer Protection Bureau in Argentina, 2000-2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzuriaga, María José; Spinelli, Hugo

    2014-05-01

    This paper analyzes problems experienced by policy-holders of voluntary private health insurance plans in Argentina when insurance companies fail to comply with the Consumer Protection Code. The sample consisted of consumer complaints filed with the Consumer Protection Bureau and rulings by the Bureau from 2000 to 2008. One striking issue was recurrent non-compliance with services included in the Mandatory Medical Program and the companies' attempts to blame policy-holders. According to the study, the lack of an information system hinders scientific studies to adequately address the problem. Thus, a comparison with studies on health insurance in other Latin American countries highlighted the importance of such research, the relationship to health systems, constraints on use and denial of citizens' rights to healthcare, and the increasing judicialization of healthcare provision.

  2. Is there a protective effect of normal to high intellectual function on mental health in children with chronic illness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundervold Astri J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High intellectual function is considered as a protective factor for children's mental health. Few studies have investigated the effect of intellectual function on mental health in children with chronic illness (CI. The aim of the present study was twofold: First, we asked if normal to high intellectual function (IQ has a protective effect on mental health in children with CI, and secondly, if this effect is more substantial than in their peers (NCI. Methods The participants were selected among children who participated in the Bergen Child Study (BCS: 96 children with CI (the CI-group and 96 children without CI (the NCI-group. The groups were matched on intellectual function as measured by the WISC-III by selecting the same number of children from three levels of the Full Scale IQ Score (FSIQ: "very low" (84. CI was reported by parents as part of a diagnostic interview (Kiddie-SADS-PL that also generated the mental health measures used in the present study: the presence of a DSM-IV psychiatric diagnosis and the score on the Children's Global Assessment Scale. Results The risk of a psychiatric diagnosis was significantly lower for children with a normal to high FSIQ-level than for children with a very low and low FSIQ-level in the CI-group as well as in the NCI-group. The group differences were statistically non-significant for all three FSIQ-levels, and the effect of the interaction between the group-variable (CI/NCI and the FSIQ-level was non-significant on both measures of mental health. Conclusion The present study showed a protective effect of normal to high intellectual function on children's mental health. This protective effect was not more substantial in children with CI than in children without CI.

  3. Commentary: Personalized health planning and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: an opportunity for academic medicine to lead health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinan, Michaela A; Simmons, Leigh Ann; Snyderman, Ralph

    2010-11-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (PPACA) mandates the exploration of new approaches to coordinated health care delivery--such as patient-centered medical homes, accountable care organizations, and disease management programs--in which reimbursement is aligned with desired outcomes. PPACA does not, however, delineate a standardized approach to improve the delivery process or a specific means to quantify performance for value-based reimbursement; these details are left to administrative agencies to develop and implement. The authors propose that coordinated care can be implemented more effectively and performance quantified more accurately by using personalized health planning, which employs individualized strategic health planning and care relevant to the patient's specific needs. Personalized health plans, developed by providers in collaboration with their patients, quantify patients' health and health risks over time, identify strategies to mitigate risks and/or treat disease, deliver personalized care, engage patients in their care, and measure outcomes. Personalized health planning is a core clinical process that can standardize coordinated care approaches while providing the data needed for performance-based reimbursement. The authors argue that academic health centers have a significant opportunity to lead true health care reform by adopting personalized health planning to coordinate care delivery while conducting the research and education necessary to enable its broad clinical application.

  4. A review of the health and economic implications of patent protection, with a specific focus on Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamabhai, Inthira; Smith, Richard D

    2012-08-01

    Although it has been two decades since the Thai Patent Act was amended to comply with the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS), there has been little emphasis given to assessing the implications of this amendment. The purpose of this review is to summarize the health and economic impact of patent protection, with a focus on the experience of Thailand. A review of national and international empirical evidence on the health and economic implications of patents from 1980 to 2009 was undertaken. The findings illustrate the role of patent protection in four areas: price, present access, future access, and international trade and investment. Forty-three empirical studies were found, three of which were from Thai databases. Patenting does increase price, although the size of effect differs according to the methodology and country. Although weakening patent rights could increase present access, evidence suggests that strengthening patenting may benefit future access; although this is based on complex assumptions and estimations. Moreover, while patent protection appears to have a positive impact on trade flow, the implication for foreign direct investment (FDI) is equivocal. Empirical studies in Thailand, and other similar countries, are rare, compromising the robustness and generalizability of conclusions. However, evidence does suggest that patenting presents a significant inter-temporal challenge in balancing aspects of current versus future access to technologies. This underlines the urgent need to prioritize health research resources to assess the wider implications of patent protection.

  5. A review of the health and economic implications of patent protection, with a specific focus on Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamabhai Inthira

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although it has been two decades since the Thai Patent Act was amended to comply with the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS, there has been little emphasis given to assessing the implications of this amendment. The purpose of this review is to summarize the health and economic impact of patent protection, with a focus on the experience of Thailand. Methods A review of national and international empirical evidence on the health and economic implications of patents from 1980 to 2009 was undertaken. Results The findings illustrate the role of patent protection in four areas: price, present access, future access, and international trade and investment. Forty-three empirical studies were found, three of which were from Thai databases. Patenting does increase price, although the size of effect differs according to the methodology and country. Although weakening patent rights could increase present access, evidence suggests that strengthening patenting may benefit future access; although this is based on complex assumptions and estimations. Moreover, while patent protection appears to have a positive impact on trade flow, the implication for foreign direct investment (FDI is equivocal. Conclusions Empirical studies in Thailand, and other similar countries, are rare, compromising the robustness and generalizability of conclusions. However, evidence does suggest that patenting presents a significant inter-temporal challenge in balancing aspects of current versus future access to technologies. This underlines the urgent need to prioritize health research resources to assess the wider implications of patent protection.

  6. [Tour operator liability in health protection for not informing travellers about health risks they could be exposed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrì, P G

    2009-01-01

    Consumer-tourist is considered the weaker bargaining party in an "all included" travel contract, compared with tour organizer and tour vendor. That's why Statute Act protecting consumer's rights provides a specific discipline concerning this particular sector In front of widening of warrants for travellers, obligations for organizer and seller of the travel have been increased, and include now specific duty to inform travellers as well. According to the law such duties of information are consistent with travel contract performance itself. In such way, failing to inform client constitutes a breach of contract liable not only in the field of civil responsibility; the subject liable with such an omission may face criminal prosecution as well. More specifically we are in front of a breach of contract by the tour organizer who will respond of all damages concerned with such a breach. Damages will concern not only the price of the travel package, but also other damages connected with the illness suffered by traveller: compensation for spoiled holidays, biological damages, patrimonial damages (these last ones could include for instance expenses for medical treatments, just to quote the more likely one). In other words, tour organizer has to grant general organization of the tour which has to take place as specified on travel brochure, but traveller have to be provided also with any information, concerning documents necessary for the travel, whether passport or visa are needed or not, vaccinations peremptory or optional. It will be very difficult for tour operator be exempted from liability for damages if traveller hasn't been informed of health risks; the only possibility consists in managing to demonstrate that the obligation hasn't been compelled due to reason for which the operator couldn't be held responsible. Besides as we have already mentioned before, criminal relevance of such omission of information couldn't be excluded. In fact, it's true that such omission

  7. The role of Swedish Radiation Protection Authority in the field of public health; SSI:s roll i folkhaelsoarbetet - redovisning av regeringsuppdrag inom folkhaelsoomraadet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cederlund, Torsten; Finck, Robert; Mjoenes, Lars; Moberg, Leif; Soederman, Ann-Louis; Wiklund, Aasa; Yuen Katarina; Oelander Guer, Hanna

    2004-09-01

    The Swedish Government has requested the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI) to make an account of the authority's role in the field of public health. Radiation Protection consists largely of preventive actions in order to protect man and the environment against harmful effects of radiation. The SSI thus considers most of the authority's activities to be public health related. The report describes a number of radiation protection areas from a health perspective. The measures taken by the authority in these areas are also described along with planned activities. In some areas the authority also points out additional measures.

  8. The role of Swedish Radiation Protection Authority in the field of public health 2008; SSI:s roll i folkhaelsoarbetet 2008 - redovisning av regeringsuppdrag inom folkhaelsoomraadet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyrke, Lena; Almen, Anja; Blixt, Anders; Brewitz, Erica; Mjoenes, Lars; Moberg, Leif; Skeppstroem, Kirlna; Wester, Ulf

    2008-04-15

    The Swedish Government has requested that the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI) to make an account of the authority's role in the field of public health. Radiation Protection consists largely of preventive actions in order to protect man and the environment against harmful effects of radiation. The SSI thus considers most of the authority's activities to be public health related. The report describes a number of radiation protection areas from a health perspective. The measures taken by the authority in these areas are also described along with planned activities. In some areas the authority also points out additional measures

  9. Relationship self-efficacy protects against mental health problems among women in bidirectionally aggressive intimate relationships with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Tami P; McPartland, Tara; Price, Carolina; Cruza-Guet, Maria Cristina; Swan, Suzanne C

    2013-10-01

    Research examining predictors or correlates of mental health problems among women who experience or use aggression in intimate relationships typically assesses factors that confer risk. Such research has primarily examined intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization or aggression frequency or severity as central risk factors for mental health problems. In the general population, one factor demonstrating a protective effect on mental health problems is self-efficacy. Research on self-efficacy among women who experience or use aggression in intimate relationships is nearly absent. The purpose of this study was to determine if self-efficacy specific to a woman's ability to manage various relationship problems (i.e., relationship self-efficacy [RSE]) played a protective role against the severity of posttraumatic stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms among 354 community-residing women who were victimized and used aggression (bidirectional IPV). Regression analyses found that RSE uniquely predicted each mental health outcome above and beyond what was accounted for by the frequency of physical, sexual, and psychological victimization and aggression. Further, RSE fully mediated the relationships between psychological victimization and each mental health outcome. If replicated, and in circumstances where it is determined safe to do so, findings suggest RSE as a promising avenue for future research to improve the health and well-being of women in bidirectionally aggressive relationships.

  10. Effects of lifetime stress exposure on mental and physical health in young adulthood: How stress degrades and forgiveness protects health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Loren; Shields, Grant S; Dorn, Gabriel; Slavich, George M

    2016-06-01

    To examine risk and resilience factors that affect health, lifetime stress exposure histories, dispositional forgiveness levels, and mental and physical health were assessed in 148 young adults. Greater lifetime stress severity and lower levels of forgiveness each uniquely predicted worse mental and physical health. Analyses also revealed a graded Stress × Forgiveness interaction effect, wherein associations between stress and mental health were weaker for persons exhibiting more forgiveness. These data are the first to elucidate the interactive effects of cumulative stress severity and forgiveness on health, and suggest that developing a more forgiving coping style may help minimize stress-related disorders.

  11. Conundrums in the legal protection of migrant workers' health rights and relative resolutions: implications from the case of Tseng Hei-tao.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai

    2013-08-01

    The deteriorating situation of migrant workers' health rights protection was once again highlighted in the case of Tseng Hei-tao. This case explicitly and implicitly showed that four conundrums--the Employment Restriction Conundrum, the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Legal Conundrum, the Morality Conundrum and the Identity Conundrum--are barriers to migrant workers' right protection. The health rights of migrant workers could be safeguarded by abolishing the outdated household registration system designed in the planned economy era, improving the rule of law, and strengthening administrative supervisions. This would fundamentally remove these barriers and thus contribute to migrant workers' health rights protection.

  12. [Medical General Inspector Debenedetti and Algeria (1956-1961)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linon, Pierre-Jean

    2005-01-01

    M.G.I. Debenedetti was appointed as director of French Military Health Service in June 1956 for seven years, during the war of Algeria where he travelled eight times. Thus, he surveyed the good organisation of the Military Health Service in Algeria from 1956 to 1961 when he had his last journey in this country. This paper tries to report his career, his survey of the French Military Health Service on the theatre of operations, of the hospitals and of the Free Medical Care of Algeria.

  13. 77 FR 31513 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of Exchanges and Qualified Health Plans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Parts 155, 156, and 157 RIN 0938-AQ67 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act... Federal Register on March 27, 2012, entitled ``Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment... rule regarding the codification of section 1413(c) of the Affordable Care Act. To align the...

  14. Understanding the transformative aspects of the Wilderness and Protected Lands experience upon human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan Ewert; Jillisa Overholt; Alison Voight; Chun Chieh Wang

    2011-01-01

    Wilderness and Protected Landscapes (WPLs) have long been considered special areas for a variety of reasons including baseline data, impact analyses, protected zones, and other tangible and intangible values. Another salient, and some would argue, a more important value offered through WPLs is that of human transformation. Accordingly, three theories have provided the...

  15. Cancer screening and health system resilience: keys to protecting and bolstering preventive services during a financial crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Moreno, Jose M; Anttila, Ahti; von Karsa, Lawrence; Alfonso-Sanchez, Jose L; Gorgojo, Lydia

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to elucidate the rationale for sustaining and expanding cost-effective, population-based screening services for breast, cervical and colorectal cancers in the context of the current financial crisis. Our objective is not only to promote optimal delivery of high-quality secondary cancer prevention services, but also to underline the importance of strengthening comprehensive cancer control, and with it, health system response to the complex care challenges posed by all chronic diseases. We focus primarily on issues surrounding planning, organisation, implementation and resources, arguing that given the growing cancer burden, policymakers have ample justification for establishing and expanding population-based programmes that are well-organised, well-resourced and well-executed. In a broader economic context of rescue packages, deficits and cutbacks to government entitlements, health professionals must intensify their advocacy for the protection of vital preventive health services by fighting for quality services with clear benefits for population health outcomes.

  16. Relationship between child abuse exposure and reported contact with child protection organizations: results from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Tracie O; MacMillan, Harriet L; Taillieu, Tamara; Cheung, Kristene; Turner, Sarah; Tonmyr, Lil; Hovdestad, Wendy

    2015-08-01

    Much of what is known about child abuse in Canada has come from reported cases of child abuse and at-risk samples, which likely represent the most severe cases of child abuse in the country. The objective of the current study is to examine the prevalence of a broad range of child abuse experiences (physical abuse, sexual abuse, and exposure to IPV) and investigate how such experiences and sociodemographic variables are related to contact with child protection organizations in Canada using a representative general population sample. Data were drawn from the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey: Mental Health collected from the 10 provinces using a multistage stratified cluster design (n=23,395; household response rate=79.8%; aged 18 years and older). Physical abuse only (16.8%) was the most prevalent child abuse experience reported with the exposure to specific combinations of two or more types of child abuse ranging from 0.4% to 3.7%. Only 7.6% of the adult population with a history of child abuse reported having had contact with child protection organizations. Experiencing all three types of child abuse was associated with the greatest odds of contact with child protection organizations (AOR=15.8; 95% CI=10.1 to 24.6). Physical abuse only was associated with one of the lowest odds of contact with child protection organizations. Preventing child abuse is widely acknowledged as an important, but challenging public health goal. Strategies to increase reporting of child abuse may help to protect children and to connect families with necessary services. One obvious priority would be physical abuse.

  17. Uneven access to safe drinking water for First Nations in Canada: connecting health and place through source water protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Source water protection has gained considerable attention in the water resources literature particularly after several well publicized (non-First Nations) water contamination events in Canada. This short report explores health and place through an examination of access to safe drinking water in a developed country. For First Nations in Canada, safe drinking water remains a serious, albeit under-reported, problem. The incidence of contaminated drinking water is pervasive in many First Nations communities. Attempts to "fix" water quality problems using technology alone have produced only limited success. It will be shown that greater attention to source water protection has potential for both to improve drinking water quality as well as to re-connect health and place for First Nations in Canada.

  18. To what extent does a tobacco carve-out protect public health in the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirono, Katherine; Gleeson, Deborah; Freeman, Becky

    2016-04-15

    In November 2015, negotiations of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement came to a close with the release of the final text. It included an optional carve-out (exclusion) for tobacco control measures from the TPP's investor-state dispute settlement mechanism. Despite the apparent 'win' for the field of tobacco control, the limited scope of the carve-out provides only partial protection for public health regulatory measures.

  19. 75 FR 26759 - Health Care Integrity and Protection Data Bank (HIPDB) and National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... Administration Health Care Integrity and Protection Data Bank (HIPDB) and National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB...: ``Government agencies,'' as defined in section 1128E(g)(3) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1320a-7e(g)(3... in a report on the HRSA and Data Bank Web sites ( http://www.hrsa.gov and http://www.npdb-hipdb.hrsa...

