WorldWideScience

Sample records for health organisation international

  1. The law of international organisations

    CERN Document Server

    White, Nigel D

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a concise account of the principles and norms of international law applicable to the main-type of international organisation - the inter-governmental organisation (IGO). That law consists of principles and rules found in the founding documents of IGOs along with applicable principles and rules of international law. The book also identifies and analyses the law produced by IGOs, applied by them and, occasionally, enforced by them. There is a concentration upon the United Nations, as the paradigmatic IGO, not only upon the UN organisation headquartered in New York, but on other IGOs in the UN system (the specialised agencies such as the World Health Organisation).

  2. New Possibilities for development of the internal health and safety organisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Peter; Jensen, Per Langå

    2004-01-01

    Research from several countries indicates that the internal health and safety organisation in most companies is placed in an appendix position. A possibility for developing a stronger and more effective health and safety organisation is to introduce learning. This approach has been applied...... in a Danish network project with eleven companies. The results indicate that health and safety managers and safety representatives have difficulties in fulfilling the role as change agents in mastering such a development project. Only three of the eleven companies turned out to be able to implement successful...... opportunities for change, es-tablish a sustainable problem definition, and build coalitions. An amoeba model for this type of development project is suggested....

  3. Awareness and the Arguments for and against the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health among Representatives of Disability Organisations

    OpenAIRE

    Lund?lv, J?rgen; T?rnbom, Marie; Larsson, Per-Olof; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S.

    2015-01-01

    Disability organisations have not been engaged in the debate about the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) in Sweden. We wanted to know representatives’ attitudes about the ICF. The aim of the study was to elucidate the arguments for and against the ICF among representatives of disability organisations. The study consisted of eighteen representatives (from six disability organisations) that answered electronic questionnaires. The questionnaires involved t...

  4. Reflections on artist organisations international

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bibi Straatman; Dr. Anke Coumans

    2015-01-01

    The Artist Organisations International conference, organised by Florian Malzacher, Jonas Staal and Joanna Warsza, took place in Berlin’s HAU theatre from 9 to 11 January 2015. The organisers emphasised how it seems that more and more activist artists are creating organisational structures that

  5. Environmental Health Organisations against Tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Gerard Hastings

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Implementing the World Health Organisation (WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC relies heavily on enforcement. Little is known of the way different enforcement agencies operate, prioritise or network. A questionnaire was sent to representatives of the International Federation of Environmental Health (IFEH in 36 countries. Tobacco control was given low priority. Almost two thirds did not have any tobacco control policy. A third reported their organisation had worked with other agencies on tobacco control. Obstacles to addressing tobacco control included a lack of resources (61% and absence of a coherent strategy (39%.

  6. Environmental health organisations against tobacco.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mulcahy, Maurice

    2009-04-01

    Implementing the World Health Organisation (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) relies heavily on enforcement. Little is known of the way different enforcement agencies operate, prioritise or network. A questionnaire was sent to representatives of the International Federation of Environmental Health (IFEH) in 36 countries. Tobacco control was given low priority. Almost two thirds did not have any tobacco control policy. A third reported their organisation had worked with other agencies on tobacco control. Obstacles to addressing tobacco control included a lack of resources (61%) and absence of a coherent strategy (39%).

  7. Development of a World Health Organisation International Reference Panel for Anti-HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigglesworth, Erin; Heath, Alan; Holmes, Harvey

    2010-01-01

    In response to a recommendation made by the "World Health Organisation (WHO) Working Group on Reference Preparations for Testing HBsAg, Anti-HCV and Anti-HIV Diagnostic Kits", a reference panel for anti-HIV consisting of plasma samples representing the major groups and subtypes of HIV has been prepared. The panel consists of solvent-detergent treated anti-HIV-positive human plasma samples that have been diluted 1 in 40 in anti-HIV-negative human serum and freeze-dried and the anti-HIV-positive plasma samples were derived from individuals infected with HIV-1 group M subtypes A, B, C and CRF01_AE, HIV-1 group O and HIV-2. Fifteen laboratories from around the world took part in a collaborative study to evaluate the reference panel for anti-HIV and were requested to test the panel in as wide a range of assays as possible. Where appropriate, serial dilutions were performed and samples tested around their end-points to facilitate the comparison of analytical sensitivity between assays. For qualitative assays such as Western blots and rapid assays, the panel was tested undiluted. Results show that the HIV-negative serum sample was negative in all assays (except for a small number of Western blot assays) and that all HIV-positive samples were detected in all assays, with the exception of an anti-HIV-2 EIA that did not detect most HIV-1 samples and a small number of assays that failed to detect the group O sample. Considerable variability was seen in the end-point titres obtained with the various assays. A report on the study was submitted to the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardisation (ECBS) and the panel established as the 1st International Reference Panel for Anti-HIV (code 02/210); a unitage was not assigned to the panel members.

  8. Awareness and the arguments for and against the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health among representatives of disability organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundälv, Jörgen; Törnbom, Marie; Larsson, Per-Olof; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S

    2015-03-18

    Disability organisations have not been engaged in the debate about the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) in Sweden. We wanted to know representatives' attitudes about the ICF. The aim of the study was to elucidate the arguments for and against the ICF among representatives of disability organisations. The study consisted of eighteen representatives (from six disability organisations) that answered electronic questionnaires. The questionnaires involved ten open questions about the arguments for and against the ICF. The answers of the questionnaires have been categorized according to qualitative content analysis. Our results indicated four themes: awareness, arguments for and against, influence and the future. More than half of the representatives had very limited awareness of the ICF. There was an explicit criticism of individual classification but more positive comments about classification on an aggregated level. The most important issue for representatives was influencing social policy in society, not learning and spreading information about the ICF.

  9. World Organisation for Animal Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Organisation for Animal Health Home About us Presentation Director general office Biography Photos Strategic plan Our missions Transparency ... Services Food safety and animal welfare History General organisation World Assembly Council Headquarters OIE Regional Representations OIE ...

  10. International regulations and standards for avian influenza, including the vaccine standards of the World Organisation for Animal Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschke, C J M; Pittman, M; Laddomada, A

    2009-04-01

    For avian influenza the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) has laid down international standards on notification, trade, diagnosis, surveillance and the production and use of vaccine. These standards are science- and risk-based to ensure safe trade in poultry and poultry products without unjustified barriers. The European Union, with its 27 Member States, has in place harmonised legislation in line with OIE standards. Early detection, rapid diagnosis, notification and high quality Veterinary Services are crucial for ensuring a rapid response to avian influenza outbreaks and for swiftly reducing the risk of virus spread via trade. Depending on the situation, vaccination may also be a very important tool for disease control. The use of high quality vaccines and postvaccination monitoring are essential for the successful implementation of vaccination. Compliance with international standards is of paramount importance for protecting animal and human health in the global crisis of the highly pathogenic avian influenza of the H5N1 subtype.

  11. Coordination Processes in International Organisations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The EU is not a member of the International Labour Organisation (ILO), but relatively elaborate EU coordination takes place anyway. This paper addresses two research questions: 1) How is it possible to evaluate the coordination of the EU in its specific observable configuration in the ILO?, and 2......-à-vis their principals, the Member States. The Commission is the leading agent in the phase leading up to the Conference; the Presidency then takes over. On the one hand, due to the Treaty obligations and their interpretations by the Court of Justice, both the Presidency and the Commission are kept within tight limits...

  12. Seeing Like an International Organisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broome, André; Seabrooke, Leonard

    2012-01-01

    International organisations (IOs) often serve as the ‘engine room’ of ideas for structural reforms at the national level, but how do IOs construct cognitive authority over the forms, processes and prescriptions for institutional change in their member states? Exploring the analytic institutions...... created by IOs provides insights into how they make their member states ‘legible’ and how greater legibility enables them to construct cognitive authority in specific policy areas, which, in turn, enhances their capacity to influence changes in national frameworks for economic and social governance....... Studying the indirect influence that IOs can exert over the design of national policies has, until recently, often been neglected in accounts of the contemporary roles that IOs play and the evolution of global economic governance. By ‘seeing like an IO’, we can increase our understanding of the cognitive...

  13. Business continuity management in international organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamou, Christel

    2014-01-01

    In the area of business continuity management, a preliminary review of the literature reveals extensive knowledge, expertise and experience concerning organisations in the private and public sectors. It is interesting to note, however, that there is little literature about business continuity management in international organisations, although these entities are complex and particularly prone to threats. This apparent absence of literature suggests that business continuity management has not yet hit the agenda of international organisations. In recent years, member states have encouraged senior management to design and implement business continuity strategies to minimise the mishandling of an internal crisis and build organisational resilience, but very few of them have actually been able to design and implement comprehensive business continuity programmes. Based on actual experience working in international organisations, this paper outlines some of the challenges faced by international organisations in developing and implementing business continuity activities and attempts to make suggestions for further improvement.

  14. Regional Organisations and International Mediation: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Regional Organisations and International Mediation: The Effectiveness of Insider Mediators. ... African Journal on Conflict Resolution ... the last two decades of the twentieth century, the world witnessed an increasing number of regional conflict management efforts undertaken by regional inter-governmental organisations.

  15. Internal corporate venturing during organisational change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Annemette L.

    2004-01-01

    Organisations have to deal with increasingly complex and turbulent environments, which demand that they continuously change and adapt to new circumstances or challenges. One way for organisations to cope with these challenges is to manage the strategy-making process in order to ensure...... that a continuous stream of new ideas and initiatives create new opportunities and ensure that the company stays viable by adapting to new internal and external challenges. This has been pursued in studies of strategy formation (Mintzberg, 1978), strategic change (Pettigrew, 1988) and internal corporate venturing...... (Burgelman, 1983b, 2002) and is still a central issue in the strategic management discourse. It is generally acknowledged that continuous change is important for organisations' survival in a changing world. On the other hand the need for stability and continuity in form of a clear and strong corporate...

  16. Regional Organisations and International Mediation: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Angela

    Regional vs. Global Mediators. International conflict management is conducted by many actors, undertaking different forms of conflict management. Mediation is ... organisations thus have a vested interest in managing a regional conflict. .... rapprochement between Nigeria and the main rebel leader, Charles Taylor, in.

  17. The role of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) to facilitate the international trade in animals and animal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, G K

    2009-03-01

    The international trade in animals and animal products has become a sensitive issue for both developed and developing countries by posing an important risk for the international spread of animal and human pathogens whilst at the same time being an essential activity to ensure world-wide food security and food safety. The OIE has since its founding in 1924, applied a democratic and transparent decision-making process to continuously develop and review international standards for animal health and zoonoses to facilitate trade in animals and animal products. The role of the OIE is also mandated by the World Trade Organization (WTO) as international reference point for standards related to animal health. In support of its overall objective of promoting animal health world-wide, the OIE has also launched several other initiatives such as the improvement of the governance of veterinary services within its member countries and territories and to enhance the availability of diagnostic and scientific expertise on a more even global geographical distribution. Several trade facilitating concepts such as country, zonal and compartment freedom from disease as well the trade in disease free commodities has been introduced to enhance the trade in animals and animal products for all its members including those from developing and transitional countries who are still in the process of enhancing to full compliance with international sanitary standards.

  18. International Organisations and Transnational Education Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moutsios, Stavros

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the World Bank/IMF (International Monetary Fund), the OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) and the WTO (World Trade Organisation) as institutions of transnational policy making. They are all at present making education policies which are decisively...... shaping current directions and developments in national education systems. The paper reviews the enhanced role of these institutions in producing education policies and investigates the ideological basis as well as the processes through which these policies are made. It is argued that decisions are taken...... largely through asymmetric, non-democratic and opaque procedures. It is also argued that the proposed policies purport to serve the principles of relentless economic competition. Taking into account similar policies and initiatives, the paper concludes that we are experiencing not only...

  19. Impact of organisational change on mental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean Bamberger, Simon; Vinding, Anker Lund; Larsen, Anelia

    2012-01-01

    Although limited evidence is available, organisational change is often cited as the cause of mental health problems. This paper provides an overview of the current literature regarding the impact of organisational change on mental health. A systematic search in PUBMED, PsychInfo and Web...... of Knowledge combining MeSH search terms for exposure and outcome. The criterion for inclusion was original data on exposure to organisational change with mental health problems as outcome. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies were included. We found in 11 out of 17 studies, an association between...... organisational change and elevated risk of mental health problems was observed, with a less provident association in the longitudinal studies. Based on the current research, this review cannot provide sufficient evidence of an association between organisational change and elevated risk of mental health problems...

  20. International Scientific and Technical Organisations; Organismos Cientifico-Tecnicos Internacionales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez-Lagos Rogla, R. [Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    The nuclear scientific and technical world is well aware of the EURATOM and IAEA activities but usually other international scientific and technical organisations relevant for their ordinary work are unknown. In this article three international organisations are described briefly, the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP). International Union of Pure and Applied chemistry (IUPAC) and the international council of Science (ICSU). (Author)

  1. Crisis management teams in health organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canyon, Deon V

    2012-01-01

    Crisis management teams (CMT) are necessary to ensure adequate and appropriate crisis management planning and response to unforeseen, adverse events. This study investigated the existence of CMTs, the membership of CMTs, and the degree of training received by CMTs in Australian health and allied health organisations. This cross-sectional study draws on data provided by executive decision makers in a broad selection of health and allied health organisations. Crisis management teams were found in 44.2 per cent of the health-related organisations surveyed, which is ten per cent lower than the figure for business organisations. Membership of these CMTs was not ideal and did not conform to standard CMT membership profiles. Similarly, the extent of crisis management training in health-related organisations is 20 per cent lower than the figure for business organisations. If organisations do not become pro-active in their crisis management practices, the onus is on government to improve the situation through regulation and the provision of more physical, monetary and skill resources to ensure that the health services of Australia are sufficiently prepared to respond to adverse events.

  2. Organisational Change, Health and the Labour Market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatti, Yosef; Gørtz, Mette; Holm Pedersen, Lene

    This research examines the effects of organisational change on employee health and labour market outcomes. Previous studies looking into organisational change in the private sector indicate that the larger the size and depth of organisational change, the larger the detrimental consequences...... to the employees. This study contributes to the literature on four main dimensions. First, we extend the analysis of organisational change to a public sector setting. Second, while previous findings remain inconclusive regarding causal effects due to problems of endogeneity, our analysis contributes to research...... of causal effects of organisational change by exploiting a large scale public sector reform which can be considered as a quasi-experiment. Third, given that the reform was exogenous and implemented simultaneously in a number of Danish municipalities, we also have an objective measure of organisational...

  3. World Health Organisation, Right to Health and Globalisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necati Dedeoglu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available World Health Organisation (WHO is an international organisation founded after the Second World War with the aim of developing cooperation among countries of the world. Its budget is provided by members’ dues along with donations. Its constitution which has been endorsed by parliaments of all member countries accepts health as a social right and health services as a public service, highlighting the social and economic determinants of health. However, the Organisation has been object to political influences since its inception and especially the USA has tried to use it for her own interests. Dominant political trends have influenced policies of WHO. For example, WHO had started Primary Health Care Program in 1970’s, when many newly independent states existed, when Third World countries like India and Yugoslavia were effective and when Soviet Union was powerful, with the slogan of “ Health for all” which prioritised equality, participation,, prevention, socio- economic factors in health. Globalization and neo-liberal economic policies which have dominated the world have also changed the values and principles of WHO; a deterioration was experienced: from an approach of public services and health as a a social right, to one of privatisation and market forces. This new WHO has ignored the unfavourable health consequences of economic “ structural adjustment” programs forced on poor nations and the distruction of civilians during the Iraq and Afganistan wars. A favorable change in WHO policies depend upon the regaining of economic and political independence of poor nations and their influence in international organisations. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(4.000: 361-366

  4. Relevance of the law of international organisations in resolving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    legal order, but it is unclear how disputes between international organisations are to be resolved. The International Court of Justice ..... constant practice, and thus interpretation, both of the institution itself and of member states and others in relation to it' ...... Schermers, Henry G. 1988. Liability of International Organisations.

  5. Women, organisational crisis and access to leadership in international organisations

    OpenAIRE

    Haack, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Women who successfully break the glass ceiling have historically done so in the context of crises. Crises offer unique windows of opportunity for women because they either legitimize women as suitable candidates or create ‘glass cliffs’ that make positions unattractive to men. This article examines four elections in the WHO, IMF and UNESCO, applying findings from the national to the international. First access to executive office international organizations – the breaking of the glass ceiling...

  6. Regional Organisations and International Mediation: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Angela

    Science at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand. His main research interests are in the .... In Table 1 (see page 16) we show the geographical distribution of. 160 disputes in the 1945-1995 ... Regional organisations are co-operative organisations based on geographical proximity, social and political ...

  7. Expanding Criminal Responsibility in Transnational and International Organised Crime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wilt, H.

    2016-01-01

    In international criminal law theory, a conceptual divide is made between international crimes stricto sensu (genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, aggression) and transnational organised crime. This differentiation sustains the direct, respectively indirect enforcement mechanism: the so

  8. Government control over health-related not-for-profit organisations: Agency for International Development v. Alliance for Open Society International Inc 570 US_(2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vines, Tim; Donohoo, Angus M; Faunce, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    The relationship between government and the not-for-profit (NFP) sector has important implications for society, especially in relation to the delivery of public health measures and the protection of the environment. In key health-related areas such as provision of medical services, welfare, foreign aid and education, governments have traditionally preferred for the NFP sector to act as service partners, with the relationship mediated through grants or funding agreements. This service delivery arrangement is intended to provide a diversity of voices, and encourage volunteerism and altruism, in conjunction with the purposes and objectives of the relevant NGO. Under the pretence of "accountability", however, governments increasingly are seeking to impose intrusive conditions on grantees, which limit their ability to fulfil their mission and advocate on behalf of their constituents. This column examines the United States Supreme Court decision, Agency for International Development v Alliance for Open Society International Inc 570 US_(2013), and compares it to the removal of gag clauses in Australian federal funding rules. Recent national changes to the health-related NFP sector in Australia are then discussed, such as those found in the Charities Act 2013 (Cth) and the Not-for-Profit Sector Freedom to Advocate Act 2013 (Cth). These respectively include the establishment of the Australian Charities and Not-For-Profit Commission, the modernising of the definition of "charity" and statutory blocks on "gag" clauses. This analysis concludes with a survey of recent moves by Australian States to impose new restrictions on the ability of health-related NFPs to lobby against harmful government policy Among the responses considered is the protection afforded by s 51l(xxiiiA) of the Australian Constitution. This constitutional guarantee appears to have been focused historically on preventing medical and dental practitioners and related small businesses being practically coerced

  9. Louis Blajan, DVM, 1924-2010: The dynamic veterinarian who brought the World Organisation for Animal Health (Office International des Épizooties: OIE into the modern age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anon.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Chevalier de la Légion d’honneurCroix du Combattant volontaire 1939-1945Officier du Mérite agricoleOfficier de l'Ordre national de la Côte d'Ivoire Louis Blajan was born in Lahage (Haute-Garonne, France on 10 April 1924 and passed away in Mont-de-Marsan on 10 February 2010. After studying at the Pierre de Fermat Lycée in Toulouse, Louis graduated from the Toulouse Veterinary School in 1948. He received the Institut d’élevage et de médecine vétérinaire des pays tropicaux (IEMVT diploma in 1949 and was posted in the French Overseas Territory of Mali from 1949 to 1952. Upon his return to France, Louis was appointed to the position of State Veterinarian in the Ministry of Agriculture from 1953 to 1968; there he was responsible for foot and mouth disease, swine fever and Newcastle disease. He also headed the consultative committee on infectious diseases. Subsequently, he was appointed Veterinary Inspector-in-Chief and Head of Border Controls Policy.Louis married Janine in 1952. She was extremely supportive of him throughout his career. She died in an accident a month before Louis retired in 1990.He was the technical director of Cofranimex (Compagnie française pour l’importation et l’exportation des animaux reproducteurs et leur semence from 1968 to 1977 and Director of the Association pour le développement des techniques de l’élevage français (ADETEF from 1977 to 1978.Louis moved to the Office International des Épizooties (now known as the World Organisation for Animal Health or ‘OIE’ where he was Head of the Technical Department from 1978 to 1980. Two years later, he was elected to the most prestigious of positions for a veterinarian, Director General, in 1980. He was re-elected in 1985 and retired in 1990.Louis succeeded in modernising the rather old-fashioned OIE and transformed it into a modern and efficient international organisation. He was instrumental in developing the International zoo-sanitary code (now the

  10. Radiological protection and the Fukushima Daiichi accident. Responses of the key international organisations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, Christopher

    2017-10-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in March 2011 shook the radiological protection world. All major organisations in the radiological protection field turned their eyes to Japan. Their actions, driven by their mandates, are reflected in their respective landmark reports on the accident. Reports of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, World Health Organisation, United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and International Atomic Energy Agency are summarised. Collaboration between key international organisations is strong, based in part on informal interactions which need to be backed up with formal relations to ensure solid long-term collaboration.

  11. TRANSNATIONAL ORGANISED CRIME IN INDONESIA: THE NEED FOR INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James N Mitchell

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the growing infuence of transnational organised crime on the nations of South East Asia. Human trafficking, maritime piracy, terrorism and wildlife trafficking are major transnational crimes that cause significant harm to both individuals and national economies. This article examines the continuing domestic and international legislative, law enforcement and policy efforts of South East Asian nations to address transnational organised crime. it is concluded that to effectively counter transnational organised crime there is a need to employ international cooperation that is focused on addressing the unique factors of each crime.

  12. The role of the World Trade Organization and the 'three sisters' (the World Organisation for Animal Health, the International Plant Protection Convention and the Codex Alimentarius Commission) in the control of invasive alien species and the preservation of biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, S; Pelgrim, W

    2010-08-01

    The missions of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) include the design of surveillance and control methods for infectious transboundary animal diseases (including zoonoses), the provision of guarantees concerning animal health and animal production food safety, and the setting of standards for, and promotion of, animal welfare. The OIE role in setting standards for the sanitary safety of international trade in animals and animal products is formally recognised in the World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (the SPS Agreement). While the primary focus of the OIE is on animal diseases and zoonoses, the OIE has also been working within the WTO framework to examine possible contributions the organisation can make to achieving the goals of the Convention on Biological Diversity, particularly to preventing the global spread of invasive alien species (IAS). However, at the present time, setting standards for invasive species (other than those connected to the cause and distribution of diseases listed by the OIE) is outside the OIE mandate. Any future expansion of the OIE mandate would need to be decided by its Members and resources (expertise and financial contributions) for an extended standard-setting work programme secured. The other international standard-setting organisations referenced by the SPS Agreement are the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) and the Codex Alimentarius Commission (CAC). The IPPC mandate and work programme address IAS and the protection of biodiversity. The CAC is not involved in this field.

  13. Job rotation and internal marketing for increased job satisfaction and organisational commitment in hospital nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Su-Yueh; Wu, Wen-Chuan; Chang, Ching-Sheng; Lin, Chia-Tzu

    2015-04-01

    To develop or enhance the job satisfaction and organisational commitment of nurses by implementing job rotation and internal marketing practices. No studies in the nursing management literature have addressed the integrated relationships among job rotation, internal marketing, job satisfaction and organisational commitment. This cross-sectional study included 266 registered nurses (response rate 81.8%) in two southern Taiwan hospitals. Software used for data analysis were SPSS 14.0 and AMOS 14.0 (structural equation modelling). Job rotation and internal marketing positively affect the job satisfaction and organisational commitment of nurses, and their job satisfaction positively affects their organisational commitment. Job rotation and internal marketing are effective strategies for improving nursing workforce utilisation in health-care organisations because they help to achieve the ultimate goals of increasing the job satisfaction of nurses and encouraging them to continue working in the field. This in turn limits the vicious cycle of high turnover and low morale in organisations, which wastes valuable human resources. Job rotation and internal marketing help nursing personnel acquire knowledge, skills and insights while simultaneously improving their job satisfaction and organisational commitment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Relevance of the law of international organisations in resolving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, it locates this to be within a legal rather than political impasse. The paper argues that the general rules of the law of international organisations may provide the key to resolving the impasse. And that accordingly, the general principles of the regime of international law point to the interpretation of the provisions of ...

  15. rethinking poverty: the role of international organisations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J MUGUMBATE

    Resource inequity and disparity between nations and communities is a significant social problem. The consequences of such inequities are immense and are compounded by governments' failure to find lasting solutions. International organizations have stepped in to fill the gap; however, their efficacy is fairly ...

  16. Role of International Organisations in Combatting Terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    Convention against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances (1988) and establishment of the UN International Drug Control Programme...Board established 1971 - Convention on Psychotropic Substances 1979 - UN drug control bodies move from Geneva to Vienna 1979 - Crime Prevention and...Control 1988 - Convention against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances 1990 - UN General Assembly adopts the Global Programme

  17. The Human Rights Approach to Education in International Organisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufner, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the work of three international governmental organisations (IGOs) dealing with human rights will be discussed, namely the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the Council of Europe (CoE). In the first section, the main characteristics of the…

  18. The role of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE to facilitate the international trade in animals and animal products : policy and trade issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.K. Bruckner

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The international trade in animals and animal products has become a sensitive issue for both developed and developing countries by posing an important risk for the international spread of animal and human pathogens whilst at the same time being an essential activity to ensure world-wide food security and food safety. The OIE has since its founding in 1924, applied a democratic and transparent decision-making process to continuously develop and review international standards for animal health and zoonoses to facilitate trade in animals and animal products. The role of the OIE is also mandated by the World Trade Organization (WTO as international reference point for standards related to animal health. In support of its overall objective of promoting animal health world-wide, the OIE has also launched several other initiatives such as the improvement of the governance of veterinary services within its member countries and territories and to enhance the availability of diagnostic and scientific expertise on a more even global geographical distribution. Several trade facilitating concepts such as country, zonal and compartment freedom from disease as well the trade in disease free commodities has been introduced to enhance the trade in animals and animal products for all its members including those from developing and transitional countries who are still in the process of enhancing to full compliance with international sanitary standards.

  19. Emerging Governance Architectures in Global Health: Do Metagovernance Norms Explain Inter-Organisational Convergence?

    OpenAIRE

    Holzscheiter, Anna; Bahr, Thurid; Pantzerhielm, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a theoretical account of institutional transformation and the emergence of order in global inter-organisational relations, which is centred on the concept of “metagovernance”. It does so by theorising on the advent of governance architectures in global health governance—relationships between international organisations (IOs) in this field that are stable over time. Global health governance is routinely portrayed as an exceptionally fragmented field of international coopera...

  20. Organisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindkvist, Pia

    Du vil som læser få et indblik i, hvordan omgivelsernes ændrede krav til virksomhederne ændrer på organisations- og ledelsesteorien. Baggrunden for ”Organisation – videregående uddannelser” er, at give dig egenskaberne til at analysere og vurdere ledelsesmæssige og organisatoriske problemer...

  1. Emerging Governance Architectures in Global Health: Do Metagovernance Norms Explain Inter-Organisational Convergence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Holzscheiter

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a theoretical account of institutional transformation and the emergence of order in global inter-organisational relations, which is centred on the concept of “metagovernance”. It does so by theorising on the advent of governance architectures in global health governance—relationships between international organisations (IOs in this field that are stable over time. Global health governance is routinely portrayed as an exceptionally fragmented field of international cooperation with a perceived lack of synergy and choreography between international and transnational organisations. However, our paper starts from the observation that there are also movements of convergence between international organisations. We seek to explain these by looking at the effects of international norms that define good global governance as orderly and harmonised global governance. We conceptualize such norms as “metagovernance norms” that are enacted in reflexive practices which govern and order the relationships between international organisations. Empirically, this paper traces changing interactions and institutional arrangements between IOs (World Health Organization; World Bank; Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance; and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria in global health governance since the late 1940s and shows how patterns therein reflect and (reproduce broader discursive perceptions of what “health” is about and how the governance thereof ought to be organised.

  2. Organisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindkvist, Pia; Hansen, Kai; Heide, Asbjørn

    Bogen giver en indføring i de centrale emner indenfor organisation og ledelse. Bogen henvender sig især til akademi- og diplomuddannelserne samt uddannelser til professionsbachelorer, der alle har et anvendelsesorienteret formål. Endvidere henvender bogen sig til uddannelser og kurser, der...... beskæftiger sig med ledelse og organisation på et videregående niveau. Til bogen er der udarbejdet en lang række supplerende materialer til undervisere og studerende i form af opgaver og cases, test med tilhørende svar, vejledninger i opgaveløsning og projektarbejde. dette univers kan findes på bogens...... hjemmeside på www.organisation.academica.dk...

  3. Organising for self-advocacy in mental health: Experiences from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This paper reports on overarching strategies which supported the establishment and sustainability of 9 mental health self-help organisations in seven African countries. Method: Eleven key informants were identified through snowballing and interviewed regarding their experience in the organisations. Thematic ...

  4. Organising Language at the International University: Three Principles of Linguistic Organisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tange, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on interview data from five Danish research sites, the article asks what processes of internationalisation mean for the way universities organise and are organised by language. Following an initial reflection on the nature of a global knowledge market, the discussion centres on the idea of "linguistic organisation", as this has…

  5. The Impact of Corporate Volunteerism on Organisational Identity and Organisational Identification: The Perspective of Community Groups and Internal Stakeholders

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Ying Hung

    2007-01-01

    The current study seeks to uncover the process underlying the renegotiation process of organisational identity orientation, a framework proposed by Brickson (2005), as well as the change on the level of organisational identification in relation to corporate volunteerism, from the perspective of internal stakeholders and community groups. In the course of studying inductively two cases which employ different sets of strategy on corporate volunteerism, a framework on different stages of c...

  6. Sustaining health promotion programs within sport and recreation organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Meghan M; Payne, Warren R; Eime, Rochelle M; Brown, Sue J

    2009-01-01

    The involvement of the sport and recreation sector as a setting for health promotion is a new strategy implemented by health policy makers and strategic planners. Strategies to promote and sustain health promotion activities are important considering the risk that programs may cease after initial funding ends. This study explored the factors affecting the sustainability of a sport- and recreation-based health promotion program. A stratified sampling method was used to select four of the nine Regional Sports Assemblies (RSAs) that delivered a state-wide health promotion program funded by the Victorian Health Promotion Foundation in Australia. Data were collected from in-depth interviews with four Executive Officers (EOs) and focus group discussions with their Boards of Management. A sustainability checklist with pre-specified dimensions (e.g. organisational setting, broader community environment, and program design and implementation) guided data collection and analysis. The results showed that the organisational setting and the broader community environment supported program institutionalisation; whilst the design and implementation of the program worked against institutionalisation. The capacity of the organisations to generate new funds for the program was limited; the relationship between the central funding organisation and the Boards of Management was weak; and the program did not support the retention of staff. The engagement of sport and recreation organisations has potential to facilitate health promotion and public health. To enhance organisational capacity and achieve program sustainability, it is important that organisational processes, structures, and resources that support long-term health promotion practice are effectively and efficiently planned and managed.

  7. Social enterprise in health organisation and management: hybridity or homogeneity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Ross

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to reflect on social enterprise as an organisational form in health organisation and management. The paper presents a critique of the underlying assumptions associated with social enterprise in the context of English health and social care. The rise of social enterprise models of service provision reflects increasingly hybrid organisational forms and functions entering the health and social care market. Whilst at one level this hybridity increases the diversity of service providers promoting innovative and responsive services, the paper argues that further inspection of the assumptions associated with social enterprise reveal an organisational form that is symbolic of isomorphic processes pushing healthcare organisations toward greater levels of homogeneity, based on market-based standardisation and practices. Social enterprise forms part of isomorphic processes moving healthcare organisation and management towards market norms". In line with the aim of the "New Perspectives section", the paper aims to present a provocative perspective about developments in health and social care, as a spur to further debate and research in this area.

  8. Health care systems in Sweden and China: Legal and formal organisational aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hjelm Katarina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sharing knowledge and experience internationally can provide valuable information, and comparative research can make an important contribution to knowledge about health care and cost-effective use of resources. Descriptions of the organisation of health care in different countries can be found, but no studies have specifically compared the legal and formal organisational systems in Sweden and China. Aim To describe and compare health care in Sweden and China with regard to legislation, organisation, and finance. Methods Literature reviews were carried out in Sweden and China to identify literature published from 1985 to 2008 using the same keywords. References in recent studies were scrutinized, national legislation and regulations and government reports were searched, and textbooks were searched manually. Results The health care systems in Sweden and China show dissimilarities in legislation, organisation, and finance. In Sweden there is one national law concerning health care while in China the law includes the "Hygienic Common Law" and the "Fundamental Health Law" which is under development. There is a tendency towards market-orientated solutions in both countries. Sweden has a well-developed primary health care system while the primary health care system in China is still under development and relies predominantly on hospital-based care concentrated in cities. Conclusion Despite dissimilarities in health care systems, Sweden and China have similar basic assumptions, i.e. to combine managerial-organisational efficiency with the humanitarian-egalitarian goals of health care, and both strive to provide better care for all.

  9. Impact of organisational characteristics on health and safety ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The construction industry makes a contribution to occupational accidents and ill health records in Nigeria. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of organisational characteristics on health and safety (H&S) management practices of Nigerian small and medium-sized construction enterprises (SMEs). The study ...

  10. Assessment of Staff Intercultural Competences in Health Care Organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stašys Rimantas

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available As a consequence of globalisation, people’s mobility has been increasing, which brought cultural diversity to a number of countries of the world, therefore intercultural competences became a particularly important research object in organisation management. Scientific literature is rich in publications on the topic, however, the latter problem and its specificity has been insufficiently studied in health care organisations whose performance is especially important for each patient and the cost of errors, possibly caused also by insufficient intercultural competences, may be very great. The conducted research justifies the meaning and significance of intercultural competences in health care organisations and identifies the principal problems in organisations faced when communicating in an intercultural environment. The development of intercultural competences was not sufficiently promoted in health care organisations, leaving that to the staff’s responsibility. Quite a few of health care services providers had a poor knowledge of etiquette and did not know much about the customs and traditions of other countries.

  11. COMMITTEES: Quark Matter 2008 Organising and International Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Organising Committee Madan M Aggarwal (Chandigarh) Jan-e Alam (Kolkata) Convener Arup Bandyopadhyay (Kolkata) Debades Bandyopadhyay (Kolkata) Rahul Basu (Chennai) Rakesh K Bhandari (Kolkata) Anju Bhasin (Jammu) Subhasis Chattopadhyay (Kolkata) Convener Sukalyan Chattopadhyay (Kolkata) Asis Chaudhuri (Kolkata) Premomoy Ghosh (Kolkata) Sanjay Ghosh (Kolkata) Sourendu Gupta (Mumbai) Muhammad Irfan (Aligarh) Durga P Mahapatra (Bhubaneswar) DAmruta Mishra (New Delhi) Ajit K Mohanty (Mumbai) Bedangadas Mohanty (Kolkata) Vaisali Naik (Kolkata) Tapan K Nayak (Kolkata) Convener Sudhir Raniwala (Jaipur) Sourav Sarkar (Kolkata) Bikash Sinha (Kolkata) Chair Dinesh Srivastava (Kolkata) Raghava Varma (Mumbai) Yogendra P Viyogi (Bhubaneswar)Co-chair International Advisory Committee R Aymar,Switzerland Jean Paul Blaizot, France Peter Braun Münzinger, Germany Igor M Dremin, Russia Kari Eskola, Finland Jens Jorgen Gaardhoje,Denmark Rajiv V Gavai, India Hans-Ake Gustaffson, Sweden Hans Gutbrod, Germany Miklos Gyulassy, USA Timothy Hallman, USA Hideki Hamagaki, Japan Tetsuo Hatsuda, Japan Huan-Zhong Huang, USA Barbara Jacak, USA Peter Jenni, Switzerland Taka Kajino, Japan Takeshi Kodama, Brazil T D Lee, USA Peter Levai, Hungary Luciano Maiani, Italy Larry McLerran, USA Berndt Müller, USA Guy Paic, Mexico Sibaji Raha, India Lodovico Riccati, Italy Hans Georg Ritter, USA Helmut Satz, Germany Jurgen Schukraft, Switzerland Yves Schutz, France Edward V Shuryak, USA Johanna Stachel, Germany Horst Stöcker, Germany Itzhak Tserruya, Israel Xin-Nian Wang, USA Bolek Wyslouch, USA Glenn R Young, USA William A Zajc, USA Wen-Long Zhan, China

  12. International regulation of wildlife trade: relevant legislation and organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, M E; Rosser, A M

    2002-04-01

    Trade in wildlife brings into play a variety of legislation from several distinct areas of law. Many species of wildlife are subject to restrictions on international movement with the aim of protecting wild populations from over-exploitation. Animal health legislation is strictly applied to the movement of most animals to prevent the spread of infectious diseases between importing and exporting counties. The welfare of animals in the course of trade requires consideration and relevant legislation has been put into place, particularly in respect of transportation. A number of institutions have an impact on the trade itself or on the legislation that regulates wildlife trade on an international basis.

  13. 6th International Accounting Congress of Barcelona (1929) organised by the Association of Accountants of Catalonia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Josepa Alemany; Joaquim Rabaseda

    2017-01-01

    .... The 6th International Conference on Accounting which took place in Barcelona coinciding with the International Exhibition of 1929, was organised by the Association Internationale de Comptabilité of Brussels...

  14. Weber, authority and the organisation of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaszewski, A; Manthorpe, J

    The third paper in the series on sociology discusses the work of Max Weber. It traces the origins and main themes of his work. The parallels between his work and contemporary issues in the organisation of health care are outlined, in particular, the insights provided into bureaucracy and authority.

  15. Organising for self-advocacy in mental health: Experiences from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    who still face significant stigma attached to their mental health conditions.3 These ... rebuilding their lives within their communities; independent decision-making, user-led membership and leadership; financial self- sufficiency, alliances with ... documents on the history and activities of the organisations. Semi-structured ...

  16. Evaluation of the World Health Organisation' antibody-testing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To evaluate the World Health Organisation. (WHO) antibody testing strategy for the individual patient diagnosis of HIV infection (strategy Ill). Design. Evaluation of a combination of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELlSAs) for the detection of antibodies to HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection. The WHO strategy.

  17. Does it matter who organises your health care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paresh Dawda

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: As the prevalence of long-term and multimorbid conditions is increasing, patients increasingly require consultations with multiple health care professionals and coordination of their care needs. Methods: This study is based on a 2011 survey of older Australians which draws on sub-populations of people with diabetes aged 50 years or over, people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and members of Nationals Seniors Australia. We develop a composite coordination measure and examine differences in the measure with different care coordination indicators using both descriptive and regression methods. Three categories of respondent-perceived care organisers are used: health care professionals; “no one”; and patients, their partner, relative or friend. Results: Of the 2,540 survey respondents (an overall response rate of 24%, 1,865 provided information on who organised their health care, and composite coordination measures were calculated for 1,614. Multivariate analysis showed the composite score was highest where a health care professional coordinated care, followed by care organised by self or a carer, and then the group reporting no organiser. Conclusion: In moving towards care coordination there are opportunities to improve the care coordination process itself, and the key enablers to improving care coordination appear to be the availability and communication of clinical information and the role of the clinical team. Normal 0 false false false EN-AU X-NONE X-NONE Outsourcing scorecard for the UN and similar international public sector organisations

    OpenAIRE

    Ken Charles; Chris E Cloete

    2011-01-01

    Outsourcing has become one of the most powerful, organisation-shaping management tools available today. However, the UN’s experience in outsourcing is limited to providing troops for peacekeeping operations.  The purpose of the paper is to develop an outsourcing scorecard for the UN and similar organisations.  Forty national and international organisations were surveyed through questionnaires, review of relevant literatures and records. The research established that by identifying core compet...

  18. Learning in and from the West: International Students and International Women's Organisations in the Interwar Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandell, Marie

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the importance of higher education to international women's organisations such as the International Federation of University Women, the International Council of Women, the International Alliance of Women and Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, and asks how studying abroad contributed to the…

  19. Trade Unions as Organisations: Key Issues and Problems of Internal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    regulating labour market and Managerial Relations with employees. Similarly, it is the opinion of this article that theoretically speaking and to some extent, Trade Unions adopt democratic constitutions by giving their members ultimate control over certain policy decisions and the organisation of their own union activities.

  1. Leadership as a management competency in rural health organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, R

    1996-01-01

    The management competency of leadership was measured on 34 middle and senior health managers from the Murray Health Service, using Situational Leadership Questionnaires. Using self-analysis, the managers found their leadership behaviours to be entrenched, inflexible and less effective than they might otherwise be. This conclusion was supported by results of the questionnaires completed on each manager by their followers. In almost half of the cases, followers had a different perception of their manager's leadership style than did the manager. This paper discusses these findings in the context of management assessment centres and the Charter for Change now facing all health organisations.

  2. Civil society organisations, social innovation and health research in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinare, Dace; McCarthy, Mark

    2012-12-01

    European Union strategies and programmes identify research and innovation as a critical dimension for future economic and social development. While European research policy emphasizes support for industry, the health field includes not-for-profit civil society organisations (CSOs) providing social innovation. Yet, the perspectives of CSOs towards health research in Europe are not well understood. STEPS (Strengthening Engagement in Public Health Research) was funded by the European Commission's Science in Society research programme. Within the study, we interviewed by telephone respondents of 13 European health CSOs, which represented collectively local and national organizations. Research was valued positively by the respondents. Health CSOs did not seek to do research themselves, but recognized the opportunity of funds in this field and welcomed the possibility of collaborating in research, of using the results from research and of providing input to research agendas. Links between research and users provides knowledge for the public and improves impacts on policy. Research and evaluation can help in demonstrating the benefit of innovative activities, and give support and legitimacy. However, the cultures of, and incentives for, researchers and health CSOs are different, and collaboration requires building trust, a shared language and for the power relations and objectives to match. Health CSOs contribute social innovation in organising services and activities such as advocacy that cannot be satisfactorily met by industry. Engaging CSOs in research and innovation will strengthen the European Research Area.

  3. The Conditions of Parenthood in Organisations: An International Comparison

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křížková, Alena; Maříková, Hana; Dudová, Radka; Sloboda, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 3 (2009), s. 519-547 ISSN 0038-0288 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS700280503; GA AV ČR IAA700280804; GA ČR GA403/05/2474; GA ČR GA403/09/1839 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70280505 Keywords : organisations * family-friendly policies * work Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography Impact factor: 0.562, year: 2009

  4. Service user led organisations in mental health today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Diana; MacDonald, Dee; Wilson, Aaron; Crawford, Mike; Barnes, Marian; Omeni, Edward

    2016-06-01

    Since 1990, health policy in England has stressed the importance of user involvement in shaping and delivering services. To explore mental health service user-led organisations (ULOs) in England, as they interact with decision-makers to bring about change desired by them with a focus on institutional norms behaviour and specialised knowledge impacting service users' relationships with services. An ethnography of five ULOs in two provider organisations (NHS Trusts) including observing their meetings and interactions with decision-makers, conducting in-depth interviews and collecting reflective diaries kept by two members of each group. During the study, one group ceased to operate. This was a group which refused to adopt the institutional rules and norms of managerial discourse. The other four groups survived by navigating the changing environment which existed at the time of the study, although often at some cost. Themes of autonomy and leadership were also identified. The current environment is one of the organisational complexity and change and the place of ULOs is an ambiguous one as they strive to maintain autonomy whilst at the same time being an acceptable voice to managers.

  5. Understanding the organisational culture of district health services: Mahalapye and Ngamiland health districts of Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Mash, Robert; Phaladze, Nthabiseng

    2015-11-30

    Botswana has a shortage of health care workers, especially in primary healthcare. Retention and high performance of employees are closely linked to job satisfaction and motivation, which are both highest where employees' personal values and goals are realised. The aim of the study was to evaluate employees' personal values, and the current and desired organisational culture of the district health services as experienced by the primary health care workers. The study was conducted in the Ngamiland and Mahalapye health districts. This was a cross sectional survey. The participants were asked to select 10 values that best described their personal, current organisational and desired organisational values from a predetermined list. Sixty and 67 health care workers completed the survey in Mahalapye and Ngamiland districts, respectively. The top 10 prevalent organisational values experienced in both districts were: teamwork, patient satisfaction, blame, confusion, job insecurity, not sharing information and manipulation. When all the current values were assessed, 32% (Mahalapye) and 36% (Ngamiland) selected by health care workers were potentially limiting organisational effectiveness. The organisational values desired by health care workers in both districts were: transparency, professional growth, staff recognition, shared decision-making, accountability, productivity, leadership development and teamwork. The experience of the primary health care workers in the two health districts were overwhelmingly negative, which is likely to contribute to low levels of motivation, job satisfaction, productivity and high attrition rates. There is therefore urgent need for organisational transformation with a focus on staff experience and leadership development.

  6. What's to be done when 'foul whisp rings are abroad'? Gossip and rumour in health organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Nick; Kotze, Beth; Storm, Victor

    2017-07-01

    This article explores the relevance of gossip and rumour to health organisations and presents what limited empirical research is available specific to the management of gossip and rumour in health organisations. The concept of a sentinel function for gossip and rumour in health organisations is proposed as a topic worthy of further research.

  7. Organised crime and the efforts to combat it: a concern for public health.

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, L; M. McKee

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This paper considers the public health impacts of the income-generating activities of organised crime. These range from the traditional vice activities of running prostitution and supplying narcotics, to the newer growth areas of human trafficking in its various forms, from international supply of young people and children as sex workers through deceit, coercion or purchase from family, through to smuggling of migrants, forced labour and the theft of human tissues for transplant, and...

  8. Management of change in health care organisations and human resource role

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carignani, Vania E-mail: carignani@posta.econ.unian.it

    2000-01-01

    The paper is focused on the analysis of the most relevant factors necessary to manage change in health care organisations. The approach suggested is the Stakeholder one. According to this approach, the hospital's managers seem to be successful if they are able to satisfy people (internal and external stakeholders) that have a stake in the health care institution. The attention of the author is mainly focused on the internal forces that make the health care sector competitive and successful. In order to motivate internal human resources to accept change and to achieve the organisational targets two main methods can be suggested. The former is based on tangible variables and in particular on a fair reward system; the latter is built on intangible elements e.g. communication, negotiation, contracting, and organisational values sharing. Moreover, in order to cope with change it is important to develop the information technology management and to reengineer delivery processes, taking into consideration both the costs and benefits of these kinds of innovations.

  9. Management of change in health care organisations and human resource role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carignani, V

    2000-01-01

    The paper is focused on the analysis of the most relevant factors necessary to manage change in health care organisations. The approach suggested is the Stakeholder one. According to this approach, the hospital's managers seem to be successful if they are able to satisfy people (internal and external stakeholders) that have a stake in the health care institution. The attention of the author is mainly focused on the internal forces that make the health care sector competitive and successful. In order to motivate internal human resources to accept change and to achieve the organisational targets two main methods can be suggested. The former is based on tangible variables and in particular on a fair reward system; the latter is built on intangible elements e.g. communication, negotiation, contracting, and organisational values sharing. Moreover, in order to cope with change it is important to develop the information technology management and to reengineer delivery processes, taking into consideration both the costs and benefits of these kinds of innovations.

  10. Developing the Internal Service Quality in Organisation Y

    OpenAIRE

    Järvi, Susanna

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to analyze the quality of internal service at Organization Y by researching internal customer relationships. The objectives were to identify areas for development and strengths, as well as to make employees aware of the importance of the internal customers. The research problem concerned the extent to which internal service quality should be improved, and if so, the ways in which this could be achieved. Solutions were researched by determining the expectations a...

  11. The impact of clinical librarian services on patients and health care organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettle, Alison; Maden, Michelle; Payne, Clare

    2016-06-01

    Systematic reviews have found limited evidence of effectiveness and impact of clinical librarians (CLs) due to the poor quality of reporting, scale and design of previous studies. To measure specific CL impact on organisational and patient outcomes using a robust approach that helps CLs develop research skills. Questionnaire and interviews. Clinical librarians contribute to a wide range of outcomes in the short and longer term reflecting organisational priorities and objectives. These include direct contributions to choice of intervention (36%) diagnosis (26%) quality of life (25%), increased patient involvement in decision making (26%) and cost savings and risk management including avoiding tests, referrals, readmissions and reducing length of stay (28%). Interventions provided by CL's are complex and each contributes to multiple outcomes of importance to health care organisations. This study is unique in taking a wide view of potential and specific impacts to which CLs contribute across health care organisations. It is the largest UK evaluation of CL services to date and demonstrates CLs affect direct patient care, improve quality and save money. Future researchers are urged to use the tools presented to collect data on the same outcomes to build a significant and comprehensive international evidence base about the effectiveness and impact of clinical librarian services. © 2016 Health Libraries Group.

