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Sample records for health program description

  1. A health equity impact assessment umbrella program (AAPRISS) to tackle social inequalities in health: program description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Thierry; Bidault, Elsa; Villeval, Mélanie; Alias, François; Gandouet, Benjamin; Servat, Martine; Theis, Ivan; Breton, Eric; Haschar-Noé, Nadine; Grosclaude, Pascale

    2016-09-01

    The failure to simultaneously address two objectives (increasing the average health of the population and reducing health inequalities) may have led to what has been observed in France so far: an overall decrease in mortality and increase in inequality. The Apprendre et Agir pour Réduire les Inégalités Sociales de Santé (AAPRISS) methodology is to analyze and modify interventions that are already underway in terms of their potential impact on health inequalities. It relies on partnership between researchers and actors in the health field, as well as policy makers. In this paper, we describe the program and discuss its feasibility and acceptability. This program is not a single intervention, but a process aiming at assessing and reshaping existing health programs, therefore acting as a kind of meta-intervention. The program develops scientific and methodological support stemming from co-construction methods aimed at increasing equity within the programs. Stakeholders from prevention policy-making and the health care system, as well as researchers, collaborate in defining interventions, monitoring their progress, and choosing indicators, methods and evaluation procedures. The target population is mainly the population of the greater Toulouse area. The steps of the process are described: (1) establishment of AAPRISS governance and partnerships; (2) inclusion of projects; and (3) the projects' process. Many partners have rallied around this program, which has been shown to be feasible and acceptable by partners and health actors. A major challenge is understanding each partner's expectations in terms of temporality of interventions, expected outcomes, assessment methods and indicators. Analyzing the projects has been quite feasible, and some modifications have been implemented in them in order to take inequalities in health into account. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Development of a Standardized Job Description for Healthcare Managers of Metabolic Syndrome Management Programs in Korean Community Health Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjin Lee, RN, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: A job description for healthcare managers may provide basic data essential for the development of a job training program for healthcare managers working in community health promotion programs.

  3. The Colombian conflict: a description of a mental health program in the Department of Tolima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grais Rebecca F

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Colombia has been seriously affected by an internal armed conflict for more than 40 years affecting mainly the civilian population, who is forced to displace, suffers kidnapping, extortion, threats and assassinations. Between 2005 and 2008, Médecins Sans Frontières-France provided psychological care and treatment in the region of Tolima, a strategic place in the armed conflict. The mental health program was based on a short-term multi-faceted treatment developed according to the psychological and psychosomatic needs of the population. Here we describe the population attending during 2005-2008, in both urban and rural settings, as well as the psychological treatment provided during this period and its outcomes. We observed differences between the urban and rural settings in the traumatic events reported, the clinical expression of the disorders, the disorders diagnosed, and their severity. Although the duration of the treatment was limited due to security reasons and access difficulties, patient condition at last visit improved in most of the patients. These descriptive results suggest that further studies should be conducted to examine the role of short-term psychotherapy, adapted specifically to the context, can be a useful tool to provide psychological care to population affected by an armed conflict.

  4. 'teen Mental Health First Aid': a description of the program and an initial evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Laura M; Mason, Robert J; Kelly, Claire M; Cvetkovski, Stefan; Jorm, Anthony F

    2016-01-01

    Many adolescents have poor mental health literacy, stigmatising attitudes towards people with mental illness, and lack skills in providing optimal Mental Health First Aid to peers. These could be improved with training to facilitate better social support and increase appropriate help-seeking among adolescents with emerging mental health problems. teen Mental Health First Aid (teen MHFA), a new initiative of Mental Health First Aid International, is a 3 × 75 min classroom based training program for students aged 15-18 years. An uncontrolled pilot of the teen MHFA course was undertaken to examine the feasibility of providing the program in Australian secondary schools, to test relevant measures of student knowledge, attitudes and behaviours, and to provide initial evidence of program effects. Across four schools, 988 students received the teen MHFA program. 520 students with a mean age of 16 years completed the baseline questionnaire, 345 completed the post-test and 241 completed the three-month follow-up. Statistically significant improvements were found in mental health literacy, confidence in providing Mental Health First Aid to a peer, help-seeking intentions and student mental health, while stigmatising attitudes significantly reduced. teen MHFA appears to be an effective and feasible program for training high school students in Mental Health First Aid techniques. Further research is required with a randomized controlled design to elucidate the causal role of the program in the changes observed.

  5. Development of a standardized job description for healthcare managers of metabolic syndrome management programs in Korean community health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjin; Choo, Jina; Cho, Jeonghyun; Kim, So-Nam; Lee, Hye-Eun; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Seomun, GyeongAe

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to develop a job description for healthcare managers of metabolic syndrome management programs using task analysis. Exploratory research was performed by using the Developing a Curriculum method, the Intervention Wheel model, and focus group discussions. Subsequently, we conducted a survey of 215 healthcare workers from 25 community health centers to verify that the job description we created was accurate. We defined the role of healthcare managers. Next, we elucidated the tasks of healthcare managers and performed needs analysis to examine the frequency, importance, and difficulty of each of their duties. Finally, we verified that our job description was accurate. Based on the 8 duties, 30 tasks, and 44 task elements assigned to healthcare managers, we found that the healthcare managers functioned both as team coordinators responsible for providing multidisciplinary health services and nurse specialists providing health promotion services. In terms of importance and difficulty of tasks performed by the healthcare managers, which were measured using a determinant coefficient, the highest-ranked task was planning social marketing (15.4), while the lowest-ranked task was managing human resources (9.9). A job description for healthcare managers may provide basic data essential for the development of a job training program for healthcare managers working in community health promotion programs. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Experiences of a Mental Health First Aid training program in Sweden: a descriptive qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Bengt; Hansson, Lars; Stjernswärd, Sigrid

    2015-05-01

    Restricted mental health literacy and stigma are barriers to treatment of mental disorders. A Mental Health First Aid training program was tested for implementation in Sweden among employees in the public sector. The aim of the present qualitative study was to explore participants' experiences of the program in more depth, in conjunction with a randomized controlled study. Twenty four persons participated in a total of six focus groups 6-8 months after program participation. Data were analyzed using content analysis. The analysis resulted in five categories illustrating the participants' experiences of the course: increased awareness, knowledge and understanding; influence on attitude and approach; tool box and confidence; feedback on content and layout; and tangible examples of applied knowledge. The most central finding is the fruitfulness of the program's practical focus and use, the increased confidence and inclination to act following program participation, and the importance of experienced instructors.

  7. Improving Perinatal Mental Health Care for Women Veterans: Description of a Quality Improvement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katon, Jodie G; Lewis, Lacey; Hercinovic, Selma; McNab, Amanda; Fortney, John; Rose, Susan M

    2017-08-01

    Purpose We describe results from a quality improvement project undertaken to address perinatal mental healthcare for women veterans. Description This quality improvement project was conducted in a single VA healthcare system between 2012 and 2015 and included screening for depressive symptoms with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) three times during the perinatal period, a dedicated maternity care coordinator (MCC), an on-site clinical social worker, and an on-site obstetrician/gynecologist (Ob/gyn). Information on prior mental health diagnosis was collected by the MCC or Ob/gyn. The prevalence of perinatal depressive symptoms and receipt of mental healthcare among those with such symptoms are reported by presence of a pre-pregnancy mental health diagnosis. Assessment Of the 199 women who used VA maternity benefits between 2012 and 2015, 56% (n = 111) had at least one pre-pregnancy mental health diagnosis. Compared to those without a pre-pregnancy mental health diagnosis, those with such a diagnosis were more likely to be screened for perinatal depressive symptoms at least once (61.5% vs. 46.8%, p = 0.04). Prevalence of depressive symptoms was 46.7% among those with a pre-pregnancy mental health diagnosis and 19.2% among those without. Among those with a pre-pregnancy mental health diagnosis and depressive symptoms (n = 35), 88% received outpatient mental healthcare and 77% met with the clinical social worker. Among those without a pre-pregnancy mental health diagnosis and depressive symptoms (n = 8), none received outpatient mental healthcare, but 77.8% met with the clinical social worker. Conclusion Improving perinatal mental healthcare for women veterans requires a multidisciplinary approach, including on-site integrated mental healthcare.

  8. Health Care Merged With Senior Housing: Description and Evaluation of a Successful Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa “Teta” Barry PhD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This article describes and evaluates a successful partnership between a large health care organization and housing for seniors. The program provides on-site, primary care visits by a physician and a nurse in addition to intensive social services to residents in an affordable senior housing apartment building located in Pennsylvania. Per Donabedian’s “Structure–Process–Outcome” model, the program demonstrated positive health care outcomes for its participants via a prescribed structure. To provide guidance for replication in similar settings, we qualitatively evaluated the processes by which successful outcomes were obtained. Methods: With program structures in place and outcomes measured, this case study collected and analyzed qualitative information taken from key informant interviews on care processes involved in the program. Themes were extracted from semistructured interviews and used to describe the processes that helped and hindered the program. Results and Discussion: Common processes were identified across respondents; however, the nuanced processes that lead to successful outcomes suggest that defined structures and processes may not be sufficient to produce similar outcomes in other settings. Further research is needed to determine the program’s replicability and policy implications.

  9. Health and wellness programming in faith-based organizations: a description of a nationwide sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, Melissa; Fallon, Elizabeth A

    2013-01-01

    Most of the U.S. population is affiliated with faith-based organizations (FBOs) and regularly attends services. Health and wellness activities (HWA) delivered through FBOs have great potential for reach, but the number of FBOs offering health programs and the characteristics of these programs are currently unknown. The purpose of this study was to better understand rates, characteristics, and factors influencing faith-based HWA across the United States. Faith leaders (N = 844) completed an online survey assessing faith leader demographics and health, FBO demographics (e.g., denomination, size, location, diversity), and details of HWA within their FBO. Respondents were primarily White (93%), male (72%), middle-aged (53.2 ± 12.1 years), and affiliated with Methodist (42.5%) or Lutheran (20.2%) denominations. Although most faith leaders report meeting physical activity recommendations (56.5%), most were overweight/obese (77.4%), did not meet fruit and vegetable recommendations (65.9%), and had been diagnosed with 1.25 ± 1.36 chronic diseases. Respondents reported offering 4.8 ± 3 HWA within their FBO over the past 12 months. Most common HWA included clubs/teams related to physical activity (54.8%), individual-level health counseling (54%), and providing health/wellness pamphlets. Leaders cited a lack of lay leadership (48.1%) and financial resources for staff time (47.8%) as the most common barriers to HWA. An increase in interest/awareness in health topics from FBO members was the most common facilitator for HWA (66.5%). Although faith-based HWA are prevalent nationally, types of HWA and the factors influencing HWA are dependent on FBO characteristics. Future faith-based interventions should consider existing capabilities and moderating factors for HWA.

  10. Land reclamation program description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-05-01

    The Land Reclamation Program will address the need for coordinated applied and basic research into the physical and ecological problems of land reclamation, and advance the development of cost-effective techniques for reclaiming and rehabilitating mined coal land to productive end uses. The purpose of this new program is to conduct integrated research and development projects focused on near- and long-term reclamation problems in all major U.S. coal resource regions including Alaska and to coordinate, evaluate, and disseminate the results of related studies conducted at other research institutions. The activities of the Land Reclamation Laboratory program will involve close cooperation with industry and focus on establishing a comprehensive field and laboratory effort. Research demonstration sites will be established throughout the United States to address regional and site-specific problems. Close cooperation with related efforts at academic institutions and other agencies, to transfer pertinent information and avoid duplication of effort, will be a primary goal of the program. The major effort will focus on the complete coal extraction/reclamation cycle where necessary to develop solutions to ameliorating the environmental impacts of coal development. A long-range comprehensive national reclamation program will be established that can schedule and prioritize research activities in all of the major coal regions. A fully integrated data management system will be developed to store and manage relevant environmental and land use data. Nine research demonstration sites have been identified.

  11. A Mobile Health App-Based Postnatal Educational Program (Home-but not Alone): Descriptive Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorey, Shefaly; Yang, Yen Yen; Dennis, Cindy-Lee

    2018-04-19

    The postnatal period poses numerous challenges for new parents. Various educational programs are available to support new parents during this stressful period. However, the usefulness of educational programs must be evaluated to ascertain their credibility. The aim of this descriptive, qualitative study was to explore the views of parents of newborns with regard to the content and delivery of a mobile health (mHealth) app-based postnatal educational program. A qualitative semistructured interview guide was used to collect data from 17 participants who belonged to the intervention group of a randomized controlled trial. The intervention, a 4-week-long access to a mHealth app-based educational program, was evaluated. The interviews were conducted in English and at the participants' homes. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. The Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research checklist was used to report the findings. The interviews revealed 4 main themes: (1) positive features of the mHealth app, (2) advice from midwives, (3) experiences gained from using the mHealth app, and (4) recommendations for the future. The participants evaluated the educational program to be a good source of information that was tailored to the local context. The different modes of delivery, including audio and video, accentuated the accessibility of information. The parents evaluated that the facilitator of the featured communication platform, a midwife, provided trustworthy advice. Belongingness to a virtual community beyond the hospital endowed the parents the confidence that they were not alone and were supported by other parents and health care professionals. According to the parents, the mHealth app-based educational program was helpful in supporting a multi-ethnic sample of parents during the postnatal period. This insight indicates that the program could be implemented in a wide community of parents in the postnatal period. The helpfulness of the educational

  12. RIMS Program Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraepelien, Hans

    Computer routines for the translation of teacher-prepared mark sense forms to magnetic tape are described. The program, Receiving IMS (RIMS), is part of the Southwest Regional Laboratory's (SWRL) Instructional Management System (IMS). It accepts mark sense sheets from remotely located Xerox 660 scanner copiers and/or IMS update information from…

  13. Quality Assurance Program Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halford, Vaughn Edward [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ryder, Ann Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Effective May 1, 2017, led by a new executive leadership team, Sandia began operating within a new organizational structure. National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia (Sandia’s) Quality Assurance Program (QAP) was established to assign responsibilities and authorities, define workflow policies and requirements, and provide for the performance and assessment of work.

  14. Health Topic XML File Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/xmldescription.html Health Topic XML File Description: MedlinePlus To use the sharing ... information categories assigned. Example of a Full Health Topic Record A record for a MedlinePlus health topic ...

  15. GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PAQUETTE,D.E.; BENNETT,D.B.; DORSCH,W.R.; GOODE,G.A.; LEE,R.J.; KLAUS,K.; HOWE,R.F.; GEIGER,K.

    2002-05-31

    THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORDER 5400.1, GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PROGRAM, REQUIRES THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A GROUNDWATER PROTECTION PROGRAM. THE BNL GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW OF HOW THE LABORATORY ENSURES THAT PLANS FOR GROUNDWATER PROTECTION, MONITORING, AND RESTORATION ARE FULLY DEFINED, INTEGRATED, AND MANAGED IN A COST EFFECTIVE MANNER THAT IS CONSISTENT WITH FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL REGULATIONS.

  16. Perspectives on enhancing international practical training of students in health and social care study programs - A qualitative descriptive case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvalič-Touzery, Simona; Hopia, Hanna; Sihvonen, Sanna; Diwan, Sadhna; Sen, Soma; Skela-Savič, Brigita

    2017-01-01

    Internationalization of practical training in health and social care study programs is an important aspect of higher education. However, field mentors' and classroom teachers' competence in guiding culturally diverse students varies widely in European countries, and the majority does not have enough training in guiding foreign students. This study aimed to examine which factors enhance the efficacy of international practical placement experiences in health and social care study programs. A qualitative descriptive case study design was used. The study was conducted at six higher education institutions-two in Finland and one in Croatia, Estonia, the Netherlands and Slovenia. A convenience sample of 14 mentors, 15 teachers and 14 students with international experiences from six higher education institutions which are part of the Bologna Process was recruited. The data were collected from six focus groups using a semi-structured questionnaire based on a literature review. Each higher education institution conducted one group interview that was tape-recorded, transcribed and analysed for themes. Participants made several recommendations for enhancing the practical placement experience of students, teachers, and mentors. Most recommendations dealt with practical supervision of students. Three major themes noted were: 'Attitudes towards internationalization of practical placements', 'Factors impacting the international placement experience', and 'Pedagogical methods used and structural support available for internationalization.' The study highlights the need for strengthening the multicultural knowledge and skills of mentors and teachers. The findings provide practical guidelines for improving the international placement experience across health and social care fields. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dilemma of prescribing aripiprazole under the Taiwan health insurance program: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu YC

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Yi-Chien Hsu,1,2 Yu-Ching Chou,3 Hsin-An Chang,1,2,4 Yu-Chen Kao,1,2,5 San-Yuan Huang,1,2 Nian-Sheng Tzeng1,2,4 1Department of Psychiatry, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 2School of Medicine, 3School of Public Health, 4Student Counseling Center, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Department of Psychiatry, Tri-Service General Hospital, Song-Shan Branch, Taipei, Taiwan Objectives: Refractory major depressive disorder (MDD is a serious problem leading to a heavy economic burden. Antipsychotic augmentation treatment with aripiprazole and quetiapine is approved for MDD patients and can achieve a high remission rate. This study aimed to examine how psychiatrists in Taiwan choose medications and how that choice is influenced by health insurance payments and administrative policy.Design: Descriptive study.Outcome measures: Eight questions about the choice of treatment strategy and atypical antipsychotics, and the reason to choose aripiprazole.Intervention: We designed an augmentation strategy questionnaire for psychiatrists whose patients had a poor response to antidepressants, and handed it out during the annual meeting of the Taiwanese Society of Psychiatry in October 2012. It included eight questions addressing the choice of treatment strategy and atypical antipsychotics, and the reason whether or not to choose aripiprazole as the augmentation antipsychotic.Results: Choosing antipsychotic augmentation therapy or switching to other antidepressant strategies for MDD patients with an inadequate response to antidepressants was common with a similar probability (76.1% vs 76.4%. The most frequently used antipsychotics were aripiprazole and quetiapine, however a substantial number of psychiatrists chose olanzapine, risperidone, and sulpiride. The major reason for not choosing aripiprazole was cost (52.1%, followed by insurance official policy audit and deletion in the claims review system (30.1%.Conclusion: The prescribing

  18. It is possible: availability of lymphedema case management in each health facility in Togo. Program description, evaluation, and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Els; Dorkenoo, Ameyo M; Datagni, Michael; Cantey, Paul T; Morgah, Kodjo; Harvey, Kira; Ziperstein, Joshua; Drexler, Naomi; Chapleau, Gina; Sodahlon, Yao

    2013-07-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a vector-borne parasitic disease that can clinically manifest as disabling lymphedema. Although the LF elimination program aims to reduce disability and to interrupt transmission, there has been a scarcity of disease morbidity management programs, particularly on a national scale. This report describes the implementation of the first nationwide LF lymphedema management program. The program, which was initiated in Togo in 2007, focuses on patient behavioral change. Its goal is two-fold: to achieve a sustainable program on a national-scale, and to serve as a model for other countries. The program has five major components: 1) train at least one health staff in lymphedema care in each health facility in Togo; 2) inform people with a swollen leg that care is available at their dispensary; 3) train patients on self-care; 4) provide a support system to motivate patients to continue self-care by training community health workers or family members and providing in home follow-up; and 5) integrate lymphedema management into the curriculum for medical staff. The program achieved the inclusion of lymphedema management in the routine healthcare package. The evaluation after three years estimated that 79% of persons with a swollen leg in Togo were enrolled in the program. The adherence rate to the proposed World Health Organization treatment of washing, exercise, and leg elevation was more than 70% after three years of the program, resulting in a stabilization of the lymphedema stage and a slight decrease in reported acute attacks among program participants. Health staff and patients consider the program successful in reaching and educating the patients. After the external funding ended, the morbidity management program is maintained through routine Ministry of Health activities.

  19. Employee assistance programs: history and program description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, B

    1994-10-01

    1. The history and development of Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) can be traced back to the 1800s. There are currently over 10,000 EAPs in the United States. 2. Standards for program accreditation and counselor certification have been established for EAPs. The "core technology of Employee Assistance Programs" includes identification of behavioural problems based on job performance issues, expert consultation with supervisors, appropriate use of constructive confrontation, microlinkages with treatment providers and resources, macrolinkages between providers, resources, and work organizations, focus on substance abuse, and evaluation of employee success based on job performance. 3. Some EAPs take a broad brush approach, and incorporate health promotion and managed care functions.

  20. Rapid review programs to support health care and policy decision making: a descriptive analysis of processes and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polisena, Julie; Garritty, Chantelle; Kamel, Chris; Stevens, Adrienne; Abou-Setta, Ahmed M

    2015-03-14

    Health care decision makers often need to make decisions in limited timeframes and cannot await the completion of a full evidence review. Rapid reviews (RRs), utilizing streamlined systematic review methods, are increasingly being used to synthesize the evidence with a shorter turnaround time. Our primary objective was to describe the processes and methods used internationally to produce RRs. In addition, we sought to understand the underlying themes associated with these programs. We contacted representatives of international RR programs from a broad realm in health care to gather information about the methods and processes used to produce RRs. The responses were summarized narratively to understand the characteristics associated with their processes and methods. The summaries were compared and contrasted to highlight potential themes and trends related to the different RR programs. Twenty-nine international RR programs were included in our sample with a broad organizational representation from academia, government, research institutions, and non-for-profit organizations. Responses revealed that the main objectives for RRs were to inform decision making with regards to funding health care technologies, services and policy, and program development. Central themes that influenced the methods used by RR programs, and report type and dissemination were the imposed turnaround time to complete a report, resources available, the complexity and sensitivity of the research topics, and permission from the requestor. Our study confirmed that there is no standard approach to conduct RRs. Differences in processes and methods across programs may be the result of the novelty of RR methods versus other types of evidence syntheses, customization of RRs for various decision makers, and definition of 'rapid' by organizations, since it impacts both the timelines and the evidence synthesis methods. Future research should investigate the impact of current RR methods and reporting to

  1. A mental health first aid training program for Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples: description and initial evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanowski, Len G; Jorm, Anthony F; Hart, Laura M

    2009-01-01

    Background Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training was developed in Australia to teach members of the public how to give initial help to someone developing a mental health problem or in a mental health crisis situation. However, this type of training requires adaptation for specific cultural groups in the community. This paper describes the adaptation of the program to create an Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Mental Health First Aid (AMHFA) course and presents an initial evaluation of its uptake and acceptability. Methods To evaluate the program, two types of data were collected: (1) quantitative data on uptake of the course (number of Instructors trained and courses subsequently run by these Instructors); (2) qualitative data on strengths, weaknesses and recommendations for the future derived from interviews with program staff and focus groups with Instructors and community participants. Results 199 Aboriginal people were trained as Instructors in a five day Instructor Training Course. With sufficient time following training, the majority of these Instructors subsequently ran 14-hour AMHFA courses for Aboriginal people in their community. Instructors were more likely to run courses if they had prior teaching experience and if there was post-course contact with one of the Trainers of Instructors. Analysis of qualitative data indicated that the Instructor Training Course and the AMHFA course are culturally appropriate, empowering for Aboriginal people, and provided information that was seen as highly relevant and important in assisting Aboriginal people with a mental illness. There were a number of recommendations for improvements. Conclusion The AMHFA program is culturally appropriate and acceptable to Aboriginal people. Further work is needed to refine the course and to evaluate its impact on help provided to Aboriginal people with mental health problems. PMID:19490648

  2. Respiratory Protection Program. Programmatic description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, J.M.; Porter, W.E.

    1986-03-01

    The ORNL Respirator Program is designed to provide employees with devices which afford maximum protection with minimum inconvenience and discomfort. Teamwork is essential since a comprehensive program involves the Medical Department, the Industrial Hygiene Department, Radiation and Safety Surveys, the Operations Division, Quality Assurance and Inspection, and the Fire Department. The purpose of this manual is to describe in detail the ORNL Respirator Program. Included are discussions of the following elements: quality assurance, selection, fit-testing, maintenance and issue, certified breathing air for self-contained breathing apparatus, inspection, program surveillance, available devices, and standard operating procedures. As program modifications develop and improvements are made, periodic revisions may be necessary. The Industrial Hygiene Department will perform this task on an ''as required'' basis.

  3. AGRIS: Description of computer programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, H.; Schallaboeck, G.

    1976-01-01

    The set of computer programs used at the AGRIS (Agricultural Information System) Input Unit at the IAEA, Vienna, Austria to process the AGRIS computer-readable data is described. The processing flow is illustrated. The configuration of the IAEA's computer, a list of error messages generated by the computer, the EBCDIC code table extended for AGRIS and INIS, the AGRIS-6 bit code, the work sheet format, and job control listings are included as appendixes. The programs are written for an IBM 370, model 145, operating system OS or VS, and require a 130K partition. The programming languages are PL/1 (F-compiler) and Assembler

  4. Firebird-III program description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, M.R.; Prawirosochardjo, S.; Rennick, D.F.; Wessman, E.; Blain, R.J.D.; Wilson, J.M.

    1979-09-01

    The FIREBIRD-III digital computer program is a general network code developed primarily for predicting the thermalhydraulic behaviour of CANDU power reactors during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident and the subsequent emergency coolant injection. Because of its flexibility, the code can also be used to solve a large variety of general two-phase flow problems. This report describes the thermalhydraulic models and the computation methods used in the program

  5. 40 CFR 233.11 - Program description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... organization and structure of the State agency (agencies) which will have responsibility for administering the... under § 233.10 shall include: (a) A description of the scope and structure of the State's program. The... will coordinate its enforcement strategy with that of the Corps and EPA; (h) A description of the...

  6. Linking High Risk Postpartum Women with a Technology Enabled Health Coaching Program to Reduce Diabetes Risk and Improve Wellbeing: Program Description, Case Studies, and Recommendations for Community Health Coaching Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athavale, Priyanka; Thomas, Melanie; Delgadillo-Duenas, Adriana T; Leong, Karen; Najmabadi, Adriana; Harleman, Elizabeth; Rios, Christina; Quan, Judy; Soria, Catalina; Handley, Margaret A

    2016-01-01

    Background . Low-income minority women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus (pGDM) or high BMIs have increased risk for chronic illnesses postpartum. Although the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) provides an evidence-based model for reducing diabetes risk, few community-based interventions have adapted this program for pGDM women. Methods . STAR MAMA is an ongoing randomized control trial (RCT) evaluating a hybrid HIT/Health Coaching DPP-based 20-week postpartum program for diabetes prevention compared with education from written materials at baseline. Eligibility includes women 18-39 years old, ≥32 weeks pregnant, and GDM or BMI > 25. Clinic- and community-based recruitment in San Francisco and Sonoma Counties targets 180 women. Sociodemographic and health coaching data from a preliminary sample are presented. Results . Most of the 86 women included to date (88%) have GDM, 80% were identified as Hispanic/Latina, 78% have migrant status, and most are Spanish-speaking. Women receiving the intervention indicate high engagement, with 86% answering 1+ calls. Health coaching callbacks last an average of 9 minutes with range of topics discussed. Case studies presented convey a range of emotional, instrumental, and health literacy-related supports offered by health coaches. Discussion . The DPP-adapted HIT/health coaching model highlights the possibility and challenge of delivering DPP content to postpartum women in community settings. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02240420.

  7. Descriptive characteristics and health outcomes of the food by prescription nutrition supplementation program for adults living with HIV in Nyanza Province, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Jason M; Cohen, Craig R; Young, Sera L; Wamuyu, Catherine; Armes, Mary N; Otieno, Benard O; Leslie, Hannah H; Dandu, Madhavi; Stewart, Christopher C; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Weiser, Sheri D

    2014-01-01

    The clinical effects and potential benefits of nutrition supplementation interventions for persons living with HIV remain largely unreported, despite awareness of the multifaceted relationship between HIV infection and nutrition. We therefore examined descriptive characteristics and nutritional outcomes of the Food by Prescription (FBP) nutrition supplementation program in Nyanza Province, Kenya. Demographic, health, and anthropometric data were gathered from a retrospective cohort of 1,017 non-pregnant adult patients who enrolled into the FBP program at a Family AIDS Care and Education Services (FACES) site in Nyanza Province between July 2009 and July 2011. Our primary outcome was FBP treatment success defined as attainment of BMI>20, and we used Cox proportional hazards to assess socio-demographic and clinical correlates of FBP treatment success. Mean body mass index was 16.4 upon enrollment into the FBP program. On average, FBP clients gained 2.01 kg in weight and 0.73 kg/m2 in BMI over follow-up (mean 100 days), with the greatest gains among the most severely undernourished (BMI 20, though 44.5% achieved a BMI increase ≥0.5. Greater BMI at baseline, younger age, male gender, and not requiring highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were associated with a higher rate of attainment of BMI>20. This study reports significant gains in weight and BMI among patients enrolled in the FBP program, though only a minority of patients achieved stated programmatic goals of BMI>20. Future research should include well-designed prospective studies that examine retention, exit reasons, mortality outcomes, and long-term sustainability of nutrition supplementation programs for persons living with HIV.

  8. Description of mathematical models and computer programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The paper gives a description of mathematical models and computer programs for analysing possible strategies for spent fuel management, with emphasis on economic analysis. The computer programs developed, describe the material flows, facility construction schedules, capital investment schedules and operating costs for the facilities used in managing the spent fuel. The computer programs use a combination of simulation and optimization procedures for the economic analyses. Many of the fuel cycle steps (such as spent fuel discharges, storage at the reactor, and transport to the RFCC) are described in physical and economic terms through simulation modeling, while others (such as reprocessing plant size and commissioning schedules, interim storage facility commissioning schedules etc.) are subjected to economic optimization procedures to determine the approximate lowest-cost plans from among the available feasible alternatives

  9. CANGEO program description and user's instruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Joo Hwan; Jun, J. S.; Suk, H. C.; Hwang, D. H.; Yoo, Y. J.

    1997-10-01

    This is a report for the description and user's instruction of CANGEO (CANdu GEOmetry) program. CANGEO program is able to generate the geometry input for thermalhydraulic subchannel analysis of CANDU fuel channel. It is developed for the calculation of subchannel analysis of CANDU fuel channel. It is developed for the calculation of subchannel data for a complicated geometry such as a CANDU fuel channel. And this code can be applicable to a bundle eccentricity from pressure tube center to bundle center, pressure tube creep, rod ballooning, and any symmetric subchannel geometry required by thermalhydraulic subchannel analysis code. The report also describes the basic calculation method of subchannel geometry, including user's manual, input and output for a CANDU fuel channel loaded with 37-element fuel bundle. (author). 35 refs., 6 figs

  10. Qualitative Descriptive Methods in Health Science Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorafi, Karen Jiggins; Evans, Bronwynne

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this methodology paper is to describe an approach to qualitative design known as qualitative descriptive that is well suited to junior health sciences researchers because it can be used with a variety of theoretical approaches, sampling techniques, and data collection strategies. It is often difficult for junior qualitative researchers to pull together the tools and resources they need to embark on a high-quality qualitative research study and to manage the volumes of data they collect during qualitative studies. This paper seeks to pull together much needed resources and provide an overview of methods. A step-by-step guide to planning a qualitative descriptive study and analyzing the data is provided, utilizing exemplars from the authors' research. This paper presents steps to conducting a qualitative descriptive study under the following headings: describing the qualitative descriptive approach, designing a qualitative descriptive study, steps to data analysis, and ensuring rigor of findings. The qualitative descriptive approach results in a summary in everyday, factual language that facilitates understanding of a selected phenomenon across disciplines of health science researchers. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. International Nuclear Model. Volume 3. Program description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andress, D.

    1985-01-01

    This is Volume 3 of three volumes of documentation of the International Nuclear Model (INM). This volume presents the Program Description of the International Nuclear Model, which was developed for the Nuclear and Alternate Fuels Division (NAFD), Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The International Nuclear Model (INM) is a comprehensive model of the commercial nuclear power industry. It simulates economic decisions for reactor deployment and fuel management decision based on an input set of technical economic and scenario parameters. The technical parameters include reactor operating characteristics, fuel cycle timing and mass loss factors, and enrichment tails assays. Economic parameters include fuel cycle costs, financial data, and tax alternatives. INM has a broad range of scenario options covering, for example, process constraints, interregional activities, reprocessing, and fuel management selection. INM reports reactor deployment schedules, electricity generation, and fuel cycle requirements and costs. It also has specialized reports for extended burnup and permanent disposal. Companion volumes to Volume 3 are: Volume 1 - Model Overview, and Volume 2 - Data Base Relationships

  12. Incorporating Health Education into Employee Assistance Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Richard E.

    1985-01-01

    Methods of aligning health education with the goals and functions of employee assistance programs are discussed. The role of the health educator in developing these programs is explained in a description of employee assistance program service standards and specific sub-tasks. (DF)

  13. NRC/RSR Data Bank Program description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankert, S.F.

    1979-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has established the NRC/Reactor Safety Research (RSR) Data Bank Program to collect, store, and make available data from the many domestic and foreign water reactor safety research programs. Local direction of the program is provided by EG and G Idaho, Inc., at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The NRC/RSR Data Bank Program provides a central computer storage mechanism and access software for data to be used by code development and assessment groups in meeting the code and correlation needs of the nuclear industry. The administrative portion of the program provides data entry, documentation, and training and advisory services to users and the NRC. The NRC/RSR Data Bank Program and the capabilities of the data access software are described

  14. Solid Waste Program technical baseline description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, A.B.

    1994-07-01

    The system engineering approach has been taken to describe the technical baseline under which the Solid Waste Program is currently operating. The document contains a mission analysis, function analysis, system definition, documentation requirements, facility and project bases, and uncertainties facing the program.

  15. The Caltech Concurrent Computation Program - Project description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, G.; Otto, S.; Lyzenga, G.; Rogstad, D.

    1985-01-01

    The Caltech Concurrent Computation Program wwhich studies basic issues in computational science is described. The research builds on initial work where novel concurrent hardware, the necessary systems software to use it and twenty significant scientific implementations running on the initial 32, 64, and 128 node hypercube machines have been constructed. A major goal of the program will be to extend this work into new disciplines and more complex algorithms including general packages that decompose arbitrary problems in major application areas. New high-performance concurrent processors with up to 1024-nodes, over a gigabyte of memory and multigigaflop performance are being constructed. The implementations cover a wide range of problems in areas such as high energy and astrophysics, condensed matter, chemical reactions, plasma physics, applied mathematics, geophysics, simulation, CAD for VLSI, graphics and image processing. The products of the research program include the concurrent algorithms, hardware, systems software, and complete program implementations.

  16. Description of the RZV and RZF programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raevskaya, V.E.; Torlin, B.Z.

    1980-01-01

    An instruction for running the P3B and P3F programs intended for an implementation of a one-group calculation of the neutron field in a polycell with multizone ring blocks in the P 3 approximation. The program is written in the FORTRAN language for the BESM-6 computer. Time for the calculation of one variant constitutes about 20 s for a simple cell and for double lattices for uniform blocks and 40 s - for double lattices from 30-zone blocks. 4 minutes is the maximum time required for the calculation of the 8x8 polycell consisting from 20 nonequivalent 30-zone blocks of 20 kinds

  17. Building Program Models Incrementally from Informal Descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    specified at each step. Since the user controls the interaction, the user may determine the order in which information flows into PMB. Information is received...until only ten years ago the term aautomatic programming" referred to the development of the assemblers, macro expanders, and compilers for these

  18. ENDF/B-V utility programs: description and operating instructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, K.

    1984-03-01

    A description and operating instructions are supplied for the following ENDF/B-V Processing Programs: CHECKER, CRECT, STNDRD, FIZCON, PSYCHE, RESEND, INTER, INTEND, SUMRIZ, PLOTEF, LSTFCV, RIGEL. These programs can be obtained on magnetic tape, free of charge, from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author)

  19. Quality assurance program description: Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant, Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the Department of Energy's Richland Field Office (DOE-RL) quality assurance (QA) program for the processing of high-level waste as well as the Vitrification Project Quality Assurance Program for the design and construction of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). It also identifies and describes the planned activities that constitute the required quality assurance program for the HWVP. This program applies to the broad scope of quality-affecting activities associated with the overall HWVP Facility. Quality-affecting activities include designing, purchasing, fabricating, handling, shipping, storing, cleaning, erecting, installing, inspecting, testing, maintaining, repairing, and modifying. Also included are the development, qualification, and production of waste forms which may be safely used to dispose of high-level radioactive waste resulting from national defense activities. The HWVP QA program is made up of many constituent programs that are being implemented by the participating organizations. This Quality Assurance program description is intended to outline and define the scope and application of the major programs that make up the HWVP QA program. It provides a means by which the overall program can be managed and directed to achieve its objectives. Subsequent parts of this description will identify the program's objectives, its scope, application, and structure

  20. Employing a Qualitative Description Approach in Health Care Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Carmel; Atkinson, Sandra; Doody, Owen

    2017-01-01

    A qualitative description design is particularly relevant where information is required directly from those experiencing the phenomenon under investigation and where time and resources are limited. Nurses and midwives often have clinical questions suitable to a qualitative approach but little time to develop an exhaustive comprehension of qualitative methodological approaches. Qualitative description research is sometimes considered a less sophisticated approach for epistemological reasons. Another challenge when considering qualitative description design is differentiating qualitative description from other qualitative approaches. This article provides a systematic and robust journey through the philosophical, ontological, and epistemological perspectives, which evidences the purpose of qualitative description research. Methods and rigor issues underpinning qualitative description research are also appraised to provide the researcher with a systematic approach to conduct research utilizing this approach. The key attributes and value of qualitative description research in the health care professions will be highlighted with the aim of extending its usage. PMID:29204457

  1. Employing a Qualitative Description Approach in Health Care Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Carmel; Atkinson, Sandra; Doody, Owen

    2017-01-01

    A qualitative description design is particularly relevant where information is required directly from those experiencing the phenomenon under investigation and where time and resources are limited. Nurses and midwives often have clinical questions suitable to a qualitative approach but little time to develop an exhaustive comprehension of qualitative methodological approaches. Qualitative description research is sometimes considered a less sophisticated approach for epistemological reasons. Another challenge when considering qualitative description design is differentiating qualitative description from other qualitative approaches. This article provides a systematic and robust journey through the philosophical, ontological, and epistemological perspectives, which evidences the purpose of qualitative description research. Methods and rigor issues underpinning qualitative description research are also appraised to provide the researcher with a systematic approach to conduct research utilizing this approach. The key attributes and value of qualitative description research in the health care professions will be highlighted with the aim of extending its usage.

  2. Qualitative description – the poor cousin of health research?

    OpenAIRE

    Sondergaard Jens; Andersen Rikke; Olesen Frede; Neergaard Mette

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The knowledge and use of qualitative description as a qualitative research approach in health services research is limited. The aim of this article is to discuss the potential benefits of a qualitative descriptive approach, to identify its strengths and weaknesses and to provide examples of use. Discussion Qualitative description is a useful qualitative method in much medical research if you keep the limitations of the approach in mind. It is especially relevant in mixed m...

  3. Integrated environment, safety, and health management system description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoghbi, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    The Integrated Environment, Safety, and Health Management System Description that is presented in this document describes the approach and management systems used to address integrated safety management within the Richland Environmental Restoration Project

  4. Mental health consultations in a prison population: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustad Aase-Bente

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The psychiatric morbidity among prison inmates is substantially higher than in the general population. We do, however, have insufficient knowledge about the extent of psychiatric treatment provided in our prisons. The aim of the present study was to give a comprehensive description of all non-pharmacological interventions provided by the psychiatric health services to a stratified sample of prison inmates. Methods Six medium/large prisons (n = 928 representing 1/3 of the Norwegian prison population and with female and preventive detention inmates over-sampled, were investigated cross-sectionally. All non-pharmacological psychiatric interventions, excluding pure correctional programs, were recorded. Those receiving interventions were investigated further and compared to the remaining prison population. Results A total of 230 of the 928 inmates (25 % had some form of psychiatric intervention: 184 (20 % were in individual psychotherapy, in addition 40 (4 % received ad hoc interventions during the registration week. Group therapy was infrequent (1 %. The psychotherapies were most often of a supportive (62 % or behavioural-cognitive (26 % nature. Dynamic, insight-oriented psychotherapies were infrequent (8 %. Concurrent psychopharmacological treatment was prevalent (52 %. Gender and age did not correlate with psychiatric interventions, whereas prisoner category (remanded, sentenced, or preventive detention did (p Conclusion Our results pertain only to prisons with adequate primary and mental health services and effective diversion from prison of individuals with serious mental disorders. Given these important limitations, we do propose that the service estimates found may serve as a rough guideline to the minimum number of sessions a prison's psychiatric health services should be able to fulfil in order to serve the inmates psychiatric needs. The results rely on the specialist services' own estimates only. Future studies should

  5. KAFEPA-II program users' manual and description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suk, H. C.; Hwang, W.; Kim, B. G.; Sim, K. S.; Heo, Y. H.; Byun, T. S.; Park, G. S.

    1992-04-01

    KAFEPA-II is a computer program for simulating the behaviour of UO 2 fuel elements under normal operating conditions of a CANDU reactor. It computes the one-dimensional temperature distribution and thermal expansion of the fuel pellets. The amount of gas released during irradiation of the fuel is also computed. Thermal expansion and gas pressure inside the fuel element are then used to compute the strains and stresses in the sheath. This document is intended as a user's manual and description for KAFEPA-II. (Author)

  6. Eye tracking to explore attendance in health-state descriptions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Selivanova

    Full Text Available A crucial assumption in health valuation methods is that respondents pay equal attention to all information components presented in the response task. So far, there is no solid evidence that respondents are fulfilling this condition. The aim of our study is to explore the attendance to various information cues presented in the discrete choice (DC response tasks.Eye tracking was used to study the eye movements and fixations on specific information areas. This was done for seven DC response tasks comprising health-state descriptions. A sample of 10 respondents participated in the study. Videos of their eye movements were recorded and are presented graphically. Frequencies were computed for length of fixation and number of fixations, so differences in attendance were demonstrated for particular attributes in the tasks.All respondents completed the survey. Respondents were fixating on the left-sided health-state descriptions slightly longer than on the right-sided. Fatigue was not observed, as the time spent did not decrease in the final response tasks. The time spent on the tasks depended on the difficulty of the task and the amount of information presented.Eye tracking proved to be a feasible method to study the process of paying attention and fixating on health-state descriptions in the DC response tasks. Eye tracking facilitates the investigation of whether respondents fully read the information in health descriptions or whether they ignore particular elements.

  7. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) program: facility description report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, A.G.

    1984-09-01

    A new boiling water reactor safety test facility (FIST, Full Integral Simulation Test) is described. It will be used to investigate small breaks and operational transients and to tie results from such tests to earlier large-break test results determined in the TLTA. The new facility's full height and prototypical components constitute a major scaling improvement over earlier test facilities. A heated feedwater system, permitting steady-state operation, and a large increase in the number of measurements are other significant improvements. The program background is outlined and program objectives defined. The design basis is presented together with a detailed, complete description of the facility and measurements to be made. An extensive component scaling analysis and prediction of performance are presented

  8. Qualitative description - the poor cousin of health research?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Olesen, Frede; Andersen, Rikke Sand

    2009-01-01

    ', relatives' or professionals' experiences with a particular topic. Another great advantage of the method is that it is suitable if time or resources are limited. SUMMARY: As a consequence of the growth in qualitative research in the health sciences, researchers sometimes feel obliged to designate their work......BACKGROUND: The knowledge and use of qualitative description as a qualitative research approach in health services research is limited.The aim of this article is to discuss the potential benefits of a qualitative descriptive approach, to identify its strengths and weaknesses and to provide examples...... of use. DISCUSSION: Qualitative description is a useful qualitative method in much medical research if you keep the limitations of the approach in mind. It is especially relevant in mixed method research, in questionnaire development and in research projects aiming to gain firsthand knowledge of patients...

  9. The Agincourt demographic and health study - site description ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Agincourt demographic and health study - site description, baseline findings and implications. Stephen M Tollman, Kobus Herbst, Michel Garenne, John S.S. Gear, KathJeen Kahn. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  10. 40 CFR 239.4 - Narrative description of state permit program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Narrative description of state permit program. 239.4 Section 239.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID... Narrative description of state permit program. The description of a state's program must include: (a) An...

  11. Water Resources Research Grant Program project descriptions, fiscal year 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1987-01-01

    This report contains information on the 34 new projects funded by the United States Geological Survey 's Water Resources Research Grant Program in fiscal year 1987 and on 3 projects completed during the year. For the new projects, the report gives the grant number, project title, performing organization, principal investigator(s), and a project description that includes: (1) identification of water related problems and problem-solution approach (2) contribution to problem solution, (3) objectives, and (4) approach. The 34 projects include 12 in the area of groundwater quality problems, 12 in the science and technology of water quality management, 1 in climate variability and the hydrologic cycle, 4 in institutional change in water resources management, and 5 in surface water management. For the three completed projects, the report furnishes the grant number; project title; performing organization; principal investor(s); starting data; data of receipt of final report; and an abstract of the final report. Each project description provides the information needed to obtain a copy of the final report. The report contains tables showing: (1) proposals received according to area of research interest, (2) grant awards and funding according to area of research interest, (3) proposals received according to type of submitting organization, and (4) awards and funding according to type of organization. (Author 's abstract)

  12. Clinic Health Awareness Program Subsystem -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Clinic Health Awareness Program Subystem (CHAPS) is a comprehensive system for recording, reporting, and analyzing a patient’s medical information and managing an...

  13. Qualitative description – the poor cousin of health research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background The knowledge and use of qualitative description as a qualitative research approach in health services research is limited. The aim of this article is to discuss the potential benefits of a qualitative descriptive approach, to identify its strengths and weaknesses and to provide examples of use. Discussion Qualitative description is a useful qualitative method in much medical research if you keep the limitations of the approach in mind. It is especially relevant in mixed method research, in questionnaire development and in research projects aiming to gain firsthand knowledge of patients', relatives' or professionals' experiences with a particular topic. Another great advantage of the method is that it is suitable if time or resources are limited. Summary As a consequence of the growth in qualitative research in the health sciences, researchers sometimes feel obliged to designate their work as phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography or a narrative study when in fact it is not. Qualitative description might be a useful alternative approach to consider. PMID:19607668

  14. Program MASTERCALC: an interactive computer program for radioanalytical computations. Description and operating instructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goode, W.

    1980-10-01

    MASTERCALC is a computer program written to support radioanalytical computations in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) Environmental Surveillance Group. Included in the program are routines for gross alpha and beta, 3 H, gross gamma, 90 Sr and alpha spectroscopic determinations. A description of MASTERCALC is presented and its source listing is included. Operating instructions and example computing sessions are given for each type of analysis

  15. 'Only systems thinking can improve family planning program in Pakistan': A descriptive qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Saira; Shaikh, Babar Tasneem

    2014-12-01

    Family Planning (FP) program in Pakistan has been struggling to achieve the desired indicators. Despite a well-timed initiation of the program in late 50s, fertility decline has been sparingly slow. As a result, rapid population growth is impeding economic development in the country. A high population growth rate, the current fertility rate, a stagnant contraceptive prevalence rate and high unmet need remain challenging targets for population policies and FP programs. To accelerate the pace of FP programs and targets concerned, it is imperative to develop and adopt a holistic approach and strategy for plugging the gaps in various components of the health system: service delivery, information systems, drugs-supplies, technology and logistics, Human Resources (HRs), financing, and governance. Hence, World Health Organization (WHO) health systems building blocks present a practical framework for overall health system strengthening. This descriptive qualitative study, through 23 in-depth interviews, explored the factors related to the health system, and those responsible for a disappointing FP program in Pakistan. Provincial representatives from Population Welfare and Health departments, donor agencies and non-governmental organizations involved with FP programs were included in the study to document the perspective of all stakeholders. Content analysis was done manually to generate nodes, sub-nodes and themes. Performance of FP programs is not satisfactory as shown by the indicators, and these programs have not been able to deliver the desired outcomes. Interviewees agreed that inadequate prioritization given to the FP program by successive governments has led to this situation. There are issues with all health system areas, including governance, strategies, funding, financial management, service delivery systems, HRs, technology and logistic systems, and Management Information System (MIS); these have encumbered the pace of success of the program. All stakeholders

  16. ‘Only Systems Thinking Can Improve Family Planning Program in Pakistan’: A Descriptive Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saira Zafar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Family Planning (FP program in Pakistan has been struggling to achieve the desired indicators. Despite a well-timed initiation of the program in late 50s, fertility decline has been sparingly slow. As a result, rapid population growth is impeding economic development in the country. A high population growth rate, the current fertility rate, a stagnant contraceptive prevalence rate and high unmet need remain challenging targets for population policies and FP programs. To accelerate the pace of FP programs and targets concerned, it is imperative to develop and adopt a holistic approach and strategy for plugging the gaps in various components of the health system: service delivery, information systems, drugs-supplies, technology and logistics, Human Resources (HRs, financing, and governance. Hence, World Health Organization (WHO health systems building blocks present a practical framework for overall health system strengthening. Methods This descriptive qualitative study, through 23 in-depth interviews, explored the factors related to the health system, and those responsible for a disappointing FP program in Pakistan. Provincial representatives from Population Welfare and Health departments, donor agencies and non-governmental organizations involved with FP programs were included in the study to document the perspective of all stakeholders. Content analysis was done manually to generate nodes, sub-nodes and themes. Results Performance of FP programs is not satisfactory as shown by the indicators, and these programs have not been able to deliver the desired outcomes. Interviewees agreed that inadequate prioritization given to the FP program by successive governments has led to this situation. There are issues with all health system areas, including governance, strategies, funding, financial management, service delivery systems, HRs, technology and logistic systems, and Management Information System (MIS; these have encumbered the pace of

  17. Quality Assurance Program description, Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslar, S.R.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the Westinghouse Savannah River Company's (WSRC) Quality Assurance Program for Defense Waste Processing at the Savannah River Site (SRS). WSRC is the operating contractor for the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the SRS. The following objectives are achieved through developing and implementing the Quality Assurance Program: (1) Ensure that the attainment of quality (in accomplishing defense high-level waste processing objectives at the SRS) is at a level commensurate with the government's responsibility for protecting public health and safety, the environment, the public investment, and for efficiently and effectively using national resources. (2) Ensure that high-level waste from qualification and production activities conform to requirements defined by OCRWM. These activities include production processes, equipment, and services; and products that are planned, designed, procured, fabricated, installed, tested, operated, maintained, modified, or produced

  18. Regulatory research and support program for 1988/89 - project descriptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-03-15

    Information Bulletin, 1988. Project descriptions for the Regulatory Research and Support Program. This Information Bulletin contains a list of the projects with a brief description of each, and additional supporting information.

  19. Regulatory research and support program for 1988/89 - project descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Information Bulletin, 1988. Project descriptions for the Regulatory Research and Support Program. This Information Bulletin contains a list of the projects with a brief description of each, and additional supporting information

  20. The AutoBayes Program Synthesis System: System Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Bernd; Pressburger, Thomas; Rosu, Grigore; Schumann, Johann; Norvog, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    AUTOBAYES is a fully automatic program synthesis system for the statistical data analysis domain. Its input is a concise description of a data analysis problem in the form of a statistical model; its output is optimized and fully documented C/C++ code which can be linked dynamically into the Matlab and Octave environments. AUTOBAYES synthesizes code by a schema-guided deductive process. Schemas (i.e., code templates with associated semantic constraints) are applied to the original problem and recursively to emerging subproblems. AUTOBAYES complements this approach by symbolic computation to derive closed-form solutions whenever possible. In this paper, we concentrate on the interaction between the symbolic computations and the deductive synthesis process. A statistical model specifies for each problem variable (i.e., data or parameter) its properties and dependencies in the form of a probability distribution, A typical data analysis task is to estimate the best possible parameter values from the given observations or measurements. The following example models normal-distributed data but takes prior information (e.g., from previous experiments) on the data's mean value and variance into account.