  20. ORTHOSCOPY (THE PROPER LOOK: TOWARDS A CODE OF ETHICS OF THE EDUCATIONAL INSPECTORATE BASED ON RESPECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Giró París

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the ethical dimension of the inspectorate as a result of a closer look, which I have called orthoscopy, or what is the same, a proper look. From the Latin word meaning inspectio we dive inside the phenomenology of sight, the distinction between seeing and looking, the two assumptions orthoscopy addressed: the admiration and collectively practiced habit of looking to end up with a reflection on the subjective moment of the act of looking. Finally we become aware of self-critical time of inspection taking into account that we look at people who watch us, and therefore it is a bidirectional ethical commitment. Inspectors do not carry out their functions just because of what they think their task should be, but mainly because of the expectations that the other members of the educational community have in relation to their functions.

  1. Protection of Health Rights from Chinese Health Care Law%略论我国卫生法律制度对健康权的保护

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋大平

    2014-01-01

    The paper discusses how Chinese health care law protects health rights ,through analysis of its overall structure and review of its evolution , evaluates the current health care law and recommend to future health care laws . The framework of Chinese health care law has initially come into being .The administrative health care law ,medical torts in the civil law ,criminal medical law and related social laws are protecting the health rights . Nevertheless , there are still challenges ,such as the lack of a fundamental health law ,weak coordination between health care laws ,insufficient fineness of clauses and legislation lagged behind .Take the opportunity of carrying forward the new round of health system reform , the improvement of the health care law system should speed up ,to make the fundamental health law ,to make changes to related department laws and to strengthen the coordination of the laws .%通过分析和回顾我国卫生法律制度的整体架构和历史沿革,对当前制度进行评价并展望未来,系统阐述了我国卫生法律制度如何保障国民健康权。目前我国卫生法律制度框架已初步形成,卫生行政法、民法中的医疗侵权、医疗刑法、有关社会法等均对健康权进行保护,但制度仍面临母法缺失、协调性不佳、精细度不足和立法滞后等挑战。以新医改为契机,卫生法律制度的完善应加快进程,应尽快制定母法,并对相关部门法做出调整,加强有关法律法规之间的协调性。

  2. 78 FR 69418 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Exchanges and Qualified Health Plans, Quality Rating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... Care Act; Standards Related to Essential Health Benefits, Actuarial Value, and Accreditation; Final... state-of-science for measuring health care quality, science and technology do not yet allow us to...

  3. A review of protective factors and causal mechanisms that enhance the mental health of Indigenous Circumpolar youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Petrasek MacDonald

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives . To review the protective factors and causal mechanisms which promote and enhance Indigenous youth mental health in the Circumpolar North. Study design . A systematic literature review of peer-reviewed English-language research was conducted to systematically examine the protective factors and causal mechanisms which promote and enhance Indigenous youth mental health in the Circumpolar North. Methods . This review followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA guidelines, with elements of a realist review. From 160 records identified in the initial search of 3 databases, 15 met the inclusion criteria and were retained for full review. Data were extracted using a codebook to organize and synthesize relevant information from the articles. Results . More than 40 protective factors at the individual, family, and community levels were identified as enhancing Indigenous youth mental health. These included practicing and holding traditional knowledge and skills, the desire to be useful and to contribute meaningfully to one's community, having positive role models, and believing in one's self. Broadly, protective factors at the family and community levels were identified as positively creating and impacting one's social environment, which interacts with factors at the individual level to enhance resilience. An emphasis on the roles of cultural and land-based activities, history, and language, as well as on the importance of social and family supports, also emerged throughout the literature. Conclusions . Healthy communities and families foster and support youth who are resilient to mental health challenges and able to adapt and cope with multiple stressors, be they social, economic, or environmental. Creating opportunities and environments where youth can successfully navigate challenges and enhance their resilience can in turn contribute to fostering healthy Circumpolar communities. Looking at the

  4. Do Political Institutions protect the poor? Intra Countries Health Inequalities and Air Pollution in Developing Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Drabo, Alassane

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the link between health inequalities, air pollution and political institutions. In health economics literature, many studies have assessed the association between environmental degradation and health outcomes. This paper extends this literature by investigating how air pollution could explain health inequalities both between and within developing countries, and the role of political institutions in this relationship. Theoretically, we argue that differential in exposition ...

  5. A review of risk and protective factors for adolescent sexual and reproductive health in developing countries: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mmari, Kristin; Sabherwal, Simran

    2013-11-01

    To conduct a literature review of studies that examined risk and protective factors related to adolescent sexual and reproductive health in developing countries. A literature search was conducted using multiple databases, including PubMed, PsycINFO, Scopus, JSTOR, and the Interagency Youth Working Group. Review criteria included publications that: were conducted in a low- or middle-income country; had a sample size of at least 100 young people aged 10-24 years, and used multivariate analysis. All studies that were identified were also conducted between 1990 and 2010, a 20-year time frame. The literature search and initial review yielded a total of 244 studies that met the criteria and analyzed risk and protective factors related to the following outcomes: sexual initiation, number of sexual partners, condom use, contraceptive use, pregnancy and early childbearing, human immunodeficiency virus, sexually transmitted infections, and sexual coercion. Most studies that were conducted on adolescent sexual and reproductive health in developing countries were largely focused in Sub-Saharan African contexts, and primarily examined factors related to sexual initiation and condom use. Most factors that examined an adolescent sexual and reproductive health outcome were also focused on the individual level, although an increasing number of studies within the past 10 years have focused on family-level factors. Few studies examined factors at the community or neighborhood level, which, to date, has largely been ignored in developing country contexts. The review not only summarizes what is currently known in terms of risk and protective factors that relate to adolescent sexual and reproductive health in developing countries, but also highlights the gaps. Implications for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Government registries containing sensitive health data and the implementation of EU directive on the protection of personal data in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, Lasse A

    2002-01-01

    Legislation on the protection of personal data was first enacted in Finland in 1987 (Act 471/1987) and revised in 1999 (Act 523/1999). The Personal Registries Act of 1987 established a special authority, the "data protection ombudsman" to ensure that a citizen's right to privacy would be maintained despite increased usage of computerised registries containing sensitive data. Health care and medical research, however, have been largely outside the scope of effective scrutiny due to special legislation that gives health care authorities the right to gather and register information on the medical history of an individual citizen. In Finland, the National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health (STAKES)--which works in close co-operation with the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health--maintains or supervises several centralised registries containing sensitive data. These registries which are based on an exemption (Act 556/1989) from the general data protection legislation, contain in practice a complete database on all Finnish citizens that have used public health care services. Furthrmore, additional personal information is added into these databases. For example, the central registry on abortions contains not only the identification data of a subject who has had an abortion but also information on the reason for abortion and on the methods of contraception she used. It is noteworthy that these registers are not accessible to the physicians who treat the patient whose data is registered, but are used by the governmental authorities only. At the moment it is unclear whether the recent implementation of an EU directive into the Finnish legislation and the constitutional right to privacy in the revised Finnish constitution (effective from March 1, 2000 onwards) will have any impact on the content or usage of these centralised registers.

  7. Health and safety in small enterprises in Denmark and the role of intermediaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Peter

    An analysis of the working environment for small enterprises in Denmark. Focussing especially on the working environment regulation and the role of intermediaries such as the occupational health service, the social partners and the labour inspectorate....

  8. 77 FR 28788 - Health Insurance Issuers Implementing Medical Loss Ratio (MLR) Under the Patient Protection and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Part 158 Health Insurance Issuers Implementing Medical Loss Ratio (MLR) Under the... Federal Register on December 1, 2010, entitled ``Health Insurance Issuers Implementing Medical Loss Ratio... published in the Federal Register on December 30, 2010, entitled ``Health Insurance Issuers Implementing...

  9. A Glimpse of the Crumbling of British Upper-Class Society in An Inspector Calls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董建炜

    2016-01-01

    Set in 1912, the 3-act drama relates a celebration party in the prosperous Birling family for the engagement between Miss Birling and Mr. Gerald Croft, when it is interrupted by an unexpected visitor who addresses himself as"Inspector Goole". My essay details about character analyses of the family members through which one learns how the vices reflected in the family result in the tragedy and the looming collapse of British upper-class society.

  10. The Assessment of Animal Welfare in British Zoos by Government-Appointed Inspectors

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Harris; Chris Draper

    2012-01-01

    Simple Summary Since 1984, British zoos have been required to meet the animal welfare standards set out under the Zoo Licensing Act 1981. Zoos are regularly assessed by government-appointed inspectors, who report on animal welfare standards in each zoo. This is the first analysis of those reports from a representative sample of British zoos. We highlight a number of concerns about the inspection process itself, and identify areas where changes would lead to improvements in both the inspection...

  11. Calculating inspector probability of detection using performance demonstration program pass rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumblidge, Stephen; D'Agostino, Amy

    2016-02-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been working since the 1970's to ensure that nondestructive testing performed on nuclear power plants in the United States will provide reasonable assurance of structural integrity of the nuclear power plant components. One tool used by the NRC has been the development and implementation of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section XI Appendix VIII[1] (Appendix VIII) blind testing requirements for ultrasonic procedures, equipment, and personnel. Some concerns have been raised, over the years, by the relatively low pass rates for the Appendix VIII qualification testing. The NRC staff has applied statistical tools and simulations to determine the expected probability of detection (POD) for ultrasonic examinations under ideal conditions based on the pass rates for the Appendix VIII qualification tests for the ultrasonic testing personnel. This work was primarily performed to answer three questions. First, given a test design and pass rate, what is the expected overall POD for inspectors? Second, can we calculate the probability of detection for flaws of different sizes using this information? Finally, if a previously qualified inspector fails a requalification test, does this call their earlier inspections into question? The calculations have shown that one can expect good performance from inspectors who have passed appendix VIII testing in a laboratory-like environment, and the requalification pass rates show that the inspectors have maintained their skills between tests. While these calculations showed that the PODs for the ultrasonic inspections are very good under laboratory conditions, the field inspections are conducted in a very different environment. The NRC staff has initiated a project to systematically analyze the human factors differences between qualification testing and field examinations. This work will be used to evaluate and prioritize

  12. Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction. Quarterly Report and Semiannual report to the United States Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-30

    livestock can be raised more economically in confi nement imported 12,400 Hungarian fi ngerlings to • cross-breed with heat -resistant Iraqi carp to...local population, who are primarily engaged in trading, farming, and raising sheep and calves . Th e Deputy Inspector General for Iraq July2009.indb...the challenges Basrah faced in unemployment, corruption, and fi scal stress .716 Security Security improved slightly, with four bombs exploding this

  13. Development of an IAEA Training Course for Future U.S. Inspectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savannah Avgerinos Fitzwater; Amanda R. Rynes; David S. Bracken; Richard R. M. Metcalf; James D. West

    2011-07-01

    U.S. citizens currently make up only 12% of the positions held in the IAEA’s Department of Safeguards. While the United States has maintained a high level of support for the Agency over the duration of its history, the number of American inspectors currently in the field does not reflect this level of involvement. As a result, the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of International Relations, as part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) mission, has tasked Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to develop a rigorous two week hands-on training program to encourage and operationally acclimatize U.S. Citizens who are interested in applying for IAEA inspector positions using IAEA authorized equipment at INL. Idaho National Laboratory is one-of-a-kind in its ability to train IAEA inspectors by including training at nuclear facilities on site and includes, for example, direct measurement of an active spent fuel storage cooling pond. This accredited course will introduce and train attendees on the major IAEA systems used in collecting nuclear safeguards data and performing safeguards inspections. Unique in the United States, these classes will give attendees direct hands-on training and will address equipment purpose, function, operating principles, application, and troubleshooting, based upon what would be expected of an IAEA Safeguards Inspector in the field and in the office. Upon completion, U.S. applicants will be better qualified to pursue a position in the IAEA Department of Safeguards Operational Divisions. In support, INL has recently established a new laboratory space to house state of the art nuclear safeguards instrumentation. Currently, equipment installed in the laboratory space includes attended systems: 3DLR (3-D Imaging Laser) for design information verification, a Digital Cerenkov Viewing Device for measurement of spent fuel, HM-5 handheld radiation detectors, quantitative neutron and gamma systems; unattended monitoring

  14. Use of protective behavioral strategies and reduced alcohol risk: examining the moderating effects of mental health, gender, and race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Shannon R; LaBrie, Joseph W

    2013-12-01

    Recent research indicates that protective behavioral strategies (PBS)-previously established as effective self-regulating tools for reducing alcohol risk among college students-may be especially useful for students with poor mental health, who are shown to be at heightened risk for alcohol-related harm. The current study examined the moderating influence of mental health (depression and anxiety severity), gender, and race (White, Asian) in the relationship between PBS use and alcohol-related negative consequences. Participants were 1,782 undergraduate students from two West Coast universities who reported past-month incidence of heavy episodic drinking (HED). Students reported on their drinking, experience of alcohol-related consequences, use of PBS, and depression and anxiety symptomatology. Overall, results demonstrated that among participants experiencing depression or anxiety, greater PBS utilization was associated with significantly lower levels of alcohol-related consequences, even after controlling for drinking and other predictors. However, findings also revealed important distinctions in the potential effectiveness of PBS by depression/anxiety severity and racial-gender subgroup, such that Asian men with poor mental health appeared to garner unique and substantial benefit (i.e., lesser consequences) from increased PBS use. Further, PBS were found to offer substantial protective benefit for White females, irrespective of mental health. This study points to the potential for targeted PBS-specific skills training and interventions to minimize alcohol-related risks faced by the growing subpopulation of college students experiencing psychological distress, and further highlights important race and gender differentials.

  15. Risk and protective factors associated with being a victim of aggression in the health sector. Research protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Parmigiani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: aggression against healthcare workers is an alarming issue worldwide. However, there is lack of data on psychological vulnerability factors (such as personality traits, attachment style which can constitute a risk or a protective factor for being a victim of an episode of violence in the health sector. Methods/design: the present protocol is a cross-sectional study on prevalence and characteristics of violent episodes experienced by nursing students in the clinical setting. Its aim is to identify risk and protective factors for becoming a victim of verbal and/or physical aggression among healthcare workers. Participants will undergo an intensive battery of psychometric tests, dealing with episodes of aggression in the previous year, attachment style, personality traits, perceived stress, health related quality of life and job strain. Conclusions: the findings derived from this study may be of value in identifying vulnerability factors in experiencing an episode of aggression in the health sector. In this respect, it is a step towards the development of valid training and support focused on health workers, aimed at teaching them how to modulate and manage their vulnerability factors in an efficient way.

  16. Communicating human biomonitoring results to ensure policy coherence with public health recommendations: analysing breastmilk whilst protecting, promoting and supporting breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arendt Maryse

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article addresses the problem of how to ensure consistency in messages communicating public health recommendations on environmental health and on child health. The World Health Organization states that the protection, promotion and support of breastfeeding rank among the most effective interventions to improve child survival. International public health policy recommends exclusive breastfeeding for six months, followed by continued breastfeeding with the addition of safe and adequate complementary foods for two years and beyond. Biomonitoring of breastmilk is used as an indicator of environmental pollution ending up in mankind. This article will therefore present the biomonitoring results of concentrations of residues in breastmilk in a wider context. These results are the mirror that reflects the chemical substances accumulated in the bodies of both men and women in the course of a lifetime. The accumulated substances in our bodies may have an effect on male or female reproductive cells; they are present in the womb, directly affecting the environment of the fragile developing foetus; they are also present in breastmilk. Evidence of man-made chemical residues in breastmilk can provide a shock tactic to push for stronger laws to protect the environment. However, messages about chemicals detected in breastmilk can become dramatized by the media and cause a backlash against breastfeeding, thus contradicting the public health messages issued by the World Health Organization. Analyses of breastmilk show the presence of important nutritional components and live protective factors active in building up the immune system, in gastro intestinal maturation, in immune defence and in providing antiviral, antiparasitic and antibacterial activity. Through cohort studies researchers in environmental health have concluded that long-term breastfeeding counterbalances the effect of prenatal exposure to chemicals causing delay in mental and

  17. Does private insurance adequately protect families of children with mental health disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Susan H; Barry, Colleen L

    2009-12-01

    Although private insurance typically covers many health care costs, the challenges faced by families who care for a sick child are substantial. These challenges may be more severe for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) with mental illnesses than for other CSHCN. Our objective was to determine if families of privately insured children who need mental health care face different burdens than other families in caring for their children. We used the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN) to study privately insured children aged 6 to 17 years. We compared CSHCN with mental health care needs (N = 4918) to 3 groups: children with no special health care needs (n = 2346); CSHCN with no mental health care needs (n = 16250); and CSHCN with no mental health care need but a need for other specialty services (n = 7902). The latter group was a subset of CSHCN with no mental health care need. We used weighted logistic regression and study outcomes across 4 domains: financial burden; health plan experiences; labor-market and time effects; and parent experience with services. We found that families of children with mental health care needs face significantly greater financial barriers, have more negative health plan experiences, and are more likely to reduce their labor-market participation to care for their child than other families. Families of privately insured CSHCN who need mental health care face a higher burden than other families in caring for their children. Policies are needed to help these families obtain affordable, high-quality care for their children.