  12. In memoriam: Jean Blancou, DVM, 1936-2010. World authority on rabies, historian and former Director General of the World Organisation for Animal Health (Office International des Épizooties: OIE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Jean-Marie Blancou was born in Bangui on 28 August 1936 and passed away in Paris on 10 November 2010 at the age of 74. After studying at the Pierre de Fermat Lycée in Toulouse, Jean Blancou graduated from the Toulouse Veterinary School in 1960. He continued his studies in tropical veterinary medicine in Paris until 1963, extending his knowledge of immunology, microbiology, biochemistry and zoology, at the Institut Pasteur. He obtained his doctorate in biological sciences at the University of Nancy in 1982. Jean Blancou commenced his career as technical adviser to the Veterinary Services of Ethiopia where he directed a campaign against rinderpest in the south of the county. From 1965 to 1967 he was deputy director of the national veterinary laboratory in Niamey where he was responsible for the diagnosis of animal diseases and the production of veterinary vaccines. In 1967, he moved to the central livestock laboratory in Madagascar, where he commenced research on the diagnosis and control of dermatophilosis, bovine tuberculosis and other bacterial and parasitic diseases. In August 1968 he married Geneviève Orue. In 1975 he was appointed as head of the national veterinary laboratory in Senegal, where he remained until 1977. Initially deputy director, and then director of Research on rabies and wildlife diseases, at the World Health Organization collaborating centre in Nancy, he remained in this position until 1990. Jean Blancou was recognised as a world authority on rabies. He conducted research into the diagnosis, aetiology, epidemiology and control of rabies during his time in Nancy. Between 1988 and 1990, Dr Blancou also headed the animal health and protection department of the Centre national d'études vétérinaires et animales (CNEVA) in Maisons-Alfort. On 1 January 1991, he was appointed director general of the World Organisation for Animal Health (Office International des Épizooties: OIE) and was re-elected in 1995 for a further five-year term, until he

  13. Facilitating organisational development using a group-based formative assessment and benchmarking method: design and implementation of the International Family Practice Maturity Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwyn, Glyn; Bekkers, Marie-Jet; Tapp, Laura; Edwards, Adrian; Newcombe, Robert; Eriksson, Tina; Braspenning, Jozé; Kuch, Christine; Adzic, Zlata Ozvacic; Ayankogbe, Olayinka; Cvetko, Tatjana; In 't Veld, Kees; Karotsis, Antonis; Kersnik, Janko; Lefebvre, Luc; Mecini, Ilir; Petricek, Goranka; Pisco, Luis; Thesen, Janecke; Turón, José María; van Rossen, Edward; Grol, Richard

    2010-12-01

    Well-organised practices deliver higher-quality care. Yet there has been very little effort so far to help primary care organisations achieve higher levels of team performance and to help them identify and prioritise areas where quality improvement efforts should be concentrated. No attempt at all has been made to achieve a method which would be capable of providing comparisons--and the stimulus for further improvement--at an international level. The development of the International Family Practice Maturity Matrix took place in three phases: (1) selection and refinement of organisational dimensions; (2) development of incremental scales based on a recognised theoretical framework; and (3) testing the feasibility of the approach on an international basis, including generation of an automated web-based benchmarking system. This work has demonstrated the feasibility of developing an organisational assessment tool for primary care organisations that is sufficiently generic to cross international borders and is applicable across a diverse range of health settings, from state-organised systems to insurer-based health economies. It proved possible to introduce this assessment method in 11 countries in Europe and one in Africa, and to generate comparison benchmarks based on the data collected. The evaluation of the assessment process was uniformly positive with the view that the approach efficiently enables the identification of priorities for organisational development and quality improvement at the same time as motivating change by virtue of the group dynamics. We are not aware of any other organisational assessment method for primary care which has been 'born international,' and that has involved attention to theory, dimension selection and item refinement. The principal aims were to achieve an organisational assessment which gains added value by using interaction, engagement comparative benchmarks: aims which have been achieved. The next step is to achieve wider

  14. Organisational Factors Affecting Policy and Programme Decision Making in a Public Health Policy Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zardo, Pauline; Collie, Alex; Livingstone, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Organisational factors can affect the success of interventions aimed at increasing research use. Research is needed to identify organisational factors affecting research use in specific public health policy contexts. Qualitative interviews with decision makers from a specific public health context identified a range of organisational factors that…

  15. Evolution Of International Governmental Organisations Concerning Danube River

    OpenAIRE

    Cristian Jura

    2014-01-01

    The international rivers are water courses that separate or cross the territories of several states and which are navigable up to discharging in the sea. The Congress of Vienna (1815) sets forth certain principles of the regime of navigation on European international rivers and the notion of international rivers. The Conference of Berlin (1885) institutes the freedom of navigation on the rivers Congo and Niger. During the Conference of Barcelona (1921) a convention and a by-law we...

  16. Evolution Of International Governmental Organisations Concerning Danube River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Jura

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The international rivers are water courses that separate or cross the territories of several states and which are navigable up to discharging in the sea. The Congress of Vienna (1815 sets forth certain principles of the regime of navigation on European international rivers and the notion of international rivers. The Conference of Berlin (1885 institutes the freedom of navigation on the rivers Congo and Niger. During the Conference of Barcelona (1921 a convention and a by-law were elaborated concerning the regime of navigable ways of international interest.

  17. The European as a Blueprint for International Organisations? A Global History View

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dykmann, Klaas

    Today, it is above all international organisations (IOs) that are expected to tackle the challenges and problems of “globalisation” in an “effective” way, while the very nature of these institutions has remained rather uncontested. In this article, I aspire to provide an overview on various...... shall place these institutions in global history. Subsequently, I will address some features in this regard, namely the dimension of international law, bureaucracy and standardisation for the prevailing image of man in IOs as well as the policy areas of human rights and medicine......., which shall reflect the imagined European that has been constructed in different areas and in different historical periods. Then, I will outline my three major questions, followed by a short overview on the historiography on international organisations. A brief history of international organisations...

  18. Participants at the 4th Controlling Conference of International Public Organisations

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2010-01-01

    The 4th Controlling Conference of International Public Organisations is part of a cycle of yearly conferences which were held the previous years in Frankfurt, Munich, Luxemburg, and which will take place this year on 31 May and 1 June at CERN. The aim of these conferences is to offer a forum for Directors of Administration, Deputy CFOs, Secretary-Generals, Heads of Budget of International Organisations, to exchange experiences on selected themes related to performance management. This year’s theme is “The Reduction of Overheads in International Public Organisations”.

  19. The Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development's International Early Learning Study: What Happened Next

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Peter; Urban, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide an update on what has happened over recent months with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's proposal for an International Early Learning Study, and review responses to the proposed International Early Learning Study, including the concerns that have been raised about this new venture in…

  20. Coordination Processes in International Organisations: The EU at the International Labour Conference in 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Nedergaard

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The EU is not a member of the International Labour Organisation (ILO, but relatively elaborate EU coordination takes place anyway. This paper addresses two research questions: 1 How is it possible to evaluate the coordination of the EU in its specific observable configuration in the ILO?, and 2 To what outcome does this coordination lead and why? Based on an analysis of EU coordination before and during the International Labour Conference in 2005, and on a comparison with coordination processes of the IMEC group, it is found that the Commission and the Presidency act as twin-agents vis-à-vis their principals, the Member States. The Commission is the leading agent in the phase leading up to the Conference; the Presidency then takes over.On the one hand, due to the Treaty obligations and their interpretations by the Court of Justice, both the Presidency and the Commission are kept within tight limits by the principals. On the other hand, both before and during the Conference, the Member States accept the so-called discursive coordination of the Commission, which seems to be of great (but often neglected importance. Owing to the organisational set-up in which coordination takes place, the EU is able to coordinate relatively elaborate agreements due to the strength of its coordination as far as professional or technical and political activities (excepting the ILO budget are concerned. In other more clear-cut or 'simple' policy areas such as the ILO budget, the EU coordination is weak: this contrast with the strong coordination of the IMEC.

  1. Investigating referral pathways from primary care to consumer health organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Charlotte E; Mutch, Allyson J; Boyle, Frances M; Dean, Julie H

    2010-01-01

    While chronic disease places an increasing burden on Australia's primary care system it is unrealistic to expect GPs to meet the range of support needs experienced by patients managing chronic conditions. Consumer health organisations (CHO) have the potential to augment clinical care by providing a variety of supportive services; however, they are underutilised by patients and GPs. This qualitative study investigates GPs' knowledge and perceptions of CHO and their contributions to chronic disease care. The study involved semi-structured interviews with 10 GPs. Overall, participants demonstrated clear understanding of the role of CHO in chronic disease management, but a critical finding was the way GPs' view of their own chronic care role appears to influence referral practices. GPs operating in a traditional role were less likely to refer to CHO than those who had adopted a chronic care approach. A second key finding related to GPs' views of Diabetes Australia. All GPs identified this organisation as an important referral point, providing some reassurance that CHO can be integrated into the primary care sector. Further research is needed to determine how the 'definite advantages' associated with Diabetes Australia can be used to extend GP referral and enhance the health system's integration of other CHO.

  2. Development of the school organisational health questionnaire: a measure for assessing teacher morale and school organisational climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, P M; Wearing, A J; Conn, M; Carter, N L; Dingle, R K

    2000-06-01

    A growing body of empirical evidence suggests that organisational factors are more important than classroom specific issues in determining teacher morale. Accordingly, it is necessary to have available measures that accurately assess morale, as well as the organisational factors that are likely to underpin the experience of morale. Three studies were conducted with the aim of developing a psychometrically sound questionnaire that could be used to assess teacher morale and various dimensions of school organisational climate. A total of 1,520 teachers from 18 primary and 26 secondary schools in the Australian state of Victoria agreed to participate in three separate studies (N = 615, 342 and 563 in Studies 1, 2 and 3, respectively) that were used to develop the questionnaire. The demographic profile of the teachers was similar to that found in the Department as a whole. All teaching staff in the participating schools were asked to complete a self-report questionnaire as part of the evaluation of an organisational development programme. A series of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to establish the questionnaire's factor structure, and correlation analyses were used to examine the questionnaire's convergent and discriminant validity. The three studies resulted in the 54-item School Organisational Health Questionnaire that measures teacher morale and 11 separate dimensions of school organisational climate: appraisal and recognition, curriculum coordination, effective discipline policy, excessive work demands, goal congruence, participative decision-making, professional growth, professional interaction, role clarity, student orientation, and supportive leadership.

  3. Factors impacting on organisational learning in three rural health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    onsite, informal learning in organisations.9 Amitay et al found a strong positive association between transformational leadership, organisational learning values and the existence of learning sessions.10 The leadership of a learning organisation should generate learning opportunities on the job, reward this type of learning, ...

  4. Rethinking poverty: The role of international organisations in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resource inequity and disparity between nations and communities is a significant social problem. The consequences of such inequities are immense and are compounded by governments' failure to find lasting solutions. International organizations have stepped in to fill the gap; however, their efficacy is fairly ...

  5. Organisational Learning through International M&A Integration Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Wayne; Salama, Alzira

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research paper is to explore the learning process associated with international mergers and acquisitions (M&A) integration strategies. Design/methodology/approach: The paper employs a comparative case study methodology, utilising qualitative data through in-depth interviews with top management responsible for…

  6. Understanding the organisational culture of district health services: Mahalapye and Ngamiland health districts of Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oathokwa Nkomazana

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Botswana has a shortage of health care workers, especially in primary healthcare. Retention and high performance of employees are closely linked to job satisfaction and motivation, which are both highest where employees’ personal values and goals are realised.Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate employees’ personal values, and the current and desired organisational culture of the district health services as experienced by the primary health care workers.Setting: The study was conducted in the Ngamiland and Mahalapye health districts.Method: This was a cross sectional survey. The participants were asked to select 10 values that best described their personal, current organisational and desired organisational values from a predetermined list.Results: Sixty and 67 health care workers completed the survey in Mahalapye and Ngamiland districts, respectively. The top 10 prevalent organisational values experienced in both districts were: teamwork, patient satisfaction, blame, confusion, job insecurity, not sharing information and manipulation. When all the current values were assessed, 32% (Mahalapye and 36% (Ngamiland selected by health care workers were potentially limiting organisational effectiveness. The organisational values desired by health care workers in both districts were: transparency, professional growth, staff recognition, shared decision-making, accountability, productivity, leadership development and teamwork.Conclusions: The experience of the primary health care workers in the two health districts were overwhelmingly negative, which is likely to contribute to low levels of motivation, job satisfaction, productivity and high attrition rates. There is therefore urgent need for organisational transformation with a focus on staff experience and leadership development.

  7. International Student Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Welch, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the mental health status of international students in institutions of higher education, unique challenges these students face and their impact on mental health, and suggestions for ways to address these challenges.

  8. In memoriam:Jean Blancou, DVM, 1936-2010. World authority on rabies, historian and former Director General of the World Organisation for Animal Health (Office International des Épizooties: OIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    laboratory in Senegal, where he remained until 1977.Initially deputy director, and then director of Research on rabies and wildlife diseases, at the World Health Organization collaborating centre in Nancy, he remained in this position until 1990. Jean Blancou was recognised as a world authority on rabies. He conducted research into the diagnosis, aetiology, epidemiology and control of rabies during his time in Nancy.Between 1988 and 1990, Dr Blancou also headed the animal health and protection department of the Centre national d’études vétérinaires et animales (CNEVA in Maisons-Alfort. On 1 January 1991, he was appointed director general of the World Organisation for Animal Health (Office International des Épizooties: OIE and was re-elected in 1995 for a further five-year term, until he retired in 2000.He attached great importance to the value of scientific publication and to the ethics involved in producing scientific literature. He had a very strong interest in the historical aspects of animal diseases and, in 2003, published a valuable book entitled History of the surveillance and control of transmissible animal diseases. He would always ensure that the most interesting and appropriate historic illustrations, irrespective of how difficult they were to obtain, were selected for the papers he published.Among some of the activities Jean Blancou undertook during his retirement was the mammoth task of co‑editing Infectious and parasitic diseases of livestock in French and English.Dr Blancou authored over 370 scientific publications devoted to animal diseases, to the production and control of biologicals and, of course, many authoritative articles on rabies and vaccinology.He was always generous with the scientific knowledge he possessed and never missed an opportunity to assist colleagues in the preparation or correction of manuscripts that they wished to submit to peer-reviewed journals.He was gentle in nature and always softly spoken. As one of his colleagues wrote

  9. International organisation of ocean programs: Making a virtue of necessity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcewan, Angus

    1992-01-01

    When faced with the needs of climate prediction, a sharp contrast is revealed between existing networks for the observation of the atmosphere and for the ocean. Even the largest and longest-serving ocean data networks were created for their value to a specific user (usually with a defence, fishing or other maritime purpose) and the major compilations of historical data have needed extensive scientific input to reconcile the differences and deficiencies of the various sources. Vast amounts of such data remain inaccessible or unusable. Observations for research purposes have been generally short lived and funded on the basis of single initiatives. Even major programs such as FGGE, TOGA and WOCE have been driven by the dedicated interest of a surprisingly small number of individuals, and have been funded from a wide variety of temporary allocations. Recognising the global scale of ocean observations needed for climate research, international cooperation and coordination is an unavoidable necessity, resulting in the creation of such bodies as the Committee for Climatic Changes and the Ocean (CCCO), with the tasks of: (1) defining the scientific elements of research and ocean observation which meet the needs of climate prediction and amelioration; (2) translating these elements into terms of programs, projects or requirements that can be understood and participated in by individual nations and marine agencies; and (3) the sponsorship of specialist groups to facilitate the definition of research programs, the implementation of cooperative international activity and the dissemination of results.

  10. Health service accreditation as a predictor of clinical and organisational performance: a blinded, random, stratified study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Greenfield, David; Westbrook, Johanna; Pawsey, Marjorie; Westbrook, Mary; Gibberd, Robert; Naylor, Justine; Nathan, Sally; Robinson, Maureen; Runciman, Bill; Jackson, Margaret; Travaglia, Joanne; Johnston, Brian; Yen, Desmond; McDonald, Heather; Low, Lena; Redman, Sally; Johnson, Betty; Corbett, Angus; Hennessy, Darlene; Clark, John; Lancaster, Judie

    2010-02-01

    Despite the widespread use of accreditation in many countries, and prevailing beliefs that accreditation is associated with variables contributing to clinical care and organisational outcomes, little systematic research has been conducted to examine its validity as a predictor of healthcare performance. To determine whether accreditation performance is associated with self-reported clinical performance and independent ratings of four aspects of organisational performance. Independent blinded assessment of these variables in a random, stratified sample of health service organisations. Acute care: large, medium and small health-service organisations in Australia. Study participants Nineteen health service organisations employing 16 448 staff treating 321 289 inpatients and 1 971 087 non-inpatient services annually, representing approximately 5% of the Australian acute care health system. Correlations of accreditation performance with organisational culture, organisational climate, consumer involvement, leadership and clinical performance. Results Accreditation performance was significantly positively correlated with organisational culture (rho=0.618, p=0.005) and leadership (rho=0.616, p=0.005). There was a trend between accreditation and clinical performance (rho=0.450, p=0.080). Accreditation was unrelated to organisational climate (rho=0.378, p=0.110) and consumer involvement (rho=0.215, p=0.377). Accreditation results predict leadership behaviours and cultural characteristics of healthcare organisations but not organisational climate or consumer participation, and a positive trend between accreditation and clinical performance is noted.

  11. Organised crime and the efforts to combat it: a concern for public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKee Martin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper considers the public health impacts of the income-generating activities of organised crime. These range from the traditional vice activities of running prostitution and supplying narcotics, to the newer growth areas of human trafficking in its various forms, from international supply of young people and children as sex workers through deceit, coercion or purchase from family, through to smuggling of migrants, forced labour and the theft of human tissues for transplant, and the sale of fake medications, foodstuffs and beverages, cigarettes and other counterfeit manufactures. It looks at the effect of globalisation on integrating supply chains from poorly-regulated and impoverished source regions through to their distant markets, often via disparate groups of organised criminals who have linked across their traditional territories for mutual benefit and enhanced profit, with both traditional and newly-created linkages between production, distribution and retail functions of cooperating criminal networks from different cultures. It discusses the interactions between criminals and the structures of the state which enable illegal and socially undesirable activities to proceed on a massive scale through corruption and subversion of regulatory mechanisms. It argues that conventional approaches to tackling organised crime often have deleterious consequences for public health, and calls for an evidence-based approach with a focus on outcomes rather than ideology.

  12. Organised crime and the efforts to combat it: a concern for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Lucy; McKee, Martin

    2010-11-15

    This paper considers the public health impacts of the income-generating activities of organised crime. These range from the traditional vice activities of running prostitution and supplying narcotics, to the newer growth areas of human trafficking in its various forms, from international supply of young people and children as sex workers through deceit, coercion or purchase from family, through to smuggling of migrants, forced labour and the theft of human tissues for transplant, and the sale of fake medications, foodstuffs and beverages, cigarettes and other counterfeit manufactures. It looks at the effect of globalisation on integrating supply chains from poorly-regulated and impoverished source regions through to their distant markets, often via disparate groups of organised criminals who have linked across their traditional territories for mutual benefit and enhanced profit, with both traditional and newly-created linkages between production, distribution and retail functions of cooperating criminal networks from different cultures. It discusses the interactions between criminals and the structures of the state which enable illegal and socially undesirable activities to proceed on a massive scale through corruption and subversion of regulatory mechanisms. It argues that conventional approaches to tackling organised crime often have deleterious consequences for public health, and calls for an evidence-based approach with a focus on outcomes rather than ideology.

  13. Incorporating translation into sociolinguistic research: translation policy in an international non-governmental organisation

    OpenAIRE

    Tesseur, Wine

    2017-01-01

    This article explores aspects of translation, multilingualism and language policy in the field of transnational civil society. By focusing on translation policies at Amnesty International, an international non-governmental organisation that performs a key role in global governance, this article seeks to contribute to a globalisation-sensitive sociolinguistics. It argues that combining a sociolinguistic approach, more precisely linguistic ethnography, with translation studies leads to an incre...

  14. Filling the Gaps: The Role and Impact of International Non-Governmental Organisations in "Education for All"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tota, Pasqua Marina

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the involvement of international non-governmental organisations (INGOs) in transnational education policy-making, with particular reference to the global initiative Education for All (EFA). EFA is a policy process carried out by international governmental organisations (IGOs) with the main aim to achieve basic education for…

  15. Outsourcing scorecard for the UN and similar international public sector organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Charles

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Outsourcing has become one of the most powerful, organisation-shaping management tools available today. However, the UN’s experience in outsourcing is limited to providing troops for peacekeeping operations.  The purpose of the paper is to develop an outsourcing scorecard for the UN and similar organisations.  Forty national and international organisations were surveyed through questionnaires, review of relevant literatures and records. The research established that by identifying core competencies, goals and objectives, risks, selection of provider as well as measurements and evaluation of providers performance using an outsourcing scorecard, support functions can be outsourced successfully. Other criteria indicated as important is peace-building, suitable for humanitarian organisations. The scorecard developed by the research could provide the UN with a number of benefits, such as maximization of efficiency and savings in costs.  The paper develops the first outsourcing scorecard to guide the UN and similar organisations in identifying services that can be outsourced successfully.

  16. Coordination and relationships between organisations during the civil-military international response against Ebola in Sierra Leone: an observational discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forestier, Colleen; Cox, A T; Horne, S

    2016-06-01

    The Ebola virus disease (EVD) crisis in West Africa began in March 2014. At the beginning of the outbreak, no one could have predicted just how far-reaching its effects would be. The EVD epidemic proved to be a unique and unusual humanitarian and public health crisis. It caused worldwide fear that impeded the rapid response required to contain it early. The situation in Sierra Leone (SL) forced the formation of a unique series of civil-military interagency relationships to be formed in order to halt the epidemic. Civil-military cooperation in humanitarian situations is not unique to this crisis; however, the slow response, the unusual nature of the battle itself and the uncertainty of the framework required to fight this deadly virus created a situation that forced civilian and military organisations to form distinct, cooperative relationships. The unique nature of the Ebola virus necessitated a steering away from normal civil-military relationships and standard pillar responses. National and international non-governmental organisations (NGOs), Department for International Development (DFID) and the SL and UK militaries were required to disable this deadly virus (as of 7 November 2015, SL was declared EVD free). This paper draws on personal experiences and preliminary distillation of information gathered in formal interviews. It discusses some of the interesting features of the interagency relationships, particularly between the military, the UK's DFID, international organisations, NGOs and departments of the SL government. The focus is on how these relationships were key to achieving a coordinated solution to EVD in SL both on the ground and within the larger organisational structure. It also discusses how these relationships needed to rapidly evolve and change along with the epidemiological curve. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. The Organisation of Local Mental Health Services in Norway: Evidence, Uncertainty and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsdal, Helge; Hansen, Gunnar Vold

    2017-01-01

    This article addresses questions about health authorities' recommendations on the local organisation of services for people with mental health disorders in Norway. Analysis is made of the dynamic relationship between different evaluations, national guidelines and other knowledge that influence the organisation of services. The analysis is based…

  18. How do consumer leaders co-create value in mental health organisations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Brett; Bocking, Julia; Happell, Brenda

    2017-10-01

    Objectives Contemporary mental health policies call for consumers to be involved in decision-making processes within mental health organisations. Some organisations have embraced leadership roles for consumers, but research suggests consumers remain disempowered within mental health services. Drawing on a service-dominant logic, which emphasises the co-creation of value of services, the present study provides an overview of consumer leadership within mental health organisations in the Australian Capital Territory. Methods Mental health organisations subscribing to the local peak body mailing list were invited to complete a survey about consumer leadership. Survey data were summarised using descriptive statistics and interpreted through the lens of service-dominant logic. Results Ways in which organisations may create opportunities for consumers to co-create value within their mental health services included soliciting feedback, involving consumer leaders in service design, having consumer leaders involved in hiring decisions and employing consumer leaders as staff or on boards. Strategies that organisations used to develop consumer leaders included induction, workshops and training in a variety of organisational processes and skills. Conclusions The findings of the present study extend the application of a service-dominant logic framework to consumer leadership within mental health organisations through consideration of the diverse opportunities that organisations can provide for consumer co-creation of service offerings. What is known about the topic? Policy calls for consumer involvement in all levels of mental health service planning, implementation and delivery. The extent to which service organisations have included consumer leaders varies, but research suggests that this inclusion can be tokenistic or that organisations choose to work with consumers who are less likely to challenge the status quo. Service literature has explored the way consumers can co

  19. Occupational stress, ill health and organisational commitment of employees at a university of technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua P. Viljoen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between occupational stress, ill health and organisational commitment. A survey design was used. The sample (N=353 consisted of academic (n=132 and support staff (n=221 at a university of technology. The Organizational Stress Screening Tool (ASSET and a biographical questionnaire were administered. The results showed that different organisational stressors contributed significantly to ill health and low organisational commitment. Stress about job security contributed to both physical and psychological ill health, whereas overload and job aspects contributed to psychological ill health. Stress about control and resources contributed to low organisational commitment. Low individual commitment to the organisation was predicted by five stressors, namely work-life balance, overload, control, job aspects and pay.

  20. A study on determining the perception of learning organisation applications by health sector workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somunoğlu, Sinem; Erdem, Erhan; Erdem, Ummühan

    2012-12-01

    It is stated that in this century not only the societies, but also the communities have to confront with a reconstruction process due to the rapid developments and reformations. It is believed that it is only possible for the organisations to achieve their goals as long as they adapt to the changes, and they continue the learning process. Based on these ideas, this study aims to determine the perceptions of a learning organisation's applications by the workers at Health Centre in Denizli. In order to achieve this goal, a questionnaire method was used and in the questionnaire, questions inquiring about the examples from learning organisation processes as well as the questions representing socio-demographic characteristics of the workers were included. When the obtained results were analyzed, the health sector workers stated that there were some applications in their organisations intended for knowing, understanding and thinking organisation models which were among the learning organisation phases. The workers also stated that they thought their organisation implemented some applications such as "Each individual in my organisation has an equal chance to learn (33.3 %)", "Knowledge reaches every part of the organisation quickly and effectively (31.3 %)", "Our organisation provides the necessary environment for learning (37.5 %)" etc. Besides, they thought that the process of being a learning organisation was not totally completed. The workers pointed out the main obstacles to be a learning organisation and to organisational learning process as communication problems (46.9 %), factors originating from managers (37.5 %), learning obstacles originating from the individual himself (32.3 %) etc.

  1. International governmental organisations and global youth unemployment: the normative and ideational foundations of policy discourses

    OpenAIRE

    Fergusson, Ross; Yeates, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    This article compares policy discourses concerning youth unemployment of seven international governmental organisations (IGOs). We classify the discourses according to broadly neo-liberal and social democratic positions across labour market and social welfare domains, regarding causes of and responses to youth unemployment. We relate evidence of hybrids and shifts in IGOs' discourses to wider institutional contexts of global social policy and to debates about IGO responses to the global finan...

  2. Organisational Commitment on the Job Performance of Employees in An International Bank

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Vi Vien

    2015-01-01

    This research explores the multifaceted nature of commitment among the employees working in a ast-pace,highly competitive organisation – an international global leader in the banking industry, operating locally in Malaysia. Being a foreign bank in Malaysia during the aftermath of the recent global financial crisis presents many challenges, especially competition against strong local banks and rising customer demands. To remain as a top player, the bank must continuously improve their performa...

  3. Managerial strategies to reorient hospitals towards health promotion: lessons from organisational theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röthlin, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Reorienting health services towards health promotion is one of the major health promotion strategies stipulated by the Ottawa Charter). Important contradictions, tensions and barriers to health promotion implementation associated with organisational structures have, thus far, been underexposed in the hospital health promotion discourse. This paper aims at identifying risks and the chances for hospital management to strategically and sustainably reorient their hospitals towards health promotion. The paper combines theories and findings from organisational science and management studies as well as from capacity development in the form of a narrative literature review. The aim is to focus on the conditions hospitals, as organisational systems with a highly professionalised workforce, provide for a strategically managed reorientation towards health promotion. Models and principles helping managers to navigate the difficulties and complexities of health promotion reorientation will be suggested. Hospital managers have to deal with genuine obstacles in the complexity and structural formation of hospital organisations. Against this background, continuous management support, a transformative leadership style, participative strategic management and expert governance can be considered important organisational capacities for the reorientation towards a new concept such as health promotion. This paper discusses managerial strategies, effective structural transformations and important organisational capacities that can contribute to a sustainable reorientation of hospitals towards health promotion. It supports hospital managers in exploring their chances of facilitating and effectively supporting a sustainable health promotion reorientation of their hospitals. The paper provides an innovative approach where the focus is on enhanced possibilities for hospital managers to strategically manage the reorientation towards health promotion.

  4. Procurement of goods and services by international organisations in donor countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Carbonnier

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the procurement of goods and services by multilateral organisations from suppliers, based on a panel data including industrialised countries and emerging economies over 11 years. It presents the results of an empirical study – the first of its kind – on the explanatory factors of variations between countries, which are mainly attributable to such factors as the strength of the manufacturing sector and business ties established in the past. The results seem to indicate that the contributions paid by donor countries may have a positive influence on the procurement of goods and services, despite the fact that multilateral organisations purchase goods and services through international tendering procedures. Geographical proximity, cultural and linguistic affinities and the presence of the headquarters of a multilateral organisation in the country also play a positive role. The purchase of goods and services by multilateral agencies may be considered as an indirect effect of official development assistance (ODA. With many donor countries facing serious economic and budgetary constraints, documentation of the “return on investment” may serve as a means of encouraging policymakers to increase – or at least to not reduce – ODA budgets, including for multilateral agencies. Such arguments must nevertheless remain marginal with respect to the key debates on aid effectiveness and on on the performance of multilateral organisations.

  5. International child health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Alexandra Y; Høgh, Birthe

    2007-01-01

    International child health has improved. Better healthcare strategies, like IMCI, have contributed implementing basic interventions: vaccinations, nutrition supplement, oral rehydration and antibiotics. But 11 million children still die every year before they turn five, most from infectious...... diseases and neonatal complications, over half associated with malnutrition. Conditions we could prevent and treat. One of UN's Millennium Development Goals is to reduce child mortality. However child health is more than mortality and morbidity indicators, it includes growth and development. Udgivelsesdato...

  6. International child health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Alexandra Y; Høgh, Birthe

    2007-01-01

    diseases and neonatal complications, over half associated with malnutrition. Conditions we could prevent and treat. One of UN's Millennium Development Goals is to reduce child mortality. However child health is more than mortality and morbidity indicators, it includes growth and development. Udgivelsesdato......International child health has improved. Better healthcare strategies, like IMCI, have contributed implementing basic interventions: vaccinations, nutrition supplement, oral rehydration and antibiotics. But 11 million children still die every year before they turn five, most from infectious...

  7. The challenges of change management in Aboriginal community-controlled health organisations. Are there learnings for Cape York health reform?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombe, Leanne L

    2008-11-01

    The health status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples continues to be significantly poorer than Australia's general population. Clearly there is a need for change, hence the renewed interest in transitioning to a community control model for health services as a health intervention. Yet this requires a significant change management process, which is a process developed using Western business philosophies, and may not be applicable for community-controlled services that need to operate within the Aboriginal cultural domain. This paper examines the literature on organisational change management processes, and features of Aboriginal community-controlled health organisations and Aboriginal management styles. It identifies challenges and synergies that can be used to inform more effective transition processes to a community-control model for health services. The findings also highlight the need for a fundamental systems change approach to achieve such major reform agendas through the creation of a "collective responsibility" to achieve the vision for change, utilising participatory change management processes both internally and externally.

  8. International Organisations and the Shared Construction of Policy "Problems": Problematisation and Change in Education Governance in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grek, Sotiria

    2010-01-01

    Over recent years, research has shown the ways that national governments have seemingly ceded some of their autonomy in education policy development to international organisations (IOs) in the context of globalisation and one of its conduits, Europeanisation. This article develops the idea that IOs, and particularly the Organisation for Economic…

  9. Bequests to health-related charitable organisations: a structural model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikkel, D.; Schoenmakers, E.

    2012-01-01

    Charitable organisations, which support research on serious diseases such as cancer, heart diseases or rheumatism, are to a considerable extent dependent on bequests. Because in the Netherlands, in the next decade, the number of deaths per year is expected to increase at a faster rate than the

  10. Authentic leadership as a source of optimism, trust in the organisation and work engagement in the public health care sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick W. Stander

    2015-03-01

    the South African public health care sector, supporting work that has been done internationally in health care where AL has been associated with a number of positive outcomes. Finally, the study puts forward two practical suggestions, on both an individual and an organisational level, to facilitate a culture in which AL can be translated more effectively into an engaged workforce.

  11. Civil society organisations and public health research--evidence from eight European union new member states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knabe, Agnese; McCarthy, Mark

    2012-12-01

    Civil society organisations (CSO) are not-for-profit, non-governmental organisations operating in the public interest. They are the "third sector" that is strongly developed in Western European countries, ensuring the link between citizens and government and working as a counterbalance to the business sector. Their role in support of public health research deserves attention. Within a broader European study (STEPS--Strengthening Engagement in Public Health Research), public health organisations in eight European Union new member states (Cyprus, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia) identified national CSOs with interests in health. A questionnaire was developed jointly, translated into national languages and sent by e-mail to 474 organisations, with 128 completed responses (27%). Most CSOs would like to be more involved in setting or advising on public-health research policy, and greater collaboration between CSOs, professional organisations and governmental institutions. Respondents did not see CSOs directly doing research, but recommended mobilizing researchers and organsations, supporting research themes, and lobbying to use public health evidence in policy and decision-making. They could receive more education for, and discussion of, public health research, and offer support in applying for research funding. Civil society organisations can contribute importantly,in setting public health research agendas. Research commissioning should give greater recognition of this role, improve links between CSOs, researchers and governmental institutions, and develop a stronger shared basis for public health policy and practice.

  12. The Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation provisional criteria for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Pistorio, Angela; Ravelli, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    To develop a provisional definition for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) based on the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation juvenile DM core set of variables....

  13. IUPESM: the international umbrella organisation for biomedical engineering and medical physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Jh

    2007-07-01

    An account of the development, aims and activities of the International Union for Physical and Engineering Sciences in Medicine (IUPESM) is presented. Associations with the International Council of Science (ICSU) and the World Health Organization (WHO) are leading to exciting new projects towards improving global health, healthcare, quality of life and support of health technologies in developing countries.

  14. International health care spending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieber, G J; Puollier, J P

    1986-01-01

    Trends in health are reviewed for the member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) covering the following: the basic difficulties inherent in international comparative studies; the absolute levels of health expenditures in 1984; the levels and rates of growth of the health share in the gross domestic product (GDP) and the public share of total health expenditures; the elasticities of real health expenditures to real GDP for the 1960-75, 1975-84, and 1960-84 time periods; growth in health expenditures for the largest 7 OECD countries in terms of growth in population, health prices, health care prices in excess of overall prices, and utilization/intensity of services per person. International comparisons are a problem due to differences in defining the boundaries of the health sector, the heterogeneity of data, and methodological problems arising from comparing different economic, demographic, cultural, and institutional structures. The most difficult problem in international comparisons of health expenditures is lack of appropriate measures of health outcome. Exhibit 1 contains per capita health expenditures denominated in US dollars based on GDP purchasing power parities for 21 OECD countries for 1984. Per capita health expenditures ranged from less than $500 in Greece, Portugal, and Spain to over $1400 in Sweden and the US, with an OECD average of $871. After adjusting for price level differences, there still appears to be a greater than 3-fold difference in the "volume" of services consumed across the OECD countries. To determine if per capita health expenditures are related to a country's wealth as measured by its per capita GDP, the relationship between per capita health expenditures and per capita GDP for the 21 countries were examined for 1984. The data points and the "best fitting" trend line indicate a statistically significant relationship in which each $100 difference in per capita GDP is associated with a $10

  15. Impact on community organisations that partnered with the Act-Belong-Commit mental health promotion campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalleh, Geoffrey; Anwar-McHenry, Julia; Donovan, Robert J; Laws, Amberlee

    2013-04-01

    A primary aim of the pilot phase of the Act-Belong-Commit mental health promotion campaign was to form partnerships with community organisations. As a component of the broader campaign strategy, collaborating organisations promoted their activities under the Act-Belong-Commit banner in exchange for resources, promotional opportunities and capacity building in event management and funding. The impact of the Act-Belong-Commit campaign on the capacity and activities of collaborating organisations during the pilot phase was evaluated using self-completed mail surveys in 2006 and 2008. Collaboration with the campaign had a positive impact on community organisations' capacity, including staff expertise, media publicity and funding applications. Collaborating organisations had strong positive perceptions of Act-Belong-Commit officers and all expressed a willingness to collaborate in future events and activities. The partnership model used during the pilot phase of the Act-Belong-Commit campaign was successful in creating mutually beneficial exchanges with collaborating organisations. So what? Community partnerships are necessary for the effective delivery of mental health promotion campaigns at a local level. Successful partnerships involve the provision of real and valuable benefits to collaborating organisations in return for their cooperation in promoting health messages.

  16. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2009-12-24

    Dec 24, 2009 ... Int J Health Res, December 2009; 2(4): 290. International Journal of Health Research. The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal allowing free unlimited access to abstract and full-text of published articles. The journal is devoted to the promotion of health sciences and ...

  17. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Expression of leptin in PCOS. Int J Health Res, September 2010; 3(3): 164. International Journal of Health Research. The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal allowing free unlimited access to abstract and full-text of published articles. The journal is devoted to the promotion of health ...

  18. Whistleblowing Need not Occur if Internal Voices Are Heard: From Deaf Effect to Hearer Courage: Comment on "Cultures of Silence and Cultures of Voice: The Role of Whistleblowing in Healthcare Organisations".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Sonja R; Doyle, Kerrie E

    2015-09-29

    Whistleblowing by health professionals is an infrequent and extraordinary event and need not occur if internal voices are heard. Mannion and Davies' editorial on "Cultures of Silence and Cultures of Voice: The Role of Whistleblowing in Healthcare Organisations" asks the question whether whistleblowing ameliorates or exacerbates the 'deaf effect' prevalent in healthcare organisations. This commentary argues that the focus should remain on internal processes and hearer courage . © 2016 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  19. The United Nations and One Health: the International Health Regulations (2005) and global health security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, I; Miyagishima, K; Roth, C; de La Rocque, S

    2014-08-01

    The One Health approach encompasses multiple themes and can be understood from many different perspectives. This paper expresses the viewpoint of those in charge of responding to public health events of international concern and, in particular, to outbreaks of zoonotic disease. Several international organisations are involved in responding to such outbreaks, including the United Nations (UN) and its technical agencies; principally, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO); UN funds and programmes, such as the United Nations Development Programme, the World Food Programme, the United Nations Environment Programme, the United Nations Children's Fund; the UN-linked multilateral banking system (the World Bank and regional development banks); and partner organisations, such as the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). All of these organisations have benefited from the experiences gained during zoonotic disease outbreaks over the last decade, developing common approaches and mechanisms to foster good governance, promote policies that cut across different sectors, target investment more effectively and strengthen global and national capacities for dealing with emerging crises. Coordination among the various UN agencies and creating partnerships with related organisations have helped to improve disease surveillance in all countries, enabling more efficient detection of disease outbreaks and a faster response, greater transparency and stakeholder engagement and improved public health. The need to build more robust national public human and animal health systems, which are based on good governance and comply with the International Health Regulations (2005) and the international standards set by the OIE, prompted FAO, WHO and the OIE to join forces with the World Bank, to provide practical tools to help countries manage their zoonotic disease risks and develop adequate resources to prevent and control disease

  20. Mainstreaming risk reduction in urban planning and housing: a challenge for international aid organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamsler, Christine

    2006-06-01

    The effects of 'natural' disasters in cities can be worse than in other environments, with poor and marginalised urban communities in the developing world being most at risk. To avoid post-disaster destruction and the forced eviction of these communities, proactive and preventive urban planning, including housing, is required. This paper examines current perceptions and practices within international aid organisations regarding the existing and potential roles of urban planning as a tool for reducing disaster risk. It reveals that urban planning confronts many of the generic challenges to mainstreaming risk reduction in development planning. However, it faces additional barriers. The main reasons for the identified lack of integration of urban planning and risk reduction are, first, the marginal position of both fields within international aid organisations, and second, an incompatibility between the respective professional disciplines. To achieve better integration, a conceptual shift from conventional to non-traditional urban planning is proposed. This paper suggests related operative measures and initiatives to achieve this change.

  1. Organisational and Infrastructure Prerequisites of Creation of an International Logistic Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarnavska Nataliya P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the article lies in the study of organisational and infrastructure prerequisites of creation and functioning of integration structures capable, on the basis of logistics, of assisting subjects of economy in structuring and optimisation of material flows and also accompanying financial and information flows. In the result of the study the article identifies irregularities of the transition of national economies to new models of development and prospects of development of logistic provision of the innovation economy connected with them, transformation possibilities and prospects of international integration of the logistic market of Ukraine; it analyses prerequisites and substantiates expediency and shows benefits of formation of an international logistic centre in the city of Ternopil. The mission of the planned international logistic centre is ensuring a qualitatively new level of logistic provision of market participants, which would correspond with the existing world standards. The logistic centre performs realisation of its tasks and conduct of functions in the process of interaction with partners – participants of the logistic chain. The logistic centre should become an operator of flows of transit and export-import cargoes and it would perform important logistic functions connected not only with organisation of shipping operations but also with sorting, storing, packing and some other functions at the level of the best world representatives of the logistic servicing. In order to ensure successful activity of such a centre, it is required to adapt tariff policy of the state to international standards, to expand a list of relevant services, to reduce terms of cargo handling and to introduce modern technologies of information processing intensively.

  2. Ethics and health promotion practice: exploring attitudes and practices in Western Australian health organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, T; Crawford, G; Lobo, R; Leavy, J; Jancey, J

    2016-04-01

    Issue addressed Evidence-informed practice underpinned by ethics is fundamental to developing the science of health promotion. Knowledge and application of ethical principles are competencies required for health promotion practice. However, these competencies are often inconsistently understood and applied. This research explored attitudes, practices, enablers and barriers related to ethics in practice in Western Australian health organisations. Methods Semistructured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 10 health promotion practitioners, purposefully selected to provide a cross-section of government and non-government organisations. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and then themed. Results The majority of participants reported consideration of ethics in their practice; however, only half reported seeking Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) approval for projects in the past 12 months. Enablers identified as supporting ethics in practice and disseminating findings included: support preparing ethics applications; resources and training about ethical practice; ability to access HRECs for ethics approval; and a supportive organisational culture. Barriers included: limited time; insufficient resourcing and capacity; ethics approval not seen as part of core business; and concerns about academic writing. Conclusion The majority of participants were aware of the importance of ethics in practice and the dissemination of findings. However, participants reported barriers to engaging in formal ethics processes and to publishing findings. So what? Alignment of evidence-informed and ethics-based practice is critical. Resources and information about ethics may be required to support practice and encourage dissemination of findings, including in the peer-reviewed literature. Investigating the role of community-based ethics boards may be valuable to bridging the ethics-evidence gap.

  3. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Statistics and Medical Students. Int J Health Res, September 2009; 2(3): 231. Reprinted from. International Journal of. Health Research. Peer-reviewed Online ... The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal allowing free unlimited access to .... are faced with the challenge of applying.

  4. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Adiponectin and Ghrelin Metabolic Syndrome in Cuban-Americans. Int J Health Res, June 2010; 3(2): 92. International Journal of Health Research. The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal allowing free unlimited access to abstract and full-text of published articles. The journal is ...

  5. Organisational restructuring/downsizing, OHS regulation and worker health and wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A growing body of international evidence indicates that downsizing and related forms of organisational restructuring are having profound adverse effects on worker safety, health and wellbeing. In particular, evidence links downsizing to poorer mental health outcomes, including bullying and other forms of occupational violence. In Australia federal, state and territory occupational health and safety (OHS) legislation imposes obligations on employers who make changes to the workplace or work processes to identify hazards, undertake risk assessment, consult with employee representatives and take appropriate steps to manage any significant hazards that are identified, including psychosocial hazards. This study shows that while Australian regulators are aware of the problems posed by downsizing they have made only modest efforts to pursue compliance with legislative duties, producing some guidance material that refers to restructuring and workloads and launching a small number of prosecutions. At the same time, there is an increased willingness to address staffing levels and other impacts of downsizing (like working in isolation). Employer and union responses were also examined. The article concludes by identifying a number of initiatives that would enable regulators, unions and employers to address the problems posed by downsizing more effectively.

  6. Internal and external use of performance information in public organisations: Results from an international executive survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Hammerschmid (Gerhard); S.G.J. Van de Walle (Steven); V. Štimac (Vid)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAbstract. This paper analyses determinants of public managers´ internal and external use of performance information. Using a sample of over 3100 top public sector executives in six European countries, we find evidence for significant country variations, with a more limited use of

  7. Organisational innovation in health services: lessons from the NHS treatment centres

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gabbay, J

    2011-01-01

    ... design and methods References Index 103 133 147 149 155 165 v List of abbreviationsOrganisational innovation in health services List of abbreviations A&E ACAD DH DTC GP G-Supp NHS NIHR PCT PFI SDO SHA TC accident and emergency (department) Ambulatory Care and Diagnostic Centre Department of Health ('the Department') diagnosis and treatment centr...

  8. Deficient crisis-probing practices and taken-for-granted assumptions in health organisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canyon, Deon V.; Adhikari, Ashmita; Cordery, Thomas; Giguère-Simmonds, Philippe; Huang, Jessica; Nguyen, Helen; Watson, Michael; Yang, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The practice of crisis-probing in proactive organisations involves meticulous and sustained investigation into operational processes and management structures for potential weaknesses and flaws before they become difficult to resolve. In health organisations, crisis probing is a necessary part of preparing to manage emerging health threats. This study examined the degree of pre-emptive probing in health organisations and the type of crisis training provided to determine whether or not they are prepared in this area. This evidence-based study draws on cross-sectional responses provided by executives from chiropractic, physiotherapy, and podiatry practices; dental and medical clinics; pharmacies; aged care facilities; and hospitals. The data show a marked lack of mandatory probing and a generalised failure to reward crisis reporting. Crisis prevention training is poor in all organisations except hospitals and aged care facilities where it occurs at an adequate frequency. However this training focuses primarily on natural disasters, fails to address most other crisis types, is mostly reactive and not designed to probe for and uncover key taken-for-granted assumptions. Crisis-probing in health organisations is inadequate, and improvements in this area may well translate into measurable improvements in preparedness and response outcomes. PMID:24149030

  9. The influence of social challenges when implementing information systems in a Swedish health-care organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Lina; Eriksén, Sara; Borg, Christel

    2016-09-01

    To describe and obtain a deeper understanding of social challenges and their influence on the implementation process when implementing Information systems in a Swedish health-care organisation. Despite positive effects when implementing Information systems in health-care organisations, there are difficulties in the implementation process. Nurses' experiences of being neglected have been dismissed as reasons for setbacks in implementation. An Institutional Ethnography design was used. A deductive content analysis was made influenced by empirically identified social challenges of power, professional identity and encounters. An abstraction was made of the analysis. Nineteen nurses at macro, meso and micro levels were interviewed in focus groups. Organisational levels are lost in different ways in how to control the reformation, how to introduce Information systems as reformation strategies and in how to translate new tools and assumptions that do not fit traditional ways of working in shaping professional identities. Different focus may affect the reformation of health-care organisations and implementation and knowledge processes. An implementation climate is needed where the system standards fit the values of the users. Nursing management needs to be visionary, engaged and work with risk factors in order to reform the hierarchical health-care organisation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Identification of World Health Organisation ship's medicine chest contents by Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayebati, Seyed Khorsow; Nittari, Giulio; Mahdi, Syed Sarosh; Ioannidis, Nicholas; Sibilio, Fabio; Amenta, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Ships should carry mandatory given amounts of medicinal products and basic first aid items, collectively known as the ship's medicine chest. Type and quantities of these products/items are suggested by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and regulated by individual flag states. In countries that lack national legislation, it is assumed that ships should follow WHO indications. An objective difficulty mainly involving vessels of international long-haul routes could be to recognise medicinal compounds obtained in other countries for replacing products used or expired. Language barrier may complicate, if not make it impossible to interpret the name of the medicinal product and/or of the active principle as indicated in a box printed in a completely different language. Handling of the ship's pharmacy may be difficult in case of purchasing of drugs abroad due to language barriers. Medicinal products are identified by the international non-proprietary name of the active principle and/or by their chemical or invented (branded) names. This may make the identification of a medicinal product difficult, primarily if it is purchased abroad and the box and instructions are written in the language of the country where it is marketed. Therefore, there is a simpler classification system of the medicinal compounds the ATC (ATC: Anatomy, Therapeutic properties, Chemical, pharmacological properties). This paper has reviewed the list of medicinal products recommended by WHO and assigned to each one the ATC code as a solution to the problem of medicinal compounds organisation. Two researchers independently examined the list of medicinal compounds indicated in the third edition of the International Medical Guide for Ships and attributed to each compound the ATC code according to the 2013 Guidelines for ATC classification and Defined Daily Dose (DDD) assignment. The ATC code was attributed to the medicinal compounds indicated in the third edition of the International Medical Guide for

  11. Organising integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Runo

    2013-01-01

    Background: In Sweden, as in many other countries, there has been a succession of trends in the organisation of health care and other welfare services. These trends have had different implications for the integration of services in the health and welfare system. Aims: One aim is to discuss...... the implications of different organisational trends for the integration of health and welfare services. Another aim is to introduce a Swedish model of financial coordination as a flexible way to organise integration. Organisational trends: In the 1960’s there was an expansion of health and welfare services leading...... an increasing lack of integration in the health and welfare system. In the 2000’s, there has been a re-centralisation through mergers of hospitals, regions and state agencies. It has become clear, however, that mergers do not promote integration but rather increase the bureaucratisation of the system. Model...