  1. Environmental Compliance and Protection Program Description Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2009-02-26

    The objective of the Environmental Compliance and Protection (EC and P) Program Description (PD) is to establish minimum environmental compliance requirements and natural resources protection goals for the Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) Oak Ridge Environmental Management Cleanup Contract (EMCC) Contract Number DE-AC05-98OR22700-M198. This PD establishes the work practices necessary to ensure protection of the environment during the performance of EMCC work activities on the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, by BJC employees and subcontractor personnel. Both BJC and subcontractor personnel are required to implement this PD. A majority of the decontamination and demolition (D and D) activities and media (e.g., soil and groundwater) remediation response actions at DOE sites on the ORR are conducted under the authority of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). CERCLA activities are governed by individual CERCLA decision documents (e.g., Record of Decision [ROD] or Action Memorandum) and according to requirements stated in the Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE 1992). Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for the selected remedy are the requirements for environmental remediation responses (e.g., removal actions and remedial actions) conducted under CERCLA.

  2. 24 CFR 92.62 - Review of program description and certifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Urban Development HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Allocation Formula Insular Areas Program... description unless the insular area has failed to submit information sufficient to allow HUD to make the... projects or activities in its program description. (c) HOME Investment Partnership Agreement. After HUD...

  3. Health Programs for Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accountability & Whistleblower Protection Transparency Media Room Inside the Media Room Public Affairs News Releases Speeches Videos Publications National Observances Veterans Day Memorial Day Celebrating America's Freedoms Special Events Adaptive Sports Program Creative Arts Festival ...

  4. Environmental health program activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergtholdt, C. P.

    1969-01-01

    Activities reported include studies on toxic air contaminants, excessive noise, poor lighting, food sanitation, water pollution, and exposure to nonionizing radiation as health hazards. Formulations for a radiological health manual provide guidance to personnel in the procurement and safe handling of radiation producing equipment and Apollo mission planning. A literature search and development of a water analysis laboratory are outlined to obtain information regarding microbiological problems involving potable water, waste management, and personal hygiene.

  5. Childrens Health Insurance Program (CHIP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This Web site discusses and provides downloadable data on state and program type, number of children ever enrolled, and the percentage of growth compared to the...

  6. Lessons from Canada's health program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terris, M

    1990-01-01

    The Canadian health program is described and analyzed. Positive features include financing through progressive taxation; complete coverage of physician and hospital services; complete absence of deductibles, copayments, and extra charges by physicians and hospitals; lower administrative costs because private insurance companies are excluded from the program; and avoidance of the straitjacket of a single federal program by decentralization to the provinces. Negative features include ever-rising costs due to the almost complete dominance of fee-for-service payment to physicians; failure to monitor the quality of care; and neglect of serious support for preventive services and improved living standards--the two most important determinants of health status. Recommendations are made for a U.S. national health program that would incorporate the positive features of the Canadian program and avoid its deficiencies.

  7. Descriptive study of external employee assistance program providers (EAP) in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Takashi; Haruyama, Yasuo; Higashi, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    The mental health problems of employees have become a major occupational health issue in Japan. External employee assistance program providers (EAP) have become important in mental health care for workers, but their activities are poorly documented. This descriptive study was undertaken to clarify the status and future tasks of EAP in Japan. The subjects were all EAP (n=27) registered in the Japanese Chapter of Employee Assistance Professionals Association. The questionnaire survey was conducted in January 2007. We received 13 replies, a response rate of 54.2%. Most EAP provided seminars, stress checks, stress management, counseling, and support for a return to work. The number of EAP contracted with small-scale enterprises was small. EAP communicated infrequently with companies. To promote the use of EAP, their advertising, education and training of staff, accumulation of scientific evidence, development of an official certification system for staff, and improvement of contents of EAP services were cited.

  8. Computer Program for Calculation of Complex Chemical Equilibrium Compositions and Applications II. Users Manual and Program Description. 2; Users Manual and Program Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1996-01-01

    This users manual is the second part of a two-part report describing the NASA Lewis CEA (Chemical Equilibrium with Applications) program. The program obtains chemical equilibrium compositions of complex mixtures with applications to several types of problems. The topics presented in this manual are: (1) details for preparing input data sets; (2) a description of output tables for various types of problems; (3) the overall modular organization of the program with information on how to make modifications; (4) a description of the function of each subroutine; (5) error messages and their significance; and (6) a number of examples that illustrate various types of problems handled by CEA and that cover many of the options available in both input and output. Seven appendixes give information on the thermodynamic and thermal transport data used in CEA; some information on common variables used in or generated by the equilibrium module; and output tables for 14 example problems. The CEA program was written in ANSI standard FORTRAN 77. CEA should work on any system with sufficient storage. There are about 6300 lines in the source code, which uses about 225 kilobytes of memory. The compiled program takes about 975 kilobytes.

  9. Medicare home health: a description of total episodes of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, L G; Goldberg, H B; Cheh, V A; Williams, J

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present descriptive information on the characteristics of 2,873 Medicare home health clients, to quantify systematically their patterns of service utilization and allowed charges during a total episode of care, and to clarify the bivariate associations between client characteristics and utilization. The model client was female, 75-84 years of age, living with a spouse, and frail based on a variety of indicators. The mean total episode was approximately 23 visits, with allowed charges of $1,238 (1986 dollars). Specific subgroups of clients, defined by their morbidities and frailties, used identifiable clusters of services. Implications for case-mix models and implications for capitation payments under health care reform are discussed.

  10. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoffstall-Cone, Sarah; Williard, Mary

    2013-01-01

    In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska's Tribal Health Organizations (THO) developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA) Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities.

  11. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Shoffstall-Cone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska’s Tribal Health Organizations (THO developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. Objectives. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. Results. The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Conclusions. Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities.

  12. Participação das famílias em Programas de Saúde Auditiva: um estudo descritivo Families participation in Hearing Health Programs: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia de Freitas Alvarenga

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a adesão dos pais para a realização dos procedimentos auditivos em um Programa de Saúde Auditiva Infantil, desenvolvido na comunidade. MÉTODOS: Foi realizada uma análise comparativa das informações sobre o comparecimento nos atendimentos de dois Programas de Saúde Auditiva Infantil, um vinculado a um hospital público e outro realizado junto à Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF. A casuística foi formada por 362 crianças, nascidas entre o período de fevereiro a março de 2007 no Hospital em que é realizada a triagem auditiva, e que foram agendadas para participar do Programa junto a ESF. RESULTADOS: Das 362 crianças que nasceram neste hospital e que foram encaminhadas para realização da avaliação audiológica na unidade básica de saúde, 147 compareceram ao atendimento, representando 40,61% de adesão das famílias no projeto desenvolvido na comunidade. Dos casos com resultado de triagem auditiva sugestivo de ausência de alteração auditiva, somente 39,80% aderiram ao Programa realizado junto ao ESF. Dos casos que não completaram alguma etapa do processo de identificação na maternidade, 32 (55,18% famílias não aderiram a nenhum dos Programas de Saúde Auditiva existentes, ficando sem esclarecimento sobre a audição do filho. CONCLUSÃO: O comparecimento das famílias nas UBS foi inferior à metade das famílias que foram convidadas a levar os filhos para a avaliação audiológica, independentemente de se a criança havia sido submetida ao processo de identificação da deficiência auditiva na maternidade pública da cidade.PURPOSE: To evaluate the commitment of parents for carrying out the hearing procedures of a Children's Hearing Health Program at their community. METHODS: It was carried out a comparative analysis of the information regarding parents' attendance at two Children's Hearing Health Programs, one developed at a public hospital and the other carried out along with the Family Health

  13. Website Sharing in Online Health Communities: A Descriptive Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Chinmoy; Huh, Jina; Adupa, Abhishek Kalyan; Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha R

    2016-01-13

    An increasing number of people visit online health communities to seek health information. In these communities, people share experiences and information with others, often complemented with links to different websites. Understanding how people share websites can help us understand patients' needs in online health communities and improve how peer patients share health information online. Our goal was to understand (1) what kinds of websites are shared, (2) information quality of the shared websites, (3) who shares websites, (4) community differences in website-sharing behavior, and (5) the contexts in which patients share websites. We aimed to find practical applications and implications of website-sharing practices in online health communities. We used regular expressions to extract URLs from 10 WebMD online health communities. We then categorized the URLs based on their top-level domains. We counted the number of trust codes (eg, accredited agencies' formal evaluation and PubMed authors' institutions) for each website to assess information quality. We used descriptive statistics to determine website-sharing activities. To understand the context of the URL being discussed, we conducted a simple random selection of 5 threads that contained at least one post with URLs from each community. Gathering all other posts in these threads resulted in 387 posts for open coding analysis with the goal of understanding motivations and situations in which website sharing occurred. We extracted a total of 25,448 websites. The majority of the shared websites were .com (59.16%, 15,056/25,448) and WebMD internal (23.2%, 5905/25,448) websites; the least shared websites were social media websites (0.15%, 39/25,448). High-posting community members and moderators posted more websites with trust codes than low-posting community members did. The heart disease community had the highest percentage of websites containing trust codes compared to other communities. Members used websites to

  14. Peer tutoring programs in health professions schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santee, Jennifer; Garavalia, Linda

    2006-06-15

    Peer tutoring programs may be one method of maintaining quality of pharmacy education in the face of growing student enrollment and a small faculty body. A critical review of the literature was performed to ascertain whether peer tutoring programs improve or maintain the academic performance of health care professional students. Various electronic databases and abstracts from past American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy's annual meetings were searched to identify pertinent research. Only those articles with quantitative data, an experimental design, and comparative statistical analysis were included for review. Most studies found that peer tutoring had a positive impact on academic performance. These results may not be readily generalizable as there were numerous methodological flaws and limited descriptions of the programs and participants. Studies with better designs and more detail are needed to answer definitively whether peer tutoring is of benefit. Details of what resources were required should be included in the study to allow the reader to determine the feasibility of the intervention.

  15. "In Our Corner": A Qualitative Descriptive Study of Patient Engagement in a Community-Based Care Coordination Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefcik, Justine S; Petrovsky, Darina; Streur, Megan; Toles, Mark; O'Connor, Melissa; Ulrich, Connie M; Marcantonio, Sherry; Coburn, Ken; Naylor, Mary D; Moriarty, Helene

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore participants' experience in the Health Quality Partners (HQP) Care Coordination Program that contributed to their continued engagement. Older adults with multiple chronic conditions often have limited engagement in health care services and face fragmented health care delivery. This can lead to increased risk for disability, mortality, poor quality of life, and increased health care utilization. A qualitative descriptive design with two focus groups was conducted with a total of 20 older adults enrolled in HQP's Care Coordination Program. Conventional content analysis was the analytical technique. The overarching theme resulting from the analysis was "in our corner," with subthemes "opportunities to learn and socialize" and "dedicated nurses," suggesting that these are the primary contributing factors to engagement in HQP's Care Coordination Program. Study findings suggest that nurses play an integral role in patient engagement among older adults enrolled in a care coordination program.

  16. Developing an Emergency Physician Productivity Index Using Descriptive Health Analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding became a major barrier to receiving timely emergency care. At King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Saudi Arabia, we identified variables and factors affecting crowding and performance to develop indicators to help evaluation and improvement. Measuring efficiency of work and activity of throughput processes; it was important to develop an ED physician productivity index. Data on all ED patients' encounters over the last six months of 2014 were retrieved and descriptive health analytics methods were used. Three variables were identified for their influence on productivity and performance; Number of Treated Patients per Physician, Patient Acuity Level and Treatment Time. The study suggested a formula to calculate the productivity index of each physician through dividing the Number of Treated Patients by Patient Acuity Level squared and Treatment Time to identify physicians with low productivity index and investigate causes and factors.

  17. 13 CFR 108.10 - Description of the New Markets Venture Capital Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Venture Capital Program. 108.10 Section 108.10 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Introduction to Part 108 § 108.10 Description of the New Markets Venture Capital Program. The New Markets Venture Capital (“NMVC”) Program is a...

  18. GGP Program Description, 2006-2011 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-22

    Dec 22, 2010 ... This document explains the context and orientation of the IDRC's Globalization, Growth and Poverty (GGP) program initiative for the 2006-11 period, detailing the GGP program's objectives, research areas, cross-cutting themes, and programming approach.Download the PDF : Globalization, Growth and ...

  19. World Perspective Case Descriptions on Educational Programs for Adults: India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayagopal, R.; Burns, E. P.

    Four adult education programs being conducted in India are described in the case studies in this packet. Two of the projects involve literacy; the third promotes literacy as one part of its community development program, and the fourth trains workers in hotel management and catering technology. The literacy programs are (1) development of a…

  20. Health related quality of life and comorbidity. A descriptive analysis comparing EQ-5D dimensions of patients in the German disease management program for type 2 diabetes and patients in routine care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ose, Dominik; Miksch, Antje; Urban, Elisabeth; Natanzon, Iris; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Kunz, Cornelia Ursula; Freund, Tobias

    2011-08-02

    The co-occurance of multiple medical conditions has a negative impact on health related quality of life (HRQoL) for patients with type 2 diabetes. These patients demand for intensified care programs. Participation in a disease management program (DMP) for type 2 diabetes has shown to counterbalance this effect. However, it remains unclear which dimensions of HRQoL are influenced by the DMP. The aim of this study was to explore the HRQoL dimensions of patients with type 2 diabetes in the German DMP and patients in routine care (RC). This analysis is part of a comparative evaluation of the German DMP for patients with type 2 diabetes. A questionnaire, including the HRQoL measure EQ-5D, was mailed to a random sample of 3,546 patients with type 2 diabetes (59.3% female). The EQ-5D dimensions were analyzed by grouping patients according to their participation in the German DMP for diabetes into DMP and RC. Compared to patients in DMP, patients in RC reported more problems for the dimensions mobility (P German DMP for type 2 diabetes mellitus show significantly higher ratings of their HRQoL in the dimensions mobility, self care and performing usual activities compared to patients in RC. This difference can also be observed in patients with significant comorbidities. As these dimensions are known to be essential for diabetes care, the German DMP may contribute to improved care even for comorbid diabetes patients.

  1. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program: FY2011 Project Descriptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC-IHD), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC-IHD), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Whinnery, LeRoy L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shelley, Timothy J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-02-03

    This document provides brief descriptions of research topics for consideration by the IDCA for potential funding in funding in FY 2011. The topics include the utilization of the results from the Proficiency Test developed during FY 2010 to start populating the small-scale safety and thermal testing (SSST) Testing Compendium and revising results from methods modifications. Other research topics were also developed for FY 2011 from issues that arose in the Proficiency Test.

  2. School Health: Findings from Evaluated Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.

    This publication presents findings from evaluations of many school health programs from across the United States. Each program includes at least one of the following eight components of a comprehensive school health program: health education, clinical services, counseling and mental health services, school environment, school food programs,…

  3. 47 CFR 79.3 - Video description of video programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... television audience measurement service, based on television viewership in the counties that make up each DMA... other distributor of video programming for residential reception that delivers such programming directly... the national audience share during prime time of nonbroadcast networks, as determined by Nielsen Media...

  4. Quality assurance program description. Topical report SDQAPD-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The topical report presented describes the SDG and E QA Program that is applied to the design, procurement, construction, and preoperational testing of nuclear power plants. The QA plan describes the SDG and E organizational structure for quality assurance; identifies the functions, duties, and responsibilities of key departments and individuals; describes interrelationships and interfaces among internal groups and external organizations; delineates program requirements, and prescribes methods of implementation. SDG and E Procedures and Directives provide detailed direction for accomplishment of program requirements in consonance with the methods specified in the QA Plan

  5. Simulation model for wind energy storage systems. Volume III. Program descriptions. [SIMWEST CODE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, A.W.; Edsinger, R.W.; Burroughs, J.D.

    1977-08-01

    The effort developed a comprehensive computer program for the modeling of wind energy/storage systems utilizing any combination of five types of storage (pumped hydro, battery, thermal, flywheel and pneumatic). An acronym for the program is SIMWEST (Simulation Model for Wind Energy Storage). The level of detail of SIMWEST is consistent with a role of evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind energy systems. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and load components. Volume III, the SIMWEST program description contains program descriptions, flow charts and program listings for the SIMWEST Model Generation Program, the Simulation program, the File Maintenance program and the Printer Plotter program. Volume III generally would not be required by SIMWEST user.

  6. HIGHWAY, a transportation routing model: program description and users' manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joy, D.S.; Johnson, P.E.; Gibson, S.M.

    1982-12-01

    A computerized transportation routing model has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be used for predicting likely routes for shipping radioactive materials. The HIGHWAY data base is a computerized road atlas containing descriptions of the entire interstate highway system, the federal highway system, and most of the principal state roads. In addition to its prediction of the most likely commercial route, options incorporated in the HIGHWAY model can allow for maximum use of interstate highways or routes that will bypass urbanized areas containing populations > 100,000. The user may also interactively modify the data base to predict routes that bypass any particular state, city, town, or specific highway segment

  7. 15 CFR 16.2 - Description and goal of program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... particular advantages of their products. These objectives are accomplished by: (1) Selecting or developing.... (c) For selected categories of consumer products, the program includes advertising guidelines covering situations where quantitative performance values are stated in advertising or where qualitative...

  8. Predictors of health-related quality of life among industrial workers: A descriptive correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malak, Malakeh Z

    2017-06-01

    Assessment and evaluation of the health-related quality of life of industrial workers is an important research focus. This descriptive correlational study identifies the predictors of health-related quality of life using a random sampling of industrial workers (n = 640) from construction factories in Amman Governorate in Jordan using demographic characteristics, a health and work-related factors questionnaire, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief scale. Results showed that industrial workers had good physical health but a poor working environment. There was a statistically significant relationship between educational level, conflict between work and individual life and work and social life, working hours, and workload, and all domains of health-related quality of life. Overall, educational level was the main predictor for all domains of health-related quality of life. Such results confirm the need to develop appropriate interventions and strategies to improve workers' health-related quality of life. Furthermore, developing an integrated approach among policymakers, employers, and work organizations to enhance industrial workers' occupational health programs could be effective. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. 77 FR 48102 - Closed Captioning and Video Description of Video Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ... Captioning and Video Description of Video Programming AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. [[Page 48103... show that providing captions on their programming would be economically burdensome. DATES: Effective...) establishing requirements for closed captioning on video programming to ensure access by persons with hearing...

  10. INTERLINE, a railroad routing model: program description and user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, B.E.

    1985-11-01

    INTERLINE is an interactive computer program that finds likely routes for shipments over the US railroad system. It is based on a shortest path algorithm modified both to reflect the nature of railroad company operations and to accommodate computer resource limitations in dealing with a large transportation network. The first section of the report discusses the nature of railroad operations and routing practices in the United States, including the tendency to concentrate traffic on a limited number of mainlines, the competition for traffic by different companies operating in the same corridors, and the tendency of originating carriers to retain traffic on their systems before transferring it to terminating carriers. The theoretical foundation and operation of shortest path algorithms are described, as well as the techniques used to simulate actual operating practices within this framework. The second section is a user's guide that describes the program operation and data structures, program features, and user access. 11 refs., 11 figs

  11. Description of the thermoelastic/plastic computer program TEPCO. Memorandum report RSI-0040

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pariseau, W.G.

    1975-01-01

    Presented is a description of the two-dimensional (plane strain, axial symmetry) thermoelastic/plastic computer program TEPCO used by RE/SPEC Inc. in conjunction with an investigation of rock mechanics of underground radioactive waste disposal

  12. Public Health Service Safety Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, J R [Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1969-07-01

    Off-Site Radiological Safety Programs conducted on past Plowshare experimental projects by the Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory for the AEC will be presented. Emphasis will be placed on the evaluation of the potential radiation hazard to off-site residents, the development of an appropriate safety plan, pre- and post-shot surveillance activities, and the necessity for a comprehensive and continuing community relations program. In consideration of the possible wide use of nuclear explosives in industrial applications, a new approach to off-site radiological safety will be discussed. (author)

  13. Public Health Service Safety Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBride, J.R.

    1969-01-01

    Off-Site Radiological Safety Programs conducted on past Plowshare experimental projects by the Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory for the AEC will be presented. Emphasis will be placed on the evaluation of the potential radiation hazard to off-site residents, the development of an appropriate safety plan, pre- and post-shot surveillance activities, and the necessity for a comprehensive and continuing community relations program. In consideration of the possible wide use of nuclear explosives in industrial applications, a new approach to off-site radiological safety will be discussed. (author)

  14. Coca-Cola Hispanic Education Fund: Los Angeles Program Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca Cola Bottling Co. of Los Angeles, CA.

    The Coca-Cola Hispanic Education Fund was created in response to the high school dropout problem in Los Angeles. The Fund enables the Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Los Angeles to build upon the successful relationship it has developed in the Hispanic community and maximizes the effectiveness of existing student support programs by directing needy…

  15. Quality assurance program description for shipping packages of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This quality assurance plan describes the quality assurance program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), for shipping packages of radioactive material. The purpose of this report is to describe how PNL will comply with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 71, Appendix E. In compliance with the instructions from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the 18 criteria from Appendix E are covered

  16. Program Description: Physical Therapy in a Heart Failure Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Knocke, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic exercise and resistance training have been proven to be beneficial for patients with heart failure. Current reimbursement guidelines exclude these patients from our traditional cardiac rehabilitation program, so at Newton Wellesley Hospital a clinic model was developed for the disease management and exercise of heart failure patients.

  17. Isochronous cyclotron closed equilibrium orbit calculation program description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyan, I.N.; Vorozhtsov, S.B.; Tarashkevich, R.

    2003-01-01

    The Equilibrium Orbit Research Program - EORP, written in C++ with the use of Visual C++ is described. The program is intended for the calculation of the particle rotation frequency and particle kinetic energy in the closed equilibrium orbits of an isochronous cyclotron, where the closed equilibrium orbits are described through the radius and particle momentum angle: r eo (θ) and φ p (θ). The program algorithm was developed on the basis of articles, lecture notes and original analytic calculations. The results of calculations by the EORP were checked and confirmed by using the results of calculations by the numerical methods. The discrepancies between the EORP results and the numerical method results for the calculations of the particle rotation frequency and particle kinetic energy are within the limits of ±1·10 -4 . The EORP results and the numerical method results for the calculations of r eo (θ) and φ p (θ) practically coincide. All this proves the accuracy of calculations by the EORP for the isochronous cyclotrons with the azimuthally varied fields. As is evident from the results of calculations, the program can be used for the calculations of both straight - sector and spiral-sector isochronous cyclotrons. (author)

  18. Qualitative Description of Global Health Nursing Competencies by Nursing Faculty in Africa and the Americas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lynda; Moran, Laura; Zarate, Rosa; Warren, Nicole; Ventura, Carla Aparecida Arena; Tamí-Maury, Irene; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze qualitative comments from four surveys asking nursing faculty to rate the importance of 30 global health competencies for undergraduate nursing programs. Method: qualitative descriptive study that included 591 individuals who responded to the survey in English (49 from Africa and 542 from the Americas), 163 who responded to the survey in Spanish (all from Latin America), and 222 Brazilian faculty who responded to the survey in Portuguese. Qualitative comments were recorded at the end of the surveys by 175 respondents to the English survey, 75 to the Spanish survey, and 70 to the Portuguese survey. Qualitative description and a committee approach guided data analysis. Results: ten new categories of global health competencies emerged from the analysis. Faculty also demonstrated concern about how and when these competencies could be integrated into nursing curricula. Conclusion: the additional categories should be considered for addition to the previously identified global health competencies. These, in addition to the guidance about integration into existing curricula, can be used to guide refinement of the original list of global health competencies. Further research is needed to seek consensus about these competencies and to develop recommendations and standards to guide nursing curriculum development. PMID:27276020

  19. 3 CFR - State Children's Health Insurance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false State Children's Health Insurance Program... Insurance Program Memorandum for the Secretary of Health and Human Services The State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) encourages States to provide health coverage for uninsured children in families...

  20. Program description and summaries of fiscal year 1981 activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    This Division supports exploratory research on novel concepts related to energy. The research is usually aimed at establishing the scientific feasibility of a concept and, where appropriate, also at estimating its economic viability. Because projects supported inevitably involve a high degree of risk, an indication of a high potential payoff is required. An immediate, specific application of the concept is not an absolute prerequisite for consideration; thus, for example, proposers of schemes leading to the development of x-ray lasers are not required to justify their proposals by discussing potential applications of such lasers. The concepts supported are typically at too early a stage of scientific verification to qualify for funding by DOE programs responsible for technology development. Where doubt exists, such programs are consulted, prior to proposal consideration by AEP, in order to establish their possible interest in the project

  1. Full-scale mark II CRT program facility description report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namatame, Ken; Kukita, Yutaka; Ito, Hideo; Yamamoto, Nobuo; Shiba, Masayoshi

    1980-03-01

    Started in fiscal year 1977, the Full-Scale Mark II CRT (Containment Response Test) Program is proceeding for the period of five years. The primary objective of the CRT Program is to provide a data base for evaluation of the pressure suppression pool hydrodynamic loads associated with a postulated loss-of-coolant accident in the BWR Mark II containment system. The test facility was designed and constructed from fiscal year 1977 to 1978, and completed in March 1979. It is 1/18 in volume and has a wetwell which is a full-scale replica of one 20 0 -sector of that of a reference Mark II. This report describes design concepts, dimensions and constructions of the test facility, as well as specifications, locations and installation schemes of the measuring equipments. Results of soil structure inspection, vacuum breaker test and shaker test of the containment shell are given in the appendices. (author)

  2. Description of an ethics curriculum for a medicine residency program.

    OpenAIRE

    Silverman, H J

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the attempts to develop and implement an ethics curriculum for the Internal Medicine Residency Program at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The objectives of the curriculum were to enhance moral reasoning skills and to promote humanistic attitudes and behavior among the residents. The diverse methodologies used to achieve these objectives included case discussions, literature reading, role playing, writing, and videos. These activities occurred predominantly withi...

  3. Isochronous Cyclotron Closed Equilibrium Orbit Calculation Program Description

    CERN Document Server

    Kian, I N; Tarashkevich, R

    2003-01-01

    The Equilibrium Orbit Research Program - EORP, written in C++ with the use of Visual C++ is described. The program is intended for the calculation of the particle rotation frequency and particle kinetic energy in the closed equilibrium orbits of an isochronous cyclotron, where the closed equilibrium orbits are described through the radius and particle momentum angle: r_{eo}(\\theta) and \\varphi_{p}(\\theta). The program algorithm was developed on the basis of articles, lecture notes and original analytic calculations. The results of calculations by the EORP were checked and confirmed by using the results of calculations by the numerical methods. The discrepancies between the EORP results and the numerical method results for the calculations of the particle rotation frequency and particle kinetic energy are within the limits of \\pm1\\cdot10^{-4}. The EORP results and the numerical method results for the calculations of r_{eo}(\\theta) and \\varphi_{p}(\\theta) practically coincide. All this proves the accuracy of ca...

  4. Office of radiation and indoor air: Program description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    The goal of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air is to protect the public and the environment from exposures to radiation and indoor air pollutants. The Office develops protection criteria, standards, and policies and works with other programs within EPA and other agencies to control radiation and indoor air pollution exposures; provides technical assistance to states through EPA's regional offices and other agencies having radiation and indoor air protection programs; directs an environmental radiation monitoring program; responds to radiological emergencies; and evaluates and assesses the overall risk and impact of radiation and indoor air pollution. The Office is EPA's lead office for intra- and interagency activities coordinated through the Committee for Indoor Air Quality. It coordinates with and assists the Office of Enforcement in enforcement activities where EPA has jurisdiction. The Office disseminates information and works with state and local governments, industry and professional groups, and citizens to promote actions to reduce exposures to harmful levels of radiation and indoor air pollutants

  5. GetData Digitizing Program Code: Description, Testing, Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taova, S.

    2013-01-01

    90 percents of compilation in our center is obtained by data digitizing. So we are rather interested in the development of different techniques of data digitizing. Plots containing a great amount of points and solid lines are most complicated for digitizing. From our point of view including to the Exfor-Digitizer procedures of automatic or semi-automatic digitizing will allow to simplify significantly this process. We managed to test some free available program codes. Program GETDATA Graph Digitizer (www.getdata- graph-digitizer.com) looks more suitable for our purposes. GetData Graph Digitizer is a program for digitizing graphs, plots and maps. Main features of GetData Graph Digitizer are: - supported graphics formats are TIFF, JPEG, BMP and PCX; - two algorithms for automatic digitizing; - convenient manual digitizing; - reorder tool for easy points reordering; - save/open workspace, which allows to save the work and return to it later; - obtained data can be exported to the clipboard; - export to the formats: TXT (text file), XLS (MS Excel), XML, DXF (AutoCAD) and EPS (PostScript). GetData Graph Digitizer includes two algorithms for automatic digitizing. Auto trace lines: This method is designed to digitize solid lines. Choose the starting point, and the program will trace the line, stopping at it's end. To trace the line use Operations =>Auto trace lines menu or context menu ('Auto trace lines' item). To choose starting point click left mouse button, or click right mouse button to additionally choose direction for line tracing. Digitize area: The second way is to set digitizing area. This method works for any type of lines, including dashed lines. Data points are set at the intersection of grid with the line. You can choose the type of grid (X grid or Y grid), and set the distance between grid lines. You can also make the grid be shifted in such a way, that it will pass through a specific X (or Y) value. To digitize area use Operations →Digitize area menu

  6. 76 FR 17139 - Health Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of Noncompetitive... Improvement Project (CIP) from Saint Vincent's Catholic Medical Centers (SVCMC) of New York, current grantee...

  7. 76 FR 1441 - Health Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of Noncompetitive... for Services (IDS) and a portion of the Capital Improvement Project (CIP) from Saint Vincent's...

  8. Integrated Worker Health Protection and Promotion Programs: Overview and Perspectives on Health and Economic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, Nicolaas P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe integrated worker health protection and promotion (IWHPP) program characteristics, to discuss the rationale for integration of OSH and WHP programs, and to summarize what is known about the impact of these programs on health and economic outcomes. Methods A descriptive assessment of the current state of the IWHPP field and a review of studies on the effectiveness of IWHPP programs on health and economic outcomes. Results Sufficient evidence of effectiveness was found for IWHPP programs when health outcomes are considered. Impact on productivity-related outcomes is considered promising, but inconclusive, whereas insufficient evidence was found for health care expenditures. Conclusions Existing evidence supports an integrated approach in terms of health outcomes but will benefit significantly from research designed to support the business case for employers of various company sizes and industry types. PMID:24284747

  9. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant quality assurance program description: Overview and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caplinger, W.H.

    1990-12-01

    This document describes the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project Quality Assurance Program. This program is being implemented to ensure the acceptability of high-level radioactive canistered waste forms produced by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant for disposal in a licensed federal repository. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program is comprised of this Quality Assurance Program Description as well as the associated contractors' quality assurance programs. The objective of this Quality Assurance Program Description is to provide the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project participants with guidance and direction for program implementation while satisfying the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management needs in repository licensing activities with regard to canistered waste forms. To accomplish this objective, this description will be prepared in three parts: Part 1 - Overview and applications document; Part 2 - Development and qualification of the canistered waste form; Part 3 - Production of canistered waste forms. Part 1 describes the background, strategy, application, and content of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program. This Quality Assurance Program Description, when complete, is designed to provide a level of confidence in the integrity of the canistered waste forms. 8 refs

  10. Description of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The background and the results to date of the Department of Energy program to identify and evaluate the radiological conditions at sites formerly utilized by the Corps of Engineers' Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) are summarized. The sites of concern were federally, privately, and institutionally owned and were used primarily for research, processing, and storage of uranium and thorium ores, concentrates, or residues. Some sites were subsequently released for other purposes without radiological restriction. Surveys have been conducted since 1974 to document radiological conditions at such sites. Based on radiological surveys, sites are identified in this document that require, or are projected to require, remedial action to remove potential restrictions on the use of the property due to the presence of residual low-level radioactive contamination. Specific recommendations for each site will result from more detailed environmental and engineering surveys to be conducted at those sites and, if necessary, an environmental impact assessment or environmental impact statement will be prepared. Section 3.0 describes the current standards and guidelines now being used to conduct remedial actions. Current authority of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to proceed with remedial actions and the new authority required are summarized. A plan to implement the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in accordance with the new authority is presented, including the objectives, scope, general approach, and a summary schedule. Key issues affecting schedule and cost are discussed

  11. Department of Energy WindSentinel Loan Program Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, William J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sturges, Mark H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns two AXYS WindSentinel buoys that collect a comprehensive set of meteorological and oceanographic data to support resource characterization for wind energy offshore. The two buoys were delivered to DOE’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in September, 2014. After acceptance testing and initial performance testing and evaluation at PNNL’s Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sequim, Washington, the buoys have been deployed off the U.S. East Coast. One buoy was deployed approximately 42 km east of Virginia Beach, Virginia from December, 2014 through June, 2016. The second buoy was deployed approximately 5 km off Atlantic City, New Jersey in November, 2015. Data from the buoys are available to the public. Interested parties can create an account and log in to http://offshoreweb.pnnl.gov. In response to a number of inquiries and unsolicited proposals, DOE’s Wind Energy Technologies Office is implementing a program, to be managed by PNNL, to lend the buoys to qualified parties for the purpose of acquiring wind resource characterization data in areas of interest for offshore wind energy development. This document describes the buoys, the scope of the loans, the process of how borrowers will be selected, and the schedule for implementation of this program, including completing current deployments.

  12. Description of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    The background and the results to date of the Department of Energy program to identify and evaluate the radiological conditions at sites formerly utilized by the Corps of Engineers' Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) are summarized. The sites of concern were federally, privately, and institutionally owned and were used primarily for research, processing, and storage of uranium and thorium ores, concentrates, or residues. Some sites were subsequently released for other purposes without radiological restriction. Surveys have been conducted since 1974 to document radiological conditions at such sites. Based on radiological surveys, sites are identified in this document that require, or are projected to require, remedial action to remove potential restrictions on the use of the property due to the presence of residual low-level radioactive contamination. Specific recommendations for each site will result from more detailed environmental and engineering surveys to be conducted at those sites and, if necessary, an environmental impact assessment or environmental impact statement will be prepared. Section 3.0 describes the current standards and guidelines now being used to conduct remedial actions. Current authority of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to proceed with remedial actions and the new authority required are summarized. A plan to implement the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in accordance with the new authority is presented, including the objectives, scope, general approach, and a summary schedule. Key issues affecting schedule and cost are discussed.

  13. 75 FR 2549 - Health Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS ACTION: Notice of Noncompetitive Replacement Award to Regional Health Care Affiliates. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be transferring Health Center Program (section 330 of the Public Health Service Act...

  14. A summary description of the flammable gas tank safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.; Sherwood, D.J.

    1994-10-01

    Radioactive liquid waste may produce hydrogen as result of the interaction of gamma radiation and water. If the waste contains organic chelating agents, additional hydrogen as well as nitrous oxide and ammonia may be produced by thermal and radiolytic decomposition of these organics. Several high-level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks, located underground at the Hanford Site in Washington State, are on a Flammable Gas Watch List. Some contain waste that produces and retains gases until large quantities of gas are released rapidly to the tank vapor space. Tanks nearly-filled to capacity have relatively little vapor space; therefore if the waste suddenly releases a large amount of hydrogen and nitrous oxide, a flammable gas mixture could result. The most notable example of a Hanford waste tank with a flammable gas problem is tank 241-SY-101. Upon occasion waste stored in this tank has released enough flammable gas to burn if an ignition source had been present inside of the tank. Several, other Hanford waste tanks exhibit similar behavior although to a lesser magnitude. Because this behavior was hot adequately-addressed in safety analysis reports for the Hanford Tank Farms, an unreviewed safety question was declared, and in 1990 the Flammable Gas Tank Safety Program was established to address this problem. The purposes of the program are a follows: (1) Provide safety documents to fill gaps in the safety analysis reports, and (2) Resolve the safety issue by acquiring knowledge about gas retention and release from radioactive liquid waste and developing mitigation technology. This document provides the general logic and work activities required to resolve the unreviewed safety question and the safety issue of flammable gas mixtures in radioactive liquid waste storage tanks

  15. The Value of Qualitative Description in Health Services and Policy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Health services and policy (HSP) researchers have long used qualitative research methodologies to explore health system issues. However, the appropriateness of one approach, qualitative description, for HSP research is still often overlooked. In this article, I discuss the role that qualitative description can play in HSP research, and argue for its greater acceptance as a valid form of academic scholarship. PMID:28277201

  16. FURNACE; a toroidal geometry neutronic program system method description and users manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verschuur, K.A.

    1984-12-01

    The FURNACE program system performs neutronic and photonic calculations in 3D toroidal geometry for application to fusion reactors. The geometry description is quite general, allowing any torus cross section and any neutron source density distribution for the plasma, as well as simple parametric representations of circular, elliptic and D-shaped tori and plasmas. The numerical method is based on an approximate transport model that produces results with sufficient accuracy for reactor-design purposes, at acceptable calculational costs. A short description is given of the numerical method, and a user manual for the programs of the system: FURNACE, ANISN-PT, LIBRA, TAPEMA and DRAWER is presented

  17. Comprehensive adolescent health programs that include sexual and reproductive health services: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kågesten, Anna; Parekh, Jenita; Tunçalp, Ozge; Turke, Shani; Blum, Robert William

    2014-12-01

    We systematically reviewed peer-reviewed and gray literature on comprehensive adolescent health (CAH) programs (1998-2013), including sexual and reproductive health services. We screened 36 119 records and extracted articles using predefined criteria. We synthesized data into descriptive characteristics and assessed quality by evidence level. We extracted data on 46 programs, of which 19 were defined as comprehensive. Ten met all inclusion criteria. Most were US based; others were implemented in Egypt, Ethiopia, and Mexico. Three programs displayed rigorous evidence; 5 had strong and 2 had modest evidence. Those with rigorous or strong evidence directly or indirectly influenced adolescent sexual and reproductive health. The long-term impact of many CAH programs cannot be proven because of insufficient evaluations. Evaluation approaches that take into account the complex operating conditions of many programs are needed to better understand mechanisms behind program effects.

  18. Health policy programs realised in Poland in 2016-2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowska, Patrycja; Królak, Anna; Giermaziak, Wojciech

    2018-01-01

    Health Policy Program (Program Polityki Zdrowotnej – PPZ) is a state policy tool for engaging local government units into the mechanism of granting provision of health services. Authors show areas in which self-governments most often took preventive health care actions and describe legislative changes in the Act on provision of health services. The aim of the article is to quantitative and qualitative statement of PPZ prepared in Poland in 2016 and 2017, as well as presenting changing legal situation in the scope of evaluation of these projects. Authors use descriptive method, presenting changes of legal status. The article includes data available in the Bulletin of Public Information by The Agency for Health Technology Assessment. 590 programs were analyzed (239 from 2016 and 351 from 2017). In 2016 – 67% of submitted programs were given a positive opinion and in 2017 – 71%. The most of positively evaluated PPZ submitted by local government units (53% in 2016; 47% in 2017) referred to prevention of infectious diseases by vaccines. On the basis of analyses conducted, significant differences were observed in the implementation of the PPZ in various regions of Poland. In the recent years a big improvement in the quality of planned self-government health programs is observed. It is suggested that due to the regulation defining the model of the health policy program and the model of the final report, this trend will continue.

  19. Descriptions of Sampling Practices Within Five Approaches to Qualitative Research in Education and the Health Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy C. Guetterman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Although recommendations exist for determining qualitative sample sizes, the literature appears to contain few instances of research on the topic. Practical guidance is needed for determining sample sizes to conduct rigorous qualitative research, to develop proposals, and to budget resources. The purpose of this article is to describe qualitative sample size and sampling practices within published studies in education and the health sciences by research design: case study, ethnography, grounded theory methodology, narrative inquiry, and phenomenology. I analyzed the 51 most highly cited studies using predetermined content categories and noteworthy sampling characteristics that emerged. In brief, the findings revealed a mean sample size of 87. Less than half of the studies identified a sampling strategy. I include a description of findings by approach and recommendations for sampling to assist methodologists, reviewers, program officers, graduate students, and other qualitative researchers in understanding qualitative sampling practices in recent studies. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1502256

  20. Evaluating a Health Risk Reduction Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelberg, Daniel B.

    1981-01-01

    A health risk reduction program at Bowling Green State University (Ohio) tested the efficacy of peer education against the efficacy of returning (by mail) health questionnaire results. A peer health education program did not appear to be effective in changing student attitudes or lifestyles; however, the research methodology may not have been…

  1. Navy Health Care Strategic Planning Process: A Draft Functional Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    are: 1. Conduct Health Care Planning 2. Manage Human Resoutrce 3. Manage Finances 4. Manag Education and Training 5. Provide Health Care Support to...and general officer medical records. This module is underdevelopment. 3. Manage Finances . This module is designed to be used by comptrollers. It assists

  2. ELESTRES.M11K program users'manual and description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suk, H. C.; Hwang, W.; Kim, B. G.; Sim, K. S.; Heo, Y. H.; Byun, T. S.; Park, G. S.

    1992-12-01

    ELESTRES.M11K is a computer program for simulating the behaviour of UO 2 fuel elements under normal operating conditions of a CANDU reactor. It computers the one-dimensional temperature distribution and thermal expansion of the fuel pellets, and computes two-dimensional pellet deformation using FEM. The amount of fission gas released and sheath strain/stress are also computed. This document is intended as a users' manual and description for ELESTRES.M11K program. (Author)

  3. US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Integrated Safety Management System Program Description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHOOP, D.S.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Program Description (PD) is to describe the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) ISMS as implemented through the RL Integrated Management System (RIMS). This PD does not impose additional requirements but rather provides an overview describing how various parts of the ISMS fit together. Specific requirements for each of the core functions and guiding principles are established in other implementing processes, procedures, and program descriptions that comprise RIMS. RL is organized to conduct work through operating contracts; therefore, it is extremely difficult to provide an adequate ISMS description that only addresses RL functions. Of necessity, this PD contains some information on contractor processes and procedures which then require RL approval or oversight

  4. Mathematical description and program documentation for CLASSY, an adaptive maximum likelihood clustering method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennington, R. K.; Rassbach, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    Discussed in this report is the clustering algorithm CLASSY, including detailed descriptions of its general structure and mathematical background and of the various major subroutines. The report provides a development of the logic and equations used with specific reference to program variables. Some comments on timing and proposed optimization techniques are included.

  5. 78 FR 40421 - Inquiry Regarding Video Description in Video Programming Distributed on Television and on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    ... description services for television are provided on a secondary audio stream, and typically a consumer can... box. The Commission recently adopted rules requiring apparatus that is designed to receive, play back, or record video programming transmitted simultaneously with sound to make secondary audio streams...

  6. Windows Calorimeter Control (WinCal) program computer software design description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertzborn, N.F.

    1997-01-01

    The Windows Calorimeter Control (WinCal) Program System Design Description contains a discussion of the design details for the WinCal product. Information in this document will assist a developer in maintaining the WinCal system. The content of this document follows the guidance in WHC-CM-3-10, Software Engineering Standards, Standard for Software User Documentation

  7. Description of Sanitation Clinic Implementation in Primary Health Care Services in Bukittinggi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vini Jamarin

    2016-01-01

    descriptive study used total sampling, in which all seven PHCS in Bukittinggi are included. This research was done from September to October 2013. Based on quedionaire result, all sanitarians are well-educated, but only two of them had sanitation clinic training. Only one PHCS has a special room, six has posters and leaflets, two allocates special budget for sanitation clinic, and six has all kind of manual books. Based on secondary data, the accumulation of environment-based disease’s cases in all PHCS is variative and fluctuative and the accumulation of clients come to sanitation clinic is still below the expectation. House-visitting activity has not met the expectation yet, while trans-program activity has been running well, trans-sector activity has been running well in almost all PHCS, and evaluation has been running in a variative frequency. All sanitation clinic graded good in implementing sanitation clinic, within the range of 50-100%.Keywords: sanitation clinic, primary health care service

  8. Starting a Health Professions Education Graduate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansman, Catherine A.

    2018-01-01

    This chapter is a case story of the evolution of the Master of Education in Health Professions Education (MEHPE), a collaborative graduate program developed by the Adult Learning and Development program at Cleveland State University and the Cleveland Clinic.

  9. Built environment interventions aimed at improving physical activity levels in rural Ontario health units: a descriptive qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coghill, Cara-Lee; Valaitis, Ruta K; Eyles, John D

    2015-05-03

    Few studies to date have explored the relationship between the built environment and physical activity specifically in rural settings. The Ontario Public Health Standards policies mandate that health units in Ontario address the built environment; however, it is unclear how public health practitioners are integrating the built environment into public health interventions aimed at improving physical activity in chronic disease prevention programs. This descriptive qualitative study explored interventions that have or are being implemented which address the built environment specifically related to physical activity in rural Ontario health units, and the impact of these interventions. Data were collected through twelve in-depth semi-structured interviews with rural public health practitioners and managers representing 12 of 13 health units serving rural communities. Key themes were identified using qualitative content analysis. Themes that emerged regarding the types of interventions that health units are employing included: Engagement with policy work at a municipal level; building and working with community partners, committees and coalitions; gathering and providing evidence; developing and implementing programs; and social marketing and awareness raising. Evaluation of interventions to date has been limited. Public health interventions, and their evaluations, are complex. Health units who serve large rural populations in Ontario are engaging in numerous activities to address physical activity levels. There is a need to further evaluate the impact of these interventions on population health.

  10. Mindfulness-based stress reduction teachers, practice characteristics, cancer incidence, and health: a nationwide ecological description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Sara Wagner; Benson, Kelsey; Middleton, Lauren; Meyers, Christine; Hébert, James R

    2015-02-14

    Studies have demonstrated the potential of the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program to improve the condition of individuals with health outcomes such as hypertension, diabetes, and chronic pain; improve psychological well-being; reduce stress levels; and increase survival among cancer patients. To date, only one study has focused on the effect of long-term meditation on stress, showing a positive protective relationship. However, the relationship between meditation and cancer incidence remains unexplored. The objective of this study was to describe the state-level relationship between MBSR instructors and their practices and county-level health outcomes, including cancer incidence, in the United States. This ecologic study was performed using geospatial mapping and descriptive epidemiology of statewide MBSR characteristics and overall health, mental health state rankings, and age-adjusted cancer incidence rates. Weak to moderate state-level correlations between meditation characteristics and colorectal and cervical cancer incidence were detected, with states with more meditation (e.g., more MBSR teachers per population) correlated with a decreased cancer incidence. A negative correlation was detected between lung & bronchus cancer and years teaching MBSR only. Moderate positive correlations were detected between Hodgkin's Lymphoma and female breast cancer in relation to all meditation characteristics. Statistically significant correlations with moderate coefficients were detected for overall health ranks and all meditation characteristics, most strongly for total number of years teaching MBSR and total number of years of general meditation practice. Our analyses might suggest that a relationship exists between the total number of MBSR teachers per state and the total number of years of general meditation practice per state, and colorectal and cervical cancer incidence. Positive correlations were observed with overall health rankings. Despite this study

  11. Description and comparison of pharmacy technician training programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Douglas C; Draime, Juanita A; Anderson, Timothy S

    2016-01-01

    To describe pharmacy technician training programs in the United States and to compare pharmacy technician program characteristics between programs with and without a pharmacist on faculty and between programs with different accreditation status. Descriptive, cross-sectional study. Not applicable. United States pharmacy technician programs. Not applicable. Student class size, faculty credentials, coursework components, program length, tuition rates, and admission criteria. Currently, there are more than 698 pharmacy technician programs across 1114 campuses, with complete data available for 216 programs. Programs varied widely in terms of class sizes, faculty credentials, and admission criteria. Programs with pharmacists on faculty were significantly less expensive than were those without pharmacists (P = 0.009). Accreditation had no impact on tuition prices. This is the first study of its kind to describe and characterize pharmacy technician training programs. There is relatively little control of technician training by the profession of pharmacy. The quality of these programs in terms of student outcomes is unknown, and it should be explored. Rigorous debate and discussion is needed regarding the future of pharmacy technician roles and the training required for those roles. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A Descriptive Analysis of the Use of Twitter by Emergency Medicine Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diller, David; Yarris, Lalena M

    2018-02-01

    Twitter is increasingly recognized as an instructional tool by the emergency medicine (EM) community. In 2012, the Council of Residency Directors in Emergency Medicine (CORD) recommended that EM residency programs' Twitter accounts be managed solely by faculty. To date, little has been published regarding the patterns of Twitter use by EM residency programs. We analyzed current patterns in Twitter use among EM residency programs with accounts and assessed conformance with CORD recommendations. In this mixed methods study, a 6-question, anonymous survey was distributed via e-mail using SurveyMonkey. In addition, a Twitter-based search was conducted, and the public profiles of EM residency programs' Twitter accounts were analyzed. We calculated descriptive statistics and performed a qualitative analysis on the data. Of 168 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited EM programs, 88 programs (52%) responded. Of those programs, 58% (51 of 88) reported having a program-level Twitter account. Residents served as content managers for those accounts in the majority of survey respondents (61%, 28 of 46). Most programs did not publicly disclose the identity or position of their Twitter content manager. We found a wide variety of applications for Twitter, with EM programs most frequently using Twitter for educational and promotional purposes. There is significant variability in the numbers of followers for EM programs' Twitter accounts. Applications and usage among EM residency programs are varied, and are frequently not consistent with current CORD recommendations.

  13. Descriptive epidemiology and health consequences of childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, John J

    2005-09-01

    Obesity is now the most common disorder of childhood in the developed world, and its prevalence is still increasing. A large body of high-quality and consistent evidence shows that it is best defined using the body mass index (BMI) percentile relative to national BMI reference data. This definition diagnoses excessive fatness adequately, and denotes increased risk of adverse health outcomes. Future research may provide improved obesity definitions for epidemiological use, so that the obesity epidemic can be monitored more effectively. Paediatric obesity causes ill health in both childhood and adulthood, though further research is required on the economic consequences, on some of the co-morbidities in childhood (notably psychological morbidity), and in adulthood where the amount of empirical evidence on long-term effects is limited. The combination of high prevalence with adverse consequences has created a public health crisis.

  14. Needs and Problems of Posbindu Program: Community Health Volunteers Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, S. T.; Andriyani, S.

    2018-01-01

    Posbindu is a form of public participation to conduct early detection and monitoring of risk factors for non-communicable diseases(NCD), and where it was carried out in as an integrated manner, routine and periodic event. This paper aims to investigates the needs and problems on Posbindu Program based on community health volunteers(CHVs) perspective. This study used descriptive qualitative method by open ended questions. Content analysis using to explicating the result. There are 3 theme finding about elderly needs in Posbindu; medical care, support group community, and health education. We found four theme problems which in Posbindu program: low motivation from elderly, Inadequate of facilities, physical disability, failed communication. To be effective in Posbindu program, all the stakeholders have reached consensus on the Posbindu program as elderly need. CHVs need given wide knowledge about early detection, daily care, control disease continuously so that the elderly keep feeling the advantages of coming to the Posbindu.