  18. Health and safety in small enterprises in Denmark and the role of intermediaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Peter

    An analysis of the working environment for small enterprises in Denmark. Focussing especially on the working environment regulation and the role of intermediaries such as the occupational health service, the social partners and the labour inspectorate.......An analysis of the working environment for small enterprises in Denmark. Focussing especially on the working environment regulation and the role of intermediaries such as the occupational health service, the social partners and the labour inspectorate....

  19. Mechanisms for training security inspectors to enhance human performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhalter, H.E.; Sessions, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has established qualification standards for protective force personnel employed at nuclear facilities (10 CFR Part 1046 (Federal Register)). Training mechanisms used at Los Alamos to enhance human performance in meeting DOE standards include, but are not limited to, the following: for cardio-respiratory training, they utilize distance running, interval training, sprint training, pacing, indoor aerobics and circuit training; for muscular strength, free weights, weight machines, light hand weights, grip strength conditioners, and calistenics are employed; for muscular endurance, participants do high repetitions (15 - 40) using dumbbells, flex weights, resistive rubber bands, benches, and calisthenics; for flexibility, each training session devotes specific times to stretch the muscles involved for a particular activity. These training mechanisms with specific protocols can enhance human performance.

  20. Assessing community values for reducing agricultural emissions to improve water quality and protect coral health in the Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, John; Windle, Jill

    2011-12-01

    Policymakers wanting to increase protection of the Great Barrier Reef from pollutants generated by agriculture need to identify when measures to improve water quality generate benefits to society that outweigh the costs involved. The research reported in this paper makes a contribution in several ways. First, it uses the improved science understanding about the links between management changes and reef health to bring together the analysis of costs and benefits of marginal changes, helping to demonstrate the appropriate way of addressing policy questions relating to reef protection. Second, it uses the scientific relationships to frame a choice experiment to value the benefits of improved reef health, with the results of mixed logit (random parameter) models linking improvements explicitly to changes in "water quality units." Third, the research demonstrates how protection values are consistent across a broader population, with some limited evidence of distance effects. Fourth, the information on marginal costs and benefits that are reported provide policymakers with information to help improve management decisions. The results indicate that while there is potential for water quality improvements to generate net benefits, high cost water quality improvements are generally uneconomic. A major policy implication is that cost thresholds for key pollutants should be set to avoid more expensive water quality proposals being selected.

  1. 78 FR 12833 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Essential Health Benefits...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ..., Medicaid consultations, and meetings with tribal leaders and representatives, health insurance issuers... election of the state. Summary of Regulatory Changes For the reasons described in the proposed rule...

  2. Surveillance for Health Protection in England and Wales: An analysis of NHS Direct syndromic data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooper, D. L.

    2008-01-01

    Disease surveillance is the collection and analysis health data to provide information for action and to inform decisions relating to public health policy. Surveillance systems in the UK typically rely on data about diagnoses made by clinicians, or laboratory confirmations of specific disease pathog

  3. New Grandparents' Mental Health: The Protective Role of Optimism, Self-Mastery, and Social Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Shlomo, Shirley; Taubman - Ben-Ari, Orit

    2012-01-01

    The current study examines the contribution of optimism, self-mastery, perceived social support, and background variables (age, physical health, economic status) to mental health following the transition to grandparenthood. The sample consisted of 257 first-time Israeli grandparents (grandmothers and grandfathers, maternal and paternal) who were…

  4. 78 FR 12065 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Personal Protective Technology for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute for Occupational Safety and... Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC... Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

  5. 78 FR 9054 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Respiratory Protection for Healthcare...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute for Occupational Safety and... for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC... Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

  6. Phytochemicals of Brassicaceae in plant protection and human health--influences of climate, environment and agronomic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Maria; Klingen, Ingeborg; Birch, Andrew N E; Bones, Atle M; Bruce, Toby J A; Johansen, Tor J; Meadow, Richard; Mølmann, Jørgen; Seljåsen, Randi; Smart, Lesley E; Stewart, Derek

    2011-05-01

    In this review, we provide an overview of the role of glucosinolates and other phytochemical compounds present in the Brassicaceae in relation to plant protection and human health. Current knowledge of the factors that influence phytochemical content and profile in the Brassicaceae is also summarized and multi-factorial approaches are briefly discussed. Variation in agronomic conditions (plant species, cultivar, developmental stage, plant organ, plant competition, fertilization, pH), season, climatic factors, water availability, light (intensity, quality, duration) and CO(2) are known to significantly affect content and profile of phytochemicals. Phytochemicals such as the glucosinolates and leaf surface waxes play an important role in interactions with pests and pathogens. Factors that affect production of phytochemicals are important when designing plant protection strategies that exploit these compounds to minimize crop damage caused by plant pests and pathogens. Brassicaceous plants are consumed increasingly for possible health benefits, for example, glucosinolate-derived effects on degenerative diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, factors influencing phytochemical content and profile in the production of brassicaceous plants are worth considering both for plant and human health. Even though it is known that factors that influence phytochemical content and profile may interact, studies of plant compounds were, until recently, restricted by methods allowing only a reductionistic approach. It is now possible to design multi-factorial experiments that simulate their combined effects. This will provide important information to ecologists, plant breeders and agronomists.

  7. Mobile phone health risk policy in Germany: the role of the federal government and the Federal Office for Radiation Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweikardt, Christoph; Gross, Dominik

    2012-01-01

    In order to establish a regulatory framework for a given technology important to society, the government must make decisions in the face of existing unknowingness. In the last decade, health risks originating from electromagnetic fields of mobile telecommunication transmitting stations and devices have become a regulation policy issue in Germany. This article investigates the role of the government and the Federal Office for Radiation Protection in regard to policy-making by analysing publications and Federal Parliament reports, hearings and debates. The government and Federal Parliament perceived the research situation in 2001 as insufficient in the absence of hard evidence for health impairment. Against this background, the government struck a compromise with mobile telecommunication network operators, who did not want to integrate stricter limit values for transmission stations as precautionary measures. The network operators' voluntary self-commitment included financing half the budget of the German Mobile Telecommunication Research Programme (2002-2008) under the lead management of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection, which concluded that it was not required to change the position taken in 2001. The results of this programme provided the basis to continue the agreement of that year. With regard to health issues and all the other interests involved, this agreement was an acceptable and remarkably stable compromise.

  8. Antioxidant protection and plasma carotenoids of incubating great tits (Parus major L.) in relation to health state and breeding conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummeleht, Lea; Mägi, Marko; Kilgas, Priit; Mänd, Raivo; Hõrak, Peeter

    2006-10-01

    Carotenoids are biologically active pigments, which are important for animals due to their dual role in health maintenance and ornamental signalling. In adult birds, immunostimulatory properties of carotenoids have been repeatedly demonstrated while much less is known about the importance of carotenoids as antioxidants. We studied the relationships between plasma carotenoid levels, as well as total antioxidant protection, and various hemato-serological health state indices in female great tits (Parus major L.), incubating their second clutches in two contrasting (coniferous and deciduous) habitats in southwest Estonia. To manipulate reproductive effort, four eggs were removed from half of the clutches during laying to stimulate females to lay additional eggs. However, egg removal had no effect on the final number of eggs laid. Plasma carotenoid levels increased seasonally in parallel with caterpillar food availability. However, no between-habitat differences in carotenoid levels, total antioxidant capacity, or indices of health state could be found despite the apparently better feeding conditions in the coniferous habitat. No correlation was detected between plasma carotenoid levels and measures of total antioxidant capacity, which suggests that at least for the adult birds feeding on naturally carotenoid-rich diet, antioxidant function of carotenoids is not of primary importance. A strong non-linear association between the measures of antioxidant protection and leukocytic markers of inflammation was found, which suggests that measures of total antioxidant capacity deserve further attention in ecophysiological studies as potential indicators of immunopathology.

  9. 45 CFR 164.520 - Notice of privacy practices for protected health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... for which the covered entity is permitted or required by this subpart to use or disclose protected... information that may be made by the covered entity, and of the individual's rights and the covered entity's... is a covered entity. (b) Implementation specifications: content of notice—(1) Required elements. The...

  10. Past, Present & Future of the US EPA: Protecting Human Health & the Natural Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The time line of events that lead to the creation of the US EPA are marked by grassroots efforts by average citizens voicing concerns to politicians in Washington. Visionary leadership by Congress and the President led to the birth of a Federal Agency dedicated to protecting huma...

  11. Social support and family communication as factors protecting adolescents against multiple recurrent health complaints related to school stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Izabela; Mazur, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    One reason of increased psychological and somatic health problems in adolescence is intensification of stress in school and everyday life. There is little evidence to what extent the level of school achievements shapes this relationship. The aim of the study was to investigate determinants of subjective health complaints in schoolaged children, taking into account the interaction effects. Anonymous survey was conducted in Poland in 2013/2014 on the sample of 4,545 students, as a part of the HBSC (Health Behaviour in School-aged Children) study. On the basis of prevalence of eight symptoms in the past 6 months, a standardized index of health complaints (SCL - Subjective Complaints Checklist) was calculated (0-100). To predict its variability three hierarchical linear models (five blocks) were estimated, separately for three levels of school achievements. Support from family, classmates and teachers as well as family communication were considered as protective factors, which can reduce the negative impact of stress. All analyses were adjusted for age, gender and family affluence. The standardized SCL index was equal to 23.2 in boys and 32.5 in girls. The high level of school stress was reported by 28.5% boys and 35.6% girls, respectively. Regarding these two measures, similar patterns of change were observed, increase with age and with deterioration of academic achievement. Final multivariate models explained 22-25% variability of SCL, slightly more among worst students. Accumulation of low family support and high level of school stress caused the highest increase in the SCL index in very good students. School performance is an important determinant of subjective health complaints in adolescence, also modifying the impact of other risk and protective factors.

  12. Knowledge of Radiation Hazards, Radiation Protection Practices and Clinical Profile of Health Workers in a Teaching Hospital in Northern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awosan, K J; Ibrahim, Mto; Saidu, S A; Ma'aji, S M; Danfulani, M; Yunusa, E U; Ikhuenbor, D B; Ige, T A

    2016-08-01

    Use of ionizing radiation in medical imaging for diagnostic and interventional purposes has risen dramatically in recent years with a concomitant increase in exposure of patients and health workers to radiation hazards. To assess the knowledge of radiation hazards, radiation protection practices and clinical profile of health workers in UDUTH, Sokoto, Nigeria. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 110 Radiology, Radiotherapy and Dentistry staff selected by universal sampling technique. The study comprised of administration of standardized semi-structured pre-tested questionnaire (to obtain information on socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge of radiation hazards, and radiation protection practices of participants), clinical assessment (comprising of chest X-ray, abdominal ultrasound and laboratory investigation on hematological parameters), and evaluation of radiation exposure of participants (extracted from existing hospital records on their radiation exposure status). The participants were aged 20 to 65 years (mean = 34.04 ± 8.83), most of them were males (67.3%) and married (65.7%). Sixty five (59.1%) had good knowledge of radiation hazards, 58 (52.7%) had good knowledge of Personal Protective Devices (PPDs), less than a third, 30 (27.3%) consistently wore dosimeter, and very few (10.9% and below) consistently wore the various PPDs at work. The average annual radiation exposure over a 4 year period ranged from 0.0475mSv to 1.8725mSv. Only 1 (1.2%) of 86 participants had abnormal chest X-ray findings, 8 (9.4%) of 85 participants had abnormal abdominal ultrasound findings; while 17 (15.5%) and 11 (10.0%) of 110 participants had anemia and leucopenia respectively. This study demonstrated poor radiation protection practices despite good knowledge of radiation hazards among the participants, but radiation exposure and prevalence of abnormal clinical conditions were found to be low. Periodic in-service training and monitoring on radiation safety was

  13. Mentoring Interventions and the Impact of Protective Assets on the Reproductive Health of Adolescent Girls and Young Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plourde, Kate F; Ippoliti, Nicole B; Nanda, Geeta; McCarraher, Donna R

    2017-08-01

    Adolescent girls and young women (AGYW) are disproportionately affected by HIV and AIDS and other negative reproductive health (RH) outcomes. Emerging evidence suggests that programs to build AGYW's assets can help reduce their vulnerability to poor RH. Mentoring interventions have demonstrated a positive impact on a variety of youth development outcomes, including the protective assets needed to circumvent poor RH outcomes. The purpose of this review was to understand the types of mentoring programs for AGYW that have demonstrated effectiveness in improving protective assets, and/or, RH knowledge, intentions, behaviors, or outcomes themselves. Interventions were identified through an electronic search of the peer-reviewed and the gray literature. Studies were excluded in stages based on reviews of titles, abstracts, and full text. A review of 491 publications yielded a total of 19 articles that were included in the final review. The majority of the publications examined the impact of the one-to-one mentoring model in the United States. However, a good proportion examined the impact of both one-on-one and group-based interventions globally. The few interventions that followed a group-based model demonstrated more promise; evaluations of this model demonstrated a positive impact on RH knowledge and behavior, academic achievement, financial behavior, and social networks, as well as reductions in the experience of violence. Group-based mentoring programs demonstrated the most promise in building AGYW's protective assets and improving their RH outcomes. The most successful interventions consisted of multiple components, including mentoring, that sought to directly improve AGYW's protective assets and met with more frequency over a longer duration. Despite the promising evidence, more research is needed to better understand the relationship between assets and RH; the characteristics of successful mentoring programs; and the influence mentoring alone has on RH outcomes

  14. EPA Strengthens Ozone Standards to Protect Public Health/Science-based standards to reduce sick days, asthma attacks, emergency room visits, greatly outweigh costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    WASHINGTON - Based on extensive scientific evidence on effects that ground-level ozone pollution, or smog, has on public health and welfare, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has strengthened the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (

  15. The hepatitis B vaccine protects re-exposed health care workers, but does not provide sterilizing immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Jens M; Abdalla, Adil; Gara, Naveen; Ghany, Marc G; Rehermann, Barbara

    2013-11-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) can be prevented by vaccination with HB surface (HBs) antigen, which induces HBs-specific antibodies and T cells. However, the duration of vaccine-induced protective immunity is poorly defined for health care workers who were vaccinated as adults. We investigated the immune mechanisms (antibody and T-cell responses) of long-term protection by the HBV vaccine in 90 health care workers with or without occupational exposure to HBV, 10-28 years after vaccination. Fifty-nine of 90 health care workers (65%) had levels of antibodies to HBs antigen above the cut-off (>12 mIU/mL) and 30 of 90 (33%) had HBs-specific T cells that produced interferon-gamma. Titers of antibodies to HBs antigen correlated with numbers of HBs-specific interferon-gamma-producing T cells, but not with time after vaccination. Although occupational exposure to HBV after vaccination did not induce antibodies to the HBV core protein (HBcore), the standard biomarker for HBV infection, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells against HBcore and polymerase antigens were detected. Similar numbers of HBcore- and polymerase-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were detected in health care workers with occupational exposure to HBV and in patients who acquired immunity via HBV infection. Most of the HBcore- and polymerase-specific T cells were CD45RO(+)CCR7(-)CD127(-) effector memory cells in exposed health care workers and in patients with acquired immunity. In contrast, most of the vaccine-induced HBs-specific T cells were CD45RO(-)CCR7(-)CD127(-) terminally differentiated cells. HBs antigen vaccine-induced immunity protects against future infection but does not provide sterilizing immunity, as evidenced by HBcore- and polymerase-specific CD8(+) T cells in vaccinated health care workers with occupational exposure to HBV. The presence of HBcore- and HBV polymerase-specific T-cell responses is a more sensitive indicator of HBV exposure than detection of HBcore-specific antibodies

  16. ТHE INFLUENCE OF THE EMOTIONAL INTELIGENCE IN PROTECTION OF THE MENTAL HEALTH IN CONDITIONS OF A PSYCHOSOCIAL STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lupco Kevereski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available If our time is stressful, than protecting and promoting of our mental health is imperative of the time that is coming.In modern literature there is a huge interest for the determination of the mental health of the emotional intelligence, which is treated as a factor for it’s keeping and development. This paper is based on the assumption that the emotional intelligence has considerable contribution for understanding the relationship between psychosocial stress and mental health, seen through three important variables: self-confidence, depression and aggressiveness. In the research were included 72 people, and for variables’ measurement are used: questionnaire for measuring emotional intelligence (PК-45, stress inventory and questionnaire for emotional structure of the person- Profile index of emotions. The results from the regressive analyses showed that stress is connected to the three indicators of the mental health. People with low emotional intelligence react with lower self-confidence and high depression and aggressiveness in stressful situations. The two competencies of emotional intelligence (EI - self consciousness and social consciousness statistically are different from the other relevant measures which show that EI is important thing in understanding the relationship between the stress and mental health.