  12. Measuring organisational readiness for patient engagement (MORE): an international online Delphi consensus study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostendorp, L.J.; Durand, M.A.; Lloyd, A.; Elwyn, G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Widespread implementation of patient engagement by organisations and clinical teams is not a reality yet. The aim of this study is to develop a measure of organisational readiness for patient engagement designed to monitor and facilitate a healthcare organisation's willingness and

  13. Factors Impacting on Organisational Learning in Three Rural Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Access to quality health care in rural areas may be compromised not only by the inadequate numbers of skilled professional staff, but also by the lack of skills of the health professionals who are employed in rural facilities, due to inadequate continual professional learning and staff development. The objective of ...

  14. 6th International Accounting Congress of Barcelona (1929 organised by the Association of Accountants of Catalonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josepa Alemany

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the work presented is a descriptive, contextual and detailed analysis of the activity, and the conclusions developed in the first international accounting conference held in Barcelona. The 6th International Conference on Accounting which took place in Barcelona coinciding with the International Exhibition of 1929, was organised by the Association Internationale de Comptabilité of Brussels. This association proposed holding regular meetings to discuss and study technical accounting and economic issues related to that time. Approach: the originality of the work lies in being an analytical description of the original documents prepared by the Association of Accountants of Catalonia about the conference. Findings/Originality: this study allows redoing assumptions made in previous works, because the documents before this work were contradictory regarding dates, facts and some of the content covered. Limitations: the biggest limitation of the work comes from the lack of written documentation existing on this conference. Value: the present study continues the research on topics of history of accounting in Catalonia. It is expected to complement this work by a deeper analysis of the contents and the topics covered in the papers presented at the conference, and by linking them with the theoretical accounting lines existing at that time.

  15. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    www.ijhr.org. Abstracting/Indexing. Embase, Index Corpenicus, Chemical Abstracts, ... The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal allowing free unlimited access to ... 2Department of Veterinary Microbiology and.

  16. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The International Journal of Health Research is an online international ... It seeks particularly (but not exclusively) to encourage multidisciplinary research and ... original research papers, reviews, commentaries and case reports on current.

  17. Relationships among Work Life, Mental Health Status and Organisation-based Self-esteem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devin Hassan Fahim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Quality of Work Life (QWL is a multi-dimensional concept that covers employees’ feelings about various dimensions of work. The current study focused on QWL that can contribute to the mental health status and Organisation-Based Self-Esteem (OBSE of employees in context of sport organisation in Iran. In this descriptive–correlative study, data was collected using three standard questionnaires: Goldberg’s (1978 General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12, Pierce, Gardner, Cummings and Dunham's (1989 OBSE scale, and Walton’s (1975 QWL questionnaire. The statistical sample of the study consisted of 67 (53 male, 14 female employees of sport and youth organisations of the Northern Khorasan Province of Iran. The alpha value for mental health, OBSE and QWL questionnaires were, respectively, 0.82, 0.80, 0.79. QWL was significantly correlated with mental health status and self-esteem of employees. Thus, it can be concluded that mental health and self-esteem of employees depend on how these employees perceive QWL in organisations. Among QWL subscales, fair and adequate pay along with growth opportunities were the strongest predictors of mental health; growth opportunities along with development of human capabilities were the strongest predictors of self-esteem of employees. Our study adds to the growing body of research on mental health status in relation to factors such as QWL. In view of our findings, we hope that improving work environment as a means of improving one’s mental health status will be more emphasized by organisation managers.

  18. H.E. Mr Leonid A.Skotnikov Ambassador,PermanentRepresentative of the Russian Federation to the United Nations and other International Organisations in Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    Photo 01: H.E. Mr Leonid A. Skotnikov, Ambassador of the Russian Federation to the United Nations and other International Organisations in Geneva (right) with CERN Director-General, L. Maiani. Photo 02: Mr Leonid A. Skotnikov, Ambassador of the Russian Federation to the United Nations and other International Organisations in Geneva. Photo 03: Mr Leonid A. Skotnikov, Ambassador of the Russian Federation to the United Nations and other International Organisations in Geneva (right) with CERN Director-General, L. Maiani.

  19. Does it matter who organises your health care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dawda, P.; McRae, I.S.; Yen, L.; Islam, M.M.; Bagheri, N.; Jowsey, T.; Banfield, M.; Parkinson, A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As the prevalence of long-term and multimorbid conditions is increasing, patients increasingly require consultations with multiple health care professionals and coordination of their care needs. METHODS: This study is based on a 2011 survey of older Australians which draws on

  20. World Health Organisation Global Programme on AIDS (GPA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This text is an excerpt from the leaflet 'AIDS and youth' prepared for the 1988 WHO World Health Assembly. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More ...

  1. International Students and Mental Health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Helen Forbes-Mewett; Anne-Maree Sawyer

    2016-01-01

    .... Several studies indicate a greater incidence of mental health problems among tertiary students, compared with the general population, and higher levels of anxiety, in particular, among international...

  2. His Excellency Mr Juraj Podhorsky Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Slovak Republic to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Ordan, Julien Marius

    2017-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Juraj Podhorsky Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Slovak Republic to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

  3. His Excellency Mr Ali Naci Koru Ambassador extraordinary and plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of Turkey to the United Nations Office at Geneva and other international organisations in Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Ali Naci Koru Ambassador extraordinary and plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of Turkey to the United Nations Office at Geneva and other international organisations in Switzerland

  4. The medium-term sustainability of organisational innovations in the national health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Graham P; Currie, Graeme; Finn, Rachael; McDonald, Ruth

    2011-03-14

    There is a growing recognition of the importance of introducing new ways of working into the UK's National Health Service (NHS) and other health systems, in order to ensure that patient care is provided as effectively and efficiently as possible. Researchers have examined the challenges of introducing new ways of working--'organisational innovations'--into complex organisations such as the NHS, and this has given rise to a much better understanding of how this takes place--and why seemingly good ideas do not always result in changes in practice. However, there has been less research on the medium- and longer-term outcomes for organisational innovations and on the question of how new ways of working, introduced by frontline clinicians and managers, are sustained and become established in day-to-day practice. Clearly, this question of sustainability is crucial if the gains in patient care that derive from organisational innovations are to be maintained, rather than lost to what the NHS Institute has called the 'improvement-evaporation effect'. The study will involve research in four case-study sites around England, each of which was successful in sustaining its new model of service provision beyond an initial period of pilot funding for new genetics services provided by the Department of Health. Building on findings relating to the introduction and sustainability of these services already gained from an earlier study, the research will use qualitative methods--in-depth interviews, observation of key meetings, and analysis of relevant documents--to understand the longer-term challenges involved in each case and how these were surmounted. The research will provide lessons for those seeking to sustain their own organisational innovations in wide-ranging clinical areas and for those designing the systems and organisations that make up the NHS, to make them more receptive contexts for the sustainment of innovation. Through comparison and contrast across four sites, each

  5. The medium-term sustainability of organisational innovations in the national health service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finn Rachael

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a growing recognition of the importance of introducing new ways of working into the UK's National Health Service (NHS and other health systems, in order to ensure that patient care is provided as effectively and efficiently as possible. Researchers have examined the challenges of introducing new ways of working--'organisational innovations'--into complex organisations such as the NHS, and this has given rise to a much better understanding of how this takes place--and why seemingly good ideas do not always result in changes in practice. However, there has been less research on the medium- and longer-term outcomes for organisational innovations and on the question of how new ways of working, introduced by frontline clinicians and managers, are sustained and become established in day-to-day practice. Clearly, this question of sustainability is crucial if the gains in patient care that derive from organisational innovations are to be maintained, rather than lost to what the NHS Institute has called the 'improvement-evaporation effect'. Methods The study will involve research in four case-study sites around England, each of which was successful in sustaining its new model of service provision beyond an initial period of pilot funding for new genetics services provided by the Department of Health. Building on findings relating to the introduction and sustainability of these services already gained from an earlier study, the research will use qualitative methods--in-depth interviews, observation of key meetings, and analysis of relevant documents--to understand the longer-term challenges involved in each case and how these were surmounted. The research will provide lessons for those seeking to sustain their own organisational innovations in wide-ranging clinical areas and for those designing the systems and organisations that make up the NHS, to make them more receptive contexts for the sustainment of innovation. Discussion

  6. Risk management assessment of Health Maintenance Organisations participating in the National Health Insurance Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Princess Christina; Korie, Patrick Chukwuemeka; Nnaji, Feziechukwu Collins

    2014-09-01

    The National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS), operated majorly in Nigeria by health maintenance organisations (HMOs), took off formally in June 2005. In view of the inherent risks in the operation of any social health insurance, it is necessary to efficiently manage these risks for sustainability of the scheme. Consequently the risk-management strategies deployed by HMOs need regular assessment. This study assessed the risk management in the Nigeria social health insurance scheme among HMOs. Cross-sectional survey of 33 HMOs participating in the NHIS. Utilisation of standard risk-management strategies by the HMOs was 11 (52.6%). The other risk-management strategies not utilised in the NHIS 10 (47.4%) were risk equalisation and reinsurance. As high as 11 (52.4%) of participating HMOs had a weak enrollee base (less than 30,000 and poor monthly premium and these impacted negatively on the HMOs such that a large percentage 12 (54.1%) were unable to meet up with their financial obligations. Most of the HMOs 15 (71.4%) participated in the Millennium development goal (MDG) maternal and child health insurance programme. Weak enrollee base and poor monthly premium predisposed the HMOs to financial risk which impacted negatively on the overall performance in service delivery in the NHIS, further worsened by the non-utilisation of risk equalisation and reinsurance as risk-management strategies in the NHIS. There is need to make the scheme compulsory and introduce risk equalisation and reinsurance.

  7. Adaptive Planning of Staffing Levels in Health Care Organisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulatunga, Harini; Knottenbelt, W. J.; Kadirkamanathan, V.

    This paper presents a new technique to adaptively measure the current performance levels of a health system and based on these decide on optimal resource allocation strategies. Here we address the specific problem of staff scheduling in real-time in order to improve patient satisfaction by dynamically predicting and controlling waiting times by adjusting staffing levels. We consider the cost of operation (which comprises staff cost and penalties for patients waiting in the system) and aim to simultaneously minimise the accumulated cost over a finite time period. A considerable body of research has shown the usefulness of queueing theory in modelling processes and resources in real-world health care situations. This paper will develop a simple queueing model of patients arriving at an Accident and Emergency unit and show how this technique provides a dynamic staff scheduling strategy that optimises the cost of operating the facility.

  8. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    International Journal of ... The journal is devoted to the promotion of health sciences and related ... and evaluation of data, methods and findings in health sciences and related ... study population and was commoner in males (5.9%) than in.

  9. Factors influencing decision making in internal management: evidence from private sector organisations in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Abunar, Malak M.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the award of Doctor of Philosophy and was awarded by Brunel University London Talent management has grown considerably in the last decade as organisations have made it a top priority issue around the world. A shortage of talent has emerged as one of the critical challenges that face organisations worldwide as they seek successful operations on a global scale. This has resulted in anxiety among organisations and thus created pressure on human resource managemen...

  10. The Role of International Non-Governmental Organisations in Promoting Adult Education for Social Change: A Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Lutz; Hickling-Hudson, Anne

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the role of International Non-Governmental Organisations (INGOs) in adult education as one instrument of global civil society to effect social change. Postcolonial theory is utilized to explore the complex relationships between the concepts of "globalisation", "global civil, society", and "adult education for social change". In…

  11. The Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development's International Early Learning Study: Opening for Debate and Contestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Peter; Dahlberg, Gunilla; Grieshaber, Susan; Mantovani, Susanna; May, Helen; Pence, Alan; Rayna, Sylvie; Swadener, Beth Blue; Vandenbroeck, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development is initiating the International Early Learning Study, a cross-national assessment of early learning outcomes involving the testing of 5-year-old children in participating countries. The authors use this colloquium to inform members of the early childhood community about this project and to…

  12. Civil society organisations' roles in health development in Vietnam: HIV as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Tu-Anh

    2013-01-01

    Civil society in contemporary Vietnam has been recognised as an important force in public health. Based on qualitative interviews and observations of 30 organisations and networks in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, this paper argues that civil society organisations (CSOs) focus almost exclusively on providing information and services, including care and treatment, in line with a state-sanctioned 'implementer' role for civil society, and that these organisations therefore miss an opportunity to act as agents for change. It was observed that the CSOs taking on roles involving advocacy and the monitoring of policy implementation were those that focus exclusively on HIV/AIDS prevention and control. However, the sustainability of these efforts is unclear.

  13. Scoping literature review on the Learning Organisation concept as applied to the health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhnif, E; Macq, J; Idrissi Fakhreddine, M O; Meessen, B

    2017-03-01

    ᅟ: There is growing interest in the use of the management concept of a 'learning organisation'. The objective of this review is to explore work undertaken towards the application of this concept to the health sector in general and to reach the goal of universal health coverage in particular. Of interest are the exploration of evaluation frameworks and their application in health. We used a scoping literature review based on the York methodology. We conducted an online search using selected keywords on some of the main databases on health science, selected websites and main reference books on learning organisations. We restricted the focus of our search on sources in the English language only. Inclusive and exclusive criteria were applied to arrive at a final list of articles, from which information was extracted and then selected and inserted in a chart. We identified 263 articles and other documents from our search. From these, 50 articles were selected for a full analysis and 27 articles were used for the summary. The majority of the articles concerned hospital settings (15 articles, 55%). Seven articles (25%) were related to the application of the concept to the health centre setting. Four articles discussed the application of the concept to the health system (14%). Most of the applications involved high-income countries (21 articles, 78%), with only one article being related to a low-income country. We found 13 different frameworks that were applied to different health organisations. The scoping review allowed us to assess applications of the learning organisation concept to the health sector to date. Such applications are still rare, but are increasingly being used. There is no uniform framework thus far, but convergence as for the dimensions that matter is increasing. Many methodological questions remain unanswered. We also identified a gap in terms of the use of this concept in low- and middle-income countries and to the health system as a whole.

  14. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal allowing free unlimited access to abstract and full-text of published ... 1School of Public health, University of Alabama at. Birmingham, USA. 2Georgia Division of ..... retrospective study done in Japan to determine the attributable risk factors to ...

  15. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    elearning

    2008-03-04

    Mar 4, 2008 ... international forum for the communication and evaluation of data, methods and findings in health sciences and related disciplines. ... Submission of Manuscript: The International Journal of Health Research uses a journal management software to allow ..... 00.44E|WHO/CDS/CSR/EDC/2000.9. UNAIDS,.

  16. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal allowing free unlimited access to abstract and full-text of ... forum for the communication and evaluation of data, methods and findings in health sciences and related disciplines. .... vegetable fat, was purchased from a local market in Benin City ...

  17. International Organisations and the Construction of the Learning Active Citizen: An Analysis of Adult Learning Policy Documents from a Durkheimian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, John; Schemmann, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The article analyses how citizenship is conceptualised in policy documents of four key international organisations. The basic assumption is that public policy has not turned away from adult learning for active citizenship, but that there are rather new ways in which international governmental organisations conceptualise and in some cases seek to…

  18. Public Health Events and International Health Regulations

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-06-21

    Dr. Katrin Kohl, a medical officer at the CDC, discusses the World Health Organization’s International Health Regulations for assessing and reporting on public health events across the world.  Created: 6/21/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/21/2012.

  19. Evaluation of the organisation and effectiveness of internal audits to govern patient safety in hospitals: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelderen, Saskia C; Zegers, Marieke; Boeijen, Wilma; Westert, Gert P; Robben, Paul B; Wollersheim, Hub C

    2017-07-10

    Hospital boards are legally responsible for safe healthcare. They need tools to assist them in their task of governing patient safety. Almost every Dutch hospital performs internal audits, but the effectiveness of these audits for hospital governance has never been evaluated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the organisation of internal audits and their effectiveness for hospitals boards to govern patient safety. A mixed-methods study consisting of a questionnaire regarding the organisation of internal audits among all Dutch hospitals (n=89) and interviews with stakeholders regarding the audit process and experienced effectiveness of audits within six hospitals. Response rate of the questionnaire was 76% and 43 interviews were held. In every responding hospital, the internal audits followed the plan-do-check-act cycle. Every hospital used interviews, document analysis and site visits as input for the internal audit. Boards stated that effective aspects of internal audits were their multidisciplinary scope, their structured and in-depth approach, the usability to monitor improvement activities and to change hospital policy and the fact that results were used in meetings with staff and boards of supervisors. The qualitative methods (interviews and site visits) used in internal audits enable the identification of soft signals such as unsafe culture or communication and collaboration problems. Reported disadvantages were the low frequency of internal audits and the absence of soft signals in the actual audit reports. This study shows that internal audits are regarded as effective for patient safety governance, as they help boards to identify patient safety problems, proactively steer patient safety and inform boards of supervisors on the status of patient safety. The description of the Dutch internal audits makes these audits replicable to other healthcare organisations in different settings, enabling hospital boards to complement their systems to govern patient

  20. Identifying organisational principles and management practices important to the quality of health care services for chronic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frølich, Anne

    2012-02-01

    The quality of health care services offered to people suffering from chronic diseases often fails to meet standards in Denmark or internationally. The population consisting of people with chronic diseases is large and accounts for about 70% of total health care expenses. Given that resources are limited, it is necessary to identify efficient methods to improve the quality of care. Comparing health care systems is a well-known method for identifying new knowledge regarding, for instance, organisational methods and principles. Kaiser Permanente (KP), an integrated health care delivery system in the U.S., is recognized as providing high-quality chronic care; to some extent, this is due to KP's implementation of the chronic care model (CCM). This model recommends a range of evidence-based management practices that support the implementation of evidence-based medicine. However, it is not clear which management practices in the CCM are most efficient and in what combinations. In addition, financial incentives and public reporting of performance are often considered effective at improving the quality of health care services, but this has not yet been definitively proved. The aim of this dissertation is to describe the effect of determinants, such as organisational structures and management practices including two selected incentives, on the quality of care in chronic diseases. The dissertation is based on four studies with the following purposes: 1) macro- or healthcare system-level identification of organisational structures and principles that affect the quality of health care services, based on a comparison of KP and the Danish health care system; 2) meso- or organisation-level identification of management practices with positive effects on screening rates for hemoglobin A1c and lipid profile in diabetes; 3) evaluation of the effect of the CCM on quality of health care services and continuity of care in a Danish setting; 4) micro- or practice-level evaluation of the

  1. Network in pediatric rheumatology: the example of pediatric rheumatology international trials organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruperto, N; Martini, A

    2008-03-01

    The pediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD) are rare conditions associated with important sequelae on the quality of life and long term outcome. The research aimed at studying new therapeutic approaches is difficult because of logistic, methodological and ethical problems. To face these problems 2 international networks; the Pediatric Rheumatology Collaborative Study Group (PRCSG) and the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organization (PRINTO) have been founded. The 2 networks have the goal to promote, facilitate and conduct high quality research for the PRD. In particular they have been able to standardize the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus, and juvenile dermatomyositis, to draft clinical remission criteria in JIA, and to provide cross-cultural adapted and validated quality of life instruments like the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire, and the Child Health Questionnaire, into 32 different languages. In this paper we reviewed how the creation of large international trial networks such as PRINTO and PRCSG, the definition of internationally recognized and standardized outcome measures and definitions of improvement, the validation of quality of life instruments, the adoption of adequate legislative measures (pediatric rule), have created the basic premises for the best future assessment of the PRD. This progress now offers children with PRD the same opportunities as adults to be treated with drugs whose safety and efficacy have been assessed through legitimate scientifically valid investigations.

  2. Wide variation in organisation and clinical practice of paediatric intestinal failure teams: an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelis, Esther; de Koning, Barbara; van Winckel, Myriam; Tabbers, Merit; Hill, Susan; Hulst, Jessie

    2017-11-22

    We aimed to assess the current organisation and clinical practice of teams treating children with intestinal failure (IF) across Europe and compare the results with the current guideline. A two-part online survey was sent to all the major European specialist IF services. The first part concerned general information about the team and patients monitored. The second part concerned important care topics such as vascular access and monitoring of complications. No patient identifiers were collected. Seventy-three respondents completed the first part, representing 61 teams in 20 countries. The median number of children on parenteral nutrition (PN) at home per team was 15 (range 1-125). Teams consisted of the following members: paediatric gastroenterologist (present in 100% of the teams), dietitian (95%), specialist nurse (92%), paediatric surgeon (89%), pharmacist (82%), psychologist (66%), social worker (62%), speech therapist (48%), physiotherapist (38%), general paediatrician (33%). The second part was completed by 67/73 respondents (59/61 teams). Vascular access care was comparable with the guideline. Somatostatin analogues were prescribed by 14% of the IF teams and probiotics by 44% of the teams. Prophylactic anticoagulation was used by 46% of the teams. In 81% of the teams a multicomponent lipid emulsion containing fish oil was routinely used. Bone densitometry was regularly performed in 75% of teams, but never performed in 19%. In conclusion, there is a wide diversity of composition of IF teams and their number of patients treated. Overall, there is good compliance to the current guideline. Clinical practice that varied most was the standard use of medication such as probiotics and somatostatin analogues, and standard monitoring of long-term complications. Experience regarding specific treatment options should be shared. Moreover, international agreement on standards of care with focus on implementation of the guideline is needed to optimise care and improve

  3. Readiness to tackle chronicity in Spanish health care organisations: a two-year experience with the Instrumento de Evaluación de Modelos de Atención ante la Cronicidad/Assessment of Readiness for Chronicity in Health Care Organisations instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, José Joaquín; Nuño-Solinís, Roberto; Fernández-Cano, Paloma; Contel, Joan Carlos; Guilabert-Mora, Mercedes; Solas-Gaspar, Olga

    2015-01-01

    The Instrumento de Evaluación de Modelos de Atención ante la Cronicidad/Assessment of Readiness for Chronicity in Health Care Organisations instrument was developed to implement the conceptual framework of the Chronic Care Model in the Spanish national health system. It has been used to assess readiness to tackle chronicity in health care organisations. In this study, we use self-assessments at macro-, meso- and micro-management levels to (a) describe the two-year experience with the Instrumento de Evaluación de Modelos de Atención ante la Cronicidad/Assessment of Readiness for Chronicity in Health Care Organisations tool in Spain and (b) assess the validity and reliability of this instrument. The results from 55 organisational self-assessments were included and described. In addition to that, the internal consistency, reliability and construct validity of Instrumento de Evaluación de Modelos de Atención ante la Cronicidad/Assessment of Readiness for Chronicity in Health Care Organisations were examined using Cronbach's alpha, the Spearman-Brown coefficient and factorial analysis. The obtained scores reflect opportunities for improvement in all dimensions of the instrument. Cronbach's alpha ranged between 0.90 and 0.95 and the Spearman-Brown coefficient ranged between 0.77 and 0.94. All 27 components converged in a second-order factorial solution that explained 53.8% of the total variance, with factorial saturations for the components of between 0.57 and 0.94. Instrumento de Evaluación de Modelos de Atención ante la Cronicidad/Assessment of Readiness for Chronicity in Health Care Organisations is an instrument that allows health care organisations to perform self-assessments regarding their readiness to tackle chronicity and to identify areas for improvement in chronic care.

  4. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The International Journal of Health Research is an online international ... Madonna University, Elele Campus, Rivers State ... Depending on the prevailing social factors such as socio- ... the problems of the disease led to the development of Directly ... and Pharmacy Practice, Faculty ..... Political commitment with increased.

  5. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal allowing free unlimited access to abstract and full-text ... cannot submit online should send their manuscript by e-mail attachment (in single file) to the editorial office below. Submission ..... Schistosoma haematobium: a potential tool for monitoring ...

  6. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2009-12-10

    Dec 10, 2009 ... The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal allowing free unlimited access to abstract and full-text of published ... species and identified by standard procedures. The susceptibility of the isolated .... was Salmonella typhi accounting for 69% of the total isolates, followed by ...

  7. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal allowing free unlimited access to .... synthetic polymers. Natural polymers primarily remain attractive for a number of reasons as they are economical, readily available, capable of modifications, and .... chloride was corrected for sampling effects.

  8. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal allowing free unlimited access to ... interest and relevance. ..... Conflict of Interest. No conflicting interests associated with this work. Contribution of Authors. We declare that this work was done by the author(s) named in this article and all liabilities.

  9. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2008-06-02

    Jun 2, 2008 ... The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal allowing free unlimited access to abstract and full-text of ... Pharmacy Education: University of Benin Experience. Received: 10-May-08 ... Method: In a special ICT class, 165 pharmacy students were introduced to LMS using an ...

  10. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal allowing free unlimited access to abstract and .... surrounding desert area of Choyr City, ... Currently smoking. 33(38.4). Habitual alcohol drinker. 19(21.8). Subjective symptoms n (%). Eye (with symptoms). 42(48.3). Respiratory (with symptoms).

  11. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2008-06-02

    Jun 2, 2008 ... The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal allowing free unlimited access to abstract and full-text of ... disciplines. The journal welcomes original research papers, reviews and case reports on current topics of special ... Chemistry, Faculty of. Pharmacy, University of. Lagos ...

  12. Key elements of high-quality practice organisation in primary health care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossland, Lisa; Janamian, Tina; Jackson, Claire L

    2014-08-04

    To identify elements that are integral to high-quality practice and determine considerations relating to high-quality practice organisation in primary care. A narrative systematic review of published and grey literature. Electronic databases (PubMed, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, Embase, Emerald Insight, PsycInfo, the Primary Health Care Research and Information Service website, Google Scholar) were searched in November 2013 and used to identify articles published in English from 2002 to 2013. Reference lists of included articles were searched for relevant unpublished articles and reports. Data were configured at the study level to allow for the inclusion of findings from a broad range of study types. Ten elements were most often included in the existing organisational assessment tools. A further three elements were identified from an inductive thematic analysis of descriptive articles, and were noted as important considerations in effective quality improvement in primary care settings. Although there are some validated tools available to primary care that identify and build quality, most are single-strategy approaches developed outside health care settings. There are currently no validated organisational improvement tools, designed specifically for primary health care, which combine all elements of practice improvement and whose use does not require extensive external facilitation.

  13. International Conference on Health Informatics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This volume presents the proceedings of the International Conference on Health Informatics (ICHI). The conference was a new special topic conference initiative by the International Federation of Medical and Biological Engineering (IFMBE), held in Vilamoura, Portugal on 7-9 November, 2013. The main theme of the ICHI2013 was “Integrating Information and Communication Technologies with Biomedicine for Global Health”. The proceedings offer a unique forum to examine enabling technologies of sensors, devices and systems that optimize the acquisition, transmission, processing, storage, retrieval of biomedical and health information as well as to report novel clinical applications of health information systems and the deployment of m-Health, e-Health, u-Health, p-Health and Telemedicine.

  14. Administrative stressors and nursing job outcomes in Australian public and non-profit health care organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Stephen T T; Yeung, Melissa; Chang, Esther

    2012-05-01

    The main aim of this study is to develop a path model to examine the effect of administrative stressors on nursing work outcomes in a sample of Australian public and non-profit nurses. The implementation of managerial reform initiatives has negative consequences on work outcomes. However, less is known about the effects of these stressors in public and non-profit health care organisations. An online, self-completion questionnaire was sent to a random sample of nurses, employed in nursing-related occupations. Useable surveys were received from 251 nurses. The path model was analysed using SmartPLS software (SmartPLS, Hamburg, Germany). Public and non-profit nurses experienced time and resource administrative-related stressors (such as resource shortage and pay not as good as other people doing similar work). They relied on work-related social support to reduce the negative consequences. Resource stressors led to job dissatisfaction while time stressors led to psychological strain. Nursing staff who reported better psychological health reported higher job satisfaction and higher level of commitment towards their organisations. Context-specific administrative stressors have a negative impact on the work outcomes of public and non-profit nurses. Work-related social support mechanisms were found to mediate the negative consequences of administrative resourcing stressors on nursing job satisfaction. Nursing managers have to be sympathetic and care for the negative experiences of nursing staff, especially when there is an increasing level of administrative expectations during organisational change. Senior management should take note of the stressors caused by the lack of resources such as information, staffing and resources, as these were found to lead to an increase in nurses seeking work-related social support from their peers and supervisors. Effective implementation of these strategies would lead to a nursing workforce, which has higher level of psychological health

  15. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Their deaths can best be reduced by increasing infant birth weight through addressing women's and maternal health in the preconception and interconception ..... Kakehashi M. An international data analysis on the level of maternal and child health relation to socioeconomic factors. Hiroshima J. Med Sci 2001; 50:9-16.

  16. International Students and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes-Mewett, Helen; Sawyer, Anne-Maree

    2016-01-01

    Since the early 2000s, reports of increased rates of mental ill health among young people worldwide have received much attention. Several studies indicate a greater incidence of mental health problems among tertiary students, compared with the general population, and higher levels of anxiety, in particular, among international students compared…

  17. Occupational stress, organisational commitment and ill-health of employees at a higher education institution in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Coetzee

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to assess the indicators and moderators of occupational stress at a higher education institution in South Africa, as well as differences based on language and years of experience at the institution. A cross-sectional survey design was used. The participants included academic and support staff at a higher education institution (N = 372. An Organisational Stress Screening Tool (ASSET and a biographical questionnaire were administered. Workload, control, work-relationships and pay and benefits were the major occupational stressors in the institution. Compared to the international norm, participants reported higher levels of physical and psychological ill-health and perceived lack of commitment from the organisation. Analysis of variance revealed differences in occupational stress levels for all the biographical variables tested. Organisational commitment moderated the effect of occupational stress on ill-health. Opsomming Die doelstellings van hierdie studie was om die aanwysers en verligtende faktore van beroepstres in ’n hoëronderwysinstansie in Suid-Afrika te identifiseer, asook moontlike verskille gebaseer op taal en jare ervaring by die instansie te bepaal. ’n Dwarsdeursnee-opnameontwerp is gebruik. Die deelnemers het bestaan uit akademiese en ondersteuningspersoneel verbonde aan ’n hoëronderwysinstansie (N = 372. ’n Organisasiestresgraderingsinstrument (ASSET en ’n biografiese vraelys is afgeneem. Oorlading, kontrole, werksverhoudinge en salaris en byvoordele was die vernaamste stressore in die instelling. Vergeleke met die internasionale norm, het deelnemers hoër vlakke van fisieke en psigologiese ongesondheid gerapporteer, en ook ’n gebrek aan verbondenheid komende van die werkgewer ervaar. Variansieanalise het verskille in werkstresvlakke uitgewys vir al die biografiese veranderlikes wat getoets is. Organisasieverbondenheid het die effek van beroepstres op ongesondheid gematig.

  18. The International Partnership in Health Informatics Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, M. W. M.; Gardner, R. M.; Gatewood, L. C.; Haux, R.; Schmidt, D.; Wetter, T.

    2004-01-01

    The International Partnership for Health Informatics Education (IPHIE) seeks to promote education through international collaboration of graduate and undergraduate training programs in Medical and Health Informatics. In 1998 an International Partnership of Health Informatics Education was

  19. [Relationship between organisational structure and worksite health management in the information technology and communications sector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansmann, L; Jung, J; Nitzsche, A; Pfaff, H

    2012-05-01

    Worksite health management (WHM) can positively influence employee health and performance. However, it has not yet been comprehensively implemented in companies. This study aims to identify the role of organisational structures in the implementation of WHM. In this cross-sectional study, data were collected on the companies' WHM and the organisational structure. Out of 522 randomly selected companies within the German information technology and communication (ITC) sector, one managing director for each company was being questioned through telephone interviews. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted. The results of the study reveal that the implementation of WHM is positively correlated with a large company size (OR 2.75; 95%-CI 1.10-6.88) and with the existence of an employee representation (OR 2.48; 95%-CI 1.54-3.98). Other structural characteristics, such as the employment of a company physician, the percentage of temporary workers as well as the staff's age and sex distribution do not seem to have a significant impact on the implementation of WHM. The results indicate that the implementation of WHM can only be explained to a certain degree by organisational structures. However, the findings highlight the fact that companies with few structural resources are in particular need of tailored support when implementing WHM. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Recovery, non-profit organisations and mental health services: 'Hit and miss' or 'dump and run'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungerford, Catherine; Hungerford, Alice; Fox, Cathy; Cleary, Michelle

    2016-03-08

    The evolution of Recovery-oriented mental health services in Western nations across the globe has given rise to a growth in community-based psychosocial support services, to assist in meeting the diverse needs of consumers. This article reports findings of research that explored the perceptions of community workers who are employed by non-profit organisations and deliver psychosocial support services to support delivery of Recovery-oriented clinical mental health services. The focus of the research reported in this article includes the benefits and challenges encountered by the community workers when working with clinicians. The research was undertaken as part of a single-case embedded study, which evaluated the implementation of Recovery-oriented approaches to the delivery of clinical mental health services in a major urban centre located in south-eastern Australia. Generally, community workers employed by the non-profit organisations perceived the implementation of Recovery-oriented clinical mental health services to be a positive step forward for consumers. Challenges to the delivery of Recovery-oriented services included issues arising from the many different understandings of what it means to experience mental health Recovery, the quality of communication between the community workers and clinicians and the clinicians' lack of understanding of the role of non-profit organisations and community workers. The article concludes with recommendations to address the challenges involved, with a view to improving the partnerships between community workers and clinicians, and the Recovery journey of people with serious mental illness. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. How much of Toyota's philosophy is embedded in health care at the organisational level? A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antierens, Alain; Beeckman, Dimitri; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Myny, Dries; Van Hecke, Ann

    2018-01-22

    Identify which of Toyota's principles are reported in health care institutions at the organisational level and to identify the type of reported outcomes related to the effectiveness of lean production reported in these studies. No scientific research has been conducted to determine which of Toyota's principles are embedded in health care systems. This knowledge is needed to perform targeted adjustments in health care. Sixty studies were identified for the final analysis. Some Toyota Way principles appear more deeply embedded in health care institutions than others are. Not all principles of Toyota's philosophy and production system were embedded in the studies in this review. The type of reported outcomes at the organisational level was diverse. This literature review increases our knowledge about how many (and which) of the Toyota Way principles are embedded in health care. This knowledge may support reflection by nursing managers about how the full range of lean management principles could be embedded at the managerial and/or operational level. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Introducing peer worker roles into UK mental health service teams: a qualitative analysis of the organisational benefits and challenges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gillard, Steve G; Edwards, Christine; Gibson, Sarah L; Owen, Katherine; Wright, Christine

    2013-01-01

    .... In this paper we seek to address a gap in the empirical literature in understanding the organisational challenges and benefits of introducing Peer Worker roles into mental health service teams...

  3. Students Educating Students: Insights from Organising an International, Interdisciplinary Conference on Surveillance and Policing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viteri, Maria-Amelia; Tobler, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    This article illustrates the multiple ways in which anthropology graduate students crossed the boundaries of educational discourses by encouraging themselves, other students, activists and community leaders to speak in dialogical contexts (Giroux 2005: 73). They did this through the organisation of the Interrogating Diversity Conference. The…

  4. [Internal medicine and public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    A special Committee on Internal Medicine and Public Health was established by Sociedad Médica de Santiago (Chilean Society of Internal Medicine) in April 2007 with the duty to write a Consensus Paper on the interaction between both branches of medical profession. The main objective was to find the common grounds on which to construct a positive approach to regain space for Internal Medicine, based on prevalent epidemiológical features related to adult health issues. The authors describe the reasons to explain the gap between clinical medicine and population health and identify the nature and evolution of chronic diseases as the point of encounter between both. With Chilean health surveys data, they state that chronic diseases explain the high proportion of burden of disease, mortality and disability, and stress that by the year 2025 one in every five inhabitants will be over 65 years of age, with ageing as another main problem for the health care sector. Population with multiple risks and multimorbidity is the most important challenge for the Chilean Health Care System. A new model of care is needed to tackle this scenario with new skills regarding psychosocial determinants of health. The leading role of internists and ideally geriatricians, will be crucial in this process and will help the implementation of sound population based interventions. Both individual and community level interventions will help to improve quality of life of Chilean families.

  5. What are the key organisational capabilities that facilitate research use in public health policy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckel Schneider, Carmen; Campbell, Danielle; Milat, Andrew; Haynes, Abby; Quinn, Emma

    2014-11-28

    Literature about research use suggests that certain characteristics or capabilities may make policy agencies more evidence attuned. This study sought to determine policy makers' perceptions of a suite of organisational capabilities identified from the literature as potentially facilitating research uptake in policy decision making. A literature scan identified eight key organisational capabilities that support research use in policy making. To determine whether these capabilities were relevant, practical and applicable in real world policy settings, nine Australian health policy makers were consulted in September 2011. We used an open-ended questionnaire asking what facilitates the use of research in policy and program decision making, followed by specific questions rating the proposed capabilities. Interviews were transcribed and the content analysed. There was general agreement that the capabilities identified from the literature were relevant to real world contexts. However, interviewees varied in whether they could provide examples of experiences with the capabilities, how essential they considered the different capabilities to be and how difficult they considered the capabilities were to achieve. Efforts to improve the use of research in policy decision making are likely to benefit from targeting multiple organisational capabilities, including staff skills and competence, tools such as templates and checklists to aid evidence use and leadership support for the use of research in policy development. However, such efforts should be guided by an understanding of how policy agencies use evidence and how they view their roles, and external factors such as resource constraints and availability of appropriate research.

  6. Global health, international health and public health: which relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, A; Civitelli, G; Marceca, M

    2012-01-01

    The international scientific community has recently seen a growing debate on global health, and what similarities exist between this, public health and international health. Going through the definitions of global health found in the literature, we will highlight points of contact and differences, and discuss the definition of global health provided by the Italian Network Global Health Education. Finally, we will stress the need to incorporate the global health approach in the training of future medical doctors,in particular public health specialists, with the aim of providing current and future health professionals with the skills to deal with the challenges posed by globalization at the local level.

  7. Development of the organisational health literacy responsiveness (Org-HLR) framework in collaboration with health and social services professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trezona, Anita; Dodson, Sarity; Osborne, Richard H

    2017-08-01

    The health literacy skills required by individuals to interact effectively with health services depends on the complexity of those services, and the demands they place on people. Public health and social service organisations have a responsibility to provide services and information in ways that promote equitable access and engagement, that are responsive to diverse needs and preferences, and support people to participate in decisions regarding their health and wellbeing. The aim of this study was to develop a conceptual framework describing the characteristics of health literacy responsive organisations. Concept mapping (CM) workshops with six groups of professionals (total N = 42) from across health and social services sectors were undertaken. An online concept mapping consultation with 153 professionals was also conducted. In these CM activities, participants responded to the seeding statement "Thinking broadly from your experiences of working in the health system, what does an organisation need to have or do in order to enable communities and community members to fully engage with information and services to promote and maintain health and wellbeing". The CM data were analysed using multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analyses to derive concept maps and cluster tree diagrams. Clusters from the CM processes were then integrated by identifying themes and subthemes across tree diagrams. Across the workshops, 373 statements were generated in response to the seeding statement. An additional 1206 statements were generated in the online consultation. 84 clusters were derived within the workshops and 20 from the online consultation. Seven domains of health literacy responsiveness were identified; i) External policy and funding environment; ii) Leadership and culture; iii) Systems, processes and policies; iv) Access to services and programs; v) Community engagement and partnerships; vi) Communication practices and standards; and vii) Workforce. Each

  8. Organisationally relevant variables and Keyes's Mental Health Continuum Scale: An exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Deo J.W. Strümpfer; Anneli Hardy; Joan S. de Villiers; Susan Rigby

    2009-01-01

    In an exploratory study on a sample of convenience (n = 165), 11 self-report variables with presumed organisational  relevance were  related,  as  predictors,  to  the  three  subscores  and  summed  score of  the Keyes  (2005a, 2005b; 2007) Mental Health Continuum  scale  (long  form). Keyes's  scale was administered five to seven days after the first set of scales. The predictor scores were reduced to three factorial scores, labelled positive orientation, negative orientation and positive s...

  9. His Excellency Mr Zbigniew Czech, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Republic of Poland to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Ordan, Julien Marius

    2018-01-01

    Visit of His Excellency Mr Zbigniew Czech, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Republic of Poland to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

  10. His Excellency Mr Yusuf Abdulkarim Bucheeri Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of Bahrain to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Ordan, Julien Marius

    2018-01-01

    Visit of His Excellency Mr Yusuf Abdulkarim Bucheeri Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of Bahrain to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

  11. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Submission of Manuscript: The International Journal of Health Research uses a journal management software to .... stomach wall receptor site bioavailability and increases the efficacy of drugs to reduce acid secretion.6. Suitable Drug Candidates for Gas- troretention. Various ... Positive results were obtained in preclinical.

  12. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Submission of Manuscript: The International Journal of Health Research uses a journal management software to allow authors track the changes to their submission. All manuscripts must be in ... ingredients (API) with excellent physicochemical stability in comparison to some other dosage forms, and also provide means of ...

  13. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2008-06-16

    Jun 16, 2008 ... online should send their manuscript by e-mail attachment (in single file) to the editorial office below. Submission ... The Editorial Office. International Journal of Health Research. Dean's Office, College of Medicine. Madonna University, Elele Campus, River State .... rights” checklist: (1) the right drug, (2) the.

  14. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    collaboration among scientists, the industry and the healthcare professionals. It will also provide an international forum for the communication and evaluation of data, methods and findings in health sciences and related disciplines. The journal welcomes original research papers, reviews and case reports on current topics of ...

  15. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Submission of Manuscript: The International Journal of Health Research uses a journal management software to ... membrane by the application of an externally .... Table 1: Solubility and partition coefficients of glibenclamide in ethanol: PB binary systems. Partition coefficients. Composition of donor system (ethanol: PB).

  16. [An economic organisation analysis of the need for the exchange of information between the European health systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainzinger, F; Brüggenjürgen, B; Willich, S N

    2009-02-01

    Demographic development and technological progress are rapidly changing the existing health systems in Europe. As a result, increasingly more complex and heterogeneous structures are emerging, which clearly differ in each of the European member state. From a company's point of view these continuously changing frameworks are leading to an increasing non-transparency regarding the structures and processes within the healthcare systems themselves. The goal is to design a suitable solution to overcome the obstacles within the information exchange process between the individual European health systems. Theoretic-deductive analysis was used for the design of an organisational structure that enables information transparency between the individual European health systems. Incorporation of an economic perspective was implemented under consideration of the theory for the building of the new institutional economics. The operational organisation analysis proves that the matrix project organisation with a function- and project-related decision system is the theoretically optimal organisational form. The organisation model derived from the theoretical analysis offers an organisation variant that guarantees an optimal processing of tasks pertaining to European health systems. This could result in the closing of an existing supply gap in the knowledge market for health systems. The evaluation of enterprise practice and the comparison with existing departments in enterprises can be explored in further research work.

  17. Organisational and Infrastructure Prerequisites of Creation of an International Logistic Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Tarnavska Nataliya P.; Syvak Roman B.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the article lies in the study of organisational and infrastructure prerequisites of creation and functioning of integration structures capable, on the basis of logistics, of assisting subjects of economy in structuring and optimisation of material flows and also accompanying financial and information flows. In the result of the study the article identifies irregularities of the transition of national economies to new models of development and prospects of development of logistic p...

  18. Organisational downsizing and work stress: testing synergistic health effects in employed men and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragano, N.; Verde, P. E.; Siegrist, J.

    2005-01-01

    Study objective: To systematically study the separate and combined effects of organisational downsizing and work related stress on a measure of health in "survivors of layoffs". Design: Using Rothman's approach, separate and combined effects of the two exposures in estimating the risk of poor self rated health (work related symptoms) are analysed in a large sample of male and female employees. Setting: 0.1% cross sectional sample of the German working population. Participants: 12 240 men and 10 319 women, aged 16 to 59 years, surveyed in 1998–1999. Main results: Compared with the reference group, the group of participants who were simultaneously exposed to downsizing and work related stress (effort-reward imbalance) exhibited odds ratios (OR) of three or more work related symptoms that were by far higher (OR 4.41 in men and OR 5.37 in women) than those associated with single exposures. Altogether 21% (men) and 31% (women) of the effect size of the combined exposure was attributable to synergistic interaction. Conclusion: Although reduced health associated with organisational downsizing is partly attributable to an increase in work related stress these findings show an additional synergy effect produced by the combined exposure to both conditions. PMID:16020648

  19. Response to the Ebola epidemics in Guinea: Public Health Organisational issues and possible solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierno Baldé

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Because of its magnitude and changing dynamics, the Ebola epidemics currently affecting some West African countries constitutes one of the most serious public health problems in recent decades. Conceptualised as a case study with two levels of analysis, this article aims at analysing the response to the Ebola epidemics in Guinea in order to ultimately highlight the public health organisational issues related to this response and to propose some possible solutions to improve the efficiency of this response. This article is based on documentary analysis, observation and a three month participating immersion conducted in Guinea from June 2014 to August 2014. Using certain elements of Parsons’ social action theory, this study has shown the existence of 4 systems of social intervention in the organisation and management of the response to the Ebola epidemics in Guinea. They are the WHO, MSF, the Red Cross and the Ministry of Health. Each of these systems of social intervention has specific characteristics and specificities and interacts actively at several levels of the healthsystem of Guinea. Having completed the analysis of the interventions undertaken by these 4 systems of social action, and using the conceptual basis of the complexity theory, we propose some avenues for reflection and action for improving the quality of the response to the Ebola epidemics in Guinea, in order to finally restrain and stop its propagation in other African countries and other continents.

  20. 22nd August 2011 - Permanent Representative of Georgia to the United Nations Office and other International Organisations in Geneva Ambassador Z. Tchiaberashvili, signing the guest book with CERN Head of International Relations F. Pauss. Deputy Permanent Representative witnessing.

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Jeannet

    2011-01-01

    22nd August 2011 - Permanent Representative of Georgia to the United Nations Office and other International Organisations in Geneva Ambassador Z. Tchiaberashvili, signing the guest book with CERN Head of International Relations F. Pauss. Deputy Permanent Representative witnessing.

  1. H.E. Mr Leonid A. Skotnikov, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of the Russian Federation to the United Nations and other International Organisations in Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Photo 01: H.E. Mr Leonid A. Skotnikov, Ambassador of the Russian Federation to the United Nations and other International Organisations in Geneva (centre) with (from left to right) V. Kaftanov, Ph. Bloch, N. Koulberg, F. Grishaev Photo 02: H.E. Mr Leonid A. Skotnikov, Ambassador of the Russian Federation to the United Nations and other International Organisations in Geneva (centre) with Ph. Bloch (behind the Ambassador, V. Kaftanov) visiting the crystal laboratory in building 27.

  2. H.E. Mr Leonid A. Skotnikov, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of the Russian Federation to the United Nations and other International Organisations in Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    Photo 01: H.E. Mr Leonid A. Skotnikov, Ambassador of the Russian Federation to the United Nations and other International Organisations in Geneva (centre) with (from left to right) F. Grishaev, Adviser, Mission of the Russian Federation and R. Cashmore. Photo 02: H.E. Mr Leonid A. Skotnikov, Ambassador of the Russian Federation to the United Nations and other International Organisations in Geneva (right) with F. Grishaev, Adviser, Mission of the Russian Federation.