  15. A Descriptive Study of Differing School Health Delivery Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Sherri I.; Maughan, Erin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory qualitative study was to identify and describe emerging models of school health services. Participants (N = 11) provided information regarding their models in semistructured phone interviews. Results identified a variety of funding sources as well as different staffing configurations and supervision. Strengths of…

  16. Eye tracking to explore attendance in health-state descriptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selivanova, Anna; Krabbe, Paul F M

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A crucial assumption in health valuation methods is that respondents pay equal attention to all information components presented in the response task. So far, there is no solid evidence that respondents are fulfilling this condition. The aim of our study is to explore the attendance to

  17. Leadership communication styles: a descriptive analysis of health care professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rebekah RogersSchool of Communication, East Carolina University, NC, USAAbstract: The study of leadership in health care is important to examine for many reasons. Health care leaders will inevitably have an impact on the lives of many people, as individuals rely on physicians and nurses during some of the most critical moments in their lives. This paper presents a broad overview of a research study conducted over the past year and highlights its general conclusions. In this study, I examined the leadership styles of health care administrators and those of physicians and nurses who chair departments. Thorough analysis yielded three clear themes: viewpoints on leadership, decision making, and relationships. Physicians' viewpoints on leadership varied; however, it was assumed that they knew they were leaders. Nurses seemed to be in a category of their own, in which it was common for them to use the term “servant leadership.” Results from the hospital administrators suggested that they were always thinking “big picture leadership.” Leadership is a working component of every job and it is important for people to become as educated as possible about their own communication style.Keywords: leadership, communication, health care

  18. Prevalence of health promotion programs in primary health care units in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Gomes, Grace Angélica de Oliveira; Bracco, Mário M; Florindo, Alex Antonio; Mielke, Gregore Iven; Parra, Diana C; Lobelo, Felipe; Simoes, Eduardo J; Hallal, Pedro Curi

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Assessment of prevalence of health promotion programs in primary health care units within Brazil’s health system. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study based on telephone interviews with managers of primary care units. Of a total 42,486 primary health care units listed in the Brazilian Unified Health System directory, 1,600 were randomly selected. Care units from all five Brazilian macroregions were selected proportionally to the number of units in each region. We examined whether any of the following five different types of health promotion programs was available: physical activity; smoking cessation; cessation of alcohol and illicit drug use; healthy eating; and healthy environment. Information was collected on the kinds of activities offered and the status of implementation of the Family Health Strategy at the units. RESULTS Most units (62.0%) reported having in place three health promotion programs or more and only 3.0% reported having none. Healthy environment (77.0%) and healthy eating (72.0%) programs were the most widely available; smoking and alcohol use cessation were reported in 54.0% and 42.0% of the units. Physical activity programs were offered in less than 40.0% of the units and their availability varied greatly nationwide, from 51.0% in the Southeast to as low as 21.0% in the North. The Family Health Strategy was implemented in most units (61.0%); however, they did not offer more health promotion programs than others did. CONCLUSIONS Our study showed that most primary care units have in place health promotion programs. Public policies are needed to strengthen primary care services and improve training of health providers to meet the goals of the agenda for health promotion in Brazil. PMID:25372175

  19. Program Planning in Health Professions Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Steven W.; Lawson, Luan

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, the major concepts from program planning in adult education will be applied to health professions education (HPE). Curriculum planning and program planning will be differentiated, and program development and planning will be grounded in a systems thinking approach.

  20. 46 CFR 176.620 - Description of the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Description of the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE... Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 176.620 Description of the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger vessels. The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program provides you with an...

  1. 46 CFR 71.50-15 - Description of the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Description of the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE... Description of the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger vessels. The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program provides you with an alternative to a drydock examination by allowing...

  2. Kennedy Space Center environmental health program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmaro, G.M.; Cardinale, M.A.; Summerfield, B.R.; Tipton, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center's environmental health organization is responsible for programs which assure its employees a healthful workplace under diverse and varied working conditions. These programs encompass the disciplines of industrial hygiene, radiation protection (health physics), and environmental sanitation/pollution control. Activities range from the routine, such as normal office work, to the highly specialized, such as the processing of highly toxic and hazardous materials

  3. Introduction to:Forest health monitoring program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark J. Ambrose

    2009-01-01

    This annual technical report is a product of the Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) Program. The report provides information about a variety of issues relating to forest health at a national scale. FHM national reports have the dual focus of presenting analyses of the latest available data and showcasing innovative techniques for analyzing forest health data. The report is...

  4. Quality assurance requirements and description for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) is the principal quality assurance document for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program (Program). It establishes the minimum requirements for the Quality Assurance Program. The QARD contains regulatory requirements and program commitments necessary for the development of an effective quality assurance program. Quality assurance implementing documents must be based on, and consistent with, QARD requirements. The QARD applies to the following: (1) acceptance of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; (2) transport of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; (3) the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility through application for an operating license; (4) Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS), including the site characterization activities (exploratory studies facility (ESF) and surface based testing), through application for an operating license; (5) the high-level-waste form from production through acceptance. Section 2.0 defines in greater detail criteria for determining work subject to QARD requirements. The QARD is organized into sections, supplements, appendices, and a glossary. The sections contain requirements that are common to all Program elements. The supplements contain requirements for specialized activities. The appendices contain requirements that are specific to an individual Program element. The glossary establishes a common vocabulary for the Quality Assurance Program

  5. System description of the Repository-Only System for the FY 1990 systems integration program studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, R.W.; Young, J.R.; Konzek, G.J.

    1991-07-01

    This document provides both functional and physical descriptions of a conceptual high-level waste management system defined as a Repository-Only System. Its purpose is to provide a basis for required system computer modeling and system studies initiated in FY 1990 under the Systems Integration Program of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The Repository-Only System is designed to accept 3000 MTU per year of spent fuel and 400 equivalent MTU per year of high-level wastes disposal in the geologic repository. This document contains both functional descriptions of the processes in the waste management system and physical descriptions of the equipment and facilities necessary for performance of those processes. These descriptions contain the level of detail needed for the projected systems analysis studies. The Repository-Only System contains all system components, from the waste storage facilities of the waste generators to the underground facilities for final disposal of the wastes. The major facilities in the system are the waste generator waste storage facilities, a repository facility that packages the wastes and than emplaces them in the geologic repository, and the transportation equipment and facilities for transporting the wastes between these major facilities. 18 refs., 39 figs

  6. Description of CORSET: a computer program for quantitative x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stohl, F.V.

    1980-08-01

    Quantitative x-ray fluorescence analysis requires a method of correcting for absorption and secondary fluorescence effects due to the sample matrix. The computer program CORSET carries out these corrections without requiring a knowledge of the spectral distribution of the x-ray source, and only requires one standard per element or one standard containing all the elements. Sandia's version of CORSET has been divided into three separate programs to fit Sandia's specific requirements for on-line analysis in a melt facility. The melt facility is used to fabricate new alloys with very variable compositions and requires very rapid analyses during a run. Therefore, the standards must be analyzed several days in advance. Program DAT1 is used to set up a permanent file consisting of all the data related to the standards. Program UNINT is used to set up a permanent file with the intensities, background counts and counting times of the unknowns. Program CORSET uses the files created in UNINT and DAT1 to carry out the analysis. This report contains descriptions, listings, and sample runs for these programs. The accuracy of the analyses carried out with these three programs is about 1 to 2% relative with an elemental concentration of about 10 wt %

  7. Plutonium immobilization project development and testing quality assurance program description - February 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLean, L. M.; Ziemba, J.

    1999-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Immobilization Development and Testing organization (LLNL ID and T) is a Participant in the Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). The LLNL D and T has lead responsibilities for form characterization and qualification, ceramic form development, process/equipment development with plutonium, and process systems testing and validation for both conversion and immobilization. This work must be performed in accordance with the graded approach of a Quality Assurance (QA) Program. A QA Program has been developed at LLNL to meet the requirements of the DOE/MD Quality Assurance Requirements. The LLNL QA Program consists of a Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) and Quality Implementing Procedures. These documents interface and are a subset of the overall PIP QA Program Documents. The PIP QA Program is described in the PIP ID and T QA Plan, PIP QAPD, and QA Procedures. Other Participant Organizations also must document and describe their PIP compliant QA Programs in a QAPD and implementing procedures. The purpose of this LLNL QAPD is to describe the organization, management processes, QA Controls for Grading, functional responsibilities, levels of authority, and interfaces for those managing, performing, and assessing the adequacy of work

  8. Regulatory research program for 1986/87 project descriptions. Information bulletin 86-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The regulatory research program is intended to augment and extend the Atomic Energy Control Board's regulatory program beyond the capability of in-house resources. The overall objective of the research program is to produce pertinent and independent information that will assist the Board and its staff in making correct, timely and credible decisions on regulating nuclear energy. The program is divided into ten main areas of research covering the safety of nuclear facilities, radioactive waste management, health physics, physical security and the development of regulatory processes. A total of 92 projects are planned for 1986/87, including a number which are ongoing from the previous fiscal year

  9. Regulatory research program for 1986/87 project descriptions. Information bulletin 86-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-07-08

    The regulatory research program is intended to augment and extend the Atomic Energy Control Board`s regulatory program beyond the capability of in-house resources. The overall objective of the research program is to produce pertinent and independent information that will assist the Board and its staff in making correct, timely and credible decisions on regulating nuclear energy. The program is divided into ten main areas of research covering the safety of nuclear facilities, radioactive waste management, health physics, physical security and the development of regulatory processes. A total of 92 projects are planned for 1986/87, including a number which are ongoing from the previous fiscal year.

  10. Impacts on power reactor health physics programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    The impacts on power reactor health physics programs form implementing the revised 10 CFR Part 20 will be extensive and costly. Every policy, program, procedure and training lesson plan involving health physics will require changes and the subsequent retraining of personnel. At each power reactor facility, hundreds of procedures and thousands of people will be affected by these changes. Every area of a power reactor health physics program will be affected. These areas include; ALARA, Respiratory Protection, Exposure Control, Job Coverage, Dosimetry, Radwaste, Effluent Accountability, Emergency Planning and Radiation Worker Training. This paper presents how power reactor facilities will go about making these changes and gives possible examples of some of these changes and their impact on each area of power reactor health physics program

  11. Worksite health promotion programs in college settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill-Mey, Patricia E.; Kumpfer, Karol L.; Merrill, Ray M.; Reel, Justine; Hyatt-Neville, Beverly; Richardson, Glenn E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the multifaceted nature and benefits of worksite health promotion programs (WHPPs), with emphasis on the college setting. An assessment of the peer-reviewed literature was conducted of articles published since 2000. Several search engines were accessed and selected key words were used. Most studies examining WHPPs have focused on return on investment and productivity. Research that targets the softer side-benefits of health promotion programs in the workplace is less available. Although the college setting offers some advantages for implementing health promotion programs. They may also have unique challenges due to their large and diverse employee population. There is little research to show the effectiveness and unique challenges of college-based health promotion programs. PMID:25861657

  12. NWTS waste package program plan. Volume I. Program strategy, description, and schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    This document describes the work planned for developing the technology to design, test and produce packages used for the long-term isolation of nuclear waste in deep geologic repositories. Waste forms considered include spent fuel and high-level waste. The testing and selection effort for barrier materials for radionuclide containment is described. The NWTS waste package program is a design-driven effort; waste package conceptual designs are used as input for preliminary designs, which are upgraded to a final design as materials and testing data become available. Performance assessment models are developed and validated. Milestones and a detailed schedule are given for the waste package development effort. Program logic networks defining work flow, interfaces among the NWTS Projects, and interrelationships of specific activities are presented. Detailed work elements are provided for the Waste Package Program Plan subtasks - design and development, waste form, barrier materials, and performance evaluation - for salt and basalt, host rocks for which the state of waste package knowledge and the corresponding data base are advanced

  13. The Environmental Science and Health Effects Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael Gurevich; Doug Lawson; Joe Mauderly

    2000-01-01

    The goal of the Environmental Science and Health Effect Program is to conduct policy-relevant research that will help us understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources

  14. Introduction to: The Forest Health monitoring program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara L. Conkling

    2011-01-01

    The National Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) Program of the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, produces an annual technical report on forest health as one of its products. The report is organized using the Criteria and Indicators for the Conservation and Sustainable Management of Temperate and Boreal Forests (Montréal Process Working Group 2007) as a...

  15. THE SCHOOL HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963

    INVOLVING INDIVIDUALS AS WELL AS ORGANIZATIONS, THE PROGRAM AIMED AT THE OPTIMUM HEALTH OF ALL CHILDREN, AND IMPROVEMENT OF HEALTH AND SAFETY STANDARDS WITHIN THE COMMUNITY. EACH OF THE CHILDREN WAS URGED TO HAVE A SUCCESSFUL VACCINATION FOR SMALL POX, THE DPT SERIES AND BOOSTER, THE POLIO SERIES, AND CORRECTIONS OF ALL DENTAL DEFECTS AND…

  16. The Environmental Science and Health Effects Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Gurevich; Doug Lawson; Joe Mauderly

    2000-04-10

    The goal of the Environmental Science and Health Effect Program is to conduct policy-relevant research that will help us understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources.

  17. Workplace Participatory Occupational Health/Health Promotion Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Flum, Marian; Kotejoshyer, Rajashree; Fleishman, Jane; Henning, Robert; Punnett, Laura

    2018-01-01

    Nursing home employees experience high physical and psychosocial workloads, resulting in poor health outcomes. An occupational health/health promotion program, designed to facilitate employee participation, was initiated in three nursing homes. The aim of the current study was to evaluate facilitators and barriers of the program after 3-year implementation. Focus groups with employees and in-depth interviews with top and middle managers were conducted. The Social Ecological Model was used to organize the evaluation. Facilitators and barriers were reported from both managers’ and employees’ perspectives, and were categorized as intrapersonal, interpersonal, institutional, and corporate level. Management support, financial resources, and release time for participation were identified as the three most important factors. Supports from multiple levels including both human and environment, and managers and employees, are important for a successful participatory occupational health/health promotion program. PMID:26977705

  18. Can health promotion programs save Medicare money?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Z Goetzel

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Ron Z Goetzel1, David Shechter2, Ronald J Ozminkowski1, David C Stapleton3, Pauline J Lapin4, J Michael McGinnis5, Catherine R Gordon6, Lester Breslow71Institute for Health and Productivity Studies, Cornell University, Washington, DC; 2Health and Productivity Research, Thomson Medstat, Santa Barbara, CA; 3Cornell Institute for Policy Research, Cornell University, Washington, DC; 4Office of Research, Development, and Information, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Baltimore, MD; 5National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine, The National Academies, Washington, DC; 6Office of the Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Washington, DC; 7UCLA School of Public Health, Dept. of Health Services, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: The impact of an aging population on escalating US healthcare costs is influenced largely by the prevalence of chronic disease in this population. Consequently, preventing or postponing disease onset among the elderly has become a crucial public health issue. Fortunately, much of the total burden of disease is attributable to conditions that are preventable. In this paper, we address whether well-designed health promotion programs can prevent illness, reduce disability, and improve the quality of life. Furthermore, we assess evidence that these programs have the potential to reduce healthcare utilization and related expenditures for the Medicare program. We hypothesize that seniors who reduce their modifiable health risks can forestall disability, reduce healthcare utilization, and save Medicare money. We end with a discussion of a new Senior Risk Reduction Demonstration, which will be initiated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2007, to test whether risk reduction programs developed in the private sector can achieve health improvements among seniors and a positive return on investment for the Medicare program.Keywords: health promotion, return on investment, Medicare, financial

  19. ACCULTURATION AS A PREDICTOR OF HEALTH PROMOTING AND LIFESTYLE PRACTICES OF ARAB AMERICANS: A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadalla, Ahlam A; Hattar, Marianne; Schubert, Christiane C

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional descriptive study was done using the Acculturation Rating scale of Arab Americans-II, and the Health Promotion and Lifestyle Profile II to assess the relationship between acculturation and health promotion practices among Arab Americans. Findings showed that attraction to American culture was the most important predictor of physical activity; whereas attraction to Arabic culture was the most important predictor of stress management and nutritional practices. Results suggest that, when demographics are controlled, acculturation predicts various health promotion practices in different patterns among members of this group. These findings contribute to a better understanding of acculturation's influence on immigrants' health promotion practices.

  20. 46 CFR 115.620 - Description of the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Description of the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE... ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 115.620 Description of the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger vessels. The Alternative...

  1. Integrating cognitive rehabilitation: A preliminary program description and theoretical review of an interdisciplinary cognitive rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleeman, Jennifer A; Stavisky, Christopher; Carson, Simon; Dukelow, Nancy; Maier, Sheryl; Coles, Heather; Wager, John; Rice, Jordyn; Essaff, David; Scherer, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    Interdisciplinary cognitive rehabilitation is emerging as the expected standard of care for individuals with mild to moderate degrees of cognitive impairment for a variety of etiologies. There is a growing body of evidence in cognitive rehabilitation literature supporting the involvement of multiple disciplines, with the use of cognitive support technologies (CSTs), in delivering cognitive therapy to individuals who require cognitive rehabilitative therapies. This article provides an overview of the guiding theories related to traditional approaches of cognitive rehabilitation and the positive impact of current theoretical models of an interdisciplinary approach in clinical service delivery of this rehabilitation. A theoretical model of the Integrative Cognitive Rehabilitation Program (ICRP) will be described in detail along with the practical substrates of delivering specific interventions to individuals and caregivers who are living with mild to moderate cognitive impairment. The ultimate goal of this article is to provide a clinically useful resource for direct service providers. It will serve to further clinical knowledge and understanding of the evolution from traditional silo based treatment paradigms to the current implementation of multiple perspectives and disciplines in the pursuit of patient centered care. The article will discuss the theories that contributed to the development of the interdisciplinary team and the ICRP model, implemented with individuals with mild to moderate cognitive deficits, regardless of etiology. The development and implementation of specific assessment and intervention strategies in this cognitive rehabilitation program will also be discussed. The assessment and intervention strategies utilized as part of ICRP are applicable to multiple clinical settings in which individuals with cognitive impairment are served. This article has specific implications for rehabilitation which include: (a) An Interdisciplinary Approach is an

  2. Health, safety and environmental research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinner, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    This report outlines the Health, Safety and Environmental Research Program being undertaken by the CFFTP. The Program objectives, relationship to other CFFTP programs, implementation plans and expected outputs are stated. Opportunities to build upon the knowledge and experience gained in safely managing tritium in the CANDU program, by addressing generic questions pertinent to tritium safety for fusion facilities, are identified. These opportunities exist across a broad spectrum of issues covering the anticipated behaviour of tritium in fusion facilities, the surrounding environment and in man

  3. The Description of Health Among Iraqi Refugee Women in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Khlood F; Resick, Lenore K

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the description of health among Iraqi women refugees, their health status, and health experiences during resettlement in the United States. Twelve women, ages 21-67 years old, who resettled in the United States during or after 2003 where interviewed. The women described health as a gift determined by God, the ability to function, the absence of physical symptoms, and the need to feel safe and secure in the context of resettlement. Although the Iraqi women valued health, during the resettlement process, seeking safety and feeling secure were the foremost priorities. Findings revealed that this is a vulnerable population which has experienced the violence of war and, as a result, have unique physical, mental, economic, and social concerns related to health. Implications are for a multidisciplinary approach to best meet the unique individual health needs of this vulnerable population.

  4. Developing Institutional Capacity for Reproductive Health in Humanitarian Settings: A Descriptive Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen-Toan Tran

    Full Text Available Institutions play a central role in advancing the field of reproductive health in humanitarian settings (RHHS, yet little is known about organizational capacity to deliver RHHS and how this has developed over the past decade. This study aimed to document the current institutional experiences and capacities related to RHHS.Descriptive study using an online questionnaire tool.Respondents represented 82 institutions from 48 countries, of which two-thirds originated from low-and middle-income countries. RHHS work was found not to be restricted to humanitarian agencies (25%, but was also embraced by development organizations (25% and institutions with dual humanitarian and development mandates (50%. Agencies reported working with refugees (81%, internally-displaced (87% and stateless persons (20%, in camp-based settings (78%, and in urban (83% and rural settings (78%. Sixty-eight percent of represented institutions indicated having an RHHS-related policy, 79% an accountability mechanism including humanitarian work, and 90% formal partnerships with other institutions. Seventy-three percent reported routinely appointing RH focal points to ensure coordination of RHHS implementation. There was reported progress in RHHS-related disaster risk reduction (DRR, emergency management and coordination, delivery of the Minimum Initial Services Package (MISP for RH, comprehensive RH services in post-crisis/recovery situations, gender mainstreaming, and community-based programming. Other reported institutional areas of work included capacity development, program delivery, advocacy/policy work, followed by research and donor activities. Except for abortion-related services, respondents cited improved efforts in advocacy, capacity development and technical support in their institutions for RHHS to address clinical services, including maternal and newborn health, sexual violence prevention and response, HIV prevention, management of sexually-transmitted infections

  5. Regulatory research and support program for 1993/1994 - project descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Regulatory Research and Support Program (RSP) is intended to augment and extend the Atomic Energy Control Board's regulatory program beyond the capability of in-house resources. The overall objective of the research and support program is to produce pertinent and independent information that will assist the Board and its staff in making sound, timely and credible decisions on regulating nuclear facilities and materials. The program is divided into nine main areas of research (mission objects) covering the safety of nuclear facilities, radioactive waste management, health physics, physical security, the development of regulatory processes, and special services. In addition, for the first time in this year's program, sub-programs (collections of related projects) have been organized in some areas of study; these sub-programs may cut across several mission objects. More sub-programs will be introduced in future years. A total of 96 projects are planned for 1993/94, including a number which are ongoing from the previous fiscal year. Projects that are held in reserve in case funding becomes available are also listed and provisionally ranked. The spending estimates for the RSP were calculated on the basis of an expected budget of $3.85 M

  6. Regulatory research and support program for 1993/1994 - project descriptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-03-01

    The Regulatory Research and Support Program (RSP) is intended to augment and extend the Atomic Energy Control Board`s regulatory program beyond the capability of in-house resources. The overall objective of the research and support program is to produce pertinent and independent information that will assist the Board and its staff in making sound, timely and credible decisions on regulating nuclear facilities and materials. The program is divided into nine main areas of research (mission objects) covering the safety of nuclear facilities, radioactive waste management, health physics, physical security, the development of regulatory processes, and special services. In addition, for the first time in this year`s program, sub-programs (collections of related projects) have been organized in some areas of study; these sub-programs may cut across several mission objects. More sub-programs will be introduced in future years. A total of 96 projects are planned for 1993/94, including a number which are ongoing from the previous fiscal year. Projects that are held in reserve in case funding becomes available are also listed and provisionally ranked. The spending estimates for the RSP were calculated on the basis of an expected budget of $3.85 M.

  7. Water reactor safety research program. A description of current and planned research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsors confirmatory safety research on lightwater reactors in support of the NRC regulatory program. The principal responsibility of the NRC, as implemented through its regulatory program is to ensure that public health, public safety, and the environment are adequately protected. The NRC performs this function by defining conditions for the use of nuclear power and by ensuring through technical review, audit, and follow-up that these conditions are met. The NRC research program provides technical information, independent of the nuclear industry, to aid in discharging these regulatory responsibilities. The objectives of NRC's research program are the following: (1) to maintain a confirmatory research program that supports assurance of public health and safety, and public confidence in the regulatory program, (2) to provide objectively evaluated safety data and analytical methods that meet the needs of regulatory activities, (3) to provide better quantified estimates of the margins of safety for reactor systems, fuel cycle facilities, and transportation systems, (4) to establish a broad and coherent exchange of safety research information with other Federal agencies, industry, and foreign organization. Current and planned research toward these goals is described

  8. Postdoctoral pharmacy industry fellowships: a descriptive analysis of programs and postgraduate positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melillo, Stephanie; Gangadharan, Amy; Johnson, Hiliary; Schleck, Patrick; Steinberg, Michael; Alexander, James G

    2012-01-01

    Postdoctoral pharmacy industry fellowship programs and the employment of fellowship graduates are described. A list of postgraduate industry fellowships was gathered from the 2009 ASHP Midyear Clinical Meeting. Data regarding program characteristics were collected using the Personnel Placement Service database and program-specific brochures. After data compilation, a standardized survey was sent in January 2010 via e-mail to the point of contact for all programs to confirm the accuracy of the program's characteristics. Only academically affiliated industry fellowship programs were analyzed. Retrospective data were collected regarding the first position of employment for all fellows who graduated from the program between 2005 and 2009 and the position of those same individuals at the time of survey completion. Surveys were sent to 64 postgraduate industry fellowship programs affiliated with a school of pharmacy, 56 (87.5%) of whom responded. The departmental breakdown for positions offered (n = 75) across all academically affiliated industry fellowship programs (including nonresponders) was as follows: medical affairs (38.7%, n = 29), clinical research (32.0%, n = 24), regulatory affairs (9.3%, n = 7), commercial (8.0%, n = 6), health economics and outcomes research (8.0%, n = 6), and pharmacovigilance (4.0%, n = 3). Data from fellows during years 1-5 after completion of the industry fellowship indicated that 90.5% of former fellows remained in the industry (n = 238). The postgraduate industry fellowship programs surveyed indicated that the majority of fellowship graduates continued to hold positions in industry after program completion. The majority of industry fellowships and subsequent job placements occurred in the areas of medical affairs, clinical research, and regulatory affairs.

  9. Educating change agents: a qualitative descriptive study of graduates of a Master's program in evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, Grete Oline; Brenna, Sissel Johansson; Graverholt, Birgitte; Ciliska, Donna; Nortvedt, Monica Wammen

    2016-02-25

    Health care professionals are expected to build decisions upon evidence. This implies decisions based on the best available, current, valid and relevant evidence, informed by clinical expertise and patient values. A multi-professional master's program in evidence-based practice was developed and offered. The aims of this study were to explore how students in this program viewed their ability to apply evidence-based practice and their perceptions of what constitute necessary conditions to implement evidence-based practice in health care organizations, one year after graduation. A qualitative descriptive design was chosen to examine the graduates' experiences. All students in the first two cohorts of the program were invited to participate. Six focus-group interviews, with a total of 21 participants, and a telephone interview of one participant were conducted. The data was analyzed thematically, using the themes from the interview guide as the starting point. The graduates reported that an overall necessary condition for evidence-based practice to occur is the existence of a "readiness for change" both at an individual level and at the organizational level. They described that they gained personal knowledge and skills to be "change-agents" with "self-efficacy, "analytic competence" and "tools" to implement evidence based practice in clinical care. An organizational culture of a "learning organization" was also required, where leaders have an "awareness of evidence- based practice", and see the need for creating "evidence-based networks". One year after graduation the participants saw themselves as "change agents" prepared to improve clinical care within a learning organization. The results of this study provides useful information for facilitating the implementation of EBP both from educational and health care organizational perspectives.

  10. Improving Defense Health Program Medical Research Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-08

    research , including a Business Cell; 87 Research Development, 88 Research Oversight, 89 and Research Compliance offices;90 and the Center...needed for DHP medical research , such as the Army’s Clinical and Translational Research Program Office, 38 the Navy’s Research Methods Training Program... research stated, “key infrastructure for a learning health system will encompass three core elements: data networks, methods , and workforce.” 221

  11. Clinical responsibility, accountability, and risk aversion in mental health nursing: a descriptive, qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Jenni; Crowe, Marie

    2014-08-01

    A number of recent, highly-publicized, perceived health-care service failures have raised concerns about health professionals' accountabilities. Relevant to these concerns, the present study sought to examine how mental health nurses understood clinical responsibility and its impact on their practice. A descriptive, qualitative design was used, and a convenience sample of 10 mental health nurses was recruited from specialist inpatient and outpatient mental health settings in Canterbury, New Zealand. Data were collected using semistructured interviews, and the transcriptions were analysed using an inductive, descriptive approach. Three major themes were identified: being accountable, fostering patient responsibility, and shifting responsibility. Being accountable involved weighing up patients' therapeutic needs against the potential for blame in an organizational culture of risk management. Fostering patient responsibility described the process of deciding in what situations patients could take responsibility for their behaviour. Shifting responsibility described the culture of defensive practice fostered by the organizational culture of risk aversion. The present study highlighted the challenges mental health nurses experience in relation to clinical responsibility in practice, including the balancing required between the needs of patients, the needs of the organization, and the perceived need for self-protection. © 2014 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  12. Health complaints among nurses working near MRI scanners-A descriptive pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilen, Jonna; Vocht, Frank de

    2011-01-01

    A questionnaire-based descriptive pilot study was conducted among all nurses routinely working with MRI in the Northern part of Sweden to provide an indication of the self-reported prevalence of health complaints related to working with MRI systems. Fifty-nine nurses (88% response rate), with on average 8 (±6) years experience with MRI scanning procedures, returned the questionnaire. In total, 9 nurses (15%) reported regularly experiencing at least one of the health complaints (1-5% for specific health complaints) attributed to arise or be aggravated by their presence in the MRI scanning room. Stratification of the results indicated that reporting of adverse symptoms was not related to the level of occupational workload/stress. However, reporting of health complaints was related to the strength of the magnet(s) the nurses worked with, with 57% of symptoms reported by those nurses working with the strongest systems (both 1.5 and 3 T scanners in this population). Although this descriptive study did not include a control population and was based on self-reporting of health complaints, these data indicate that the prevalence of reported health complaints is not related to perceived work load or occupational stress, but does confirm data from other occupational sectors and indicates that the prevalence of adverse health complaints increases with the strength of the MRI system for nurses as well.

  13. Can health promotion programs save Medicare money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzel, Ron Z; Shechter, David; Ozminkowski, Ronald J; Stapleton, David C; Lapin, Pauline J; McGinnis, J Michael; Gordon, Catherine R; Breslow, Lester

    2007-01-01

    The impact of an aging population on escalating US healthcare costs is influenced largely by the prevalence of chronic disease in this population. Consequently, preventing or postponing disease onset among the elderly has become a crucial public health issue. Fortunately, much of the total burden of disease is attributable to conditions that are preventable. In this paper, we address whether well-designed health promotion programs can prevent illness, reduce disability, and improve the quality of life. Furthermore, we assess evidence that these programs have the potential to reduce healthcare utilization and related expenditures for the Medicare program. We hypothesize that seniors who reduce their modifiable health risks can forestall disability, reduce healthcare utilization, and save Medicare money. We end with a discussion of a new Senior Risk Reduction Demonstration, which will be initiated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2007, to test whether risk reduction programs developed in the private sector can achieve health improvements among seniors and a positive return on investment for the Medicare program. PMID:18044084

  14. Training program attracts work and health researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skakon, Janne

    2007-01-01

    Each year in Canada, the costs of disability arising from work-related causes – including workers’ compensation and health-care costs – exceed $6.7 billion. Despite the significant financial and social impacts of worker injury and illness, only a small fraction of Canadian researchers are dedicated...... to examining work disability prevention issues. An innovative program that attracts international students, the Work Disability Prevention Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Strategic Training Program, aims to build research capacity in young researchers and to create a strong network that examines...

  15. Training the Workforce: Description of a Longitudinal Interdisciplinary Education and Mentoring Program in Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stacie; O'Mahony, Sean; Baron, Aliza; Ansari, Aziz; Deamant, Catherine; Frader, Joel; Leyva, Ileana; Marschke, Michael; Preodor, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The rapid increase in demand for palliative care (PC) services has led to concerns regarding workforce shortages and threats to the resiliency of PC teams. To describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a regional interdisciplinary training program in PC. Thirty nurse and physician fellows representing 22 health systems across the Chicago region participated in a two-year PC training program. The curriculum was delivered through multiple conferences, self-directed e-learning, and individualized mentoring by expert local faculty (mentors). Fellows shadowed mentors' clinical practices and received guidance on designing, implementing, and evaluating a practice improvement project to address gaps in PC at their institutions. Enduring, interdisciplinary relationships were built at all levels across health care organizations. Fellows made significant increases in knowledge and self-reported confidence in adult and pediatric PC and program development skills and frequency performing these skills. Fellows and mentors reported high satisfaction with the educational program. This interdisciplinary PC training model addressed local workforce issues by increasing the number of clinicians capable of providing PC. Unique features include individualized longitudinal mentoring, interdisciplinary education, on-site project implementation, and local network building. Future research will address the impact of the addition of social work and chaplain trainees to the program. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Computer Programming Languages for Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Joseph T.

    1979-01-01

    This paper advocates the use of standard high level programming languages for medical computing. It recommends that U.S. Government agencies having health care missions implement coordinated policies that encourage the use of existing standard languages and the development of new ones, thereby enabling them and the medical computing community at large to share state-of-the-art application programs. Examples are based on a model that characterizes language and language translator influence upon the specification, development, test, evaluation, and transfer of application programs.

  17. System description of the Basic MRS System for the FY 1990 Systems Integration Program studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, R.W.; Young, J.R.; Konzek, G.J.

    1991-07-01

    This document provides both functional and physical descriptions of a conceptual high-level waste management system defined as a Basic MRS System. Its purpose is to provide a basis for required system computer modeling and system studies initiated in FY 1990 under the Systems Integration Program of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Office (OCRWM). Two specific systems studies initiated in FY 1990, the Reference System Performance Evaluation and the Aggregate Receipt Rate Study, utilize the information in this document. The Basic MRS System is the current OCRWM reference high-level radioactive wastes repository system concept. It is designed to accept 3000 MTU per year of spent fuel and 400 equivalent MTU per year of high-level wastes. The Basic MRS System includes a storage-only MRS that provides for a limited amount of commercial spent fuel storage capacity prior to acceptance by the geologic repository for disposal. This document contains both functional descriptions of the processes in the waste management system and physical descriptions of the equipment and facilities necessary for performance of those processes. The basic MRS system contains all system components, from the waste storage facilities of the waste generators to the underground facilities for final disposal of the wastes. The major facilities in the system are the waste generator waste storage facilities, an MRS facility that provides interim storage wastes accepted from the waste generators, a repository facility that packages the wastes and then emplaces them in the geologic repository, and the transportation equipment and facilities for transporting the waste between these major facilities

  18. Coping experience of health concerns and physical disability for older Chinese people: A qualitative, descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, He; Turale, Sue

    2017-12-01

    In this qualitative, descriptive study, we explored the perspectives of older, community-dwelling Chinese people regarding their experiences of coping with a physical disability and their health concerns. Twenty participants were interviewed in-depth, and data were analyzed using content analysis. Five themes with 13 subthemes emerged that described older people's experiences of coping with health concerns and disability: (i) ignoring health concerns; (ii) managing self; (iii) seeking medical help; (iv) living with physical disability; and (v) relying on limited resources. Most participants did not have sufficient access to health services due to physical disability and financial deficits, so they tended to ignore their health conditions or tackle them independently before seeking medical help. At the same time, they were impacted on by social and cultural factors. Policies are required that offer more resources to community-dwelling people with disabilities in China. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Framing health for land-use planning legislation: A qualitative descriptive content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Patrick; Kent, Jennifer; Sainsbury, Peter; Thow, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    Framing health as a relevant policy issue for other sectors is not well understood. A recent review of the New South Wales (Australia) land-use planning system resulted in the drafting of legislation with an internationally unprecedented focus on human health. We apply a political science approach to investigate the question 'how and to what extent were health and wider issues framed in submissions to the review?' We investigated a range of stakeholder submissions including health focussed agencies (n = 31), purposively identified key stakeholders with influence on the review (n = 24), and a random sample of other agencies and individuals (n = 47). Using qualitative descriptive analysis we inductively coded for the term 'health' and sub-categories. We deductively coded for 'wider concerns' using a locally endorsed 'Healthy Urban Development Checklist'. Additional inductive analysis uncovered further 'wider concerns'. Health was explicitly identified as a relevant issue for planning policy only in submissions by health-focussed agencies. This framing concerned the new planning system promoting and protecting health as well as connecting health to wider planning concerns including economic issues, transport, public open space and, to a slightly lesser extent, environmental sustainability. Key stakeholder and other agency submissions focussed on these and other wider planning concerns but did not mention health in detail. Health agency submissions did not emphasise infrastructure, density or housing as explicitly as others. Framing health as a relevant policy issue has the potential to influence legislative change governing the business of other sectors. Without submissions from health agencies arguing the importance of having health as an objective in the proposed legislation it is unlikely health considerations would have gained prominence in the draft bill. The findings have implications for health agency engagement with legislative change processes and beyond in

  20. Strategic environmental safety inspection for the National disposal program. Description of the inspection volume. Documentation for the scoping team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The Strategic environmental safety inspection for the National disposal program covers the following topics: Legal framework: determination of the requirement for an environmental inspection program, coordination of the scoping team into the overall context; environmental targets; approach for assessment and evaluation of environmental impact, description of the inspection targets for the strategic environmental inspection; consideration of alternatives.

  1. Model description. NUDOS: A computer program for assessing the consequences of airborne releases of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poley, A.D.

    1996-02-01

    NUDOS is a computer program that can be used to evaluate the consequences of airborne releases of radioactive material. The consequences which can be evaluated are individual dose and associated radiological risk, collective dose and the contamination of land. The code is capable of dealing with both continuous (routine) and accidental releases. For accidental releases both deterministic and probabilistic calculations can be performed, and the impact and effectiveness of emergency actions can be evaluated. This report contains a description of the models contained in NUDOS92 and the recommended values for the input parameters of these models. Additionally, a short overview is given of the future model improvement planned for the next NUDOS-version. (orig.)

  2. International Nuclear Model. Volume 3. Program description. Appendix A-H (Part 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andress, D.

    1985-01-01

    The International Nuclear Model (INM) is a comprehensive model of the commercial nuclear power industry. It simulates economic decisions for reactor deployment and fuel management decisions based on an input set of technical, economic and scenario parameters. The technical parameters include reactor operating characteristics, fuel cycle timing and mass loss factors, and enrichment tails assays. Economic parameters include fuel cycle costs, financial data, and tax alternatives. INM has a broad range of scenario options covering, for example, process constraints, interregional activities, reprocessing, and fuel management selection. INM reports reactor deployment schedules, electricity generation, and fuel cycle requirements and costs. It also has specialized reports for extended burnup and permanent disposal. This volume contains appendices A through H including a description of subroutines and the Fortran listing of the program

  3. Mental Health and Mental Disorder Recommendation Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchiwit, Manyat

    2017-12-01

    The characteristic differences among the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) countries in terms of trade and investment, society and cultural values, medical information and technology, and the living and working environment have become major health problems in terms of mental disorders. The purpose of this article is to identify the gaps in those aspects, to propose mental health and mental disorder recommendation programs, and to recommend policies for policy makers and research investors. A comparative analysis and literature review of existing policy, including overviews of previous research were used to generate a synthesis of the existing knowledge of the mental health and mental disorder recommendation programs. The review results recommend mental health and mental disorder programs for policy makers, research investors, and stakeholders in order to strengthen the directions for implementing these programs in the future. The healthcare provision in each country will not be limited only to its citizens; the healthcare markets and target groups are likely to expand to the neighboring countries in the context of changes in domestic and international factors, which have both positive and negative impacts according to the political, economic, and social situations of the influencing countries.

  4. School Oral Health Program in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariga, Jitendra; Al-Mutawa, Sabiha; Nazar, Huda

    2014-01-01

    The School Oral Health Program (SOHP), Kuwait, is a joint venture between the Ministry of Health, Kuwait, and Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, Mass., USA. This program provides oral health education, prevention and treatment to almost 280,000 public school children in Kuwait. Services are delivered through a system of center- and school-based clinics and preventive mobile teams. One of the recent developments is the effective use of portable dental units for the delivery of preventive care to children in schools without the need for children to go to dental clinics. Preventive procedures performed under this program are the biannual application of fluoride varnish and the placement of pit and fissure sealants on newly erupted permanent molars and premolars. During recent years, the SOHP has improved its coverage of children, with prevention up to 80%. This has resulted in a considerable reduction in treatment needs, which is evident from the reduced number of composite restorations performed under this program during the last 6 years. This indicates that the disease level is on a decline, which can be confirmed from the results of the ongoing National Oral Health Survey on Kuwaiti school children. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. 78 FR 24756 - Health Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ...'s funded section 330 grant application. Genesee County Community Mental Health (GCCMH)--now Genesee... operations of the grant program since its award in June 2012. On January 1, 2013, the State of Michigan... care services on the County of Genesee's behalf and has indicated an ability to continue operations...

  6. Health promotion through employee assistance programs: a role for occupational therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, M

    1986-11-01

    Health promotion is predicted to have a major impact on occupational therapy practice. Keeping people well and promoting a healthy life-style will be the focus for the future. Many companies and agencies are taking the lead by instituting employee assistance programs (EAPs). With the de-emphasis on long-term hospital care, many occupational therapists will be seeking employment with community health programs. This paper advocates a role for occupational therapists in health promotion and disease prevention in an EAP. A description of EAPs and the contributions that occupational therapists can make to these programs is offered. Practice and education considerations for occupational therapists' roles in EAPs are provided.

  7. Intervention mapping: a process for developing theory- and evidence-based health education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, L K; Parcel, G S; Kok, G

    1998-10-01

    The practice of health education involves three major program-planning activities: needs assessment, program development, and evaluation. Over the past 20 years, significant enhancements have been made to the conceptual base and practice of health education. Models that outline explicit procedures and detailed conceptualization of community assessment and evaluation have been developed. Other advancements include the application of theory to health education and promotion program development and implementation. However, there remains a need for more explicit specification of the processes by which one uses theory and empirical findings to develop interventions. This article presents the origins, purpose, and description of Intervention Mapping, a framework for health education intervention development. Intervention Mapping is composed of five steps: (1) creating a matrix of proximal program objectives, (2) selecting theory-based intervention methods and practical strategies, (3) designing and organizing a program, (4) specifying adoption and implementation plans, and (5) generating program evaluation plans.

  8. Plutonium immobilization project development and testing technical project office quality assurance program description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, T.H.; MacLean, L.M.; Ziemba, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) is one of several fissile materials disposition projects managed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD). The PIP is expected to evolve from the current Development and Testing (D and T) effort, to design, to construction, and finally to operations. Overall management and technical management of the D and T effort resides at the Lead Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), through the LLNL Manager, Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP). Day to day project activities are managed by the D and T Technical Project Office (TPO), which reports to the LLNL Manager, FMDP. The D and T TPO consists of the Technical Manager, the TPO Quality Assurance (QA) Program Manager, and TPO Planning and Support Staff. This Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) defines the QA policies and controls that will be implemented by these TPO personnel in their management of D and T activities. This QAPD is consistent with and responsive to the Department of Energy Fissile Materials Disposition Program Quality Assurance Requirements Document (FMDP QARD). As the Project and upper level requirement's documents evolve, this QAPD will be updated as necessary to accurately define and describe the QA Program and Management of the PIP. The TPO has a policy that all development and testing activities be planned, performed and assessed in accordance with its customer's requirements, needs and expectations, and with a commitment to excellence and continuous improvement. The TPO QAPD describes implementation requirements which, when completed, will ensure that the project development and testing activities conform to the appropriate QA requirements. For the program to be effective, the TPO QA Program Manager will ensure that each site participating in D and T activities has developed a QAPD, which meets the customer's requirements, and has a designated quality leader in place. These customer

  9. Health-related Culinary Education: A Summary of Representative Emerging Programs for Health Professionals and Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Rani; Phillips, Edward M; Nordgren, Julia; La Puma, John; La Barba, Julie; Cucuzzella, Mark; Graham, Robert; Harlan, Timothy S; Burg, Tracey; Eisenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    Beneficial correlations are suggested between food preparation and home food preparation of healthy choices. Therefore, there is an emergence of culinary medicine (CM) programs directed at both patients and medical professionals which deliver education emphasizing skills such as shopping, food storage, and meal preparation. The goal of this article is to provide a description of emerging CM programs and to imagine how this field can mature. During April 2015, 10 CM programs were identified by surveying CM and lifestyle medicine leaders. Program directors completed a narrative describing their program's structure, curricula, educational design, modes of delivery, funding, and cost. Interviews were conducted in an effort to optimize data collection. All 10 culinary programs deliver medical education curricula educating 2654 health professionals per year. Educational goals vary within the domains of (1) provider's self-behavior, (2) nutritional knowledge and (3) prescribing nutrition. Six programs deliver patients' curricula, educating 4225 individuals per year. These programs' content varies and focuses on either specific diets or various culinary behaviors. All the programs' directors are health professionals who are also either credentialed chefs or have a strong culinary background. Nine of these programs offer culinary training in either a hands-on or visual demonstration within a teaching kitchen setting, while one delivers remote culinary tele-education. Seven programs track outcomes using various questionnaires and biometric data. There is currently no consensus about learning objectives, curricular domains, staffing, and facility requirements associated with CM, and there has been little research to explore its impact. A shared strategy is needed to collectively overcome these challenges.

  10. Health-related Culinary Education: A Summary of Representative Emerging Programs for Health Professionals and Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Edward M.; Nordgren, Julia; La Puma, John; La Barba, Julie; Cucuzzella, Mark; Graham, Robert; Harlan, Timothy S.; Burg, Tracey; Eisenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Beneficial correlations are suggested between food preparation and home food preparation of healthy choices. Therefore, there is an emergence of culinary medicine (CM) programs directed at both patients and medical professionals which deliver education emphasizing skills such as shopping, food storage, and meal preparation. Objective: The goal of this article is to provide a description of emerging CM programs and to imagine how this field can mature. Methods: During April 2015, 10 CM programs were identified by surveying CM and lifestyle medicine leaders. Program directors completed a narrative describing their program's structure, curricula, educational design, modes of delivery, funding, and cost. Interviews were conducted in an effort to optimize data collection. Results: All 10 culinary programs deliver medical education curricula educating 2654 health professionals per year. Educational goals vary within the domains of (1) provider's self-behavior, (2) nutritional knowledge and (3) prescribing nutrition. Six programs deliver patients' curricula, educating 4225 individuals per year. These programs' content varies and focuses on either specific diets or various culinary behaviors. All the programs' directors are health professionals who are also either credentialed chefs or have a strong culinary background. Nine of these programs offer culinary training in either a hands-on or visual demonstration within a teaching kitchen setting, while one delivers remote culinary tele-education. Seven programs track outcomes using various questionnaires and biometric data. Conclusions: There is currently no consensus about learning objectives, curricular domains, staffing, and facility requirements associated with CM, and there has been little research to explore its impact. A shared strategy is needed to collectively overcome these challenges. PMID:26937315

  11. Description of a medical writing rotation for a postgraduate pharmacy residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jamie N; Tiemann, Kelsey A; Ostroff, Jared L

    2014-04-01

    To provide a description of a pharmacy residency rotation dedicated to medical writing developed at a tertiary care academic medical center. Contribution to the medical literature is an important component of professional pharmacy practice, and there are many benefits seen by practitioners actively involved in scholarly activities. Residency programs have an opportunity to expand beyond the standard roles of postgraduate pharmacist training but rarely is there formal instruction on medical writing skills or are scholarship opportunities provided to residents. In order to address this deficiency, a residency program may consider the implementation of a formal Medical Writing rotation. This rotation is designed to introduce the resident to medical writing through active discussion on medical writing foundational topics, engage the resident in a collaborative review of a manuscript submitted to a peer-reviewed professional journal, and support the resident in the design and composition of manuscript of publishable quality. A structured Medical Writing rotation during a pharmacy resident's training can help develop the skills necessary to promote scholarly activities and foster resident interest in future pursuit of professional medical writing.

  12. Baccalaureate Student Nurses' Study Habits Prior to Admission to Nursing Program: A Descriptive Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicilda-Reynaldo, Rhea Faye D; Cruz, Jonas Preposi; Bigley, Louise; Adams, Kathryn

    2017-06-01

    Faculty continue to observe students struggling as they adapt their study strategies to learn nursing core content. This study described the study habits of Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) students prior to admission to the program. This study used a descriptive qualitative research design. A purposive sample of 19 BSN students (juniors [n=10] and seniors [n=9]) from a 4-year public Midwestern university were included in this study. Two focus group sessions, using a semi-structured interview guide, were conducted in the spring semester of 2013. The four themes which emerged from the analysis of data were: "I just got it," "I had a lot of time then," "I studied alone" mostly, and "…a little struggle with the sciences." The findings suggest the BSN students did not study much or employed poor study strategies during their years completing general education courses. Academic support is needed by students prior to admission to the nursing program so they can learn effective study skills and modify their study habits for easier adaptation to the rigors of nursing education. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Data Science Programs in U.S. Higher Education: An Exploratory Content Analysis of Program Description, Curriculum Structure, and Course Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rong; Sae-Lim, Watinee

    2016-01-01

    In this study, an exploratory content analysis of 30 randomly selected Data Science (DS) programs from eight disciplines revealed significant gaps in current DS education in the United States. The analysis centers on linguistic patterns of program descriptions, curriculum requirements, and DS course focus as pertaining to key skills and domain…

  14. Mental health rehabilitation in a care farm context: A descriptive review of Norwegian intervention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Ingeborg; Patil, Grete; Berget, Bente; Ihlebæk, Camilla; Gonzalez, Marianne Thorsen

    2015-01-01

    C are farming is a service developed at farms for promoting mental and physical health and is increasingly used in mental health rehabilitation in Norway. This article aims to present a descriptive review of Norwegian intervention research on care farms that provide rehabilitation for people with mental health disorders. This literature review applied a non-systematic search strategy: all articles in the field known to the authors were selected for inclusion. The selected studies were intervention studies that were conducted on farms in Norway, that used adult participants with mental health problems/disorders, and that reported outcome measures related to mental health. The studies and articles presented quantitative and/or qualitative data. The findings from the published articles report improvements to mental health problems, such as depression, anxiety, perceived stress, positive affect, rumination, and self-efficacy. Qualitative data describe a variety of positive experiences, such as improved coping ability, increased social support, and appreciation of the care farm activity. Participating in interventions on care farms positively influences mental health. Care farming may therefore be used as a supplementary approach in mental health rehabilitation, as it offers meaningful and engaging occupations and social inclusion.

  15. 77 FR 59931 - Single Source Program Expansion Supplement Award to Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... Program Expansion Supplement Award to Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) Program Grantee; Exception to... Competition--Single Source Program Expansion Supplement Award to Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) Program... supplement award to the University of Guam School of Nursing, an Area Health Education Center (AHEC) Program...

  16. 75 FR 48815 - Medicaid Program and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Revisions to the Medicaid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... Parts 431, 447, and 457 Medicaid Program and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Revisions to... 431, 447, and 457 [CMS-6150-F] RIN 0938-AP69 Medicaid Program and Children's Health Insurance Program... final rule implements provisions from the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of...

  17. Exploration and Description of Faith-Based Health Resources: Findings Inform Advancing Holistic Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyess, Susan MacLeod

    2015-01-01

    It is important to use all holistic resource opportunities in communities, such as integrative healing centers, and mind-body-spirit approaches to health. These holistic approaches may be realized through nontraditional avenues, such as faith-based resources. This article reports on an exploratory study that describes faith-based resources supporting holistic health in a southeastern region of the United States. A working definition for "faith-based health resources" was "ecumenical and interfaith community-based, open-access health resources that include in mission for service a reference to faith." Excluded from the definition were institutional services from hospitals, focused social services from area agencies, and federally funded services.