  17. Meeting the public health challenge of protecting private wells: Proceedings and recommendations from an expert panel workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Mary A; Nachman, Keeve E; Anderson, Breeana; Lam, Juleen; Resnick, Beth

    2016-06-01

    Private wells serving fewer than 25 people are federally unregulated, and their users may be exposed to naturally occurring agents of concern such as arsenic and radionuclides, as well as anthropogenic contaminants. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Clean Water for Health Program works to protect private wells and prevent adverse health outcomes for the roughly 15% of Americans who rely on them. To understand current and emerging challenges to the private drinking water supply, an interdisciplinary expert panel workshop on "Future and Emerging Issues for Private Wells" was organized to inform strategic planning for the Clean Water for Health Program. The panel assessed current conditions of ground water as a source for private wells, identified emerging threats, critical gaps in knowledge, and public health needs, and recommended strategies to guide future activities to ensure the safety of private drinking water wells. These strategies addressed topics of broad interest to the environmental public health community including: development of new methods to support citizen science; addressing contaminant mixtures; expanding capacity for well testing; evaluating treatment technologies; building an evidence base on best practices on well owner outreach and stewardship; and research and data needs.

  18. 77 FR 70643 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Essential Health Benefits...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... Federal government identification, commenters are encouraged to leave their comments in the CMS drop slots... statutory benefit categories, such as hospitalization, prescription drugs, and maternity and newborn care... patient services; emergency services; hospitalization; maternity and newborn care; mental health and...

  19. 77 FR 5012 - Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Health and Human Services and Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... production in plants (such as cry genes). EPA grants experimental use permits for field testing and... office of Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service/Biotechnology Regulatory Services (APHIS/BRS) and...

  20. A proposal to protect privacy of health information while accelerating comparative effectiveness research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddicord, Douglas; Waldo, Ann B; Boutin, Marc; Grande, Tina; Gutierrez, Luis

    2010-11-01

    Current laws, practices, and concerns about privacy inhibit access to health data for research. Barriers include inconsistent Institutional Review Board policies and complicated and costly procedures to obtain the consent of patients for release of their information. To realize the promise of comparative effectiveness research, it is essential to develop a new policy framework that will allow and encourage the use of health information in all forms--fully identifiable, partially anonymized, and deidentified. We propose that health data be made available for information-based research under a so-called research safe harbor. The arrangement would include strict data security controls, standards, and practices to be promulgated by the secretary of health and human services, and an annual third-party audit to ensure compliance.

  1. [Railway medical hygiene and health protection system in Croatia between 1945 and 1953].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajnert, Sinisa

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the system of medical hygiene and health care adopted by the Croatian section of Yugoslav Railways in the aftermath of World War Two until 1953, based on archival information. In 1945, the human resources section of the Railway Administration in Zagreb included the Department of Social Welfare with offices that managed health insurance in cases of illness and accidents, workers' pension fund, and sanitary care‥ On 19 June 1947, the regional railway executive board established a medical section within the so called Secretariat and appointed Dr Marijan Derkos as its head. On 3 July 1948, central and regional healthcare offices for traffic staff were established to manage and oversee the activities of health institutions providing services for railway workers. The seat of the regional office in Zagreb was in Grgurova street. After the dismantlement of the central healthcare office in charge of railway health institutions in 1953, regional boards established new institutions, that were now self-financed.

  2. [Health inequalities among occupations: epidemiologic hints for labour and social protection policies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, G

    2005-01-01

    Based on existing information systems in Italy, a program can be created for monitoring and surveillance of occupational differences in health. In recent years, a number of proposals were made for defining wearing-out jobs and for reforming the retirement age and/or required number of years of contributions: on these occasions the need to create a programme for monitoring occupational health was stressed. To this end, ISPESL (the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Prevention), in cooperation with the Epidemiology Unit of the Piedmont Region of Italy, assessed the validity of epidemiological indicators from existing sources and their use in creating a surveillance system of wearing-out jobs. The main results of the evaluations performed to date are presented herein. The results are discussed in relation to the information needs for developing both health policies and other types of policies addressing occupation. Each of the articles in this issue deals with a specific model (based on information sources available in Italy in the 1990's) for studying the relationship between health [general and cause-specific mortality; accidents and accident proneness; the main causes of chronic morbidity (cancer, diabetes, and vascular and respiratory diseases); self-reported health: perceived health, chronic illnesses; absenteeism, lifestyles, stress, working conditions] and occupation (most recent occupation or the main lifetime occupation recorded by the specific information source, using a 55-item classification created especially for this research). Here, the statistically significant associations are compared with data in the literature and discussed in light of the information needs for developing health policies and other pertinent policies. For men, the data on health indicators taken from the available information sources were adequate for identifying occupational differences in health. Certain occupations were consistently disadvantaged: masons and

  3. Genetic toolkits for bee health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekeepers, inspectors, and researchers have a shared interest in checking bees and hives for clues related to bee health and disease. These checks take many forms, from lifting fall supers prior to feeding decisions to carrying out sticky board or jar tests for estimating varroa populations. Most d...

  4. Practicing preventive ethics, protecting patients: challenges of the electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satkoske, Valerie B; Parker, Lisa S

    2010-01-01

    Implementation of guidelines regarding breaches of electronic health information requires an anticipatory stance and physician and patient education regarding security and monitoring measures and methods of redress. Adopting a preventive ethics, rather than a crisis management, model may also increase physician awareness of how the information they choose to include and privilege within the health record may expose patients to added harms if not done mindfully.

  5. Protective Eyewear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of ... They protect your eyes from the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays, which can damage your eyes. Pick sunglasses ...

  6. Resiliency in the face of disadvantage: do Hispanic cultural characteristics protect health outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Linda C; Penedo, Frank J; Espinosa de los Monteros, Karla; Arguelles, William

    2009-12-01

    Hispanics living in the United States may face substantial adversity, given stresses of immigration and acculturation, low incomes, poor educational and occupational opportunities, inadequate access to health care, and exposure to discrimination. Despite these disadvantages, the Hispanic population often shows equal or better health outcomes when compared to non-Hispanic Whites, a trend that has puzzled researchers and has been referred to as the "Hispanic Paradox." Hispanics with non-U.S. nativity also tend to show better health than those born in the United States, although this advantage dissipates with increasing time spent in the United States. The current article discusses the Reserve Capacity Model (L.C. Gallo & K. A. Matthews, 2003) as a potential framework for understanding how psychosocial risk and resilient factors may contribute to health disparities associated with broad sociocultural factors, such as low socioeconomic status or minority ethnicity. In addition, we examine theory concerning features of the Hispanic culture that may enhance resilience (e.g., social resources, familism, religiousness; G. Marin & B. V. Marin, 1991) in the face of adverse circumstances. We summarize some of our recent work that has empirically tested effects of risk and resilient factors in Hispanic health in the contexts of prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease. We conclude by discussing future directions and opportunities for researchers interested in culture-specific resiliency factors in relation to health outcomes.

  7. International collaboration to protect health workers from infectious diseases in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Marie-Claude; Yassi, Annalee; Bryce, Elizabeth; Fujii, Ronaldo; Logronio, Milton; Tennassee, Maritza

    2010-05-01

    The Healthy Hospital Project, an international collaboration, aimed to strengthen Ecuador's capacity to promote healthier and safer hospitals by reducing occupational transmission of infectious diseases. Team members conducted a needs assessment to identify workplace hazards and health risks in three hospitals. A survey of health care workers' knowledge and practices of occupational health (OH) and infection control (IC) revealed positive practices such as a medical waste disposal program and widespread dissemination of health information. Challenges identified included a high frequency of recapping needles and limited resources for workers to apply consistent IC measures. The survey revealed underreporting of needlestick injuries and limited OH and safety (OHS) training. Therefore, project collaborators organized a training workshop for health care workers that aimed to overcome the identified obstacles by integrating interdisciplinary local, national, and international stakeholders to build capacity and institutionalize work-related infection prevention and control measures. The knowledge transferred and experience gained led to useful hospital-based projects and serves as a basis for implementation of other OHS projects nationwide. International interdisciplinary, interinstitutional collaboration in OHS and IC can build capacity to address OHS concerns in health care.

  8. Caffeine metabolites not caffeine protect against riboflavin photosensitized oxidative damage related to skin and eye health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scurachio, R. S.; Mattiucci, F.; Santos, W. G.

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine metabolites were found to bind riboflavin with dissociation constant in the millimolar region by an exothermic process with positive entropy of reaction, which was found by 1H NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy to occur predominantly by hydrogen bonding with water being released from ribo...... singlet excited riboflavin through exothermic formation of ground-state precursor complexes indicating importance of hydrogen bounding through keto-enol tautomer's for protection of oxidizable substrates and sensitive structures against riboflavin photosensitization....

  9. About a Method of the Estimation of the Recreational and Health Value of a Protected Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazurkiewicz Ludwik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Recreation is very popular in protected areas where the number of visitors is increasing from year to year. They are attracted by benefits provided by natural resources in the form of favorable conditions to spend time for leisure. These benefits have a specified value which is known as a recreational one. In this paper a method is presented how to measure it.

  10. Noise producing toys and the efficacy of product standard criteria to protect health and education outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Stuart J; Page, Wyatt H; Parker, Lou; Rushton, Martin

    2013-12-19

    An evaluation of 28 commercially available toys imported into New Zealand revealed that 21% of these toys do not meet the acoustic criteria in the ISO standard, ISO 8124-1:2009 Safety of Toys, adopted by Australia and New Zealand as AS/NZS ISO 8124.1:2010. While overall the 2010 standard provided a greater level of protection than the earlier 2002 standard, there was one high risk toy category where the 2002 standard provided greater protection. A secondary set of toys from the personal collections of children known to display atypical methods of play with toys, such as those with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), was part of the evaluation. Only one of these toys cleanly passed the 2010 standard, with the remainder failing or showing a marginal-pass. As there is no tolerance level stated in the standards to account for interpretation of data and experimental error, a value of +2 dB was used. The findings of the study indicate that the current standard is inadequate in providing protection against excessive noise exposure. Amendments to the criteria have been recommended that apply to the recently adopted 2013 standard. These include the integration of the new approaches published in the recently amended European standard (EN 71) on safety of toys.

  11. Flame-retardant contamination of firefighter personal protective clothing - A potential health risk for firefighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Barbara M; Baxter, C Stuart

    2016-09-01

    There is a high incidence of cardiovascular disease and certain cancers in firefighters that may be related to their occupational exposure to hazardous substances. Exposure may result from contaminated personal protective gear, as well as from direct exposure at fire scenes. This study characterized flame-retardant contamination on firefighter personal protective clothing to assess exposure of firefighters to these chemicals. Samples from used and unused firefighter protective clothing, including gloves, hoods and a coat wristlet, were extracted with methylene chloride and analyzed by EPA method 8270D Specific Ion Method (SIM) for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Until recently PBDEs were some of the most common flame-retardant chemicals used in the US. Fifteen of the seventeen PBDEs for which analysis was performed were found on at least one clothing swatch. Every clothing sample, including an unused hood and all three layers of an unused glove, held a detectable concentration of at least one PBDE. These findings, along with previous research, suggest that firefighters are exposed to PBDE flame retardants at levels much higher than the general public. PBDEs are found widely dispersed in the environment and still persist in existing domestic materials such as clothing and furnishings. Firefighter exposure to flame retardants therefore merits further study.

  12. Noise Producing Toys and the Efficacy of Product Standard Criteria to Protect Health and Education Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart J. McLaren

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of 28 commercially available toys imported into New Zealand revealed that 21% of these toys do not meet the acoustic criteria in the ISO standard, ISO 8124-1:2009 Safety of Toys, adopted by Australia and New Zealand as AS/NZS ISO 8124.1:2010. While overall the 2010 standard provided a greater level of protection than the earlier 2002 standard, there was one high risk toy category where the 2002 standard provided greater protection. A secondary set of toys from the personal collections of children known to display atypical methods of play with toys, such as those with autism spectrum disorders (ASD, was part of the evaluation. Only one of these toys cleanly passed the 2010 standard, with the remainder failing or showing a marginal-pass. As there is no tolerance level stated in the standards to account for interpretation of data and experimental error, a value of +2 dB was used. The findings of the study indicate that the current standard is inadequate in providing protection against excessive noise exposure. Amendments to the criteria have been recommended that apply to the recently adopted 2013 standard. These include the integration of the new approaches published in the recently amended European standard (EN 71 on safety of toys.

  13. Primary School Inspectors and Teachers’ Views About Teachers’ Problems and Solutions on Activities in Primary School Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğba YANPAR YELKEN

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Activity-based education has been applied to the instructional programmes of primary schools in Turkey. The purpose of this research is to examine the inspectors and the teachers’ views about Primary school teachers’ problems and solutions on activities. Survey method was used in this study. The inspectors and the teachers were taken in-service training in Mersin at 2008 summer period. 411 inspectors and 181 teachers participated in this study to fill the questionnaires. Several problems came into the daylight, for the teachers’applications of the activities according to the inspectors and the teachers’ views. Problems can be summarized as follows: Many of the teachers give homework as an activity, activities in teachers’ guide books are used as they are written without the teachers’ contribution, teachers can’t create new activities for their students. Many of the teachers prefer teacher-centered practices, teachers need material design and development education for activities, teachers need in-service training on new activities development skills and so forth. Some solutions have been developed by the inspectors and the teachers.

  14. Regulating India's health services: to what end? What future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, David H; Muraleedharan, V R

    2008-05-01

    India has a comprehensive legal and regulatory framework and large public health delivery system which are disconnected from the realities of health care delivery and financing for most Indians. In reviewing the current bureaucratic approach to regulation, we find an extensive set of rules and procedures, though we argue it has failed in three critical ways, namely to (1) protect the interests of vulnerable groups; (2) demonstrate how health financing meets the public interests; (3) generate the trust of providers and the public. The paper reviews the state of alternative approaches to regulation of health services in India, using consumer and market based approaches, as well as multi-actor and collaborative approaches. We argue that poor regulation is a symptom of poor governance and that simply creating and enforcing the rules will continue to have limited effects. Rather than advocate for better implementation and expansion of the current bureaucratic approach, where Ministries of Health focus on their roles as inspectorate and provider, we propose that India's future health system is more likely to achieve its goals through greater attention to consumer and other market oriented approaches, and through collaborative mechanisms that enhance accountability. Civil society organizations, the media, and provider organizations can play more active parts in disclosing and using information on the use of health resources and the performance of public and private providers. The overview of the health sector would be more effective, if Indian Ministries of Health were to actively facilitate participation of these key stakeholders and the use of information.