  3. eSimulation: A novel approach to enhancing cultural competence within a health care organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Astrid; Woodland, Lisa; Brunero, Scott

    2015-05-01

    The need for Australian health care organisations to deliver culturally competent and safe care to its increasingly diverse population provided the impetus for the development of an interactive eSimulation module "Communicating with Patients from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Backgrounds, Case Study: Ms Shu Fen Chen". This article discusses the rationale, development and implementation of the module. Feedback from sixty nurses and allied health professionals indicated the module was highly engaging and had a positive impact on learners' confidence, knowledge and clinical practice. It is concluded that eSimulation modules can contribute to the uptake of cultural competency training and create a foundation for further initiatives to enhance the provision of culturally competent health care. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. "International workshop on socio-economic impacts of genetically modified crops co-organised by JRC-IPTS and FAO"

    OpenAIRE

    LUSSER MARIA; Raney, Terri; TILLIE PASCAL; DILLEN KOEN; Rodriguez Cerezo, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    This JRC Scientific and Technical report provides proceedings of the "International workshop on socio-economic impacts of genetically modified (GM) crops" which was co-organised by JRC-IPTS and FAO in Seville on 23-24 November 2011. JRC-IPTS has been requested to review for policy makers the main findings of scientists active in this field world-wide in co-operation with FAO. The objective of this workshop, which was directed at socio-economic experts from the Competent Authorities of the...

  5. The challenges to performance and sustaining mutual health organisations/health institutions: an exploratory study in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adomah-Afari, Augustine

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore challenges to the performance and sustainability of mutual health organisations (MHOs) and health institutions towards enhancing access to quality health care (HC) in Ghana. Data were gathered through interviews and documentary review. Problems with late release of reimbursement funds for discharging with claims by the central government has impacted heavily on the financial and strategic management and decision-making processes of the MHOs and health institutions. The lack of in-depth analysis of the financial viability of the MHOs; and the limited number of schemes selected. Recommends the need to ensure prompt release of reimbursement funds by government to enable the MHOs to reimburse claims to health institutions. There is a perceived tension between the MHOs and HC institutions due to late release of reimbursement funds by the government. Contributes to understanding of how the NHI Act influences the operations of MHOs and health institutions towards increasing access to quality HC and financing.

  6. An empirically-derived approach for investigating Health Information Technology: the Elementally Entangled Organisational Communication (EEOC framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiou Andrew

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the Elementally Entangled Organisational Communication (EEOC framework by drawing on a set of three case studies which assessed the impact of new Health Information Technology (HIT on a pathology service. The EEOC framework was empirically developed as a tool to tackle organisational communication challenges in the implementation and evaluation of health information systems. Methods The framework was synthesised from multiple research studies undertaken across a major metropolitan hospital pathology service during the period 2005 to 2008. These studies evaluated the impact of new HIT systems in pathology departments (Laboratory Information System and an Emergency Department (Computerised Provider Order Entry located in Sydney, Australia. Results Key dimensions of EEOC are illustrated by the following case studies: 1 the communication infrastructure between the Blood Bank and the ward for the coordination and distribution of blood products; 2 the organisational environment in the Clinical Chemistry and Haematology departments and their attempts to organise, plan and control the processing of laboratory specimens; and 3 the temporal make up of the organisation as revealed in changes to the way the Central Specimen Reception allocated, sequenced and synchronised work tasks. Conclusions The case studies not only highlight the pre-existing communication architecture within the organisation but also the constitutive role communication plays in the way organisations go about addressing their requirements. HIT implementation involves a mutual transformation of the organisation and the technology. This is a vital consideration because of the dangers associated with poor organisational planning and implementation of HIT, and the potential for unintended adverse consequences, workarounds and risks to the quality and safety of patient care. The EEOC framework aims to account for the complex

  7. An empirically-derived approach for investigating Health Information Technology: the Elementally Entangled Organisational Communication (EEOC) framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna I; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2012-07-12

    The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the Elementally Entangled Organisational Communication (EEOC) framework by drawing on a set of three case studies which assessed the impact of new Health Information Technology (HIT) on a pathology service. The EEOC framework was empirically developed as a tool to tackle organisational communication challenges in the implementation and evaluation of health information systems. The framework was synthesised from multiple research studies undertaken across a major metropolitan hospital pathology service during the period 2005 to 2008. These studies evaluated the impact of new HIT systems in pathology departments (Laboratory Information System) and an Emergency Department (Computerised Provider Order Entry) located in Sydney, Australia. Key dimensions of EEOC are illustrated by the following case studies: 1) the communication infrastructure between the Blood Bank and the ward for the coordination and distribution of blood products; 2) the organisational environment in the Clinical Chemistry and Haematology departments and their attempts to organise, plan and control the processing of laboratory specimens; and 3) the temporal make up of the organisation as revealed in changes to the way the Central Specimen Reception allocated, sequenced and synchronised work tasks. The case studies not only highlight the pre-existing communication architecture within the organisation but also the constitutive role communication plays in the way organisations go about addressing their requirements. HIT implementation involves a mutual transformation of the organisation and the technology. This is a vital consideration because of the dangers associated with poor organisational planning and implementation of HIT, and the potential for unintended adverse consequences, workarounds and risks to the quality and safety of patient care. The EEOC framework aims to account for the complex range of contextual factors and triggers that play a role in the

  8. The Perceived Differences in Interdepartmental Communication Regarding Organisational Formalisation: a Case Study of an International Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruvli Elena

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to study differences in communication between two cultures that are believed to belong to a low-context pole and represent “old“ and “new“ European. It is achieved in the context of the German-based MNE by investigation of the perceived differences between Estonian and Bavarian-based production units. An exploratory qualitative case study with ethnographic techniques proved that the reason for dysfunctional outcomes originated in how knowledge of norms was transferred and in differences in cultural orientations. It concludes that prior to organisational learning and development activities MNE managers should get training in intercultural communication

  9. Models of inter professional working for older people living at home: a survey and review of the local strategies of english health and social care statutory organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodman Claire

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most services provided by health and social care organisations for older people living at home rely on interprofessional working (IPW. Although there is research investigating what supports and inhibits how professionals work together, less is known about how different service models deliver care to older people and how effectiveness is measured. The aim of this study was to describe how IPW for older people living at home is delivered, enacted and evaluated in England. Method An online survey of health and social care managers across England directly involved in providing services to older people, and a review of local strategies for older people services produced by primary care organisations and local government adult services organisations in England. Results The online survey achieved a 31% response rate and search strategies identified 50 local strategies that addressed IPW for older people living at home across health and social care organisations. IPW definitions varied, but there was an internal consistency of language informed by budgeting and organisation specific definitions of IPW. Community Services for Older People, Intermediate Care and Re-enablement (rehabilitation Teams were the services most frequently identified as involving IPW. Other IPW services identified were problem or disease specific and reflected issues highlighted in local strategies. There was limited agreement about what interventions or strategies supported the process of IPW. Older people and their carers were not reported to be involved in the evaluation of the services they received and it was unclear how organisations and managers judged the effectiveness of IPW, particularly for services that had an open-ended commitment to the care of older people. Conclusion Health and social care organisations and their managers recognise the value and importance of IPW. There is a theoretical literature on what supports IPW and what it can achieve

  10. Models of inter professional working for older people living at home: a survey and review of the local strategies of English health and social care statutory organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Claire; Drennan, Vari; Scheibl, Fiona; Shah, Dhrushita; Manthorpe, Jill; Gage, Heather; Iliffe, Steve

    2011-12-14

    Most services provided by health and social care organisations for older people living at home rely on interprofessional working (IPW). Although there is research investigating what supports and inhibits how professionals work together, less is known about how different service models deliver care to older people and how effectiveness is measured. The aim of this study was to describe how IPW for older people living at home is delivered, enacted and evaluated in England. An online survey of health and social care managers across England directly involved in providing services to older people, and a review of local strategies for older people services produced by primary care organisations and local government adult services organisations in England. The online survey achieved a 31% response rate and search strategies identified 50 local strategies that addressed IPW for older people living at home across health and social care organisations. IPW definitions varied, but there was an internal consistency of language informed by budgeting and organisation specific definitions of IPW. Community Services for Older People, Intermediate Care and Re-enablement (rehabilitation) Teams were the services most frequently identified as involving IPW. Other IPW services identified were problem or disease specific and reflected issues highlighted in local strategies. There was limited agreement about what interventions or strategies supported the process of IPW. Older people and their carers were not reported to be involved in the evaluation of the services they received and it was unclear how organisations and managers judged the effectiveness of IPW, particularly for services that had an open-ended commitment to the care of older people. Health and social care organisations and their managers recognise the value and importance of IPW. There is a theoretical literature on what supports IPW and what it can achieve. The need for precision may not be so necessary for the terms used

  11. [Subtainable health promotion via organisational development--a model project for teachers in professional training schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, L; Nieskens, B; Bräuer, H; Sieland, B

    2005-02-01

    The goal of this project is the development, implementation and evaluation of a concept designed for sustainable health promotion among occupational and trade school teachers. We assume that for sustainable health promotion -- along with a behavioral prevention program -- a change is necessary in the structure, as well as, the working and communication processes within schools. The realization of early teacher participation and self regulated cooperative groups initiates comprehensive and goal-oriented developmental processes in the project schools. The organizational development process was accomplished in the following way: At the beginning we conducted a diagnosis of school-specific and individual health risks and the resources available to the project schools. The results were reported for both the individual and for the teacher group. This was intended to clarify the potential for improvement and, thus, strengthen the teachers' motivation toward processes of change. Following the diagnosis, the teachers chose areas of stress-related strain and then worked in groups to develop and implement behaviour and working condition-oriented intervention strategies for health promotion. The diagnosis results confirm the necessity of school-specific health promotion: the schools demonstrate very different demand and resource profiles. Furthermore, is has become evident that the central success factor for health promotion in schools is the teachers' willingness for change. The individual and group reports of the diagnosis results seem to have made clear how essential individual and organisational changes are.

  12. Summary of the SWOT panel's evaluation of the organisation and financing of the Danish health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Terkel

    2002-02-01

    The organisation and financing of the Danish health care system was evaluated within a framework of a SWOT analysis (analysis of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) by a panel of five members with a background in health economics. This paper systematically summarises the panel's assessments, within the framework of the triangular model of health care. The members of the panel are in agreement on a number of aspects, while their views on other aspects differ. In general they find many strength in the way the system is organised and financed more so in the primary sector than in the hospital sector.

  13. International health law : an emerging field of public international law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toebes, Brigit

    This article discusses the nature and scope of international health law as an emerging field of public international law. It is argued that the protection of health reflects a pressing social need that should now be spoken of in the vocabulary of international law. Furthermore, there is an urgent

  14. THE ROLE OF NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANISATIONS IN CREATING STANDARDS IN INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Maria HANCIU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The participation and influence of non-governmental actors in areas of international environmental governance has increased tremendously over the last decades. Some of these non-governmental organization (NGOs, like International Union for Conservation of Nature, World Wide Fund for Nature or Greenpeace, have a global character and an intense activity in promoting environmental protection. Of great importance is the fact that some NGOs have gained a consultative status in international and regional organizations influencing the process of drafting and adopting norms of international environmental law. The study analyses the contribution of NGOs in international environmental field and their essential role as ,,guardians of the environment” in promoting and respecting the provisions of international environmental agreements, in particular of Aarhus Convention.

  15. Collaboration between a Child Telephone Helpline and Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights Organisations in Senegal: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flink, Ilse Johanna Elisabeth; Mbaye, Solange Marie Odile; Diouf, Simon Richard Baye; Baumgartner, Sophie; Okur, Pinar

    2018-01-01

    This study identifies lessons learned from a collaboration between a child telephone helpline and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) organisations in Senegal established in the context of an SRHR programme for young people. We assessed how helpline operators are equipped to address sexual health and rights issues with young people,…

  16. The contribution of community leadership upon the performance of mutual health organisations in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adomah-Afari, Augustine

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of social dynamics on the performance of mutual health organisations (MHOs) exploring the influence of community wealth and community leadership on policy implementation. Four operating district mutual health insurance schemes were selected using geographical locations, among other criteria, as case studies. Data were gathered through interviews and documentary review. The findings were analysed using community field and social capital theories. Traditional leaders like the Chiefs serve as the pivot around which social and human capital of the communities revolve in the developmental process of the country. Lack of exhaustive examination of the financial and institutional viability issues of the MHOs. Future studies could assess the interplay between financial, institutional and social viability models when measuring the financial and overall sustainability of MHOs. Health policy makers need to involve traditional leaders in the formulation and implementation of national policies since their acceptance or rejection of central government policy could have negative consequences. Ghana is a dynamic country and there is the need to utilise existing social networks: inter-family and inter-tribal relationships to ensure the viability of MHOs. There is and can be a successful interplay between public sector funding and community sector revenue mobilisation for financing the health sector in Ghana. This justifies the complementarity between government funding and community's resource mobilisation efforts in the health sector.

  17. When big isn't beautiful: lessons from England and Scotland on primary health care organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, James A

    2011-08-15

    United Kingdom primary care trusts resembled the primary health care organisations (PHCOs) that have been proposed for Australia--for example, Medicare Locals. They resulted in a loss of innovation, creativity, motivation and morale among general practitioners and other front-line staff. English primary care trusts are being abolished and £80 billion will be handed over to GP commissioners. Management theory and practical experience shows repeatedly the dangers of reorganising into larger units. Lessons for Australia are to defer deciding on the size of PHCOs until their purposes are clear, to enshrine the principle of subsidiarity, and to opt for networking of the current Divisions of General Practice over mergers. So far, debate on the functions and structures of PHCOs has been muted. It is now time for vigorous debate.

  18. Organisationally relevant variables and Keyes's Mental Health Continuum Scale: An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deo J.W. Strümpfer

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In an exploratory study on a sample of convenience (n = 165, 11 self-report variables with presumed organisational  relevance were  related,  as  predictors,  to  the  three  subscores  and  summed  score of  the Keyes  (2005a, 2005b; 2007 Mental Health Continuum  scale  (long  form. Keyes's  scale was administered five to seven days after the first set of scales. The predictor scores were reduced to three factorial scores, labelled positive orientation, negative orientation and positive striving. When classified thus, the predictor variables showed significant and meaningful relationships with some or all of the Keyes subscores and the total score, although few reached medium effect sizes.

  19. Clinics and home-based care organisations: an interface between theformal and informal health sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boros, Adam Kenneth

    2010-12-01

    The article outlines the findings of a study designed to explore the working relationship between home-based caregivers and clinic nurses at locations in two informal settlements in Johannesburg, South Africa. By considering the views and experiences of both sponsored and unsponsored caregivers, the research focused on how degrees of informality affect this relationship. The nurse/caregiver relationship represents a primary interface between the formal and informal health sectors and is an important part of the country's primary healthcare system. Despite the attention given to linking home-based care (HBC) with the formal health system, very little research has examined the functionality of this link at the ground level. Through a number of qualitative, semi-structured interviews with nurses, home-based caregivers, and staff from the Department of Health, information was collected to better understand what systems are in place to facilitate the relationship between clinics and HBC organisations, and whether these systems are helping to create the desired results. Do the formal and informal health sectors complement and strengthen or do they distract and damage each other? By examining the influence of degrees of informality, the research also lends insight into how this distinction plays a role in healthcare provision. For instance, how does state support impact the link between the formal and informal health sectors and the ultimate quality of care? And what steps can be taken to improve the health system in this regard, as a whole? The findings point to a number of problems and challenges with integrating HBC into the formal health sector. Degrees of informality are found to have a profound impact on the work of home-based caregivers in some respects, but a surprising lack of impact in others. These issues need to be confronted in order to improve the existing system and, ultimately, health outcomes in South Africa.

  20. The scientific rationale for the World Organisation for Animal Health standards and recommendations on avian influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasick, J; Kahn, S

    2014-12-01

    The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) prescribes standards for the diagnosis and control of avian influenza, as well as health measures for safe trade in birds and avian products, which are based on up-to-date scientific information and risk management principles, consistent with the role of the OIE as a reference standard-setting body for the World Trade Organization (WTO). These standards and recommendations continue to evolve, reflecting advances in technology and scientific understanding of this important zoonotic disease. The avian influenza viruses form part of the natural ecosystem by virtue of their ubiquitous presence in wild aquatic birds, a fact that human intervention cannot change. For the purposes of the Terrestrial Animal Health Code (Terrestrial Code), avian influenza is defined as an infection of poultry. However, the scope of the OIE standards and recommendations is not restricted to poultry, covering the diagnosis, early detection and management of avian influenza, including sanitary measures for trade in birds and avian products. The best way to manage avian influenza-associated risks to human and animal health is for countries to conduct surveillance using recommended methods, to report results in a consistent and transparent manner, and to applythe sanitary measures described in the Terrestrial Code. Surveillance for and timely reporting of avian influenza in accordance with OIE standards enable the distribution of relevant, up-to-date information to the global community.

  1. Female leaders in an international evangelical mission organisation: an empirical study of Youth With A Mission in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.A.S. Hornstra-Fuchs

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Evangelicals are frequently perceived as conservative, for instance in their perspective on women. There is indeed a widespread evangelical hierarchical or complementarian theological view which objects to women in church leadership. There is, however, a growing egalitarian counter position, sometimes also referred to as “evangelical feminism”, which supports female leadership. This article concentrates on the international missionary organisation Youth With A Mission (YWAM, which clearly endorses female leaders in formal statements. In YWAM Germany, however, women are under-represented in leadership positions. The article seeks to explain this under-representation, especially in terms of the role played by Scripture. By means of interviews with leaders in YWAM Germany, possible answers were explored. Surprisingly, for an evangelical organisation, the interpretation of Scripture proved not to be a significant factor. Factors that do play a role are church background, the lack of female role models, lower self-confidence of women, family responsibilities, and the role of incumbent leadership. The latter appears to be the most crucial factor, since the incumbent leaders, who mostly are men, select and appoint new leaders. It is likely that in this they are influenced by stereotypical conceptions of the leader as male and are inclined to appoint leaders similar to themselves.

  2. How Does Organisational Literacy Impact Access to Health Care for Homeless Individuals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Naomi Rebecca

    2017-03-01

    This article describes a study that examined the experiences of 27 individuals who frequented an Open Access homeless shelter in Toronto, Canada. The overarching aim of this study was to map the social organisation of health care in Toronto, with particular regards to the ways in which literacy, or the lack of literacy, mediates the experiences of homeless individuals attempting to gain access to health care. While terms such as "literate" or "illiterate" might be seen to reflect an individual's level of acquired education or competence, critical social theorists argue that such terms instead more accurately reflect an individual's relative class or position within the social hierarchy. Individuals who possess literacy are able to read into texts for their implicit understandings, directives, and power structures. Furthermore, they are able to translate and decode texts as potential pretexts for coordination or control. This study draws on a Freirean critical standpoint, which acknowledges that knowledge and power are inextricably interconnected. This study asked: How does literacy, or the lack of literacy, facilitate or impede access to health care for homeless individuals? What are the social consequences of illiteracy?

  3. 9 JUne 2016 - Permanent Representative of the Republic of Poland to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva Ambassador P. Stachańczyk signing the guest book with CERN Director for International Relations C. Warakaulle.

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Piotr Stachańczyk Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Republic of Poland to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

  4. Management accounting use and financial performance in public health-care organisations: evidence from the Italian National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macinati, Manuela S; Anessi-Pessina, E

    2014-07-01

    Reforms of the public health-care sector have emphasised the role of management accounting (MA). However, there is little systematic evidence on its use and benefits. To fill this gap, we propose a contingency-based model which addresses three related issues, that is, whether: (i) MA use is influenced by contextual variables and MA design; (ii) top-management satisfaction with MA mediates the relationship between MA design and MA use; and (iii) financial performance is influenced by MA use. A questionnaire was mailed out to all Italian public health-care organisations. Structural equation modelling was performed to validate the research hypotheses. The response rate was 49%. Our findings suggest that: (i) cost-containment strategies encourage more sophisticated MA designs; (ii) MA use is directly and indirectly influenced by contingency, organisational, and behavioural variables; (iii) a weakly significant positive relationship exists between MA use and financial performance. These findings are relevant from the viewpoint of both top managers and policymakers. The former must make sure that MA is not only technically advanced, but also properly understood and appreciated by users. The latter need to be aware that MA may improve performance in ways and along dimensions that may not fully translate into better financial results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. THE IMPORTANCE OF LEGAL ORGANISATION OF RAPIDLY GROWING COMPANIES FOR INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPETITIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riko Novak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the importance of a company’s legal form for the process of internationalisation using a sample of 1577 Slovenian companies. We refer to previous studies and on the basis of additional statistical data evaluate whether the choice of corporate legal structure influences a company’s ability to compete internationally. In the domestic market, most companies operate as limited liability companies; this is also the most frequent legal form in which companies enter foreign markets. We conclude that the form by itself does not influence the decision to go international.

  6. Host government impact on the logistics performance of international humanitarian organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dube, N.; van der Vaart, T.; Teunter, R. H.; Van Wassenhove, L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Host governments severely impact international relief operations. An openness to assistance can lead to the timely delivery of aid whereas a reluctance to receive assistance can have devastating consequences. With lives at stake and no time to lose in humanitarian crises, understanding the host

  7. Geostrategies of Interlingualism: Language Policy and Practice in the International Maritime Organisation, London, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntee-Atalianis, Lisa J.

    2006-01-01

    Fettes (2004) asserts that "politico-strategies" of languages are no longer viable frameworks for "national and community policy". Rather, he proposes the development of "geostrategies of interlingualism", i.e. linguistic strategies which promote international communication equitably and efficiently, whilst respecting…

  8. Implementation of checklists in health care; learning from high-reliability organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lossius Hans

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Checklists are common in some medical fields, including surgery, intensive care and emergency medicine. They can be an effective tool to improve care processes and reduce mortality and morbidity. Despite the seemingly rapid acceptance and dissemination of the checklist, there are few studies describing the actual process of developing and implementing such tools in health care. The aim of this study is to explore the experiences from checklist development and implementation in a group of non-medical, high reliability organisations (HROs. Method A qualitative study based on key informant interviews and field visits followed by a Delphi approach. Eight informants, each with 10-30 years of checklist experience, were recruited from six different HROs. Results The interviews generated 84 assertions and recommendations for checklist implementation. To achieve checklist acceptance and compliance, there must be a predefined need for which a checklist is considered a well suited solution. The end-users ("sharp-end" are the key stakeholders throughout the development and implementation process. Proximity and ownership must be assured through a thorough and wise process. All informants underlined the importance of short, self-developed, and operationally-suited checklists. Simulation is a valuable and widely used method for training, revision, and validation. Conclusion Checklists have been a cornerstone of safety management in HROs for nearly a century, and are becoming increasingly popular in medicine. Acceptance and compliance are crucial for checklist implementation in health care. Experiences from HROs may provide valuable input to checklist implementation in healthcare.

  9. Quality of the contraceptive service structure: a pilot study in Finnish health centre organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannisto, Tuire; Saaristo, Vesa; Ståhl, Timo; Mattila, Kari; Kosunen, Elise

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the quality of the contraceptive service structure in health centre organisations (HCOs) in western Finland and to establish whether the characteristics of the HCOs are associated with the quality measured. Survey data were collected from all HCOs in a university hospital area in western Finland (N = 63). Quality was evaluated using a score of ten indicators. Associations between the score and the characteristics of the HCOs were studied using rank correlation analysis and a multivariate ordered logit model. Among 51 HCOs yielding complete data for the evaluation, the quality score ranged from 3 to 10, the mean being 5.8. From 25 variables studied, 'a chief nursing officer or leading nurse engaged in the HCO' (p = 0.001) and 'an appointed person responsible for management of health promotion' (p = 0.006) were found to be associated with a good score in the rank correlation analysis, and they also remained significant in multivariate analysis (Odds Ratio [OR] = 11.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.3-56.5 and OR = 5.9, 95% CI 1.6-21.5, respectively). In the majority of the HCOs involved, the quality of service structure was rated average, but there was much variation between the HCOs. The results of the multivariate analysis emphasise the importance of good management of services.

  10. Linking research to practice: the organisation and implementation of The Netherlands health and social care improvement programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ovretveit, John; Klazinga, Niek

    2013-01-01

    Both public and private health and social care services are facing increased and changing demands to improve quality and reduce costs. To enable local services to respond to these demands, governments and other organisations have established large scale improvement programmes. These usually seek to

  11. Legitimate Peripheral Participation by Sandwich Year Interns in the National Health Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Helen Maria; Sandiford, Peter John

    2014-01-01

    Student internships are widely seen as a valuable part of education provision and there is a growing body of research into internship programmes from student, employer and educator perspectives. This paper explores the experiences of a group of information technology interns employed in a small organisation involved in health care business…

  12. The absolute risk of venous thrombosis after air travel: a cohort study of 8,755 employees of international organisations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Kuipers

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risk of venous thrombosis is approximately 2- to 4-fold increased after air travel, but the absolute risk is unknown. The objective of this study was to assess the absolute risk of venous thrombosis after air travel. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a cohort study among employees of large international companies and organisations, who were followed between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2005. The occurrence of symptomatic venous thrombosis was linked to exposure to air travel, as assessed by travel records provided by the companies and organisations. A long-haul flight was defined as a flight of at least 4 h and participants were considered exposed for a postflight period of 8 wk. A total of 8,755 employees were followed during a total follow-up time of 38,910 person-years (PY. The total time employees were exposed to a long-haul flight was 6,872 PY. In the follow-up period, 53 thromboses occurred, 22 of which within 8 wk of a long-haul flight, yielding an incidence rate of 3.2/1,000 PY, as compared to 1.0/1,000 PY in individuals not exposed to air travel (incidence rate ratio 3.2, 95% confidence interval 1.8-5.6. This rate was equivalent to a risk of one event per 4,656 long-haul flights. The risk increased with exposure to more flights within a short time frame and with increasing duration of flights. The incidence was highest in the first 2 wk after travel and gradually decreased to baseline after 8 wk. The risk was particularly high in employees under age 30 y, women who used oral contraceptives, and individuals who were particularly short, tall, or overweight. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of symptomatic venous thrombosis after air travel is moderately increased on average, and rises with increasing exposure and in high-risk groups.

  13. Co-production of community mental health services: Organising the interplay between public services and civil society in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaeggemose, Ulla; Ankersen, Pia Vedel; Aagaard, Jørgen; Burau, Viola

    2018-01-01

    Co-production involves knowledge and skills based on both lived experiences of citizens and professionally training of staff. In Europe, co-production is viewed as an essential tool for meeting the demographic, political and economic challenges of welfare states. However, co-production is facing challenges because public services and civil society are rooted in two very different logics. These challenges are typically encountered by provider organisations and their staff who must convert policies and strategies into practice. Denmark is a welfare state with a strong public services sector and a relatively low involvement of volunteers. The aim of this study was to investigate how provider organisations and their staff navigate between the two logics. The present analysis is a critical case study of two municipalities selected from seven participating municipalities, for their maximum diversity. The study setting was the Community Families programme, which aim to support the social network of mental health users by offering regular contact with selected private families/individuals. The task of the municipalities was to initiate and support Community Families. The analysis built on qualitative data generated at the organisational level in the seven participating municipalities. Within the two "case study" municipalities, qualitative interviews were conducted with front-line co-ordinators (six) and line managers (two). The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded using the software program NVivo. The results confirm the central role played by staff and identify a close interplay between public services and civil society logics as essential for the organisation of co-production. Corresponding objectives, activities and collaborative relations of provider organisations are keys for facilitating the co-productive practice of individual staff. Organised in this way, co-production can succeed even in a mental health setting associated with social stigma

  14. Organisational culture and post-merger integration in an academic health centre: a mixed-methods study.

    OpenAIRE

    Ovseiko, PV; Melham, K; Fowler, J.; Buchan, AM

    2015-01-01

    Background Around the world, the last two decades have been characterised by an increase in the numbers of mergers between healthcare providers, including some of the most prestigious university hospitals and academic health centres. However, many mergers fail to bring the anticipated benefits, and successful post-merger integration in university hospitals and academic health centres is even harder to achieve. An increasing body of literature suggests that organisational culture affects the s...

  15. Growth of health maintenance organisations in Nigeria and the potential for a role in promoting universal coverage efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoka, Chima A; Hanson, Kara; Mills, Anne

    2016-08-01

    There has been growing interest in the potential for private health insurance (PHI) and private organisations to contribute to universal health coverage (UHC). Yet evidence from low and middle income countries remains very thin. This paper examines the evolution of health maintenance organisations (HMOs) in Nigeria, the nature of the PHI plans and social health insurance (SHI) programmes and their performance, and the implications of their business practices for providing PHI and UHC-related SHI programmes. An embedded case study design was used with multiple subunits of analysis (individual HMOs and the HMO industry) and mixed (qualitative and quantitative) methods, and the study was guided by the structure-conduct-performance paradigm that has its roots in the neo-classical theory of the firm. Quantitative data collection and 35 in-depth interviews were carried out between October 2012 to July 2013. Although HMOs first emerged in Nigeria to supply PHI, their expansion was driven by their role as purchasers in the government's national health insurance scheme that finances SHI programmes, and facilitated by a weak accreditation system. HMOs' characteristics distinguish the market they operate in as monopolistically competitive, and HMOs as multiproduct firms operating multiple risk pools through parallel administrative systems. The considerable product differentiation and consequent risk selection by private insurers promote inefficiencies. Where HMOs and similar private organisations play roles in health financing systems, effective regulatory institutions and mandates must be established to guide their behaviours towards attainment of public health goals and to identify and control undesirable business practices. Lessons are drawn for policy makers and programme implementers especially in those low and middle-income countries considering the use of private organisations in their health financing systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Context, Process, and Outcome Evaluation Model for Organisational Health Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie Fridrich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To facilitate evaluation of complex, organisational health interventions (OHIs, this paper aims at developing a context, process, and outcome (CPO evaluation model. It builds on previous model developments in the field and advances them by clearly defining and relating generic evaluation categories for OHIs. Context is defined as the underlying frame that influences and is influenced by an OHI. It is further differentiated into the omnibus and discrete contexts. Process is differentiated into the implementation process, as the time-limited enactment of the original intervention plan, and the change process of individual and collective dynamics triggered by the implementation process. These processes lead to proximate, intermediate, and distal outcomes, as all results of the change process that are meaningful for various stakeholders. Research questions that might guide the evaluation of an OHI according to the CPO categories and a list of concrete themes/indicators and methods/sources applied within the evaluation of an OHI project at a hospital in Switzerland illustrate the model’s applicability in structuring evaluations of complex OHIs. In conclusion, the model supplies a common language and a shared mental model for improving communication between researchers and company members and will improve the comparability and aggregation of evaluation study results.

  17. The Context, Process, and Outcome Evaluation Model for Organisational Health Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridrich, Annemarie; Jenny, Gregor J; Bauer, Georg F

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate evaluation of complex, organisational health interventions (OHIs), this paper aims at developing a context, process, and outcome (CPO) evaluation model. It builds on previous model developments in the field and advances them by clearly defining and relating generic evaluation categories for OHIs. Context is defined as the underlying frame that influences and is influenced by an OHI. It is further differentiated into the omnibus and discrete contexts. Process is differentiated into the implementation process, as the time-limited enactment of the original intervention plan, and the change process of individual and collective dynamics triggered by the implementation process. These processes lead to proximate, intermediate, and distal outcomes, as all results of the change process that are meaningful for various stakeholders. Research questions that might guide the evaluation of an OHI according to the CPO categories and a list of concrete themes/indicators and methods/sources applied within the evaluation of an OHI project at a hospital in Switzerland illustrate the model's applicability in structuring evaluations of complex OHIs. In conclusion, the model supplies a common language and a shared mental model for improving communication between researchers and company members and will improve the comparability and aggregation of evaluation study results.

  18. Facility location of organ procurement organisations in Indian health care supply chain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajmohan, M.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In health care supply chain management, particularly in the area of organ transplantation, organ procurement and the transplantation network play an important role. The organ procurement organisation (OPO should coordinate so that organs are prepared and transported to the recipients when donors become available. The scarcity of organ supply leads to life-challenging issues for the organ recipient. In this research, the importance of the location of OPOs to coordinate with the transplant centres in India is considered, and a solution is provided by facilitating the identification of locations where organs can be procured and distributed to the nearest transplant location. The location of the distribution centres of organs are identified, based on the p-median model. This model minimises the weighted distance of the organ recipients. Initially, the demand or the population density of organ recipients with respect to particular location is recognised. Then, based on the p-median model, the location of OPOs is effectively identified. Experimental analysis proves that the proposed model performs well in facilitating the location of OPOs. The robustness of the proposed work is validated using a sensitivity analysis of the differences in the selection of OPOs when the estimated demand for organs varies.

  19. The development of ORACLe: a measure of an organisation's capacity to engage in evidence-informed health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkar, Steve R; Turner, Tari; Williamson, Anna; Louviere, Jordan; Redman, Sally; Haynes, Abby; Green, Sally; Brennan, Sue

    2016-01-14

    Evidence-informed policymaking is more likely if organisations have cultures that promote research use and invest in resources that facilitate staff engagement with research. Measures of organisations' research use culture and capacity are needed to assess current capacity, identify opportunities for improvement, and examine the impact of capacity-building interventions. The aim of the current study was to develop a comprehensive system to measure and score organisations' capacity to engage with and use research in policymaking, which we entitled ORACLe (Organisational Research Access, Culture, and Leadership). We used a multifaceted approach to develop ORACLe. Firstly, we reviewed the available literature to identify key domains of organisational tools and systems that may facilitate research use by staff. We interviewed senior health policymakers to verify the relevance and applicability of these domains. This information was used to generate an interview schedule that focused on seven key domains of organisational capacity. The interview was pilot-tested within four Australian policy agencies. A discrete choice experiment (DCE) was then undertaken using an expert sample to establish the relative importance of these domains. This data was used to produce a scoring system for ORACLe. The ORACLe interview was developed, comprised of 23 questions addressing seven domains of organisational capacity and tools that support research use, including (1) documented processes for policymaking; (2) leadership training; (3) staff training; (4) research resources (e.g. database access); and systems to (5) generate new research, (6) undertake evaluations, and (7) strengthen relationships with researchers. From the DCE data, a conditional logit model was estimated to calculate total scores that took into account the relative importance of the seven domains. The model indicated that our expert sample placed the greatest importance on domains (2), (3) and (4). We utilised

  20. International environmental law and global public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirnding, Yasmin von; Onzivu, William; Adede, Andronico O

    2002-01-01

    The environment continues to be a source of ill-health for many people, particularly in developing countries. International environmental law offers a viable strategy for enhancing public health through the promotion of increased awareness of the linkages between health and environment, mobilization of technical and financial resources, strengthening of research and monitoring, enforcement of health-related standards, and promotion of global cooperation. An enhanced capacity to utilize international environmental law could lead to significant worldwide gains in public health.

  1. Organisation of Prostate Cancer Services in the English National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, A; Nossiter, J; Cathcart, P; van der Meulen, J; Rashbass, J; Clarke, N; Payne, H

    2016-08-01

    The National Prostate Cancer Audit (NPCA) started in April 2013 with the aim of assessing the process of care and its outcomes in men diagnosed with prostate cancer in England and Wales. One of the key aims of the audit was to assess the configuration and availability of specialist prostate cancer services in England. In 2014, the NPCA undertook an organisational survey of all 143 acute National Health Service (NHS) Trusts and 48 specialist multidisciplinary team (MDT) hubs cross England. Questionnaires established the availability and location of core diagnostic, treatment and patient-centred support services for the management of non-metastatic prostate cancer in addition to specific diagnostic and treatment procedures that reflect the continuing evolution of prostate cancer management, such as high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and stereotactic body radiotherapy. The survey received a 100% response rate. The results showed considerable geographical variation with respect to the availability of core treatment modalities, the size of the target population and catchment areas served by specialist MDT hubs, as well as in the uptake of additional procedures and services. Specifically there are gaps in the availability of core radiotherapy procedures; high dose rate and low dose rate brachytherapy are available in 44% and 75% of specialist MDTs, respectively. By comparison, there seems to be a relative 'over-penetration' of surgical innovation, with 67% of specialist MDTs providing robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy and 21% HIFU. There is also evidence of increased centralisation of core surgical procedures and regional inequity in the availability of surgical innovation across England. The organisational survey of the NPCA has provided a comprehensive assessment of the structure and function of specialist MDTs in England and the availability of prostate cancer procedures and services. As part of the prospective audit, the NPCA will assess the effect of

  2. [Recent progress in international public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Li, Liming

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes the recent progress in international public health in terms of public health challenges, infectious diseases prevention and control, disease surveillance, chronic and non-communicable disease prevention and treatment, global health, health literacy and precision medicine for the purpose to provide reference for the improvement of public health in China.

  3. H.E. Mr Leonid A. Skotnikov, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of the Russian Federation to the United Nations and other International Organisations in Geneva

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    H.E. Mr Leonid A. Skotnikov, Ambassador of the Russian Federation to the United Nations and other International Organisations in Geneva (far right). On his right F. Grishaev, Adviser, Mission of the Russian Federation; opposite N. Koulberg and L. Maiani, CERN Director general

  4. The Malmö study : a calibration of traffic conflict techniques. A study organised by ICTCT (The International Committee on Traffic Conflict Techniques).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grayson, G.B. (ed.) Hyden, C. Kraay, J.H. Muhlrad, N. & Oppe, S.

    1984-01-01

    In the summer of 1983 a unique experiment took place in Malmö; a calibration study of eight different conflict techniques. The week before this experiment an international meeting in Copenhagen was organised in order to show a broader audience the detailed information concerning each applied

  5. Female employees' perceptions of organisational support for breastfeeding at work: findings from an Australian health service workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Danielle

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Women's return to work can be a significant barrier to continued breastfeeding. Workplace policies and practices to promote and support continued, and longer duration of, breastfeeding are important. In the context of the introduction of a new breastfeeding policy for Area Health Services in New South Wales, Australia, a baseline survey was conducted to describe current practices and examine women's reports of perceived organisational support on breastfeeding intention and practice. Methods A cross sectional survey of female employees of the Sydney South West Area Health Service was conducted in late 2009. A mailed questionnaire was sent to 998 eligible participants who had taken maternity leave over the 20-month period from January 2008 to August 2009. The questionnaire collected items assessing breastfeeding intentions, awareness of workplace policies, and the level of organisational and social support available. For those women who had returned to work, further questions were asked to assess the perceptions and practices of breastfeeding in the work environment, as well as barriers and enabling factors to combining breastfeeding and work. Results Returning to work was one of the main reasons women ceased breastfeeding, with 60 percent of women intending to breastfeed when they returned to work, but only 40 percent doing so. Support to combine breastfeeding and work came mainly from family and partners (74% and 83% respectively, with little perceived support from the organisation (13% and human resources (6%. Most women (92% had received no information from their managers about their breastfeeding options upon their return to work, and few had access to a room specially designated for breastfeeding (19%. Flexible work options and lactation breaks, as well as access to a private room, were identified as the main factors that facilitate breastfeeding at work. Conclusions Enabling women to continue breastfeeding at work has

  6. International observatory on mental health systems: structure and operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minas Harry

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Sustained cooperative action is required to improve the mental health of populations, particularly in low and middle-income countries where meagre mental health investment and insufficient human and other resources result in poorly performing mental health systems. The Observatory The International Observatory on Mental Health Systems is a mental health systems research, education and development network that will contribute to the development of high quality mental health systems in low and middle-income countries. The work of the Observatory will be done by mental health systems research, education and development groups that are located in and managed by collaborating organisations. These groups will be supported by the IOMHS Secretariat, the International IOMHS Steering Group and a Technical Reference Group. Summary The International Observatory on Mental Health Systems is: 1 the mental health systems research, education and development groups; 2 the IOMHS Steering Group; 3 the IOMHS Technical Reference Group; and 4 the IOMHS Secretariat. The work of the Observatory will depend on free and open collaboration, sharing of knowledge and skills, and governance arrangements that are inclusive and that put the needs and interests of people with mental illness and their families at the centre of decision-making. We welcome contact from individuals and institutions that wish to contribute to achieving the goals of the Observatory. Now is the time to make it happen where it matters, by turning scientific knowledge into effective action for people's health. (J.W. Lee, in his acceptance speech on his appointment as the Director-General of the World Health Organization 1.

  7. Effect of professional self-concept on burnout among community health nurses in Chengdu, China: the mediator role of organisational commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoyi; Chen, Lin; Tian, Lang; Diao, Yongshu; Hu, Xiuying

    2015-10-01

    To examine the associations among professional self-concept, organisational commitment and burnout, and to analyse the mediating role of organisational commitment on the relationship between professional self-concept and burnout among community health nurses in Chengdu, China. Previous studies have focused on work environmental variables that contributed to burnout in nurses. However, no study has explored the mediating effect of organisational commitment on the correlation between professional self-concept and burnout in community health nurses. A cross-sectional descriptive study. This study was conducted at 36 community health centres in Chengdu, China with 485 nurses sampled using a two-stage sampling method. The measures used in our study included Nurses' Self-concept Questionnaire, Organisational Commitment Scale and Maslach Burnout Inventory. The results of structural equation model techniques indicated that, in the direct approach, positive professional self-concept resulted in increased organisational commitment and reduced burnout. Higher organisational commitment resulted in less burnout. In the indirect approach, organisational commitment performed as a partial mediator on the correlation between professional self-concept and burnout. Positive perception of professional self-concept can result in reduced burnout via enhancing organisational commitment. It is crucial for nursing administrators to develop effective intervention strategies such as skills escalator training and assertive training, and establishing a supportive working environment to enhance nurses' professional self-concept and organisational commitment, and decrease burnout. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Going digital: a narrative overview of the clinical and organisational impacts of eHealth technologies in hospital practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keasberry, Justin; Scott, Ian A; Sullivan, Clair; Staib, Andrew; Ashby, Richard

    2017-12-01

    alert fatigue, increased technology interaction time, creation of disruptive workarounds and new prescribing errors. Conclusion eHealth technologies in hospital settings appear to improve efficiency and appropriateness of care, prescribing safety and disease control. Effects on mortality, readmissions, total costs and patient and provider experience remain uncertain. What is known about the topic? Healthcare systems internationally are undertaking large-scale digitisation programs with hospitals being a major focus. Although predictive analyses suggest that eHealth technologies have the potential to markedly transform health care delivery, contemporary peer-reviewed research evidence detailing their benefits and harms is limited. What does this paper add? This narrative overview of 19 systematic reviews and two reviews of systematic reviews published over the past 5 years provides a summary of cumulative evidence of clinical and organisational effects of contemporary eHealth technologies in hospital practice. EMRs have the potential to increase accuracy and completeness of clinical information, reduce documentation time and enhance information transfer and organisational efficiency. CPOE appears to improve laboratory turnaround times and decrease resource utilisation. ePrescribing significantly reduces medication errors and adverse drug events. CDSS, especially those used at the point of care and integrated into workflows, attract the strongest evidence for substantially increasing clinician adherence to guidelines, appropriateness of disease and treatment monitoring and optimal medication use. Evidence of effects of eHealth technologies on discrete clinical outcomes, such as morbid events, mortality and readmissions, is currently limited and conflicting. What are the implications for practitioners? eHealth technologies confer benefits in improving quality and safety of care with little evidence of major hazards. Whether EMRs and CPOE can affect clinical outcomes or

  9. Public-non-governmental organisation partnerships for health: an exploratory study with case studies from recent Ghanaian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hushie, Martin

    2016-09-13

    The last few decades have seen a dramatic increase in public-non-governmental organisation (NGO) partnerships in the health sector of many low- and middle- income countries (LMICs) as a means of improving the public's health. However, little research has focused to date on the nature, facilitators and barriers of these partnerships. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 17 participants from five different NGOs and their collaboration with state partners in the Ghanaian health sector at the national and local levels in four regions of the country (Northern, Upper East, Greater Accra, and Eastern) to explore the drivers and nature of these partnerships and their advantages and disadvantages in the effort to improve the public's health. Major findings reveal that: 1) each collaboration between civil society organisations (CSOs) and the state in the health sector demands different partnerships; 2) partnership types can range from equal, formal contractual, decentralized to advocacy ones; 3) commitment by the state and NGOs to work in collaboration lead to improved service delivery, reduced health inequities and disparities; 4) added value of NGOs lies in their knowledge, expertise, community legitimacy, ability to attract donor funding and implementation capacity to address health needs in geographical areas or communities where the government does not reach and for services, which it does not provide and 5) success factors and challenges to be considered, moving forward to promote such partnerships in other LMICs. Recommendations are offered for NGOs, governments, donors, and future research including studying the organisational effectiveness and sustainability of these partnerships to deliver effective and efficient health outcomes to recommend universal best practices in health care.

  10. The Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation provisional criteria for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Pistorio, Angela; Ravelli, Angelo; Rider, Lisa G; Pilkington, Clarissa; Oliveira, Sheila; Wulffraat, Nico; Espada, Graciela; Garay, Stella; Cuttica, Ruben; Hofer, Michael; Quartier, Pierre; Melo-Gomes, Jose; Reed, Ann M; Wierzbowska, Malgorzata; Feldman, Brian M; Harjacek, Miroslav; Huppertz, Hans-Iko; Nielsen, Susan; Flato, Berit; Lahdenne, Pekka; Michels, Harmut; Murray, Kevin J; Punaro, Lynn; Rennebohm, Robert; Russo, Ricardo; Balogh, Zsolt; Rooney, Madeleine; Pachman, Lauren M; Wallace, Carol; Hashkes, Philip; Lovell, Daniel J; Giannini, Edward H; Gare, Boel Andersson; Martini, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    To develop a provisional definition for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) based on the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation juvenile DM core set of variables. Thirty-seven experienced pediatric rheumatologists from 27 countries achieved consensus on 128 difficult patient profiles as clinically improved or not improved using a stepwise approach (patient's rating, statistical analysis, definition selection). Using the physicians' consensus ratings as the "gold standard measure," chi-square, sensitivity, specificity, false-positive and-negative rates, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, and kappa agreement for candidate definitions of improvement were calculated. Definitions with kappa values >0.8 were multiplied by the face validity score to select the top definitions. The top definition of improvement was at least 20% improvement from baseline in 3 of 6 core set variables with no more than 1 of the remaining worsening by more than 30%, which cannot be muscle strength. The second-highest scoring definition was at least 20% improvement from baseline in 3 of 6 core set variables with no more than 2 of the remaining worsening by more than 25%, which cannot be muscle strength (definition P1 selected by the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies group). The third is similar to the second with the maximum amount of worsening set to 30%. This indicates convergent validity of the process. We propose a provisional data-driven definition of improvement that reflects well the consensus rating of experienced clinicians, which incorporates clinically meaningful change in core set variables in a composite end point for the evaluation of global response to therapy in juvenile DM. Copyright © 2010 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Organisational Art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferro-Thomsen, Martin

    University of Copenhagen / Learning Lab Denmark. 2005 Kort beskrivelse: Organisational Art is a tentative title for an art form that works together with organisations to produce art. This is most often done together with non-artist members of the organisation and on-site in their social context. OA...... is characterised as socially engaged, conceptual, discursive, site-specific and contextual. Abstract: This investigation is about Organisational Art (OA), which is a tentative title for an art form that works together with organisations (companies, institutions, communities, governments and NGOs) to produce art....... This is most often done together with non-artist members of the organisation and on-site in their social context. OA is characterised as socially engaged, conceptual, discursive, site-specific and contextual. It is argued that OA seeks to advance both art and the organisation of human work/life by crossing...

  12. Archives: International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 17 of 17 ... Archives: International Journal of Health Research. Journal Home > Archives: International Journal of Health Research. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue ...

  13. Australia's international health relations in 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, Simon

    2005-02-21

    A survey for the year 2003 of significant developments in Australia's official international health relations, and their domestic ramifications, is presented. The discussion is set within the broader context of Australian foreign policy. Sources include official documents, media reports and consultations with officers of the Department of Health and Ageing responsible for international linkages.

  14. International Students, University Health Centers, and Memorable Messages about Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmack, Heather J.; Bedi, Shireen; Heiss, Sarah N.

    2016-01-01

    International students entering US universities often experience a variety of important socialization messages. One important message is learning about and using the US health system. International students often first encounter the US health system through their experiences with university health centers. The authors explore the memorable…

  15. Individual and organisational factors influencing registered nurses' attitudes towards patient advocacy in Swedish community health care of elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josse-Eklund, Anna; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Petzäll, Kerstin; Sandin-Bojö, Ann-Kristin

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and explore individual and organisational factors potentially influencing registered nurses' (RNs) attitudes towards patient advocacy. In a quantitative cross-sectional study, data were collected from 226 RNs in community health care of elders. A questionnaire was used to measure a number of factors including attitudes towards patient advocacy, nursing competence, personality traits, individual preferences regarding the quality of health care and working climate. A multiple regression analysis was performed. The results showed that individual factors of nursing competence and individual preferences of the quality of health care, as well as organisational factors of the working climate, explained 26.2% of the variance in the RNs' attitudes towards patient advocacy. Although the mentioned individual factors may be intertwined, the conclusion is that both individual and organisational factors influenced RNs' attitudes towards patient advocacy. The results do not verify that nursing experience, workplace experience, educational level or personality traits influence the RNs' attitudes towards patient advocacy. The proportion of explained variance indicates that additional factors also influence attitudes towards patient advocacy, and more research is needed to shed further light on these factors. © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  16. Evaluation of a countrywide implementation of the world health organisation surgical safety checklist in Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michelle C.; Baxter, Linden S.; Close, Kristin L.; Ravelojaona, Vaonandianina A.; Rakotoarison, Hasiniaina N.; Bruno, Emily; Herbert, Alison; Andean, Vanessa; Callahan, James; Andriamanjato, Hery H.; Shrime, Mark G.