  18. Description of how the Atomic Energy Control Board research and development program is administered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    The Regulatory Research Program should be seen as augmenting and extending the capability of in-house resources. The overall objective of the research program is to produce pertinent and independent information that will assist the Board and its staff in making correct, timely and credible decisions on regulating atomic energy. Within the framework of the general objective, the specific objectives are: (i) to verify information, claims or analyses from licensees in support of licensing actions; (ii) to fill gaps in knowledge to enable the Board to contribute to the establishment of health and safety requirements or guidelines or to aid in arriving at licensing decisions; (iii) to stimulate licensees to do more work on certain topics relating to health, safety or security; (iv) to develop information on the regulatory process and the evaluation of the regulatory process; (v) to develop equipment or procedures to enhance health, safety or security in those cases where the industry is not competent or inclined to do so; and (vi) to enhance the competence of the Board and its credibility in the eyes of licensees and the public

  19. Health information systems in Africa: descriptive analysis of data sources, information products and health statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbondji, Peter Ebongue; Kebede, Derege; Soumbey-Alley, Edoh William; Zielinski, Chris; Kouvividila, Wenceslas; Lusamba-Dikassa, Paul-Samson

    2014-05-01

    To identify key data sources of health information and describe their availability in countries of the World Health Organization (WHO) African Region. An analytical review on the availability and quality of health information data sources in countries; from experience, observations, literature and contributions from countries. Forty-six Member States of the WHO African Region. No participants. The state of data sources, including censuses, surveys, vital registration and health care facility-based sources. In almost all countries of the Region, there is a heavy reliance on household surveys for most indicators, with more than 121 household surveys having been conducted in the Region since 2000. Few countries have civil registration systems that permit adequate and regular tracking of mortality and causes of death. Demographic surveillance sites function in several countries, but the data generated are not integrated into the national health information system because of concerns about representativeness. Health management information systems generate considerable data, but the information is rarely used because of concerns about bias, quality and timeliness. To date, 43 countries in the Region have initiated Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response. A multitude of data sources are used to track progress towards health-related goals in the Region, with heavy reliance on household surveys for most indicators. Countries need to develop comprehensive national plans for health information that address the full range of data needs and data sources and that include provision for building national capacities for data generation, analysis, dissemination and use. © The Royal Society of Medicine.

  20. How Home Health Nurses Plan Their Work Schedules: A Qualitative Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Elliane; Hirschman, Karen B; Cacchione, Pamela Z; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2018-06-12

    To describe how home health nurses plan their daily work schedules and what challenges they face during the planning process. Home health nurses are viewed as independent providers and value the nature of their work because of the flexibility and autonomy they hold in developing their work schedules. However, there is limited empirical evidence about how home health nurses plan their work schedules, including the factors they consider during the process and the challenges they face within the dynamic home health setting. Qualitative descriptive design. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 registered nurses who had greater than 2 years of experience in home health and were employed by one of the three participating home health agencies in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Four themes emerged about planning work schedules and daily itineraries: identifying patient needs to prioritize visits accordingly, partnering with patients to accommodate their preferences, coordinating visit timing with other providers to avoid overwhelming patients, and working within agency standards to meet productivity requirements. Scheduling challenges included readjusting the schedule based on patient needs and staffing availability, anticipating longer visits, and maintaining continuity of care with patients. Home health nurses make autonomous decisions regarding their work schedules while considering specific patient and agency factors, and overcome challenges related to the unpredictable nature of providing care in a home health setting. Future research is needed to further explore nurse productivity in home health and improve home health work environments. Home health nurses plan their work schedules to provide high quality care that is patient-centered and timely. The findings also highlight organizational priorities to facilitate continuity of care and support nurses while alleviating the burnout

  1. A descriptive study of chiropractors' opinions and practices regarding office-based health product sales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Stacey A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the sale of non-prescription health products is ubiquitous, the views of health professionals, such as chiropractors, regarding the sale of such products are not well known. Practitioner opinion is important to understand and inform professional practice. The purpose of this study was to describe chiropractors' perspectives and practices on the sale of health care products from practitioners' offices. Methods Chiropractors were invited to provide written comments about health product sales at the end of a fixed choice, mailed survey. Respondents' comments were analyzed using qualitative description. Ethics approval was received from the Conjoint Health Research Ethics Board at the University of Calgary. Results One hundred seven of the 265 respondents (response rate of 51% provided written comments. Approximately 30 pages of double-spaced, typed text were gathered. Respondents did not consistently endorse or condemn health product sales, and engaged in the practice to greater and lesser extents. While some were opposed to health products sales, some accepted the practice with a degree of ambivalence whereas others clearly embraced it. Some respondents acknowledged a professional conflict of interest in such sales and marketing, and described strategies used to mitigate it. Others provided a range of justifications for the practice. Personal integrity and professional standards were discussed and a need for monitoring identified. Conclusions A wide range of opinions and practices were described and this is consistent with resulting variation in practice. In light of this, standards that facilitate consistency in practice may benefit professionals and the public alike.

  2. General health workers' description of mental health problems and treatment approaches used in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koka, Betty E; Deane, Frank P; Lyons, Geoffrey Cb; Lambert, Gordon

    2014-11-01

    Papua New Guinea is a developing country with limited resources for specialist mental health services. Little is known about the mental health and treatment services of Papua New Guinea. The aim of this study was to clarify the presenting mental health problems encountered by Papua New Guinean health workers and the common treatment approaches used. A total of 203 Papua New Guinean health workers completed a retrospective quantitative survey about their three most recent mental health patients. The survey asked about presenting symptomatology, diagnoses (including culture-bound diagnoses) and treatment approaches. The major presenting mental health problems for males included schizophrenia, substance use disorder, sorcery and spirit possession. Depression was the most common diagnoses for women, followed by sorcery and somatisation. Over 65% of patients were prescribed psychotropic medication, over 50% received some form of psychological intervention and 28% were receiving traditional treatments. Somatic symptoms are common among both male and female Papua New Guineans; however, males may be more likely to present with psychotic symptoms and females with mood-related problems. Schizophrenia and depression are commonly identified with substance use disorder more problematic among males. Culture-specific explanations and treatment are commonly used. © The Author(s) 2013.

  3. Preventing child abuse: psychosocial description of clients of brief intervention programs in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Gómez

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The study describe characteristics and risk factors for child abuse and neglect,in 591 children and adolescents, their parents and families served by eight brief intervention programs (PIB “Viviendo en Familia”, funded by the Chilean National Service of Children (SENAME and implemented by Protectora de la Infancia (a non-profit organization in Chile. The results revealed the existence of problems of moderate complexity, on the environment,parental competencies, family interactions, family safety and child well-being. About three of each four caregivers show signs of high risk for the abuse or neglect of children, especially in their mental health, a topic that must be considered by the staff to develop a plan of coordinated work with the local network of health services.

  4. An operational health physics quality assurance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costigan, S.A.; McAtee, J.L. III; Somers, W.M.; Huchton, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    DOE Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance, stipulates QA requirements for all DOE activities. This order is now codified as 10CFR830.120, Nuclear Safety Management, Quality Assurance Requirements, which is applicable to DOE nuclear facilities. A Quality Assurance Management Plan (QAMP) was developed by the Health Physics Operations Group (ESH-1) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of the ESH-1 QAMP is to ensure that operational radiation protection activities meet the criteria outlined in DOE Order 5700.6C, DOE-ER-STD-6001-92 and 10CFR830.120. The ten required elements are QA Program, Personal Training and Qualifications, Quality Improvement, Documents and Records, Work Processes, Design, Procurement, Inspection and Acceptance Testing, Management Assessment and Independent Assessment. The QAMP has been useful for the development of QAMPs at nuclear facilities and has helped ensure uniformity of institutional requirements where Health Physics services are deployed to facilities. To implement a subset of QAMP requirements, a Quality Assurance Self-Evaluation Program (QASE) was established. This program provides a novel self-audit mechanism for the formal identification and correction of non-conforming items related to Operational Health Physics. Additionally, the QASE is a useful management tool for Radiological Control Technician Supervisors and staff and provides a tracking mechanism for ongoing problem areas. Data have been Collected for two calendar years on a number of concerns that fall into four general categories: radiological posting and labeling, instrumentation, monitoring requirements, and radiological documents/records

  5. 76 FR 4350 - Health Information Technology Extension Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Information Technology Extension Program ACTION: Public Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces changes to the Health Information Technology Extension... of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, 200 Independence Ave, SW., Suite 729D...

  6. Encouraging children to eat more fruit and vegetables: Health vs. descriptive social norm-based messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharps, Maxine; Robinson, Eric

    2016-05-01

    Traditional intervention approaches to promote fruit and vegetable consumption outline the health benefits of eating fruit and vegetables. More recently, social norm-based messages describing the healthy eating habits of others have been shown to increase fruit and vegetable intake in adults. Here we report two experimental studies which investigated whether exposure to descriptive social norm-based messages about the behaviour of other children and health-based messages increased fruit and vegetable intake in young children. In both studies children were exposed to messages whilst playing a board-game. After exposure to the messages, children were able to consume fruit and vegetables, as well as high calorie snack foods. Although findings were inconsistent across the two individual studies, in a pooled analysis we found evidence that both health messages and descriptive social norm-based messages increased children's fruit and vegetable intake, relative to control condition messages (p norm-based messages can be used to promote meaningful changes to children's dietary behaviour warrants further study. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Qualitative Description of Global Health Nursing Competencies by Nursing Faculty in Africa and the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lynda; Moran, Laura; Zarate, Rosa; Warren, Nicole; Ventura, Carla Aparecida Arena; Tamí-Maury, Irene; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa

    2016-06-07

    to analyze qualitative comments from four surveys asking nursing faculty to rate the importance of 30 global health competencies for undergraduate nursing programs. qualitative descriptive study that included 591 individuals who responded to the survey in English (49 from Africa and 542 from the Americas), 163 who responded to the survey in Spanish (all from Latin America), and 222 Brazilian faculty who responded to the survey in Portuguese. Qualitative comments were recorded at the end of the surveys by 175 respondents to the English survey, 75 to the Spanish survey, and 70 to the Portuguese survey. Qualitative description and a committee approach guided data analysis. ten new categories of global health competencies emerged from the analysis. Faculty also demonstrated concern about how and when these competencies could be integrated into nursing curricula. the additional categories should be considered for addition to the previously identified global health competencies. These, in addition to the guidance about integration into existing curricula, can be used to guide refinement of the original list of global health competencies. Further research is needed to seek consensus about these competencies and to develop recommendations and standards to guide nursing curriculum development. analisar os dados qualitativos obtidos em quatro surveys realizados com docentes de enfermagem que avaliaram a importância de 30 competências em saúde global para cursos de graduação em enfermagem. pesquisa qualitativa-descritiva com 591 indivíduos que responderam ao survey em inglês (49 da África e 542 das Américas), 163 que responderam ao survey em espanhol (todos da América Latina), e 222 docentes brasileiros que responderam ao survey em português. Os comentários qualitativos foram registrados ao final dos surveys por 175 respondentes na língua inglesa, 75 na espanhola e 70 na portuguesa. A análise dos dados foi dirigida por uma descrição qualitativa e desenvolvido

  8. Unified description of structure and reactions: implementing the nuclear field theory program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broglia, R A; Bortignon, P F; Barranco, F; Vigezzi, E; Idini, A; Potel, G

    2016-01-01

    The modern theory of the atomic nucleus results from the merging of the liquid drop model of Niels Bohr and Fritz Kalckar, and of the shell model of Marie Goeppert Meyer and Hans Jensen. The first model contributed the concepts of collective excitations. The second, those of independent-particle motion. The unification of these apparently contradictory views in terms of the particle-vibration and particle-rotation couplings carried out by Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson has allowed for an ever more complete, accurate and detailed description of nuclear structure. Nuclear field theory (NFT), developed by the Copenhagen–Buenos Aires collaboration, provided a powerful quantal embodiment of this unification. Reactions are not only at the basis of quantum mechanics (statistical interpretation, Max Born), but also the specific tools to probe the atomic nucleus. It is then natural that NFT is being extended to deal with processes which involve the continuum in an intrinsic fashion, so as to be able to treat them on an equal footing with those associated with bound states (structure). As a result, spectroscopic studies of transfer to continuum states could eventually make use of the NFT rules, properly extended to take care of recoil effects. In the present contribution we review the implementation of the NFT program of structure and reactions, setting special emphasis on open problems and outstanding predictions. (invited comment)

  9. 42 CFR 441.106 - Comprehensive mental health program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... health and public welfare resources; including— (i) Community mental health centers; (ii) Nursing homes... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Comprehensive mental health program. 441.106... Comprehensive mental health program. (a) If the plan includes services in public institutions for mental...

  10. Physical fitness and health education program at NASA Headquarters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angotti, Cathy

    1993-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: policy procedures to enter the NASA Headquarters Physical Fitness and Health Program; eligibility; TDY eligibility; health promotions offered; and general facility management.

  11. Addressing the Health and Wellness Needs of Vulnerable Rockaway Residents in the Wake of Hurricane Sandy: Findings From a Health Coaching and Community Health Worker Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, David; Oberlink, Mia R; Shah, Shivani; Evans, Lauren; Bassuk, Karen

    To describe the design and participants of a program that employed health coaches and community health workers to address the social, health, and long-term disaster recovery needs of Rockaway residents roughly 2 years after Hurricane Sandy made landfall. Baseline and exit questionnaires, containing demographic, health, and health care utilization measures, were administered to participants at the start and end of the program. Enrollment and encounter information was captured in program administrative records. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize participant characteristics, personal goals, referrals to local organizations and agencies, and outcomes. Qualitative analyses were used to identify recurring themes in challenges faced by participants and barriers to health and wellness. The program served 732 community residents, of whom 455 (62%) completed baseline and exit questionnaires. Participants were directly and/or indirectly impacted by Hurricane Sandy through property damage, closures of health care facilities, limited employment opportunities, and trouble securing affordable housing. Furthermore, many participants faced considerable adversities and struggled to manage chronic health conditions. Personal goals set by participants included locating health care and other resources (44%), weight management and healthy eating (35%), and self-management of chronic conditions (24%). Health coaches and community health workers engaged participants an average of 4 times-providing counseling and referrals to local organizations and services, including medical and dental services (29%), city-issued identification cards (27%), and health insurance and other entitlements (23%). Comparisons of baseline and exit surveys indicated significant improvements in self-reported health, health care utilization, and confidence managing health issues. No significant improvement was observed in the use of preventive health care services. The program represents a model for

  12. Health and safety information program for hazardous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, M.P.; Fallon, N.J.; Kuehner, A.V.

    1979-01-01

    The system is used as a management tool in several safety and health programs. It is used to: trace the use of hazardous materials and to determine monitoring needs; inform the occupational physician of the potential health problems associated with materials ordered by a given individual; inform the fire and rescue group of hazardous materials in a given building; provide waste disposal recommendations to the hazardous waste management group; assist the hazardous materials shipping coordinator in identifying materials which are regulated by the Department of Transportation; and guide management decisions in the area of recognizing and rectifying unsafe conditions. The information system has been expanded from a manual effort to provide a brief description of health hazards of chemicals used at the lab to a computerized health and safety information system which serves the needs of all personnel who may encounter the material in the course of their work. The system has been designed to provide information needed to control the potential problems associated with a hazardous material up to the time that it is consumed in a given operation or is sent to the waste disposal facility

  13. 77 FR 23193 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program-Stage 2; Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ..., 413, and 495 [CMS-0044-CN] RIN 0938-AQ84 Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record... proposed rule entitled ``Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program--Stage... (77 FR 13698), the proposed rule entitled ``Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record...

  14. 75 FR 63480 - Medicaid Program: Implementation of Section 614 of the Children's Health Insurance Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 for Adjustments to the Federal Medical... section 614 of the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 (CHIPRA), Public Law... Medicaid program and required by Section 614 of the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act...

  15. Health effects of unemployment benefit program generosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cylus, Jonathan; Glymour, M Maria; Avendano, Mauricio

    2015-02-01

    We assessed the impact of unemployment benefit programs on the health of the unemployed. We linked US state law data on maximum allowable unemployment benefit levels between 1985 and 2008 to individual self-rated health for heads of households in the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and implemented state and year fixed-effect models. Unemployment was associated with increased risk of reporting poor health among men in both linear probability (b=0.0794; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.0623, 0.0965) and logistic models (odds ratio=2.777; 95% CI=2.294, 3.362), but this effect is lower when the generosity of state unemployment benefits is high (b for interaction between unemployment and benefits=-0.124; 95% CI=-0.197, -0.0523). A 63% increase in benefits completely offsets the impact of unemployment on self-reported health. Results suggest that unemployment benefits may significantly alleviate the adverse health effects of unemployment among men.

  16. How a Fully Automated eHealth Program Simulates Three Therapeutic Processes: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holter, Marianne T S; Johansen, Ayna; Brendryen, Håvar

    2016-06-28

    eHealth programs may be better understood by breaking down the components of one particular program and discussing its potential for interactivity and tailoring in regard to concepts from face-to-face counseling. In the search for the efficacious elements within eHealth programs, it is important to understand how a program using lapse management may simultaneously support working alliance, internalization of motivation, and behavior maintenance. These processes have been applied to fully automated eHealth programs individually. However, given their significance in face-to-face counseling, it may be important to simulate the processes simultaneously in interactive, tailored programs. We propose a theoretical model for how fully automated behavior change eHealth programs may be more effective by simulating a therapist's support of a working alliance, internalization of motivation, and managing lapses. We show how the model is derived from theory and its application to Endre, a fully automated smoking cessation program that engages the user in several "counseling sessions" about quitting. A descriptive case study based on tools from the intervention mapping protocol shows how each therapeutic process is simulated. The program supports the user's working alliance through alliance factors, the nonembodied relational agent Endre and computerized motivational interviewing. Computerized motivational interviewing also supports internalized motivation to quit, whereas a lapse management component responds to lapses. The description operationalizes working alliance, internalization of motivation, and managing lapses, in terms of eHealth support of smoking cessation. A program may simulate working alliance, internalization of motivation, and lapse management through interactivity and individual tailoring, potentially making fully automated eHealth behavior change programs more effective.

  17. How federalism shapes public health financing, policy, and program options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Lydia L

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, fiscal and functional federalism strongly shape public health policy and programs. Federalism has implications for public health practice: it molds financing and disbursement options, including funding formulas, which affect allocations and program goals, and shapes how funding decisions are operationalized in a political context. This article explores how American federalism, both fiscal and functional, structures public health funding, policy, and program options, investigating the effects of intergovernmental transfers on public health finance and programs.

  18. Health risk assessment for program managers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jump, R.A.; Williamson, D.S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a sensitivity analysis into the independent variables that determine the levels of health risks posed by buried plutonium and americium at a typical contaminated site in an arid region. Environmental Restoration Program Managers often must make decisions concerning cleanup levels, remediation alternatives, schedules, cost estimates, etc. based upon extraordinarily safe assumptions about risk assessment calculation inputs. This study reveals to the Program Manager which variables are major drivers to the calculated levels of risk posed by transuranic radionuclides and which ones have second order effects or less. The findings of this study should indicate which inputs should be the focus of attention during negotiations with regulators and of further empirical investigation

  19. Description of the MHS Health Level 7 Anatomic Pathology for Public Health Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    t ’ "’ frX ’I!’Vi""">inq ir str.r.:lioos, S€’ £l "r:’hi fl!’:: li l<i ~lin,:l ddc ~o.r-c.;s, !] :l:ho:>r rr:, aY. nflinttlirir~ :he !::f;, ·nod c ol...including average age, gender distribution, physical fitness, and health status. Further, this population has universal access to medical care, which

  20. 78 FR 4593 - Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health Benefits in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ...'s Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health Benefits in Alternative Benefit Plans...-2334-P] RIN 0938-AR04 Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health... 2010 (collectively referred to as the Affordable Care Act), and the Children's Health Insurance Program...

  1. Health and Aging Policy Fellows Program: Shaping a Healthy Future for Older Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, Harold Alan; Pike, Kathleen M; Spaeth-Rublee, Brigitta; Elinson, Lynn

    2017-09-01

    As the size of the elderly population increases, so do the challenges of and barriers to high-quality, affordable health care. The Health and Aging Policy Fellows (HAPF) Program is designed to provide health and aging professionals with the skills and experience to help lead the effort in reducing these barriers and shaping a healthy and productive future for older Americans. Since its inception in 2008, the program has affected not only the fellows who participate, but also the field of health and aging policy. Work needs to be done to sustain this program so that more fellows can participate and sound policies for the elderly population can continue to be shaped and improved. This report describes the HAPF Program, including its background (rationale, description, partners, progress, effect), lessons learned, challenges and solutions, and policy implications. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  2. Space Station Freedom Environmental Health Care Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Elizabeth E.; Russo, Dane M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses the environmental planning and monitoring aspects of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Environmental Health Care Program, which encompasses all phases of the SSF assembly and operation from the first element entry at MB-6 through the Permanent Manned Capability and beyond. Environmental planning involves the definition of acceptability limits and monitoring requirements for the radiation dose barothermal parameters and potential contaminants in the SSF air and water and on internal surfaces. Inflight monitoring will be implemented through the Environmental Health System, which consists of five subsystems: Microbiology, Toxicology, Water Quality, Radiation, and Barothermal Physiology. In addition to the environmental data interpretation and analysis conducted after each mission, the new data will be compared to archived data for statistical and long-term trend analysis and determination of risk exposures. Results of these analyses will be used to modify the acceptability limits and monitoring requirements for the future.

  3. Employed women with alcohol problems who seek help from employee assistance programs. Description and comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, T C; Roman, P M; Harwood, E M

    1995-01-01

    After a brief description of employee assistance programs (EAP), we present data collected from 6,400 employees from 84 worksites who used the services of EAPs, a portion of whom were assessed by the EAP as having alcohol-related problems and/or received scores on the Alcohol Dependence Scale (ADS) indicative of a potential alcohol-related problem. In addition, data were collected at intake from the EAP administrators, and employment status of the employee clients was assessed 18 to 24 months later. These data indicate that EAPs are effective in sustaining the employment of most women with alcohol-related problems who seek services from EAPs and that EAPs' goal of early intervention is especially realized among women with alcohol problems. Other conclusions include: women with alcohol problems do not enter EAPs through routes that are strikingly different from those of men; many of the gender differences that are revealed are associated with job status differences; employed women with alcohol problems are detached from nuclear families, with markedly low rates of current marriage; even when married, spouses are less likely to play a role in the referral of women with alcohol problems than the spouses of the men; and, there is no clear indication that women are the target of any form of discrimination in the process of EAP utilization. However, women are considerably more likely to have less adequate insurance coverage, according to the EAP administrators' assessment reported at client intake, than their male counterparts, leading to treatment choices that may be less than appropriate.

  4. Health workers' views of a program to facilitate physical health care in mental health settings: implications for implementation and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Wendy; Harris, Melanie; Battersby, Malcolm

    2014-12-01

    Physical comorbidities shorten the lifespan of people with severe mental illness therefore mental health clinicians need to support service users in risk factor-related behaviour change. We investigated mental health care workers' views of a physical health self-management support program in order to identify implementation requirements. Qualitative interviews were conducted with workers who had differing levels of experience with a self-management support program. Themes were identified using interpretive descriptive analysis and then matched against domains used in implementation models to draw implications for successful practice change. Three main themes emerged related to: (1) understandings of disease management within job roles; (2) requirements for putting self-management support into practice; and (3) challenges of coordination in disease management. Priority domains from implementation models were inner and outer health service settings. While staff training is required, practice change for care which takes account of both mental and physical health also requires changes in organisational frameworks. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  5. A comprehensive joint replacement program for total knee arthroplasty: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prefontaine Paul

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA is a commonly performed surgical procedure in the US. It is important to have a comprehensive inpatient TKA program which maximizes outcomes while minimizing adverse events. The purpose of this study was to describe a TKA program – the Joint Replacement Program (JRP – and report post-surgical outcomes. Methods 74 candidates for a primary TKA were enrolled in the JRP. The JRP was designed to minimize complications and optimize patient-centered outcomes using a team approach including the patient, patient's family, and a multidisciplinary team of health professionals. The JRP consisted of a pre-operative class, standard pathways for medical care, comprehensive peri-operative pain management, aggressive physical therapy (PT, and proactive discharge planning. Measures included functional tests, knee range of motion (ROM, and medical record abstraction of patient demographics, length of stay, discharge disposition, and complications over a 6-month follow-up period. Results All patients achieved medical criteria for hospital discharge. The patients achieved the knee flexion ROM goal of 90° (91.7 ± 5.4°, but did not achieve the knee extension ROM goal of 0° (2.4 ± 2.6°. The length of hospital stay was two days for 53% of the patients, with 39% and 7% discharged in three and four days, respectively. All but three patients were discharged home with functional independence. 68% of these received outpatient physical therapy compared with 32% who received home physical therapy immediately after discharge. Two patients ( Conclusion The comprehensive JRP for TKA was associated with satisfactory clinical outcomes, short lengths of stay, a high percentage of patients discharged home with outpatient PT, and minimal complications. This JRP may represent an efficient, effective and safe protocol for providing care after a TKA.

  6. Health insurers promoting employee wellness: strategies, program components and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brigid M; Schoenman, Julie A; Pirani, Hafiza

    2010-01-01

    To examine health insurance companies' role in employee wellness. Case studies of eight insurers. Wellness activities in work, clinical, online, and telephonic settings. Senior executives and wellness program leaders from Blue Cross Blue Shield health insurers and from one wellness organization. Telephone interviews with 20 informants. Health insurers were engaged in wellness as part of their mission to promote health and reduce health care costs. Program components included the following: education, health risk assessments, incentives, coaching, environmental consultation, targeted programming, onsite biometric screening, professional support, and full-time wellness staff. Programs relied almost exclusively on positive incentives to encourage participation. Results included participation rates as high as 90%, return on investment ranging from $1.09 to $1.65, and improved health outcomes. Health insurers have expertise in developing, implementing, and marketing health programs and have wide access to employers and their employees' health data. These capabilities make health insurers particularly well equipped to expand the reach of wellness programming to improve the health of many Americans. By coupling members' medical data with wellness-program data, health insurers can better understand an individual's health status to develop and deliver targeted interventions. Through program evaluation, health insurers can also contribute to the limited but growing evidence base on employee wellness programs.

  7. Involvement of the US Department of Defense in Civilian Assistance, Part I: a quantitative description of the projects funded by the Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdeaux, Margaret Ellis; Lawry, Lynn; Bonventre, Eugene V; Burkle, Frederick M

    2010-03-01

    To review the history and goals of the US Department of Defense's largest civilian assistance program, the Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster and Civic Aid Program and to describe the number, geographic regions, years, key words, countries, and types of projects carried out under this program since 2001. Using the program's central database, we reviewed all approved projects since 2001 and tabulated them by year, combatant command, country, and key word. We also reviewed the project descriptions of projects funded between January 1, 2006, and February 9, 2008, and examined how their activities varied by combatant command and year. Of the 5395 projects in the database, 2097 were funded. Projects took place in more than 90 countries, with Southern, Pacific, and Africa Command hosting the greatest number. The most common types of projects were school, health, disaster response, and water infrastructure construction, and disaster-response training. The "global war on terror" was the key word most frequently tagged to project descriptions. Project descriptions lacked stated goals as well as implementation and coordination strategies with potential partners, and did not report outcome or impact indicators. The geographic reach of the program is vast and projects take place in a wide variety of public sectors. Yet their security and civilian assistance value remains unclear given the lack of stated project goals, implementation strategies, or measures of effectiveness. To facilitate transparency and policy discussion, we recommend project proposals include hypotheses as to how they will enhance US security, their relevance to the public sector they address, and outcome and impact indicators that can assess their value and effectiveness.

  8. Epigenomic programing: a future way to health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris A. Shenderov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available It is now generally accepted that the ‘central genome dogma’ (i.e. a causal chain going from DNA to RNA to proteins and downstream to biological functions should be replaced by the ‘fluid genome dogma’, that is, complex feed-forward and feed-back cycles that interconnect organism and environment by epigenomic programing – and reprograming – throughout life and at all levels, sometimes also down the generations. The epigenomic programing is the net sum of interactions derived from own metabolism and microbiota as well as external factors such as diet, pharmaceuticals, environmental compounds, and so on. It is a growing body of results indicating that many chronic metabolic and degenerative disorders and diseases – often called ‘civilization diseases’ – are initiated and/or influenced upon by non-optimal epigenomic programing, often taking place early in life. In this context, the first 1,000 days of life – from conception into early infancy – is often called the most important period of life. The following sections present some major mechanisms for epigenomic programing as well as some factors assumed to be of importance. The need for more information about own genome and metagenome, as well as a substantial lack of adequate information regarding dietary and environmental databases are also commented upon. However, the mere fact that we can influence epigenomic health programing opens up the way for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions. The authors underline the importance of creating a ‘Human Gut Microbiota and Epigenomic Platform’ in order to facilitate interdisciplinary collaborations among scientists and clinicians engaged in host microbial ecology, nutrition, metagenomics, epigenomics and metabolomics as well as in disease epidemiology, prevention and treatment.

  9. Epigenomic programing: a future way to health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenderov, Boris A; Midtvedt, Tore

    2014-01-01

    It is now generally accepted that the 'central genome dogma' (i.e. a causal chain going from DNA to RNA to proteins and downstream to biological functions) should be replaced by the 'fluid genome dogma', that is, complex feed-forward and feed-back cycles that interconnect organism and environment by epigenomic programing - and reprograming - throughout life and at all levels, sometimes also down the generations. The epigenomic programing is the net sum of interactions derived from own metabolism and microbiota as well as external factors such as diet, pharmaceuticals, environmental compounds, and so on. It is a growing body of results indicating that many chronic metabolic and degenerative disorders and diseases - often called 'civilization diseases' - are initiated and/or influenced upon by non-optimal epigenomic programing, often taking place early in life. In this context, the first 1,000 days of life - from conception into early infancy - is often called the most important period of life. The following sections present some major mechanisms for epigenomic programing as well as some factors assumed to be of importance. The need for more information about own genome and metagenome, as well as a substantial lack of adequate information regarding dietary and environmental databases are also commented upon. However, the mere fact that we can influence epigenomic health programing opens up the way for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions. The authors underline the importance of creating a 'Human Gut Microbiota and Epigenomic Platform' in order to facilitate interdisciplinary collaborations among scientists and clinicians engaged in host microbial ecology, nutrition, metagenomics, epigenomics and metabolomics as well as in disease epidemiology, prevention and treatment.

  10. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF): a unifying model for the conceptual description of the rehabilitation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucki, Gerold; Cieza, Alarcos; Melvin, John

    2007-05-01

    An important basis for the successful development of rehabilitation practice and research is a conceptually sound description of rehabilitation understood as a health strategy based on a universally accepted conceptual model and taxonomy of human functioning. With the approval of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) by the World Health Assembly in 2001 and the reference to the ICF in the World Health Assembly's resolution on "Disability, including prevention, management and rehabilitation" in 2005, we can now rely on a universally accepted conceptual model. It is thus time to initiate the process of evolving an ICF-based conceptual description that can serve as a basis for similar conceptual descriptions and according definitions of the professions applying the rehabilitation strategy and of distinct scientific fields of human functioning and rehabilitation research. In co-operation with the Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (PRM) section of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS) and its professional practice committee, we present a first tentative version of an ICF-based conceptual description in this paper. A brief definition describes rehabilitation as the health strategy applied by PRM and professionals in the health sector and across other sectors that aims to enable people with health conditions experiencing or likely to experience disability to achieve and maintain optimal functioning in interaction with the environment. Readers of the Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine are invited to contribute towards achieving an internationally accepted ICF-based conceptual description of rehabilitation by submitting commentaries to the Editor of this journal.

  11. Developing Collaborative Maternal and Child Health Leaders: A Descriptive Study of the National Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Alina Nadira; Cilenti, Dorothy

    2018-01-01

    Purpose An assessment of the National Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development Center (the Center) was conducted to describe (1) effects of the Center's training on the use of collaborative leadership practices by MCH leaders, and (2) perceived barriers to collaboration for MCH leaders. The Center provides services to strengthen MCH professionals' skills in three core areas: Change Management/Adaptive Leadership, Evidence-Based Decision Making, and Systems Integration. Description This descriptive qualitative study compares eight interview responses from a sample of the Center's participants and findings from a document review of the training curriculum against an existing framework of collaborative leadership themes. Assessment Systems thinking tools and related training were highly referenced, and the interviewees often related process-based leadership practices with their applied learning health transformation projects. Perceived barriers to sustaining collaborative work included: (1) a tendency for state agencies to have siloed priorities, (2) difficulty achieving a consensus to move a project forward without individual partners disengaging, (3) strained organizational partnerships when the individual representative leaves that partnering organization, and (4) difficulty in sustaining project-based partnerships past the short term. Conclusion The findings in this study suggest that investments in leadership development training for MCH professionals, such as the Center, can provide opportunities for participants to utilize collaborative leadership practices.

  12. The Practice of Health Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sarah R

    2017-11-01

    The Practice of Health Program Evaluation provides an overview of the evaluation process for public health programs while diving deeper to address select advanced concepts and techniques. The book unfolds evaluation as a three-phased process consisting of identification of evaluation questions, data collection and analysis, and dissemination of results and recommendations. The text covers research design, sampling methods, as well as quantitative and qualitative approaches. Types of evaluation are also discussed, including economic assessment and systems research as relative newcomers. Aspects critical to conducting a successful evaluation regardless of type or research design are emphasized, such as stakeholder engagement, validity and reliability, and adoption of sound recommendations. The book encourages evaluators to document their approach by developing an evaluation plan, a data analysis plan, and a dissemination plan, in order to help build consensus throughout the process. The evaluative text offers a good bird's-eye view of the evaluation process, while offering guidance for evaluation experts on how to navigate political waters and advocate for their findings to help affect change.

  13. The Use of Narrative as a Treatment Approach for Obesity: A Storied Educational Program Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Marcus; Griffith, Jeana; Cobb, Mellanese; Oge, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a health care crisis according to the leading pediatric advocacy groups (National Medical Association, American Academy of Pediatrics, and American Diabetes Association) and the White House. The problem has reached epidemic proportions for all children, but it has an even greater impact on racial minorities. The subject of childhood obesity can lead to a host of medical, psychological, and social problems, including low self-esteem and discrimination.We wrote an interventional children's book and workbook (The Tale of Two Athletes: The Story of Jumper and The Thumper) and developed a three-step intervention based on the narrative. The intervention's purpose is to increase public awareness, reduce stigma, and to help members of underserved communities become more comfortable discussing obesity. In classrooms and other community settings, a storied education program is presented to students of various ages. Interactive storytelling is the first step: live narration with direct listening and active participation. Didactic information on obesity is shared, including a sociocultural explanation for why the issue is more problematic among racial minorities. The audience is then introduced to the story of Jumper and The Thumper, two larger-than-life characters who experience different outcomes as a result of their choices about diet and exercise. True examples are described during the narration about these two young men, accompanied by cartoons and photographs for visual emphasis.The next step is reading: audience members are provided with a book to reinforce what was learned. Readers are allowed to more closely examine the importance of making healthy choices.Practicing positive behaviors and decision making through games and exercises from the companion workbook is the final step. These activities help children and their families live a healthier lifestyle. The goal is that these three steps, linked to a common narrative, will have a meaningful

  14. Developing family rooms in mental health inpatient units: an exploratory descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobel, Sophie; Foster, Kim; Edwards, Clair

    2015-06-19

    Family-friendly spaces for children and families to visit inpatient mental health units are recommended in international mental health guidelines as one way to provide service delivery that is responsive to the needs of parent-consumers and families. There is a lack of evidence on the implementation of family-friendly spaces or Family Rooms. This study aimed to explore the development, role, and function of Family Rooms in four mental health inpatient units in a local health district in NSW Australia. An exploratory descriptive inductive-deductive design using multiple data sources was employed. Methods included Family Room usage and parental status data over a 12 week period, an open-ended questionnaire, and semi-structured interviews with 20 nurses. Available parental status data indicated that between 8-14 % of inpatients were parents of dependent children under 18. Family Room usage was multipurpose and used specifically for children & families 29 % of the time. As spaces in the units, Family Rooms were perceived as acknowledging of the importance of family, and providing comfortable, secure spaces for parent-consumers and their children and family to maintain connections. Units did not have local policies or guidelines on the development, maintenance, and/or use of the rooms. Despite long-standing recognition of the need to identify consumers' parental status, there remains a lack of systematic processes for identifying parents in mental health inpatient services nationally. Family Rooms as spaces within inpatient units acknowledge the importance of families and are a step towards provision of family-focused mental health care. Recommendations for establishing and maintaining Family Rooms are outlined.

  15. ASTDD Synopses of State Oral Health Programs - Selected indicators

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2011-2017. The ASTDD Synopses of State Oral Health Programs contain information useful in tracking states’ efforts to improve oral health and contributions to...

  16. ASTDD Synopses of State Oral Health Programs - Selected indicators

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2011-2017. The ASTDD Synopses of State Oral Health Programs contain information useful in tracking states’ efforts to improve oral health and contributions to...

  17. Family health program user: knowledge and satisfaction about user embracement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Lacerda Borges de Sá

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the knowledge and satisfaction of users of a Basic Health Unit about the strategy of embracement. Methods: Descriptive study with qualitative approach, carried out in a Basic Health Unit, Fortaleza, Brazil, where practical activities of the Education Program of Work for Health of the University of Fortaleza were performed. Fifty eight service users were involved, following inclusion criteria: being present during the data collection, age over 18, regardless of sex, and voluntary participation. Data collection occurred in December 2009, through semi-structured interview. The data associated with the identification of users were processed in Microsoft Office Excel 2007, being organizedstatistically in table. Data related to qualitative aspects were analyzed according to the technique of content analysis. Results: 56 (97% were women, with ages ranging between 21 and 40 years, 34 (59% were married and 53 (91% are literate. On family income, 55 (95%received less than two minimum salaries per month. In order to facilitate understanding the speech of users, these were evaluated from the perspective of two categories: knowledge about embracement and satisfaction with embracement. Conclusion: Users have a limited view of the significance and magnitude of the embracement to provide the care. Although satisfied with the service, respondents report as negative aspects: the shortage of professionals, the professional relationship with user impaired due to constant delays of the professional, and the dehumanization of care.

  18. Description of a multi-university education and collaborative care child psychiatry access program: New York State's CAP PC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, D L; Fornari, V; Scharf, M; Fremont, W; Zuckerbrot, R; Foley, C; Hargrave, T; Smith, B A; Wallace, J; Blakeslee, G; Petras, J; Sengupta, S; Singarayer, J; Cogswell, A; Bhatia, I; Jensen, P

    2017-09-01

    Although, child mental health problems are widespread, few get adequate treatment, and there is a severe shortage of child psychiatrists. To address this public health need many states have adopted collaborative care programs to assist primary care to better assess and manage pediatric mental health concerns. This report adds to the small literature on collaborative care programs and describes one large program that covers most of New York state. CAP PC, a component program of New York State's Office of Mental Health (OMH) Project TEACH, has provided education and consultation support to primary care providers covering most of New York state since 2010. The program is uniquely a five medical school collaboration with hubs at each that share one toll free number and work together to provide education and consultation support services to PCPs. The program developed a clinical communications record to track information about all consultations which forms the basis of much of this report. 2-week surveys following consultations, annual surveys, and pre- and post-educational program evaluations have also been used to measure the success of the program. CAP PC has grown over the 6years of the program and has provided 8013 phone consultations to over 1500 PCPs. The program synergistically provided 17,523 CME credits of educational programming to 1200 PCPs. PCP users of the program report very high levels of satisfaction and self reported growth in confidence. CAP PC demonstrates that large-scale collaborative consultation models for primary care are feasible to implement, popular with PCPs, and can be sustained. The program supports increased access to child mental health services in primary care and provides child psychiatric expertise for patients who would otherwise have none. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Psycho-social aspects of personal health monitoring: a descriptive literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlan, Holger; Schmidt, Silke

    2013-01-01

    We aimed at providing a short review on already published studies addressing psycho-social issues of personal health monitoring (PHM). Both core questions addressed within this review are: What is the impact of PHM on intended psycho-social and health-related outcomes? And which psycho-social issues affected by or related to PHM have already been investigated? This descriptive review based on a literature search using various databases (Psycinfo, Psyndex, Pubmed, SSCI). Resulting 428 abstracts were coded regarding their psycho-social content. Inspection of results was carried out along the relevance of the papers regarding psycho-social issues. Research in PHM focuses on telemonitoring and smart home applications: Tele-monitoring studies are directed to outcome-related questions, smart home studies to feasibility issues. Despite of technological matters, comparability of both systems in psycho-social issues is lacking. Tele-monitoring has been proven for impact on patient groups with chronic diseases, yet smart home still lacks evidence in health-related and psycho-social matters. Smart home applications have been investigated with respect to attitudes, perceptions and concerns of end-users, telemonitoring regarding acceptance and adherence.

  20. Description of physiotherapy services in a mental health institution in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Gbiri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Physiotherapy  has  long  been  recognised  as  adjunct  to  drug therapy in the management of individuals with mental illness. however, little evidence existed on the utilization of physiotherapy in mental health especially in developing worlds.This study reviewed the utilization of physiotherapy in a Mental health  Institution in lagos, nigeria and determined its contribution to quality of  patient-care in the hospital.This study involved review of clients’ activity profile and patients’ record in a federal neuro-psychiatric hospital in lagos, nigeria between 2002 and 2006. The hospital records were used as source of information for socio- demographic details. Information on the physical diagnosis was extracted from the patients’ records in the departmental records. Data were summarized using descriptive statistics.Six thousand, four hundred and seventy-three (3.3% out of the 195,686  patients of the hospital within the study period enjoyed physiotherapy ser vices. only 766 (14% of the hospital in-patients enjoyed physiotherapy services. In addition, 808 clients enjoyed the health promotion services. low back pain (85; 21.7%, osteo-arthritis (82; 20.9%, stroke (64; 16.3% and shoulder pain  (29; 7.4% were the most common co-existing health problems referred for physiotherapy.The importance of physiotherapy in mental health is evidenced in the number of patients/clients who benefited from its services. Therefore, physiotherapy is an integral and indispensible member of the mental health team. however, physiotherapy  is  still  under-utilized  in  the  hospital.  This  points  to  the  need  for  proper  integration  of  physiotherapy  into mental health team in the hospital and other similar health institutions.

  1. [Research within the reach of Osakidetza professionals: Primary Health Care Research Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandes, Gonzalo; Arce, Verónica; Arietaleanizbeaskoa, María Soledad

    2014-04-01

    To provide information about the process and results of the Primary Health Care Research Program 2010-2011 organised by the Primary Care Research Unit of Bizkaia. Descriptive study. Osakidetza primary care. The 107 health professionals who applied for the program from a total of 4,338 general practitioners, nurses and administrative staff who were informed about it. Application level, research topics classification, program evaluation by participants, projects funding and program costs. Percentage who applied, 2.47%; 95% CI 2.41-2.88%. Of the 28 who were selected and 19 completed. The research topics were mostly related to the more common chronic diseases (32%), and prevention and health promotion (18%). Over 90% of participants assessed the quality of the program as good or excellent, and half of them considered it as difficult or very difficult. Of the18 new projects generated, 12 received funding, with 16 grants, 10 from the Health Department of the Basque Government, 4 from the Carlos III Institute of Health of the Ministry of Health of Spain, and 2 from Kronikgune. A total of €500,000 was obtained for these projects. This program cost €198,327. This experience can be used by others interested in the promotion of research in primary care, as the program achieved its objectives, and was useful and productive. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Mental health nurses' views and experiences of working with undergraduate nursing students: A descriptive exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienert-Brown, Mel; Taylor, Peta; Withington, John; Lefebvre, Evelyn

    2018-05-01

    The core of pre-registration nursing education is the learning that takes place during the clinical placement. However, despite the fact that registered nurse preceptors are key players in supporting students during their placements there is a lack of literature examining the views of preceptors working with nursing students in mental health settings. To explore mental health nurses' views and experiences of working with undergraduate nursing students and determine what factors influence this experience. A descriptive exploratory study approach using an on-line questionnaire was adopted for this study. A specialist mental health service (SMHS) within one District Health Board in New Zealand. 89 registered nurses who had been involved in working with nursing students participated in this study. Data was collected using an online questionnaire. The majority of the respondents in this study reported that they felt confident and well supported in the work they did with nursing students and had a positive perception of this role. However, one significant negative factor identified was the extra stress and workload pressure they reported when working with students, when no allowance was made for this. Another key finding was that engaging in some form of education related to the preceptorship role was positively correlated with nurses knowing what was required of them, feeling confident, the extent to which they planned clinical education, and feeling that they were sufficiently appreciated. Ensuring nurses have access to education related to clinical teaching and learning increases their confidence in the work they do with nursing students and has also been shown to have a positive impact on how they view this role. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Recruiting patients as partners in health research: a qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vat, Lidewij Eva; Ryan, Devonne; Etchegary, Holly

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, funders and researchers want to partner with patients in health research, but it can be challenging for researchers to find patient partners. More than taking part in research as participants, patient partners help design, carry out and manage research projects. The goal of this study was to describe ways that patient partners have been recruited by researchers and patient engagement leads (individuals within organizations responsible for promoting and supporting patients as research partners). We talked with researchers and patient engagement leads in Canada and the United Kingdom, as well as a patient representative. We found three ways that could help researchers and patients find each other. One way is a case-by-case basis, where patients are often sought with experience of a health condition that is the focus of the research. The other ways involved directories where projects were posted and could be found by patients and researchers, or a third party matched patients with research projects. We found four recruitment strategies:Social marketingCommunity outreachHealth systemPartnering with other organizations (e.g., advocacy groups) There are many influences on finding, selecting and retaining patient partners: patient characteristics, the local setting, the opportunity, work climate, education and support. We hope study results will provide a useful starting point for research teams in recruiting their patient partners. Background Patient engagement in clinical trials and other health research continues to gain momentum. While the benefits of patient engagement in research are emerging, relatively little is known about recruiting patients as research partners. The purpose of this study was to describe recruitment strategies and models of recruiting patients as partners in health research. Methods Qualitative descriptive study. Thirteen patient engagement leads and health researchers from Canada and the United Kingdom, as well as one patient

  4. OSHA Training Programs. Module SH-48. Safety and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Act) training programs is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module provides a list of OSHA training requirements and describes OSHA training programs and other safety organizations' programs. Following the introduction, 11 objectives (each keyed to a page in the…

  5. Programed Instruction in Health Education and Physical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayshark, Cyrus; Evaul, Thomas W.

    This book contains eight chapters by several different authors, most of them professors of health or physical education. Focus is on applications and implications of programed instruction for professionals in the health and physical education fields. "Overview of Programed Instruction" defines programing, its development and implications for…

  6. Enrolling Underserved Women in mHealth Programs: Results From Text4baby Outreach Campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushar, Jessica A; Fishman, Jodie; Garfinkel, Danielle; Pirretti, Amy

    2018-03-01

    Public health practitioners have increasingly leveraged technology-based communication to get health information into the hands of hard-to-reach populations; however, best practices for outreach and enrollment into mobile health (mHealth) programs are lacking. This article describes enrollment results from campaigns focused on enrolling underserved pregnant women and mothers in Text4baby-a free, mHealth service-to inform outreach strategies for mHealth programs. Text4baby participants receive health and safety information, interactive surveys, alerts, and appointment reminders through at least three weekly texts and a free app-timed to users' due date or babies' birth date. Text4baby worked with partners to implement national, state, and community-based enrollment campaigns. Descriptive statistics were used to compare baseline enrollment prior to a campaign with enrollment during a campaign to generate enrollment estimates. Enrollment rates were calculated for campaigns for which the number targeted/reached was available. National television campaigns resulted in more than 10,000 estimated enrollments. Campaigns that were integrated with an existing program and text-based recruitment had the highest enrollment rates, ranging from 7% to 24%. Facebook advertisements and traditional media targeting providers and consumers were least effective. mHealth programs should consider text-based recruitment and outreach via existing programs; additional research is needed on return on investment for different outreach strategies and on the effectiveness of different outreach strategies at reaching and enrolling specific target populations.

  7. On models of health assistance and the program of family health of the Brazilian Health Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Hausman Silveira

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The article makes reference to the three models that have inspired the construction of the Program of Family Health in Brazil (Cuban, English and Canadian, observing their differences and similarities and comparing them with the Brazilian case. Therefore, an associative line is also constructed between the Only System of Health (SUS and the necessity of a practice which allows the functioning of its lines of direction and organization principles. Thus, we reach the conclusion that the Program of Family Health in Brazil, for its multi professional work proposal in interdisciplinary teams, in accordance with the SUS, can help keep the law of health in the Country. Key-words: SUS; Program of Family Health; Interdisciplinary; Medical care model; Sanitary practice

  8. 78 FR 6275 - Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health Benefits in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health Benefits in Alternative...'s Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health Benefits in Alternative Benefit Plans... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 430...

  9. Problem area descriptions : motor vehicle crashes - data analysis and IVI program analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    In general, the IVI program focuses on the more significant safety problem categories as : indicated by statistical analyses of crash data. However, other factors were considered in setting : program priorities and schedules. For some problem areas, ...

  10. Nursing Philosophy of community mental health nurses in Japan: A qualitative, descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Koji; Hasegawa, Masami; Nagayama, Yutaka; Oe, Masato

    2018-04-01

    The present study reports the findings of a qualitative, descriptive study that sought to clarify nursing philosophy for community mental health nurses (CMHN) working at independent psychiatric home-visit nursing agencies in Japan. We carried out participant observation and semistructured interviews with 13 CMHN in rural and urban areas. We identified eight subthemes and three higher-order themes based on these subthemes. CMHN embraced a nursing philosophy in which they: (i) have respect for consumers' ways of life and their self-realization; (ii) find harmony between view of life and work; and (iii) build communities where residents support each other beyond their roles. Together, these themes constitute a valuable nursing philosophy that supports the recovery of people with mental illness. The themes could also help educate professionals about principles and meanings relevant to recovery, which are regarded as key to changing the professional's care paradigm from a biomedical model to a recovery model. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  11. Neighbourhood as community: A qualitative descriptive study of nursing students' experiences of community health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babenko-Mould, Yolanda; Ferguson, Karen; Atthill, Stephanie

    2016-03-01

    Explore the use of a neighbourhood practice placement with nursing students to gain insight into how the experience influenced their learning and how the reconceptualization of community can be a model for students' professional development. The integration of community health nursing competencies in undergraduate nursing education is a critical element of student development. Neighbourhood placements have been found to support development of such competencies by exposing students to issues such as culture, social justice, partnership, and community development. A qualitative design was used with a sample of 48 Year 3 baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in a community health nursing practice course. Students submitted reflective reviews where they responded to questions and subsequently participated in focus groups. Meaning making of narrative data took place using the descriptive qualitative analysis approach. Students became more self-directed learners and developed team process skills. Some found it challenging to adapt to a role outside of the traditional acute care context. Nursing practice in a neighbourhood context requires students to be innovative and creative in problem-solving and relationship building. The placement also requires neighbourhood liaison persons who are adept at helping students bridge the theory-practice gap. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Consumer involvement in the health technology assessment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, Jane; Oliver, Sandy

    2004-01-01

    This study aims to describe a cycle of development leading to sustainable methods for involving consumers in the management of a program commissioning health technology assessment. Staff time was dedicated to developing procedures for recruiting and briefing consumers to participate in prioritizing, commissioning, and reporting research. Resources and support were developed in light of early feedback from consumers and those working with them. These were piloted and amended before being used routinely. Over 4 years, procedures and resources have been developed to support six consumers attending seven to eight prioritization meetings a year; thirty to forty-five consumers each year commenting on research need for particular topics; thirty consumers a year commenting on research proposals, and twenty a year commenting on research reports. The procedures include clear job descriptions, induction and development days, clear briefing materials, payment for substantial tasks, and regularly seeking feedback to improve procedures. Explicit, inclusive, and reproducible methods for supporting consumer involvement that satisfy National Health Service policy recommendations for involving consumers in research require dedicated staff time to support a cycle of organizational development.