  15. Climate change and children's health--a call for research on what works to protect children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiwei; Sheffield, Perry E; Hu, Wenbiao; Su, Hong; Yu, Weiwei; Qi, Xin; Tong, Shilu

    2012-09-10

    Climate change is affecting and will increasingly influence human health and wellbeing. Children are particularly vulnerable to the impact of climate change. An extensive literature review regarding the impact of climate change on children's health was conducted in April 2012 by searching electronic databases PubMed, Scopus, ProQuest, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science, as well as relevant websites, such as IPCC and WHO. Climate change affects children's health through increased air pollution, more weather-related disasters, more frequent and intense heat waves, decreased water quality and quantity, food shortage and greater exposure to toxicants. As a result, children experience greater risk of mental disorders, malnutrition, infectious diseases, allergic diseases and respiratory diseases. Mitigation measures like reducing carbon pollution emissions, and adaptation measures such as early warning systems and post-disaster counseling are strongly needed. Future health research directions should focus on: (1) identifying whether climate change impacts on children will be modified by gender, age and socioeconomic status; (2) refining outcome measures of children's vulnerability to climate change; (3) projecting children's disease burden under climate change scenarios; (4) exploring children's disease burden related to climate change in low-income countries; and (5) identifying the most cost-effective mitigation and adaptation actions from a children's health perspective.

  16. How can hospitals better protect the privacy of electronic medical records? Perspectives from staff members of health information management departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Ming-Ling; Talley, Paul C; Cheng, Tain-Junn; Kuo, Kuang-Ming

    2017-05-01

    The adoption of electronic medical records (EMR) is expected to better improve overall healthcare quality and to offset the financial pressure of excessive administrative burden. However, safeguarding EMR against potentially hostile security breaches from both inside and outside healthcare facilities has created increased patients' privacy concerns from all sides. The aim of our study was to examine the influencing factors of privacy protection for EMR by healthcare professionals. We used survey methodology to collect questionnaire responses from staff members in health information management departments among nine Taiwanese hospitals active in EMR utilisation. A total of 209 valid responses were collected in 2014. We used partial least squares for analysing the collected data. Perceived benefits, perceived barriers, self-efficacy and cues to action were found to have a significant association with intention to protect EMR privacy, while perceived susceptibility and perceived severity were not. Based on the findings obtained, we suggest that hospitals should provide continuous ethics awareness training to relevant staff and design more effective strategies for improving the protection of EMR privacy in their charge. Further practical and research implications are also discussed.

  17. Mental Health of Transgender Veterans in US States With and Without Discrimination and Hate Crime Legal Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosnich, John R; Marsiglio, Mary C; Gao, Shasha; Gordon, Adam J; Shipherd, Jillian C; Kauth, Michael; Brown, George R; Fine, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    To examine whether indicators of community- and state-level lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender equality are associated with transgender veterans' mental health. We extracted Veterans Administration data for patients who were diagnosed with gender identity disorder, had at least 1 visit in 2013, and lived in a zip code with a Municipality Equality Index score (n = 1640). We examined the associations of whether a state included transgender status in employment nondiscrimination laws and in hate crimes laws with mood disorders; alcohol, illicit drug, and tobacco use disorders; posttraumatic stress disorder; and suicidal ideation or attempt. Nearly half (47.3%) of the sample lived in states with employment discrimination protection, and 44.8% lived in states with hate crimes protection. Employment nondiscrimination protection was associated with 26% decreased odds of mood disorders (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.59, 0.93) and 43% decreased odds of self-directed violence (AOR = 0.57; 95% CI = 0.34, 0.95). Understanding lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender social stressors can inform treatment and care coordination for transgender populations.

  18. The Assessment of Animal Welfare in British Zoos by Government-Appointed Inspectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Chris; Harris, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Simple Summary Since 1984, British zoos have been required to meet the animal welfare standards set out under the Zoo Licensing Act 1981. Zoos are regularly assessed by government-appointed inspectors, who report on animal welfare standards in each zoo. This is the first analysis of those reports from a representative sample of British zoos. We highlight a number of concerns about the inspection process itself, and identify areas where changes would lead to improvements in both the inspection process and our ability to monitor animal welfare standards in zoos. Abstract We analysed the reports of government-appointed inspectors from 192 zoos between 2005–2008 to provide the first review of how animal welfare was assessed in British zoos since the enactment of the Zoo Licensing Act 1981. We examined the effects of whether or not a veterinarian was included in the inspection team, type of inspection, licence status of the zoo and membership of a zoo association on the inspectors’ assessments of animal welfare standards in five areas that approximate to the Five Freedoms. At least 11% of full licence inspections did not comply with the legal requirement for two inspectors. The inspectors’ reports were unclear as to how animal welfare was assessed, whether all animals or only a sub-sample had been inspected, and were based predominantly on welfare inputs rather than outcomes. Of 9,024 animal welfare assessments across the 192 zoos, 7,511 (83%) were graded as meeting the standards, 782 (9%) as substandard and the rest were not graded. Of the 192 zoos, 47 (24%) were assessed as meeting all the animal welfare standards. Membership of a zoo association was not associated with a higher overall assessment of animal welfare standards, and specialist collections such as Farm Parks and Other Bird collections performed least well. We recommend a number of changes to the inspection process that should lead to greater clarity in the assessment of animal welfare in British

  19. Effect of health education based on the protection motivation theory on malaria preventive behaviors in rural households of kerman, iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahremani, Leila; Faryabi, Reza; Kaveh, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-04-01

    Malaria is one of the most serious diseases in pregnant women as well as children less than 5 years around the world. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of health education based on the protection motivation theory on malaria preventive behaviors in the households of Ghale Ganj, Kerman, Iran in 2011. The present quasi-experimental study was conducted on 144 households covered by 8 health centers of Ghale Ganj, Kerman. The study samples were selected through systematic random sampling and the study data were collected using a questionnaire including demographic information, the constructs of the protection motivation theory, and a checklist for assessing the malaria preventive behaviors. After the pre-test, the intervention group underwent an educational intervention and after two months, the post-test was performed through the same questionnaire. Then, the data were entered into the SPSS statistical software (v. 18) and analyzed using Chi-square and Wilcoxon non-parametric tests. Besides, P motivation theory as well as malaria preventive behaviors (P motivation theory is highly effective in promoting malaria preventive behaviors.

  20. Community campaigns, supply chains, and protecting the health and well-being of workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Michael; Sokas, Rosemary K

    2009-11-01

    The growth of contingent work (also known as precarious employment), the informal sector, and business practices that diffuse employer responsibility for worker health and safety (such as outsourcing and the development of extended national and international contracting networks [supply chains]) pose a serious threat to occupational health and safety that disproportionately affects low-wage, ethnic minority, and immigrant workers. Drawing on cases from the United States and Australia, we examine the role that community-based campaigns can play in meeting these challenges, including several successful campaigns that incorporate supply chain regulation.

  1. THE PRIORITY WAYS OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE REGIONAL HEALTH PROTECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Klimin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This article displays the characteristic of a complex of measures on differentiation of powers and obligations between various levels of authority in sphere of public health services, on maintenance of equation of volumes of rendering of medical aid to citizens with volumes of its financing. The special attention is given to an estimation of medical insurance using to improve quality of the medical aid and to preserve the health of the population. In this article the primary goals of a state policy in this sphere are represented.

  2. The Impact of Discrimination on the Mental Health of Trans*Female Youth and the Protective Effect of Parental Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Erin C; Chen, Yea-Hung; Arayasirikul, Sean; Raymond, H Fisher; McFarland, Willi

    2016-10-01

    Significant health disparities exist for transgender female (trans*female) youth. We assessed differences in mental health outcomes based on exposure to discrimination among transgender female youth in the San Francisco Bay Area aged 16-24 years. Youth were recruited using a combination of respondent driven sampling with online and social media methods. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios for the mental health outcomes, comparing levels of discrimination and levels of resiliency promoting protective factors among sexually active youth in the sample (N = 216). High transgender-based discrimination was significantly associated with greater odds of PTSD (AOR, 2.6; 95 % CI 1.4-5.0), depression (AOR, 2.6; 95 % CI 1.2-5.9), and stress related to suicidal thoughts (AOR 7.7, 95 % CI 2.3-35.2). High racial discrimination was significantly associated with greater odds of psychological stress (AOR 3.6; 95 % CI 1.2-10.8), PTSD (AOR 2.1; 95 % CI 1.1-4.2) and stress related to suicidal thoughts (AOR 4.3, 95 % CI 1.5-13.3). Parental closeness was related to significantly lower odds of all four mental health outcomes measured, and intrinsic resiliency positively reduced risk for psychological stress, PTSD, and stress related to suicidal thoughts. Transgender and racial discrimination may have deleterious effects on the mental health of trans*female youth. Interventions that address individual and intersectional discrimination and build resources for resiliency and parental closeness may have success in preventing mental health disorders in this underserved population.

  3. Public health focus: effectiveness of rollover protective structures for preventing injuries associated with agricultural tractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-29

    Agriculture ranks fourth among U.S. industries for work-related fatalities (1). Fatalities associated with agricultural machinery commonly involve farm tractors, and rollover incidents (i.e., the tractor tips sideways or backward and overturns, crushing the operator) account for 46% (Minnesota) to 76% (Georgia) of all farm tractor-related fatalities (2). Annually, agricultural tractor rollovers result in approximately 132 work-related deaths among persons aged > or = 16 years* (3). This report summarizes information regarding the efficacy, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of rollover protective structures (ROPS) on agricultural tractors.

  4. Public health law: the constitutionality of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ville, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Congress of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) was immediately challenged by lawsuits attacking the constitutionality of the legislation. The lawsuits, joined by over 2 dozen state's attorney generals, contend that PPACA is an unconstitutional exercise of federal power. Specifically, the suits argue that the individual insurance mandate portion of the law is justified by neither the "Commerce Power" nor Congress' authority to "tax" and provide for "the general welfare." This essay outlines and analyzes the constitutional arguments for, and against, PPACA forecasting the likely resolution of the debate if the suits reach the US Supreme Court.

  5. Using Third-Party Inspectors in Building Energy Codes Enforcement in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Kumar, Pradeep; Van Wie, Laura; Bhatt, Vatsal

    2013-01-31

    India is experiencing fast income growth and urbanization, and this leads to unprecedented increases in demand for building energy services and resulting energy consumption. In response to rapid growth in building energy use, the Government of India issued the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) in 2007, which is consistent with and based on the 2001 Energy Conservation Act. ECBC implementation has been voluntary since its enactment and a few states have started to make progress towards mandatory implementation. Rajasthan is the first state in India to adopt ECBC as a mandatory code. The State adopted ECBC with minor additions on March 28, 2011 through a stakeholder process; it became mandatory in Rajasthan on September 28, 2011. Tamil Nadu, Gujarat, and Andhra Pradesh have started to draft an implementation roadmap and build capacity for its implementation. The Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) plans to encourage more states to adopt ECBC in the near future, including Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, Karnataka, Maharashtra, West Bengal, and Delhi. Since its inception, India has applied the code on a voluntary basis, but the Government of India is developing a strategy to mandate compliance. Implementing ECBC requires coordination between the Ministry of Power and the Ministry of Urban Development at the national level as well as interdepartmental coordination at the state level. One challenge is that the Urban Local Bodies (ULBs), the enforcement entities of building by-laws, lack capacity to implement ECBC effectively. For example, ULBs in some states might find the building permitting procedures to be too complex; in other cases, lack of awareness and technical knowledge on ECBC slows down the amendment of local building by-laws as well as ECBC implementation. The intent of this white paper is to share with Indian decision-makers code enforcement approaches: through code officials, third-party inspectors, or a hybrid approach. Given the limited capacity and human

  6. A quick guide to API 510 certified pressure vessel inspector syllabus example questions and worked answers

    CERN Document Server

    Matthews, Clifford

    2010-01-01

    The API Individual Certification Programs (ICPs) are well established worldwide in the oil, gas, and petroleum industries. This Quick Guide is unique in providing simple, accessible and well-structured guidance for anyone studying the API 510 Certified Pressure Vessel Inspector syllabus by summarizing and helping them through the syllabus and providing multiple example questions and worked answers.Technical standards are referenced from the API 'body of knowledge' for the examination, i.e. API 510 Pressure vessel inspection, alteration, rerating; API 572 Pressure vessel inspection; API

  7. 45 CFR 164.524 - Access of individuals to protected health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... health information is maintained in the designated record set, except for: (i) Psychotherapy notes; (ii) Information compiled in reasonable anticipation of, or for use in, a civil, criminal, or administrative action... Improvements Amendments of 1988, pursuant to 42 CFR 493.3(a)(2). (2) Unreviewable grounds for denial. A...

  8. 76 FR 66925 - Children's Health Protection Advisory Committee (CHPAC); Notice of Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... children's health risks. Inquiries may be directed to Martha Berger, Designated Federal Officer, CHPAC, U.S. EPA, OCHP MC 1107A, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20460. berger.martha@epa.gov , Telephone (202) 564-2191. Dated: October 7, 2011. Peter Grevatt, Director, Office of Children's...

  9. Sierra Leone's Former Child Soldiers: A Longitudinal Study of Risk, Protective Factors, and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Theresa S.; Brennan, Robert T.; Rubin-Smith, Julia; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Gilman, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the longitudinal course of internalizing and externalizing problems and adaptive/prosocial behaviors among Sierra Leonean former child soldiers and whether postconflict factors contribute to adverse or resilient mental health outcomes. Method: Male and female former child soldiers (N = 260, aged 10 to 17 years at…

  10. Sierra Leone's Former Child Soldiers: A Longitudinal Study of Risk, Protective Factors, and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Theresa S.; Brennan, Robert T.; Rubin-Smith, Julia; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Gilman, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the longitudinal course of internalizing and externalizing problems and adaptive/prosocial behaviors among Sierra Leonean former child soldiers and whether postconflict factors contribute to adverse or resilient mental health outcomes. Method: Male and female former child soldiers (N = 260, aged 10 to 17 years at…

  11. La protección sanitaria frente a los campos electromagnéticos Health protection against electromagnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Vargas-Marcos

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available En estos últimos años se ha generado en España una creciente preocupación social por los efectos de los campos electromagnéticos (CEM sobre la salud humana. Algunos colectivos sociales han expresado su rechazo a la instalación de antenas de estaciones base y a las líneas de alta tensión. En este trabajo se analiza la situación actual de la protección sanitaria en España frente a los CEM. La valoración se realiza en función de los antecedentes y justificación de la Recomendación de Consejo de Ministros de Sanidad de la Unión Europea que limita la exposición del público a CEM de 0 Hz a 300 GHz, al Real Decreto 1006/2001 sobre protección sanitaria frente a emisiones radioeléctricas y los estudios epidemiológicos más relevantes. Se subraya la necesidad de utilizar un enfoque conjunto de evaluación del riesgo y de la aplicación del principio de precaución. Se proponen las medidas de protección sanitaria que deben aplicarse en nuestro país para ser coherentes con la Recomendación Europea sobre exposición a CEM de 0 Hz a 300 GHz y con la propia legislación española sobre CEM de radiofrecuencias.In recent years there has been an increasing social concern in Spain about electromagnetic fields (EMF and their effects on human health. Some groups have expressed their opposition to antennas of base stations and high voltage power transmission lines. The present article discusses the current status of health protection against EMF in Spain. The assessment is based on the background and justification of the European Union Council Recommendation of 12 July 1999 on the limitation of exposure of the general population to electromagnetic fields (0 Hz to 300 GHz, the Spanish Royal Decree 1006/2001 on health protection against radioelectric emissions and the most relevant epidemiological studies. The need for implementation of a comprehensive approach based on risk assessment and the precaution principle is emphasized. In order to be

  12. Getting the vaccine now will protect you in the future! A pragma-dialectical analysis of strategic maneuvering with pragmatic argumentation in health brochures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. van Poppel

    2013-01-01

    ‘Getting the vaccine now will protect you in the future’ is an example of pragmatic argumentation in a health brochure aimed at convincing the reader of a piece of health advice. A brochure writer can be expected to attempt to choose the most convincing arguments and formulate them in the most appea

  13. Psychological Problems, Protective Factors and Health-Related Quality of Life in Youth Affected by Violence: The Burden of the Multiply Victimised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlack, Robert; Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike; Petermann, Franz

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates self-rated mental health in terms of psychological problems, protective factors and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in a nationally representative sample of adolescents (n = 6813) aged 11-17 involved in violence with varying frequency. Using MANCOVA and ANCOVA, youth with single and multiple histories of violent…

  14. Climate change threats to population health and well-being: the imperative of protective solutions that will last

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellstrom, Tord; McMichael, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    , climate change mitigation by significantly reducing global greenhouse gas emissions, especially long-acting carbon dioxide (CO2), and by increasing the uptake of CO2 at the earth's surface. This involves urgent shifts in energy production from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources, energy conservation in building design and urban planning, and reduced waste of energy for transport, building heating/cooling, and agriculture. It would also involve shifts in agricultural production and food systems to reduce energy and water use particularly in meat production. There is also potential for prevention via mitigation, adaptation, or resilience building actions, but for the large populations in tropical countries, mitigation of climate change is required to achieve health protection solutions that will last. PMID:23561024

  15. Climate change threats to population health and well-being: the imperative of protective solutions that will last

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tord Kjellstrom

    2013-04-01

    strategy is, of course, climate change mitigation by significantly reducing global greenhouse gas emissions, especially long-acting carbon dioxide (CO2, and by increasing the uptake of CO2 at the earth's surface. This involves urgent shifts in energy production from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources, energy conservation in building design and urban planning, and reduced waste of energy for transport, building heating/cooling, and agriculture. It would also involve shifts in agricultural production and food systems to reduce energy and water use particularly in meat production. There is also potential for prevention via mitigation, adaptation, or resilience building actions, but for the large populations in tropical countries, mitigation of climate change is required to achieve health protection solutions that will last.