    2018-01-01

    Background The 2009 World Health Organisation (WHO) surgical safety checklist significantly reduces surgical mortality and morbidity (up to 47%). Yet in 2016, only 25% of East African anesthetists regularly use the checklist. Nationwide implementation of the checklist is reported in high-income countries, but in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) reports of successful implementations are sparse, limited to single institutions and require intensive support. Since checklist use leads to the biggest improvements in outcomes in LMICs, methods of wide-scale implementation are needed. We hypothesized that, using a three-day course, successful wide-scale implementation of the checklist could be achieved, as measured by at least 50% compliance with six basic safety processes at three to four months. We also aimed to determine predictors for checklist utilization. Materials and methods Using a blended educational implementation strategy based on prior pilot studies we designed a three-day dynamic educational course to facilitate widespread implementation of the WHO checklist. The course utilized lectures, film, small group breakouts, participant feedback and simulation to teach the knowledge, skills and behavior changes needed to implement the checklist. In collaboration with the Ministry of Health and local hospital leadership, the course was delivered to 427 multi-disciplinary staff at 21 hospitals located in 19 of 22 regions of Madagascar between September 2015 and March 2016. We evaluated implementation at three to four months using questionnaires (with a 5-point Likert scale) and focus groups. Multivariate linear regression was used to test predictors of checklist utilization. Results At three to four months, 65% of respondents reported always using the checklist, with another 13% using it in part. Participant’s years in practice, hospital size, or surgical volume did not predict checklist use. Checklist use was associated with counting instruments (pchecklist

  17. Embedding chiropractic in Indigenous Health Care Organisations: applying the normalisation process model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polus Barbara I

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improving the health of Indigenous Australians remains a major challenge. A chiropractic service was established to evaluate this treatment option for musculoskeletal illness in rural Indigenous communities, based on the philosophy of keeping the community involved in all the phases of development, implementation, and evaluation. The development and integration of this service has experienced many difficulties with referrals, funding and building sustainability. Evaluation of the program was a key aspect of its implementation, requiring an appropriate process to identify specific problems and formulate solutions to improve the service. Methods We used the normalisation process model (May 2006 to order the data collected in consultation meetings and to inform our strategy and actions. The normalisation process model provided us with a structure for organising consultation meeting data and helped prioritise tasks. Our data was analysed as it applied to each dimension of the model, noting aspects that the model did not encompass. During this process we reworded the dimensions into more everyday terminology. The final analysis focused on to what extent the model helped us to prioritise and systematise our tasks and plans. Results We used the model to consider ways to promote the chiropractic service, to enhance relationships and interactions between clinicians and procedures within the health service, and to avoid disruption of the existing service. We identified ways in which chiropractors can become trusted team members who have acceptable and recognised knowledge and skills. We also developed strategies that should result in chiropractic practitioners finding a place within a complex occupational web, by being seen as similar to well-known occupations such as physiotherapy. Interestingly, one dimension identified by our data, which we have labelled ‘emancipatory’, was absent from the model. Conclusions The normalisation

  18. Embedding chiropractic in Indigenous Health Care Organisations: applying the normalisation process model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polus, Barbara I; Paterson, Charlotte; van Rotterdam, Joan; Vindigni, Dein

    2012-11-26

    Improving the health of Indigenous Australians remains a major challenge. A chiropractic service was established to evaluate this treatment option for musculoskeletal illness in rural Indigenous communities, based on the philosophy of keeping the community involved in all the phases of development, implementation, and evaluation. The development and integration of this service has experienced many difficulties with referrals, funding and building sustainability. Evaluation of the program was a key aspect of its implementation, requiring an appropriate process to identify specific problems and formulate solutions to improve the service. We used the normalisation process model (May 2006) to order the data collected in consultation meetings and to inform our strategy and actions. The normalisation process model provided us with a structure for organising consultation meeting data and helped prioritise tasks. Our data was analysed as it applied to each dimension of the model, noting aspects that the model did not encompass. During this process we reworded the dimensions into more everyday terminology. The final analysis focused on to what extent the model helped us to prioritise and systematise our tasks and plans. We used the model to consider ways to promote the chiropractic service, to enhance relationships and interactions between clinicians and procedures within the health service, and to avoid disruption of the existing service. We identified ways in which chiropractors can become trusted team members who have acceptable and recognised knowledge and skills. We also developed strategies that should result in chiropractic practitioners finding a place within a complex occupational web, by being seen as similar to well-known occupations such as physiotherapy. Interestingly, one dimension identified by our data, which we have labelled 'emancipatory', was absent from the model. The normalisation process model has resulted in a number of new insights and questions. We

  19. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    electric power supply and internet services, could limit its full application. Conclusion: Although the knowledge of the health professionals on e-health and telemedicine was poor, majority of them were in support of the services. There is therefore the need to intensify training workshops for health professionals and improve ...

  20. Mortality from ischaemic heart disease by country, region, and age: statistics from World Health Organisation and United Nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finegold, Judith A; Asaria, Perviz; Francis, Darrel P

    2013-09-30

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. The World Health Organisation (WHO) collects mortality data coded using the International Statistical Classification of Diseases (ICD) code. We analysed IHD deaths world-wide between 1995 and 2009 and used the UN population database to calculate age-specific and directly and indirectly age-standardised IHD mortality rates by country and region. IHD is the single largest cause of death worldwide, causing 7,249,000 deaths in 2008, 12.7% of total global mortality. There is more than 20-fold variation in IHD mortality rates between countries. Highest IHD mortality rates are in Eastern Europe and Central Asian countries; lowest rates in high income countries. For the working-age population, IHD mortality rates are markedly higher in low-and-middle income countries than in high income countries. Over the last 25 years, age-standardised IHD mortality has fallen by more than half in high income countries, but the trend is flat or increasing in some low-and-middle income countries. Low-and-middle income countries now account for more than 80% of global IHD deaths. The global burden of IHD deaths has shifted to low-and-middle income countries as lifestyles approach those of high income countries. In high income countries, population ageing maintains IHD as the leading cause of death. Nevertheless, the progressive decline in age-standardised IHD mortality in high income countries shows that increasing IHD mortality is not inevitable. The 20-fold mortality difference between countries, and the temporal trends, may hold vital clues for handling IHD epidemic which is migratory, and still burgeoning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. International research collaboration in maritime health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Olaf Chresten

    2011-01-01

    The new ILO-2006-convention and the EU Commission's strategic objectives for the EU maritime transport policy 2008-2018, mentions the necessity of a modern health and safety system for maritime transportation. However, there is no specific strategy for the development of maritime health and safety....... The area is regulated by international standards based on international research-based knowledge on health and safety. Moreover, many of the world's seafarers come from developing countries with specific disease problems like HIV and no possibility of independent maritime health research. The international...... maritime health research is sparse, and an increase in such research is necessary to help benefit needed shipping as a highly globalized industry. This paper presents an example of such research, accompanied by a discussion of methods and opportunities to increase international maritime health research....

  2. The linkage between work-related factors, employee satisfaction and organisational commitment: Insights from public health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengedzai Mafini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The public health sector in South Africa faces a number of human resource– related inundations. Solving these challenges requires the provision of empirically derived information on these matters.Research purpose: This study investigated the relationship between three work-related factors, person-environment fit, work-family balance and perceived job security, and employee satisfaction and organisational commitment. A conceptual framework that links these factors is proposed and tested.Motivation for the study: The prevalence of employee-related challenges involving public health professionals, as evidenced through industrial action and high labour turnover, amongst others, demands further research in order to generate appropriate solutions.Research approach, design and method: A quantitative design using the survey approach was adopted. A six-section questionnaire was administered to a stratified sample of 287 professionals in three public health institutions in Gauteng, South Africa. Data was analysed using descriptive statistics, exploratory factor analysis, Pearson’s correlation analysis and regression analysis.Main findings: Job security and person-environment fit both positively correlated with and predicted employee satisfaction. The association between work-family balance and employee satisfaction was weak and showed no significant predictive validity. Employee satisfaction was strongly correlated to and predicted organisational commitment.Practical/managerial implications: The findings of the current study may be used by managers in public health institutions to improve the level of organisational commitment amongst professionals in the sector, thus preventing further employee-related challenges that negatively affect the provision of outstanding public health services.Contribution: The study provides current evidence on how both work-related and humanrelated factors could contribute to the prosperity of the public

  3. Having a yarn about smoking: using action research to develop a 'no smoking' policy within an Aboriginal Health Organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Gillian; Fredericks, Bronwyn; Adams, Karen; Finlay, Summer; Andy, Simone; Briggs, Lyn; Hall, Robert

    2011-11-01

    This article reports on a culturally appropriate process of development of a smoke-free workplace policy within the peak Aboriginal Controlled Community Health Organisation in Victoria, Australia. Smoking is acknowledged as being responsible for at least 20% of all deaths in Aboriginal communities in Australia, and many Aboriginal health workers smoke. The smoke-free workplace policy was developed using the iterative, discursive and experience-based methodology of Participatory Action Research, combined with the culturally embedded concept of 'having a yarn'. Staff members initially identified smoking as a topic to be avoided within workplace discussions. This was due, in part, to grief (everyone had suffered a smoking-related bereavement). Further, there was anxiety that discussing smoking would result in culturally difficult conflict. The use of yarning opened up a safe space for discussion and debate, enabling development of a policy that was accepted across the organisation. Within Aboriginal organisations, it is not sufficient to focus on the outcomes of policy development. Rather, due attention must be paid to the process employed in development of policy, particularly when that policy is directly related to an emotionally and communally weighted topic such as smoking. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    collaboration among scientists, the industry and the healthcare professionals. It will also provide an international forum for the communication and evaluation of data, methods ..... Beck G. Role of leukotrienes in acute gastric lesions induced by ethanol, taurocholate, aspirin, platelet-activating factor and stress in rats, Dig. Dis.

  5. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2009-12-12

    Dec 12, 2009 ... research articles, 3,000 for technical notes, case reports, commentaries and short communications. Submission of ... Preparation, Jobelyn. ® ..... Policy, International Development Research. Center, Ottawa, Canada,1994. 3. WHO. Traditional medicine. Fact Sheet N134,. WHO, Geneva, 1996. 4. Hans S.

  6. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2008-09-19

    Sep 19, 2008 ... engineering fields). It seeks particularly (but not exclusively) to encourage multidisciplinary research and collaboration among scientists, the industry and the healthcare professionals. It will also provide an international .... were observed for 72 hr include behavioral changes, locomotion, convulsions.

  7. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    elearning

    2008-03-05

    Mar 5, 2008 ... research and collaboration among scientists, the industry and the healthcare professionals. It will also provide an international forum for the communication and evaluation of .... metry 18, chemiluminescence method 19, electron spin resonance spectroscopy 20, nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) spec-.

  8. Visit of His Excellency Mr Juan Martabit, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of Chile to the United Nations Office in Geneva and other international organisations in Switzerland.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    Secretary-General; Mrs Juan Martabit. 0502017_07.jpg His Excellency Mr Juan Martabit, Ambassador,Permanent Representative of Chile to the United Nations Office in Geneva and other international organisations in Switzerland visiting the ATLAS building site. From left to right: Prof. Giora Mikenberg, ATLAS Collaboration; Mr Maximilian Metzger, Secretary-General and His Excellency Mr Juan Martabit. 0502017_08.jpg His Excellency Mr Juan Martabit, Ambassador,Permanent Representative of Chile to the United Nations Office in Geneva and other international organisations in Switzerland visiting the ATLAS cavern. From left to right: From left to right: Prof. Giora Mikenberg, ATLAS Collaboration; Mr Maximilian Metzger, Secretary-General; His Excellency Mr Juan Martabit and Mrs Juan Martabit.

  9. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    The journal is devoted to the promotion of health sciences and related disciplines (including medicine ... Pharmaceutical Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical ... ingredients (API) with excellent physicochemical stability in comparison to ...

  10. Community and consumer participation in Australian health services--an overview of organisational commitment and participation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A; Silburn, K

    2000-01-01

    This article briefly describes recent initiatives to improve consumer participation in health services that have led to the establishment of the National Resource Centre for Consumer Participation in Health. The results of a component of the needs assessment undertaken by the newly established Centre are presented. They provide a 'snapshot' of the types of feedback and participation processes mainly being utilised by Australian health services at the different levels of seeking information, information sharing and consultation, partnership, delegated power and consumer control. They also allow identification of the organisational commitment made by Australian health services to support a more coordinated approach to community and consumer feedback and participation at different levels of health services such as particular emphasis on determining the presence of community and consumer participation in key organisational statements, specific consumer policies and plans, identifiable leadership, inclusion into job descriptions, allocation of resources, and staff development and consumer training. Discussion centres around four key observations and some of the key perceived external barriers.

  11. International institutions and China's health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanzhong

    2015-02-01

    This article examines the role of international institutional actors in China's health policy process. Particular attention is paid to three major international institutional actors: the World Bank, the World Health Organization, and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Through process tracing and comparative case studies, the article looks at how international institutions contribute to policy change in China and seeks to explain different outcomes in the relationship between international institutions and China's health policies. It finds that despite the opaque and exclusive authoritarian structure in China, international institutions play a significant role in the country's domestic health governance. By investing their resources and capabilities selectively and strategically, international institutions can change the preferences of government policy makers, move latent public health issues to the government's agenda, and affect the timing of government action and the content of policy design. Furthermore, the study suggests that different outcomes in the relationship between China's health policies and global health governance can be explained through the seriousness of the externalities China faces. Copyright © 2015 by Duke University Press.

  12. Consensus on quality indicators to assess the organisation of palliative cancer and dementia care applicable across national healthcare systems and selected by international experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riet Paap, Jasper; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; Dröes, Rose-Marie; Radbruch, Lukas; Vissers, Kris; Engels, Yvonne

    2014-09-17

    Large numbers of vulnerable patients are in need of palliative cancer and dementia care. However, a wide gap exists between the knowledge of best practices in palliative care and their use in everyday clinical practice. As part of a European policy improvement program, quality indicators (QIs) have been developed to monitor and improve the organisation of palliative care for patients with cancer and those with dementia in various settings in different European countries. A multidisciplinary, international panel of professionals participated in a modified RAND Delphi procedure to compose a set of palliative care QIs based on existing sets of QIs on the organisation of palliative care. Panellists participated in three written rounds, one feedback round and one meeting. The panel's median votes were used to identify the final set of QIs. The Delphi procedure resulted in 23 useful QIs. These QIs represent key elements of the organisation of good clinical practice, such as the availability of palliative care teams, the availability of special facilities to provide palliative care for patients and their relatives, and the presence of educational interventions for professionals. The final set also includes QIs that are related to the process of palliative care, such as documentation of pain and other symptoms, communication with patients in need of palliative care and their relatives, and end-of-life decisions. International experts selected a set of 23 QIs for the organisation of palliative care. Although we particularly focused on the organisation of cancer and dementia palliative care, most QIs are generic and are applicable for other types of diseases as well.

  13. Organising health care services for people with an acquired brain injury: an overview of systematic reviews and randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laver, Kate; Lannin, Natasha A; Bragge, Peter; Hunter, Peter; Holland, Anne E; Tavender, Emma; O'Connor, Denise; Khan, Fary; Teasell, Robert; Gruen, Russell

    2014-09-17

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) is the leading cause of disability worldwide yet there is little information regarding the most effective way to organise ABI health care services. The aim of this review was to identify the most up-to-date high quality evidence to answer specific questions regarding the organisation of health care services for people with an ABI. We conducted a systematic review of English papers using MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library. We included the most recently published high quality systematic reviews and any randomised controlled trials, non-randomised controlled trials, controlled before after studies or interrupted time series studies published subsequent to the systematic review. We searched for papers that evaluated pre-defined organisational interventions for adults with an ABI. Organisational interventions of interest included fee-for-service care, integrated care, integrated care pathways, continuity of care, consumer engagement in governance and quality monitoring interventions. Data extraction and appraisal of included reviews and studies was completed independently by two reviewers. A total of five systematic reviews and 21 studies were included in the review; eight of the papers (31%) included people with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) or ABI and the remaining papers (69%) included only participants with a diagnosis of stroke. We found evidence supporting the use of integrated care to improve functional outcome and reduce length of stay and evidence supporting early supported discharge teams for reducing morbidity and mortality and reducing length of stay for stroke survivors. There was little evidence to support case management or the use of integrated care pathways for people with ABI. We found evidence that a quality monitoring intervention can lead to improvements in process outcomes in acute and rehabilitation settings. We were unable to find any studies meeting our inclusion criteria regarding fee

  14. The Indigenous Experience of Work in a Health Research Organisation: Are There Wider Inferences?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Chirgwin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify the factors that positively and negatively impacted on the employment experiences and trajectories of Indigenous Australians who are currently or were formerly employed by a research organisation in both remote and urban settings. The study design was an embedded mixed-methods approach. The first phase quantified staff uptake, continued employment, and attrition. Then interviews were conducted with 42 former and 51 current Indigenous staff members to obtain qualitative data. The results showed that the quality of supervision, the work flexibility to enable employees to respond to family and community priorities, and training and other forms of career support were all identified as important factors in the workplace. The most common reasons for leaving were that research projects ended, or to pursue a career change or further study. The authors use the findings to make recommendations pertinent to policy formation for both government and organisations seeking to attract and nurture Indigenous staff.

  15. Innovative Power of Health Care Organisations Affects IT Adoption: A bi-National Health IT Benchmark Comparing Austria and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüsers, Jens; Hübner, Ursula; Esdar, Moritz; Ammenwerth, Elske; Hackl, Werner O; Naumann, Laura; Liebe, Jan David

    2017-02-01

    Multinational health IT benchmarks foster cross-country learning and have been employed at various levels, e.g. OECD and Nordic countries. A bi-national benchmark study conducted in 2007 revealed a significantly higher adoption of health IT in Austria compared to Germany, two countries with comparable healthcare systems. We now investigated whether these differences still persisted. We further studied whether these differences were associated with hospital intrinsic factors, i.e. the innovative power of the organisation and hospital demographics. We thus performed a survey to measure the "perceived IT availability" and the "innovative power of the hospital" of 464 German and 70 Austrian hospitals. The survey was based on a questionnaire with 52 items and was given to the directors of nursing in 2013/2014. Our findings confirmed a significantly greater IT availability in Austria than in Germany. This was visible in the aggregated IT adoption composite score "IT function" as well as in the IT adoption for the individual functions "nursing documentation" (OR = 5.98), "intensive care unit (ICU) documentation" (OR = 2.49), "medication administration documentation" (OR = 2.48), "electronic archive" (OR = 2.27) and "medication" (OR = 2.16). "Innovative power" was the strongest factor to explain the variance of the composite score "IT function". It was effective in hospitals of both countries but significantly more effective in Austria than in Germany. "Hospital size" and "hospital system affiliation" were also significantly associated with the composite score "IT function", but they did not differ between the countries. These findings can be partly associated with the national characteristics. Indicators point to a more favourable financial situation in Austrian hospitals; we thus argue that Austrian hospitals may possess a larger degree of financial freedom to be innovative and to act accordingly. This study is the first to empirically demonstrate the

  16. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2009-12-02

    Dec 2, 2009 ... forum for the communication and evaluation of data, methods and findings in health sciences and related disciplines. The journal welcomes ... Original Research Article. Development and Evaluation of a Training Programme .... A concise pocket sized manual measuring. 15.2 x 10.3 cm consisting of 32 ...

  17. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2008-09-19

    Sep 19, 2008 ... forum for the communication and evaluation of data, methods and findings in health sciences and related .... hepatic marker enzymes, serum glutamate .... Applied Chemistry, Division of Clinical Chemistry: Definition of the terms certification, licensure and accreditation in clinical chemistry. J Clin Chem.

  18. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Waithaka et al. Biochemical Parameters in Adult Kenyans. Int J Health Res, September 2009; 2(3): 260. Introduction. A reference range of a clinical chemistry parameter is a set of values used in the interpretation of a clinical chemistry report. There are two types of reference ranges categorized as subject based and group.

  19. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    and believed that abstinence from sexual intercourse and health education remains viable preventive measures. However, only. 171(32.8%) of respondents were ready to be screened for HIV infection. Table 1: Sociodemographic characteristics of respondents (n=521). Variable. Frequency. Age group. Early adolescence.

  20. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    organizations by giving money for charity. Nevertheless, volunteering in health research (for example, as participants and data collectors) is considered a way of supporting these organizations. This article discusses the projected role of nonprofit organizations in encouraging people's voluntary participation in different types ...

  1. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    and the high ozone forming potential of many organic compounds found in car emissions which adversely effect human health and other living organisms and ecosystems. The increasing awareness about the consequences of fuel combustion on the local and global environ- mental issues together with the continued and.

  2. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    forum for the communication and evaluation of data, methods and findings in health sciences and related disciplines. The journal welcomes original .... preventable diseases. In May 2006, the. Immunization Plus Days (IPDs) ... transportation to institutional care, inability to pay for services, and resistance among some.

  3. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    forum for the communication and evaluation of data, methods and findings in health sciences and related disciplines. The journal welcomes ... association with chronic diseases such as heart disease, hypertension and type II ... transportation and leisure time/exercise or sport). Physical activity levels are assessed by asking.

  4. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2008-09-01

    Sep 1, 2008 ... deprivation aggravates health risk factors including depression, anxiety5,6, cognitive dysfunctions7,8,9, impaired motor activity10, behavioral irritability .... hydrogen peroxides (H2O2) was measured at. 240 nm. Briefly, assay mixture consisted of 3 ml of H2O2 phosphate buffer and 0.05 ml of supernatant of ...

  5. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The significant effect of gender as a factor affecting choice is seem in the fact that females seems to be more careful in their choice because males have a higher tendency to patronize the patent medicine stores and would visit any health facility without any particular preference. (p<0.05). The marital status also goes to show.

  6. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The journal publishes original research articles, reviews, and case reports in health sciences and related disciplines, including medicine, pharmacy, nursing, biotechnology, cell and molecular ... Evaluation of Post-Operative Visual Outcomes of Cataract Surgery in Ghana · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  7. Leprosy: International Public Health Policies and Public Health Eras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyi Awofeso

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Public health policies continue to play important roles in national and international health reforms. However, the influence and legacies of the public health eras during which such policies are formulated remain largely underappreciated. The limited appreciation of this relationship may hinder consistent adoption of public health policies by nation-states, and encumber disinvestment from ineffective or anachronistic policies. This article reviews seven public health eras and highlights how each era has influenced international policy formulation for leprosy control—“the fertile soil for policy learning”. The author reiterates the role of health leadership and health activism in facilitating consistency in international health policy formulation and implementation for leprosy control.

  8. Leprosy: International Public Health Policies and Public Health Eras

    OpenAIRE

    Niyi Awofeso

    2011-01-01

    Public health policies continue to play important roles in national and international health reforms. However, the influence and legacies of the public health eras during which such policies are formulated remain largely underappreciated. The limited appreciation of this relationship may hinder consistent adoption of public health policies by nation-states, and encumber disinvestment from ineffective or anachronistic policies. This article reviews seven public health eras and highlights how e...

  9. A Review of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development's International Education Surveys: Governance, Human Capital Discourses, and Policy Debates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Clara; Volante, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Given the influential role that the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) plays in educational governance, we believe it is timely to provide an in-depth review of its education surveys and their associated human capital discourses. By reviewing and summarizing the OECD's suite of education surveys, this paper identifies the…

  10. Identifying organisational principles and management practices important to the quality of health care services for chronic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Anne

    2012-01-01

    are limited, it is necessary to identify efficient methods to improve the quality of care. Comparing health care systems is a well-known method for identifying new knowledge regarding, for instance, organisational methods and principles. Kaiser Permanente (KP), an integrated health care delivery system...... in the U.S., is recognized as providing high-quality chronic care; to some extent, this is due to KP's implementation of the chronic care model (CCM). This model recommends a range of evidence-based management practices that support the implementation of evidence-based medicine. However, it is not clear...... which management practices in the CCM are most efficient and in what combinations. In addition, financial incentives and public reporting of performance are often considered effective at improving the quality of health care services, but this has not yet been definitively proved....

  11. Human and organisational factors influencing the reliability of non-destructive testing. An international literary survey; Inhimillisten ja organisatoristen tekijoeiden yhteys NDT- tarkastusten luotettavuuteen. Katsaus kansainvaeliseen kirjallisuuteen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettunen, J.; Norros, L.

    1996-04-01

    The aim of the study is to chart human and organisational factors influencing the reliability of non-destructive testing (NDT). The emphasis will be in ultrasonic testing (UT) and in the planning and execution of in-service inspections during nuclear power plant maintenance outages. Being a literary survey this study is mainly based on the foreign and domestic research available on the topic. In consequence, the results presented in this report reflect the ideas of international research community. In addition to this, Finnish nuclear power plant operators (Imatran Voima Oy and Teollisuuden Voima Oy), independent inspection organisations and the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety have provided us with valuable information on NDT theory and practice. Especially, a kind of `big picture` of non-destructive testing has been pursued in the study. (6 figs., 2 tabs.).

  12. Organisation Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unphon, Hataichanok; Dittrich, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    Our work aims at understanding the design rationale for product line architecture by focusing on the design of common data access modules for complex simulation software products. This paper presents empirical evidence of organisational and business domain aspects that influence the development...... of product line architecture. We suggest that the assessment of use-situation and his tory of organisational structure should be considered when creating product line architectures, especially for products that are tailored and used interactively....

  13. The effect of perceived organisational support on burnout among community health nurses in China: the mediating role of professional self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoyi; Chen, Lin; Tian, Lang; Diao, Yongshu

    2016-01-01

    To examine the mediating effect of professional self-concept on the association between perceived organisational support and burnout among community health nurses in Chengdu, China. Burnout is a common phenomenon among nurses and previous studies have focused on work environmental factors contributing to burnout. Limited studies have examined the effects of perceived organisational support and professional self-concept on burnout among community health nurses. This was a cross-sectional study with 551 community health nurses in Chengdu, China, which included a two-stage sampling method. Structural equation modelling was used to examine the relationships among perceived organisational support, professional self-concept and burnout. The final sample included 456 nurses (82.7%). Perceived organisational support was a significant positive direct predictor for professional self-concept and a significant negative direct predictor for burnout. Professional self-concept was a significant negative direct contributor to burnout. Professional self-concept had a mediating effect on the relationship between perceived organisational support and burnout. Perceived organisational support may result in reduced burnout by facilitating the development of positive professional self-concept. Strategies such as establishing a supportive work environment and professional competence training may be effective methods for burnout prevention and management among community health nurses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Seeking health care through international medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissler, Lee Ann; Casken, John

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was the exploration of international travel experiences for the purpose of medical or dental care from the perspective of patients from Alaska and to develop insight and understanding of the essence of the phenomenon of medical tourism. The study is conceptually oriented within a model of health-seeking behavior. Using a qualitative design, 15 Alaska medical tourists were individually interviewed. The data were analyzed using a hermeneutic process of inquiry to uncover the meaning of the experience. Six themes reflecting the experiences of Alaska medical tourists emerged: "my motivation," "I did the research," "the medical care I need," "follow-up care," "the advice I give," and "in the future." Subthemes further categorized data for increased understanding of the phenomenon. The thematic analysis provides insight into the experience and reflects a modern approach to health-seeking behavior through international medical tourism. The results of this study provide increased understanding of the experience of obtaining health care internationally from the patient perspective. Improved understanding of medical tourism provides additional information about a contemporary approach to health-seeking behavior. Results of this study will aid nursing professionals in counseling regarding medical tourism options and providing follow-up health care after medical tourism. Nurses will be able to actively participate in global health policy discussions regarding medical tourism trends. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  15. INTERNAL CONTROL IN PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICES INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila FRUMUSACHI

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Internal control has a special role in the efficient organization of the entity’s management. The components of this control in the institutions of public health service are determined by the specific character of these institutions and National Standards of Internal Control in the Public Sector. The system of internal control in the institutions of public health service has the capacity to canalize the effort of the whole institution for the achievement of proposed objectives, to signalize permanently the dysfunctionalities about the quality of medical services and the deviations and to operate timely corrective measures for eliminating the noticed problems. In this regard the managers are obliged to analyse and to resize the system of internal control when in the organizational structure appear substantial changes.

  16. World health organization perspective on implementation of International Health Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Maxwell Charles

    2012-07-01

    In 2005, the International Health Regulations were adopted at the 58th World Health Assembly; in June 2007, they were entered into force for most countries. In 2012, the world is approaching a major 5-year milestone in the global commitment to ensure national capacities to identify, investigate, assess, and respond to public health events. In the past 5 years, existing programs have been boosted and some new activities relating to International Health Regulations provisions have been successfully established. The lessons and experience of the past 5 years need to be drawn upon to provide improved direction for the future.

  17. The nature of international health security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ya-Wen; Weng, Yi-Hao; Su, Yi-Yuan; Huang, Ching-Yi; Chang, Ya-Chen; Kuo, Ken N

    2009-01-01

    Health issues occasionally intersect security issues. Health security has been viewed as an essential part of human security. Policymakers and health professionals, however, do not share a common definition of health security. This article aims to characterize the notions of health security in order to clarify what constitutes the nexus of health and security. The concept of health security has evolved over time so that it encompasses many entities. Analyzing the health reports of four multilateral organizations (the United Nations, World Health Organization, Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, and the European Union) produced eight categories of most significant relevance to contemporary health security, allowing comparison of the definitions. The four categories are: emerging diseases; global infectious disease; deliberate release of chemical and biological materials; violence, conflict, and humanitarian emergencies. Two other categories of common concern are natural disasters and environmental change, as well as chemical and radioactive accidents. The final two categories, food insecurity and poverty, are discussed less frequently. Nevertheless, food security is emerging as an increasingly important issue in public health. Health security is the first line of defence against health emergencies. As globalization brings more complexities, dealing with the increased scale and extent of health security will require greater international effort and political support.

  18. His Excellency Mr Shanker Das Bairagi, Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador, Permanent Representative of the Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2012-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Shanker Das Bairagi, Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador, Permanent Representative of the Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

  19. His Excellency Mr Warren W. Tichenor Ambassador, Permanent Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva signing the Golden Book.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Warren W. Tichenor Ambassador, Permanent Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva signing the Golden Book.

  20. 16 February 2016 - British Ambassador to the United Nations and Other International Organisations at Geneva signing the guest book with CERN Director-General F. Gianotti and Beams Department Head P. Collier.

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2016-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Julian Braithwaite Ambassador and Permanent Representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the United Nations and Other International Organisations at Geneva

  1. His Excellency Mr Deepak Dhital Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Deepak Dhital Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

  2. His Excellency Mr Cristóbal González-Aller Jurado Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of Spain to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

    CERN Document Server

    Ordan, Julien Marius

    2017-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Cristóbal González-Aller Jurado Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of Spain to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

  3. His Excellency Mr Maurizio Enrico Serra Ambassador Permanent Representative of Italy to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva on the occasion of the Inauguration of the Industrial Exhibition Italy@ CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Maurizio Enrico Serra Ambassador Permanent Representative of Italy to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva on the occasion of the Inauguration of the Industrial Exhibition Italy@ CERN

  4. Her Excellency Ms Monique T.G. van Daalen Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Her Excellency Ms Monique T.G. van Daalen Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

  5. 26 August 2016 - K. Singye Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of Bhutan to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva signing the CERN Guest book with Adviser P. Fassnacht

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Kinga Singye Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of Bhutan to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva Friday 26 August 2016

  6. 19 May 2015 - M. Ciobanu Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of Romania to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva on the occasion of the inauguration of the industrial event Romania@CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Egli, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Mrs Maria Ciobanu Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of Romania to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva on the occasion of the inauguration of the industrial event Romania@CERN

  7. Organised crime and the efforts to combat it: a concern for public health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reynolds, Lucy; McKee, Martin

    2010-01-01

    .... These range from the traditional vice activities of running prostitution and supplying narcotics, to the newer growth areas of human trafficking in its various forms, from international supply...

  8. Non-profit organisations and government’s pro-poor spending: the case of health and development in Gauteng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L B Mzini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Globally, there is growing recognition of participatory public expenditure management (PPEM. PPEM is seen as the process whereby citizens and civil society organisations participate in the management of public expenditures. The adoption of PPEM is aimed at ensuring greater transparency, better targeting and tracking of resources, and increased overall responsiveness. The Gauteng Department of Health and Social Development (GDHSD is committed to co-operative governance; this includes working with different spheres of government and civil society or non-profit organisations (NPOs. NPOs are required to have a governing committee to manage funds allocated by GDHSD. The committee has the capacity to hold the NPO management accountable for the resources (financial and material entrusted to it by the GDHSD. The effectiveness of NPOs is challenged by poor attendance of board members at meetings, poor understanding of the board’s mandate and responsibilities and lack of experience amongst members. The paradigm of PPEM is still faced with challenges to ensure that significant flows of revenue are accounted for and used effectively for growth and poverty reduction. This study is divided into three components. The first section focuses on the background, the introduction and the conceptual framework. The second part focuses on the empirical study for deriving a benchmark for the South African NPO sector. The third section highlights good practices as well as governance-related challenges. Finally, for further consideration by the GDHSD, a series of recommendations is provided, focusing on how key domestic stakeholders can better contribute to successful participatory budgeting programmes. Keywords: Participatory public expenditure management, non-profit organisations, pro-poor spending, public finance, public financial management, early childhood development.  Disciplines: Public Management and Administration, Public Financial Management

  9. Organisational Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Peter

    This Ph.D. research is carried out for the business unit at LEGO concerned with Internet shopping (e-business) called LEGO Direct. The research is concerned with the issues of organisational change and management. The research is partly sponsored by LEGO Company and Aalborg University The research......, ranging from areas such as engineering, psychology, management, and sociology. We also learnt that all of the theories were adding bits and pieces to our understanding of organisational change. During the search and selection, we found that it would be interesting to analyse what can be gained from...... understanding of organizational change and its processes both theoretical as well as empirical. In the search for interesting and relevant theories that would fulfill the goal of thesis, we learnt that the field of organisational change was complex and widely spread across lots of disciplines and paradigms...

  10. Le Rapport langue-culture dans les organisations internationales: Pour Une Sociologie des organisations internationales (The Relationship between Language and Culture in International Organizations: Toward a Sociology of International Organizations).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrab de Saint Robert, de Marie-Josee

    1988-01-01

    Understanding the work of international organizations requires an understanding of the relationship between language and culture, a relationship evident in the activities of the international organizations. This relationship is partly responsible for the negative image of such organizations. Research in the sociology of international organizations…

  11. Sociopolitical determinants of international health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Pol; Van der Stuyft, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    For decades, two opposing logics have dominated the health policy debate: a comprehensive health care approach, with the 1978 Alma Ata Declaration as its cornerstone, and a private competition logic, emphasizing the role of the private sector. We present this debate and its influence on international health policies in the context of changing global economic and sociopolitical power relations in the second half of the last century. The neoliberal approach is illustrated with Chile's health sector reform in the 1980s and the Colombian reform since 1993. The comprehensive "public logic" is shown through the social insurance models in Costa Rica and in Brazil and through the national public health systems in Cuba since 1959 and in Nicaragua during the 1980s. These experiences emphasize that health care systems do not naturally gravitate toward greater fairness and efficiency, but require deliberate policy decisions. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions:]br]sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. Safety cases for medical devices and health information technology: involving health-care organisations in the assurance of safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujan, Mark A; Koornneef, Floor; Chozos, Nick; Pozzi, Simone; Kelly, Tim

    2013-09-01

    In the United Kingdom, there are more than 9000 reports of adverse events involving medical devices annually. The regulatory processes in Europe and in the United States have been challenged as to their ability to protect patients effectively from unreasonable risk and harm. Two of the major shortcomings of current practice include the lack of transparency in the safety certification process and the lack of involvement of service providers. We reviewed recent international standardisation activities in this area, and we reviewed regulatory practices in other safety-critical industries. The review showed that the use of safety cases is an accepted practice in UK safety-critical industries, but at present, there is little awareness of this concept in health care. Safety cases have the potential to provide greater transparency and confidence in safety certification and to act as a communication tool between manufacturers, service providers, regulators and patients.

  13. Celebrity-led Development Organisations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budabin, Alexandra Cosima; Rasmussen, Louise Mubanda; Richey, Lisa Ann

    2017-01-01

    The past decade has seen a frontier open up in international development engagement with the entrance of new actors such as celebrity-led organisations. We explore how such organisations earn legitimacy with a focus on Madonna’s Raising Malawi and Ben Affleck’s Eastern Congo Initiative. The study...... for funding, endorsements, and expertise. We argue that the ways in which celebrity-led organisations establish themselves as legitimate development actors illustrate broader dynamics of the machinery of development....

  14. 10th International Conference on Health Informatics

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the International Conference on Health Informatics is to bring together researchers and practitioners interested in the application of information and communication technologies (ICT) to healthcare and medicine in general and to the support of persons with special needs in particular.

  15. Ranking health between countries in international comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Cross-national comparisons and ranking of summary measures of population health sometimes give rise to inconsistent and diverging conclusions. In order to minimise confusion, international comparative studies ought to be based on well-harmonised data with common standards of definitions...

  16. Increased health care utilisation in international adoptees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, Heidi Jeannet; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Kragstrup, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    after adoption. Our study aimed to theassess health-care utilisation of international adoptees inprimary and secondary care for somatic and psychiatricdiagnoses in a late post-adoption period. Is there an increaseduse of the health-care system in this period, evenwhen increased morbidity in the group...... comprised internationallyadopted children (n = 6,820), adopted between 1994 and2005, and all non-adopted children (n = 492,374) who couldbe matched with the adopted children on sex, age, municipalityand family constellation at the time of adoption. Results: International adoption increased the use...... of allservices in primary care, while in secondary care only fewareas showed an increased long-term morbidity. Conclusion: International adoptees use medical servicesin primary care at a higher rate than non-adoptees someyears after adoption. Excess use of services in secondarycare is also present, but only...

  17. Using information communication technologies to increase the institutional capacity of local health organisations in Africa: a case study of the Kenya Civil Society Portal for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juma, Charles; Sundsmo, Aaron; Maket, Boniface; Powell, Richard; Aluoch, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    Achieving the healthcare components of the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals is significantly premised on effective service delivery by civil society organisations (CSOs). However, many CSOs across Africalack the necessary capacity to perform this role robustly. This paper reports on an evaluation of the use, and perceived impact, of aknowledge management tool upon institutional strengthening among CSOs working in Kenya's health sector. Three methods were used: analytics data; user satisfaction surveys; and a furtherkey informant survey. Satisfaction with the portal was consistently high, with 99% finding the quality and relevance of the content very good or good for institutional strengthening standards, governance, and planning and resource mobilisation. Critical facilitators to the success of knowledge management for CSO institutional strengthening were identified as people/culture (developed resources and organisational narratives) and technology (easily accessible, enabling information exchange, tools/resources available, access to consultants/partners). Critical barriers were identified as people/culture (database limitations, materials limitations, and lack of active users), and process (limited access, limited interactions, and limited approval process). This pilot study demonstrated the perceived utility of a web-based knowledge management portal among developing nations' CSOs, with widespread satisfaction across multiple domains, which increased over time. Providing increased opportunities for collective mutual learning, promoting a culture of data use for decision making, and encouraging all health organisations to be learning institutions should be a priority for those interested in promoting sustainable long-term solutions for Africa.

  18. Engendering a high performing organisational culture through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Concluding that Africa's poor organisational performances are attributable to some inadequacies in the cultural foundations of countries and organisations, this paper argues for internal branding as the way forward for African organisations. Through internal branding an African organization can use a systematic and ...

  19. [On the issue of improving health care organisation for retirement age population (the Nizhny Novgorod experience)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vvedenskaia, E S; Kobzeva, L F; Vvedenskaia, I I

    2012-01-01

    The article presents a detailed analysis of health care provision to both general and retirement age population (RAP) in the Nizhny Novgorod region. For the past 10 years, the organization and use of different types of health care for RAP have not changed. The availability of inpatient health care for RAP is high whereas the availability of nursing and outpatient health care is low and palliative care service is not available. In order to enhance availability and ensure quality of medical services it is necessary to implement restructuring of health care for RAP at the municipal level herewith a key attention will be paid to out-patient types of health care expansion and palliative care development. The authors formulate some proposals aimed at improving the organization of medical and social care for RAP which should be included in the health care restructuring program at the municipal level.

  20. Organization of the population health follow-up; Organisation du suivi sanitaire des populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirard, Ph. [Institut de Veille Sanitaire, 94 - Saint Maurice (France)

    2010-07-01

    This document presents propositions for the organization of health supervision after a radiological accident of medium severity. It distinguishes short term medical care (psychological impacts, side effects of ingestion of iodine tablets, anthropo-radiometry when required, and prevention or taking into care of health problems due to massive grouping of people), and long term measures. The author indicates and discusses what health supervision will have to do: to identify health problems to be treated in priority, to assess the impact of the accident, to give elements on the application and efficiency of management actions. He also discusses and comments the various tools which health supervision will use: a health control and alert system, existing health supervision data, an adapted epidemiological investigation

  1. Building on the EGIPPS performance assessment: the multipolar framework as a heuristic to tackle the complexity of performance of public service oriented health care organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Bruno; Hoerée, Tom; da Silveira, Valéria Campos; Van Belle, Sara; Prashanth, Nuggehalli S; Kegels, Guy

    2014-04-17

    Performance of health care systems is a key concern of policy makers and health service managers all over the world. It is also a major challenge, given its multidimensional nature that easily leads to conceptual and methodological confusion. This is reflected by a scarcity of models that comprehensively analyse health system performance. In health, one of the most comprehensive performance frameworks was developed by the team of Leggat and Sicotte. Their framework integrates 4 key organisational functions (goal attainment, production, adaptation to the environment, and values and culture) and the tensions between these functions.We modified this framework to better fit the assessment of the performance of health organisations in the public service domain and propose an analytical strategy that takes it into the social complexity of health organisations. The resulting multipolar performance framework (MPF) is a meta-framework that facilitates the analysis of the relations and interactions between the multiple actors that influence the performance of health organisations. Using the MPF in a dynamic reiterative mode not only helps managers to identify the bottlenecks that hamper performance, but also the unintended effects and feedback loops that emerge. Similarly, it helps policymakers and programme managers at central level to better anticipate the potential results and side effects of and required conditions for health policies and programmes and to steer their implementation accordingly.

  2. Organisational LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez-Blanco, Julia; Finkbeiner, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    environmental performance over time, supporting strategic decisions, and informing corporate sustainability reporting. Several initiatives are on the way for the LCA of organisations: the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative published the ‘Guidance on organizational LCA’, using ISO/TS 14072 as a backbone; moreover...

  3. Learning organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Jelenc Krašovec

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available A vast array of economical, social, political, cultural and other factors influences the transformed role of learning and education in the society, as well as the functioning of local community and its social and communication patterns. The influences which are manifested as global problems can only be successfully solved on the level of local community. Analogously with the society in general, there is a great need of transforming a local community into a learning, flexible and interconnected environment which takes into account different interests, wishes and needs regarding learning and being active. The fundamental answer to changes is the strategy of lifelong learning and education which requires reorganisation of all walks of life (work, free time, family, mass media, culture, sport, education and transforming of organisations into learning organisations. With learning society based on networks of knowledge individuals are turning into learning individuals, and organisations into learning organisations; people who learn take the responsibility of their progress, learning denotes partnership among learning people, teachers, parents, employers and local community, so that they work together to achieve better results.

  4. Organisation 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Camilla Hedegaard; Meldgaard, Morten

    2017-01-01

    På kurset Organisation studerer vi en række bymæssige og arkitektoniske organiseringer, som vi kalder `vektorer`. Det er en åben betegnelse for de mange fænomener, som dels organiseres rumligt, tektonisk og programmatisk og dels selv har form- og strukturdannende kræfter. Et godt eksempel er...

  5. Les dangers de l’implication : donateurs bilatéraux, organisations confessionnelles et développement international

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Clarke

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available L’interface entre foi et développement est devenue, depuis quinze ans, un trait important des discours et des politiques de développement. Même si une grande partie de la littérature récente la considère comme une évolution bienvenue et positive qui conduit à un engagement productif entre donateurs et groupes confessionnels, cette nouvelle interface constitue également un défi, tant pour les donateurs que pour les chefs religieux. Le présent article explore les initiatives récentes des donateurs européens bilatéraux en matière de collaboration avec les organisations confessionnelles, ainsi que les efforts des groupes confessionnels pour créer les conditions d’une collaboration productive. Il examine également certaines des controverses qui en résultent, et estime que les donateurs, tout comme les organisations confessionnelles, ont du chemin à parcourir pour créer les conditions et les mécanismes qui leur permettraient de mener ensemble une lutte efficace contre la pauvreté et l’exclusion sociale.