  13. Wellness Programs: Preventive Medicine to Reduce Health Care Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Gilbert R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A wellness program is a formalized approach to preventive health care that can positively affect employee lifestyle and reduce future health-care costs. Describes programs for health education, smoking cessation, early detection, employee assistance, and fitness, citing industry success figures. (eight references) (MLF)

  14. The diffusion of the distance Entomology Master's Degree Program at the University of Nebraska Lincoln: A descriptive case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbell, Jody M.

    This study explored three selected phases of Rogers' (1995) Diffusion of Innovations Theory to examine the diffusion process of the distance Entomology Master's Degree program at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. A qualitative descriptive case study approach incorporated semi-structured interviews with individuals involved in one or more of the three stages: Development, Implementation, and Institutionalization. Documents and archival evidence were used to triangulate findings. This research analyzed descriptions of the program as it moved from the Development, to the Implementation, and finally, the Institutionalization stages of diffusion. Each respective stage was examined through open and axial coding. Process coding identified themes common to two or more diffusion stages, and explored the evolution of themes from one diffusion stage to the next. At a time of significant budget constraints, many departments were faced with the possibility of merger or dissolution. The Entomology Master's Degree Program evolved from being an entrepreneurial means to prevent departmental dissolution to eventually being viewed as a model for the development of similar programs across this university and other institutions of higher education. During this evolution, the program was reinvented to meet the broader needs of industry and a global student market. One finding not consistent with Rogers' model was that smaller, rather than larger, departmental size contributed to the success of the program. Within this small department, faculty members were able to share their experiences and knowledge with each other on a regular basis, which promoted greater acceptance of the distance program. How quality and rigor may be defined and measured was a key issue in each respective stage. In this specific case, quality and rigor was initially a comparison of on-campus and distance course content and then moved to program-based assessment and measures of student outcomes such as job

  15. Computer automation of continuous-flow analyzers for trace constituents in water. Volume 4. Description of program segments. Part 3. TAASTART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    This report describes TAASTART, the third program in the series of programs necessary in automating the Technicon AutoAnalyzer. Included is a flow chart that illustrates the program logic and a description of each section and subroutine. In addition, all arrays, variables and strings are listed and defined, and a sample program listing with a complete list of symbols and references is provided

  16. A Descriptive Study of Wisconsin PK-12 Virtual Public School Program Operations and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banker, Margaret M.

    2012-01-01

    E-Learning as it pertains to public education is in its infancy in America. There is limited research on what operational design, development, and management attributes of virtual school programs foster student achievement. The Wisconsin Department of Instruction has not developed or adopted program standards for E-Learning programs. The purpose…

  17. [Public health competencies and contents in pharmacy degree programs in Spanish universities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbreras, Blanca; Davó-Blanes, María Carmen; Vives-Cases, Carmen; Bosch, Félix

    2015-01-01

    To identify public health core competencies and contents in pharmacy degrees at a meeting of public health lecturers in pharmacy degrees from various public and private universities. The first Meeting of the Forum of University Teaching Staff in Pharmacy Degrees was held at the Faculty of Medicine in the Complutense University, Madrid, Spain on the 19(th) and 20(th) of November 2013. The meeting was attended by 17 lecturers. Participants brought their own teaching programs and were given two previous studies on public health competencies for analysis of public health contents and competencies in pharmacy degrees. Working groups were formed and the results were shared. The highest number of core competencies was identified in the following functions: "Assessment of the population's health needs" and "Developing health policies". The final program included basic contents organized into 8 units: Concept of Public Health, Demography, Epidemiological Method, Environment and Health, Food Safety, Epidemiology of Major Health Problems, Health Promotion and Education, and Health Planning and Management. Representation of almost all the Spanish Pharmacy Faculties and the consensus reached in the description of competences and program contents will greatly improve the quality of teaching in this area. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Family support programs and adolescent mental health: review of evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuhn ES

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Emily S Kuhn, Robert D Laird Department of Psychology, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, USA Abstract: Family support programs aim to improve parent wellbeing and parenting as well as adolescent mental and behavioral health by addressing the needs of parents of adolescents experiencing or at risk for mental health problems. Family support programs can be part of the treatment for adolescents diagnosed with mental or behavioral health problems, or family support programs can be delivered as prevention programs designed to prevent the onset or escalation of mental or behavioral health problems. This review discusses the rationale for family support programs and describes the range of services provided by family support programs. The primary focus of the review is on evaluating the effectiveness of family support programs as treatments or prevention efforts delivered by clinicians or peers. Two main themes emerged from the review. First, family support programs that included more forms of support evidenced higher levels of effectiveness than family support programs that provided fewer forms of support. Discussion of this theme focuses on individual differences in client needs and program adaptions that may facilitate meeting diverse needs. Second, family support prevention programs appear to be most effective when serving individuals more in need of mental and behavioral health services. Discussion of this theme focuses on the intensity versus breadth of the services provided in prevention programs. More rigorous evaluations of family support programs are needed, especially for peer-delivered family support treatments. Keywords: intervention, parent, mental and behavioral health

  19. Planning for Sustainability of an Evidence-Based Mental Health Promotion Program in Canadian Elementary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadbeater, Bonnie J; Gladstone, Emilie J; Sukhawathanakul, Paweena

    2015-09-01

    Substantial research illuminates many factors effecting the implementation of evidence-based mental health promotion programs in schools; however, research on how schools plan for sustaining their investments in these programs is limited. In this qualitative study, we elicited descriptions of opportunities and challenges for sustainability. We interviewed 24 individuals from schools involved in a longitudinal, qualitative research project that followed uptake and implementation of the evidence-based WITS Programs across 2 years (Leadbeater et al. 2012). WITS stands for Walk away, Ignore, Talk it out and Seek help and the online WITS Programs focus on preventing peer victimization ( www.witsprograms.ca ). Our findings suggest that sustainability planning in schools is not merely a next step following high quality implementation, but rather involves multiple ongoing processes that need to be anticipated and supported by school leadership and program champions and developers in order to realize investments in evidence-based programs.

  20. SIMON. A computer program for reliability and statistical analysis using Monte Carlo simulation. Program description and manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kongsoe, H.E.; Lauridsen, K.

    1993-09-01

    SIMON is a program for calculation of reliability and statistical analysis. The program is of the Monte Carlo type, and it is designed with high flexibility, and has a large potential for application to complex problems like reliability analyses of very large systems and of systems, where complex modelling or knowledge of special details are required. Examples of application of the program, including input and output, for reliability and statistical analysis are presented. (au) (3 tabs., 3 ills., 5 refs.)

  1. Family support programs and adolescent mental health: review of evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Laird, Robert; Kuhn,Emily

    2014-01-01

    Emily S Kuhn, Robert D Laird Department of Psychology, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, USA Abstract: Family support programs aim to improve parent wellbeing and parenting as well as adolescent mental and behavioral health by addressing the needs of parents of adolescents experiencing or at risk for mental health problems. Family support programs can be part of the treatment for adolescents diagnosed with mental or behavioral health problems, or family support programs can be deli...

  2. Hypersonic ramjet experiment project. Phase 1: Computer program description, ramjet and scramjet cycle performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, R. J.; Wang, T. T.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program was developed to describe the performance of ramjet and scramjet cycles. The program performs one dimensional calculations of the equilibrium, real-gas internal flow properties of the engine. The program can be used for the following: (1) preliminary design calculation and (2) design analysis of internal flow properties corresponding to stipulated flow areas. Only the combustion of hydrogen in air is considered in this case.

  3. Regulatory research and support program for 1992/93 - project descriptions. Information bulletin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Regulatory Research and Support Program (RSP) is intended to augment and extend the Atomic Energy Control Board's regulatory program beyond the capability of in-house resources. The overall objective of the research and support program is to produce pertinent and independent information that will assist the Board and its staff in making correct, timely and credible decisions on regulating nuclear facilities and materials

  4. Regulatory research and support program for 1992/93 - project descriptions. Information bulletin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-03-02

    The Regulatory Research and Support Program (RSP) is intended to augment and extend the Atomic Energy Control Board`s regulatory program beyond the capability of in-house resources. The overall objective of the research and support program is to produce pertinent and independent information that will assist the Board and its staff in making correct, timely and credible decisions on regulating nuclear facilities and materials.

  5. Health plans' disease management programs: extending across the medical and behavioral health spectrum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Elizabeth Levy; Horgan, Constance M; Garnick, Deborah W; Hodgkin, Dominic; Morley, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    Although the disease management industry has expanded rapidly, there is little nationally representative data regarding medical and behavioral health disease management programs at the health plan level. National estimates from a survey of private health plans indicate that 90% of health plan products offered disease management for general medical conditions such as diabetes but only 37% had depression programs. The frequency of specific depression disease management activities varied widely. Program adoption was significantly related to product type and behavioral health contracting. In health plans, disease management has penetrated more slowly into behavioral health and depression program characteristics are highly variable.

  6. Factors influencing perceived sustainability of Dutch community health programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, A. J. M.; van Assema, P.; Hesdahl, B.; Harting, J.; de Vries, N. K.

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the perceived sustainability of community health programs organized by local intersectoral coalitions, as well as the factors that collaborating partners think might influence sustainability. Semi-structured interviews were conducted among 31 collaborating partners of 5 community health

  7. Program Spotlight: National Outreach Network's Community Health Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Outreach Network of Community Health Educators located at Community Network Program Centers, Partnerships to Advance Cancer Health Equity, and NCI-designated cancer centers help patients and their families receive survivorship support.

  8. The Role of Leadership Support for Health Promotion in Employee Wellness Program Participation, Perceived Job Stress, and Health Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoert, Jennifer; Herd, Ann M; Hambrick, Marion

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the relationship between leadership support for health promotion and job stress, wellness program participation, and health behaviors. A cross-sectional survey design was used. Four worksites with a range of wellness programs were selected for this study. Participants in this study were employees (n = 618) at 4 organizations (bank, private university, wholesale supplier, and public university) in the southeastern United States, each offering an employee wellness program. Response rates in each organization ranged from 3% to 34%. Leadership support for health promotion was measured with the Leading by Example instrument. Employee participation in wellness activities, job stress, and health behaviors were measured with multi-item scales. Correlation/regression analysis and descriptive statistics were used to analyze the relationships among the scaled variables. Employees reporting higher levels of leadership support for health promotion also reported higher levels of wellness activity participation, lower job stress, and greater levels of health behavior ( P = .001). To ascertain the amount of variance in health behaviors accounted for by the other variables in the study, a hierarchical regression analysis revealed a statistically significant model (model F 7,523 = 27.28; P = .001), with leadership support for health promotion (β = .19, t = 4.39, P = .001), wellness activity participation (β = .28, t = 6.95, P stress (β = -.27, t = -6.75, P ≤ .001) found to be significant predictors of health behaviors in the model. Exploratory regression analyses by organization revealed the focal variables as significant model predictors for only the 2 larger organizations with well-established wellness programs. Results from the study suggest that employees' perceptions of organizational leadership support for health promotion are related to their participation in wellness activities, perceived job stress levels, and health behaviors.

  9. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: a unifying model for the conceptual description of physical and rehabilitation medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucki, Gerold; Melvin, John

    2007-05-01

    There is a need to develop a contemporary and internationally accepted conceptual description of physical and rehabilitation medicine (PRM). The process of evolving such a definition can now rely on the unifying conceptual model and taxonomy of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and an ICF-based conceptual description of rehabilitation understood as a health strategy. The PRM section of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS) has endorsed the application of the ICF as a unifying conceptual model for PRM and supports the process of moving towards an "ICF-based conceptual description and according definitions of PRM". With this goal in mind, the authors have developed a first tentative conceptual description in co-operation with the professional practice committee of the UEMS-PRM-section. A respective brief definition describes PRM as the medical specialty that, based on the assessment of functioning and including the diagnosis and treatment of health conditions, performs, applies and co-ordinates biomedical and engineering and a wide range of other interventions with the goal of optimizing functioning of people experiencing or likely to experience disability. Readers of the Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine are invited to contribute to the process of achieving an internationally accepted ICF-based conceptual description of PRM by submitting commentaries to the Editor of this journal.

  10. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program description for high-level waste form development and qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project has been established to convert the high-level radioactive waste associated with nuclear defense production at the Hanford Site into a waste form suitable for disposal in a deep geologic repository. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant will mix processed radioactive waste with borosilicate material, then heat the mixture to its melting point (vitrification) to forin a glass-like substance that traps the radionuclides in the glass matrix upon cooling. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program has been established to support the mission of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant. This Quality Assurance Program Description has been written to document the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program

  11. Enhancing teamwork between chief residents and residency program directors: description and outcomes of an experiential workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhillips, Heather A; Frohna, John G; Murad, M Hassan; Batra, Maneesh; Panda, Mukta; Miller, Marsha A; Brigham, Timothy P; Doughty, Robert A

    2011-12-01

    An effective working relationship between chief residents and residency program directors is critical to a residency program's success. Despite the importance of this relationship, few studies have explored the characteristics of an effective program director-chief resident partnership or how to facilitate collaboration between the 2 roles, which collectively are important to program quality and resident satisfaction. We describe the development and impact of a novel workshop that paired program directors with their incoming chief residents to facilitate improved partnerships. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education sponsored a full-day workshop for residency program directors and their incoming chief residents. Sessions focused on increased understanding of personality styles, using experiential learning, and open communication between chief residents and program directors, related to feedback and expectations of each other. Participants completed an anonymous survey immediately after the workshop and again 8 months later to assess its long-term impact. Participants found the workshop to be a valuable experience, with comments revealing common themes. Program directors and chief residents expect each other to act as a role model for the residents, be approachable and available, and to be transparent and fair in their decision-making processes; both groups wanted feedback on performance and clear expectations from each other for roles and responsibilities; and both groups identified the need to be innovative and supportive of changes in the program. Respondents to the follow-up survey reported that workshop participation improved their relationships with their co-chiefs and program directors. Participation in this experiential workshop improved the working relationships between chief residents and program directors. The themes that were identified can be used to foster communication between incoming chief residents and residency directors and to

  12. Description of an Intensive Dialectical Behavior Therapy Program for Multidiagnostic Clients with Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Anita; Wisniewski, Lucene; Ben-Porath, Denise

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe an intensive outpatient dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) program for multidiagnostic clients with eating disorders who had not responded adequately to standard, empirically supported treatments for eating disorders. The program integrates DBT with empirically supported cognitive behavior therapy approaches that are well…

  13. A descriptive analysis of psychological traits among the health-care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study is to access various personality traits of doctors of hospital subspecialties. Introduction: One of the most common perceptions in our society is that of medicine being a very stressful profession. The demands of practicing medicine can have significant effects on general health, work satisfaction, professional, and nonprofessional life. To increase the profitability, organizations curtail the staff to reduce the costs. Hence, it can be argued that doctors are subjected to extreme amounts psychiatric duress. Methodology: A descriptive study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital. In which one hundred and twenty-one doctors were approached randomly varying from different specialties. The short form of the psychopathic personality inventory (PPI-SF was used as a questionnaire. Results: One hundred and one (81 females and 20 males doctors from various specialties responded and completed the PPI-SF questionnaire. The subspecialty analysis of the doctors' responses was subdivided into pediatrics, gynecology, medical specialties, surgery, anesthetics, and radiology. Surgeons and GyneObs were the highest scorers on the PPI-SF, with scores of 138 and 149, respectively. Conclusion: This study showed that doctors score higher on a scale of psychopathic personality than the general population. This study also showed that stress immunity is the overriding personality trait in doctors which may, in turn, facilitate better overall patient care. Stress immunity may better facilitate empathy in certain acute situations, which plays a vital role in being a proficient doctor and providing satisfactory patient care and counseling.

  14. Program description of FIBRAM (Fiber Optic Radiation Attenuation Model): a radiation attenuation model for optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingram, W.J.

    1987-06-01

    The report describes a fiber-optics system model and its computer implementation. This implementation can calculate the bit error ratio (BER) versus time for optical fibers that have been exposed to gamma radiation. The program is designed so that the user may arbitrarily change any or all of the system input variables and produce separate outputs. The primary output of the program is a table of the BER as a function of time. This table may be stored on magnetic media and later incorporated into computer graphic programs. The program was written in FORTRAN 77 for the IBM PC/AT/XT computers. Flow charts and program listings are included in the report

  15. 78 FR 42788 - School-Based Health Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration School-Based... Gadsden County. SUMMARY: HRSA will be transferring a School-Based Health Center Capital (SBHCC) Program... support the expansion of services at school-based health centers will continue. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION...

  16. Healthe Kids: An Assessment of Program Performance and Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Bonnie B.; Kindermann, Sylvia L.; Carson, Tabetha; Gavin, Jan; Frerking, Melissa; Bergren, Martha Dewey

    2014-01-01

    Many states in the United States have mandated school health screenings for early identification and referral to professional services for a set of health conditions. Healthe Kids, a community-based program, began offering school-based health screenings to Missouri elementary schools in March 2007. The purpose of the article is to provide a…

  17. Transitions: A Mental Health Literacy Program for Postsecondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin-Boucher, Jacqueline; Szumilas, Magdalena; Sheikh, Tabinda; Kutcher, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Enhancement of mental health literacy is a mental health promotion strategy that may be effective at destigmatizing mental illness and increasing self-seeking behavior. Transitions is a mental health literacy program intended to heighten students' awareness and discussion of mental health problems and promote help-seeking behaviors. Transitions…

  18. The Association Between Health Program Participation and Employee Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca J; Ozminkowski, Ronald J; Hartley, Stephen K

    2016-09-01

    Using health plan membership as a proxy for employee retention, the objective of this study was to examine whether use of health promotion programs was associated with employee retention. Propensity score weighted generalized linear regression models were used to estimate the association between telephonic programs or health risk surveys and retention. Analyses were conducted with six study samples based on type of program participation. Retention rates were highest for employees with either telephonic program activity or health risk surveys and lowest for employees who did not participate in any interventions. Participants ranged from 71% more likely to 5% less likely to remain with their employers compared with nonparticipants, depending on the sample used in analyses. Using health promotion programs in combination with health risk surveys may lead to improvements in employee retention.

  19. 78 FR 42159 - Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Essential Health Benefits in Alternative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... and 156 Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Essential Health Benefits in Alternative... Secretary 45 CFR Parts 155 and 156 [CMS-2334-F] RIN 0938-AR04 Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance... Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) eligibility notices, delegation of appeals, and...

  20. Public health program capacity for sustainability: a new framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Sarah F; Luke, Douglas A; Schooley, Michael W; Elliott, Michael B; Herbers, Stephanie H; Mueller, Nancy B; Bunger, Alicia C

    2013-02-01

    Public health programs can only deliver benefits if they are able to sustain activities over time. There is a broad literature on program sustainability in public health, but it is fragmented and there is a lack of consensus on core constructs. The purpose of this paper is to present a new conceptual framework for program sustainability in public health. This developmental study uses a comprehensive literature review, input from an expert panel, and the results of concept-mapping to identify the core domains of a conceptual framework for public health program capacity for sustainability. The concept-mapping process included three types of participants (scientists, funders, and practitioners) from several public health areas (e.g., tobacco control, heart disease and stroke, physical activity and nutrition, and injury prevention). The literature review identified 85 relevant studies focusing on program sustainability in public health. Most of the papers described empirical studies of prevention-oriented programs aimed at the community level. The concept-mapping process identified nine core domains that affect a program's capacity for sustainability: Political Support, Funding Stability, Partnerships, Organizational Capacity, Program Evaluation, Program Adaptation, Communications, Public Health Impacts, and Strategic Planning. Concept-mapping participants further identified 93 items across these domains that have strong face validity-89% of the individual items composing the framework had specific support in the sustainability literature. The sustainability framework presented here suggests that a number of selected factors may be related to a program's ability to sustain its activities and benefits over time. These factors have been discussed in the literature, but this framework synthesizes and combines the factors and suggests how they may be interrelated with one another. The framework presents domains for public health decision makers to consider when developing

  1. Community health events for enrolling uninsured into public health insurance programs: implications for health reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Scott; Tsai, Kai-ya; Nascimento, Lori M; Cousineau, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether enrollment events may serve as a venue to identify eligible individuals, enroll them into health insurance programs, and educate them about the changes the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will bring about. More than 2900 surveys were administered to attendees of 7 public health insurance enrollment events in California. Surveys were used to identify whether participants had any change in understanding of health reform after participating in the event. More than half of attendees at nearly all events had no knowledge about health reform before attending the event. On average, more than 80% of attendees knew more about health reform following the event and more than 80% believed that the law would benefit their families. Enrollment events can serve as an effective method to educate the public on health reform. Further research is recommended to explore in greater detail the impact community enrollment events can have on expanding public understanding of health reform.

  2. PLAN Bicol, Philippines: health manpower development program in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, K

    1994-06-01

    PLAN Bicol in the Philippines is a community based Health Manpower Development Program (HMDP) geared toward training and mobilization of indigenous health practitioners, providing infrastructural and logistical support to individual families, and educating the community about health, nutrition, and the environment. The field officer recommends at the initiation of a project that program staff have roles that are well defined. New programs should be introduced to the community first and should involve the community in the planning stages. The HMDP program is directed to 38 villages located around national parks that have suffered from deforestation. Community health issues are malnutrition, low immunization, and lack of access to health services. HMDP established a training program for auxiliary health workers (AHWs), who make a commitment to return to their villages after training. Midwives are being trained at local schools. Village houses are being built and repaired; water systems and sanitary toilet facilities are being installed. Village health stations have been constructed and equipped with basic medicines, supplies, and equipment, and are open 5 days a week. Health education classes inform the community about nutrition and health. The problems at inception were the unwillingness of field staff to participate in the program and a high drop out rate among AHWs. Problems were worked out as the program progressed. Facilitative factors are the close coordination with the provincial health office, community acceptance, and the availability of qualified people.

  3. Program description of FIBRAM: a radiation attenuation model for optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingram, W.J.

    1987-06-01

    The report describes a fiber optics system model and its computer implementation. This implementation can calculate the bit error ratio (BER) versus time for optical fibers that have been exposed to gamma radiation. The program is designed so that the user may arbitrarily change any or all of the system input variables and produce separate output calculations. The primary output of the program is a table of the BER as a function of time. This table may be stored on magnetic media and later incorporated into computer graphics programs

  4. TMAP/Mod 1: Tritium Migration Analysis Program code description and user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrill, B.J.; Jones, J.L.; Holland, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    The Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) has been developed by the Fusion Safety Program of EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) as a safety analysis code to analyze tritium loss from fusion systems during normal operation and under accident conditions. TMAP is a one-dimensional code that determines tritium movement and inventories in a system of interconnected enclosures and wall structures. In addition, the thermal response of structures is modeled to provide temperature information required for calculations of tritium movement. The program is written in FORTRAN 4 and has been implemented on the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computing Center (NMFECC)

  5. Systems for the monitoring of working conditions relating to health and safety : extensive descriptions : Belgium, Germany, Luxembourg, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, R.; Verboon, F.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains the extensive descriptions of (some of) the monitoring systems on health and safety in use in the Benelux countries and Germany. The project of which this report is a part aimed at gathering information on monitoring systems throughout the EC member states.

  6. A Guide for Understanding Health Education and Promotion Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Richard W; Nahar, Vinayak K

    2018-03-01

    Planning, Implementing & Evaluating Health Promotion Programs: A Primer is a versatile and comprehensive resource on the theoretical and practical underpinnings of successful health promotion programs. The requirements for effective health promotion program development are presented with frequent use of practical planning examples, pedagogical devices, and expert rationale. Ideal for undergraduate and graduate students in health education, promotion, and planning courses, this 15-chapter textbook is organized in a manner that specifically addresses the responsibilities and competencies required of health education specialists as published in the Health Education Specialist Practice Analysis of 2015. The authors of this textbook are leaders in the field and provide readers with the skills necessary to carry out the full process of health promotion program execution, while also offering direct preparation for CHES and MCHES licensing exams.

  7. Description of a materials/coolant laboratory for support of the Breeder Reactor Technology Shipping Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, H.J.; Rohde, R.W.

    1979-04-01

    A description of a facility devoted to evaluating the environmental compatibility and mechanical response of materials suitable for a breeder reactor spent-fuel shipping cask is given. The facility presently consists of a closed-loop servo-controlled hydraulic, horizontal test system coupled to an environmental chamber, generalized mechanical test equipment and high-rate mechanical behavior apparatus. Future plans include the procurement of real-time computer control equipment which will be used to assess the effects of complex load-time histories on spent-fuel shipping cask materials

  8. LISA. A code for safety assessment in nuclear waste disposals program description and user guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saltelli, A.; Bertozzi, G.; Stanners, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    The code LISA (Long term Isolation Safety Assessment), developed at the Joint Research Centre, Ispra is a useful tool in the analysis of the hazard due to the disposal of nuclear waste in geological formations. The risk linked to preestablished release scenarios is assessed by the code in terms of dose rate to a maximum exposed individual. The various submodels in the code simulate the system of barriers -both natural and man made- which are interposed between the contaminants and man. After a description of the code features a guide for the user is supplied and then a test case is presented

  9. Community Based Competitive Employment Preparation of Developmentally Disabled Persons: A Program Description and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodden, Robert A.; Browder, Phyllis Meighen

    1986-01-01

    Success in competitive employment placement of a demonstration project serving 53 persons with developmental disabilities is associated with three factors: (1) training approach and methodology; (2) program management; and (3) trainee characteristics. (CL)

  10. Social cognition intervention in schizophrenia: Description of the training of affect recognition program - Indian version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thonse, Umesh; Behere, Rishikesh V; Frommann, Nicole; Sharma, Psvn

    2018-01-01

    Social cognition refers to mental operations involved in processing of social cues and includes the domains of emotion processing, Theory of Mind (ToM), social perception, social knowledge and attributional bias. Significant deficits in ToM, emotion perception and social perception have been demonstrated in schizophrenia which can have an impact on socio-occupational functioning. Intervention modules for social cognition have demonstrated moderate effect sizes for improving emotion identification and discrimination. We describe the Indian version of the Training of Affect Recognition (TAR) program and a pilot study to demonstrate the feasibility of administering this intervention program in the Indian population. We also discuss the cultural sensibilities in adopting an intervention program for the Indian setting. To the best of our knowledge this is the first intervention program for social cognition for use in persons with schizophrenia in India. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Sexual Health Education in Massage Therapy Programs: A Survey of Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Brian D.; Healey, Dale K.

    2016-01-01

    Massage therapy program directors completed an online survey to explore sexual education in massage therapy programs. The overall data suggest that program directors are supportive of sexual health education in the training of massage therapists and that such education is integrated into several aspects of their training programs. To enhance…

  12. [Common competencies and contents in public health in graduate programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davó, M A Carmen; Vives-Cases, Carmen; Benavides, Fernando García; Alvarez-Dardet, Carlos; Segura-Benedicto, Andreu; Icart, Teresa; Astasio, Paloma; Gil, Angel; Ortiz, M Del Rocío; García, Angel; Ronda, Elena; Bosch, Félix

    2011-01-01

    To identify fundamental public health competencies and contents in nursing, pharmacy, teaching, medicine, human nutrition and dietetics, optics and optometry, labor relations and human resources, and social work in graduate programs and to formulate proposals for their improvement. The workshop on Public health contents in graduate programs in the XXI Menorca Public Health School was organized as follows: eight groups were set up, coordinated by 37 Spanish university teachers participating in the workshop and selected through key informants and snowball techniques. Two studies on public health professional competencies and the participants' own graduate programs were used to discuss public health professional competencies and contents and establish recommendations to improve public health programs. Each group worked on a particular degree course and the results were shared in plenary. Professional competencies for the three essential public health functions were indentified in all the degrees, except teaching, optics and optometry, and social work. Some of the competencies included in degrees in nursing, teaching, human nutrition and dietetics, and social work were rewritten to highlight the role of each type of professional in public health functions. The groups agreed on the introductory topics (basic concepts and health determinants) and intervention strategies. Common competencies and contents were identified in graduate programs. Updating public health contents in graduate programs would help to define and promote the profile of public health professionals. Copyright © 2011 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Changes in health indicators related to health promotion and microcredit programs in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohn, Anita L; Chávez, Andrea; Dohn, Michael N; Saturria, Luis; Pimentel, Carlos

    2004-03-01

    To assess the impact of health promotion programs and microcredit programs on three communities in the Dominican Republic. One community had only the health promotion program, one community had only the microcredit program, and one community had both a health promotion program and a microcredit program. This pilot project examined the hypothesis that the largest changes in 11 health indicators that were studied would be in the community with both a health promotion program and a microcredit program, that there would be intermediate changes in the community with only a health promotion program, and that the smallest changes would be in the community with only a microcredit program. The health promotion programs used community volunteers to address two major concerns: (1) the prevalent causes of mortality among children under 5 years of age and (2) women's health (specifically breast and cervical cancer screening). The microcredit program made small loans to individuals to start or expand small businesses. Outcome measures were based on comparisons for 11 health indicators from baseline community surveys (27 households surveyed in each of the three communities, done in December 2000 and January 2001) and from follow-up surveys (also 27 households surveyed in each of the three communities, in June and July 2002, after the health promotion program had been operating for about 13 months). Households were randomly chosen during both the baseline and follow-up surveys, without regard to their involvement in the microcredit or health promotion programs. The health indicators improved in all three communities. However, the degree of change was different among the communities (P microcredit and health promotion programs had the largest changes for 10 of the 11 health indicators. Multisector development is known to be important on a macroeconomic scale. The results of this pilot project support the view that multisector development is also important on a microeconomic level

  14. INTRODUCTION OF UNIVERSAL HEALTH PROGRAM IN GEORGIA: PROBLEMS AND PERSPECTIVES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verulava, T; Jorbenadze, R; Barkalaia, T

    2017-01-01

    Since 2013, Georgia enacted Universal Healthcare (UHC) program. Inclusion of uninsured population in the UHC program will have a positive impact on their financial accessibility to the health services. The study aims to analyze the referral rate of the beneficiaries to the health service providers before introduction and after application of the UHC program, particularly, how much it increased the recently uninsured population referral to primary health care units, and also to study the level of satisfaction with the UHC program. Research was conducted by qualitative and quantitative methods. The target groups' (program beneficiaries, physicians, personnel of the Social Service Agency) opinions were identified by means of face-to-face interviews. Enactment of the UHC programs significantly raised the population refferal to the family physicians, and the specialists. Insignificantly, but also increased the frequency of laboratory and diagnostic services. Despite the serious positive changes caused by UHC program implementation there still remain the problems in the primary healthcare system. Also, it is desirable to raise the financial availability of those medical services, which may cause catastrophic costs. In this respect, such medical services must be involved in the universal healthcare program and been expanded their scale. For the purpose of effective usage of the limited funds allocated for health care services provision, the private health insurance companies should be involved in UHC programs. This, together with the reduction of health care costs will increase a competition in the medical market, and enhance the quality of health service.

  15. Stakeholder Knowledge Levels of Coordinated School Health Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Lisa Crouch

    2012-01-01

    Acute and chronic health conditions may be important factors impacting absenteeism and student achievement in schools. Coordinated school health programs can support students who have these conditions. Although such programs have had documented success, implementation can be costly and time consuming. The local problem addressed in this project…

  16. Directory of Academic Programs in Occupational Safety and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, William J., III; And Others

    This booklet describes academic program offerings in American colleges and universities in the area of occupational safety and health. Programs are divided into five major categories, corresponding to each of the core disciplines: (1) occupational safety and health/industrial hygiene, (2) occupational safety, (3) industrial hygiene, (4)…

  17. Occupational Safety and Health Programs in Career Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, Robert D.; And Others

    This resource guide was developed in response to the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and is intended to assist teachers in implementing courses in occupational safety and health as part of a career education program. The material is a synthesis of films, programed instruction, slides and narration, case studies, safety pamphlets,…

  18. What systemic factors contribute to collaboration between primary care and public health sectors? An interpretive descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sabrina T; MacDonald, Marjorie; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Meagher-Stewart, Donna; O'Mara, Linda; Valaitis, Ruta K

    2017-12-01

    Purposefully building stronger collaborations between primary care (PC) and public health (PH) is one approach to strengthening primary health care. The purpose of this paper is to report: 1) what systemic factors influence collaborations between PC and PH; and 2) how systemic factors interact and could influence collaboration. This interpretive descriptive study used purposive and snowball sampling to recruit and conduct interviews with PC and PH key informants in British Columbia (n = 20), Ontario (n = 19), and Nova Scotia (n = 21), Canada. Other participants (n = 14) were knowledgeable about collaborations and were located in various Canadian provinces or working at a national level. Data were organized into codes and thematic analysis was completed using NVivo. The frequency of "sources" (individual transcripts), "references" (quotes), and matrix queries were used to identify potential relationships between factors. We conducted a total of 70 in-depth interviews with 74 participants working in either PC (n = 33) or PH (n = 32), both PC and PH (n = 7), or neither sector (n = 2). Participant roles included direct service providers (n = 17), senior program managers (n = 14), executive officers (n = 11), and middle managers (n = 10). Seven systemic factors for collaboration were identified: 1) health service structures that promote collaboration; 2) funding models and financial incentives supporting collaboration; 3) governmental and regulatory policies and mandates for collaboration; 4) power relations; 5) harmonized information and communication infrastructure; 6) targeted professional education; and 7) formal systems leaders as collaborative champions. Most themes were discussed with equal frequency between PC and PH. An assessment of the system level context (i.e., provincial and regional organization and funding of PC and PH, history of government in successful implementation of health care reform, etc) along

  19. Sexual health education in U.S. physician assistant programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaborne, Lori A; Prince, Ronald J; Kushner, David M

    2015-05-01

    Since the 1950s, sexual health education in medical schools has been evaluated and reported upon, but there has never been an assessment published about sexual health curricula in U.S. physician assistant (PA) programs. The aim of this study was to gain better understanding of how PA programs cover sexual health topics. Between January and March 2014, 181 accredited PA programs received a mailed survey inquiring about their sexual health curriculum. The survey assessed general sexual health topics; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) topics; teaching methods; and the amount of time spent on sexual health education. A total of 106 programs responded (59%). Ten programs offered a required, discrete course on human sexuality. The majority incorporated training into other coursework, which is consistent with most medical schools. LGBT topics were covered less thoroughly than the general sexual health topics. Total amount of time spent on sexual health topics varied widely among programs, from a minimum of 2-4 hours to a maximum of 60 hours, with a median of 12 hours. PA programs in the United States appear to compare favorably with the training offered to medical students in regard to time spent on sexual health education. Transgender issues were least well-covered of all the topics queried. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  20. Functional process descriptions for the program to develop the Nuclear Waste Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, T.W.

    1991-09-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is executing a plan for improvement of the systems implemented to carry out its responsibilities under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA). As part of the plan, OCRWM is performing a systems engineering analysis of both the physical system, i.e., the Nuclear Waste Management System (NWMS), and the programmatic functions that must be accomplished to bring the physical system into being. The purpose of the program analysis is to provide a systematic identification and definition of all program functions, functional process flows, and function products necessary and sufficient to provide the physical system. The analysis resulting from this approach provides a basis for development of a comprehensive and integrated set of policies, standard practices, and procedures for the effective and efficient execution of the program. Thus, this analysis will form a basis for revising current OCRWM policies and procedures, or developing new ones is necessary. The primary purposes of this report are as follows: (1) summarizes the major functional processes and process flows that have been developed as a part of the program analysis, and (2) provide an introduction and assistance in understanding the detailed analysis information contained in the three volume report titled The Analysis of the Program to Develop the Nuclear Waste Management System (Woods 1991a)

  1. Functional process descriptions for the program to develop the Nuclear Waste Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, T.W.

    1991-09-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is executing a plan for improvement of the systems implemented to carry out its responsibilities under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA). As part of the plan, OCRWM is performing a systems engineering analysis of both the physical system, i.e., the Nuclear Waste Management System (NWMS), and the programmatic functions that must be accomplished to bring the physical system into being. The purpose of the program analysis is to provide a systematic identification and definition of all program functions, functional process flows, and function products necessary and sufficient to provide the physical system. The analysis resulting from this approach provides a basis for development of a comprehensive and integrated set of policies, standard practices, and procedures for the effective and efficient execution of the program. Thus, this analysis will form a basis for revising current OCRWM policies and procedures, or developing new ones is necessary. The primary purposes of this report are as follows: (1) summarizes the major functional processes and process flows that have been developed as a part of the program analysis, and (2) provide an introduction and assistance in understanding the detailed analysis information contained in the three volume report titled The Analysis of the Program to Develop the Nuclear Waste Management System (Woods 1991a).

  2. Tensions of Health: Narratives of Employee Wellness Program Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lu; Baker, Jane S; Meadows, Cui Zhang

    2016-09-01

    This article examines dialectical tensions in the health narratives of participants of the Employee Wellness Program (EWP) of a large public university in the southeastern United States. Semi-structured interviews (n = 12) with team leaders in the program indicated that health is a multifaceted concept characterized by three pairs of dialectical tensions: autonomy versus connection, private versus public, and control versus lack of control. These findings suggest that to better promote health and wellness in the workplace, EWP staff should consider employees' unique experiences and beliefs about health when designing organization-wide programs and campaigns. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. Defence Health Service Mentoring Program Evaluation 2001

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Highfield, Jane

    2002-01-01

    The Defense Health Services (DHS) Steering Committee has considered the concept of Mentoring as part of an effort to assist in the development of future health leaders in the Australian Defense Force (ADF...

  4. Designing health promotion programs by watching the market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelb, B D; Bryant, J M

    1992-03-01

    More health care providers and payors are beginning to see health promotion programs as a significant tool for attracting patients, reducing costs, or both. To help design programs that take into account the values and lifestyles of the target group, naturalistic observation can be useful. The authors illustrate the approach in a study of pipeline workers that provided input for the design of nutrition and smoking cessation programs.

  5. Description of a program for steam generators; Descripcion de un programa de generadores de vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campana, F. J.

    2014-10-01

    Steam Generators (SGs) are a key component of PWR nuclear power plants, maintaining their structural integrity throughout their life time is necessary to allow for long term operation (LTD) of PWR plants. NEI 97-06 provides the fundamental elements to be included in a SG Program. In addiction it describes performance criteria that SG tubes have to meet in order to provide reasonable assurance that the tubes are still able to maintain specific safety function. Hence, it is mandatory for plants with SGs to have defined a SG program consistent with NEI 97-06 and contains the elements which are described by it. This Program must contain some elements such as, Degradation Assessment, inspection and Integrity Assessment, among other. (Author)

  6. FURNACE 2. Toroidal geometry neutronic program system method. Description and users manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verschuur, K.A.

    1995-10-01

    FURNACE2 is a 3-dimensional neutron/photon-transport program system for toroidal geometries. It uses ray-tracing and double-differential reflection-and transmission-coefficients and flux-kernels to calculate the angular-flux spectra inside the torus of a fusion-reactor. FURNACE2 is an extended version of FURNACE, developed for application to the neutron-diagnostics at JET, which was supported financially by JET. It is used at JET to calculate the foil-activation for the KN2 diagnostics, the angular-fluxes on the lines of sight of the KN3 profile monitors, and general background fluxes and activation of the vessel. The program is used along with MCNP, combining the advantages of each of the programs and for mutual checks. (orig.).

  7. FURNACE 2. Toroidal geometry neutronic program system method. Description and users manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verschuur, K.A.

    1995-10-01

    FURNACE2 is a 3-dimensional neutron/photon-transport program system for toroidal geometries. It uses ray-tracing and double-differential reflection-and transmission-coefficients and flux-kernels to calculate the angular-flux spectra inside the torus of a fusion-reactor. FURNACE2 is an extended version of FURNACE, developed for application to the neutron-diagnostics at JET, which was supported financially by JET. It is used at JET to calculate the foil-activation for the KN2 diagnostics, the angular-fluxes on the lines of sight of the KN3 profile monitors, and general background fluxes and activation of the vessel. The program is used along with MCNP, combining the advantages of each of the programs and for mutual checks. (orig.)

  8. [Descriptive Analysis of Health Economics of Intensive Home Care of Ventilated Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Yvonne; Ostermann, Julia; Reinhold, Thomas; Ewers, Michael

    2018-05-14

    Long-term ventilated patients in Germany receive intensive care mainly in the patients' home or in assisted-living facilities. There is a lack of knowledge about the nature and extent of resource use and costs associated with care of this small, heterogeneous but overall growing patient group. A sub-study in the context of a research project SHAPE analyzed costs of 29 patients descriptively from a social perspective. Direct and indirect costs of intensive home care over a period of three months were recorded and analyzed retrospectively. Standardized recorded written self-reports from patients and relatives as well as information from the interviewing of nursing staff and from nursing documentation were the basis for this analysis. There was an average total cost of intensive home care for three months per patient of 61194 € (95% CI 53 884-68 504) including hospital stays. The main costs were directly linked to outpatient medical and nursing care provided according to the Code of Social Law V and XI. Services provided by nursing home care service according to § 37(2) Code of Social Law V (65%) were the largest cost item. Approximately 13% of the total costs were attributable to indirect costs. Intensive home care for ventilated patients is resource-intensive and cost-intensive and has received little attention also from a health economics perspective. Valid information and transparency about the cost structures are required for an effective and economic design and management of the long-term care of this patient group. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Access to electronic health knowledge in five countries in Africa: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honorati Masanja

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Access to medical literature in developing countries is helped by open access publishing and initiatives to allow free access to subscription only journals. The effectiveness of these initiatives in Africa has not been assessed. This study describes awareness, reported use and factors influencing use of on-line medical literature via free access initiatives. Methods Descriptive study in four teaching hospitals in Cameroon, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda plus one externally funded research institution in The Gambia. Survey with postgraduate doctors and research scientists to determine Internet access patterns, reported awareness of on-line medical information and free access initiatives; semi structured interviews with a sub-sample of survey participants to explore factors influencing use. Results In the four African teaching hospitals, 70% of the 305 postgraduate doctors reported textbooks as their main source of information; 66% had used the Internet for health information in the last week. In two hospitals, Internet cafés were the main Internet access point. For researchers at the externally-funded research institution, electronic resources were their main source, and almost all had used the Internet in the last week. Across all 333 respondents, 90% had heard of PubMed, 78% of BMJ on line, 49% the Cochrane Library, 47% HINARI, and 19% BioMedCentral. HINARI use correlates with accessing the Internet on computers located in institutions. Qualitative data suggested there are difficulties logging into HINARI and that sometimes it is librarians that limit access to passwords. Conclusion Text books remain an important resource for postgraduate doctors in training. Internet use is common, but awareness of free-access initiatives is limited. HINARI and other initiatives could be more effective with strong institutional endorsement and management to promote and ensure access.

  10. Public dental health care program for persons with disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lisa Bøge; Hede, Børge; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of the study were (1) to describe the organization and content of the Danish public oral health care program for persons with disability, and (2) to analyse possible variations in relation to the goals and requirements set by the health authorities. Data were collected by means......) payment of service, (4) providers of oral health care, (5) special training of staff, 6) dental services delivered, (7) ethical issues, and (8) patient rights. Less than one-third of persons estimated by the health authorities were enrolled in the program. On average, 0.4% of the municipal population...... of knowledge of oral health and oral health care for persons with disability were barriers to equal access to the program. Preventive dental services were the most frequent services delivered, although relatively few oral hygienists were involved in the program. Special training was most frequent in large...

  11. Current status of clinical education in paramedic programs: a descriptive research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, K C

    1997-01-01

    Development of competence in exercising therapeutic judgment skills represents the goal of clinical education. Time (clock hours) is not a valid predictor of attainment of competence in paramedic clinical education. Quantity of patient contact experiences facilitates development of judgment skills, and offers a valid measure of progress toward competence. This project uses national survey data from accredited programs to describe the availability and accessibility of patient contact experiences within paramedic clinical education. Data from this local program supplements the national survey results. The components of clinical judgment are enumerated, and strategies to teach and evaluate clinical judgment skills are discussed.

  12. SMATASY. A Program for the model independent description of the Z resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsch, S.; Riemann, T.

    1994-07-01

    SMATASY is an interface for the ZF I T T ER package and may be used for the model independent description of the Z resonance at LEP 1 and SLC. It allows the determination of the Z mass and width and its resonance shape parameters r and j for cross-sections and their asymmetries. The r describes the peak height and j the interference of the Z resonance with photon exchange in each scattering channel and for σ T , σ FB , σ lr , σ pol etc. separately. Alternatively, the helicity amplitudes for a given scattering channel may be determined. We compare our formalism with other model independent approaches. The model independent treatment of QED corrections in SMATASY is applicable also far away from the Z peak. (orig.)

  13. HIGHWAY, a transportation routing model: program description and revised users' manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joy, D.S.; Johnson, P.E.

    1983-10-01

    A computerized transportation routing model has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be used for predicting likely routes for shipping radioactive materials. The HIGHWAY data base is a computerized road atlas containing descriptions of the entire Interstate System, the federal highway system, and most of the principal state roads. In addition to its prediction of the most likely commercial route, options incorporated in the HIGHWAY model can allow for maximum use of Interstate highways or routes that will bypass urbanized areas containing populations greater than 100,000 persons. The user may also interactively modify the data base to predict routes that bypass any particular state, city, town, or specific highway segment

  14. Training Future Entrepreneurs Using European Funds. A Descriptive Research on Start-Up Romania Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Nicolau

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the mutual relationship among the concepts of entrepreneurship, trainingpersonnel and business start-up and development. From our point of view, Romania shallencourage as much as possible entrepreneurship so as to create SMEs, the most flexible andnumerous in number in the Romanian total number of companies. Hence, the main objective of thispaper is to highlight the importance of accessing European funds in increasing the number ofRomanians properly trained so as to become successful entrepreneurs and to manage successfulbusinesses. At the same time, another main objective is to present the need of entrepreneurshiptraining and support in business start-up and development by using the descriptive method ofresearch.

  15. A Cooperative Training Program for Students with Severe Behavior Problems: Description and Comparative Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reganick, Karol A.

    The Cooperative Training Program was implemented with 20 students having severe behavior problems, to augment a classroom employability curriculum. Educators and business managers at a local Perkins restaurant worked cooperatively to design a new curriculum and recruitment procedure to benefit both students and the business. A continuous and…

  16. Descriptions of new varieties recently distributed from the Citrus Clonal Protection Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP) is operated through the Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology at University of California (UC) Riverside and is funded in large part by The California Citrus Research Board (CRB). The CCPP processes citrus propagative material in two phases. First...

  17. The ARAMCO Industrial Traiing Centers: Academic Training and College Preparatory Programs: A Descriptive Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARAMCO Services Co., Houston, TX.

    The report describes the components of the educational program provided by the Industrial Training Centers of the Training and Career Development Organization of ARAMCO (Arabian American Oil Company) in Saudi Arabia. ARAMCO provides in-house academic or job skills training to over 15,000 employees. Characteristics of the company's training program…

  18. National Waste Terminal Storage Program: configuration management plan. Volume II. Plan description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-05-01

    Purpose of the Configuration Management Plan is to provide the management discipline through which the integrity and continuity of program cost and schedule trade-off decisions which are made concerning the site selections and facilities performance, producibility, operability and supportability are recorded, communicated, and controlled by the Office of Waste Isolation

  19. National Waste Terminal Storage Program: planning and control plan. Volume II. Plan description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-05-01

    Objective of the NWTS program planning and control plan is to provide the information necessary for timely and effective OWI management decisions. Purpose is to describe the concepts and techniques that will be utilized by OWI to establish structured, completely planned and controlled technical, cost, and schedule NWTS baselines from which performance or progress can be accurately measured

  20. Continuing Care in High Schools: A Descriptive Study of Recovery High School Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Andrew J.; Moberg, D. Paul; Krupp, Amanda Lawton

    2014-01-01

    Data from 17 recovery high schools suggest programs are dynamic and vary in enrollment, fiscal stability, governance, staffing, and organizational structure. Schools struggle with enrollment, funding, lack of primary treatment accessibility, academic rigor, and institutional support. Still, for adolescents having received treatment for substance…

  1. National Waste Terminal Storage Program: critical element management concept. Volume II. Concept description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-05-01

    The objective of the CEM Concept is to describe techniques for systematically identifying, evaluating, and influencing those technical, social, economic, political and institutional factors (i.e., events, trends and conditions) that are perceived as being probable uncertainties to the attainment of planned program objectives

  2. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-A: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal resource description; Resource origin and sediment type; Gulf Coast resource extent; Resource estimates; Project history; Authorizing legislation; Program objectives; Perceived constraints; Program activities and structure; Well testing; Program management; Program cost summary; Funding history; Resource characterization; Wells of opportunity; Edna Delcambre No. 1 well; Edna Delcambre well recompletion; Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well; Beulah Simon No. 2 well; P.E. Girouard No. 1 well; Prairie Canal No. 1 well; Crown Zellerbach No. 2 well; Alice C. Plantation No. 2 well; Tenneco Fee N No. 1 well; Pauline Kraft No. 1 well; Saldana well No. 2; G.M. Koelemay well No. 1; Willis Hulin No. 1 well; Investigations of other wells of opportunity; Clovis A. Kennedy No. 1 well; Watkins-Miller No. 1 well; Lucien J. Richard et al No. 1 well; and the C and K-Frank A. Godchaux, III, well No. 1.

  3. Directory of personnel responsible for radiological health programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This is a directory of professional personnel who administer the radiological health program activities in state and local governmental agencies. Included in the directory is a listing of each state health officer or the head of the agency responsible for the radiological health program. The name, address, and telephone number of the radiological health personnel are listed, followed by the alternate contact who, in many instances, may be chief of a larger administrative unit of which the radiological health program is a subunit. The address for the program is also included if it differs from the official health department or agency. Generally, the titles of the personnel listed will indicate the administrative status of the radiological health program. The directory also includes a list of key professional personnel in the Bureau of Radiological Health, Radiation Operations Staff, Regional Radiological Health Representatives, Winchester Engineering and Analytical Center, Food and Drug Administration; Office of Radiation Programs, Regional Radiation Representatives, National Environmental Research Center, and Eastern Environmental Radiation Laboratory, Environmental Protection Agency; selected personnel in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and selected personnel in the National Bureau of Standards

  4. 42 CFR 457.618 - Ten percent limit on certain Children's Health Insurance Program expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Insurance Program expenditures. 457.618 Section 457.618 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS... Children's Health Insurance Program expenditures. (a) Expenditures. (1) Primary expenditures are...

  5. Professional competence in a health promotion program in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkers-de Boer, Caroline J. M.; Heijsman, Anke; van Nes, Fenna; Abma, Tineke A.

    Health promotion for senior citizens ('seniors') is an increasingly important factor in health and welfare policy, having important implications for occupational therapy. The health promotion program 'Healthy and Active Aging' originated in the US, has been modified and adapted to the Dutch context

  6. Federal Program Encourages Health Service Innovations on Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nix, Mary P.