  16. APPROACHING THE DISCRIMINATORY WORK ENVIRONMENT AS STRESSOR: THE PROTECTIVE ROLE OF JOB SATISFACTION ON HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Di Marco

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Discrimination is a complex phenomenon with adverse consequences at personal and organisational levels. Past studies have demonstrated that workers who are victims of discrimination might show less job satisfaction, less organisational commitment and worse levels of health and productivity. Although most research has focused on the effects of discrimination on victims, less is known about the extent to which discrimination produces consequences on workers who perceive the existence of a discriminatory work environment. The goal of this article is to analyse the consequences of the perception of a discriminatory work environment on employees’ health. The importance of this relationship is studied taking into account the mediating effect of job satisfaction. In order to reach this goal a cross-sectional study was carried out with a sample of 1633 Italian workers (male= 826, female= 764, employed in private and public sectors, and in different hierarchical positions. Results suggest that the perception of a discriminatory work environment is negatively associated with employees’ health. This relationship is partially mediated by job satisfaction (R²= .17. This study demonstrates that perceiving a discriminatory work environment might have a negative impact on workers’ health. A higher level of job satisfaction might buffer this effect. These findings have several practical implications. On the one hand, Human Resource Managers need to intervene in order to recognise and diminish implicit biases, creating a healthy and inclusive environment (e.g. through training, diversity policies, etc.. On the other hand, promoting job satisfaction (e.g. providing mechanisms of voice might help workers to preserve their well-being, coping with the negative effects of a discriminatory work environment.Keywords: Discriminatory work environment, Job satisfaction, Employees’ health, Human Resource Management, Italian workers, Workplace, Work-related stress

  17. Caffeine metabolites not caffeine protect against riboflavin photosensitized oxidative damage related to skin and eye health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scurachio, R S; Mattiucci, F; Santos, W G; Skibsted, L H; Cardoso, D R

    2016-10-01

    Caffeine metabolites were found to bind riboflavin with dissociation constant in the millimolar region by an exothermic process with positive entropy of reaction, which was found by (1)H NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy to occur predominantly by hydrogen bonding with water being released from riboflavin solvation shell upon caffeine metabolite binding to riboflavin. The caffeine metabolites 1-methyl uric acid and 1,7-dimethyl uric acid were shown by transient absorption laser flash photolysis to be efficient as quenchers of triplet riboflavin with second-order rate constant of 1.4 10(8)Lmol(-1)s(-1) and 1.0 10(8)Lmol(-1)s(-1), respectively, in aqueous solution of pH6.4 at 25°C and more efficient than the other caffeine metabolite 1,7-dimethyl xanthine with second-order rate constant of 4.2 10(7)Lmol(-1)s(-1). Caffeine was in contrast found to be non-reactive towards triplet riboflavin. Caffeine metabolites rather than caffeine seem accordingly important for the observed protective effect against cutaneous melanoma identified for drinkers of regular but not of decaffeinated coffee. The caffeine metabolites, but not caffeine, were by time resolved single photon counting found to quench singlet excited riboflavin through exothermic formation of ground-state precursor complexes indicating importance of hydrogen bounding through keto-enol tautomer's for protection of oxidizable substrates and sensitive structures against riboflavin photosensitization.

  18. Enrolment of older people in social health protection programs in West Africa--does social exclusion play a part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Divya; Williams, Gemma; Dkhimi, Fahdi; Ndiaye, Alfred; Asante, Felix Ankomah; Arhinful, Daniel Kojo; Mladovsky, Philipa

    2014-10-01

    Although the population of older people in Africa is increasing, and older people are becoming increasingly vulnerable due to urbanisation, breakdown of family structures and rising healthcare costs, most African countries have no social health protection for older people. Two exceptions include Senegal's Plan Sesame, a user fees exemption for older people and Ghana's National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) where older people are exempt from paying premiums. Evidence on whether older people are aware of and enrolling in these schemes is however lacking. We aim to fill this gap. Besides exploring economic indicators, we also investigate whether social exclusion determines enrolment of older people. This is the first study that tries to explore the social, political, economic and cultural (SPEC) dimensions of social exclusion in the context of social health protection programs for older people. Data were collected by two cross-sectional household surveys conducted in Ghana and Senegal in 2012. We develop SPEC indices and conduct logistic regressions to study the determinants of enrolment. Our results indicate that older people vulnerable to social exclusion in all SPEC dimensions are less likely to enrol in Plan Sesame and those that are vulnerable in the political dimension are less likely to enrol in NHIS. Efforts should be taken to specifically enrol older people in rural areas, ethnic minorities, women and those isolated due to a lack of social support. Consideration should also be paid to modify scheme features such as eliminating the registration fee for older people in NHIS and creating administration offices for ID cards in remote communities in Senegal.

  19. Performing Arts: A Subject-Based Aspect Report on Provision in Scotland's Colleges by HM Inspectors on Behalf of the Scottish Funding Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Scotland, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education (HMIE) publication, "External quality arrangements for Scotland's colleges," September 2008, specifies that HM Inspectors (HMIs) will produce a number of subject aspect reports over the four years 2008-12. These reports complement in a subject-specific context the generic evaluations of learning and…

  20. Protecting the delivery of heart failure: Regenerative Medicine/Stem Cell Therapeutics: Potential protections afforded by the Department of Health and Human Services and Health Resources Service Administration's Bureau of Special Programs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gary S Friedman; John S. Tomicki; Neil Cohen; Robert Marshall; Philip Lowry; Jeffrey Warsh

    2006-01-01

    malpractice liability have not impeded the development and growth of organ/cell/tissue transplantation despite increased risks of infection, malignancy and cardiovascular disease in transplant recipients. Currently, human transplantation is only performed using FDA/CBER-approved, non-embryonic stem cells from peripheral blood, bone marrow or umbilical cord blood. Federal legislation passed in 2005 (HR2520 and S1317: The Bone Marrow and Cord Blood Cell Transplantation Program) authorizes the Secretary of Health and Human Services acting through the Director of HRSA to ensure uniform stem cell units distribution and outcomes monitoring via the federally-designated C.W. Bill Young Cell Transplant Program.Historically in the U.S., human biological therapies (vaccines, organ transplant and stem cell transplant) have required federal protections to ensure continued distribution, fair access and avoidance of inhibitory product liability via protections afforded under the "stewardship" of the Secretary of Health and Human Services. The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986 established the NVICP to equitably and expeditiously compensate individuals, or families of individuals, who have been declared injured by vaccines, thereby stabilizing a once imperiled vaccine supply by substantially reducing the threat of liability for vaccine companies, physicians, and other health care professionals who administer vaccines. Vaccines were the first biologics administered to U.S. citizens en masse and presage stem cell therapeutics(which may similarly be administered to millions) will similarly necessitate that a Stem Cell Injury Compensation Program(SCICP) will also need to be in place to demonstrate an intention to do good, an understanding that industry may do well,but that the health care consumer has a right of protection-all recognized from the outset. The Federal Tort Claims Act(FTCA) addresses liability claims via the Executive, Judicial and Legislative branches of Government

  1. "Take time. Save lives. Clean hands protect." A comparison of two hand hygiene health promotion posters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackert, Michael; Lazard, Allison; Champlin, Sara; Liang, Ming-Ching; Mabry, Amanda; Stroever, Stephanie; Guadagno, Marie; Watkins, Lynda

    2014-05-01

    Two posters were designed to encourage hospital staff hand hygiene. One focused on broad benefits of hand hygiene to patients and staff, and the other highlighted hand hygiene as a long-known measure to infection control. The former was better received in terms of attention, likability, and potential to promote hand hygiene. A third-person effect, the perception of stronger impact of communication messages on others, was observed. Implications on health promotion message design were discussed.

  2. Approaching the Discriminatory Work Environment as Stressor: The Protective Role of Job Satisfaction on Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Marco, Donatella; López-Cabrera, Rocio; Arenas, Alicia; Giorgi, Gabriele; Arcangeli, Giulio; Mucci, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Discrimination is a complex phenomenon with adverse consequences at personal and organizational levels. Past studies have demonstrated that workers who are victims of discrimination might show less job satisfaction, less organizational commitment and worse levels of health and productivity. Although most research has focused on the effects of discrimination on victims, less is known about the extent to which discrimination produces consequences on workers who perceive the existence of a discriminatory work environment. The goal of this article is to analyze the consequences of the perception of a discriminatory work environment on employees’ health. The importance of this relationship is studied taking into account the mediating effect of job satisfaction. In order to reach this goal a cross-sectional study was carried out with a sample of 1633 Italian workers (male = 826, female = 764), employed in private and public sectors, and in different hierarchical positions. Results suggest that the perception of a discriminatory work environment is negatively associated with employees’ health. This relationship is partially mediated by job satisfaction (R2 = 0.17). This study demonstrates that perceiving a discriminatory work environment might have a negative impact on workers’ health. A higher level of job satisfaction might buffer this effect. These findings have several practical implications. On the one hand, Human Resource Managers need to intervene in order to recognize and diminish implicit biases, creating a healthy and inclusive environment (e.g., through training, diversity policies, etc.). On the other hand, promoting job satisfaction (e.g., providing mechanisms of voice) might help workers to preserve their well-being, coping with the negative effects of a discriminatory work environment. PMID:27625625

  3. Children Affected by War and Armed Conflict: Parental Protective Factors and Resistance to Mental Health Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Michelle Slone; Anat Shoshani

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the role of parenting styles and parental warmth in moderating relations between exposure to political life events and mental health symptoms among 277 Israeli adolescents aged 12–14 and their parents, who had been exposed to protracted periods of war, missile bombardments, and terrorism. Adolescents completed the Political Life Events (PLE) scale, Brief Symptom Inventory and questionnaires regarding parenting style and parental warmth. The primary caregiver completed the ...

  4. Approaching the Discriminatory Work Environment as Stressor: The Protective Role of Job Satisfaction on Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Marco, Donatella; López-Cabrera, Rocio; Arenas, Alicia; Giorgi, Gabriele; Arcangeli, Giulio; Mucci, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Discrimination is a complex phenomenon with adverse consequences at personal and organizational levels. Past studies have demonstrated that workers who are victims of discrimination might show less job satisfaction, less organizational commitment and worse levels of health and productivity. Although most research has focused on the effects of discrimination on victims, less is known about the extent to which discrimination produces consequences on workers who perceive the existence of a discriminatory work environment. The goal of this article is to analyze the consequences of the perception of a discriminatory work environment on employees' health. The importance of this relationship is studied taking into account the mediating effect of job satisfaction. In order to reach this goal a cross-sectional study was carried out with a sample of 1633 Italian workers (male = 826, female = 764), employed in private and public sectors, and in different hierarchical positions. Results suggest that the perception of a discriminatory work environment is negatively associated with employees' health. This relationship is partially mediated by job satisfaction (R (2) = 0.17). This study demonstrates that perceiving a discriminatory work environment might have a negative impact on workers' health. A higher level of job satisfaction might buffer this effect. These findings have several practical implications. On the one hand, Human Resource Managers need to intervene in order to recognize and diminish implicit biases, creating a healthy and inclusive environment (e.g., through training, diversity policies, etc.). On the other hand, promoting job satisfaction (e.g., providing mechanisms of voice) might help workers to preserve their well-being, coping with the negative effects of a discriminatory work environment.

  5. Assessment of Knowledge, Behaviour and Sun Protection Practices among Health Services Vocational School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eray Yurtseven

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There has been a significant increase in the cases of skin cancer throughout the world in the last few decades. Although the mortality rate of skin cancer is relatively low, its impact on other health aspects is high and the treatment of undesired aesthetic damage is costly. According to disability-adjusted life year rates (DALY, 1.5 million days are estimated to be lost from people’s lives every year worldwide due to ultraviolet (UV radiation. The purpose of this study was to raise sun health awareness levels among health services vocational school students. A total of 414 students were included in the analysis. A questionnaire form was used to evaluate knowledge, attitudes and behaviours among the survey sample. The average level of knowledge concerning the effects of the sun was found to be 8.64 ± 2.5 out of 15 points. All socio-demographic factors were analysed, but the only significant variables found were age and the possible presence of skin cancer within the immediate family (p < 0.05.

  6. The challenge of characterizing an inefficient antenna field for health protection purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2006-03-01

    Growing evidence that the electromagnetic field around electrical wires is harmful to human health prompted a 1990s National Academy of Sciences study of power-frequency (50-60 Hz) fields; results for power-frequency fields were negative but data suggested that fields from transients may be hazardous.^1 Transients represent high frequencies that can reach into the radiofrequency (RF) range. What instrument can be used to measure an RF field around electric wires carrying RF current? Such an RF field is that of an inefficient antenna, which lacks the pure far-field region characteristic of an efficient antenna field for which standard RF measuring instruments are calibrated, making it impossible to obtain a properly calibrated measurement with such instruments. The magnetic induction current dB/dt is explored as an alternative way to characterize the inefficient antenna RF field sheathing electric wires carrying RF due to poor power quality (e.g., switching transients) or to utility use of power line carrier^2 or of FCC-approved broadband on power lines. ^1National Research Council, Possible Health Effects of Exposure to Residential Electric and Magnetic Fields, Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1997. ^2M. Vignati & L. Giuliani, Environ. Health Perspect. 105(Suppl 6):1565-1568(1997).

  7. Children´s sun protection need not conflict with health promoting physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderström, Margareta; Boldemann, Cecilia; Wester, Ulf

    ABSTRACT: Preschool children´s sun exposure was measured 2009 with UV-dosimeters at nine preschools in Malmö 55°N, in southern Sweden and at two in Raleigh 36°N, North Carolina, USA at comparable seasons. Outdoor playground environment was explored how play facilities, available space and vegetat......ABSTRACT: Preschool children´s sun exposure was measured 2009 with UV-dosimeters at nine preschools in Malmö 55°N, in southern Sweden and at two in Raleigh 36°N, North Carolina, USA at comparable seasons. Outdoor playground environment was explored how play facilities, available space...... Raleigh in April also indicate that vegetation is sunprotective when children play. Favourable outdoor environment may promote both sun protection and physical activity in a Nordic spring or summer climate, while for physical activity, this might not be so pronounced at a southern mid-latitude due...

  8. Stigma, health disparities, and the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic: how to protect Latino farmworkers in future health emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch-Spana, Monica; Bouri, Nidhi; Rambhia, Kunal J; Norwood, Ann

    2010-09-01

    At the outset of the 2009 H1N1 influenza ("swine flu") pandemic, Mexican nationals and Mexican commodities were shunned globally, and, in the United States, some media personalities characterized Mexican immigrants as disease vectors who were a danger to the country. We investigated instances in the U.S. of stigmatization of Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers (MSFWs) and developed guidance for officials in curtailing its effects. At the same time, we explored social factors that make farmworkers more vulnerable to influenza infection and its complications, including high rates of underlying medical conditions, limited access to health care, and certain circumstances that interfere with the ability to implement community mitigation measures. This article reviews study findings and concludes with advice to policymakers and practitioners on the need to mitigate stigmatization in future outbreaks, to create public health preparedness systems that better protect migrant and seasonal farmworkers, and to undertake larger reforms to reduce institutional conditions that render farmworkers at greater risk for morbidity and mortality during health emergencies.