  6. Determinants of organised sports participation patterns countries: an imperative investment for improving the health of populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Fauziah; Shipton, Leah; White, Franklin; Nuwayhid, Iman; London, Leslie; Ghaffar, Abdul; Ha, Bui Thi Thu; Tomson, Göran; Rimal, Rajiv; Islam, Anwar; Takian, Amirhossein; Wong, Samuel; Zaidi, Shehla; Khan, Kausar; Karmaliani, Rozina; Abbasi, Imran Naeem; Abbas, Farhat

    2016-09-07

    Public health has multicultural origins. By the close of the nineteenth century, Schools of Public Health (SPHs) began to emerge in western countries in response to major contemporary public health challenges. The Flexner Report (1910) emphasized the centrality of preventive medicine, sanitation, and public health measures in health professional education. The Alma Ata Declaration on Primary Health Care (PHC) in 1978 was a critical milestone, especially for low and middle-income countries (LMICs), conceptualizing a close working relationship between PHC and public health measures. The Commission on Social Determinants of Health (2005-2008) strengthened the case for SPHs in LMICs as key stakeholders in efforts to reduce global health inequities. This scoping review groups text into public health challenges faced by LMICs and the role of SPHs in addressing these challenges. The challenges faced by LMICs include rapid urbanization, environmental degradation, unfair terms of global trade, limited capacity for equitable growth, mass displacements associated with conflicts and natural disasters, and universal health coverage. Poor governance and externally imposed donor policies and agendas, further strain the fragile health systems of LMICs faced with epidemiological transition. Moreover barriers to education and research imposed by limited resources, political and economic instability, and unbalanced partnerships additionally aggravate the crisis. To address these contextual challenges effectively, SPHs are offering broad based health professional education, conducting multidisciplinary population based research and fostering collaborative partnerships. SPHs are also looked upon as the key drivers to achieve sustainable development goals (SDGs). SPHs in LMICs can contribute to overcoming several public health challenges being faced by LMICs, including achieving SDGs. Most importantly they can develop cadres of competent and well-motivated public health professionals

  7. New insights into health financing: First results of the international data collection under the System of Health Accounts 2011 framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael; Morgan, David

    2017-07-01

    International comparisons of health spending and financing are most frequently carried out using datasets of international organisations based on the System of Health Accounts (SHA). This accounting framework has recently been updated and 2016 saw the first international data collection under the new SHA 2011 guidelines. In addition to reaching better comparability of health spending figures and greater country coverage, the updated framework has seen changes in the dimension of health financing leading to important consequences when analysing health financing data. This article presents the first results of health spending and financing data collected under this new framework and highlights the areas where SHA 2011 has become a more useful tool for policy analysis, by complementing data on expenditure of health financing schemes with information about their revenue streams. It describes the major conceptual changes in the scope of health financing and highlights why comprehensive analyses based on SHA 2011 can provide for a more complete description and comparison of health financing across countries, facilitate a more meaningful discussion of fiscal sustainability of health spending by also analysing the revenues of compulsory public schemes and help to clarify the role of governments in financing health care - which is generally much bigger than previously documented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. If you build it, they will come: unintended future uses of organised health data collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Doherty, Kieran C; Christofides, Emily; Yen, Jeffery; Bentzen, Heidi Beate; Burke, Wylie; Hallowell, Nina; Koenig, Barbara A; Willison, Donald J

    2016-09-06

    Health research increasingly relies on organized collections of health data and biological samples. There are many types of sample and data collections that are used for health research, though these are collected for many purposes, not all of which are health-related. These collections exist under different jurisdictional and regulatory arrangements and include: 1) Population biobanks, cohort studies, and genome databases 2) Clinical and public health data 3) Direct-to-consumer genetic testing 4) Social media 5) Fitness trackers, health apps, and biometric data sensors Ethical, legal, and social challenges of such collections are well recognized, but there has been limited attention to the broader societal implications of the existence of these collections. Although health research conducted using these collections is broadly recognized as beneficent, secondary uses of these data and samples may be controversial. We examine both documented and hypothetical scenarios of secondary uses of health data and samples. In particular, we focus on the use of health data for purposes of: Forensic investigations Civil lawsuits Identification of victims of mass casualty events Denial of entry for border security and immigration Making health resource rationing decisions Facilitating human rights abuses in autocratic regimes Current safeguards relating to the use of health data and samples include research ethics oversight and privacy laws. These safeguards have a strong focus on informed consent and anonymization, which are aimed at the protection of the individual research subject. They are not intended to address broader societal implications of health data and sample collections. As such, existing arrangements are insufficient to protect against subversion of health databases for non-sanctioned secondary uses, or to provide guidance for reasonable but controversial secondary uses. We are concerned that existing debate in the scholarly literature and beyond has not

  9. Organising, Educating... Changing the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, John

    2005-01-01

    Over the past few years a constellation of social movements and organisations concerned with issues of globalisation and world poverty have exploded onto the world stage. They have mobilised demonstrations, organised mass gatherings and conferences, created e-networks and websites and become major players in international political lobbying and…

  10. Determinants of innovation within health care organisations: a literature review and Delphi-study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleuren, M.A.H.; Wiefferink, C.H.; Paulussen, T.G.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. When introducing innovations to health care, it is important to gain insight into determinants that may facilitate or impede the introduction, in order to design an appropriate strategy for introducing the innovation. To obtain an overview of determinants of innovations in health care

  11. The associations between psychotic experiences, and substance use and substance use disorders: Findings from the World Health Organisation World Mental Health Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenhardt, Louisa; Saha, Sukanta; Lim, Carmen C W; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Al-Hamzawi, Ali; Alonso, Jordi; Andrade, Laura H; Bromet, Evelyn J; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas-de-Almeida, José M; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Florescu, Silvia; Gureje, Oye; Haro, Josep M; Karam, Elie G; Karam, Georges; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Lee, Sing; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Makanjuola, Victor; Medina-Mora, Maria E; Mneimneh, Zeina; Navarro-Mateu, Fernando; Piazza, Marina; Posada-Villa, José; Sampson, Nancy A; Scott, Kate M; Stagnaro, Juan C; Ten Have, Margreet; Kendler, Kenneth S; Kessler, Ronald C; McGrath, John J

    2017-12-28

    Prior research has found bidirectional associations between psychotic experiences (PEs), and selected substance use disorders. We aimed to extend this research by examining the bidirectional association between PEs, and various types of substance use (SU), and substance use disorders (SUDs), and the influence of antecedent mental disorders on these associations. We used data from the World Health Organisation World Mental Health surveys. A total of 30,902 adult respondents across 18 countries were assessed for (a) six types of lifetime PEs, (b) a range of types of SU and DSM-IV SUDs, and (c) mental disorders using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Discrete-time survival analyses based on retrospective age-at-onset reports examined the bidirectional associations between PEs and SU/SUDs controlling for antecedent mental disorders. After adjusting for demographics, comorbid SU/SUDs and antecedent mental disorders, those with prior alcohol use disorders (OR=1.6, 95% CI=1.2-2.0), extra-medical prescription drug use (OR=1.5, 95% CI=1.1-1.9), alcohol use (OR=1.4, 95% CI=1.1-1.7), and tobacco use (OR=1.3, 95% CI=1.0-1.8) had increased odds of subsequent first onset of PEs. In contrast, those with temporally prior PEs had increased odds of subsequent onset of tobacco use (OR=1.5, 95% CI=1.2-1.9), alcohol use (OR=1.3, 95% CI=1.1-1.6) or cannabis use (OR=1.3, 95% CI=1.0-1.5) as well as of all substance use disorders (ORs ranged between 1.4 and 1.5). There was a dose response relationship between both count and frequency of PEs and increased subsequent odds of selected SU/SUDs. Associations between psychotic experiences (PEs) and substance use/substance use disorders (SU/SUDs) are often bidirectional, but not all types of SU/SUDs are associated with PEs. These findings suggest that it is important to be aware of the presence of PEs within those with SUDs or at risk of SUDs, given the plausibility that they may each impact upon the other. This article is

  12. Transition Towards An Integrated Network Organisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mykhaylenko, Alona; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum

    2016-01-01

    Management of internationally dispersed and networked operations has been in the focus of research attention. However, the existing studies underestimate the incrementality of changes shaping such organisations. This work investigates how organisations evolve into network structures, with particu......Management of internationally dispersed and networked operations has been in the focus of research attention. However, the existing studies underestimate the incrementality of changes shaping such organisations. This work investigates how organisations evolve into network structures...

  13. Educating for Peace: The Role and Impact of International Organisations in Interwar and Post-War Danish School Experiments, 1918–1975

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Egedal Andreasen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the aftermath of the two world wars, strong international networks and organisations manifested themselves with promotion of peace through education on their agenda. Danish pedagogical experiments and experimental schools were strongly influenced by these trends and played a role in subsequent school practices and policies. Drawing on the notions of “the transnational” and “trading spaces” as well as the theoretical concepts of transfer, translation, and transformation, this article addresses the following research question: How were international ideas, knowledge and practice of promoting peace through education transferred, translated, and transformed in Danish school experiments in interwar and post-war scenarios? In exploring this question, the article uses transnational and Danish archival sources as well as journals and reports linked to the Danish progressive education movement. Thus, the article contributes to our understanding of the entanglements of educational ideas and to how trends of internationalisation and globalisation work.

  14. Developments in international/European health law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbing, Henriette D C Roscam

    2009-03-01

    International (European) organizations have impact on health law. The most recent developments are: a revision of the world Medical's Association Declaration of Helsinki, a proposal for a Directive (European Commission) on standards of quality and safety of human organs intended for transplantation, accompanied by a ten point action plan; a proposal (European Commission) for a Directive on the application of patients' rights in cross-border health care; a proposal (European commission) for a Directive on information to the general public on medicinal products subject to medical prescription.

  15. Participatory Development and Non-Governmental Organisations in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Participatory Development and Non-Governmental Organisations in Sudan: Expectations and Realities. ... links between government institutions local community organisations, private sectors and international organisations. Moreover, the article ... Information about NGOs is based on a field research conducted 2007.

  16. Mental health service changes, organisational factors, and patient suicide in England in 1997-2012: a before-and-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Nav; Ibrahim, Saied; While, David; Baird, Alison; Rodway, Cathryn; Hunt, Isabelle M; Windfuhr, Kirsten; Moreton, Adam; Shaw, Jenny; Appleby, Louis

    2016-06-01

    Research into which aspects of service provision in mental health are most effective in preventing suicide is sparse. We examined the association between service changes, organisational factors, and suicide rates in a national sample. We did a before-and-after analysis of service delivery data and an ecological analysis of organisational characteristics, in relation to suicide rates, in providers of mental health care in England. We also investigated whether the effect of service changes varied according to markers of organisational functioning. Overall, 19 248 individuals who died by suicide within 12 months of contact with mental health services were included (1997-2012). Various service changes related to ward safety, improved community services, staff training, and implementation of policy and guidance were associated with a lower suicide rate after the introduction of these changes (incidence rate ratios ranged from 0·71 to 0·79, psuicide rates but others, such as staff sickness (-0·12, 0·37) and patient satisfaction (-0·06, 0·64), were not. Service changes had more effect in organisations that had low rates of staff turnover but high rates of overall event reporting. Aspects of mental health service provision might have an effect on suicide rates in clinical populations but the wider organisational context in which service changes are made are likely to be important too. System-wide change implemented across the patient care pathway could be a key strategy for improving patient safety in mental health care. The Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership commissions the Mental Health Clinical Outcome Review Programme, National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Homicide by People with Mental Illness, on behalf of NHS England, NHS Wales, the Scottish Government Health and Social Care Directorate, the Northern Ireland Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety, and the States of Jersey and Guernsey. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  17. Organisational culture and post-merger integration in an academic health centre: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovseiko, Pavel V; Melham, Karen; Fowler, Jan; Buchan, Alastair M

    2015-01-22

    Around the world, the last two decades have been characterised by an increase in the numbers of mergers between healthcare providers, including some of the most prestigious university hospitals and academic health centres. However, many mergers fail to bring the anticipated benefits, and successful post-merger integration in university hospitals and academic health centres is even harder to achieve. An increasing body of literature suggests that organisational culture affects the success of post-merger integration and academic-clinical collaboration. This paper reports findings from a mixed-methods single-site study to examine 1) the perceptions of organisational culture in academic and clinical enterprises at one National Health Service (NHS) trust, and 2) the major cultural issues for its post-merger integration with another NHS trust and strategic partnership with a university. From the entire population of 72 clinician-scientists at one of the legacy NHS trusts, 38 (53%) completed a quantitative Competing Values Framework survey and 24 (33%) also provided qualitative responses. The survey was followed up by semi-structured interviews with six clinician-scientists and a group discussion including five senior managers. The cultures of two legacy NHS trusts differed and were primarily distinct from the culture of the academic enterprise. Major cultural issues were related to the relative size, influence, and history of the legacy NHS trusts, and the implications of these for respective identities, clinical services, and finances. Strategic partnership with a university served as an important ameliorating consideration in reaching trust merger. However, some aspects of university entrepreneurial culture are difficult to reconcile with the NHS service delivery model and may create tension. There are challenges in preserving a more desirable culture at one of the legacy NHS trusts, enhancing cultures in both legacy NHS trusts during their post-merger integration, and

  18. An evaluation of the benefits to a UK Health Care Trust working in a partnership with a hospital in Northern Uganda: International partnership working in mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, Ben; Sills, Jenny; Thompson, Andrew R

    2015-12-22

    Despite the worthy intentions of international health partnerships between high-income countries and countries with developing economies, the tangible benefits are rarely evaluated, limiting the assessment of the achievements of such collaborations. The present study used longitudinal qualitative methods to examine the individual and organisational benefits of a partnership between a National Health Service (NHS) mental health Trust in the United Kingdom and a mental health referral hospital in Northern Uganda. Benefits to UK staff and organisational development were benchmarked against an existing framework of healthcare competencies. Partnership involvement was beneficial to UK staff, by increasing awareness of diversity, and in enhancing ability to work flexibly and as a team. There were clear benefits expressed with regards to the partnership having the potential to enhance organisational reputation and staff morale. The findings from this study demonstrate that international partnerships are experienced as being of tangible value for healthcare staff from high-income countries, providing opportunities for the development of recognised healthcare competencies. In this study there was also some evidence that staff involvement might also provide wider organisational benefits.

  19. Preliminary report from the World Health Organisation Chest Radiography in Epidemiological Studies project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomed, Nasreen; Fancourt, Nicholas; de Campo, John; de Campo, Margaret; Akano, Aliu; Cherian, Thomas; Cohen, Olivia G; Greenberg, David; Lacey, Stephen; Kohli, Neera; Lederman, Henrique M; Madhi, Shabir A; Manduku, Veronica; McCollum, Eric D; Park, Kate; Ribo-Aristizabal, Jose Luis; Bar-Zeev, Naor; O'Brien, Katherine L; Mulholland, Kim

    2017-10-01

    Childhood pneumonia is among the leading infectious causes of mortality in children younger than 5 years of age globally. Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is the leading infectious cause of childhood bacterial pneumonia. The diagnosis of childhood pneumonia remains a critical epidemiological task for monitoring vaccine and treatment program effectiveness. The chest radiograph remains the most readily available and common imaging modality to assess childhood pneumonia. In 1997, the World Health Organization Radiology Working Group was established to provide a consensus method for the standardized definition for the interpretation of pediatric frontal chest radiographs, for use in bacterial vaccine efficacy trials in children. The definition was not designed for use in individual patient clinical management because of its emphasis on specificity at the expense of sensitivity. These definitions and endpoint conclusions were published in 2001 and an analysis of observer variation for these conclusions using a reference library of chest radiographs was published in 2005. In response to the technical needs identified through subsequent meetings, the World Health Organization Chest Radiography in Epidemiological Studies (CRES) project was initiated and is designed to be a continuation of the World Health Organization Radiology Working Group. The aims of the World Health Organization CRES project are to clarify the definitions used in the World Health Organization defined standardized interpretation of pediatric chest radiographs in bacterial vaccine impact and pneumonia epidemiological studies, reinforce the focus on reproducible chest radiograph readings, provide training and support with World Health Organization defined standardized interpretation of chest radiographs and develop guidelines and tools for investigators and site staff to assist in obtaining high-quality chest radiographs.

  20. Preliminary report from the World Health Organisation Chest Radiography in Epidemiological Studies project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahomed, Nasreen [University of the Witwatersrand, Department of Radiology, Johannesburg (South Africa); University of the Witwatersrand, Medical Research Council: Respiratory and Meningeal Pathogens Research Unit, Johannesburg (South Africa); Fancourt, Nicholas [Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore (United States); Murdoch Children' s Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); De Campo, John; De Campo, Margaret [Murdoch Children' s Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Melbourne University, Melbourne (Australia); Akano, Aliu [Department of Radiology National Hospital, Abuja (Nigeria); Medical Research Council, Gambia (South Africa); Cherian, Thomas [World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland); Cohen, Olivia G. [Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore (United States); World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland); Greenberg, David [Soroka University Medical Center, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Lacey, Stephen [Murdoch Children' s Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Kohli, Neera [King George Medical University, Lucknow (India); Lederman, Henrique M. [Paulista School of Medicine, Hospital Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Madhi, Shabir A. [University of the Witwatersrand, Medical Research Council: Respiratory and Meningeal Pathogens Research Unit, Johannesburg (South Africa); University of the Witwatersrand, Department of Science and Technology/National Research Foundation: Vaccine Preventable Diseases, Johannesburg (South Africa); Manduku, Veronica [Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), Nairobi (Kenya); McCollum, Eric D. [Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Eudowood Division of Pediatric Respiratory Sciences, Baltimore (United States); Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore (United States); Park, Kate [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford (United Kingdom); Ribo-Aristizabal, Jose Luis [Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona (Spain); Bar-Zeev, Naor [University of Malawi, Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme, College of Medicine, Blantyre (Malawi); University of Liverpool, Centre for Global Vaccine Research, Liverpool (United Kingdom); O' Brien, Katherine L. [Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore (United States); Mulholland, Kim [Murdoch Children' s Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-15

    Childhood pneumonia is among the leading infectious causes of mortality in children younger than 5 years of age globally. Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is the leading infectious cause of childhood bacterial pneumonia. The diagnosis of childhood pneumonia remains a critical epidemiological task for monitoring vaccine and treatment program effectiveness. The chest radiograph remains the most readily available and common imaging modality to assess childhood pneumonia. In 1997, the World Health Organization Radiology Working Group was established to provide a consensus method for the standardized definition for the interpretation of pediatric frontal chest radiographs, for use in bacterial vaccine efficacy trials in children. The definition was not designed for use in individual patient clinical management because of its emphasis on specificity at the expense of sensitivity. These definitions and endpoint conclusions were published in 2001 and an analysis of observer variation for these conclusions using a reference library of chest radiographs was published in 2005. In response to the technical needs identified through subsequent meetings, the World Health Organization Chest Radiography in Epidemiological Studies (CRES) project was initiated and is designed to be a continuation of the World Health Organization Radiology Working Group. The aims of the World Health Organization CRES project are to clarify the definitions used in the World Health Organization defined standardized interpretation of pediatric chest radiographs in bacterial vaccine impact and pneumonia epidemiological studies, reinforce the focus on reproducible chest radiograph readings, provide training and support with World Health Organization defined standardized interpretation of chest radiographs and develop guidelines and tools for investigators and site staff to assist in obtaining high-quality chest radiographs. (orig.)

  1. The weakest link: inter-organisational communication about (near-) incidents in the health care chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kaap, G.

    2012-01-01

    Where people work, things go wrong, mistakes happen, and systems fail. The health care system is an example of a complex environment in which mistakes happen. Worst-case scenario, patients die because of things that go wrong, because of (near-) incidents. Central to this study, is the 'exchange of

  2. Organisation and financing of the health care systems of Bulgaria and Greece -- what are the parallels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exadaktylos, Nikolaos M

    2005-05-28

    The Bulgarian and Greek Medical Care systems have been reformated the last fifteen years. The aim of this study was an examination and comparison of the Bulgarian and Greek Medical Care Systems. This study was prepared by using all the published data related to both Bulgarian and Greek Medical Care systems. Besides, personal communications with related offices such as administration offices of hospitals and Ministries of Health were made. In both countries, besides the compulsory insurance there is also additional voluntary insurance which is provided by private companies. The most important difference is the family doctor (specialist in general medicine) existing in Bulgaria. Every insured person needs a 'referral form' completed by the family doctor before visiting a hospital for medical attention (except emergencies). In contrast, in Greece an insured person can directly visit any hospital without needing any forms and independent of the severity of their health problem. An important disadvantage of the Greek health system is the low number of hospitals (139), in relation to population. In contrast, there are 211 hospitals in Bulgaria, although its population is lower than in Greece. In both Greek and Bulgarian health systems changes must be done to solve the problems related to informal payments, limited financing, large debts, lack of appropriate investment policy, lack of an objective method for the costing of medical activities and inefficient management.

  3. Organisational learning and continuous improvement of health and safety in certified manufacturers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granerud, Lise; Rocha, Robson Sø

    2011-01-01

    Certified management systems have increasingly been applied by firms in recent decades and now cover the management of health and safety, principally through the OHSAS 18001 standard. In order to become certified, firms must not only observe the relevant legislation, but also improve performance...

  4. 6 JUne 2016 - Permanent Representative of Greece to the United Nations Office at Geneva and other international organisations in Switzerland Ambassador A. Korka signing the guest book with CERN Director-General F. Gianotti.

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Her Excellency Ms Anna Korka Ambassador Permanent Representative of Greece to the United Nations Office at Geneva and other international organisations in Switzerland; Also present: Deputy Permanent Representative I. Tsaousis, Member State Liaison Officer E. Tsesmelis, Director for International Relations C. Warakaulle and Head of Member State Relations P. Wells.

  5. Health system frameworks and performance indicators in eight countries: A comparative international analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Hibbert, Peter; Blakely, Brette; Plumb, Jennifer; Hannaford, Natalie; Long, Janet Cameron; Marks, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    Performance indicators are a popular mechanism for measuring the quality of healthcare to facilitate both quality improvement and systems management. Few studies make comparative assessments of different countries' performance indicator frameworks. This study identifies and compares frameworks and performance indicators used in selected Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development health systems to measure and report on the performance of healthcare organisations and local health systems. Countries involved are Australia, Canada, Denmark, England, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Scotland and the United States. Identification of comparable international indicators and analyses of their characteristics and of their broader national frameworks and contexts were undertaken. Two dimensions of indicators - that they are nationally consistent (used across the country rather than just regionally) and locally relevant (measured and reported publicly at a local level, for example, a health service) - were deemed important. The most commonly used domains in performance frameworks were safety, effectiveness and access. The search found 401 indicators that fulfilled the 'nationally consistent and locally relevant' criteria. Of these, 45 indicators are reported in more than one country. Cardiovascular, surgery and mental health were the most frequently reported disease groups. These comparative data inform researchers and policymakers internationally when designing health performance frameworks and indicator sets.

  6. International and collaborative strategies to enhance genetic health in purebred dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedhammar, Åke A; Malm, Sofia; Bonnett, Brenda

    2011-08-01

    Health problems in pedigree dogs have recently been highlighted in the media worldwide and verified internationally by cynological organisations. Collaborative actions are now needed to deal with both existing and future issues. In this article, potential roles for various stakeholders are discussed and the value of national and international platforms for collaborations is stressed. Development of specific strategies for action must be based on criteria of significance, such as severity, prevalence and inheritance, as well as availability of effective preventive measures. Assessment of options should be founded on evidence from appropriate populations-at-risk and consider broader issues, such as demographics and human-animal interactions. Existing data, such as those from insurance statistics and health surveys, should be used as a reference until representative national/international population-level breed-specific data are available. Key issues and challenges, as well as possible strategies to address them, are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The role of legal regulation and place of international organisations in transport companies’ development at foreign market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleh Lyashuk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the analysis of the market of international trucking transport companies. The study is based on statistics and works of domestic and foreign scholars on the issue of current state and prospects of market development. Dedicated dynamics and structure of international trucking market, features of export, import and transit trucking. Identified the main priorities for the development and growth of the market.

  8. Perceived critical success factors of electronic health record system implementation in a dental clinic context: An organisational management perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidek, Yusof Haji; Martins, Jorge Tiago

    2017-11-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) make health care more efficient. They improve the quality of care by making patients' medical history more accessible. However, little is known about the factors contributing to the successful EHR implementation in dental clinics. This article aims to identify the perceived critical success factors of EHR system implementation in a dental clinic context. We used Grounded Theory to analyse data collected in the context of Brunei's national EHR - the Healthcare Information and Management System (Bru-HIMS). Data analysis followed the stages of open, axial and selective coding. Six perceived critical success factors emerged: usability of the system, emergent behaviours, requirements analysis, training, change management, and project organisation. The study identified a mismatch between end-users and product owner/vendor perspectives. Workflow changes were significant challenges to clinicians' confident use, particularly as the system offered limited modularity and configurability. Recommendations are made for all the parties involved in healthcare information systems implementation to manage the change process by agreeing system goals and functionalities through wider consensual debate, and participated supporting strategies realised through common commitment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Individual and Organisational Capacity for Evidence Use in Policy Making in Nigeria: An Exploratory Study of the Perceptions of Nigeria Health Policy Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uneke, C. J.; Ezeoha, A. E.; Ndukwe, C. D.; Oyibo, P. G.; Onwe, F.; Igbinedion, E. B.; Chukwu, P. N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses the outcome of an exploratory quantitative cross-sectional study of the perceptions of Nigeria health policy makers on capacity for evidence use in policy making at individual and organisational levels. The capacity for acquisition, assessment, adaptation and application of research evidence in policy making at…

  10. International adoption: a health and developmental prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Patrick; Narad, Christine

    2005-02-01

    Adoptions from international countries have become an option for many US families, with over 150,000 children adopted in the past 14 years. Typically, internationally adopted children present with a host of medical and developmental concerns. Issues such as growth stunting, abnormal behaviors, and significant delays in motor, speech, and language development are likely directly related to the prenatal and early postnatal environment experienced prior to adoption. The new family and its health-care team must quickly work to identify and address these issues to aid the child's integration into his or her new family. This article will examine potential issues seen in children who are being adopted, including the impact of early environment on subsequent development. We will summarize early and long-term medical issues and review the extent of developmental delays seen in children adopted internationally. Finally, we will discuss possible mechanisms leading to the observed delays, including the impact of stress on subsequent development. By understanding the extent of expected delays and the mechanisms likely causing the issues, the health-care team will be in a good position to quickly identify and develop intervention protocols that will foster the child's assimilation into his or her new family.

  11. A systematic review on the effect of the organisation of hospital discharge on patient health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, Bérengère; Carrat, Fabrice; Hejblum, Gilles

    2016-12-21

    The transition from hospital to home represents a key step in the management of patients and several problems related to this transition may arise, with potential adverse effects on patient health after discharge. The purpose of our study was to explore the association between components of the hospital discharge process including subsequent continuity of care and patient outcomes in the post-discharge period. Systematic review of observational and interventional studies. We conducted a combined search in the Medline and Web of Science databases. Additional studies were identified by screening the bibliographies of the included studies. The data collection process was conducted using a standardised predefined grid that included quality criteria. A standard patient population returning home after hospitalisation. Adverse health outcomes occurring after hospital discharge. In the 20 studies fulfilling our eligibility criteria, the main discharge-process components explored were: discharge summary (n=2), discharge instructions (n=2), drug-related problems at discharge (n=4), transition from hospital to home (n=5) and continuity of care after hospital discharge (n=7). The major subsequent patient health outcomes measured were: rehospitalisations (n=18), emergency department visits (n=8) and mortality (n=5). Eight of the 18 studies exploring rehospitalisations and two of the eight studies examining emergency department visits reported at least one significant association between the discharge process and these outcomes. None of the studies investigating patient mortality reported any significant such associations between the discharge process and these outcomes. Irrespective of the component of the discharge process explored, the outcome considered (composite or not), the sample size and the study design, no consistent statistical association between hospital discharge and patient health outcome was identified. This systematic review highlights a wide heterogeneity

  12. Promoting the health of Europeans in a rapidly changing world: a historical study of the implementation of World Health Organisation policies by the Nursing and Midwifery Unit, European Regional Office, 1970-2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallett, Christine; Wagner, Lis

    2011-01-01

    HALLETT C and WAGNER L. Nursing Inquiry 2011; 18: 359-368 Promoting the health of Europeans in a rapidly changing world: a historical study of the implementation of World Health Organisation policies by the Nursing and Midwifery Unit, European Regional Office, 1970-2003 The World Health Organisat......HALLETT C and WAGNER L. Nursing Inquiry 2011; 18: 359-368 Promoting the health of Europeans in a rapidly changing world: a historical study of the implementation of World Health Organisation policies by the Nursing and Midwifery Unit, European Regional Office, 1970-2003 The World Health...... Organisation (WHO) was inaugurated in 1948. Formed in a period of post-war devastation, WHO aimed to develop and meet goals that would rebuild the health of shattered populations. The historical study reported here examined the work of the Nursing and Midwifery Unit (NMU) of WHO's European Regional Office...

  13. Characteristics of electronic patient-provider messaging system utilisation in an urban health care organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Patrick Mikles

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Research suggests that electronic messaging can improve patient engagement. Studies indicate that a ‘digital divide’ may exist, where certain patient populations may be using electronic messaging less frequently. This study aims to determine which patient characteristics are associated with different levels of usage of an electronic patient-provider messaging system in a diverse urban population.Methods Cross-sectional electronic health record data were extracted for patients 10 years of age or older who live in New York City and who visited a set of clinics between 1 July 2011 and 30 June 2012. Regression analyses determined which participant characteristics were associated with the sending of electronic messages.Results Older, female, English-speaking participants of white race who received more messages, had any diagnoses, more office visits and a provider who sent messages were more likely to send more messages. Non-Millennial, non-white participants who received fewer messages, had more office visits, any diagnoses, a provider who saw fewer patients with patient portal accounts, lived in a low socioeconomic status neighbourhood, and did not have private insurance were more likely to send zero messages.Conclusion This study found significant differences in electronic messaging usage based on demographic, socioeconomic and health-related patient characteristics. Future studies are needed to support these results and determine the causes of observed associations.

  14. Design principles for data- and change-oriented organisational analysis in workplace health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inauen, A; Jenny, G J; Bauer, G F

    2012-06-01

    This article focuses on organizational analysis in workplace health promotion (WHP) projects. It shows how this analysis can be designed such that it provides rational data relevant to the further context-specific and goal-oriented planning of WHP and equally supports individual and organizational change processes implied by WHP. Design principles for organizational analysis were developed on the basis of a narrative review of the guiding principles of WHP interventions and organizational change as well as the scientific principles of data collection. Further, the practical experience of WHP consultants who routinely conduct organizational analysis was considered. This resulted in a framework with data-oriented and change-oriented design principles, addressing the following elements of organizational analysis in WHP: planning the overall procedure, data content, data-collection methods and information processing. Overall, the data-oriented design principles aim to produce valid, reliable and representative data, whereas the change-oriented design principles aim to promote motivation, coherence and a capacity for self-analysis. We expect that the simultaneous consideration of data- and change-oriented design principles for organizational analysis will strongly support the WHP process. We finally illustrate the applicability of the design principles to health promotion within a WHP case study.

  15. The right to health of prisoners in international human rights law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lines, Rick

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the health rights of prisoners as defined in international law, and the mechanisms that have been used to ensure the rights of persons in detention to realise the highest attainable standard of health. It examines this right as articulated within United Nations and regional human rights treaties, non-binding or so-called soft law instruments from international organisations and the jurisprudence of international human rights bodies. It explores the use of economic, social and cultural rights mechanisms, and those within civil and political rights, as they engage the right to health of prisoners, and identifies the minimum legal obligations of governments in order to remain compliant with human rights norms as defined within the international case law. In addressing these issues, this article adopts a holistic approach to the definition of the highest attainable standard of health. This includes a consideration of adequate standards of general medical care, including preventative health and mental health services. It also examines the question of environmental health, and those poor conditions of detention that may exacerbate health decline, disease transmission, mental illness or death. The paper examines the approach to prison health of the United Nations human rights system and its various monitoring bodies, as well as the regional human rights systems in Europe, Africa and the Americas. Based upon this analysis, the paper draws conclusions on the current fulfilment of the right to health of prisoners on an international scale, and proposes expanded mechanisms under the UN Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment to monitor and promote the health rights of prisoners at the international and domestic levels.

  16. University psychiatry in Italy: organisation and integration of university clinics and the National Health Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Maria Furlan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In the Italian psychiatric system, community-based care has become increasingly important and widespread since the national reform of 1978. This report aims to provide an overview of the involvement of university medical schools in this process, considering their responsibility for teaching and training specialist practitioners and professionals. METHODS: The study was carried out between early 2010 and February 2011. An 18-items, self-administered, questionnaire was designed to investigate the number of faculty members that are responsible both for running a clinical ward and for providing community-based healthcare. RESULTS: Nine out of 53 faculty members (17% manage a Mental Health Department, 9 (17% manage a University Department, and 2 (3.8% manage both types of department. Less than half of the teachers have full responsibility (hospital and community; however the percentage reaches 73.2% if we include the hospital wards open to the community emergencies. The remaining 26.8% have no responsibility for community psychiatry. Moreover there were undoubtedly still too many universities with specialisation schools that are without an appropriate network of facilities enabling them to offer complex psychiatric training. DISCUSSION: As expected, there were several types of healthcare management that were not uniformly distributed throughout Italy and there were also marked differences between mental health care provision in the North, Centre, and South of Italy. The university involvement in clinical responsibility was great, but at the management level there was a lack of equality in terms of clinical care, which risks being reflected also on the institutional functions of teaching and research.

  17. Managing youe organisation's ethical climate | Ike | LBS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article explains how the level of ethical practice in an organisation can be influenced by the core values of the organisation and its internal and external environment. The argues that to ensure high ethical standards in an organisation, it is important to clarify and reinforce core values, and to ensure that the ...

  18. Using International Accreditation in Higher Education to Effect Changes in Organisational Culture: A Case Study from a Turkish University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Ian

    2015-01-01

    International accreditation is now a significant yet controversial issue in global higher education. This case study looked at the experience of an intensive English language preparatory programme within a university in Turkey going through an accreditation by a foreign institution, and assessed to what extent the project managed to foster changes…

  19. The use of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health to classify the factors influencing mobility reported by persons with an amputation: An international study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Seema; Kohler, Friedbert; Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Jayaraman, Arun; Li, Jianin; Pieber, Karin; Schiappacasse, Carolina

    2017-08-01

    Amputation of lower limb results in limitations in mobility which are amenable to multiple rehabilitation interventions. The challenges faced by the persons with lower limb amputation vary internationally. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health provides a common language to describe the function of persons with lower limb amputation across various countries. This article reports the concepts in mobility important to persons with lower limb amputation across six countries using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Qualitative study using focus groups and individual interviews. Focus groups and individual interviews of persons with lower limb amputation were organised across six countries to identify the issues faced by patients with an amputation during and after their amputation, subsequent rehabilitation and on an ongoing basis in their daily life. Meaningful concepts were extracted from the responses and linked to suitable second-level and where applicable third-level International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories. International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categorical frequencies were analysed to represent the prevalence and spread of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories by location. A total of 133 patients were interviewed. A large percentage (93%) of the identified concepts could be matched to International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories for quantitative analysis. The important concepts in mobility were similar across different countries. The comprehensiveness of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a classification system for human function and its universality across the globe is demonstrated by the large proportion of the concepts contained in the interviews from across the study centres that could be matched to International

  20. Personal health care of internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palabindala, Venkataraman; Foster, Paul; Kanduri, Swetha; Doppalapudi, Avanthi; Pamarthy, Amaleswari; Kovvuru, Karthik

    2011-01-01

    Medical residents, as part of their job to balance the demands of their work with caring for themselves so as to be mentally, emotionally, and physically sound to stay clinically competent. While regulatory and legislative attempts at limiting medical resident work hours have materialized but have yet to attain passage, there are fairly little data looking into how residents cope up with their demands and yet attend to their own personal health. Anonymous mailed survey. Three hundred and thirty-seven residents from all internal medicine residency programs within United States. We conducted a survey in the form of a questionnaire that was sent by e-mail to the program directors of various internal medicine residency programs within the United States, and responses were collected between May 19 and June 21, 2009. Response was well appreciated with total number of participants of 337 with even demographical distribution in gender, residency year, AMG/IMG, age group. Seventy-one percent of the residents felt that they would prefer getting admitted to their own hospital for any acute medical or surgical condition. Of the 216 residents who have had received health care in the past, almost half of them chose their own hospital because of the proximity, while 45% did not choose their own hospital despite proximity. Two out of three residents missed their doctors appointments or cancelled them due to demands of medical training. Only half of the residents have a primary care physician and almost 80% of them did not have their yearly health checkup. Close to 30% held back information regarding their social and sexual history from their provider because of privacy and confidentiality concerns. Eighty percent of residents never received information about barriers that physicians may face in obtaining care for their socially embarrassing conditions. Seventy percent felt that their performance then was suboptimal because of that health condition and also felt sick but did not

  1. [International adoption: children's health risk evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartiguenave, C

    2012-05-01

    The socioeconomic and sanitary conditions in many countries make it necessary to weigh as precisely as possible the uncertainties which might affect the health of internationally adopted children, which is one of the key drivers to adoption decision. Indeed, health troubles are more and more frequent among children proposed by countries, at a time when there are fewer children to be adopted. Hence the institutions and the actors in the field of international adoption are compelled to frequently update their professional practices, so as to cope both with the declining offer for adoptable children and with the increasing pressure from the birth countries of children to make host countries adopt children with high age or with special needs. It also requires from the administrations the will to provide better initial information and to implement the demand for an agreement. Meanwhile, in spite of those growing constraints, adopting families have been more and more risk adverse during the latest decades, this being a common trend in our developed countries.

  2. What are the factors of organisational culture in health care settings that act as barriers to the implementation of evidence-based practice? A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brett; Perillo, Samuel; Brown, Ted

    2015-02-01

    The responsibility to implement evidence-based practice (EBP) in a health care workplace does not fall solely on the individual health care professional. Organisational barriers relate to the workplace setting, administrational support, infrastructure, and facilities available for the retrieval, critique, summation, utilisation, and integration of research findings in health care practices and settings. Using a scoping review approach, the organisational barriers to the implementation of EBP in health care settings were sought. This scoping review used the first five of the six stage methodology developed by Levac et al. (2010). The five stages used are: 1) Identify the research question; 2) identify relevant studies; 3) study selection; 4) charting the data; and 5) collating, summarising and reporting the results. The following databases were searched from January 2004 until February 2014: Medline, EMBASE, EBM Reviews, Google Scholar, The Cochrane Library and CINAHL. Of the 49 articles included in this study, there were 29 cross-sectional surveys, six descriptions of specific interventions, seven literature reviews, four narrative reviews, nine qualitative studies, one ethnographic study and one systematic review. The articles were analysed and five broad organisational barriers were identified. This scoping review sought to map the breadth of information available on the organisational barriers to the use of EBP in health care settings. Even for a health care professional who is motivated and competent in the use of EBP; all of these barriers will impact on their ability to increase and maintain their use of EBP in the workplace. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 13 May 2016 - Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Permanent Representative of the Republic of Azerbaijan to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva V. Sadiqov signing the guest book with Head of Associate Member and Non-Member State Relations E. Tsesmelis and Adviser C. Schäfer. Permanent Mission First Secretary H. Huseynov is also present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2016-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Vaqif Sadiqov Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Republic of Azerbaijan to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

  4. 4 July 2016 - S. Dalil Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva signing the Guest Book with Director-General F. Gianotti. P. Fassnacht present throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2016-01-01

    Her Excellency Dr Suraya Dalil Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

  5. 14 November 2016 - Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary H. M. Cima, Permanent Representative of the Argentine Republic to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva signing the guest book with CERN Director-General F. Gianotti, Director for International Relations C. Warakaulle; Adviser J. Salicio Diez and V. Perez-Reale, CERN HR Department, are also present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2016-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Héctor Marcelo Cima Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Argentine Republic to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

  6. Integrated care: a fresh perspective for international health policies in low and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Jean-Pierre; DePaepe, Pierre; Ghilbert, Patricia; Soors, Werner; Green, Andrew

    2006-09-18

    To propose a social-and-democrat health policy alternative to the current neoliberal one. The general failure of neoliberal health policies in low and middle-income countries justifies the design of an alternative to bring disease control and health care back in step with ethical principles and desired outcomes. National policies, international programmes and pilot experiments--including those led by the authors--are examined in both scientific and grey literature. We call for the promotion of a publicly-oriented health sector as a cornerstone of such alternative policy. We define 'publicly-oriented' as opposed to 'private-for-profit' in terms of objectives and commitment, not of ownership. We classify development strategies for such a sector according to an organisation-based typology of health systems defined by Mintzberg. As such, strategies are adapted to three types of health systems: machine bureaucracies, professional bureaucracies and divisionalized forms. We describe avenues for family and community health and for hospital care. We stress social control at the peripheral level to increase accountability and responsiveness. Community-based, national and international sources are required to provide viable financing. Our proposed social-and-democrat health policy calls for networking, lobbying and training as a joint effort in which committed health professionals can lead the way.

  7. Integrated care: a fresh perspective for international health policies in low and middle-income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Unger

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To propose a social-and-democrat health policy alternative to the current neoliberal one. Context of case: The general failure of neoliberal health policies in low and middle-income countries justifies the design of an alternative to bring disease control and health care back in step with ethical principles and desired outcomes. Data sources: National policies, international programmes and pilot experiments—including those led by the authors—are examined in both scientific and grey literature. Case description: We call for the promotion of a publicly-oriented health sector as a cornerstone of such alternative policy. We define ‘publicly-oriented’ as opposed to ‘private-for-profit’ in terms of objectives and commitment, not of ownership. We classify development strategies for such a sector according to an organisation-based typology of health systems defined by Mintzberg. As such, strategies are adapted to three types of health systems: machine bureaucracies, professional bureaucracies and divisionalized forms. We describe avenues for family and community health and for hospital care. We stress social control at the peripheral level to increase accountability and responsiveness. Community-based, national and international sources are required to provide viable financing. Conclusions and discussion: Our proposed social-and-democrat health policy calls for networking, lobbying and training as a joint effort in which committed health professionals can lead the way.

  8. Personal health care of internal medicine residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkataraman Palabindala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical residents, as part of their job to balance the demands of their work with caring for themselves so as to be mentally, emotionally, and physically sound to stay clinically competent. While regulatory and legislative attempts at limiting medical resident work hours have materialized but have yet to attain passage, there are fairly little data looking into how residents cope up with their demands and yet attend to their own personal health.Anonymous mailed survey.Three hundred and thirty-seven residents from all internal medicine residency programs within United States.We conducted a survey in the form of a questionnaire that was sent by e-mail to the program directors of various internal medicine residency programs within the United States, and responses were collected between May 19 and June 21, 2009. Response was well appreciated with total number of participants of 337 with even demographical distribution in gender, residency year, AMG/IMG, age group. Seventy-one percent of the residents felt that they would prefer getting admitted to their own hospital for any acute medical or surgical condition. Of the 216 residents who have had received health care in the past, almost half of them chose their own hospital because of the proximity, while 45% did not choose their own hospital despite proximity. Two out of three residents missed their doctors appointments or cancelled them due to demands of medical training. Only half of the residents have a primary care physician and almost 80% of them did not have their yearly health checkup. Close to 30% held back information regarding their social and sexual history from their provider because of privacy and confidentiality concerns. Eighty percent of residents never received information about barriers that physicians may face in obtaining care for their socially embarrassing conditions. Seventy percent felt that their performance then was suboptimal because of that health condition and also felt

  9. Towards people-centred health services delivery: a Framework for Action for the World Health Organisation (WHO European Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Stein

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Integrated care has moved from the small niche it traditionally occupied in academia, accessible only to experts in the field and applied merely on a project specific or pilot effort basis, now onto the radar of politicians and health system planners the world over.

  10. Bachelor studies for nurses organised in rural contexts – a tool for improving the health care services in circumpolar region?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudrun Nilsen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This article is based on a pilot study of Finnmark University College's off-campus bachelor programme (BA for nurses, organised in rural areas. The objectives were to explore whether these courses had contributed to reduced vacancies; whether the learning outcome of the off-campus courses was the same as the on-campus programme, and how the education had influenced the nurses’ professional practice in local health services. Study design: In the study we used mixed strategies in data collection and analyses. Methods: Data about course completion, average age, average grades and retention effect were collected in 2009/2010 from 3 off-campus classes and their contemporary on-campus classes. Then 7 of the off-campus nurses were interviewed. A content analytical approach to the data was employed. Results: With retention of 93%, the off-campus BA course for nurses has been one of the most effective measures, particularly in rural areas. The employers’ support for further education after graduating seems to be an important factor for the high retention rate. Teaching methods such as learning activities in small local groups influenced the nurses’ professional development. Local training grants, supervision and a local learning environment were important for where they chose their first job after graduation. Conclusions: The study confirms that nurses educated through off-campus courses remain in the county over time after graduating. The “home-grown” nurses are familiar with the local culture and specific needs of the population in this remote area. The study confirms findings in other studies, that further education is an important factor for nurses’ retention.

  11. Trophoblastic Disease Review for Diagnosis and Management: A Joint Report From the International Society for the Study of Trophoblastic Disease, European Organisation for the Treatment of Trophoblastic Disease, and the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangili, G.; Lorusso, D.; Brown, J.; Pfisterer, J.; Massuger, L.F.; Vaughan, M.; Ngan, H.Y.; Golfier, F.; Sekharan, P.K.; Charry, R.C.; Poveda, A.; Kim, J.W.; Xiang, Y.; Berkowtiz, R.; Seckl, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to provide a consensus review on gestational trophoblastic disease diagnosis and management from the combined International Society for the Study of Trophoblastic Disease, European Organisation for the Treatment of Trophoblastic Disease, and the Gynecologic

  12. The Dynamics of Organisation and Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter

    The Dynamics of Organisation and Work - Measurement framework of the Meadow survey by Peter Nielsen for the MEADOW Consortium Organisational changes and the upcoming of new adaptable work organisations are common in most developed countries regardless of culture and industrial traditions. The main...... and this influences the new ways of configuring the work organisations. However, there is a great diversity in the ways firm develop their organisations and restructure work and not least in the resulting economic and social performance. This diversity means that there is a considerable and urgent need to produce...... international comparative data on organisational changes and economic as well as social performance of the emerging new work organisations. The Meadow project has created instruments to produce such international comparative data and the aim of this paper is to present the measurement framework of Meadow...

  13. Ranked Performance of Canada's Health System on the International Stage: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafizada, Said Ahmad Maisam; Sivanandan, Thushara; Hogan, Kelly; Cohen, Deborah; Harvey, Jean

    2017-08-01

    Since the release of the World Health Report in 2000, health system performance ranking studies have garnered significant health policy attention. However, this literature has produced variable results. The objective of this study was to synthesize the research and analyze the ranked performance of Canada's health system on the international stage. We conducted a scoping review exploring Canada's place in ranked health system performance among its peer Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries. Arksey and O'Malley's five-stage scoping review framework was adopted, yielding 48 academic and grey literature articles. A literature extraction tool was developed to gather information on themes that emerged from the literature. Although various methodologies were used to rank health system performance internationally, results generally suggested that Canada has been a middle-of-the-pack performer in overall health system performance for the last 15 years. Canada's overall rankings were 7/191, 11/24, 10/11, 10/17, "Promising" and "B" grade across different studies. According to past literature, Canada performed well in areas of efficiency, productivity, attaining health system goals, years of life lived with disability and stroke mortality. By contrast, Canada performed poorly in areas related to disability-adjusted life expectancy, potential years of life lost, obesity in adults and children, diabetes, female lung cancer and infant mortality. As countries introduce health system reforms aimed at improving the health of populations, international comparisons are useful to inform cross-country learning in health and social policy. While ranking systems do have shortcomings, they can serve to shine a spotlight on Canada's health system strengths and weaknesses to better inform the health policy agenda. Copyright © 2017 Longwoods Publishing.

  14. Are the World Health Organisation case definitions for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome sufficient at initial assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, H K; Tham, K Y; Seow, E

    2005-08-01

    On March 13, 2003, Singapore doctors were alerted about an outbreak of atypical pneumonia that became known as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). We now describe a series of patients that did not fit World Health Organisation (WHO) case definitions for SARS at initial assessment. The Ministry of Health, Singapore centralised SARS cases in the study hospital and its emergency department (ED) became the national screening centre. A screening questionnaire and a set of admission criteria based on WHO case definitions were applied. Patients discharged from ED were tracked via telephone surveillance and recalled if necessary. A retrospective review was done of patients who did not fit WHO definitions initially, were discharged and had re-attended. During the outbreak, 11,461 people were screened for SARS. Among 10,075 (87.9 percent) discharged from the ED, there were 28 re-attendees diagnosed to have SARS later, giving an undertriage rate of 0.3 percent. Among the 28, six (21.4 percent) did not complain of fever and 22 (78.6 percent) had temperatures less than 38.0 degrees Celsius during their first ED visit. One patient was screened to have all three criteria but during consultation, the contact history was found to be unrelated to the known "hot spots". The initial mean temperature was 37.6 degrees Celsius (standard deviation [SD] 0.8), which increased significantly (p-value equals 0.04) to 38.0 degrees Celsius (SD 0.8) during their subsequent visit. Chest radiographs with infective changes increased significantly (p-value equals 0.009) from 16 percent to 52.4 percent over the two ED visits. The WHO case definitions were helpful in evaluating majority of SARS patients initially. However under-triage at ED is inevitable, with a 0.3 percent under-triage in our study population. In this group and asymptomatic individuals who came for screening, a tracking and recall system helped to ensure their timely return to the ED.

  15. Piecing the puzzle together: case studies of international research in health-promoting sports clubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokko, Sami; Donaldson, Alex; Geidne, Susanna; Seghers, Jan; Scheerder, Jeroen; Meganck, Jeroen; Lane, Aoife; Kelly, Bridget; Casey, Meghan; Eime, Rochelle; Villberg, Jari; Kannas, Lasse

    2016-03-01

    This paper seeks to review the current international health-promoting sports club (HPSC) research, drawing together findings based on case studies from various countries to illustrate the status of HPSCs. In addition, future challenges for HPSC research and implementation are considered. The review includes six case studies from five countries. In summary, there are two major research themes in this area, namely 'research into HPSC activity' and 'research into HPSC networks'. The first theme investigates the extent to which sports clubs and/or national sports organisations invest in health promotion (HP) - both in policy and practice. The latter theme is driven by an intention to widen the scope of HPSCs to reach novel internal actors, like parents, siblings, etc., and/or external non-sporting bodies, like communities, schools, etc. The future challenges for HPSC research require a better understanding of the motives, barriers and capacities of sports clubs and coaches. Sports organisations, clubs and coaches generally support the intent of the HPSC concept, but even with the best evidence- or theory-based HP programmes/guidelines/standards, nothing will happen in practice if the nature and capacities of sports clubs are not better acknowledged. Therefore, a call for embracing implementation science is finally made to enhance implementation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Organisational learning by way of organisational development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjær, Bente

    project contributes toorganisational learning. The point of departure is a municipality in Denmark workingtoward digitalising its administration. The conclusion is that the success of such aprocess very much depends on an organisation's ability to encompass severalunderstandings of organisational...

  17. [New global challenges: the role of international organizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, L; Scaroni, E; Riccardo, F; De Rosa, A G; Pacini, A; Russo, G; Pacifici, L E

    2007-01-01

    Facing the numerous humanitarian emergencies that upset the international balances, the International Organisations (IO) who intervene are: the Agencies of the United Nations (UN), the International Federation of the Red Cross (IFRC) and NGOs. In the sector of international health cooperation, the World Health Organization (WHO) has elaborated a document, the International Health Regulations (IHR), that regulates the health workers' activity during a health emergency. In this paper different International Organizations employed in international humanitarian crisis are described.

  18. Engendering a high performing organisational culture through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Through internal branding an African organization can use a systematic and comprehensive approach that takes into view factors impacting organisational performance with the required attention to people who must deliver the corporate brand promise. This paper demonstrates that internal branding of African organisations ...