    2009-01-01

    There is always room for improvement in the delivery of health services. This article discusses the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's (AHRQ) Health Care Innovations Exchange (www.innovations.ahrq.gov), a comprehensive program that aims to increase awareness of innovative strategies to meet health service delivery challenges and…

  7. Workplace Setting of Mental Health Nursing Program Graduates in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rwanda Journal Series F: Medicine and Health Sciences Vol. 2 No. 2, 2015. Workplace Setting of Mental Health Nursing Program Graduates in Rwanda. Marie Claire Gasanganwa. 1. , Benoite Umubyeyi1, Darius Gishoma1. 1. University of Rwanda, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Rwanda. Background.

  8. Leading by Example: Health Promotion Programs for School Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Patrick C.; Lohrmann, David K.

    2011-01-01

    Health promotion programs for school staff are an overlooked and underused resource that can reduce overweight and obesity among teachers and other staff members. They can also reduce staff absenteeism, increase productivity, reduce costs associated with health care and disability, and foster a climate that promotes good health schoolwide. An…

  9. Evaluation of the Health Rocks! Program: The Association of Youth Engagement with Program Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This evaluation research examined the relationship between program process and program outcome, specifically, youth engagement in the national 4-H Council Health Rocks! program and their program outcomes.  Based on program evaluation surveys completed after the program by participants, youths’ engagement in the program was associated with their gains in knowledge and skills about substance use, and personal assets related to avoiding risks.  When youth participants find a program interesting, are actively engaged in the program, and find the program staff friendly, they benefit more from the program.  Findings underscore the importance of engaging curriculum and friendly staff to the success of extension or afterschool youth programs. The evaluation method may offer an example of balancing rigor of evaluation design and feasibility of implementing an evaluation.

  10. AAHD's Health Promotion and Wellness, Part 2: Health Promotion Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exceptional Parent, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article is part 2 of a 4-part series on "Health Promotion and Wellness" from the American Association on Health and Disability (AAHD). According to the U.S. Census Bureau, more than 54 million people--one in five Americans--have a disability, and these Americans are more likely to report: (1) Being in poorer overall health; (2) Having less…

  11. Infusing Adult Education Principles Into a Health Insurance Literacy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Virginia

    2018-03-01

    Health insurance literacy is an emerging concept in the health education and health promotion field. The passage of the Affordable Care Act highlighted the link between health insurance and health outcomes. However, the law does not specifically address how the public should be educated on choosing an appropriate health insurance plan. Research shows adults, regardless of previous health insurance status, are likely confused and uncertain about their selection. The University of Maryland Extension developed and created health insurance Smart Choice Health Insurance™ to reduce confusion and increase confidence and capability to make this decision. Andragogy, an adult learning theory, was used to guide the development of the program and help ensure best practices are used to achieve desired outcomes. Using the six principles of andragogy, the team incorporated reality-based case studies, allowed adults time to practice, and emphasized choice making and many other elements to create an atmosphere conducive to adult learning. Results from Smart Choice indicate the program is successful in reducing confusion and increasing confidence. Furthermore, feedback from participants and trained educators indicates that adults were engaged in the program and found the materials useful. Based on program success, creation of new health insurance literacy programs grounded in adult education principles is under way.

  12. Ventures in science status report, Summer 1992. [Program description and Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrick, Wayne C.

    1992-01-01

    The Ventures in Science summer program is directed towards students who are from underrepresented minority groups in mathematics and science professions. The target group of 40 was drawn from eligible students who will be entering high school freshman in the fall of 1992. 450 students applied. The theme for the summer is Chicago as an Ecosystem. The students are instructed in integrated math and science (2 hours), English/ESL (1 1/2 hrs.), counseling (1 hr.) and, physical education (1 hr.) each day four days a week. Integrated math and science are team taught. Parents are invited to participate in two workshops that will be presented based on their input. Parents may also visit the program at any time and participate in any field trip.

  13. The pollution reduction technology program for can-annular combustor engines - Description and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, R.; Fiorentino, A. J.; Diehl, L.

    1976-01-01

    Pollutant reduction and performance characteristics were determined for three successively more advanced combustor concepts. Program Element I consisted of minor modifications to the current production JT8D combustor and fuel system to evaluate means of improved fuel preparation and changes to the basic airflow distribution. Element II addressed versions of the two-staged Vorbix (vortex burning and mixing) combustor and represented a moderate increase in hardware complexity and difficulty of development. The concept selected for Element III employed vaporized fuel as a means of achieving minimum emission levels and represented the greatest difficulty of development and adaptation to the JT8D engine. Test results indicate that the Element I single-stage combustors were capable of dramatic improvement in idle pollutants. The multistage combustors evaluated in Program Elements II and III simultaneously reduced CO, THC and NOx emissions, but were unable to satisfy the current 1979 EPA standards.

  14. Aerobic Exercise for Alcohol Recovery: Rationale, Program Description, and Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard A.; Abrantes, Ana M.; Read, Jennifer P.; Marcus, Bess H.; Jakicic, John; Strong, David R.; Oakley, Julie R.; Ramsey, Susan E.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Stuart, Gregory; Dubreuil, Mary Ella; Gordon, Alan A.

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders are a major public health concern. Despite the demonstrated efficacy of a number of different treatments for alcohol dependence, relapse remains a major problem. Healthy lifestyle changes may contribute to long-term maintenance of recovery, and interventions targeting physical activity, in particular, may be especially…

  15. PCM- data processing - description of the program TAPEDUMP for the computer HP-2100 S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, G.

    1978-01-01

    The assembler program TADEDUMP has the task, to preprocess PCM-data for further processing with a large computer and to put them in an output routine on magnetic tape with a measurement specific header. In the preprocessing the data can be reduced by selection and averaging. In the case of certain reading errors the data are discarded, but the synchronization is reestablished. (orig.) [de

  16. Description of computer code PRINS, Program for Interpreting Gamma Spectra, developed at ENEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borsari, R. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche `E. Clementel`, Bologna (Italy). Dip. Energia

    1995-11-01

    The computer code PRINS, program for interpreting gamma Spectra, has been developed in collaboration with CENG/SECC (Centre Etude Nucleaire Grenoble / Service Etude Comportement du Combustible). Later it has been updated and improved at ENEA. Properties of the PRINS code are: (1) A powerful algorithm to locate the peaks; (2) An accurate evaluation of the errors; (3) Possibility of an automatic channels-energy calibration.

  17. Critical evaluation of the nonradiological environmental technical specifications. Program description, summary, and recommendations. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, S.M.; Cunningham, P.A.; Gray, D.D.; Kumar, K.D.; Witten, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the data collected as part of the environmental Technical Specifications program for eight nuclear power plants was conducted for the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory commission. This report includes a summary of the screening phase in which the adequacy of the hydrothermal and ecological monitoring data for each plant were evaluated, and the summary and recommendations resulting from a detailed examination of the three nuclear power plants selected in the initial screening

  18. Description of computer code PRINS, Program for Interpreting Gamma Spectra, developed at ENEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsari, R.

    1995-12-01

    The computer code PRINS, PRogram for INterpreting gamma Spectra, has been developed in collaboration with CENG/SECC (Centre Etude Nucleaire Grenoble / Service Etude Comportement du Combustible). Later it has been updated and improved at ENEA. Properties of the PRINS code are: I) A powerful algorithm to locate the peaks; 2) An accurate evaluation of the errors; 3) Possibility of an automatic channels-energy calibration

  19. AutoBayes/CC: Combining Program Synthesis with Automatic Code Certification: System Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Michael; Schumann, Johann; Fischer, Bernd; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Code certification is a lightweight approach to formally demonstrate software quality. It concentrates on aspects of software quality that can be defined and formalized via properties, e.g., operator safety or memory safety. Its basic idea is to require code producers to provide formal proofs that their code satisfies these quality properties. The proofs serve as certificates which can be checked independently, by the code consumer or by certification authorities, e.g., the FAA. It is the idea underlying such approaches as proof-carrying code [6]. Code certification can be viewed as a more practical version of traditional Hoare-style program verification. The properties to be verified are fairly simple and regular so that it is often possible to use an automated theorem prover to automatically discharge all emerging proof obligations. Usually, however, the programmer must still splice auxiliary annotations (e.g., loop invariants) into the program to facilitate the proofs. For complex properties or larger programs this quickly becomes the limiting factor for the applicability of current certification approaches.

  20. Computer automation of continuous-flow analyzers for trace constituents in water. Volume 4. Description of program segments. Part 2. TAAINRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    TAAINRE, the second program in the series of programs necessary in automating the Technicon AutoAnalyzer, is presented. A flow chart and sequence list that describes and illustrates the function of each logical group of coding, and a description of the contents and function of each section and subroutine in the program is included. In addition, all arrays, strings, and variables are listed and defined, and a sample program listing with a complete list of symbols and references provided

  1. Computer automation of continuous-flow analyzers for trace constituents in water. Volume 4. Description of program segments. Part 1. TAAIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    This report describes TAAIN, the first program in the series of programs necessary in automating the Technicon AutoAnalyzer. A flow chart and sequence list that describes and illustrates each logical group of coding, and a description of the contents and functions of each section and subroutine in the program is included. In addition, all arrays, strings, and variables are listed and defined, and a sample program listing with a complete list of symbols and references is provided

  2. Defence Health Service Mentoring Program Evaluation 2001

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Highfield, Jane

    2002-01-01

    ...). DHS commissioned the Directorate of Strategic Personnel Planning and Research (DSPPR) to evaluate a recent Mentoring Program trial in order to assess the effectiveness and organizational value of Mentoring within DHS...

  3. [Evaluation of a workplace health promotion program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forette, Françoise; Brieu, Marie-Anne; Lemasson, Hervé; Salord, Jean-Claude; Le Pen, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Some studies suggest that a workplace prevention programme could reduce health inequalities related to education level and improve the health status of the employees. The objective of the study was to demonstrate the advantages for a company to implement a health prevention programme in the workplace in order to: 1-improve health literacy 2 - change health-related behaviours 3-improve the company image. A "before - after" methodology was used in a population of 2153 employees of three companies. Three areas of prevention were considered: nutrition, physical activity and prevention of back pain. The successive steps of the EBS programme included general communication, group workshops and individual coaching. Data collection was carried out using anonymous questionnaires sent by e-mail. A global assessment was performed based on the companies' pooled data, with separate analysis according to the steps of the programme. The programme mobilized employees with participation rates ranging from 25% to 45.5%. After completion of the full programme, 77.5% of respondents reported an improvement of their health knowledge versus 50.3% of those who only received general communication. Behavioural modification was observed, especially in the fields of nutrition and back pain.. EBS can be considered to be a vector of the company image for almost 7 out of 10 employees. A health prevention education programme provided by the company in the workplace mobilizes employees and contributes to improvement of health knowledge and behaviour change. All approaches tested were important and applicable to various types of companies or workers.

  4. 78 FR 54256 - Health Careers Opportunity Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-03

    ..., such as a graduate degree in Clinical or Counseling Psychology, Clinical Social Work, and/or Marriage.... D18HP23014 Research NY 111,764 Foundation of the State University of New York. D18HP23023 Howard DC 111,764..., dentistry, pharmacy, and allied health. With the growing need for mental health and substance abuse services...

  5. A Yoga Intervention Program for Patients Suffering from Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Qualitative Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindani, Farah A; Khalsa, G F S

    2015-07-01

    To understand how individuals with symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) perceive a trauma-sensitive Kundalini yoga (KY) program. Digitally recorded telephone interviews 30-60 minutes in duration were conducted with 40 individuals with PTSD participating in an 8-week KY treatment program. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative thematic analysis techniques. Qualitative analysis identifies three major themes: self-observed changes, new awareness, and the yoga program itself. Findings suggest that participants noted changes in areas of health and well-being, lifestyle, psychosocial integration, and perceptions of self in relation to the world. Presented are practical suggestions for trauma-related programming. There is a need to consider alternative and potentially empowering approaches to trauma treatment. Yoga-related self-care or self-management strategies are widely accessible, are empowering, and may address the mind-body elements of PTSD.

  6. Coordinated school health program and dietetics professionals: partners in promoting healthful eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Sandra M; Cinelli, Bethann

    2004-05-01

    Although research indicates that school meal programs contribute to improved academic performance and healthier eating behaviors for students who participate, fewer than 60% of students choose the National School Lunch Program or School Breakfast Program. School meal programs have a difficult time competing with foods that are marketed to young people through sophisticated advertising campaigns. Youth's preferences for fast foods, soft drinks, and salty snacks; mixed messages sent by school personnel; school food preparation and serving space limitations; inadequate meal periods; and lack of education standards for school foodservice directors challenge school meal programs as well. A coordinated school health program offers a framework for meeting these challenges and provides children and adolescents with the knowledge and skills necessary for healthful eating. This article identifies challenges facing school foodservice directors in delivering healthful meals and acquaints dietetics professionals with the coordinated school health program to be used as a tool for addressing unhealthful weight gain and promoting healthful eating.

  7. The Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil (RIBRAS) facility. Description, program, main results, future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepine-Szily, A.; Lichtenthaeler, R.; Guimaraes, V. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil) is a facility installed at the Institute of Physics of the University of Sao Paulo (IFUSP), Brazil. The RIBRAS system consists of two superconducting solenoids and uses the ''in-flight method'' to produce radioactive ion beams using the primary beam provided by the 8UD Pelletron Tandem of IFUSP. The ion beams produced so far by RIBRAS are {sup 6}He, {sup 8}Li, {sup 7}Be, {sup 10}Be, {sup 8}B, {sup 12}B with intensities that can vary from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 6} pps. Initially the experimental program covered the study of elastic and inelastic scattering with the objective to study the interaction potential and the reaction mechanisms between weakly bound (RIB) and halo ({sup 6}He and {sup 8}B) projectiles on light, medium and heavy mass targets. With highly purified beams, the study of resonant elastic scattering and resonant transfer reactions, using inverse kinematics and thick targets, has also been included in our experimental program. Also, transfer reactions of astrophysical interest and fusion reactions induced by halo nuclei are part of the near-future research program. Our recent results on elastic scattering, alpha-particle production and total reaction cross sections, as well as the resonant elastic and transfer reactions, are presented. Our plans for the near future are related to the installation of a new beam line and a cave for gamma-ray detection. We intend to place in operation a large area neutron detector available in our laboratory. The long-range plans could be the move of the RIBRAS system to the more energetic beam line of the LINAC post-accelerator (10MeV/nucleon primary beams) still in construction in our laboratory. (orig.)

  8. The Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil (RIBRAS) facility. Description, program, main results, future plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lépine-Szily, A.; Lichtenthäler, R.; Guimarães, V.

    2014-08-01

    RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil) is a facility installed at the Institute of Physics of the University of São Paulo (IFUSP), Brazil. The RIBRAS system consists of two superconducting solenoids and uses the "in-flight method" to produce radioactive ion beams using the primary beam provided by the 8UD Pelletron Tandem of IFUSP. The ion beams produced so far by RIBRAS are 6He, 8Li, 7Be, 10Be, 8B, 12B with intensities that can vary from 104 to 106 pps. Initially the experimental program covered the study of elastic and inelastic scattering with the objective to study the interaction potential and the reaction mechanisms between weakly bound (RIB) and halo (6He and 8B projectiles on light, medium and heavy mass targets. With highly purified beams, the study of resonant elastic scattering and resonant transfer reactions, using inverse kinematics and thick targets, has also been included in our experimental program. Also, transfer reactions of astrophysical interest and fusion reactions induced by halo nuclei are part of the near-future research program. Our recent results on elastic scattering, alpha-particle production and total reaction cross sections, as well as the resonant elastic and transfer reactions, are presented. Our plans for the near future are related to the installation of a new beam line and a cave for gamma-ray detection. We intend to place in operation a large area neutron detector available in our laboratory. The long-range plans could be the move of the RIBRAS system to the more energetic beam line of the LINAC post-accelerator (10MeV/nucleon primary beams) still in construction in our laboratory.

  9. Overview of waste isoltaion safety assessment program and description of source term characterization task at PNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, D.

    1977-01-01

    A project is being conducted to develop and illustrate the methods and obtain the data necessary to assess the safety of long-term disposal of high-level radioactive waste in geologic formations. The methods and data will initially focus on generic geologic isolation systems but will ultimately be applied to the long-term safety assessment of specific candidate sites that are selected in the NWTS Program. The activities of waste isolation safety assessment (WISAP) are divided into six tasks: (1) Safety Assessment Concepts and Methods, (2) Disruptive Event Analysis, (3) Source Characterization, (4) Transport Modeling, (5) Transport Data and (6) Societal Acceptance

  10. Physics Division Argonne National Laboratory description of the programs and facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K.J. [ed.

    1999-05-24

    The ANL Physics Division traces its roots to nuclear physics research at the University of Chicago around the time of the second world war. Following the move from the University of Chicago out to the present Argonne site and the formation of Argonne National Laboratory: the Physics Division has had a tradition of research into fundamental aspects of nuclear and atomic physics. Initially, the emphasis was on areas such as neutron physics, mass spectrometry, and theoretical studies of the nuclear shell model. Maria Goeppert Maier was an employee in the Physics Division during the time she did her Nobel-Prize-winning work on the nuclear shell model. These interests diversified and at the present time the research addresses a wide range of current problems in nuclear and atomic physics. The major emphasis of the current experimental nuclear physics research is in heavy-ion physics, centered around the ATLAS facility (Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System) with its new injector providing intense, energetic ion beams over the fill mass range up to uranium. ATLAS is a designated National User Facility and is based on superconducting radio-frequency technology developed in the Physics Division. A small program continues in accelerator development. In addition, the Division has a strong program in medium-energy nuclear physics carried out at a variety of major national and international facilities. The nuclear theory research in the Division spans a wide range of interests including nuclear dynamics with subnucleonic degrees of freedom, dynamics of many-nucleon systems, nuclear structure, and heavy-ion interactions. This research makes contact with experimental research programs in intermediate-energy and heavy-ion physics, both within the Division and on the national and international scale. The Physics Division traditionally has strong connections with the nation's universities. We have many visiting faculty members and we encourage students to participate in our

  11. Descriptions of health states associated with increasing severity and frequency of hypoglycemia: a patient-level perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris SB

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Stewart B Harris,1 Kamlesh Khunti,2 Mona Landin-Olsson,3 Claus B Galbo-Jørgensen,4 Mette Bøgelund,4 Barrie Chubb,5 Jens Gundgaard,6 Marc Evans71Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, ON, Canada; 2Diabetes Research Unit, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK; 3Department of Medicine, Helsingborg Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; 4Incentive, Holte Stationsvej, Holte, Denmark; 5EU Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Novo Nordisk Ltd, Crawley, UK; 6Health Economics and HTA, Novo Nordisk A/S, Søborg, Denmark; 7Department of Diabetes, University Hospital Llandough, Cardiff, UKAims: We sought to develop descriptions of health states associated with daytime and nocturnal hypoglycemia in a structured fashion from the patient's perspective under different combinations of severity and frequency of hypoglycemic events.Methods: An expert meeting followed by two patient focus groups was used to develop comprehensive descriptions of acute consequences of severe and non-severe, daytime and nocturnal hypoglycemia. Patients with diabetes (type 1 = 85, type 2 = 162 from a survey panel then validated these descriptions and assessed how often they worried and took different actions to prevent hypoglycemia. Severity and frequency of hypoglycemia were compared with respect to how often people worried and took actions to prevent an event. The effect of hypoglycemia on 35 different life activities was quantitatively compared for patients who had and had not experienced a severe hypoglycemic event.Results: At least 95% of respondents agreed that the detailed patient-level descriptions of health states accurately reflected their experience of severe and non-severe, daytime and nocturnal hypoglycemia, thereby validating these descriptions. Respondents who had experienced a severe hypoglycemic event were generally more adversely affected in their worries and actions and life events than those who experienced only non

  12. Parents Plus Systemic, Solution-Focused Parent Training Programs: Description, Review of the Evidence Base, and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Alan; Hartnett, Dan; Brosnan, Eileen; Sharry, John

    2017-09-01

    Parents Plus (PP) programs are systemic, solution-focused, group-based interventions. They are designed for delivery in clinical and community settings as treatment programs for families with child-focused problems, such as behavioral difficulties, disruptive behavior disorders, and emotional disorders in young people with and without developmental disabilities. PP programs have been developed for families of preschoolers, preadolescent children, and teenagers, as well as for separated or divorced families. Seventeen evaluation studies involving over 1,000 families have shown that PP programs have a significant impact on child behavior problems, goal attainment, and parental satisfaction and stress. The effect size of 0.57 (p < .001) from a meta-analysis of 10 controlled studies for child behavior problems compares favorably with those of meta-analyses of other well-established parent training programs with large evidence bases. In controlled studies, PP programs yielded significant (p < .001) effect sizes for goal attainment (d = 1.51), parental satisfaction (d = 0.78), and parental stress reduction (d = 0.54). PP programs may be facilitated by trained front-line mental health and educational professionals. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  13. Gaps in the existing public health informatics training programs: a challenge to the development of a skilled global workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ashish; Perin, Douglas Marcel Puricelli

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore public health informatics (PHI) training programs that currently exist to meet the growing demand for a trained global workforce. We used several search engines, scientific databases, and the websites of informatics organizations; sources included PubMed, Google, the American Medical Informatics Organization, and the International Medical Informatics Organization. The search was conducted from May to July 2011 and from January to February 2012 using key words such as informatics, public health informatics, or biomedical informatics along with academic programs, training, certificate, graduate programs, or postgraduate programs. Course titles and catalog descriptions were gathered from the program or institution websites. Variables included PHI program categories, location and mode of delivery, program credits, and costs. Each course was then categorized based on its title and description as available on the Internet. Finally, we matched course titles and descriptions with the competencies for PHIs determined by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Descriptive analysis was performed to report means and frequency distributions for continuous and categorical variables. Stratified analysis was performed to explore average credits and cost per credit among both the public and private institutions. Fifteen PHI programs were identified across 13 different institutions, the majority of which were US-based. The average number of credits and the associated costs required to obtain PHI training were much higher in private as compared to public institutions. The study results suggest that a need for online contextual and cost-effective PHI training programs exists to address the growing needs of professionals worldwide who are using technology to improve public health in their respective countries.

  14. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project document control and Records Management Program Description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MARTIN, B.M.

    2000-01-01

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project document control and records management program, as defined within this document, is based on a broad spectrum of regulatory requirements, Department of Energy (DOE) and Project Hanford and SNF Project-specific direction and guidance. The SNF Project Execution Plan, HNF-3552, requires the control of documents and management of records under the auspices of configuration control, conduct of operations, training, quality assurance, work control, records management, data management, engineering and design control, operational readiness review, and project management and turnover. Implementation of the controls, systems, and processes necessary to ensure compliance with applicable requirements is facilitated through plans, directives, and procedures within the Project Hanford Management System (PHMS) and the SNF Project internal technical and administrative procedures systems. The documents cited within this document are those which directly establish or define the SNF Project document control and records management program. There are many peripheral documents that establish requirements and provide direction pertinent to managing specific types of documents that, for the sake of brevity and clarity, are not cited within this document

  15. NRC sponsored rotating equipment vibration research: a program description and progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitzel, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is currently involved in a research project sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regarding operational vibration in rotating equipment. The object of this program is to assess the nature of vibrational failures and the effect that improved qualification standards may have in reducing the incidence of failure. In order to limit the scope of the initial effort, safety injection (SI) pumps were chosen as the component group for concentrated study. The task has been oriented to addressing the issues of whether certain SI pumps experience more failures than others, examining the dynamic environments in operation, examining the adequacy of current qualification standards, and examining what performance parameters could be used more efficiently to predict degradation or failure. Results of a literature search performed to survey SI pump failures indicate that failures are due to a diversity of causes, many of which may not be influenced by qualification criteria. Cooperative efforts have been undertaken with a limited number of nuclear utilities to describe the variety of possible operating environments and to analyze available data. The results of this analysis as they apply to the research issues are presented and possibilities for the future direction of the program are discussed

  16. Automated Critical PeakPricing Field Tests: 2006 Pilot ProgramDescription and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-06-19

    During 2006 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) performed a technology evaluation for the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) Emerging Technologies Programs. This report summarizes the design, deployment, and results from the 2006 Automated Critical Peak Pricing Program (Auto-CPP). The program was designed to evaluate the feasibility of deploying automation systems that allow customers to participate in critical peak pricing (CPP) with a fully-automated response. The 2006 program was in operation during the entire six-month CPP period from May through October. The methodology for this field study included site recruitment, control strategy development, automation system deployment, and evaluation of sites' participation in actual CPP events through the summer of 2006. LBNL recruited sites in PG&E's territory in northern California through contacts from PG&E account managers, conferences, and industry meetings. Each site contact signed a memorandum of understanding with LBNL that outlined the activities needed to participate in the Auto-CPP program. Each facility worked with LBNL to select and implement control strategies for demand response and developed automation system designs based on existing Internet connectivity and building control systems. Once the automation systems were installed, LBNL conducted communications tests to ensure that the Demand Response Automation Server (DRAS) correctly provided and logged the continuous communications of the CPP signals with the energy management and control system (EMCS) for each site. LBNL also observed and evaluated Demand Response (DR) shed strategies to ensure proper commissioning of controls. The communication system allowed sites to receive day-ahead as well as day-of signals for pre-cooling, a DR strategy used at a few sites. Measurement of demand response was conducted using two different baseline models for estimating peak load savings. One

  17. Selecting, adapting, and sustaining programs in health care systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zullig LL

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Leah L Zullig,1,2 Hayden B Bosworth1–4 1Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 3School of Nursing, 4Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Practitioners and researchers often design behavioral programs that are effective for a specific population or problem. Despite their success in a controlled setting, relatively few programs are scaled up and implemented in health care systems. Planning for scale-up is a critical, yet often overlooked, element in the process of program design. Equally as important is understanding how to select a program that has already been developed, and adapt and implement the program to meet specific organizational goals. This adaptation and implementation requires attention to organizational goals, available resources, and program cost. We assert that translational behavioral medicine necessitates expanding successful programs beyond a stand-alone research study. This paper describes key factors to consider when selecting, adapting, and sustaining programs for scale-up in large health care systems and applies the Knowledge to Action (KTA Framework to a case study, illustrating knowledge creation and an action cycle of implementation and evaluation activities. Keywords: program sustainability, diffusion of innovation, information dissemination, health services research, intervention studies 

  18. Description and user manual of the WIMSLIC, FIXER and COMPA programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar H, F.

    1992-08-01

    In this work the WIMS library and those WIMSLIC, FIXER and COMPA codes that are used to give him maintenance or to create a new one, the way to use them and its scopes are described. The objective of WIMSLIC, is the one of generating data nuclear with the WIMS code format, uses those results obtained with the NJOY system and the one POWR module, the FIXER function is to generate a new WIMS library or to already modify an existent, using the results of the one WIMSLIC code or those obtained with NJOY and WIMSR, while the COMPA function is to compare data groups with WIMS format. In the Appendix 1 the files of data are had that would use to generate a new library of WIMS that contain nuclear data for U-235, U-238, H-1, 0-16 and Al-27. In the Appendix 2 one has the listing of the programs before mentioned. (Author)

  19. Epigenomic programing: a future way to health?

    OpenAIRE

    Shenderov, Boris A.; Midtvedt, Tore

    2014-01-01

    It is now generally accepted that the ‘central genome dogma’ (i.e. a causal chain going from DNA to RNA to proteins and downstream to biological functions) should be replaced by the ‘fluid genome dogma’, that is, complex feed-forward and feed-back cycles that interconnect organism and environment by epigenomic programing – and reprograming – throughout life and at all levels, sometimes also down the generations. The epigenomic programing is the net sum of interactions derived from own metabol...

  20. The duty health physicist program at Byron Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, D.G.; Carey, T.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Duty Health Physicist Program at Byron Station was established to deal with routine health physics tasks and provide an interface between frontline and upper radiation-chemistry management. The program consists of a weekly rotation of selected members of the health physics staff into the duty health physicist position to handle the assigned duty tasks. The tasks include, but are not limited to, daily isotopic and air sample review, effluent release package review, maximum permissible concentration calculations, dose approvals, as-low-as-reasonably-achievable action review of pending jobs, and general availability to answer questions and address problems in health-physics-related areas of plant operation. The daily attendance of the duty health physicist at the radiation-chemistry and station plan-of-the-day meetings has increased the overall presence and visibility of the health physics program to upper station management and other station departments. Since its inception in July of 1985, the Duty Health Physics Program has been a major contributor to the observed 50% reduction in reportable personnel errors in the radiation-chemistry department (based on personnel-error-related deviation reports and license event reports generated on the radiation-chemistry department at Byron Station). Although difficulty to quantify, other important benefits of this program are also discussed in this paper

  1. The Need and Curricula for Health Professions Education Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervero, Ronald M.; Daley, Barbara J.

    2018-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the emerging social and organizational contexts for health professions education and the rationale for foundational adult and continuing education concepts to be included in the curricula of HPE graduate programs.

  2. Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP) Plan Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A list of all Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP) plans available in each state, as well as links to the plan brochures, changes for each plan from the...

  3. The Role of Extension Nutrition Education in Student Achievement of Nutrition Standards in Grades K-3: A Descriptive Evaluation of a School-Based Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Mary E.; Schreiber, Debera

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the results of a descriptive evaluation of the impact of an in-school Extension nutrition education program in a small, very rural county. The evaluation focused on understanding the nature of the role the Extension educator plays in delivering nutrition education, the impact of the program on student learning and achievement…

  4. Design of Training Systems, Phase II Report, Volume III; Model Program Descriptions and Operating Procedures. TAEG Report No. 12-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naval Training Equipment Center, Orlando, FL. Training Analysis and Evaluation Group.

    The Design of Training Systems (DOTS) project was initiated by the Department of Defense (DOD) to develop tools for the effective management of military training organizations. Volume 3 contains the model and data base program descriptions and operating procedures designed for phase 2 of the project. Flow charts and program listings for the…

  5. Reactor safety research program. A description of current and planned reactor safety research sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    The reactor safety research program, sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research, is described in terms of its program objectives, current status, and future plans. Elements of safety research work applicable to water reactors, fast reactors, and gas cooled reactors are presented together with brief descriptions of current and planned test facilities. (U.S.)

  6. Home health nurse decision-making regarding visit intensity planning for newly admitted patients: a qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Elliane; Hirschman, Karen B; Cacchione, Pamela Z; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2018-04-13

    Despite patients referred to home health having diverse and complex needs, it is unknown how nurses develop personalized visit plans. In this qualitative descriptive study, we interviewed 26 nurses from three agencies about their decision-making process to determine visit intensity and analyzed data using directed content analysis. Following a multifactorial assessment of the patient, nurses relied on their experience and their agency's protocols to develop the personalized visit plan. They revised the plan based on changes in the patient's clinical condition, engagement, and caregiver availability. Findings suggest strategies to improve visit planning and positively influence outcomes of home health patients.

  7. Satisfaction with a distance continuing education program for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Ann B; Irwin, Cathy A; Cohen, Betty

    2010-09-01

    This study assessed differences in program satisfaction among health professionals participating in a distance continuing education program by gender, ethnicity, discipline, and community size. A one-group posttest design was used with a sample of 45,996 participants in the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Rural Hospital, Distance Continuing Medical Education Program during 1995-2007. This program provided 2,219 continuing education programs for physicians (n = 7,047), nurses (n = 21,264), allied health (n = 3,230) and dental (n = 305) professionals, pharmacists (n = 4,088), administrators (n = 1,211), and marketing/finance/human resources professionals (n = 343). These programs were provided in Arkansas hospitals, clinics, and area health education centers. Interactive video technology and the Internet were used to deliver these programs. The program satisfaction instrument demonstrated adequate internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.91) and construct validity. Participants had high levels of satisfaction regarding knowledge and skills, use of information to enhance patient care, program quality, and convenience of the technology (mean total satisfaction score = 4.44, range: 1-5). Results from the t-test for independent samples and one-way analysis of variance indicated that men (p = 0.01), African-Americans and Hispanics (p affect satisfaction with distance continuing education programs.

  8. 77 FR 37415 - Office of Urban Indian Health Programs; Title V HIV/AIDS Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... Indian health program HIV/AIDS activities is necessary to reduce the incidence of HIV/AIDS in the urban Indian communities by increasing access to HIV related services, reducing stigma, and making testing..., Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Health Resource and Services Administration, and...

  9. The US Public Health Service's radioactive materials program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villforth, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    This review concentrates primarily on the U.S. Public Health Service's radiological health programs that are related to the use of radium in medicine. The history of program development is given, with a focus on legal and regulatory aspects. Federal and state cooperative actions are outlined, including congressional radium hearings, National Advisory Committee on Radiation, and Federal Radiation Council rulings. Problems associated with the medical use of radium, such as contamination and disposal, are also described. 30 refs

  10. Excellence in Radiation Research for the 21st Century (EIRR21): Description of an Innovative Research Training Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P' ng, Christine [Radiation Medicine Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ito, Emma [Radiation Medicine Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); How, Christine [Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bezjak, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bristow, Rob [Radiation Medicine Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Catton, Pam; Fyles, Anthony; Gospodarowicz, Mary [Radiation Medicine Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jaffray, David [Radiation Medicine Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kelley, Shana [Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Wong Shun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Odette Cancer Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Liu Feifei, E-mail: Fei-Fei.Liu@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To describe and assess an interdisciplinary research training program for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and clinical fellows focused on radiation medicine; funded by the Canadian Institutes for Health Research since 2003, the program entitled 'Excellence in Radiation Research for the 21st Century' (EIRR21) aims to train the next generation of interdisciplinary radiation medicine researchers. Methods and Materials: Online surveys evaluating EIRR21 were sent to trainees (n=56), mentors (n=36), and seminar speakers (n=72). Face-to-face interviews were also conducted for trainee liaisons (n=4) and participants in the international exchange program (n=2). Results: Overall response rates ranged from 53% (mentors) to 91% (trainees). EIRR21 was well received by trainees, with the acquisition of several important skills related to their research endeavors. An innovative seminar series, entitled Brainstorm sessions, imparting 'extracurricular' knowledge in intellectual property protection, commercialization strategies, and effective communication, was considered to be the most valuable component of the program. Networking with researchers in other disciplines was also facilitated owing to program participation. Conclusions: EIRR21 is an innovative training program that positively impacts the biomedical community and imparts valuable skill sets to foster success for the future generation of radiation medicine researchers.

  11. Excellence in Radiation Research for the 21st Century (EIRR21): Description of an Innovative Research Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P'ng, Christine; Ito, Emma; How, Christine; Bezjak, Andrea; Bristow, Rob; Catton, Pam; Fyles, Anthony; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Jaffray, David; Kelley, Shana; Wong Shun; Liu Feifei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To describe and assess an interdisciplinary research training program for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and clinical fellows focused on radiation medicine; funded by the Canadian Institutes for Health Research since 2003, the program entitled “Excellence in Radiation Research for the 21st Century” (EIRR21) aims to train the next generation of interdisciplinary radiation medicine researchers. Methods and Materials: Online surveys evaluating EIRR21 were sent to trainees (n=56), mentors (n=36), and seminar speakers (n=72). Face-to-face interviews were also conducted for trainee liaisons (n=4) and participants in the international exchange program (n=2). Results: Overall response rates ranged from 53% (mentors) to 91% (trainees). EIRR21 was well received by trainees, with the acquisition of several important skills related to their research endeavors. An innovative seminar series, entitled Brainstorm sessions, imparting “extracurricular” knowledge in intellectual property protection, commercialization strategies, and effective communication, was considered to be the most valuable component of the program. Networking with researchers in other disciplines was also facilitated owing to program participation. Conclusions: EIRR21 is an innovative training program that positively impacts the biomedical community and imparts valuable skill sets to foster success for the future generation of radiation medicine researchers.

  12. Program of Hanford high-level waste retrieval task: a narrative description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallskog, H.A.

    1976-12-01

    The objective of this task is to develop and demonstrate the equipment and methods for the retrieval of high-level radioactive wastes from underground storage tanks at Hanford. The approach will be to continue with engineering studies and the conceptual design in progress and follow on with the engineering design, construction, testing and demonstration of a Prototype Retrieval System. This system will consist of a large, mobile platform providing the support and control of an articulated arm used to remotely position waste recovery/removal tools. Other major components include the equipment needed to bring the material up to the platform for packaging and subsequent transport to a processing facility, and the television viewing and lighting subsystem. This prototype system will be functionally complete and will contain items such as a control center, tool change and maintenance/repair capability, etc. The program includes a complete non-radioactive demonstration of the system in a mock waste tank as well as a radioactive demonstration involving one or more waste tanks

  13. PR-EDB: Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base, version 1: Program description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stallmann, F.W.; Kam, F.B.K.; Taylor, B.J.

    1990-06-01

    Data concerning radiation embrittlement of pressure vessel steels in commercial power reactors have been collected form available surveillance reports. The purpose of this NRC-sponsored program is to provide the technical bases for voluntary consensus standards, regulatory guides, standard review plans, and codes. The data can also be used for the exploration and verification of embrittlement prediction models. The data files are given in dBASE 3 Plus format and can be accessed with any personal computer using the DOS operating system. Menu-driven software is provided for easy access to the data including curve fitting and plotting facilities. This software has drastically reduced the time and effort for data processing and evaluation compared to previous data bases. The current compilation of the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data base (PR-EDB, version 1) contains results from surveillance capsule reports of 78 reactors with 381 data points from 110 different irradiated base materials (plates and forgings) and 161 data points from 79 different welds. Results from heat-affected-zone materials are also listed. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), reactor vendors, and utilities are in the process of providing back-up quality assurance checks of the PR-EDB and will be supplementing the data base with additional data and documentation. 2 figs., 28 tabs

  14. PR-EDB: Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base, Version 2. Revision 2, Program description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stallmann, F.W.; Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K.; Taylor, B.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Investigations of regulatory issues such as vessel integrity over plant life, vessel failure, and sufficiency of current codes Standard Review Plans (SRP`s) and Guides for license renewal can be greatly expedited by the use of a well-designed computerized data base. Also, such a data base is essential for the validation of embrittlement prediction models by researchers. The Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) is such a comprehensive collection of data for US commercial nuclear reactors. The current version of the PR-EDB contains the Charpy test data that were irradiated in 252 capsules of 96 reactors and consists of 207 data points for heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials (98 different HAZ), 227 data points for weld materials (105 different welds), 524 data points for base materials (136 different base materials), including 297 plate data points (85 different plates), 119 forging data points (31) different forging), and 108 correlation monitor materials data points (3 different plates). The data files are given in dBASE format and can be accessed with any computer using the DOS operating system. ``User-friendly`` utility programs are used to retrieve and select specific data, manipulate data, display data to the screen or printer, and to fit and plot Charpy impact data. The results of several studies investigated are presented in Appendix D.

  15. National Waste Terminal Storage Program: information management plan. Volume II. Plan description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-05-01

    A comprehensive information management plan to provide for the systematic processing of large amounts of internally prepared and externally acquired documentation that will accrue to the Office of Waste Isolation (OWI) during the next decade is outlined. The Information Management Plan of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program is based on time proven procedures developed by government and industry for the requirements determination, acquisition, and the administration of documentation. The NWTS Information Management Plan is designed to establish the basis for the planning, development, implemenation, operation and maintenance of the NWTS Information Management System. This plan will help assure that documentation meets required quality standards and that each organization's needs are reflected when soliciting documentation from subcontractors. An example would be the Quality Assurance documentation requirement necessary to comply with eventual NRC licensing regulations. The provisions of the NWTS Information Management Plan will apply to all documentation from OWI contractors, subcontractors, and suppliers, and to OWI organizations for documentation prepared periodically for external dissemination

  16. INTERLINE 5.0 -- An expanded railroad routing model: Program description, methodology, and revised user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S.; Clarke, D.B.; Jacobi, J.M.

    1993-03-01

    A rail routine model, INTERLINE, has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate potential routes for transporting radioactive materials. In Version 5.0, the INTERLINE routing algorithms have been enhanced to include the ability to predict alternative routes, barge routes, and population statistics for any route. The INTERLINE railroad network is essentially a computerized rail atlas describing the US railroad system. All rail lines, with the exception of industrial spurs, are included in the network. Inland waterways and deep water routes along with their interchange points with the US railroadsystem are also included. The network contains over 15,000 rail and barge segments (links) and over 13,000 stations, interchange points, ports, and other locations (nodes). The INTERLINE model has been converted to operate on an IBM-compatible personal computer. At least a 286 computer with a hard disk containing approximately 6 MB of free space is recommended. Enhanced program performance will be obtained by using arandom-access memory drive on a 386 or 486 computer

  17. The United States nuclear plant reliability data program: Its description and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, M.J.

    1975-01-01

    The American National Standards Institute Subcommittee N18-20 has developed and implemented the United States Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS). The NPRDS is designed to accumulate, store, analyse, and report reliability and failure statistics on systems and components of nuclear power plants related to nuclear safety. Input data to the NPRDS consist of engineering, operating, and failure information submitted on a voluntary basis by participating utilities. Prior to entry into the computerized data base, the data are thoroughly checked for accuracy by both the submitting organizations and the NPRDS operating contractor. The data base is the source of various periodic output reports to the nuclear power industry and is utilized to produce special reports upon request. The present data base represents data accumulated from about thirty nuclear units with additional units expected to begin submitting data immediately. The objective is to have essentially all operating nuclear units in the United States of America participating in the program by the end of 1975. The first NPRDS annual reports containing meaningful reliability and failure statistics are expected to be produced following the end of 1975. (author)

  18. Sri Lanka's Health Unit Program: A Model of "Selective" Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma Hewa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that the health unit program developed in Sri Lanka in the early twentieth century was an earlier model of selective primary health care promoted by the Rockefeller Foundation in the 1980s in opposition to comprehensive primary health care advocated by the Alma-Ata Declaration of the World Health Organization. A key strategy of the health unit program was to identify the most common and serious infectious diseases in each health unit area and control them through improved sanitation, health education, immunization and treatment with the help of local communities. The health unit program was later introduced to other countries in South and Southeast Asia as part of the Rockefeller Foundation's global campaign to promote public health.

  19. Home Economics/Health Grades 6-12. Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Moines Public Schools, IA. Teaching and Learning Div.

    Home economics programs are offered to students in grades 6-12 in the Des Moines INdependent Community School District (Iowa). Programs at the middle school level are exploratory, leading to occupational training in family and consumer science, child care, food service, and textile and fashion arts at the high school level. Health education…

  20. Ethics in Worksite Health Programming: Who Is Served?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Paul M.; Blum, Terry C.

    1987-01-01

    Based on extensive research experience with employee assistance programs, ethical issues concerning employee assistance and wellness/health promotion programs are considered at three levels: (1) the individual level, (2) the organizational level, and (3) the interorganizational level. (Author/CH)

  1. 77 FR 10455 - National Institutes of Health Loan Repayment Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... science or clinical research parameters and is not targeted toward a specific area (e.g., AIDS) or type of..., whether the time is spent on research, teaching, patient care, or other activities. Living Expenses: Means...) Primary Care Loan (PCL) Program, and (10) Public Health Service Scholarship (PHS) Program; (d) For...

  2. 78 FR 20466 - National Institutes of Health Loan Repayment Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... science or clinical research parameters and is not targeted toward a specific area (e.g., AIDS) or type of..., whether the time is spent on research, teaching, patient care, or other activities. Living expenses means... Shortage Area Scholarship Program, (9) Primary Care Loan (PCL) Program, and (10) Public Health Service...

  3. Outcomes Assessment in Accredited Health Information Management Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Dorine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the use and perceived usefulness of outcomes assessment methods in health information management programs. Additional characteristics of the outcomes assessment practices were recognized. The findings were evaluated for significant differences in results based on age of the program, type of institution,…

  4. Assessment of Student Outcomes in Undergraduate Health Information Administration Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Jody

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to a) determine what assessment methods are being used in undergraduate health information administration programs to assess student learning and the usefulness of those methods, b) determine to what extent programs have incorporated good student learning assessment practices. Programs use a variety of assessment tools to measure student learning; the most useful include assessments by the professional practice supervisor, course tests, assignments, presentati...

  5. Description and outcomes of a Medicare case management program by nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, S A

    1999-01-01

    During the current environment of cost-cutting and restructuring, case management is viewed as a means of providing comprehensive, coordinated care while reducing costs. Studies of community-based case management have been disappointing. This study evaluates a Medicare service, Management and Evaluation of the Care Plan (MAE), as a model of nurses providing case management in the home. Three groups were compared: MAE (N = 176), non-MAE (N = 187) and newly discharged (N = 93). Utilization data was collected over one year. Overall, subjects were unmarried older women with three functional limitations, four medical diagnoses and averaged 43 home care visits and one hospitalization. MAE patients were older, had more functional and environmental limitations, less ADL independence, and a worse prognosis, yet used significantly less health care than non-MAE recipients did. Regression analysis was performed using group membership and hospital and home care utilization as dependent variables. Although the project was conducted at one site, overall the sample was similar to the national Medicare population.

  6. Dimensions of lay health worker programmes: results of a scoping study and production of a descriptive framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Jane; Meah, Angela; Bagnall, Anne-Marie; Jones, Rebecca

    2013-03-01

    Approaches that engage and support lay health workers in the delivery of health improvement activities have been widely applied across different health issues and populations. The lack of a common terminology, inconsistency in the use of role descriptors and poor indexing of lay health worker roles are all barriers to the development of a shared evidence base for lay health worker interventions. The aim of the paper is to report results from a scoping study of approaches to involve lay people in public health roles and to present a framework for categorisation of the different dimensions of lay health worker programmes. Our scoping study comprised a systematic scoping review to map the literature on lay health worker interventions and to identify role dimensions and common models. The review, which was limited to interventions relevant to UK public health priorities, covered a total of 224 publications. The scoping study also drew on experiential evidence from UK practice. Research-based and practice-based evidence confirmed the variety of role descriptors in use and the complexity of role dimensions. Five common models that define the primary role of the lay health worker were identified from the literature. A framework was later developed that grouped features of lay health worker programmes into four dimensions: intervention, role, professional support/service and the community. More account needs to be taken of the variations that occur between lay health worker programmes. This framework, with the mapping of key categories of difference, may enable better description of lay health worker programmes, which will in turn assist in building a shared evidence base. More research is needed to examine the transferability of the framework within different contexts.

  7. A Descriptive Study of Occupational Health Services in Self-employed Enterprises (Nanoscale Enterprises, Shiraz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Jahangiri

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: This study revealed a poor level of the implementation of occupational health services in Iranian self-employed enterprises. Based on the findings, providing basic training on the occupational health, more enforcing in conduction of health examinations and providing PPE, and taking appropriate strategies aimed at eliminating or minimizing work environment harmful agents are the major factor that should be considered to improve the level of occupational health services among the studied enterprises.

  8. Planning and Implementing a Public Health Professional Distance Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoffery, Cam; Leppke, Allison M.; Robinson, Kara B.; Mettler, Erik P.; Miner, Kathleen R.; Smith, Iris

    2005-01-01

    Training of public health professionals through web-based technology is rapidly increasing. This article describes one school of public health's effort to establish an online Master's program that serves students nationally and internationally. It examines the critical components in the design and implementation of distance education, including…

  9. Evaluation of a Reproductive Health Program to Support Married ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... self-esteem, reproductive health and gender through girls' groups. The husbands' program focused on non-violence, support to families, and reproductive health. Population-based surveys were undertaken among married girls, at midterm and end line. Outcomes of interest were husbands' assistance with domestic work, ...

  10. The Rural Alabama Pregnancy and Infant Health (RAPIH) Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeper, J. D.; And Others

    The impact of the Rural Alabama Pregnancy and Infant Health (RAPIH) Program was evaluated in relation to prenatal care, birth outcome measures, and several child health and home environment outcomes. Begun in 1983, RAPIH targets poor rural blacks in three of west-central Alabama's poorest counties, where economic conditions and infant mortality…

  11. Evaluating health inequity interventions: applying a contextual (external) validity framework to programs funded by the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kaye; Müller-Clemm, Werner; Ysselstein, Margaretha; Sachs, Jonathan

    2013-02-01

    Including context in the measurement and evaluation of health in equity interventions is critical to understanding how events that occur in an intervention's environment might contribute to or impede its success. This study adapted and piloted a contextual validity assessment framework on a selection of health inequity-related programs funded by the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF) between 1998 and 2006. The two overarching objectives of this study were (1) to determine the relative amount and quality of attention given to conceptualizing, measuring and validating context within CHSRF funded research final reports related to health-inequity; and (2) to contribute evaluative evidence towards the incorporation of context into the assessment and measurement of health inequity interventions. The study found that of the 42/146 CHSRF programs and projects, judged to be related to health inequity 20 adequately reported on the conceptualization, measurement and validation of context. Amongst these health-inequity related project reports, greatest emphasis was placed on describing the socio-political and economical context over actually measuring and validating contextual evidence. Applying a contextual validity assessment framework was useful for distinguishing between the descriptive (conceptual) versus empirical (measurement and validation) inclusion of documented contextual evidence. Although contextual validity measurement frameworks needs further development, this study contributes insight into identifying funded research related to health inequities and preliminary criteria for assessing interventions targeted at specific populations and jurisdictions. This study also feeds a larger critical dialogue (albeit beyond the scope of this study) regarding the relevance and utility of using evaluative techniques for understanding how specific external conditions support or impede the successful implementation of health inequity interventions. Copyright

  12. 78 FR 46339 - Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Announcement of Temporary Moratoria...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ...] Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Announcement of Temporary Moratoria on... combat fraud, waste, and abuse in Medicare, Medicaid, and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP... Health Insurance Programs; Additional Screening Requirements, Application Fees, Temporary Enrollment...

  13. Operating plan for the Office of International Health Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    In this report unified ideas are presented about what the Office of International Health Programs does, what the individual contributions are, and how the organization connects to the Department of Energy. The planning efforts have focused on the office's three areas of responsibility: Europe, Japan, and the Marshall Islands. Common to each technical program area are issues related to the following: health of populations exposed to radiation incidents and the associated medical aspects of exposure; dose reconstruction; training; and public involvement. Each of the program areas, its customers, and primary customer interests are described

  14. Building an Educational Program together health community agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Rondelo Duarte

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at contributing inputs to the learning process of community health agents from Family Health Strategy, this study has sought to devise an Educational Program to qualify seven community agents from the Family Health Unit on Habiteto, a neighborhood in the Brazilian city of Sorocaba. Speeches on the perception these agents have of their work, their difficulties and proposals were captured and analyzed within the framework of the "Collective Subject Speech". Results showed the group's learning needs, and guided the devising and implementation of the Educational Program, which adopted the "Problem-Based Education" model. This knowledge was built by the agents through a problem-focused reality, debating, searching for solutions, and implementing intervention projects. They noticed that being a community health agent means, above all, to struggle and harness community forces for purposes of defending health & education public services and for improving social health determinants.

  15. Experiences with recruitment of marginalized groups in a Danish health promotion program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marianne; Poulsen, Eva Kanstrup; Rytter, Anne Stoffersen

    2016-01-01

    neighborhoods across Denmark between 2010 and 2014. The aim of this study was to understand how recruitment approaches could promote participation in health programs within deprived neighborhoods to reach marginalized groups. METHOD: Documents from all 12 of the included municipalities were collected to conduct......BACKGROUND: Studies have found that marginalized groups living in deprived neighborhoods are less likely to participate in health programs compared to the majority of society. This study evaluates recruitment approaches conducted during a national government-funded project in 12 deprived...... have developed evaluations related to recruitment, and only three evaluations provided a description of which marginalized groups were recruited. Challenges related to recruitment consist of difficulties involving the target group, including general distrust, language barriers and a lack of ability...