  9. El derecho a la protección de la salud The right to have health protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Elizondo Mayer-Serra

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo tiene como objetivo analizar cómo debe distribuirse el bien salud, o el derecho a la protección a la salud, partiendo de la definición que establece la legislación mexicana. Se mostrará el contraste entre la definición constitucional y la forma en que se ha distribuido y financiado, en la práctica, el gasto en salud, así como sus implicaciones. A continuación se realizará una comparación con otro bien social de gran relevancia, la educación, mismo que consume una proporción de los recursos fiscales nacionales aun mayor que el bien salud. Finalmente, el artículo propone una posible explicación a este hecho y esboza algunas ideas sobre sus implicaciones.This article intends to analyze how the health good or the right to have health protection should be distributed, following the definition established by the Mexican Constitution. This legal definition will be contrasted with the way in which the expenditure on health is actually distributed and financed, and the implications of this. The distribution of this expenditure, in turn, will be compared to another social good of great relevance: education, which consumes an even larger proportion of the national fiscal resources. Finally, the article will suggest a possible explanation for this fact and provide some ideas regarding its implications.

  10. Secret Guilt of an Artist: The Real Inspector Hound and Tom Stoppard’s Political Voice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Drzakowski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tom Stoppard once famously proclaimed his guilt that art is unimportant. The character Moon from Stoppard’s early farce The Real Inspector Hound presents surprising evidence that Stoppard’s view of art in his early years as a playwright may have been more complex than he let on. The circumstances behind Moon’s journey into the very art he criticizes are not unlike Tom Stoppard’s foray into politically conscious drama. Moon desperately wants the thriller he is reviewing to mean more than it really does. His wish becomes a reality when a third party, Puckeridge, forcibly pulls Moon into the fantasy. Like Moon, Stoppard had a fantasy, a dream-world in which art has the power to enact social change. Stoppard was unwilling or unable to act on that desire alone, until his own Puckeridge, an artist and dissident named Victor Fainberg, compelled him to act on his dream and merge art with politics.Keywords: Stoppard, The Real Inspector Hound, Fainberg, art, politics

  11. The Assessment of Animal Welfare in British Zoos by Government-Appointed Inspectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Harris

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We analysed the reports of government-appointed inspectors from 192 zoos between 2005–2008 to provide the first review of how animal welfare was assessed in British zoos since the enactment of the Zoo Licensing Act 1981. We examined the effects of whether or not a veterinarian was included in the inspection team, type of inspection, licence status of the zoo and membership of a zoo association on the inspectors’ assessments of animal welfare standards in five areas that approximate to the Five Freedoms. At least 11% of full licence inspections did not comply with the legal requirement for two inspectors. The inspectors’ reports were unclear as to how animal welfare was assessed, whether all animals or only a sub-sample had been inspected, and were based predominantly on welfare inputs rather than outcomes. Of 9,024 animal welfare assessments across the 192 zoos, 7,511 (83% were graded as meeting the standards, 782 (9% as substandard and the rest were not graded. Of the 192 zoos, 47 (24% were assessed as meeting all the animal welfare standards. Membership of a zoo association was not associated with a higher overall assessment of animal welfare standards, and specialist collections such as Farm Parks and Other Bird collections performed least well. We recommend a number of changes to the inspection process that should lead to greater clarity in the assessment of animal welfare in British zoos.

  12. [The social and hygienic aspects in the protection of the health of forest industry workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmetzyanov, L M

    1990-01-01

    The study of social and hygiene aspects in the industry of forest exploitation permitted to point out the changes that occurred in the field of mechanization and automation of production processes, which radically influenced the working conditions and characteristics, as well as the health indices. The study approaches some economic, social and hygiene problems. Proposals are made regarding the improvement of medical care organization for workers, for example the drawing up of a complex programme of prophylaxis of diseases in the enterprises for wood industrialization and of utilization of the computation technique.

  13. Ten steps or climbing a mountain: A study of Australian health professionals' perceptions of implementing the baby friendly health initiative to protect, promote and support breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheehan Athena

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Baby Friendly Hospital (Health Initiative (BFHI is a global initiative aimed at protecting, promoting and supporting breastfeeding and is based on the ten steps to successful breastfeeding. Worldwide, over 20,000 health facilities have attained BFHI accreditation but only 77 Australian hospitals (approximately 23% have received accreditation. Few studies have investigated the factors that facilitate or hinder implementation of BFHI but it is acknowledged this is a major undertaking requiring strategic planning and change management throughout an institution. This paper examines the perceptions of BFHI held by midwives and nurses working in one Area Health Service in NSW, Australia. Methods The study used an interpretive, qualitative approach. A total of 132 health professionals, working across four maternity units, two neonatal intensive care units and related community services, participated in 10 focus groups. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results Three main themes were identified: 'Belief and Commitment'; 'Interpreting BFHI' and 'Climbing a Mountain'. Participants considered the BFHI implementation a high priority; an essential set of practices that would have positive benefits for babies and mothers both locally and globally as well as for health professionals. It was considered achievable but would take commitment and hard work to overcome the numerous challenges including a number of organisational constraints. There were, however, differing interpretations of what was required to attain BFHI accreditation with the potential that misinterpretation could hinder implementation. A model described by Greenhalgh and colleagues on adoption of innovation is drawn on to interpret the findings. Conclusion Despite strong support for BFHI, the principles of this global strategy are interpreted differently by health professionals and further education and accurate information is required. It may be that the

  14. Methodological proposal for the construction of the labor profiles of inspectors of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority; Propuesta metodologica para la construccion de los perfiles laborales de inspectores de la Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larcher, A.M.; Maceiras, E.; Degiovanni, G.; Perrin, C.; Sajaroff, P. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. e-mail: alarcher@sede.arn.gov.ar

    2006-07-01

    The Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) like essential part of their strategic institutional plan and in the mark of the modernization of the National Public Administration (NPA), identify the necessity to modify their functional organization, introducing the administration for processes and defining more flexible and better guided structures to the work in team. Starting from the definition of a new institutional flowchart it decided to proceed to a general reorganization of the human resources and on January, 2005 it was prepared the creation of a process whose serious objective to sit down the bases for the development of the professional career of the ARN. To such an end, it was thought about a work outline by stages, the first one of which had as final objective the elaboration of the Labor Profiles of the Institution. The work group for this first stage was integrated by a group of professionals of long trajectory in the institution and not belonging to the sector of Human Resources (RRHH). By this way it was organized as an independent group that it worked in narrow collaboration with the specific sector and informed directly to the maximum institutional direction. For the construction of the profiles a 'mixed' model was chosen that included the requirements of each position (that to make) and the competitions to complete them (how to make it), since a focus purely of competitions has not been seen as the more appropriate for the public administration and in particular for the ARN. In this work it is given to know a part of the results obtained during six months of effective work of the PerLa Group (denominated as well as an acronym of the expression Labor Profiles) putting emphasis in the defined profiles for the inspectors of those different regulatory branches that constitute the environment of competition of the RNA, this is Radiological Protection, Nuclear Safety, Safeguards and Physical Protection. The idea that underlies to the

  15. Strengthening institutional and organizational capacity for social health protection of the informal sector in lesser-developed countries: a study of policy barriers and opportunities in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annear, Peter Leslie; Ahmed, Shakil; Ros, Chhun Eang; Ir, Por

    2013-11-01

    Reaching out to the poor and the informal sector is a major challenge for achieving universal coverage in lesser-developed countries. In Cambodia, extensive coverage by health equity funds for the poor has created the opportunity to consolidate various non-government health financing schemes under the government's proposed social health protection structure. This paper identifies the main policy and operational challenges to strengthening existing arrangements for the poor and the informal sector, and considers policy options to address these barriers. Conducted in conjunction with the Cambodian Ministry of Health in 2011-12, the study reviewed policy documents and collected qualitative data through 18 semi-structured key informant interviews with government, non-government and donor officials. Data were analysed using the Organizational Assessment for Improving and Strengthening Health Financing conceptual framework. We found that a significant shortfall related to institutional, organisational and health financing issues resulted in fragmentation and constrained the implementation of social health protection schemes, including health equity funds, community-based health insurance, vouchers and others. Key documents proposed the establishment of a national structure for the unification of the informal-sector schemes but left unresolved issues related to structure, institutional capacity and the third-party status of the national agency. This study adds to the evidence base on appropriate and effective institutional and organizational arrangements for social health protection in the informal sector in developing countries. Among the key lessons are: the need to expand the fiscal space for health care; a commitment to equity; specific measures to protect the poor; building national capacity for administration of universal coverage; and working within the specific national context.

  16. Public health effects of pesticides used in pest management and precautions for the protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Alparslan Babayigit

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides, which are widely used not only for weed and pest control efforts in agricultural sector but also preservatives and antifouling for factory products, consumer products such as household disinfectants and food packaging and storage operations, can be detected both from the basic components of the environment and all living tissues. Due to the toxic effects, they can lead to many chronic irreversible diseases such as cancer, defective births, nervous system disorders, endocrine system disorders including diabetes. Not only the risk groups in the community including children, the elderly, pregnant women, and particularly the agricultural sector workers, who have high risk of exposure to pesticides, but also all the individuals in the community must be protected against the harmful effects of pesticides. For this reason, when fighting against the pests, integrated pest management principles, which primarily targets not damaging the humans and community as well as the environment and other organisms, should be based on. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(5.000: 405-412

  17. EPA policies to protect the health of consumers of drinking water in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotruvo, J.A.

    1981-04-01

    In the United States our objective is to protect drinking water at the source, during treatment and during distribution. In 1975 interim regulations for bacteria and turbidity, 10 inorganic chemicals, 6 organic chemicals and radionuclides were promulgated. In 1979 National Secondary Regulations for substances affecting the aesthetic quality of water were promulgated. In 1979 trihalomethanes were added. The United States is engaged in comprehensive revisions of the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations. The areas of our most significant concern include detection and control of contamination of ground waters by organic chemicals resulting from improper waste disposal practices, a reassessment of microbiological regulations and toxicity of disinfectant by-products and a major effort to deal with corrosion-related contamination of drinking water during distribution. We are evaluating the issue of a granular activated carbon requirement for contaminated surface waters. A program to assure the quality of direct and indirect additives to drinking water has also been initiated. Part of this activity will include determination of the contaminants and by-products associated with the use of various water treatment chemicals and pipe materials.

  18. Ice Inspector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), unmanned subs with their own navigation systems and an array of interchangeable sensors, are becoming an important tool for oceanographers performing tasks over extensive areas. AUVs are getting faster, smarter, and cheaper to produce. They’ll take a big jump forward this month when the MIT Sea Grant

  19. The Inspector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhail, Mohammad A.; Lauesen, Søren; Pantazos, Kostas

    2013-01-01

    Existing custom visualization tools provide cognitive artefacts that can reduce the cognitive barriers designers encounter in visual mapping, mapping data to visual primitives (e.g. ellipse, rectangle) and their properties (e.g. colour, size.) However, our experience with designers shows that the...

  20. The Inspector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhail, Mohammad A.; Lauesen, Søren; Pantazos, Kostas

    2013-01-01

    Existing custom visualization tools provide cognitive artefacts that can reduce the cognitive barriers designers encounter in visual mapping, mapping data to visual primitives (e.g. ellipse, rectangle) and their properties (e.g. colour, size.) However, our experience with designers shows...

  1. Using a combined protection motivation theory and health action process approach intervention to promote exercise during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Anca; Prapavessis, Harry

    2014-04-01

    Despite the benefits of exercise during pregnancy, many expectant mothers are inactive. This study examined whether augmenting a protection motivation theory (PMT) intervention with a Health Action Process Approach can enhance exercise behavior change among pregnant women. Sixty inactive pregnant women were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: PMT-only, PMT + action-planning, and PMT + action-and-coping-planning. Week-long objective (accelerometer) and subjective (self-report) exercise measures were collected at baseline, and at 1- and 4-weeks post-intervention. Repeated-measures ANOVAs demonstrated that while all participants reported increased exercise from baseline to 1-week post-intervention, participants in both planning groups were significantly more active (p planning can enhance exercise behavior change in pregnant women.

  2. Working mothers of the World Health Organization Western Pacific offices: lessons and experiences to protect, promote, and support breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iellamo, Alessandro; Sobel, Howard; Engelhardt, Katrin

    2015-02-01

    Optimal breastfeeding saves lives. However, suboptimal breastfeeding is prevalent, primarily resulting from inappropriate promotion of infant formula and challenges of working mothers to continue breastfeeding. The article aims to determine the extent to which World Health Organization (WHO) policies protect, promote, and support breastfeeding women working at the WHO, Western Pacific Region. An online survey targeted all female WHO and contractual staff in all country and regional offices, who delivered a baby between July 24, 2008 and July 24, 2013. Respondents advised on how the worksite could better support breastfeeding. Thirty-two female staff from 11 of the 12 WHO offices within the Western Pacific Region responded. "Returning to work" (44%) and "not having enough milk" (17%) were the most commonly reported reasons for not breastfeeding. Eighteen (56%) reported using infant formula and 8 (44%) reported that the product was prescribed. Among the suggestions given to better support breastfeeding, 10 (32%) recommended having a private room with a chair, table, electric outlet, and refrigerator. The findings show that women working at the WHO face similar challenges to mothers outside the WHO. Based on the findings, we recommend the following: (1) provide prenatal/postpartum breastfeeding counseling services for employees; (2) establish breastfeeding rooms in country offices and regularly orient staff on agency policies to protect, promote, and support breastfeeding; (3) annually celebrate World Breastfeeding Week with employees; (4) encourage other public and private institutions to conduct online surveys and elicit recommendations from mothers on how their workplace can support breastfeeding; and (5) conduct a larger survey among UN agencies on how to better protect, promote, and support breastfeeding.

  3. The Impact of State Preemption of Local Smoking Restrictions on Public Health Protections and Changes in Social Norms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D. Mowery

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Preemption is a legislative or judicial arrangement in which a higher level of government precludes lower levels of government from exercising authority over a topic. In the area of smoke-free policy, preemption typically takes the form of a state law that prevents communities from adopting local smoking restrictions. Background. A broad consensus exists among tobacco control practitioners that preemption adversely impacts tobacco control efforts. This paper examines the effect of state provisions preempting local smoking restrictions in enclosed public places and workplaces. Methods. Multiple data sources were used to assess the impact of state preemptive laws on the proportion of indoor workers covered by smoke-free workplace policies and public support for smoke-free policies. We controlled for potential confounding variables. Results. State preemptive laws were associated with fewer local ordinances restricting smoking, a reduced level of worker protection from secondhand smoke, and reduced support for smoke-free policies among current smokers. Discussion. State preemptive laws have several effects that could impede progress in secondhand smoke protections and broader tobacco control efforts. Conclusion. Practitioners and advocates working on other public health issues should familiarize themselves with the benefits of local policy making and the potential impact of preemption.

  4. Education about protection against solar radiation for teachers teaching young children: a contribution to promote school health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gislaine Ricci Leonardi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Skin cancer Primary prevention should focus young populations, using the school and teachers as strategic players. This paper describes results from a project aimed to educate kindergarten teachers in the Diadema municipality (metropolitan S Paulo about photoeducation and sun exposure risks. The intervention was based on an investigation about teachers level of knowledge. Analysis revealed several gaps in knowledge topics - effects of skin tanning; sun exposure damage different than skin cancer; forms of sun protection, other than sunscreens; importance of sunscreen in childhood; types of solar radiation and their effects on human health; facts to be observed in the use of sunscreens. Based on the results of the first step, educational intervention was performed. The last step involved the evaluation of acquired knowledge. The collecting data technique was the Focal Group. Through content analysis, advances in knowledge and the acquisition of concepts were identified. The educational intervention was determinant for teachers knowledge especially regarding UVt radiation types and sun protection factors, but also revealed some pitfalls. In conclusion, short-term actions may be sufficient to transform some concepts but not enough to achieve all goals, especially the transformation of concepts related to cultural aspects, demanding greater daily educational investments.