  19. The social enterprise organisation: market sector organisations and social problem redress

    OpenAIRE

    Mendan, Kathleen Cassandra

    2017-01-01

    A social enterprise organisation seeks business solutions to social problems. It identifies social needs and uses the market to address them. Existing literature presents a variety of concepts and frameworks to connect market sector organisations with social amelioration agendas, including corporate social responsibility and stakeholder management. Yet, the demand for such organisations to contribute to resolving social problems remains, and international business and manage...

  20. A new international health order. An inquiry into the international relations of world health and medical care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pannenborg, Charles Olke

    1978-01-01

    A 'New International Health Order' (NIHO) is a new notion. In order to value the function of a NIHO, the present international health order and the socioeconomic order between the rich and poor countries will have to be taken into account. The factual and normatived evelopment of a new international

  1. Facilitating organisational development using a group-based formative assessment and benchmarking method: design and implementation of the International Family Practice Maturity Matrix.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwyn, G.; Bekkers, M.J.; Tapp, L.; Edwards, A.; Newcombe, R.; Eriksson, T.; Braspenning, J.C.C.; Kuch, C.; Adzic, Z.O.; Ayankogbe, O.; Cvetko, T.; Veld, K. in 't; Karotsis, A.; Kersnik, J.; Lefebvre, L.; Mecini, I.; Petricek, G.; Pisco, L.; Thesen, J.; Turon, J.M.; Rossen, E. van; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Well-organised practices deliver higher-quality care. Yet there has been very little effort so far to help primary care organisations achieve higher levels of team performance and to help them identify and prioritise areas where quality improvement efforts should be concentrated. No

  2. Public Health and International Drug Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csete, Joanne; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Kazatchkine, Michel; Altice, Frederick; Balicki, Marek; Buxton, Julia; Cepeda, Javier; Comfort, Megan; Goosby, Eric; Goulão, João; Hart, Carl; Horton, Richard; Kerr, Thomas; Lajous, Alejandro Madrazo; Lewis, Stephen; Martin, Natasha; Mejía, Daniel; Mathiesson, David; Obot, Isidore; Ogunrombi, Adeolu; Sherman, Susan; Stone, Jack; Vallath, Nandini; Vickerman, Peter; Zábranský, Tomáš; Beyrer, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Executive summary In September 2015, the member states of the United Nations endorsed sustainable development goals (SDG) for 2030 that aspire to human rights-centered approaches to ensuring the health and well-being of all people. The SDGs embody both the UN Charter values of rights and justice for all and the responsibility of states to rely on the best scientific evidence as they seek to better humankind. In April 2016, these same states will consider control of illicit drugs, an area of social policy that has been fraught with controversy, seen as inconsistent with human rights norms, and for which scientific evidence and public health approaches have arguably played too limited a role. The previous UN General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS) on drugs in 1998 – convened under the theme “a drug-free world, we can do it!” – endorsed drug control policies based on the goal of prohibiting all use, possession, production, and trafficking of illicit drugs. This goal is enshrined in national law in many countries. In pronouncing drugs a “grave threat to the health and well-being of all mankind,” the 1998 UNGASS echoed the foundational 1961 convention of the international drug control regime, which justified eliminating the “evil” of drugs in the name of “the health and welfare of mankind.” But neither of these international agreements refers to the ways in which pursuing drug prohibition itself might affect public health. The “war on drugs” and “zero-tolerance” policies that grew out of the prohibitionist consensus are now being challenged on multiple fronts, including their health, human rights, and development impact. The Johns Hopkins – Lancet Commission on Drug Policy and Health has sought to examine the emerging scientific evidence on public health issues arising from drug control policy and to inform and encourage a central focus on public health evidence and outcomes in drug policy debates, such as the important deliberations of

  3. Defining Health Research for Development: The perspective of stakeholders from an international health research partnership in Ghana and Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Claire Leonie; Shaw, David; Anane-Sarpong, Evelyn; Sankoh, Osman; Tanner, Marcel; Elger, Bernice

    2017-05-03

    The study uses a qualitative empirical method to define Health Research for Development. This project explores the perspectives of stakeholders in an international health research partnership operating in Ghana and Tanzania. We conducted 52 key informant interviews with major stakeholders in an international multicenter partnership between GlaxoSmithKline (GSK, Vaccine Developer) and the global health nonprofit organisation PATH and its Malaria Vaccine Initiative program (PATH/MVI, Funder-Development Partner), (RTS, S) (NCT00866619). The respondents included teams from four clinical research centres (two centres in Ghana and two in Tanzania) and various collaborating partners. This paper analyses responses to the question: What is Health Research for Development? Based on the stakeholders' experience the respondents offered many ways of defining Health Research for Development. The responses fell into four broad themes: i) Equitable Partnerships; ii) System Sustainability; iii) Addressing Local Health Targets, and iv) Regional Commitment to Benefit Sharing. Through defining Health Research for Development six key learning points were generated from the four result themes: 1) Ensure there is local research leadership working with the collaborative partnership, and local healthcare system, to align the project agenda and activities with local research and health priorities; 2) Know the country-specific context - map the social, health, legislative and political setting; 3) Define an explicit development component and plan of action in a research project; 4) Address the barriers and opportunities to sustain system capacity. 5) Support decentralised health system decision-making to facilitate the translation pathway; 6) Govern, monitor and evaluate the development components of health research partnerships. Overall, equity and unity between partners are required to deliver health research for development. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Supra-National Organisations and Conflict Resolution during the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Supra-national Organisations like the United Nations Organisation, Organisation of African Unity now called African Union (AU) and Commonwealth of Nations are inter-state governmental organisations or part of the non-state actors that impinge on the international environment. More importantly, due to the various crises ...

  5. Droit des organisations internationales

    CERN Document Server

    Sorel, Jean-Marc; Ndior, Valère

    2013-01-01

    Cet ouvrage collectif offre aux enseignants et chercheurs en droit international, aux praticiens et aux étudiants, une analyse actualisée du droit des organisations internationales. Il dresse en cinq parties un tableau, illustré par des exemples variés, des problématiques que soulève le phénomène polymorphe d institutionnalisation de la société internationale. La première partie est consacrée au phénomène des « organisations internationales », sous l angle à la fois de l institutionnalisation progressive des relations internationales et de la difficulté à cerner une catégorie unifiée. La deuxième partie rend compte de la création, de la disparition et des mutations des organisations internationales, ici envisagées comme systèmes institutionnels et ordres juridiques dérivés. La troisième partie analyse l autonomie que l acquisition de la personnalité juridique et de privilèges et immunités, un organe administratif intégré, un personnel ou un budget propres confèrent aux organi...

  6. International adoption families: a unique health care journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Eileen M

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the health care experiences of families with an internationally adopted child. Content analysis of data from 107 adoptive parents was used to identify themes that characterized health care experiences of the families. Four themes were identified: a) Coming home: Like a lobster thrown into a boiling pot; b) Vigilance: Is my child healthy today? Will my child be healthy tomorrow?; c) Unique health care needs of international adoption families: We are different; and d) Importance of support by health care providers: Do they know or care? Health care providers need to be aware of the unique experiences of the increasing number of international adoption families. The themes identified provide insight into the health care experiences of international adoption families and the crucial role of health care providers in helping international adoption families feel supported on their journey.

  7. ALICE Organisation

    CERN Multimedia

    Gouriou, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    ALICE is the acronym for A Large Ion Collider Experiment, one of the largest experiments in the world devoted to research in the physics of matter at an infinitely small scale. Hosted at CERN, the European Laboratory for Nuclear Research, this project involves an international collaboration of more than 1400 physicists, engineers and technicians, including about 340 graduate students, from 132 physics institutes in 37 countries across the world.

  8. ALICE Organisation

    CERN Multimedia

    Hadre, J

    2015-01-01

    ALICE is the acronym for A Large Ion Collider Experiment, one of the largest experiments in the world devoted to research in the physics of matter at an infinitely small scale. Hosted at CERN, the European Laboratory for Nuclear Research, this project involves an international collaboration of more than 1400 physicists, engineers and technicians, including around 340 graduate students, from 132 physics institutes in 37 countries across the world.

  9. A Qualitative Study of Health Care Experiences Among International Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Anna; Kitsos, Jewel; Miller, Andrea; Abraham, Sam

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the health care experiences of international students at a college in Indiana. The study answered the following research question: What are the lived experiences of international students while seeking health care? This research question was identified after a literature review, which showed a lack of research regarding international students' health care experiences. The data in this study were collected through in-depth interviews with 5 participants who resided at the college. After the interviews, the identification of themes and the analysis of results revealed the international students' lived experiences and perceptions of health care in the United States.

  10. Organising to Enable Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Tove

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this conceptual paper is to reveal how organising can enable innovation across organisational layers and organisational units. This approach calls for a cross-disciplinary literature review. The aim is to provide an integrated understanding of innovation in an organisational approach....... The findings reveal a continous organising process between individual/ team creativity and organisational structures/control to enable innovation at firm level. Organising provides a dynamic approach and contains the integrated reconstruction of creativity, structures and boundaries for enhanced balance...... of explorative and exploitative learning in uncertain environments. Shedding light on the cross-disciplinary theories to organise innovation provides a contribution at the firm level to enable innovation....

  11. Engines of alternative objectivity: Re-articulating the nature and value of participatory mental health organisations with the Hearing Voices Movement and Stepping Out Theatre Company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blencowe, Claire; Brigstocke, Julian; Noorani, Tehseen

    2015-06-25

    We argue that successful participatory mental health organisations should be seen as 'engines of alternative objectivity' rather than as the subjective 'other' to objective science. With the term 'alternative objectivity', we point to collectivisations of experience that are different to biomedical science but are nonetheless forms of objectivity. Taking inspiration from feminist theory, science studies and sociology of culture, we argue that participatory mental health organisations generate their own forms of objectivity through novel modes of collectivising experience. Through two case studies, the Hearing Voices Movement and Stepping Out Theatre Company, we demonstrate how successful participatory organisations can be seen as 'engines of alternative objectivity' rather than as the subjective other to objective, biomedical science. The Hearing Voices Movement cultivates an 'activist science' that generates an alternative objective knowledge through a commitment to experimentation, controlling, testing, recording and sharing experience. Stepping Out distinguishes itself from drama therapy by cultivating an alternative objective culture through its embrace of high production values, material culture, aesthetic standards and critical review processes. A crucial aspect of participatory practice is overcoming alienation, enabling people to get outside of themselves, encounter material worlds and join forces with others. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Incidence and prevalence of lupus in Buenos Aires, Argentina: a 11-year health management organisation-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolnik, M; Marin, J; Valeiras, S M; Marchese, M F; Talani, A S; Avellaneda, N L; Etchepare, A; Etchepare, P; Plou, M S; Soriano, E R

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Studies regarding the epidemiology of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are lacking in Argentina. Our purpose was to estimate the incidence and prevalence of SLE in a university hospital-based health management organisation in Buenos Aires (HIMCP). Methods For incidence calculation, the population at risk included all adult members of the HIMCP, with continuous affiliation for at least 1 year from January 1998 to January 2009. Each person was followed until he/she voluntarily left the HIMCP, death or finalisation of the study. Multiple methods for case finding were used to ensure complete ascertainment: (a) patients with problem SLE, undifferentiated autoimmune disease or mixed connective tissue disease in the Computer-based Patient Record System, (b) patients with positive antinuclear antibody test, anti-Sm antibodies and/or anti-dsDNA antibodies in the laboratory database and (c) patients who consumed hydroxichloroquine, chloroquine, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, mycophenolate, cyclosporine or rituximab, from the administrative HIMCP drugs database. Medical records of all patients found were reviewed, and only patients fulfilling ACR criteria for SLE were included. Global and gender incidence rate (IR) was calculated. Prevalence was estimated on 1 January 2009, and the denominator population was the number of active members >18 years at that date (n=127 959). Results In the study period, 68 patients developed SLE. The observed IR (per 100 000 person-years, (CI 95%)) was 6.3 (4.9 to 7.7) for total population; 8.9 (CI 6.6 to 11.2) for women and 2.6 (1.2 to 3.9) for men. On 1 January 2009, 75 prevalent cases were identified. Prevalence rates (cases per 100 000 habitants, (CI 95%)) were 58.6 (46.1 to 73.5) for total population; 83.2 (63.9 to 106.4) for women and 23 (CI 11.9 to 40.1) for men. Conclusions SLE incidence and prevalence rates in Argentina are in agreement with those of other studies from different parts of the world. PMID:25379189

  13. Who shall live when not all can live? Intellectual property in accessing and benefit-sharing influenza viruses through the World Health Organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Charles

    2011-03-01

    This article addresses the development of the World Health Organisation's (WHO) arrangements for accessing viruses and the development of vaccines to respond to potential pandemics (and other lesser outbreaks). It examines the ongoing "conflict" between the United Nations' Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the World Trade Organisation's Agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) in the context of the debates about the paramountcy of intellectual property, and the potential for other (equity and development) imperatives to over-ride respect for intellectual property and TRIPS. The article concludes that the same intellectual property fault lines are evident in the WHO forum as those apparent at the CBD and the WTO fora, and an ongoing failure to properly address questions of equity and development. This poses a challenge for the Australian Government in guaranteeing a satisfactory pandemic influenza preparation and response.

  14. Risk of psychological ill health and methods of organisational downsizing: a cross-sectional survey in four European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Andreeva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The manner in which organizational downsizing is implemented can make a substantial difference as to whether the exposed workers will suffer from psychological ill health. Surprisingly, little research has directly investigated this issue. We examined the likelihood of psychological ill health associated with strategic and reactive downsizing. Methods A cross-sectional survey included 1456 respondents from France, Sweden, Hungary and the United Kingdom: 681 employees in stable workplaces (reference group and 775 workers from downsized companies. Reactive downsizing was exemplified by the exposures to compulsory redundancies of medium to large scale resulting in job loss or surviving a layoff while staying employed in downsized organizations. The workforce exposed to strategic downsizing was represented by surplus employees who were internally redeployed and supported through their career change process within a policy context of “no compulsory redundancy”. Symptoms of anxiety, depression and emotional exhaustion were assessed in telephone interviews with brief subscales from Hospital Anxiety Scale (HADS-A, Hopkins Symptom Checklist (SCL-CD6 and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI-GS. Data were analyzed using logistic regression. Results We observed no increased risk of psychological ill health in the case of strategic downsizing. The number of significant associations with psychological ill health was the largest for the large-scale reactive downsizing: surviving a layoff was consistently associated with all three outcome measures; returning to work after the job loss experience was related to anxiety and depression, while persons still unemployed at interview had elevated odds of anxiety. After reactive medium-scale downsizing, unemployment at interview was the only exposure associated with anxiety and depression. Conclusions The manner in which organizational downsizing is implemented can be important for the psychological

  15. Risk of psychological ill health and methods of organisational downsizing: a cross-sectional survey in four European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Elena; Brenner, M Harvey; Theorell, Töres; Goldberg, Marcel

    2017-09-29

    The manner in which organizational downsizing is implemented can make a substantial difference as to whether the exposed workers will suffer from psychological ill health. Surprisingly, little research has directly investigated this issue. We examined the likelihood of psychological ill health associated with strategic and reactive downsizing. A cross-sectional survey included 1456 respondents from France, Sweden, Hungary and the United Kingdom: 681 employees in stable workplaces (reference group) and 775 workers from downsized companies. Reactive downsizing was exemplified by the exposures to compulsory redundancies of medium to large scale resulting in job loss or surviving a layoff while staying employed in downsized organizations. The workforce exposed to strategic downsizing was represented by surplus employees who were internally redeployed and supported through their career change process within a policy context of "no compulsory redundancy". Symptoms of anxiety, depression and emotional exhaustion were assessed in telephone interviews with brief subscales from Hospital Anxiety Scale (HADS-A), Hopkins Symptom Checklist (SCL-CD6) and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI-GS). Data were analyzed using logistic regression. We observed no increased risk of psychological ill health in the case of strategic downsizing. The number of significant associations with psychological ill health was the largest for the large-scale reactive downsizing: surviving a layoff was consistently associated with all three outcome measures; returning to work after the job loss experience was related to anxiety and depression, while persons still unemployed at interview had elevated odds of anxiety. After reactive medium-scale downsizing, unemployment at interview was the only exposure associated with anxiety and depression. The manner in which organizational downsizing is implemented can be important for the psychological wellbeing of workers. If downsizing is unavoidable, it should be

  16. Organisational aspects and benchmarking of e-learning initiatives: a case study with South African community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisach, Ulrike; Weilemann, Mitja

    2016-06-01

    South Africa desperately needs a comprehensive approach to fight HIV/AIDS. Education is crucial to reach this goal and Internet and e-learning could offer huge opportunities to broaden and deepen the knowledge basis. But due to the huge societal and digital divide between rich and poor areas, e-learning is difficult to realize in the townships. Community health workers often act as mediators and coaches for people seeking medical and personal help. They could give good advice regarding hygiene, nutrition, protection of family members in case of HIV/AIDS and finding legal ways to earn one's living if they were trained to do so. Therefore they need to have a broader general knowledge. Since learning opportunities in the townships are scarce, a system for e-learning has to be created in order to overcome the lack of experience with computers or the Internet and to enable them to implement a network of expertise. The article describes how the best international resources on basic medical knowledge, HIV/AIDS as well as on basic economic and entrepreneurial skills were benchmarked to be integrated into an e-learning system. After tests with community health workers, researchers developed recommendations on building a self-sustaining system for learning, including a network of expertise and best practice sharing. The article explains the opportunities and challenges for community health workers, which could provide information for other parts of the world with similar preconditions of rural poverty. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Integrating ICTs within health systems | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-06-10

    Jun 10, 2016 ... There is limited evidence on how electronic health (eHealth) technologies can be used to enable the governance and functioning of health systems in ... It aims to deepen understanding of the relationship between eHealth, equity, governance, and systems integration and build research capacity through ...

  18. Development of non-profit organisations providing health and social services in rural South Africa: a three-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshabela, Mosa; Gitomer, Shira; Qhibi, Bongiwe; Schneider, Helen

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to increase understanding of formation of the community and home-based care economy in South Africa, we investigated the origin and development of non-profit organisations (NPOs) providing home- and community-based care for health and social services in a remote rural area of South Africa. Over a three-year period (2010-12), we identified and tracked all NPOs providing health care and social services in Bushbuckridge sub-district through the use of local government records, snowballing techniques, and attendance at NPO networking meetings--recording both existing and new NPOs. NPO founders and managers were interviewed in face-to-face in-depth interviews, and their organisational records were reviewed. Forty-seven NPOs were formed prior to the study period, and 14 during the study period--six in 2010, six in 2011 and two in 2012, while four ceased operation, representing a 22% growth in the number of NPOs during the study period. Histories of NPOs showed a steady rise in the NPO formation over a 20-year period, from one (1991-1995) to 12 (1996-2000), 16 (2001-2005) and 24 (2006-2010) new organisations formed in each period. Furthermore, the histories of formation revealed three predominant milestones--loose association, formal formation and finally registration. Just over one quarter (28%) of NPOs emerged from a long-standing community based programme of 'care groups' of women. Founders of NPOs were mostly women (62%), with either a religious motivation or a nursing background, but occasionally had an entrepreneurial profile. We observed rapid growth of the NPO sector providing community based health and social services. Women dominated the rural NPO sector, which is being seen as creating occupation and employment opportunities. The implications of this growth in the NPO sector providing community based health and social services needs to be further explored and suggests the need for greater coordination and possibly regulation.

  19. A feasibility open trial of internet-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy (iCBT among consumers of a non-governmental mental health organisation with anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Kirkpatrick

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. To date the efficacy and acceptability of internet-delivered cognitive behavioural treatments (iCBT has been examined in clinical trials and specialist facilities. The present study reports the acceptability, feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an established iCBT treatment course (the Wellbeing Course administered by a not-for-profit non-governmental organisation, the Mental Health Association (MHA of New South Wales, to consumers with symptoms of anxiety.Methods. Ten individuals who contacted the MHA’s telephone support line or visited the MHA’s website and reported at least mild symptoms of anxiety (GAD-7 total scores ≥5 were admitted to the study. Participants were provided access to the Wellbeing Course, which comprises five online lessons and homework assignments, and brief weekly support from an MHA staff member via telephone and email. The MHA staff member was an experienced mental health professional and received minimal training in administering the intervention.Results. All 10 participants completed the course within the 8 weeks. Post-treatment and two month follow-up questionnaires were completed by all participants. Mean within-group effect sizes (Cohen’s d for the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 Item (GAD-7 and Patient Health Questionnaire 9 Item (PHQ-9 were large (i.e., > .80 and consistent with previous controlled research. The Course was also rated as highly acceptable with all 10 participants reporting it was worth their time and they would recommend it to a friend.Conclusions. These results provide support for the potential clinical utility of iCBT interventions and the acceptability and feasibility of employing non-governmental mental health organisations to deliver these treatments. However, further research is needed to examine the clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of delivering iCBT via such organisations.

  20. A feasibility open trial of internet-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy (iCBT) among consumers of a non-governmental mental health organisation with anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Terry; Manoukian, Linda; Dear, Blake F; Johnston, Luke; Titov, Nickolai

    2013-01-01

    Background. To date the efficacy and acceptability of internet-delivered cognitive behavioural treatments (iCBT) has been examined in clinical trials and specialist facilities. The present study reports the acceptability, feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an established iCBT treatment course (the Wellbeing Course) administered by a not-for-profit non-governmental organisation, the Mental Health Association (MHA) of New South Wales, to consumers with symptoms of anxiety. Methods. Ten individuals who contacted the MHA's telephone support line or visited the MHA's website and reported at least mild symptoms of anxiety (GAD-7 total scores ≥5) were admitted to the study. Participants were provided access to the Wellbeing Course, which comprises five online lessons and homework assignments, and brief weekly support from an MHA staff member via telephone and email. The MHA staff member was an experienced mental health professional and received minimal training in administering the intervention. Results. All 10 participants completed the course within the 8 weeks. Post-treatment and two month follow-up questionnaires were completed by all participants. Mean within-group effect sizes (Cohen's d) for the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 Item (GAD-7) and Patient Health Questionnaire 9 Item (PHQ-9) were large (i.e., > .80) and consistent with previous controlled research. The Course was also rated as highly acceptable with all 10 participants reporting it was worth their time and they would recommend it to a friend. Conclusions. These results provide support for the potential clinical utility of iCBT interventions and the acceptability and feasibility of employing non-governmental mental health organisations to deliver these treatments. However, further research is needed to examine the clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of delivering iCBT via such organisations.

  1. Quality indicators for international benchmarking of mental health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Richard C; Mattke, Soeren; Somekh, David

    2006-01-01

    To identify quality measures for international benchmarking of mental health care that assess important processes and outcomes of care, are scientifically sound, and are feasible to construct from preexisting data.......To identify quality measures for international benchmarking of mental health care that assess important processes and outcomes of care, are scientifically sound, and are feasible to construct from preexisting data....

  2. International Inequalities: Algebraic Investigations into Health and Economic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Susan; Robertson, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    The Millennium Project is an international effort to improve the health, economic status, and environmental resources of the world's most vulnerable people. Using data associated with the Millennium Project, students use algebra to explore international development issues including poverty reduction and the relationship between health and economy.…

  3. Community governance in primary health care: towards an international Ideal Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meads, Geoffrey; Russell, Grant; Lees, Amanda

    2017-10-01

    Against a global background of increased resource management responsibilities for primary health care agencies, general medical practices, in particular, are increasingly being required to demonstrate the legitimacy of their decision making in market oriented environments. In this context a scoping review explores the potential utility for health managers in primary health care of community governance as a policy concept. The review of recent research suggests that applied learning from international health systems with enhanced approaches to public and patient involvement may contribute to meeting this requirement. Such approaches often characterise local health systems in Latin America and North West Europe where innovative models are beginning to respond effectively to the growing demands on general practice. The study design draws on documentary and secondary data analyses to identify common components of community governance from the countries in these regions, supplemented by other relevant international studies and sources where appropriate. Within a comprehensive framework of collaborative governance the components are aggregated in an Ideal Type format to provide a point of reference for possible adaptation and transferable learning across market oriented health systems. Each component is illustrated with international exemplars from recent organisational practices in primary health care. The application of community governance is considered for the particular contexts of GP led Clinical Commissioning Groups in England and Primary Health Networks in Australia. Some components of the Ideal Type possess potentially powerful negative as well as positive motivational effects, with PPI at practice levels sometimes hindering the development of effective local governance. This highlights the importance of careful and competent management of the growing resources attributed to primary health care agencies, which possess an increasingly diverse range of non

  4. A comparison of the International Standards Organisation reference method for the detection of coliforms and Escherichia coli in water with a defined substrate procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemela, S I; Lee, J V; Fricker, C R

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the use of the International Standards Organisation (ISO) procedure for the comparison of microbiological methods. Using this procedure the ISO reference procedure for the detection of coliforms and Escherichia coli in water was compared with a defined substrate method (ColilertTM). A total of 20 laboratories from 13 European countries compared the use of Colilert/Quanti-TrayTM, a quantitative defined substrate test (DST) for the presence of coliforms and E. coli with the ISO reference procedure, which utilizes tergitol-TTC medium. Results of the study showed that DST detected significantly more coliforms and E. coli than did the reference procedure. In the case of E. coli the recoveries were also higher when using DST and the difference seen was statistically significant. The confirmation rate obtained when using the DST product suggested that no confirmation of wells positive for E. coli was necessary during routine use. Colilert is a suitable alternative to the ISO reference procedure for the detection of coliforms and E. coli in water. The methods used during the comparison study indicated that confirmation of all colonies/positive wells led to the most accurate information and it is recommended that for future comparison studies this should become standard practice. Confirmation of a small proportion of colonies led to misleading conclusions and should be avoided when comparing microbiological methods. It has been demonstrated that the ISO reference procedure fails to detect a significant proportion of coliforms and E. coli in drinking water. Colilert/QuantiTrayTM is a more suitable alternative.

  5. Organising Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Chairman Associate Professor Sr Dr Abdul Rashid Mohamed Shariff Secretariat Dr Ahmad Fikri Abdullah Dr Farrah Melissa Muharram Normalina Jamaluddin Siti Nooradzah Adam Members Professor Dr Shattri Mansor, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) Professor Sr Dr Mazlan Bin Hashim, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) Professor Dr Ruslan Ruainis, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) Associate Professor Dr Norzailawati Mohd Nor, International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM) Associate Professor Dr Biswajeet Pradhan, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) Associate Professor Dr Helmi Zulhaidi Mohd Shafri, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) Associate Professor Dr Siva K Balasundram, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) Dr Muhamad Radzali Mispan, Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI) Dr Siti Khairunnisa Bejo, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) Dr Mohd Johari Mohd Yusof, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) Dr Ali Ariapour, Islamic Azad University Dr Eran Sadek Said Md Sadek, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) Dr Dinesh Sathyamoorthy, Science & Technology Research Institute for Defence (STRIDE) Sr Mokhtar Azizi Mohd Din, Universiti Malaya Noor Azawani Wahap, National Space Agency Mohd Azahari Faidi, Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM) Abdul Munir Hafizy Ladoni, Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS) Kay Thoan San, TSKAY Technology Sdn Bhd Kumar Veliayudam, Geo Spatial Solutions Sdn Bhd Muhammad Zakri Tarmidi, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) Zailani Khuzaimah, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) Saleh Abdullahi, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) Mohd Amiruddin, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) Siti Sarah Emran, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) Sarah Hanim Samsudin, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) Maizatul Akma Mohamad, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM)

  6. Strengthening global health security by embedding the International Health Regulations requirements into national health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Hans; Martín-Moreno, Jose Maria; Emiroglu, Nedret; Rodier, Guenael; Kelley, Edward; Vujnovic, Melitta; Permanand, Govin

    2018-01-01

    The International Health Regulations (IHR) 2005, as the overarching instrument for global health security, are designed to prevent and cope with major international public health threats. But poor implementation in countries hampers their effectiveness. In the wake of a number of major international health crises, such as the 2014 Ebola and 2016 Zika outbreaks, and the findings of a number of high-level assessments of the global response to these crises, it has become clear that there is a need for more joined-up thinking between health system strengthening activities and health security efforts for prevention, alert and response. WHO is working directly with its Member States to promote this approach, more specifically around how to better embed the IHR (2005) core capacities into the main health system functions. This paper looks at how and where the intersections between the IHR and the health system can be best leveraged towards developing greater health system resilience. This merging of approaches is a key component in pursuit of Universal Health Coverage and strengthened global health security as two mutually reinforcing agendas.

  7. 11 July 2012 - Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador M. Alemu Getahun, Permanent Representative of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva signing the guest book with Head of International relations F. Pauss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    11 July 2012 - Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador M. Alemu Getahun, Permanent Representative of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva signing the guest book with Head of International relations F. Pauss.

  8. 9th January 2012 - Indonesian Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador Triansyah Djani to to the United Nations, WTO and other International Organisations in Geneva signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Adviser E. Tsesmelis, visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS underground experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela.

    CERN Multimedia

    Estelle Spirig

    2012-01-01

    9th January 2012 - Indonesian Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador Triansyah Djani to to the United Nations, WTO and other International Organisations in Geneva signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Adviser E. Tsesmelis, visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS underground experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela.

  9. 30 January 2012 - Ecuadorian Ambassador Gallegos Chiriboga, Permanent Representative to the United Nations Office and other International Organisations at Geneva and San Francisco de Quito University Vice Chancellor C. Montùfar visiting CMS surface facilities and underground experimental area with CMS Collaboration L. Sulak and Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi, throughout accompanied by Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Michael Hoch

    2012-01-01

    30 January 2012 - Ecuadorian Ambassador Gallegos Chiriboga, Permanent Representative to the United Nations Office and other International Organisations at Geneva and San Francisco de Quito University Vice Chancellor C. Montùfar visiting CMS surface facilities and underground experimental area with CMS Collaboration L. Sulak and Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi, throughout accompanied by Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

  10. 29 November 2013 - U. Humphrey Orjiako Nigerian Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Mission to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva signing the Guest Book with Head of International Relations R. Voss, visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2 and the ALICE cavern with ALICE Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson Y. Schutz.

    CERN Multimedia

    Noemi Caraban

    2013-01-01

    29 November 2013 - U. Humphrey Orjiako Nigerian Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Mission to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva signing the Guest Book with Head of International Relations R. Voss, visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2 and the ALICE cavern with ALICE Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson Y. Schutz.

  11. The framework of international health research--secondary publication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Kruse, Alexandra Yasmin

    2007-01-01

    Of the global budget for health research, only 10% is spent on the disease burden of 90% of the world's population. Investments in international health research are lacking, hampering health of the poor in particular. Effective vaccines against the world killers HIV, malaria and tuberculosis still...... and private sector commitment.Of the global budget for health research, only 10% is spent on the disease burden of 90% of the world's population. Investments in international health research are lacking, hampering health of the poor in particular. Effective vaccines against the world killers HIV, malaria...

  12. Efficient Communication Management in a Growing Organisation

    OpenAIRE

    Alakotila, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to analyse the importance of organisational communication and to explain how communication should be managed for it to be effective. Two fast-growing companies were interviewed for the thesis, who give entail on how they have managed communication regarding the organisational changes. Organisational communication is divided into external, stakeholder and internal communication in this study. With the help of interviews from two case companies, researcher offers r...

  13. CASE STUDY: Building better health | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-01-13

    Jan 13, 2011 ... The TEHIP 'Spark': Planning and Managing Health Resources at the District Level A case study by IDRC's Evaluation Unit details how TEHIP has influenced public policy and decision-making in Tanzania's health sector. Building Better Health A short video on the importance of community involvement to ...

  14. History of the international societies in health technology assessment: International Society for Technology Assessment in Health Care and Health Technology Assessment International.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, David; Jonsson, Egon; Childs, Paul

    2009-07-01

    The International Society for Technology Assessment in Health Care (ISTAHC) was formed in 1985. It grew out of the increasing awareness of the international dimensions of health technology assessment (HTA) and the need for new communication methods at the international level. The main function of ISTAHC was to present an annual conference, which gradually grew in size, and also to generally improve in quality from to year. ISTAHC overextended itself financially early in the first decade of the 2000s and had to cease its existence. A new society, Health Technology Assessment international (HTAi), based on many of the same ideas and people, grew up beginning in the year 2003. The two societies have played a large role in making the field of HTA visible to people around the world and providing a forum for discussion on the methods and role of HTA.

  15. International collaboration in mental health: Contributions, opportunities, and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratap Sharan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Arising from the push for global health, the movement for global mental health has established itself as a distinct identity in the last few decades. Collaboration between donors, international agencies, institutions, and individuals of different countries has been an essential component in this endeavor. Methods: We review relevant reports in the literature that describe the process of collaboration between individuals and institutions in the area of mental health, in order to describe current patterns in international collaboration. Results and Discussion: In the last decade, international collaboration for mental health has increased substantially. Newer international professional associations; centers for global mental health at academic centers in Europe, USA, and Australia; and international health aid agencies have joined more established agencies, to provide platforms for collaboration. A number of priority-setting exercises have been undertaken that have stressed service development for mental health. International consortia for genetics and neuroimaging have demonstrated successful research collaboration. However, barriers to collaboration persist—these include a continuing failure to prioritize mental healthcare at a policy level, as well as difficulties in arriving at a consensus on conceptualization, transcultural issues, and priority-setting for mental health research. Going forward, the challenge for “global mental health” is to establish a framework that recognizes the unique contributions of all stakeholders and emphasizes equitable partnerships, while adapting knowledge across settings and health systems. Such an approach would be essential to achieve the stated aims of this movement.

  16. International clinical volunteering in Tanzania: A postcolonial analysis of a Global Health business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Noelle

    2018-03-01

    This article traces how scarcities characteristic of health systems in low-income countries (LICs), and increasing popular interest in Global Health, have inadvertently contributed to the popularisation of a specific Global Health business: international clinical volunteering through private volunteer placement organisations (VPOs). VPOs market neglected health facilities as sites where foreigners can 'make a difference', regardless of their skill set. Drawing on online investigation and ethnographic research in Tanzania over four field seasons from 2011 to 2015, including qualitative interviews with 41 foreign volunteers and 90 Tanzanian health workers, this article offers a postcolonial analysis of VPO marketing and volunteer action in health facilities of LICs. Two prevalent postcolonial racialised tropes inform both VPO marketing and foreign volunteers' discourses and practices in Tanzania. The first trope discounts Tanzanian expertise in order to envision volunteers in expert roles despite lacking training, expertise, or contextual knowledge. The second trope envisions Tanzanian patients as so impoverished that insufficiently trained volunteer help is 'better than nothing at all'. These two postcolonial racialised tropes inform the conceptual work undertaken by VPO marketing schemes and foreign volunteers in order to remake Tanzanian health professionals and patients into appropriate and justifiable sites for foreign volunteer intervention.

  17. Childhood Diabesity: International Applications for Health Education and Health Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon-Perez, Helda; Kotkin-Jaszi, Suzanne; Perez, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    Health policy has a direct impact on health education initiatives, health care delivery, resource allocation, and quality of life. Increasing rates in the epidemics of obesity and obesity-dependent diabetes mellitus (aka diabesity) suggest that health policy changes should be included in health education and disease prevention strategies. Health…

  18. International obligations through collective rights: Moving from foreign health assistance to global health governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Benjamin Mason; Fox, Ashley M

    2010-06-15

    This article analyzes the growing chasm between international power and state responsibility in health rights, proposing an international legal framework for collective rights - rights that can reform international institutions and empower developing states to realize the determinants of health structured by global forces. With longstanding recognition that many developing state governments cannot realize the health of their peoples without international cooperation, scholars have increasingly sought to codify international obligations under the purview of an evolving human right to health, applying this rights-based approach as a foundational framework for reducing global health inequalities through foreign assistance. Yet the inherent limitations of the individual human rights framework stymie the right to health in impacting the global institutions that are most crucial for realizing underlying determinants of health through the strengthening of primary health care systems. Whereas the right to health has been advanced as an individual right to be realized by a state duty-bearer, the authors find that this limited, atomized right has proven insufficient to create accountability for international obligations in global health policy, enabling the deterioration of primary health care systems that lack the ability to address an expanding set of public health claims. For rights scholars to advance disease protection and health promotion through national primary health care systems - creating the international legal obligations necessary to spur development supportive of the public's health - the authors conclude that scholars must look beyond the individual right to health to create collective international legal obligations commensurate with a public health-centered approach to primary health care. Through the development and implementation of these collective health rights, states can address interconnected determinants of health within and across countries

  19. Influenza virus samples, international law, and global health diplomacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, David P

    2008-01-01

    Indonesia's decision to withhold samples of avian influenza virus A (H5N1) from the World Health Organization for much of 2007 caused a crisis in global health. The World Health Assembly produced a resolution to try to address the crisis at its May 2007 meeting. I examine how the parties to this controversy used international law in framing and negotiating the dispute. Specifically, I analyze Indonesia's use of the international legal principle of sovereignty and its appeal to rules on the protection of biological and genetic resources found in the Convention on Biological Diversity. In addition, I consider how the International Health Regulations 2005 applied to the controversy. The incident involving Indonesia's actions with virus samples illustrates both the importance and the limitations of international law in global health diplomacy.

  20. Strengthening health systems | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-04-03

    Apr 3, 2013 ... The health of mothers and their children depends on the status of women. Creativity and audacity. The first step is to understand that health systems are complex social entities. Then one needs to be creative, participatory, and audacious to implement interventions suitable to specific contexts. Walter Flores.

  1. Management of health technologies: An international view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonsson, E.; Banta, D.

    1999-01-01

    Health technology includes not only equipment, pharmaceuticals, and medical devices but also surgical and medical procedures Most countries regulate drugs and devices by law, by payment, or by placement of services-a new, multidisciplinary research called health technology assessment assists policy

  2. Strengthening health systems in Africa | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-29

    Apr 29, 2016 ... Weak health systems cause a high burden of preventable and treatable illnesses, especially for those living in rural areas. Strong ... Research in Uganda found that training community health workers in common childhood illnesses, such as malaria and diarrhea, increased the number of children receiving ...

  3. Health | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Photo: Direct Relief. Health systems in developing countries face huge challenges in providing high-quality, affordable services. Among them are geographic barriers, a shortage of skilled personnel, and poor data. Read more about Innovations are bringing better health within reach. Language English. Les programmes de ...

  4. Turning health research into policy | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Nelson K. Sewankambo is the Principal of the College of Health Sciences at Makerere University. For 11 years, he was Dean of the university's School of Medicine, the precursor to the college. A longtime advocate of advancing health research and policy in Africa, Sewankambo led the effort that established the REACH ...

  5. [The modern international public health and globalization challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The article deals with the issues of impact of globalization on population health and public health. The positive and negative aspects of this process are analyzed. The role of international organizations (UN, WHO, UNESCO, ILO, UNISEF) is demonstrated in the area of management of globalization impact on public health of different countries, Russia included.

  6. International trends in health science librarianship part 20: Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jeannette; Jargin, Serge

    2017-03-01

    This is the last in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship in the 21st century. The focus of the present issue is Russia. The next feature column will initiate a new series entitled New Directions in Health Science Librarianship. The first contribution will be from Australia. JM. © 2017 Health Libraries Group.

  7. The framework of international health research--secondary publication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Alexandra Yasmin; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    2007-01-01

    Of the global budget for health research, only 10% is spent on the disease burden of 90% of the world's population. Investments in international health research are lacking, hampering health of the poor in particular. Effective vaccines against the world killers HIV, malaria and tuberculosis still...

  8. Schools as learning organisations: assessing the organisational ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study is to examine the extent to which schools displayed practices that promoted the notion of schools as learning organisations. The conceptual framework for this study is grounded in the current organisational learning and leadership literature. Cross-sectional survey research design was used to ...

  9. International Journal of Health Research: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The journal publishes original research articles, reviews, and case reports in health sciences and related disciplines, including medicine, pharmacy, nursing, biotechnology, cell and molecular biology, and related engineering and social science fields.

  10. The impact of organisational change and fiscal restraint on organisational culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dark, Frances; Whiteford, Harvey; Ashkanasy, Neal M; Harvey, Carol; Harris, Meredith; Crompton, David; Newman, Ellie

    2017-01-01

    Strategies to implement evidence-based practice have highlighted the bidirectional relationship of organisational change on organisational culture. The present study examined changes in perceptions of organisational culture in two community mental health services implementing cognitive therapies into routine psychosis care over 3 years. During the time of the study there were a number of shared planned and unplanned changes that the mental health services had to accommodate. One service, Metro South, had the additional challenge of embarking on a major organisational restructure. A survey of organisational culture was administered to clinical staff of each service at yearly intervals over the 3 years. At baseline assessment there was no significant difference between the two services in organisational culture. At the midpoint assessment, which was conducted at the time the Metro South restructure was operationalized, there were less positive ratings of organisational culture recorded in Metro South compared to the other service. Organisational culture returned to near-baseline levels at endpoint assessment. These findings are consistent with the literature that organisational culture is relatively robust and resilient. It is also consistent with the literature that, at any one time, a service or organisation may have a finite capacity to absorb change. Consequently this limitation needs to be taken into account in the timing and planning of major service reform where possible. The results also extend the literature, insofar as external factors with a high impact on the operation of an organisation may impact upon organisational culture albeit temporarily.

  11. Internal marketing strategy: Focusing on staff orientation in health care in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. De Jager

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to determine the levels of satisfaction in respect of pre identified internal marketing-related variables in a large provincial hospital in South Africa. Problem investigated: Low job satisfaction is often cited as a major cause of high turnover among health care providers worldwide. Likewise the Public Health Care Industry in South Africa is facing complex employee retention issues. In determining the reasons for high turnover an interest in evaluating employee satisfaction among health care providers has increased. Measuring components of job satisfaction will assist not only the health care organisations' management to understand hospital culture, but also to compile an effective internal marketing plan and strategy. Design/Methodology/Approach: A staff satisfaction survey was conducted amongst staff members at a provincial hospital in the Tshwane region, South Africa. Attitudes of staff on pre-identified staff satisfaction variables were assessed. These variables were employed to implement an internal marketing strategy. A list of variables was formulated after an extensive literature study had been conducted. A total of 416 staff members voluntarily completed a self-administered questionnaire. A five-point Likert type scale was used to measure the levels of satisfaction on staff-related issues, with a view to addressing issues in the internal marketing strategy. Findings : It was evident that the management principles currently employed by the management team were a cause for concern among staff members. Based on the analysis that identified the satisfaction variables best it was clear that management should take immediate steps to address the following issues : Clarification of hospital goals \\ objectives; Understanding the goals of the respective departments; The functioning of the Human resource department; Functioning of the overall hospital management; andImplications: This paper aims to present a

  12. Organisation og demokrati

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Jørgen Troelssøn

    1995-01-01

    the role of the business organisations of tyhe urban trades in the democratisation of Denmark 1830- 1915......the role of the business organisations of tyhe urban trades in the democratisation of Denmark 1830- 1915...

  13. Administrativ organisation og ansvar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, Jannik C; Krogsgaard, Kim

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes the current organisation of clinical trials in Danish hospitals, with particular emphasis on the relationship between hospitals and the pharmaceutical industry. Legal responsibilities as well as mutual agreements on collaboration and organisation are described and discussed....

  14. Cryptogenic organising pneumonia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cordier, J-F

    2006-01-01

    ...s: Cryptogenic organising pneumonia Received: February 8, 2005 Accepted November 22, 2005 Organising pneumonia is defined histopathologically by intra-alveolar buds of granulation tissue, consisting of intermixed myofibroblasts and connective tissue...

  15. Responding to Organisational Misbehaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgreen, Lise-Lotte

    2018-01-01

    Over the past decades, the seriousness with which organisational crises have developed has, in part, been contingent on public access to social media platforms. Analysing two Danish organisational crises, the article explores whether the conceptual repertoires that underlie public evaluation...

  16. A contemporary case study illustrating the integration of health information technologies into the organisation and clinical practice of radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alexis Andrew; Phillips, Aaron K

    2006-01-01

    The development of software in radiation oncology departments has seen the increase in capability from the Record and Verify software focused on patient safety to a fully-fledged Oncology Information System (OIS). This paper reports on the medical aspects of the implementation of a modern Oncology Information System (IMPAC MultiAccess, also known as the Siemens LANTIS) in a New Zealand hospital oncology department. The department was successful in translating paper procedures into electronic procedures, and the report focuses on the changes in approach to organisation and data use that occurred. The difficulties that were faced, which included procedural re-design, management of change, removal of paper, implementation cost, integration with the HIS, quality assurance and datasets, are highlighted along with the local solutions developed to overcome these problems.

  17. International students at an American university: health problems and status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D F; Harwell, D J

    1983-01-01

    Eighty-eight international students enrolled at the University of Toledo were surveyed in order to ascertain their health care needs since arriving at the university. This study of the health status of international students indicated that the four leading problems experienced since arriving at the university were fatigue, homesickness, headaches and colds. Fatigue and colds were more commonly reported by students from Latin America than those from Asia or the Middle East. Both community health services and the university health service are not used by a majority of international students. Friends and the telephone book yellow pages are the most commonly used sources for finding a physician if one becomes sick. The drug store was indicated as being the place the international students would go for medicine if they became sick. The findings of this study suggest that international students must be oriented to the health services available in the community and at the university health service. A health education program needs to be conducted to inform these students about personal health practices and available services.

  18. The psychosocial and health effects of workplace reorganisation. 1. A systematic review of organisational-level interventions that aim to increase employee control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Matt; Bambra, Clare; Thomas, Sian; Petticrew, Mark; Whitehead, Margaret; Thomson, Hilary

    2007-11-01

    Systematic review of the health and psychosocial effects of increasing employee participation and control through workplace reorganisation, with reference to the "demand-control-support" model of workplace health. Systematic review (QUORUM) of experimental and quasi-experimental studies (any language) reporting health and psychosocial effects of such interventions. Electronic databases (medical, social science and economic), bibliographies and expert contacts. We identified 18 studies, 12 with control/comparison groups (no randomised controlled trials). Eight controlled and three uncontrolled studies found some evidence of health benefits (especially beneficial effects on mental health, including reduction in anxiety and depression) when employee control improved or (less consistently) demands decreased or support increased. Some effects may have been short term or influenced by concurrent interventions. Two studies of participatory interventions occurring alongside redundancies reported worsening employee health. This systematic review identified evidence suggesting that some organisational-level participation interventions may benefit employee health, as predicted by the demand-control-support model, but may not protect employees from generally poor working conditions. More investigation of the relative impacts of different interventions, implementation and the distribution of effects across the socioeconomic spectrum is required.

  19. Prevalence and correlates of internalizing mental health symptoms among CSHCN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandour, Reem M; Kogan, Michael D; Blumberg, Stephen J; Perry, Deborah F

    2010-02-01

    This study provides nationally representative prevalence estimates of internalizing mental health symptoms among children with special health care needs (CSHCN) and identifies significant covariates of these symptoms by using multivariate regression. Internalizing symptoms include feeling anxious and depressed. Data were obtained from the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, a nationally representative, parent-reported, cross-sectional survey of 40 465 CSHCN. The presence of internalizing mental health symptoms was assessed by using 2 binary items capturing whether a child had or experienced difficulty with depression, anxiety, disordered eating, or other emotional problems. The odds of experiencing internalizing symptoms were assessed by using multivariate regression, controlling for sociodemographic, health-related, and burden-related covariates. A total of 31.9% of CSHCN 3 to 17 years of age experienced internalizing mental health symptoms. Multivariate logistic regression showed internalizing symptoms to be strongly associated with female gender, older age, and frequent activity limitations, as well as externalizing mental health symptoms and conditions with behavioral components. Children with behavior problems had 6 times the odds of internalizing symptoms (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 5.95 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.30-6.69]), whereas children with autism spectrum disorder had 3 times the odds (aOR: 3.00 [95% CI: 2.39-3.77]). Increased odds of symptoms also were associated with frequent headaches (aOR: 1.76 [95% CI: 1.45-2.13]) and chronic pain (aOR: 1.46 [95% CI: 1.22-1.75]). Odds of symptoms were greater for children living in households that experienced employment changes or financial burdens resulting from the children's needs. Internalizing mental health symptoms are common among CSHCN. Findings may help caregivers focus screening and prevention efforts for high-risk groups in this heterogeneous population.

  20. International Terrorism and Mental Health: Recent Research and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter; Ai, Amy L.