  16. Counseling Health Psychology: Assessing Health Psychology Training within Counseling Psychology Doctoral Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raque-Bogdan, Trisha L.; Torrey, Carrie L.; Lewis, Brian L.; Borges, Nicole J.

    2013-01-01

    Training directors of American Psychological Association-approved counseling psychology doctoral programs completed a questionnaire assessing (a) student and faculty involvement in health-related research, practice, and teaching; (b) health-related research conducted by students and faculty; and (c) programs' expectations and ability to…

  17. Program Development and Evaluation - Nutrition / Health

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Martha Archuleta: Kitchen Creations - A Cooking School for People with Diabetes. Darlene Christensen: University of Wyoming Food & Nutrition Extension Website. Judith L. Corbus: Hawaii Five-A-Day A Taste of the Tropics with Fruits and Vegetables. Luanne J. Hughes: Reaching Key Audiences with Food Safety Messages. Darlene Liesch: Pregnancy Prevention for Latino Teens. Karen Richey: Food Irradiation - Insuring your Food’s Safety. Carole Rison: Farmers Markets – Impacting Health through Economic...

  18. Environmental geology, Allegheny County and vicinity, Pennsylvania; description of a program and its results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Reginald Peter

    1977-01-01

    Past land-use practices, including mining, in Allegheny County, Pa., have resulted in three principal environmental problems, exclusive of air and water contamination. They are flooding, landsliding, and subsidence over underground mines. In 1973, information was most complete relative to flooding and least complete relative to landsliding. Accordingly, in July 1973, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and The Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) entered into an agreement by which the USGS undertook studies chiefly aimed at increasing knowledge of landsliding and mine subsidence relative to land use, but having other ramifications as well, as part of a larger ARC 'Land-use and physical-resource analysis' (LUPRA) program. The chief geographic focus was Allegheny County, but adjacent areas were included in some investigations. Resulting products, exclusive of this report, are: 1. Forty-three provisional maps of landslide, distribution and susceptibility and of land modified by man in Allegheny County, 1:24,000 scale, 7? -minute quadrangle format, released to open files. 2. Four USGS Miscellaneous Field Studies (MF) maps of Allegheny County showing (a) bedrock, MF685A; (b) susceptibility to landsliding, MF-685B ; (c) coal-mining features, MF-685C; and (d) zones that can be affected by flooding, landsliding and undermining, MF-685D; all at the scale of 1:50,000. 3. Two MF maps showing coal-mining activity and related information and sites of recorded mine-subsidence events, and one MF map classifying land surface by relative potentiality of mine subsidence, in Allegheny, Washington, and Westmoreland Counties, Pa., at a scale of 1:125,000--MF-693A through MF-693C. 4. A companion report to the Allegheny County map of susceptibility to landsliding--USGS Circular 728. 5. Five MF maps, largely in chart form, describing interaction of the shallow ground-water regime with mining-related problems, landsliding, heavy storm precipitation, and other features and processes, largely

  19. Fetal health locus of control: Scale properties and applications in preconception health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliday, Elizabeth; Strahm, Anna; Mammenga, Stefani

    2016-04-01

    Preconception health programs have resulted in improved health behaviors among participants and have shown promise in reducing adverse birth outcomes. However, the role of health beliefs in preconception health program outcomes has been overlooked but warrants attention due to reported positive associations between women's views of control over fetal health and health behavior in pregnancy. Towards an ultimate aim of improving preconception health program reach and effectiveness, we examined properties of a fetal health locus of control (FHLC; Labs & Wurtele, 1986) measure in nulliparous, childbearing aged university women and men. Students (n=1467) completed an online survey that included the FHLC subscales maternal, powerful others', and chance control over fetal health. Factor analyses and correlations with related scales supported the soundness of FHLC constructs in both women and men. All participants rated maternal control in fetal health nearly twice as highly as powerful others' and chance. We therefore recommend that FHLC be integrated into preconception health program evaluation as personal agency in fetal health likely has an important role in women's and men's preconception health behavior and health behavior change. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Health physics educational program in the Tennessee Valley Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holley, Wesley L.

    1978-01-01

    In the spring of 1977, the Radiological Hygiene Branch of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) instituted a training program for health physics technicians to ensure availability of qualified personnel for the agency, which is rapidly becoming the world's largest nuclear utility. From this, a health physics education program is developing to also include health physics orientation and retraining for unescorted entry into nuclear power plants, health physics training for employees at other (non-TVA) nuclear plants, specialized health physics training, and possibly theoretical health physics courses to qualify technician-level personnel for professional status. Videotaped presentations are being used extensively, with innovations such as giving examinations by videotape of real-life, in-plant experiences and acted out scenarios of health physics procedures; and teaching health physics personnel to observe, detect, and act on procedural, equipment, and personnel deficiencies promptly. Video-taped lectures are being used for review and to complement live lectures. Also, a 35-mm slide and videotape library is being developed on all aspects of the operational health physics program for nuclear plants using pressurized and boiling water reactors. (author)

  1. Program collaboration and service integration activities among HIV programs in 59 U.S. health departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitz Harris, Lauren F; Toledo, Lauren; Dunbar, Erica; Aquino, Gustavo A; Nesheim, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    We identified the level and type of program collaboration and service integration (PCSI) among HIV prevention programs in 59 CDC-funded health department jurisdictions. Annual progress reports (APRs) completed by all 59 health departments funded by CDC for HIV prevention activities were reviewed for collaborative and integrated activities reported by HIV programs for calendar year 2009. We identified associations between PCSI activities and funding, AIDS diagnosis rate, and organizational integration. HIV programs collaborated with other health department programs through data-related activities, provider training, and providing funding for sexually transmitted disease (STD) activities in 24 (41%), 31 (53%), and 16 (27%) jurisdictions, respectively. Of the 59 jurisdictions, 57 (97%) reported integrated HIV and STD testing at the same venue, 39 (66%) reported integrated HIV and tuberculosis testing, and 26 (44%) reported integrated HIV and viral hepatitis testing. Forty-five (76%) jurisdictions reported providing integrated education/outreach activities for HIV and at least one other disease. Twenty-six (44%) jurisdictions reported integrated partner services among HIV and STD programs. Overall, the level of PCSI activities was not associated with HIV funding, AIDS diagnoses, or organizational integration. HIV programs in health departments collaborate primarily with STD programs. Key PCSI activities include integrated testing, integrated education/outreach, and training. Future assessments are needed to evaluate PCSI activities and to identify the level of collaboration and integration among prevention programs.

  2. A Qualitative Study Exploring Facilitators for Improved Health Behaviors and Health Behavior Programs: Mental Health Service Users’ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candida Graham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Mental health service users experience high rates of cardiometabolic disorders and have a 20–25% shorter life expectancy than the general population from such disorders. Clinician-led health behavior programs have shown moderate improvements, for mental health service users, in managing aspects of cardiometabolic disorders. This study sought to potentially enhance health initiatives by exploring (1 facilitators that help mental health service users engage in better health behaviors and (2 the types of health programs mental health service users want to develop. Methods. A qualitative study utilizing focus groups was conducted with 37 mental health service users attending a psychosocial rehabilitation center, in Northern British Columbia, Canada. Results. Four major facilitator themes were identified: (1 factors of empowerment, self-value, and personal growth; (2 the need for social support; (3 pragmatic aspects of motivation and planning; and (4 access. Participants believed that engaging with programs of physical activity, nutrition, creativity, and illness support would motivate them to live more healthily. Conclusions and Implications for Practice. Being able to contribute to health behavior programs, feeling valued and able to experience personal growth are vital factors to engage mental health service users in health programs. Clinicians and health care policy makers need to account for these considerations to improve success of health improvement initiatives for this population.

  3. Factors influencing perceived sustainability of Dutch community health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, A J M; Van Assema, P; Hesdahl, B; Harting, J; De Vries, N K

    2015-09-01

    We assessed the perceived sustainability of community health programs organized by local intersectoral coalitions, as well as the factors that collaborating partners think might influence sustainability. Semi-structured interviews were conducted among 31 collaborating partners of 5 community health programs in deprived neighborhoods in the southern part of the Netherlands. The interview guide was based on a conceptual framework that includes factors related to the context, the leading organization, leadership, the coalition, collaborating partners, interventions and outcomes. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and content analyzed using NVivo 8.0. Participants in each of the programs varied in their perceptions of the sustainability of the program, but those people collaborating in pre-existing neighborhood structures expressed relatively high faith in their continuation. The participating citizens in particular believed that these structures would continue to address the health of the community in the future. We found factors from all categories of the conceptual framework that were perceived to influence sustainability. The program leaders appeared to be crucial to the programs, as they were frequently mentioned in close interaction with other factors. Program leaders should use a motivating and supportive leadership style and should act as 'program champions'. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Review and analysis of the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Platania-Phung, Chris

    2017-09-04

    Objective The aim of the present study was to review and synthesise research on the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program (MHNIP) to ascertain the benefits and limitations of this initiative for people with mental illness, general practitioners, mental health nurses and the wider community. Methods An electronic and manual search was made of the research literature for MHNIP in May 2017. Features of studies, including cohorts and findings, were tabulated and cross-study patterns in program processes and outcomes were closely compared. Results Seventeen reports of primary research data have been released. Triangulation of data from different cohorts, regions and design show that the program has been successful on the primary objectives of increased access to primary mental health care, and has received positive feedback from all major stakeholders. Although the program has been broadly beneficial to consumer health, there are inequities in access for people with mental illness. Conclusions The MHNIP greatly benefits the health of people with mental illness. Larger and more representative sampling of consumers is needed, as well as intensive case studies to provide a more comprehensive and effective understanding of the benefits and limitations of the program as it evolves with the establishment of primary health networks. What is known about the topic? The MHNIP is designed to increase access to mental health care in primary care settings such as general practice clinics. Studies have reported favourable views about the program. However, research is limited and further investigation is required to demonstrate the strengths and limitations of the program. What does this paper add? All studies reviewed reported that the MHNIP had positive implications for people with severe and persistent mental illness. Qualitative research has been most prevalent for mental health nurse views and research on Health of the Nation Outcome Scale scores for recipients of the program

  5. Relevance of Trust Marks and CE Labels in German-Language Store Descriptions of Health Apps: Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Urs-Vito; Hillebrand, Uta; von Jan, Ute

    2018-04-25

    In addition to mandatory CE marking ("CE" representing Conformité Européenne, with the CE marking being a symbol of free marketability in the European Economic Area) for medical devices, there are various seals, initiatives, action groups, etc, in the health app context. However, whether manufacturers use them to distinguish their apps and attach relevance to them is unclear. The objective was to take a snapshot of quality seals, regulatory marks, and other orientation aids available on the German app market and to determine whether manufacturers deem such labels relevant enough to apply them to their apps, namely as reflected by mentions in app description texts in a typical app store (ie, Apple's App Store). A full survey of the metadata of 103,046 apps from Apple's German App Store in the Medicine and Health & Fitness categories was carried out. For apps with German-language store descriptions (N=8767), these were automatically searched for the occurrence of relevant keywords and validated manually (N=41). In addition, the websites of various app seal providers were checked for assigned seals. Few manufacturers referenced seals in the descriptions (5/41), although this would have been expected more often based on the seals we were able to identify from the seal providers' Web pages, and there were 34 of 41 that mentioned CE status in the descriptions. Two apps referenced an app directory curated by experts; however, this is not an alternative to CE marks and seals of approval. Currently, quality seals seem to be irrelevant for manufacturers. In line with regulatory requirements, mentions of medical device status are more frequent; however, neither characteristic is effective for identifying high-quality apps. To improve this situation, a possibly legally obligatory, standardized reporting system should be implemented. ©Urs-Vito Albrecht, Uta Hillebrand, Ute von Jan. Originally published in JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth (http://mhealth.jmir.org), 25.04.2018.

  6. Nurse-led primary health care for homeless men: a multimethods descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, M A; Duffield, C; Smith, J; Kelly, D; Cook, R; Bichel-Findlay, J; Saunders, C; Carter, D J

    2017-12-21

    To explore the primary healthcare needs and health service use of homeless men in inner Sydney. People experiencing homelessness have greater health needs than the general population and place high demands on tertiary care, which is expensive and may not be the optimum service for their needs. Accessible, approachable and affordable primary healthcare services could improve the health of homeless persons and potentially decrease costs to the healthcare system. A multimethod design using a cross-sectional survey (n = 40) and administrative data (n = 2 707 daily summaries) collected from a nurse-led primary healthcare clinic for homeless men in Sydney. Survey respondents were aged 27-76 years. Health problems reflected multimorbidity, with mental health issues present in almost all respondents. The majority had attended the clinic more than 20 times in the past year and said the services, treatments and referrals helped them avoid the emergency department. Administrative data indicated that medication administration was the most frequent service provided. Referrals to other health services doubled over the 7-year period. Multiple morbidities, particularly mental health issues, are associated with homelessness. A proactive approach by nurses including preventative services appeared to overcome barriers to health service use. This nurse-led primary healthcare clinic highlights the importance of providing services to homeless men with multiple comorbidities. Respect and trust in addition to easy access to health services appear to be important facilitators of health service use. A greater number of primary health services that collaborate with specialist services, including nurse-led clinics, may facilitate health care for persons who are homeless, reducing the burden on acute services. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  7. Evidence-informed health policy 4 – Case descriptions of organizations that support the use of research evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxman Andrew D

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous efforts to produce case descriptions have typically not focused on the organizations that produce research evidence and support its use. External evaluations of such organizations have typically not been analyzed as a group to identify the lessons that have emerged across multiple evaluations. Case descriptions offer the potential for capturing the views and experiences of many individuals who are familiar with an organization, including staff, advocates, and critics. Methods We purposively sampled a subgroup of organizations from among those that participated in the second (interview phase of the study and (once from among other organizations with which we were familiar. We developed and pilot-tested a case description data collection protocol, and conducted site visits that included both interviews and documentary analyses. Themes were identified from among responses to semi-structured questions using a constant comparative method of analysis. We produced both a brief (one to two pages written description and a video documentary for each case. Results We conducted 51 interviews as part of the eight site visits. Two organizational strengths were repeatedly cited by individuals participating in the site visits: use of an evidence-based approach (which was identified as being very time-consuming and existence of a strong relationship between researchers and policymakers (which can be challenged by conflicts of interest. Two organizational weaknesses – a lack of resources and the presence of conflicts of interest – were repeatedly cited by individuals participating in the site visits. Participants offered two main suggestions for the World Health Organization (and other international organizations and networks: 1 mobilize one or more of government support, financial resources, and the participation of both policymakers and researchers; and 2 create knowledge-related global public goods. Conclusion The findings from

  8. Sexual health definition from the perspective of Iranian experts and description its components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batool Hosein Rashidi

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: According to this study, sexual health has a special definition in each age group and also has different requirements. To start a healthy sexual relationship, at first a correct relationship between a woman and a man must shape. A relationship that is based on customary, religious and social values. Sexual health is a system that consists of abstract components and without proper formation of each of these components we will not be able to access sexual health completely. It seems one of the most important components of sexual health is the knowledge and information about sexual issues. However, further studies are needed to confirm this result.

  9. Depression Screening at a Community Health Fair: Descriptives and Treatment Linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opperman, Kiel J; Hanson, Devin M; Toro, Paul A

    2017-08-01

    Health fairs are a cost-efficient platform for dissemination of preventive services to vulnerable populations. Effectiveness of depression screenings and associated treatment linkage via community health fairs warrants investigation. This study offers the first examination of a depression screening at a community health fair in 261 adult men (18-87years). The PHQ-9 was administered via interview by graduate students and on-site psychiatric nurses were available for a brief consultation for those interested. Over a quarter of participants screened positive for at least moderate depressive symptomatology. Of those who screened positive, 35.8% met with an on-site psychiatric nurse for a consultation. At six-month follow-up, none of the participants given a referral made an appointment at the community mental health agency. This suggests the importance of providing on-site clinician consultations at health fairs and the need for a more coordinated system to schedule future appointments while at the event. Community health fairs reach vulnerable populations, such as those who are uninsured and who have not spoken with a professional about mental health concerns. By conducting depression screening and providing onsite access to a mental health consultation at community health fairs, participants are better able to identify their depressive symptoms and are introduced to ways to treat depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of a health promotion program on employee health risks and work productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Peter R; Kessler, Ronald C; Cooper, John; Sullivan, Sean

    2007-01-01

    Evaluate the impact of a multicomponent workplace health promotion program on employee health risks and work productivity. Quasi-experimental 12-month before-after intervention-control study. A multinational corporation headquartered in the United Kingdom. Of 618 employees offered the program, 266 (43%) completed questionnaires before and after the program. A total of 1242 of 2500 (49.7%) of a control population also completed questionnaires 12 months apart. A multicomponent health promotion program incorporating a health risk appraisal questionnaire, access to a tailored health improvement web portal, wellness literature, and seminars and workshops focused upon identified wellness issues. Outcomes were (1) cumulative count of health risk factors and the World Health Organization health and work performance questionnaire measures of (2) workplace absenteeism and (3) work performance. After adjusting for baseline differences, improvements in all three outcomes were significantly greater in the intervention group compared with the control group. Mean excess reductions of 0.45 health risk factors and 0.36 monthly absenteeism days and a mean increase of 0.79 on the work performance scale were observed in the intervention group compared with the control group. The intervention yielded a positive return on investment, even using conservative assumptions about effect size estimation. The results suggest that a well-implemented multicomponent workplace health promotion program can produce sizeable changes in health risks and productivity.

  11. Population Health Research: Early Description of the Organizational Shift Toward Population Health Management and Defining a Vision for Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldararo, Kristi L; Nash, David B

    2017-10-01

    As health care delivery systems adapt to the changing marketplace, many struggle to define a clear strategy that will prove successful in managing the health of entire populations. The federal government continues to put increasing pressure on organizations to shift away from the traditional way of delivering episodic care and move toward managing populations as a whole-before, during, and after a patient presents in a health care facility. Private payers have begun to follow suit as risk-based payer contracts and bundled payment models become increasingly popular. For organizations to adequately influence the health outcomes of a population, they must be responsible for more than just a patient's medical care. They must partner with the community to create a strategy that encompasses the psychosocial and environmental factors that contribute to one's health. Although health care leaders know this industry transformation is imminent, there is minimal research that shares best practices in regard to designing and implementing a successful population health management strategy. Interviews were conducted with leadership from 10 organizations in order to understand the strategic approach taken by delivery systems and health care institutions that view population health as a key aspect of their overall mission. Responses were recorded and outlined in a detailed response grid. The objective is to provide a qualitative overview of how industry leaders are currently responding to population health. Additionally, common themes and recommendations are presented to serve as guidance for other health care organizations that are at the start of their journey toward population health management.

  12. Components of cultural competence in three mental health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Carole; Haugland, Gary; Reid-Rose, Lenora; Hopper, Kim

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify components of cultural competence in mental health programs developed for cultural groups by community and mental health professionals from these groups. Three programs were studied: a prevention program primarily serving African-American and Afro-Caribbean youth, a Latino adult acute inpatient unit, and a Chinese day treatment program in a community-based agency. Nine study-trained field researchers used a semistructured instrument that captures program genealogy, structure, processes, and cultural infusion. Program cultural elements were identified from field notes and from individual and group interviews of consumers and staff (N=104). A research-group consensus process with feedback from program staff was used to group elements by shared characteristics into the program components of cultural competence. Components included communication competencies (with use of colloquialisms and accepted forms of address); staff in culturally acceptable roles; culturally framed trust building (such as pairing youths with mentors), stigma reduction, friendly milieus (such as serving culturally familiar foods and playing music popular with the culture), and services; and peer, family, and community involvement (including use of peer counselors and mentors, hosting parent weekends, and linking clients with senior center and community services). Incorporating these components into any program in which underserved cultural populations are seen is recommended for improving cultural competence.

  13. Workplace Violence Training Programs for Health Care Workers: An Analysis of Program Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbury, Sheila; Hodgson, Michael; Zankowski, Donna; Lipscomb, Jane

    2017-06-01

    Commercial workplace violence (WPV) prevention training programs differ in their approach to violence prevention and the content they present. This study reviews 12 such programs using criteria developed from training topics in the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Guidelines for Preventing Workplace Violence for Healthcare and Social Service Workers and a review of the WPV literature. None of the training programs addressed all the review criteria. The most significant gap in content was the lack of attention to facility-specific risk assessment and policies. To fill this gap, health care facilities should supplement purchased training programs with specific training in organizational policies and procedures, emergency action plans, communication, facility risk assessment, and employee post-incident debriefing and monitoring. Critical to success is a dedicated program manager who understands risk assessment, facility clinical operations, and program management and evaluation.

  14. Formal intervention in employee health: comparisons of the nature and structure of employee assistance programs and health promotion programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, P M; Blum, T C

    1988-01-01

    Health promotion programs (HPP) and employee assistance programs (EAP) are compared in terms of their structure and process. Two common themes are extracted: a belief that both are beneficial to both employers and employees, and a sense of 'mission'. The technology of HPP and EAP are examined and compared. EAPs' stimulation from Federal funding is contrasted with the more indigenous roots of HPPs. Examination of empirical data comparing organizations with EAPs which have and have not adopted HPPs indicate the former tend to be somewhat more 'caring' toward employees. An examination of program ingredients indicates much greater commonality of structural and processual ingredients within EAPs as compared to HPPs. The extent to which each program type has become more 'populist' in orientation and the implications of these changes for program technology are considered. Finally the paper describes differences in program evaluation stemming from target group definitions in the two types of programs.

  15. Multidisciplinary program for stress-related disease in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Ekvall Hansson

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Eva Ekvall Hansson1, Eva Håkansson2, Annelie Raushed2, Anders Håkansson1 1Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö/General Practice, Malmö, Sweden; 2Primary Health Care Malmö, SwedenObjective: To describe a multidisciplinary program, given by an occupational therapist and a physiotherapist, for patients with stress-related disease in primary health care and to measure the effect of this program in terms of self-perceived health, degree of burnout, physical activity, symptoms, recreational activities, and psychological and physical well-being.Method: Retrospective study.Results: At measures after three months, the thirteen patients included in this study had improved in self-estimated health, measured with EuroQol-5D Visual Analogue Scale (p = 0.000, and in degree of burnout, measured with the Shirom–Melamed Burnout Questionnaire (p = 0.001. There was also a decrease in presence of headache, in physical activity and in satisfaction with leisure time, although not statistically significant. After six months, the improvements remained for all measures except physical activity. The patients were also satisfied with the program to a high degree, measured with Client Satisfaction Questionnaire (median 3.7.Conclusion: This descriptive study shows that a stress-management program, provided by a team including an occupational therapist and a physiotherapist in primary health care, is both feasible and effective in terms of self-estimated health, degree of burnout, and patient satisfaction. Keywords: stress-related health, burnout, occupational therapy, physiotherapy

  16. A Description of a Blind Student's Science Process Skills through Health Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülbül, M. Sahin

    2013-01-01

    This study describes an approach for blind students thought health physics about how they could set a hypothesis and test it. The participant of the study used some health materials designed for high school blind student and tested her hypothesis with the data she gathered with those materials. It was asked that she should hypothesize which could…

  17. Public health nurses perception of clinical leadership in Ireland: narrative descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Marie

    2009-05-01

    The aim of the study was to identify how clinical leadership skills are perceived by Public Health Nurses in the course of their everyday work and the effectiveness and consequences of such skills in primary care delivery. Public health nurses deliver primary care to children and adults as part of small teams or in individual situations. Leadership skills are needed to fulfil their many roles. Rigorous analysis of narrative interviews with public health nurses working in primary care environments in Ireland was undertaken. Narrative information was obtained by having conversations with 20 public health nurses relating to their perceptions on what clinical leadership meant to them and how their leadership skills influenced effective primary care delivery. Analysis of conversations identified the tensions existing between the various roles and responsibilities of the public health nurse and other primary care workers. This tension was perceived by the nurses as being the main barrier to effective primary care delivery from their perspective. Clinical leadership is viewed narrowly by public health nurses as management skills rather than leadership skills were mainly identified. Education for the role was identified as a critical success factor. RELEVANCE TO NURSE MANAGERS: Public health nurses are well placed to shape and influence health service culture through effective clinical leadership.

  18. Measuring the diffusion of innovative health promotion programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckler, A; Goodman, R M; McLeroy, K R; Davis, S; Koch, G

    1992-01-01

    Once a health promotion program has proven to be effective in one or two initial settings, attempts may be made to transfer the program to new settings. One way to conceptualize the transference of health promotion programs from one locale to another is by considering the programs to be innovations that are being diffused. In this way, diffusion of innovation theory can be applied to guide the process of program transference. This article reports on the development of six questionnaires to measure the extent to which health promotion programs are successfully disseminated: Organizational Climate, Awareness-Concern, Rogers's Adoption Variables, Level of Use, Level of Success, and Level of Institutionalization. The instruments are being successfully used in a study of the diffusion of health promotion/tobacco prevention curricula to junior high schools in North Carolina. The instruments, which measure the four steps of the diffusion process, have construct validity since they were developed within existing theories and are derived from the work of previous researchers. No previous research has attempted to use instruments like these to measure sequentially the stages of the diffusion process.

  19. Health risk reduction programs in employer-sponsored health plans: Part II-law and ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, Mark A; Harrell, Heather L

    2009-08-01

    We sought to examine the legal and ethical implications of workplace health risk reduction programs (HRRPs) using health risk assessments, individually focused risk reduction, and financial incentives to promote compliance. We conducted a literature review, analyzed relevant statutes and regulations, and considered the effects of these programs on employee health privacy. A variety of laws regulate HRRPs, and there is little evidence that employer-sponsored HRRPs violate these provisions; infringement on individual health privacy is more difficult to assess. Although current laws permit a wide range of employer health promotion activities, HRRPs also may entail largely unquantifiable costs to employee privacy and related interests.

  20. Health Risk Reduction Programs in Employer-Sponsored Health Plans: Part II—Law and Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, Mark A.; Harrell, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective We sought to examine the legal and ethical implications of workplace health risk reduction programs (HRRPs) using health risk assessments, individually focused risk reduction, and financial incentives to promote compliance. Methods We conducted a literature review, analyzed relevant statutes and regulations, and considered the effects of these programs on employee health privacy. Results A variety of laws regulate HRRPs, and there is little evidence that employer-sponsored HRRPs violate these provisions; infringement on individual health privacy is more difficult to assess. Conclusion Although current laws permit a wide range of employer health promotion activities, HRRPs also may entail largely unquantifiable costs to employee privacy and related interests. PMID:19625971

  1. [Therapeutic adherence in users of a cardiovascular health program in primary care in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veliz-Rojas, Lizet; Mendoza-Parra, Sara; Barriga, Omar A

    2015-01-01

    To analyze therapeutic adherence in users of a cardiovascular health program in primary care in the community of San Pedro de la Paz in the region of Bío Bío, Chile. Cross-sectional and correlational study with a sample of 257 people aged 18-60 years. A questionnaire that included the Miller´s health behavior scale to measure adherence, and review of medical records was performed. Descriptive univariate and bivariate analyses supported in SPSS were performed. Of the total participants, 157 (61.1%) were women. The health behavior scale reflected non-adherence of participants, as only 4 (1.5%) indicated that they always followed the instructions provided by the health team. The subscale monitoring stress management had the highest average, indicating that in this aspect there was greater adherence of the participants. Associations between therapeutic adherence and doing paid work (p=0.025) and with participation in social activities (p=0.005) were found. Therapeutic adherence in users of the cardiovascular health program was low. It is important to develop strategies that favor therapeutic adherence from the perspective of equity and social determinants of health.

  2. Support vector data description for fusion of multiple health indicators for enhancing gearbox fault diagnosis and prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Dong; Tse, Peter W; Guo, Wei; Miao, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for enhancing gearbox fault diagnosis and prognosis is developed by fusion of multiple health indicators through support vector data description. First, the Comblet transform is used to identify gear residual error signals from the raw signal. Second, based on the observation of gear residual error signals, a total of 11 gear health indicators are identified, and are categorized into two types of indicators. The first and second types of indicators are for fault diagnosis and prognosis, respectively. The first type has six indicators, which are sensitive to impulsive signals triggered by anomalous impacts. The second type has five indicators, which are suitable for tracking degradation of faults. Third, through the support vector data description, the first six health indicators are fused into type one indicators for fault diagnosis. The remaining five indicators are fused into type two indicators for fault prognosis. Finally, a Gaussian kernel is designed to enhance the performance of type one and two indicators by optimal range of width size. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated through experiments. The new method has been proven to be superior to methods that use unfused indicators individually

  3. Chronic beryllium disease prevention program; worker safety and health program. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-09

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is today publishing a final rule to implement the statutory mandate of section 3173 of the Bob Stump National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2003 to establish worker safety and health regulations to govern contractor activities at DOE sites. This program codifies and enhances the worker protection program in operation when the NDAA was enacted.

  4. Honolulu Community College Program Health Indicators: 2000-2001 Program Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Honolulu Community Coll.

    This report presents an overall health summation of 21 programs offered at Honolulu Community College (Hawaii) during 2000-2001. The programs profiled are: (1) Auto Body Repair and Painting; (2) Aeronautics Maintenance Technology; (3) Administration of Justice; (4) Automotive Mechanics Technology; (5) Boat Maintenance Repair; (6) Carpentry; (7)…

  5. Health service utilization by indigenous cancer patients in Queensland: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardes Christina M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Indigenous Australians experience more aggressive cancers and higher cancer mortality rates than other Australians. Cancer patients undergoing treatment are likely to access health services (e.g. social worker, cancer helpline, pain management services. To date Indigenous cancer patients’ use of these services is limited. This paper describes the use of health services by Indigenous cancer patients. Methods Indigenous cancer patients receiving treatment were recruited at four major Queensland public hospitals (Royal Brisbane Women’s Hospital, Princess Alexandra, Cairns Base Hospital and Townsville Hospital. Participants were invited to complete a structured questionnaire during a face-to-face interview which sought information about their use of community and allied health services. Results Of the 157 patients interviewed most were women (54.1%, of Aboriginal descent (73.9%, lived outer regional areas (40.1% and had a mean age of 52.2 years. The most frequent cancer types were breast cancer (22.3%, blood related (14.0%, lung (12.1% and gastroenterological (10.8%. More than half of the participants reported using at least one of the ‘Indigenous Health Worker/Services’ (76.4%, ‘Allied Health Workers/Services’ (72.6% and ‘Information Sources’ (70.7%. Younger participants 19–39 years were more likely to use information sources (81.0% than older participants who more commonly used community services (48.8%. The cancer patients used a median of three health services groups while receiving cancer treatment. Conclusions Indigenous cancer patients used a range of health services whilst receiving treatment. Indigenous Health Workers/Services and Allied Health Workers/Services were the most commonly used services. However, there is a need for further systematic investigation into the health service utilization by Indigenous cancer patients.

  6. 76 FR 40733 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, (NIOSH), World Trade Center Health Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, (NIOSH), World Trade Center Health Program Science/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP-STAC) Correction: This notice was published in the Federal Register on June 23...

  7. An Overview of State Policies Supporting Worksite Health Promotion Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderVeur, Jennifer; Gilchrist, Siobhan; Matson-Koffman, Dyann

    2017-05-01

    Worksite health promotion (WHP) programs can reduce the occurrence of cardiovascular disease risk factors. State law can encourage employers and employer-provided insurance companies to offer comprehensive WHP programs. This research examines state law authorizing WHP programs. Quantitative content analysis. Worksites or workplaces. United States (and the District of Columbia). State law in effect in 2013 authorizing WHP programs. Frequency and distribution of states with WHP laws. To determine the content of the laws for analysis and coding, we identified 18 policy elements, 12 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Worksite Health ScoreCard (HSC) and 6 additional supportive WHP strategies. We used these strategies as key words to search for laws authorizing WHP programs or select WHP elements. We calculated the number and type of WHP elements for each state with WHP laws and selected two case examples from states with comprehensive WHP laws. Twenty-four states authorized onsite WHP programs, 29 authorized WHP through employer-provided insurance plans, and 18 authorized both. Seven states had a comprehensive WHP strategy, addressing 8 or more of 12 HSC elements. The most common HSC elements were weight management, tobacco cessation, and physical activity. Most states had laws encouraging the adoption of WHP programs. Massachusetts and Maine are implementing comprehensive WHP laws but studies evaluating their health impact are needed.

  8. Including oral health training in a health system strengthening program in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Seymour

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Rwanda's Ministry of Health, with the Clinton Health Access Initiative, implemented the Human Resources for Health (HRH Program. The purpose of the program is to train and retain high-quality health care professionals to improve and sustain health in Rwanda. Design: In May 2011, an oral health team from Rwanda and the United States proposed that oral health be included in the HRH Program, due to its important links to health, in a recommendation to the Rwandan Ministry of Health. The proposal outlined a diagonal approach to curriculum design that supports the principles of global health through interconnected training for both treatment and collaborative prevention, rather than discipline-based fragmented training focused on isolated risk factors. It combined ‘vertical’ direct patient care training with ‘horizontal’ interdisciplinary training to address common underlying risk factors and associations for disease through primary care, program retention, and sustainability. Results: The proposal was accepted by the Ministry of Health and was approved for funding by the US Government and The Global Fund. Rwanda's first Bachelor of Dental Surgery program, which is in the planning phase, is being developed. Conclusions: Competencies, the training curriculum, insurance and payment schemes, licensure, and other challenges are currently being addressed. With the Ministry of Health supporting the dental HRH efforts and fully appreciating the importance of oral health, all are hopeful that these developments will ultimately lead to more robust oral health data collection, a well-trained and well-retained dental profession, and vastly improved oral health and overall health for the people of Rwanda in the decades to come.

  9. Including oral health training in a health system strengthening program in Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Brittany; Muhumuza, Ibra; Mumena, Chris; Isyagi, Moses; Barrow, Jane; Meeks, Valli

    2013-01-01

    Objective Rwanda's Ministry of Health, with the Clinton Health Access Initiative, implemented the Human Resources for Health (HRH) Program. The purpose of the program is to train and retain high-quality health care professionals to improve and sustain health in Rwanda. Design In May 2011, an oral health team from Rwanda and the United States proposed that oral health be included in the HRH Program, due to its important links to health, in a recommendation to the Rwandan Ministry of Health. The proposal outlined a diagonal approach to curriculum design that supports the principles of global health through interconnected training for both treatment and collaborative prevention, rather than discipline-based fragmented training focused on isolated risk factors. It combined ‘vertical’ direct patient care training with ‘horizontal’ interdisciplinary training to address common underlying risk factors and associations for disease through primary care, program retention, and sustainability. Results The proposal was accepted by the Ministry of Health and was approved for funding by the US Government and The Global Fund. Rwanda's first Bachelor of Dental Surgery program, which is in the planning phase, is being developed. Conclusions Competencies, the training curriculum, insurance and payment schemes, licensure, and other challenges are currently being addressed. With the Ministry of Health supporting the dental HRH efforts and fully appreciating the importance of oral health, all are hopeful that these developments will ultimately lead to more robust oral health data collection, a well-trained and well-retained dental profession, and vastly improved oral health and overall health for the people of Rwanda in the decades to come. PMID:23473054

  10. 78 FR 59121 - Basic Health Program: State Administration of Basic Health Programs; Eligibility and Enrollment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ... coverage program for low-income individuals who would otherwise be eligible to purchase coverage through... applicability to the new program. Beginning in 2014, individuals and small businesses will be able to purchase... impact on the enrollee experience in BHP or the program financing. 7. Withdrawal of a BHP Blueprint prior...

  11. The early childhood oral health program: a qualitative study of the perceptions of child and family health nurses in South Western Sydney, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Maxine; Ajwani, Shilpi; Johnson, Maree; Nash, Linda; Patterson, Tiffany; George, Ajesh

    2016-05-16

    Early childhood caries affects nearly half the population of Australian children aged 5 years and has the potential to negatively impact their growth and development. To address this issue, an Early Childhood Oral Health (ECOH) program, facilitated by Child and Family Health Nurses (CFHNs), commenced in 2007 in New South Wales, Australia. This study builds on the previous evaluation of the program. It aims to explore the perceptions of CFHNs regarding the implementation of the ECOH program in South Western Sydney and the challenges and barriers related to its sustainability. A descriptive qualitative design was used in this study. Two focus groups were conducted with 22 CFHNs who were sampled from two Community Health Centres in South Western Sydney, Australia. Data were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was undertaken. Most CFHNs acknowledged the importance of early childhood oral health promotion and were providing education, oral assessments and referrals during child health checks. Many stressed the need for collaboration with other health professionals to help broaden the scope of the program. Some barriers to implementing the program included confusion regarding the correct referral process, limited feedback from dental services and the lack of oral health awareness among parents. The study findings suggest that the ECOH program is being sustained and effectively implemented into practice by CFHNs. Improvement in the referral and feedback process as well as enhancing parental knowledge of the importance of infant and child oral health could further strengthen the effectiveness of the program. Expanding oral health education opportunities into general practice is advocated, while regular on-line training for CFHNs is preferred. Future research should include strategies to reduce non-attendances, and an assessment of the impact on the prevalence of childhood caries of the ECOH program.

  12. Doppler ion program description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henline, P.

    1980-12-01

    The Doppler spectrometer is a conventional Czerny-Turner grating spectrometer with a 1024 channel multiple detector. Light is dispersed across the detector, and its output yields a spectrum covering approximately 200 A. The width of the spectral peak is directly proportional to the temperature of the emitting ions, and determination of the impurity ion temperature allows one to infer the plasma ion temperature. The Doppler ion software system developed at General Atomic uses a TRACOR Northern 1710-31 and an LSI-11/2. The exact configuration of Doublet III is different from TRACOR Northern systems at other facilities

  13. Readiness of health facilities to deliver safe male circumcision services in Tanzania: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Felix Mosha

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the readiness of health facilities to deliver safe male circumcision services is more important in sub-Saharan Africa because of the inadequacy state of health facilities in many ways. The World Health Organization recommends that only facilities equipped with available trained staff, capable to perform at least minor surgery, able to offer minimum MC package and appropriate equipment for resuscitation, and compliant with requirements for sterilization and infection control should be allowed to deliver safe circumcision services. A cross-sectional study using quantitative data collection technique was conducted to assess the readiness of the health facilities to deliver safe circumcision services in selected districts of Tanzania. All hospitals, health centres and 30% of all dispensaries in these districts were selected to participate in the study. Face-toface questionnaires were administered to the heads of the health facilities and to health practitioners. Overall, 49/69 (59% of the facilities visited provided circumcision services and only 46/203 (24% of the health practitioners performed circumcision procedures. These were mainly assistant medical officers and clinical officers. The vast majority – 190/203 (95% – of the health practitioners require additional training prior to providing circumcision services. Most facilities – 63/69 (91% – had all basic supplies (gloves, basin, chlorine and waste disposal necessary for infection prevention, 44/69 (65% provided condoms, HIV counselling and testing, and sexuallytransmitted infections services, while 62/69 (90% had the capability to perform at least minor surgery. However, only 25/69 (36% and 15/69 (22% of the facilities had functioning sterilization equipment and appropriate resuscitation equipment, respectively. There is readiness for roll out of circumcision services; however, more practitioners need to be trained on circumcision procedures, demand forecasting

  14. 76 FR 11782 - Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Renewal, Expansion, and Renaming of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ...] Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Renewal, Expansion, and Renaming of the...'s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) about options for selecting health care coverage under these and... needs are for experts in health disparities, State Health Insurance Assistance Programs (SHIPs), health...

  15. Improving delivery of a health-promoting-environments program: experiences from Queensland Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, S

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline the key components of a statewide multisite health-promoting-environments program. Contemporary health-promotion programs in settings such as schools, workplaces and hospitals use organisational development theory to address the health issues of the setting, including the physical environment, the organisational environment, and the specific health needs of the employees and consumers of the service. Program principles include management of each project by the participant organisation or site (for example, a school or workplace), using resources available within the organisation and the local community, voluntary participation, social justice and participant-based priority setting, and evaluation and monitoring. Adoption of these principles implies a shift in the role of the health worker from implementer to facilitator. Based on the experience of Queensland Health, it is proposed that the essential building blocks of the health-promoting-environments program are an intersectoral policy base, a model for action, training and resources, local facilitators, support from local organisations, a supportive network of sites, marketing of the program, and a state-based evaluation and monitoring system. The program in Queensland was able to develop a significant number of these components over the 1990-1996 period. In regard to evaluation, process measures can be built around the program components; however, further research is required for development of impact indicators and benchmarks on quality.

  16. Can health insurance improve employee health outcome and reduce cost? An evaluation of Geisinger's employee health and wellness program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeng, Daniel D; Pitcavage, James M; Tomcavage, Janet; Steinhubl, Steven R

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the impact of a health plan-driven employee health and wellness program (known as MyHealth Rewards) on health outcomes (stroke and myocardial infarction) and cost of care. A cohort of Geisinger Health Plan members who were Geisinger Health System (GHS) employees throughout the study period (2007 to 2011) was compared with a comparison group consisting of Geisinger Health Plan members who were non-GHS employees. The GHS employee cohort experienced a stroke or myocardial infarction later than the non-GHS comparison group (hazard ratios of 0.73 and 0.56; P employee health and wellness programs similarly designed as MyHealth Rewards can potentially have a desirable impact on employee health and cost.

  17. Health physics program for the Edgemont Uranium Mill decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polehn, J.L.; Wallace, R.G.; Reed, R.P.; Wilson, G.T.

    1986-01-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is actively involved in decommissioning a uranium mill located near the town of Edgemont, South Dakota. The Edgemont Mill Decommissioning Project, which is unique in many respects, will involve dismantlement of the old inactive mill building and excavation and transportation of several million tons of uranium mill tailings to a permanent disposal site. To ensure that workers are adequately protected from radiation exposure during decommissioning operations, a health physics program appropriate for the decommissioning situation was developed. The Edgemont Mill Decommissioning Project Health Physics Manual (HPM) gives the programmatic requirements for worker radiation protection. The requirements of the HPM are implemented by means of detailed onsite operating procedures. The Edgemont project health physics program was developed using currently available regulations and guidance for an operating uranium mill with appropriate modifications for decommissioning. This paper discusses the development, implementation, and documentation of that program

  18. Success of the Undergraduate Public Health Program At Tulane University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luann Ellis White

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine (SPHTM launched the Bachelors of Science in Public Health (BSPH in 2005. The BSPH has steadily grown and comprises one third of the total enrollment in the school. A review of the organizational structure demonstrates that direct responsibility for undergraduate education by a school of public health is advantageous to the success of the program. The competency and skills-based curriculum attracts students. Outcome measures show the enrollment is steadily increasing. The majority of the BSPH graduates continue onto competitive graduate and professional degree programs. Those who seek jobs find employment related to their public health education, but outside of the traditional governmental public health agencies. The combined BSPH/MPH degree is a pipeline for students to pursue a MPH and increases the likelihood students will pursue careers in public health. The range and depth of study in the bachelors program is continually examined. Topics once within the purview of graduate education are now being incorporated into undergraduate courses. Undergraduate public health is one of a number of factors that is influencing changes in the MPH degree.

  19. Health for Life in Primary Schools Program, United Kingdom: a Program Impact Pathways (PIP) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, Sandra; Donovan, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The Health for Life in Primary Schools Program helps schools promote healthy, active lifestyles through curriculum support related to healthy eating and cooking, growing food, physical activity, and family involvement. These interrelated strands are shown to have the greatest impact on healthy lifestyles, and the Health for Life in Primary Schools Program seeks to make these not one-off lessons, but a sustainable part of a school's culture. Each school involved with the program develops its own Action Plan in order to achieve program goals. Each school is assessed by an audit of facilities, skills, and curriculum at baseline and follow-up, and the pupils complete an on-line questionnaire at baseline and follow-up. Other impact measures are individual to the school and relate to its own Action Plan. Health for Life in Primary Schools sought to assess the cohesiveness and strength of the program using the Program Impact Pathways (PIP) model. The program was deconstructed to its individual parts, with each part assessed in terms of its contribution to the overall program and constraints upon its effectiveness. The PIP analysis helped clarify the logic and structure of the program, whether its objectives can be achieved, the Critical Quality Control Points (CCPs), and the impact measures required to demonstrate success. The core indicators identified for impact evaluation were knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of pupils around healthy eating cooking, growing food, and physical activity. The PIP model confirmed that the Health for Life in Primary Schools Program is well structured and is well suited to achieve its goals. The findings were presented at the Healthy Lifestyles Program Evaluation Workshop held in Granada, Spain, 13-14 September 2013, under the auspices of the Mondelēz International Foundation.

  20. Conditional cash transfer programs and the health and nutrition of Latin American children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Segura-Pérez

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To 1 describe the benefits, conditions, coverage, funding, goals, governance, and structure of well-established conditional cash transfer programs (CCTs in Latin America and 2 identify their health and nutritional impacts among children under 5 years old. Methods A realist review was conducted. CCTs were included if they met the following inclusion criteria: 1 current national-level program; 2 coverage of at least 50% of the target population; 3 continuous operation at scale for 10+ years; 4 clear description of structure, funding sources, and governance; 5 both health/nutrition- and education-related conditions for participation; and 6 available impact evaluation studies with health, development, and/or nutrition indicators among children under 5 years old. Three CCTs (one each in Brazil, Colombia, and Mexico met the criteria. Results There was consistent evidence that the three CCTs selected for review had positive impacts on child health and nutrition outcomes in their respective countries. In all three countries, the programs were scaled up and positive impacts were documented relatively quickly. All three programs had strong political support and clear and transparent governance structures, including accountability and social participation mechanisms, which might explain their success and sustainability. Conclusions CCTs in Latin America have had a positive impact on child health and nutrition outcomes among the poorest families. A key challenge for the future is to reform these programs to help families move out of not only extreme poverty but all poverty in order to lead healthy and productive lives, as called for in the post-2105 Sustainable Development Goals.

  1. Experiences of instructors delivering the Mental Health First Aid training programme: a descriptive qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, J

    2010-09-01

    Mental health literacy among the public is often poor, and although people frequently encounter others experiencing mental distress in their workplace, families and communities, they may be ill-equipped to provide appropriate support. 'Mental Health First Aid' (MHFA), a 12-h mental health promotion programme seeks to address this, training people in the knowledge and skills needed to engage with someone experiencing mental health problems. Research relating to the MHFA programme has centred on course attendees, with a paucity of research surrounding the delivery of basic mental health training programmes. Understanding experiences of instructors delivering such programmes is key to the success of future delivery. This study sought to identify the views and experiences of instructors delivering the MHFA programme in Wales. Fourteen MHFA instructors participated in semi-structured audio-recorded interviews, with the transcripts analysed to identify key themes. This paper explores two of the identified themes namely prerequisite skills and support required by instructors. The study highlighted that because of the ensuing emotional labour experienced by instructors, universal mental health training programmes must put in place a clear infrastructure to train, support and monitor those delivering them, for programme roll-out to be effective.

  2. Assessing environmental assets for health promotion program planning: a practical framework for health promotion practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Andrew E; Evans, Alexandra E

    2016-01-01

    Conducting a health needs assessment is an important if not essential first step for health promotion planning. This paper explores how health needs assessments may be further strengthened for health promotion planning via an assessment of environmental assets rooted in the multiple environments (policy, information, social and physical environments) that shape health and behavior. Guided by a behavioral-ecological perspective- one that seeks to identify environmental assets that can influence health behavior, and an implementation science perspective- one that seeks to interweave health promotion strategies into existing environmental assets, we present a basic framework for assessing environmental assets and review examples from the literature to illustrate the incorporation of environmental assets into health program design. Health promotion practitioners and researchers implicitly identify and apply environmental assets in the design and implementation of health promotion interventions;this paper provides foundation for greater intentionality in assessing environmental assets for health promotion planning.

  3. Health Education Assistance Loan (HEAL) Program. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    On July 1, 2014, the HEAL Program was transferred from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to the U.S. Department of Education (the Department). To reflect this transfer and to facilitate the servicing of all HEAL loans that are currently held by the Department, the Secretary adds the HEAL Program regulations to the Department's chapter in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR).

  4. Health-Based Capitation Risk Adjustment in Minnesota Public Health Care Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Gregory A.; Edwards, Kevan R.; Knutson, David J.

    2004-01-01

    This article documents the history and implementation of health-based capitation risk adjustment in Minnesota public health care programs, and identifies key implementation issues. Capitation payments in these programs are risk adjusted using an historical, health plan risk score, based on concurrent risk assessment. Phased implementation of capitation risk adjustment for these programs began January 1, 2000. Minnesota's experience with capitation risk adjustment suggests that: (1) implementation can accelerate encounter data submission, (2) administrative decisions made during implementation can create issues that impact payment model performance, and (3) changes in diagnosis data management during implementation may require changes to the payment model. PMID:25372356

  5. Teaching corner: child family health international : the ethics of asset-based global health education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evert, Jessica

    2015-03-01

    Child Family Health International (CFHI) is a U.S.-based nonprofit, nongovernmental organization (NGO) that has more than 25 global health education programs in seven countries annually serving more than 600 interprofessional undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate participants in programs geared toward individual students and university partners. Recognized by Special Consultative Status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), CFHI utilizes an asset-based community engagement model to ensure that CFHI's programs challenge, rather than reinforce, historical power imbalances between the "Global North" and "Global South." CFHI's programs are predicated on ethical principles including reciprocity, sustainability, humility, transparency, nonmaleficence, respect for persons, and social justice.

  6. Home literacy experiences and early childhood disability: a descriptive study using the National Household Education Surveys (NHES) program database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit-Smith, Allison; Cabell, Sonia Q; Justice, Laura M

    2010-01-01

    The present article illustrates how the National Household Education Surveys (NHES; U.S. Department of Education, 2009) database might be used to address questions of relevance to researchers who are concerned with literacy development among young children. Following a general description of the NHES database, a study is provided that examines the extent to which parent-reported home literacy activities and child emergent literacy skills differ for children with (a) developmental disabilities versus those who are developing typically, (b) single disability versus multiple disabilities, and (c) speech-language disability only versus other types of disabilities. Four hundred and seventy-eight preschool-age children with disabilities and a typically developing matched sample (based on parent report) were identified in the 2005 administration of the Early Childhood Program Participation (ECPP) Survey in the NHES database. Parent responses to survey items were then compared between groups. After controlling for age and socioeconomic status, no significant differences were found in the frequency of home literacy activities for children with and without disabilities. Parents reported higher levels of emergent literacy skills for typically developing children relative to children with disabilities. These findings suggest the importance of considering the home literacy experiences and emergent literacy skills of young children with disabilities when making clinical recommendations.