  5. [Condom use among heterosexuals: a comparison of the theory of planned behavior, the health belief model and protection motivation theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, A B; Buunk, B P; Siero, F W

    1993-10-01

    In the Netherlands, the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, 1991), the health belief model (Janz and Becker, 1984), and the protection-motivation theory (Rogers, 1983) were compared for predicting condom use intentions because of AIDS. The 641 respondents were given two questionnaires: one for themselves and another one for a friend, partner, or acquaintance. 514 (80%) of them returned completed forms. 60% of these (307) persons were encouraged to answer and return another questionnaire, thus the final sample consisted of 821 responses. 711 individuals (481 women aged 15-91 years and 230 men aged 15-85 years) admitted having had heterosexual intercourse. 75% had had more than one sex partner in the previous 5 years. 45% had had sex at least once with someone other than their regular partner. Multivariance analysis of variance of promiscuity and condom use revealed that men exhibited more risky sex practices than women (p .001), had more sex partners in the previous 5 years than women (p .01), had more single sexual encounters with other persons than the regular sex partner than women (p .001), and they used condoms less often than women (p .01). 119 respondents had experienced sexually transmitted diseases and 165 had taken HIV tests. The difference between men and women also showed up in terms of their ideas, perceptions, and feelings about condom use when the three theoretical models were considered (p .001). The variables used in the theory of planned behavior explained the variance in intended condom use for 36% of women and 43% of men. The health belief model explained intended condom use only for 15% of women and 32% of men, while the cost-benefit analysis explained it for 9% of women and 18% of men. The protection-motivation theory explained intended condom use variance for 32% of women and 41% of men, but not all variables were included in the model. Fear from AIDS was correlated with inquisitive behavior and with seriousness (both p .001).

  6. Health education: Effect on knowledge and practice of workplace personal hygiene and protective measures among woodworkers in Enugu, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeugwu, L; Aguwa, E N; Arinze-Onyia, S U; Okeke, T A

    2017-07-01

    There has been increasing incidence of occupational diseases among woodworkers due to exposure to preventable hazards in the workplace. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of health education on the knowledge and practice of workplace hygiene and protective measures among woodworkers in Enugu timber market. This was a before and after study conducted among 290 woodworkers using interviewer administered semi-structured questionnaire and manual on workplace hazards prevention. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 17 and P-value of 0.05 was set as the significance level. Two hundred and ninety respondents participated in the study; 282 (97.2%) were males, most completed secondary education and had worked for less than 10 years (71% and 58.3%, respectively). The mean knowledge score of participants pre- and postintervention were 89.5% ± 9.03 and 98.5% ± 1.84, respectively (P work experience had no effect (P = 0.285). Preintervention, 37.9% of the participants used protective materials regularly, which increased to 65.8% post intervention (P Personal hygiene practices showed mixed responses most of which improved post intervention. The most common reason for eating in workplace was excessive workload (60.3%), while lack of PPEs (29.3%) and lack of training (23.8%) were the most common reasons for nonuse of PPEs. Majority of the participants had good knowledge of workplace hygiene but had poor use of PPEs. Health education intervention improved the use of PPEs and should be recommended.

  7. Evaluating goals in worker health protection using a participatory design and an evaluation checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahonen, Emily Q; Zanoni, Joseph; Forst, Linda; Ochsner, Michele; Kimmel, Louis; Martino, Carmen; Ringholm, Elisa; Rodríguez, Eric; Kader, Adam; Sokas, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    Spanish-speaking immigrant workers in construction are considered hard to reach and at high risk for work-related injury and fatality. This evaluation study describes the use of participatory methods and an evaluation checklist to consider a health and safety (H&S) training program for these workers. A previously developed training manual and model were disseminated to eight worker centers (WCs) through participatory research collaboration. It incorporated H&S training for workers while strengthening the role of WCs as sources for leadership development and worker empowerment. Design, delivery, reaction, application, and extension were assessed through individual interviews with participants, trained trainers, and center staff and through observation of training sessions and partner debriefs; pre- and post-training tests assessed participant learning. Results indicate moderate learning and application by participants and strong evidence for structural gains in and among WCs. We conclude that such partnerships and models are valuable tools for collaborating with hard-to-reach workers.

  8. Protecting Public Health: Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging and the Healthcare Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryder, Carrie; Lommele, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    In 2014, the U.S. transportation sector consumed more than 13 million barrels of petroleum a day, approximately 70% of all domestic petroleum consumption. Internal combustion engine vehicles are major sources of greenhouse gases (GHGs), smog-forming compounds, particulate matter, and other air pollutants. Widespread use of alternative fuels and advanced vehicles, including plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), can reduce our national dependence on petroleum and decrease the emissions that impact our air quality and public health. Healthcare organizations are major employers and community leaders that are committed to public well-being and are often early adopters of employer best practices. A growing number of hospitals are offering PEV charging stations for employees to help promote driving electric vehicles, reduce their carbon footprint, and improve local air quality.

  9. Global infant formula: monitoring and regulating the impacts to protect human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, George

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide promotion of infant formula and other commercial baby foods is leading to increased use of these products, raising concerns about their impact on the health of infants. These products are made and marketed through a global system that extends beyond the control of separate nations. As the industry is increasingly globalized, there is a growing need for guidance, monitoring, and regulation. This study suggests a path toward achieving better control of infant formula and other baby foods to ensure that infants and young children everywhere are well nourished. The negotiation of a new Optional Protocol on Children's Nutrition, to be linked to the most relevant human rights treaty, the Convention on the Rights of the Child, would bring the major issues relating to infant formula and other baby foods to the attention of the global community and all national governments.

  10. Intervention model for contaminated consumer products: a multifaceted tool for protecting public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hore, Paromita; Ahmed, Munerah; Nagin, Deborah; Clark, Nancy

    2014-08-01

    Lead-based paint and occupational lead hazards remain the primary exposure sources of lead in New York City (NYC) children and men, respectively. Lead poisoning has also been associated with the use of certain consumer products in NYC. The NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene developed the Intervention Model for Contaminated Consumer Products, a comprehensive approach to identify and reduce exposure to lead and other hazards in consumer products. The model identifies hazardous consumer products, determines their availability in NYC, enforces on these products, and provides risk communication and public education. Implementation of the model has resulted in removal of thousands of contaminated products from local businesses and continues to raise awareness of these hazardous products.

  11. Social protection systems in vulnerable families: their importance for the public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcos, Estela; Sanchez, Ximena; Toffoletto, Maria Cecilia; Baeza, Margarita; Gazmuri, Patricia; Muñoz, Luz Angélica; Vollrath, Antonia

    2014-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the effectiveness of the Chilean System of Childhood Welfare in transferring benefits to socially vulnerable families. METHODS A cross-sectional study with a sample of 132 families from the Metropolitan Region, Chile, stratified according to degree of social vulnerability, between September 2011 and January 2012. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with mothers of the studied families in public health facilities or their households. The variables studied were family structure, psychosocial risk in the family context and integrated benefits from the welfare system in families that fulfill the necessary requirements for transfer of benefits. Descriptive statistics to measure location and dispersion were calculated. A binary logistic regression, which accounts for the sample size of the study, was carried out. RESULTS The groups were homogenous regarding family size, the presence of biological father in the household, the number of relatives living in the same dwelling, income generation capacity and the rate of dependency and psychosocial risk (p ≥ 0.05). The transfer of benefits was low in all three groups of the sample (≤ 23.0%). The benefit with the best coverage in the system was the Single Family Subsidy, whose transfer was associated with the size of the family, the presence of relatives in the dwelling, the absence of the father in the household, a high rate of dependency and a high income generation capacity (p ≤ 0.10). CONCLUSIONS The effectiveness of benefit transfer was poor, especially in families that were extremely socially vulnerable. Further explanatory studies of benefit transfers to the vulnerable population, of differing intensity and duration, are required in order to reduce health disparities and inequalities.

  12. Social protection systems in vulnerable families: their importance for the public health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcos, Estela; Sanchez, Ximena; Toffoletto, Maria Cecilia; Baeza, Margarita; Gazmuri, Patricia; Muñoz, Luz Angélica; Vollrath, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the effectiveness of the Chilean System of Childhood Welfare in transferring benefits to socially vulnerable families. METHODS A cross-sectional study with a sample of 132 families from the Metropolitan Region, Chile, stratified according to degree of social vulnerability, between September 2011 and January 2012. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with mothers of the studied families in public health facilities or their households. The variables studied were family structure, psychosocial risk in the family context and integrated benefits from the welfare system in families that fulfill the necessary requirements for transfer of benefits. Descriptive statistics to measure location and dispersion were calculated. A binary logistic regression, which accounts for the sample size of the study, was carried out. RESULTS The groups were homogenous regarding family size, the presence of biological father in the household, the number of relatives living in the same dwelling, income generation capacity and the rate of dependency and psychosocial risk (p ≥ 0.05). The transfer of benefits was low in all three groups of the sample (≤ 23.0%). The benefit with the best coverage in the system was the Single Family Subsidy, whose transfer was associated with the size of the family, the presence of relatives in the dwelling, the absence of the father in the household, a high rate of dependency and a high income generation capacity (p ≤ 0.10). CONCLUSIONS The effectiveness of benefit transfer was poor, especially in families that were extremely socially vulnerable. Further explanatory studies of benefit transfers to the vulnerable population, of differing intensity and duration, are required in order to reduce health disparities and inequalities. PMID:25119935

  13. Protecting the Health and Well-being of Populations from Disasters: Health and Health Care in The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitsi-Selmi, Amina; Murray, Virginia

    2016-02-01

    The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) 2015-2030 is the first of three United Nations (UN) landmark agreements this year (the other two being the Sustainable Development Goals due in September 2015 and the climate change agreements due in December 2015). It represents a step in the direction of global policy coherence with explicit reference to health, economic development, and climate change. The multiple efforts of the health community in the policy development process, including campaigning for safe schools and hospitals, helped to put people's mental and physical health, resilience, and well-being higher up the DRR agenda compared with its predecessor, the 2005 Hyogo Framework for Action. This report reflects on these policy developments and their implications and reviews the range of health impacts from disasters; summarizes the widened remit of DRR in the post-2015 world; and finally, presents the science and health calls of the Sendai Framework to be implemented over the next 15 years to reduce disaster losses in lives and livelihoods.

  14. Analysis of NDT-inspectors working practices; NDT-tarkastajien toimintatavat ammattitaitoa ja tarkastustehtaevaeae koskevien kaesitysten perusteella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norros, L.; Kettunen, J. [VTT Automation, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-10-01

    The human and organizational factors play a significant role in the reliability of non-destructive testing (NDT); however, no single factors have been identified as the major causes of unreliability. In this study as activity-centered approach was adopted in order to capture the nature of the problem. Three successive studies were carried out, this report providing the results of the last one. It focused on the analysis of the decision-making demands of NDT inspectors on the basis of interview data. The data was carried out during the ultrasonic inspections during the 1996 annual maintenance outages of both Finnish nuclear power plants. All 15 NDT inspectors who participated in the work were interviewed. The data consisted of 200 pages. It was analyzed in two ways. First the factors that the inspectors consider affecting the reliability of inspections were studied. Secondly, the inspectors conceptions of the decision-making demands of their work were analyzed. Differences in these conceptions were supposed to indicate differences in professional orientations becoming manifest in different habits of action, i.e. ways of taking into account the situational demands of inspection. A systematic discourse analysis was carried out on the interview material to verify this assumption 26 refs.

  15. 28 CFR 0.64-3 - Delegation respecting designation of certain Department of Agriculture employees (Tick Inspectors...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Delegation respecting designation of certain Department of Agriculture employees (Tick Inspectors) to carry and use firearms. 0.64-3 Section 0.64-3 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE...

  16. Why police officers and labour inspectors (do not) blow the whistle A grid group cultural theory perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loyens, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to offer and test a theoretical framework that can be used to identify different styles of peer reporting, and explain why police officers and labour inspectors (do not) report peers' misconduct. Design/methodology/approach - A conceptual framework is developed

  17. Novel strategies for capturing health-protective mango phytochemicals in shelf stable food matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Ivette; Grace, Mary H; Yousef, Gad G; Raskin, Ilya; Lila, Mary Ann

    2015-03-01

    Cost-effective methods for concentration and stabilization of otherwise perishable mango fruit phytoactives into shelf stable high protein ingredients were developed to combat stunting (malnutrition) in rural Africa. Mango juices complexed with sunflower oil and protein-rich legume flours yielded carotenoid-enriched oils and pelleted polyphenol-enriched flour matrices. Carotenoids from juices were concentrated 9-10 times in the fortified sunflower oil. Protein-rich soy and peanut flours captured 2.2-3.2 mg/g polyphenols from the juices. Alternatively, mango juice was sorbed and co-dried with flours, which stably bound the polyphenols, carotenoids, and natural sugars in soy or peanut protein-rich matrices. The concentration of provitamin A carotenoids was almost doubled and total polyphenols were enriched 4-5 times higher in the matrices compared to fresh pureed juice. Both strategies require minimal instrumentation, are compatible with rural village dietary practices; and capture the benefits of otherwise perishable seasonal resources by complexing healthful proteins together with phytoactive compounds.

  18. A semantic framework to protect the privacy of electronic health records with non-numerical attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Sergio; Sánchez, David; Valls, Aida

    2013-04-01

    Structured patient data like Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are a valuable source for clinical research. However, the sensitive nature of such information requires some anonymisation procedure to be applied before releasing the data to third parties. Several studies have shown that the removal of identifying attributes, like the Social Security Number, is not enough to obtain an anonymous data file, since unique combinations of other attributes as for example, rare diagnoses and personalised treatments, may lead to patient's identity disclosure. To tackle this problem, Statistical Disclosure Control (SDC) methods have been proposed to mask sensitive attributes while preserving, up to a certain degree, the utility of anonymised data. Most of these methods focus on continuous-scale numerical data. Considering that part of the clinical data found in EHRs is expressed with non-numerical attributes as for example, diagnoses, symptoms, procedures, etc., their application to EHRs produces far from optimal results. In this paper, we propose a general framework to enable the accurate application of SDC methods to non-numerical clinical data, with a focus on the preservation of semantics. To do so, we exploit structured medical knowledge bases like SNOMED CT to propose semantically-grounded operators to compare, aggregate and sort non-numerical terms. Our framework has been applied to several well-known SDC methods and evaluated using a real clinical dataset with non-numerical attributes. Results show that the exploitation of medical semantics produces anonymised datasets that better preserve the utility of EHRs.

  19. Integrative Monitoring of Marine and Freshwater Harmful Algae in Washington State for Public Health Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera L. Trainer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The more frequent occurrence of both marine and freshwater toxic algal blooms and recent problems with new toxic events have increased the risk for illness and negatively impacted sustainable public access to safe shellfish and recreational waters in Washington State. Marine toxins that affect safe shellfish harvest in the state are the saxitoxins that cause paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP, domoic acid that causes amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP and the first ever US closure in 2011 due to diarrhetic shellfish toxins that cause diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP. Likewise, the freshwater toxins microcystins, anatoxin-a, cylindrospermopsins, and saxitoxins have been measured in state lakes, although cylindrospermopsins have not yet been measured above state regulatory guidance levels. This increased incidence of harmful algal blooms (HABs has necessitated the partnering of state regulatory programs with citizen and user-fee sponsored monitoring efforts such as SoundToxins, the Olympic Region Harmful Algal Bloom (ORHAB partnership and the state’s freshwater harmful algal bloom passive (opportunistic surveillance program that allow citizens to share their observations with scientists. Through such integrated programs that provide an effective interface between formalized state and federal programs and observations by the general public, county staff and trained citizen volunteers, the best possible early warning systems can be instituted for surveillance of known HABs, as well as for the reporting and diagnosis of unusual events that may impact the future health of oceans, lakes, wildlife, and humans.

  20. Protect your heart: a culture-specific multimedia cardiovascular health education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amy; Clayman, Marla L; Glass, Sara; Kandula, Namratha R

    2015-04-01

    South Asians, the second fastest growing racial/ethnic minority in the United States, have high rates of coronary heart disease. Few coronary heart disease prevention efforts target this population. The authors developed and tested a culture-specific, multimedia coronary heart disease prevention education program in English and Hindi for South Asians. Participants were recruited from community organizations in Chicago, Illinois, between June and October of 2011. Bilingual interviewers used questionnaires to assess participants' knowledge and perceptions before and after the patient education program. The change from pretest score to posttest score was calculated using a paired t test. Linear regression was used to determine the association between posttest scores and education and language. Participants' (N = 112) average age was 41 years, 67% had more than a high school education, and 50% spoke Hindi. Participants' mean pretest score was 15 (SD = 4). After the patient education program, posttest scores increased significantly among all participants (posttest score = 24, SD = 4), including those with limited English proficiency. Lower education was associated with a lower posttest score (β = -2.2, 95% CI [-0.68, -3.83]) in adjusted regression. A culture-specific, multimedia patient education program significantly improved knowledge and perceptions about coronary heart disease prevention among South Asian immigrants. Culturally salient multimedia education may be an effective and engaging way to deliver health information to diverse patient populations.