    2008-01-01

    International terrorism has become a major global concern. Several studies conducted in North America and Europe in the aftermath of terrorist attacks reveal that international terrorism represents a significant short-term and long-term threat to mental health. In the present article, the authors clarify the concept and categories of terrorism and…

  1. Linking osteoarthritis-specific health-status measures to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, M; Cieza, A; Harder, M; Geyh, S; Amann, E; Kostanjsek, N; Stucki, G

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this study was to link the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) and Lequesne-Algofunctional indices to the ICF on the basis of linking rules developed specifically to accomplish this aim. The linking process enables the understanding of the relationship between health-status measures and the ICF. Since the fifth World Health Organisation/International Liege Against Rheumatism (WHO/ILAR) Task Force and the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) group recommend the use of WOMAC and the Lequesne-Algofunctional indices in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and knee in clinical trials, these two health-status measures have been used in this study. Both health-status measures were linked to the ICF separately by two trained health professionals. Consensus between health professionals was used to decide which ICF category should be linked to each item/concept of the two questionnaires. To resolve disagreements between the two health professionals, a third person trained in the linking rules was consulted. Except for the concept of 'morning stiffness', both health professionals agreed on the ICF category chosen to link all the items/concepts of both questionnaires. Altogether, 29 different ICF categories have been linked. Five ICF categories belong to the ICF component 'body functions', 23 categories to the component 'activities and participation', and one category to 'environmental factors'. Both questionnaires have 10 ICF categories in common. The results of the linking process reflect both the structure of the two questionnaires studied and the relationship between them, showing that the ICF classification can become the cardinal reference for existing health-status measures.

  2. 1851 International Sanitary Conference and the construction of an international sphere of public health

    OpenAIRE

    Rangel De Almeida, Joao Jose

    2012-01-01

    Focusing on the 1851 International Sanitary Conference, this dissertation analyses an important episode in the international regulation of health, trade, passengers, and cargo in a period of epidemic crisis. It argues that a group of diplomats and physicians appointed to represent 12 European nations instituted a new international forum that extended – and occasionally rivalled – national and local agencies for epidemic governance. Together, delegates endeavoured to establish a...

  3. Health in urban environments | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-13

    Dec 13, 2010 ... Cities attract millions of people seeking a better life and greater opportunities. But cities can also be home to poverty, inequality, and environmental hazards. By looking at urban environments as ecosystems, researchers tease apart tensions between ecology, social inequities, and health to help ...

  4. International Master Classes in health informatics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gatewood, L.; Limburg, M.; Gardner, R.; Haux, R.; Jaspers, M.; Schmidt, D.; Wetter, T.

    2004-01-01

    Master Classes arose within the performing arts and are now being offered in system sciences. The IPhiE group of faculty from six universities in Europe and the United States has offered Master Classes in health informatics to provide an integrative forum for honors students. Featured are

  5. International Journal of Medicine and Health Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is the official publication of College of Medicine, University of Nigeria under the supervision of the Directorate for research and publications, . The College consists of three faculties: The Faculty of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technology and Faculty of Dentistry. Through excellence in education ...

  6. Maternal and Child Health | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Maternal, newborn, and child health is Canada's top development priority. Despite progress in the past two decades, nearly 800 women die every day due to complications during pregnancy and childbirth, and 16,000 children under the age of five die from preventable causes. Most of these deaths occur in low-and ...

  7. African Health Systems Initiative (AHSI) | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Institution. Tropical Institute of Community Health Development Trust Registered Trustees. Institution Country. Canada. Related content. Driving vaccine innovations to improve lives and livelihoods. Five world-class research teams are working to develop vaccines for neglected livestock diseases in the Global South.

  8. Travel Health and Wellness Officer | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Maintain a checklist of medical supplies, including vaccines and medications with their expiry dates; ... Create, plan and deliver an effective workplace wellness program focusing on healthy living and health promotion in the workplace in Head Office and the four Regional Offices;; Plan and organize monthly workshops ...

  9. The Living Cell as a Multi-agent Organisation: A Compositional Organisation Model of Intracellular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, C. M.; Snoep, J. L.; Treur, J.; Westerhoff, H. V.; Wijngaards, W. C. A.

    Within the areas of Computational Organisation Theory and Artificial Intelligence, techniques have been developed to simulate and analyse dynamics within organisations in society. Usually these modelling techniques are applied to factories and to the internal organisation of their process flows, thus obtaining models of complex organisations at various levels of aggregation. The dynamics in living cells are often interpreted in terms of well-organised processes, a bacterium being considered a (micro)factory. This suggests that organisation modelling techniques may also benefit their analysis. Using the example of Escherichia coli it is shown how indeed agent-based organisational modelling techniques can be used to simulate and analyse E.coli's intracellular dynamics. Exploiting the abstraction levels entailed by this perspective, a concise model is obtained that is readily simulated and analysed at the various levels of aggregation, yet shows the cell's essential dynamic patterns.

  10. International politics and primary health care in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, L M

    1990-01-01

    Costa Rica's internationally-renowned rural health program exemplifies the principles put forth by the 1978 Alma Ata Declaration on Primary Health Care with one exception: the government has not succeeded in achieving active community participation in health. This paper uses a historical and political-economic perspective to explain why the Costa Rican government failed in its efforts to enhance community participation after Alma Ata. International agencies have been closely involved in the design and implementation of rural health services in Costa Rica since the early 1900s, yet community participation did not figure in these programs until the mid-1970s. The demise of community participation in the early 1980s is attributed to a combination of factors including partisan conflicts, social class conflicts, interest group politics and, particularly, to the shifting priorities of international health and development agencies.

  11. Health maintenance practices and healthcare experiences among international university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Suzanne; Dyer, Jane

    2017-11-01

    While over a million international students attend U.S. universities, there is little information to guide providers on their care. Differences in language and health beliefs can lead to misunderstandings and poor outcomes. The purpose of this study was to describe the health practices and healthcare experiences of international students before and after they move to the United States to carve out specific quality improvement activities at a student health center. International students volunteered to attend focus groups. Data were analyzed using text coding software (Dedoose) to identify salient themes that reflected participants' experiences. Participants (N = 19) identified four areas of health maintenance: exercise, nutrition, yearly checkups, and self-care for minor ailments. While participants described health care in their home countries as accessible and affordable, they described health care in the United States as less accessible, more expensive, and laden with communication mishaps. A broader educational message to international students, that is, how to maintain healthy habits in the United States and how to access/navigate U.S. health care, coupled with staff training on effective health communication and the use of interpreter services would enhance the health and healthcare experience of this vital population. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  12. Beyond health aid: would an international equalization scheme for universal health coverage serve the international collective interest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, Gorik; Hammonds, Rachel; Waris, Attiya; Criel, Bart; Van Damme, Wim; Whiteside, Alan

    2014-05-21

    It has been argued that the international community is moving 'beyond aid'. International co-financing in the international collective interest is expected to replace altruistically motivated foreign aid. The World Health Organization promotes 'universal health coverage' as the overarching health goal for the next phase of the Millennium Development Goals. In order to provide a basic level of health care coverage, at least some countries will need foreign aid for decades to come. If international co-financing of global public goods is replacing foreign aid, is universal health coverage a hopeless endeavor? Or would universal health coverage somehow serve the international collective interest?Using the Sustainable Development Solutions Network proposal to finance universal health coverage as a test case, we examined the hypothesis that national social policies face the threat of a 'race to the bottom' due to global economic integration and that this threat could be mitigated through international social protection policies that include international cross-subsidies - a kind of 'equalization' at the international level.The evidence for the race to the bottom theory is inconclusive. We seem to be witnessing a 'convergence to the middle'. However, the 'middle' where 'convergence' of national social policies is likely to occur may not be high enough to keep income inequality in check.The implementation of the international equalization scheme proposed by the Sustainable Development Solutions Network would allow to ensure universal health coverage at a cost of US$55 in low income countries-the minimum cost estimated by the World Health Organization. The domestic efforts expected from low and middle countries are far more substantial than the international co-financing efforts expected from high income countries. This would contribute to 'convergence' of national social policies at a higher level. We therefore submit that the proposed international equalization scheme

  13. Qualities of life, educational level and human development: an international investigation of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skevington, Suzanne M

    2010-10-01

    This study investigated the relationship between health-related quality of life (QoL), educational level and culture, using a high quality cross-cultural generic measure (WHOQOL-BREF) containing 25 international dimensions organised in physical, psychological, social and environmental domains. Cross-cultural data from 9,404 sick and well adults in 13 countries showed that environmental QoL increased positively and sequentially from no education to tertiary education. The other three domains increased only up to secondary school level. These MANCOVA results were significantly influenced by health status, age, culture and economic development level. More positive feelings, less dependence on medication and treatment, better perceptions of financial resources, physical environment, and opportunities for information and skills, represent adult QoL advantages to those who received tertiary education compared with secondary schooling. Developing countries reported poorer environmental, psychological and physical QoL than developed countries, although social QoL was good, and no different for the two development bands. Only psychological QoL distinguished between every educational level, in developing countries. Increased positive feelings serve to link better mental health with more education. Across each domain, secondary and tertiary education was associated with better QoL in developing countries. The results support a QoL case for universal secondary education on which better health and health care may be built.

  14. Together for yourself. The development and implementation of a health-enhancing intervention within a network of organisations in a complex setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haar, ter M.; Verhoeven, P.; Aarts, N.

    2012-01-01

    As a rule, solving complex social problems involves several organisations with various backgrounds, interests and visions. Together, these organisations form networks that change constantly. The question is how such networks of organisations that collaborate in the context of a complex problem can

  15. The effect of organisational context on organisational development (OD interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjana Brijball Parumasur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Systematic and congruent organisational structures, systems, strategies and designs are necessary for the successful implementation of organisational development (OD interventions.Research purpose: This article examines national and international OD practices. It assesses the effect of diverse cultures and cultural values for determining the effectiveness of OD interventions.Motivation for the study: Most organisational change and development programmes fail and only a few result in increased competitiveness, improvements and profitability. This emphasises the need for change interventions to give sufficient attention to leadership, cultures, managing change and adopting context-based OD interventions.Research design, approach and method: This article is a literature review of the current trends and research in the area of OD interventions. It synthesises the influence that cultures and cultural orientations have on determining which OD intervention strategies organisations should adopt in different cultures.Main findings: The analysis emphasises how important it is to achieve congruence between the OD interventions organisations select and their local cultures.Practical/managerial implications: It is important to note the evolving nature of the political and economic climates that influence national cultures and that they emphasise that interventions that reflect OD values, which are tailor-made and shaped to the needs of local cultures, are necessary.Contribution/value-add: This study links various OD interventions to Hofstede’s dimensions for differentiating national cultures. It provides guidelines for aligning the practices and techniques of OD to the values and cultures of the organisations and societies in which they are to be implemented.

  16. Towards equity and sustainability of rural and remote health services access: supporting social capital and integrated organisational and professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoo, Adrian; Lawn, Sharon; Carson, Dean

    2016-04-02

    Access to rural health services is compromised in many countries including Australia due to workforce shortages. The issues that consequently impact on equity of access and sustainability of rural and remote health services are complex. The purpose of this paper is to describe a number of approaches from the literature that could form the basis of a more integrated approach to health workforce and rural health service enhancement that can be supported by policy. A case study is used to demonstrate how such an approach could work. Disjointed health services are common in rural areas due to the 'tyranny of distance.' Recruitment and retention of health professionals in rural areas and access to and sustainability of rural health services is therefore compromised. Strategies to address these issues tend to have a narrow focus. An integrated approach is needed to enhance rural workforce and health services; one that develops, acknowledges and accounts for social capital and social relations within the rural community.

  17. Managing resource learning in distributed organisations with the organisational capability approach

    OpenAIRE

    Rauffet, Philippe; Cunha, Catherine Da; Bernard, Alain

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Organisational capability management is a recent approach; it enables global and coordinated management of resources and facilitates future synergies within extended organisations. This paper provides a state of the art of organisational capability approach and proposes a management framework. On the one hand, an overview of the theoretical principles and the practical solutions, especially methods for standardising and transferring firms' good practices, points out th...

  18. 2 February 2016 - Signature of CERN guest book by Ambassador of Montenegro to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva N.Kaluđerović with Adviser C. Schäfer. S. Damjanovic is also present.

    CERN Document Server

    Brice, Maximilien

    2016-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Nebojša Kaluđerović Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of Montenegro to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

  19. International collaboration in mental health: Contributions, opportunities, and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Pratap Sharan; Vijay Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Arising from the push for global health, the movement for global mental health has established itself as a distinct identity in the last few decades. Collaboration between donors, international agencies, institutions, and individuals of different countries has been an essential component in this endeavor. Methods: We review relevant reports in the literature that describe the process of collaboration between individuals and institutions in the area of mental health, in order to ...

  20. International trends in health science librarianship: Part 2--Northern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollfuss, Helmut; Bauer, Bruno; Declève, Ghislaine; Verhaaren, Henri; Utard-Wlerick, Guillemette; Bakker, Suzanne; Leclerq, Edith; Murphy, Jeannette

    2012-06-01

    This is the third in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship in the first decade of the 21st century. The invited authors were asked to reflect on developments in their country--viz. Austria, Belgium, France and the Netherlands. Future issues will track trends in the Nordic countries, Southern Europe and Latin America. JM. © 2012 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2012 Health Libraries Group.

  1. The Pan American Health Organization and international health: a history of training, conceptualization, and collective development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Annella; Guerrero Espinel, Juan Eduardo

    2011-08-01

    A constantly changing and increasingly complex global environment requires leaders with special competencies to respond effectively to this scenario. Within this context, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) goes beyond traditional leadership training models both in terms of its design as well as its conceptual approach to international health. As an intergovernmental, centenary organization in health, PAHO allows participants a unique vantage point from which to conceptualize, share experiences and develop projects relevant to international health. Derived from over two decades of experience (1985-2006) training professionals through its predessor Training Program in International Health, the Leaders in International Health Program "Edmundo Granda Ugalde" (LIHP) utilizes an innovative design, virtual and practical learning activities, and a problem-based approach to analyze the main concepts, theories, actors, forces, and processes relevant to international health. In collaboration with PAHO/WHO Representative Offices and national institutions, participants develop country projects based on priority health issues, many of which are integrated into the Organization's technical cooperation and/or implemented by relevant ministries and other entities in their respective countries/subregions. A total of 185 participants representing 31 countries have participated in the LIHP since its inception in 2008, building upon the 187 trained through its predecessor. These initiatives have contributed to the development of health professionals in the Region of the Americas devoted to international health, as well as provided important input towards a conceptual understanding of international health by fostering debate on this issue.

  2. The world trade organisation and Human Rights: The role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present article attempts to determine the role of principles of good governance in the discussion regarding the World Trade Organisation (WTO) and its human rights accountability. It shows that the WTO as an organisation cannot be compared to other international organisations that are more autonomous such as the ...

  3. How did international agencies perceive the avian influenza problem? The adoption and manufacture of the 'One World, One Health' framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yu-Ju

    2013-02-01

    Over the past few years, a 'One World, One Health' (OWOH) policy framework has become the guiding principle for international responses to avian influenza and other zoonotic infectious diseases. Several specialised inter-governmental agencies, including the World Health Organization, the Food and Agricultural Organization and World Organization for Animal Health, jointly endorsed and promoted this framework. This article attempts to explain why international agencies advocated OWOH despite its vagueness. By examining how these international agencies gradually reframed avian flu problems, this article illustrates the crucial roles of international agencies in constructing disease knowledge and relevant policy responses. It shows that the three agencies adopted an all-inclusive approach to reduce conflicts, defend their legitimacy, and facilitate commitment for collaboration. Not only has this new framework reduced tensions between agencies, it has also reshaped the interests and interactions of other global actors. The case thus illustrates how these organisational actors actively manufacture new cognitive frames and policy regimes that advance their own legitimacy and influence. © 2012 The Author. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2012 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. 76 FR 37207 - Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers: Rules Relating to Internal Claims and Appeals...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... 45 CFR Part 147 Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers: Rules Relating to Internal Claims... Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers: Rules Relating to Internal Claims and Appeals and External... internal claims and appeals and external review processes for group health plans and health insurance...

  5. Implementation of a self-management support approach (WISE) across a health system: a process evaluation explaining what did and did not work for organisations, clinicians and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Anne; Rogers, Anne; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Blakeman, Thomas; Bowen, Robert; Gardner, Caroline; Lee, Victoria; Morris, Rebecca; Protheroe, Joanne

    2014-10-21

    Implementation of long-term condition management interventions rests on the notion of whole systems re-design, where incorporating wider elements of health care systems are integral to embedding effective and integrated solutions. However, most self-management support (SMS) evaluations still focus on particular elements or outcomes of a sub-system. A randomised controlled trial of a SMS intervention (WISE-Whole System Informing Self-management Engagement) implemented in primary care showed no effect on patient-level outcomes. This paper reports on a parallel process evaluation to ascertain influences affecting WISE implementation at patient, clinical and organisational levels. Normalisation Process Theory (NPT) provided a sensitising background and analytical framework. A multi-method approach using surveys and interviews with organisational stakeholders, practice staff and trial participants about impact of training and use of tools developed for WISE. Analysis was sensitised by NPT (coherence, cognitive participation, collective action and reflective monitoring). The aim was to identify what worked and what did not work for who and in what context. Interviews with organisation stakeholders emphasised top-down initiation of WISE by managers who supported innovation in self-management. Staff from 31 practices indicated engagement with training but patchy adoption of WISE tools; SMS was neither prioritised by practices nor fitted with a biomedically focussed ethos, so little effort was invested in WISE techniques. Interviews with 24 patients indicated no awareness of any changes following the training of practice staff; furthermore, they did not view primary care as an appropriate place for SMS. The results contribute to understanding why SMS is not routinely adopted and implemented in primary care. WISE was not embedded because of the perceived lack of relevance and fit to the ethos and existing work. Enacting SMS within primary care practice was not viewed as a

  6. Situational Prevention of Organised Crimes.

    OpenAIRE

    Bullock, KA; Clarke, R.(Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley, CA, United States of America); Tilley, N

    2010-01-01

    Situational crime prevention is the art and science of reducing opportunities for crime. Despite accumulating evidence of its value in reducing many different kinds of crime - such as burglary, fraud, robbery, car theft, child sexual abuse and even terrorism - little has previously been published about its role in reducing organised crimes. This collection of case studies, by a distinguished international group of researchers, fills this gap by documenting the application of a situational pre...

  7. [Global public health: international health is tested to its limits by the human influenza A epidemic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Giraldo, Alvaro; Alvarez-Dardet, Carlos

    2009-06-01

    This article comes from the intense international pressure that follows a near-catastrophy, such as the human influenza A H1N1 epidemic, and the limited resources for confronting such events. The analysis covers prevailing 20th century trends in the international public health arena and the change-induced challenges brought on by globalization, the transition set in motion by what has been deemed the "new" international public health and an ever-increasing focus on global health, in the context of an international scenario of shifting risks and opportunities and a growing number of multinational players. Global public health is defined as a public right, based on a new appreciation of the public, a new paradigm centered on human rights, and altruistic philosophy, politics, and ethics that undergird the changes in international public health on at least three fronts: redefining its theoretical foundation, improving world health, and renewing the international public health system, all of which is the byproduct of a new form of governance. A new world health system, directed by new global public institutions, would aim to make public health a global public right and face a variety of staggering challenges, such as working on public policy management on a global scale, renewing and democratizing the current global governing structure, and conquering the limits and weaknesses witnessed by international health.

  8. Inequalities, the arts and public health: Towards an international conversation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Clive; White, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers how participatory arts informed by thinking in public health can play a significant part internationally in addressing inequalities in health. It looks beyond national overviews of arts and health to consider what would make for meaningful international practice, citing recent initiatives of national networks in English-speaking countries and examples of influential developments in South America and the European Union. In the context of public health thinking on inequalities and social justice, the paper posits what would make for good practice and appropriate research that impacts on policy. As the arts and health movement gathers momentum, the paper urges the arts to describe their potency in the policy-making arena in the most compelling ways to articulate their social, economic and cultural values. In the process, it identifies the reflexive consideration of participatory practice – involving people routinely marginalised from decision-making processes – as a possible avenue into this work. PMID:25729409

  9. Inequalities, the arts and public health: Towards an international conversation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Clive; White, Mike

    2013-08-12

    This paper considers how participatory arts informed by thinking in public health can play a significant part internationally in addressing inequalities in health. It looks beyond national overviews of arts and health to consider what would make for meaningful international practice, citing recent initiatives of national networks in English-speaking countries and examples of influential developments in South America and the European Union. In the context of public health thinking on inequalities and social justice, the paper posits what would make for good practice and appropriate research that impacts on policy. As the arts and health movement gathers momentum, the paper urges the arts to describe their potency in the policy-making arena in the most compelling ways to articulate their social, economic and cultural values. In the process, it identifies the reflexive consideration of participatory practice - involving people routinely marginalised from decision-making processes - as a possible avenue into this work.

  10. Trophoblastic disease review for diagnosis and management: a joint report from the International Society for the Study of Trophoblastic Disease, European Organisation for the Treatment of Trophoblastic Disease, and the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangili, Giorgia; Lorusso, Domenica; Brown, Jubilee; Pfisterer, Jacobus; Massuger, Leon; Vaughan, Michelle; Ngan, Hextan Y S; Golfier, Francois; Sekharan, Paradan K; Charry, Rafael Cortés; Poveda, Andres; Kim, Jae-Weon; Xiang, Yang; Berkowtiz, Ross; Seckl, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a consensus review on gestational trophoblastic disease diagnosis and management from the combined International Society for the Study of Trophoblastic Disease, European Organisation for the Treatment of Trophoblastic Disease, and the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup. A joint committee representing various groups reviewed the literature obtained from PubMed searches. Guidelines were constructed on the basis of literature review. After initial diagnosis in local centers, centralization of pathology review and ongoing care is recommended to achieve the best outcomes.

  11. Organisational support, organisational identification and organisational citizenship behaviour among male nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng-Hwang; Yu, Hsing-Yi; Hsu, Hsiu-Yueh; Lin, Fang-Chen; Lou, Jiunn-Horng

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between organisational support, organisational identification, and organisational citizenship behaviour and the predictors of organisational citizenship behaviour in Taiwanese male nurses. The turnover rate among male nurses is twice that of female nurses. Organisational citizenship behaviour is the predictor of turnover intention. Little information is available on the relationship between organisational support, organisational identification and organisational citizenship behaviour, particularly for male nurses. Data were collected in 2010 from a questionnaire mailed to 167 male nurses in Taiwan. A cross-sectional survey with simple sampling was used in this study. The results showed that organisational identification and organisational support were correlated with organisational citizenship behaviour. Organisational distinctiveness, organisational support of work conditions and the type of organisation were the main predictors of organisational citizenship behaviour. Together they accounted for 40.7% of the total variation in organisational citizenship behaviour. Organisational distinctiveness was the most critical predictor, accounting for 29.6% of the variation. Organisational support and organisational identification have positive relationships with organisational behaviour. Organisational distinctiveness is an important factor in explaining organisational citizenship behaviour in male nurses. This finding provides concrete directions for managers to follow when providing organisational identification, in particular, the organisational distinctiveness will help male nurses to display increasingly more organisational citizenship behaviour. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Interventions to change the behaviour of health professionals and the organisation of care to promote weight reduction in children and adults with overweight or obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flodgren, Gerd; Gonçalves-Bradley, Daniela C; Summerbell, Carolyn D

    2017-11-30

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing globally, an increase which has major implications for both population health and costs to health services. This is an update of a Cochrane Review. To assess the effects of strategies to change the behaviour of health professionals or the organisation of care compared to standard care, to promote weight reduction in children and adults with overweight or obesity. We searched the following databases for primary studies up to September 2016: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, DARE and PsycINFO. We searched the reference lists of included studies and two trial registries. We considered randomised trials that compared routine provision of care with interventions aimed either at changing the behaviour of healthcare professionals or the organisation of care to promote weight reduction in children and adults with overweight or obesity. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane when conducting this review. We report the results for the professional interventions and the organisational interventions in seven 'Summary of findings' tables. We identified 12 studies for inclusion in this review, seven of which evaluated interventions targeting healthcare professional and five targeting the organisation of care. Eight studies recruited adults with overweight or obesity and four recruited children with obesity. Eight studies had an overall high risk of bias, and four had a low risk of bias. In total, 139 practices provided care to 89,754 people, with a median follow-up of 12 months. Professional interventions Educational interventions aimed at general practitioners (GPs), may slightly reduce the weight of participants (mean difference (MD) -1.24 kg, 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.84 to 0.37; 3 studies, N = 1017 adults; low-certainty evidence).Tailoring interventions to improve GPs' compliance with obesity guidelines probably leads to little or no difference in weight loss (MD 0.05 (kg), 95% CI -0.32 to 0

  13. International terrorism and mental health: recent research and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter; Ai, Amy L

    2008-03-01

    International terrorism has become a major global concern. Several studies conducted in North America and Europe in the aftermath of terrorist attacks reveal that international terrorism represents a significant short-term and long-term threat to mental health. In the present article, the authors clarify the concept and categories of terrorism and then present central findings from studies conducted in the United States and Europe, which mainly focus on negative impacts on mental health, such as emotional stress and PTSD. Furthermore, the authors outline experiments that focus on social interaction processes thought to be triggered by international terrorism and which are assumed to be related indirectly to mental health processes. Next, they highlight the potential positive outcomes on the resilience side, in line with the current theory on posttraumatic growth in adversity. Finally, theoretical and practical implications as well as limitations and future directions are discussed.

  14. Immigration and self-reported health status by social class and gender: the importance of material deprivation, work organisation and household labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell, C; Muntaner, C; Solà, J; Artazcoz, L; Puigpinós, R; Benach, J; Noh, S

    2008-05-01

    Spain and Catalonia have experienced several immigration waves over the last century. The goal of this study was to examine the role of social class and its mediating pathways (ie, work organisation, material deprivation at home and household labour) in the association between migration status and health, as well as whether these associations were modified by social class or gender. Barcelona city, Spain. The study used the Barcelona Health Interview Survey, a cross-sectional survey of 10,000 residents of the city's non-institutionalised population in 2000. The present study was conducted on the working population, aged 16-64 years (2342 men and 1872 women). The dependent variable was self-reported health status. The main independent variable was migration status. Other variables were: social class (measured using Erik Olin Wright's indicators); age; psychosocial and physical working conditions; job insecurity; type of labour contract; number of hours worked per week; material deprivation at home and household labour. Two hierarchical logistic regression models were built by adding different independent variables. Among men, foreigners presented the poorest health status (fully adjusted odds ratios (OR) 2.16; 95% CI 1.14 to 4.10), whereas among women the poorest health status corresponded to those born in other regions of Spain. There was an interaction between migration and social class among women, with women owners, managers, supervisors or professionals born in other regions of Spain reporting a worse health status than the remaining groups (fully adjusted OR 3.60; 95% CI 1.83 to 7.07). This study has shown that the pattern of perceived health status among immigrant populations varies according to gender and social class. These results have to be taken into account when developing policies addressed at the immigrant population.

  15. Political dimensions of 'the psychosocial': The 1948 International Congress on Mental Health and the Mental Hygiene Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toms, Jonathan

    2012-12-01

    The Foucauldian sociologist Nikolas Rose has influentially argued that psychosocial technologies have offered means through which the ideals of democracy can be made congruent with the management of social life and the government of citizens in modern Western liberal democracies. This interpretation is contested here through an examination of the 1948 International Congress on Mental Health held in London and the mental hygiene movement that organised it. It is argued that, in Britain, this movement's theory and practice represents an uneasy and ambiguous attempt to reconcile visions of 'the modern' with 'the traditional'. The mental hygienist emphasis on the family is central. Here it appears as a forcing-house of the modern self-sustaining individual. Mental hygienists cast the social organisation of 'traditional' communities as static, with rigid authority frustrating both social progress and the full emergence of individual personality. Yet mental hygienists were also concerned about threats to social cohesion and secure personhood under modernity. If the social organisation of 'traditional' communities was patterned by the archetype of the family, with its personal relations of authority, mental hygienists compressed these relations into the 'private' family. Situated here they became part of a developmental process of mental adjustment through which 'mature', responsible citizens emerged. This reformulation of the family's centrality for the social order informed mental hygienist critiques of the growth of state power under existing forms of democracy, as well as suspicion of popular political participation or protest, and of movements towards greater egalitarianism.

  16. Analysing organisational context: case studies on the contribution of absorptive capacity theory to understanding inter-organisational variation in performance improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Gill; Jas, Pauline; Walshe, Kieran

    2015-01-01

    Organisational context is frequently cited as an important consideration when implementing and evaluating quality improvement interventions in healthcare, but limited guidance is available on which aspects of context are most influential or modifiable. This paper examines how internal and external contextual factors mediate organisational-level performance improvement through applying the knowledge-based theory of absorptive capacity (AC). Three healthcare case studies are presented. Each case is a UK National Health Service organisation that had been identified as having performance problems. Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews with general and clinical managers within the organisation and members of external teams supporting or overseeing performance improvement (n=22). Interview data were analysed using an existing AC framework from the literature. The organisation with the highest AC showed the quickest and most comprehensive performance improvement. Internal characteristics including strategic priorities, processes for managing information, communication and orientation to learning and development impacted on the organisation's ability to engage successfully with external stakeholders and make use of available knowledge. This enabled the organisation to thrive despite the challenging external environment. Lower levels of AC appeared to delay or limit the improvement trajectory. Developing a more detailed and nuanced understanding of how context influences improvement is an important step towards achieving more effective and sustainable quality improvement programmes in healthcare. AC, with its focus on knowledge and organisational learning, provides a useful way to explore the relationship between context and quality improvement and represents a potentially valuable area for future research and development. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go

  17. Fibrosing organising pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardsley, Brooke; Rassl, Doris

    2013-10-01

    Organising pneumonia (otherwise referred to as bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia) is characterised histologically by plugs of granulation tissue, which are present predominantly within small airways, alveolar ducts and peri-bronchiolar alveoli. This pattern is not specific for any disorder or cause, but is one type of inflammatory response to pulmonary injury, which may be seen in a wide variety of clinical conditions. Typically, organising pneumonia responds very well to corticosteroid treatment; however, a small percentage of patients appear to develop progressive fibrosis.

  18. Health literacy: setting an international collaborative research agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowlands Gillian

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health literacy is an increasingly important topic in both the policy and research agendas of many countries. During the recent 36th Annual Meeting of the North American Primary Care Research Group, the authors led an audio-taped 3-hour forum, "Studying Health Literacy: Developing an International Collaboration," where the current state of health literacy (HL in the United States (US and United Kingdom (UK was presented and attendees were encouraged to debate a future research agenda. Discussion of Forum Themes The debate centred around three distinct themes, including: (1 refining HL definitions and conceptual models, (2 HL measurement and assessment tools, and (3 developing a collaborative international research agenda. The attendees agreed that future research should be theoretically grounded and conceptual models employed in studies should be explicit to allow for international comparisons to be drawn. Summary and Authors Reflections The importance of HL research and its possible contribution to health disparities is becoming increasingly recognised internationally. International collaborations and comparative studies could illuminate some of the possible determinants of disparities, and also possibly provide a vehicle to examine other research questions of interest.

  19. Tools for organisational risk evaluation for occupational health stressors (OREOHS) for the small-scale mining industry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Edwards, AL

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available of silicosis Figure 4 Risk of silicosis flow-diagram Risk of heat stress Risk of heat stress Work task factors Physical work rate Workplace factors Environmental cooling capacity Wet-bulb temperature Dry-bulb temperature Air... are entered the total risk value for the workplace or task is displayed in 1.15. Employee-related risk factors should be evaluated by the Occupational Health or Medical Practitioner. These include age, general health, nutritional status, fitness, use...

  20. Protecting health from climate change: Preparedness of medical interns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majra Jai

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Climate change is a significant and emerging threat to public health and to meet the challenge, health systems require qualified staff. Aims : To study the preparedness of medical interns to meet the challenge of protecting health from climate change. Settings and Design: Medical colleges in a coastal town. Cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: A proportionate number of medical interns from five medical colleges were included in the study. Level of awareness was used as a criterion to judge the preparedness. A self-administered, pretested, open-ended questionnaire was used. Responses were evaluated and graded. Statistical Analysis Used: Proportions, percentage, Chi-test. Results : About 90% of the medical interns were aware of the climate change and human activities that were playing a major role. Ninety-four percent were aware of the direct health impacts due to higher temperature and depletion in ozone concentration, and about 78% of the respondents were aware about the change in frequency / distribution of vector-borne diseases, water borne / related diseases, malnutrition, and health impact of population displacement. Knowledge regarding health protection was limited to mitigation of climate change and training / education. Options like adaptation, establishing / strengthening climate and disease surveillance systems, and health action in emergency were known to only nine (7%, eight (6%, and 17 (13%, respectively. Collegewise difference was statistically insignificant. Extra / co-curricular activities were the major source of knowledge. Conclusions : Majority of medical interns were aware of the causes and health impacts of climate change, but their knowledge regarding health protection measures was limited.

  1. The international spread of Academic Health Science Centres: a scoping review and the case of policy transfer to England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Catherine E; Ferlie, Ewan; Fulop, Naomi J

    2014-09-01

    Academic Health Science Centres (AHSCs) have been a key feature of the North American healthcare landscape for many years, and the term is becoming more widely used internationally. The defining feature of these complex organisations is a tripartite mission of delivering high quality research, medical education and clinical care. The biomedical innovations developed in AHSCs are often well documented, but less is known about the policy and organisational processes which enable the translation of research into patient care. This paper has two linked purposes. Firstly, we present a scoping review of the literature which explores the managerial, political and cultural perspectives of AHSCs. The literature is largely normative with little social science theory underpinning commentary and descriptive case studies. Secondly, we contribute to addressing this gap by applying a policy transfer framework to the English case to examine how AHSC policy has spread internationally. We conclude by suggesting a research agenda on AHSCs using the relevant literatures of policy transfer, professional/managerial relations and boundary theory, and highlighting three key messages for policy makers: (1) competing policy incentives for AHSCs should be minimised; (2) no single AHSC model will fit all settings; (3) AHSC networks operate internationally and this should be encouraged. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. [Child health and international cooperation: A paediatric approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino Toro, M; Riaño Galan, I; Bassat, Q; Perez-Lescure Picarzo, J; de Aranzabal Agudo, M; Krauel Vidal, X; Rivera Cuello, M

    2015-05-01

    The international development cooperation in child health arouses special interest in paediatric settings. In the last 10 10 years or so, new evidence has been presented on factors associated with morbidity and mortality in the first years of life in the least developed countries. This greater knowledge on the causes of health problems and possible responses in the form of interventions with impact, leads to the need to disseminate this information among concerned professional pediatricians. Serious efforts are needed to get a deeper insight into matters related to global child health and encourage pediatricians to be aware and participate in these processes. This article aims to provide a social pediatric approach towards international cooperation and child health-related matters. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. An international partnership interdisciplinary training programme on public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrioti, Despena; Charalambous, George; Skitsou, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    expertise in course content and audience needs. Given the financial constrains in the country national health system reforms in organization and management to provide efficient services is of the highest importance. Assessing perceived training needs of health professionals will help designing more......Background: Targeted training programmes are more efficient towards skills development. Literature on assessing training needs in order to formulate programmes through international partnerships is very limited. This study intended to identify perceived training needs in public health with an aim...... health (61%) as the highest priorities echoed current population needs. Conclusions: This international partnership training programme was the first of this type provided to a member state by WHO/EURO. It combined academic expertise in curriculum development and teaching technologies with practical...

  4. Internalized homophobia and internalizing mental health problems: a meta-analytic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Michael E; Mustanski, Brian

    2010-12-01

    Research on internalized homophobia (IH) has linked it to both mental and physical health outcomes. Extant research indicates that IH and mental health are related in a variety of different subgroups of lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) persons. However, much of this research has suffered from methodological issues. Studies have frequently substituted distress-related constructs (e.g., self-esteem and general well-being) for measures of internalizing mental health problems. Furthermore, many studies have misapplied measures of IH designed for gay men with lesbian samples. The current study used Hierarchical Linear Modeling to perform meta-analysis. Effect sizes were combined across multiple studies that used dimensional measures of internalizing mental health problems (i.e., depression and anxiety). The use of multilevel modeling techniques allowed for the evaluation of moderating effects on these relationships, including those of gender, year of data collection, mean age of the sample, publication type, and type of symptomatology measured. Thirty-one studies were meta-analyzed for the relationship between IH and mental health (N=5831), revealing a small to moderate overall effect size for the relationship between the two variables. Higher levels of IH were associated with higher scores on dimensional measures of internalizing mental health problems. Significant moderating effects were also found for mean age of the sample and the type of symptomatology measured in each study. The relationship between IH and internalizing mental health problems was stronger in studies with a higher mean age. The relationship between IH and depressive symptomatology was stronger than the relationship between IH and symptoms of anxiety. Limitations and future research directions are discussed as well as implications for clinical practice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Legal Strength of International Health Instruments - What It Brings to Global Health Governance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haik Nikogosian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Public health instruments have been under constant development and renewal for decades. International legal instruments, with their binding character and strength, have a special place in this development. The start of the 21st century saw, in particular, the birth of the first World Health Organization (WHO-era health treaties – the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC and its first Protocol. The authors analyze the potential impact of these instruments on global health governance and public health, beyond the traditional view of their impact on tobacco control. Overall, the very fact that globally binding treaties in modern-era health were feasible has accelerated the debate and expectations for an expanded role of international legal regimes in public health. The impact of treaties has also been notable in global health architecture as the novel instruments required novel institutions to govern their implementation. The legal power of the WHO FCTC has enabled rapid adoption of further instruments to promote its implementation, thus, enhancing the international instrumentarium for health, and it has also prompted stronger role for national legislation on health. Notably, the Convention has elevated several traditionally challenging public health features to the level of international legal obligations. It has also revealed how the legal power of the international health instrument can be utilized in safeguarding the interests of health in the face of competing agendas and legal disputes at both the domestic and international levels. Lastly, the legal power of health instruments is associated with their potential impact not only on health but also beyond; the recently adopted Protocol to Eliminate Illicit Trade in Tobacco Products may best exemplify this matter. The first treaty experiences of the 21st century may provide important lessons for the role of legal instruments in addressing the unfolding challenges in global

  6. Mapping the Dutch SNOMED CT subset to Omaha System, NANDA International and International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieft, R A M M; Vreeke, E M; de Groot, E M; de Graaf-Waar, H I; van Gool, C H; Koster, N; Ten Napel, H; Francke, A L; Delnoij, D M J

    2018-03-01

    Nurses register data in electronic health records, which can use various terminology and coding systems. The net result is that information cannot be exchanged and reused properly, for example when a patient is transferred from one care setting to another. A nursing subset of patient problems was therefore developed in the Netherlands, based on comparable and exchangeable terms that are used throughout the healthcare sector and elsewhere (semantic interoperability). The purpose of the current research is to develop a mapping between the subset of patient problems and three classifications in order to improve the exchangeability of data. Those classifications are the Omaha System, NANDA International, and ICF (the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health). Descriptive research using a unidirectional mapping strategy. Some 30%-39% of the 119 SNOMED CT patient problems can be mapped one-to-one from the subset onto each separate classification. Between 6% and 8% have been mapped partially to a related term. This is considered to be a one-to-one mapping, although the meanings do not correspond fully. Additionally, 23%-51% of the patient problems could be mapped n-to-one, i.e. more specifically than the classification. Some loss of information will always occur in such exchanges. Between 1% and 4% of the patient problems from the subset are defined less specifically than the problems within the individual classifications. Finally, it turns out that 9%-32% of the terms from the subset of patient problems could not be mapped onto a classification, either because they did not occur in the classification or because they could not be mapped at a higher level. To promote the exchange of data, the subset of patient problems has been mapped onto three classifications. Loss of information occurs in most cases when the patient problems are transformed from the subset into a classification. This arises because the classifications are different in structure

  7. Organisation and financing of the health care systems of Bulgaria and Greece – what are the parallels?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Exadaktylos Nikolaos M

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Bulgarian and Greek Medical Care systems have been reformated the last fifteen years. The aim of this study was an examination and comparison of the Bulgarian and Greek Medical Care Systems. Methods This study was prepared by using all the published data related to both Bulgarian and Greek Medical Care systems. Besides, personal communications with related offices such as administration offices of hospitals and Ministries of Health were made. Results In both countries, besides the compulsory insurance there is also additional voluntary insurance which is provided by private companies. The most important difference is the family doctor (specialist in general medicine existing in Bulgaria. Every insured person needs a 'referral form' completed by the family doctor before visiting a hospital for medical attention (except emergencies. In contrast, in Greece an insured person can directly visit any hospital without needing any forms and independent of the severity of their health problem. An important disadvantage of the Greek health system is the low number of hospitals (139, in relation to population. In contrast, there are 211 hospitals in Bulgaria, although its population is lower than in Greece. Conclusion In both Greek and Bulgarian health systems changes must be done to solve the problems related to informal payments, limited financing, large debts, lack of appropriate investment policy, lack of an objective method for the costing of medical activities and inefficient management.

  8. 3rd International Conference on Health Care Systems Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jingshan; Matta, Andrea; Sahin, Evren; Vandaele, Nico; Visintin, Filippo

    2017-01-01

    This book presents statistical processes for health care delivery and covers new ideas, methods and technologies used to improve health care organizations. It gathers the proceedings of the Third International Conference on Health Care Systems Engineering (HCSE 2017), which took place in Florence, Italy from May 29 to 31, 2017. The Conference provided a timely opportunity to address operations research and operations management issues in health care delivery systems. Scientists and practitioners discussed new ideas, methods and technologies for improving the operations of health care systems, developed in close collaborations with clinicians. The topics cover a broad spectrum of concrete problems that pose challenges for researchers and practitioners alike: hospital drug logistics, operating theatre management, home care services, modeling, simulation, process mining and data mining in patient care and health care organizations.

  9. European and International Standards on health and safety in welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, A.

    2009-02-01

    A number of European and International Standards on health and safety in welding have been published in recent years and work on several more is nearing completion. These standards have been prepared jointly by the International Standards Organization (ISO) and the European Committee for Standardization (CEN). The standards development work has mostly been led by CEN/TC 121/SC 9, with excellent technical input from experts within Europe; but work on the revision of published standards, which has recently gathered pace, is now being carried out by ISO/TC 44/SC 9, with greater international involvement. This paper gives an overview of the various standards that have been published, are being revised or are under development in this field of health and safety in welding, seeking to (i) increase international awareness of published standards, (ii) encourage wider participation in health and safety in welding standards work and (iii) obtain feedback and solicit comments on standards that are currently under development or revision. Such an initiative is particularly timely because work is currently in progress on the revision of one of the more important standards in this field, namely EN ISO 10882:2001 Health and safety in welding and allied processes— Sampling of airborne particles and gases in the operator's breathing zone — Part 1: Sampling of airborne particles.

  10. International Journal of Health Research - Vol 2, No 2 (2009)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors Influencing the Health Behaviors of International Students at a University · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. G Larte, S Mishra, D Odonwodo, C Chitalu, A Chafatelli. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ijhr.v2i2.55404 ...

  11. Factors Influencing the Health Behaviors of International Students at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Each year, college campuses in America welcome an increasing and diverse population of international students. While the health status of these students is as diverse as the countries they come from, the shared experience of coming from different cultures, different backgrounds and different systems could lead ...

  12. Kommunikation skaber din organisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heidi

    KOMMUNIKATION skaber din ORGANISATION tager udgangspunkt i en narrativ tilgang til kommunikation, hvor organisationen skabes i mødet mellem ledere, medarbejdere, organisation og omverden. Historier hjælper os med at skabe mening, og er derfor vigtige både som et udviklingsværktøj i organisationen...

  13. Organisational Attachment Among

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    most studied in industrial and organisational psychology and in the sociology of work and occupations. Some of .... employee differences in job satisfaction and organisation attachment. In this study, the following job .... were studied. These are subsid- iaries of multinational corporations based in Europe and North America.

  14. Organised Cultural Encounters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lene Bull; Galal, Lise Paulsen; Hvenegård-Lassen, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    The article introduces the special issue by presenting the concept of organised cultural encounters that are encounters organised to manage and/or transform problems perceived to originate in or include cultural differences. Inspired by Pratt’s conceptualisation of the contact zone, a critical...

  15. Den kommunikerende organisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tække, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    Det må antages at såvel interne som eksterne krav til organisationer har med kommunikation i forskellige medier at gøre og at organisationer derfor kan analyseres og evalueres i forhold til mere eller mindre succesfuld kommunikation i forhold til disse krav. Det nuværende samfund eksisterer i et...... yderst diversificeret mediemiljø og repræsenterer et yderst komplekst og uddifferentieret kommunikationsmiljø som organisationer må lykkes i at knytte positivt an til hvis de skal kunne opretholdes. Samtidig må organisationsmedlemmer iagttages som ressourcer, der må værdsættes og beskyttes mod stress og...... samtidig tilbydes optimale muligheder for at få opfyldt individuelle behov og karrieremuligheder. For at en organisation skal kunne korrigere sig i forhold til de krav den konfronteres med, må der kunne fremstilles et adækvat billede af den. Det vil sige at dens faktiske kommunikationsprocesser må kunne...

  16. The bioethical relevance of the ethics of healthcare organisations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioethics and organisational ethics* are applied ethics disciplines with different objects of investigation. Bioethics focuses on the moral aspects of caring for the health of individuals and populations, and organisational ethics on the moral aspects of organisations' strategies and operations. So these two disciplines converge ...

  17. Interpreting the International Right to Health in a Human Rights-Based Approach to Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Paul

    2016-12-01

    This article tracks the shifting place of the international right to health, and human rights-based approaches to health, in the scholarly literature and United Nations (UN). From 1993 to 1994, the focus began to move from the right to health toward human rights-based approaches to health, including human rights guidance adopted by UN agencies in relation to specific health issues. There is a compelling case for a human rights-based approach to health, but it runs the risk of playing down the right to health, as evidenced by an examination of some UN human rights guidance. The right to health has important and distinctive qualities that are not provided by other rights-consequently, playing down the right to health can diminish rights-based approaches to health, as well as the right to health itself. Because general comments, the reports of UN Special Rapporteurs, and UN agencies' guidance are exercises in interpretation, I discuss methods of legal interpretation. I suggest that the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights permits distinctive interpretative methods within the boundaries established by the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties. I call for the right to health to be placed explicitly at the center of a rights-based approach and interpreted in accordance with public international law and international human rights law.

  18. [The founding fathers of the International Union for Health Education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senault, R

    1991-03-01

    At the Fourteenth World Conference on Health Education in Helsinki in June 1991, a special ceremony will celebrate the fortieth anniversary of the founding of the International Union for Health Education. The Union was created following studies and discussions among delegates from thirty-five countries and representatives from fifteen non-governmental organizations (NGO), and in the presence of observers from WHO and UNESCO. The document creating the Union was signed at the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs on May 30, 1951. This article evokes the memory of the pioneers under whose authority the Union was formed and has developed. The leading thinkers in health education were the creators of a work still referred to today when we examine the history and evolution of the IUHE. Our pioneers were Jacques Parisot and Lucien Bivorel in France, Clair E. Turner in the United States of America, and Giovanni Canaperia in Italy. An English translation of this homage to the founders of the international Union for Health Education will appear as a publication made available at the Fourteenth International Conference on Health Education in Helsinki. It will also be available from the IUHE's Headquarters.

  19. Acculturation and health behaviors among international students: A qualitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zi; FitzPatrick, Kathleen

    2016-03-01

    The process of acculturation often results in changes in the health behavior of international students. This study employed an open-ended, qualitative approach in an attempt to gain an in-depth understanding of the acculturation process for physical activity, diet, and drinking behavior among international students. Eighteen undergraduate international students (average age 19.20, standard deviation 1.21) were interviewed for 45-60 min. Most of the international students became more physically active after they arrived in the United States. Facilitators included accessibility, weight management, free time, and role modeling. Most international students were unsatisfied with the food on campus. Their strategies for adjusting to this included ordering food from restaurants, visiting supermarkets, and moving off campus. Most international students felt uncomfortable with the drinking culture in the United States, although some of them felt drinking was a good way to socialize with Americans and explore American culture. Colleges and universities should adopt strategies to better help their international students build lifelong healthy behaviors. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Development, health, and international policy: the research and innovation dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Marchiori Buss

    Full Text Available Abstract: This text main objective is to discuss development and health from the perspective of the influence of global health governance, using as the tracer the dimension of research, development, and innovation policies in health, which relate to both important inputs for the health system, like drugs and medicines, vaccines, diagnostic reagents, and equipment, and innovative concepts and practices for the improvement of health systems and public health. The authors examine the two main macro-processes that influence development and health: the post-2015 Development Agenda and the process under way in the World Health Organization concerning research and development, intellectual property, and access to health inputs. The article concludes, first, that much remains to be done for the Agenda to truly represent a coherent and viable international political pact, and that the two macro-processes related to innovation in health need to be streamlined. But this requires democratization of participation by the main stakeholders - patients and the general population of the poorest countries - since this is the only way to overcome a "zero sum" result in the clash in the current debates among member State representatives.