  7. Association of health literacy with health information-seeking preference in older people: A correlational, descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Hyun; Utz, Sonja

    2018-02-28

    Low health literacy has been recognized as a potential barrier to obtaining knowledge and maintaining self-care in older people. However, little is known about information-seeking preference in relation to health literacy among older people. The aim of the present study was to understand the influence of health literacy on the information-seeking preference of older people. A total of 129 community-residing Korean older people completed a survey in 2016. The findings revealed that health literacy was a significant predictor of information-seeking preference in older people after controlling for demographic and illness variables. Our study highlights the important need to incorporate strategies to increase the desire for information seeking in older people, in addition to adopting communication strategies that address low health literacy. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Worksite health and wellness programs: Canadian achievements & prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Després, Jean-Pierre; Alméras, Natalie; Gauvin, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Canada has experienced a substantial reduction in mortality related to cardiovascular disease (CVD). There is a general consensus that more effective and widespread health promotion interventions may lead to further reductions in CVD risk factors and actual disease states. In this paper, we briefly outline the prevalence of selected risk factors for CVD in Canada, describe characteristics of the Canadian labor market and workforce, and depict what is known about health and wellness program delivery systems in Canadian workplaces. Our review indicates that there have been numerous and diverse relevant legislative and policy initiatives to create a context conducive to improve the healthfulness of Canadian workplaces. However, there is still a dearth of evidence on the effectiveness of the delivery system and the actual impact of workplace health and wellness programs in reducing CVD risk in Canada. Thus, while a promising model, more research is needed in this area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Global agenda, local health: including concepts of health security in preparedness programs at the jurisdictional level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Chas

    2014-01-01

    The Global Health Security Agenda's objectives contain components that could help health departments address emerging public health challenges that threaten the population. As part of the agenda, partner countries with advanced public health systems will support the development of infrastructure in stakeholder health departments. To facilitate this process and augment local programs, state and local health departments may want to include concepts of health security in their public health preparedness offices in order to simultaneously build capacity. Health security programs developed by public health departments should complete projects that are closely aligned with the objectives outlined in the global agenda and that facilitate the completion of current preparedness grant requirements. This article identifies objectives and proposes tactical local projects that run parallel to the 9 primary objectives of the Global Health Security Agenda. Executing concurrent projects at the international and local levels in preparedness offices will accelerate the completion of these objectives and help prevent disease epidemics, detect health threats, and respond to public health emergencies. Additionally, future funding tied or related to health security may become more accessible to state and local health departments that have achieved these objectives.

  10. Home and Health in the Third Age — Methodological Background and Descriptive Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Kylén

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The understanding of the complex relationship between the home environment, well-being and daily functioning in the third age is currently weak. The aim of this paper is to present the methodological background of the Home and Health in the Third Age Study, and describe a sample of men and women in relation to their home and health situation. Methods and Design: The study sample included 371 people aged 67–70, living in ordinary housing in the south of Sweden. Structured interviews and observations were conducted to collect data about objective and perceived aspects of home and health. Results: The majority of the participants were in good health and had few functional limitations. Women had more functional limitations and reported more symptoms than men. Environmental barriers were found in every home investigated; the most were found in the kitchen and hygiene area. Environmental barriers were more common in multi-family than in one-family dwellings. Discussion: This study will increase our knowledge on home and health dynamics among people in the third age. The results have potential to contribute to societal planning related to housing provision, home care and social services for senior citizens.

  11. Home and Health in the Third Age — Methodological Background and Descriptive Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylén, Maya; Ekström, Henrik; Haak, Maria; Elmståhl, Sölve; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Background: The understanding of the complex relationship between the home environment, well-being and daily functioning in the third age is currently weak. The aim of this paper is to present the methodological background of the Home and Health in the Third Age Study, and describe a sample of men and women in relation to their home and health situation. Methods and Design: The study sample included 371 people aged 67–70, living in ordinary housing in the south of Sweden. Structured interviews and observations were conducted to collect data about objective and perceived aspects of home and health. Results: The majority of the participants were in good health and had few functional limitations. Women had more functional limitations and reported more symptoms than men. Environmental barriers were found in every home investigated; the most were found in the kitchen and hygiene area. Environmental barriers were more common in multi-family than in one-family dwellings. Discussion: This study will increase our knowledge on home and health dynamics among people in the third age. The results have potential to contribute to societal planning related to housing provision, home care and social services for senior citizens. PMID:25019267

  12. FAMILY HEALTH PROGRAM: CHALLENGES AND POTENTIALITIES REGARDING DRUGS USE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle Aparecida de Barros

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Epidemiological studies on drugs use point towards this phenomenon as a public health problem. Nowadays, the Family Health Program (FHP is presented by the Health Ministry as a model to restructure primary health care and aims to offer family-centered care, permeated by integrality, problem solving and community bonds. This article aims to discuss action possibilities of Family Health Care professionals involving drugs patients. It is evident that, as opposed to other actions already developed by FHP professionals in other health care areas, which has appeared clearly and objectively. This fact is observed in the daily activities of FHP professionals, which give little attention to drugs-related problems. However, research emphasizes that there exists a broad range of action possibilities for FHP professionals. Although other studies evidence this team’s fragilities in terms of care for drugs users, these can be overcome by investing in the training and valuation of these professionals. KEY WORDS: Family Health Program; Street drugs; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice.

  13. Nurses' lifestyle behaviours, health priorities and barriers to living a healthy lifestyle: a qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiri, Lindokuhle P; Draper, Catherine E; Lambert, Estelle V; Kolbe-Alexander, Tracy L

    2014-01-01

    Nurses have an increased risk for non-communicable diseases (NCDs), along with a high prevalence of obesity, poor eating habits and insufficient physical activity. The aim of this study was to determine the health concerns, health priorities and barriers to living a healthy lifestyle among nurses and hospital management staff from public hospitals in the Western Cape Metropole, South Africa. Participants were purposively sampled (n = 103), and included management personnel (n = 9), night shift (n = 57) and day-shift nurses (n = 36). Twelve focus groups (FGDs) were conducted with nursing staff to obtain insight into nurses' health concerns, lifestyle behaviours and worksite health promotion programmes (WHPPs). Seven key informant interviews (KII) were conducted with management personnel, to gain their perspective on health promotion in the worksite. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data with the assistance of Atlas.ti Qualitative Data Analysis Software. Night shift nurses frequently identified weight gain and living with NCDs such as hypertension as their main health concerns. Being overweight was perceived to have a negative impact on work performance. All nurses identified backache and exposure to tuberculosis (TB) as occupation-related health concerns, and both management and nurses frequently reported a stressful working environment. Nurses frequently mentioned lack of time to prepare healthy meals due to long working hours and being overtired from work. The hospital environment was perceived to have a negative influence on the nurses' lifestyle behaviours, including food service that offered predominantly unhealthy foods. The most commonly delivered WHPPs included independent counselling services, an online employee wellness programme offered by the Department of Health and wellness days in which clinical measures, such as blood glucose were measured. Nurses identified a preference for WHPPs that provided access to fitness facilities or

  14. Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program: facilitating physical health care for people with mental illness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Platania-Phung, Chris; Scott, David

    2013-10-01

    People with serious mental illness have increased rates of physical ill-health and reduced contact with primary care services. In Australia, the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program (MHNIP) was developed to facilitate access to mental health services. However, as a primary care service, the contribution to physical health care is worthy of consideration. Thirty-eight nurses who were part of the MHNIP participated in a national survey of nurses working in mental health about physical health care. The survey invited nurses to report their views on the physical health of consumers and the regularity of physical health care they provide. Physical health-care provision in collaboration with general practitioners (GPs) and other health-care professionals was reported as common. The findings suggest that the MHNIP provides integrated care, where nurses and GPs work in collaboration, allowing enough time to discuss physical health or share physical health activities. Consumers of this service appeared to have good access to physical and mental health services, and nurses had access to primary care professionals to discuss consumers' physical health and develop their clinical skills in the physical domain. The MHNIP has an important role in addressing physical health concerns, in addition to the mental health issues of people accessing this service. © 2012 The Authors; International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  15. A youth-led reproductive health program in a university setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djalalinia, Shirin; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Malekafzali, Hossein; Hashemi, Zeynab; Peykari, Niloofar

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive health problems affect youths in all countries. There is an urgent need to enhance youths reproductive health services to provide a healthy life for this group. In this regard, the present study aimed to evaluate the Reproductive Health Peer Education Program based on the opinion of university students. This interventional study was conducted in Qazvin University of Medical Sciences through the peer education method. The participants of this study were 24 peer educators who received training in a 40 hour peer educator training course. The peer education program was implemented in the university. In order to evaluate this community- based intervention, 329 students were selected through the stratified sampling method and their opinion was assessed. Descriptive statistical methods were used by SPSS software for data analysis. The results of the study revealed that peer education was accepted by 64.7% (n= 213) of the students, according to their opinion. The educational priorities of the students were as follows: pre-marriage counseling (78%, n= 166); STI/AIDS (17%, n= 36); and contraception (5%, n= 11). The peer education program was recognized as the most required reproductive health service in the university by 55.3% (n= 118) of the students. They believed that the most important duties of the peer educators were: education (33.5%, n= 71); counseling (30.4%, n= 65); referring to a counseling center (21.6%, n= 46) and referring to a therapeutic center (14.5%, n= 31). Also, the students stated that confidentiality (53%, n= 113), suitable communication (26%, n= 55) and sufficient knowledge (21%, n= 45) were desired characteristics for the peer educators. According to the students' opinion, peer education could provide suitable reproductive health services and could also be beneficial for reproductive health promotion and might reinforce positive behaviors in youths. Reproductive health peer- counseling is a sensitive process, and it is best to be

  16. The Role of Values, Moral Norms, and Descriptive Norms in Building Occupant Responses to an Energy-Efficiency Pilot Program and to Framing of Related Messages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpan, Laura M.; Barooah, Prabir; Subramany, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    This study examined building occupants' responses associated with an occupant-based energy-efficiency pilot in a university building. The influence of occupants' values and norms as well as effects of two educational message frames (descriptive vs. moral norms cues) on program support were tested. Occupants' personal moral norm to conserve energy…

  17. 42 CFR 431.636 - Coordination of Medicaid with the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Insurance Program (CHIP). 431.636 Section 431.636 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES...'s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). (a) Statutory basis. This section implements— (1) Section 2102(b... coordination between a State child health program and other public health insurance programs. (b) Obligations...

  18. School Nurses' Descriptions of Concerns Arising during Pupils' Health Check-Ups: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poutiainen, Hannele; Holopainen, Arja; Hakulinen-Viitanen, Tuovi; Laatikainen, Tiina

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the concerns and modes of action of Finnish school nurses during pupils' health check-ups. Methods: Focus group interviews with 17 school nurses were performed in 2011 and again in 2013. Data were analysed using inductive content analysis. Results: School nurses' concerns were mostly associated with the psychosocial…

  19. Electronic Health Record Vendors Reported by Health Care Providers Participating in Federal EHR Incentive Programs

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This public use file combines registration data compiled from two federal programs that are on-going since February 2009 – the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid...

  20. [Cost-benefit analysis of primary prevention programs for mental health at the workplace in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Kensuke; Kawakami, Norito; Tsusumi, Akizumi; Inoue, Akiomi; Kobayashi, Yuka; Takeuchi, Ayano; Fukuda, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    To determine the cost-benefits of primary prevention programs for mental health at the workplace, we conducted a meta-analysis of published studies in Japan. We searched the literature, published as of 16 November 2011, using the Pubmed database and relevant key words. The inclusion criteria were: conducted in the workplace in Japan; primary prevention focus; quasi-experimental studies or controlled trials; and outcomes including absenteeism or presenteeism. Four studies were identified: one participatory work environment improvement, one individual-oriented stress management, and two supervisor education programs. Costs and benefits in yen were estimated for each program, based on the description of the programs in the literature, and additional information from the authors. The benefits were estimated based on each program's effect on work performance (measured using the WHO Health and Work Performance Questionnaire in all studies), as well as sick leave days, if available. The estimated relative increase in work performance (%) in the intervention group compared to the control group was converted into labor cost using the average bonus (18% of the total annual salary) awarded to employees in Japan as a base. Sensitive analyses were conducted using different models of time-trend of intervention effects and 95% confidence limits of the relative increase in work performance. For the participatory work environment improvement program, the cost was estimated as 7,660 yen per employee, and the benefit was 15,200-22,800 yen per employee. For the individual-oriented stress management program, the cost was 9,708 yen per employee, and the benefit was 15,200-22,920 yen per employee. For supervisor education programs, the costs and benefits were respectively 5,209 and 4,400-6,600 yen per employee, in one study, 2,949 and zero yen per employee in the other study. The 95% confidence intervals were wide for all these studies. For the point estimates based on these cases, the

  1. Description and Evaluation of an Educational Intervention on Health Care Costs and Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Jennifer A; Ronan, Jeanine C; Petrie, Ian; Fieldston, Evan S

    2016-02-01

    There is growing consensus that to ensure that health care dollars are spent efficiently, physicians need more training in how to provide high-value, cost-conscious care. Thus, in fiscal year 2014, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia piloted a 9-part curriculum on health care costs and value for faculty in the Division of General Pediatrics. This study uses baseline and postintervention surveys to gauge knowledge, perceptions, and views on these issues and to assess the efficacy of the pilot curriculum. Faculty completed surveys about their knowledge and perceptions about health care costs and value and their views on the role physicians should play in containing costs and promoting value. Baseline and postintervention responses were compared and analyzed on the basis of how many of the sessions respondents attended. Sixty-two faculty members completed the baseline survey (71% response rate), and 45 faculty members completed the postintervention survey (63% response rate). Reported knowledge of health care costs and value increased significantly in the postintervention survey (P=.04 and Pvalue were 2.42 (confidence interval: 1.05-5.58) and 6.22 times greater (confidence interval: 2.29-16.90), respectively, postintervention. Reported knowledge of health care costs and value increased with number of sessions attended (P=.01 and Pvalue and initiated important discussions about the role physicians can play in containing costs and promoting value. Additional education, increased cost transparency, and more decision support tools are needed to help physicians translate knowledge into practice. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Assessing the health, functional characteristics, and health needs of youth attending a noncategorical transition support program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Jason F; Swigonski, Nancy L; Ciccarelli, Mary R

    2012-09-01

    To assess the health, functional characteristics, and health care service needs of youth and young adults with special health care needs attending a comprehensive, noncategorical transition program. A self-administered survey was developed from national health surveys and clinical experience to assess concepts identified as important for successful transition to adulthood. Surveys were mailed to 198 parents of youth and young adults with special health care needs attending the transition clinic. Parents were asked about the youth's health, functional status, and health care services needed. The clinical database provided demographic and patient health characteristics. Results were compared against the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs. Forty-four percent of surveys were returned. Average age of youth was 17.5 (11-22) years old and diagnoses included cerebral palsy (36%), spina bifida (10%), developmental delay or Down syndrome (17%), and autism (6%). Most youth needed assistance with personal care (69%) and routine needs (91%) and used assistive devices (59%). Compared with the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, parents reported higher needs for all services except mental health care and tobacco or substance use counseling. Forty three percent reported at least one unmet health need. Few parents reported the need for counseling on substance use (1%), sexual health screening (16%), nutrition (34%), and exercise (41%). Youth attending our transition program had more functional limitations, poorer reported health status, different diagnosis distribution, and higher levels of needed health services. Few parents identified needs for other recommended adolescent preventive services. Transition programs should assess patient health characteristics and service needs to design effective patient-centered services. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  3. Program Development and Effectiveness of Workplace Health Promotion Program for Preventing Metabolic Syndrome among Office Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hosihn; Jung, Jiyeon; Cho, Jeonghyun; Chin, Dal Lae

    2017-08-04

    This paper aims to develop and analyze the effects of a socio-ecological model-based intervention program for preventing metabolic syndrome (MetS) among office workers. The intervention program was developed using regular health examinations, a "health behavior and need" assessment survey among workers, and a focus group study. According to the type of intervention, subjects took part in three groups: health education via an intranet-based web magazine (Group 1), self-monitoring with the U-health system (Group 2), and the target population who received intensive intervention (Group 3). The intervention programs of Group 1 and Group 2, which relied on voluntary participation, did not show significant effects. In Group 3, which relied on targeted and proactive programs, showed a decrease in waist circumference and in fasting glucose ( p light of the effectiveness of the intensive intervention strategy for metabolic syndrome prevention among workers used in this study, companies should establish targeted and proactive health care programs rather than providing a healthcare system that is dependent on an individual's voluntary participation.

  4. Teaching children about mental health and illness: a school nurse health education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desocio, Janiece; Stember, Lisa; Schrinsky, Joanne

    2006-04-01

    A mental health education program designed by school nurses for children ages 10- 12 was developed in 2000-2001 and expanded with broader distribution in 2004-2005. Six classroom sessions, each 45 minutes in length, provided information and activities to increase children's awareness of mental health and illness. Education program content included facts about the brain's connection to mental health, information about healthy ways to manage stress, resources and activities to promote mental health, common mental health problems experienced by children, and how to seek help for mental health problems. Classes included a combination of didactic presentation and open discussion, encouraging students to ask questions and allowing the school nurse to correct misinformation. Analysis of pre- and posttests from 370 elementary and middle school students revealed statistically significant improvements in their knowledge of mental health and mental illness.

  5. A health recreation program for u-healthcare clients: effects on mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jisan; Kim, Jeongeun; Jeong, Suyong; Choi, Hanna; Jin, Meiling; Kim, Sukwha

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a health recreation program was implemented with elderly patients (60 years of age or older) who were receiving ubiquitous healthcare (u-healthcare) services. Furthermore, we examined the effects of health recreation on perceived stress, anxiety, and depression, by comparing survey results before and after the recreation program was conducted. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop an offline service with the ability to promote the impact of the u-healthcare service on mental healthcare. A health recreation program, consisting of a variety of weekly games, songs, and minilectures about mental health over a 10-week period, was offered at a senior citizens center in K-Gu, Seoul, Korea. This program targeted 18 elderly people currently receiving u-healthcare services. Data on the impact of the program on the mental health of the elderly were collected through surveys administered before and after the recreation program, and the results were compared with those of a control group. The control group consisted of 18 elderly people who were receiving u-healthcare services from the same district. The perceived stress and anxiety of the experimental group decreased significantly compared with those of the control group. However, the program did not result in a significant reduction in depression. This offline health recreation program offered to elderly u-healthcare service clients contributed to the promotion of their mental health. Further studies will be required to better incorporate the offline mental healthcare program into their daily lives within the u-healthcare service.

  6. Personal health promotion at US medical schools: a quantitative study and qualitative description of deans' and students' perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elon Lisa K

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prior literature has shown that physicians with healthy personal habits are more likely to encourage patients to adopt similar habits. However, despite the possibility that promoting medical student health might therefore efficiently improve patient outcomes, no one has studied whether such promotion happens in medical school. We therefore wished to describe both typical and outstanding personal health promotion environments experienced by students in U.S. medical schools. Methods We collected information through four different modalities: a literature review, written surveys of medical school deans and students, student and dean focus groups, and site visits at and interviews with medical schools with reportedly outstanding student health promotion programs. Results We found strong correlations between deans' and students' perceptions of their schools' health promotion environments, including consistent support of the idea of schools' encouraging healthy student behaviors, with less consistent follow-through by schools on this concept. Though students seemed to have thought little about the relationships between their own personal and clinical health promotion practices, deans felt strongly that faculty members should model healthy behaviors. Conclusions Deans' support of the relationship between physicians' personal and clinical health practices, and concern about their institutions' acting on this relationship augurs well for the role of student health promotion in the future of medical education. Deans seem to understand their students' health environment, and believe it could and should be improved; if this is acted on, it could create important positive changes in medical education and in disease prevention.

  7. A descriptive qualitative examination of knowledge translation practice among health researchers in Manitoba, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Kathryn M; Roche, Patricia L; Bell, Courtney P; Temple, Beverley; Wittmeier, Kristy D M

    2017-09-06

    The importance of effective translation of health research findings into action has been well recognized, but there is evidence to suggest that the practice of knowledge translation (KT) among health researchers is still evolving. Compared to research user stakeholders, researchers (knowledge producers) have been under-studied in this context. The goals of this study were to understand the experiences of health researchers in practicing KT in Manitoba, Canada, and identify their support needs to sustain and increase their participation in KT. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 26 researchers studying in biomedical; clinical; health systems and services; and social, cultural, environmental and population health research. Interview questions were open-ended and probed participants' understanding of KT, their experiences in practicing KT, barriers and facilitators to practicing KT, and their needs for KT practice support. KT was broadly conceptualized across participants. Participants described a range of KT practice experiences, most of which related to dissemination. Participants also expressed a number of negative emotions associated with the practice of KT. Many individual, logistical, and systemic or organizational barriers to practicing KT were identified, which included a lack of institutional support for KT in both academic and non-academic systems. Participants described the presence of good relationships with stakeholders as a critical facilitator for practicing KT. The most commonly identified needs for supporting KT practice were access to education and training, and access to resources to increase awareness and promotion of KT. While there were few major variations in response trends across most areas of health research, the responses of biomedical researchers suggested a unique KT context, reflected by distinct conceptualizations of KT (such as commercialization as a core component), experiences (including frustration and lack of

  8. Formulating Employability Skills for Graduates of Public Health Study Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qomariyah, Nurul; Savitri, Titi; Hadianto, Tridjoko; Claramita, Mora

    2016-01-01

    Employability skills (ES) are important for effective and successful individual participation in the workplace. The main aims of the research were to identify important ES needed by graduates of Public Health Study Program Universitas Ahmad Dahlan (PHSP UAD) and to assess the achievement of the ES development that has been carried out by PHSP UAD.…

  9. Programming microphysiological systems for children's health protection (SEBM meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentation: Programming microphysiological systems for children’s health protectionAuthors: Knudsen1 T, Klieforth2 B, and Slikker3 W Jr.1National Center for Computational Toxicology/EPA, Research Triangle Park NC2National Center for Environmental Research/EPA, Washington DC3Nat...

  10. Professional competence in a health promotion program in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkers-de Boer, Caroline J M; Heijsman, Anke; van Nes, Fenna; Abma, Tineke A

    2017-07-12

    Health promotion for senior citizens ('seniors') is an increasingly important factor in health and welfare policy, having important implications for occupational therapy. The health promotion program 'Healthy and Active Aging' originated in the US, has been modified and adapted to the Dutch context and has been implemented in community contexts. This study aimed to generate an in-depth understanding of the Healthy and Active Aging program and to use this knowledge to inform professional practice. A naturalistic case study methodology was followed, using document analysis, observations, interviews and a group interview as data gathering methods. Data were analyzed and interpreted using narrative analyses. In this specific case, a small group of women joined the program. During 10 sessions, the participants explored the meaning of everyday activities for their self-perceived health and well-being. The key experience reported by the participants and professionals related to the positive ambience within the group, the emotional recognition among the participants and the responsive guidance of the professionals. This case showed how the framework of the program can be modified and tailored to the wishes and needs of the participating seniors. The group facilitators chose a subtle, responsive manner to support and motivate the participants. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. A Mental Health Consultation Program for Project Head Start.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawin, Marjorie R.

    The Psychological Center provided a family oriented mental health consultation service to 17 delegate agencies who had contracts with Head Start programs in 1966-67. This paper presents an overview of the services which an interdisciplinary staff of 52 professionals provided to 6,780 families and 1,500 agency staff members. Gerald Caplan's (1964)…

  12. Medicaid program; health care-related taxes. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-30

    This rule finalizes our proposal to delay enforcement of certain clarifications regarding standards for determining hold harmless arrangements in the final rule entitled, "Medicaid Program; Health Care-Related Taxes" from the expiration of a Congressional moratorium on enforcement from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010.

  13. Targeting Obesity through Health Promotion Programs for School Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Patrick C.; Lohrmann, David K.; Hall, Cougar

    2017-01-01

    Health promotion programs for school staff are an overlooked and under-utilized resource that can lead to reductions in overweight and obesity among teachers and other staff members if implemented properly. In addition to increasing the overall staff wellness, boosting morale, increasing productivity, improving academic achievement, providing…

  14. Prenatal Foundations: Fetal Programming of Health and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elysia Poggi; Thompson, Ross A.

    2014-01-01

    The fetal programming and developmental origins of disease models suggest that experiences that occur before birth can have consequences for physical and mental health that persist across the lifespan. Development is more rapid during the prenatal period as compared to any other stage of life. This introductory article considers evidence that…

  15. 75 FR 79323 - Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ... during performance. Any failure to meet the standards in Sec. 63.15 must be remedied to the satisfaction..., a sector of the economy, productivity, competition, jobs, the environment, public health or safety..., Individuals with disabilities, Low and moderate income housing, Public assistance programs, Public housing...

  16. Social network analysis of public health programs to measure partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Martin W; Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Prewitt, Kim; Carothers, Bobbi J

    2014-12-01

    In order to prevent chronic diseases, community-based programs are encouraged to take an ecological approach to public health promotion and involve many diverse partners. Little is known about measuring partnership in implementing public health strategies. We collected data from 23 Missouri communities in early 2012 that received funding from three separate programs to prevent obesity and/or reduce tobacco use. While all of these funding programs encourage partnership, only the Social Innovation for Missouri (SIM) program included a focus on building community capacity and enhancing collaboration. Social network analysis techniques were used to understand contact and collaboration networks in community organizations. Measurements of average degree, density, degree centralization, and betweenness centralization were calculated for each network. Because of the various sizes of the networks, we conducted comparative analyses with and without adjustment for network size. SIM programs had increased measurements of average degree for partner collaboration and larger networks. When controlling for network size, SIM groups had higher measures of network density and lower measures of degree centralization and betweenness centralization. SIM collaboration networks were more dense and less centralized, indicating increased partnership. The methods described in this paper can be used to compare partnership in community networks of various sizes. Further research is necessary to define causal mechanisms of partnership development and their relationship to public health outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sustaining health education research programs in Aboriginal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisener, Katherine; Shapka, Jennifer; Jarvis-Selinger, Sandra

    2017-09-01

    Despite evidence supporting the ongoing provision of health education interventions in First Nations communities, there is a paucity of research that specifically addresses how these programs should be designed to ensure sustainability and long-term effects. Using a Community-Based Research approach, a collective case study was completed with three Canadian First Nations communities to address the following research question: What factors are related to sustainable health education programs, and how do they contribute to and/or inhibit program success in an Aboriginal context? Semi-structured interviews and a sharing circle were completed with 19 participants, including members of community leadership, external partners, and program staff and users. Seven factors were identified to either promote or inhibit program sustainability, including: 1) community uptake; 2) environmental factors; 3) stakeholder awareness and support; 4) presence of a champion; 5) availability of funding; 6) fit and flexibility; and 7) capacity and capacity building. Each factor is provided with a working definition, influential moderators, and key evaluation questions. This study is grounded in, and builds on existing research, and can be used by First Nations communities and universities to support effective sustainability planning for community-based health education interventions.

  18. Bauxite mining and alumina refining: process description and occupational health risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, A Michael; Frisch, Neale; Olney, David

    2014-05-01

    To describe bauxite mining and alumina refining processes and to outline the relevant physical, chemical, biological, ergonomic, and psychosocial health risks. Review article. The most important risks relate to noise, ergonomics, trauma, and caustic soda splashes of the skin/eyes. Other risks of note relate to fatigue, heat, and solar ultraviolet and for some operations tropical diseases, venomous/dangerous animals, and remote locations. Exposures to bauxite dust, alumina dust, and caustic mist in contemporary best-practice bauxite mining and alumina refining operations have not been demonstrated to be associated with clinically significant decrements in lung function. Exposures to bauxite dust and alumina dust at such operations are also not associated with the incidence of cancer. A range of occupational health risks in bauxite mining and alumina refining require the maintenance of effective control measures.

  19. Descriptions of sampling practices within five approaches to qualitative research in education and the health sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Guetterman, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    Although recommendations exist for determining qualitative sample sizes, the literature appears to contain few instances of research on the topic. Practical guidance is needed for determining sample sizes to conduct rigorous qualitative research, to develop proposals, and to budget resources. The purpose of this article is to describe qualitative sample size and sampling practices within published studies in education and the health sciences by research design: case study, ethnography, ground...

  20. The diagnostic yield of the first episode of a periodic health evaluation: a descriptive epidemiology study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kermott Cindy A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The benefits of a periodic health evaluation remain debatable. The incremental value added by such evaluations beyond the delivery of age appropriate screening and preventive medicine recommendations is unclear. Methods We retrospectively collected data on a cohort of consecutive patients presenting for their first episode of a comprehensive periodic health evaluation. We abstracted data on new diagnoses that were identified during this single episode of care and that were not trivial (i.e., required additional testing or intervention. Results The cohort consisted of 491 patients. The rate of new diagnoses per this single episode of care was 0.9 diagnoses per patient. The majority of these diagnoses was not prompted by patients’ complaints (71% and would not have been identified by screening guidelines (51%. Men (odds ratio 2.67; 95% CI, 1.76, 4.03 and those with multiple complaints at presentation (odds ratio 1.12; 95% CI, 1.05, 1.19 were more likely to receive a clinically relevant diagnosis at the conclusion of the visit. Age was not a predictor of receiving a diagnosis in this cohort. Conclusion The first episode of a comprehensive periodic health evaluation may reveal numerous important diagnoses or risk factors that are not always identified through routine screening.

  1. Extensive Description and Comparison of Human Supra-Gingival Microbiome in Root Caries and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Qin, Bingcai; Du, Minquan; Zhong, Huanzi; Xu, Qingan; Li, Yuhong; Zhang, Ping; Fan, Mingwen

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the polymicrobial etiology of root caries is limited. To conduct a comprehensive research study on root caries, we utilized 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene libraries and quantitative PCR to compare supra-gingival bacterial communities from healthy sites and carious sites of 21 patients with root caries (Patient-controls and Patient-cases) and the sites of 21 healthy individuals (Healthy-controls) from two nursing homes. Healthy-controls and Patient-cases showed no significant differences in terms of biomass, species richness, and species diversity. However, as for beta diversity based on either community membership metric (unweighted UniFrac) or community structure metric (weighted UniFrac), Healthy-controls and Patient-cases were clearly distinguished from each other, appearing more variable in the community membership and structure in root caries microbiome but relatively conserved in the health microbiome. The Patient-controls group was at an intermediate stage between Healthy-controls and Patient-cases, but was more inclined to the former. Demonstrated in both relative abundance and prevalence of species in health and root caries, Propionibacterium acidifaciens, Streptococcus mutans, Olsenella profusa, Prevotella multisaccharivorax, and Lactobacillus crispatus were found to be most associated with root caries, whereas Delftia acidovorans, Bacteroidetes[G-2] sp., Lachnospiraceae[G-3] sp., and Prevotella intermedia are most associated with health. Our study provides a basis for further elucidating the microbial etiology of root caries in the elderly. PMID:25658087

  2. Composite Measures of Health Care Provider Performance: A Description of Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwartz, Michael; Restuccia, Joseph D; Rosen, Amy K

    2015-01-01

    Context Since the Institute of Medicine’s 2001 report Crossing the Quality Chasm, there has been a rapid proliferation of quality measures used in quality-monitoring, provider-profiling, and pay-for-performance (P4P) programs. Although individual performance measures are useful for identifying specific processes and outcomes for improvement and tracking progress, they do not easily provide an accessible overview of performance. Composite measures aggregate individual performance measures into a summary score. By reducing the amount of data that must be processed, they facilitate (1) benchmarking of an organization’s performance, encouraging quality improvement initiatives to match performance against high-performing organizations, and (2) profiling and P4P programs based on an organization’s overall performance. Methods We describe different approaches to creating composite measures, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and provide examples of their use. Findings The major issues in creating composite measures are (1) whether to aggregate measures at the patient level through all-or-none approaches or the facility level, using one of the several possible weighting schemes; (2) when combining measures on different scales, how to rescale measures (using z scores, range percentages, ranks, or 5-star categorizations); and (3) whether to use shrinkage estimators, which increase precision by smoothing rates from smaller facilities but also decrease transparency. Conclusions Because provider rankings and rewards under P4P programs may be sensitive to both context and the data, careful analysis is warranted before deciding to implement a particular method. A better understanding of both when and where to use composite measures and the incentives created by composite measures are likely to be important areas of research as the use of composite measures grows. PMID:26626986

  3. Occupational safety and health program for a model uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, H.T.

    1981-01-01

    The basic purpose of this paper is to suggest procedures and practices to insure that no employee working in a uranium milling operation receives exposure to radioactive, toxic, or other materials or agents that might produce a permanent, deleterious effect upon his physical health and well-being. This program is also designed to insure that each employee can carry out his assigned duties without risk to his health or to that of his fellow workers. The total program is envisioned as a balanced combination of occupational hygiene and radiation monitoring. This includes surveying, air sampling, personnel dosimetry, bioassay, medical surveillance, epidemiology, and training - all backed by a thoroughly tested and evaluated set of emergency procedures. The program, as presented, is keyed to the results of monitoring, surveying, air sampling, medical surveillance, and epidemiology - it being obvious that no problem can result when no hazard can be identified

  4. A descriptive study of advising practices during travel health consultations in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, C; Merrina, F; Gagnayre, R; Bouchaud, O

    2017-09-01

    Recommendations for improving traveler adherence address both the content of the advice given and the structure of the consultation. The objective of this article is to describe how travel health consultations are structured in France. A questionnaire based on both theoretical foundations and recommendations in the literature was sent to health professionals who practice in travel clinics, all of them members of France's Société de Médecine des Voyages. The response rate was 78.5% (176/224). One hundred thirty nine respondents (78.9%) reported that treatment (vaccinations, in particular) and advising were done at separate times in the consultation. The majority of respondents questioned the traveler on his wishes, difficulties, expectations, experiences, and previous knowledge. A third explored the traveler's perceptions regarding the seriousness of diseases, the effectiveness of prevention measures and the latter's adverse effects with a difference when health professionals were practicing >5 years and/or had received specific training ( P  traveler whether he understood the advice given. One hundred thirty seven respondents (77.8%) gave travelers a booklet with additional advice, and 66.5% gave them a website where they could find health advice on their destination. Travelers were almost never offered group consultations or the opportunity to work on real-life situations. When there were language barriers, the respondents were more likely to seek help from a French-speaking member of the traveler's entourage (48.9%) than from an interpreter (22.7%). While the majority of practitioners follow most of the recommendations regarding the structure of travel health consultations, some of the factors that enhance traveler learning are underutilized, reducing the likelihood that travelers will apply the advice given. The study illustrates the need to develop more educational intervention methods and to evaluate their impact on travelers. © International Society

  5. [Pedagogical training in stricto sensu graduate programs in public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Guilherme Torres; Ribeiro, Victoria Maria Brant

    2013-06-01

    The scope of this research is to discuss the relevance and need for pedagogical training of university lecturers in the Public Health field. The contention is that college teaching is a practice that requires specific training, since it is characterized by complex elements that transcend the mastery of given content. Considering stricto sensu graduate studies as an important stage in the training of future university lecturers, an attempt was made to identify and analyze the subjects and practices of pedagogical training in academic masters and doctorate programs in Public Health. To achieve the research aim, this work was based on Pierre Bourdieu's field theory and on Tomaz Tadeu da Silva's curriculum theory. Results indicate that the programs do not consider the aspect of teacher training as a major issue. With regard to the Public Health field approximately 61% of masters and 38% of doctorate programs have pedagogical training subjects/practices. Furthermore, there is a tendency for technical-instrumental training, which is in line with the history of the Public Health field. The conclusion is that there is a need to develop a culture that values college and graduate Public Health teaching, considering the complexity of pedagogical practice in all its dimensions.

  6. Effective recruitment and retention strategies in community health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Jennifer; Ridgers, Nicola D; Carver, Alison; Thornton, Lukar E; Teychenne, Megan

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this project was to identify effective recruitment and retention strategies used by health-promotion organisations that focus on increasing physical activity and improving nutrition within the local community. Semistructured telephone or face-to-face interviews with 25 key informants from stakeholder organisations were conducted. Key informants discussed strategies used by their organisation to effectively recruit and retain participants into community-based healthy eating and/or physical activity programs. Transcribed data were analysed with NVivo software. Effective recruitment strategies included word of mouth, links with organisations, dissemination of printed materials, media, referrals, cross-promotion of programs and face-to-face methods. Effective retention strategies included encouraging a sense of community ownership, social opportunities, recruiting a suitable leader and offering flexibility and support. Fees and support for recruiting and retaining participants was also identified. This study provides novel insights to a greatly under researched topic in the field of health promotion. There are two key take-home messages from the present study that are applicable to health practitioners as well as developers and deliverers of community health-promotion programs: (1) it is imperative that all community health organisations report on the effectiveness of their recruitment and retention, both successes and failures; and (2) there is a clear need to tailor the recruitment and retention approach to the target population and the setting the program is occurring in. SO WHAT? These findings provide important insights for the development of future community-based healthy eating and physical activity programs.

  7. 78 FR 72089 - Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Provider Enrollment Application Fee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services [CMS-6051-N] Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Provider Enrollment Application Fee Amount... period entitled ``Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Additional Screening...

  8. A computerized program to educate adults about environmental health risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, M.; Dewey, J.; Schur, P.

    1993-01-01

    A computerized program called Environmental Risk Appraisal (ERA) has been developed to educate adults about environmental health risks and to motivate positive behavior change. A questionnaire addresses issues such as radon, environmental tobacco smoke, pesticides, lead, air and water pollution, and work-site risks. Responses are computer processed in seconds to produce an individualized computer printout containing a score, educational messages, and phone numbers to call for more information. A variety of audiences including environmental groups, worksites, women's organizations and health professionals were represented in this study of 269 participants. Many respondents indicated they were exposed to important environmental hazards and nearly 40 percent reported they had, or might have had, an environmental related illness at some time. Preliminary evaluation indicates the program is effective as an educational tool in raising awareness of environmental health risks

  9. Sexual and Reproductive Health Needs of HIV-Positive People in Tehran, Iran: A Mixed-Method Descriptive Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saharnaz Nedjat

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background People Living with HIV (PLHIV are highly stigmatized and consequently hard-to-access by researchers and importantly, public health outreach in Iran, possibly due to the existing socio-cultural situation in this country. The present study aimed to evaluate the sexual and reproductive health needs of PLHIV in Tehran, the capital of Iran. Methods As a mixed-method descriptive study, this project was conducted in 2012 in Tehran, Iran. In this study, we evaluated and discussed socio-demographic characteristics, family and social support, sexual behaviors, fertility desires and needs, PMTCT services, contraceptive methods, unintended pregnancy and safe abortion, and Pap smear tests among 400 participants referring to the behavioral disorders consulting centers. Results Of the sample 240 (60% were male and 160 (40% were female. About 50% of women and 40% of men were 25-34 years old. More than 60% of men and 96% of women were married, while more than 50% of the participants had HIV-positive spouses at the time of study. According to the results, fertility desire was observed among more than 30% of female and 40% of male participants. Results of the in-depth interviews indicate that the participants are not satisfied with most of the existing services offered to address their sexual and reproductive health needs. Conclusion Despite the availability of services, most of sexual and reproductive health needs of the PLHIV are overlooked by the health system in Iran. Paying attention to sexual and reproductive health needs of PLHIV in Iran not only protects their right to live long and healthy lives, but also may prevent the transmission of HIV from the patients to others within the community.

  10. Australia’s National Health Programs: An Ontological Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkalgud Ramaprasad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Australia has a large number of health program initiatives whose comprehensive assessment will help refine and redefine priorities by highlighting areas of emphasis, under-emphasis, and non-emphasis. The objectives of our research are to: (a systematically map all the programs onto an ontological framework, and (b systemically analyse their relative emphases at different levels of granularity. We mapped all the health program initiatives onto an ontology with five dimensions, namely: (a Policy-scope, (b Policy-focus, (c Outcomes, (d Type of care, and (e Population served. Each dimension is expanded into a taxonomy of its constituent elements. Each combination of elements from the five dimensions is a possible policy initiative component. There are 30,030 possible components encapsulated in the ontology. It includes, for example: (a National financial policies on accessibility of preventive care for family, and (b Local-urban regulatory policies on cost of palliative care for individual-aged. Four of the authors mapped all of Australia’s health programs and initiatives on to the ontology. Visualizations of the data are used to highlight the relative emphases in the program initiatives. The dominant emphasis of the program initiatives is: [National] [educational, personnel-physician, information] policies on [accessibility, quality] of [preventive, wellness] care for the [community]. However, although (a information is emphasized technology is not; and (b accessibility and quality are emphasized cost, satisfaction, and quality are not. The ontology and the results of the mapping can help systematically reassess and redirect the relative emphases of the programs and initiatives from a systemic perspective.

  11. Past speculations of future health technologies: a description of technologies predicted in 15 forecasting studies published between 1986 and 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doos, Lucy; Packer, Claire; Ward, Derek; Simpson, Sue; Stevens, Andrew

    2017-07-31

    To describe and classify health technologies predicted in forecasting studies. A portrait describing health technologies predicted in 15 forecasting studies published between 1986 and 2010 that were identified in a previous systematic review. Health technologies are classified according to their type, purpose and clinical use; relating these to the original purpose and timing of the forecasting studies. All health-related technologies predicted in 15 forecasting studies identified in a previously published systematic review. Outcomes related to (1) each forecasting study including country, year, intention and forecasting methods used and (2) the predicted technologies including technology type, purpose, targeted clinical area and forecast timeframe. Of the 896 identified health-related technologies, 685 (76.5%) were health technologies with an explicit or implied health application and included in our study. Of these, 19.1% were diagnostic or imaging tests, 14.3% devices or biomaterials, 12.6% information technology systems, eHealth or mHealth and 12% drugs. The majority of the technologies were intended to treat or manage disease (38.1%) or diagnose or monitor disease (26.1%). The most frequent targeted clinical areas were infectious diseases followed by cancer, circulatory and nervous system disorders. The most frequent technology types were for: infectious diseases-prophylactic vaccines (45.8%), cancer-drugs (40%), circulatory disease-devices and biomaterials (26.3%), and diseases of the nervous system-equally devices and biomaterials (25%) and regenerative medicine (25%). The mean timeframe for forecasting was 11.6 years (range 0-33 years, median=10, SD=6.6). The forecasting timeframe significantly differed by technology type (p=0.002), the intent of the forecasting group (p<0.001) and the methods used (p<001). While description and classification of predicted health-related technologies is crucial in preparing healthcare systems for adopting new innovations

  12. A comparison of Omaha worksite health promotion activities to the 1992 national survey with a special perspective on program intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickhoff-Shemek, J M; Ryan, K F

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the results from a survey of Omaha worksite health promotion activities with the results of a 1992 national survey. Comparisons were made on: (1) the kinds of health promotion activities offered, (2) progress toward the Healthy People 2000 worksite objectives, (3) types of program intervention offered, and (4) administrative factors. A one-time, written, mail-out/mail-back survey design was used. The study took place in Omaha, Nebraska. All area public and private worksites with 250 or more employees were sent surveys. Individuals who were preselected and identified as the best qualified within the company completed the survey instrument. Of the 176 worksites surveyed, 86 completed the survey (49%). Descriptive statistics (percentages) were used to compare the two surveys on kinds of programs offered, progress toward Healthy People 2000 related to worksite health promotion, the types of program intervention offered, and administrative factors. Generally, a greater percentage of respondent worksites from the national survey are offering more health promotion activities and have made more progress toward the Healthy People 2000 worksite objectives than the Omaha worksites. Results from both surveys showed that low levels of intervention are more prevalent than high levels of intervention, and that health promotion activities in most worksites are coordinated by human resources departments and not by someone professionally prepared in health education. Traditionally, major goals of worksite health promotion programs have focused on important organizational outcomes such as improved productivity/morale, reduction in absenteeism, and health care cost-containment. It is important to recognize, however, that low levels of intervention have less impact than more intensive programs on these desired outcomes. Future goals for local and national worksite health promotion programs may need to encourage implementation of more intensive

  13. Effectiveness of a Multilevel Workplace Health Promotion Program on Vitality, Health, and Work-Related Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, I.J.M.; Snoijer, M.; Kok, B.P. de; Vlisteren, J. van; Hofstetter, H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of the effectiveness of a workplace health promotion program on employees’ vitality, health, and work-related outcomes, and exploring the influence of organizational support and the supervisors’ role on these outcomes. Methods: The 5-month intervention included activities at

  14. An adaptive maneuvering logic computer program for the simulation of one-on-one air-to-air combat. Volume 1: General description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgin, G. H.; Fogel, L. J.; Phelps, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    A technique for computer simulation of air combat is described. Volume 1 decribes the computer program and its development in general terms. Two versions of the program exist. Both incorporate a logic for selecting and executing air combat maneuvers with performance models of specific fighter aircraft. In the batch processing version the flight paths of two aircraft engaged in interactive aerial combat and controlled by the same logic are computed. The realtime version permits human pilots to fly air-to-air combat against the adaptive maneuvering logic (AML) in Langley Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS). Volume 2 consists of a detailed description of the computer programs.

  15. [Implementation of good quality and safety practices. Descriptive study in a occupational mutual health centre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzanera, R; Plana, M; Moya, D; Ortner, J; Mira, J J

    2016-01-01

    To describe the level of implementation of quality and safety good practice elements in a Mutual Society health centre. A Cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the level of implementation of good practices using a questionnaire. Some quality dimensions were also assessed (scale 0 to 10) by a set of 87 quality coordinators of health centres and a random sample of 54 healthcare professionals working in small centres. Seventy quality coordinators and 27 professionals replied (response rates 80% and 50%, respectively. There were no differences in the assessment of quality attributes between both groups. They identified as areas for improvement: use of practice guidelines (7.6/10), scientific and technical skills (7.5/10), and patient satisfaction (7.7/10). Availability and accessibility to clinical reports, informed consent, availability of hydro-alcoholic solution, and to record allergies, were considered of high importance to be implemented, with training and research, improvements in equipment and technology plans, adherence to clinical practice guidelines and the preparation of risk maps, being of less importance. The good practices related to equipment and resources have a higher likelihood to be implemented, meanwhile those related to quality and safety attitudes have more barriers before being implemented. The mutual has a similar behaviour than other healthcare institutions. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Nutritional and mental health status of Afghan refugee children in Peshawar, Pakistan: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izutsu, T; Tsutsumi, A; Sato, T; Naqibullah, Z; Wakai, S; Kurita, H

    2005-01-01

    The study sought to ascertain and describe the physical and mental health states of Afghan refugee children after the terrorist attack on September 11, 2001 in the US and the aerial bombing of Afghanistan that followed. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in four refugee camps in Peshawar, Pakistan from February to March 2002, and comparisons among camps were made. A total of 70 males (mean age SD = 9.81 +/- 1.98 years old) and 30 females (7.94 +/- 2.07) answered a self-developed questionnaire on demographic data, traumatic events experience, living environment in the camps, and physical and mental health, through interviews. Anthropometric measures were measured and physical symptoms including anaemia and edema were assessed. Severe malnutrition was not shown and there were no significant differences in most nutritional and physical states among the camps. Nevertheless, in the newer camps more children experienced war related traumatic events. Mental symptoms were prevalent in all camps, though the characteristics of the symptoms differed among the camps.

  17. Description of the CEEH health effect model. CEEH scientific report no. 7a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boenloekke, J.H.; Sigsgaard, T. (Aarhus Univ. Dept. of of Public Health, AArhus (Denmark)); Brandt, J.; Frohn, L.M. (Aarhus Univ. National Environmental Research Institute, Dept. of Atmospheric Environment, Roskilde (Denmark)); Flachs, E.M.; Broennum-Hansen, H. (Univ. of Southern Denmark. National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Siggaard-Andersen4, M.-L. (Univ. of Copenhagen. Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2011-11-15

    This report is based on a number of up-to-date reviews of the existing literature on health effects from air pollution at the population level and conclude with recommendations for CEEH. The pollutants in the CEEH models have been selected based on the following criteria: 1) They stem from combustion sources either directly or via chemical transformations. This may include evaporation or dust from the energy sources themselves (i.e. from wear and tear). Other pollution derived from energy production but not liberated to the air is not included (e.g. heavy metals in soil deposits). However, heavy metals, dioxins and possibly PAHs that are emitted to the air, deposit on soil or in water and end up by being ingested should ideally be covered by CEEH. 2) Be possible to model in the CEEH settings both in terms of emissions, chemical transformations and transport. 3) Be sufficiently investigated in terms of documented health effects and in terms of the costs associated with these health effects. Combustion sources and accordingly combustion products are highly diverse and widespread. In practice, therefore, not all sources that contribute to health effects in humans can be included in the CEEH models. Other sources than combustion contribute some of the pollutants and as a result a brief discussion of the relevance and effect of such non-combustion derived air pollutants is included in this report. For a more comprehensive discussion of secondary pollutants from e.g. agricultural activities the reader is referred to CEEH report no. 3. The EVA model was based on existing European models such as EcoSense 4.0 from ExternE and used the same air pollution products as these in the versions available in 2003-4. With time EVA has changed independently from its predecessors. A more recent version of the ExternE methods is now available (ExternE, 2005). The pollutants ontained by ExternE are provided in table 1. Pollutants originally included in EVA are the following: SO2, O3, PM2

  18. Learning professional ethics: Student experiences in a health mentor program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Sylvia; Lymer, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The use of patient centred approaches to healthcare education is evolving, yet the effectiveness of these approaches in relation to professional ethics education is not well understood. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and learning of health profession students engaged in an ethics module as part of a Health Mentor Program at the University of Toronto. Students were assigned to interprofessional groups representing seven professional programs and matched with a health mentor. The health mentors, individuals living with chronic health conditions, shared their experiences of the healthcare system through 90 minute semi-structured interviews with the students. Following the interviews, students completed self-reflective papers and engaged in facilitated asynchronous online discussions. Thematic analysis of reflections and discussions was used to uncover pertaining to student experiences and learning regarding professional ethics. Five major themes emerged from the data: (1) Patient autonomy and expertise in care; (2) ethical complexity and its inevitable reality in the clinical practice setting; (3) patient advocacy as an essential component of day-to-day practice; (4) qualities of remarkable clinicians that informed personal ideals for future practice; (5) patients' perspectives on clinician error and how they enabled suggestions for improving future practice. The findings of a study in one university context suggest that engagement with the health mentor narratives facilitated students' critical reflection related to their understanding of the principles of healthcare ethics.

  19. Program description for the program Demonstration program for electric vehicles 2011-2015; Programbeskrivning foer programmet Demonstrationsprogram foer elfordon 2011-2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-04-15

    The program's efforts aim at, firstly, from a user perspective identify and possibly eliminate barriers for large-scale introduction of electric vehicles on the Swedish market. Through various research activities based in the real environment experience may be drawn from both vehicle use and different types of behavior. Infrastructure tests on a sufficient scale give the combined effect of real-life test environments for the combination of vehicles and charging environments as well as a base for experiences of softer issues around electric vehicles. Precisely these behavioral experiences are difficult to reach via the related but more technically focused programs such as, FFI (Vehicle strategic research and innovation) and Energy efficient road vehicles. Several systems for electrification of vehicles exist today, and further initiatives for solutions are on the way. It is therefore very important to examine which systems give the highest total energy efficiency. It is also relevant for these different systems in a real environment to explore the potentials and difficulties that may arise in larger implementations

  20. Global health education programming as a model for inter-institutional collaboration in interprofessional health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Michael J; Hafler, Janet P; Sipsma, Heather; Cherlin, Emily

    2014-07-01

    While global health (GH) opportunities have expanded at schools of medicine, nursing, and public health, few examples of interprofessional approaches to GH education have been described. The elective GH program at our university serves as an important opportunity for high-quality interprofessional education. We undertook a qualitative study to examine the experience of student, faculty and administrative leaders of the program. We used content analysis to code responses and analyze data. Among the leadership, key themes fell within the categories of interprofessional education, student-faculty collaboration, professional development, and practical considerations for the development of such programs. The principles described could be considered by institutions seeking to develop meaningful partnerships in an effort to develop or refine interprofessional global health education programs.